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TECHNICIAN          

monday september

13 2010

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Dogs, owners invade downtown for Dog Olympics The 19th annual Dog Olympics, hosted by the College of Veterinary Medicine, were held Saturday in Moore Square. Aaron Andersen Correspondent

LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Chancellor Randy Woodson looks at his Dog Olympics T-shirt with his wife, Susan Woodson and their two dogs, Mr. Beasley and Georgia, before judging the “Look-a-like” contest. The Dog Olympics has been held every year for the past 19 years by the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Keith Pickens has been a Raleigh police officer for 14 years. The past four years of that has been shared with his K-9 partner, Phantom, a four-year-old black German shepherd. “He’s with me 24/7,” Pickens said. Pickens’s and Phantom’s K-9 demonstration was just one of many events going on Saturday in Moore Square during the 19th annual Dog Olympics. Hosted by N.C. State’s College of Veterinary Medicine, the event was held to raise money for rescue organizations around North Carolina. In Pickens’s demonstration with Phantom, he showed the audience how well the dog obeys commands. Speaking in Dutch, Pickens instructed Phantom to stay by his side as he walked around the middle of the park, explaining how the orders work. “Speaking in Dutch to the dogs makes it harder for other people to try and command the dogs,” Pickens said. Other than the demonstrations given by Pickens, there were 10 organizations represented, including the

Carolina Border Collie Rescue, “2 allowed them to participate in one of Paws Up” and the Southern Siberian the many competitive events during Rescue. Laura Greene, the event or- the day. Some of these events included ganizer, said last year there were only the Look-A-Like contest, the Rollover eight organizations represented. Each Rover contest, the High Jump and the Frisbee Toss. of them received $300. Volunteer Kathleen McGinnis, a “We try to limit the number of rescue organizations represented so that first year student in CVM, said winmore [money] can be given to each,” ners of these contests were awarded gift certificates to a local pet store, Greene said. Demonstrations from the Ameri- Unleashed. The owners also got a picture of their dog can Kennel Club in the winner’s a nd “Pawsicircle as well as a tive Pooches,” small medal for a g roup t h at their dog. supports using Raff le tickets only positive recould a lso be inforcement in bought for $1 dog training, also Laura Greene, event organizer each or six tickgave demonstraets for $5. The tions. The AKC, a national group who prizes for the raffle ranged from oris responsible for keeping records of ganic pet food to small pet toys. Chancellor Randy Woodson made purebred dogs’ genealogical history, held two agility demonstrations that an appearance as a judge for the Lookshowed a small portion of what a pro- A-Like contest. This contest pitted fessional agility course for dogs would three owner/dog pairs against each be like. It involved having dogs jump other to see which dog looked the over hurdles, crawl through tunnels most like their owner. Eva Millar and her Bichon Frise, and run around poles. The AKC also holds national competitions for sporting and herding dogs, show dogs and OLYMPICS continued page 5 obedience training. Admission to the Dog Olympics was $1 for spectators and $7 for dogs. The admission fee for the dogs

“It really shows off the special human-animal bond.”

Operation Smile Club helps funds surgeries for underprivileged

Collapsed jogger in stable condition

International charity organization Operation Smile provides non-profit surgeries for cleft lip and palate.

Allison Saito

Chelsey Francis

Spencer Shell is recovering well, but doctors have not determined underlying cause of collapse.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Staff Writer

Contact: Josh Wall Email: jtwall2@ncsu.edu Operation Smile website: operationsmile.org

Spencer Shell, the student who collapsed in front of Harris Field on Thursday, Sept. 2, has been moved from the Intensive Care Unit and is in stable condition. Koby Shell, Spencer’s mother, said he was transferred into a regular hospital room at Rex Hospital. “He came to his regular room yesterday,” Koby Shell said. “He’s doing awesome. He is not hooked up to anything,” Shell said. “He is walking the halls right now. He is feeling good and wanted to go to the courtyard.” According to a website set up for Shell, Shell’s recovery has been astonishing. “I ran into [the first emergency room doctor to see Spencer] in the hall. She was astonished at his progress and said when he first got to the ER she did not think he was going to make it,” Koby Shell wrote in the journal of Shell’s website. According to Spencer’s website, he suffered cardiac arrest and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. According to the National Institute of Health, ARDS is when capillaries leak too much fluid into the lungs, preventing oxygen absorption. “ARDS usually occurs in people

Deputy News Editor

Operation Smile Club is raising awareness, along with funds, for children around the world with cleft lip or cleft palate. Operation Smile, an international charity, was established in 1982, has a presence in over fifty countries and uses the funds internationally for underprivileged children’s surgeries. According to the Operation Smile website, over 200,000 children are born with severe a cleft condition each year. These cleft conditions often leave children unable to eat, speak, socialize or smile. Joshua Wall, president of the Operation Smile Club and a junior in history, said this is the first semester the club has been on its own. “Operation Smile Club was a part of the pre-health club in the past, but the decision was made for Operation Smile Club to be on its own. We don’t have an advisor for this. It’s just the students,” Wall said. Mackenzie Gibbons, a co-vice president of awareness and a freshman in biological sciences, said the club is

hoping for more student involvement this year. “I hope we can get more people involved this year,” Gibbons said. “It’s really a great cause and so rewarding to know you’re helping someone live a normal life.” Operation Smile Club is planning two fundraisers, according to Wall. “In the fall, we’re planning to go to businesses on Hillsborough Street to see if they will donate a percentage of their sales to the club for a week,” Wall said. “Then we’ll encourage people to go to these businesses, especially for that week.” The club is hoping to have the fundraiser sometime in October, but they are still planning, Wall said. “In the spring, we’re planning on having a run for Operation Smile,” Gibbons said. “This is our first year doing a run, so hopefully we will have a great turnout.” Operation Smile Club is planning on having the run in the middle of the spring semester.

SMILE continued page 3

BRENT KITCHEN/TECHNICIAN

Spencer Shell, a junior in political science, is put in an ambulance following his collapse on Dan Allen Drive Sept. 2. Shell went into cardiac arrest while jogging due to an Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Shell is in stable condition at Rex Hospital.

who are very ill with another disease or who have major injuries,” the NIH website says. Koby Shell said that they do not know what caused Spencer to develop ARDS. “We still don’t know why he collapsed. We are still waiting for his heart test next week,” Shell said. Although Spencer Shell is doing well, doctors have not said when he will be able to leave the hospital. Koby Shell said that they have “no clue” when he will be released. “It depends on how the heart test turns out,” Koby Shell said. “They will be monitoring him over the next few days.” Koby Shell explained that they are trying to prevent him from being overwhelmed.

For more information and updates, visit http://www.caringbridge.org/ visit/spencershell

“We are really trying to protect his emotional state,” Koby Shell said. “He’s still very confused about what happened to him, and he doesn’t remember going for a run. But, the doctors tell us that is normal.” “He hasn’t read Facebook yet,” Koby Shell said. On Shell’s website, Koby wrote, “Information overload is a concern.  Less is best right now, until he comes to grips with things.  According to Koby Shell, friends can send cards to Spencer Shell through a website run by Rex Health Care: http://www.rexhealth.com/patients_ and_visitors/greeting_cards/ .

Students celebrate Indian festival, traditions with Ganesh Chaturthi gathering The festival of the elephantheaded god was celebrated at Champion Court Condominiums this weekend. Pranay Deshpande Staff Writer

Lord Ganesha arrived at the University for one and a half days this year. Ganesh Chaturthi, a popular annual Indian festival normally celebrated in September, ranges from one and a half days to 21 days. The celebration revolves around a clay idol that is brought home and

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worshipped. The festival is celebrated to encourage social gatherings. Ganesha was considered to be lord of knowledge and prosperity. Idols range from six inches to over 25 feet. The idol is offered popular sweets made out of coconut and sugar called modaks. According to Saurabh Bengali, an event organizer and graduate student in computer science, more than 150 students were involved in the event this year. The immersion of the idol took place in Lake Raleigh on Sept. 12 at 6.30 p.m. Bengali said the student commu-

nity came together to authentic the festival. “It was genuine effort by us to make this festival as authentic as possible, one of the major factors in organizing this festival was to bring student community together in pious environment,” Bengali said. Bengali said he hopes the festival will be celebrated in the future and tradition will be carried forward by future students. Ben Matthew, a graduate student in business administration, said it was interesting to see a different community’s worship style. “It was a different style of worship,

nothing close to what I have ever seen, incredible to see so many people worshipping, it was interesting to observe the traditions of a different community,” Matthew said. Sagar Khale, a graduate student in business administration, said the event brought a sense of homecoming. “I felt a sense of Déjà vu and home coming; Graduate students from different departments and housing complexes welcomed the beloved lord with enthusiasm,” Khale said. According to Khale, the idol was specially f lown from India for the event. “2322 Champion Court resembled a

typical Indian temple with flowers and essence sticks. Hats off to those who made it possible,” Khale said. Prachiti Sak halkar, event organizer and graduate student in computer science, said the organization got permission from University authorities for the celebrations and procession for immersion. “Except from getting the idol from India, everything went smoothly, the authorities of N.C. State University were co-operative in giving us permission for procession and immersion,” said Sakhalkar.

NC State Bookstores CALL FOR ENTRIES!

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CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH JORDAN’S LENS

CAMPUS CALENDAR September 2010 Su

In Friday’s editorial cartoon, the caption was “Knighty Knight: University of Central Florida vs. North Carolina State University.” Friday’s column “Separate facts from opinion” was written by Theju Jacob.

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Monday DIVERSITY SPEAKER SERIES - DR. PEGGY MCINTOSH AND VICTOR LEWIS Noon to 1:30 P.M. African American Cultural Center

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

SMART-SHOP SERIES WORKSHOP: NOTE-TAKING/ STUDY SKILLS 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Talley Student Center, Blue Room CHANCELLOR’S FORUM 3 P.M. to 4 P.M. Titmus Theater

WEATHER WISE

DIVERSITY SPEAKER SERIES - DR. PEGGY MCINTOSH AND VICTOR LEWIS 3 P.M. to 6 P.M. African American Cultural Center

Monday:

Cookin’ in the kitchen PHOTO BY JORDAN MOORE

84/58 Clear skies.

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ax Morris, a senior in mechanical engineering, takes his homemade biscuits out of the oven with the aid of a pair of channel lock pliers Sunday afternoon. “I used a bunch of flour, so they may be kind of dense,” said Morris, of his biscuit recipe. Morris was making biscuits for his friends that came over to watch the Carolina Panther football game later that afternoon. When questioned about his unique way of taking biscuits out of the oven, Morris laughed “What do you mean? Haven’t you ever made biscuits this way before?”

Tuesday:

88 61 Mostly sunny.

Wednesday:

87 63 Sunny.

SOURCE: WEATHER BY: JAMES STANLEY, LINDSEY ANDERSON, JOEY BROOKS, LOIS BENNETT, DANIEL BURRIS, WWWW.NOAA.GOV

IN THE KNOW

Downtown Raleigh hosts 6th Annual Ray Price Capital City Bike Fest From September 24 to 25, Fayetteville Street will host motorcycles, live music and shows. This free event is hosted by Deep South Entertainment, a nationally recognized record label and artist management company. The event was created to bring businesses to the area and to give motorcycle enthusiasts a family friendly area to converge. An all-girl AC/DC cover band (Back Seat Confidential) and country music singer Matt Stillwell will headline and more than 16 bands, dance troops and martial artists will perform on two stages during the two-day event. For more information visit capitalcitybikefest.com.

Little Shop of Horrors Performance North Carolina Theatre opens its production of Little Shop of Horrors on September 18 and it runs through 26 in Raleigh Memorial Auditorium, in downtown Raleigh. The Student Preview night is a special night for students, sponsored by Target. It is on Friday, September 17th with $10 tickets for any student or teacher with a valid I.D. There is also a student rush program with $10 tickets during the regular run of the show. SOURCE: KRISTIN BUIE

GET INVOLVED WHAT DO IN TECHNICIAN YOU WANT TO SEE?

Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

Tell us what you want to see on page 2. E-mail Alanna Howard at page2@ technicianonline.com to share your ideas.

ON THE WEB See exclusive videos and photo slideshows. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

this week North Carolina Computer Music Festival

Mon-Tues, Sept 13-14 Stewart Theatre & Talley Ballroom

To find out how you can become an officer in the Army or Army Reserve, contact your local recruiter or visit us online at http://goarmy.com/info.h580

©2009. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved.

N.C. COMPUTER MUSIC FESTIVAL 4 P.M. to 9 P.M. Stewart Theater Ongoing Events SEQUENCE OF IMPRESSIONS: THE WORK OF DOUGLAS GORSLINE, 1946 TO 1981 Noon to 8 P.M. Gregg Museum of Art and Design SOUTHERN ROOTS OF MIDCENTURY MODERN Noon to 8 P.M. Gregg Museum of Art and Design STUDENT T-SHIRT DESIGN CONTEST @ NC STATE BOOKSTORES REGISTRATION FOR CRAFTS CENTER FALL CLASSES “QUILTING IS ART” EXHIBITION

SOURCE: EMILY CANNADY

BECOMING ARMY STRONG WILL OPEN DOORS, INCLUDING THOSE ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES.

SCHOLARS FORUM: ANNIE GRIFFITHS 3 P.M. to 4 P.M. Witherspoon Cinema

The Arts NOW Series in cooperation with the Music Department and the Arts Studies Program presents the fourth North Carolina Computer Music Festival. This two-day festival will include two afternoon concert events, two evening concerts, and a panel discussion with the guest composers. All events are FREE. Visit ncsu.edu/music for more info.

Haitian Celebration! Resurrection Dance Theatre Fri, Sept 17 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

Hearts with Haiti and Center Stage present a free performance by this internationally recognized dance troupe of former orphaned street children and child slaves in Haiti. This is a free event, but tickets are required. Hearts with Haiti will accept donations at the performance.

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd oor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts

POLICE BLOTTER September 7 1:37 A.M. | ASSIST ANOTHER AGENCY Off Campus NCSU Police Department assisted Raleigh Police Department in reference to arrest of two students. Students were arrested for Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Third student was issued citation by Raleigh Police Department for Possession of drug Paraphernalia. All students were referred to the University for same. 12:14 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE Faucette Drive/Dan Allen Drive Report of suspicious vehicle in the area. Officer searched but did not locate vehicle. 2:28 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT Fraternity Court Report of suspicious incident in the area. Officers checked area but did not locate any problems. 3:08 P.M. | LARCENY D.H. Hill Library Student reported unattended textbooks were stolen. 3:14 P.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Student Health Center Staff member reported suspicious subject in the building. Officers checked area but did not locate subject. 3:48 P.M. | LARCENY Student Health Center Staff member reported digital camera stolen. 4:22 P.M. | CHECK PERSON Peele Hall Staff member reported suspicious subject in the building. Subject left prior to officer’s arrival. 4:27 P.M. | BREAKING & ENTERING-VEHICLE Fraternity Court Student reported face plate from care stereo missing. 8:38 P.M. | CONCERNED BEHAVIOR ASSISTANCE Lee Hall At the request of non-student, officers advised student regarding unwanted text messages.


News

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2010 • PAGE 3

Student Government first year senate seat elections ELEVEN FRESHMAN AND TWO GRADUATE STUDENT SENATE SEATS ARE OPEN COMPILED BY CHELSEY FRANCIS

KATIE ADCOCK Year: Freshman Major: Political Science Why you are running for office: “I chose to run for office because I want to leave my mark and my legacy here at N.C. State in the best way possible.” Campaign: “I’m running for you and because I have the passion, motivation, dedication, and diligence it takes to be a member on the Senate. I’m placing the students wishes and hopes for N.C. State and its future in my hands and delivering in Senate what is most important to them.

V.S. AKSHAY

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reshmen, graduate students and transfer students are encouraged to vote Sept. 14, for the senate seats, according to Jennifer Meoni, student government elections commission secretary. Senators are assigned duties by the Student Body Constitution. According to the Student Government website, these duties include enacting legislation to promote the welfare of the student body, approve the student body budget annually, allocate funds to agencies, confirm or reject appointments of the Student Body President. As well, the Senate along with the department of athletics, determines student ticket distribution policies for football and men’s basketball games. The current Student Senate President is Stephen Kouba. Voting is online Sept. 14 from midnight until 11:59 p.m. at vote.ncsu.edu.

Year: Graduate student Major: Industrial engineering Why you are running for office: “I would like to be an integral part of the University and help make a positive impact on the lives of students.” Campaign: “Impact State! I would like to get the graduate community more involved on campus. I am also thinking on the lines of integration of various student organizations in order to augment their efficacy on the Wolfpack community.” SOURCE: V.S. AKSHAY

SOURCE: KATIE ADCOCK

EMERSON BARKER

TONI CAMPBELL

RISHAV DEY

THOMAS DEANS

JOE DICESARE

Year: Sophomore Major: Political science Why are you running for office: “I decided to campaign because I love to work with groups of people to get things done. Student Government provides an excellent opportunity to make changes that will really matter to the student body.” Campaign: “One of the major focuses of my campaign is freshmen advising. During orientation it is difficult to advise so many students on a personal level when there is only one advisor. I think that more professors should be given the option to become advisors.”

Year: Freshman Major: First Year College Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for office because I’ve found something that makes me happier than anything is participating in something bigger than myself. I really enjoy feeling like I am a part of something big, something important.” Campaign: “My biggest platform that I am campaigning for is the student voice. I believe it is incredibly important to listen to the student body and do whatever necessary to make their college experience here at N.C. State the very best it can be.”

Year: Freshman Major: Aerospace engineering and economics Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for office because I like to try and make a difference from within the system, rather than criticize it. I am also a determined person and a workhorse, and if I see something that has to be done, I will do it, no matter what. Campaign: “The main themes of my campaign are happiness and the ‘Make a Difference’ slogan. I want everyone happy and wish for those who are already happy to be happier.

Year: Sophomore Major: Political Science Note: Thomas Deans could not be contacted, despite repeated attempts.

Year: Freshman Major: Textile engineering Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for Student Senate so that I may be involved here on campus.” Campaign: “I do not have anything specific that I am campaigning for, but I am keeping my mind open for ideas that I get when walking around campus.”

SOURCE: EMERSON BARKER

SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS DIRECTORY

KEY: GRADUATE STUDENT

SOURCE: JOE DICESARE

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

SOURCE: RISHAV DEY

SOURCE: TONI CAMPBELL

DEMIA FARINA Year: Freshman Major: Business Administration Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for office because I wanted the opportunity to represent the class of 2014 and be a part of the leadership and decisions made by Student Senate here at N.C. State.” Campaign:

VICTOR GALLOWAY II

SEVE M. GASKIN Year: Freshman Major: Environmental design in architecture

Year: Freshman Major: Environmental design in architecture

Note: Seve Gaskin could not be contacted, despite repeated attempts. Note: Victor Galloway II could not be contacted, despite repeated attempts.

SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS DIRECTORY

SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS DIRECTORY

SOURCE: DEMIA FARINA

CHRISTIAN GRUNDMAN Year: Freshman Major: Mechanical engineering Why are you running for office: “I want to be a part of things at N.C. State, and this is a good way for me to get involved. I also want to help make more fun events possible.” Campaign: “I am campaigning for fun. I want my campaign to embrace humor.” SOURCE: CHRISTIAN GRUNDMAN

ASHLEY HONEYCUTT Year: Sophomore Major: Political science Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for office because N.C. State is very dear to me. I am running because I want to make my school and my community a better place and I think I would do a good job at accomplishing those goals through the Student Government.” Campaign: “I will always have the students in mind when making decisions and I know I have the creative problem solving skills to help run our Student Government.” SOURCE: ASHLEY HONEYCUTT

BRANSON KINSEY

HAYLEE MCLEAN

KATIE MILLS

BENTON MORTON

Year: Sophomore Major: Engineering Why are you running for office: “I really enjoy making things easier and better for my friends and classmates. I hope to do this in big ways that help N.C. State improve as a whole and allow for the best personal college experience.” Campaign: “Although I do not have any specific issues to address, I will strive to stay connected and open to my peers as I work to continue improving [N.C.]State’s greatness.

Year: Freshman Major: Nutrition science Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for office because I wish to represent the freshmen class and make sure that they have a voice in our Student Government.” Campaign: “I am campaigning for representation and I am in favor of the referendum bill.”

Year: Graduate student Major: Extension education Why are you running for office: “I’ve been in Senate for four years. Why not?” Campaign: “More graduate student representation, voices heard.”

Year: Freshman Major: Biomedical engineering Why are you running for office: “I’ve always been interested in government and how it works. My family and friends suggested that I get involved.” Campaign: “I just want to accurately represent the freshman and first year class at N.C. State.”

Year: Freshman Major: Biochemistry Note: Attempts to reach Angelina Song went unanswered. SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS DIRECTOR

SOURCE: BENTON MORTON

SOURCE: HAYLEE MCLEAN

PARTH THAKKAR

SOURCE: BRANSON KINSE

ANGELINA EUN SONG

SOURCE: KATIE MILLS

Year: Senior Major: Biological Sciences Note: Attempts to reach Parth Thakkar went unanswered.

JAMES STEPHENS Year: Freshman Major: Political Science Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for office because I want to be able to make a difference on the campus of N.C. State.” Campaign: “I do not have a specific cause other than helping to ensure that funds are spent conservatively to best benefit the student.” SOURCE: JAMES STEPHENS

SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS DIRECTORY

GROWING BY 50% TO BETTER SERVE YOU!

JAY TOMBLIN Year: Freshman Major: Biological Sciences Note: Attempts to reach Jay Tomblin went unanswered. SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS DIRECTORY

SOURCE: BEN RICE

ONLINE APPOINTMENTS!

https://healthweb.ncsu.edu Or call 919-515-7107

Physical Therapy 919-513-3260 Women’s Health 919-515-7762 HOURS Mon – Fri* 8 AM - 9:00 PM Tues 9 AM - 9 PM Sat 8:30 - 11:30 AM *Limited services M-F 5-9 pm & Sat. am Accredited by AAAHC

Health Promotion 919-515-9355 (WELL)

Now located in 360 Harrelson Hall

For more info: 919-515-2563

ncsu.edu/student_health Located at Cates and Dan Allen Dr.

FRANCESCA VERCELES-ZARA Year: Freshman Major: Biological Sciences Note: Attempts to reach Francesca Verceles-Zara went unanswered. SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS DIRECTORY

WESLEY JONES Year: Freshman Major: Human biology Why are you running for office: “In the few short weeks I’ve been at N.C. State, I’ve really come to love being a student here, and as a First Year Senator, I would be excited to make sure other students are enjoying their college experience as well.” Campaign: “As a freshman, I don’t feel that I’m in a position to campaign for specific issues just [this] year, but I’m sure I’ll develop quite a stance on things in a very short period of time.”

Laboratory & X-ray 919-515-3283 Pharmacy 919-515-5040

Year: Junior Major: Natural resources Why are you running for office: “I decided to run for office because I want to try and make a difference on campus. I love N.C. State and I want everyone else to love it as much as I do.” Campaign: “My main campaign goal is just to have students first. I want students to be able to come up to me and talk to me about thing they think should be changed.” SOURCE: MELISSA ASHLEY SCALLY

BEN RICE Year: Freshman Major: Psychology Why are you running for office: “I am running for Student Senate because I want to be able to make a difference on this campus, no matter how small that may be.” Campaign:

MELISSA ASHLEY SCALLY

SOURCE: WESLEY JONES

SMILE

continued from page 1

According to Wall, one surgery costs between $200 and $250. “When we have the first meeting of this year, we will discuss how many surgeries we’d like to fund, but I hope we can do at least 10,” Gibbons said. Wall said he first heard about Operation Smile on TV. “I saw something about Op-

eration Smile on television,” Wall said. “I saw how the kids with cleft lip or cleft palate are excluded from school. They’re scared to go because of how they get picked on and shunned.” Gibbons said she chose to join the club because of Operation Smile’s involvement with children. “I decided to get involved with Operation Smile because it truly changes children’s lives,” Gibbons said. “Without the cheap and simple operation to fix their cleft

lip or pallet, they would spend the rest of their lives looking very different than everyone else.” Wall said cleft lip and cleft palate are two different problems that are both caused by malnutrition in pregnancy. “Cleft lip is when the lip is split in one part,” Wall said. “Cleft palate is when the palate inside the mouth is split.”


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2010

TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

THE FACTS:

Voting will open midnight and last until 11:59 p.m. on Sept. 14 for freshmen, graduate and transfer students. Students can go to vote.ncsu.edu to vote.

OUR OPINION:

The news students, whether they are freshmen or transfers, need to vote in this Student Government election. This election will affect their voice and representation on this campus for the next year.

A

We need your vote

s new college students, freshman you will begin your lives on your own, away from your families. You are free to make your own way and have your own opinions, because of the great nation you live in. Most of you are starting college as 18-year-olds, which means you are finally eligible to vote and really get involved as a citizen of the state and the country. But, the only way you can truly have a voice and a right to an opinion is if you vote. Although state and national elections are coming up, you have to remember to start local and small. Student Government is holding freshman, transfer and graduate student elections for open seats and first-year students need to vote

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

in these elections. It is crucial you realize the importance of your years’ representation in this body. Student Government will have the most direct effect on your lives as students, besides the N.C. State Board of Trustees and the UNC Board of Governors. Being represented in year and status on campus will make sure your point of view and position are understood and heard. Without your representatives, decisions could be made without your position ever being considered. However, the effectiveness of having the freshman and transfer seats filled depends on

the candidates who are elected. Freshmen, you need to learn that part of being a voter is staying informed and up-todate on events that affect your lives and knowing the people who are trying to represent you feel the same way about them. The worst thing a voter can do is blindly vote for a candidate, so don’t sell your opinion to just anybody. Freshmen and first-year students, there is no excuse for not knowing. All the candidates running are available for questions and comments. And, if they are not, they are probably not the best person for the job. Part of their job is to be

available for any constituent to talk to and if they cannot, they should not be trusted to represent you. Remember, despite being a freshman, transfer or even international student, this is your first exercise as members of a free, democratic republic. You have a chance to be involved in public affairs and policy in a way that millions of people and hundred of countries still have yet to achieve. Do not take your voice and your vote for granted. Voters, good luck finding the perfect candidate and may the most trustworthy person win.

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Technician is looking for columnists!

BY GAURAV SHAH

Tyler Towe freshman, engineering

Use it, don’t abuse it

T

he Bill of Rights is in our Constitution to guarantee certain inalienable rights all free men should have, and protects the people from too much government control. The f irst amendment specifically, has b e e n on Chad my mind Rhoades quite a bit Senior Staff recently. Columnist The issues of Mosque building and Quran burning has taken over the news. The issues have surrounded the first amendment. What Rev. Terry Jones wanted to do was nothing short of atrocious. It is completely ignorant, and disrespectful to believe anyone can destroy another’s holy text and actually expect something positive to come from it. It is even more ignorant to believe “moderate” members of Islam should not only support the burning, but join in themselves. Rev. Jones wanted attention, and he got it. He is a perfect example of what is wrong with the United States today. These individuals fall on both sides of the spectrum, whether they are liberal or conservative. I am sure there are ignorant, outspoken people like this all over the world; however, the problem in the United States is they get publicized for it.

Freedom of press is guaranteed to us by the first amendment in our Bill of Rights. I believe the founders would turn in their graves if they knew how the media acted today. The media has transitioned from an informative body to pure garbage. It is impossible to even watch a news network, yes, I mean all of them, without getting a biased presentation of the “facts.” It has turned into an entertainment industry, and not an informative one. We care more a b out how much money Elin is getting from Tiger, or whether this is going to be Brett Farve’s last season in the NFL, than we do about the war in Afghanistan or the economic hardship our country is facing. What Rev. Jones did, and what the media did that surrounded the incident, was not only selfish, but dangerous. The minute Rev. Jones decided he wanted to burn a stack of Qurans and the first person that picked up the story put both themselves and the United States in danger. I could only imagine how outraged Muslims, both in our country and in Muslim nations, were when they got news of this. His actions make it appear the United States is at war with Islam, and that is simply not the case. With already shaky relations among Islamic nations, his actions and

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the media publicizing his actions is the last thing the United States needs. There needs to be a change in our media today. There is a freedom granted by the Bill of Rights that allows us to have freedom of press, but it needs to be used responsibly. As a nation, we need to be informed about what is going on, but when we start endangering lives just to ma ke news people will want to watch, t h e re i s certainly a problem. Fortunately this problem wa s squashed before it became extremely ugly. I just hope people realize the potential repercussions of what could have happened. An old saying says “the problem with democracy is that every idiot has a vote.” The same problem comes with freedom of speech. Everyone can say what they want within reason, but that doesn’t mean they should. The same goes with media. Just because a story can be told, doesn’t necessarily mean it should be told.

“I believe the founders would turn in their graves if they knew how the media acted today.”

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Features

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2010 • PAGE 5

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Tasha, were decided to look the least alike. The other two pairs, Melissa Markus and her golden retriever, Maddie, who dressed alike for the event with matching shorts, shirt, hat and scarf, and Beverly Tucker and Tobi, who sported matching hair and N.C. State pride, were voted on by the audience. Despite a much louder cheer for the matching pair, Melissa and Maddie, Woodson said, “there’s only one way for a chancellor of N.C. State to decide. I have to go with N.C. State,” deeming Beverly and Tobi the winners. Another event that attracted attention was Rollover Rover. In the contest, judges counted how many times a dog will roll over on command before getting tired or dizzy, and stopping. One dog rolled her way into third place by consistently rolling the opposite way to what her owners were telling her. Owner Chris Kelly, University alumnus, and his girlfriend Irene Brandon, were both very proud of Lilly-Anne. “This is one of the few [events] we thought she could do,” Kelly said. “She has a mind of her own sometimes,” Brandon added. The owners got a $10 gift certificate and a bronze medal for Lilly-Ann. For the first time in the event’s history, the Dog Olympics featured the Paralympics, a special event designed for dogs with spinal cord injuries. “It really shows off the special human-animal bond,” Greene said. There were three events for the dogs that took place in the Paralympics: a cart costume contest, a race and an obstacle course. “It shows how well these dogs in carts can do,” Greene said. Dr. Natasha Olby, a neurologist at the Vet School as well as the president of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, introduced the Paralympics. She told the audience her motivation for starting the Paralympics was not only to thank the support they have gotten over the years, but also to raise positive awareness about dogs who have suffered spinal cord injuries. “A loving owner can do incredibly well and lead a happy life,” Olby said. The events helped to prove that point.

JORDAN MOORE/TECHNICIAN

Garrett Parrish, a junior in chemical engineering, plays with his dog Chester at the Dog Olympics held at Moore Square Saturday. The Dog Olympics, hosted annually by the N.C. State College of Veterinary Medicine, incorporated numerous events for participants to demonstrate their canine’s talent.

In the costume contest, owners dressed their dogs in outfits that integrated their carts into the costume. One dog was dressed as the Bat Mobile, another as a pirate in a boat. Millar dressed her dog, Tasha, in a tutu. The winning dog was Tobi, dressed with N.C. State pride by her owner, Tucker. After this contest was the race, in which the dogs ran the length of the small demonstration field. The last event, the obstacle course, challenged the dogs to run from one corner of the demonstration field, cross a small, plywood foot-bridge and then go through a “maze” of buckets, where they would exit and sprint to the finish line. The dogs with the fastest times were awarded gift certificates to Unleashed, as well as small medals. After the events, Olby explained more about spinal cord injuries. “They are really common in dogs,” Olby said, “but many dogs recover from this injury.” The estimate for the number of all spinal cord injuries in veterinary of-

fices across the nation is about 1 per- the organization is centralized in five cent of all vet visits, “but this number or six counties, mainly in central varies greatly,” Olby said. North Carolina. “50 percent of all those injuries “We rescue cats and dogs from make full recoveries,” Olby said, shelters, especially from the high-kill “and less than 10 ones,” Hayes said, percent become “t hen we foscompletely parater them in our lyzed.” own homes.” She She told the said more people au d ie nc e t h e adopt young anionly way they bemals, and white is come completely a more popular paralyzed is if color. the spinal cord Another rescue i s comple tely organization repsevered. Accordresented was the Keith Pickens, Raleigh Police Officer ing to Olby, most Carolina Border of the recovery Collie Rescue. takes place in the first three months, Founded in 1998, they rescue about and that the dogs in the carts are “the 40 border collies per year. Nancy Solum, application coordinaworst of the worst.” Several rescue organizations were tor and former president of the orgarepresented Saturday, including “2 nization, said she considers a rescue Paws Up,” a no-shelter rescue orga- “when you take a dog out of a shelter nization, meaning they do not use and then adopt them out to a good shelters to house their cats and dogs. home.” Solum got her start in the world of Linda Hayes of Harnett County said

“Speaking in Dutch to the dogs makes it harder for other people to tray and command the dogs.”

Students share knowledge at BugFest N.C. State students and faculty informed visitors about a wide range of insects at Museum’s insect festival. Allison Saito Staff Writer

Bug scientists from N.C. State went to the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences this Saturday to teach the public about insects. Groups set up displays and demonstrations for visitors at the 14th annual BugFest. Hannah Burrack, an assistant professor in entomology, said it is a way to educate the public. “It’s a great outreach tool,” Burrack said. “We think about insects every day because it’s our job. Most people only think of bugs in a negative way, and this is a way to show them beneficial bugs.” Lena Guisewite, a graduate student in entomology, said it is a way to share their interest with others. “It’s great, so many people in one spot to celebrate arthropod diversity, especially with the general public involved,” Guisewite said. According to Jim Hunt, a visiting professor of biology and entomology, BugFest is mostly a family event. “We get a lot of young children, moms, dads, and everyone learns something,” Hunt said. “This is mostly a family affair, but you see a few curious [college students].” Many students and professors said they were delighted to see children learning about bugs. Heather Lessig, research technician in the biology department, said she likes to see their enthusiasm. “I like seeing all the kids around. Working in a university, you don’t see many kids around. It’s great to see them getting excited about sciencey things,” Lessig said. “We want to get them excited about butterflies and bugs in general.” According to Guisewite, whose group NATALIE CLAUNCH/TECHNICIAN was running a live insect display, children Adam Whisnant, an alumnus of N.C. State, volunteers his seventh year at BugFest. learn from their parents’ reactions as well Whisnant said he enjoys working at the Lepidoptera table, the butterflies and moths. “It’s the easiest way to get people interested in insects. Caterpillars are fun for kids to

BUGS continued page 6 hold and people are drawn to a butterfly’s beauty. It shows people not all insects are gross or bad.”

border collies after watching a movie in the 1980s with a border collie in it. This inspired her to get two border collies. However, after one of the two dogs died in an accident and left the other heartbroken, Solum said she began looking for another border collie and found the organization. “They are wonderful dogs,” Solum said. Adopting a border collie from the organization costs $225 and includes up-to-date shots, behavior evaluations and getting the dog spayed or neutered. Solum said she loves being around people who know how to handle border collies. “We’ve been coming here for years.” Ryan Garret, a senior in biochemistry engineering, said “I don’t have a dog, but I’m looking at adopting one.” Garret said the event had good resources for learning about adoption. As with most rescue organizations, in order to adopt an animal, there is an application process. This involves giving background information, as well as allowing a volunteer come to check the potential home. The application process can often be tedious. Dawn Howard, co-founder of Southern Siberian Rescue, is very particular about where the dogs go. “We make sure that the home is a good match,” Howard said. Howard started the organization after she came to own five Siberians about 10 years ago. A couple of years later, in 2002, she started to rescue the Siberians from shelters. The cost to adopt a Siberian from Southern Siberian Rescue is $250. This includes up-to-date shots, getting the dog spayed or neutered, medical care until the adoption date and getting the dog microchipped. A microchip is like an internal, electronic ID tag. If a dog or cat becomes lost and is found and taken to a veterinarian’s office, most vets will scan the animal for a microchip. If the animal has one in it, it will tell the vet who he or she belongs to. Howard said that while Siberians may be very beautiful, many people don’t understand the responsibility behind owning one. “You have got to have a sense of humor to own these dogs,” Howard said, smiling at her Siberian.

‘Pack for Pakistan’ provides relief for flood victims The Pakistani Student Association and the Muslim Student Association have joined forces to pack boxes of donated items for flood victims. Nasir Khatri Staff Writer

Flooding in Pakistan has displaced millions of people throughout the povertystricken nation, and many N.C. State students have teamed up to help those affected by the disaster. The Pakistani Student Association and the Muslim Student Association have teamed up to create the “Pack for Pakistan” movement, which strives to provide relief and aid to the flood victims. So far, the aim of this organization has been to pack hundreds of boxes which contain donated items such as water, soy milk, juice, biscuits and blankets, which will then be shipped to the affected areas in Pakistan free of charge by PIA, Pakistan International Airlines. The United Nations has officially declared these floods the greatest humanitarian crisis in recent history, citing the fact that more people have been affected by these floods than the Southeast Asian tsunami in 2004, and the recent earthquakes in Kashmir and Haiti combined. According to the Anam Lodhi, a board member for

the organization and a junior in psychology, “the floods have truly ruined the lives of millions of Pakistanis and I believe it’s our obligation as humans to help those in need.” “We are continuing to accept donations and any help by the members of the Wolfpack will be greatly appreciated,” Lodhi said. Lodhi expressed resentment at the alarmingly low level of response to the disaster by other organizations on campus, including Student Government, who they contacted to assist them in the Pack for Pakistan movement. Furthermore, only a fraction of the people needing aid has been contacted by emergency crews. Statements by the United Nations and several independent research organizations have repeatedly stated that in the 10 days following the flood, only 10,000 flood packs had been disbursed by the government, for the 15 million people that need aid. For this reason, the Pack for Pakistan movement is donating the relief packages independently to a reputable, non-profit organization, and not directly to the Pakistani government. Pack for Pakistan is planning to hold a Pakistan Flood Relief Fundraising Dinner October 2. Tayyaba Rayyast, a board member for the movement, said “hopefully we’ll raise a substantial amount of money, and every cent of the proceeds will be donated to a reputable, non-profit organization that will give the money to those who are in dire need of the funds.”


Features

PAGE 6 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2010

TECHNICIAN

Hopscotch Festival a new addition to Raleigh’s new look STORY BY MARK HERRING | PHOTOS BY JOSH BIELICK John Hubbard, a senior in communications, and other fans dance to Raleigh indie rock band The Love Language Sept. 11, 2010. The concert was part of Hopscotch, a three-day music festival organized by the Independent Weekly.

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he Hopscotch Music Festival w a s t he biggest coordinated music event in Raleigh’s history.  With 130 bands and artists representing various genres performing at 10 different venues in downtown Raleigh, the three-day event celebrated local music talent as well as contributions from international stars.  As one of the fastest growing cities in the nation, Raleigh has recently transformed into a cultural center for music, food and nightlife. The brainchild of Independent Weekly’s Greg Lowenhagen and Grayson Currin, Hopscotch Music Festival brought growth to Raleigh’s music and artistic scene.  A year ago Lowenhagen and Currin debated the possibilities of how to plan and execute such a music festival. Their main intention was to create a festival that paid tribute to local bands and to celebrate the promising music venues of Raleigh. The name Hopscotch came from their idea that people would hop from venue to venue. Moreover, they say Hopscotch won’t be a short-lived fling.  “I don’t want to look back and say, ‘Remember when we did Hopscotch Fest?’” Lowenhagen said. “The goal is to keep this thing going.” The nascent festival attracted crowds from various generations. Along with homegrown indie rock bands, Hopscotch recruited rap artists, alternative rock bands from all across the U.S. and some foreign artists from as far away as Sweden and Iceland.  The festival opened Thursday downtown at a collection of bars, nightclubs and public venues. Friday night, the festivities started early at 5:30 p.m. in City Plaza. The concert starred Raleigh band The Rosebuds, Canadian alternative band Broken Social Scene and Panda Bear, the lead singer of The Animal Collective. The show attracted a large student crowd eager to get its fill of indie music. “Broken Social Scene was what I came for,” Samatha Walker, a junior in zoology, said.  Walker managed to get free

BUGS

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as learning from the people at the booth. “[We are] showing kids the insects aren’t scary and gross. But, a lot of times, the kids mimic the parents’ reaction,” Guisewite said. Andi Hawksley, a freshman in chemical engineering, was showing caterpillars to visitors. Hawksley said visitors’ reactions to the caterpillar crawling on her hand were unexpected and fun to see. “[Occasionally] when a parent and a child walk up, the parent pushes their child forward as a shield from the caterpillar,” Hawksley said. “It’s all volunteer. I also like to listen to the little kids be freaked out by the bugs. I like the enthusiasm,” Mary Beth Conrad, a freshman in mechanical engineering, said. Students from Entomology 203, an Introduction to the Honey Bee and Beekeeping, were telling visitors about

Jon Mueller of Collections of Colonies of Bees plays for fans at The Pour House Sept. 10, 2010. The free show was a part of Raleigh’s Hopscotch Music Festival.

tickets since she volunteered a minimum of seven hours for Hopscotch. “It’s awesome to get in for free and I would definitely do it again,” she said. Jay Patel, a junior in biological sciences, excited to see the Chapel Hill band The Love Language, said he’s been pleased with the growth of Raleigh’s culture.  “I like it that Raleigh has a great music scene and that we’re working on it even more now.  It’s awesome to be a part of the first big music fest Raleigh’s had,” Patel said.

bees. Riley Huston, a senior in graphic design, said the chance to receive extra credit for ENT 203 motivated him to come to BugFest, but it was a worthwhile experience. “[I came] initially for extra credit, but it has helped us see what people don’t know about bees,” Huston said. Margaux Novak, a senior in English, is also a student in ENT 203. She said they helped many people at BugFest. “We are answering a lot of questions,” Novak said. “There was this one little kid who asked so many intelligent questions, it was great to see.”

“It’s really great that bands that I listen to a lot come to Raleigh,” William Hinrichs, a sophomore in zoology, said. “I am most pumped about Panda Bear, Broken Social Scene and Love Language. I listened to their stuff countless times, imagining what they will be like live. This concert was better than what I dreamed.” Local businesses saw Hopscotch as an opportunity to cater to the music crowd as well as increase profits. Various restaurants downtown kept their kitchens open past mid-

Ryan Gustafson and band play at The Pour House Sept. 10, 2010. Gustafson and more than 100 other artists were showcased at Raleigh’s Hopscotch Music Festival.

night and offered reduced price menus in light of Hopscotch.  However, restaurants and bars were not the only business looking to make a buck off of Hopscotch.  Erwann Domalain, a junior in biomedical engineering and employee of Raleigh Rickshaw, carted revelers around downtown during the festival.  “Business has been great. They’re a hip crowd and they’re a blast. Plenty of people are looking for rides and I have been able to watch some of the shows,” Domalain said. “I’m

“I like it that Raleigh has a great music scene and that we’re working on it even more now. ” Jay Patel, junior in biological sciences

absolutely getting a workout. I go after the heavyweights!” Despite the threat of bad weather Saturday, a large crowd hit downtown Raleigh to attend the Hopscotch finale. The biggest act of the evening was

Public Enemy, the hip-hop band that has been around since 1988 and is currently on its world tour.  

CAMPAIGN MONEY QUICK FACTS: •

BugFest is the kickoff event to the North Carolina Science Festival. The Science Festival runs Sept. 11-26.

There are more ants in a square mile of a tropical forest than there are people on Earth.

In tropical forests, the biomass of ants is four times more than terrestrial vertebrates.

There are about 180 species of ants in North Carolina.

About 12,500 species of ants are known.

Estimate 25,000-30,000 species on the planet (known and unknown). SOURCE: ELEANOR SPICER RICE, BENOIT GUENARD

NATALIE CLAUNCH/TECHNICIAN

Michelle Miller; currently studying Immunology as a graduate student at N.C. State; shares her knowledge of entomology at the Orthopteroid table during BugFest. The display included cockroaches; stick insects; and grasshoppers; all members of this group of insects; but “the praying manids were a definite favorite.” Miller worked with the Entomology department as an undergraduate student; and has volunteered at BugFest for the past five years.t.


Sports

Technician

football continued from page 8

brought their freshman in with his fresh legs. The defense hung in there. We had a couple of big, big turnovers and that ended up being the difference in the football game.”  Despite starting 2-0 for the first time since Phillip Rivers led the 2002 team to a Gator Bowl victory over Notre Dame, a quick turnaround, with Cincinnati coming to Raleigh on Thursday night, has the team’s attention. As soon as State wrapped up its first road victory of the season on Saturday night, Russell Wilson said the team’s focus had already

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in front of Wolfpack Nation: junior outside hitter Luciana Shafer, redshirt sophomore setter Megan Cyr and junior outside hitter Becah Fogle. Shafer, a UNC-Greensboro transfer, led the team with 11 digs while also helping the Pack’s offense with 10 kills. “[Luciana is] really embracing what we’re teaching her,” Bunn said. “It’s a change from what she’s done in the past and anytime you do something new, there’s some adjustment but she’s making great adjustments.” Shafer said the adjustments have been a challenge, but the support around her has allowed her to become better. “It’s been different,” Shafer said. “I’m definitely getting a lot of feedback, positive feedback of course, but at the same time there’s always the challenge of having those bad games where

shifted to Zach Collaros and the visiting Bearcats. The nationally televised game will be Wilson’s fourth Thursday night start of his career.  “The experienced guys have to lead more than anything,” Wilson said. “We’ve had a few Thursday night games since I’ve been here. The seniors have to step up and tell them what the deal is. You have to get your rest and get ready to go.”  The two-time defending Big East Champions will come into Carter-Finley with a 1-1 record as the Bearcats begin a difficult stretch including a contest against Oklahoma on September 25th.

you’re still figuring things out and I feel like tonight was one of those nights where it kind of clicked so it was a good feeling to be like, ‘Oh, that’s what they were talking about.’” Cyr, a University of Colorado transfer, led the team in assists in every game of the tournament, including 41 in the final match. “Megan Cyr did a great job distributing it,” Bunn said. “They had no idea where she was going to set it, so we had a lot of seams and everybody was locked in tonight.” Fogle, also a University of Colorado transfer, earned tournament MVP honors for her efforts, grabbing a teamhigh 13 kills in the nightcap. “[Becah is] really embracing the things that we’re doing here,” Bunn said. “And you can just tell the difference between how she’s playing now compared to three weeks ago in terms of how she’s fitting in with what we’re doing” The Pack will take on UNCWilmington this weekend.

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monday, september 13, 2010 • Page 7

Men’s soccer

Pack drops ACC opener State loses narrowly in front of sell-out crowd.

through the fence of the old practice football field and even from the top of the Reynolds Coliseum parking deck. “That’s definitely the biggest crowd I have ever seen in my life,” senior defender Lucas Carpenter said. “That’s the most fans I’ve ever played in front of. I would really love to see it again.” Despite the enormous crowd, the Pack struggled to get things going offensively, and conceded a goal in the 32nd minute. “They gave us great motivation,” Carpenter said. “We went down one but we never stopped fighting, and the crowd had a lot to do with that.” In the second half, the Pack seemed to be a different team, outshooting the Heels, and providing many goal-scoring opportunities. “It was a hard fought match,” Carpenter said. “Both teams had chances and opportunities. In the second half we definitely had the run of play and a lot of opportunities to score. We just

Sean Klemm Deputy Sports Editor

With fall in full swing, students, alumni, children, parents and even some University of North Carolina supporters ventured out of the woodwork to Dail Soccer Stadium for N.C. State’s ACC opener against No. 3 UNC. “The crowd was huge, huge, huge,” coach George Tarantini said. “I want to applaud my athletics director [Debbie Yow], because I think she understands what this means to us. I want to say thank you in the name of the N.C. State soccer team for the opportunity we had.” The crowd of over 3,000 spectators cheered, sneered and jeered from the permanent seats, additional bleachers behind each goal,

Cain said. “Thank God,It’s always great to score.” In the second half State dominated on offense ,State finished with a 17-5 shot advantage to come away with the win. “Anytime we win, and certainly at home finishing in front of our fans, it’s a positive, good thing for us,” State coach Steve Springthorpe said after the game. “Especially coming back from that loss at ECU.” While praising the play of his team, Springthorpe mentioned he was impressed by Chesnutt’s coaching. Before becoming head coach for the Wolfpack

SOCCER

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ECU so we just came here and had to do something to come away with a win and we did.” It was Cain, who scored the first goal of the game off a missed shot from sophomore midfielder Kara Blosser. The goal occurred at the 44:27 mark, just seconds before the end of the first half. “It felt great,”A breathless

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Freshman midfielder Mamadou Kansaye passes the ball through UNC’s midfielders - senior Dustin McCarthy and junior Kirk Urso at the game Friday.

couldn’t get in on one.” Tarantini agreed that the team showed improvement in the second half. “I think the energy from the second half was better, and that’s encouraging,” Tarantini said. “But we need to win. We are 0-1 in the league, now we have to recuperate and get ready for the next game.” Although the Wolfpack did not gain three points for a win, the young team did gain valu-

able experience. “It’s a good experience because they are a ranked team and our big rivals,” DeFreitas said. “I think we have the caliber to be a ranked team as well. It was a good experience, especially for the newcomers to see how fast the ACC play actually is.” State is back in action Wednesday night at 7 p.m. at Dail Soccer Stadium as it takes on VMI.

women, Springthorpe spent five seasons at Fresno State University. Florida International coach Thomas Chesnuitt served as Springthorpe’s first assistant for much of the time and the two have remained close in the years since. “It’s always a little different,” Springthorpe said about coaching against his former assistant.”But this is the second time I’ve had to do that. We coached against each other when he first left Fresno State and took over at Florida International. So I’m glad we got the win but sorry that he got the

loss. He’s got a great team. He’s a great coach and he’s done a great job rebuilding the program.” Springthorpe will face yet another former colleague when his team plays Old Dominion in its next game. “ODU is another important win,” Springthorpe said. “And it’s against my old coach that I used to coach for so it should be a good time visiting with a friend of mine. And hopefully we’ll get on the field and get another win.”

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Work one on one w/children w/disabilities. part time evenings and/or weekends. we will train. $9-14 p/h. for more info or application go to www.asmallmiracleinc.com. Xbox 360 Reps Wanted Xbox 360 has launched a revolutionary new platform, Kinect, and we’re looking for campus ambassadors to promote it! Apply now at http://www.repnation. com/xbox

Homes For rent Near NCSU. Charming 3BR/2BA Ranch - located on Jones Franklin Road near Athens Drive. Nice neighborhood. Pristine condition. Ideal for students. Available Now. Call day: 833-7142 and evening 783-9410. Please visit our website at: www.jansenproperties.com.

For Sale FOR SALE: 2008 Piaggio 150cc Scooter. Wolfpack Red. Excellent Condition. Kept garaged, great commuter bike gets 50mpg, up to 65mph, automatic – no shifting required, under seat storage, has 3000 miles. Will include lock and helmet. Paid $3600. Asking $1750. Call 881-4646 or 844- 7124 or email gmbauer53@yahoo.com.

By The Mepham Group

1 2 3 4

FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 13, 2010

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Level 2

Level 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

9/13/10

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2010 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Solution to Friday’s puzzle

10/10/09

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2009 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

ACROSS 1 Green gem 5 Runs easily 10 Ruler marking 14 High spot 15 Baton-passing event 16 Delhi dress 17 Consequences of a minor accident, perhaps 20 Less than 90 degrees, anglewise 21 Baseball card data 22 “The Greatest Show on Earth” promoters 27 Totally dreadful 28 Place for cookies 29 Like EEE shoes 30 Skin: Suff. 31 Air gun ammo 34 ’50s political monogram 35 Before long 38 Span of history 39 “So’s __ old man!” 40 “¿Cómo __ usted?” 41 Horse’s stride 42 Adjust to the desired wake-up time, as an alarm 43 Gently slips past 46 Product improvement slogan 51 Be __ model: exemplify grace in success 52 Hideous sorts 53 Cozy inn whose abbreviation is a hint to this puzzle’s theme 59 Grandson of Adam 60 Celtic priest of old 61 Basis of an invention 62 Tennis do-overs 63 1,000 kilograms 64 Word with ghost or boom DOWN 1 Sharp punch

9/13/10

By Jeff Chen

2 “The Simpsons” storekeeper 3 FDR or JFK, politically 4 Wide-open space 5 Emotional shock 6 Hertz auto, e.g. 7 Of days gone by 8 Bar bill 9 Damascus’ land: Abbr. 10 “Lord, __?”: Last Supper question 11 __ decongestant 12 Greek island where Minos ruled 13 __ fit: tantrum 18 Pond gunk 19 G.I.’s group 22 Off-color 23 Tolerate 24 Winona of “Edward Scissorhands” 25 Spun CDs at a party 26 Caustic remark 30 Crime lab evidence, briefly 31 Beauty’s beloved 32 Payola, e.g.

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

Lookin’ for the answer key? Visit technicianonline.com

(c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

33 Mythical mangoat 35 Get noticed 36 River of Flanders 37 Lead-in to girl or boy 41 Tones one’s body 43 Enter stealthily 44 Use emery on 45 Hide’s partner 46 Genesis tower locale 47 Dancer Castle

9/13/10

48 No-show in a Beckett play 49 Half-full or halfempty item 50 Smudge-proof, like mascara 54 Banned bug spray 55 Certain sib 56 Commotion 57 Use a Singer 58 Beachgoer’s shade


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• Three days until the football team squares off against Cincinnati

INSIDE

• Page 7: A continuation of the recap of the Central Florida football game.

Technician

Page 8 • monday, september 13, 2010

Football

Cole, Defense fend off stingy Knights

Women’s golf begins season at Cougar Classic

21 points off turnovers enough to escape Orlando with victory.

The women’s golf team opened its season at the Cougar Classic at Yeamans Hall Golf Course in Hanahan, S.C. on Sunday. The Pack shot a 20-over par in the opening round and currently sits in 16th place out of the 21-team field. Senior Brooke Baker and freshman Ana Menendez led the Wolfpack by each shooting a three-over par in the first round. Freshmen Maureen Dunnagan and Brittany Merchand and sophomore Amanda Baker each finished seven-over par. The second round will be held today, while the final round wraps up Tuesday.

Sean Fairholm Staff Writer

A week removed from settling into its season with a 48-7 win over Western Carolina, NC State passed a much sterner test Saturday night by defeating preseason Conference-USA favorite Central Florida, 28-21. It was the first nonconference road victory for the Pack since defeating the ECU Pirates in Greenville on October 20, 2007.  The story of the night from Bright House Networks Stadium was the opportunistic Wolfpack defense, which forced five turnovers while only allowing 14 points. State’s effort was highlighted by junior linebacker Audie Cole’s impressive 12 tackles, one interception and one sack display. The team leader in tackles a year ago nearly matched his career high of 13 tackles, which came against Virginia Tech last November. With the Pack offense only able to muster 239 total yards, Cole said he

Source: N.C. State Athletics

Men’s tennis opens season with a bang

The men’s tennis team kicked off the fall portion of its season at the University of Virginia Invitational over the weekend. The Wolfpack received strong efforts from Julian Sullivan, Rafael Paez, Rob Lowe and Sean Weber in the four-bracket invitational. Sullivan won four matches en route to the purple bracket singles title. Paez finished fourth in the white bracket, while Lowe and Weber took home fourth place finishes in the gold and orange consolation brackets, respectively. The Wolpack collected nine singles wins over the weekend, giving the team momentum as it heads to the Nike Fab Four this upcoming weekend. Source: N.C. State Athletics

athletic schedule Su

M

T

W

Th

5

6

7

12

13

19

20

26

27

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Sa

1

2

3

4

8

9

10

11

14

15

16

17

18

21

22

23

24

25

28

29

30

Thursday FOOTBALL VS. CINCINNATI Carter-Finley Stadium, 7:30 p.m.

Standings

No. 9 Penn State at No. 1 Alabama

football continued page 7

Women’s soccer edges FIU

When coach Bryan Bunn came to Raleigh, few Wolfpack volleyball fans could have expected him to turn the program around in the blink of an eye. This weekend showed that he is on track to doing just that. The Wolfpack left little doubt this past weekend as to who the best team competing at the Hilton RTP Invitational was this year, going 3-0 in its first home appearance of the season. “Winning is always better than losing,” Bunn said. “It’s something that the program hasn’t experienced in a while, so it’s something that the girls are very excited about what we’re doing.” The team started out the tournament on Friday with a 3-1 win over Georgia

Wednesday MEN’S SOCCER VS. VMI Dail Soccer Stadium, 7 p.m.

pressure on the quarterback.  The Lincolnton native also noted that linebacker coach Jon Tenuta’s blitz-happy approach, which he became infamous for during his days at Georgia Tech, has given the defense a new and exciting dynamic.  “It helps us out a lot,” Wilson said. “The balls are coming out fast and we need to react faster [than before].”  Another theme, aside from

New faces provide new results for Pack Agromeck Sports Editor

Tuesday WOMEN’S GOLF AT COUGAR CLASSIC Hanahan, S.C., all day MEN’S GOLF AT COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON INVITATIONAL Kiawah Island, S.C., all day

to extend the lead to 28-7 in the 3rd quarter was the first pick of the sophomore cornerback’s career. It was one of three interceptions that starting Knight quarterback Rob Calabrese ended up throwing after he entered the game with a streak of 98 consecutive passes without an interception.  “That’s how our defense works,” Wilson said. “We try to get turnovers and try to get

women’s soccer

Brent Kitchen

Monday WOMEN’S GOLF AT COUGAR CLASSIC Hanahan, S.C., all day MEN’S GOLF AT COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON INVITATIONAL Kiawah Island, S.C., all day

and the rest of the defense enjoyed the opportunity to carry an offense that often picked up the slack for the second-worst scoring defense in the ACC last season.  “They’ve kept us in games plenty of times before,” Cole said. “I think we owed them one. Whatever happened, we’ll get it fixed.”  C.J. Wilson’s 43-yard interception return for a touchdown

Volleyball

Volleyball goes undefeated in weekend tournament.

September 2010

Brent Kitchen/Technician

Freshman running back Mustafa Greene runs past the Catamount defense during the Wolfpack’s season opener Saturday, Sept. 4. Greene rushed the ball 10 times for 35 yards and a touchdown. N.C. State defeated Western Carolina 48-7.

finishing the game plus-five in the turnover department, was being able to capitalize on those opportunities. Despite a self-admitted disappointing offensive effort, Russell Wilson and Co. were able to convert the first three turnovers that Central Florida committed into touchdowns. After racing out to a 21-0 lead on the strength of Mustafa Greene and Dean Haynes rushing scores as well as Darrell Davis’ first ever collegiate touchdown catch, the offense only managed 85 yards the rest of the night. The Pack’s offensive struggles combined with strong play from Knights freshman quarterback Jeff Godfrey late in the third quarter to keep UCF in the game until Brandon Bishop forced a Quincey McDuffie fumble inside the Wolfpack’s 10-yard line with less than a minute to play.  Coach Tom O’Brien said he was relieved more than anything to escape Orlando with a victory after nearly letting go of a 21-point lead through the third quarter.  “That was a heck of a win for our team,” O’Brien said. “We thought we had things pretty much under control until they

Southern. The Pack followed up its first performance with a 3-0 victory Saturday morning over Mercer and finished its weekend off with a 3-0 win over Morehead State in the nightcap, bringing its overall record to 8-1. Much of the team’s success in the final game of the tournament came from an area the Pack has found itself much improved in—blocking. The Wolfpack out-blocked Morehead State 9-2, led by junior middle blocker Margaret Salata. Salata, who had one unassisted block and five block assists, attributes the improvement to new assistant coach Pete Hoyer. “Pete Hoyer, he knows how to teach how to block,” Salata said. “If you’re not clicking with him on how he’s saying something, he tries it another way. He doesn’t give up on you ever.” The Wolfpack also benefitted from a trio of outstanding transfers making their debut

Vball continued page 7

Wolfpack Women hold on to 1-0 halftime lead for win. Christina Owens Correspondent

Luis Zapata/Technician

Senior setter Alex Smith and junior over hitter Luciana Shafer raise there arms up for a team hug after scoring a point against Morehead State Saturday in Reynolds Coliseum.

The women’s soccer team outplayed Florida International to win 1-0, Sunday afternoon. After losing to East Carolina,0-1 in the first away game of the season Friday, N.C. State returned home and redeemed themselves with a win Sunday. Despite a number of opportunities on the offensive end, State was unable to come away with the victory against its instate rival due in large part to the play of East Carolina goalie Christiane Cordero, who made 11 saves. “It was a tough loss to ECU,” junior forward Tanya Cain said. “We don’t like losing against anyone, but especially

soccer continued page 3

Randy Woodson

Kelly Hook Student Body President

Tommy Anderson

Mark Thomas

Julius Hodge

Debra Morgan

Tyler Everett

Tucker Frazier

Sean Klemm

Chancellor

Deputy sports editor

Deputy sports editor

19-1 T-2nd

18-2 1st

17-3 T-9th

16-4 T-7th

18-2 T-9th

16-4 T-2nd

15-5 T-2nd

16-4 T-7th

18-2 T-2nd

17-3 T-2nd

WKNC General Manager

Co-host of 620 The Buzz’s “The Insiders”

Former Wolfpack basketball star

WRAL TV anchor

Sports editor

Deputy sports editor

Taylor Barbour

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

No. 13 Miami at No. 2 Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

Miami

Ohio State

Miami

Miami

Ohio State

Ohio State

Ohio State

No. 20 Florida State at No. 7 Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Florida State

Florida State

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Florida State

South Florida at No. 4 Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

Florida

NCSU at Central Florida

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

NCSU

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

No. 11 Oregon at Tennessee Duke at Wake Forest No. 23 Georgia at South Carolina Michigan at Notre Dame Colorado at California

Wake Forest

Duke

Duke

Duke

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

Duke

Wake

Wake

Wake

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

Georgia

South Carolina

Georgia

South Carolina

Michigan

Notre Dame

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Michigan

Notre Dame

Michigan

Notre Dame

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal


Technician - September 13, 2010  

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