Issuu on Google+

TECHNICIAN          

 

 

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Dan Allen gate approved The proposed gate to close off Dan Allen Drive has been approved.

Making a name for himself as undergrad After being published in journal Nature, Adam Keith credits his success to his alma mater.

Jessie Halpern News Editor

The N.C. State Office of Transportation approved a new plan to block off parts of Dan Allen Drive. Later this summer, the installation of new gates will cut off throughtraffic between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The gates will be located on either side of the railroad bridge, allowing only buses and University vehicles to pass. According to the Office of Transportation, this change is meant to increase the safety for drivers, bus passenger and pedestrians. By limiting access to Dan Allen Drive, Transportation hopes to increase the use of sustainable transportation and decrease the number of accidents.

1(:*$7(

the behavior of these phases using established physical laws and rely on complex models to examine their data. Some models can grow large enough where they can no longer be read on a standard computer. Noah Rouse That is where Keith and his team Correspondent stepped in. Keith spent his time at NIST solvWhile many PhD candidates are dreaming of the chance to be ing equations by hand and writpublished in a prestigious jour- ing code to numerically evaluate the quantities his nal, recent N.C. group was interState graduate ested in. NIST reAda m Keit h searchers used this made it his recode to compare ality when he his theory to their was published results. Keith said in Nature, an his method made international it much simpler to journal detailcreate large simuing the newest lations by allowing findings in scithem to evolve natence and mediurally, so it could be cine. Adam Keith, recent graduate read off the values Last summer, Keith and his colleagues at the of interest. Keith believes the method could National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at Boul- open the gateway to more ambider, Colo., undertook the task tious efforts like research into suof simplifying the rules of con- perconductivity and the possibility densed matter systems to make of exploring deeper questions conmore complex simulations pos- densed matter physicists are eager to explore. He joked, though, that sible. Condensed matter phys- he is a member of a team and not a ics examines the properties of standalone genius. “I actually did not write the pacondensed phases of solids and liquids. Physicists who work in the field attempt to understand NATURE continued page 3

“I am no genius, but I do feel I was well prepared to conduct this research...”

1(:*$7( 3URSRVHG'D\WLPH*DWH 3URSRVHG'D\WLPH&ORVXUH

'$1$//(1'5,9('$<7,0(&/2685(,03/(0(17$7,21678'<











 )HHW

LQFK IHHW

1&67$7(81,9(56,7< $SULO

New stents make for healthier hearts Noah Rouse Correspondent

Jordan Kaufmann, an alumna with a doctorate in biomedical engineering, has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the University of Texas to develop a new method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) using stent-grafts. Kaufmann’s inspiration for this method came from noticing the flaws of the current treatment, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). The method uses a physical object placed near the site of the aneurysm to strengthen the walls of the aorta. EVAR has strong results, but the risks of endoleaks—blood flow around the graft and into the aneurysm sac —persist. Kaufmann’s device, known as a stent-graft, improves the current procedure by using the body’s own tissue to repair the aneurysms and reduce the chance of rupture and endoleaks According to the CDC, abdominal aortic aneurysms is a condition where a section of the aortic artery, the tube which carries blood from the chest down through the abdomen, balloons to dangerous sizes, with some reaching sizes of seven centimeters or more. Prolonged swellings often result in rupture and subsequent death by internal bleeding, with a mortality rate as high as 90 percent. Doctors have recently seen a slow decline in deaths caused by the condition thanks to early screenings and medical advancements like those developed by Kaufmann. Her project has the potential to

improve treatment of patients with AAA and increase their lifespan with minimally invasive surgery. The device took years of hard work, perseverance and the mercy of the UT grant board, but Kaufmann credits the foundations of her skills to the engineering department here at N.C. State. “The device itself comes from my dissertation work in Biomedical Engineering at UTSA, but N.C. State provided me with not only the engineering background, but also how to think and overcome obstacles,” Kaufmann said. “Most engineers at N.C. State know that it’s not exactly an “easy A” degree. What they might not realize is that those hours spent trying to solve homework problems— sometimes unsuccessfully—not only teach you mechanics or differential equations, but they’re also teaching you to think and how to overcome failure.” Kauffman’s technical skills were not the only factor that led to her success. Her skills as both a businessperson and presenter were ultimately what helped convince the grant board that her work would guarantee success. “While at N.C. State I also had the opportunity to be a Franklin Scholar and worked on a degree in interpersonal communication, which has come in handy for the business side of this adventure,” Kaufmann said. “Then, of course, there were the design classes I took which gave me the very real (and very necessary) hands-on skills I needed to build equipment for my project.”

GRANT continued page 3

FIND US ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF HARRELSON HALL UNTIL THE NEW TALLEY STUDENT CENTER OPENS IN 2014 ncsu.edu/bookstore | bookstore@ncsu.edu | 919.515.2161

CHARLIE HARLESS/TECHNICIAN

Construction on the new Talley Student Center continues daily through both summer sessions as part one of renovations is set to open late 2013.

Talley renovations stay on track Despite upsets over fees, the University is excited to reveal the plans for Talley. Arth Pandya Senior Staff Writer

Construction for the new Talley Student Center on schedule, and the University is on track to finish phase one construction around September or October of next year. Despite ongoing construction, the center is still open and accessible to students. Despite recent concerns of going over budget with the project, the University has stayed on track, according to Dan Adams, associate vice chancellor for Campus Enterprises. “With a project like this, you’re always leery of costs going up,” Adams said. “We are on target financially. We will not have to go back and ask

for additional dollars.” The latest efforts are associated with the branding and graphics of the building, according to TJ Willis, assistant director of University Student Centers. “We’re establishing a look, identity, feel and character for [the building],” Willis said. The student body expressed frustration with the Talley plans in past years particularly with regard to increased student fees needed to finance the project, but Student Body President Andy Walsh isn’t concerned. “The most negative feedback is just about the fee in general. We need to move on from that conversion at this point,” Walsh said. “We need to make this the best student space that it can be.” The lack of excitement over the project in the past is attributable to

the lack of information available to students, according to Adams. “In my opinion, part of the resistance and bad feelings about the fee being moved forward with Talley have to do with students not knowing what they were paying for. There were no pictures, no visuals, no concepts of what it was,” Adams said. Adams believes students will begin to see a return on their investment once certain aspects of the project come to fruition. The University has set October 2012 as a big reveal date for certain information, such as venue names, logos and sample menus. “A lot of work has gone into what the space will look like, what foods are being served and how it can be special for students,” Adams said.

COMPARE TEXTBOOK CHOICES RENTALS NEW USED EBOOKS LAPTOPS SOFTWARE APPAREL MORE

TALLEY continued page 3

SCAN HERE

Jordan Kaufmann, a recent N.C. State graduate, changes medicine with development of artery stents.


THROUGH NATALIE’S LENS

Page 2 WEATHERWISE TODAY on campus FRI

SAT

SUN

H: 94° L : 71° MON

94°

TUE

WED

91° 88° 88° 88° 82° 84° 72° 71° 71° 69° 66° 68°

GAME

continued from page 7

Adapting to the controls is key, as ground fights quickly give way to aerial combat early in the game. New enemies are constantly introduced, with each one requiring a different approach. Kat may on ly have a few attacks, but the large number of enemies provides great variety and many opportunities to strategize. This is even more apparent in the game’s many boss fights. Learning how the larger monsters move and attack is important, as players will need to carefully time the use of their gravity kick ability to land a hit. The gravity mechanic is easily the shining star of the game, but it’s also easy to see how it won’t be for everyone. The constant need to reorient the camera and keep track of where you are in the sky will be off-putting to some. However, those who stick with it will find one of the best aerial combat systems available outside of a flight simulator.

In fact, the weakest part of Gravity Rush comes when Kat is on the ground. Basic combat is a buttonmashing chore, while the touchscreen-based gravity slide maneuver is sloppy and hard to control. Fortunately, taking to the skies is almost always an option. Gravity Rush also has a lot to of fer outside of tackling story missions. A n up grade system allows players to customize Kat’s abilities to their liking, while challenge missions give gamers a chance to test their skills in races and arena fights. Simply put, Gravity Rush is a must-play for Vita owners. Though it has the rough edges one might expect from a new IP, there’s still a great deal of polish on display. As a superhero game, a handheld title and proof of the potential of the PS Vita, they don’t come much better than Gravity Rush.

“Simply put, Gravity Rush is a must-play for Vita owners...”

Getting ‘ant’-sy PHOTO BY NATALIE CLAUNCH

P

rofessor Harold Heatwole records the behavior of ant species living symbiotically in an acacia bush in Ometepe, Nicaragua. The ants live in hollow thorns and eat Beltian bodies, which the plant produces solely for the ants’ consumption. In return, the ants defend the plant against potential grazers with powerful stings. Many of the videos Heatwole records in the field are available to view in the Zoology section of the North Carolina Learning Objects Repository, which is a free resource for educators throughout the state.

A King’s insight Jennifer Jung Staff Writer

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! BE THE FIRST TO SEE IT

FREE MOVIE PASSES Available for these showings:

People Like Us

Just stop by the Technician office, 307 Witherspoon Student Center, to get your free movie passes! Passes are valid at any Raleigh area Regal Cinema. Movie pass giveaway is limited to NC State students only. Limit one pair of passes per student. Passes are issued on a first come first serve basis. Contact your local Regal Cinema for movie times.

Technician interviewed rapper King Mez about his new album, released Wednesday. Here are his comments on his music and his personal life. Technician: What inspires you? Would any of your inspirations surprise some of your fans? Mez: People don’t expect me to like a lot of different things. I like anime but as far as music, I like Led Zeppelin. I like Japanese Cartoon. I like Avenged Sevenfold. I like rock and that’s probably something you’d hear in my music. But I like all types of music. I like classical sometimes really but rock is my heaviest inf luence. All different types of things influence me. I like Banksy I like his thought process and his

state of mind... He’s like my favorite artist because he does some crazy crazy things. The best part about music is incorporating your whole life. Everything that you do should inspire you. Everything in life should inspire you and I think that’s what makes people different and that’s what makes music different. I think sometimes, people try to follow a certain type of subject matter, and that’s when [music] becomes redundant and it’s not really appealing. It’s not really different or refreshing so I like to make sure I’m sticking to whatever I like and incorporating everything I like into my music. That’s what’s really important. T: What’s your favorite food?

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS In June 14th’s story “College: Is it worth your time?” the info-graphic referred to tuition ($18,855 in-state and $31,90 out-of-state) for fall of 2011, but the numbers correlate to the 2011-2012 school year, including student fees and room and board. Technician regrets these errors. Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

POLICE BLOTTER June 7 3:26 P.M. | SKATEBOARD VIOLATION Case Athletic Center Report of skateboard violations. Skaters fled upon officer arrival.

8:59 P.M. | SPEEDING Main Campus Drive Staff Member was cited for speeding. June 8 2:05 P.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON D.H. Hill Library Report of subject causing disturbance. Officer located non-student who had been previously trespassed. Subject was issued citation for 2nd Degree Trespass and retrespassed from NCSU property. June 9 5:18 A.M. | FIRE ALARM Gold Hall Units responded to alarm caused by water flow dry system. FP responded to address issue.

CAMPUS CALENDAR June 2012 Su

M

T

W

Th

F

Sa

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Thursday THE HELP 07:00 p.m. - 09:00 p.m. Witherspoon Student Center Friday LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW Last day to withdraw or drop a course without a grade Monday TRANSFER ORIENTATION 08:00 a.m. - 05:00 p.m. Tuesday WRATH OF THE TITANS 07:00 p.m. - 09:00 p.m. Witherspoon Student Center

M: Meatloaf with cheese in the middle. It has to be cooked exquisitely though. T: Favorite movie? M: Rocky IV. T: Favorite music artist? M: Probably Nas. Nasir Jones. T: Demi Lovato or Taylor Swift? M: Taylor Swift. T: What is the weirdest thing that has ever happened to you? Weird fan encounter? M: See —it’s weird when you’re first coming up and you’re not used to people knowing who you are before you speak to them. One time, I went to the fair with my girlfriend and there were people pointing at me and I was just so uncomfortable. I was like, “Man, I wonder what’s going on?” One kid eventually walked up to me and told me he was the biggest fan.


News PHOTOILLU

STRATION

BY CHARLI

E HARLESS

Faculty and staff to pay for GoPass Non-students using the city transportation pass will incur an annual $25 fee beginning in August. Laura Wilkinson Deputy News Editor

The GoPass, which allows students, faculty and staff to ride Capital Area Transit and Triangle Transit buses for free, will be available from N.C. State Transportation in early July. In the past the bus pass was free for both students and non-students, but this year faculty and staff will pay an annual fee of $25. Christine Klein, public communications specialist

with N.C. State Transportation, said the change was to make the system more equitable for students and nonstudents. “Some of the funding for GoPass comes out of the student transit fee and it wasn’t equitable for students to be paying for a portion of the GoPass and faculty and staff to not be contributing at all,” Klein said. The $25 charge for faculty and staff is equal to about 5-12 round-trip rides on CAT or TT buses. Brian O’Sullivan, university program manager for N.C. State Transportation, said GoPass recipients are approximately 20 percent

employees and 80 percent students. Between 2010 and 2011, approximately 8,500 passes were distributed and in the 2011-2012 year, there were nearly 9,700 distributed. “While a GoPass can be used on any route on either system [CAT or TT], our emphasis is on paying for the trips for the services that would bring people to campus and take them from campus,” O’Sullivan said. Rick Gardner, associate director of Campus Activities, uses the GoPass to get to and from work about twice a week. Other than saving two days worth of gas, Gardner said it’s a more sustainable option and gives him time

BREAKING DOWN THE EXPERIENCE: Program: Research Experience for Undergraduates Location: National Institute of Science and Technology Research Journal: Nature Field: Condensed Matter Physics SOURCE: ADAM KEITH

PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS

Recent graduate Adam Keith works in a physics lab at N.C. State.

to socialize and prepare for the day. Although he is not excited about paying for the pass next year, Gardner said he will still purchase one because it will pay for itself, since the pass costs less than paying for one full tank of gas. “I’m disappointed that they feel they need to charge us for the GoPass. However, I understand the economics of the situation,” Gardner said. “I wish they could have found another way to get that money without having to charge us for it.” According to the University Cashier’s Office, full-time undergraduate students will each pay $71.30 this fall in

NATURE

continued from page 1

per, although a section in the supplementary materials was based on my writing,” Keith said. “My contribution was the theory and code that allowed the experimentalists to correctly interpret their results. So, I literally could not have done it without the experimental work done by Joe Britton, Brian Sawyer and John Bollinger at NIST,

transit operations fees, and a portion of that fee will pay for students to have a GoPass if they wish. Klein said one benefit of the program is the ability to visit other nearby universities for free, whereas some colleges, like UNC-Chapel Hill, charge students for non-campus bus transportation. “You can use GoPass and go visit your friends at that other university for free, but it’s not the case for them. They have to pay to come and see you,” Klein said. This year’s pass will be valid from Aug. 4, 2012 to Aug. 3, 2013. Passes may be ordered online and will arrive via mail, though they can be

picked up directly at the N.C. State Transportation office for a $5 rush processing fee. Bryan Hum, a senior in international studies, said he likes riding the bus for free instead of wasting gas on trips downtown or to Chapel Hill to visit friends. “I don’t think it’s fair for students to have to pay for both students and members of the public to ride the buses, so I’m glad the University decided to decrease some of that burden on students,” Hum said.

and Jim Freericks and Joseph Wang at Georgetown University.” Keith credited the University with laying the foundation underpinning his success. “I’m no genius, but I do feel I was well prepared to conduct this research and am confident that several others in my graduating class would have done equally well at doing this work,” Keith said. “That is to say, I am comfortable with the caricature of a ‘boy genius’ if it repre-

sents the degree to which the physics department at N.C. State prepared me to solve problems. We’re physicists - we’re all ‘geniuses.’ I am nothing super special in my own community.” Keith plans to attend graduate school at the University of Colorado at Boulder and continue working on similar research, if not the same project.

GRANT

continued from page 1

*In House Movie Theater*24 hour GYM* ON THEWOLFLINE!*2 Resort Pools*BarkPark!*HUGE walk-in Closets*Washer and Dryers*Ultra Level Tanning Bed*9 foot ceilings* All Inclusive Rent*Garages*Private Bedroom Suites with Privacy Locks*Resident Parties* SCAN ME to experience life @ THEEDGE!

To other N.C. State students who wish to put their degrees to full use, Kaufmann said your degree is what you make of it. “People knew I had a good education, and that gives you a slight leg up, but you have to keep working,” Kaufmann said. “I would also suggest diversifying. Knowing your specialty is great, but knowing a little bit about a few other areas is even better.” Kauffman already has big plans for the money she’s been awarded. Over the next five years, she hopes to continue to develop her device while growing her company. Her chief goal, however, is to one day sell her equipment or license it to a larger medical company where victims of AAA worldwide may benefit from her work.

TALLEY

continued from page 1

“We’ve worked with consultants on what is the best way to deliver the items students have asked for. We have done a lot of homework on this to make sure we’ve done this right,” Adams said. Last week, a group from N.C. State went to Chicago to attend NEOCON, a furniture expo, where they selected products for the new building. “A major takeaway was to see things more conceptually and to test out the fit,” Willis said. “We looked at things we had picked out, at certain items we thought we liked, things we couldn’t get samples of.” The goal is to create a more

PHOTO COURTESY OF JORDAN KAUFMANN

Jordan Kaufmann, a recent graduate with a PhD in biomedical engineering, received a grant from the University of Texas to continue improving cardiovascular stent methods.

collaborative, flexible space that will be more adaptable to changes in the future, according to Willis. Walsh tweeted live from the conference, posting pictures of various products in order to gauge student opinion. “Student feedback is important the entire way through. It is our building, so to have our input is a vital step in the process,” Walsh said. Adams said the new Talley will be an iconic structure and will symbolize the University’s commitment and pride in its students and community once the project is finished. “N.C. State has not yet seen the impact that this building will have on our students and campus,” Adams said. The University has scheduled a steel signing ceremony

for Wolfpack Welcome Week. “We want to get students engaged with the project from the start. It’s something more tangible, something exciting to look forward to. Taking those concepts to reality will boost people’s excitement,” Willis said. As the fall semester nears, there may be certain challenges, such as noise from construction and students in residential areas close to the project. However, the University is coordinating with the Office of Transportation to minimize the impact. “You have to understand is that this is urban construction,” Adams said. “We’re going to keep on top of things to keep people up to date on what will happen.”


PA

GE

Viewpoint

DAY, JUNE 21 URS , 20 TH 12 • 4

TECHNICIAN

{ AHMED’S VIEW }

BICYCLE

F

or the past week I’ve been marinating in a giant bowl of mixed emotions. Unlike my usual marinade of awesomeness and sheer brilliance, this one was one part sadness and four parts anger, with a little denial for added zest. You see, readers, I’ve been dealing with a tragic loss. The name Ahmed Salah Mohammad Metwally Amer is synonymous with composure, but today I write with a sad, yet pouty and sexy face. As of June 6, 2012, my brightly colored yellow and red bicycle was vandalized and stolen from campus. The bike, which garnered attention from hordes of lustful women, was a gift from my sister. You see, even earlier in the semester I faced yet another tragic loss when my minivan, Big Red, died on the side of I-40 East. The bike was given with the intent to quell my mental anguish. Much like the lives of the bike thieves, this story begins with a mistake. At some point between me se-

in vain. Campus police would not help me get my bike. Each time I was rushed off of the phone, and that baffled me. What else could campus police be preoccupied with? I made sure to tell them how important I am right off the bat. I always introduce myself by saying “Hi, I’m Ahmed Salah Mohammad Metwally Amer, and I manage one page in a student newspaper.” What kind of world do we live in where the individual isn’t more important than the community? This ordeal put me in the frustrating position of wanting my bike while being unable to retrieve it myself or prove that it was mine; this left the McDonald’s themed ride susceptible to theft.

curing my yellow and red lady-magnet to the bike-rack and returning later that evening to ride it to my apartment, I lost the keys to my U-bolt lock. It was frustrating to have lost my keys, but being the calm, levelheaded individual that I am, I knew to call campus police for help. At least that’s what I thought... Apparently the only proof of ownership campus police can accept is a receipt. Let’s face it, who keeps receipts for everything they buy, let alone gifts? My only proof was a time-stamped photo on my phone from earlier in the year, but that wasn’t good enough. I called campus police several times to speak with different representatives in hopes that each one would be more understanding than the one before. After the first few times, I got the feeling that they were getting a little frustrated with me, so I disguised myself with a fake moustache, but my attempts were

GRIEF

I came to campus the next day to check up on my bicycle, and that’s when I saw the product of the heinous crime. The once sleek, black frame bent and twisted beyond repair, the U-bolt no longer physically represented its namesake. Although the thieves were unable to remove t he lo c k and frame, they were still going to leave with something—the wheels. To add i nsu lt to injury, dangling from the handlebars was a ticket from the University saying that the bicycle appeared to be abandoned and would be surplussed if not retrieved. Judging from my experience, I think it’s apparent that campus police likes to make little girls cry,

“What kind of world do we live in where the individual isn’t more important than the community?”

in that I cried like a little girl. What if other organizations acted as campus police did? Firefighters would refuse to get family pets from trees. Truckers wouldn’t stop to offer rides to strangers. It’s safe to say that the world would be a sad and chaotic place. So how do I go about seeking justice? If you’re an avid reader, you’ll recall the foundation I started earlier this year called PONY 2012; the foundation is dedicated to providing me with a horse. Since campus police’s unwillingness to help indirectly led to the theft of my bike, I think a fair and equitable remedy would be for them to give me one of the horses I see them riding in the Brickyard, or at least let me ride it once. The ball’s in your court, campus police.

Ahmed Amer, Viewpoint Editor

{ LAUREN’S VIEW }

Lauren 2.0: The Avocado on top of the Southwestern Salad

T

here was once a time in my life when I was a far inferior version of the majestic woman that I embody today. I know that this may be hard to believe, even though the majority of you don’t even know me, but it’s true. I am confident enough in the woman that I have become to state this as more than just a dramatic hyperbole but as fact. Though perhaps I should take a second of your editorial browsing time to explain exactly how and when this transformation came about and moreover, what it entails. Over the past few months, while all of my friends were slaving away and receiving their higher education at the fine institution of N.C. State, I was doing quite the opposite. I was engaging in the collegiate privilege of studying abroad in a country known more for their wine and naptime than probably any other country in the world. To begin, I should explain that the title “study abroad” is quite the misnomer, in that I believe I logged about two weeks of studying academic material during the entire semester. However, I believe that throughout the course of the semester, I was able to study different aspects of life that may in fact be more vital to my very existence than “Masterpieces of Spanish Literature,” but please don’t report me to my professor. While abroad, I was able to gain the cliché survival skills that one must acquire when they are living halfway around the world and can’t cry to their mom at home when something goes awry. Thus, I was able to become a more independent version

of myself: Lauren 2.0, if you will. I was no longer afraid to walk alone in a big city at night, despite the horror stories that my mother and society has hammered into my skull about the degenerates that lurk around in the shadows. I was no longer worried about much at all except for doing things that I wanted to do myself, which I would consider to be the most important survival skill that I adapted in the concrete jungle of Madrid. After all, what’s wrong with being selfish? What’s wrong with putting yourself first in your list of priorities? Su re , t h i s contradicts the early elementary teachings of our parents and Sunday school teachers, but I honestly believe that adolescents are just too preoccupied with how their actions will be perceived by others that they don’t allow themselves to engage in the whims of their true desires. So this is my proposal, I advise that the maybe three of you that are reading this lovely piece of rudimentary prose join me in my endeavor to keep Lauren 2.0 alive. If you so desire, you can alter the name to one more suitable for you, but I also wouldn’t be opposed it if you kept it out of mere dedication to your inspiration. Now, there are not many guidelines for keeping Lauren 2.0 (or Caleb 2.0/ Gina 2.0/Katie 2.0/etc.) alive

“After all, what’s wrong with being selfish? What’s wrong with putting yourself first in your list of priorities? ”

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

except for your utmost devotion to engaging in activities that you have always wanted to do but found yourself being held back. There should be no limitations (except for perhaps the pesky legal regulations that might try to stand in your way), therefore if you want to go see an adorable British boy band yet have no one to go with, go alone and sing your heart out like it’s 1999. If you want to take a risqué dance class that can also be coupled as a form of exercise, have at it and shake your groove thing. If you want to act out the entire string of events listed in Katy Perry’s p op s ong , “TGIF”, take it one step further, dye your hair whatever color she is sporting that day and go crazy. Push away all inhibitions that you might have about being seen as “silly”, “weird” or “downright stupid” because if you are 100 percent happy and content with what you are doing, then what should it matter what other people think about it? Once this realization has come to form, you will find yourself with a happier outlook on life, and that, my friends, is like the delicious avocado on the southwestern salad. Lauren Noriega, senior in business administration

Noah Rouse, Correspondent

{ OUR VIEW }

Reducing traffic, but not headaches Crossing Dan Allen Drive on at noon during the semester requires focus for any pedestrian running to commuter parking or to the dorms. The rush of traffic, pedestrians and bikers resemble a clogged artery. By 5 p.m., that clogged artery is a traffic heart attack. Cutting through campus on Dan Allen has been a n e f f icient way for many motorists to nav igate north and south through this area of Raleigh, but the occasional crossing of pedestrians has created a dangerous stop-and-go traffic pattern. The University’s solution? Get rid of traffic completely—at least between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. T houg h t h i s mea-

sure will increase safety on Dan Allen, it will make the cut from Hillsborough to Western considerably more congested—and with the Belltower roundabout going from two lanes to one, expect traffic delays. The major changes of this area of the city have been conceived to improve safety, but no danger will be avoided until drivers understand the changes. Tr a f f i c o n Dan A l len may very well get worse, with drivers ma k i ng Uturns more disruptive than normal congestion. However, there is no doubt that this flow will feel normal in time. A faster bus system will be a tangible benefit, and that will encourage students to use it more frequently. Before more changes are made, N.C. State Transportation and the city of Raleigh

“However, there is no doubt that this flow will feel normal in time.”

Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring

News Editor Jessie Halpern

Sports Editor Sean Fairholm

Design Editor Bradley Guidry

editor@technicianonline.com

news@technicianonline.com

sports@technicianonline.com

design@technicianonline.com

Advertising Manager Olivia Pope

Managing Editor Trey Ferguson

Features Editor Young Lee & Jordan Alsaqa

Viewpoint Editor Ahmed Amer

Photo Editor Charlie Harless

advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

photo@technicianonline.com

managingeditor@technician online.com 515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

You know what they say about Dan Allen Drive, Charlie. Nobody comes in, and nobody comes out!

features@technicianonline.com

THE FACTS: N.C. State Transportation will install a gate on Dan Allen Drive to limit access and improve safety for pedestrians.

OUR OPINION:

The changes will improve pedestrian safety for those living on West Campus, but be prepared for traffic and angry motorists.

must let drivers acclimate. Perhaps consider the changes at the Belltower roundabout a lesson: Making novel changes may exacerbate poor traffic. Nevertheless, once Raleigh drivers acclimate to the initial inconvenience, campus safety will improve, especially considering the risks an open campus poses. Though drivers may be temporarily upset, as long as increased safety is the net benefit, it will be worth the hassle. But that’s what the city of Raleigh said when instilling the first traffic circle by the University.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features 7+5($7

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 5 â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012

$1$/<=,1*7+(5($/ 2)9,578$/(1(0,(6

THE RESULTS OF THE ANDROID MALWARE GENOME PROJECT BENEFIT USERS OF ANDROID TECHNOLOGY STORY BY ABHISHEK SVAMI | GRAPHIC BY MENGCHAO LAI

W

ith the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers around the world now have a better understanding of the human body. When it is possible to map out all of the information in a human being, researchers are able to directly confront and challenge the problems that have plagued the human race for a millennia. However, as technology increases, a new phenomenon is creating a lot of problems for the human race: malicious software, also known as malware. However, Xuxian Jiang, a computer science researcher, has reached a breakthrough in malware analysis mirroring the breakthrough achieved with the Human Genome Project. With Jiangâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Android Malware Genome project, he hopes to help the fight against malware and create a safer experience for users of this technology. The number of smartphone shipments have tripled in the past three years. However, due to the widespread use of this technology, malware is much more potent. Popular platforms such as Android, are a particular concern for researchers and users due to its penetration of the market. Difficulties with malware are no longer uncommon and is something that many students like Ashray Nagaraju, a graduate student in computer science, have experienced firsthand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One day, I happened to receive a text message [on my smartphone] contain-

ing a link accompanied by a message that indicated the need for a system upgrade. I clicked the link [and]... after a few days I observed that text messages were being sent automatically from my Android device, phone calls were getting connected randomly and unknown apps were being downloaded and installed... I totally freaked out. I had no option but to format my entire smartphone and start again, losing critical information,â&#x20AC;? Nagaraju said. The inconvenience Nagaraju experienced is just one example of the damage that malware can cause. Malware has potential to do much greater harm. According to Jiang, researchers and users have tried to defend against and halt the spread of malware, but they hit a roadblock due to a lack of understanding and a information. Because of this Jiang began to analyze and characterize existing Android malware. In May, Jiang and his team released

a paper describing the work of him and his team at the Proceedings of the 33rd Institute of Electrical Electronics Engineers Symposium on Security and Privacy in San Francisco. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Defense capability is largely constrained by the limited understanding of these emerging mobile malware and lack of timely access to related samples. Our research community needs to do a better job of sharing data if we want to develop timely, next-generation mobile security solutions,â&#x20AC;? Jiang said in a statement on his website. Jiang and his team hope that by publicizing their dataset of 1,260 Andriod Malware samples will help achieve these new security solutions. However, simply collecting the data was, of course, not the only thing that Jiang accomplished as part of the Android Malware Genome Project. Jiang

MALWARE continued page 7

    (14 #..FNEF

     ` Formerly University Village

   

PGKI

recommended by students

.11-n.'#5'61&#; #0&4'%'+8'PFNN^ Currently waiving all fees!

PE  x   

FXG14H'&411/59+6*    Sharing bathrooms is not cool.

#8#+.#$.'6+.+6;#%-#)'5j0''06*'%-#;5 6..k Why waste time on utilities, when you could waste it on something else?

72)4#&'&7:74;11.j+6*#$#0#5n170)'4'#5k No need to go to the Shore.

72)4#&'&FHg 174 +60'55'06'4X

 4''#00+0)X#5*'4n4;'4 0 #%*0+6 GTL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gym. Tan. Laundry. The only way to live.

72)4#&'&FHg 174 #/'11/ Game on.

72)4#&'& #56'4#$.'n 06'40'6 Facebook & Twitter just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait.

1X9*#6+5*'#.'+)*`

2.#%'#..#$176^ (and your friends too)

MEMTKIHTMEGEŠ*'#.'+)*T%1/

#%'$11-T%1/f*'#.'+)* GGGG'.415'.7$.8&T (on the corner of Trailwood and Lineberry)

HOME OF


PAGE 6 â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012

Features

TECHNICIAN

King Mez: Zeal for the throne

The power of storytelling

My Everlasting Zeal, King Mezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest album was released on June 20.

When Tim Rosenbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer internship fell through, he decided to create his own path.

Jennifer Jung

Jennifer Jung

Staff Writer

Staff Writer

Young Lee Associate Features Editor

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just know I want that throne/It donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gotta be the main one/As long as donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t nobody living has the same one.â&#x20AC;? These are the words of Morris Wayne Ricks II in his song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reign,â&#x20AC;? a track from his new album, My Everlasting Zeal. Ricks is more popularly known as King Mez, one of the most heralded rappers to ever represent Raleigh. The feelings expressed in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reignâ&#x20AC;? have guided Ricks ever since he decided he wanted to pursue rapping. Inspired by the vibes of legendary hip hop artists like Biggie Smalls at an age where he admits was probably too young to fully understand the genre,Mez began rapping at the age of nine. From there, Ricks worked his way up from casual rap battles in middle school to recording in high schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and most recently leaving college to pursue rapping as a full-time career. On June 20, Ricks finally released My Everlasting Zeal, which he considers to be his first album. For Ricks, the album not only represents another chance for his fans to enjoy his music, but also the next step in achieving

PHOTO BY: CHARLIE HARLESS

Raleigh-based hip-hop Morris Wayne Ricks II, otherwise known as King Mez, released his latest album, My Everlasting Zeal, on June 20.

his dream - or what he some- more... [If you stick to one style], youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d end up only times calls his â&#x20AC;&#x153;throne.â&#x20AC;? Sonically, the 14 tracks that making one kind of music make up My Everlasting Zeal that only one particular fan is different from what Ricks base can listen to and be hapsees as the classic â&#x20AC;&#x153;samplingâ&#x20AC;? py about.â&#x20AC;? Ricks said. With an aggressive f low production style North Carand charisma ol i na rappers and with smooth are known for. production T h i s producfrom producers tion style uses li ke Commissmall snippets sioner Gordon, of other songs to Soundtrakk and create a new and even J.Cole - My unique sound. Everlasting Zeal While Ricks still shows that Ricks loves sampling, King Mez has the ability to he believes My carry hip hop to Everlasting Zeal represents an exciting new new levels. My Everlasting Zeal departs frontier for North Carolina from convention in more hip-hop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I still love to sample, but ways than one. The concept samples alone donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feed my album is a welcome return creative style as much any- to tradition from the recent

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want everybody to hear me... but I want to stay hereâ&#x20AC;?

trend of hip-hop albums that sound like a simple collection of singles. My Everlasting Zeal creates an arc that mimics the passage from morning to evening. Ricks is proud of how the concept turned out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all cohesive.â&#x20AC;? Ricks said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so cohesive to the point where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the sound of the first couple of songs are like morning, and [the album] goes from morning to afternoon to night, and you can feel it.â&#x20AC;? With coverage from popular hip hop culture media outlets like XXL and The Source, Ricks is on track to become one of the next big names in hip hop. No mat-

Tim Rosenberg, a senior in graphic design, was packed and ready to take a flight to Los Angeles for his internship when just two hours before his departure, he received an email telling him that his internship fell through and there was not a position for him. Nevertheless, Rosenberg boarded the plane with no expectations whatsoever. Tim Rosenberg, a senior in graphic design, was packed and ready to take a flight to Los Angeles for his internship when just two hours before his departure, he received an email telling him that his internship fell through and there was not a position for him. Nevertheless, Rosenberg boarded the plane with no expectations whatsoever. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just decided â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You know what? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any promise of really anything in California, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just going

to hop on the plane and embrace life and just say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;yesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to see whatever life gives me.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Rosenberg said. Rosenberg said this outlook helped him reach ach ievement s he never thought possible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just having an extraordinary time...â&#x20AC;? Rosenberg said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Basically I have all the free time I want ... Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m making about three times as much as I would working nine to five [and]... I basically make my own rates, make my own hours, and I work at homeâ&#x20AC;? Rosenberg said he accomplished it all thanks to the power of stories and storytelling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[For] three years, all I did was meet new people and listen to their story...â&#x20AC;? Rosenberg said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I met people especially through a network for couch surfing... an extraordinary number of people, people who are doing interesting things.â&#x20AC;? With stories from Ukrainian tango dancers, Argentinean drummers and Roman artists ingrained in his mind, Rosenberg said he wanted to fully immerse himself in the craft of storytelling. Coupling this realization w it h h i s background in design, Rosenberg quickly worked up the plans for his new project: Quillor. The project connects peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stories

MEZ continued page 7

RETREATRALEIGH.COM LIVE THE COTTAGE

Raleigh NC 27607

RY

con tin

ue

 

        

2416 Hillsborough St

STO

919.755.7877

dp

ag

e7


Features

TECHNICIAN

STORY

continued from page 6

through handwritten letters. Rosenberg decided to take a semester off to fully focus on the Quillor concept rather than homework â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I realized the direction that I wanted to take, the path for me became very clear,â&#x20AC;? Rosenberg said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew that in order to pursue this project, i couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in school because school was taking

MALWARE continued from page 5

and his team also tracked the times in which the different Malware samples attacked. This has been instrumental in revealing major outbreaks of different Android malware while shedding light on possible defenses. In addition to breakthroughs related to analyzing malware attacks, the Android Malware Genome Project also pointed out flaws in current malware defense. By analyzing the changes in malware design between August 2010 and October 2011, Jiang and his researchers tracked the rate of changes in malware development. Unfortunately for users depending on older methods of preventing malware, Jiang found that many anti-malware solutions are seriously lagging behind rapidly evolving malware threats. Taking the next step forward in mitigating malware threats in mobile platforms like Android and in an effort to engage the research com-

up so much time and giving me so less in return.â&#x20AC;? Anyone who is interested in being featured on Quillor can send in a handwritten letter detailing an interesting event in their lives â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a defining moment, a serendipitous event or an educational hardship. In return for what the story teaches, a letter written by someone else is sent to the previous writer to teach them something new. Rosenberg hopes to collect the letters and publish them in the future. Wendy Bry-

munity to better our understanding and defense, the researchers released the mobile malware data set to a total of 93 universities, research labs and companies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Based on the feedback we get from the industry and research community, we will release more data in the second part of the project,â&#x20AC;? Jiang said. Jiang is happy to note that the research community has taken it very seriously to wipe out the mobile malware completely of our smartphones. As smartphone users, we can expect that the coming days will be safer and malware free, thanks to the idea known as the Andriod Malware Genome Project.

POLICY

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

DEADLINES

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

ant Gow, a client of Rosenbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and CEO of the Lily Winston image consulting and wardrobe styling firm, was featured on Quillor. He found her path to success inspiring and asked to have it featured as a story. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My story reaches out to women specifically because we can accomplish anything, and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize how strong, capable, and business-minded we are,â&#x20AC;? Gow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to help other women and inspire them. If I can do it,

MEZ

continued from page 6

ter where his career takes him, though, Ricks said his â&#x20AC;&#x153;throneâ&#x20AC;? will always be one with Raleigh at its center â&#x20AC;&#x153;[My dream] is about getting my music to everybody,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want everybody hear me... but I want to stay here. I got to come back to Raleigh at some point. I want an apartment right above Glenwood. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I want. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my dream.â&#x20AC;?

then so can they.â&#x20AC;? With his full focus on promoting Quillor and continuing his freelance career, Rosenberg has learned the importance of taking risks and embracing the unknown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t jump out and go out to a new country, take a small step,â&#x20AC;? Rosenberg said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the small steps like taking the bus to New York City that has given me the confidence to hop on a plane to go to California and study abroad in Italy.â&#x20AC;? Rosenberg said he

PAGE 7 â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012

believes in the importance of his workâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s representation rather than simply the income associated with each project. Rosenberg was once offered a chance to work with a company that asked him to develop a website similar to tuckermax.com, a site in which a man details his drunken sexual encounters. Rosenberg walked into the job interview and explained his decision not to sign the nondisclosure agreement because he found the contents

of the Web site offensive and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be associated with it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you take the small steps in that direction, it only leads to more steps further in that direction, and even though I could have used the finances to help me settle in California, it is actually more expensive to compromise your integrity than it is to gain short-term cash.â&#x20AC;?

A new Vita game that rarely falls flat An adrenaline â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for Vita owners provides everything needed for a fun shooter. Jordan Alsaqa Associate Features Editor

While the PlayStation Vita hit the market with an impressive variety of games, the past few months have seen few titles worth getting excited about. Outside of ports like Disgaea 3 and mediocre releases like Resistance: Burning Skies, Vita owners have been experiencing a post-launch drought. While the PlayStation Vita hit the market with an impressive canon of games, the past few months have seen few titles worth getting excited about. Outside of ports like Disgaea 3 and mediocre releases like Resistance: Burning Skies,

Classifieds

Vita owners have seen a postlaunch drought. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all changed with the release of Gravity Rush. Featuring a unique new gameplay mechanic, tight controls and a solid story, this handheld action game has brought the Vita its first true killer app, one any owner of the system should check out. In Gravity Rush, players take on the role of Kat, a girl who awakens in the city Hekseville, which is under attack from a mysterious race known as the Nevi. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take Kat long to learn that, with the help of her cat Dusty, she has the ability to manipulate gravity. With no memory of her past, Kat decides to use her newfound powers to protect the city and discover what ties she has to the mysterious Nevi. In terms of narrative, Gravity Rush does a good job of making familiar tropes feel fresh again. A main character with amnesia is nothing new,

but the game avoids the issue by focusing the mystery of the story on Hekseville itself. Further, the presentation of the story does a great job pulling players in. Gravity Rush plays out like a superhero origin story, and the game embraces its origin with comic book panels used in cut scenes and a highly episodic plot progression. Kat even receives a superhero name from the citizens. Where Gravity Rush truly shines, though, is in the titular gravity mechanic. At any time, players can tap a button and send Kat floating into the air. By repositioning the camera, they can then change the orientation of the gravity around Kat to send her flying through the air. While the controls take a little getting used to, zipping around the sky, walking on the ceiling and dive bombing enemies quickly become second nature.

GAME continued page 2

RATES

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds

ANNOUNCEMENTS

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

AROUND CAMPUS

HELP WANTED

P/T LANDSCAPE HELPER NEEDED NOW

HELP WANTED Part-time Retail Sales

HELP WANTED

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR RENT

Go Bananaz is Hiring

with small company. 3 miles from

Omega Sports in Raleigh area is

Go Bananaz is Now Hiring

seeking sales associates. Training,

Floor Attendants & a Shift leader.

camden crossing townhome

buying discounts, incentives,

A fun place where families & kids

3 bed, 2.5 bath around the corner from

enjoy arcade games, inflatables,

NC State. Perfect for students or young

& mechanical rides. If interested, stop

family. Includes wash/dryer, new

by Saturday or Sunday ONLY

carpet. Community pool. Available

Technician Classifies are a great way to

Evenings & Weekends, Cafe Co-

campus. Flexible hours (10+/weekly).

buy, sell, or rent property. Also a great

worker. We will train you to grind

Starting salary $8.50/hr. Previous

place to post and apply for a job. Visit

espresso and spin crepes - talents that

experience preferred. Basic carpentry

flexible schedules. Email resume to

technicianonline.com/classifieds today

will certainly wow your friends and

skills desirable. Call 779-2596. Leave

blaughton@omegasports.net and

to place your ad. Technician publishes

intimidate your enemies! Flexible hours

message.

once a week on Thursdays during

for fun, friendly and reliable persons.

and speak with Jo.

08/07.

summer school.

Tips and frequent-payout bonus too.

6022 Duraleigh Rd, Raleigh

Email amospllc@yahoo.com

include phone number.

Our success is your success! See www.coffeeandcrepes.com. Please call Andres 919-971-2601 to apply. FOR RELEASE MARCH 14, 2011

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis



 $   #   ! 0//4 # ' & /43-36.6'521'63-- 



.-9!  #   *3     ( % !  #   '

 &  "    %

ACROSS 1 World Wide __ 4 Gunpowder element 10 Turns seaward 14 Firefighterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tool 15 Dream up 16 Losing strategy? 17 Lather-holding cup 19 Homely fruit 20 Eye part containing the pupil 21 Timeline divisions 23 Habit wearer 24 Kimono sashes 25 Sock menderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tool 28 Magi 30 Sweden neighbor 31 Utmost degree 32 Church instrument 35 Flag maker Betsy 36 Violin knob for pitch adjustments 38 â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ to that!â&#x20AC;? 40 Ecstatic way to walk 41 Roman 700 44 1992 Olympic skating champ Yamaguchi 46 As an alternative 48 Retriever or pointer 51 Heidiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heights 52 2011 minus year of birth, roughly 53 It replaced the franc 54 Handling the job 55 Member of an Iraqi minority 57 Joke that gets funnier with repetition 61 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now ___ me down ...â&#x20AC;? 62 Complete 63 Hurry, old-style 64 Clearance event 65 Smells to high heaven 66 Blasting sply. DOWN 1 Used to be 2 Lettered piece of court evidence

3/14/11

By Billie Truitt

3 Pessimistic about Wall Street 4 Biol. and chem. 5 Coffeepot for a crowd 6 Jeans part 7 Hall of __: enshrined athlete 8 One-eighty 9 Win back 10 Campus e-mail address letters 11 Special report subject 12 Sturgeon yielding expensive caviar 13 Tight-fisted 18 Workbench clamp 22 Noisy sleepers 24 Part of BYOB 25 Bruce of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming Homeâ&#x20AC;? 26 Prefix with -plasty 27 Pirateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quaff 29 Canadian lawman on horseback 33 Raggedy doll 34 Whodunit writer Marsh 36 Try out

   Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Puzzle Solved

     " %'#

   

     #    

&&&$"$'!" !  $ ($ !#

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

37 Unwelcome engine sound 38 Peppery salad green 39 Twenty Questions choice 41 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Afternoon __â&#x20AC;?: suggestive #1 hit of 1976 42 Shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leader 43 Jewel box contents, briefly

3/14/11

44 Military pants 45 Hardens 47 Zesty taste 49 McJob holder 50 â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ know you?â&#x20AC;? 54 Vending machine bills 56 Hair coloring agent 58 Author AnaĂŻs 59 Rub the wrong way 60 Retrieve


TECHNICIAN

Sports PAGE 8 • THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012

F Road to double

GLJLWV AUGUST 31 VS. TENNESSEE (ATLANTA, GA.)

National Outlook: 37th out of 124 Venue: Georgia Dome (71,228) 2011 Record: 5-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 1-1 Last Meeting: 1939 (TENN 13, NCSU 0) Last Decade vs. ACC: 1-4

SEPTEMBER 29 AT MIAMI (MIAMI GARDENS, FLA.)

National Outlook: 48th out of 124 Venue: Sun Life Stadium (74,916) 2011 Record: 6-6 All-Time Record vs. State: 7-5-1 Last Meeting: 2008 (NCSU 38, MIA 28) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 0-1

NOVEMBER 3 VS. VIRGINIA (RALEIGH)

National Outlook: 36th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 8-5 All-Time Record vs. State: 21-34 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 28, UVA 14) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 0-2

ollowing consecutive bowl victories and 17 wins in two years, N.C. State now has its eyes on something even bigger: a double-digit win total for the second time in program history. Although the football season is over two months away, it’s never too early to take a look at how the Wolfpack stacks up against the competition. In this 12-team breakdown, Technician takes a look at the projected preseason ranking for each opponent entering fall camp and several other key stats, including the venue of the game, the team’s record last season, its all-time record against NCSU and the last meeting between the two teams.

SEPTEMBER 8 AT CONNECTICUT (STORRS, CONN.)

SEPTEMBER 15 VS. SOUTH ALABAMA* (RALEIGH)

SEPTEMBER 22 VS. THE CITADEL* (RALEIGH)

OCTOBER 6 VS. FLORIDA STATE (RALEIGH)

OCTOBER 20 AT MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK, MD.)

OCTOBER 27 AT NORTH CAROLINA (CHAPEL HILL, N.C.)

National Outlook: 69th out of 124 Venue: Rentschler Field (40,000) 2011 Record: 5-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 0-1 Last Meeting: 2003 (NCSU 31, UCONN 24) Last Decade vs. ACC: 4-13

National Outlook: 9th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 9-4 All-Time Record vs. State: 21-9 Last Meeting: 2011 (FSU 34, NCSU 0) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 2-3

NOVEMBER 10 VS. WAKE FOREST (RALEIGH)

National Outlook: 57th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 6-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 37-62-5 Last Meeting: 2011 (WF 34, NCSU 27) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 1-4

MEAL PLANS

National Outlook: 123rd out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 6-4 All-Time Record vs. State: 0-1 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 35, USA 17)

National Outlook: 72nd out of 124 Venue: Byrd Stadium (54,000) 2011 Record: 2-10 All-Time Record vs. State: 32-31-4 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 56, MARY 41) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 4-1

National Outlook: N/A Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 4-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 0-4 Last Meeting: 1983 (NCSU 45, CIT 0)

National Outlook: 29th out of 124 Venue: Kenan Memorial Stadium (63,000) 2011 Record: 7-6 All-Time Record vs. State: 55-32-5 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 13, UNC 0) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 2-3

NOVEMBER 17 AT CLEMSON NOVEMBER 24 VS. BOSTON (CLEMSON, S.C.) COLLEGE (RALEIGH) National Outlook: 15th out of 124 Venue: Clemson Memorial Stadium (81,500) 2011 Record: 10-4 All-Time Record vs. State: 50-28-1 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 37, CLEM 13) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 4-1

National Outlook: 86th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 4-8 All-Time Record vs. State: 5-3 Last Meeting: 2011 (BC 14, NCSU 10) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 1-2

SIGN UP NOW: go.ncsu.edu/eat


TECHNICIAN          

 

 

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Dan Allen gate approved The proposed gate to close off Dan Allen Drive has been approved.

Making a name for himself as undergrad After being published in journal Nature, Adam Keith credits his success to his alma mater.

Jessie Halpern News Editor

The N.C. State Office of Transportation approved a new plan to block off parts of Dan Allen Drive. Later this summer, the installation of new gates will cut off throughtraffic between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The gates will be located on either side of the railroad bridge, allowing only buses and University vehicles to pass. According to the Office of Transportation, this change is meant to increase the safety for drivers, bus passenger and pedestrians. By limiting access to Dan Allen Drive, Transportation hopes to increase the use of sustainable transportation and decrease the number of accidents.

1(:*$7(

the behavior of these phases using established physical laws and rely on complex models to examine their data. Some models can grow large enough where they can no longer be read on a standard computer. Noah Rouse That is where Keith and his team Correspondent stepped in. Keith spent his time at NIST solvWhile many PhD candidates are dreaming of the chance to be ing equations by hand and writpublished in a prestigious jour- ing code to numerically evaluate the quantities his nal, recent N.C. group was interState graduate ested in. NIST reAda m Keit h searchers used this made it his recode to compare ality when he his theory to their was published results. Keith said in Nature, an his method made international it much simpler to journal detailcreate large simuing the newest lations by allowing findings in scithem to evolve natence and mediurally, so it could be cine. Adam Keith, recent graduate read off the values Last summer, Keith and his colleagues at the of interest. Keith believes the method could National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at Boul- open the gateway to more ambider, Colo., undertook the task tious efforts like research into suof simplifying the rules of con- perconductivity and the possibility densed matter systems to make of exploring deeper questions conmore complex simulations pos- densed matter physicists are eager to explore. He joked, though, that sible. Condensed matter phys- he is a member of a team and not a ics examines the properties of standalone genius. “I actually did not write the pacondensed phases of solids and liquids. Physicists who work in the field attempt to understand NATURE continued page 3

“I am no genius, but I do feel I was well prepared to conduct this research...”

1(:*$7( 3URSRVHG'D\WLPH*DWH 3URSRVHG'D\WLPH&ORVXUH

'$1$//(1'5,9('$<7,0(&/2685(,03/(0(17$7,21678'<











 )HHW

LQFK IHHW

1&67$7(81,9(56,7< $SULO

New stents make for healthier hearts Noah Rouse Correspondent

Jordan Kaufmann, an alumna with a doctorate in biomedical engineering, has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the University of Texas to develop a new method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) using stent-grafts. Kaufmann’s inspiration for this method came from noticing the flaws of the current treatment, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). The method uses a physical object placed near the site of the aneurysm to strengthen the walls of the aorta. EVAR has strong results, but the risks of endoleaks—blood flow around the graft and into the aneurysm sac —persist. Kaufmann’s device, known as a stent-graft, improves the current procedure by using the body’s own tissue to repair the aneurysms and reduce the chance of rupture and endoleaks According to the CDC, abdominal aortic aneurysms is a condition where a section of the aortic artery, the tube which carries blood from the chest down through the abdomen, balloons to dangerous sizes, with some reaching sizes of seven centimeters or more. Prolonged swellings often result in rupture and subsequent death by internal bleeding, with a mortality rate as high as 90 percent. Doctors have recently seen a slow decline in deaths caused by the condition thanks to early screenings and medical advancements like those developed by Kaufmann. Her project has the potential to

improve treatment of patients with AAA and increase their lifespan with minimally invasive surgery. The device took years of hard work, perseverance and the mercy of the UT grant board, but Kaufmann credits the foundations of her skills to the engineering department here at N.C. State. “The device itself comes from my dissertation work in Biomedical Engineering at UTSA, but N.C. State provided me with not only the engineering background, but also how to think and overcome obstacles,” Kaufmann said. “Most engineers at N.C. State know that it’s not exactly an “easy A” degree. What they might not realize is that those hours spent trying to solve homework problems— sometimes unsuccessfully—not only teach you mechanics or differential equations, but they’re also teaching you to think and how to overcome failure.” Kauffman’s technical skills were not the only factor that led to her success. Her skills as both a businessperson and presenter were ultimately what helped convince the grant board that her work would guarantee success. “While at N.C. State I also had the opportunity to be a Franklin Scholar and worked on a degree in interpersonal communication, which has come in handy for the business side of this adventure,” Kaufmann said. “Then, of course, there were the design classes I took which gave me the very real (and very necessary) hands-on skills I needed to build equipment for my project.”

GRANT continued page 3

FIND US ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF HARRELSON HALL UNTIL THE NEW TALLEY STUDENT CENTER OPENS IN 2014 ncsu.edu/bookstore | bookstore@ncsu.edu | 919.515.2161

CHARLIE HARLESS/TECHNICIAN

Construction on the new Talley Student Center continues daily through both summer sessions as part one of renovations is set to open late 2013.

Talley renovations stay on track Despite upsets over fees, the University is excited to reveal the plans for Talley. Arth Pandya Senior Staff Writer

Construction for the new Talley Student Center on schedule, and the University is on track to finish phase one construction around September or October of next year. Despite ongoing construction, the center is still open and accessible to students. Despite recent concerns of going over budget with the project, the University has stayed on track, according to Dan Adams, associate vice chancellor for Campus Enterprises. “With a project like this, you’re always leery of costs going up,” Adams said. “We are on target financially. We will not have to go back and ask

for additional dollars.” The latest efforts are associated with the branding and graphics of the building, according to TJ Willis, assistant director of University Student Centers. “We’re establishing a look, identity, feel and character for [the building],” Willis said. The student body expressed frustration with the Talley plans in past years particularly with regard to increased student fees needed to finance the project, but Student Body President Andy Walsh isn’t concerned. “The most negative feedback is just about the fee in general. We need to move on from that conversion at this point,” Walsh said. “We need to make this the best student space that it can be.” The lack of excitement over the project in the past is attributable to

the lack of information available to students, according to Adams. “In my opinion, part of the resistance and bad feelings about the fee being moved forward with Talley have to do with students not knowing what they were paying for. There were no pictures, no visuals, no concepts of what it was,” Adams said. Adams believes students will begin to see a return on their investment once certain aspects of the project come to fruition. The University has set October 2012 as a big reveal date for certain information, such as venue names, logos and sample menus. “A lot of work has gone into what the space will look like, what foods are being served and how it can be special for students,” Adams said.

COMPARE TEXTBOOK CHOICES RENTALS NEW USED EBOOKS LAPTOPS SOFTWARE APPAREL MORE

TALLEY continued page 3

SCAN HERE

Jordan Kaufmann, a recent N.C. State graduate, changes medicine with development of artery stents.


TECHNICIAN

Sports PAGE 8 • THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 2012

F Road to double

GLJLWV AUGUST 31 VS. TENNESSEE (ATLANTA, GA.)

National Outlook: 37th out of 124 Venue: Georgia Dome (71,228) 2011 Record: 5-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 1-1 Last Meeting: 1939 (TENN 13, NCSU 0) Last Decade vs. ACC: 1-4

SEPTEMBER 29 AT MIAMI (MIAMI GARDENS, FLA.)

National Outlook: 48th out of 124 Venue: Sun Life Stadium (74,916) 2011 Record: 6-6 All-Time Record vs. State: 7-5-1 Last Meeting: 2008 (NCSU 38, MIA 28) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 0-1

NOVEMBER 3 VS. VIRGINIA (RALEIGH)

National Outlook: 36th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 8-5 All-Time Record vs. State: 21-34 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 28, UVA 14) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 0-2

ollowing consecutive bowl victories and 17 wins in two years, N.C. State now has its eyes on something even bigger: a double-digit win total for the second time in program history. Although the football season is over two months away, it’s never too early to take a look at how the Wolfpack stacks up against the competition. In this 12-team breakdown, Technician takes a look at the projected preseason ranking for each opponent entering fall camp and several other key stats, including the venue of the game, the team’s record last season, its all-time record against NCSU and the last meeting between the two teams.

SEPTEMBER 8 AT CONNECTICUT (STORRS, CONN.)

SEPTEMBER 15 VS. SOUTH ALABAMA* (RALEIGH)

SEPTEMBER 22 VS. THE CITADEL* (RALEIGH)

OCTOBER 6 VS. FLORIDA STATE (RALEIGH)

OCTOBER 20 AT MARYLAND (COLLEGE PARK, MD.)

OCTOBER 27 AT NORTH CAROLINA (CHAPEL HILL, N.C.)

National Outlook: 69th out of 124 Venue: Rentschler Field (40,000) 2011 Record: 5-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 0-1 Last Meeting: 2003 (NCSU 31, UCONN 24) Last Decade vs. ACC: 4-13

National Outlook: 9th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 9-4 All-Time Record vs. State: 21-9 Last Meeting: 2011 (FSU 34, NCSU 0) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 2-3

NOVEMBER 10 VS. WAKE FOREST (RALEIGH)

National Outlook: 57th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 6-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 37-62-5 Last Meeting: 2011 (WF 34, NCSU 27) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 1-4

MEAL PLANS

National Outlook: 123rd out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 6-4 All-Time Record vs. State: 0-1 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 35, USA 17)

National Outlook: 72nd out of 124 Venue: Byrd Stadium (54,000) 2011 Record: 2-10 All-Time Record vs. State: 32-31-4 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 56, MARY 41) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 4-1

National Outlook: N/A Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 4-7 All-Time Record vs. State: 0-4 Last Meeting: 1983 (NCSU 45, CIT 0)

National Outlook: 29th out of 124 Venue: Kenan Memorial Stadium (63,000) 2011 Record: 7-6 All-Time Record vs. State: 55-32-5 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 13, UNC 0) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 2-3

NOVEMBER 17 AT CLEMSON NOVEMBER 24 VS. BOSTON (CLEMSON, S.C.) COLLEGE (RALEIGH) National Outlook: 15th out of 124 Venue: Clemson Memorial Stadium (81,500) 2011 Record: 10-4 All-Time Record vs. State: 50-28-1 Last Meeting: 2011 (NCSU 37, CLEM 13) Last Decade at Home vs. State: 4-1

National Outlook: 86th out of 124 Venue: Carter-Finley Stadium 2011 Record: 4-8 All-Time Record vs. State: 5-3 Last Meeting: 2011 (BC 14, NCSU 10) Last Decade on Road vs. State: 1-2

SIGN UP NOW: go.ncsu.edu/eat


Technician - 06.21.2012