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Technician          

tuesday september

21 2010

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

OIT plans Internet safety presentations The Office of Information Technology is hosting a variety of e vents for Cyber Security Awareness month. Shivalik Daga Staff writer

The Office of Information Technology is planning two presentations on cyber security in October. Tim Gurganus, security officer with OIT security and compliance, said he will present the opening presentation,. “The presentation will be an annual report of our most important security concerns, and contain an analysis of all the phishing attacks, malicious mail and viruses that infect numerous Facebook and Twitter pages,” Gurganus said. Marc Hoit, vice chancellor of OIT, said he wants to emphasize precautions are never enough.

The University network in the state and is a major target for hackers and phishers alike, according to Gurganus. Attackers are beginning to target applications more frequently, rather than just the operating system. A major trend is to attack commonly used applications like Java, Adobe Reader, Flash and Firefox, according to Gurganus. “My view is that we have to balance between allowing for freedom for expression and exploration, and creating and maintaining a safer network that prevents malicious code,” Gurganus said. Gurganus said he wanted to emphasize the importance of regularly updating products. “Many students do not install these patches because they either simply don’t know that they exist, or don’t bother much. This should be taken seriously because it helps avoid many security problems,” Gurganus said. OIT recently upgraded the student

information system. SIS is an integrated information system which serves all departments within the University. There are modules which include information about business activities and human resources. SIS has a lot of monitoring systems and is safer than before. The OIT also plans to start a “Safe Computing Section” on its website. The University has a bi-monthly newsletter which updates students about various issues related to information technology on campus. SysNews, a public webpage, is another resource maintained by the OIT. The cyber security presentations will focus on Facebook privacy and the numerous ways students can stay updated and safe. “Our two biggest concerns regarding students’ safety are with students releasing information that compromises their identity on the Internet, mostly on sites like Facebook and Twitter, and regarding social engi-

neering for security,” Hoit said. According to Hoit, social engineering includes emails that redirect the user to a webpage which causes them to give personal information online. “With the advent of smartphones, staying aware and protecting your identity has become all the more important. Luckily such cyber-theft issues are not widespread and students are generally aware about such threats,” Hoit said Hoit said students should remember the information they share can be found by other people. “If you spend a little time thinking about the implications of the information you share, you’ll be a lot safer. When you put something in an email, you should be able to put it as a headline in the newspaper,” said Hoit. The Student Advisory Group started by Hoit is a link between the OIT and the student body. These meetings provide a place for students of all affiliations to share their thoughts and

coming up: “NCSU Annual State of InfoSecurity” presentation Noon to 1 p.m. Oct. 8 in the Erdahl-Cloyd Auditorium of D.H. Hill Library What’s New in Facebook? Noon to 1 p.m. Oct. 12 in 216 Scott Hall Will highlight recent changes in the Facebook interface, new privacy setting tweaks and changes in thirdparty application support. Source: Chancellor’s Office

ideas about technology. Hoit participates in these meetings by listening to feedback, answering questions and addressing concerns. The Student Advisory Group generally meets once a month during the fall and spring semesters. Gurganus said, “The Student Advisory Group is to help us to stay connected to the student body.”

Program seeks to inspire young readers Through interactions with N.C. State student athletes, area middle school students are becoming more excited about reading and writing. Joshua Chappell Correspondent

Ayanna Seals/Technician

Spotted spray painting from the top of the Free Expression tunnel, John Potts a senior in mechanical engineering and Kayla Flanagan, a sophomore in communications tag the tunnel for their first time. “Its good to see something new on the wall on your way to class. Its mildly entertaining”, Kayla said while deciding to embark in on the action.

Free Expression Tunnel allows for painting on campus The free expression tunnel is constantly changing because of students and groups painting in the tunnel. Nithya Kote Staff Writer

Students use the free expression tunnel to share messages around campus. The free expression tunnel changes daily. The free expression tunnel is the University’s answer to combating graffiti on campus since the 1960’s. The free expression tunnel connects North campus to the Central campus which is split by the railroad track. Students can express their thoughts and feelings about anything in the tunnel. Students paint announcements of upcoming events or express their art on the tunnel walls. As a result the tunnel never looks the same. David Hatch, the director of repair and renovation said students should act responsibly when using the tunnel. “Students should paint within the defined region on the both sides of the tunnel, as it costs us a lot for cleaning up the areas outside the tunnel,” Hatch said. “Students should not paint beyond the signs “No painting beyond this point” which are placed at the northern and southern extremes of the tunnel.” According to policies in REG 11.55.4 specified by Student Activities and

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Ayanna Seals/Technician

Getting a boost from the center hand rail, David Ji a freshman in architecture, spray paints an image in the expression tunnel. “The tunnel keeps society in check. It[graffiti] would be raining across campus if this wasn’t here”

Services, there is no restriction regarding painting over the sections of the tunnel that other people or organizations have painted - no matter how recently they have been painted. However, in the past a lot of animosity has been generated toward groups who paint over sections that are advertising events not yet held or sections painted very recently. Students should use some courtesy and common sense when selecting an area of the tunnel to paint. Only the lights and railings inside the tunnel are repaired, according to Hatch.

For some local middle school students, reading books does not only mean increased knowledge – it also means free N.C. State women’s basketball tickets and the opportunity to meet some of the N.C. State student athletes. “Booking with the Pack,” a program coordinated by the Academic Support Program for Student Athletes (ASPSA) is a fairly new program at the University striving to inspire middle school students to read, and to those students a sense of connection to the local university. There are essentially two parts to this project. The first, which has been around since 2006, specifically targets improving reading and writing skills among Triangle-area middle school students. According to Jennifer Womack, ASPSA graduate assistant, the first part of the program challenges middle school students to read ten books in ten weeks. Should they complete the requirement, they can earn tickets to an N.C. State women’s basketball game that recognizes all of the students who achieved the goal. The students will also get a chance to meet N.C. State student athletes at the event. Additionally, the middle schools can request a ‘pep rally,’ in which case student athletes from the University and ASPSA staff members come to the schools to kick off the program and get students excited about reading. “Students sometimes tend to lis-

ten better when they are listening to someone they look up to – like a student athlete. They have seen these guys on TV, so they really enjoy it,” said Womack. This part of the program also seeks to connect middle school students to the idea of college at a young age. The schools sometimes bring their students to N.C. State and the studentathletes get to spend time with them and tour them around campus. “Often there are programs to connect high school students to college,” Womack said, “but this program goes after the middle school students and gets them thinking about college at a young age.” Although there are certain guidelines for the program, the schools do a lot of their own planning and steering of their respective programs. “We provide the resources, and it’s up to [the schools] to decide the direction of their program,” said Womack. The second part of the program is a more recently started effort to collect books through various organizations to donate to area schools. According to Womack, Booking with the Pack has collected 17,902 books and donated 11,613 of them. “We contact area organizations to let them know that we have books to donate,” said Womack, “and based on their current needs and storage space, they can request the books on a first come, first served basis.” Organizations that have received books include: Tammy Lynn Center for Developmental Disabilities, Boys and Girls Club of Wake County, Greystone Recreation Center, and more, according to ASPSA. A few weeks ago, Booking with the Pack made one of its first large-scale

book continued page 3

insidetechnician Centennial Campus enjoys alternative food option

“Before we would paint and clean up the tunnel walls and ceilings, but we no longer do it as it is not practical,” Hatch said. “But we do fix the lights and railings inside the tunnel when needed.” According to Hatch, students should not paint on the lights inside the tunnel. “We prefer if students do not paint on the light coverings. It is not practical to clean up the paint on the light coverings as it gets sprayed on once again,” Hatch said.

Tunnel continued page 3

Mom’s Delicious Dishes food truck serves food to comfort hunger, soul and wallet. Evemt better - it cmoes to campus. See page 6

Patience pays for Underwood

Sophomore running back waiting for his opportunity to come knocking. See page 8.

viewpoint business and money classifieds sports

NC State Bookstores CALL FOR ENTRIES!

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PAGE 2 • TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2010

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

THROUGH NATALIE’S LENS

TECHNICIAN CAMPUS CALENDAR

PLAY B.I.G. 3118 Talley Student Center, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

September 2010

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

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MOVIE: TAKING ROOT: THE VISION OF WANGARI MAATHAI Witherspoon Cinema, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Ongoing Events “IN SEARCH OF A STATE TREASURE” The Crafts Center, Street Gallery Start Day

EXCEL 2007 LEVEL 2 McKimmon Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

“QUILTING IS ART” EXHIBITION The Crafts Center, All Day

TRANSGENDER 101 GLBT Center, 10 a.m. to Noon

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POWERPOINT: MOVING BEYOND BULLET TBA, Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Sunny and clear

SCHOLARS FORUM: WHO INVESTIGATES THE INVESTIGATORS? Witherspoon Cinema, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Tomorrow:

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SEQUENCE OF IMPRESSIONS: THE WORK OF DOUGLAS GORSLINE, 1946 TO 1981 Gregg Museum of Art and Design, Noon to 8:00 p.m. SOUTHERN ROOTS OF MIDCENTURY MODERN Gregg Museum of Art and Design, Noon to 8 p.m.

TOXICOLOGY SEMINAR Toxicology Building Room 2014, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Partly cloudy and sunny

DELTA FALL WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS REGISTRATION NOW OPEN ITTC Labs in DH Hill Library, All Day

Thursday

IN THE KNOW

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New Campus Strategic Plan

Mostly clear and sunny

Friday

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‘Gymnastics on wheels’

Mostly clear and sunny

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rinding on a rail near the bookstore, Matt Perrault practices his rollerblading techniques. Perrault, a junior in Mechanical Engineering, has been rollerblading since the 6th grade. He rollerblades for recreation, not for competition. “Competitive rollerblading used to be a part of the X-games, but now it’s really only found in Japan.” Despite this, he enjoys the recreational sport; “Rollerblading gives you more freedom than skateboarding,” Perrault said, “It’s like gymnastics on wheels.”

SOURCE: WWW.NOAA.GOV

POLICE BLOTTER

Staff member reported mulch fire. Officer and staff member extinguished.

10:15 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Jordan Hall Staff member reported suspicious subject in the building. Subject left prior to officer’s arrival.

10:59 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON D.H. Hill Library Officer arrested non-student in violation of existing trespass warning.

8:59 A.M. | MISSING PERSON Lee Hall Officers located student reported missing at off campus residence. Student was issued a welfare referral.

9:21 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Carmichael Gym Units responded to student in need of medical assistance. Student refused transport. 9:26 A.M. | CONCERNED BEHAVIOR Wolf Village Officers checked on welfare of student. Student was issued welfare referral.

2:01 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Bagwell Hall Units responded and transported student in need of medical assistance.

SOURCE: NCSU.EDU

11:10 P.M. | AFFRAY Fairgrounds Lot Three students were referred to University for fighting.

Sept 14 1:32 A.M. | ASSIST ANOTHER AGENCY Off Campus NCSU Police Dept. assisted Raleigh Police Dept. at University Towers with student. Student was referred for alcohol violation, drunk & disruptive, and resisting a public officer.

6:30 A.M. | FIRE Harris Field

PHOTO BY NATALIE CLAUNCH

Administration, including Chancellor Randy Woodson and Interim Provost Warwick Arden, are in the process of creating a new strategic plan for the University to span over the next five to ten years. A strategic plan is a plan that outlines the vision and action plans for “nine task forces, an overseeing committee, and several hundred volunteers,” according to a bulletin posted on NCSU’s Web site. Due to a drop in N.C. State’s drop in U.S. News rankings Woodson highlighted areas to improve in the life sciences industry, and focused on partnering with private in-

dustries. He also spoke of the challenges facing the current faculty and how the student/ faculty ratio has become too disproportionate. To fix this he cited building the endowment fund to help fund scholarships, research and more positions. Starting in November nine task forces will being looking into the following areas, undergraduate student success, graduate and postdoctoral program development, faculty excellence, research and scholarships, comprehensiveness and interdisciplinary, global engagement, partnerships and innovation, campus culture and resource strategies. The next set of task force reports are scheduled for December.

9:47 A.M. | SPECIAL EVENT Carter-Finley Stadium Units reported to work football game. Enforcement action was taken against 33 subjects, 14 students were referred to the University, 32 subjects were trespassed. Five subjects were issued state citations and three subjects were arrested. Two larcenies and two assaults were investigated. Fire Protection responded to seven medical calls with two subjects transported for treatment.

12:08 P.M. | CONCERNED BEHAVIOR Public Safety Center Report of possible concerned behavior concerning student. Officers met with student and determined dispute did not involved campus community.

12:33 P.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Student Health Center Units responded to student in need of medical assistance.

3:17 P.M. | FIRE ALARM Varsity Research Building Fire Protection responded to alarm caused by smoke from equipment being cleaned. No damage or injuries.

3:46 P.M. | LARCENY D.H. Hill Library Student reported unattended textbook was stolen.

VS .

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4:46 P.M. | LARCENY Carmichael Gym Student reported unattended purse was stolen.

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News

Technician

Tuesday, september 21, 2010 • Page 3

1911 Building offers non-University dining option The 1911 Building Snack Bar is not on the University meal plan and the only place on campus which serves Pepsi products. Chelsey Francis Deputy News Editor

The 1911 Building Snack Bar holds the special distinction of being the only place on campus where Pepsi products are served. Because the 1911 Building Snack Bar operates on University property, owner Eva Yee must pay the University equipment maintenance charges. The 1911 Building Snack Bar has gained popularity because it is the only place that serves Pepsi products. “We’re the only place on campus where you can get Pepsi,” Yee said. According to Yee, the 1911 Building Snack Bar has been operating for almost three decades. Yee has only owned the 1911 Building Snack Bar for 12 years. “The Snack Bar was started nearly 30 to 40 years back,” Yee

said. “I have been here myself said. “University Dining was founded in 1982.” since 1998.” According to Yee, since the In 2006, the 1911 Building Snack Bar closed for renova- 1911 Building Snack Bar is not affiliated with University Dintions, according to Yee. “The store was closed in 2006 ing, she can only accept cash. for renovations and reopened Yee is not allowed to process in February of 2008,” Yee said. credit cards either. Yee said According to Jennifer Gilm- this poses a problem for her, ore, marketing and commu- as many students do not carry cash. nications “I d o n’t manager k now, [t he with UniverUniversity] sit y Dining has some said the 1911 rules. So, I Building can’t accept Snack Bar is credit cards funded by a f rom stuspecial prodents,” Yee gram. Eva Yee, owner of 1911 Building Snack Bar said. “But “The 1911 it’s fine, what Building can I do. One Snack Bar is funded by a federal program must keep going.” According to Yee, drinks to provide jobs for people who are visually impaired,” Gilmore form a major part of the sales, said. “It is administered by the with North Carolina specialN.C. Division of Services for ties Cheerwine and Sundrop also popular for students. As the Blind. According to Gilmore, the well, the 1911 Building Snack 1911 Building Snack Bar existed Bar has chips, candy bars and chocolates for sale. before University Dining. “People here just love Pepsi, “The 1911 Building Snack Bar has a history that pre-dates and they’re always asking for University Dining,” Gilmore more,” Yee said.

“People here just love Pepsi, and they’re always asking for more.”

evening worship

According to Yee, people giving campus tours wrongly state proceeds from the 1911 Building Snack Bar go to an organization for the blind. “Volunteers who give campus tours aren’t completely informed about the Snack Bar and say that some proceeds from the Snack Bar go to an organization for the blind,” Yee said. “Except for the money paid to the University, all money from the sales comes to me.” Yee said her prices are cheaper than any of the machines on campus. “The prices in the Snack Bar have always been lower than the machines on campus for years,” Yee said. “The Snack Bar is a good place for students to grab a quick snack or drink, without having to go all the way to Hillsborough Street.” Staff Writer Shivalik Daga contributed to this report. Alex Canoutas/Technician

Eva Yee, the blind owner at 1911 building’s snack bar, rings up a student on September 2, 2010. “I’m the only one on campus, physically, that’s not part of it {N.C. State} and I’ve been doing it for the past thirteen years,” said Yee. Yee’s snack bar is the only establishment on campus that sells Pepsi products and that is not owned by the university.

book

continued from page 1

donations in collaboration with the N.C. State Golden Key Society. According to Womack, they donated a large amount of books to Better World Books, which is an organization that distributes donated books worldwide. Womack said that ASPSA has received donations from various on-campus organizations like the Women’s Center and

TUnnel

continued from page 1

Hatch said the tunnel is the only place on campus students are allowed to paint. “Students should not paint on any other buildings on the campus, as it costs us a lot to clean it up. Many students are not aware of the rules regarding putting up posters and chalking the sidewalks. Students should learn how to do it properly. They can learn this by reading the student handbook which is available online,” Hatch said. According to policies regarding Poster/Painting/Sidewalk Chalk in REG 11.55.4, posters should be displayed only on designated surfaces like bulletin boards and kiosks. They should be mounted with tape and pushpins so as to allow removal without surface de-

Marisa Akers/Technician

Josh Robbins, a junior in construction engineering and management, and Matthew Nifong, a junior in civil engineering, sing praise with a group of InterVarsity and Campus Crusade for Christ club members in the Brickyard, during Shack-A-Thon. “I’m here to worship God,” Robbins said. “[I like] seeing the impact it can make with the people walking by.”

Be a model student and get $25

women’s basketball team, and is seeking more donations from the community. Jennifer MacNab, Booking with the Pack coordinator, says she believes that the program has been extremely successful. “The student athletes who volunteer with our program prove they are committed to giving back to the community and to using their notoriety to set a positive example for youth today,” said MacNab. Although the program was founded on the idea of stu-

dent-athletes getting involved with area schools, ASPSA has given thought to expanding the program to include nonstudent athletes. According to Womack, involving the rest of campus will only help to further the impact of the program. “We really want to expand this program to the rest of campus,” said Womack.

facement. Students are not supposed to use chalk on building walls. “Students should chalk only on horizontal surfaces, which can be washed off by the rains. Only water soluble chalk has to be used. They should not use chalk on any other building walls on campus as we need to clean it up which could be costly,” Hatch said. Cathleen Brooke, a junior in natural resources said the free expression tunnel was a good place to express thoughts and advertise. “The free expression tunnel is a good place for the student organizations to advertise for upcoming events which people might be interested in. For the most part students are responsible when painting inside the tunnel,” Brooke said. Sara Babcock, a freshman in accounting said that people abuse the free expression tun-

nel. “Students abuse it. They do some offensive drawings inside the tunnel. They should use to express positive thoughts instead. Students should not paint on the light coverings, so that there is sufficient light in the tunnel at nights,” Babcock said. Zach Sherman, a sophomore in civil engineering said he liked the concept of the free expression tunnel. “It is pretty original; it is uncommon for a school to have a tunnel where students can freely express their thoughts. I am a transfer student and my previous school did not have it,” Sherman said. Sherman said he found the tunnel to be informative. “I learn about many upcoming events when I pass through the tunnel on my way to classes. Just today, I learned about the Shack-a-thon,” Sherman said.

TECHNICIAN

Open Forum

All students, faculty and staff are welcome!

We’re looking for feedback!

Stop in to share your suggestions, comments, concerns and critiques and meet with the Technician Staff! Wednesday, Sept. 29 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Brown Room, Talley Student Center

Picture this: Your face as the face of our university. NC State’s Communication Services Dept is looking for fresh faces to feature in our ads, brochures and web sites. And if we choose yours, we’ll give you a $25 gift card. How do you get in on the fun? Send a photo of yourself — and your contact info — to creative_services@ncsu.edu

For more information, please email Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@technicianonline.


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 21, 2010

TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

THE FACTS:

Cyber protection will save college T

Students at the University put their information and the University’s network at risk when they access unsafe webpages.

OUR OPINION:

Students need to make sure they protect their computer and be wary of giving personal information out online.

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

here are few places on campus where Wi-fi is not available and new students are discovering the freedoms of the University’s extensive wireless network. After being restricted at school from Facebook and Twitter during their high school years, new students can now take advantage of all the Internet has to offer. Few students have a background in basic computer safety and this poses a risk to them and the school’s network. New students need to realize when they go to websites on the Internet, they are opening a gateway for other users to gain access to their computer and the network they are on. Keep in mind, there are thousands of other users on the University’s network, and any security risk can make these users vulner-

able as well. Irresponsible computer use can cost hundreds of dollars replacing software and hardware. Data, whether it is files or user data, is accessible on the Internet and there are people who prowl the Internet looking for it. When students take in the breadth of the Internet, it can be intimidating. However, the Office of Information Technologies offers services students can take advantage of to protect their computer. All students, both new and old, are encouraged to use is the antivirus software, Trend Micro OfficeScan. OIT also offers classes to help inform students about possible ricks and other computer-relat-

ed topics. Their website is also a great resource new students can use to learn about computer safety. Antivirus is critical to computer health, but so is an activated firewall and spyware blocker. Firewalls are built into Microsoft Windows, but there is also independent software students can use. Spyware is also a security risk. It is a program that sends out unwarranted information from computers unknowingly to users. There are free programs offered, like Spybot Search and Destroy, that can scan your computer and disable these programs. If students are unsure about these programs, they should imme-

diately ask OIT and report any errors that occur. Ultimately, students should always be aware of where they go on the Internet. There are a wide variety of websites, and some are unsafe. Many browsers have built-in databases of unsafe websites and users should listen to these warnings on the Internet. New students should make sure their computer is protected before they start using the University’s network. There are resources available to keep students and other users safe and informed if they have any questions. In the end, the difference between students keeping their term papers and laptops safe and having to wipe their hard drives and losing all of their files is awareness while they are using the Internet.

{

Sorry Charlie Brown, it’s a Ronald McDonald universe

W

hat do Ronald McDonald, Sketchers Shoes, children’s TV shows and the Tea Party have in common? At first glance, not much. But upon closer inspection, it becomes apparent they are all symptoms of our shallow, money-obsessed society, where experiZakk White ence and realStaff Columnist ity have lost their meaning and depth. One of the main culprits of a devaluation of human emotions and meaning is the advertising industry, who have recently tried to craft a cartoon show out of commercial characters. The Federal Communications Commission recently received a serious complaint from a children’s advocacy group to ban Nicktoons f rom airing a new cartoon show called Zevo3. The show isn’t u nder fire for any obscene content, but for the origin of its characters. The characters on Zevo-3 were originally created to market Sketchers shoes to children. The advocacy group targeting Zevo-3, Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood, said this is the first show ever to consist of pitchmen characters and this would open the door for Ronald McDonald and Tony the Tiger shows. Legally, the advocacy group trying to ban Zevo-3 is on solid ground. Federal law which regulates the airwaves stipulates that for every half-hour TV show geared towards children, there should be no more than 12 minutes of commercial material. So it is OK for shows to create empires of merchandise for children to buy, but they can’t start a show with pitchcharacters? We like to think childhood is a special time of pure experience and innocent joy instead of one dominated by soulless corporations and

slimy ad wizards. Unfortunately, children and adult’s experiences and beliefs have been fodder and play-dough for a long time. Advertising geared towards adults is no different. Product placement has become standard practice for movies and television. Full length commercials are actually being shown in movie theaters now. I remember how shocking this was when it started and now no one even bats an eye. The main problem with advertising is that it exploits our deepest held beliefs and achievements for monetary gain. It seems that almost every commercial on television today features a montage of the moon landing, Ellis Island, and the Wright brothers to try to sell you the newest gadget or gizmo that will be outdated before you f i n i sh this sentence. This loss of meaning is a big motivation behind rec ent po litical movements, with Obama’s candidacy and the Tea Party movement. “Taking our country back” is nothing more than a desperate call for a return to a culture that had meaning, value, and purpose. Instead of living in a simple and beautiful “Charlie Brown’ world, we live in a chaotic, frightening and commoditized “Ronald McDonald’ universe. The best you can do is every once in a while turn off the TV, computer and even the cell phone, and enjoy nature or read some classic literature. The Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood is taking an admirable stand against the shallowness of our modern lives but I am afraid the battle for meaning and depth has already been lost.

“The best you can do is every once in a while turn off the TV, computer and even the cell phone, and enjoy nature.”

IN YOUR WORDS

}

“Do you think the free expression tunnel is important? Why or why not?” BY NATALIE CLAUNCH

“Yes; I just do.” Stephanie Defrancesco freshman, chemical engineering

The Adventures Of Captain Sarcasm and the Ignorant Bureaucrat

Brian Schultz, sophomore in environmental design in architecture

{

CAMPUS FORUM

To the Anonymous ROTC Student

}

As an officer in the Student Senate, it angered me to read the letter that was printed on Sept. 17 regarding the seating for the ROTC students. I too was upset when I found out where the ROTC students were to be seated during the game and I am in no way supporting the decision by the Athletics Department to seat them there. Rather, I am upset with the Technician for printing the letter to the editor in the fashion that they did. After receiving this “anonymous” letter, I think it would have been appropriate for the Technician to contact Stephen Kouba, the Student Senate President. The student is correct in his claim that Student Government is in charge of student ticketing. He is also correct when stating that the Student Senate passed two resolutions last year: one for designating a certain amount of tickets to the Military Appreciation Game for last year, and a separate resolution allocating tickets for every home, football and military appreciation game. The Student Senate can only make changes to ticketing through the passage of a

resolution. The decision to move the ROTC students into the 14/15 section was not even known by anyone in the Student Senate until the night before the game. This was a decision that, to the extent of my knowledge, was made by the Athletics Department. When he says that the Senate “wanted to be able to sell the seats normally reserved for us instead of giving them away for free,” he is spreading nothing but rumors and false accusations. We do not sell tickets to football games. Now, I am not writing this letter as an attack against the student. I do not expect him to know the truth behind many of his false claims. I place the blame for this letter onto Technician. You have a responsibility to print factual information and prevent the publication of false claims. When it comes to printing “Letters to the Editor,” I have never before seen a letter get printed anonymously. I am most disappointed in the fact that Technician didn’t investigate the claims made to see if there was any truth to them. I sign my name proudly to this because I want students to be able to contact me if they have any questions, comments or concerns regarding this letter. With Wolfpack Pride, Johnathan Tucker sophomore, political science

EDITOR’S NOTE Letters to the editor are the individual opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Technician staff or N.C. State University. All writers must include their full names and, if applicable, their affiliations, including years and majors for students and professional titles for University employees. For verification purposes, the writers must also include their phone numbers, which will not be published.

HOW TO SUBMIT Letters must be submitted before 5 p.m. the day before publication and must be limited to 250 words. Contributors are limited to one letter per week. Please submit all letters electronically to viewpoint@

“I think it is very important in communicating different events.” Keron Fraser junior, business administration

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Features BUSINESS & MONEY

TECHNICIAN

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2010 • PAGE 5

M

any University students have wandered into Melvin’s and tried their legendary hamburgers, but they may have overlooked their next-door neighbor while grabbing lunch. 5-O-Clock Sports Bar is nestled right beside Melvin’s Hamburgers on Hillsborough Street. Often students can be found enjoying their favorite beverage and playing in one of the bar’s cornhole tournaments. Elyse Kline, N.C. State alumna, can be found behind the bar greeting people with a smile and making sure that no one gets thirsty. “I love still having that closeness to the N.C. State community,” Kline said. Kline said she knows all of her regulars by name, but it isn’t her memory that has them coming back to this watering hole again and again. She doesn’t just make everyday small talk with the patron’s, but instead engages them in thoughtful conversation. She took the bartending job at 5-O-Clock with the hopes of making it more college friendly. To reach out the student population, Kline communicates through social media networks. The bar’s information can be found on Facebook and the site regularly posts upcoming events and specials. Occasionally, Kline will get a special visitor patrons of 5-O-Clock love to see walk by. Ruckus, her adorable — and massive — rescue dog will sometimes stop by outside for a drink of water when out for an evening stroll with one of Kline’s friends. If people hadn’t stopped by to play cornhole, check out the evening’s specials, or to chat with Elyse, then they are definitely going to stop outside to pet Ruckus. Kline has managed to create a family-like environment from behind the bar. Clientele get to know her and the people sitting beside them. It’s the kind of environment where a patron can expect at least one person they know to ask how the latest test went or how school is going. “I heard good things about Melvin’s Hamburgers and I like being able to sit down at 5-O-Clock and watch the game or talk to friends,” Matt Roberts, a junior in mathematics, said. The bar not only offers drink specials that are budget-friendly for college students, but Melvin’s Hamburgers are also available for order. “The prices are amazing too,” Roberts said. Kline said she does a lot of marketing on campus. Every now and then she can be spotted on campus posting flyers to let students know the latest news at 5-O-Clock. Her approachable demeanor makes it easy for students to approach her and ask questions about events that are coming up. “Elyse really makes this place happen at night — there is always something fun going on,” Annie Cohen, a N.C. State alumna, said. Cohen said she and friends like to come by to socialize in a more relaxed environment. The business is also reaching out to student organizations. Student organizations have held gatherings at Melvin’s and 5-O-Clock to promote fundraisers and to host mixers. Kline said she will keep up her marketing efforts on campus and hopes the NCSU football season will bring in bigger crowds. There are TVs at every booth and a big screen outside so pedestrians and people enjoying a cigarette won’t miss the game.

ALUMNA USES MARKETING SKILLS AND FRIENDLINESS TO PROMOTE SPORTS BAR ON HILLSBOROUGH STREET STORY BY ELLEN SCOTT

5

It’s 5-O-Clock somewhere


Features BUSINESS & MONEY

PAGE 6 • TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2010

TECHNICIAN

CENTENNIAL CAMPUS ENJOYS ALTERNATIVE FOOD OPTION

LEE DANIELLO/TECHNICIAN (3)

Ardath Church is one of the “moms” behind Mom’s Delicious Dishes, a food truck that comes to Centennial Campus every Tuesday and Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Alex Manasa, a senior in aerospace engineering, and twins Spencer and Andrew Williamson, both seniors in electrical engineering, enjoy their sandwiches from Mom’s Delicious Dishes.

Mom’s Delicious Dishes handmakes their sandwiches and salads. “We’re trying to be able to set up on the Brickyard on Mondays, but we have to get permission for that,” Church said.

Mom’s Delicious Dishes food truck serves food to comfort hunger, soul and wallet. Even better—it comes to campus.

Mark Herring Staff Writer

G

ourmet street food may sound like an oxymoron, but a new mobile business is redefining the conventional outlook on food served from a truck. Mom’s Delicious Dishes, a nascent Raleigh food truck, has quickly developed a large following, especially among the students, faculty and professionals on Centennial Campus. Ardath Church and Thao Beck, the “moms” behind Mom’s Delicious Dishes, come to Centennial Campus twice a week. The three-month-old business strives to deviate from the generic hot dog and funnel cake expectation associated with street food. ` “We want to serve hearty food that reminds the customer of comfort food,” Church said. “For instance, instead of a traditional hamburger that you can find anywhere, we serve a meatloaf sandwich.” The menu is a compilation of various comfort dishes executed with a gourmet twist. “We have macaroni and cheese, but I also add some nutmeg to give it a unique twist,” Beck, the mastermind behind the cooking, said. Additionally, Mom’s Delicious Dishes tries to use local vegetables and organic products whenever possible. Church said she goes to the farmers market daily. Freshness at Mom’s Delicious Dishes is not a hackneyed mantra but

WHEN IS MDD ON CAMPUS? • •

930 Main Campus Drive, Centennial Campus Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 p.m. to 2 p.m.

rather one of the goals of the business. “Local ingredients typically taste better and are healthier,” Beck said. Furthermore, Church and Beck still manage to keep prices affordable. A sandwich, drink and a side go for $7. “We have to manage between getting the best ingredients and the price, so we find a balance,” Beck said. “But we don’t want gouging! I’m very cost conscious, so I see what we can save in paper products and things like that so [we] don’t cheap out on the food.” The Centennial Campus stop has so far been the business’ busiest location. “We sell out every time we come,” Beck said. Even before the fall semester started, Church said Mom’s Delicious Dishes thrived at its location at 930 Main Campus Dr., near Venture II Building. “First of all, we believe that the students here are exactly our target audience,” Church said. “The other part of it is that Red Hat is so close nearby. We have an audience here that we can’t discover anywhere else in Raleigh.” Finding an audience proves to be one of the most crucial factors to the success of the mobile food business, according to Church.

“In Durham there is a great truck called Only Burger, and they pretty much have all of Duke behind them,” Church said. “We want to be able to make that connection here at State.” Moreover, Mom’s Delicious Dishes is interested in coming to main campus.

“…instead of a traditional hamburger that you can find anywhere, we serve a meatloaf sandwich.” Ardath Church, owner of Mom’s Delicious Dishes

“We would love to be here at State for another day,” Church said. If the process works out, Church and Thao said they will come to the Brickyard on Mondays. Despite being isolated from main campus, Mom’s Delicious Dishes still attracts students that don’t study on Centennial Campus. Kyle Jones, a sophomore in nutrition, has made the trip to Centennial

MENU ITEMS • • • • •

Asian BBQ grilled chicken sandwich Portobello mushroom on ciabatta Avocado BLT on Croissant Mom’s meatloaf sandwich Mac n cheese

• • • • • • • •

Campus twice. “I was pretty excited to see some of the menu items that are not very typical of street food cuisine. You can tell how they have their own little flair on normal dishes,” Jones said. “The service is great and the ladies are very lively and momlike. My favorite is the avocado BLT.” Mom’s Delicious Dishes is not exclusive to the N.C. State demographic. Throughout the week, the truck goes to RTP, Cary Crossroads Office Park and various spots in Durham. On weekends, the women plan around community events. “We play the weekends by ear, but there is still a lot of planning involved,” Beck said. Mom’s Delicious Dishes participated in SPARKcon in downtown Raleigh last weekend and got so much business they said they ran out of side dishes within a few hours. Adam Kim, a junior in civil engineering, was downtown during SPARKcon and tried Mom’s Delicious Dishes for the first time. “The Asian barbeque chicken sandwich is really good. It was interesting, because I’ve never bought real food — besides snow cones and stuff — from a food truck,” Kim said. Church and Beck said they have put a lot of effort into

Fresh fruit salad Pasta salad Vegetable and mixed green salad Donuts Coffee Sweet tea Soda Water

trying to alleviate common suspicions about street food. “There is the term ‘roach coach,’” Beck said. “A lot of people have impressions that food trucks are dirty.” Wake County has set strong regulations to avoid the negativity associated with “roach coaches.” Church said the food truck is certified with the county and is associated with commissary. Restaurants are the most common commissaries in the food truck business and Mom’s Delicious Dishes works with Jibarra Mexican Restaurant. The main intention of the regulations is to assure that food trucks have a preparation area that is safe, sanitary and accountable. Despite being relatively new to the business, Church and Beck are confident they can continue to satisfy their customers. “We just want to serve really good food that makes people happy,” Church said. “I think everyone grew up — no matter what culture — with these types of f lavors,” Beck said. Beck said her cooking style comes from a mix of various culinary inf luences. Beck is Vietnamese American, and this is occasionally expressed in her food. The truck’s Asian Barbeque Chicken Sandwich is a spinoff of the famous French Vietnamese sandwich, Bánh mì. “I just cook what feels and tastes right,” Beck said.

OTHER STOPS • • • • •

RTP Cary Crossroads Office Park ECPI College of Technology Duke University Five Points


Sports

TECHNICIAN

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2010 • PAGE 7

FOOTBALL

EVERETT

Wilson. “It is all about opportunity. And once I got the opportunity I had already prepared myself mentally earlier in the week,” Underwood said. “So when it came time, I had already prepared myself as a starter.” His play did not go unnoticed, as coach Tom O’Brien noted Underwood’s play and said he was impressed at Underwood’s continued commitment. “He has been very patient. He knows he is going to get a chance and he is going to have an opportunity and he got it Thursday night to get in as a part of the offense,” O Brien said. “I felt very good about it and I know his teammates felt very good about it.” When the depth chart for the Georgia Tech game was released on Monday and Underwood was still not on it, he remained focused on giving everything he has in practice, so that when opportunity comes knocking, he will be at the door to answer. “Every week I just try to prepare like I am the starter and when my number gets called I’ll try and do my best,” Underwood said. “There is still a chance for things to change. Things happen in between games and it is just all about opportunity.”

team’s attitude seems to be different this season. While fans celebrated the first 3-0 start since the Philip Rivers days, the refrain in the locker room was far more grounded. Nearly every player asked about the thrill of three straight victories dismissed being 3-0 as no big deal. This team is far from content, and memories of the difficulties of a year ago will not be washed away any time soon. State was 3-1 last season and k nows what happened. With recollection of the disastrous conclusion to 2009 still vivid, expect this team to keep playing like it has something to prove. O’Brien’s players are buying in to his system. Curtis Underwood is a veteran player who was expected to start the season. And he’s not even on the depth chart, as he was replaced by a pair of freshmen. In a lot of locker rooms, a controversy would be brewing. Instead, Underwood has kept his mouth shut and his motor running, and helped spell Greene with a touchdown in week three. Nate Irving, the unquestioned star of this defense, has willingly moved to the middle in a scheme that will have him wrong-arming guards and centers while his counterparts Cole and Manning rack up sacks and big plays. He’s said more than once that he doesn’t care how many tackles he makes, as long as his team wins. More than anything, it’s that attitude that makes State a force to be reckoned with in a down year for the perennially mediocre ACC.

continued from page 8

continued from page 8

LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Redshirt junior halfback Curtis Underwood, Jr. drives past Cincinnati defensive during the 4th quarter of the Thursday night home game in Carter-Finley Stadium. Underwood had 23 yards of rushing. N.C. State won against Cincinnati 30 - 19.

POLO

continued from page 8

in some running out at the field and might go work out afterwards. “Also, we’ve been trying to do more social-type things. Everyone on the team met up at the Cincinnati game last Thursday and hung out with each other. We’ve been trying to keep the team connected through social events and make sure everybody still feels a part of the team even though we’re not having practices.” The renovations should finish in two to three weeks, right before the team plays its second tournament of the season at James Madison Oct. 8-10.

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Despite stiff competition in its first tournament, the team is looking to see how it stacks up against fellow Atlantic Division foes of the Collegiate Water Polo Association. “We’re playing some of the toughest teams in the conference in our first tournament,” Brown said. “We’re playing Duke, Virginia Tech and Virginia, which are three of the top five teams in our conference. It will be a good indicator of how we are as a team, even though we haven’t had a place to practice.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF N.C. STATE CLUB WATER POLO

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Sudoku Level:

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FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 21, 2010

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Monday’s puzzle

9/21/10

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2010 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

5/5/10

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2010 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

indie rock / hip-hop / dance / electronica / metal / folk / post rock / local / soul / a capella

ACROSS 1 Briquettes 6 Zip 10 Country music pioneer Ernest 14 “As a result ...” 15 Country on the tip of the Arabian Peninsula 16 Spot in the ocean 17 Top banana 19 Depilatory brand 20 ’60s-’70s war site, briefly 21 “Now it makes sense!” 22 Cake finish 23 Unstable situation, metaphorically 26 Workplace inspection org. 29 Comportment 30 Louise’s gal pal 33 Buzzing swarmers 34 Performed 37 Huge mess 40 “Danny and the Dinosaur” author Hoff 41 Court postponement 42 Ancient Greek military power 43 Blood fluids 44 Veggies studied by Mendel 45 Gregarious fun lovers 52 Assumed name 53 Defensive spray 54 Marx’s “__ Kapital” 57 Thin curl of smoke 58 Valuable shore property, and a hint to what the first words of 17-, 23-, 37- and 45Across have in common 61 Third man 62 High-strung 63 Sacher treat 64 Goodyear product 65 Member’s obligation 66 What matzo lacks DOWN 1 “High Hopes” lyricist Sammy 2 Top draft status 3 Father of 61Across

9/21/10

By Robert A. Doll

4 ’60s “trip” drug 5 Early gas company based in Cleveland 6 Districts 7 Roast host 8 Bleachers cry 9 John __ Lennon 10 Kid’s makebelieve phone 11 Carrier that added “ways” to its name in 1997 12 Duck hunter’s cover 13 Cold-water hazards 18 Its flagship sch. is in Stillwater, west of Tulsa 22 Freezes over 23 Oates’s musical partner 24 Divine sign 25 Feudal domains 26 Gambling parlors, briefly 27 One-horse carriage 28 Had in one’s hands 31 Strolls (along) 32 Performers’ union: Abbr. 33 Tarzan’s son 34 Awful

Monday’s Puzzle Solved

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35 Letter after theta 36 Genetic info carriers 38 “Misery” actor James 39 Easy targets 43 Swingline fastener 45 Touch, cat-style 46 Accused’s excuse 47 Choir platform 48 Likeness 49 “Miracle on 34th Street” setting

9/21/10

50 Rhine whine? 51 Sandy Koufax or CC Sabathia 54 The first Mrs. Copperfield 55 Insects on farms 56 Editor’s “leave it in” 58 B&B part 59 College URL ending 60 Future fish


Sports PAGE 8 • TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2010

COUNTDOWN

• 4 days until the football team opens ACC play against Georgia Tech

INSIDE

• Page 7: A continuation of the Curtis Underwood feature

TECHNICIAN COMMENTARY

FOOTBALL

Patience pays for Underwood ACC recognizes stars of win over Bearcats

Taylor Barbour Deputy Sports Editor

Clemson

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FOOTBALL continued page 7

CLUB SPORTS

Tucker Frazier Deputy Sports Editor

September 2010 T

Underwood said. “But going through my head was, ‘I just have to keep working and can’t stop playing and trying hard.’” And just like when he was redshirted in 2009, Underwood did not get down and start to sulk when he was not named the starter but instead learned a valuable lesson and kept working hard. “I have learned about coming into things and just knowing not to sit back and expect things to be given to me,” Underwood said. “I have learned to work a little harder and appreciate things a little more.” With this attitude, Underwood kept practicing hard, knowing that his chance would come. And it when finally did, Underwood took full advantage Thursday against Cincinnati, as he came in and scored his first touchdown of the season on a 13-yard pass play from quarterback Russell

With first tournament approaching, team struggles to find adequate practice facility

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE M

be done for the betterment of the program,” Underwood said. “Watching and playing with Toney, Jamelle, and Andre and just seeing the success they are having outside of football has been a motivation to me because I know I can play with those guys.” But a year later, Underwood appeared poised to take over as the starting running back and many believed he would. However, when the depth chart was released, Underwood was nowhere to be found, as two freshmen, Dean Haynes and Mustafa Greene, were listed above him. “Obviously it was the coach’s decision and that is what they wanted,”

Water polo temporarily without home

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Su

TO HO

2-0

EP

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Boston College

CH

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AR

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North Carolina State

IA

Wake Forest

IC

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/T

ACC FOOTBALL STANDINGS

OK

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

CO

Voters in the Associated Press and USA Today Top 25 polls are slowly but surely beginning to take note of the Pack’s 3-0 start. State remains unranked, but received 14 votes in the AP poll. The Wolfpack is one of 19 teams outside the Top 25 that received votes in the AP poll and is one of three ACC teams, along with Georgia Tech and Clemson, that received exactly 14 votes. State earned seven votes in this week’s AP Poll. In last week’s edition, the Pack received one vote in the AP Poll and none in the USA Today rankings.

N

Football approaching top 25

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SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

When Curtis Underwood committed to N.C. State in the fall of 2006, he understood what he was getting into. Underwood, a redshirt junior running back, knew at the time that N.C. State had just signed two highly ranked running backs in Toney Baker and Andre Brown the year before and both players had exceeded expectations in their freshman seasons. Baker rushed for more than 500 yards and scored five touchdowns, while Brown ran for 667 yards, scoring six touchdowns. Thus, Underwood knew playing time probably would be at a premium but nonetheless committed to the Pack. A nd Under wood played in his first two years in Raleigh as a knee injury to Toney Baker left State short on running backs and Baker’s career in jeopardy. In his first two seasons, Underwood played sparingly, seeing time in six games his freshman year and in all 12 games as a sophomore. Heading into last year, Underwood was positioned for a breakout season. He had paid his dues and waited his turn. Andre Brown had gone on to the NFL and all that was left was redshirt senior Jamelle Eugene as the starter and Underwood as his backup. But then Underwood’s plan hit a brick wall when Toney Baker was able to come back from multiple knee surgeries to diminish Underwood’s role to the point that coach Tom O’Brien decided to redshirt him. “It was a shock at first,” Underwood said. “The decision was up to coach O’Brien. He pulled me into the office one day and told me that I was going to redshirt.” Underwood admits that sitting out for him was tough, but said he understood why it had to happen and took it in stride, while using it as a motivating tool. “Sitting out last year was hard. But it was something that needed to

KE

The Pack’s nationally televised romp over visiting Cincinnati Thursday night has yielded weekly recognition from the ACC for both Russell Wilson and Mustafa Greene. Wilson took home ACC Player of the Week honors for his sixth career game with 300 or more yards through the air. The Wolfpack’s offensive leader spread the wealth, completing passes to 11 different receivers on his own team, while committing no turnovers on 40 pass attempts. In easily the best performance of his young career, Mustafa Greene accounted for more than 100 yards, rushing for 84 and adding 54 yards receiving. The effort was good enough to earn Greene ACC Rookie of the Week.

SOPHOMORE RUNNING BACK REMAINING FOCUSED WHILE WAITING FOR OPPORTUNITY TO COME KNOCKING

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Today WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL VS. NORTH CAROLINA Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m. MEN’S GOLF AT GOLFWEEK’S CONFERENCE CHALLENGE Burlington, Iowa, All day Wednesday MEN’S SOCCER VS. PRESBYTERIAN Raleigh, N.C., 7 p.m. Thursday WOMEN’S SOCCER AT CLEMSON Clemson, S.C., 7 p.m. MEN’S SOCCER VS. UCLA, 4 p.m. (exhibition)

Like former NBA All-star Allen Iverson once said, “We talkin’ about practice.” The N.C. State water polo team wishes it had the opportunity to do what Mr. Iverson once took for granted—practice. While renovations continue at Willis R. Casey Aquatic Center, the N.C. State water polo club finds itself with no practice facility, just 11 days away from its season-opening tournament at Virginia Tech. Needless to say, the inability to hold practices has hindered the team, but it has been making attempts to find alternate pools for practice in preparation for its first tournament, according to club president Kamau Brown. “We’ve been trying to go over to the Triangle Aquatics Center in Cary once a week and scrimmage with a team out there,” Brown said. “We’re also going to go to [North] Carolina and scrimmage with them starting this week. TAC charges us five dollars per person but it’s free to scrimmage Carolina, it’s just a matter of getting over there.” One of the biggest hurdles in holding structured practices has been the struggle to find an adequate facility. “We were supposed to practice last Monday but the space that they gave us wasn’t adequate enough for us to have a decent practice, so we didn’t,” Brown said.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE N.C. STATE CLUB WATER POLO TEAM

Renovations at the aquatic facility people show up, which was really have also had an impact on people’s in- good for us. So not having a place terest in joining the club. The team had to practice has hurt us.” Although the team may be poola record number of people who showed less, players have interest this season, been ma k ing but the lack of havefforts to maining a nearby pool to t a i n p e r s on a l practice in has jeopconditioning, as ardized the wellbeing well as keep the of the team. team spirit high “It’s really detriby holding social mental to the team,” events to promote Brown said. “This is team cohesivethe first year we’ve ness. had a lot of people “We’re trying to come out for the club water polo president to do more things team. A lot of people Kamau Brown outside of t he showed interest. We pool like crosshad about 40 people come out for the first practice, which training,” Brown said. “We’ll get were pretty high numbers. The next practice we held, we had about 25 POLO continued page 7

“This is the first year we’ve had a lot of people to come out for the team.”

ACC there for the taking

J

ust three games into the season, it’s probably way too early to start entertaining thoughts of State fighting for an ACC title. Three wins over unranked opponents, no matter the nature of those victories, would normally be no reason to start such discussions before a team’s first conference game. But based on the state of the conference this year and what the Pack has shown in its Tyler Everett first two games against Sports Editor respectable opponents, (Sorry, Western), I can’t help but wonder, why not State? It would be easy to trash the ACC after Virginia Tech fell to James Madison and Georgia Tech fell to Kansas. Making matters worse for the conference was the humiliation FSU suffered at the hands of Oklahoma. But it’s a long season, and 2010 wouldn’t be the first time a team that looked pitiful one weekend in September was celebrating a conference title three months later. So it would be unwise to say the Pack has a conference schedule full of cupcakes. The Hokies have an annual habit of playing their best football of the season later than sooner. Georgia Tech’s loss to a Kansas team that has lost to North Dakota State and Southern Miss makes the Jackets vulnerable, but is no reason to pencil in the trip to Atlanta as an easy victory. Plenty of State’s conference opponents will provide stiff competition. The ACC might rebound and regain some national credibility. It might not. All that is really certain about the rest of the teams on State’s schedule is that the Pack will have good reason to like its chances, week in and week out. The ACC slate looks even better considering State will take on two of its toughest ACC foes, Virginia Tech and Florida State, at home, and does not have to play the only team in the conference currently ranked in the Top 25 - Miami. As for the Pack itself, the team’s effort against UCF and Cincinnati makes it hard for even the most grounded of fans to stave off optimism. State went on the road to what figures to be one of the top teams in CUSA and won despite one of the worst nights of star quarterback Russell Wilson’s career. Fans need to realize what a big deal that was. Every team O’Brien and Co. square off against knows what No. 16 can do, and nobody doubts the Pack’s capabilities when Wilson is on target. But the defense made an invaluable statement, preserving the victory with a late takeaway to win despite the offense’s last points of the night coming in the first half. One week later, it became apparent that in year four, Tom O’Brien might very well have one of the best defenses and most complete teams of his tenure in Raleigh. Audie Cole was the hero in Orlando. Thursday night, it was hard to single out just one player from a unit that harassed Zach Collaros into a largely miserable night, letting up only after the game had long since been decided. Defenders flew around the field with an energy level unseen throughout a disappointing 2009 season. Perhaps the most encouraging thing about the Pack’s defense is that it has played at a high level without Nate Irving dominating as he did in 2008. Against the Bearcats, Irving made his presence felt, but by no means stole the show. Based on the way Audie Cole and Terrell Manning have played the past two games, should Irving return to form, the linebacking core might go from good to downright scary. On offense, Russell Wilson has played great in two of three games. His performance has lived up to the expectations. With top receivers Owen Spencer and Jarvis Williams and All-ACC tight end George Bryan, Wilson was counted on to lead a potent aerial attack. But so far this year, those three players are just part of the equation. Considering the capabilities of that pass-catching trio, the fact that they are just three of five players with at least eight catches this season gives the Pack a real possibility to easily exceed the production of last year’s offense, which often scored at will. In addition to Williams, Bryan and Spencer, T.J Graham and running back Mustafa Greene have both caught at least eight passes. Wilson hit 11 different receivers in the win over the Bearcats. It’s hard to find the words to adequately explain how explosive this offense might be if Wilson can consistently keep people guessing who he wants to target. Finally, and most importantly, the

EVERETT continued page 7

Technician - September 21, 2010  

OIT plans Internet safety presentations

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