Issuu on Google+

Technician          

monday september

20 2010

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Alcohol violations interpreted differently Over the past three years, Campus Police has seen a decrease in the number of alcohol violations. But, Substance Abuse with Student Health has a different view of the statistics.

alcohol sanctions class after receiving an alcohol citation or violation. “Students sent to me received a violation from University Housing or Campus Police or the Office of Student Conduct,” Austin said. There are many possible reasons for the decrease in alcohol violations, according to Barnwell. Chelsey Francis “The Alcohol Edu requirement Deputy News Editor started in 2007, which is a positive Campus Police and Substance Abuse stand point because it educates stuwith Student Health disagree about dents on alcohol and its consequenchow to interpret the numbers con- es,” Barnwell said. Some students, like Carnell Griffin, cerning alcohol violations. Jon Barnwell, patrol division com- a sophomore in management, don’t think AlcoholEmander for Camdu is the reason pus Police, said for the decrease. t h e nu m b e r s “I would have have been goguessed the aling down. Chris cohol violations Austin, assistant Eric Boone, a senior in were increasing. director of health technology education The Edu program promotion and is pretty pointsubstance abuse, said he thinks the numbers are about less,” Griffin said. “I don’t drink, so I guess it may be better for people who the same. “What was really interesting was consume alcohol to learn about its when I saw that the numbers decreased consequences.” Rikito Ogawa, a senior in internaover three years, because that’s when you can start talking about a trend,” tional studies, said he thinks the violations are decreasing. Barnwell said. “I would have guessed the violations Austin said the number of students he has for alcohol sanctions class is were decreasing because of regulations. People are also getting careful,” holding about the same year to year. “The year before last, I had 345 Ogawa said. “I don’t think there is a students sent to me for alcohol viola- direct relation between the Edu and tions,” Austin said. “Last year, I had the decrease though.” Austin said AlcoholEdu has been 338 students. Those numbers are shown to have effective results. about the same.” “The entire purpose of AlcoholEThe numbers reported by Austin are the number of students who take an du is to teach low-risk consumption

“People violate laws regardless.”

instead of high-risk consumption,” Austin said. Some numbers have increased after Student Health began education campaigns, according to Austin. “I have seen an increase in alleged alcohol poisonings. Ten years ago, we didn’t receive any calls about alcohol poisonings. One year, we printed the signs and symptoms of it,” Austin said. “After that, we received about a call a week for alcohol poisoning. In my estimation, it was happening before, students just didn’t know what it was.” Austin said AlcoholEdu has students thinking about consumption in different ways. “AlcoholEdu helps students watch out for each other more. AlcoholEdu helps teach information about alcohol poisonings and drinking safely,” Austin said. “Students know the signs and they watch out for each other.” Barnwell also said Campus Police, off-campus police departments and University Housing are working together to prevent more alcohol violations. “Also, because of cooperation between the police department and University Housing, students aren’t taking chances on campus that they were in the past,” Barnwell said. A significant spike of violations occurs on football game days, according to Barnwell. “During game day operations the police department stands out in the arena parking lot and several individ-

alcohol continued page 3

Potential N.C. plan likely to mean more ACT applicants North Carolina is considering a plan to require the ACT for high school students.

We’ve always stressed classwork more than standardized test scores [for applicants], Griffin said. Passage of the state’s plan will not affect Admissions’ view of the test itself, either, Griffin said. The ACT will still Chris Boucher be considered as valid an examination Deputy News Editor as the SAT, just as it is now. “Both tests are valuable tools for Even if the state follows through on its plan to require most 11th graders to admissions officers in selecting aptake the ACT college entrance exami- plicants,” Griffin said. “The tests are nation, don’t expect radically altered different, but equally valuable.” Jayne Fleener, dean of the College admission requirements for prospecof Education, said both standardized tive N.C. State students. According to a Sept. 3rd News & tests are valid and beneficial for evaluObserver story, the State Board of ating students. While the SAT and ACT are both Education is set to require most 11th graders to take the ACT examination; valid evaluations, there is emerging the Board could decide on the plan as evidence that the ACT might be more beneficial for college preparation, early as October. Thomas Griffin, director of under- Fleener said. “Both [tests] are predictors of stugraduate admissions, said the proposal is a positive move toward preparing dent success, but the battery of tests North Carolina high school students associated with the ACT allow students to have better information about for higher education. “From the standpoint of an admis- their strengths and make adjustments sions officer, we want to encourage in their academic efforts and focus,” access to higher education for the Fleener said. While people of North the SAT remains Carolina,” Griffin the most common said. test for students “Ma k ing sure applying to colthat every student leges, the ACT has has some college already become a entrance exam beThomas Griffin, director of part of many profore they graduate undergraduate admissions spective students’ – be it ACT or SAT application pro– is a step in the cess. “More appliright direction.” The proposal’s main benefit for cants are starting to submit both [SAT 11th graders is opportunity: the state and ACT] scores,” Griffin said. According to the Admissions Office, would pay students’ registration fees if the plan is approved, according to most people that take ACT also take the SAT - but not all. the N&O story. Out of 10,390 applicants for the fall “Most colleges require the SAT or ACT, and this will help make sure stu- 2010 semester, only 563 students submitted only ACT scores, according to dents have one,” Griffin said. Admissions to continue stressing Admissions Office statistics. The number of ACT submissions is grades If the Board of Education approves quite likely to increase if the Board the ACT plan, it won’t make much passes the ACT plan, Griffin acknowldifference for prospective N.C. State edged. Plan won’t change University’s applicants. “The best barometer for college pre- teacher preparation If the plan passes, “it will not imparedness is high school performance.

“The tests are different, but equally valuable.”

? ?

luis zapata/Technician

James Augenbaugh, a sophomore in political science, bongs a beer during student tailgating before the Cincinatti game Thursday. Augenbaugh said his favorite part of the game is “the walk to the gate because you see the fans from the other team and you get to talk to them.”

Students lose e-mails to Postini quarantine

pact how we prepare teachers. The College of Education goes to great lengths to ensure that our graduates are prepared to teach the North Carolina Standard Course of Study in innovative and engaging ways,” said Michael Maher, director of professional education. The ACT plan might, however, help teachers from the College of Education guide high school students through college preparatory testing more easily. In conjunction with the ACT plan, the state would use eighthand tenth-grade tests to provide interim information about where students are doing well, and where they may need additional help, before actually taking the ACT. These “pre-ACT” tests will “attempt to focus attention on both career preparation and improving academic achievement,” according to the ACT website. Fleener said PLAN was a great tool to get students ready for the ACT. “PLAN provides opportunities for reteaching, and provide students and families with some career preparation guidelines,” Fleener said.”In the long run, the [ACT] plan will help students stay on target for post-secondary studies and career preparation,” said Fleener. While the College of Education won’t instruct students on how to “teach to the ACT,” it will stress that teachers should be familiar with the ACT/PLAN testing battery. “We provide training for our future teachers in test interpretation, and the use data to make instructional decisions,” Fleener said. “Because the ACT will be tied to PLAN, it will give us the opportunity to address the continuum of feedback systems to access student knowledge and make adjustments

act continued page 3

Student e-mails were quarantined by anti-virus/anti-spam software. OIT said they have resolved the issue and e-mails can be retrieved.� Allison Saito Staff Writer

On Sept. 5, the Office of Information Technology Helpdesk sent an email to students acknowledging that students may not have received their e-mails because it had been quarantined by the Postini Anti-Virus/AntiSpam service. Student e-mails were not supposed to be processed by Postini, and this mix-up was a result of the switch to Gmail that the University made over the summer, according to Harry Nicholos, assistant director for systems and hosted services. Nicholos said the University was notified that there was an issue by a student. “We’d gotten a remedy call. It said

very precisely … that this student didn’t get something,” Nicholos said. When the University looked into why this student did not receive their e-mail, they discovered that the settings in Postini were not what they should have been, according to Nicholos. Postini is a program that scans email for spam and viruses, Nicholos said. Generally, it scans e-mails; then, it quarantines suspect mail in a separate account. Users receive e-mails that notify them about the e-mails in their quarantine. “This tool [Postini] has a quarantine. For the students, that is not supposed to happen,” Nicholos said. When the University switched to having Google student e-mail accounts, it intended to have the scan and quarantine features turned off. They were not turned off, but the notifications were turned off. Nicholos explained that finding the extent of the quarantine is diffi-

e-mail continued page 3

insidetechnician Special teams coverage unit has new look See page 8.

Ludacris packs Reynolds for soldout concert See page 5.

viewpoint features classifieds sports

NC State Bookstores CALL FOR ENTRIES!

4 5 7 8

? ?


Page 2

page 2 • monday, september 20, 2010

Through michelle’s lens

Corrections & Clarifications

Technician Campus CalendaR

SMART-Shop Series Workshop: Goal Setting 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Talley Student Center, Room 3118

September 2010

In Wednesday’s “Annual SparkCon begins Thursday,” Jeff Pettus the visual arts director for the N.C. Arts Council.

Su

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

M

T

W

Th

F

Sa

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Today Airiel Down Free Concert 7 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema

Weather Wise

Paul Zia Distinguished Lecture Series All Day McKimmon Center

Today:

Communicating Science Noon to 1:30 p.m. Walnut Room, Talley Student Center

90/62

Scholars Forum: Joe Neff and Mandy Locke: Who Investigates the Investigators? 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Witherspoon Student Center

Sunny with scattered clouds

Tomorrow:

Tuition Review Advisory Committee meeting 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Winslow Hall Conference Room Lecture: Early Christianity in the Middle East 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Withers Hall Ongoing Events “Quilting IS Art” Exhibition All Day The Crafts Center DELTA Fall Workshops and Seminars Registration Now Open All Day ITTC Labs in DH Hill Library Sequence of Impressions: The Work of Douglas Gorsline, 1946 to 1981 Noon to 8:00 p.m. Gregg Museum of Art and Design Southern Roots of MidCentury Modern Noon to 8 p.m. Gregg Museum of Art and Design

87 60 Sunny with scattered clouds

POLICe BlOTTER

Wednesday

91 60 Sunny with limited cloud cover.

source: www.noaa.gov

Going Gaga

on the Web See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

F

photo ByMichelle Fidelia

riends Lexie Athanas, a freshman in international studies, and Reaghan Smith take photos in the Free Expression Tunnel before the Lady Gaga concert on Sunday.

Sept. 14 11:39 A.M. | Fire Alarm D.H. Hill Library Fire Protection responded to alarm caused by mechanical problem. Electronics notified. 12:06 A.M. | Illegally Parked Vehicle Hillsborough Building Lot Due to citizen complaints, officer checked lot for parking violations. Five vehicles were issued Transportation Parking Tickets.

2:10 A.M. | Suspicious Person Wood Hall Student reported subject banging on door and asking to get in. Officers checked area but did not locate subject.

Chew First | Brian Schultz

1:05 P.M. | Medical Assist Withers Hall Fire Protection responded to student in need of medical assistance. Student was transported to Student Health Center. 10:25 P.M. | Suspicious Person Beef Feed Barn Report of suspicious subjects. Officers located student and staff member checking for signs of coyotes. Everything OK.

12:30 P.M. | Drug Violation Caldwell Hall Report of possible drug violation. Officer checked area but did not locate subjects.

Get involved in technician Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

In the know

BECOMING ARMY STRONG WILL OPEN DOORS, INCLUDING THOSE ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES. To find out how you can become an officer in the Army or Army Reserve, contact your local recruiter or visit us online at http://goarmy.com/info.h580

©2009. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved.

Zia Lecture Series: Panel of engineers behind Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge Three engineers responsible for the planning, design and construction of the spectacular Hoover Dam Bypass Project in the southwestern US will discuss their work during an all-day series of events. The centerpiece of the project is a 2,000-foot bridge over the Colorado River that will open to traffic later this year, the 75th anniversary of the iconic dam’s construction. The engineers will speak at the McKimmon Center as part of the Paul Zia Distinguished Lecture Series in Civil Engineering and Construction, an

2:20 P.M. | Medical Assist Weisiger-Brown Athletic Facility Units responded and transported staff member in need of medical assistance.

4:45 P.M. | Safety Program Wood Hall Officer conducted engraving program. 5:55 P.M. | Check Person D.H. Hill Library Report of suspicious subject.

annual event featuring prominent engineers in the field. Morning sessions will feature all three speakers: David Goodyear, chief bridge engineer and senior vice president of T.Y. Lin International, William Dowd, project director and executive vice president of HDR Engineering, Inc., and David Zanetell, project manager with the Federal Highway Administration. At 3 p.m., Goodyear will deliver the Zia Distinguished Lecture, which will illustrate the spectacular process of the bridge construction as it unfolded. The bridge’s concrete arch span of 1,060 feet is the longest in the United States and the fourth-longest in the world. The Paul Zia Distinguished Lecture Series was established in 2002 to honor the accomplishments of Dr. Paul Zia, Distinguished University

Subject left prior to officer’s arrival.

6:07 P.M. | Fire Alarm Engineering Building III Officers responded to alarm caused by contractors working in the area. System reset. 8:25 P.M. | Fire Alarm Western Manor Apartments Officer responded to alarm caused by cooking. Everything OK. 9:58 P.M. | Breaking and Entering - Larceny North Shore Condos Student reported bicycle stolen from garage.

Sept 15 12:50 A.M. | Suspicious Person Faucette Drive Report of suspicious subjects in the area. Officers located two students walking. No further action taken. 9:07 A.M. | Concerned Behavior Wolf Village Units responded and transported student in need of medical and psychological assistance.

9:28 A.M. | Assistance Poe Hall Officers stood by at the request of staff member while former employee retrieved personal belongings. 11:42 P.M. | Suspicious Person DH Hill Library Officer located non-student sleeping in library. Subject was advised of library policy and complied to leave the area.

12:08 P.M. | Suspicious Person Dan Allen Deck Report of subject pulling on door handles of vehicles. Officers located non-student placing coupons on vehicle windows. It was determined subject did not have permit and was instructed to cease and desist and leave premises.

Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. Zia is a leading figure in the fields of concrete and structural engineering and served as head of the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering for nine years. More information, including a full schedule of events and directions to the McKimmon Center, is available at the series website. Photos of the project are available at the Hoover Dam Bypass Project website. Source: Nate DeGraff, Engineering Communications


News

Technician

alcohol continued from page 1

uals are cited in some fashion,” Barnwell said. Sgt. Edward Farmer, with Campus Police said there were 24 alcohol violations or citations at the Western Carolina season opener, and 28 alcohol violations or citations at the Thursday night Cincinnati football game. “The day of the game, [the team] we are playing and the significance of the game all play a role in the number of citations,” Barnwell said. Austin said students receiving alcohol violations at football games are not allowed to attend games for a year. “If students get caught with an alcohol violation at a game, and go to the Office of Student Conduct, they can’t go to a game for a year,” Austin said. After citing students, Campus Police makes the decision whether to charge them criminally. The following steps vary according to the decision made by Campus Police, according to Paul Tongsri, assistant director of the Office of Student Conduct. “[The police department] isn’t involved in every off-campus offense, but local police will contact us if they are dealing with a student,” Barnwell said. According to Barnwell, when students have alcohol violations they try to educate the students. Campus Police has a zero tolerance policy for DWI that always ends in arrest because of the potential danger. “The number of student conduct referrals is

e-mail

continued from page 1

cult because of the complicated program. “Unfortunately, we were not able to tell what students were affected, because we couldn’t ask Postini who was affected. There is no mechanism that we can make that query,” Nicholos said. “We’re not quite sure who was set for quarantine and who wasn’t.” Nicholos explained that due to the size of the student body, it was impractical to individually determine which individuals were affected. They acted as though all student accounts were having spam quarantined. “We programmatically went through and reset all our student accounts, so that they fly right through Postini, as if Postini wasn’t there, which was what should have happened to begin with,” Nicholos said. Nicholos is confident that the e-mail system is now running correctly. “We’ve checked and made sure that mail flows correctly for students,” Nicholos said. Erin Lindauer, a freshman in

higher [than in the past] because [the police department] makes every attempt to make it an educational experience.” Barnwell said. According to Tongsri, after a student has received an alcohol violation, the Office of Student Conduct determines if there will be a hearing or just a meeting with the student. “If the student has had prior violations and depending on the violations, they may have a hearing. The hearing can have so many different outcomes, it’s not possible to name them all,” Tongsri said. “For the first violation the student will receive a written warning, and generally will be asked to complete and educational sanction and write a reflection paper.” Barnwell said Campus Police believes education will help students who have been cited with alcohol violations. “The students learn there are ramifications and disciplinary actions, with an educational piece tied in. Students come away from the experience well rounded instead of just getting a criminal record” Barnwell said. Eric Boone, a senior in technology education, said he didn’t have to take AlcoholEdu, but it only raises awareness. “People violate laws regardless. The only thing that stops them is how likely they are to get caught for breaking that law,” Boone said. “I didn’t have to take the AlcoholEdu but it only awareness about what people already know.”

monday, september 20, 2010 • Page 3

What is AlcoholEdu? AlcoholEdu for college is the only online alcohol prevention program designed for population-level, primary prevention. AlcoholEdu is a program designed to be for an entire population of students. AlcoholEdu is suggested for an incoming class. At the University, AlcoholEdu is required for all incoming students. According to Chris Austin, assistant director of health promotion, substance abuse, most students average between zero to three drinks per week. AlcoholEdu has been required for four years, according to Austin.

“AlcoholEdu was first required in the 20072008 school year,” Austin said. “This is the fourth year AlcoholEdu has been required for incoming students, under the age of 21.” AlcoholEdu is a twopart, online, sciencebased course, providing detailed information about alcohol and its effects on the body and mind. According to Austin, the goal is to help students make wellinformed decisions about alcohol and to help them cope with some peers’ drinking behaviors. Austin said he believes AlcoholEdu doesn’t decrease the number of students drinking

alcohol, but decreases the number of high-risk drinking students. “With AlcoholEdu, students are thinking more about drinking and the effects of drinking,” Austin said. The main purpose of AlcoholEdu is to teach students the difference between low-risk and high-risk drinking, according to Austin. “The purpose of the program is to teach students about low-risk and high-risk drinking,” Austin said. Source: outsidetheclassroom. com and Chris Austin, assistant director of health promotion and substance abuse prevention

materials science and engineering, said she lost several e-mails in the accidental quarantine. “They had quarantined three, and I just pulled them out and put them in my inbox,” Lindauer said. “They were three important e-mails, one of them I missed the date for something.” James Blew, a freshman in chemistry, said his quarantined e-mails weren’t important but if they were it could have been a different story. “[My quarantined e-mails] weren’t really important, but fairly important. But, if you’d been interested in it, it could have been a problem,” Blew said. Blew said he was not upset by the quarantined mail. “Crap happens, it’s getting fixed, nothing important [of mine] was blocked,” Blew said. Nicholos explained that they regret the mix up and have remedied the problem. “As soon as we found out, we fixed the user [accounts] and fixed our code so that won’t happen again,” Nicholos said. “We’re sorry for the inconvenience. We work hard to deliver a quality e-mail service. We really feel bad that we missed this.”

act

continued from page 1

to instruction.” As it is being presented, the ACT plan can only help North Carolina high school students, Fleener said. “The ACT, along with PLAN, will give students, their fami-

1/2 price scoops

in the library! with this ad 12-1pm & 5-7pm Sept 19-24

lies and teachers information that will help refocus and adjust learning in specific need areas,” Fleener said. “In this regard, the multiple tests provide much richer data to make academic decisions.”

TECHNICIAN

Open Forum

All students, faculty and staff are welcome!

We’re looking for feedback!

Stop in to share your suggestions, comments, concerns and critiques and meet with the Technician Staff!

Wednesday, Sept. 29 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Howling Cow Ice Cream, Sundaes and Shakes Wolfpack-To-Go Sandwiches, Salads and Wraps Use your Meal Plan Equivalency, Board Bucks, AllCampus or Credit Card Mon-Thur 12pm - 1am • Fri 12pm - 8pm • Sun 4pm - 1am • Closed Saturday

Brown Room, Talley Student Center

For more information, please email Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@technicianonline.


Viewpoint

page 4 • monday, september 20, 2010

Technician

{Our view}

ACTing in the best interest of science A

The Facts:

The North Carolina Board of Education is looking to pass the ACT plan, which will require 11th graders to take the ACT test. The College of Education already teaches the ACT/ PLAN battery.

Our Opinion:

The N.C. Board of Education should pass the plan. It will encourage students to learn skills imperative to dealing with science and help the future of our country in science fields.

lthough standardized tests may be a thing of the past for college students, most remember their experiences with the SAT and the ACT. These tests functioned as a way for students to prove themselves to colleges and measure themselves against students from other regions. Now, the North Carolina Board of Education is looking into paying for high school students to take the ACT and integrating the test into its standard curriculum. There is merit to this idea and the state should go through with the plan. Much like the SAT, the ACT is divided into sections on math, reading, English and writing, however it also has a science portion. This section requires students to be able to analyze data from graphs and charts, comprehend science reports

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

and discern between differing opinions and arguments. These skills are critical in science and engineering fields, which are becoming more prevalent in the global society. The argument against standardized tests is they do not accurately represent students coming into college. Some claim they have good grades, but they are bad test takers, thus it cannot accurately represent them. However valid this point, it is also important students realize the importance of testing in college. Many college course grades are dependent on a couple of tests and a bad score can wreck a semester. Students should make this realization sooner rather than

later. The College of Education need to watch the passage of this plan closely. Although they claim it will not effect the way they teach secondary education, the goal of the program is to revolutionize how students take standardized tests and how they learn science. Every day they pass engineers and scientists who this has already effected. Teaching science is a big part of our future as a nation and should be the top priority of the college as they are educating future teachers. If the BOE passes this plan, they will be paying the bill to ACT, Inc. Although the SAT and ACT tests are close in cost, $47 and $48 respectively,

the ACT offers a test without the writing portion that only costs $33. If the state chooses the pass this plan, they could choose the less expensive option. Almost 50% of students in N.C. public school qualify for a fee waiver, so the BOE may be able to take advantage of the fee waiver that is offered through the test for underprivileged students. The SAT has many merits as a standardized test and has been the leading standard test since the 1920’s, however it lacks the science portion the ACT has. For the future of science in our country, the N.C. Board of Education should pass the plan to require students to take the ACT in the 11th grade. This will help teachers prepare students for futures in sciences, as well as other math and rhetorical skills.

{

The pursuit of happiness

A

merica is the greatest nation in the world. We are strong, powerful, successful and live more comfortable live than anywhere else in the world. However, all of the affluence and prosperity our nation has seen in the past has developed a poor attitude that is evident throughout t he n at ion . Chad This attitude is a false sense Rhoads of entitlement, Senior Staff Columnist and the idea the world owes us something. We are losing some of the essential elements that this country was built on, such as hard work, personal responsibility, and ambition. Often times people say the idea of the American Dream is dead, but in reality the American dream is not dead. The problem is people lack the motivation and ambition to chase it. So many people in this wonderful nation have turned into little kids in the grocery store. If their mom says they cannot have a bag of sk it t les, they throw a fit until their mom g ives i n . I h ave worked at a grocery store for three and a half years, and this is a frequent occurrence. It is embarrassing and frustrating for the workers, the shoppers and the parents. This mirrors problems within our society today. Those of us who work hard have to see others who don’t get benefits for acting irresponsible or just simply don’t deserve them. People want the American dream, but not enough to work for it. We want what we cannot afford to have and we either get frustrated by it or buy it on credit we cannot afford to pay off. It truly amazes me how people will spend money that they simply do not have, and it is often times on things that they don’t even need. There is nothing wrong with having nice things, or even wanting nice things because this desire can drive us to reach our greatest potentials, but you have to

have the means to buy these things. If you go back to my grandfather‚Äôs generation, there was a much different approach to life. After the Great Depression, people understood how to spend their money in responsible and economical ways. They may not have had six cars in their driveway, but they learned how to make sure their families were provided for. They spent money when they needed too, and they saved money for when they needed it. They were able to buy nice things, but it was after they had saved money, not before they had earned it. This philosophy needs to become imbedded with the American people once again, whether it is concerning our personal finances or government spending. The excessive spending from individuals and the government is ridiculous, and a lot of it is unnecessary. If we continue believing that we have the right to have certain things that we do not, our country will continue to decline. A lot of blessings are t a k e n for granted in this country, and will continue to slip away if we continue to act irresponsibly. It is our right to have access to the pursuit of happiness, but it is our responsibility to go after it and reap the rewards of it. William Graham Sumner once wrote, “The men who start out with the notion that the world owes them a living generally find that the world pays its debt in the penitentiary or the poor house.” I believe that this statement is very true. It is our responsibility to ensure ourselves happy lives, and it must be done responsibly.

“ A lot of blessings are taken for granted in this country.”

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

}

Did you take the SAT or the ACT? Which one do you think is more indicative of college performance? Why? by michelle fidelia

Christian O’Neal, sophomore in mechanical engineering “Neither test is indicative of college performance because I don’t think four years of highschool should be put into one test.”

Stimulus for your pocket

T

he recent Hillsborough Street project has been a long and arduous improvement for residents and students in the N.C. State area. When it comes to a close on September 25, there will be two roundabouts, safer pedestrian walkw ay s a nd more aesEmily Kelly thetically Staff Columnist pleasing developments. However, some students are questioning how necessary these improvements were. The millions of dollars that went into this project were used in one of the worst times this economy has seen since the Carter era. Just like the Rally 4 Talley project that Student Government launched last year, this is a necessary project at an unnecessary time. The roundabouts, the new brick on North Campus and the beautification of the sidewalks and businesses looks great, but the larger question is, if spending large amounts of money in a recovering economy really a smart move. You could make the argument that this project created jobs, but only for a short period of time. “If we really want to see a true creation of jobs, we bring in large companies like the next Microsoft,” said

Allen Coin, a junior in English and philosophy. When you are in a time of instability, you want to create security and tangible incentives that people feel confident about. You don’t make money by spending it, you make money by saving it. Pouring in money from the government sounds like a great plan, and it worked during the Progressive movement in the Great Depression. But we’re not in a Depression, we’re in a Recession. The government, whether State or Federal, gets their money f rom you. You payed the bill in taxes. Basically, you’re stimulating your own pocket. The plan is not completely incompetent, it makes sense to try and stimulate the economy by shocking it back into place. At this point, we’ve spent enough. If you create tax cuts instead of tax incentives, and give secure jobs instead of temporary ones, people gain money. If people have money, they will feel more comfortable spending money, thus you have stimulated your economy. Of course, it is not as simple as this, but it is a start. Another aspect is that if people have more money to spend, they also have more money to save. Investing in your school, putting some away for a rainy day or saving for retirement

Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins

News Editor Nathan Hardin

Sports Editor Tyler Everett

Photo Editor Sarah Tudor

news@technicianonline.com

sports@technicianonline.com

photo@technicianonline.com

Managing Editor Biko Tushinde

Page 2 Editor Alanna Howard

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

Viewpoint Editor

Advertising Manager Andrea Mason advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

Features Editor Laura Wilkinson features@technicianonline.com

Design Editor design@technicianonline.com

is a smart and efficient way people choose to store their hard-earned dollars. Investing is another great way to stimulate businesses because now you have confident shareholders who will invest in small businesses and emerging companies with hopes of raising their share. This plan is not just relevant to parents, it is relevant to students, too. Students who benefit from the optimism of making more money when they graduate and ma king or contributing more while in school will spend money on t he bu sinesses on Hi l lsborough St reet. It will also open up downtown Raleigh, which is a great and studentfriendly area of town that hosts hundreds of events each year, to student spending. In essence, st i mu lating your pocket ultimately comes from wisely saving and spending your money, but timing can be everything. The Hillsborough Street renovation was great, but it was a temporary fix. The local economy will need more to help student feel more confident spending money.

“If people have money, they will feel more comfortable spending money.”

editor@technicianonline.com

managingeditor@technicianonline.com

in your words

Delana Doan freshman, FYC

“Neither of the tests indicate college performance, especially the SAT, because it doesn’t actually cover your personal knowledge. It is more strategy than brain power.” Grant Matthews freshman, FYC

“If you didn’t practice, then its definitely indicative of your college performance.” Mikayla Craig freshman, landscape architecture

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features CAMPUS & CAPITAL

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2010 • PAGE 5

Ludacris packs Reynolds for a sold-out concert Hosted by the Air Force Reserve and the Union Activities Board, the free concert helped raise money for Stop Hunger Now. Nasir Khatri Staff Writer

After months of effort and dedication put forth by the Union Activities Board and the Air Force Reserve, Ludacris performed to a sold-out audience Friday night. The free event, held in Reynolds Coliseum, was hosted by the UAB and the AFR, along with several co-sponsors, and helped raise funds for Stop Hunger Now, a non-profit organization dedicated to ending starvation and hunger around the globe. UAB volunteers set up a stand outside the coliseum in an effort to educate others about the cause and to collect donations. Before the concert began, the entrance line circled the entire garden area behind Talley Student Center to the entrance to the Campus Bookstore, all the way from the entrance of Reynolds, with people starting to line up as early as 6 p.m. Haroon Tariq, a senior in biochemistry, yelled the Wolfpack chant along with his fellow concert-goers outside the coliseum. “I think it’s awesome how Ludacris is here at N.C. State. I know we’ve had celebrities perform on

campus before, but this is something completely different. Ludacris is by far the most popular celebrity we’ve brought here,” Tariq said while waiting in line. According to Bobby Fitzjohn, director of the UAB, “the show was completely sold out with all 7,000 tickets being sold. Also, what’s more great about that is that over half the tickets were sold within the first day of sales.” Scott Nedvesky, a sophomore in software engineering, stood in line the day the tickets came on sale to make sure he wouldn’t miss out on this great opportunity. “I’ve listened to Ludacris songs for years now and I’ve seen a ton of his music videos, but I’m positive that this concert is going to be like nothing I’ve seen or heard of his before,” Nedvesky said after getting his ticket at Talley Student Center. After the concert Friday, Nedvesky confirmed his prediction about the event. “Wow. I will never forget this concert. It’s not every day you get to see such a world famous celebrity right in front of you, but that’s exactly how it was for each and every one of us at the concert,” Nedvesky said. “This was by far the coolest thing the UAB has put on that I’ve been to.” All this was due to the hard work put forth by the students and faculty in the AFR and UAB. Though the program went smoothly and according to plan,

it took months of preparation. Fitzjohn said the concept of a Ludacris concert on campus was presented to him and the UAB executives by the Air Force Reserve. “The AFR had planned a nation-wide promotional campaign and had booked Ludacris for all 10 of their shows. They asked us if we would like to participate in their campaign sometime in July and — obviously — we accepted,” Fitzjohn said. “The Air Force Reserve booked the event but we were responsible for the rest of the work.” Fitzjohn also said the UAB ran into some problems when they tried to book a venue toward the end of the summer. “As soon as we confirmed Ludacris with the AFR, we started negotiating with the managers at Reynolds to try to book it. That was pretty tough because the schedule for the volleyball team wasn’t released yet so they weren’t sure if there was going to be a conflict. Thankfully, though, we were able to get Reynolds for that night,” Fitzjohn said. “This saved us a lot of money, considering we used a venue on campus, and a lot more time we would’ve lost trying to negotiate with offcampus venues.” Fitzjohn said the UAB had to arrange $30,000, which was going to be the production cost. “Although this seems like a lot,

LUDA continued page 5

MARISA AKERS/TECHNICIAN

Chris Sullivan, a freshman in sports management, cheers as Ludacris performs in Reynolds Coliseum. The concert was sponsored by the Union Activities Board and the Air Force Reserve, and UAB encouraged attendees to donate $5 to Stop Hunger Now.

Haitian Celebration uses various art forms to engage students The Resurrection Dance Theater aims to heal disaster wounds with passion, positive thinking and music, while the Craft Center teaches students how to make a Haitian petwo drum as part of the Haitian Celebration.  Isabella Vigilante & Laura Wilkinson Staff Writer & Features Editor

Resurrection Dance Theater, named for the troupe’s mission: to “lift up the St. Joseph Family from the rubble,” performed in Talley Student Center’s Stewart Theater Friday night to a packed auditorium. The troupe is comprised of 10 former children of the streets of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, taken in by the St. Joseph Family, a school for orphaned and disenfranchised Haitian youth. Their Friday night program consisted of eight performances which included drama, dance and rollicking, traditional Haitian drumming. Most of the numbers had powerful and serious themes, including those of triumphing over adversity and of reclaiming freedom — slavery is a problem in Haiti to this day — and of finding self-worth. Serena Murison, a freshman in Spanish, said she enjoyed the performance. “I thought it was good and I think they portrayed life in Haiti excellently,” Murison said. Julia Belcher, a freshman in nutrition science, was also a fan of the group and of one performer in particular. “I love Didi!” Belcher said. Didi is the group’s youngest performer, at the age of 10. However, he had a definitive presence in the show overall, performing in all of the group numbers and in a solo dance, to Michael Jackson’s “Beat It.”   Cheryl Proctor, a board member of Hearts with Haiti, the Cincinnati-based nonprofit with a Raleigh-based planning and development office, spoke during the show, and became so admittedly emotional that she choked up.  After the show in the lobby of Stewart Theater, Proctor commented on the dancers’ level of communion and connection with the audience.  “It was so engaging. These

guys have such a way of drawing you in. I’ve known them for 12 years and watched them grow up, and I’ve seen their wonderful hopes and dreams for the future,” Proctor said. “I love them and I have seen them so many times, and every time it evolves, it changes. It’s great.”  Though the St. Joseph Family school started 25 years ago, they suffered huge setbacks after the January earthquake in Haiti, and were for several nerve-wracking days unsure of the whereabouts of or the wellbeing of certain members of the dance troupe. Fortunately, none of the children or staff of the school were killed or seriously injured.  Walnes, one of the dancers, spoke after the show of the restorative and life-changing powers of his craft.   “We all come from rough backgrounds, from the streets. We have been neglected. Art is something very meaningful to us. It plays such a huge part in our lives. It is a way for us to live,” Walnes said. Haitian Drum Making Also part of the Haitian Celebration was a Craft Center class that taught students how to make their own drum. Tony Allen, a senior in physics and the drum-making instructor, said people at the Craft Center knew him as the guy who made drums before George Thomas, the director of the Craft Center, approached him about teaching a class as part of the Haitian Celebration activities. “I play drums so I just looked online and saw how they were made. There’s a Haitian drum called the petwo drum and they use it in some ceremonies,” Allen said. “Originally, they made it by hollowing out a log from a tree; they drill a hole, set it over a fire and hollow the wood out. We built drums similar to that except we used modern tools.” The workshop began Friday and students took their completed drums home Sunday afternoon. “Friday we cut staves. It’s like assembling a barrel — so you take planks of wood, you cut them at an angle so they fit together and depending on how many staves you have you cut them circularly. I taught them how to stabilize them and how to cut them,” Allen said. “We put the drums together and had a little bit of time left over so I taught them how to taper the

drums.” Saturday, Allen said the group shaved the edges off the wood to make the drum round. “It was a really long process, so every 45 minutes we would take a break and I told them how to make a snare drum, how to make the rope stuff. It took [Saturday] and [Sunday] to show them how to do the ropes,” Allen said. “[Sunday] we came in and stained the drums and put the heads on them.” Kevin Spivey, a sophomore in aerospace engineering, said he had wanted to make a hand drum for a while. “I’m not good with the actual drum set that requires the drum sticks, so I wanted to have one of these [drums]. But looking online they cost so much money. I’ve seen some on eBay that cost $200-$300,” Spivey said. “This class was $41 and I got to make it myself. It was too good an opportunity to pass up.” Spivey said the work was not very difficult, just tedious. “It takes time, it takes patience, especially when you have to shave the wood and make it into a circle. Other than that, it’s every bit worth the time and the effort you put into it,” Spivey said. “The rest of it was easy and I really liked the challenge of spending hours of time getting it just right. That was my favorite part — trying to form it how I wanted it.” Spivey said when he finishes his drum he plans to carve a cross and a Bible verse on the side to personalize it. Erin McKenney, a master’s student in animal nutrition, said the drum-making workshop was one of two events she was interested in at the Craft Center. “It’s a great, hands-on experience. It’s been very repetitive, so when you’re planing the entire drum a lot of it is figuring out the most ergonomic way to hold your body to do this process that you’re going to do for two hours to get your drum to a perfect stance or smoothness,” McKenney said. “You’re kind of learning about yourself in the process of making your drum and it gives you something to concentrate on besides schoolwork, which is really great and really cathartic.” McKenney said she was making her drum to give to her brother as a gift. “I wanted to make sure this

was a good template because I wanted to make a drum for my brother, either for his birthday or for Christmas. So a lot of it was just making [the drum] my own,” McKenney said. “I love that deep, rich mahogany stain, but at the same time I’m making sure it’s not too ornate or weird that I could definitely replicate this.” Stephen Dozier, a sophomore in biological sciences, said he has been drumming for about eight years and has always wondered how to make the type of drum featured at the workshop. “You get to pick up these miraculous things and you wonder ‘how do they get there?’ I own a Djembe, which is something similar to what we’re making, but I’ve always wanted to make one,” Dozier said. “My sister went to Ghana on a study abroad trip and she bought me [a Djembe] that they had made over there for about $10, which they retail here for about $60. It’s quite an investment.” Dozier said he does not own a drum on campus and the workshop was a great opportunity for him to now only own a drum on campus, but to have made it himself. “It’s a learning process and it was actually really fun. The only part that wasn’t that fun was carving it down and making it more into a sloped, tapering, shell thing,” Dozier said. “Tapering it was the hardest part because it was a day’s process and it was extremely physically exerting, but I would say rewarding in the end. If it sounds good, then it was rewarding; if it doesn’t sound good then it might not be as rewarding.” Dozier said that while he did personalize his drum, it was originally on accident. “I put nicks at the bottom. Initially it was unintentional, but I ran with it and it makes a pretty cool design,” Dozier said. “We used an old tablecloth that had glossy wax on it and so [the canvas top] looks very psychedelic.” Craft Center Director George Thomas said there will be another drum making workshop offered to the general public during the spring semester.

LEE DANIELLO./TECHNICIAN

Resurrection from the Rubble, a performance by the Resurrection Dance Thearer of Haiti, features a short dance sequences, called Freedom Reclaimed, in which Gerald frantically frees himself from white chains. This section of the show warmed many hearts of the audience, as Gerald tried to reclaim his freedom.

Infinite Possibilities are within your REACH. internationalpaper.com/careers Imagine working for an innovative organization that will take you from a new grad to a manufacturing management professional. Then make it happen with International Paper’s REACH engineering program. A global leader in paper and packaging products, we touch your life every day with our extensive products used in practically every market. Focused on growth and bold ideas, we’re looking for like-minded engineers with degrees in:

Chemical, Mechanical, Environmental or Electrical Engineering, or Pulp and Paper Science Right from the start, you’ll experience challenging work and learn from industry experts about the skills, processes, equipment, and tools you’ll need to succeed. We will be on campus: • • • •

September 22 – TAPPI pre-night dinner September 23-24 – Pulp & Paper school interviews October 5-6 – Career Fair October 7 – Career Center Interviews

Contact the Career Services Center to register, email your resume to MillCollegeRecruit@ipaper.com or stop by our booth. EOE, M/F/D/V

© 2010 NAS (Media: delete copyright notice)

Alloy Media & Marketing - NC state 3.39” x 5” B&W


Features CAMPUS & CAPITAL

PAGE 6 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2010

TECHNICIAN LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Kneeling on Fayetteville Street, Meredith Laxton, a junior in art and design, and Rachel Sheffield, a junior in art applications, draw with chalk the scales on a mermaid as part of the SPARKCon street art contest Friday, Sept. 17, 2010. Laxton said it was “supposed to be the last scene of ‘The Little Mermaid,’ the fairy tale, when she turns into sea foam.” Laxton and Sheffield have been partners for the contest the past three years. All of their designs so far have had a theme of water. They won honorable mention for their design.

JOSH BIELICK/TECHNICIAN

Fayetteville Street fills with color as artists paint their assigned squares with brightly colored pastels Sep. 18, 2010. The street is closed for Raleigh’s 5th annual SPARKcon, a three-day artist and creative showcase.

SPARKcon lights up local art scene

T

he fifth annual SPARKcon brought thousands of artists, volunteers and attendees to Raleigh over the weekend to showcase local talent in the areas of art, music, film, fashion, design, dance and more. Hosted by the Visual Art Exchange, a Raleigh non-profit group who supports artists and promotes art in the Raleigh community, SPARKcon featured many works by University students.

LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Sam Holmes, a senior in industrial design, juggles pins as part of CircusSpark Saturday on Fayetteville Street. Holmes heard about SparkCon from a design letter, his roommates and his family. “I like circus[Spark],” Holmes said, “I like to pick up and juggle stuff.”

LUDA

continued from page 5

it’s actually a very small price to pay for such a big superstar to perform on campus,” Fitzjohn said. Since the AFR paid

for Ludacris’ booking costs, the UAB was only responsible for “the venue, production and ticketing.” They also contacted several large organizations across campus in an attempt to get cosponsors to lessen the financial burden.

FIVE

DOLLARS

NCSU students pay only $5 for ARTS NC STATE performances

this week Nearly Lear

Sat, Sept 25 at 8pm Sun, Sept 26 at 2pm Titmus Theatre (Thompson Hall) Who knew that the great and tragic story of King Lear could be… a comedy? Seen through the eyes of Lear’s devoted clown, Norris, the story becomes not only poignant and tragic, but also mischievous, tender and achingly funny.

The 2nd NC State Pinhole Camera Challenge Sat, Sept 25, 9:30am-4pm

The Crafts Center challenges you to capture the campus through the eye of a pinhole camera. Registration deadline is Thur, Sept 23 ($2 entry fee). $100 prize! See full details at ncsu.edu/crafts.

Gregg Museum of Art & Design exhibitions:

• Sequence of Impressions: The Work of Douglas Gorsline (thru Oct 2) • Southern Roots of Mid-Century Modern (thru Dec 18)

The Crafts Center exhibitions:

• Quilting IS Art (thru Oct 11) • In Search of a State Treasure (thru Oct 19)

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd floor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts

Exhibitions are always FREE.

KAYU HO/TECHNICIAN

FashionSpark was held at the City Plaza Friday night. Local designers volunteered for the fashion show. Leigh Hawkins, a senior in textile technology, presented work for the designers of Raleigh Denim.

“With the cost of booking Lifehouse for Friday Fest, we needed all the monetary help we could get so we could continue to have events throughout the school year,” Fitzjohn said. Considering the popularity of the artist and the event, Fitzjohn took this concert as an opportunity to promote a humanitarian cause. Because the experience was going to be completely free to all the concert-goers, the director estimated that at least 5,000 of the concert goers would be willing to donate $5, for a grand total of at least $25,000 raised for the Stop Hunger Now campaign. Shafiq Zaib, a junior in biological sciences, said he was impressed by the way the UAB saw the concert as a charity opportunity. “It’s good to know that people are donating for a good cause even though the concert was free,” Zaib said. “There are billions of people starving to death around this world and it feels good knowing that such a big organization at N.C. State is doing something to help the situation.”

PARTIAL SETLIST • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Southern Fried Intro Blueberry Yum Yum What’s Your Fantasy Ho Roll Out Area Codes Move B**** Stand Up Pimpin’ All Over the World Money Maker One More Drink How Low My Chick Bad Sex Room Act a Fool Gold Digger COMPILED BY LAURA WILKINSON

MARISA AKERS/TECHNICIAN

Ludacris performs for a packed Reynolds Coliseum Friday, Sept. 17, 2010. Over 3,600 free tickets were handed out to students, faculty and staff.


Sports

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2010 • PAGE 7

VBALL

FOOTBALL

are going to work their butts off to beat us.” Senior Jana Angel agreed with her teammate’s assessment of the disappointing loss and said it was a good learning experience for the young team. “It was a good learning experience for us,” Angel said. “We let our level of play drop. We shouldn’t have lost to a team like Campbell. We need to be locked in mentally, and if we’re not, then games like that are going to happen to us. But if we come in with a purpose, we’ll be successful.” State rebounded from the loss in the final match of the tournament, beating Elon in straight sets by scores of 2624, 25-16, and 29-27. The victory against Elon capped off the Pack ’s non-conference schedule. The team will begin conference play against rival North Carolina on Tuesday in Reynold’s Coliseum at 7 p.m. The pack will be looking to duplicate the result from last year’s meeting when it won 3-2 on Senior Day. “Everyone’s thrilled to play North Carolina for our first game in conference,” Angel

“The freshmen are getting better,” O’Brien said. “Somet i mes f resh men make mistakes but they overcome it with their enthusiasm and athleticism. So as they continue to play, they will continue to get better.” And O’Brien understands that in special teams more so than in any other facets of the game, if you are more athletic than your man and are giving it maximum effort, you can be successful. And that seems to be the case for this unit so far. “Special teams are a lot about individual efforts and

continued from page 8

continued from page 8

XC

continued from page 8

race,” Hoer said. “You always have stuff to work on so I definitely have to keep training hard.” Even with Hoer’s recordbreaking performance, Richmond took first in the women’s with 27 points. N.C. State followed with 33 points, and East Carolina finished third with 68

LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

points. Henes said times for the Wolfpack women were still pretty good even without 2009 All-American Emily Pritt and Jordan Jenkin. “If you look at times in history this is actually pretty good,” Henes said. “We held quite a few people out today. We need to have Emily Pritt back in, we need to have Jordan Jenkins, and I actually think Davis, another freshman will probably

POLICY

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

DEADLINES

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

back Taylor Gentry. Gentry tallied 403 special teams snaps in the past two years and led all players with 21 tackles on special teams last season. Because of Gentry’s resume and abilities, he seems to be the unquestioned leader of the unit. “Gentry is a tough guy,” Amerson said. “He fires me up and gets my adrenaline pumping on kickoffs and it’s a pleasure to be right beside him on kickoffs.” But as good as the unit has looked compared to a season before, O’Brien knows it still has a ways to go. “We have to continue to work hard and get better,” O”Brien said. “We are better athletically on special teams than last year, we just have to continue getting better.”

Women’s soccer closes non-conference slate with second consecutive shutout

Junior mid-blocker Margaret Salata and senior setter Alex Smith jump to block a ball during the Morehead State match. Salata had a total of six blocks throughout the three sets. N.C. State beat Morehead State, 3 - 0.

said. “We’re looking for a lot of people to come out and support us. The win against [Carolina] last year was the

that’s more when individuals can show up and outwork the guy across from them,” O’Brien said. Amerson credits the improved coverage to the mentality the unit has going onto the field, knowing each one of them has the ability to make a play and is going down there to make it. “We look good,” Amerson said. “Everybody out there is having fun and it’s just a mentality thing that we have that everyone is going to go down there and make plays. Everyone on special teams thinks they are going to make plays and we do.” Along with these new freshmen, there has been a staple on the special teams units in the past two years in junior full-

Pack takes second 1-0 victory in as many games.

high note of our season and we’re trying to start that way this year.”

Staff Report State was outshot in Friday’s win over Old Dominion, but for the second time in as many games, notched a 1-0 victory. The Pack’s lone goal came in the 22nd minute, when sophomore Kara Blosser netted a header from junior Kristina Argiroff. T he women’s soccer team’s record now stands at 6-3, with all six victories coming in shutouts. The win gave coach Steve Springthorpe his team’s

go in next week. But the people who ran ran much faster here than they usually start on a hot day, so I think we are in a pretty good position going forward.” Following Hoer, the next three finishers were from Richmond. Wolfpack senior Kara McKenna was fifth with a time of 17:37.6, followed by sophomore Erin Mercer (17:37.8) and junior� Andie Cozzarelli (17:42.6).

Classifieds

first road win of the season in its second game away from Dail Soccer Field, as the Pack dropped the road opener against ECU Sept. 10. Goalkeeper Kim Kern has played all 60 minutes in three of her team’s shutout wins. The assist by Argiroff ties the junior for the team lead in that category. Argiroff is also tied for the team lead in goals and total points, with four apiece. Blosser’s goal gives her three on the year and has her tied for fourth in total points, with seven. With the team’s nine nonconference games behind it, the Pack now turns its attention to ACC play, which starts with a trip to Clemson

Thursday. State started strong outside league play in 2009, going 6-2-1, and has once again won six of its first nine. But ACC play was unkind to Springthorpe’s team in 2009, as it posted a 2-7-1 record in conference action. In his second year in Raleigh, Springthorpe and the Pack hope to parlay strong play out of conference into a higher finish in the ACC.

RATES

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit ­technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds

Announcements

EmploymEnt

Help Wanted

Special eventS

Help Wanted

Groundskeeper/odd jobs. flexible hours 15/20 hrs/week. salary based on experience. 781-7501.

Holy Trinity (2723 Clark Ave.) offers $1,000 scholarships to vocalists who can sing with our Chancel Choir. For more information or to schedule an audition, contact Director of Music Shannon Thomas at shanthom81@gmail.com

BARTENDERS ARE IN DEMAND! Earn $20-$35 per hour. 1 or 2 week classes & weekend classes. 100% job placement assistance. Raleigh’s bartending school. Have fun! Make money! Meet people! Ask about our FALL tuition rates and student discount. CALL NOW!! 919676-0774. www.cocktailmixer.com

Computer service technician needed.. Apple Service certification desirable. Send resume to Maria@digitzcomputers.com. Digitz. 3016 Hillsborough St, Raleigh, NC 27607

Sudoku Level:

1 2 3 4

By The

Extras needed to stand in the backgrounds for a major film production. Mepham Group Earn up to $200/ day Exp not Req. All looks needed! CAll 877-460-0657

Help Wanted

Hab Techs Needed!! Maxim Healthcare needs staff to work w/developmentally disabled clients in Wake Co. Flexible hours in afternoons, evenings and weekends. $9-$10/hr. Need own transportation. 919- 676-3118. Part-time Stock Associate Needed. Capel Rugs is looking for Stock Associate. Responsibilities include maintaining store appearance, receiving, display and packaging of a variety of area rugs and rug accessories. Must frequently lift and/or move up to 50 pounds and occasionally lift and/or move up to 70 pounds. Must have excellent customer service skills, be friendly, and organized. Weekend work is required. Please apply at Capel Rugs, 8000 Winchester Dr. Raleigh, NC 27612

Sudoku Level:

By The

Help Wanted The City of Raleigh Parks and Recreation Department are looking for motivated, enthusiastic staff for part time counselor positions are Brier Creek Community Center. Staff are needed Monday-Friday from 6:45-8:45 am and 3:30-6:30 pm. No nights or weekends. experience working with children is a plus. Please contact Cathering Worthington at 919-420-2342 or catherine.worthington@raleighnc.gov.

PART-TIME WORK $12.50/Appt, Flexible Schedules, Great Resume’ Builder, conditions apply customer sales/service no experience necessary 919-788-9020 OR www.workforstudents.com PARTY RENTAL JOBS 1) Delivery / setup 2) Dish room

Real estate ApArtments For rent NCSU- Wolfline large 2BD/2BA apartment. Gorman/Ligon St. W/D in unit. Wolfline or walk. Offstreet parking. $625/mo. per apartment. www. okellyapartments.com. Call 805- 0190.

Wanted: Mature college student, prefer junior or senior. odd jobs in medical office. Flexible hours, approximately 5-10hrs/wk. jss@veincareofnc.com

Clean dmv record needed Flexible hours Weekends & weekdays Near campus NCSU students only Smoke Free 833-9743 Retired physician seeks office help. Flexible hours. Computer skills and typing required. Organized self-starter with integrity and sense of humor desired. $9 Mepham Group per hour. 828-2245

Work one on one w/children w/disabilities. part time evenings and/or weekends. we will train. $9-14 p/h. for more info or application go to www.asmallmiracleinc.com.

1 2 3 4

FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 20, 2010

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

9/20/10

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2010 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Solution to Friday’s puzzle

5/1/10

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2010 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

indie rock / hip-hop / dance / electronica / metal / folk / post rock / local / soul / a capella

ACROSS 1 Persian Gulf emirate 6 Aptly named novelist 11 Check for drinks 14 Rocket scientist Wernher von __ 15 Use for dinner, as dishes 16 Realm from 8001806: Abbr. 17 Jazzy O’Day 18 On the __: broken 19 Approx. landing hr. 20 Daydreaming 23 More intimate 25 __-mutuel: type of betting 26 Funny Costello 27 Abel’s slayer 30 Tsar or emperor 32 It follows the overture 34 Pressed for time 36 Failing to grasp a key element 41 Conceived of 42 IRS agent 43 What ballerinas dance on 46 Slangy agreement 48 HVAC measure 49 Utah city near Provo 50 Uproar 52 Not expected back at work until tomorrow 58 Econ. yardstick 59 Nebraska city 60 Tee shot 63 Mauna __ 64 Lees competitor 65 Ocean ship 66 Bigger picture: Abbr. 67 Kosher deli offering 68 Sharp-eyed bird DOWN 1 Trade name abbr. 2 Caterer’s vessel 3 Controversial financial rescues 4 Cars

9/20/10

By Samantha Wine

5 “Be right there!” 6 Get a better int. rate, probably 7 Make on the job 8 Working busily 9 “The lady __ protest too much”: “Hamlet” 10 Automaker Ferrari 11 Store to “fall into,” in old ads 12 Prefix with scopic 13 “Scram!” 21 New employee 22 End result 23 Littleneck, e.g. 24 Centers of activity 28 Actress Swenson 29 Smartly dressed 30 Obstetrician’s calculation 31 Psychic’s asset, for short 33 “Surely I’m not the only one?!” 35 South Korea’s first president 37 Altar promise 38 “Drinks are on yours truly”

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

Lookin’ for the answer key? VISIT TECHNICIANONLINE.COM

(c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

39 MLB league 40 Letter-shaped fastener 43 Flip back and forth, as an onoff switch 44 Like some denim patches 45 Letter-writing friend 47 Circular gridiron gathering

9/20/10

51 “West Side Story” heroine 53 Music genre that experienced a ’50s-’60s revival 54 Sign of the future 55 Sitarist Shankar 56 That’s partner 57 Corned beef dish 61 Commercial prefix with -cro 62 Prior to


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 5 days until the football team opens ACC play against Georgia Tech

INSIDE

• A continuation of the feature on special teams

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2010

FOOTBALL

Special teams coverage unit has new look

Kickoff time for Georgia Tech game set for noon

Fresh faces on kickoff and punt teams have made Pack more well-rounded. Taylor Barbour

For the second week in a row, the N.C. State football team will play in front of a nationally televised audience as it opens up ACC play against Georgia Tech Saturday at noon. The game at Bobby Dodd stadium will be broadcast by ESPN. The Wolfpack is 3-0 for the first time since 2002, when it opened up the season with a 9-0 record. The Yellow Jackets are fresh off a 30-24 win against North Carolina and will be seeking their second straight conference victory.

Deputy Sports Editor

A lot of things did not go right last season for the Wolfpack. The defense struggled mightily to stop a rushing or passing attack, the special teams had problems on punt and kickoff coverage, and all of these things led to the Pack finishing its season with a disappointing record of just 5-7, well below expectations. But what a difference a year makes. The Pack is now sitting at 3-0 on the season after a hot start many thought couldn’t happen, and has a defense that has looked dominant at times, as well as a special teams unit that looks like a completely different group than last season. This year’s unit, unlike head coach Tom O’Brien’s special teams packages over the past few years, is full of athletes and players focused on special teams. Three of these athletes are true freshmen David Amerson, Dontae Johnson and D.J. Greene, all of who came in and made the roster out of camp in large part due to their abilities to play special teams. “A lot of the freshman have come in and played really hard,” redshirt sophomore safety Earl Wolff said. “D.J. Green, Donte and David Am-

SOURCE: WRAL SPORTS

Men’s golf in second place at Golfweek’s Conference Challenge Led by senior Brandon Detweiler’s three-under par (69) first round, the men’s golf team shot a team score of 283 to move into second place at Golfweek’s Conference Challenge in Burlington, Iowa. Freshman Albin Choi followed up his collegiate debut last week by shooting a two-under par (70). Joining Detweiler and Choi underpar was sophomore Mitchell Sutton with a one-under par (71). Action continues today as the Wolfpack aim to catch host Iowa, who shot a team score of 268 in Sunday’s first round. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Thomson, Paez claim victories at Duke Nike Fab Four The men’s tennis team put together a strong showing at the Duke Nike Fab Four, as sophomores Dave Thomson and Rafael Paez each took home victories. Thomson easily beat North Carolina Central’s Alejandro Espitia (6-1, 6-1) while Paez beat Espitia’s teammate Trey Chatman (6-0, 6-2). Junior Dominic Hodgson suffered a loss at the hands of Wake Forest’s Tripp Carleton (6-2, 6-2). Redshirt junior Julian Sullivan finished in eightplace in section A after losing to East Tennessee State’s Grega Teraz (6-2, 6-4). The Wolfpack will continue its fall season this weekend at the UVA Plus One tournament in Charlottesville, Va.

Su

M

T

W

Th

F

Sa

1

2

3

4 11

5

6

7

8

9

10

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Today MEN’S GOLF @ GOLFWEEK’S CONFERENCE CHALLENGE Burlington, Iowa, All Day

Standings

mistakes, one of those being against UCF two weeks ago, when they allowed a 93-yard kick return.

FOOTBALL continued page 7

Cross country wins at seasonopening Wolfpack Invite

Volleyball upends UNC-Wilmington, Elon

Men’s team finishes first, women second in seasonopener.

Wolfpack finishes nonconference schedule on high note.

On Friday, the men’s and women’s cross countr y teams opened their seasons with first and second place finishes at the Wolfpack Invite. Fifth-year senior Sandy Roberts finished first for the men’s team, followed by a pack of five N.C. State runners. Roberts, with a time of 15:11.4, was followed by sophomore Brian Himelright (15:11.7), freshman Andrew Colley (12.12), sophomore Matt Sonnenfeldt (15:12.3), junior Ryan Hill (15:12.7), and sophomore Lewis McPherson (15:21.2). Sonnenfeldt and Hill ran unattached, which allowed East Carolina’s Zack Montijo to ruin the Pack’s chance at a perfect score. State finished with 16 points, followed by East Carolina with 47 points, Virginia Wesleyan with 97

September 2010

thusiasm and energy, is what has helped them come in and immediately earn playing time. But he is quick to mention that because they are freshmen, they lack experience and they make

VOLLEYBALL

Staff Writer

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE

erson came in wanting to play and made the team on special teams, so their ability to do that helps a lot.” O’Brien believes the way those freshmen play, with such a high level of en-

CROSS COUNTRY

Samantha Collier

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

ALEX CANOUTAS/TECHNICIAN

Junior fullback Taylor Gentry dives over a Cincinnati defenseman into the end zone, scoring the final touchdown for N.C. State, leaving the score 30-7 in the middle of the fourth quarter. Gentry had three receptions for 20 yards in the game.

points, and Winston-Salem lead, setting a record time of 17:00.8 and winning the State with 109 points. “We were a little tired from women’s race. “We were pretty sure the training we are doing but this is the first good start for us from workouts that she was as a team,” Roberts said. “Win- really fit and we really conning wasn’t important, it was trolled the first half of this that we had to group together, race too,” women’s coach work the whole 5k, and that is Laurie Henes said. “So for going to set us up for the rest her to run that fast after focusing of the season on tempo really nicely.” the f irst With temha lf of peratures in the course the 90’s, times is rea l ly were slower impresthis year than sive. She last year. has been “I told the doing evg uys to be real conser- Fifth-year senior Sandy Roberts erything we have vative,” men’s coach Rollie Geiger said. “It is asked her to do and she has a miserable day out here. It is had a great preseason, but just awful hot. They were out 15 that is still really impresseconds slower at the mile than sive.” Surprised by her margin last year, and we knew that was of victory, Hoer said she is going to happen.” Despite the heat, 15 of the top proud of her finish, but that 20 men’s finishers were from doesn’t mean that she is going to slow down. N.C. State. “We came into this race The men were not the only ones to have top performanc- prepared, but you can neves. True freshman Laura Hoer er expect anything from a blew the competition out of the water with a 29.5-second XC continued page 7

“Winning wasn’t important, it was that we had to group together.”

Tucker Frazier Deputy Sports Editor

The N.C. State volleyball team took another step in its rebuilding process by winning two of its three matches over the weekend at the UNCW Hilton Garden Inn Beach Bash. First-year coach Bryan Bunn and Co. claimed victories over UNCW and Elon, but fell to Campbell. Although the Pack won two matches to push its record to 10-2, compared to 6-6 at this time last season, junior libero Kelly Wood said the team stuck together despite its inconsistent play. “Overall, we kind of struggled at times this weekend, but we did a good job of staying together as a team,” Wood said. “We didn’t bicker with one another. We all kept a good attitude and played for each other, which is definitely one of our goals. “It shows a lot about our team’s character t hat we

weren’t having our best weekend, but we stuck together as a team and pushed through it.” State got off to a hot start in the tournament by dominating UNCW in three sets, winning 25-22, 25-17, and 25-19. Junior Luciana Schafer paced the Pack on both offense and defense, finishing the contest with nine kills and 11 digs. Sophomore Megan Cyr, a transfer from Colorado, led State in assists for the tenth time this season, finishing with 27 against the Seahawks. The Pack stumbled in its next match against Campbell, who came into the match with a 3-10 record, losing in four sets 25-22, 22-25, 27-25, and 25-14. The loss to the Camels served as an eye-opener for the Wolfpack, according to Wood. “It was very disappointing,” Wood said. “We were devastated to lose to Campbell because they are definitely not at our level. We needed one of those games to realize that people are going to want to beat us because we’re a big instate school. [The Campbell] game showed us that people

VBALL continued page 7

Randy Woodson

Kelly Hook Student Body President

Tommy Anderson

Mark Thomas

Julius Hodge

Debra Morgan

Tyler Everett

Tucker Frazier

Sean Klemm

Chancellor

Deputy sports editor

Deputy sports editor

26-4 T-2nd

27-3 1st

24-6 T-7th

25-5 6th

26-4 T-2nd

23-7 10th

24-6 T-7th

24-6 T-7th

26-4 T-2nd

17-3 T-2nd

WKNC General Manager

Co-host of 620 The Buzz’s “The Insiders”

Former Wolfpack basketball star

WRAL TV anchor

Sports editor

Deputy sports editor

Taylor Barbour

Cincinnati at NCSU

NC State

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

No. 12 Arkansas at Georgia

Arkansas

 Arkansas

Arkansas

Georgia

Arkansas

Arkansas

Arkansas

Arkansas

Arkansas

Arkansas

Georgia Tech at UNC

UNC

Georgia Tech

UNC

Georgia Tech

UNC

UNC

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

UNC

Georgia Tech

ECU at Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

ECU

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Florida

 Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Wisconsin

 Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Auburn

Auburn

Auburn

Auburn

Auburn

Auburn

Auburn

Clemson

Auburn

Auburn

Iowa

 Iowa

Iowa

Arizona

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Maryland

 West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

Florida State

Florida State

BYU

Florida State

Florida State

Florida State

Florida State

Florida State

Florida State

Florida State

No. 10 Florida at Tennessee Arizona State at No. 11 Wisconsin Clemson at No. 16 Auburn No. 9 Iowa at No. 24 Arizona Maryland at No. 21 West Virginia BYU at Florida State


Technician September 20 2010