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ANNUAL CONFERENCE

PROGRAM & EXHIBITS GUIDE

National Council for the Social Studies

www.socialstudies.org Nov. 30 – Dec. 2 , 2018 Hyatt Regency Chicago


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YESTERDAY-TODAY-TOMORROW: BUILDING THE FUTURE OF SOCIAL STUDIES Welcome to the 98th Annual Conference of the National Council for the Social Studies in the “Windy City” of Chicago! It is an innovative city, full of history and rich ethnic diversity, and was recently ranked the “best city for having it all” through Time Out’s extensive “City Life Index” as well as the second-best place to eat in the world! Since 2003 when our annual conference was last held in Chicago, much has changed in the realm of social studies education. It is this ever-changing landscape that makes the NCSS Annual Conference such an important professional development and networking opportunity for social studies educators and administrators across the nation and around the globe. Throughout the 3 ½ days of the conference, you will have over 500 content-rich sessions covering all subjects and grade levels embodying the conference theme: YesterdayToday-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies. Within these numbers will be a multitude of sessions, workshops, clinics, and tours that will offer opportunities for you to integrate various social studies disciplines with our colleagues from other subject areas and engage your students in real-life learning experiences. The popular conference feature, the “unconference”, will continue Friday afternoon from 4–7pm at the Swissotel. Come lead or participate in discussions of social studies topics of interest that might not be covered elsewhere. With so many choices, your greatest challenge may be in selecting your schedule from the numerous available options! This year we are offering an amazing lineup of speakers who will not only challenge you but will take you through a wide range of emotions as they journey you through their life’s history. Additionally, we have amassed several panels that will address the Holocaust, civic education, media literacy and introduce you to three dynamic NatGeo Explorers inspiring us to help them change the world! Of course, you will want to take time to visit the Exhibit Hall—always one of the highlights of the conference. This is THE place to network with vendors and socialize with friends while looking at the latest textbooks, supplemental materials, technology and media. This year we will have two times dedicated as “Exhibits Only” times: Friday from 5–6pm and Saturday from 8–9am. Come visit the exhibitors during these two “session free” times. No sessions. No meetings—just time to roam the Exhibit Hall to your heart’s content. Another new feature at this conference is a special strand of Friday conference sessions focusing on the new Illinois Social Studies Standards. Specifically designed for Illinois teachers, but open to all conference attendees, these sessions will highlight how deliberation, student voice, and informed action can be used to connect classroom actions across cultural, geographic, and socioeconomic differences to promote culturally responsive teaching that prepares students for college, career and civic life. I am grateful to the many people who have given countless hours in a “labor of love” for this conference to be a success: • • • • • • •

NCSS Director of Meetings David Bailor Conference Co-Chair Shawn Healy Local Arrangements Chairs Mary Ellen Daneels, Heather Van Benthuysen and Jessica Marshall Steve Armstrong and Mike Koren for their tireless work on the proposal system the dedicated NCSS Staff and Board of Directors all those who started this ball rolling by attending conference planning meetings the many who accepted the baton in this conference relay and “brought it home” by selecting the conference proposals that are listed in this program.

Have a great conference. As one of my young people once told me, “It’s gonna be lit!”

India Meissel NCSS President and Co-Chair 98th NCSS Annual Conference

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CONFERENCE AT-A-GLANCE Day TUE WED

THUR

FRI

SAT

SUN

Start Time 4:00pm 7:30am 8:00am 1:15pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:30am 7:30am 9:00am 9:45am 9:00am 12:00pm 5:00pm 8:00am 7:00am 9:00am 9:00am 10:00am 10:15am 10:15am 11:00am 11:30am 1:30pm 2:45pm 4:00pm 8:00am 9:00am 10:15am 10:15am 11:30am 1:30pm 2:45pm 4:00pm 5:15pm 11:00am

Event Council Of State Social Studies Specialists (CS4) Council Of State Social Studies Specialists (CS4) College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) CUFA Keynote National Social Studies Supervisors Association (NSSSA) NCSS Board Meeting Council of State Social Studies Specialists (CS4) National Social Studies Supervisors Association (NSSSA) College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) Tours Clinics NSSSA Keynote CUFA Keynote International Assembly (IA) President’s Breakfast and Teacher of the Year Awards Featured Speaker Special Strand: Inquiry to Engagement Exhibit Hall Opens Tours Featured Speaker Jan L. Tucker Memorial Lecture Vital Issues Session Keynote Speaker Vital Issue Sessions Featured Speaker Exhibit Hall Continental Breakfast Featured Speaker Vital Issue Sessions Tours Featured Speaker Featured Speaker Vital Issue Sessions Featured Speaker Keynote Speaker Keynote Speaker

Speakers CS4 Meeting begins CUFA Meeting begins Dr. David Stovall Board Meeting (Board members only, please) Board Meeting (Board members only, please) CS4 Meeting NSSSA Meeting begins CUFA Meeting Phil Gersmehl Dr. Angela Valenzuela IA Meeting begins Ticketed Event Anthony Ray Hinton Illinois Social Studies Educators Keating Crown Fred Mednick Lessons of the Holocaust Peter Sagal In Her Shoes: Field Notes from National Geographic Explorers Alex Wagner Sponsored by Kaur Foundation Susan Hood A Conversation with Federal Judges Khizr Khan Hall Davidson Civic Education & Media Literacy Kenneth C. Davis Eric Liu Jose Antonio Vargas

Page 46 46 48 51 62 41 46 62 54 31 70 62 61 65 73 9, 73 14 26 31 9, 80 65 12, 86 9, 89 12, 90 9, 96 26, 102 10, 102 12, 109 31 10, 115 10, 120 12, 126 10, 133 10, 136 10, 139

TABLE OF CONTENTS President, India Meissel Welcomes You..............................................................1

NCSS Community Meetings / Communities Showcase............................. 42

At-A-Glance Table of Contents..............................................................................2

Community Meals................................................................................................... 44

Welcome Letters Illinois Governor and Chicago Mayor..........................4–5 Executive Director’s Welcome................................................................................6

Associated Groups

Navigating The Hyatt................................................................................................6

Council of State Social Studies Specialists (CS4)..................................... 46

Local Arrangements Welcome...............................................................................7

College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA)............................48–61

NCSS Board of Directors...........................................................................................8

National Social Studies Supervisors Assoc. (NSSSA).......................62–64

Conference Speakers......................................................................................... 9–10

International Assembly.............................................................................65–68

Vital Issue Sessions.................................................................................................. 12 Community Scholars Speakers........................................................................... 13

Content Overview................................................................................................... 69

Inquiry to Engagement: Connecting Across Differences...................14–17

Thursday Clinics................................................................................................70–72

Notable Trade Books Author Talk....................................................................... 18

Friday Schedule.............................................................................................. 73–101

Teaching with Primary Sources (Poster Presentations).......................18–25

Saturday Schedule......................................................................................102–136

On-Site Information/Stay Connected.............................................................. 26

Sunday Schedule.........................................................................................137–139

Special Events / Tips for a Rewarding Experience....................................... 28

Exhibit Hall Map.....................................................................................................140

Conference Sponsors / First Timers’ Scholarships........................................ 30

Exhibitors List................................................................................................141–148

Tours............................................................................................................................. 31

Participant Index.........................................................................................148–154

NCSS Awards: Celebrate Excellence...........................................................32–38

Ad Index....................................................................................................................154

Carter G. Woodson Awards............................................................................39-40

Credits and Future Conferences.......................................................................155

NCSS Committees................................................................................................... 41

Hotel Maps...............................................................................................................156

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


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November 30, 2018 National Council for the Social Studies 98th Annual Conference 151 East Upper Wacker Drive Chicago, Illinois 60601 Greetings! As Governor of the State of Illinois, I am pleased to welcome everyone gathered for the 98th Annual Conference for the National Council of the Social Studies. This event presents an exciting opportunity for everyone in attendance to join with fellow members of your organization to share important information and ideas. I commend you for your service to the community. As you reflect on your accomplishments over the past year, I urge you to make plans for the future of your organization that will build on your past successes. I am certain that this conference will go a long way towards furthering your goals into the future, both individually and collectively. On behalf of the people of Illinois, I offer my best wishes for an enjoyable and memorable occasion. Sincerely,

Bruce Rauner Governor, State of Illinois

#IllinoisProud

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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photo by Joy Lindsey

WELCOME TO YOUR SOCIAL STUDIES CONFERENCE! Welcome to Chicago and our 98th Annual Conference! Immerse yourself in a culturally and historically rich city, make new friends sharing best practices in teaching and learning, and return home refreshed and ready to build your future. Our conference theme is designed to help you do just that: build the future of social studies. Whether you are a first-time or long-time attendee, welcome to your professional home to support your goals for lifelong social studies learning. This year, we present over 500 sessions, 25 pre-conference clinics, 8 regional tours, 20+ speakers, and 180 exhibitors. We are delighted to bring so much talent together in one place. We deeply appreciate the hard work of our Conference Planning Committee, Local Arrangements Committee, and numerous partnering organizations which make the largest social studies conference in the nation happen! The social studies profession is strong and more urgent than ever before because of you. During and after the conference, please consider giving your voice and talents to our ongoing mission. You are invited to publish original articles and research through our journals and blogs, facilitate webinars or teaching institutes, lead communities or committees, and present sessions and programs at a future conference. Stop by our NCSS booth in the Exhibit Hall, or meet any NCSS staff or board member to learn more. Please let us know what we can do to build a social studies future together. I also invite you to help us realize our bold strategic priorities for social studies education by visiting www.socialstudies.org/about/strategicplan. Have a great conference!

Lawrence M. Paska, Ph.D. Executive Director

FINDING YOUR WAY AROUND THE HYATT REGENCY The meeting rooms at the Hyatt Regency are located in two towers (east and west) on multiple levels. Individual session listings include the room name, level, and tower. WEST TOWER 3rd floor Burnham Dusable Field McCormick

EAST TOWER Skyway Level (1 floor above lobby) Skyway 260 Skyway 272

Lobby Level Crystal Ballroom Crystal Ballroom foyer (poster sessions)

Lobby Level Plaza Ballroom

Concourse Level (1 floor below lobby) Columbian Comiskey Gold Coast Soldier Field Water Tower Wrigley

Concourse Level (1 floor below lobby) Roosevelt 1AB Randolph 1–3

Ballroom Level (2 floors below lobby) Regency Ballroom Acapulco Hong Kong San Francisco Toronto

Ballroom Level (2 floors below lobby) NCSS Registration Grand Ballroom Columbus Hall A–L Grand Suites 3 & 5 NCSS Bookstore Exhibit Hall Level (3 floors below lobby)

There are walkways between the towers in two locations: WEST TOWER Concourse Level (1 floor below lobby) to  Skyway Level (1 floor above lobby) to 

 

EAST TOWER Concourse Level (1 flor below lobby) Skyway Level (front desk level)

Floor plans are included on page 156. Follow hotel and NCSS directional signs to ensure you reach your desired location.

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


LOCAL ARRANGEMENTS WELCOME Welcome to Chicago, host of the 98th Annual Conference for the National Council for the Social Studies. Aptly called The City of the Broad Shoulders by Carl Sandburg, we think Chicago is the perfect location to “carry” this year’s theme, “Yesterday-TodayTomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies.” This year, Illinois is celebrating its bicentennial. We hope you will take the opportunity to learn more about the rich history of the “Land of Lincoln” in the many clinic and conference offerings. Delve into the rich cultural contributions of artists who trace their roots to Chicago—like Miles Davis and Gwendolyn Brooks. Explore the path of political leaders like Abraham Lincoln and Barack Obama. Be inspired to stand for social justice by the examples of Jane Addams, the first American Woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize, and Judge Anne Burke, one of the founders of the Special Olympics. Use your evenings to step into the present and explore our city. Take advantage of our world class museums, many within walking distance of the conference. Chicago is a food lover’s paradise with offerings to fit anyone’s palate and price point. If you love sports, you will love Chi-Town, home to both professional and collegiate offerings. Our theater scene can take you to the “room where it happens” with a trip to the award winning Hamilton, or cater to your musical taste with an evening enjoying the Blues. We hope you will join us on November 30th for a special strand of programming as we look to the future of social studies. (See pages 14–17.) Our theme, Inquiry as Engagement: Connecting Across Difference, will emphasize the importance of how student inquiry can promote collaboration, communication and critical thinking to address vital issues facing this diverse state and nation. Workshop sessions will be designed to highlight how deliberation, student voice and informed action can be leveraged to connect classrooms across cultural, geographic, and socio-economic differences to promote culturally responsive teaching that prepare students for college, career and civic life. The Robert R. McCormick Foundation, the Chicago Public Schools Department of Social Science and Civic Engagement, and the Illinois Council for the Social Studies welcome you to Chicago. Please seek out our conference volunteers if you have any questions. —Mary Ellen Daneels and Heather Van Benthuysen, Local Arrangements Co-Chairs

“The online master’s program in history was truly life changing. After earning my degree, I was named Texas History Teacher of the Year, and was recruited from the classroom to a district leadership role.” Steve Sonksen, Graduate VISIT with University of Nebraska at Kearney online history faculty at BOOTH 102.

Online History, MA University of Nebraska at Kearney • Thesis and Non-Thesis Options • Low Student to Faculty Ratio • Extensive Online Course Offerings in Areas Such as American, European, World, Public and Digital History

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98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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NCSS BOARD OF DIRECTORS The official NCSS Board office is listed after each name. Tina Heafner President-Elect

Stefanie Wager Vice-President

Terry Cherry Past-President

Kristin Ayala HOD Steering Committee Chair

Joe Feinberg At-Large

Jesse Haight College/University

Kimberly Heckart Elementary Classroom Teacher

Wesley Hedgepeth Secondary/High School Classroom Teacher

Marjorie Hunter Secondary/High School Classroom Teacher

Joseph Karb Middle Level Classroom Teacher

Tracy Middleton K-12 Classroom Teacher At-Large

Andy Mink At-Large

Shannon Pugh At-Large

Chanda Robinson Supervisor

Anthony Roy K-12 Classroom Teacher At-Large

Rhonda Watton K-12 Classroom Teacher At-Large

India Meissel President

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

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CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Friday

9:00–10:00am Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower Anthony Ray Hinton Anthony Ray Hinton spent nearly thirty years on death row in Alabama for murders he didn’t commit. With the help of Bryan Stevenson (founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative), Hinton was exonerated and finally released from prison in April 2015. His memoir, The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row, is his harrowing first-person account of his time in prison and eventual release. Mr. Hinton, who lectures frequently on prison reform, the death penalty, and the power of faith and forgiveness, lives in Alabama. Mr. Hinton’s appearance is generously sponsored by Macmillan Publishers. 10:15–11:15am Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower Keating Crown On September 11, 2001, Keating Crown was in his office on the 100th floor of the South Tower when the North Tower was hit. As he attempted to evacuate the building, he reached the 78th floor when the airplane hit the South Tower

from floors 78–84. He was fortunate to survive the impact and find his way to the stairwell. Despite his injuries, he reached the ground level, where he was evacuated and taken to the hospital. He is now a Principal with Sterling Bay Companies in Chicago, primarily focused on new Real Estate Acquisitions and Development, as well as strategic capital pursuits and relationships. Mr. Crown also serves on the Board of Directors for the 9/11 Memorial and Museum. Mr. Crown’s appearance is generously sponsored by the 9/11 Memorial and Museum. 1:30–2:30pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Peter Sagal For the past twenty years, Peter Sagal has hosted the NPR news-quiz show, Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!, heard by more than 3 million people every week, broadcast on 450 public radio stations nationwide and via a popular podcast. The show received the prestigious Peabody Award in 2008, the same year it celebrated its 10th Anniversary. Mr. Sagal is a noted playwright, author, actor and essayist. He is also the host of the 2013 PBS series Constitution USA with Peter Sagal, where he traveled the country on a Harley Davidson Road King to find out where the Constitution lives, how it works, its history and its vital relevance today. Mr. Sagal’s appearance is generously sponsored by The News Literacy Project. 4:00–5:00pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Alex Wagner Alex Wagner is co-host and co-executive producer of Showtime’s The Circus and a contributor to CBS News and The Atlantic. She was formerly the host of Now with Alex Wagner on MSNBC. She is also the author of FutureFace: A Family Mystery, an Epic Quest, and the Secret to Belonging. Ms. Wagner’s appearance is generously sponsored by Penguin Random House.

Lincoln Park Franklin by Alan Scott Walker

8:00–8:20am Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower Sylvia Acevedo Sylvia Acevedo is an award-winning entrepreneur who has earned worldwide recognition for her work addressing one of society’s most vexing challenges—universal access to education. She currently serves as CEO for the Girl Scouts of the United States. She also serves as a commissioner on the White House Initiative for Educational Excellence for Hispanics. She started her career as a rocket scientist at the Jet Propulsion Labs, where she worked on the Voyager mission’s fly-by of Jupiter and its moons, and the Solar Polar/Probe missions. Seating is available in the Ballroom beginning at 7:50am for any interested attendees not registered for the President’s Breakfast.

CHICAGO RESOURCES Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Pritzker Military Museum & Library is offering free admission with your NCSS name badge. Located at 104 S. Michigan Avenue, the museum is about 7 blocks from the Hyatt Regency. It’s open Tuesday-Thursday 10:00am–6:00pm, Friday-Saturday 10:00am–4:00pm, and Sunday 12:00– 4:00pm. For more information on the museum, go to www.pritzkermilitary.org. Statue Stories Chicago If statues could talk, what stories would they tell? Chicago’s celebrated actors, writers, and theatres have united to give voice to iconic statues across the city. Visit any statue with a Statue Stories sign, scan the QR code with your smartphone or go to the URL listed, then answer your phone. A statue is calling! For more information, go to www.StatueStoriesChicago.com. 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CONFERENCE SPEAKERS Saturday 9:00–10:00am Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower Susan Hood Susan Hood is an award-winning author of more than 200 books for young readers, including Ada’s Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay and Shaking Things Up: 14 Young Women Who Changed the World. She is the recipient of the 2017 E. B. White Honor Award, the 2017 Christopher Award, the 2017 Americas Award and the 2017 Bank Street Flora Steiglitz Straus Award given annually to a “distinguished work of nonfiction that serves as an inspiration to young people.” Lifeboat 12 is her first middle grade novel, based on a true but little known World War II story she discovered in family letters home. Ms. Hood’s appearance is generously sponsored by Simon & Schuster, Inc.

4:00–5:00pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Kenneth C. Davis Kenneth C. Davis is The New York Times bestselling author of America’s Hidden History and Don’t Know Much About History, along with other books for adults and children in the “Don’t Know Much About” series. He published In the Shadow of Liberty: The Hidden History of Slavery, Four Presidents, and Five Black Lives, his first work of narrative nonfiction for Young Adults in 2016. His latest book for Young Adults is More Deadly Than War: The Hidden History of the Spanish Flu and the First World War. During the past seven years in his outreach to teachers and students, he has visited more than 200 classrooms around the country via Skype, discussing the critical connection between past and present, linking history and the headlines.

11:30am–12:30pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Khizr Khan Khizr Khan was born in 1950, the eldest of ten children, in rural Pakistan. He moved to the United States with his wife, Ghazala, in 1980. The couple became American citizens and raised three sons. Their middle son, U.S. Army Captain Humayun Khan, a graduate of the University of Virginia and its Army ROTC program, was killed in 2004 while stopping a suicide attack near Baqubah, Iraq, and was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart and Bronze Star. Mr. Khan is the author of An American Family: A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice and This Is Our Constitution. Khizr Khan is the recipient of the 2018 Spirit of America Award, generously sponsored by Social Studies School Service. Mr. Khan’s appearance is generously sponsored by Penguin Random House.

5:15–6:15pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Eric Liu Eric Liu is an author, educator, and civic entrepreneur. He is the founder and CEO of Citizen University and executive director of the Aspen Institute Citizenship and American Identity Program. He is the author of several books, including You’re More Powerful Than You Think: A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen, A Chinaman’s Chance, The Gardens of Democracy, and The Accidental Asian. He served as a White House speechwriter and policy adviser for President Bill Clinton. Mr. Liu’s appearance is generously sponsored by Facing History and Ourselves.

1:30–2:30pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Hall Davidson Hall Davidson has worked from think tanks in Turkey to classrooms in Tennessee. For forty years, he has been an educational innovator in important waves of change, first in broadcasting, then computers, and now digital learning. A former K-12 bilingual math teacher and college faculty member with four decades of work with education, he identifies right now as the most transformative and important time for teaching and learning. Mr. Davidson’s appearance is generously sponsored by Discovery Education.

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Sunday 11:00am–12:00pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Jose Antonio Vargas Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker, and a leading voice for the human rights of immigrants. He is the founder and CEO of Define American, the nation's leading nonprofit media and culture organization that fights injustice and anti-immigrant hate through the power of storytelling. In 2011, The New York Times Magazine published an essay he wrote in which he revealed and chronicled his life in America as an undocumented immigrant. He then produced and directed Documented, a documentary feature film on his undocumented experience. He also produced and directed the Emmy-nominated special White People, on what it means to be young and white in a demographically-changing America. His newly-published memoir is Dear America: Notes from an Undocumented Citizen.

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


bewashington.org

Mount Vernon’s newest interactive experience puts your students in George Washington’s boots at key moments in history. Hear different perspectives from the advisers that influenced Washington’s decisions and watch as primary sources come to life. Challenge their critical thinking skills through this innovative platform, available both on site at Mount Vernon and online at bewashington.org.

Visit us at booth 916 to try it for yourself.


VITAL ISSUE SESSIONS Friday

Saturday

11:30am–12:30pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Lessons of the Holocaust: The Experiences of Survivors The Holocaust represents a watershed moment in history, providing endless opportunities for study and understanding. The lessons of this history are not confined to the past but resonate throughout our political, cultural, civic, and communal lives today. Survivors of the Holocaust are uniquely positioned to share their experiences, providing inspiration to educators and students alike. Explore these issues through the lens of two Holocaust survivors’ experiences. Fritzie Fritszhall, Adina Sella. Moderated by Kelley Szany.

Fritszhall

Sella

Szany

The panelists’ appearances are generously sponsored by the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center.

2:45–3:45pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower In Her Shoes: Field Notes from National Geographic Explorers Let’s change the world together. New this year, an all-female trio of National Geographic Explorers share their stories from the field live on stage. Hear from engaging women who are preserving history, sharing cultures from across the globe, and inspiring the next generation of changemakers. Discover National Geographic’s commitment to support women creating positive change in the world. Lillygol Sedaghat, Sandhya K. Narayanan, Losang Rabgey.

Sedaghat

Narayanan

10:15–11:15am Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower A Conversation with Federal Judges: A View of Civic Education from the Bench This conversation with federal judges provides unique insight into possible partnerships for judges and educators. The judges will discuss initiatives within their communities to educate students and the public about the role of courts and the rule of law. As civic education leaders, judges and educators are ideal partners in educating students to be engaged citizens. Chief Judge Robert Katzmann, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit; Judge Diane Wood, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit; Judge Jeremy D. Fogel, Berkeley Judicial Institute. Moderated by Associate Justice Adrienne Nelson, Oregon Supreme Court.

Katzmann

Wood

Fogel

Nelson

The panelists’ appearances are generously sponsored by the American Bar Association Division for Public Education.

2:45–3:45pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower Civic Education & Media Literacy: Preparing Learners to Thrive in the Digital World This panel explores the intersections between civic education and media literacy education from both a local and national perspective. Moderated by the National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE), the conversation includes examples of best practices, discussion of the challenges educators face, and a brainstorm about how best to align efforts moving forward. Abby Kiesa, CIRCLE; Jessi McCarthy, Newseum; Keta Glenn, Free Spirit Media; Heather Van Benthuysen, Chicago Public Schools. Moderated by Tony Streit, Education Development Center.

Rabgey

Presented by the National Geographic Society and National Geographic Learning.

BOOK DONATIONS The NCSS Rho Kappa Social Studies Honor Society Advisory Board is collecting books to donate to Chicago institutions, including the Harold Washington Library and Chicago Public Schools. To contribute:

Kiesa

McCarthy

• Drop them off at the collection area, near the NCSS booth in the Exhibit Hall

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Van Benthuysen

The panelists’ appearances are generously sponsored by the National Association for Media Literacy Education.

• Visit the Exhibit Hall and NCSS Bookstore • Get books

Glenn

NCSS greatly appreciates the help of the Hyatt Regency Chicago in facilitating these donations.

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SPEAKERS NCSS Communities have invited prominent scholars to speak on issues related to their missions. Community Scholar sessions are open to all attendees. Attend sessions of interest to learn about the discussion topics and the role that communities play within NCSS.

Friday

11:30am–12:30pm Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower José António Brandão “Pathways of Change: Natives and French in the Great Lakes” Sponsored by the Canada Community Examine Native-French interactions in the Great Lakes region. Fur trade across waterways in the region changed both cultures, helped forge alliances and profoundly impacted North America. José António Brandão is Professor of History at Western Michigan University. 2:45–3:45pm Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower Scott Waring and Richard Hartshorne “Teaching with Primary Sources and Emerging Technologies” Sponsored by the Teacher Education and Professional Development Community Explore ways to integrate emerging technologies and primary sources into instruction. Strategies for use in K-16 classrooms will be shared and discussed. Scott Waring is Professor and Program Coordinator of Social Science Education at the University of Central Florida. Richard Hartshorne is Associate Professor and Chair, Learning Sciences and Education Research at the University of Central Florida. 2:45–3:45pm Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower Dafney Blanca Dabach, Aliza Fones, Natasha Hakimali Merchant, Adebowale Adekile "Teachers Navigating Civic Education When Students Are Undocumented: Building Case Knowledge" Sponsored by the Research Community How do we teach civics when there are differences in the rights of those who are in the classroom? In this interactive lecture, we highlight practices and essential questions to support the continued learning of teachers who work in settings that are heterogeneous in terms of immigration status and citizenship rights. Dafney Blanca Dabach is Associate Professor at the University of Washington College of Education. Aliza Fones is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Iowa. Natasha Hakimali Merchant is an Assistant Professor of education at the University of North Georgia. Adebowale Adekile is a doctoral candidate in the University of Washington College of Education.

Saturday

11:30am–12:30pm Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower Jon Mueller “Thinking Like a Scientist: Using Formative Assessment to Develop Scientific Thinking Skills” Sponsored by the Psychology Community Jon Mueller is Professor of Psychology at North Central College in Naperville, IL. He is the author of several psychology websites including Resources for the Teaching of Social Psychology and Authentic Assessment Toolbox. His research has particularly focused on science in the media, examining how people interpret scientific claims presented in the media. 1:30–2:30pm Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower Michael Meyer The Road to Sleeping Dragon: Learning China from the Ground Up Sponsored by the Asia Community and World History Community In the last book of his China trilogy, Michael Meyer tells a story both deeply personal and universal, as he gains greater—if never complete—assurance, capturing what it feels like to learn a language, culture, and history from the ground up. Michael Meyer is Associate Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh. 2:45–3:45pm Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower Glenn Mitoma “Human Rights Education: The Last, Best Hope for Social Studies” Sponsored by the Human Rights Education Community How do we unleash students’ passion for building a humane, just, and equitable world and transform our classrooms and schools into vibrant, inclusive spaces? Explore principles and practices of human rights as a paradigm for making social studies relevant. Glenn Mitoma is an Assistant Professor of Human Rights and Education, Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut. 4:00–5:00pm Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower Emily Reeves “Critical Literacy, Language Barriers, and Responsible Civic Engagement” Sponsored by the Educators for Social Justice Community Critical literacy for responsible civic engagement is impacted by accessibility of quality information. Lack of access and language barriers limit political presence. Emily Reeves is Associate Professor of Language and Literacy Studies at Midwestern State University. 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

13


SPECIAL STRAND INQUIRY TO ENGAGEMENT: CONNECTING ACROSS DIFFERENCES Friday, November 30

9:00–10:00am Swissotel, Zurich ABCD Connecting Across Differences Dr. Diana Hess leads a vigorous conversation that explores the question, “What are the opportunities and challenges in engaging students with differing political views?” Learn from the lived classroom experiences of educators and students as they explore the possibilities for “better arguments” to support inquiry in the social science classroom. Jamie Garcia, Community High School District 94, West Chicago, IL; Jessica Marshall, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Elizabeth Kirby, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL; Matthew Wdowiarz, Winfield School District 34, Winfield, IL. Moderated by Diana Hess, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI. SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

10:15–11:15am PREK-ELEMENTARY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower Inquiry in Elementary: A How-to Guide Receive unit ideas, pictures, and practical strategies from the leader of the elementary team that wrote the Illinois Social Science standards, who now implements these standards in her own first-grade classroom. Receive a “how-to” of inquiry for various grade levels, and leave ready to start an inquiry-based unit the very next day. Shonda Ronen, Wolf Ridge Elementary School, Bunker Hill, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower Building Student Capacity for Engaging in Critical and Courageous Conversations Real social changes start with having hard conversations. Unsilence will help you build strategies for facilitating tough conversations in the classroom that lead to authentic, studentdriven, and informed civic action. Annie Rezac, Unsilence, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower Losing the Debate: Listening and Reasoning in Public Policy Discussions Learn how to lead a differentiated discussion that utilizes values in conflict to enable, promote, and encourage student analysis and empathy while discussing public policy issues. Kathleen Meeks, Lauren Berg, Downers Grove South High School, Downers Grove, IL SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower Designing a Comprehensive K-12 Social Studies Curriculum: One District’s Journey How do students “do” social studies? Learn about one district’s process of developing a comprehensive K-12 social studies curriculum based on the C3 Framework and current Illinois state standards. Deborah Lee, Michael DiNovo, Caroline Branick, Danielle Cerone, Jim Tang, Elmhurst CUSD 205, Elmhurst, IL

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GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower Global Ed-Engage. Inspire. Empower. Explore the global competencies and discover how your existing lessons already incorporate the 21st century skills of investigating the world, recognizing perspectives, communicating ideas, and taking action. Seth Brady, Naperville Central High School, Naperville, IL; Cyndi Oberle-Dahm, Belleville West High School, Belleville, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower Civic Engagement as a Core Principle of University/School Partnership Examine a private university/public school partnership that seeks to support and sustain neighborhood public education. Understand how civic engagement is a core animating value of a partnership. Learn how students in a diverse school examine and act on critical social and political issues. Jon Schmidt, Loyola University, Chicago, IL; Madeline Kobayashi, Senn High School, Chicago, IL; Elizabeth Newton, Allow Good, Evanston, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower Taking Informed Action—Resources for Teachers Informed action provides students an opportunity to apply classroom learning to real world problems. Learn how K-12 teachers employ this proven practice of civic education as an assessment that enhances learning and builds important social science and SEL competencies. Karla Schwarze, Piper Elementary School, Berwyn, IL; Andrew Conneen, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, IL; Chris Kubik, Grayslake North High School, Grayslake, IL, Tiffani M. Watson, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Chicago, IL, William Behrends, Champaign Centennial High School, Champaign, IL. Moderated by Carolyn Pereira, Illinois Civic Mission Coalition, Chicago, IL. SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower Student Voice in School Governance Schools function better with communication and collaboration between students and adults. Students can provide valuable expertise on how to foster a more peaceful and positive school climate. Learn strategies for engaging student voice and fostering student leadership. Cristina Salgado, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL with SVC students from Chicago Public Schools

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


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INQUIRY TO ENGAGEMENT: CONNECTING ACROSS DIFFERENCES Friday, November 30

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower Civic Data to Inform Student Action To what extent does the civic empowerment gap exist in recent cohorts of Democracy Schools? Explore the connection between exposure to proven civic learning practices and civic engagement outcomes. Discuss ways to address issues of inequity in your school. Shawn Healy, Sonia Mathew, Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower Civics in Action: Participatory Budgeting in the Classroom Learn what participatory budgeting is, how it works in a classroom/school setting, and how it enriches civics curriculum with hands-on application. Receive specific examples from multiple schools that implemented participatory budgeting successfully in Chicago Public Schools and hear results from the initial pilot evaluation. Thea Crum, Great Cities Institute at the University of IllinoisChicago, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower Deliberation and Controversies in the Classroom Powerful social studies classrooms are rich with discussion and deliberation of controversial issues, but it takes practice to build a classroom where students feel safe, drive the discussion, and ensure equity of voice. Explore methods, consider relevant issues, and share best practices. Liz Robbins, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL 11:30am–12:30pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower Elementary Inquiry to Engagement Dive into the inquiry arc by developing questions and planning inquiries; explore techniques for evaluating and using sources; and consider ways to take informed action in K-5 settings. Shawn Reddy, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL; Karen Van Zytveld, Galileo Scholastic Academy of Math and Science, Chicago, IL; Norma Garrity, Prussing Elementary School, Chicago, IL

16

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower How Administrators Can Support Social Studies Teachers Inquiry as engagement can be daunting for educators in these politically polarized times. Learn how administrators can support teachers in the proven practices of civic education to promote student success and more equitable outcomes. Darlene Ruscitti, DuPage County Regional Office of Education, Wheaton, IL; Brad Hubbard, Community High School District 117, Antioch, IL; Darrell Echols, Indian Prairie School District, Aurora, IL. Facilitated by Jessica Marshall, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower Reflective Democracy The Reflective Democracy work of the Center for Tech and Civic Life highlights the lack of representation of women and people of color in government. This impacts everything from legislation affecting schools to the self-image of students. Brainstorm ideas on how to combat these limiting factors in the classroom. Tiana Epps-Johnson, Donny Bridges, Center for Tech and Civic Life, Chicago, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower Unpacking the Effects of White Supremacy on Teachers, Students, and All Develop teaching strategies and best practices for discussing race. Learn which resources to use to help lessen racial bias among teachers and students, and help create a more trusting classroom environment. David Steiber, Mayra Almarez, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL PREK-ELEMENTARY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower Building a Democratic Classroom Culture Our classrooms are powerful communities with the potential to help young people to develop civic competencies; but we need to construct learning environments where they can practice these skills. Receive resources and tools to start practicing democracy in your classroom daily. Heather Van Benthuysen, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower Civic Engagement Portfolio—We Did All the Work for You! Acquire ready-to-use, differentiated, student-centered materials to implement action in your class. Learn how to build civic engagement in your students. Whitney Wilda, Christopher Wilbur, Hinsdale Central High School, Hinsdale, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower The STEAM and Social Studies of Current Events Discover concepts in social studies and STEAM through current events. Master informational texts, news articles, podcasts, and graphic organizers to meet Illinois Social Science standards, Common Core, and the C3 Framework. Mary Beth Henning, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower From Policy to Practice: Reflections on Standards and Civics Course Implementation in Illinois Engage with members of the #CivicsIsBack campaign to learn lessons from the field on how to seed instructional shifts in implementing the new Illinois high school civics course. Shawn Healy, Mary Ellen Daneels, Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Chicago, IL; Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, CIRCLE, Tufts University, Medford, MA

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


INQUIRY TO ENGAGEMENT: CONNECTING ACROSS DIFFERENCES SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower Taking Informed Action Across the Curriculum—Classroom Practitioner Panel Inquiry as engagement is NOT limited to the social sciences. Learn how the proven practice of service learning can be used to build connections across disciplines to build civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Daniel Jimenez, Curie High School, Chicago, IL; Mark Mesle, Cook County Clerk’s Office, Chicago, IL; Sue Khalaieff, Democracy Schools Initiative, Chicago, IL; Shanti Elliott, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL, Moderated by Barbara Laimin, Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Chicago, IL. Friday, 2:45–4:45pm Swissotel, Zurich ABCD Better Arguments Project Moderated by Eric Liu The polarization of American politics doesn’t mean we have fewer arguments, but that we need to have better ones. The Better Arguments Project equips Americans to have arguments that bring us closer. The more communities can have arguments rooted in history and constructive communication, the healthier our country will be. Educators have an essential role to play in this movement. Explore how to adapt the Better Arguments Project for your classroom. The Better Arguments Project is a partnership between Facing History and Ourselves, the Aspen Institute’s program on Citizenship and American Identity, and The Allstate Corporation.

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98 th NCSS Annual Conference

17


FEATURED SESSIONS GUEST SPEAKERS

NCSS Notable Trade Books Author Talk Saturday, 11:30am–12:30pm Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower Each year the list of Notable Social Studies Trade Books honors exceptional trade books that instill social studies concepts. Hear from some of the creators of these select books as they speak about their work, process, and outreach to social studies students. Each author will introduce the selected book and respond to audience questions.

Songju Ma Daemicke Cao Chong Weighs an Elephant

Laurie Lawlor Super Women: Six Scientists Who Changed the World

Ray Anthony Shepard Now or Never

Jacqueline Briggs and June Jo Lee Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix

TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES POSTER PRESENTATIONS Friday, 9:00–11:30am

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower Join Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources partners and grant recipients for a cup of coffee and learn about activities they have created that integrate primary sources into classroom activities across the grade spectrum. Table 1 Bringing the Social Studies Olympiad to Your State Michigan has conducted the Michigan Social Studies Olympiad for thirty years. This poster will provide attendees with the logistical tools to implement this competition in their state. Anthony Salciccoli, Michigan Council for the Social Studies, Lansing, MI

Table 5 Digital Gaming: Engaging Congress—Play the Game and Learn the Facts Engaging Congress, a fun, FREE digital app, utilizes primary sources to explore representative government. It is formatted for Chromebooks, computers, tablets and mobile devices. Elizabeth Osborn, Valerie Pena, Indiana University Center on Representative Government, Indianapolis, IN

Table 2 Engaging Primary Source Inquiry with the KidCitizen App The presenters will demonstrate how to use KidCitizen episodes to foster visual literacy and historical inquiry with elementary grade students. Ilene Berson, Michael Berson, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Bert Snow, Snow & Co., Newburyport, MA

Table 6 A Time for Truth: Primary Sources Unmask Genocide in the United States Learn more about using visual elements and an online teacher’s guide to demonstrate how to teach about genocide against Indigenous peoples in U.S. history. Mishy Lesser, Upstander Project, Boston, MA

Table 3 Eagle Eye Citizen: Online Civics Interactive Eagle Eye Citizen is an interactive website dedicated to teaching government and civics through the close reading of Library of Congress primary sources. Nate Sleeter, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

Table 7 New York City as a Living Museum: Modeling Place-Based Inquiry Using primary sources from Library of Congress and local cultural institutions, participants will leave with classroomready resources that illustrate how to make local and global connections when planning lessons. Salika Lawrence, Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, NY; Julie Maurer, The Gotham Center for New York History, City University of New York, NY

Table 4 DBQuest: Using Technology to Analyze Primary Sources Empower your students to dig into primary source material with DBQuest, the interactive document analysis tool from iCivics. It’s digital, it’s deep, and it’s all document-based. Come dig in! Emma Humphries, iCivics, Jacksonville, FL; Carrie Ray-Hill, iCivics, Madison, WI; Christina Wiley, iCivics, Cambridge, MA

18

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


Featured Speaker

Don’t miss Anthony Ray Hinton “A remarkable storyteller.” —Oprah Winfrey

FRE E COP Y*

Join us: Friday, November 30 | 9:00 am - 10:00 am | Hyatt Regency Chicago - Crystal Ballroom C “No one I have represented has inspired me more than Anthony Ray Hinton.” —Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy

“Harrowing and inspiring.” —Entertainment Weekly

“A story of resilience and imagination.” —The New York Times

“An important story and an inspiring one.” —The Denver Post

*Free copy for the first 300 attendees

What would you do if you were arrested for a crime you didn’t commit?

© Cody Love

ANTHONY RAY HINTON spent nearly 30 years on death row for crimes he didn’t commit. With the help of Bryan Stevenson, he was released in April 2015 and now speaks widely on prison reform, the power of faith, and forgiveness. Please join us for an unforgettable journey of hope, love, justice, and the gift of reading in the darkest times. Follow us: @macmillanreads


TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES POSTER PRESENTATIONS Table 8 Building Inquiry and Disciplinary Literacy in Elementary Classrooms Preservice elementary teachers enrolled in a social studies methods course used primary sources to design lessons and activities that foster students’ inquiry and disciplinary literacy skills. Salika Lawrence, Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY; Tabora Johnson, Keshia James, W. Aaron Duton, Keturah Brooks, Sherene Hodgson, Zoland Smith, Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY Table 9 Primary Source Sets: Infusing State History with National and International History Topics Explore primary source sets that study Iowa history and provide connections with national and international events. The Primary Source Sets address state social studies standards and are created for K-12 educators from any state. Jennifer Cooley, State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, IA; Stefanie Wager, Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA Table 10 Fostering Inquiry Using the Library of Congress Online Collections Learn to locate and engage students in analyzing primary sources from the Library of Congress’s Digital Collections, to help build students’ content knowledge and cultivate historical thinking skills. James M. M. Hartwick, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI Table 11 Was the Domino Theory a Valid Concept? Teacher candidates were provided resources from the Library of Congress. After analyzing the evidence they were asked to make a documentary that presented an argument for or against the Domino Theory. Juan Walker, Augusta University, Augusta, GA Table 12 Disability History at the Library of Congress Explore the varied and rich primary sources of the Library of Congress on the history of people with disabilities from the early 19th century to the 21st century. Access teacher-created lessons. Rich Cairn, Collaborative for Educational Services, Northampton, MA Table 13 Reshaping America: The Fourteenth Amendment and Its Legacy The Fourteenth Amendment redefined citizenship rights during Reconstruction. Learn about educational resources exploring its immediate impact and how various groups have used it to pursue equal treatment under the law. Kira Duke, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN

20

Table 14 Reading Like a Historian Curriculum and Beyond the Bubble Assessments Learn about curriculum and assessments designed by the Stanford History Education Group that incorporate documents from the Library of Congress’s archives. Participants will examine materials and sample student responses. Joel Breakstone, Sarah McGrew, Teresa Ortega, Stanford History Education Group, Stanford, CA Table 15 Introduce the Lavender Scare with Library of Congress Primary Sources Teachers will discover ways to introduce the Lavender Scare using a dynamic poster that presents primary and secondary sources from the Library of Congress. Miriam Morgenstern, History UnErased, Westford, MA; Debra Fowler, History UnErased, Lowell, MA Table 16 Teaching Immigration Past and Present: Building Curriculum with Primary Sources Understanding immigration history is critical for connecting to diverse student experiences. Learn how the Map Center uses historical and modern maps to teach this broad topic. Michelle LeBlanc, Norman B. Leventhal Map and Education Center, Boston, MA Table 17 Teaching with SOURCES and Emerging Technologies Receive strategies from the SOURCES Framework for Teaching with Primary Sources and emerging technologies. Scott Waring, Brian Furgione, Mary Dougherty, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Table 18 Teaching with Primary Sources Mississippi: Engaging Students and Teachers Teaching with Primary Sources Mississippi collaborates with teachers to develop and implement lesson plans and curriculum for the Magnolia State and provides professional development to help support these activities. Nicole Miller, Paul Binford, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS Table 19 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy with Primary Sources Learn about free resources from the Inquiry in the Upper Midwest project that support the use of culturally relevant primary sources that are challenging and engaging and promote analytical skills. Jennifer Cadwell-Vaughan, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN Table 20 Connecting Carolina: Making State History Relevant Through Inquiry Using the Library of Congress Collection Learn about three examples that demonstrate our work to make North Carolina state history relevant to students through inquiry-based instruction that leverages the Library of Congress collection. Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES POSTER PRESENTATIONS Table 21 TPS Inquiry Kits: Primary Sources for All Learners Honors students, English Language Learners, students with special needs, and on-level students are all capable of analyzing primary documents. TPS Inquiry Kits provide curated, accessible documents and interactive lessons on research skills. Mike Kuethe, Maryland Humanities, Baltimore, MD Table 22 The Whiskey Rebellion, Popular Rights, and the First Amendment Informed civic action is inspired by this classroom-tested inquiry. Students investigated First Amendment rights using historic monuments, folklore and primary sources from loc.gov, sharing findings through Google Docs. Ann B. Canning, Waynesburg University, Waynesburg, PA Table 23 Investigating Technology’s Impact on American History Through History’s Habits of Mind TIAH teachers utilize Library of Congress primary sources to build students’ understanding of the government’s role in shaping technology. Explore teacher-created inquiries using LOC sources and archives of partner institutions. Sarah Brown, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

Table 24 Prime Suspects: Unlocking History’s Mysteries with Primary Sources Challenge your students to solve historical mysteries by examining primary source “clues” to help them open a Breakout EDU style box containing the answers or more information. Jane Garver, Little Traverse History Museum, Petoskey, MI; Sara Muladore, Charlevoix Elementary School, Charlevoix, MI Table 25 The Academy Model: Instructing, Facilitating, Extending Student Use of Primary Sources The TPS Academy is a model that helps teachers learn HOW to use primary sources and gives them TIME to prepare. Follow-up observations, coaching and collaborations facilitate teachers’ effective use of primary sources. Pam Su’a, Jordan School District, West Jordan, UT Table 26 Supporting Students to Write Increasingly Complex Arguments Over Time We share social studies curriculum that supports three increasingly complex types of argument writing to build skills over time. Come see how Read.Inquire.Write. has improved diverse middle schoolers’ argument writing. Chauncey Monte-Sano, Ryan Hughes, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Jared Aumen, Kimberly Harn, Ann Arbor Public Schools, Ann Arbor, MI

Visit us in Booths 304-306

FEATURED SPEAKERS

2018 NCSS Conference Sponsor

Location: The Grand Ballroom on the ballroom level in the east tower of the Hyatt Regency Chicago (Book signings to follow in the NCSS Bookstore)

KHIZR KHAN

ALEX WAGNER

Author of Futureface: A Family Mystery, an Epic Quest, and the Secret to Belonging

Author of An American Family: A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1ST 11:30am–12:30pm

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30TH 4:00pm–5:00pm

Spirit o America A f w recipient ard for 2018

Random House • Paperback • 978-0-399-59251-5 304 pages • $18.00/$24.00 Can.

One World • Hardcover • 978-0-8129-9794-1 352 pages • $28.00/$37.00 Can.

KHIZR KHAN, the eldest of ten children, was born in rural Pakistan in 1950. He moved to the United States with his wife, Ghazala, in 1980. The couple became American citizens and raised their three sons in Silver Spring, Maryland. Their middle son, U.S. Army captain Humayun Khan, a graduate of the University of Virginia and its Army ROTC program, was killed in 2004 while stopping a suicide attack near Baqubah, Iraq, and was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart and Bronze Star.

ALEX WAGNER is co-host of Showtime’s The Circus and a contributor to CBS News and The Atlantic. She was formerly the host of MSNBC’s Emmy-nominated Now with Alex Wagner. She lives in New York City.

Visit our website: www.randomhouse.com/highschool Like us: HighSchool@RandomHouse NCSS.HalfPageAd.RandomHouse.v3.indd 1

Follow us: @RHhighschool

Follow us: randomhousehs

Subscribe to: Tiny.cc/PRHedu

9/25/18 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

21

9:42 AM


Education

2018 NCSS CONFERENCE SPONSOR

Booths 304-306

New Books for Your Classroom

THE PENGUIN BOOK OF OUTER SPACE EXPLORATION

CHURCHILL AND ORWELL

Edited by John Logsdon

Penguin Books | Paperback | 978-0-14-311088-0 | 352 pages | $17.00

Foreword by Bill Nye Penguin Classics | Paperback | 978-0-14-312995-0 | 400 pages | $18.00

THE RED BANDANNA

NASA and the Incredible Story of Human Spaceflight

THE FAR AWAY BROTHERS

The Fight for Freedom by Thomas E. Ricks

A Life. A Choice. A Legacy. Educator Guide Available

Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life by Lauren Markham

Broadway Books | Paperback | 978-1-101-90620-0 | 320 pages | $16.00

Educator Guide Available

by Tom Rinaldi

Penguin Books | Paperback | 978-0-14-313007-9 | 224 pages | $17.00

RAD GIRLS CAN

Stories of Bold, Brave, and Brilliant Young Women

THE SOUL OF AMERICA

by Kate Schatz; Illustrated by Miriam Klein Stahl

The Battle for Our Better Angels

Ten Speed Press | Hardcover | 978-0-399-58110-6 | 112 pages | $16.99

by Jon Meacham

Random House | Hardcover | 978-0-399-58981-2 | 416 pages | $30.00

THE WOMEN’S ATLAS by Joni Seager

THE LAST GIRL

My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State

by Nadia Murad; Foreword by Amal Clooney Tim Duggan Books | Paperback | 978-1-5247-6044-1 | 320 pages | $16.00

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC ALMANAC 2019

Penguin Books | Paperback | 978-0-14-313234-9 | 208 pages | $25.00

A DIFFERENT MIRROR FOR YOUNG PEOPLE A History of Multicultural America

by Ronald Takaki; Adapted by Rebecca Stefoff Triangle Square | Paperback | 978-1-60980-416-9 | 384 pages | $18.95

Hot New Science • Incredible Photographs • Maps, Facts, Infographics & More

THE GIRL WHO SMILED BEADS

National Geographic | Paperback | 978-1-4262-1981-8 | 400 pages | $19.99

by Clemantine Wamariya and Elizabeth Weil

by National Geographic

AN AFRICAN AMERICAN AND LATINX HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

A Story of War and What Comes After

Crown | Hardcover | 978-0-451-49532-7 | 288 pages | $26.00

THE WOMAN’S HOUR Educator Guide Available

The Great Fight to Win the Vote

by Paul Ortiz

by Elaine Weiss

Beacon Press | Paperback | 978-0-8070-0593-4 | 296 pages | $16.00

Viking | Hardcover | 978-0-525-42972-2 | 416 pages | $28.00

THE DEAD EYE AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA

EDUCATED

by Vannak Anan Prum; as told to Ben and Jocelyn Pederick

by Tara Westover

Seven Stories Press | Hardcover | 978-1-60980-602-6 | 256 pages | $24.95

Random House | Hardcover | 978-0-399-59050-4 | 352 pages | $28.00

WEST WINGERS

UNCENSORED

Edited by Gautam Raghavan

by Zachary R. Wood

Penguin Books | Paperback | 978-0-14-313329-2 | 336 pages | $17.00

Dutton | Hardcover | 978-1-5247-4244-7 | 272 pages | $26.00

A Graphic Memoir of Modern Slavery

Stories from the Dream Chasers, Change Makers, and Hope Creators Inside the Obama White House

A Memoir

Educator Guide Available

My Life and Uncomfortable Conversations at the Intersection of Black and White America

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Education

2018 NCSS CONFERENCE SPONSOR

Booths 304-306

New Books for Your Classroom

CHE

A NATION WITHOUT BORDERS

A Revolutionary Life

by Jon Lee Anderson and José Hernández Penguin Press | Hardcover | 978-0-7352-2177-2 | 432 pages | $35.00

HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE A PROBLEM?

The United States and Its World in an Age of Civil Wars, 1830-1910 by Steven Hahn

Penguin Books | Paperback | 978-0-14-312178-7 | 608 pages | $20.00

Being Young and Arab in America

WHAT THE EYES DON’T SEE

Penguin Books | Paperback | 978-0-14-311541-0 | 320 pages | $17.00

by Mona Hanna-Attisha

by Moustafa Bayoumi

Educator Guide Available

A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City One World | Hardcover | 978-0-399-59083-2 | 384 pages | $28.00

THE WORLD IN A GRAIN

The Story of Sand and How It Transformed Civilization by Vince Beiser

Riverhead Books | Hardcover | 978-0-399-57642-3 | 304 pages | $28.00

A DOCUMENTARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES Revised and Updated Tenth Edition

by Richard D. Heffner and Alexander B. Heffner

THE LINE BECOMES A RIVER

Signet Classics | Paperback | 978-0-451-49001-8 | 640 pages | $16.00

Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantú

Riverhead Books | Hardcover | 978-0-7352-1771-3 | 256 pages | $26.00

WHEN WOMEN RULED THE WORLD Six Queens of Egypt by Kara Cooney

National Geographic | Hardcover | 978-1-4262-1977-1 | 400 pages | $28.00

THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK

UNBROKEN

Educator Guide Available

(Movie Tie-in Edition) A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand

Ballantine Books | Mass Market Paperback | 978-1-9848-1844-7 720 pages | $9.99

MODERN HERSTORY

Stories of Women and Nonbinary People Rewriting History

With “The Talented Tenth” and “The Souls of White Folk”

by Blair Imani

by W. E. B. Du Bois

Ten Speed Press | Hardcover | 978-0-399-58223-3 | 208 pages | $17.99

Introduction by Ibram X. Kendi Notes by Monica E. Elbert Penguin Classics | Paperback | 978-0-14-018998-8 | 288 pages | $14.00

READING WITH PATRICK

A Teacher, a Student, and a Life-Changing Friendship by Michelle Kuo

TALES OF TWO AMERICAS

Stories of Inequality in a Divided Nation

Random House Trade Paperbacks | Paperback | 978-0-8129-8714-0 336 pages | $16.00

Penguin Books | Paperback | 978-0-14-313103-8 | 352 pages | $17.00

IN THE SHADOW OF STATUES

RUSH

by Mitch Landrieu

Edited by John Freeman

A White Southerner Confronts History

Revolution, Madness, and Benjamin Rush, the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father

Viking | Hardcover | 978-0-525-55944-3 | 240 pages | $25.00

Crown | Hardcover | 978-0-8041-4006-5 | 608 pages | $30.00

With Love, Joy, Anger, and Hope

by Stephen Fried

TO OBAMA

by Jeanne Marie Laskas

Random House | Hardcover | 978-0-525-50938-7 | 416 pages | $28.00

Visit our Website: www.randomhouse.com/highschool Like us: High School@Random House

Follow us: @RHhighschool

Follow us: randomhousehs

Subscribe to: Tiny.cc/PRHEdu


TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES POSTER PRESENTATIONS Table 27 Economic Choices and Environmental Consequences: Are Free-Riders Causing Climate Change? Why can’t we agree on the environmental consequences of our economic decisions? Introducing economic concepts through simulations and primary source analysis enables students to formulate policies. Leave ready to inspire. Jill Beccaris-Pescatore, Montgomery County Community College, Blue Bell, PA; Jessica Schocker, Penn State UniversityBerks, Reading, PA Table 28 Making Vocabulary Important in Elementary Social Studies Classrooms Do you find vocabulary instruction boring? Why not try something that will increase content knowledge and activate students’ content vocabulary! Cheryl Best, Wolf Ridge Educational Center, Bunker Hill, IL; Barbara O’Donnell, Amy Wilkinson, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, IL Table 29 Maximizing Music’s Connections to Social Studies via Inquiry-Based Strategies Learn about instructional units designed to integrate social studies content, TPS resources, and inquiry-based models with the National Music Standards’ Responding Process for Performing Ensembles. Lynn M. Tuttle, National Association for Music Education, Reston, VA; Jenny Neff, University of the Arts, Philadelphia, PA

Table 30 TPS Teachers Network The TPS Teachers Network is a professional learning community centered on Library of Congress primary sources. Join us to learn more about this engaging online resource. Mary Johnson, TPS Teachers Network, Colorado Springs, CO; Kile Clabaugh, TPS Western Region. Denver, CO Table 31 Teaching with Primary Sources Western Region Learn about granting opportunities available to help K-16 teachers access and incorporate free educational materials from the Library of Congress. Peggy O’Neill-Jones, Keith Patterson, Kile Clabaugh, TPS Western Region, Denver, CO Table 32 Literacy Rocks! Social Studies Rules! Key Methods for Integration Do you desire to engage all learners? Extend constructivist and inquiry-based learning through the language arts to ignite foundations for historical thinking by exploring killer sources. Roland Schendel, Metropolitan State University, Denver, CO Table 33 Primary Source Analysis-Social Media Style Engage students in their medium: social media. Interact with social media, e.g., Twitter and YouTube, to teach students to think critically about social media as a primary source. Peggy O’Neill Jones, Metropolitan State University, Denver, CO

Questions - email info@sqcc.org www.sqcc.org

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES POSTER PRESENTATIONS Table 34 Beyond Smokey Bear: The National Museum of Forest Service History Learn about the primary sources resources from the National Museum of Forest Service History and exemplary teaching resources developed in two successful regional workshops. Michelle Pearson, National Museum of Forest Service History, Missoula, MT Table 35 Using TPS to Build Capacity Across a School District Learn how a grant from the TPS regional program enabled Nebraska Wesleyan University to launch a district-wide initiative using primary documents. Kevin Bower, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln, NE; Jaclyn Kellison, Pat O’Meara, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE Table 36 Educating with Evidence Through Museums, 3D Printing, and the Library Learn how to form partnerships with local museums to access and 3D scan artifacts that engage students with objects from the past. Grant R. Miller, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL; Ashley Taylor, Cobden Middle School, Cobden, IL; Stacie Tefft, Murphysboro High School, Murphysboro, IL

Table 37 The Curiosity Classroom: Collaboration Between Schools and Museums A partnership between Fulton County Schools and three Atlanta museums train Georgia Studies teachers to create instructional model units incorporating TPS strategies. Jena Sibille, Fulton County Public Schools, Roswell, GA Table 38 Teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict with Primary Sources Understanding the Arab-Israeli conflict is critical to being a global citizen. Using primary sources, learn to connect the history to the current situation. Steve Goldberg, Institute for Curriculum Services, New York, NY; Andrew Askuvich, Institute for Curriculum Services, Chicago, IL Table 39 Bringing Historic Public Television Broadcasts to the Classroom This collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Educational Foundation provides access to significant public media programming from the 1940’s forward. Ryn Marchese, WGBH, Boston, MA Table 40 Business Leadership Lessons from Historical Events Receive historical examples for the study of leadership that can help with cross-disciplinary efforts in business courses. Michelle Kowalsky, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ

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98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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ON-SITE INFORMATION

STAY CONNECTED TO THE CONFERENCE

Registration Hours NCSS Registration Desk—Ballroom Level, East Tower

There are a variety of ways to keep up with what’s going on at the conference.

Wednesday 11:00am–7:00pm Thursday 7:00am–6:00pm Friday 6:30am–5:30pm Saturday 7:00am–4:30pm Sunday 7:30–9:30am

Twitter Follow the conference on Twitter, @NCSSNetwork, and include the hashtag #ncss18 in all of your conference tweets. Updates, reminders, and special offers will be sent regularly, so be sure to follow.

Badges Required All conference participants must register, including chairs, presenters, exhibitors, and committee members. Badges must be worn at all times to gain access to conference sessions, exhibits, and events. Coat Check Coat and bag check is available Friday and Saturday on the Ballroom Level, East Tower, near NCSS Registration. The fee is $2 per item.

NCSS Conference mobile app The NCSS Conference mobile app is available for your smartphone or tablet. Get the full conference schedule, maps, updates and more on your mobile device—completely FREE. It has the latest and most up-todate information, including all changes since this Program was printed in late October. Download Guidebook in the App Store or Google Play or visit guidebook.com/getit Search for 2018 NCSS Annual Conference.

Lost and Found Lost and found items will be turned in to NCSS Registration. Exhibit Hall Hours Riverside Exhibit Hall, East Tower, access through Ballroom Level Friday 10:00am–6:00pm Saturday 8:00am–4:00pm NCSS Bookstore Be sure to make time to visit the NCSS Bookstore, located on the Ballroom Level, East Tower, in Columbus A/B. You’ll find copies of books by major conference speakers, among many valuable resources. Book signings will take place immediately in front of the Bookstore. NCSS Technology Community Tech Lounge One-on-one tech tutorials, app giveaways, tech teaching materials, tech ideas and streaming TECH talks by teacher leaders will be available for attendees. Located on the Ballroom Level, East Tower, between NCSS Registration and Bookstore.

Connect with colleagues through a special interest community and share your experiences at https://connected. socialstudies.org, the NCSS online social network for conference attendees and NCSS members. Complimentary wireless Internet service is available in all Hyatt Regency meeting rooms and public areas.

SCHEDULE INFORMATION This program was printed in late October. Some schedule information has changed, and some sessions have been canceled by the presenters. The 2018 NCSS Conference mobile app has all updates.

Lead Retrieval Many NCSS exhibitors use lead retrieval (a paperless tracking system) to receive quicker, more accurate information about conference attendees who have visited their booth. With the lead retrieval system, an exhibitor asks to enter the number on your badge as you visit the booth, capturing the encoded registration information. This allows exhibitors to send you information while the conference is still fresh in your mind.

To see a full list of all canceled sessions within the app, tap on the search icon (magnifying glass at the top of the screen) and type in “Canceled.”

Emergency Procedure To report an emergency within the Hyatt Regency, use one of the house phones located on each floor. Dial 55.

@NCSSNetwork

All sessions canceled before the conference are also listed on a sign at NCSS Registration, Ballroom Level, East Tower.

NCSS

National Council for the Social Studies

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


BRINGING THE WO R L D I N TO T H E C L A S S RO OM Learn more about our print and digital Social Studies solutions in PreK–12, AP®, Honors, Electives, and Professional Development. Visit us during NCSS at Booth #1111 “National Geographic”, “National Geographic Society” and the Yellow Border Design are registered trademarks of the National Geographic Society ®Marcas Registradas. AP® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this product.

NGL.Cengage.com/School 888-915-3276


SPECIAL EVENTS Friday

7:00–9:00am Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

NCSS President’s Breakfast Fee: $5 Join us for the official opening of the 98th NCSS Annual Conference. The breakfast will include a keynote speech by Girl Scouts of the United States CEO Sylvia Acevedo, honor the 2018 Teacher of the Year award recipients, and include NCSS President India Meissel’s address on the current state of social studies. The NCSS President’s Breakfast is generously sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Saturday 6:00–9:00pm Reception at the Palatine Gurdwara Palatine Gurdwara, 1280 Winnetka St., Palatine, IL The Palatine Gurdwara, the oldest in the midwest, is a unique venue for this celebration of teachers and social studies education, connecting us with the heritage of the Sikh-American community. This engaging evening includes networking opportunities, a gallery tour, cultural activities, and a traditional vegetarian Langar. Explore exhibits and watch diverse documentaries. The reception is hosted by the American Sikh Council in collaboration with the Sikh Resource Society and the Palatine Gurdwara.

NOTE: Tickets to Hamilton, “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me,” and The Second City are all SOLD OUT.

TIPS FOR A REWARDING EXPERIENCE AT THE NCSS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

 Review the Conference Program and mark the sessions

you plan to attend. If you are here with colleagues, plan to attend different sessions and share your learned knowledge after the conference.

Become familiar with the layout of the Hyatt Regency Chicago. Floor plans are available on page 159.

 Visit the Exhibit Hall, where more than 180 exhibitors will share their latest educational products.

 Visit the NCSS Bookstore near NCSS Registration on the Ballroom Level of the East Tower for the latest in NCSS educational resources and for book signings.

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 Stop by the NCSS arena in the Exhibit Hall (Booth 1001) to learn about the benefits of membership in NCSS.

 Attend a Community Scholar session, a Community

session, Community showcase, or a Community meeting to find colleagues with similar interests, and learn about the ways to be involved in NCSS.

 Wear comfortable shoes and clothes, and dress in layers.  Attend some of the many social events to meet colleagues from across the country.

 Tell us about your conference experience by filling out the post-conference survey.

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


Empower your students and make THE WEEK part of your classroom curriculum. NCSS MEMBERS:

Discover how to transform the world’s most-interesting weekly news magazine into one of your most-effective new tools for building the essential skills well-rounded students need to succeed. Complete with ready-to-use lesson plans and interactive quizzes – for results you can measure. MAIN STORIES

TRUMP’S PORN-STAR PAYOFF

p.5 Stormy Daniels

TALKING POINTS

Can pork fix what ails Congress?

INTERNATIONAL

The backlash against #MeToo

p.16

This Week THE WEEK—in the hands of innovative educators—has become a powerful teaching tool in curriculums at high schools and universities all across America. And now you can put it to work for your students too.

Full Page Ad FPO THE WEEK in the classroom takes the best reporting, most-in-

triguing ideas, and thought-provoking commentary from the pages of America’s fastest-growing newsweekly, and assembles them into complete and balanced teaching blocks on everything students need—and want—to know about today’s world. THE WEEK has you covered. Our FREE GUIDES help you to integrate THE WEEK into your classroom.

Pages 14, 17

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p.35

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Facebook’s re grets Stephen Hawking

Why Zuckerb giant influenceerg wants to shrink his site’s on news and polit p.34 ics THE BEST OF THE U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL MEDIA

Who’ll strike first?

Trump’s growing rage over Mueller’s Russia investigation p.4

JANUARY 26, 2018 VOLUME ALL YOU NEED

18 ISSUE 857

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EVERYTHING THAT MATTERS WWW.THEWEEK.CO M

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• Teacher’s Guide is sent every Sunday via email for 40 weeks during the school year, providing helpful tips on connecting issue content with your curriculum. • Educator’s Reference Guide is your online resource for how best to use THE WEEK to challenge your students, including activities appropriate for every issue.

The physicist whoTHE became BEST OF THE U.S. AND INTERNA TIONAL MEDIA an oracle

How weather affects batted balls

THE WEST’S OPTIONS ON PUTIN

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OBITUARIES

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September 14, 2018 Issue 890

The Week at a Glance

Learn how to bring this exciting new source for classroom investigation into your world. Sign up now at TheWeek.com/ teachsmarter. Or call toll-free 1-877-245-8151.

4

Turbulent confirmation hearings for Kavanaugh

5

White House shaken by Woodward expose’

7

New York City: Kaepernick case to proceed

News

President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, faced one of the most contentious confirmation hearings in Senate history this week, with his vote expected to give conservatives the power to shape American law for decades to come.

News

The Trump administration was thrown into damage control mode this week by a new book from veteran Washington journalist Bob Woodward, which depicts a dysfunctional White House and a president viewed by his inner circle as dangerously ignorant and impulsive.

News

Colin Kaepernick, the onetime star player who sparked a national furor when he began kneeling during the national anthem to protest police shootings of African-Americans, claims NFL owners have colluded to keep him out of the game.

11

Afghanistan: The endless war

News

18

Google: Is search rigged against Trump?

Tech

The U.S. war in the ‘graveyard of empires’ has lasted nearly 17 years. Will it ever end?

President Trump delivered an edict that Google search results were skewed against him and other conservatives. Is search rigged?

Government American History Legal Studies

Politics Government Media Studies

Civil Rights Legal Studies Business

World Studies World History

Politics Technology Business

BRIEFLY​: ​Quick Questions & Ideas To Engage Students New York City: Kaepernick case to proceed PAGE 7 A transgender study’s non-PC conclusion PAGE 12 Political ads will get even worse PAGE 18

1. Why does former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick have a grievance against NFL owners? 2. According to the article, how did he spark a national furor in 2016? 3. What do you know about reactions to Kaepernick’s protests, both positive and negative? 4. How do you feel about Kaepernick’s protest and the reactions that it sparked? 1. What conclusion did a Brown University researcher reach about transgender youth? 2. Why do you think that conclusion was described as “stunning”? 3. What is “social contagion” and how do the researchers believe that it relates to transgender youth? 4. Why are some activist groups objecting the study? 1. According to the article, why do campaign strategists think that political ads are about to get “worse”? 2. Why could Facebook be a likely platform for these negative ads? 3. Why do you think that campaign strategists choose to go negative? 4. Would you be more or less likely to vote for a candidate as a result of them “going negative”?

FEATURE OF THE WEEK: Cover

Invite students to​ ​look at this week’s cover and answer the questions.

1. Describe what you see in the illustration on this week’s cover. 2. What examples of symbolism can you identify? 3. What do you think the illustrator’s point of view is? Justify your answer. 4. Do you agree or disagree with this point of view? How else could this point of view be illustrated? How might the opposing point of view be illustrated?


CONFERENCE SPONSORS NCSS thanks all of the following sponsors for their generous support of the 98th NCSS Annual Conference. Please visit their booths in the Exhibit Hall and thank them for their contributions. SPONSOR

EVENT / ITEM / SERVICE

SPONSOR

EVENT / ITEM / SERVICE

9/11 Memorial & Museum

Featured speaker Keating Crown

Macmillan

Featured speaker Anthony Ray Hinton

National Geographic National Geographic Learning

Vital Issue Session: In Her Shoes: Field Notes from National Geographic Explorers

The News Literacy Project

Featured speaker Peter Sagal

Penguin Random House

Featured speaker Alex Wagner Featured speaker Khizr Khan

Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Featured speaker Susan Hood

Social Studies School Service

Spirit of America Award honoring Khizr Khan

Big History Project

C-SPAN

General conference support

Conference tote bags Featured speaker Hall Davidson

Discovery Education

Facing History and Ourselves

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Kaur Foundation

NCSS Institutional Members’ Networking Lounge

Featured speaker Eric Liu NCSS President’s Breakfast Saturday Exhibit Hall continental breakfast

Name badge holders

Studies Weekly

FIRST-TIMERS’ SCHOLARSHIPS NCSS has awarded conference scholarships to deserving teachers in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, and Wisconsin who have never been able to attend an NCSS Annual Conference and join NCSS. These scholarships enable teachers from diverse ethnic groups and/or who teach in high-poverty schools to take advantage of this premier professional development opportunity. Many individuals and organizations listed below, including a number of state and local councils, made generous donations to allow these teachers to attend. In many cases, the award was given in honor of an individual. A special thank you goes to Gayle Thieman and Melissa Collum for leading all aspects of the scholarship program. We also thank everyone who contributed to the scholarship fund and welcome all recipients to the conference and to NCSS. INDIVIDUALS Susan Adler Sherry Adrian Peggy Altoff Charlee Archuleta Karen Bomberger Rozella Clyde Melissa Collum Vuanya Cyrus Kenneth de Masi Syd Golston, in honor of the Parkland, Florida students and “The March for Our Lives” Susan Herrick Lynn Ingram Dr. Mary A. McFarland Margit McGuire Julia Morris Karen Muir, in honor of Pat and Ron Robeson, Dr. Sari Bennett and Peggy Altoff, Dr. Gayle Thieman and Melissa Collum

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NCSS Board of Directors in recognition of Peggy Jackson, Mary Ellen Daneels, David Klemm and Jennifer Morgan for their leadership and service. Dulcie Neiman Ryan New Angela Orr Jeff Passe Anthony Roy

Ron Schooler Stefanie Wager Pamela Wasserman Bruce Wendt

STATE COUNCILS Arizona Council for the Social Studies Georgia Council for the Social Studies Iowa Council for the Social Studies Oregon Council for the Social Studies Michigan Council for the Social Studies Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies ORGANIZATIONS Information Age Publishing Robert R. McCormick Foundation

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


TOURS Chicago’s rich history, spectacular architecture, and lively neighborhoods are all on display at the 98th NCSS Annual Conference. Take advantage of some of these great tours to explore and learn more about the city. Please check availability and purchase tickets at NCSS Registration. Some tours may have been canceled or sold out since this Program went to print. Thursday, November 29 9:45am–1:15pm

Chicago’s Architectural Highlights, by Bus

10:00am–2:00pm

Frank Lloyd Wright by Bus CANCELED

2:00–3:45pm

Chicago’s Original Gangster Tour

2:30–4:00pm

Hull House

SOLD OUT Friday, November 30 SOLD OUT

10:15am–1:45pm

Devil in the White City

10:15am–1:45pm

Chicago’s Architectural Highlights, by Bus

3:30–6:30pm

Sin & Suds Beer Tour

4:00–6:30pm

Best in Chow Food Tour

Saturday, December 1

NCSS Live Learning Center As part of our commitment to providing members with valuable education, NCSS brings you online education through the NCSS Live Learning Center. As a special thank you to all our attendees, this resource is included in your registration. Don’t let your education end when the conference ends. Continue your professional development with educational session recordings from the conference through the NCSS Live Learning Center. This online library of more than 30 hours of session audio syncto-slide recordings lets you catch up on sessions you missed for a more complete educational experience, available any time. Look for the recording icon [REC] next to the sessions that will be recorded at the conference. Stay tuned for a post-conference email with instructions for accessing your free content. For more details, go to www.socialstudies.org/ conference/learningcenter.

SOLD OUT

Friday, 4:00–7:00pm Swissotel, Lucerne Ballroom

#sschat unconference The NCSS unconference offers opportunities for participants to engage in organic, dynamic, and collaborative professional development led by the #sschat co-leaders. Participants help determine sessions and then learn with each other. Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas, Denton, TX; Michael Milton, Burlington High School, Burlington, MA; Chris Hitchcock, Indiana University High School, Bloomington, IN; Andrew Swan, Bigelow Middle School, Newton, MA; Mary-Owen Holmes, Spring Hill Middle School, Spring Hill, TN

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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AWARDS

2018 Outstanding Elementary Social Studies Teacher of the Year Elisabetta Bavaro Oceanside Union Free School District Oceanside, New York

2018 Outstanding Middle Level Social Studies Teacher of the Year Tracey Zaval Midlothian Middle School Midlothian, Virginia

2018 Outstanding Secondary Social Studies Teacher of the Year

Alicen Morley Boone High School Boone, Iowa

Saturday, December 1 1:30–2:30pm Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Saturday, December 1 2:45–3:45pm Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Saturday, December 1 4:00–5:00pm Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Empower Your Students to Take Action: Fostering Global Citizens and Solutionary Thinkers

Tonight In the Classroom— Incorporating The Tonight Show's Games Into Your Classroom

Using Deductive Reasoning to Uncover History

This workshop will discuss how the 2018 NCSS Elementary Teacher of the Year converted her engaged learners into empowered learners. Student agency is at the heart of this classroom transformation. Using the UN Sustainable Development Goals, see how you can promote global citizenship and solutionary thinking in an effort to inspire students to change the world around them. Presenter: Elisabetta Bavaro, Oceanside School #5, Oceanside, NY Chair: Sarah B. Shear, Penn State Altoona, PA

Are you looking for ways to bring fun and excitement into your classroom? Come learn how to incorporate games from The Tonight Show into your lessons to increase student engagement through creativity, collaboration and critical thinking. This session will feature games such as Box of Lies, Five Second Summaries, Wheel of Freestyle and Lip Sync Battle among others. Presenter: Tracey Zaval, Midlothian Middle School, Midlothian, VA Chair: Anthony Angelini, Conewago Valley School District, New Oxford, PA

History is taught in chronological order. We start from the beginning and work our way to the end. But, that’s not how researchers discover history so why are we for inquiry in the opposite direction? Learn how to teach history backwards and spiral the curriculum forward to strengthen such historical thinking skills as causality and chronology. Presenter: Alicen Morely, Boone High School, Boone, IA Chair: Jesse Haight, Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA

These awards recognize exceptional classroom social studies teachers, grades K-12, who teach social studies regularly and systematically in elementary school settings, and at least half-time in middle or junior high and high school settings. Award winners receive $2,500, up to $500 in transportation/lodging reimbursement to attend the NCSS Annual Conference, and a complimentary one-year membership in NCSS. NCSS Teachers of the Year excel and demonstrate exceptional abilities in the following seven areas: 1. Creative and effective development/use of instructional materials. 2. Incorporation of innovative and verified effective instructional strategies and techniques. 3. Utilization of new scholarship from history, the social sciences, and other appropriate fields. 4. Utilization of the ten interrelated themes identified in the NCSS National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies and integration of the four dimensions of inquiry concepts from the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework. 5. Ability to foster a spirit of inquiry and the development of information literacy skills. 6. Ability to foster the development of democratic beliefs and values, and the skills needed for citizen participation. 7. Professional development. To apply for these awards each year visit http://www.socialstudies.org/awards. Applications are open in January 2019.

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


Year of German American Friendship Celebrate this year-long, nationwide showcase of the ties that unite our two countries. Beginning in October 2018, the Year of German American Friendship will mark our shared history and highlight the ways in which Germany and America work together to tackle common global challenges while drawing attention to our many partnerships in the fields of education, science, business, culture and beyond.

www.wunderbartogether.org funded by

implemented by

supported by

Be sure to visit the German Embassy at Booth #1126

98th NCSS Annual Conference November 30-December 1, 2018, Hyatt Regency Chicago www.socialstudies.org


CELEBRATE EXCELLENCE AWARDS 2018 Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies Award Dr. Stephen J. Thornton University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Friday, November 30 10:15–11:15am Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Gatekeepers All For more than 30 years Stephen Thornton has explored how social studies teachers tend the curricular-instructional gate—why, how, and to what effects. Professor Thornton explains how he first became intrigued by the notion of teacher-as-gatekeeper, how the field has profited from studying it, and why attention to it remains vital. Presenter: Stephen J. Thornton, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Chair: Jeff Passe, Cal Poly Pomona, Pomona, CA Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies

The Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career in Research Award recognizes professionals who have made extensive contributions to knowledge concerning significant areas of social studies education through meritorious research.

2017 Christa McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award Kevin A. Wagner Carlisle Area School District, Carlisle, PA Saturday, December 1 9:00–10:00am Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Piecing Together the Puzzle: Using Source Materials to Understand Lives of the WWII Fallen Over 405,000 American men and women gave their lives during WWII. We know the stories of too few. Learn how to engage students to study the life of a Silent Hero. Learn the key steps in researching a soldier, sailor, airman, Marine, or Coastguardsman killed in action during World War II. Learn the historical thinking skills that apply to this type of work. Explore the idea of engaging students in this program. Presenter: Kevin A. Wagner, Carlisle Area School District, Carlisle, PA

Christa McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award

Christa McAuliffe was an innovative social studies teacher who reached for the stars in an effort to make her dream a reality. The purpose of this $2,500 grant is to help a social studies educator make his or her dream of innovative social studies a reality. Grants will be given to assist classroom teachers in developing and implementing imaginative, innovative, and illustrative social studies teaching strategies; and supporting student implementation of innovative social studies citizenship projects, field experiences, and community connections.

CUFA-FASSE Social Studies Social Justice Research Grant Friday, November 30 11:30am–12:30pm Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Anti-Racist Teacher Efficacy: Toward Justice-Oriented Teaching in Missouri This project explores the influence of white fragility on the pedagogical choices that teachers make. Findings from a statewide survey of teachers in Missouri will be discussed. Presenters: Ryan T. Knowles, Andrea Hawkman, Utah State University, Logan, UT; Antonio J. Castro, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO Chair: Dr. Tina Heafner, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, Charlotte, NC

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


NCSS 99th Annual Conference November 22–24, 2019

NCSS, Texas Council for the Social Studies and National Council for Geographic Education will join together for a co-located conference in Austin, Texas. Opportunities to deepen and broaden your professional interests await!

Visit socialstudies.org/conference for updates. Call for Proposals opens in December 2018 Registration opens in June 2019


CELEBRATE EXCELLENCE AWARDS 2018 Exemplary Research in Social Studies Award Dr. Wayne Journell University of North Carolina at Greensboro Greensboro, NC Friday, November 30 11:30–12:30pm Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Grabbing the Third Rail: Teaching Politics in Secondary Education Many teachers have become afraid to broach political issues in their classrooms. However, helping students become politically aware is an imperative of effective civic education. This presentation, which is based on the book Teaching Politics in Secondary Education: Engaging with Contentious Issues, will discuss reasons for incorporating politics into the curriculum, as well as offer research-based strategies for doing so. Presenter: Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC Chair: Sarah Mathews, Florida International University, Miami, FL

Exemplary Research Award This award acknowledges and encourages scholarly inquiry into significant issues and possibilities for social studies education. Research must be published and have a social studies education focus.

How are your students learning to manage money? The University of Chicago is looking for high school teachers to pilot our new research-based financial education curriculum.

UCHICAGO STEM EDUCATION

Visit us at NCSS in booth 116

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


CELEBRATE EXCELLENCE AWARDS 2018 Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award Dr. Neil Shanks University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Friday, November 30 9:00–10:00am Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Economics is Political: Preservice Teachers, Purpose, and the Challenges of Critical Economics Pedagogy A case study of preservice teachers in an Urban Teaching program exploring the intersections between purpose and economics. Specifically, these teachers wanted to explore the past, present, and future with social studies and fundamentally alter traditional forms of social studies instruction. At times, economics aligned with these purposes, but the misalignments offer important lessons for utilizing economics in critical social studies pedagogy. Presenter: Neil Shanks, University of Texas at Austin Chair: Ritu Radhakrishnan, Oswego State University, Oswego, NY

Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation The Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award recognizes out-standing research completed in pursuit of a doctoral degree.

2017 Grant for Enhancement of Geographic Literacy in Honor of James F. Marran Friday, November 30 2:45–3:45pm Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower Dr. Jason Harshman University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Alisa Meggitt North Central Junior High School, North Liberty, IA

Where is Islam?: Mapping with the Global Geographers Group (G3) Organized around the compelling question “Where is Islam?”, this project focuses on the work of a team of seventh and eighth grade students known as the Global Geographers Group (G3). Bridging the NCSS C3 Inquiry Arc, the National Geography Standards, state of Iowa social studies standards, and the new NCSS Standards for the Preparation of Social Studies Teachers, this inquiry-based project is designed to foster (1) geographic literacy skills among middle school and pre-service teachers through the (2) incorporation of local and global experiences and perspectives (3) in and out of the classroom (4) to be applied to the creation of a standards-based digital media and mapping project. Presenters: Dr. Jason Harshman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Alisa Meggitt, North Central Junior High School, North Liberty, IA Chair: Paul Nagel, Curriculum Writer, Cypress, TX

Enhancement of Geographic Literacy in honor of James F. Marran The NCSS Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy was created to promote geography education in the schools; to enhance the geographic literacy of students at the classroom, district, or statewide level; and to encourage the integration of geography into the social studies curriculum/classroom. Award winners receive $2,500, a commemorative award, and present a session on their project outcomes at the NCSS Annual Conference.

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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MASTER OF ARTS IN

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Quality coursework in a breadth of historical fields A well-designed study plan makes it possible for teachers to complete the program in three years, starting with a 5-day residency on EIU’s campus All courses are taught by the dedicated faculty at EIU

GET READY TO EXPLORE, ENGAGE AND THRIVE. Our program is one of the few content-area history graduate programs in the nation designed specifically for K-12 teachers. In our program you will find all the scholarly rigor of a traditional master’s in history, but with a schedule of coursework and plan of study to meet your professional needs. EIU.EDU/HISTORYGRAD/ONLINE.PHP

Join a supportive academic environment based on a collaborative approach to learning Does not lead to teacher licensure DR. LEE E. PATTERSON GRADUATE COORDINATOR DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 600 LINCOLN AVENUE CHARLESTON, IL 61920 GRADUATEHISTORY@EIU.EDU 217-581-6372

DON’T TALK ABOUT CHANGE. LEAD IT! Do you want civics to come alive for your students? Do you hope your students will become active participants in their democracy?

Award for Global Understanding Given in Honor of James M. Becker Saturday, December 1 10:15 – 11:15am Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower Gustova Carrera Shore Country Day School, Beverly, MA

Teaching Global Citizenship a Case Study: Civil Rights, Cold War, and the African Anti-Colonial Struggle Civil rights leaders understood their struggle as part of a larger struggle for liberation, and proindependence leaders in Africa understood America and its foreign policy, at least in part, through the lens of segregation and the Civil Rights struggle; while America’s Soviet adversaries exploited those perceptions to their advantage, a community of Civil Rights and anti-colonial advocates bound by ideas and ideals emerged across the Atlantic. Presenter: Gustova Carrera, Shore Country Day School, Beverly, MA

Chair: Joseph David, J.I. Watson Elementary School, Iowa, LA

Come visit us at Booth #508 to learn how our Action Civics curriculum and teacher training can support you in empowering your students to become lifelong civic leaders and change-makers in their community!

Check us out at: www.generationcitizen.org Or contact: bmills@generationcitizen.org

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

Award for Global Understanding Given in Honor of James M. Becker This award annually recognizes a social studies educator (or a team of educators) who has made notable contributions in helping social studies students increase their understanding of the world.


CARTER G. WOODSON BOOKS AND HONOR BOOKS These awards are presented for the most distinguished social studies books depicting ethnicity in the United States that are appropriate for children and young-adult readers. The awards are designed to encourage the writing, publishing, and dissemination of books that treat topics related to ethnic minorities and relations sensitively and accurately. The Carter G. Woodson Book Award Subcommittee has selected the 2018 elementary and secondary level book winners. In addition, four honor book awards (elementary and secondary) recipients have been selected. There were no middle level winner and honor books selected this year. Elementary Winner (Grades K–6) The Youngest Marcher—The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a Young Civil Rights Activist by Cynthia Levinson Atheneum Books for Young Readers

Elementary Honor Winners

Martin’s Dream Day by Kitty Kelley Atheneum Books for Young Readers

Middle Level Winner Fighting for Justice—Fred Korematsu Speaks Up by Laura Atkins and Stan Yogi Heyday

Middle Level Honoree

Schomberg—The Man Who Built A Library by Carole Boston Weatherford Candlewick Press

Secondary Winner Twelve Days in May—Freedom Ride 1961 by Larry Dane Brimner Calkins Creek, An Imprint of Highlights

Secondary Honor Winners Now or Never!—54th Massachusetts Infantry’s War to End Slavery by Ray Anthony Shepard Calkins Creek, An Imprint of Highlights

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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2018 Carter G. Woodson Book Award: Winning Author Panel Discussion Saturday, December 1 11:30 –12:30pm Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower This panel offers a fascinating glimpse at “the story behind the stories” of the 2018 Carter G. Woodson award books, as told by the authors. It also features a discussion and Q & A session. Book panel make up: Cynthia Levinson—Elementary Level Winner Mariko Atkins and Stan Yogi—Middle Level Winners Larry Dane Brimner—Secondary Level Winner Chair: Sarah Segal, Hood River Middle School, Hood River, OR

Friday, November 30 11:30am–12:30pm Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower.

50 Ideas in 50 Minutes: Great Ideas from NCSS Award Winners Join award winning teachers and grant recipients as they share “Top Tips for Success” in the classroom and beyond. Winners will also share their experience applying for NCSS Awards. NCSS offers three grant opportunities ranging from $2,000–$2,500. Come hear from NCSS Grant Recipients as they share grant writing tips for success to support and enhance your classroom or boost projects that showcase your students’ work. Moderator and Facilitator: Kristy Brugar, Associate Professor, Social Studies Education, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK On hand to answer your questions: Recipients of the following Awards and Grants • NCSS Outstanding Social Studies Teacher of the Year Award • Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy

Note: A book signing immediately follows the Carter G. Woodson Panel at the NCSS Bookstore.

• Award for Global Understanding • McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award

Teachers explore Kehinde Wiley’s President Barack Obama, 2018; Photo: Mark Gulezian

Want to Liven Up Your Classroom ? Stop by Booth 307 for educator resources and methods to engage your students with portraiture.

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


NCSS COMMITTEES NCSS conducts official business at the Annual Conference. Unless otherwise noted, meetings of the House of Delegates, Operations Committees, and other NCSS work groups are open to all NCSS members interested in council governance. All NCSS Committee meetings are at the Hyatt Regency.

7:00–9:00pm 9:00–11:00am 12:00–2:00pm 2:00–3:00pm 3:00–5:00pm 3:00–5:00pm 4:00–6:00pm 5:30–7:30pm

Wednesday, November 28 NCSS Board Meeting (Board members only, please) Thursday, November 29 Documents Review Committee (Board members only, please) House of Delegates Steering Committee House of Delegates Assignment Committee House of Delegates Resolutions Committee and Hearing Community Chairs Roundtable Awards Committee Publications Committee Friday, November 30

Addams, 3rd Floor, West Tower Horner, 3rd Floor, West Tower Haymarket, Concourse Level, West Tower Haymarket, Concourse Level, West Tower Haymarket, Concourse Level, West Tower Skyway 272, Skyway Level, East Tower Picasso, Concourse Level, West Tower Haymarket, Concourse Level, West Tower

9:00–11:00am

House of Delegates Resolutions Hearing

New Orleans, Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:00–11:00am

Public Relations/Government Relations Committee

Haymarket, Concourse Level, West Tower

10:15am–12:00pm

Membership Committee

Picasso, Concourse Level, West Tower

11:30am–12:30pm

Social Studies and the Young Learner Advisory Board

Ogden, 3rd Floor, West Tower

11:30am–12:30pm

FASSE Governing Board

Addams, 3rd Floor, West Tower

11:30am–1:00pm

Archives Committee

Horner, 3rd Floor, West Tower

12:45–1:30pm

House of Delegates New Delegate Briefing

Regency Ballroom CD, Ballroom Level, West Tower

1:30–2:00pm

House of Delegates Credentials Committee

Regency Ballroom CD, Ballroom Level, West Tower

2:00–3:00pm

House of Delegates Registration

North Registration Desk, Regency Ballroom Ballroom Foyer, Ballroom Level, West Tower

3:00–7:00pm

House of Delegates

Regency Ballroom CD, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Saturday, December 1 9:00–11:00am 9:00–11:00am 10:00am–12:00pm 10:15am–12:15pm 1:00–3:00pm

Carter G. Woodson Committee International Visitors Committee Nominations and Elections Committee Program Planning: 2019—99th Annual Conference, Austin, TX Affiliated Council Presidents

3:15–4:45pm

Program Planning: 2020—100 Annual Conference, Washington, DC

8:00–11:00am

NCSS Board Meeting (Board members only, please)

Picasso, Concourse Level, West Tower Haymarket, Concourse Level, West Tower Roosevelt 2, Concourse Level, East Tower Skyway 272, Skyway Level, East Tower New Orleans, Ballroom Level, West Tower

th

Soldier Field, Concourse Level, West Tower

Sunday, December 2

House of Delegates Events at NCSS All meetings will be held at the Hyatt Regency. Steering Committee: 12:00–2:00pm Thursday

New Delegate Briefing: 12:45–1:30pm Friday

Assignment Committee: 2:00–3:00pm, Thursday

Credentials Committee: 1:30–2:00pm Friday

Resolutions Committee & Hearing: 3:00–5:00pm, Thursday

Registration: 2:00–3:00pm Friday

Resolutions Hearing: 9:00–11:00am Friday

62nd Delegate Assembly: 3:00–7:00pm Friday

Addams, 3rd Floor, West Tower

House of Delegates 62nd Delegate Assembly Friday, November 30 3:00–7:00pm Regency Ballroom CD Ballroom Level, West Tower Hyatt Regency Ballroom Discussion open to any NCSS member in good standing (Voting for House of Delegates members only) 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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NCSS SPECIAL INTEREST COMMUNITY MEETINGS Special Interest Communities are formal subgroups within NCSS that bring together educators with common interests. Conference attendees are strongly encouraged to attend any and all community meetings of interest to them. All Special Interest Community meetings are at the Hyatt Regency. Friday, November 30 9:00–10:00am

Research Community

Addams, 3rd Floor, West Tower

9:00–10:00am

Geography Community

Skyway 260, Skyway Level, East Tower

10:15–11:15am

Citizenship Community

Skyway 260, Skyway Level, East Tower

10:15–11:15am

Non-Public Schools Community

Ogden, 3rd Floor, West Tower

10:15–11:15am

Issues-Centered Education Community

Addams, 3rd Floor, West Tower

11:30am–12:30pm

African American Educators for the Social Studies Community

Wright, 3rd Floor, West Tower

11:30am–12:30pm

Preservice Educators Community

Skyway 260, Skyway Level, East Tower

2:45–3:45pm

Teacher Education and Professional Development Community

Haymarket, Concourse Level, West Tower

2:45–3:45pm

Academic Freedom Community

Skyway 260, Skyway Level, East Tower

9:00–10:00am

Asia Community

Skyway 272, Skyway Level, East Tower

9:00–10:00am

Indigenous Education Community

New Orleans, Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:00–10:00am

Friends of NCSS Community

Soldier Field, Concourse Level, West Tower

10:15–11:15am

National Board of Professional Teaching Standards Community

Skyway 260, Skyway Level, East Tower

10:15–11:15am

Human Rights Education Community

Horner, 3rd Floor, West Tower

11:30am–12:30pm

World History Community

Soldier Field, Concourse Level, West Tower

1:30–2:30pm

LGBTQ & Allies Community

Skyway 272, Skyway Level, East Tower

1:30–2:30pm

Environmental & Sustainability Community

Horner, 3rd Floor, West Tower

1:30–2:30pm

Educators for Social Justice Community

Picasso, Concourse Level, West Tower

1:30–2:30pm

Psychology Community

Soldier Field, Concourse Level, West Tower

Saturday, December 1

COMMUNITIES SHOWCASE 12:00–1:15pm

Friday and Saturday Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

NCSS Special Interest Communities play a vital role as vehicles for social studies professionals to discuss current topics in the profession, seek advice, share their knowledge and connect with others of similar interests. Visit the NCSS Communities Showcase and talk one-on-one with community members to explore which might be the right fit for you!

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


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98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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COMMUNITY/COUNCIL MEALS NCSS Communities and Affiliated Councils also hold breakfast and lunch meetings. Tickets to them must have been ordered during advance registration; they cannot be purchased onsite. NCSS attendees without tickets are always welcome to attend the business portion of these meetings. Friday, November 30 12:30pm–1:30pm African American Educators for the Social Studies Lunch

Wright, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Saturday, December 1 7:00–8:00am

Great Lakes Council Breakfast

Swissotel Chicago, Zurich AB

7:00–8:00am

Texas Breakfast, hosted by Texas Council for the Social Studies

Skyway 260, Skyway Level, East Tower

7:00–8:00am

Indigenous Education Community Breakfast

New Orleans, Ballroom Level, West Tower

NCSS Community Chairs Roundtable Thursday, November 29 3:00–5:00pm Skyway 272, Skyway Level, East Tower

Join fellow leaders from our Special Interest Communities for a day  of strategic planning.

Support local, state, and national advocacy efforts together.  Dive into the five NCSS strategic priorities for social studies 

education and your Community’s vital role within them, to increase your Community’s members, and support collective actions.

Vote for the NCSS Board of Directors after the Conference! The NCSS Board of Directors has approved the following slate of candidates for the 2018-2019 officer elections. President-Elect Stefanie Wager (Iowa) Vice-President Marjorie Hunter (Arkansas) Anton Schulzki (Colorado) Secondary/High School Classroom Teacher Georgette Hackman (Pennsylvania) David Huebner (Tennessee) Bruce Mize (Mississippi) Ron Reichle (Wisconsin) Jessica Wilkerson (Virginia)

K-12 Classroom Teacher At-Large Leslie Barstow (Texas) Zachariah Lowe (South Carolina) June Morris (Oregon) Rhonda Watton (Wisconsin) Frederick Whaples (North Carolina) At-Large David Kendrick (Georgia) Montra Rogers (Texas) Joseph Schmidt (Maine) Barry Thomas (Nebraska) Scott Waring (Florida) Annie Whitlock (Michigan)

Elementary Classroom Teacher Vicki Gonterman (Arkansas) Rebecca Valbuena (California) Heather Whyte (Kentucky) View bios and position statements for all of our candidates online at www.socialstudies.org/ncss-election-2019.

 The election ballot opens in December 2018.  NCSS individual members in good standing as of October 15, 2018 are eligible to vote.  Instructions and credentials will be sent by email to access the online ballots.

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


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ASSOCIATED GROUPS

Local school district social studies supervisors, state social studies specialists, international educators, and college and university faculty members are organized as formal subgroups of NCSS. These groups hold meetings concurrently with the NCSS Annual Conference. All registered conference attendees are welcome to attend Associated Group sessions, except where noted. Attendance at Associated Group sessions requires NCSS conference registration and a valid NCSS conference badge, regardless of whether you are a member of that Associated Group, and payment of NCSS conference registration fees and any additional fees for these meetings.

COUNCIL OF STATE SOCIAL STUDIES SPECIALISTS (CS4)

CS4 provides a vehicle for the exchange of ideas among the specialists, consultants, and supervisors who have responsibilities for social studies education in the various state departments of education/public instruction. All CS4 sessions will take place at the Hyatt Regency, except where noted. Tuesday, November 27 4:00–4:45pm

New Member Welcome

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

5:30pm

Meet in Hotel Lobby

East Tower

5:45–9:00pm

Talk with Emily Graslie, Chief Curiosity Officer, The Field Museum & Dinner, sponsored by Big History Project

Field Museum, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive

Wednesday, November 28 7:30–8:15am 8:20–8:45am 8:45–9:45am 9:45–10:00am 10:15–11:30am 11:35am–12:05pm 12:05–1:05pm 1:10–2:00pm 2:15–3:15pm 3:30–4:30pm 5:15pm 5:30–7:30pm 7:30–9:30pm

Breakfast, sponsored by National Geographic

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Welcome to CS4’s 53rd!

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Business Meeting 1

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

NCSS Welcome—Dr. Lawrence Paska, NCSS Executive Director

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

“They Say, I Say: Nurturing Argumentative Reading and Writing in History” Dr. Jeff Nokes, Assistant Professor of History, Brigham Young University

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

EVERFI: “Education for the Real World”

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Lunch, sponsored by EVERFI

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Open Spaces

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

“Systemic Approaches to Social and Emotional Learning: Lessons from the Field” Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL)

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Obama Foundation: “Speaking to America’s Youth”

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Meet in Lobby

East Tower

“Chicago Jazz, Blues, and Beyond.” Sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Dinner, sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

House of Blues, 329 N. Dearborn

Thursday, November 29 7:30–8:20am

Breakfast, sponsored by Ashbrook Center at Ashland University

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

8:25–9:25am

“Moving Toward Schools as Spaces for Civic Learning”: Dr. Joseph Kahne, Dr. Cathy Cohen, Ms. Jessica Marshall, Civic Engagement Research Group

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

9:30–10:30am

“What’s New with National Geographic? Resources, Student Voice and PD!” National Geographic

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

10:45–11:30am

Business Meeting II

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

11:35am–12:15pm

“Early Childhood and Social Studies: Are We Prepared” Stefanie Wager and the Iowa Department of Education

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

12:20–1:15pm

Lunch, sponsored by George Washington’s Mount Vernon

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

1:20-2:20pm

“Engaging Students in Democratic Discussions” Dr. Paula McAvoy, Assist. Professor of Social Studies, North Carolina State University

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

2:40–3:10pm

“Civic Renewal Network: Free Online Resources” Ellen Iwamoto, Director of Research Support Services, Annenberg Center

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

3:10–3:45pm

“It’s All About Standards: Help When You Need It!” Beth Ratway, American Institutes for Research

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

3:50–4:30pm

Scott Wolla, Senior Economic Education Specialist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

5:15pm

Meet in Lobby

East Tower

5:30–7:30pm

“Mobsters, Gangsters, and More! Crime of Old Chicago” Tour

7:45–9:45pm

Dinner and Gift Exchange, sponsored by Gibbs-Smith

8:00–10:00am

CS4 Executive Board Meeting (Board members only, please)

Giordano’s, 130 E. Randolph St.

Friday, November 30

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

Picasso, Concourse Level, West Tower


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BROTHERS AT ARMS American Independence and the Men of France and Spain Who Saved It VINTAGE | PAPER | 464 PAGES | $18.00

Nick Bunker

YOUNG BENJAMIN FRANKLIN The Birth of Ingenuity KNOPF | CLOTH | 464 PAGES | $30.00

PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST

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KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Justin Driver

THE SCHOOLHOUSE GATE

VINTAGE | PAPER | 400 PAGES | $16.95

Public Education, the Supreme Court, and the Battle for the American Mind

NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST

PANTHEON | CLOTH | 576 PAGES | $35.00

James Fallows & Deborah Fallows

OUR TOWNS A 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America PANTHEON | CLOTH | 432 PAGES | $28.95

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Max Tegmark

LIFE 3.0 Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence VINTAGE | PAPER | 384 PAGES | $17.00

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ANNE FRANK’S DIARY: THE GRAPHIC ADAPTATION Illustrated by David Polonsky Adapted by Ari Folman PANTHEON | CLOTH | 160 PAGES | $24.95

Scott Kelly

ENDURANCE My Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery VINTAGE | PAPER | 464 PAGES | $16.95

Robert Kagan

THE JUNGLE GROWS BACK America and Our Imperiled World KNOPF | CLOTH | 192 PAGES | $22.95

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AMERICAN DIALOGUE The Founders and Us KNOPF | CLOTH | 304 PAGES | $27.95

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HEIRS OF THE FOUNDERS The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun and Daniel Webster, the Second Generation of American Giants DOUBLEDAY | CLOTH | 432 PAGES | $30.00

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THE ACCIDENTAL ASIAN Notes of a Native Speaker VINTAGE | PAPER | 224 PAGES | $16.00

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ASSOCIATED COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY FACULTY ASSEMBLY (CUFA) CUFA consists of higher education faculty members, graduate students, and others who are interested in social studies educational theory and research and their links to practice. As an organization, CUFA advocates for social studies education and generates research-based discussions about the social studies disciplines and their purposes, learning and teaching and their social contexts, the curriculum, teacher education and professional development, and educational policy. All CUFA sessions will be held at the Hyatt Regency. Please check for the latest CUFA program updates. All CUFA attendees must register for the CUFA and NCSS Annual Conferences. Registration for CUFA sessions is $50, in addition to the NCSS registration fee. Wednesday, November 28 8:00–11:00am

CUFA Board Meeting (Board members only)

Roosevelt 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

9:30am–1:00pm

Graduate Student Forum

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

11:15am–1:00pm

Theory and Research in Social Education Editorial Board Meeting (Board members only)

Roosevelt 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

1:15–2:20pm

Welcome CUFA 2018 and Opening Keynote: Dr. David Stovall

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

2:30–3:45pm

Concurrent Sessions 1

4:00–5:15pm

Concurrent Sessions 2

5:30–6:00pm

CUFA 2018 Awards Ceremony

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

6:00–7:00pm

CUFA 2018 Membership Meet and Greet

Grand Ballroom Foyer, Ballroom Level, East Tower

7:15–8:15pm

Small Colleges and University Faculty Forum (SCUFF) Business Meeting

Columbus Hall G, Ballroom Level, East Tower

7:15–8:15pm

Scholars of Color Forum Business Meeting

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

9:00–10:15am

Concurrent Sessions 3

10:30–11:45am

Concurrent Sessions 4

11:50am–1:50pm

Java Network Literature Lunches (on your own)

2:00–3:15pm

Concurrent Sessions 5

3:30–4:45pm

Concurrent Sessions 6

5:00–6:00pm

CUFA 2018 Closing Keynote: Dr. Angela Valenzuela

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

6:00–6:30pm

CUFA Business Meeting

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

7:15–9:00pm

Closing Reception

Crystal Ballroom BC, Lobby Level, West Tower

8:00–10:00am

CUFA Board Meeting (Board members only)

9:00am–5:00pm

CUFA/NCSS Research into Practice Sessions

Thursday, November 29

Friday, November 30 Roosevelt 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

CUFA SESSIONS Wednesday, 10:00–11:15am Graduate Forum Roundtables Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower TABLE 1

Teaching World History Discussant: Scott Roberts, Central Michigan University

“Why Don’t We Talk about Rape?”: Teaching about Sexual Violence in War and Genocide

Unconference Space Grand Ballroom C From Wednesday, 2:30–3:45pm through Thursday, 3:30–4:45pm The unconference offers opportunities for participants to engage in organic, dynamic, and collaborative professional development. Participants help determine sessions and then learn with each other.

George Dalbo, University of Minnesota

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


GROUPS

CUFA • Wednesday “It Isn’t in the Curriculum”: World History Teachers’ Views on Presidential Elections Erin Bronstein, Michigan State University

History Teachers’ Purpose of Teaching and Affective Historical Empathy: The Case of the “Comfort Women” Issue in South Korea Hana Jun, Indiana University TABLE 2

Critical Social Studies for Elementary Schools Discussant: Adam Schmitt, University of Southern Maine

Interrogating Whiteness: A Critical Content Analysis of Notable Picture Books Recommended by the National Council for the Social Studies Jacob Gates, Penn State University

Elementary Schoolers Conceptualizations of American Slavery Ryan Hughes, University of Michigan

Overcoming Barriers to Teaching Controversial Current Events at the Elementary Level Genevieve Caffrey, University of Missouri-Columbia

“Three, Two, One, Agreement!”: Critical Discourse Analysis on Children’s Civic Dialogue Xiaoying Zhao, University of Georgia TABLE 3

Gender and Sexuality in Social Studies Education Discussant: Lara Willox, University of West Georgia

Into the Past, Looking Forward: Historical Consciousness, Gender Equality, and a Future of Social Studies Education Kim Edmondson Speed, University of Alberta

Rural Homophobia: The Space of Isolation, Danger, and Fear Heather Abrahamson, University of Minnesota

(Re)Constructing History Education: How Teachers Discuss Their Discipline Through the Lens of Gender and Women’s History Kimberly Bowman, Virginia Commonwealth University TABLE 4

The Role of Identity in Social Studies Teaching and Learning Discussant: Christopher Clark, Northeastern State University

Developing Intercultural Competence for Preservice Teachers: Reflections on Identity, Cultural Immersion, and Teaching History

Historical Empathy: An Explanatory Mixed Methods Study Katy Morgan, Kent State University

Illuminating Immigrant Identity: Immigrant Youth Identity and Sense of Civic Inclusion in the North Carolina High School Civics Classroom Casey Holmes, North Carolina State University

Negotiating Narratives, (Re)Producing Subjectivities: Perspectives of Second Generation Southeast Asian Youth Van Anh Tran, Teachers College, Columbia University TABLE 5

Global Education Discussant: Jennice Wright, Missouri State University

What Spoken Word Poetry Might Offer Global Citizenship Education Lauren Bagwell, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Re-Conceptualizing Global Citizenship Education Andrea Menger, Kent State University

War and Peace in Social Studies Education Scott Glew, University of Minnesota

Beyond Controversy: Deconstructing Helpful Discourses Nick Jacobs, University of Alberta TABLE 6

Multicultural Education & Culturally Relevant Social Studies Discussant: Gerardo Aponte-Martinez, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Untangling White and Christian Supremacy in Experiences with Social Studies: Two White Jewish Teachers’ Experiences Hannah Grisham, Michigan State University

Bringing Students to Life Using Affective, Aesthetic Historical Texts B. Scott Durham, Michigan State University

Researching Learners’ Experiences with Difficult Knowledge in the History Classroom James Miles, University of Toronto

The Community as a Teacher Educator: Preparing Critically Conscious Social Studies Teacher Candidates in Detroit Kaitlin Popielarz, Wayne State University

Ian McGregor, University of Connecticut

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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TABLE 7

TABLE 8

U.S. History Teaching & Curriculum

Social Studies Research Across Disciplines

Discussant: Christopher Gibbs, University of North Carolina

Discussant: Don McClure, St. John’s University

Playing the Past: A Directed Content Analysis of Affordances for Historical Thinking in a History-Oriented Videogame

Environmental Justice and Social Studies Education: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Extractive Industry Curricular Materials

Taylor Kessner, Arizona State University

Elaine Alvey, University of Georgia

The Civil Rights Movement and Teacher Decision-Making

National and Racial Ideology in the Teaching of the American South

Peter M. Nelson, Michigan State University

Christoph Stutts, University of North Carolina

U.S. History State Assessments, Discourse Demands, and English Learners’ Achievement: Evidence for the Importance of Reading and Writing Instruction in U.S. History for English Learners Jason Miller, University of Virginia

Racialized Figured Worlds and Teaching U.S. History

Market Structures & the NCAA: Student Learning in AP Economics Ariel Cornett, University of Virginia

Examining Student Learning Outcomes with the Inquiry Design Model: An Action Research Approach William Keating, North Carolina State University

Charley Brooks, University of California Santa Cruz

Meet Your Favorite Authors From Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 1:00-2:00pm

Riverside Exhibit Hall, Booth 1203

4:00-5:00pm Featured Speaker: Kenneth C. Davis

2:45-3:45pm

East Tower, Grand Ballroom

BETTY BEFORE X Signing

PROGRAM: Girls in the Movement: Teaching Young People’s Civil Rights Stories East Tower, Columbus EF

5:00-6:00pm MORE DEADLY THAN WAR Signing NCSS Bookstore

Ilyasah Shabazz Renée Watson

Stop by Booth 1203 to pick up free advance readers copies, educator resources, and purchase select titles including our 2018 NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Book titles!

mackids.com • mackidseducators.com

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Kenneth C. Davis


GROUPS

CUFA • Wednesday TABLE 9

Social Studies Teacher Education Discussant: Lauren Harris, Arizona State University

Preservice Teachers’ Views of Teaching News Media Joseph McAnulty, University of Georgia

The Art of Inquiry: Promoting and Supporting Shifts in Practice Juliann Noble-Healy, Kennesaw State University

The Use of Video Case Study in an Early Secondary Social Studies Field Experience Jessica Zaker, Indiana University

Intersectionality Professional Development and Why it Can’t Wait Bryan Arnold, Virginia Commonwealth University

Wednesday, 1:15–2:20pm ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

CUFA Welcome and Opening Keynote David Stovall David Stovall, Ph.D. is a Professor of African-American Studies and Criminology, Law & Justice at the University of Illinois-Chicago (UIC). His scholarship investigates three areas: 1) Critical Race Theory; 2) the relationship between housing and education; and 3) the intersection of race, place and school. In the attempt to bring theory to action, he works with community organizations and schools to develop curriculum that addresses issues of equity and justice.

Wednesday, 2:30–3:45pm ROOM | Columbus CD

TABLE 10

Teaching Citizenship and Politics Discussant: Erin Casey, Louisiana State University

What Kind of History? Social Studies Teachers’ Decisions Around Politics in the Classroom Jerry Wilson, University of North Carolina

Growing Civic Engagement in Singapore — A Curriculum Analysis Marilyn Lim, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Reframing Community Values for Cultivating Students’ Environmental Citizenship: Rethinking Place-Based Education Yun-Wen Chan, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Wednesday, 11:30am–1:00pm ROOM | Columbus G

Pre-Conference Brown Bag Workshop Rethinking Social Studies for Undocumented Students and Families Discuss the challenges and opportunities that teachers encounter in the education of undocumented students. How can we prepare preservice teachers for these challenges and then begin building a network to help current educators to learn about resources Jesús Tirado, University of Georgia; Daniel Jimenez, Chicago Public Schools

Wednesday, 12:00–1:00pm Grand Ballroom B

CUFA Grad Forum Conversation with Colleagues 1. Topical or Timeless? Choosing a Research Agenda 2. Researcher Positionality and Responsibility 3. Navigating the Contemporary Job Market 4. Becoming Public Intellectuals: Research as Engaged Activism 5. Research-Practice Partnerships

Civic and Citizenship Education of a Different Hue: [Critical] Race Theories and Perspectives from Communities of Color Scholars of Color Forum Sponsored Session Chair: Delandrea Hall, University of Texas at Austin Discussant: Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University

The Role of Civic Debt in Democratic Education Jane Lo, Florida State University

“Would We Be Slaves If We Were Alive Back Then?” An Asian American Child’s Navigation of U.S. History Sohyun An, Kennesaw State University

Rhetorics of Recognition and Erasure: Indigenous Citizenship and Sovereignty in U.S. Civics and Government Standards Sarah B. Shear, Penn State University-Altoona; Leilani Sabzalian, University of Oregon; Jimmy Snyder, University of Oregon

“What Better Tool Do I Have?”: A Critical Race Theory Approach to Teaching Government Kristen Duncan, Clemson University ROOM | Columbus EF

Newspeak 2018: Challenging Untruths and the Narrowing of Thought Chair: Kevin Magill, Baylor University Discussant: Cathryn van Kessel, University of Alberta

The Discourse of Misconstruction and National History Exams Jay Shuttleworth, Long Island University-Brooklyn; Tim Patterson, Temple University

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CUFA • Wednesday

Clinically-Based Social Studies Teacher Education: Engaging with Media Literacy in an Age of Fake News Sonia Janis, University of Georgia; Mardi Schmeichel, University of Georgia; Joseph McAnulty, University of Georgia

Media Literacy is Not Enough Lance Mason, Indiana University Kokomo

Tapping Into the Pedagogical Power of Mass Media: Reflections on a General Education Course Amy Mungur, Green Mountain College ROOM | Columbus G

History, Memory, and Silence: A Symposium on Remembering and Public Pedagogy Chair: William Gaudelli, Lehigh University Discussant: Sandra Schmidt, Teachers College, Columbia University Cathlin Goulding, National September 11 Memorial and Museum; Avner Segall, Michigan State University; Brenda Trofanenko, Acadia University; Allison Weller, Teachers College, Columbia University

ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

Social Studies Education and Race, Part I: Research from the Elementary and Secondary Classrooms Chair: Annie Whitlock, University of Michigan-Flint Discussant: Annie Whitlock, University of Michigan-Flint

Learning to Teach (or Not Teach) Race: A Longitudinal Study of Beginning Elementary Teachers Christopher Martell, Boston University

Enactments of Humanizing Pedagogies & Racial Literacy in Social Studies Classrooms: Portraits of Praxis & Possibility Christina Villarreal, Teachers College, Columbia University

Analysis of Racism in Elementary Students Jennifer Burke, Millersville University

Black Parents’ Perspectives on History Instruction at a Predominantly White Elementary School Jane Bolgatz, Fordham University

ROOM | Columbus H

ROOM | Grand Ballroom B

Learning Social Studies in Virtual and Augmented Spaces: Theory, Methods, Approaches

Disrupting the Monolingual: Bilingual Education and Social Studies Education

Chair/Discussant: Jeremy Stoddard, College of William & Mary Stephanie van Hover, University of Virginia; Patrice Grimes, University of Virginia; Ariel Cornett, University of Virginia; Colleen Fitzpatrick, University of Virginia; David Hicks, Virginia Tech University; Ricky Mullins, Virginia Tech University; Zachary Duer, Virginia Tech University; Todd Ogle, Virginia Tech University; Jeremy Stoddard, College of William & Mary; Simone Schweber, University of Wisconsin; Alan Marcus, University of Connecticut; Ian McGregor, University of Connecticut; Gary Mills, Pryce Davis, University of Nottingham; Aaron Johnson, University of Nebraska; Andrew Hostetler, Vanderbilt University; Benjamin Rydal, Vanderbilt University; Helen Collins, Vanderbilt University; Rogers Hall, Vanderbilt University; Dave Owens, Vanderbilt University; Doug Fisher, Vanderbilt University; Colleen Daw, Vanderbilt University; Chelsea Surovek, Vanderbilt University ROOM | Columbus IJ

Inquiry as a Wrecking Ball: Tearing Down Walls and Stereotypes in Incarcerated Secondary Classroom Environments Aubrey Southall, Aurora University; James Pawola, Kane County Regional Office of Education ROOM | Columbus KL

Broadening the Conceptualization of LGBTQ+ Allyship in Social Studies Research

Scholars of Color Forum Sponsored Session Chair: Ashley Taylor Jaffee, James Madison University Discussant: Stephen Thornton, University of South Florida

“Lo Construimos de Nuevo”: Bilingual Elementary Teachers Rethinking el Movimiento Through Critical Historical Inquiry Melissa Williams, The University of Texas at Austin; Cinthia Salinas, The University of Texas at Austin; Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, Iowa State University

Transnational Civic Education in a Dual Language Setting: An Intersectional Citizenship Approach Marialuisa Di Stefano, Utah State University; Steven Camicia, Utah State University

Translanguaging Towards Justice: Bilingualism as a Civic Tool Melissa Gibson, Marquette University

Historical Building Analysis as a Tool to Provide Multiple Means of Accessing and Demonstrating Knowledge for Bilingual Learners with Disabilities in the Social Studies Classroom Christine Baron, Teachers College, Columbia University; Patricia Martinez-Alvarez, Teachers College, Columbia University

Bretton Varga, University of South Florida; Leia Cain, University of South Florida; Cathy Brant, University of South Carolina

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GROUPS

CUFA • Wednesday

Wednesday, 4:00–5:15pm ROOM |Columbus CD

Tensions, Complexities & Contradictions in the Teaching of Immigration Scholars of Color Forum Sponsored Session Chair: Jesús Tirado, University of Georgia Discussant: Antonio J. Castro, University of Missouri Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, Iowa State University; Esther Kim, The University of Texas at Austin; Delandrea Hall, The University of Texas at Austin; Heath Robinson, The University of Texas at Austin; Binaya Subedi, The Ohio State University; Lakota Pochedley, Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi ROOM | Columbus EF

Whiteness and White Dominance in Social Studies Education Chair: Travis L. Seay, University of Florida Discussant: Christopher Martell, Boston University

Social Studies Needs (New) White People: The Case for Including Allies in the Curriculum William L. Smith, University of Arizona; Ryan Crowley, Carly Muetterties, University of Kentucky

All White Everything: An Investigation into the Educational Resources of the National Women’s History Museum Lauren Colley, The University of Alabama; John Broome, University of Mary Washington

Figured Worlds and Whiteness: Exploring AntiRacism in Social Studies Teacher Education Andrea Hawkman, Utah State University

Memorializing Whiteness in State Standards and Local History: A Critical Sociohistorical Consciousness Analysis of Southern Racial Violence Cara Ward, University of North Carolina Wilmington; Lisa Buchanan, University of North Carolina Wilmington ROOM | Columbus G

Elementary Education and the 2016 Election: Navigating Politically Divisive Rhetoric with Young Learners Chair: Kathryn Obenchain, Purdue University Discussant: Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Michigan State University

“Will Donald Trump Knock Our School Down if He Doesn’t Like It?”: Creating and Teaching Civics Curriculum in Contentious Times William Toledo, University of Michigan

“This Campaign Has Become X-Rated”: Exploring Elementary Teacher Decision Making and Student Civic Learning in an Election Year Alice Sullivan, The University of Texas at Austin

Addressing Contentious Politics and Political Trauma with Elementary Students Katherina Payne, The University of Texas at Austin; Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro ROOM | Columbus H

Confronting Capitalism in Social Studies Teaching and Teacher Education Chair: Todd Hawley, Kent State University Discussant: Abraham DeLeon, University of Texas at San Antonio

Education for Democracy…In What Economy? Quentin Wheeler-Bell, Indiana University

How Capitalism Trumps Democracy and What It Means for Social Studies Education E. Wayne Ross, University of British Columbia

Questioning Capitalism with Elementary Students Katy Swalwell, Iowa State University

Developing a Deep, Socialist Democratic Rationale and Justice Oriented Commitment in an Anti-Capitalist Social Studies Todd Hawley, Kent State University

Engaging the Privilege of Art-Making: A Vision for the Spirit of Activism and Activist Allies Michael Levicky, Kent State University ROOM | Columbus IJ

Teaching Social Studies Methods: Conversations Among Colleagues S.G. Grant, Binghamton University; John Lee, North Carolina State University; Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky; Joe O’Brien, University of Kansas; Bob Bain, University of Michigan; Nicholas Bardo, Colorado Mesa University; Philip Bernhardt, Metropolitan State University of Denver; Brooke Blevins, Baylor University; Chara Bohan, Georgia State University; Daniel Bordwell, University of Minnesota; Kristy Brugar, University of Oklahoma; Erik Byker, UNC Charlotte; Prentice Chandler, Austin Peay State University; Christopher Clark, Northeastern State University; Lauren Colley, University of Alabama; Margaret Crocco, Michigan State University; Alexander Cuenca, Indiana University; Todd Dinkelman, University of Georgia; Jason Endacott, University of Arkansas; Tina Ellsworth, Olathe Public Schools; Brian Girard, The College of New Jersey; Amy Good, UNC Charlotte; Jason Harshman, University of Iowa; Todd Hawley, Kent State University; David Hicks, Virginia Tech; Jeremy Hilburn, University of North Carolina at Wilmington; Hannah Kim, University of Delaware; Timothy Lintner, continued on page 54

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CUFA • Wednesday/Thursday

University of South Carolina Aiken; Aaron Johnson, University of Nebraska; Brad Maguth, The University of Akron; Kevin Meuwissen, University of Rochester; Darren Minarik, Radford University; Thomas Misco, Miami University; Rebecca Mueller, University of South Carolina Upstate; Kari Muente, Martin Luther College; Star Nance, University of Central Missouri; Jeff Passe, The College of New Jersey; Mark Pearcy, Rider University; Alexander Pope, Salisbury State College; David Powell, Gettysburg College; Corey Sell, Metropolitan State University of Denver; Tony Talbert, Baylor University; Emma Thacker, James Mason University; Stephanie van Hover, University of Virginia; Kent Willman, University of Colorado

ROOM | Grand Ballroom B

Book Talk: In the Shadow of Authoritarianism: American Education in the Twentieth Century Thomas Fallace, Teachers College, Columbia University; Stephen Thornton, University of South Florida; Ronald Evans, San Diego State University; Chara Bohan, Georgia State University; Patricia Avery, University of Minnesota

Wednesday, 5:30–6:00pm ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

ROOM | Columbus KL

An Activist, Spoken-Word Poet, Museum Educator, and a Couple Profs Walk Into a Theatre: Community Collaborations in Theatre and Film Laura Meyers, Georgia State University; Patrick Morgan, Writer/Actor/Activist, Jasmine Waters, Atlanta History Center; Brian Williams, Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence; Jon Goode, Author/Spoken-Word Poet ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

CUFA Awards Ceremony Announcements made for the Kipchoge Neftali Kirkland Social Justice Award, the NTLI Fellowship Award, and the Early Career Scholar Award.

Thursday, 8:00–8:50am ROOM | Grand Ballroom B

CUFA Grad Forum Business Meeting and Elections

Resisting the Master Script: Black, Latinx, and Caribbean Perspectives Towards History Education

Thursday, 9:00–10:15am

Scholars of Color Forum Sponsored Session Chair: Nafees Khan, Clemson University Discussant: Eliana Castro, Michigan State University

From Multicultural to Romanticized Representations of the Past: The Role of Contemporary Context on the Teaching of Latinx History Maribel Santiago, Michigan State University

Making Our Mark: A Historiographical Sketch of Primary and Secondary Black History in the US, 1900-1950 ArCasia James, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

ROOM |Columbus CD

Family Dis/Connections: Reimagining School-Based Family History Research in Response to Colonial Contexts Meredith McCoy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Tommy Ender, Loyola University Maryland; Lakota Pochedley, Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi; Leilani Sabzalian, University of Oregon ROOM |Columbus EF

Race and Civic Myths: Troubling Patriotism, Civic Altruism, and the American Dream

Framing Race Talk in World History Classrooms: A Case Study of the Haitian Revolution

Chair: Christine Stanton, Montana State University

Ashley Woodson, University of Missouri; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri

Discussant: Jane Lo, Florida State University

Professional Development to Disrupt Generalizations and Misperceptions of Latin America and the Caribbean: #LittleHaiti Sarah Mathews, Florida International University; Sherrie Beeson, Florida International University; Hilary Landorf, Florida International University

This is a Story of Who America Is: Utilizing Cultural Memories as the Foundation to Black Civic Identity Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University

Patriotism as Critique: Students’ Thoughts on Their Country and the Critical Teaching of U.S. History Hillary Parkhouse, Virginia Commonwealth University

Whose “American” Story: Two Self-Studies of Unsettling National Myths and Civic Identities in University Classrooms Mark Helmsing, George Mason University; Sarah B. Shear, Penn State University-Altoona

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GROUPS

CUFA • Thursday America and the Myth: Hip-Hop Based Education and the Possibilities for Disruption in Economics Delandrea Hall, The University of Texas at Austin; Neil Shanks, Baylor University ROOM | Columbus G

The Emancipatory Potential of Practitioner Research in the Social Studies Chair/Discussant: Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University Meghan Manfra, North Carolina State University; Christopher Martell, Boston University; Todd Dinkelman, University of Georgia; J.B. Mayo, University of Minnesota; Jeff Greiner, North Carolina State University ROOM | Columbus H

Creating and Situating Authentic Teaching Cases of Controversial Issues in Elementary and Middle Grades Social Studies Jennifer Gallagher, East Carolina University; Christina Tschida, East Carolina University; Jacob Gates, Penn State University; Sarah Pamperin, Iowa State University; Kelly Olson, Chicago Public Schools; Jenny Sinclair, Carlisle Community School ROOM | Columbus IJ

Doing Teacher Education in the Park: New York City’s Central Park as a Pedagogical Space and a Space of Pedagogy Chair/Discussant: Tim Patterson, Temple University William Gaudelli, Lehigh University; Avner Segall, Michigan State University; Sandra Schmidt, Teachers College, Columbia University; Patrick Keegan, New York University ROOM | Columbus KL

The Long Tail of the Inquiry Design Model Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky; John Lee, North Carolina State University; S.G. Grant, Binghamton University; Walter Parker, University of Washington; Ryan Crowley, University of Kentucky; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri; Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University; Emma Thacker, James Madison University; Paul Fitchett, UNC Charlotte; Edwin Schupman, National Museum of the American Indian

“I Got Your Back”: Muslim Girls and Mothers (Re)telling and (Re)living Stories of Relational Resistance Muna Saleh, Concordia University of Edmonton

“Gender Issues but Bring Race Into the Mix”: Perceptions and Understandings of Women’s Histories and Movements Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas; Lauren Colley, The University of Alabama

Women’s History Students Learn about Race through Historical Memoir: Anne Moody’s Coming of Age in Mississippi Jessica Schocker, Penn State Berks

On the Uses of Intersectionality in Social Studies Research Lisa Sibbett, University of Washington ROOM | Grand Ballroom B

SCUFF Roundtable Session Expanding the Intellectual Contours of Social Studies Education Chair: Scott Dewitt, Knox College

Critical Issues and Active Citizenship Annie Whitlock, University of Michigan Flint; Rebecca Mueller, University of South Carolina Upstate

Going Beyond the Methods Course Margaret Gillikin, Winthrop University; Melissa Marks, University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg; Amy Mungur, Green Mountain College

Embedding ESL Methods and Instruction Into Traditional Methods Coursework Aubrey Southall, Aurora University; Paul Yoder, Eastern Mennonite University

Why Bother? An Examination of Elementary Social Studies with Research and Practitioner Based Models Greer Burroughs, The College of New Jersey; Eileen Heddy, The College of New Jersey; James Daly, Seton Hall University; Amy Camardese, Westminster College; Kristi Stricker, Concordia University; Lara Willox, University of West Georgia

Thursday, 10:30–11:45am ROOM | Columbus CD

ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

Beyond Essentialism: Narratives of Intersectionality in Social Studies Education Chair: Tianna Dowie-Chin, University of Florida Discussant: Kristen Duncan, Clemson University

Reconceptualizing Civic Education: Attitudes, Ideology, Identity, and Resistance in Social Studies Classrooms Chair/Discussant: H. James Garrett, University of Georgia Christopher Clark, University of Georgia; Ryan T. Knowles, Utah State University; Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University; Jane Lo, Florida State University 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CUFA • Thursday

ROOM | Columbus EF

ROOM | Columbus IJ

When White Supremacist Perspectives Become One of the ‘Multiple’ Perspectives: Teacher Educators of Color Engaging During Troubling Times in the U.S. South

Nuancing Discourses on Gender and Sexuality in Social Studies Education

Scholars of Color Forum Sponsored Session Sonia Janis, University of Georgia; Kristen Duncan, Clemson University; Jesús Tirado, University of Georgia; Natasha Murray Everett, West Virginia University; Delandrea Hall, The University of Texas at Austin; Melissa Williams, The University of Texas at Austin ROOM | Columbus G

Lesson Study in Social Studies: Promises and Challenges Chair: Jada Kohlmeier, Auburn University Discussant: Margaret Crocco, Michigan State University Jada Kohlmeier, Auburn University; Cory Callahan, The University of Alabama; James Howell, University of Southern Mississippi; Lamont Maddox, University of North Alabama; Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Michigan State University; Lauren Harris, Arizona State University; Linda Doornbos, Oakland University; Matthew T. Missias, Cultivated Learning

Chair: Bretton Varga, University of South Florida Discussant: Ginney Norton, Drury University

Analyzing a District’s Gender and Sexuality Professional Development Daniel Bordwell, University of Minnesota

Engaging Two Spirit Knowledge While Deconstructing the Gender Binary in One Social Studies Classroom J.B. Mayo, University of Minnesota

Disrupting Social Studies Teaching Through LGBTQ Identity: A Case Study of Social Studies Teachers and the Enactment of Counter Stories/Narratives Steven Montemayor, The University of Texas at Austin

Navigating Controversial Identity Issues for Students and Teachers: One Gay Teacher’s Disclosure and Participation During the National Day of Silence Jenni Conrad, University of Washington

ROOM | Columbus H

ROOM | Columbus KL

Perspectives on Social Studies Teacher Education

War, Race, and Monuments: Confronting Historical Debates, Controversies, and Difficult Dialogues

Chair: Erin Adams, Kennesaw State University Discussant: Kristy Brugar, University of Oklahoma

Fad or Future? Core Practices in Social Studies Teacher Education Todd Dinkelman, University of Georgia; Alexander Cuenca, Indiana University

Towards a Practice-Based Framework of Teaching for Justice: Interactive Read-Alouds and Deliberation Marie Heath, Townson University; Jessica Schocker, Penn State Berks; Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas; Corey Sell, Metropolitan State University Denver

What Should I Teach? Examining a Methods Exercise for Making Subject Matter Choices Rebecca Mueller, University of South Carolina Upstate; Emma Thacker, James Madison University; Lauren Colley, The University of Alabama

Hidden in Plain Sight: Museum Educators’ Role in Social Studies Teacher Professional Development Christine Baron, Teachers College Columbia; Sherri Sklarwitz, Tufts University; Hyeyoung Bang, Bowling Green State University; Nicholas Coddington, Teachers College, Columbia

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Chair: Amy Mungur, Green Mountain College Discussant: Ryan Crowley, University of Kentucky

Countering Counter Stories: A Case Study of Teaching and Learning to Confront Confederate Monuments Gabriel Reich, Virginia Commonwealth University

“Why Can’t We Fight for Very Intense Reasons?” Middle School Students’ Thinking in Context of Just War Principles Tina Ellsworth, Olathe Public Schools; Joe O’Brien, University of Kansas

Teacher Content Knowledge That Matters: The Case of Teaching School Desegregation Yonghee Suh, Old Dominion University; Brian Daugherity, Virginia Commonwealth University

“We Should Know Everything Shouldn’t We? Children of Veterans on What and How War Should Be Taught Brian Gibbs, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


GROUPS

CUFA • Thursday ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

Expanding the Curricular & Intellectual Contours of Social Studies: A Conversation on Ethnic Studies and Social Studies Education Scholars of Color Forum Sponsored Session Angela Valenzuela, The University of Texas at Austin; Binaya Subedi, The Ohio State University; Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, Iowa State University; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri; Ashley Woodson, University of Missouri; Lakota Pochedley, Nottawaseppi Huron Band of Potawatomi; Leilani Sabzalian, University of Oregon; Sarah B. Shear, Penn State University-Altoona ROOM | Grand Ballroom B ROUNDTABLE #1:

Global Citizenship Education Research Chair/Discussant: Jason Harshman, University of Iowa

Global Education in Neoliberal Times: A Case Study of Two New York City Area Schools William Gaudelli, Lehigh University; Melissa Mitchem, Teachers College, Columbia; Yeji Kim, Teachers College, Columbia; Hanadi Shatara, Teachers College, Columbia

Act Globally, Teach Locally: Developing an EcoJustice Stance Among Preservice Teachers Through Place-Based Service Learning Greer Burroughs, The College of New Jersey; Marissa Bellino, The College of New Jersey; Morgan Johnston, The College of New Jersey

Cosmopolitanism in the Coalfields: Educating Appalachian Youth for Global Citizenship Eric Moffa, Washington and Lee University

Developing Globally Competent Teacher Candidates Through CrossCultural Experiential Learning Michael Kopish, Ohio University; Bahman Shahri, Ohio University; Mohamed Amira, Ohio University ROUNDTABLE #2:

Standards, Curriculum, and Position Statements: Cases Inclusion, Exclusion, or [Mis-]Representation

Global Citizenship, Migration, and National Curriculum: A Tale of Two Nations Tim Patterson, Temple University; Yoonjung Choi, Ewha Woman’s University ROUNDTABLE #3:

“…of and from”: Religion and Social Studies Education Chair/Discussant: Benjamin Jacobs, George Washington University

The Power of the Savior Mentality: When Christianity Becomes Normalized in Elementary School Aaron Bodle, James Madison University; Elizabeth Bellows, Appalachian State University

Teaching Religion as a Part of the Social Studies: Teacher Subjectivity, School Structures and Superstructures John Shekitka, Manhattanville College

Secondary Teacher Candidates’ Experiences Teaching About Religion Within a History Curriculum Sarah Brooks, Millersville University

Teaching About Religion Within Early Childhood and Elementary Social Studies: Exploring How Preservice Teachers Perceive Their Rights and Responsibilities as Educators Rory Tannebaum, Merrimack College

Thursday, 2:00–3:15pm ROOM | Columbus CD

Global Education and the Geopolitics of Epistemology Chair: Gabriel Swarts, University of Wyoming Discussant: Gabriel Swarts, University of Wyoming

Unsettling Globally Oriented Social Studies Classrooms: Understanding Teachers’ Practices, Resources and Tensions in Centering Indigenous Ways of Knowing & Pedagogies Jenni Conrad, University of Washington

Chair/Discussant: Rebecca Christ, Florida International University

Moving Towards the Inclusion of Global Content Knowledge to Advance Global Learning?

Where is Race? A Critical Whiteness Studies Analysis of NCSS Position Statements

Brad Maguth, The University of Akron; Yang Huiyong, Henan University

Sara Demoiny, Auburn University

Against ‘Economic Man’: A Feminist Challenge to Prevailing Neoclassical Norms In K-12 Economics Education Neil Shanks, Baylor University

The Influence of Teacher Positionalities on the Teaching of Global Education Hanadi Shatara, Teachers College, Columbia

Critical Readings of Global Citizenship in Teacher Education from the Global South Jason Harshman, University of Iowa 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CUFA • Thursday

ROOM | Columbus EF

ROOM | Columbus IJ

Social Studies Education and Race, Part II: Critical Conversations in Teacher Education

Interrumpiendo las fronteras de epistemologías, ontologías, y lenguajes en los estudios sociales

Chair: Hillary Parkhouse, Virginia Commonwealth University Discussant: John Broome, University of Mary Washington

Beyond Colorblind? Shifting Conceptions of White Social Studies Teacher Identity Dean Vesperman, Luther College; Jill Leet-Otley, Luther College; Jeannette Pillsbury, Luther College

Scholars of Color Forum Sponsored Session Tommy Ender, Loyola University Maryland; Rebecca Christ, Florida International University; Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University; Ana Carolina Diaz Beltran, Penn State University; Aubrey Southall, Aurora University; Gerardo Aponte-Martinez, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley; Yianella Blanco, Teachers College, Columbia

Teaching About Racism Through Counterstories of School Segregation Sohyun An, Kennesaw State University

Social Studies Teacher Educators Who Do Race Work: A Racial-PedagogicalContent-Knowledge Analysis Sara Demoiny, Auburn University

“They’re Dressed Like Regular People”: Critical Race Film Literacy in Elementary Teacher Education Sarah B. Shear, Penn State University-Altoona; Andrea Hawkman, Utah State University

ROOM | Columbus KL

They Don’t Know What They Don’t Know: Navigating Elementary Preservice Teachers’ Struggle for Content Knowledge Elizabeth Bellows, Appalachian State University; Christina Tschida, East Carolina University; Elizabeth Saylor, University of Georgia; Lisa Buchanan, University of North Carolina Wilmington; Sarah B. Shear, Penn State University-Altoona; Jeanette Alarcón, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Partigya Christy, University of North Carolina at Greensboro ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

ROOM | Columbus G

Constructivism and the New Social Studies: A Collection of Classic Inquiry Lessons Geoffrey Scheurman, University of Wisconsin; Ronald Evans, San Diego State University; Carole Hahn, Emory University; S.G. Grant, Binghamton University; Peter Dow, First Hand Learning ROOM | Columbus H

Resistance, Activism, and Agency in Social Studies Education Chair: Diana Fousi, Syracuse University Discussant: Sarah King, University of New Brunswick

Fake News: Why It Is Problematic and What We Can Do About It Chair/Discussant: Jeremy Stoddard, College of William & Mary Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Christopher Clark, University of Georgia; Margaret Crocco, Michigan State University; Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Michigan State University; Erica Hodgin, University of California, Riverside; H. James Garrett, University of Georgia; LaGarrett King, University of Missouri; Avner Segall, Michigan State University; Jeremy Stoddard, College of William & Mary; Ashley Woodson, University of Missouri; Sarah McGrew, Stanford University; Joel Breakstone, Stanford University

Youth-Led Self-Determination: Indigenous Storywork in the Digital Age

ROOM | Grand Ballroom B

Christine Stanton, Montana State University

El Pueblo Unido: University Faculty and Student Activism in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala’s Coyuntura Estudiantil Chris Lemley, Baylor University

Teaching Power: The Role of Civic Agency and Social Justice in the Social Studies Classroom Mary Carney, Dracut High School

Citizenship Education Beyond P-16: SelfDirected Learning in Online Communities Stephanie Schroeder, Penn State University; Lisa Lundgren, University of Florida; Shelly Curcio, University of South Carolina; Elizabeth Currin, University of Florida; Elizabeth Yeager Washington, University of Florida

ROUNDTABLE #1:

Curriculum Theorizing Social Studies Education Chair/Discussant: Lance Mason, Indiana University Kokomo

Bringing Out the Dead: Engaging with Death and Corporeality in Social Studies Education Mark Helmsing, George Mason University; Cathryn van Kessel, University of Alberta

(Refusing) Work: Teaching About Immaterial Labor in the Intangible Economy Erin Adams, Kennesaw State University

Ghosts in the Curriculum: Social Studies Education and the Spectral Turn Adam Schmitt, University of Southern Maine

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CUFA • Thursday ROUNDTABLE #2:

Expanding the Boundaries of Social Studies Teacher Education Chair/Discussant: Karen Burgard, Texas A&M University San-Antonio

“I Never Thought about Science as Being Part of Social Studies:” Enriching Content Knowledge and Pedagogy through an Interdisciplinary Elementary Science and Social Studies Methods Course Evan Mooney, University of Maine

Breaking Out of Academic Silos to Prepare Teacher Candidates to Teach at the Intersections of Social Studies Standards, UDL, CRT, and Civic Engagement for Social Justice Anneliese Worster, Salem State University; Leigh Rohde, Salem State University

Can Preservice Social Studies Teachers Create a Student-Centered Classroom? Sarah Kaka, Ohio Wesleyan University

Preparing Prospective Teachers Across the History Department and the School of Education: Intersecting the Worlds of History and Education Jared McBrady, University of Saint Francis ROUNDTABLE #3:

Teacher Reflections and Research on Social Studies Praxis Chair/Discussant: Melissa Gibson, Marquette University

Using Video-Stimulated Recall to Understand the Contents of Ambitious History Teachers’ Reflections Rob Martinelle, Boston University

Beyond Theory Practice Gap: Dialogical Praxis and Critical Social Studies Teaching Kevin Magill, Baylor University; Brooke Blevins, Baylor University

The Power of Mo´olelo: Narrative Portraits of Wise and Ambitious Social Studies Teachers Jyoti Castillo, Washington Middle School/University of Hawai’i at Manoa

Bringing Voices Into the Rural Classroom: Rural Social Studies Teachers Struggles to Introduce Diverse Perspectives Into Their White Rural Classrooms Jason Williamson, University of Missouri ROUNDTABLE #4:

New Dialogues on Civic Education Chair/Discussant: Thomas Lucey, Illinois State University

Dewey and Disability: Extending the Conception of Citizenship Ricky Mullins, Virginia Tech University

World History’s Civic Purpose: An Investigation Into Global Citizenship Discourse and World History’s Place in Civic Education Carly Muetterties, University of Kentucky

Individuality as Intersectionality: How Cuban Preservice Social Studies Teachers and Teacher Educators Reconcile Official Civic Norms Jenny Dawley-Carr, Northeastern Illinois University

Teaching and Learning Culturally and Linguistically Relevant Citizenship Education for Late Arrival Newcomer Students Ashley Taylor Jaffee, James Madison University

Thursday, 3:30–4:45pm ROOM | Columbus CD

Traveling Beyond 90 Feet to Home: How the BASEChicago Encourages Active Student Citizenship Tommy Ender, Loyola University Maryland; Adam Friedman, Wake Forest University; BASE Chicago ROOM |Columbus EF

Using Children’s Literature to Teach Powerful and Purposeful Elementary Social Studies Chair: Katy Swalwell, Iowa State University Discussant: Andrea Libresco, Hofstra University Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, Iowa State University; Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University; Delandrea Hall, The University of Texas at Austin; Christina Tschida, East Carolina University; Lisa Buchanan, University of North Carolina Wilmington; Esther Kim, The University of Texas at Austin; Anna Falkner, The University of Texas at Austin; Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas; Michelle Bauml, Texas Christian University ROOM | Columbus G

Digging Up and Digging Through the Literature: Social Studies Research as a Site for Excavation Chair/Discussant: Lisa Sibbett, University of Washington

Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Social Studies Instruction for English Language Learners: Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Research and Pedagogical Practices Ashley Taylor Jaffee, James Madison University; Paul Yoder, Eastern Mennonite University

Call It Like It Is: A Critical Race Theory Examination of Bullying in Social Studies Curriculum Carolyn Silva, University of Florida; Tianna Dowie-Chin, University of Florida continued on page 60 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CUFA • Thursday

Online and Technology-Mediated Learning in K-12 Social Studies

ROOM |Columbus KL

The Praxis of Civic Education

Tina Heafner, UNC Charlotte; Laura Handler, UNC Charlotte

Against the Hegemony of Idealism: The Rise of Materialist Theories of Race and Racism in Theory and Research in Social Education Ryan Oto, University of Minnesota ROOM | Columbus H

Controversial Issues and Difficult Dialogues: Democratic Pedagogy in an Era of Polarization

Chair/Discussant: Erin Casey, Louisiana State University

Developing Civic Competence: A Longitudinal Examination of an Action Civics Project Brooke Blevins, Baylor University; Chris Lemley, Baylor University; Cameron Dexter Torti, Baylor University

Moving beyond Civic Rituals: Elementary Students’ Understanding of Civic Life in the 2016 Election

Chair: Jay Shuttleworth, Long Island University, Brooklyn

Kathryn Obenchain, Purdue University; Julie Pennington, Purdue University; Hannah Carter, University of Nevada Reno

Discussant: Patricia Avery, University of Minnesota

Liberation Psychology and Urban Civic Education

Accommodating the Role of Emotion and Affect in Classroom-Based Political Discussion and Deliberation

Shira Epstein, The City College of New York (CUNY)

Iterative Digital Art Making as Community Civic Engagement

H. James Garrett, University of Georgia; Margaret Crocco, Michigan State University; Avner Segall, Michigan State University

Jamie Gravell, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)

Affective Listening: Conceptualizing a Silent Skill and the Democratic Orientations it Fosters

Issues, Trends, and Future Visions for Social Studies Education: A Chat with Journal and Book Series Editors

Hilary Conklin, DePaul University; Molly Andolina, DePaul University

Designing for Difficult Discourses: Using Simulated Encounters in a Social Studies Literacies Teacher Education Course Elizabeth Self, Vanderbilt University; Andrew Hostetler, Vanderbilt University; Barbara Stengel, Vanderbilt University

Learning to Teach Controversial Issues in Troubling Times Judy Pace, University of San Francisco ROOM |Columbus IJ

Critical Research Methodologies and Representation in Social Studies Research Chair: Sandra Schmidt, Teachers College, Columbia University Discussant: Terrie Epstein, City University of New York (CUNY) Patrick Keegan, New York University; Christina Villarreal, Teachers College, Columbia; Tadashi Dozono, New York City Department of Education

ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

Moderated by Daniel Krutka and Michael Milton and Recorded for the Visions of Ed Podcast Wayne Journell, Anthony L. Brown, & Paul Fitchett (Theory & Research in Social Education); William Russell & Stewart Waters (Journal of Social Studies Research); Kenneth Carano (Oregon Journal for the Social Studies); Jessica Zolotsky & Sarah Brooks (Social Studies Journal); Cynthia Sunal (Social Studies Research and Practice); Brad Maguth and Merry Merryfield (Information Age Publishing: Research in Social Education); Todd Hawley (Information Age Publishing: Social Issues in Education); Scott Waring (Social Studies and the Young Learner, CITE) ROOM | Grand Ballroom B ROUNDTABLE #1:

Global Perspectives on Teaching and Curriculum Chair/Discussant: Crystal Anderson, Cabrini University

Teach or not Teach: Teachers’ CurricularInstructional Decision Making of Controversial Public Issues Yu-Han Hung, University of Houston-Downtown

Interrogating Inequality: A Transdisciplinary Study of Social Studies Curricula in Two Global Cities Theresa Alviar-Martin, Kennesaw State University; Mark Baildon, National Institute of Education

Victims or Competitors: Korean Students’ Competing Understandings of Migrants Jiyoung Kang, Indiana University

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CUFA • Thursday ROUNDTABLE #2:

Thinking and Inquiring About History Chair/Discussant: Elizabeth Yeager Washington, University of Florida

Developing a Planning Framework for Effective Historical Inquiry James Miles, University of Toronto, Ontario; Lindsay Gibson, University of Alberta

An Expert/Novice/Novice Comparison of Social Interactions During DocumentBased History Lessons Jeffery Nokes, Brigham Young University; Alisa Kesler-Lund, Brigham Young University

Students’ Use of Data Visualizations in Historical Reasoning: A Think-Aloud Investigation with Elementary, Middle, and High School Students Tamara Shreiner, Grand Valley State University

Internet as Archive: Expertise in Searching for Digital Sources on a Contentious Historical Question Sarah McGrew, Stanford University ROUNDTABLE #3:

Teacher Beliefs and Teacher Perceptions Chair/Discussant: Mark Kissling, Penn State University

The Relationship Between Teachers’ Beliefs about Migration and Their Attitudes toward Immigrant Students

University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Timothy Monreal, University of South Carolina

Surveying Pennsylvania Social Studies Teachers About (Teaching) Environmental Issues Mark Kissling, Penn State University; Jonathan Bell, Penn State University

Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions About Master and Counter Narratives in the Curriculum Travis L. Seay, University of Florida

Thursday, 5:00–6:00pm ROOM | Grand Ballroom A

CUFA Closing Keynote Angela Valenzuela Angela Valenzuela, Ph.D. is a professor in both the Cultural Studies in Education Program within the Department of Curriculum & Instruction and the Educational Policy and Planning Program within the Department of Educational Administration at The University of Texas at Austin, where she also serves as the director of the University of Texas Center for Education Policy. She is the author of the awardwinning book, Subtractive Schooling: U.S. Mexican Youth and the Politics of Caring and Leaving Children Behind: How “Texas-style” Accountability Fails Latino Youth. Her most recent book is Growing Critically Conscious Teachers: A Social Justice Curriculum for Educators of Latino/a Youth. Her teaching interests are in the sociology of education, minority youth in schools, education policy, and urban education reform.

William McCorkle, Clemson University; Sophia Rodriguez,

TECH LOUNGE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Friday, Nov 30

Saturday, Dec 1

9–10

9:00–10:00 Using KidCitizen to Design an Inquiry-Based Learning Experience

Ed Tech Tools

10:15–11:15 Transform Learning Through Technology 11:30–12:30 Nearpod: Bring Presentations to Life

10:15–11:15 Nearpod in the Social Studies Classroom 11:30–12:30 Free Open Source Curriculum Materials

1:30–2:30

KidCitizen App: Primary Sources for Young Learners

2:45–3:45

Teaching Up a Field Trip, Poll Everywhere Social Media and Social Studies

2:45–3:45 Getting Involved in the NCSS Tech Community

4:00–5:00

Live Podcast and Learn about Podcasting

4:00–5:00

1:30–2:30

Digital Breakouts

Using Digital Collaborative Projects to Build Professional Bridges between Preand-In-Service Teachers

LOCATED NEXT TO THE REGISTRATION DESK BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE NCSS TECHNOLOGY COMMUNITY @TECHNESS FACEBOOK.COM/NCSSTECHCOMMUNITY

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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NSSSA • Thursday

NATIONAL SOCIAL STUDIES SUPERVISORS ASSOCIATION (NSSSA) NSSSA promotes the common interest of social studies supervisors in instruction, curriculum materials, research, teacher training, and social action. Based on the belief that interaction between teachers and students is the most vital element of an education system, NSSSA encourages and assists in the development of social studies instruction. It extends its services and assistance to supervisors at state and local levels in their efforts to initiate similar organizations. NSSSA members who are registered with NCSS are asked to please check in with NSSSA on Thursday. NCSS attendees who are not members of NSSSA may join NSSSA and attend the members-only events by paying the NSSSA membership and registration fees on the day of the conference. Registration for NSSSA sessions is $40 for NSSSA members, $90 for non-members, in addition to the NCSS registration fee. All NSSSA sessions will be held at the Hyatt Regency. A complete NSSSA schedule will be distributed at NSSSA registration. Wednesday, November 28 3:00–10:00pm

NSSSA Board Meeting (Board members only, please)

New Orleans, Ballroom Level West Tower

Thursday, November 29 7:30am–7:30pm

NSSSA Registration

Regency Ballroom Foyer, Ballroom Level, West Tower

8:00–9:15am

Breakfast/Business Meeting, Hosted by Pearson (Registered NSSSA members only, please)

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

9:30–10:30am

Concurrent Sessions

10:45–11:45am

Concurrent Sessions

12:00–1:30pm

Lunch/Business Meeting (Registered NSSSA members only, please) Speaker—Phil Gersmehl, Geographic Acts of Kindness: Spatial Thinking Pays It Forward

1:45–2:45pm

Concurrent Sessions

3:00–4:00pm

Concurrent Sessions

4:15–5:45pm

Special Session: Let’s Fix Our Democracy—It’s on Us and It’s Doable Berto Aguayo, Brian Brady and the American Soapbox Initiative students

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

5:45–7:00pm

Reception—Hosted by Pearson

Location TBA

7:30–10:00pm

NSSSA Board Meeting (Board members only, please)

Roosevelt 2, Concourse Level East Tower

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

NSSSA SESSIONS Thursday, November 29 GENERAL

DISCIPLINARY LITERACY

Soaring with Social Studies While Rooted in Reading PK-12 Our B.O.L.D. Adventure—Come see how we used literacy strategies to boost social studies instruction, and to build a PK-12 social studies literacy culture. We will share our B.O.L.D. journey, along with successful strategies our teachers are implementing with fidelity in social studies classrooms across our district. Presenters: Barbara Vrana, Birdville ISD, Haltom City, TX; Dawn Fielder, Birdville ISD, Haltom City, TX

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BEST PRACTICES

Inquiry Made Real: The Inquiry Design Model Although the subject of much discussion, inquiry has proven to be a challenge to enact in school classrooms. The Inquiry Design Model (IDM) offers a clear, coherent, and practical approach to develop inquiry-based instructional practices. This session offers educators an overview of IDM and examples of inquiry lessons. Presenters: Kathy Swan, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY; S.G. Grant, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY; John Lee, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


NSSSA • Thursday GENERAL

SUPERVISION/LEADERSHIP

SECONDARY

GROUPS DISCIPLINARY LITERACY

Assessment Literacy Standards for Social Studies Supervisors

Making Sense of the News: Teaching Current Events with News Literacy in an Age of Misinformation

The Michigan State Board of Education (SBE) endorsed the Assessment Literacy Standards, developed by the Michigan Assessment Consortium to serve as the foundation to improve assessment practices and systems in the state of Michigan. How can these standards help our supervisors as the C3 Framework is implemented in our schools? Presenters: Stan Masters, Lenawee ISD, Adrian, MI; David Johnson, Wexford-Missaukee ISD, Cadillac, MI

Never before has the need for News Literacy been more urgent. As news consumers are bombarded with a constant stream of fake news, propaganda, hoaxes, rumors, satire, and advertising—that often masquerade as credible journalism—it is becoming more and more difficult to distinguish fact from fiction. Learn how to actively sort and evaluate media online and discern and identify credible sources of news, and in turn, walk away with resources to help equip your students through in-classroom activities adapted from Stony Brook University’s course on News Literacy. Presenter: Michael Spikes, Center for News Literacy, Stony Brook University, Chicago, IL

SECONDARY

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

Diplomacy Simulations: Inspiring Students to Be Informed and Involved in the World In a world of global connections and global conflict, students need skills of diplomacy more than ever. Workshop participants engage in a diplomatic simulation and learn about free classroom resources. Presenter: Lauren Krizner Fischer, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC SECONDARY SUPERVISION/LEADERSHIP

Compelling Curricular Change: Combining Skills and Content in Grades K-12 How can a curriculum redesign promote an “UnderstandingFocused” Curriculum? Learn how one Maryland district’s teachers developed a viable skills-based preK-12 social studies curriculum that integrates Essential Questions, UbD, and Performance Assessments. Participants will be given curriculum samples and exposed to assessments, scoring tools, and PD resources. Presenters: Kim Hutzel, Washington County Public Schools, Hagerstown, MD; Kate Long, Washington County Public Schools, Hagerstown, MD SECONDARY

INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING

Tackling Controversial Issues Through Deliberation Join Street Law in an exploration of the powerful Deliberation discussion strategy. Learn how to prepare and coach teachers through deliberative discussion of controversial issues in their classroom. Receive classroomready teaching materials and insight into a wealth of free, online resources for teachers who wish to tackle controversial issues. Presenters: Megan Hanson, Street Law, Inc., Silver Spring, MD; Lee Arbetman, Street Law, Inc., Silver Spring MD GENERAL SUPERVISION/LEADERSHIP

Leading Change Through Professional Learning Leading and sustaining change is both very exciting and challenging especially with a limited amount of time allocated to professional learning. This session will focus on factors necessary for planning effective professional learning experiences that will both lead and sustain change in your district. Presenters: Pamela Gothart, Social Studies School Service, Huntsville, AL; Aaron Willis, Social Studies School Service, Culver City, CA

GENERAL SUPERVISION/LEADERSHIP

How to Create and Implement a Culture of Inquiry – K through 12! Learn how one district implemented a systematic approach for creating a culture of inquiry K-12: the need, vision, buy-in and excitement necessary for success. Allow their journey to help you on yours! Gather ideas to challenge and equip both administrators and educators to support deep and rigorous instruction. Presenters: Becky Ryckeley, Fayette County Schools, Fayetteville, GA; Sherry Owens, s3strategies, Lubbock, TX; Steve Beasley, s3strategies, Lubbock, TX GENERAL SUPERVISION/LEADERSHIP

Is Schooling a Mechanism for Racial Control?: Anti-Racist Education Equation Schools and educators are brokers of hope. However, systems minoritize people and control their potential. Schooling as a system is a mechanism for racial control. The anti-racist education equation proposed is intended to equip influencers to ensure that schooling isn’t debilitating and disenfranchising for entire populations of kids. Presenters: Shelley Henderson, READY Nationwide, Omaha, NE; Earl Redrick, E4 Leadership Solutions (e4LS), Omaha, NE SECONDARY

INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING

From Conflict to Civility: Helping Teachers Embrace Controversial Issues in Classrooms Differing opinions do not need to become uncivil matters in classrooms. Developed by the Anne Frank House, Free2Choose and Memory Walk help students explore issues of Human Rights and memorialization in communities. Aligned to the C3 Framework, these platforms help teachers introduce sensitive topics relevant to students in a structured environment designed to promote civil discourse and informed action. Presenter: Charles Vaughan, AC Flora High School, Columbia, SC

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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NSSSA • Thursday

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

Beyond Checklists: New Instructional Approaches to Digital Literacy How can we prepare students to navigate the deluge of information that floods their phones, tablets, and laptops? Explore new curriculum and assessments designed by the Stanford History Education Group to teach students to be discerning consumers of social and political information online. Presenters: Joel Breakstone, Stanford History Education Group, Stanford, CA; Mark Smith, Stanford History Education Group, Stanford, CA

SECONDARY

DISCIPLINARY LITERACY

Literacy: Making Meaning Out of Best Practices This session tackles the challenge of pairing disciplinary literacy with effective literacy strategies in classrooms. Acquire low-prep/high-yield literacy strategies, participate in a Talk, Read, Talk, Write lesson paired with historical thinking skills, and receive a bibliography of best practices for reading, writing, speaking, and vocabulary. Presenters: Pier Larsen, Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, Carrollton, TX; Megan Duckworth, Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, Carrollton, TX MIDDLE

K-8

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

A GIANT Step Forward This interactive session has it all. Free curricular units, online assessments, interactive maps, instructional strategies, and digital textbooks that build geographic inquiry and historical thinking skills for students. Presenter: David Johnson, Northern Michigan Learning Consortium, Cadillac, MI GENERAL SUPERVISION/LEADERSHIP

Developing Local Social Studies Teacher Leader Group During this session, you will learn about how one Social Studies Supervisor has developed and is growing a group of local social studies department chairs and classroom teachers from various districts. Specific strategies, processes, and technology applications will be shared that will enable others to duplicate it in their own service area. Presenter: Roy Sovis, Genesee Intermediate School District, Flint, MI SECONDARY

DISCIPLINARY LITERACY

Strategies for Supporting ELL Language and Content Learning in History/Social Science Creating schools where content teachers effectively support English Language Learners is challenging. Featuring work with history teachers in a middle school laboratory project, leadership moves that develop skilled lesson planning and delivery for powerful ELL instruction will be featured and participants will learn compelling ELL approaches to motivate teachers. Presenters: Elizabeth Fralicks, Fresno Unified School District, Fresno, CA; Jennifer Blitz, West Ed, Phoenix, AZ

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BEST PRACTICES

Teaching Controversial Issues in a Sharply Divided America Explore five big ideas for social studies supervisors, curriculum writers, and teachers to consider when planning and teaching lessons on controversial issues. These big ideas fall into five broad categories (purpose, preparation, process, practice, perspective) that, when considered together, will help to develop meaningful, curriculum-aligned, and ageappropriate lessons. Presenters: Marty Creel, Discovery Education, Silver Spring, MD; Kevin Jenkins, Discovery Education, Silver Spring, MD; Amy Davis, Discovery Education, Chicago, IL GENERAL

BEST PRACTICES

Teaching Literacy Through History Using the Gilder Lehrman Teaching Literacy through History approach, participants will be guided on how to connect seven key literacy strategies tied to Common Core and C3 into the K-12 classroom. Materials will include textual, visual, and audio documents and several historical periods will be addressed. Presenters: Ron Nash, Gilder Lehrman Institute of America, New York, NY; Tim Bailey, Gilder Lehrman Institute of America, New York, NY SECONDARY

PROFESSIONAL SKILLS

Teaching Strategies That Foster Civil Discourse Educators have an essential role in creating educational spaces where respect and civil discourse are the norm. This interactive experience highlights Facing History and Ourselves strategies and resources designed to help navigate challenging times and support your students to develop effective skills for civic participation. Fostering Civil Discourse Guide included. Presenters: Jennifer Jones-Clark, Facing History and Ourselves, Brookline, MA; Wayde Grinstead, Facing History and Ourselves, Chicago, IL

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


GROUPS

International Assembly

INTERNATIONAL ASSEMBLY (IA) The International Assembly provides a forum for collaboration and interchange of ideas among NCSS members from the United States and foreign countries. The Assembly promotes linkages among NCSS educators to enhance professional development, enrich social studies learning, and share research, learning activities, and teaching methods with global perspectives. Registration for International Assembly is $20 for IA members, $45 for non-members, in addition to the NCSS registration fee. Payment must be made at NCSS Registration. All IA Sessions will be at the Hyatt Regency. Thursday, November 29 4:00–5:30pm

International Assembly 2018–19 Executive Board Meeting (Board Members Only)

Big Bar, East Tower

Friday, November 30 8:00–8:45am

Welcome and Business Meeting

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

9:30–10:30am

Roundtable Sessions: Round 1

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

10:30–11:00am

Morning Break

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

11:00am–12:00pm

Jan L. Tucker Memorial Lecture: “My Backyard IS the World: Teaching Without Borders” Fred Mednick

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

1:15–2:45pm

Roundtable Sessions: Round 2

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

2:45–3:00pm

Closing Remarks

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

3:00–5:00pm

Collaboration & Publication Opportunity – International Social Studies: A Discussion of Current and Future Scholarship William Russell & Jing Williams

Plaza Ballroom, Lobby Level, East Tower

5:00–6:00pm

International Assembly 2018–19 Executive Board Meeting (Board Members Only)

Big Bar, East Tower

INTERNATIONAL ASSEMBLY SESSIONS ROUNDTABLE SESSIONS – ROUND 1 9:00–10:30am TABLE 1 –GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION

Bridging the Epistemological Divide of the Other: John Dewey’s Philosophical Continuum and the Purpose of Global Citizenship Education Daniel Stuckart, Lehman College, NY

Teachers, Twitter, and Global Citizenship Education: Global Discussions, National Boundaries

TABLE 2 – PEACE EDUCATION

Lessons from A-Bomb Survivors: Researching Hiroshima & Nagasaki Victims’ Perspectives for Use in U.S. Social Studies Classrooms Misato Yamaguchi, H. K. Barker Center for Economic Education at the University of Akron, Japan; Brad Maguth, The University of Akron, OH

Laura Quaynor, Lewis University, IL; Elizabeth Sturm, Lewis University, IL

Beyond National Context in Peace Education: Rethinking Hiroshima with Multiple Perspectives

Durban Deep: South African Perspectives on Global Citizenship in Teacher Education

Jongsung Kim, Hiroshima University, Japan; Kazuhiro Kusahara, Hiroshima University, Japan; Hiromi Kawaguchi, Hiroshima University, Japan; Mariko Komatsu, Hiroshima University, Japan

Jason Harshman, University of Iowa, IA Discussion Facilitator: Sarah Mead, University of South Florida, FL

Peace Education Initiatives; One Planet - the Earth, One Family - Mankind Kamiya Kumar, Teachers College Columbia University, NY Discussion Facilitator: Brad Maguth, The University of Akron, OH 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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International Assembly

TABLE 3 – GLOBAL EDUCATION: TEACHER PERSPECTIVES

The Influence of Social Studies Teachers’ Purposes for Teaching Social Studies on Ideas About Instruction in Normal Technical (Vocational) Track Classrooms in Singapore

TABLE 6 – HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION

“Why Have I Never Learned About This in School?” Significance of Teaching the Nanjing Atrocities in Teacher Education Programs Jing Williams, University of South Dakota, SD

E-von Lai, Indiana University Bloomington, IN

Understanding Nigeria’s Social Studies Education: Perspectives of Teacher Education Faculty Omiunota Ukpokodu, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO; Flora Nkire, Abia State University, Nigeria

Perceptions of Globalization: A Case Study of Preservice Teachers from the Caribbean Patricia Sealy, The University of Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago; Guichun Zong, Kennesaw State University, GA Discussion Facilitator: Marilyn Lim, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI TABLE 4 – MULTICULTURALISM IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

Bringing Intangible Cultural Heritage into Chinese Classrooms to Develop Global Awareness and Multiethnic Cultural Pride Xueyan Xia, Shengfei Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China; Yali Zhao, Georgia State University, GA; Hong Xiao, Shengfei Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China; Lihua Liu, Shengfei Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China; Jufang Heng, Shengfei Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China

Managing Classroom Discussions on Diversity in a Multicultural Classroom in Singapore Lloyd Yeo, Academy of Singapore Teachers, Singapore; Osman Abdullah, Academy of Singapore Teachers, Singapore

Culturally Responsive Curriculum and Pedagogy in U.S. Territories: How Might We Think about NCSS in Colonial Spaces? Thomas Misco, Miami University, OH; James Shiveley, Miami University, OH; Greg Hamot, University of Iowa, IA Discussion Facilitator: Nicholas Bardo, Colorado Mesa University, CO

The Comfort Women of World War II: An International Case Study in the Violation of Human Rights Beverly Milner Bisland, Queens College of the City University of New York, NY; Sunghee Shin, Queens College of the City University of New York, NY; Jimin Kim, Independent Scholar

American Internationalists During the Interwar Years: A Case Example and Primary Sources for Student Explorations Bea Bailey, Clemson University, SC Discussion Facilitator: Lin Lin, SUNY Cortland, NY TABLE 7 – SOCIAL STUDIES AROUND THE WORLD

Beyond the Tip of the Cultural Iceberg: Teaching for Deeper Cultural Understanding Min Fui Chee, National Institute of Education, Singapore; Ee Moi Kho, National Institute of Education, Singapore; Jasmine B-Y Sim, National Institute of Education, Singapore

Improving Chinese Elementary Students’ Life Skills and Civic Competence Through Economics and Financial Education Wei Huang, Experimental Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China; Yan Liu, Experimental Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China; Shu Liu, Experimental Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China; Wenxiu You, Experimental Elementary School Affiliated with Sichuan Normal University, China

Teach or Not Teach: Increased Authority and Autonomy of Social Studies Teachers in Taiwan Yu-Han Hung, University of Houston-Downtown, TX Discussion Facilitator: Ingrid Robinson, St. Francis Xavier University, Canada

TABLE 5 – CRITICAL GLOBAL ISSUES

Gender in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals Melissa Mitchem, Teachers College Columbia University, NY

Conceptualizations of the Refugee Van Anh Tran, Teachers College Columbia University, NY

Thinking With and Through Terrorism, Grievance, and Silence: Different—but Connected—Paths to Violence and White Supremacy in Social Studies Education Jennice McCafferty-Wright, University of Missouri, MO; Rebecca Christ, Florida International University, FL; Sarah Mathews, Florida International University, FL Discussion Facilitator: Yun-Wen Chan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI

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Save the Date 3 Conferences – 1 Location


GROUPS

International Assembly TABLE 8 – GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Madison Camp—Kenya: Bringing a Vision of Global Engagement to Life Michelle Cude, James Madison University, VA

Digging Deeper; Scaffolding on Nine Years of International Projects Kalliopi Logothetis, Seton Hall University, NJ; Emma Pearson, Seton Hall University, NJ; Laura Abel, Seton Hall University, NJ; James Daly, Seton Hall University, NJ

An Emergent Third Space for Cuba and the United States: The Role of Social Studies Education in Promoting Transnational Understandings Timothy G. Cashman, University of Texas at El Paso, TX

TABLE 3 – CIVIC EDUCATION IN GLOBAL CONTEXT

Impacts of Three IEA Civic Education Studies Across Two Decades: An Opportunity for Reflection and Input Judith Torney-Purta, University of Maryland (Emerita), MD; Barbara Malak-Minkiewicz, IEA Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Guiding Principles for Cross-Cultural Civic Education Reform: Lessons from the Post-Communist World Greg Hamot, The University of Iowa, IA; Thomas Misco, Miami University, OH; James Shiveley, Miami University, OH

Conceptions of Civic Engagement in the Singapore Social Studies Curriculum Marilyn Lim, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI

Discussion Facilitator: Ashley Lucas, Towson University, MD

ROUNDTABLE SESSIONS – ROUND 2 1:15–2:45pm TABLE 1 – GLOBAL EDUCATION PEDAGOGY

Developing Global Perspectives Through Contemporary Art Barbara Cruz, University of South Florida, FL; Sarah Mead, University of South Florida, FL

Scenery Photo Reports as a Social Studies Education Method: How to Be an Active Learner with 21st Century Skills Kihachiro Sakai, Minamikyushu University, Japan

Reframing Community Values for Cultivating Students’ Environmental Citizenship: Rethinking Place-Based Education Yun-Wen Chan, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI Discussion Facilitator: Jason Harshman, University of Iowa, IA

Discussion Facilitator: Daniel Stuckart, Lehman College, NY TABLE 4 – TEACHER PREPARATION FOR GLOBAL AWARENESS

Preparing to Teach Global Issues: Building Global Content Knowledge in Teacher Education John Myers, Florida State University, FL; Keith Rivero, Florida State University, FL

Developing Global Perspectives in the Social Studies: Three Cross-Cultural Simulations Nicholas Bardo, Colorado Mesa University, CO

Encouraging Critical Thinking, Creativity, Collaboration and Communication (4Cs) in Teacher Preparation: Teaching for Global Awareness and Social Justice Lydiah Nganga, University of Wyoming, WY; John Kambutu, University of Wyoming, WY Discussion Facilitator: Guichun Zong, Kennesaw State University, GA TABLE 5 – INTERNATIONAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

TABLE 2 – CHALLENGES IN GLOBAL EDUCATION

How Can Border Pedagogy in a Japanese Classroom Be Practiced? Kayo Madokoro, Yokohama Science Frontier High School, Japan; Timothy G. Cashman, University of Texas at El Paso, TX; Takeshi Miyazaki, Soka University, Japan

“I Can’t Take Time to Do That”: Barriers to Teaching About World Cultures Heidi Torres, University of Oklahoma, OK

Examining the Marginalization of Global Perspectives Pedagogy in Social Studies Teacher Education Omiunota Ukpokodu, University of Missouri-Kansas City, MO

Overseas Student Teachers’ Reflections on National Identity: A Longitudinal Study Frans Doppen, Ohio University, OH; Bahman Shahri, Ohio University, OH

“I Haven’t Just Developed, I’ve Transformed”: Student Teaching Abroad and Developing Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices Di Ryter, Fort Lewis College, CO

International Professional Development Experiences of Oregon Teachers Kenneth Carano, Western Oregon University, OR Discussion Facilitator: Beverly Milner Bisland, Queens College of the City University of New York, NY

Discussion Facilitator: Yu-Han Hung, University of Houston-Downtown, TX

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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ASSOCIATED

International Assembly

TABLE 6 – GLOBAL COMPETENCY

“No Excuse to Live in a Bubble”: How Do Children in Your Classroom Stay Connected to the World? Lin Lin, SUNY Cortland, NY

Negotiating Tensions Critically and Reflexively: Bearing Witness to Citizenship Teachers in Singapore Jasmine B-Y Sim, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Educating for Global Competency: Framing Study Abroad with Critical Cosmopolitan Theory

TABLE 8 – SELF-STUDY

Personal Life Experience as Subject Matter Knowledge in Social Studies Min Fui Chee, National Institute of Education, Singapore

Helping Teachers to Navigate the Uncertainties of Social Justice in the Social Studies Andrea Milligan, Victoria University Wellington, New Zealand; Ashley Lucas, Towson University, MD

Is “Best Practice” Different Near the Equator? A Study of a Teacher Trainer in Kenya Michelle Cude, James Madison University, VA

Erik Byker, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, NC Discussion Facilitator: Van Anh Tran, Teachers College Columbia University, NY TABLE 7 – CURRICULA IN GLOBAL SETTINGS

Indigenous Knowledge and Perspectives in Social Studies: An Analysis Of Canadian Social Studies Curricula

Discussion Facilitator: Michelle Cude, James Madison University, VA

COLLABORATION & PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY 3:00–5:00pm

Ingrid Robinson, St. Francis Xavier University, Canada

An Examination of Social Studies Curricula in French Language Settings Natalie Keefer, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA; Michelle Haj-Broussard, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA

The Despair and Empowerment Curricular Curve in Global Education: Lessons from a 7th Grade World History Classroom Brad Maguth, The University of Akron, OH; Avery Apanius, The University of Akron, OH Discussion Facilitator: Bea Bailey, Clemson University, SC

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International Social Studies: A Discussion of Current and Future Scholarship William Russell & Jing Williams The field of social studies is often described and discussed from an American perspective. This session aims to explore current and future scholarship opportunities and ideas for scholars interested in social studies around the globe. Specifically, this session will discuss details regarding a call for proposals for a special issue of The Journal of Social Studies Research and a new call for chapter proposals for an edited book published by Information Age Publishing. All are welcome to attend.

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


CONTENT OVERVIEW Event

When

Length

Where

Clinics, AP Workshops (Tickets Required)

Thursday

Full-day or half-day

Hyatt Regency Ballroom meeting rooms and off-site locations

Sessions

Friday, Saturday, Sunday

One hour

Hyatt Regency Ballroom meeting rooms

Power Sessions

Friday, Saturday

30 minutes

Hyatt Regency Ballroom meeting rooms

Workshops

Sunday

Two hours

Hyatt Regency Ballroom meeting rooms

Poster Presentations

Friday, Saturday

One hour

Crystal Ballroom foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

Exhibitor Sessions

Friday, Saturday

One hour

Hyatt Regency Ballroom meeting rooms

Schedule Information This program was printed in late October. Some schedule information has changed, and some sessions have been canceled by the presenters. The 2018 NCSS Annual Conference mobile app has all updates. To see a full list of all canceled sessions, within the app, tap on the search icon (magnifying glass at the top of the screen) and type in “Canceled.” All sessions canceled before the conference are also listed on a sign at NCSS Registration, Ballroom Level, East Tower. Conference Evaluation Be sure to check your email inbox after the conference for a link to our conference evaluation survey. Audio-Visual NCSS will fulfill audio-visual needs originally requested on the program proposals as long as the request is within the limits of equipment that NCSS provides. For any last-minute A/V needs, presenters must arrange and pay for their own equipment at the daily rates established by Freeman (the

designated A/V company), not the advanced rates that NCSS charged during the proposal process. During the conference, the Freeman A/V offices are in Grand Suites 2AB on the Ballroom Level, East Tower and Atlanta on the Ballroom Level, West Tower.

Graduate Credit and CEUs  One graduate-level semester credit is available for all interested attendees through Adams State University.  Up to two Continuing Education Units (CEU) are available through San José State University.  NCSS has partnered with Eastern Illinois University, a state-approved PD provider, to offer approved professional development for Illinois teachers. For more information on all these options, go to www.socialstudies.org/conference/credit.

CERTIFIED Stop by the NCSS Membership Booth #1001 in the Exhibit Hall to receive your official 98th NCSS Annual Conference attendance stamp. Exhibit Hall Hours Riverside Exhibit Hall, East Tower, access through Ballroom Level Friday 10:00am–6:00pm Saturday 8:00am–4:00pm 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CLINICS CLINICS This list of clinics is current as of mid-October. Some of these clinics may have been canceled after mid-October due to low registration. Attendees should have received notification if a clinic was canceled. Please consult the 98th NCSS Annual Conference mobile app for the updated list.

Thursday, November 29 OFF-SITE CLINICS

8:00am–3:00pm Take a Stand: From History Learning to Civic Engagement Host: Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center Explore strategies and practical approaches for bringing civic engagement and meaningful student activism to life from the state-of-the-art Take a Stand Center to your grade 3-12 classroom. Amanda Friedeman, Kelley Szany, Jessica Hulten, Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center, Skokie, IL

9:00am–12:00pm Your Whole Classroom is Watching: Teaching 1968 Host: Chicago History Museum Explore the tumultuous events of 1968 through analysis of artifacts, photographs, oral histories and place. Drawing on the Chicago History Museum’s resources, discover strategies to critically assess 1968’s lasting impact. Heidi Moisan, Megan Clark, Chicago History Museum, Chicago, IL

9:00am–12:00pm Are Custom Wedding Cakes Speech under the First Amendment? Host: John Marshall Law School Explore a unique collaboration between the Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago and local law students to bring civics education to the public schools through the First Amendment. Dee Runaas, Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, Chicago, IL; Steven Schwinn, John Marshall Law School, Chicago, IL

9:00am–3:00pm Religious Literacy Bus Tour of Chicagoland Explore Chicagoland’s rich religious culture and history by exploring notable houses of worship in Chicago and the surrounding suburbs. Examine intersections of belief, behavior, and community identity. Seth Brady, Naperville Central High School, Naperville, IL; Benjamin Marcus, Washington, DC

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9:00am–5:00pm Tasting Trade/Trading Tastes: Teaching Geography and Culture Through Food How do cuisine, cowboys, and calligraphy all connect in the pre-modern Middle East? Travel with us along pathways of pre-modern trade from Asia to Europe to America to find out! Barbara Petzen, Middle East Outreach Council, Washington, DC; Chris Rose, Middle East Outreach Council, Austin, TX; Craig Cangemi, Qatar Foundation International, Washington, DC

9:30am–3:30pm Chicago: The Exceptional City This bus tour examines Chicago as a city that epitomizes the concept of American exceptionalism, focusing on sites related to the 1893 Exposition and its role in the American West. Rich Loosbrock, Ed Crowther, Adams State University, Alamosa, CO

12:00–3:00pm Civics in Action: Classroom Visit to Westinghouse College Prep During this offsite experience, participants will observe an AP Government Classroom incorporating Action Civics, and talk with teachers and students about integrating civic action in and out of the classroom. Jill Bass, Mikva Challenge, Chicago, IL; Linda Becker, Westinghouse College Prep, Chicago, IL

1:00–4:00pm American Empire: Philippines, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico in Primary Sources Host: The Newberry Study original primary sources from the Newberry’s collection to explore perspectives on, and experiences with, American imperialism. Clinic case studies will focus on Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. Kara Johnson, The Newberry, Chicago, IL

1:45–5:00pm Artwork as Primary Source: Fostering Historical Thinking and Student Inquiry Host: Art Institute of Chicago Explore artwork at the Art Institute related to themes of identity and membership in society. Session will model strategies for fostering student inquiry and visual literacy. Access to museum provided. Wayde Grinstead, Facing History and Ourselves, Chicago, IL; Jack Gruszczynski, Kristin Enright, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


CLINICS 2:00–5:00pm Looking at Ourselves: Confronting Race and Racism Host: The Field Museum Uncover the history of scholarship around race and its lasting impacts on society. Unpack ideas related to race and racism, and explore strategies for addressing these complex topics with students. Heidi Rouleau, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL; Heidi Moisan, Megan Clark, Chicago History Museum, Chicago, IL FULL-DAY CLINICS AT THE HYATT REGENCY

10:00am–4:00pm

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Teaching and Assessing World History: Korea Today to Yesterday Explore how to leverage current events in Korea to teach historical concepts and reasoning skills. Utilizing free, open source resources, participants will build instructional and assessment materials aligned to AP. Greg Ahlquist, Webster Central Schools, Webster, NY; Deborah Wing-Leonard, Clear Lake High School, Houston, TX; Ryan New, Boyle County High School, Danville, KY; Gabe Fain, Frisco Heritage High School, McKinney, TX; Samantha Fraser, Cherokee High School, Woodstock, GA; Barbara Coulter, Chillicothe High School, Chillicothe, OH; Patrick Whelan, Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School, Bradenton, FL

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Primarily Speaking: Primary Source Strategies to Support Literacy and STEAM

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Discover the world of digital primary sources and the Library of Congress through the lens of Chicago, while learning and applying innovative literacy, technology, and media strategies for the classroom. Keith Patterson, Kile Clabaugh, Teaching With Primary Sources Western Region, Denver, CO; Peggy O’Neill Jones, Teaching with Primary Sources at MSU Denver, Denver, CO; Michelle Pearson, Adams 12 School District, Broomfield, CO; Laura Israelsen, Chesterfield School District, Chesterfield, VA; Roland Schendel, MSU Denver - School of Education, Denver, CO

This interactive workshop helps teachers organize this AP course to facilitate research and comparison of the United Kingdom, Russia, Mexico, Iran, China, and Nigeria. Engage in activities using political data and key concepts to compare political systems and explore how governments respond to external and internal forces of change.

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Inquiry, Argument Writing, and DBQ Online To address the C3 Framework, instructional shifts emphasizing student engagement and writing instruction must prevail. The DBQ Method helps teachers implement rigorous reading and writing activities in technology-rich classrooms. Chip Brady, Phil Roden, The DBQ Project, Evanston, IL Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Birth of a Movement: Do You Know William Monroe Trotter? Who’s William Monroe Trotter, and why is he forgotten? His fight against D.W. Griffith’s groundbreaking yet notoriously KKK-friendly “Birth of a Nation” is a lesson for civil rights activists today. Michael Curry, NAACP National Board of Directors, Boston, MA; Judy Richardson, SNCC Digital Gateway, Silver Spring, MD; Colin Rose, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA; Susan Gray, Northern Light Productions, Allston, MA; Dick Lehr, Boston University, Boston, MA

AP Comparative Government and Politics

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

AP Human Geography This interactive workshop contains activities that explore the content and structure of the AP Human Geography course and exam and will suggest appropriate instructional strategies and practices for AP teachers. Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

AP World History: Critical Trends and Global Processes Learn how to use course themes and concepts from the World History Curriculum Framework to develop strategies for cultivating students’ historical reasoning as focused on critical trends and global processes. Discuss how to revise a course syllabus to align with course audit requirements. Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

AP U.S. Government and Politics Engage in several interactive activities structured to facilitate key curriculum requirements from the redesigned curriculum framework, including interpreting political data, argumentation, exploring other political science skills, and applying course content to contemporary political events. HALF-DAY CLINICS AT THE HYATT REGENCY

2:00–5:00pm Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Live It to Learn It: Understanding Elections Using Storypath How do we teach about elections in a manner that inspires students to embrace the democratic process and ultimately be lifelong engaged citizens? Learn about the Storypath approach—curriculum provided. Margit McGuire, Seattle University, Seattle, WA; Bridget Walker, Mukilteo, WA 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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CLINICS Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Meet in Picasso, Concourse Level, West Tower

Teaching Content Literacy Skills, Developing Content, and Engaging Elementary Learners

Using Inquiry to Discover the Past and Present of Chicago

Learn content literacy, inquiry and effective questioning strategies, having social studies content as the focus, while fulfilling CCSS’s increasing depth, rigor and student engagement. Speaker will share ready-to-use lessons. Handouts. Donna Knoell, Shawnee Mission, KS

Find treasure along the Magnificent Mile; discover the secrets of the Chicago River and enjoy sculptures near Lake Michigan. Join a hands-on exploration of Chicago using inquiry as our guide Paul Nagel, Curriculum Writer, Cypress, TX; David Faerber, Lee Magnet High School, Baton Rouge, LA

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Building Problem-Based Learning Units That Connect Classrooms and Community

Developing Social Studies Curriculum to Combat Misinformation

Learn how to develop an inquiry-laden, problem-based project around an important community issue. Middle school students and teachers will share their framework for passing a new city law. Matthew Russ, Sam Chestnut, John Bennett, The Lippman School, Akron, OH

Work collaboratively to explore the long history of misinformation and create interactive lessons to help students develop the skills they need to understand and combat misinformation. Sarah Morris, Nucleus Learning Network, Austin, TX

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower Plaza Ballroom A, Lobby Level, East Tower

Engaging Social Studies: Creative Assessment with Toys, Games, and Comics

Finding Truth: White Supremacy and Forced Removal of Native Children

Learn how to help all students connect with social studies using toys, games, and comics! Literacy strategies, design thinking, and cross-curriculum connections all combine in this hands-on clinic! Quinn Rollins, Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT

Explore new ways to teach about white supremacy, settler colonialism, forced removal of Native children, curricular representations of Indigenous peoples, and historical falsehoods using Dawnland and its digital teacher’s guide. Mishy Lesser, Upstander Project, Boston, MA; Sarah B. Shear, Pennsylvania State University-Altoona, Altoona, PA

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

New Space, New Day: Blending ELA, Social Studies, Social Media

Classroom-Ready Lessons on the Muslim World

Explore how social studies and ELA intersect with this generation. Learn how to open up students’ imaginations, using sources from picture books to the Canon to Tweets to Beyoncé. Jocelyn A. Chadwick, Harvard Graduate School of Education/ National Council of Teachers of English, Arlington, MA; Carol Jago, UCLA and National Council of Teachers of English, Chicago, IL

Explore the diversity of the Muslim world, including southeastern Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, and East Africa! A group of teachers share their innovative lesson plans and teaching ideas. Lisa Adeli, University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Tucson, AZ; Robert Hallock, Sammamish High School, Bellevue, WA; Seth Polley, Bisbee High School, Bisbee, AZ; Katy Smoot, Ridgedale Middle School, Florham Park, NJ

NCSS Congratulates Khizr Khan

2018 Spirit of America Award Recipient sponsored by Social Studies School Service

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 1 • 9:00–10:05am

Friday At-A-Glance Time

Event

Speakers

Page

7:00–9:00am

President’s Breakfast (ticketed event) and Teacher of the Year Awards (open)

NCSS President India Meissel Sylvia Acevedo

73

9:00–10:05am

Concurrent Sessions 1 Power Sessions: 9:00–9:30am / 9:35–10:05am

Featured Speaker: Anthony Ray Hinton

73

9:30–10:30am

Poster Presentations

77

10:00am

Exhibit Hall opens

n/a

10:15–11:20am

Concurrent Sessions 2 Power Sessions: 10:15–10:45am / 10:50–11:20am

10:45–11:45am

Poster Presentations

Featured Speaker: Keating Crown

84

11:30am–12:35pm

Concurrent Sessions 3 Power Sessions: 11:30am–12:00pm / 12:05–12:35pm

12:30–1:30pm

Break

Vital Issues Session: Lessons of the Holocaust: The Experiences of Survivors

1:30–2:30pm

Keynote Speaker: Peter Sagal

2:45–3:50pm

Vital Issue Session: In Her Shoes: Field Notes from National Geographic Explorers

3:00–4:00pm 4:00–5:05pm

Concurrent Sessions 4 Power Sessions: 2:45–3:15pm / 3:20–3:50pm Poster Presentations Concurrent Sessions 5 Power Sessions: 4:00–4:30pm / 4:35–5:05pm

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86 n/a 89 90 94

Featured Speaker: Alex Wagner

96

4:15–5:15pm

Poster Presentations

99

5:15–6:00pm

Dedicated Exhibit Hall Time

n/a

7:00–9:00am Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

President’s Breakfast

The President’s Breakfast is the official opening of the 98th NCSS Annual Conference. The program will honor the 2018 Teacher of the Year award recipients and include NCSS President India Meissel’s address on the current state of social studies. The President’s Breakfast is a ticketed event, generously sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. The Ballroom will be open for any registered attendee without a breakfast ticket interested in hearing the program.

9:00–10:00am FEATURED SPEAKER

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Anthony Ray Hinton Surviving American Injustice: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row Anthony Ray Hinton spent nearly thirty years on Death Row in Alabama for murders that he did not commit. His case was another tragic example of the institutionalized racism and classism raging through America's criminal justice system. With the tireless help of the founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative, Bryan Stevenson, Hinton finally won his release in 2015. Hinton will speak about the circumstances of his wrongful incarceration, the racial biases that influenced the investigation and

conviction, his unrelenting determination to survive, the power of faith and forgiveness, and the urgent need for prison reform in America. Anthony Ray Hinton is the author of The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row. His appearance is generously sponsored by Macmillan. Everyone attending Anthony Ray Hinton’s presentation will receive a free copy of The Sun Does Shine, compliments of Macmillan. Swissotel, Zurich ABCD

Connecting Across Differences Dr. Diana Hess leads a vigorous conversation that explores the question, “What are the opportunities and challenges in engaging students with differing political views?” Learn from the lived classroom experiences of educators and students as they explore the possibilities for “better arguments” to support inquiry in the social science classroom. Jamie Garcia, Community High School District 94, West Chicago, IL; Jessica Marshall, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Elizabeth Kirby, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL. Moderated by Diana Hess, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI: Matthew Wdowiarz, Winfield School District 34, Winfield, IL Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Ed Tech Tools

Share, learn and have fun with the NCSS Tech Community. 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 1 • 9:00–10:05am

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

PREK-ELEMENTARY

9:00–10:00am

AWARD SESSION

HIGHER EDUCATION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower 2018 Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation Award

“Economics is Political”: Preservice Teachers, Purpose, and the Challenges of Critical Economics Pedagogy This session thinks differently about economics: its purpose, its foundation, and its role in a transformative and humanizing vision of social studies. Presenter: Neil Shanks, University of Texas at Austin, TX Chair: Ritu Radhakrishnan, Oswego State University, Oswego, NY

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Carter Woodson and Notable Tradebooks: Engaging Early Grade Lesson Plans! Searching for compelling early grade lesson plans tied to NCSS Notable Tradebooks and Carter Woodson winning titles? Look no further! Participants will receive all lesson plans. JoAnn Wood, Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, GA; Cynthia Sunal, Dennis W. Sunal, Oluseyi Odebiyi, Holly Swain, Lee Freeman, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Angel Bestwick, Kutztown University, Dallas, PA; Amanda Pendergrass, Lynn Kelley, Dana Rolison, University of West Alabama, Livingston, AL; Wanda L. Ward, Alabama Council for Social Studies, Birmingham, AL; Sarah Montgomery, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA; Lois McFadyen Christensen, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL; Blythe Hinitz, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ; Kimberly Heckart, College Community School District, Cedar Rapids, IA; Denisha Jones, Trinity Washington University, Washington, DC PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Practical Issues of Using Inquiry-Based Learning in the K-5 Classroom Explore common challenges and solutions to teaching the C3 Framework and other inquiry models in the K-5 social studies classroom. Katie Knapp, Kent State University, Kent, OK PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Not Your Granny’s Storytime: Merging Biographies and Historical Thinking Skills Launch those boring wax museum biographies into an engaging, evidence-based performance that all learners will enjoy. Leave with a framework and resources to get you started. Amy Walker, Janelle Stigall, Olathe School District, Olathe, KS

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US HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Teaching Critical Elementary Social Studies with Children’s Literature Discover how children’s literature about historically marginalized groups can be paired with primary sources for critical social studies learning in elementary classrooms. Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ; Esther Kim, The University of Texas at Austin, TX PREK-ELEMENTARY

WORLD HISTORY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Channelling Socrates: Inquiry Techniques that Get Elementary Students to Think! Learn to create a Socratic Classroom to encourage critical thinking and inquiry. Leave with lesson ideas, ready to implement Socratic circles, student debates, and classroom councils when you get home. Amy Allen, The Academy of Classical Studies, Oklahoma City, OK

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Who Should Own Jerusalem? A Literacy Inquiry For Global Learners Explore compelling questions that require students to analyze global problems, generate claims supporting historical, geographic, economic, and civic minded evidence, that applies to various perspectives, civic virtues, and democratic principles. Amy Niklasch, Reeths-Puffer Schools, Muskegon, MI MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Cold Case: 03051770

Serve in a Colonial America grand jury and grapple with historical evidence in this cold case. Will you indict? Regardless, this session will hone your investigative teaching strategy skills. Paul Binford, Nicole Miller, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Voices of Immigration: Past and Present Through Fiction and Non-Fiction Explore the experiences of immigrants past and present through realistic historical fiction and interviews of recent immigrants. Consider what brought people here and the challenges and opportunities they found. Megan Clark, Nancy Villafranca, Chicago History Museum, Chicago, IL

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 1 • 9:00–10:05am MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Discover sources that illuminate how women across all North American colonies engaged in or resisted colonization and that will help present history more equitably in your classroom. Receive curriculum materials. Allyson Schettino, New-York Historical Society, New York, NY

Explore 4-level analysis and ESPNDC to conduct a spatial analysis of gentrification in Chicago. Discussion includes the pros and cons of gentrification. Receive inquiry-based activities. David Palmer, Kara Casini, Eaglecrest High School, Centennial, CO

Women and the American Story: Early Colonial Period, 1500-1740

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Coffee Shops and Gentrification: Spatial Analysis of Chicago Neighborhoods

WORLD HISTORY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Researching Medieval Islam: Tools to Unearth an Omitted History

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Use student-driven research methods as a means to counteract incomplete historical narratives through an exploration of Medieval Islamic contributions and their impact on subsequent human history. Daniela Jimenez Gabb, City and Country School, New York, NY

Secondary Level-High School Sessions

Complicating the Narrative: Teaching 9/11 in a Changing World

Discover classroom-ready strategies from the 9/11 Memorial & Museum to help students deconstruct and complicate the often over-simplified media narrative regarding Muslims and Islam. Jennifer Lagasse, Megan Jones, 9/11 Memorial & Museum, New York, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Avoiding Ethical Missteps: Engaging and Ethical Practices in Psychological Science

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Making Social Studies: Gerrymandering and Invention in America Explore ways to connect MakerKits and contemporary social studies topics. Learn how to integrate STEM into the social studies classroom as we interactively examine issues of racial and partisan gerrymandering. Tina Heafner, UNC Charlotte, Charlotte, NC; Drew Hammill, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, Charlotte, NC

Experience lessons that value scientific literacy in the areas of abnormal psychology, intelligence, and research methods while gaining new active learning strategies that avoid ethical missteps. Maria Vita, Penn Manor High School, Millersville, PA; Virginia Welle, Chippewa Falls Senior High School, Chippewa Falls, WI SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Taking Informed Action: Supporting Student Leadership in Civic Action Projects Learn about Mikva Challenge’s Project Soapbox program to examine how the development of speaking and listening skills builds empathy and strengthens civic discourse. Jill Bass, Brian Brady, Mikva Challenge, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

PSYCHOLOGY

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Shaping Hearts and Minds: The AP BioPsych Bundle [REC]

How do HUHS educators blend AP Psychology and AP Biology into a collaborative experience for both students and teachers alike? Get ideas to take back to your own classroom! Terry Wick, Kevin Martin, Hartford Union High School, Hartford, WI

ECONOMICS

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Does the Minimum Wage Still Matter? Participate in this interactive lesson demonstrating minimum wage facts and myths and learn how to access primary sources via an online data tool to tell the story of the minimum wage. Lesley Mace, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta- Jacksonville Branch, Jacksonville, FL; Amy Hennessy, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, GA

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Developing Data Analysis Skills in the Social Studies Setting [REC] Discover simple, free Internet datasets to engage students in hands-on data analysis. Applicable to courses including sociology, psychology, anthropology, civics, history, economics, and geography. ASA Symposium Session One. Lynette Hoelter, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Teresa Ciabattari, Diego de los Rios, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 1 • 9:00–10:05am

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Primary Source Analysis—Social Media Style: Telegrams to Tweets

Social media has morphed into a mainstream communication channel that moves information at lightning speed with global access. Connect primary source analysis skills to social media analysis. Kelly Jones-Wagy, Overland High School, Aurora, CO; Linda Sargent Wood, University of Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ; Peggy O’Neill-Jones, Metropolitan State University of Denver, CO SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Researching and Writing Histories of Local Schools Learn how teachers can help students explore the history of their local schools and communities through local historical research assignments. Dennis Urban, John F. Kennedy High School, Bellmore, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Hamline University, St. Paul, MN; Scott Wylie, Chaminade University of Honolulu, Honolulu, HI; Gregg Jorgensen, Soka University of America, Aliso Viejo, CA; Jay Shuttleworth, Long Island University Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY; William Fernekes, Rutgers Graduate School, New Brunswick, NJ SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

AP World History: Present Achievement Leads to Future Success Learn how to connect AP World History teachers across geographical boundaries using technology to co-teach a wide-range of learners. Presenters link student achievements in the present to future college success. Marjorie Hunter, Academies of West Memphis, AR; Peter Wegman, McQuaid Jesuit School, Rochester, NY; Christina Shively, Cypress Ranch High School, Cypress, TX

Higher Education Session HIGHER EDUCATION

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Using the C3 inquiry arc and primary sources, investigate tactics citizens use to make change—from the civil rights movement to our social media age, including #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter. Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas, Denton, TX; Marie Heath, Towson University, Towson, MD

Learn ways to integrate emerging technologies and primary sources into the classroom. Receive strategies, examples, and resources. Scott Waring, Richard Hartshorne, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL

Primary Sources Instructional Design and Technology: Impacting Student Learning

Tactics for Social Change: From Civil Rights to #BlackLivesMatter

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Exhibitor Sessions

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

You’ve Got Issues...You Just Didn’t Know It Learn how to “issue-ize” existing instructional units in American history and world history by applying an issues-centered focus to increase student engagement, understanding, and responsibility. Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh Johnstown, PA; Ronald Evans, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA; Kim Koeppen,

Fostering Civil Dialogue

NewseumED offers techniques for creating a respectful yet vibrant environment for students to explore diverse ideas on First Amendment hot-button issues, from politics to profanity, religion to racism. Jessi McCarthy, Newseum, Washington, DC

International Alley International Alley NCSS Chicago 2018

1019 National Consortium for Teaching about Asia 1020 The Choices Program Brown University 1021 United States Institute of Peace 1023 Dar al Islam 1024 Heifer International 1025 Middle East Outreach 1026 Hemispheres 1027 Keizai Koho Center Fellowship 1028 Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs

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visit

1029 Feat Travel 1030 Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting 1031 Qatar Foundation 1032 Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center 1033 U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum 1034 H2O for Life 1119 Aramco 1120 The Genocide Education Project 1121 Klett International & eMapshop

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

1122 1123 1124 1126 1127 1129 1132

Youth for Human Rights World History Digital Education Transatlantic Outreach Program German Information Center PenPal Schools NRCs on Canada American Councils for International Education NSLI-Y & YES Abroad Scholarships 1133 IREX: Teachers for Global Classrooms 1134 Polish Perspectives


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 1 • 9:00–10:05am / Poster Sessions 9:30–10:30am ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

It’s About People: Building Perspectives and Empathy in the Social Studies Classroom Drive engagement through story and historical perspective. Learn strategies that immerse students in primary sources of multiple perspectives and technology to build empathy and understanding. Help students critically examine the past and develop connections in the social studies classroom. Keishla Ceaser-Jones, Pearson, Houston, TX

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 9:00–9:30am

PREK-ELEMENTARY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

From Time Immemorial: Indigenous History, Cultural Sensitivity, and Children’s Literacy Learning cultural sensitivity begins early. Introduce students to North American indigenous peoples—First Nations, Inuit, and Métis—through thoughtfully selected picture books in a modern context to avoid stereotypes. Resources distributed. Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada, SUNY Plattsburgh, NY; Betsy Arntzen, University of Maine, Orono, ME; Kyla Sweet, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

All students are uniquely different. By teaching students about metacognition, thinking about the way they think, teachers are able to target the needs of all learners in a single classroom. Amber Bean, Lindsay Weaver, Fulton County Schools, Alpharetta, GA CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

This Zinn Education Project lesson sheds light on the history of incarceration in America. Through personal stories of the incarcerated, explore why our prison system has grown exponentially. Camila Arze Torres Goitia, Kim Kanof, Portland Public Schools & Zinn Education Project, Portland, OR PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Show What You Know! Building Effective Social Studies Writing Strategies Engage all learners using interactive strategies to build writing skills and social studies content knowledge. Explore classroom-ready writing activities that make written expression accessible for students with learning differences. Laura Shea, Kathryn Mehlbauer, The de Paul School, Louisville, KY

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

9:30–10:30am PREK-ELEMENTARY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

More than Just Complex Math: Elementary Economics with Biogiraffe Explore the interconnectedness of our global economy through the use of biography. Learn how Biogiraffe can support your elementary classroom and enhance your economics lessons. Rachel K. Turner, Eliel Hinojosa, Jr., Texas A&M University/ Biogiraffe.org, Bryan, TX PREK-ELEMENTARY

Our Class Goes to Washington: Applying the Bill Process

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

Discover how students can transform bills. Learn how technology, meetings, and writing can create a monument. Learn the steps, and how your students can become a Special Interest Group. Shawn Curtis, Carmel High School, Carmel, IN

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 9:35–10:05am

PREK-ELEMENTARY

Why Do People Go to Prison?: Analyzing American Incarceration

Table 1

Are You Thinking What I’m Thinking?

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Informational Texts: A Key to Revitalizing Elementary Social Studies? Explore the results of a survey study of elementary teachers’ use of informational texts as a means for teaching social studies content and skills during literacy instruction. Kimberlee Sharp, Kelsey Purdum, Morehead State University, Morehead, KY PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Early Childhood: Teaching Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion through Picture Books Explore ways to help young learners understand identity. Gain valuable resources and tools to lay the foundations for complex issues that influence ourselves and the world around us. Danyelle Post, Danielle Danz, Latin School of Chicago, Chicago, IL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 3

There’s a Book for That! Using Bibliotherapy in Social Studies Explore the meaning of bibliotherapy, see examples of children books to cover critical topics, hear teachers’ feelings/concerns about presenting critical issues to children, and learn strategies to overcome discomfort. Erin Casey, Hillary Eisworth, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Poster Sessions 9:30–10:30am

PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 4

Table 9

Explore structured instructional strategies for K-5 teachers which incorporate an analysis of media (film) and primary source documents. Films such as “Pocahontas” are discussed. Scott Roberts, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI; Chalres Elfer, Clayton State University, Morrow, GA; Anne Perry, University of Houston, TX; Brianna D'Alessio Scatorchia, Matawan Aberdeen Middle School, Cliffwood, NJ

Learn how to make the academically complex vocabulary and content of civics accessible to all learners by using video games and carefully crafted wrap-around supports. Resources provided! Emma Humphries, Taylor Davis, iCivics, Cambridge, MA

Using Film to Teach U.S. History at the Elementary Level

GBL for ELLs: Using Video Games to Support Language Learners

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Table 10 MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 5

Flipping Civics: Guide to Flipping Lessons in Civics Discover how to integrate flipped lessons into your civics classroom with an introduction to flipping, beginner tips, and collaboration. Clifford Weyrauch, University of South Florida, Ocala, FL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Environmental Cooperation as Path to Peace in the Middle East Explore the major environmental challenges in the Middle East, particularly around water resources, and the ways that Israelis, Jordanians, and Palestinians are cooperating to meet these challenges. Andrew Askuvich, Institute for Curriculum Services, San Francisco, CA

US HISTORY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Table 6

Building Bridges to the Past: Supporting Disability with Place-Based Education

Table 11

This interactive session will provide strategies, resources and methods that support K-12 teachers in scaffolding instruction for students with disabilities in the social studies classroom by utilizing place-based education (PBE). Ricky Mullins, David Hicks, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Ariel Cornett, Stephanie van Hover, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

21st Century Abolitionism: Teach Students about Modern Day Slavery Teach your students about human trafficking. Why it exists, signs you can identify, and how to be a modern day abolitionist. Use the Prevention Project Curriculum. Mike Hasley, Henrico County Public Schools, Mechanicsville, VA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

US HISTORY

Table 7

Not Your Grandma’s Bingo! Social Justice, Literature, and Primary Sources Transform your curriculum using young adult literature, Social Justice Bingo, and primary sources. Learn how to develop thought provoking and relevant interdisciplinary lessons from multiple perspectives for diverse student populations. Jessica Flock, The Peoples Project, Laramie, WY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 12

Religion Artifact Kits: Engaging Ways to Compare World Beliefs Systems Learn about a religious artifact kit created by the Rochester (NY) Science Museum. Artifact kits and lessons have been created from travels to Japan, Korea, and Mexico. Howard Krug, Vanguard Collegiate High School, Rochester, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Table 13 MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 8

More Than Human Sacrifice: The Aztecs Talk Back History classes often reduce the Aztecs to a single story— human sacrifice. But the Aztecs were brilliant philosophers and poets. Discover the wisdom of Aztec elders, the tlamatinime. Timothy Monreal, Lexington Middle School/University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

We Can Do That Experiment! Teaching Research in Psychology Discover how to guide your psychology students from learning about research to learning through their own research. Receive strategies for teaching research methods, ethics, analysis, and reporting. Katy Morgan, Kent State University, Massillon, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 14

Primary Sources for All! Explore TPS Inquiry Kits and learn how these digital primary source sets can help all students, including English Language Learners and Special Education students, to get started on historical research projects. Grace Leatherman, Maryland Humanities, Baltimore, MD

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Poster Sessions 9:30–10:30am SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 15

Table 18

Learn about a new resource to teach immigration/migration history in new ways. Becoming US consists of five units: Borderlands, Policy, Education, Resistance, and Belonging that connect historical events with contemporary issues. Magdalena Mieri, Orlando Serrano, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, Washington, DC

Nineteenth-century infographics that convinced Victorian England to change hygiene practices and long-held beliefs about disease are powerful teaching tools for today. Receive materials for suggested literacy-based lessons. Caroline Sheffield, University of Louisville, KY

Becoming US: Teaching Migration and Immigration History in the 21st Century

Fighting Disease with Data: Victorian Era Infographics as Primary Sources

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

WORLD HISTORY

Table 19

Table 16

Wisdom of Teenage Diarists in the Holocaust for Today’s World

The goal of social studies teachers is to prepare students to be engaged and effective citizens. Learn about teachers’ perceptions of teaching controversial materials. Jeffrey Byford, The University of Memphis, TN; Sean Lennon, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA

Enhance social justice and Holocaust education through an analysis of the writings of teenage diarists in Salvaged Pages, and evaluate the relevance of their words to issues facing today’s students. Bonnie Sussman, Bishop O’Dowd High School, Oakland, CA; Lisa Bauman, Blue Valley West High School, Overland Park, KS; Sheila Hansen, Stevens High School, Rapid City, SD; Colleen Tambuscio, New Milford High School, New Milford, NJ

Dare I Teach It? Teaching Controversial Issues in the Classroom

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 17

Showing Struggle through Images: Teaching Civil Rights with Graphic Novels In recent years, the civil rights movement has become a popular subject for graphic novel artists. Learn how to take advantage of these texts with lesson plans and project ideas. Tyler Hilbert, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Callensburg, PA

HIGHER EDUCATION

PSYCHOLOGY

Table 20

Stressed and Depressed: Mindfulness, the 21st Century Undergrad’s Coping Tool Explore how to develop more peaceful undergraduates by using Mindfulness Meditation in the college classroom. Kelsey Evans, William Russell, Shiva Jahani, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL

Invest in the Future of Social Studies Education.

Donate to the Fund for the Advancement of Social Studies Education, the Christa McAuliffe “Reach for the Stars” Award, or FASSE/CUFA Social Studies Inquiry Grant. Visit socialstudies.org/fasse to donate online or mail your donation to: National Council for the Social Studies, FASSE Donations, 8555 Sixteenth Street, Suite 500, Silver Spring, MD 20910.

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 2 • 10:15–11:20am

10:15–11:15am FEATURED SPEAKER

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Keating Crown

On September 11, 2001, Keating Crown worked on the 100th floor of the South Tower at the World Trade Center. That morning, he was one of just 18 people to survive from above the impact zones in the Twin Towers. Despite severe lacerations and a broken leg, he evacuated moments before the South Tower collapsed. Mr. Crown will share his powerful, firsthand account of that day and discuss the ongoing relevance of the attacks to a generation with no living memory. Keating Crown is a Principal with Sterling Bay Companies in Chicago. His appearance is generously sponsored by the 9/11 Memorial & Museum.

Libresco, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY; Elizabeth Sturm, Lewis University, Romeoville, IL; Melinda Staubs, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL; M. Gail Hickey, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, IN; Mary E. Haas, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; Carolyn Weber, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Best Practice in Meaningful Elementary Social Studies

Receive best practices in elementary social studies from the Social Studies & the Young Learner editorial board. Scott Waring, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL PREK-ELEMETARY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Inquiry in Elementary: A How-to Guide

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS FEATURED SESSION

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

OER Implementation: Supporting Teachers and Schools This session looks at OER and the lessons of the Big History Project (BHP) as an effort to support teacher communities of practice across the country. Bob Regan, Big History Project, San Francisco, CA

AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower 2018 Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies Award

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Civic Data to Inform Student Action

To what extent does the civic empowerment gap exist in recent cohorts of Democracy Schools? Explore the connection between exposure to proven civic learning practices and civic engagement outcomes. Discuss ways to address issues of inequity in your school. Shawn Healy, Sonia Mathew, Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Chicago, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Gatekeepers All For more than 30 years, Stephen Thornton has explored how social studies teachers tend the curricular-instructional gate—why, how, and to what effects. Professor Thornton explains how he first became intrigued by the notion of teacher-as-gatekeeper, how the field has profited from studying it, and why attention to it remains vital. Dr. Stephen Thornton, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

Receive unit ideas, pictures, and practical strategies from the leader of the elementary team that wrote the Illinois Social Science standards who now implements these standards in her own first-grade classroom. Receive a “how-to” of inquiry for various grade levels and leave ready to start an inquirybased unit the very next day. Shonda Ronen, Wolf Ridge Elementary School, Bunker Hill, IL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

The Room Where It Happens: The Senate in Your Classroom

Empower your students to think like lawmakers, understand how government works, build knowledge of key national debates, and develop skills for effective dialogue. Materials included. Sarah Yezzi, Amy Munslow, The Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, Boston, MA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Searching for compelling upper/middle grade lesson plans tied to NCSS Notable Tradebooks and Carter Woodson winning titles? Look no further! Participants will receive all lesson plans. JoAnn Wood, Georgia Dept. of Education, Atlanta, GA; Janie Hubbard, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Lara Willox, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA; Andrea

Learn about the Korean War Legacy Project, an interactive and free online resource designed to help educators teach about the Korean War and its legacy. Kathy Swan, Thomas Clouse, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY; John Lee, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Mona Al-Hayina, Korean War Legacy Project, Columbus, OH; Elaine Alvey, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Carter Woodson and Notable Tradebooks: Engaging Upper Elementary/Middle Lesson Plans!

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The Korea War Legacy Project: A Toolkit for Teachers

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 2 • 10:15–11:20am MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

The Zaatari Refugee Camp: A Call to Action [REC] 43,450 children live in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan. Explore this global crisis through a multi-disciplinary experience that incorporates in-depth inquiry and scaffolded academic discussions for ALL students. Sarah Saltmarsh, Stephanie Lund, Malissa Chavez-Thibault, Brad Bostick, Wendy Farr, iTeachELLs, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Girl Scouts and the C3 Framework: Journey Taking Action Projects

Secondary Level-High School Sessions CIVICS/GOVERMENT

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Building Student Capacity for Engaging in Critical and Courageous Conversations Real social changes start with having hard conversations. Unsilence will help you build strategies for facilitating tough conversations in the classroom that lead to authentic, student-driven, and informed civic action. Annie Rezac, Unsilence, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERMENT

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Losing the Debate: Listening and Reasoning in Public Policy Discussions Learn how to lead a differentiated discussion that utilizes values in conflict to enable, promote, and encourage student analysis and empathy while discussing public policy issues. Kathleen Meeks, Lauren Berg, Downers Grove South High School, Downers Grove, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Civics in Action: Participatory Budgeting in the Classroom

Learn what participatory budgeting is, how it works in a classroom/school setting, and how it enriches civics curriculum with hands-on application. Receive specific examples from multiple schools that implemented participatory budgeting successfully in Chicago Public Schools and hear results from the initial pilot evaluation. Thea Crum, Great Cities Institute at the University of IllinoisChicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

How can Girl Scouts support the C3 Framework? The Journey Taking Action Project cultivates leadership and allows scouts to discover, connect, and take action, similar to the inquiry arc. Geraldine Stevens, Girl Scout Troop 41369, Des Plaines, IL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Civic Engagement as a Core Principle of University/School Partnership Examine a private university/public school partnership that seeks to support and sustain neighborhood public education. Understand how civic engagement is a core animating value of a partnership. Learn how students in a diverse school examine and act on critical social and political issues. Jon Schmidt, Loyola University, Chicago, IL; Madeline Kobayashi, Senn High School, Chicago, IL; Elizabeth Newton, Allow Good, Evanston, IL

Research in Practice: Engaging Students in Authentic Action Civics Projects Explore action civics programs and discuss how to implement them in context. Lively discussion to be sure. Brooke Blevins, Baylor University, Waco, TX; Michelle Bauml, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Student Voice in School Governance Schools function better with communication and collaboration between students and adults. Students can provide valuable expertise on how to foster a more peaceful and positive school climate. Learn strategies for engaging student voice and fostering student leadership. Cristina Salgado, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL with SVC students from Chicago Public Schools SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Sports Stadiums, the Olympics, Taxes: Who Profits? Explore unique ways to teach economic concepts by looking at various sports-related topics such as stadium building and the Olympics, and help students analyze winners and losers in this arena. Christi Carlson, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Our Planet Our Selves: Pedagogy and Practice for Analyzing Sustainability Integrate dynamic media decoding activities to teach critical thinking and key knowledge about climate, water, energy, and environmental and social justice issues, using an engaging constructivist methodology. Materials provided. Chris Sperry, Project Look Sharp, Ithaca, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Global Ed-Engage. Inspire. Empower.

Explore the global competencies and discover how your existing lessons already incorporate the 21st century skills of investigating the world, recognizing perspectives, communicating ideas and taking action. Seth Brady, Naperville Central High School, Naperville, IL; Cyndi Oberle-Dahm, Belleville West High School, Belleville, IL 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

81


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 2 • 10:15–11:20am

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Exhibitor Sessions

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Taking Informed Action—Resources for Teachers Informed action provides students an opportunity to apply classroom learning to real world problems. Learn how K-12 teachers employ this proven practice of civic education as an assessment that enhances learning and builds important social science and SEL competencies. Karla Schwarze, Piper Elementary School, Berwyn, IL; Andrew Conneen, Adlai E. Stevenson HIgh School, Lincolnshire, IL; Chris Kubik, Grayslake North High School, Grayslake, IL, Tiffani M. Watson, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Chicago, IL; William Behrends, Champaign Centennial High School, Champaign, IL Moderated by Carolyn Pereira, Illinois Civic Mission Coalition, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE in the Classroom: Our Past Informs Our Present AMERICAN EXPERIENCE combines archival footage, historical images, and dramatic re-enactments with commentary by historians and authors to present an absorbing look at what shapes America’s past and present. Join us for a panel discussion on using free AMERICAN EXPERIENCE educational resources in the classroom. All attendees will be entered into a raffle for a PBS prize bag. Sue Blanchette, Lakehill Preparatory School, Dallas, TX; Bonnie Belshie, Monte Vista High School, Danville, CA; Carolyn Jacobs, WGBH Education, Boston, MA

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

The Impact of Hate Speech on Social and Emotional Well-Being [REC]

The American Revolution Institute Needs You!

Sociologist and attorney Laura Beth Nielsen discusses the impact of hate speech on mental health and social behavior and what we can do about it. ASA Symposium Session Two. Laura Beth Nielsen, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Teresa Ciabattari, Diego de los Rios, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

Presidents in the Hot Seat: PerspectiveTaking, Inquiry, and Historical Empathy Learn how teachers can help students understand historical decisions by placing them in the roles of the president and his advisors during times of sudden crisis. John Schissler, Topeka High School, Topeka, KS; Ryan Fullerton, Ottawa Middle School, Ottawa, KS MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Join the dynamic teachers undertaking our mission to promote the teaching of the American Revolution and its legacy, Explore our new online resources and take home a free classroom kit. Eleesha Tucker, Stacia Smith, American Revolution Institute at the Society of the Cincinnati, Washington, DC ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Project Archaeology: The Archaeology of Food Explore the archaeology of food with Archaeology Education Clearinghouse and Project Archaeology. Experience an interactive, teacher-tested lesson you can take to your classroom, and learn about Project Archaeology's interdisciplinary curriculum. Elizabeth Reetz, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Calgary Haines-Troutman, University of Chicago, IL

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Deliberation and Controversies in the Classroom Powerful social studies classrooms are rich with discussion and deliberation of controversial issues, but it takes practice to build a classroom where students feel safe, drive the discussion, and ensure equity of voice. Explore methods, consider relevant issues, and share best practices. Liz Robbins, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL

Supervisory-Administrative Session SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Designing a Comprehensive K-12 Social Studies Curriculum: One District’s Journey

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Personal Finance for Teens

Bring economic principles to life with HSFPP, a free, comprehensive, basic personal finance curriculum specifically designed to be relevant to the lives of teens in grades 8–12. Kimberly Roy, National Endowment for Financial Education, Denver, CO Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Transforming Learning Experiences through Technology Ed Finney, Schodack Central Schools, Castleton-on-Hudson, NY; Brian Bechard, Olathe Public Schools, Olathe, KS

How do students “do” social studies? Learn about one district’s process of developing a comprehensive K-12 social studies curriculum based on the C3 Framework and current Illinois state standards. Deborah Lee, Michael DiNovo, Caroline Branick, Stephen Schroeder, Jim Tang, Elmhurst CUSD 205, Elmhurst, IL

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 2 • 10:15–11:20am

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS

10:15–10:45am

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

10:50–11:20am

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

The conversation around mass shootings tends to begin and end with debates about gun control. Explore resources to broaden the conversation in an inquiry-based classroom environment. Kristal Curry, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC

Explore how to discuss gun violence in conservative classrooms in such a way that students are able to drop their defensiveness and look at their assumptions through a critical lens. William McCorkle, Clemson University, Clemson, SC

Mass Shootings as a Contemporary “Issue” in an Inquiry-Based Classroom

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Courageously Yet Effectively Discussing Gun Violence in Conservative Settings

ECONOMICS

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Engaging Students Through Economic Indicators Enthrall students with economic data! By engaging students through economic indicator presentations, students learn how to go beyond GDP and unemployment numbers to connect with the inner working of the economy. Peter Van, Lindblom Math & Science Academy, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Empirical Analysis of a Blended Classroom in AP Psychology Evaluate the effectiveness of a blended-model versus a traditional classroom model by comparing data (formative & summative assessments and student survey) from a blended and traditional AP Psychology class. Corinne Schwarzrock, Community High School District 155, Crystal Lake, IL

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Who Am I?: A Biopsychosocial Analysis of the Self Engage students in a comprehensive and multi-faceted exploration of the biological, social, and psychological factors that influence their everyday, personal mental processes and behaviors through the use of interactive projects. Kelly Walenga, Jeremy Kauffman, Jig Vora, Deerfield High School, Deerfield, IL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

TLDR? Capture Diverse Students’ Interest with Visual World War II Primary Sources Reduce language barriers! Allow students with learning challenges (including emerging English skills) equal access to primary sources. Experience frameworks for visual primary source analysis and discover collections of World War II visuals. Wendy Harris, Metro Deaf School, St. Paul, MN

Your NCSS Annual Conference is Mobile-Ready! Download the new NCSS Annual Conference mobile app now and have all the conference information you need. Schedule, maps, and more on your smart phone—completely free. Create a personalized schedule of must-see speakers, sessions, and special events. Android and iOS users: 1. Visit https://guidebook.com/g/ncss2018 2. Tap the “Download” button to download the free Guidebook app. 3. Open Guidebook and you can find our “98th NCSS Annual Conference Chicago 2018" guide.

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Poster Sessions 10:45–11:45am MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

10:45–11:45am PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 1

Religion in the Early-Childhood and Elementary Social Studies Curriculum

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

The Power of Practice: Perfecting Discussions in Social Studies Classrooms Explore how interactive simulations allow you to practice discussion tools in elementary classrooms. Learn the discrete skills needed for effective discussions—you may even get a chance to practice! Lara Willox, College of Education / University of West Georgia Education Annex, Carrollton, GA; Terri Ponder, University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Table 3

Enough Ellis Island! Teaching Elementary Students About the Current Immigrant/Refugee Experience Analyze data from a study that explored what is taught in elementary classrooms concerning immigration. Receive ready-to-go lessons that remove immigration from the historical Eurocentric context to include present-day issues. Jennifer Burke, Maria LaSpina, Jennae Piper, Millersville University, Millersville, PA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 4

True-False is dead. Take home classroom-ready ideas for transforming test questions and discussion templates focused on the rules of evidence and the skills of interpretation. No “alternative facts” here! Robert Levin, Montclair State University and Engaged Teachers, Metuchen, NJ; Annie Wu, Wardlaw-Hartridge School, Edison, NJ GEOGRAPHY

Table 5

Annotated Maps for Inquiry, PBL, and Beyond (Plus It’s Free) Empower students to create maps answering “Where?” “How?” and “Why?” with this free Atlas tool. Annotating maps combines technology, content, and creativity. It’s the inquiry-based learning that the 21st-century demands. Molly Farrow, SAS Curriculum Pathways, Cary, NC

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Learn how to use Hip-Hop music to teach controversial topics within history. Tracy Tilotta, University of South Florida, Zephyrhills, FL US HISTORY

Table 7

Understanding the Role of Indigenous People in the Fur Trade Unpack stereotypes and misunderstandings between furtrade era indigenous and non-indigenous peoples to better understand the cultures and contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis in developing contemporary Canada. Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada, SUNY Plattsburgh, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 8

Tackling Twitter for the Government Classroom Navigating Twitter and determining how to use it for your Government course can be overwhelming. An experienced teacher shows you the ropes and shares best practices! Jennifer Bouchard, Needham High School, Needham, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 9

Ride to Canada! Global Studies on a Bike How do bicycles impact political, economic, and social structures? See how a student bike tour to Quebec City helped students learn how bicycles make the world a smaller place. Kirsten Surprenant, Story Graves, Rivendell Academy, Orford, NH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 10

Effective Technical Writing in the Social Studies and Cross-Curricular Classrooms

Fact, Opinion, Lie, Shades of Meaning: The New True-False

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Tackling Controversial Topics: Hip-Hop to Enhance Social Studies Instruction

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Learn practical strategies and ethical considerations for teaching religion to students at the early-childhood and elementary level. Rory Tannebaum, Merrimack College, North Andover, MA PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Table 6

Do you struggle with implementing writing into your social studies curriculum? We have several ideas and strategies that will help you. Susan Carey, USD 210, Hugoton, KS SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 11

Teacher Beliefs and the History of Social Studies Education What social studies teachers know and understand about the discipline and its history—in content, pedagogy, theory, and practice—affects student learning and consequently the global community that we share. Hadyn B. Call, Utah State University/Davis School District, Logan, UT

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Poster Sessions 10:45–11:45am SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 12

Table 18

Learn how clothing on Washington’s Mount Vernon defined social standing, reinforced ideas of racial superiority, and helped the enslaved navigate society on and off the estate. Matt Shomaker, Clinton Middle School, Clinton, MO

Explore more global history that allows students to gain knowledge of non-Hellenistic civilizations. In this globalized society it is necessary to teach the unbiased history of all empires. Ashley Deen, 1995, Titusville, PA

Clothing as Culture: Discovering Mount Vernon’s Enslaved Through Material Culture

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

What Makes History? Learning About the Whole World

US HISTORY HIGHER EDUCATION

Table 13

Hooking Kids with Comics: How Graphic Novels Make History Exciting Explore the ways that comics and graphic novels can create student-centered and culturally relevant experiences in our history classrooms, with examples of teaching strategies and historical connections. Daniel Redman, Hilliard City Schools, Columbus, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 19

US HISTORY

The iTeach ELLs Project: Providing Access to All Learners Expand your understanding of reform efforts that surround preparing all preservice teachers to work with English Language Learners (ELLs). Wendy Farr, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ HIGHER EDUCATION

US HISTORY

Table 14

Table 20

Law vs. ethics, private wealth vs. common wealth, freedom vs. equality, unity vs. diversity: America’s struggle to balance these value tensions provides a framework for analyzing history and present controversies. Summer Carter, SocialStudies.com, Culver City, CA

Discover how elementary education preservice teachers can integrate both the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards and edTPA requirements using one effective lesson template. Jennifer Davis, University of Montevallo, AL

The Great Debate: The Paradox of Civil Discourse and Democracy

Integrated C3 and edTPA Lesson Template for Elementary Preservice Teachers

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 15

Using the Aurasma App in the Classroom Learn how to use the Aurasma app for classroom projects and presentations. The Aurasma app makes presenting engaging, interactive, and fun for students and teachers. Clemisha Garnet, Plantation High School, Plantation, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 21

Scaffolding Quality, Not Quantity: A Foolproof Method for Constructing Arguments Rethink the way that you scaffold the process of constructing effective arguments with a flexible and memorable writing framework. The amount of evidence isn’t as important as how it’s used! Meghan McDermott, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Table 16

If It’s Not Impossible: Sir Nicholas Winton, England’s “Better-Than-Schindler” What does it take to do the right thing, without looking for recognition? Nicky Winton saved 669 Czechoslovak children in 1939, without fanfare. Teach your students the power of good. Susan Glaser, New Braunfels, TX; Tom Glaser, Brooks Collegiate Academy Charter High School, San Antonio, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 17

It’s Still Greek to Me: Teaching An Issues-Centered Unit Traditional units often treat history as disjointed facts leaving students asking, “So what?” This issues-centered activity promotes elements of the ancient Greek culture. Receive materials. John Grant, Jeffrey Byford, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN

NCSS + TCSS + NCGE will co-locate at the 99th Annual Conference Call for Proposals opens in December 2018 Registration opens in June 2019

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 3 • 11:30am–12:35pm

11:30am–12:30pm

statewide survey of teachers in Missouri will be discussed. Presenters: Andrea Hawkman, Ryan T. Knowles, Utah State University, Logan, UT; Antonio J. Castro, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO Chair: Dr. Tina Heafner, UNC-Charlotte, Charlotte, NC

VITAL ISSUE SESSION

Grand Ballroom, East Tower

Lessons of the Holocaust: The Experiences of Survivors The Holocaust represents a watershed moment in history, providing endless opportunities for study and understanding. The lessons of this history are not confined to the past but resonate throughout our political, cultural, civic, and communal lives today. Survivors of the Holocaust are uniquely positioned to share their experiences, providing inspiration to educators and students alike. Explore these issues through the lens of two Holocaust survivors’ experiences, in conversation with Illinois Holocaust Museum Director of Education Kelley H. Szany. Fritzie Fritszhall, Adina Sella. Moderated by Kelley Szany. This panel is generously sponsored by the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center. COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SESSION

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

José António Brandão “Pathways to Change: Natives and French in the Great Lakes”

50 Ideas in 50 Minutes: Great Ideas from NCSS Award Winners Join award winning teachers and grant recipients as they share “Top Tips for Success” in the classroom and beyond. Winners will also share their experience applying for NCSS Awards. NCSS offers three grant opportunities ranging from $2,000–$2,500. Come hear from NCSS Grant Recipients as they share grant writing tips for success to support and enhance your classroom or boost projects that showcase your students’ work. Moderator and Facilitator: Kristy Brugar, Associate Professor, Social Studies Education, University of Oklahoma in Norman, OK On hand to answer your questions: Recipients of the following Awards and Grants

Sponsored by the Canada Community Examine Native-French interactions in the Great Lakes region. Fur trade across waterways in the region changed both cultures, helped forge alliances and profoundly impacted North America. José António Brandão, West Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

• NCSS Outstanding Social Studies Teacher of the Year Award • Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy • Award for Global Understanding • McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

AWARD SESSION

2018 Exemplary Research in Social Studies Award

Grabbing the Third Rail: Teaching Politics in Secondary Education This presentation, which is based on the book Teaching Politics in Secondary Education: Engaging with Contentious Issues, will discuss best practices for incorporating politics into the social studies curriculum. Presenter: Dr. Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC Chair: Sarah Mathews, Florida International University, Miami, FL HIGHER EDUCATION

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower CUFA/FASSE Research Award

Anti-Racist Teacher Efficacy: Toward Justice-Oriented Teaching in Missouri

Tools for Facilitating Historical Inquiry in 5 or 55 Minutes Tight on time? Implementing these effective and efficient inquiry and higher-level thinking tools will allow you to dig into elementary social studies content without wasting a single second. Rebecca Hall-Barrett, Heather Sitler, Chase Street Elementary, Athens, GA PREK-ELEMETARY

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Elementary Inquiry to Engagement Dive into the inquiry arc by developing questions and planning inquiries, and exploring techniques for evaluating and using sources and ways to take informed action in K-5 settings. Shawn Reddy, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL; Karen Van Zytveld, Galileo Scholastic Academy of Math and Science, Chicago, IL; Norma Garrity, Prussing Elementary School, Chicago, IL

This project explores the influence of white fragility on the pedagogical choices that teachers make. Findings from a

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US HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

AWARD SESSION

AWARD SESSION

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower.

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 3 • 11:30am–12:35pm

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Secondary Level-High School Sessions SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Acquire ready-to-use, differentiated, student-centered materials to implement action in your class. Learn how to build civic engagement in your students over the duration of the course. Whitney Wilda, Christopher Wilbur, Hinsdale Central High School, Hinsdale, IL

Our classrooms are powerful communities with the potential to prepare young people to engage in our democracy by helping them develop civic competencies, but we need to construct learning environments where they can practice these skills. Receive resources and tools to start practicing democracy in your classroom daily. Heather VanBenthuysen, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL

Civic Engagement Portfolio— We Did All the Work for You!

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Building a Democratic Classroom Culture

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

To Tweet or Not to Tweet: The Art of Persuasion Learn the art of persuasion through social media. Discover how tweets use language to motivate and influence your decisions. Create your own persuasive tweet and help your favorite cause! Brad Bostick, Malissa Chavez-Thibault, Stephanie Lund, Sarah Saltmarsh, Wendy Farr, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

From Policy to Practice: Reflections on Standards and Civics Course Implementation in Illinois Engage with members of the #CivicsisBack campaign to learn lessons from the field on how to seed instructional shifts in implementing the new Illinois high school civics course. Shawn Healy, Mary Ellen Daneels, Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Chicago, IL; Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, CIRCLE, Tufts University, Medford, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Helping Students Own Their Civic Responsibility

Become a FAN of School by drafting teams of countries in a fantasy sports model based on news mentions and tone. Grow global awareness and news literacy skills! John Honish, Turner Middle School, Beloit, WI SOCIAL SCIENCE

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

The STEAM and Social Studies of Current Events Discover concepts in social studies and STEAM through current events. Master informational texts, news articles, podcasts, and graphic organizers to meet Illinois Social Science standards, Common Core, and the C3 Framework. Mary Beth Henning, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Fantasy Sports for Current Events! Become Fans of School

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

US HISTORY

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Bending the Arc Through History and Literature [REC]

Connect the past and present. Using a Harvard-developed action-reflection framework, re-invent history and literature education to explore social change and youth agency, and reflect them in a digital context. Elizabeth Olesen, Innovation Academy Charter, Tyngsborough, MA; Melissa Strelke, Frontier Regional High School, South Deerfield, MA; Chaebong Nam, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Explore ways to inspire the iGeneration to choose accountability, respect, generosity, productivity, and participation in our democracy. Discuss best practices, including interweaving history, the Constitution, public policy, and biography. Jason Raia, Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, Valley Forge, PA; Sara Durury, Wabash College, Crawfordsville, IN SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Instructional Dilemma: What if Privileged Students’ Views Harm Marginalized Peers? How can teachers facilitate student-centered discussions of inequality while avoiding privileged students’ dominant views harming their marginalized peers? Examine how one teacher grappled with this dilemma. Lisa Sibbett, University of Washington, Seattle, WA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Reflective Democracy

Learn about the Center for Tech and Civic Life’s Reflective Democracy work, which highlights the lack of representation of women and people of color in our government. See how these imbalances affect everything from legislation affecting schools to the self-image of students. Brainstorm ideas on how to combat these limiting factors in the classroom. Tiana Epps-Johnson, Donny Bridges, Center for Tech and Civic Life, Chicago, IL

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 3 • 11:30am–12:35pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Inquiry as engagement is NOT limited to the social sciences. Learn how the proven practice of service learning can be used to build connections across disciplines to build civic knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Daniel Jimenez, Curie High School, Chicago, IL; Mark Mesle, Cook County Clerk’s Office, Chicago, IL; Sue Khalaieff, Democracy Schools Initiative, Chicago, IL; Shanti Elliott, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL. Moderated by Barbara Laimin, Robert R. McCormick Foundation, Chicago, IL

Join two geeks and explore how exemplary primary sources can be paired with literature and other resources to create engaging and hands-on inquiry-based digital breakouts for your students. Michelle Pearson, Adams 12 School District, Broomfield, CO; Laura Israelsen, Chesterfield County Public Schools, Chesterfield, VA

Taking Informed Action Across the Curriculum—Classroom Practitioner Panel

Break Out of the Normal with Inquiry and Technology

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Reaching Diverse Learners: Resources from the Instruction Community Engage with teacher-created and teacher-tested resources that help you reach your diverse learners. Receive resources for supporting your English learners and students in special education. Margarita Jimenez-Silva, University of California Davis, CA; Ruth Luevanos, Los Angeles USD, Simi Valley, CA; Karen Guerrero, Amanda Vickery, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Psychology Stations on Stations! Stations within the psychology classroom are an engaging way to help students obtain deeper understanding. Learn about stations and leave with four station units to immediately incorporate into your classroom! Allison Shaver, Plymouth South High School, Plymouth, MA; Heather Chambers, Glenbrook South High School, Glenview, IL; Jennifer Schlict, Olathe South High School, Olathe, KS; Stephanie Franks, Springboro High School, Springboro, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Unpacking the Effects of White Supremacy on Teachers, Students, and All Develop teaching strategies and best practices for discussing race. Learn which resources to use to help lessen racial bias among teachers and students, and help create a more trusting classroom environment. David Steiber, Mayra Almarez, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Teaching with the ASA National Standards: Concepts, Resources, and Pedagogy [REC] Learn strategies to teach core concepts from the ASA National Standards, including the sociological perspective and social structure, as well as socialization, stratification, and inequality. ASA Symposium Session Three. Hayley Lotspeich, Wheaton North High School, Wheaton, IL; Chris Salituro, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, IL; Teresa Ciabattari, Diego de los Rios, American Sociological Association, Washington, DC

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Forced Movement: Questioning the Narrative of the U.S. as Nation of (Im)Migrants Involuntary migration of peoples represents a defining feature of the United States. Students trace patterns of movement of African-, Mexican- and Native-Americans across 400 years of history. Joe O’Brien, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS; Taylor Smith, Shawnee Mission West High School, Overland Park, KS SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

“Thinking about the Past in Order to See the Future”

University of Michigan professor Bob Bain takes up the problem of broadening and extending students’ capacity to “see” historical change and to “see” more clearly the present and the future. Bob Bain, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Supervisory-Administrative Sessions SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

How Administrators Can Support Social Studies Teachers

Inquiry as engagement can be daunting for educators in these politically polarized times. Learn how administrators can endeavor to support teachers in the proven practices of civic education to achieve student success and more equitable outcomes. Darlene Ruscitti, DuPage County Regional Office of Education, Wheaton IL; Brad Hubbard,Community High School District 117, Antioch, IL; Darrell Echols, Indian Prairie School District, Aurora, IL. Facilitated by Jessica Marshall, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Wright, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Beyond the Classroom: The Administrator’s Role in Supporting African American Social Studies Teachers Shannon Williams, Atlanta Public Schools, Atlanta, GA; Barry Thomas, Omaha Public Schools, Omaha, NE; Jania Hoover, Parish Episcopal School, Dallas, TX; Tamara Davis, Herzl School of Excellence, Chicago, IL

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 3 • 11:30am–12:35pm SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Encouraging educators to utilize the whole community as their classroom? Receive explicit strategies for incorporating meaningful place-based learning into teacher professional development and classroom instruction. Natacha Scott, Josue Sakata, Dolores Bates, Boston Public Schools, Boston, MA

Analyze indigenous representation in U.S. history and discuss how current curricula and teacher perception covertly perpetuate both misconceptions of the past and racial stereotypes of Native Americans in the present. Joshua Tipton, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN

Incorporating Place-Based Learning into Professional Development and Instruction

Exhibitor Sessions

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

12:05–12:35pm

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Hidden Stories in History: Transform Social Studies with Nearpod

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Empower students to uncover history beneath the surface. Nearpod’s culturally-relevant supplemental curriculum combines VR, primary sources, and modern media with our award-winning platform to transform teaching and learning. Damian Harvey, Nearpod, Aventura, FL ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Current Trends in Personal Finance Education Personal Finance Lab is a customizable stock market game with embedded curriculum aligned to standards for personal finance, economics, accounting, management, and marketing classes. Kevin Smith, Personal Finance Lab, Montreal, PQ, Canada Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Bring your Presentations to Life with Nearpod Ed Finney, Schodack Central Schools, Castleton-on-Hudson, NY

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS

US HISTORY

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Visual Voices: Incorporating African-American Picturebook Illustrations into Social Studies Increase cultural and ethnic authenticity with books illustrated by African Americans, featuring African Americans. Enhance critical thinking with visual voices of Ekua Holmes, Floyd Cooper, Kadir Nelson, and others. James Shiveley, Brenda Dales, Miami University, Oxford, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Reinventing World History Final Assessments: Deeper Learning with STEAM Tools Visualize world history globally, both in space and time, rather than through the regional, linear approach of our textbooks. Two projects employ STEAM skills to enhance geographic and historical understanding. Matthew Sudnik, The Madeira School, McLean, VA

1:30–2:30pm Grand Ballroom, East Tower

11:30am–12:00pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

The Bodyguard of Lies: Teacher Perception of Indigenous Historical Representation

GEOGRAPHY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

“Freshman in AP?!” Bridging Experience Gaps Through Innovative Summer Enrichment Discover the logistics and advantages of creating an experienced-based summer program to pre-teach AP content, using methods driven by inquiry and real-world fieldwork. Barbara Millhausen, Eve Case, Betsy Crooks, Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD

Peter Sagal “What I’ve Learned in Speaking Fart Jokes to Power” The host of NPR’s “Wait, Wait ... Don’t Tell Me!” reflects on lessons he’s learned (and, in some cases, unlearned) during his eclectic career, including two decades as a proud member of the “satirical-industrial complex.” This includes such enduring beliefs as “conversations convert,” “power does not listen” and “fart jokes heal.” He also confides why his faith is shaken in his belief that democracy derives its abiding power from being a civic religion undergirded by mutual faith. Peter Sagal is the host of the NPR news quiz show, “Wait Wait …Don’t Tell Me.” His appearance is generously sponsored by The News Literacy Project.

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 4 • 2:45–3:50pm

2:45–3:45pm VITAL ISSUE SESSION

Grand Ballroom, East Tower

In Her Shoes: Field Notes from National Geographic Explorers Let’s change the world together. New this year, an all-female trio of National Geographic Explorers share their stories from the field live on stage. Hear from engaging women who are preserving history, sharing cultures from across the globe, and inspiring the next generation of changemakers. Discover National Geographic’s commitment to support women creating positive change in the world. Lillygol Sedaghat, Sandhya K. Narayanan, Losang Rabgey Presented by the National Geographic Society and National Geographic Learning.

2:45–4:45pm

COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SESSIONS

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Dafney Blanca Dabach, Aliza Fones, Natasha Hakimali Merchant, Adebowale Adekile “Teachers Navigating Civic Education When Students Are Undocumented: Building Case Knowledge” Sponsored by the Research Community How do we teach civics when there are differences in the rights of those who are in the classroom? In this interactive lecture, we highlight practices and essential questions to support the continued learning of teachers who work in settings that are heterogeneous in terms of immigration status and citizenship rights. Dafney Blanca Dabach, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Aliza Fones, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Natasha Hakimali Merchant, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA; Adebowale Adekile, University of Washington College of Education, Seattle, WA

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

Swissotel, Zurich ABCD

Better Arguments Project Moderated by Eric Liu The polarization of American politics doesn’t mean we have fewer arguments, but that we need to have better ones. The Better Arguments Project equips Americans to have arguments that bring us closer. The more communities can have arguments rooted in history and constructive communication, the healthier our country will be. Educators have an essential role to play in this movement. Explore how to adapt the Better Arguments Project for your classroom.

COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SESSIONS

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Scott Waring and Richard Hartshorne “Teaching with Primary Sources and Emerging Technologies” Sponsored by the Teacher Education and Professional Development Community Explore ways to integrate emerging technologies and primary sources into instructions. Strategies for use in K-16 classrooms will be shared and discussed. Scott Waring, Richard Hartshorne, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL

AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower Grant for Enhancement of Geographic Literacy in Honor of James F. Marran

Where is Islam?: Mapping with the Global Geographers Group (G3) Organized around the compelling question “Where is Islam?”, this project focuses on the work of a team of seventh and eighth grade students known as the Global Geographers Group (G3). Teachers will have an opportunity to respond to some of the same questions that students were asked at the outset of the project to gain perspective on how a student driven approach to the project was maintained. Video, mapping, and other technology platforms used as part of this project will be shared. Presenters: Dr. Jason Harshman, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Alisa Meggitt, North Central Junior High School, North Liberty, IA Chair: Paul Nagel, Curriculum Writer, Cypress, TX

3:00–4:00pm Art Institute of Chicago, 111 S. Michigan Ave. Mystery Object: An Arts Integration Model Celebrating Improvisation and Experimentation Discover how to encourage creativity and critical thinking in a non-competitive/non-high stakes manner. The Art Institute of Chicago’s Teacher Advisory Panel will share effective pedagogy for promoting visual literacy. Kristin Enright, Art Institute of Chicago Museum, Chicago, IL; Luke Albrecht, Ray Elementary School, Chicago, IL; Kelly McKee, Lake Forest High School, Lake Forest, IL; Adriana Villagomez, Rockford Environmental Science Academy, Rockford, IL This is a ticketed session that required advance registration.

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 4 • 2:45–3:50pm

PreK-Elementary Sessions

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Reading the World: Multimodal Access Points to Critical Literacy Learn how to teach with and about graphical elements of social studies texts. In an increasingly multi-modal world, interpreting information within and across modes is essential to engaged citizenship. Kristy Brugar, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; Kathryn Roberts, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

#WeAreHere: World War I Now

Discover the impact of World War on people already at war among themselves. An academic historian who presents in schools models how to engage kids in thinking historically about race, class, gender, and more. Annette Laing, Dr. Annette Laing’s Non-Boring History, Decatur, GA PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Feathers and Paint: The Misappropriation and Misinterpretation of Native Cultures Move beyond “Indian Parades,” the “Tipi Syndrome,” and endless folktales. Come learn how to improve and enrich the teaching of Indigenous history and cultures in your classroom. Carol Bacak-Egbo, Oakland University, Ortonville, MI; Eric Hemenway, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Harbor Springs, MI

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Keeping Current with Civic Action Learn about Civic Action Project (CAP), a free project-based learning curriculum for high school civics and government students and now for middle school students too. Gregorio Medina, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA; Christopher Spinale, Valerie McVey, Lou Frey Institute, Orlando, FL

Objects Speak: Integrating Native American Art into Social Studies

Explore Native American art as rich primary-source material for investigating history, culture, and continuity. Develop opportunities for cross-curricular inquiry through online resources from the Hood Art Museum, Dartmouth College. Ellen Fisher, Frances Richmond Middle School, Hanover, NH; Vivian Ladd, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Through their Words and Belongings: Civil War Narratives The Civil War Museum brings to life voices of those who lived in the Upper Midwest during the Civil War. Learn how to use these first person accounts in your classroom. Doug Dammann, Jennifer Edginton, Kenosha Public Museums, Kenosha, WI

Secondary Level-High School Sessions SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

African American History through the Oral Tradition for Middle School Investigate African American history through inquiry and the oral tradition. Learn about one district’s experience with teaching African American history to middle school students from idea to impact. C. Renee Bos, Robert Coffman, Karen Saunderson, Howard County Public Schools, Ellicott City, MD

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Current Events Classroom: Teaching about Bias, Diversity and Social Justice [REC] With an increase in societal bias and injustice, anti-bias education strategies can assist in teaching about current events. Through interactive activities, gain skills in turning “teachable moments” into enriching curricula. Jinnie Spiegler, Lara Trubowitz, Anti-Defamation League, New York, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Grappling with Dilemmas of Educational Justice in Troubling Times Learn how to use cases about educational justice issues to facilitate transdisciplinary inquiry, democratic deliberation among stakeholders, and critical reflection on practice, policy, and the meaning of democratic living. Judy Pace, University of San Francisco, CA; Meira Levinson, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Jacob Fay, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME; Arthur Baraf, The Met High School, Providence, RI SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

How Can Districts Promote Equity and Access in Civic Education?

Learn how four school districts are advancing a district-wide commitment to prepare all students to be thoughtful and active participants in our democracy. Erica Hodgin, Joe Kahne, Daniela Digiacomo, Civic Engagement Research Group, UC Riverside, CA; John Rogers, Center X, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA; Young Whan Choi, Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, CA; Cynthia Gonzalez, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, CA; Carolyn Power, Riverside Unified School District, Riverside, CA; Cristina Salgado, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

91


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 4 • 2:45–3:50pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Explore the constitutional process of impeachment by using primary source activities to analyze controversies of the Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon, and Bill Clinton administrations. Rachel D. Humphries, Bill of Rights Institute, Arlington, VA

“Hamilton: An American Musical” offers students multiple viewpoints of the American Revolution. Through video clips, songs from the musical, and primary sources, we’ll explore history through this revolutionary musical. Shanedra Nowell, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK; Lauren Reddout, Sequoyah Middle School, Edmond, OK

Presidential Controversies: Impeachment in U.S. History

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Teaching the American Revolution with the Ten-Dollar Founding Father

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower After its blockbuster 2017 term, learn what the Court has in store for us this term! Study a key case argued but not yet decided. Lee Arbetman, Street Law, Inc., Silver Spring, MD SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Fake News and Economics - Perfect Together [REC] “Janet Yellin works for RUSSIA!” “China will STEAL YOUR JOB!” Engage students in economics classes with media literacy strategies for determining what is real and fake online. Scott Bacon, Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship, Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

I’m Not for Sale!: Teaching About Human Trafficking Examine the nature, extent, causes, and consequences of human trafficking—a moral abomination involving all countries and 25 million human beings—and explore methods for teaching about modern-day slavery. James Moore, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

It’s More Than Maps: Incorporating Choices’ Geography Series into Classrooms From Afghanistan to the Rohingya, explore Choices’ Geography Series and experience inquiry-based lessons from the units on Brazil, Immigration, and Nigeria. Additional geography-related resources provided. Digital license or unit PDFs provided. Mimi Stephens, The Choices Program, Brown University, Providence, RI SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Teaching Students How to Critically Evaluate Museums and Historic Sites Learning from museums and historic sites can deepen students’ historical understanding. Learn how to teach students to critically evaluate the history presented at those sites. Classroom materials provided. Karen Burgard, Texas A&M University - San Antonio, TX; Michael Boucher, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX

92

US HISTORY

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Preview of the Supreme Court’s Term

What is Islamophobia? A Gallery Walk What is Islamophobia? This interactive lesson introduces students to the multifaceted nature of Islamophobia in America through a gallery walk, emphasizing connections between Islamophobia, anti-Black and anti-immigrant racism. Alison Kysia, Teaching for Change, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Disease and Public Health in the Ottoman Empire: Document-Based Activities The Ottoman Empire: the crossroads of trade, pilgrimage, war—and disease? Experience/receive document-based activities examining Ottoman medicine and the impact of globalization on public health in early modern times. Lisa Adeli, University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Tucson, AZ

Supervisory-Administrative Session SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

GEOGRAPHY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

A Timely Update on the K-12 Geography Education Support System 2017/18 brought a groundswell of changes to the geography education landscape, especially affecting the infrastructure supporting K-12 geography education. Learn the most up-to-date lay of the land. Kurt Butefish, Tennessee Geographic Alliance, Knoxville, TN

Higher Education Session HIGHER EDUCATION

GEOGRAPHY

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Songs in the Key of My Life

What’s on your playlist? Sing along or listen to songs used to foster critical consciousness of K-6 preservice teachers in a social studies course. Discover critical listening strategies and multicultural resources. Danne Davis, Montclair State University UN 3237, Montclair, NJ

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 4 • 2:45–3:50pm

Exhibitor Sessions ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

VLS Social Studies: An Online Nexus of the C3 Framework, Student Inquiry, and Primary Sources Virtual Learning Social Studies is a unique, interactive online learning curriculum. Discover why it’s important to incorporate Virtual Learning Social Studies curriculum and learn about the benefits of doing so. D. Antonio Cantu, Bradley University, Peoria, IL ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Personalized Learning: Ensure That Every Student Learning Path Leads to Success Explore how high-quality digital content can be used to reach diverse learners through personalized learning. Discover K12 social studies topics through differentiated text, images, and primary source documents—paired with targeted learning tasks to support students’ unique needs, preferences, learning styles, and goals. Pam Renfrow, Britannica Digital Learning, Chicago, IL Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Teching Up a Field Trip

Cool uses of Poll Everywhere and Padlet, social media and social studies, and more! Chuck Taft, University School of Milwaukee, WI

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 2:45–3:15pm

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

The Power of Text Sets: Helping Students Question History

Learn about text sets that use compelling, supporting, and text dependent questions to emphasize multiple perspectives and how to develop their own text sets. Stefanie Wager, Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA; Jennifer Cooley, State Historical Museum of Iowa, Des Moines, IA CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Teach with FRONTLINE: Go Beyond the Superficial Sound Bite Explore FRONTLINE digital resources on PBS LearningMedia, including short clips from full-length programs and teaching tips. There will be a drawing for a PBS gift bag including FRONTLINE DVDs. Carolyn Jacobs, WGBH, Boston, MA; Kevin Dua, Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, Cambridge, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Highlighting Student Voice Through Exploration of Paired Complex Texts Highlight student voice through exploration of crosscurricular complex texts in social studies and ELA. Create inquiry-based questions in order to facilitate opportunities for student questioning and discussion. Shelley Murray, Melissa Sedita, New Heights Academy Charter School, New York, NY

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 3:20–3:50pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

The Civic Corner Initiative: Making Political Participation Visible/Accessible to Students Discover how your school can inexpensively provide a year-round student political engagement hub. Students can register to vote, send postcards to representatives, request absentee ballots, and more. Lori Kumler, Abby Honaker, University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

and implicit biases we all share, and learn how to use this knowledge to implement productive classroom discussions on issues such as racism. William McCorkle, Clemson University, Clemson, SC

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

We All Have Prejudice: Reframing the Discussion on Racism Explore the psychology behind the common prejudices

Teaching Stress Management Without Sacrificing Rigor Explore a lab in which students learn stress management without wasting instructional time. Students discover research-backed techniques and apply knowledge of research methods and the physiological impact of stress to their experience. Melissa Rogers, Cedar Falls High School, Cedar Falls, IA; Heather Chambers, Glenbrook South High School, Glenview, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Let Big Questions Drive Your Social Studies Classroom

Make Big Questions a HABIT in your classroom. Walk away with professional development resources and actionable lesson plans from practicing teachers. Dan Fouts, Maine West High School, Des Plaines, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Absent Narratives: Teaching About Rape and Sexual Violence in War Explore rationale and resources to talk about rape and sexual violence in history classes. Predominantly affecting women, rape and sexual violence are too often absented from curriculum and classroom narrative. George Dalbo, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

93


FRI.

Poster Sessions 3:00–4:00pm

3:00–4:00pm

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 6

Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow

POSTER SESSIONS

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower PREK-ELEMENTARY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 1

Young Learners Learn About Sustainability and Take Action!

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Learn how the UN Sustainability Development Goals can teach young learners about global issues and help them take action. Receive “three-part model” lesson ideas and resources using technology. Jiwon Kim, Monmouth University, West Long Branch, NJ; Christine Grabowski, Middle Road School, Hazlet, NJ PREK-ELEMENTARY

Explore the struggle for full citizenship and racial equality that unfolded after the Civil War, including African American activism, the harsh backlash, and the period’s lasting legacies. Receive free curriculum materials. Mia Nagawiecki, New-York Historical Society, New York, NY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

Teaching with Legal Documents as Primary Sources Receive resources for analyzing legal documents as primary sources. Example documents include U.S. Supreme Court opinions, injunctions, executive orders, congressional legislation, U.S. passports, customs declarations, and sentencing statements in court. Tiffany Middleton, American Bar Association, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Dividing and Conquering Elementary Social Science

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 7

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 8

Discover how the use of station learning in classrooms heightens student engagement, allows for deeper exploration of content areas, and leads to a greater understanding and retention of knowledge. Melissa Pietracatella, University Of South Florida, Wesley Chapel, FL; Valerie Walworth, University Of South Florida, New Port Richey, FL; Alexander Ledford, University Of South Florida, Tampa, FL

Context is Key: Making Current Events Accessible to Everyone Discover how to teach current events, using print and digital resources, with an interactive, classroom-ready lesson. Resources provided. Samantha Badias, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 9 MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 3

Agents of Change: Using Young Adult Literature to Teach Current Events Learn how to use young adult literature to teach current events and to explain how students are the main agents of change in society. Tracy Tilotta, University of South Florida, Zephyrhills, FL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

Using Discussion Based Learning to Promote Communication in the Classroom Create a more collaborative environment within your classroom with discussion-based learning. Using research, strategies, and other resources, teachers can facilitate student learning and form a deeper understanding of texts. Alex Elias, Clarion University, Clarion, PA; Mallory Piercy, Clarion University, Clarion, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 4

Table 10

If you teach economics, this is for you! Learn about successful lessons and activities created over the years for an economics classroom. Brian Markwald, University School of Milwaukee, WI

Technology in any social studies course offers students the opportunity to successfully master all standards, and provides differentiated instructional opportunities for students to work at their own pace. Laurie Feinzimer, Jenna Breuer, Stephanie Levenbrook, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, IL

Using Technology to Meet the Diverse Needs of Students Simultaneously

All Hail the Glorious Leader! Engaging Lessons for Teaching Economics

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Table 5

Using Powerful Photographs to Examine Public Policy Issues in Geography Experience wise-practice use of photographs within a problem-based geographic inquiry framework, and discuss research-based suggestions for selecting, scaffolding, and interpreting photographs and other aesthetic texts. Lamont Maddox, University of North Alabama, Florence, AL; James Howell, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS; Cory Callahan, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

94

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 11

Breaking Boundaries: Incorporating the World Around You into Your Classroom Using the breaking-boundaries process, learn how to reduce barriers and create conversations with marginalized communities in your area and leave with ready-toimplement solutions. Haley Herbst, Rebekah Cleaver, Aubrie Faust, St. Norbert College, De Pere, WI

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Poster Sessions 3:00–4:00pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 12

Practical Bellringer System for ANY Class Employ a practical bellringer system that fosters mastery of vocabulary and content material on a daily basis. Perfect for low level readers, struggling students, and novice teachers. Sarah Quong, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 13

What Are These Books Hiding? Explore the history of book banning throughout the country. Find out why some of the most popular books are banned and what people are doing to get them back. Isaiah Griebel, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Lucinda, PA; Nicholas Chrimes, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Apollo, PA; Linda Somerville, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Clarion, PA; Isabelle Morrison, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Kennett Square, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 18

Student Built Digital Video Textbooks: Student Voices to Support Learning Experience and discover how student-built online digital and video textbooks can facilitate better reflection, engagement, and collaboration in order to achieve more complex learning and analytical thinking. Svetoslav Matejic, Adam Chamberlin, Southwestern City Schools, Columbus, OH HIGHER EDUCATION

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 19

Innovative and Collaborative Teacher Transformation Discover the power of interdisciplinary, collaborative planning using micro-credentialing for teachers to develop skill in civic-mindedness. Create inquiry-based civic lessons using Library of Congress resources. Donna Kiel, DePaul University, Chicago, IL; Sheila Smith, Barat Education Foundation, Chicago, IL

US HISTORY SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

Table 14

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Yesterday’s Snow Day is Today’s Digital Learning Day

Table 20

Yesterday’s snow days are today’s digital learning days that will support tomorrow’s 21st century students. Teachers can stay on schedule with the opportunities that are available through virtual snow days. Laura Harris, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Dacula, GA

Discover the newest format for professional learning: Microcredentialing. This format provides professional learning on-demand, and allows for choice of what will be studied, as well as when and where. Micro-credentials recognize mastery. Pamela Gothart, Social Studies School Service, Huntsville, AL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Your Learning—Your Choice

WORLD HISTORY HIGHER EDUCATION

Table 15

Artificial Antiquity: Using Virtual Reality to Recreate History Discover how to recreate history using virtual reality technology in the classroom. Learn the basics of using VR as an instructional tool and as a learner-centered assessment. Lindsey Maxwell, Gulliver Preparatory School, Miami, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 21

WORLD HISTORY

Table 16

“Newbies” School the Experienced: Preservice Partnering with Professionals Learn about reverse mentoring as preservice and beginning teachers invigorate and enrich veteran teachers, benefiting from their wisdom. Nicholas Crady, Noel Miller, Elizabeth Langa, John Schissler, Taylor Smith, Mark Schlitz, Laura Fleck, Kansas University Council for the Social Studies, Lawrence, KS

Contested Space and Nationalism: A Japanese Case Study National capitals require spaces with meaning, but that meaning can be contested. Examine the creation of Tokyo as a national capital during the Meiji era. Catherine Mein, Ballard High School, Huxley, IA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 17

Dungeons, Dragons, & Thrones: Modern-Day Medievalisms in World History Courses Learn concepts and tools for teaching representations of medievalism and the medieval world that exist today in literature, television, film, games, and other forms of popular culture. Mark Helmsing, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

Save the Date 3 Conferences – 1 Location 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

95


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 5 • 4:00–5:05pm

4:00–5:00pm

PREK-ELEMENTARY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

FEATURED SPEAKER

Active Vocabulary: Making Vocabulary Important in Elementary Social Studies Classrooms

Grand Ballroom, East Tower

Alex Wagner

Moved by her own deep hunger to belong—to have an identity that matters and a tribe of her own—Alex Wagner, author and co-host of Showtime’s “The Circus,” set off on a quest to find the truth about her family history. It became the memoir Futureface, and it took her from Burma to Luxembourg, from ruined colonial capitals to high-tech genetic labs. As she closed in on the mystery of her own ancestry, she began to grapple with a deeper question: does it even matter? Alex Wagner is co-host of Showtime’s The Circus and a contributor to CBS News and The Atlantic. Her appearance is generously sponsored by Penguin Random House.

4:00–7:00pm #sschat unconference

The NCSS unconference offers opportunities for participants to engage in organic, dynamic, and collaborative professional development led by the #sschat co-leaders. Participants help determine sessions and then learn with each other.

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Outstanding Social Studies Teacher of the Year Panel

PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Using Picture Books to Teach About Civic Role Models Learn about award-winning children’s literature that highlights people who made a difference. Lessons, activities, and a diverse selection of picture books on active citizens (C3, D4) will be shared. Andrea Libresco, Hofstra Unversity, Hempstead, NY; Jeannette Balantic, Garden City Public Schools, Garden City, NY

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

PreK-Elementary Sessions CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Social Studies Environments that Support Embodied Civic Experiences Public schools must be sites of civic practice. See how children can be civic actors and embody civic action, and learn what school contexts make it possible. Anna Falkner, Katherina Payne, Jennifer Keys Adair, The University of Texas at Austin, TX

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Aliens, Don’t Kill My Rights!

Our political climate has shifted, and America’s children demand a voice. Learn how to implement deeper knowledge of their rights by aligning assessments with CRFC’s Lawyers In the Classroom Program. Tiffani M. Watson, Constitutional Rights Foundation Chicago, Chicago, IL; Daniel Winters, formerly of Jenner and Block Law Firm, Chicago, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Enhance your teaching strategies and join the 2018 Social Studies Teacher of the Year winners as they share how they moved their instruction to the next level. Panelists: Elisabetta Bavaro, Oceanside School #5, Oceanside, NY; Tracey Zaval, Midlothian Middle School, Midlothian, VA; Alicen Morely, Boone High School, Boone, IA

96

Do you find vocabulary instruction boring? Learn a strategy that can be used quickly and confidently to assess and activate students’ understanding of a topic while strengthening their vocabulary. Amy Wilkinson, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, IL

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions

Swissotel, Lucerne Ballroom

PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

No More Boring Writing! Projects that Bring Literacy to Life [REC] Discover new ways to teach reading, writing, and research skills while digging into current events and U.S. history. Take away ready-made rubrics and project guidelines that make literacy fun. Sarah Cooper, Flintridge Preparatory School, La Canada, CA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Discovering Diversity: Understanding Sacred Spaces in Your Community Searching for answers during these trying times? Advocate for religious diversity, employing established sacred spaces in your community. Develop an understanding for all beliefs by participating in our model lesson. David Kendrick, Bear Creek Middle School, Statham, GA; Crystal A’Hearn, Andrew Rubinson, Evelina Despaigne, Kelly McCracken-Villanueva, John E Dwyer Technology Academy, Elizabeth, NJ

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 5 • 4:00–5:05pm MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Think climate change is a science topic? Think again! Motivate middle school social studies students to investigate civics, economics, and geography through climate change and take action in their communities. Natalie Stapert, Lowell School, Washington, DC

Explore how recent Supreme Court rulings on the Fourth Amendment continue to define the legal perimeters and definitions of privacy. Classroom ready case studies provided. Christine Lucianek, Cathie Hawke, American Bar Association Division for Public Education, Chicago, IL

Why You (Yes, You!) Have to Teach Climate Change Now

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

What is Private Anymore? Interpreting the Fourth Amendment

US HISTORY

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

First-Person Historical Presenters Bring Your Social Studies Classroom Alive Experience how first-person historical presenters reinforce social studies educators’ instruction by allowing students to engage with “living” historical characters and feel the connection between their own lives and history. Kevin Wood, Abraham Lincoln by Kevin Wood, Oak Park, IL; Laura Keyes, Historic Voices, Freeport, IL

Secondary Level-High School Sessions SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Economic Choices and Environmental Consequences: Are Free-Riders Causing Climate Change? Why can’t we agree on the environmental consequences of our economic decisions? Explore economic concepts through simulations and primary source analysis focusing on climate change. Leave ready to inspire. Jill Beccaris-Pescatore, Montgomery County Community College, Blue Bell, PA; Jessica Schocker, Penn State UniversityBerks, Reading, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Empowering student voice and 21st century civic engagement requires students to become critical consumers of news in today’s complex information landscape. Discover how news literacy supports and encourages this engagement. John Silva, The News Literacy Project, Chicago, IL

Examine how conflicts over geographical names (past/ present) denote the rise and fall of political regimes, the expansion and contraction of powerful empires, and the enduring influence of indigenous cultures. Amy Perkins, Michigan Geographic Alliance, Saint Joseph, MI

Empowering 21st Century Civic Engagement Through News Literacy

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Keep or Destroy? How Historical Monuments Teach Us About Democracy What can Mount Rushmore and Stone Mountain teach students about democracy? Explore how to teach democratic principles by using diverse and sometimes controversial monuments. Examples, teaching ideas, and resources provided. Alisa Kesler-Lund, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

March for Our Lives: A Rural Community United for Schools

Explore the massive impact of March for Our Lives on rural communities, led by a teacher with PTSD from an active shooter, to revolutionize student engagement. Suzanne Swain, March For Our Lives, Cookeville, TN

Identity Crises: Using Geographical Names to Chart Historical Developments [REC]

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Climate Change as a Human Rights Issue in the Arctic

The Arctic is a barometer of global environmental health. View the issue of climate change through a human rights lens by examining environmental and cultural experiences of Inuit. Betsy Arntzen, Canadian-American Center, Orono, ME SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Exploring Thinking Routines and Portraiture to Educate for Global Competence Build your students’ capacities for living in an ever-changing global world. Examine identity, immigration, history, and contemporary portraiture by uncovering the many layers of a single artwork. Briana White, Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Fun Activities vs. Effective Activities: You Don’t Have to Choose! Learn how to make sure the activities you plan provide your students with the maximum learning benefit versus just being “fun”. They can be both! Melissa Schaefer, Mundelein High School, Mundelein, IL 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

97


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 5 • 4:00–5:05pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Exhibitor Sessions

US HISTORY

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Strategies from the Smithsonian: Facilitating Challenging Conversations in U.S. History Discover how using innovative dialogue-based games in the U.S. history classroom can build students’ civic skills. Learn facilitation strategies and receive free resources from the National Museum of American History. Abby Pfisterer, Katharine Mead, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Inquiry, Evidence-Based Writing, and DBQ Online The DBQ Project is excited to demo our new DBQ online platform. For those familiar with our methodology, see if the online version is right for you. For those new to DBQ, you'll get an overview of our 6-step teaching method and address issues of equity when involving students in historical inquiries using documents. Chip Brady, Beth Montgomery, The DBQ Project, Evanston, IL

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

We Shall Overcome: The Fight for Voting Rights Connect current voting rights issues to history through rich primary sources from the LBJ Library, including telephone conversations with Martin Luther King, Jr., and telegrams from George Wallace. Lesson provided. Mallory Lineberger, LBJ Presidential Library, Austin, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

How to Connect Your School to the World Global connections are changing the way that students understand the world, practice languages, and share perspectives. Explore connecting global education to positive learning outcomes and examine how students’ experiences broaden perspectives and form the foundation for a more collaborative planet. Joe Troyen, PenPal Schools, Austin, TX

Women and the American Story: Modernizing America, 1889-1920

Explore sources, stories, and strategies about women’s roles in the debates over voting rights, immigration, citizenship, birth control, and more, to help you present history more equitably in your classroom. Leslie Hayes, New-York Historical Society, New York, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Holocaust Rescue and Resistance: Caring or Indifferent?

Have we learned anything from the Holocaust to prevent future genocides? Explore the actions of those who cared and those who were indifferent through strategies and visuals. Barbara Bernard, SUNY Oneonta, SUNY Old Westbury, Oneonta, Old Westbury, NY; Vincent Marmorale, Holocaust Memorial Committee of Long Island, Long Beach, NY

Higher Education Session HIGHER EDUCATION

SOCIAL SCIENCES

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

So Many Standards: Infusing NCSS & edTPA into Teacher Preparation Explore the meaningful integration of both the NCSS Standards and the edTPA performance-based assessment into the teaching and assessing of effective teacher candidates in secondary social studies. Richard Hughes, Monica Noraian, Sara Piotrowski, Illinois State University, Normal, IL Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Live Podcast and Learn About Podcasting Chris Hitchcock, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Amy Presley, Broken Arrow Public Schools, Broken Arrow, OK

98

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 4:00–4:30pm

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

JFK on the U.S. and Canada: Neighbors, Friends, Partners, Allies Though linked historically, economically, and geographically, our largest trading partner/northern neighbor receives little classroom limelight. JFK’s Canadian Parliament quote springboards to hands-on lessons emphasizing the Great Lakes Region and beyond. Jennifer Dawson, Cobb County School District, Kennesaw, GA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Representando la Historia: Using Tableaux Vivant in Bilingual History Classes Increase emergent bilingual students’ engagement in history class by using tableaux vivant. Learn how students in bilingual classes used tableaux to represent historical encounters and built empathy and content knowledge. Diana Turk, New York University, New York, NY; Adriana Garcia, Lower East Side Preparatory High School, New York, NY

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 4:35–5:05pm PREK-ELEMENTARY

WORLD HISTORY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Historical Fiction: The Power of Reading Aloud to Your Students

Explore the benefits of reading chapter books to your students. Historical fiction can be a powerful way of integrating social studies. A list of excellent titles will be provided. Ruth Kennedy, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, PA

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Concurrent Sessions 5 • 4:00–5:05pm / Poster Sessions 4:15–5:15pm MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Table 4

Learn how to use the Circle of Viewpoints strategy to teach the Chinese Exclusion Act and support historical empathy in your classroom. Nicole Miller, Paul Binford, Kenneth Anthony, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS

Explore a teacher’s experience using politically charged presidential elections in the U.S. and Korea to teach civic engagement and promote the global education tenet of perspective consciousness. Elizabeth Barrow, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA; Alex Ford, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, NC

Examining Historical Empathy Through the Chinese Exclusion Act

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

An American Teacher in Korea: Teaching Politically Charged Presidential Elections

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

What role should human rights play in U.S. foreign policy? Challenge your students to examine the difficulty of defining and enforcing human rights, at home and abroad. Choices Unit provided. Nicole Means, Torrence Williams, West Feliciana High School, St. Francisville, LA

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

4:15–5:15pm PREK-ELEMENTARY

GEOGRAPHY

Table 1

Inquiry Project for Spatial Citizenship Enhance your instructional strategies to promote elementary students’ inquiry on spatial citizenship. Learn about online resources, including story maps and GIS apps that promote spatial citizenship. Euikyung Shin, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

Leveraging Literacy for Authentic Social Studies Experiences in K-2 Classrooms Explore a way to address the challenge of limited social studies time and resources by developing C3 Frameworkaligned “social studies extensions” to the early literacy curriculum for grades K-2. Anthony Sievert, Eva Bridgeforth, Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO PREK-ELEMENTARY

Testing is Over: NOW WHAT? A Guide to Engaging Year-End Activities Discover new and engaging activities that will have students excited about class, even once testing is over. Because, what’s worse than testing? After testing. Chiara Santos, Shaquila Boyd, Clayton County Public Schools, Jonesboro, GA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 5

Competing Visions of Human Rights: Questions for U.S. Policy

US HISTORY

Table 3

Springboarding into the Past with Elementary Social Studies Inquiry Units Discover how to integrate inquiry and historical thinking skills into your elementary classroom. Explore content during the session that will focus on analysis of multiple types of text. Leslie Harris, Arine Lowery, Nancy Harris, Public Schools of Robeson County, Pembroke, NC

US HISTORY

Table 6

Crossing Borders: An Integrated Approach to Teaching Immigration Explore an inquiry-based integrated social studies and math lesson on teaching immigration that promotes real-world learning. Melissa Haas, Belmont Middle School, Belmont, NH; Brandon Haas, Plymouth State University, Plymouth, NH MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 7

Revolutionary Tools for Teaching the American Revolution Explore apps and digital tools that allow students to collect, create, and share information about the American Revolution. Strengthen critical thinking skills, while developing other literacies, including data, visual, and civic. Kathleen Barker, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 8

Days of Future Past: Social Studies in the 21st Century Learn about a blended classroom model that focuses on historical concepts and historical thinking skills through self-directed content modules, projects, and simulations. Receive rubrics and sample activities. Kason Dalton, Marc Turner, Dent Middle School, Columbia, SC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 9

Fine Art of Equal Opportunity: Student Examples of Project CivicsWorks See winning student projects from a Project CivicsWorks competition that incorporate the skills of argumentative essay writing. The projects involved research of reforms meant to reinvigorate founding ideals of American government. Andrew Conneen, Adlai E. Stevenson HS, Lincolnshire, IL 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

99


FRI.

Poster Sessions 4:15–5:15pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 10

Table 16

Embrace the power of contemporary world music to improve student involvement, cognition, and cultural awareness during Geography lessons MeLisa James, Sacramento, CA

Discover how one teacher incorporates exciting and innovative 21st century instructional methods to teach 20th century primary source documents in her classroom of diverse learners. Receive lesson plans. Elizabeth Rasmussen, Fort Meade Middle Senior High School, Fort Meade, FL

Young Cultural Geographers Unite! Contemporary World Music in Geography Lessons

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 11

Global Sustainability: Economics, Food and the Environment, An Interdisciplinary Course Learn how Economics & AP Environmental Science courses in a professional studies program create authentic experiences that drive deep learning about global sustainability: economics, food, and the environment. Kim Meehan, Dawn Norton, Robb Virgin, Minnetonka Public Schools, Minnetonka, MN SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 12

Pay Attention to the Man behind the Curtain: Media Literacy

US HISTORY

Table 13

21st Century—Sikh Religious Literacy Education Interested in teaching about Sikhism, the world’s fifth largest religion? Include lessons about Sikh Americans and their contributions to American history in your classroom. Discover state-specific, customizable K-12 resources. Pritpal Kaur, Sikh Coalition, Lake Forest, CA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 14

Baseball: The All-American Pastime? Explore the struggles of gay baseball players to be accepted at home and in the locker room, and how they have changed the face of baseball. Breana Finch, Clarion University Council for Social Studies, Clarion, PA; Isabelle Morrison, Clarion University Council for Social Studies, Clarion, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 15

Deeper Learning Through Thematic Videoconferencing and Memorial Design Learn how thematic videoconferencing can advance students’ historical understanding and interest. Explore the creative application of knowledge through memorial design using 3D pens. Julie Anne Taylor, University of Michigan-Dearborn, MI; Quan Neloms, Douglass Academy for Young Men, Detroit, MI

100

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 17

An Enduring Issue: Are the Benefits of Interconnectedness Worth It? Learn about the New Visions Global History Curriculum by examining the question, “Do the benefits of interconnectedness outweigh the costs?” with evidence from the Silk Roads to YouTube. Timothy Lent, Kameelah Rasheed, New Visions for Public Schools, New York, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Equip 21st-century learners to decipher the “man behind the curtain” through media literacy. Teaching students to critically evaluate media messages will deepen their understanding of marginalized peoples’ experiences. Barbara Epperson, Baylor University, Belton, TX; Lee Anne Brannon, Baylor University, Waco, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Using Primary Sources to Teach Diverse Populations

WORLD HISTORY

Table 18

Past-Present-Future of Nuclear Weapons: Messages from Japanese A-Bomb Survivors Hear the experiences of Japanese A-bomb survivors and their thoughts on the possible future use of nuclear weapons. Receive resources to teach about nuclear weapons. Misato Yamaguchi, H.K. Barker Center for Economic Education at The University of Akron, Yokohama, Japan; Brad Maguth, The University of Akron, Akron, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 19

Revisiting the Renaissance: Teaching an Issues-Centered Unit Issue-centered units in World History treat historical data not as mere facts, but as timeless issues answering students’ question: “So what?” This issues-centered activity addresses the Renaissance. Participants receive materials. John Grant, First Assembly Christian School, Memphis, TN; Jeffrey Byford, The University of Memphis, TN HIGHER EDUCATION

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 20

A Symphonic Arrangement: Preservice, Novice, and Inservice Social Studies Teachers Capture the lessons that were learned through a three-year case study of preservice, novice, and inservice social studies teachers—integrating content, strategies, and engaging pedagogy, and framed with the Nevada Academic Common Core. Margaret Ferrara, University of Nevada Reno, NV; Angela Orr, Sarah Brown, Washoe County School District, Reno, NV

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


FRI.

Available Now in the NCSS Bookstore!

Not an NCSS member? Join at www.socialstudies.org/membership

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

101


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 6 • 9:00–10:05am

Saturday At-A-Glance Time

Event

Speakers

Page

8:00–9:00am

Exhibit Hall Continental Breakfast

Sponsored by Kaur Foundation

102

9:00–10:05am

Concurrent Sessions 6 Power Sessions: 9:00–9:30am / 9:35–10:05am

Featured Speaker: Susan Hood

102

9:30–10:30am

Poster Presentations

10:15–11:20am

Concurrent Sessions 7 Power Sessions: 10:15–10:45am / 10:50–11:20am

10:45–11:45am 11:30am–12:35pm 12:30–1:30pm 1:30–2:35pm 2:00–3:00pm

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Poster Presentations Concurrent Sessions 8 Power Sessions: 11:30am–12:00pm / 12:05–12:35pm Break Concurrent Sessions 9 Power Sessions: 1:30–2:00pm / 2:05–2:35pm Poster Presentations

2:45–3:50pm

Concurrent Sessions 10 Power Sessions: 2:45–3:15pm / 3:20–3:50pm

3:15–4:15pm

Poster Presentations

4:00–5:05pm

Concurrent Sessions 11

Vital Issue Session: A Conversation with Federal Judges: A View from the Bench

109 113

Featured Speaker: Khizr Khan

115 n/a

Featured Speaker: Hall Davidson

120 124

Vital Issue Session: Civic Education & Media Literacy: Preparing Learners to Thrive in the Digital World

126 130

5:15–6:15pm

Featured Speaker: Kenneth C. Davis

133

Keynote Speaker: Eric Liu

136

8:00–9:00am Exhibit Hall Continental Breakfast Sponsored by Kaur Foundation Explore all the goods and services offered by the 200+ exhibitors in the NCSS Exhibit Hall during this dedicated hour before sessions begin. Enjoy complimentary coffee, tea, and breakfast pastries.

9:00–10:00am Featured Speaker

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS 9:00–10:00am

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Susan Hood “To Tell the Truth: Finding Facts vs. ‘Fake News’” How do you teach kids to find accurate information in a world of “alternate facts” and too much (mis)information? Discussing her latest books (Ada’s Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay; Shaking Things Up: 14 Young Women Who Changed the World; and her brand-new middle grade historical novel, Lifeboat 12), Susan Hood talks about digging deep to unearth facts and weed out mistakes on social media and the Internet. She’ll offer strategies students can use to go beyond Google in their own nonfiction writing. Susan Hood is the winner of the 2017 Christopher Award, the 2017 Américas Award, the 2017 Bank Street Flora Steiglitz Straus Award, and an E. B. White Award honoree. Her appearance is generously sponsored by Simon & Schuster, Inc.

102

AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower 2017 Christa McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award

Piecing Together the Puzzle: Using Source Materials to Understand Lives of the WWII Fallen Over 405,000 American men and women gave their lives during WWII. We know the stories of too few. Learn how to engage students to study the life of a Silent Hero. Learn the key steps in researching a soldier, sailor, airman, Marine, or Coastguardsman killed in action during World War II. Learn the historical thinking skills that apply to this type of work. Explore the idea of engaging students in this program. Presenter: Kevin A. Wagner, Carlisle Area School District, Carlisle, PA

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 6 • 9:00–10:05am

PreK-Elementary Sessions

PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower PREK-ELEMENTARY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Getting into Good Trouble: Teaching Towards Justice-Oriented Citizenship What does it mean to be a “good” citizen? Explore the difference between a peacekeeper and a peacemaker, and leave with resources to guide your students towards becoming justice-oriented citizens. Erin Green, The University of Texas Elementary School, Austin, TX; Katherina Payne, The University of Texas, Austin, TX

Growing a Growth Mindset: A New Lens for Inquiry Design Redesigned C3 inquiries nurturing growth mindset will enable students to connect history to their lives. Learn how an Industrial Revolution Shark Tank can make history come alive your for students. Kevin Sheehan, Molloy College, Massapequa, NY

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

PREK-ELEMENTARY

GEOGRAPHY

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Using STEMSS Lessons and Strategies to Support Linguistically Diverse Learners [REC] Participate in lessons developed by Arizona Geographic Alliance. Walk away with access to over 150+ STEMSS lessons that integrate social studies with STEM and are designed for language learners. Karen Guerrero, Arizona State University, Tempe, CA; Margarita Jimenez-Silva, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA PREK-ELEMENTARY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Finding Refuge and Telling the Story of Fleeing from Danger Explore an emerging genre of children’s literature focused on refugee journeys and analyze possible answers to the questions: Should children welcome the stranger? Who are we as global citizens? Martha Ritter, Cabrini University, Radnor, PA PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Do You DBQ? It’s Elementary! Handing out inquiry units of study isn’t the same as teaching inquiry. Learn about instructional flow to engage younger students in collaborative inquiry and evidencebased analysis and writing. Megan Beaudoin, Baker Demonstration School, Wilmette, IL PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Putting the Spotlight on Poverty Engage in a mini-simulation activity exploring multiple perspectives of poverty. Discover strategies and children’s literature that foster appreciation for students of all backgrounds. Queen Ogbomo, Kathy Brashears, Kristen Trent, Marilyn Bruckman, Tennessee Technological University, Knoxville, TN

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Cops & Kids: Working Together for Peace on the Streets [REC] Educate students about the scope and limits of police authority with lessons that include positive interactions with police officers; learning about police work; and opportunities to improve public safety. Gregorio Medina, Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Engage English Learners and Students with Disabilities through Primary Sources Gain insights, strategies, and free resources to help ALL learners succeed in social studies from Accessing Inquiry, the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources program at CES. Rich Cairn, Collaborative for Educational Services, Northampton, MA

Secondary Level-High School Sessions SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

#BlendedGov: Utilizing Blended Learning to Foster Future Ready Citizens Explore how to combine a C3 Framework-aligned civics curriculum with the benefits of student ownership of their place and time to develop both future ready skills and effective citizens. Adam Dyche, Waubonsie Valley High School, Aurora, IL; Sydney Neukirch, Meate Valley High School, Aurora, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Diversity + Democracy=Opportunity: Promoting Diverse Perspectives Authentically [REC] Instruct your students in the skills of democracy! YLI and American Evolution have teamed up to create the First Amendment Wall, an online resource for students to communicate civilly. Meg Heubeck, Daman Irby, American Evolution, hosted by the Youth Leadership Initiative, Charlottesville, VA

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

103


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 6 • 9:00–10:05am

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Rho Kappa Advisors Session

“What’s with the Turban?” An Invisible Identity

Current Rho Kappa National Social Studies Honor Society Advisors are invited to join Rho Kappa Advisory Council members to exchange ideas and activities for their local chapters. Presenters: Jill Armstrong, Greenup County High School, Greenup, KY; Kristy Brasfield, Blytheville High School, Blytheville, AR; Mary McCullagh, Christopher Columbus High School, Miami, FL

A must-attend C3 and B3 interactive, engaging and experiential session advancing sensitive cultural and religious understanding about Sikh Americans. Take back classroom resources, NCSS-approved lesson plans, and pedagogical skills. Religious Literacy dispels stereotypes, promotes cross-cultural understanding, and encourages respect for the rights of others to religious liberty. Prepare yourself to be engaged in Courageous Conversations about the Sikhs and their little-known 120 year journey in America! Mirin Phool, Kaur Foundation, Potomac, MD; Kate Soules, Boston College, Boston, MA; Linda K. Wertheimer, author, FaithEd

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

They Can Handle the Truth, If They Can Find It Receive a five-day sequence in news literacy skills, including slide decks and worksheets. Your students want the truth and you can help them find it. Jennifer Conlon, Snjezana Salamon, Maine East High School, Park Ridge, IL; Gary Zielinski, Maine East High School, Park Ridge, IL; Teresa Cipolletta, Maine East High School, Park Ridge, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Through a Geography Lens How many times have you heard the phrase “Through the lens of...”? See how students are given an opportunity to do just that in their geography classroom. Lisa Waligora, Katie Batenhorst, Clear Creek ISD, League City, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Where in the World? Geocaching, Google, and Carmen Sandiego How do I get students excited about the world? Harness media, virtual reality, and project-based learning to help students understand and care about the world and their place in it. Geraldine Stevens, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Evanston, IL; Susan Geidner, Avoca West Elementary School, Glenview, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower

How to Survive the First Five Floundering, thriving, or simply surviving? Discover proven techniques for surviving the challenges of the first five years of teaching. Explore more than the wisdom of veteran educators; learn practical application. Melissa Collum, Viterbo University & University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, WI; Jennifer Morgan, West Salem Schools, West Salem, WI

104

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Plaza Ballroom A, Lobby Level, East Tower

Accomplished Practice in Action—the NB/C3 Way How does being an NBCT, National Board Certified Teacher, validate accomplished teaching, offer leadership opportunities, and advance one’s professional learning continuum? Find out. See NBCTs using C3! Kim O’Neil, National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Liverpool, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Bears, Beets, Battlestar Galactica ... and Behavior Looking for lessons and labs to use in your introductory psychology course via The Office? “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” Take a chance on this session. Stephanie Franks, Springboro High School, Springboro, OH; Stephen Foley, The Linsly School, Wheeling, WV SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Empowering Students: Human Rights in the High Achieving Classrooms Contribute to the empowerment of students by exploring the connections between inalienable human rights, contemporary issues, and the curricular standards found in high achieving or AP style classrooms. Christopher Buckley, Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights/ University of Connecticut/Darien High School, Brookfield, CT SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Conflict and Continuity: Media in America Help students become informed and reasoned decisionmakers regarding media. Activities will assist in applying constitutional principles as students differentiate fact from fiction, and investigate the importance of a free press. Christopher Janson, Bill of Rights Institute, Arlington, VA

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 6 • 9:00–10:05am SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

More than Meets the Eye: Building Visual Literacy and Argumentation

Helping Students ‘Think on Paper’ - A Teacher’s View

Learn ways to design a Virtual Exhibition activity that engages students in primary source image analysis to create historical arguments about any topic, era, or artistic movement. Marsha Greco, The Preuss School UCSD, La Jolla, CA

Writing is thinking on paper. Helping students develop a solid understanding of disciplinary practices requires clear expectations and consistent feedback. Review examples of student writing and strategies for helping students. Allison Lipp, The Big History Project, Seattle, WA; Scott Collins, Lemont High School, Lemont, IL; Rachel Hansen, Muscatine High School, Muscatine, IA

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

The Great Anti-Immigrant Riots of Chicago and Cincinnati in 1855

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Learn about the explosive anti-immigrant riots of 1855 in both Cincinnati and Chicago, including an exploration of nativism, policing, immigrant identity, and temperance. Lee Eysturlid, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Geneva, IL; Chris Mullin, Santa Ynez Valley Union High School, Los Olivios, CA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

WORLD HISTORY

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

The Nervous Teacher’s Guide to Analyzing and Discussing Controversial Events [REC] Overcome your fear of teaching controversial events by discovering strategies that engage students and focus on building critical thinking and communication skills such as perspective taking, interpreting sources, and collaborating. Jeffrey Shea, Belmont High School, Belmont, MA

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Who Do You Think You Are?

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Who do you think you are? Empowering students to discover and connect their own stories of history through oral narratives and genealogy. Kimberly Leegan, Hilary Haskell, Elizabeth Piombino, Andrea Brenann, Westfield High School, Westfield, NJ SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

20th-Century Democracies and Dictatorships Strengthen your students’ sense of democracy, social justice, and power of resistance by designing lessons, or even an entire course, based on this case study approach on democracies and dictatorships. Jonathon Allen, Marlborough School, Los Angeles, CA

WORLD HISTORY

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

It Starts with Intolerance: Understanding the Stages of Genocide Genocide begins with intolerance. Learn how the seeds of hate can lead to genocide through analysis of the stages of genocide, beginning with the first modern case, the Armenian Genocide. Sara Cohan, The Genocide Education Project, Nashville, TN; Roxanne Makasdjian, The Genocide Education Project, San Francisco, CA

Supervisory-Administrative Session SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Beyond Battles: Alternative Ways and Resources for Teaching about Wars Receive resources to go beyond instruction that only deals with the logistics of warfare and instead develop understandings of the different motivations and rationales for war. Erin Bronstein, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; Mark Helmsing, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA

Unpacking Color Consciousness Understanding how to recognize, embrace and unpack issues around diverse identities is essential for creating inclusive campuses and classrooms. Ruth Burson, Eran De Silva, Notre Dame High School, San Jose, CA

Exhibitor Session ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Inquiry, Evidence-Based Writing, and DBQ Online The DBQ Project is excited to demo our new DBQ online platform. For those familiar with our methodology, see if the online version is right for you. For those new to DBQ, you'll get an overview of our 6-step teaching method and address issues of equity when involving students in historical inquiries using documents. Chip Brady, Beth Montgomery, The DBQ Project, Evanston, IL

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

105


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 6 • 9:00–10:05am / Poster Sessions 9:30–10:30am

Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Using KidCitizen to Design an InquiryBased Learning Experience Bert Snow, Snow & Co., Newburyport, MA; Ilene Berson, Michael Berson, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 9:00–9:30am

PREK-ELEMENTARY

WORLD HISTORY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

GEOGRAPHY

Plebeians Unite! Simulating Ancient Rome’s Conflict of the Orders Consider a unit of study that helps students take on the role of ancient Romans in a class struggle. Tools include primary/ secondary sources, active-learning techniques, and teacher guidance. Stephen Capone, The McGillis School, Salt Lake City, UT SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Exploring the Nooks in Urban Context: From Classroom to Street

The Past’s Many Layers: Corroborating GIS Maps with Primary Sources

Using the city as a laboratory transforms the methodology and content of the social studies curriculum. It becomes a powerful, engaging, integrating, and puzzling tool for students to understand their context. Ileana Quintero, Mabel Cruz, Diana Soto, Sahily Fernández, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Learn how high school teachers helped develop and now teach with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) maps and primary sources on topics that include the Trail of Tears and Underground Railroad. Stacie Tefft, Murphysboro School District, Murphysboro, IL; Kayeleigh Sharp, Grant Miller, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Advancing Inquiry-Oriented Global Learning Based on the C3 Framework

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

Global education specialists present resources for preparing learners for responsible citizenship in an increasingly multicultural and global world. Brad Maguth, The University of Akron, Akron, OH; Gloria Wu, Toledo City Schools, Toledo, OH

9:30–10:30am PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Building Bridges: Understanding Perspective

Comply, Collaborate or Resist? Protest Movement Simulation Lessons Print-and-go lessons to analyze the moral dilemma of whether to resist, collaborate, or comply with a historical movement and the impact that choice can have on you and others. Luke Rosa, Students of History, Ashburn, VA

Develop students’ discussion, understanding, and empathy of cultural diversity using close reading, inquiry, and projectbased instruction with nonfiction and human rights texts. Promote critical thinking, questioning, and differentiation! Victoria Berger, Sarah Rookwood, Mariana Winnik, Brent Harney, Allison Silverman, Peck Slip School, New York City, NY PREK-ELEMENTARY

Read Our Stories from Our Eyes— From Immigrant Students’ Perspectives

9:35–10:05am

US HISTORY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

“The Other Side of the Story”: Designing Multiple Perspectives Inquiries Develop empathy and critical thinking in elementary students with a guided inquiry of multiple perspectives. Receive a design model utilizing the C3 Framework, lesson plans, and resources. Charlene Cornwell, Sacred Heart Schools-Atherton, Atherton, CA

106

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS PREK-ELEMENTARY

GEOGRAPHY

Table 1

Learn how to best serve immigrant, minority, and ELL students when teaching the difficult topic of literacy. Yu-Han Hung, University of Houston-Downtown, Houston, TX MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 3

Teachers Perspectives on Implementing the Common Core State Standards in Alabama’s Social Studies Classrooms The researcher examined Alabama high school social studies teachers’ perceptions of the implementation of the anchor standards for reading and writing in the Common Core State Standards. Adam NeSmith, Alabama Council for the Social Studies, Boaz, AL

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Poster Sessions 9:30–10:30am MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 4

Table 10

Hidden Voices: Inclusive Teaching through Forgotten Stories

Teaching Discernment in Times of Fake News and Echo Chambers

Learn how teachers can facilitate inclusive learning experiences by revealing the hidden voices often omitted from the shared historical narrative. Jenna Ryall, Norah Lovett, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY

Explore how to help students be more discerning in an era of “fake news” and echo chambers with exciting resources and best practices that foster media literacy. Justin Detmers, Michigan State University, Grand Ledge, MI

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 5

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 11

“Justice for All”: Discussing Social Justice in Rural Schools

National Identity in Social Studies Classes in Puerto Rico Is Puerto Rico a colony? Discover and critique the relationship between the social studies curriculum, national identity, and political ideology in this commonwealth of the United States. Jesús Diaz, School District U-46, Elgin, IL

Don’t fear confronting issues of justice in your classroom. Learn about one rural teacher’s strategy of framing her year around the promise of justice in the Pledge of Allegiance. Jason Williamson, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 12 SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 6

Model Parliament: Utilizing Student Energy and Passion to Generate Understanding Explore the world of government in action, as students become Members of the UK Parliament, work in political parties, and debate current hot topics across party lines. Resources provided. Allison Kane, Ward Melville High School, East Setauket, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 7

Discover concrete strategies to transfer the work of historical thinking to students. Leverage essential questions to create inquiry-based strategies where students build authentic connections and exercise critical thinking. Rachel Mohr, Nate Mulder, Memphis Teacher Residency, Memphis, TN SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 13

My Private Diary: Facilitating Learning Through Digital Scavenger Hunts

Students as Analysts: Offering Policy Solutions for an Aging Japan The population is aging. Help students develop critical thinking and research skills in this classroom simulation that examines the aging population in Japan. Belinda Cambre, Louisiana State University Laboratory School, Baton Rouge, LA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

All the Essentials: Powerful Essential Question Strategies for Every Teacher

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Learn how to create a technology-based, studentdriven project that teaches visual literacy and historical understanding. Resources will be provided to help with the creation of a journal utilizing a digital application. Arren Swift, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 14

Table 8

Using the 1:1 to Foster Inquiry in U.S. History

Why DC Statehood? What the Lack of Democracy Looks Like!

Explore how U.S. history teachers can move beyond traditional pedagogy by using the 1:1 to foster inquirybased learning that encourages critical thinking. Adam Wiley, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

There are 700,000 residents of Washington, D.C., whose citizenship rights are restricted by the U.S. Congress. Statehood will resolve this situation. Anise Jenkins, Stand Up! for Democracy in DC (Free DC), Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Table 9

I Want to Go to There!: Field Experiences in Geography Bring Geography to life through an inquiry-based Field Experiences Project. Connect classroom to community using creativity, technology and spatial analysis in Geography and AP Human Geography. Project materials provided. Jason Miller, Mary Jo Bauer, Rebecca McLaughlin, Rockwood Summit High School, St. Louis, MO

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 15

Yankee Doodle to CRR: The Relationship Between Music and War Explore the relationship between war and music. Discover how music has been used as a promotional tool and as a form of protest during times of strife. Austin Cessna, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Elderton, PA; Ryan Radaker, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, DuBois, PA; Devin Hoffman, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Knox, PA; Breana Finch, Clarion Uiniversity Council for the Social Studies, Beaver Falls, PA

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SAT.

Poster Sessions 9:30–10:30am

SSECONDARY ECONDARY LEVELLEVEL-HIGH -HIGH SCHOOL SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY WORLD HISTORY

SSUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE UPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 16

Table 19

Disillusion: How Media Distorts the True Meaning of Mythology

Teaching with Primary Sources Regional Program

How is mythology seen by students? Mythology has been corrupted by the media in today’s day and age. Compare deities with their actual story versus the media interpretation. Devin Hoffman, Hoffman, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Knox, PA

Explore how the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Regional Program promotes the effective effective use of primary sources from loc.gov for K-16 classrooms and teacher professional development. Barbara Kirby, Sue Wise, Waynesburg University, Waynesburg, PA SSUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE UPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SSECONDARY ECONDARY LEVELLEVEL-HIGH -HIGH SCHOOL SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY WORLD HISTORY

Table 17

Bell Ringers That Hook Students!

The Great Terror: Then and Now Examine the impact of communism in the Soviet Union, China, and North Korea, using photos, testimony, and literature. Allison Graves, Kerri Flynn, Washington High School, Washington, MO; Michelle Best, Austintown Schools, Masury, OH SSECONDARY ECONDARY LEVELLEVEL-HIGH -HIGH SCHOOL SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 20

WORLD HISTORY WORLD HISTORY

Table 18

Understanding Chinese History Through Graphic Novels Novels through Graphic Learn how to incorporate graphic novels into world history courses. A specific specific novel series will be used as an example; however, the activities can be altered for any graphic novel. Laurel Kuepker, Marci Ward, Trinity High School, Euless, TX

Bell Ringers can be some of the best ways to start or finish finish a class. Use them to introduce lessons or as a powerful way to bring them home. Ryan Keller, Certell, Indianapolis, IN EDUCATION HHIGHER IGHER E DUCATION

GLOBALGLOBAL CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS

Table 21

The OER Revolution: Building Curriculum with Open Educational Resources The OER method is an innovative way to create exciting, engaging curriculum based solely upon open source material. Explore ways to build or supplement history, geography, civics, and economics. Courtney Kisat, Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies A Framework for Teaching, Learning, and Assessment A must for curriculum developers, social studies departments, teachers, and teacher education programs. Like the original standards, published in 1994, the book is based on the ten themes of social studies. It includes a revised section on essential social studies skills and strategies. It offers a sharper focus than the original standards on: • Purposes • Questions for Exploration • Knowledge: what learners need to understand • Processes: what learners will be capable of doing • Products: how learners demonstrate understanding

Available Now in the NCSS Bookstore!

Item# 100111 - NCSS Bulletin 111 Price: $29.95 / NCSS Members $19.95 Purchase 10 or more copies and save 20% off the non-member price. Order online at www. socialstudies.org/store. To order by phone, call 1-800-683-0812. To order by purchase order, please email as attachments to ncss@pbd.com; fax to 770-280-4092, or mail to NCSS Publications, P.O. Box 936082, Atlanta, GA 31193-6082.

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 7 • 10:15–11:20am

10:15–11:15am VITAL ISSUE SESSION

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

A Conversation with Federal Judges: A View of Civic Education from the Bench This conversation with federal judges provides unique insight into possible partnerships for judges and educators. The judges will discuss initiatives within their communities to educate students and the public about the role of courts and the rule of law. As civic education leaders, judges and educators are ideal partners in educating students to be engaged citizens. Moderated by (Oregon Supreme Court) Associate Justice Adrienne Nelson, Panelists are Chief Judge Robert Katzmann, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit; Judge Diane Wood, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit; Judge Jeremy D. Fogel, Berkeley Judicial Institute This panel is generously sponsored by the American Bar Association Division for Public Education.

PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

Empowering Bilingual Students Through Stories of the Past Ever used history to empower bilingual students? Learn how 3rd graders inquired into stories of the past in order to honor stories of their present lives. Jennie Schmaltz, Aurora Public Schools, Denver, CO; Corey Sell, Metropolitan State University of Denver, CO; Stephanie Hartman, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO PREK-ELEMENTARY

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

US HISTORY

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Grappling with Slavery with Young People: Historic Sites in Partnership [REC]

AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower Award for Global Understanding Given in Honor of James M. Becker

Teaching Global Citizenship a Case Study: Civil Rights, Cold War, and the African Anti-Colonial Struggle This presentation seeks to contextualize and connect the Civil Rights Movement and the struggle for liberation and independence in Africa; through that lens, this presentation will emphasize the importance of a teaching global citizenship. Presenter: Gustova Carrera, Shore Country Day School, Beverly, MA Chair: Joseph David, J.I. Watson Elementary School, Iowa, LA

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

resources for using this year’s books in the classroom. Books will be given away. Craig Carson, Ozark R-VI School District, Ozark, MO; Eric Groce, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC; Wendy Harris, Metro Deaf School, St. Paul, MN; Kimberly Heckart, Prairie Ridge Elementary School, Cedar Rapids, IA; Kurt Johnson, Bringham Young University Hawaii, Laine, HI; Laura Meyers, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA; Beverly Milner Bisland, Queens College, CUNY, Flushing, NY; Ritu Radhakrishnan, SUNY Oswego, Oswego, NY; Jen Reiter, Gilman School, Baltimore, MD

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Receive resources for teaching even your youngest students about slavery and learn how historic sites like President Lincoln’s Cottage can bolster your efforts to address this complex but important subject. Joan Cummins, President Lincoln’s Cottage, Washington, DC; Cody Norton, DC Public Schools, Washington, DC; David C. Burton, Moore Public Schools, Moore, OK

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Unlock the Power of Geographic Inquiry Learn how to incorporate power geographic thinking into any social science course. Discover rich disciplinary perspectives and 21st century tools for any classroom. Thomas Herman, California Geographic Alliance, San Diego, CA

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

TOXIC WATER!!!!: Evaluating Sources Concerning Flint’s Water Crisis

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Review strategies to support students’ evaluation of sources through inquiry, focusing on children’s right to clean water and Flint, Michigan. Carolyn Weber, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA; Heather Hagan, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC PREK-ELEMENTARY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

NCSS Notable Tradebooks 2018: In the Classroom! [REC]

#GlobalEd: Join the Global Education Movement and Transform Your Classroom Hear from Teachers for Global Classrooms alumni as they share their ideas, resources, and technology tips for incorporating global competencies into the classroom. Their global approach will inspire you! Emily Philpott, St. Andrew's Episcopal School, Jackson, MS; Rhett Oldham, Ste Genevieve Middle School, Ste. Genevieve, MO; Randy Martin, Desert Ridge Middle School, Albuquerque, NM; Sue Bolly, Nicolet High School, Milwaukee, WI

Explore 2018 NCSS Notable Trade Books with selection committee members! Members share ideas, lessons, and

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

109


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 7 • 10:15–11:20am

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

5E in DC: Daily Inquiry Lessons from the Nation’s Capital

Making History “Real” Concrete: Capturing the Abstract

ENGAGE in a simulation, EXPLORE sample 5E lessons, EXPLAIN how 5E sustains inquiry, ELABORATE on applications of 5E, and EVALUATE our understanding on this inquiry approach. Scott Abbott, Anthony Hiller, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC

History can be abstract for students, especially those who struggle with language. Language-based activities allow students to access historical content and abstract concepts. Bruce Miller, Landmark School, Manchester, MA

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Secondary Level-High School Sessions SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Honey, I Shrunk the Artifacts!

AP Government/Politics Redesign and Podcasting with the Government Gurus

How does technology change the way historians have interpreted the past? This team will share their experience utilizing 3D technologies to give students a chance to “touch the past.” Kimberly Heath, Steven Mijajlovic, Janelle Tregoning, Skokie/ Morton Grove School District 69, Skokie, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Music: A “Lyrical” Hook to American History Everyone loves a good show tune. Whether cowboys from Oklahoma or Founders from Hamilton, you’ll learn how to grab and keep student attention with songs from yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Abi Shelbourn, Carolyn Patterson, Becky Boswell, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Using NCSS Yearbooks to Teach the C3 Framework The C3 Framework has caused many social studies educators to reconsider their teaching practices. Learn how to use NCSS Yearbooks to implement the C3 Framework. Jeremiah Clabough, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL; Dwight Herold, Iowa Council for the Social Studies, Ames, IA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Make Yesterday’s Civilizations Alive Today and Endure Tomorrow with “Our History Clips” [REC] Think like historians and integrate 21st Century Skills. A strategy called “Our History Clips” can be implemented to address a variety of learning needs. Technology and history come alive. Nora McMillan, Northwest Middle School, Anderson, SC; Bea Bailey, Clemson University, Clemson, SC

110

Learn how to integrate newly required primary source documents for the College Board redesign of AP Government and Politics. Podcasting tips from founder/ hosts of the “Government Gurus” podcast. Lisa Gibson, Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, VA; Alex Bennett, Loudoun County Public Schools, Loudoun County, VA; Jennifer Hitchcock, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA; Jennifer Goss, Staunton County Public Schools, Staunton, VA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

From Federalism to Firewalls: Teaching the First Amendment Today Help students understand where and how they can exercise freedom of expression responsibly in a new world of social media and social protests. What limits exist, and why? Jessi McCarthy, Newseum, Washington, DC; Megan Fromm, Colorado Mesa University, Grand Junction, CO; Tyler Gordon, Columbia Middle School, Medina, OH SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Shark Tank: Engaging Students in the Economics Classroom Discover how to simulate the television show Shark Tank in your classroom, as students become entrepreneurs and pitch their business ideas to student “sharks.” Resources and rubrics provided. Dianne Kraemer, Megan Stringer, Three Village Central School District, Stony Brook, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower

Discovering U.S. and Caribbean Connections Through Digital Library Collections Explore interconnections between the United States and the Caribbean. Learn about resources and lesson plans inspired by the Digital Library of the Caribbean. Sarah Mathews, Sherrie Beeson, Yuleisy Mena, Jose Pombo, Ginelle Rosenberg, Miguel Asencio, Florida International University, Miami, FL Sponsored by Florida International University's Latin American and Caribbean Center (LACC).

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 7 • 10:15–11:20am SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Teaching “Reel” Issues: Using Doc Films for Teachers, by Teachers

COINTELPRO: Teaching the FBI’s War on the Black Freedom Movement

Discover classroom-tested strategies and examine research about incorporating documentary film to teach media literacy in the social studies. Educators and acclaimed documentary filmmakers will participate in this innovative session. Fran Sterling, Blueshift Education, Denver, CO; John Golden, Cleveland High School, Portland, OR; Alice Quinlan, POV-PBS, Brooklyn, NY

Examine declassified FBI documents from the 1960s and 1970s in this Zinn Education Project lesson to understand the scope of the counterintelligence programs directed toward the Black Freedom Movement. Ursula Wolfe-Rocca, Zinn Education Project, Portland, OR

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Psychology Yesterday, Psychology Today, Psychology Tomorrow Participate in hands-on, active learning demonstrations designed to address issues related to social psychology, cultural proficiency, and well-being. This session is appropriate for on-level, AP, and IB psychology. Randal Ernst, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln, NE; Charles Blair-Broeker, Hawkeye Community College, Waterloo, IA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Speaking Truth to Power: Teaching Content through Activism Work with RFK Human Rights Lead Educators to explore the pedagogy and power of activism as a teaching tool through the Speak Truth to Power toolkit of lessons. Christopher Buckley, Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights/ Darien High School, Brookfield, CT; Michelle Haddix, Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights/Herron High School, Indianapolis, IN

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Hamilton the Man-ilton: Roots of the Revolution Turn students into amateur historians on many perspectives of the American Revolution using databases, primary sources, arts, imagination, and Hamilton to create time capsules for America’s greatest drama. Sarah Justice, Rosman Middle and High Schools, Rosman, NC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

The Henrietta Lacks Education Project: So Much More Than Science Explore lessons from The Immortal Henrietta Lacks Curriculum. This resource helps students understand the significance of Henrietta Lacks and her contribution to science, from a historical point of view. Amy Rosenkrans, Prince George’s County Public Schools, Havre De Grace, MD; Shelina Warren, DC Public Schools, Washington DC; Carla Easter , National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, MD; Candra Flanagan, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington, DC US HISTORY

New Orleans, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Indigenous Chicago: Sovereignty and Self Determination in an Urban Context

The Other Option to AP: Critical Thinking Courses [REC] An alternative to AP programs: the critical thinking classroom—combining History and English to produce college readiness. Paul Lambrecht, Heather Monson, Brian Schou, United Township High School, East Moline, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Learn about Indigenous Chicago! Panelists from the Chicago American Indian Center and D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian Studies discuss the past and present of urban American Indians. Rachel Talbert, George Washington University Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Washington, DC

US HISTORY

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

“My Part of the Story: Exploring Identity in the U.S.” Explore My Part of the Story, a teaching resource designed to launch a course about United States history, literature, or civic life through an examination of students’ individual identities. Jennifer Jones-Clark, Facing History and Ourselves, Cambridge, MA; Sarah Shields, Facing History and Ourselves, Chicago, IL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Leveraging Current Events to Teach the Past: Korea Explore how to leverage current events in Korea to engage students in historical thinking and connect the past to today through instructional and assessment materials based on primary/secondary sources. Greg Ahlquist, Webster Schools, Webster, NY; Gabe Fain, Frisco Heritage High School, McKinney, TX; Patrick Whelan, Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School, Bradenton, FL; Deborah Wing-Leonard, Clear Lake High School, Houston, TX

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

111


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 7 • 10:15–11:20am

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Eight-Day Study Trip to Japan

The Mexican Revolution: The Past Becoming the Relevant Present Discover how a revolution in Mexico in the early 20th century has become relevant in 21st century United States. Develope relevant connections—explore past actions and current problems. Anton Schulzki, William J. Palmer High School, Colorado Springs, CO SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

WORLD HISTORY

What can we learn from Japan’s society and economy today? Get insights for your classroom and learn more about the expenses-paid Keizai Koho Center study tour to Japan. Amy Boots, Keizai Koho Center, Monroesville, PA Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Nearpod in the Social Studies Classroom Ed Finney, Schodack Central Schools, Castleton-on-Hudson, NY

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

The World’s History: The Queens Immigration Project

10:15–10:45am

The NHPRC-funded “Queens Immigration Project” inspires teachers to create citizen archivists of 10th grade students. Students explore family history, engage world historical methods and thinking, and learn digital literacy skills. Elaine Carey, Purdue University Northwest, Hammond, IN; Kathryn Shaugnessy, St. John’s University, Queens, NY; Steven Spear, Eleanor Roosevelt High School, Manhattan, NY; Jennifer Suri, Stuyvesant High School, Manhattan, NY; John Ronzino, Flushing High School, Queens, NY; Michael Freydin, JHS157, Rego Park, NY; Sean McManamon, Brooklyn Tech, Brooklyn, NY

Higher Education Session HIGHER EDUCATION

US HISTORY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Contextualizing the People’s House for the 21st Century Classroom Explore new ways to engage students with history and government classes using the lens of the White House, the People’s House. Discover innovative resources including a new virtual tour. Joanna Capps, Whitney Hayne, White House Historical Association, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower US HISTORY

Plaza Ballroom A, Lobby Level, East Tower

Teaching and Learning about 9/11 — A Teacher Inquiry Project Learn about the inquiry process as experienced by preservice elementary education teachers who initiated a research project to understand how to teach their future students about 9/11. Amina Chaudhri, Ayesha Yousuf, Alexa Zajac, Mirsad Muminovic, Beata Soltys, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL

Exhibitor Sessions ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

FRONTLINE in the Classroom: Serious Journalism for Serious Times FRONTLINE explores and illuminates the critical issues of our times from business and health to social issues, politics and war. Join us for a panel discussion on using free FRONTLINE educational resources in the classroom. High school educators share lesson ideas that use FRONTLINE media, resulting in highly engaging and thought-provoking learning experiences. All attendees will be entered into a raffle for a PBS prize bag. Kevin Dua, Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, Cambridge, MA; David Olson, James Madison Memorial High School, Madison, WI; Pamala Miller, Hanover High School, Hanover, NH; Elizabeth Gardner, Carolyn Jacobs, WGBH Education, Boston, MA

112

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Synthesizing the “isms” in AP U.S. History Exploring terms like mercantilism, capitalism, racism, imperialism, nativism, communism, and other “isms” can provide all teachers a way to enhance their teaching of AP U.S. History. Nathan Newhalfen, John Roncone, Barrington High School, Barrington, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

The Power of Podcasting for Teaching and Learning Podcasts can be great for sharing content with students, but podcasts aren’t only for listening and consuming. You and your students can create your own audio and podcasts easily. Chris Hitchcock, Indiana University High School, Bloomington, IN; Amy Presley, Broken Arrow High School, Broken Arrow, OK

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 10:50–11:20am

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Good to the Last Drop: Water in AP Human Geography Explore the ways that water is the driving force behind population concentrations, agricultural innovations, industrial output, and our day-to-day needs. John Roncone, Nathan Newhalfen, Barrington High School, Barrington, IL

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 7 • 10:15–11:20am / Poster Sessions 10:45-11:45am SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

PREK-ELEMENTARY

WORLD HISTORY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Table 4

Steel Beams, Spurious Memes: Conspiracy Theories, Media Literacy and 9/11

The Very Hungry Teacher! K-3 Historical Thinking and Children’s Literature

The prevalence of conspiracy theories highlights the ubiquity of misinformation and insufficient media literacy skills. Tackle both issues through a close examination and debunking of common 9/11 conspiracy theories. Noah Rauch, 9/11 Memorial & Museum, New York, NY

Learn how to get your students “talking historically” during literacy time. Explore book selection strategies, take-home lessons to foster chronological awareness and vocabulary, and assessment approaches with student work samples. Katherine Charette, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Instruction and Assessment in the Contemporary Social Studies Classroom As social studies curriculum evolves and adapts, so must our instruction. Explore rigorous and innovative strategies and assessments in this interactive session that will improve student achievement. Torrence Williams, Nicole Means, West Feliciana Parish School, St. Francisville, LA

10:45–11:45am CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 1

Wicked Problems: Democracy and Deliberation in the Elementary Classroom Explore the concept of wicked problems and solutions. Discover how to use the instruction strategy of deliberation to create meaningful classroom activities in civic competence and democracy. Michelle Torregano, California University of Pennsylvania, California, PA SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

Strengthening Classroom Libraries and Instruction with NCSS Notable Trade Books Strong classroom libraries simultaneously foster social studies content and literacy development. Does your classroom library meet these integrated goals? Learn practical applications for selecting Notable Trade Books for your classroom. Tracey Hodges, Holly Swain, Julianne Coleman, Claire Schweiker, Behzad Mansouri, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Katherine Wright, Boise State University, Boise, ID PREK-ELEMENTARY

Learn how Florida civic educators have come to interpret and implement six proven practices of highly effective civic instruction in their middle school classrooms. Joshua Carey, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

PREK-ELEMENTARY

Research into Practice: Proven Practices of High Quality Civic Instruction

WORLD HISTORY

Table 7

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

PREK-ELEMENTARY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 5

US HISTORY

Table 3

Adding to the Mix—Teaching in a Cross-Curricular Classroom

Preparing for the Future Without Leaving the Past Behind To prepare students for the 21st century, today’s classrooms must integrate collaboration, critical thinking, literacy skills, and technology. Formative assessment implementation easily assesses learning and guides future instruction. Hope Culpepper, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Grayson, GA; Anna Marie Lawrence, Gwinnett County Public Schools, Dacula, GA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 8

Future Ready Grading Practices in Social Studies Classrooms As school districts take the future ready pledge, what does this mean for social studies? Explore how to assess student learning using standards-based grading practices aligned to NCSS curriculum standards. Adam Dyche, Waubonsie Valley High School, Aurora, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 9

Social Studies Education and the Black Teacher—Musings and Discussion This presentation endeavors to delve into the sometimes problematic issue of cultivating true and authentic diversity within social studies departments and curriculum as a black or minority teacher. Keanya Clifton-Roach, The Education Equity Project, Prince Frederick, MD

You can successfully teach history in a cross-curricular setting without losing content. Explore ways in which you can teach history and language arts standards together in an authentic, cross-curricular manner. Kristine Petersen, Dranesville Elementary School, Herndon, VA 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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SAT.

Poster Sessions 10:45-11:45am

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 10

Table 15

Objectively Teaching Economics and Immigration in a Polarized Era

Marginalized Memories: How to Open New Dialogue About Historic Monuments

Economics and immigration have become polarized. Explore a digital Project-Based Learning curriculum with prepared lessons so that students can objectively compare, contrast, and critique economics and immigration. Jeff Bush, Kent Innovation High, Grand Rapids, MI; George Colburn, Contemporary Learning Systems, Boyne City, MI

Learn how to utilize primary and secondary sources related to historical and contemporary monuments to promote meaningful discussions and critical thinking. Receive handouts and resources. Stewart Waters, Matthew Hensley, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN; Stephen Blythe, L & N Stem Academy, Knoxville, TN

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Table 11

Table 16

Explore the Uniqueness of South Korea: Lessons for Your Classroom Learn about South Korea’s culture, demographics, economy, urban areas, and politics. Explore and learn uses of the National Atlas of Korea, and gain access to ready-to-use lesson plans. Jongnam Choi, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Pottawatomie Massacre CSI: Selfless Crusade for Emancipation or Cold-Blooded Murder? View a lesson idea using evidence to investigate the Pottawatomie Massacre and its importance as a cause of the Civil War. Kaye Rizzuto, Jordan School District, West Jordan, UT SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 12

Table 17

A Case Study Approach to Teaching Social Studies

If These Walls Could Talk: Maximize Your Classroom’s Instructional Potential!

Explore the case study approach in the social studies classroom as demonstrated through the global studies curriculum. Discuss and evaluate case study integration into other disciplines and levels throughout social studies. Wesley Hedgepeth, Trinity Episcopal School, Richmond, VA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Tired of the same old bulletin boards and classroom decorations? Gain innovative, practical strategies for utilizing classroom space to enhance your students’ historical thinking skills and supplement your content. Scott Peavey, Basehor-Linwood Middle School, Basehor, KS; Joe Zlatnik, Eudora High School, Eudora, KS

Table 13 SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Free Reading Tools for Primary Sources, Songs, and Just-in-Time Definitions Explore over 250 free online primary sources, a series of 40+ case studies with reading tools facilitating text analysis, and just-in-time definitions and comprehension questions seeded throughout to help struggling readers. Molly Farrow, Curriculum Pathways, Cary, NC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 18

World History Through One Big Question If world history were defined by preparing students to answer one question, what would it be? What is the best approach for the course to accomplish this task? Skeffington Young, Robert Fish, The Masters School, Dobbs Ferry, NY

US HISTORY HIGHER EDUCATION

Table 14

Active Learning Strategies: Not Your Average Native American Lesson Plan Discover interactive ways to engage your students in the classroom. Learn about various active learning strategies for teaching about the past, present, and future of Native Americans. Sarah Lucker, Chris Taylor, Mia Venafro, USF Social Science Education Club, Tampa, FL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 19

Student-Led Versus Teacher-Directed Questioning in a Critical Discourse Analyze the results of a study of teacher-led questions versus student-led questions in a critical thinking dialog. Sean Lennon, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA; Jeffrey Byford, The University of Memphis, TN HIGHER EDUCATION

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 20

Common Sense Curriculum That Works! Today’s students have grown up with technology as part of their everyday life. Instead of substituting education with entertainment, we blend tech with teaching to empower teachers and engage students. Fred Fransen, Certell, Indianapolis, IN

114

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 8 • 11:30–12:35pm

11:30am–12:30pm FEATURED SPEAKER

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

Grand Ballroom, East Tower

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Khizr Khan

Putting “Place” at the Heart of Your Geo-Inquiry [REC]

One minute after Gold Star parent Khizr Khan concluded his speech at the 2016 Democratic Convention, Google searches for “register to vote” spiked, and pocket Constitutions soared to the top of bestseller lists. Mr. Khan continues to give talks around the country celebrating equal protection and equal dignity for all Americans, and standing up to words and deeds that violate the ideals patriots hold dear. His moving memoir, An American Family, tells the inspiring story of one family’s pursuit of the American dream and why—especially in these tumultuous times—we must not be afraid to step forward for what we believe in when it matters most. Khizr Khan reminds us what being a nation of immigrants really means, and what it is to live— rather than simply to pay lip service to—our ideals. Khizr Khan is the author of An American Family: A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice and This Is Our Constitution. His appearance is generously sponsored by Penguin Random House. COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SESSION

GEOGRAPHY

Place-based resources are essential for designing IDMs that explore geographic issues. Learn how to access and utilize place-based resources to create geo-inquiries. Rosela Balinbin Santos, Rayna Fujii, Amber Makaiau, Jyoti Castillo, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI; Rosanna Fukuda, Hawai’i State Department of Education, Honolulu, HI PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Mindful Citizens: The Heart of Social Studies Education What is Mindfulness and how can it support our social studies teaching? Learn how we can develop Mindful Citizens through creative social studies instructional strategies in a responsive classroom. Sarah Montgomery, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

Jon Mueller “Thinking Like a Scientist: Using Formative Assessment to Develop Scientific Thinking Skills”

Exploring the Lives of Enslaved Peoples with Primary Source Documents

Sponsored by the Psychology Community Jon Mueller is Professor of Psychology at North Central College in Naperville, IL. He is the author of several psychology websites including Resources for the Teaching of Social Psychology and Authentic Assessment Toolbox, and author of the text Assessing Critical Skills. His research has particularly focused on science in the media, examining how well people interpret scientific claims and evidence presented in the media and how we can help students improve those skills.

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower

Carter G. Woodson Panel Discussion This panel offers a fascinating glimpse at “the story behind the stories” of the 2018 Carter G. Woodson award books, as told by the authors. It also features a discussion and Q & A session. Presenting Authors: Cynthia Levinson—Elementary Level Winner; Mariko Atkins and Stan Yogi—Middle Level Winners; Larry Dane Brimner—Secondary Level Winner Chair: Sarah Segal, Hood River Middle School, Hood River, OR Note: Book signing by the authors will take place immediately after the Carter G. Woodson Panel.

Pedagogies about enslaved peoples challenge teachers’ knowledge. Explore how primary sources and literature can construct lessons that incorporate meaningful strategies to foster critical thinking about enslaved peoples and their descendants. Natalie Keefer, Matthew Green, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Unlock the Mystery of Inquiry in the Elementary Classroom Want to increase rigor/excitement in your elementary classrooms? Learn how to effectively use the C3 Framework for inquiry that has students engaging with primary source evidence and taking informed action. Rachel Swearengin, Manchester Park Elementary School, Lenexa, KS; Tina Ellsworth, Olathe Public Schools, Olathe, KS

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Civil Liberties Today: Why Korematsu Still Matters Gain new insights on the modern importance of the Korematsu case, and receive exciting resources to help you tackle issues of civil liberties and race in your C3 classroom! Karen Korematsu, Fred T. Korematsu Institute, San Francisco, CA; Noreen Naseem Rodríguez, Iowa State University, Ames, IA; Stefanie Wager, Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA; Rosanna Fukuda, Hawaii State Department of Education, Honolulu, HI 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

115


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 8 • 11:30–12:35pm

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

NCSS Notable Trade Book Author Talk! [REC]

Native Knowledge 360°: Transformative Inquiry About American Indians

Explore NCSS Notable Trade Books: exceptional books that speak to social studies concepts. Hear some authors of these books speak about their work, process, and outreach to students. Jen Reiter, Gilman School, Baltimore, MD MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Seeds of Inquiry: Visual Inventory, Short Texts, and Primary Sources

NK360° reimagines teaching and learning about American Indian history, cultures, and contemporary lives. Engage with online inquiries that feature Native perspectives, images, and objects from NMAI’s collection. Edwin Schupman, Colleen Smith, MaryBeth Yerdon, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Engage with strategies and teaching techniques that leverage the seductive power of stories through visual and short texts which inspire curiosity and facilitate studentinitiated questioning. Tina Heafner, UNC-Charlotte, Charlotte, NC; Dixie Massey, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Secondary Level-High School Sessions

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Quest for DC Statehood – Examples of Democracy in Action [REC] Explore the 217-year grassroots effort to make residents of Washington, D.C., equal American citizens, and learn how to use experiential learning to teach democracy. Michael Brown, United States Senate, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Hearing the Other Side at Home and at School Using a Harvard-developed reflection-action framework, explore how to help students engage in vital conversations about politics, race, and important social issues to rebuild the center in a divisive era. Ben Liberto, Milford High School, Milford, MA; Kathleen FitzGerald, Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, Cambridge, MA; Christina Wiley, Chaebong Nam, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Combating Digital Misinformation: Teaching Students to Read Like Fact Checkers Help students to cope with unprecedented amounts of digital information. Based on research with fact checkers, new Stanford History Education Group lessons teach students how to evaluate online content. Joel Breakstone, Sarah McGrew, Mark Smith, Teresa Ortega, Stanford History Education Group, Stanford, CA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Interactive Constitution: Innovative Approaches for Teaching Constitutional Literacy Explore strategies for incorporating innovative, free, online tools and resources to bring primary sources and analysis from top scholars into your classroom, promoting meaningful, up-to-date constitutional literacy. Kerry Sautner, Mike Adams, National Constitution Center, Philadelphia, PA

116

ECONOMICS

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Ten Years After: How the Financial Crisis Changed our World Ten years after the financial crisis, we see significant changes in our economy. Learn about our “new normal” for GDP growth, discuss technological disruption, and explore changing employment dynamics. Susan Kizer, Federal Reserve Bank, Houston Branch, Houston, TX; Princeton William, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Wars, Woodstock, and Water: Intriguing Connections Through GeoHistory Discover multiple, free, online tools to help students explore connections across time and place. See how resources and strategies teach rigorous inquiries in geography and history in this interactive session. Rebecca J. Bush, Ottawa Area Intermediate School District, Holland, MI; Phil Gersmehl, Michigan Geographic Alliance, Mt. Pleasant, MI SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower

“She Can Do Something”: Authentic Narratives of Arab/Muslim Women Learn how to integrate authentic narratives of Arab and Muslim women into your teaching. Come away with the ability to challenge stereotypes with powerful classroomready materials. Hanadi Shatara, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY; Melinda McClimans, Middle East Studies Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 8 • 11:30–12:35pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

A Technology Town Hall for Social Studies Teachers

A Framework for Teaching American Slavery by Teaching Tolerance

Join the NCSS Technology Community in a town hall meeting to discuss current issues facing technology as it relates to social studies curriculum. Leave better connected and prepared to stay informed! Nick Lawrence, East Bronx Academy for the Future, Bronx, NY; Brian Bechard, Mission Trail Middle School, Olathe, KS; Kimberly Gilman, Hocker Grove Middle School, Shawnee, KS; Ed Finney, Maple Hill Middle School, Schodack, NY; Michael Berson, Alexander Ledford, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Kori Green, El Dorado Middle School, El Dorado, KS SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Back, Back, Back It Up! Evidence-Based Lessons in Any Setting Supporting claims with evidence is central to social studies education, both in standards and in practice. Receive classroom-tested lesson plans incorporating scaffolding and interdisciplinary teaching, for 6th-12th grades. Amanda Toporek, Berkeley High School, Berkeley, CA; Italia Krahling, Robertson High School, Fremont, CA; Galen Byrne, Yorkville East Middle School, New York, NY; Madeline Resch, S.T.A.R. Carly College School at Erasmus, Brooklyn, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Immigrant Voices in Social Studies Lessons Engage in an important conversation on teaching immigrant voices throughout history. Listen to engaging primary-source audio stories with lessons to get students talking about migration, past and present. Monica Brady-Myerov, Listenwise, Chestnut Hill, MA; Adam Strom, Re-imagining Migration, Boston, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Increasing Student Voice and Ownership in Social Studies Classrooms Explore ideas for increasing student voice, choice, and ownership through contracts, performance reviews, and other techniques. Learn how such strategies align with the Danielson rubric. Chris Kubik, Grayslake North High School, Grayslake, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Making Social Studies Inclusive for ALL Students with Disabilities Learn how to create an inclusive social studies classroom for a wide range of students with disabilities. Strategies are shared that support Universal Design for Learning and the C3 Framework. Darren Minarik, Radford University, Radford, VA; Kari Muente, Martin Luther College, New Ulm, MN

US HISTORY

Learn how this framework helps you and your students understand the role of slavery in the development of our country and how its legacies influence us today. Free materials provided. Lauryn Mascareñaz, Monita Bell, Teaching Tolerance, Montgomery, AL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

How Can Economic Thinking Deepen Students’ Historical Understanding? Discover how six economic principles can deepen the teaching and learning of American history. Why would free people in England sell themselves into bondage? How was America changed forever? Mark Schug, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Jupiter, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

More than History: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Black Chicago Renaissance Make your classes more than History! Engage your students with an interdisciplinary exploration of history that connects art, poetry, and literature through a study of the Black Chicago Renaissance. Michael Pond, Julie Mallory, Evanston Township High School, Evanston, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

U.S. HISTORY

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

The Hot 100+ Song Activities to Teach Diverse Students Experience classroom music and media activities to help diverse students understand history, current issues, world cultures, civics, social justice, and trends for the future. Packets provide ready-to-use activities. Judith Failoni, Ed Wright, Fontbonne University, St. Louis, MO SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Challenges and Change for Iranian Women: DBQs to Creative Writing Discover the dramatic challenges and changes that have affected Iranian women over the past century. Explore a lesson using documents and formal and informal writings: DBQs, Mini Qs, creative writing. Lisa Adeli, University of Arizona Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Tucson, AZ

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

117


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 8 • 11:30–12:35pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Using the C3 Framework to Analyze American Engagement in Vietnam Explore key events in the initial U.S. engagement in Vietnam. Utilizing visual, literary, musical and other primary documents, learn how to connect content with literacy strategies. Ron Nash, Gilder Lehrman Institute of America, New York, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Timothy Lent, Aruna Arjunan, Kameelah Rasheed, New Visions for Public School, New York, NY

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 11:30am–12:00pm

WORLD HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Virtual Reality and Immersive Experiences of a Great War Battlefield Experience the power of virtual reality and immersive technologies to visualize and physically explore World War I trenches and tunnels while uncovering the mystery of the destroyed village of Vauquois. David Hicks, Todd Ogle, Zachary Duer, Thomas Tucker, Dongsoo Choi, Ricky Mullins, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Jack Jagodzinski, Roanoke City Public Schools, Roanoke, VA; Jeffery Pederson, Suzanne Shelbourne, Montgomery County Public School, Blacksburg, VA

Higher Education Session HIGHER EDUCATION

Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Free, Open Source Curriculum Materials for Teachers by Teachers

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Plaza Ballroom A, Lobby Level, East Tower

The Activist’s Guide to Teaching and Resistance Develop critical skills related to organizing and creative action in order to promote justice-oriented student agency in the classroom. This session will privilege antiracist, queer, and pro-worker activisms. Alexandria Hollett, Scot Wilson, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Exhibitor Sessions ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

I’m So Stressed Out! Teachers Taking Better Care of Themselves 46% of teachers report feeling daily high levels of stress. How can we as teachers ease stress brought on by exterior factors and take better care of ourselves? Jennifer Bouchard, Needham High School, Bedford, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Expand Your Idea(s) with a National Geographic Education Grant The National Geographic Society is looking for educators to explore ideas that have the potential to change the future of our planet. Learn about National Geographic’s grant opportunities that are available to educators just like you. Let’s go exploring! Holly Emert, Rosemary Martin, National Geographic Society, Washington, DC

118

ECONOMICS

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Will Robots Take Our Jobs?: Economics, Technology, and Inequality Do your students fear the robot apocalypse? Learn the history and economics of the issue, participate in a simulation, and discuss how technology might affect economic inequality. Scott Wolla, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, MO; Kris Bertelsen, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Little Rock, AR SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Nigeria: History, Identity, and Change Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa, yet most students in the United States are unfamiliar with its history and culture. Come explore with the Choices Program’s primary sources, artifacts, & literature. Unit provided. Mimi Stephens, The Choices Program, Brown University, Providence, RI

Hands-On and Minds-On Active Learning for Social Studies Classrooms (K-12) Active Classroom Strategies and other quick activities help students develop routines. Learn how these “hands-on” and “minds-on” strategies increase student engagement and constructive talk in the social studies classroom. Keishla Ceasar-Jones, Pearson, Houston, TX

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 12:05–12:35pm MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

DeLorean for the Classroom: Back in Time with Green Screens Get your students out of their seats and traveling back in time using simple green screen technology. See how to get started, receive lesson plans, explore problem solving and more! Dylan Hultman, Trenton Middle School, Trenton, MO

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 8 • 11:30–12:35pm MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

When Words Fail: Teaching War on a Human Scale

The Future of School: Black Voices on Desegregation

War is more than a military affair. How can students reach deeper understandings of war’s impact? Shift the focus from military maneuvers to catastrophic events altering everything they touch. Matt Shomaker, Clinton Middle School, Clinton, MO

US HISTORY

Learn how education is a site of struggle for power, identity, knowledge, and freedom. Encounter diverse Black voices tackling school desegregation through a mixer role play. Ursula Wolfe-Rocca, Lake Oswego High School, Portland, OR; Natalie Labossiere, Westview High School, Beaverton, OR

Become a Chapter Sponsor! Stop by the NCSS Membership Booth (#1001) in the Exhibit Hall for more information socialstudies.org/rhokappa

A Program of National Council for the Social Studies

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

119


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 9 • 1:30–2:35pm

1:30–2:30pm FEATURED SPEAKER

Grand Ballroom, East Tower

Hall Davidson “Necessary New Letters for School Alphabets: AR, VR, AI, ML, MR” The NCSS Standards acknowledge the major influence of technology on social and cultural change. There is a new alphabet of technologies changing the world of work and daily life. AI (artificial intelligence) is a reality, a massive wave that will transform nearly everything. Machine Learning (ML) makes it powerful. AR (augmented reality), VR (virtual reality), and MR (mixed reality) are embedded in industries from manufacturing to transportation to design. Put these technologies into classrooms, integrated into traditional subject matter. Expose students to the alphabet of their future and make sure they are ready for their world. Hall Davidson is Director of the Discovery Educator Network. His appearance is generously sponsored by Discovery Education. COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SESSION

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Michael Meyer The Road to Sleeping Dragon: Learning China from the Ground Up Sponsored by the Asia Community and World History Community In the last book of his China trilogy, Michael Meyer tells a story both deeply personal and universal, as he gains greater—if never complete—assurance, capturing what it feels like to learn a language, culture, and history from the ground up. He will recount his 20-year journey via photographs, and talk about the challenges of reporting from China. Michael Meyer, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower 2018 Outstanding Elementary Social Studies Teacher of the Year

Empower Your Students to Take Action: Fostering Global Citizens and Solutionary Thinkers Change your thoughts and you can change the world. Join us as we explore the transformation from student engagement to student empowerment through the lens of Taking Informed Action. Presenter: Elisabetta Bavaro, Oceanside Union Free School District, Oceanside, NY Chair: Sarah B. Shear, Penn State-Altoona, PA

120

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Welcome to Finkalawinkaville: Building a Socially Responsible 21st Century Community Learn how constructing a simulated community in your classroom can integrate civics, geography, economics, art, science, and literacy while developing socially responsible behavior and encouraging critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, and communication. Heidi Torres, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Disciplinary Literacy and Inquiry: Helping Students Generate and Answer Questions Learn how students can generate inquiry questions to guide their social studies outcomes as they think like historians, political scientists, activists, economists, and geographers. Classroom examples will be shared! Ryan Hughes, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Kimberly Heckart, Prairie Ridge Elementary School, Cedar Rapids, IA PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Biographies and Local History: Bridging the ELA-Social Studies Divide [REC] Explore ways to use biographies and local history to create engaging interdisciplinary instruction that addresses social studies and ELA standards. Receive lists of mentor texts and sample lessons. Kathleen Heubach, Jamin Wells, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

Empowering Learners with Special Needs Through Project-Based Social Studies Explore ways that a project-based, narrative approach to social studies can be used to support the academic and social-emotional development of students with a range of special education needs. Bridget Walker, Sound Supports and Associates, Seattle, WA; Margit McGuire, Seattle University, Seattle, WA

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

How Teachers Are Using Interactives to Explore Congress and Civic Participation [REC] Through an LOC grant, educational organizations have created free interactives on Congress and civic participation. Learn ways in which teachers have used these interactives with their students. Stephen Wesson, Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 9 • 1:30–2:35pm MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Geo-Inquiry: Informed Action to Make Our World a Better Place [REC]

Push Play: Beginning Gamification in Your Classroom

Learn how an inquiry-based geography process effectively advances students’ geography, inquiry, literacy, and civic engagement abilities by taking informed action to make the world around us a better place. Alex Oberle, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA; Shelley Rath, West Middle School, Rapid City, SD; Amber Robbins, West Middle School, Rapid City, SD; Joy Bess, Kelsey Ehmke, Gentry Middle School, Columbia, MO

Push Play gamification has students engaged in a collaborative world filled with quests, mobs, and guilds. Learn how to create joyous learning experiences for you and your students. Michael Matera, University School of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower

A 24-hour video conference world tour! Connect students to an international audience and have a learning experience like no other. Rick Bleemel, Kelly Glos, Lewisville ISD, Lewisville, TX GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Examine Supreme Court history regarding immigrant students. Analyze educational law cases used to better inform district personnel and teachers about the rights of immigrant students in their classrooms. Kelly Owens, Hinsdale Township High Schools, Hinsdale, IL CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Examine global social movements and critical media pedagogy through vivid street art from around the world. Jennice McCafferty-Wright, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Rebecca Christ, University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Ten Strategies to Engage Your Most Reluctant Writers Discover strategies, methods, and tips to encourage and engage even your most reluctant writers. Engage in classroom-ready activities designed to teach historical thinking skills. Lynne O’Hara, National History Day, College Park, MD MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Covering Controversy: 9/11 and Beyond Explore how iconic New Yorker covers related to 9/11 offer entry points into controversial topics, including the shifting balance between civil liberties and national security, and the rise of Islamophobia. Megan Jones, Jennifer Lagasse, 9/11 Memorial & Museum, New York, NY MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Know Your Rights! Immigration and Students’ Rights

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Murals and Graffiti: Teaching Civic Expression with Global Street Art

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

24-Hour World Tour: An International Cultural Experience Like No Other

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Secondary Level-High School Sessions

US HISTORY

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Success in the Classroom: Learning from Latino Students Learn pedagogical strategies that will enhance your relationships with Latina/o/x students in middle grades social studies settings and lead to student academic success. Tommy Ender, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD

Rho Kappa National Social Studies Honor Society Showcase Rho Kappa National Social Studies Honor Society recognizes excellence in the field of Social Studies. If you've been curious about starting a chapter in your school, join Rho Kappa Advisory Council members, current advisors and other interested educators for a look into chapter activities and programs. Kristy Brasfield, Blytheville High School, Blytheville, AR; Mary McCullagh, Christopher Columbus High School, Miami, FL; Jill Armstrong, Greenup County High School, Greenup, KY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

The U.S. Constitution: Dead or Alive? Explore Constitutional interpretations (i.e., “original intent” vs. “living document”) through exemplary lessons created by James Madison Fellows about amendments, Supreme Court decisions, and various legislative and executive actions. Claire Griffin, James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Using Structured Academic Controversy to Teach 21st Century Skills Discover how you can equip your students with crucial 21st century skills through the structured academic controversy method. Georgia Brown, Grayslake Central High School, Grayslake, IL

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

121


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 9 • 1:30–2:35pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

De-Lecturing AP Human Geography for Twenty-First Century Skills

#GirlBoss: [Extra]ordinary Women Hidden in the Archives

Explore pedagogies allowing students to be active participants with the AP Human Geography curriculum. Learn strategies for putting 21st century and geographic skills to the forefront while maintaining course rigor. Daniel Bordwell, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Rachel Haemig-Lehman, Anoka High School, Anoka, MN; Justine Wewers, Blaine High School, Blaine, MN

Explore sources that illuminate the contributions of women to American history. Receive classroom-ready primary source lessons on ordinary women in extraordinary movements: abolitionism, women’s suffrage, and international volunteerism in World War II. Brianna Murphy, Advanced Math & Science Academy, Northborough, MA

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

A Technology Showcase for You and Your Students Learn about and engage in technology-related best practices designed to help students make global connections. Then follow us to the tech lounge for oneon-one mentoring! Nick Lawrence, East Bronx Academy for the Future, Bronx, NY; Brian Bechard, Mission Trail Middle School, Olathe, KS; Kimberly Gilman, Hocker Grove School, Shawnee, KS; Ed Finney, Maple Hill Middle School, Schodack, NY; Michael Berson, Ilene Berson, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Kori Green, El Dorado Middle School, El Dorado, KS; Alexander Ledford, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Tom Mullaney, San Francisco United School District, San Francisco, CA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Linking Local to Global: An Ethiopian Curriculum Project Learn how to use basic geospatial tools to help students visualize the world, using traditional Ethiopian artifacts. Receive classroom-ready lessons that emphasize 21st-century skills. Kate Van Haren, Pittsville School District, Pittsville, WI; Erin Towns, Edward Little High School, Auburn, ME SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Maximize Your NCSS Experience! Become a Friend: Networking 101 NCSS is more than a conference. Learn about NCSS Communities and Associated Groups. Share strategies for maximizing your conference experience and how to connect between conferences. Explore, connect, relate! Rozella Clyde, Chatham Borough, NJ; Steve Armstrong, Connecticut Department of Education, Hartford, CT; Gayle Thieman, Portland State University, Portland, OR; Terry Cherry, Mesquite, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Practicing Inclusion: Bringing LGBTQ History and Culture to the Classroom Explore best practices for including LGBTQ history, culture, and narratives into your classroom. Acquire skills, activity ideas, and access to LGBTQ-inclusive lesson plans. Erik Adamian, Nicholas Bihr, ONE Archives Foundation, Los Angeles, CA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Project-Based Learning in AP U.S. History Learn three project-based learning ideas designed and used specifically for AP U.S. History and cover 12 different AP Key Concepts. Help your students gain 21st-century skills, by infusing inquiry-based projects. Arren Swift, University of South Florida, Seminole, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

The Justice League: Unmasking the Mystery Behind Supreme Court Cases Discover strategies for teaching often-confusing U.S. Supreme Court cases. Receive edited cases with guiding questions to enhance comprehension, critical thinking, and disciplinary literacy. Gretchen Oltman, Creighton University, Omaha, NE; Cynthia Wood Maddux, Johnna Graff, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln, NE SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

March, Maus, & More.… Developing Historical Literacy with Graphic Memoirs Graphic memoirs written about historic events offer unique opportunities to explore the concepts of contextualization and perspective recognition. Receive strategies for both reading and creating history-focused graphic memoirs. Caroline Sheffield, Ashley Arnold, James Chisholm, University of Louisville, KY

Student-Centered Instruction in a 1:1 Social Science Classroom Discover and learn how to harness the power of technology in a 1:1 social science classroom to engage students and drive a rigorous curriculum in the 21st century. Chris Peters, Clint Paskozim, Maine East High School, Park Ridge, IL

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US HISTORY

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 9 • 1:30–2:35pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

NCSS Tech Community

Using Memorials to Teach Contested History and Collective Memory Explore U.S. and German memorials as resources for teaching contested, controversial history and divergent historical perspectives. Receive free resources and info on fully-funded teacher travel to Germany. Mark Pearcy, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ; Wood Powell, Transatlantic Outreach Program, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

What About ME? Teaching World History through the Middle East [REC] Looking to incorporate more about the Middle East in your World History course? Two teachers from King’s Academy, an international school in Jordan, guide you through ready-toimplement lessons. Michael Levasseur, Shaadi Khoury, King’s Academy, MadabaManja, Jordan

Higher Education Session HIGHER EDUCATION

Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Digital Breakouts

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Plaza Ballroom A, Lobby Level, East Tower

Learning About and Writing For Journals in the Social Studies Editors of major journals in social studies education will provide overviews of their respective journals (purpose, audience, circulation, publication guidelines, etc.) for readers and prospective authors. Cynthia Sunal, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Ronald Banaszak, Aurora University, Aurora, IL; William Russell, Scott Waring, Richard Hartshorne, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL; Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC; Stewart Waters, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

Exhibitor Sessions ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

The New Media Literacy Essentials Adapt traditional literacy lessons for a media landscape in which anyone (and bots) can publish and distribute information. NewseumED resources help students evaluate purpose and credibility, search rankings, and AI. Jessi McCarthy, Newseum, Washington, DC ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Social and Emotional Learning in the Classroom Learn about the importance of social and emotional learning in education and how it can positively influence student achievement, strengthen cross-cultural connections, and reduce conflict and bullying. Christopher Heinze, Challenge Day, Concord, CA

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 1:30–2:00pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

After-Hours Social Studies: Creating Successful Social Studies-Based Extracurriculars Is a 50-minute class not enough time? Learn how to create an extracurricular organization that focuses on service learning through student identification of current global issues. Maggie Haas, Lisa Willuweit, West Chicago Community High School, West Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Discuss it! The Harkness Model and Beyond Get ideas for increasing student discussion and participation. Learn a few easy-to-implement options as well as the Harkness Model and how to modify it for your classroom. Kelsey Hudson, Anne Broderick, Valley High School, West Des Moines, IA

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 2:05–2:35pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Wakanda Forever: Introducing Critical Media Literacy using Marvel’s Black Panther Teach critical media literacy skills using Marvel’s Black Panther ! Explore themes of race, gender, and sexuality in the film—skills transferable to other parts of the curriculum. Lesson plans provided. Scott Wylie, Chaminade University of Honolulu, Honolulu, HI; Jay Shuttleworth, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Teaching the Civil War: Finding Time for Politics, People, Passion Navigate through the challenges of teaching the American Civil War’s military, social, and political history in a constructive and engaging manner. Middle and secondary appropriate. Elizabeth Barrow, Michelle Reidel, April Newkirk, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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SAT.

Poster Sessions 2:00–3:00pm MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

2:00–3:00pm PREK-ELEMENTARY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 1

Immigration: Connecting Past to Present through Students’ Family History

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

A Community of Peacemakers: JK-4 Approach to Standing Up! Our world needs peacemakers. Dive into the Latin School of Chicago’s fourth grade unit on cultivating a community of up-standers, peacemakers, and change-makers. Amanda Schirmacher, Rebecca Reaves, John Taylor, Latin School of Chicago, Chicago, IL PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Table 3

We Are History Too: Latinx Children’s Literature in Social Studies Latinx histories and culture are important perspectives to include in elementary social studies. Discover ways to use picture book sets with inquiry questions that highlight Latinx experiences. Jessica Ferreras-Stone, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA; Sara Demoiny, Auburn University, Auburn, AL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 4

Bullies and Bystanders: Rethinking Holocaust and Anti-Bullying Educational Narratives Explore recent trends linking Holocaust education and antibullying programs. This session examines several national and state curricular programming, discussing the rationale, narratives, and implications for linking the Holocaust and bullying. George Dalbo, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 5

Call To Action: Extending Learning Outside of the Classroom Receive engaging research-based strategies that will promote civic learning and cultivate student learning that extends outside the social studies classroom. Semeka Samuels, Cobb County Schools, Powder Springs, GA

124

Teaching through Distractions: Understanding ADD and Guiding Student Progress Discuss and explore how successful classroom teachers support students with Attention Deficit Disorder and related behavioral traits in the middle school and secondary setting. Ray Kinzie, Chicago Public Schools, Arlington Heights, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Discover ways to teach children about the topic of immigration through their own family history. Students explore reasons people from different countries came to America from the past to today. Jennie Schwab, Karen Bucci, Rhode Island College, Providence, RI PREK-ELEMENTARY

PSYCHOLOGY

Table 6

US HISTORY

Table 7

History as Mystery: An Inquisitive Approach to 21st Century Classrooms Looking for new ways to expose students to the wonders of history? Discover the power of students searching for the “solutions” to historical issues. Experience a model lesson! David Kendrick, Bear Creek Middle School, Statham, GA; Sam Thomas, Ashleigh Oatts, T.R.R. Cobb House, Athens, GA; Nick Hussain, Pierre Oulevey, Megan Tipton, Clarke County School District, Athens, GA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 8

Using Technology of the Future to Engage Social Studies Learners Receive 20 technology resources appropriate for K-12 social studies educators. Learn current apps and tools, see engaging simulations, and consider virtual reality opportunities. Lara Willox, College of Education / University of West Georgia Education Annex, Carrolton, GA; Kristi Stricker, Concordia University Chicago, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 9

Just DO Civics: It’s a Participatory Sport! Learn engaging ways to bring civics alive, highlighting activities/resources recognized by the California Civic Learning Award. Receive lessons/resources to support the C3 Framework and Inquiry Arc. Barbara Lane, San Bernardino County Schools, San Bernardino, CA; Liz Ramos, Alta Loma High School, Alta Loma, CA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Table 10

“Mercy Mercy Me”: Teaching About Environmental Issues Through Music Do you want to engage your students in examining environmental issues? Discover ways to incorporate popular music through inquiry into your social studies lessons. Elizabeth Wilson, Lisa Matherson, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL; Russell Hammack, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Poster Sessions 2:00–3:00pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Table 11

Table 17

Rails to Tubes: The History of Mass Transport

The U.S. Interstate Highway System: A Civil Rights Issue?

People have always had a need to move, and will continue to do so in the future. How did we, and do we, get from one place to another? Antonio Cercone, Clarion Council for the Social Studies, Trafford, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 18

Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality: Teaching Tolerance and the IDM Why are school bathrooms so controversial? Learn how to use Teaching Tolerance resources and the IDM to create inquiries like this that explore issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Amber Makaiau, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI; Hoyt Phillips, Teaching Tolerance, Montgomery, AL

Differentiating Fact from Fiction Using Primary Resources About Ancient Greece Explore and examine various resources that have surfaced throughout the decades. Discover how they differ from past educated views of historical events and cultures of ancient Greek civilizations. Rebecca Sattely, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Clarion, PA

SOCIAL SCIENCES SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Table 13

WORLD HISTORY

Table 19

Data Analysis Made Easy with ZipGrade Data analysis is becoming increasingly important in education. Often it’s difficult to get quick data on a test. ZipGrade allows you to easily get analysis on multiple choice assessments. Melissa Ackerman, Northwest Career and Technical Academy, Las Vegas, NV SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Explore how to use an inquiry-based lesson on the U.S. Interstate Highway System to promote both critical thinking skills and social justice issues in the classroom. Joshua Kenna, Matthew Hensley, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

PSYCHOLOGY

Table 12

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Investigating the Political Message and Ramifications of the Christian Gospels Explore how to teach the political message and ramifications of the Christian Gospels, how they have been interpreted over time, and the similarities and differences to modern American Christianity. William McCorkle, Clemson University, Clemson, SC

SOCIAL SCIENCES SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Table 14

WORLD HISTORY

Strategies to “CHEW” On!

Table 20

Students can only take in new information in small increments, and need some time to “chew” on it before processing. Receive strategies that will help students process new information. Richard Pauly, John F. Kennedy High School, Sacramento, CA

Enjoy a new and creative way to teach students about the innovations that changed war and how they were fought. Ryan Radaker, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, DuBois, PA

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Wartime Innovations Have Changed the Game

US HISTORY

Table 15

A Congressional Hearing for the Gilded Age The Sherman Anti-Trust Act, the Interstate Commerce Act, the McKinley Tariff Act ... how do we make these exciting when teaching the Gilded Age? A veteran teacher shows you how! Jennifer Bouchard, Needham High School, Bedford, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 16

Can We Discuss This? Promoting 21st-Century Skills Learn to design discussions that promote students’ construction of 21st-century skills. This includes 5-3-1, affinity mapping, philosophical chairs, and others. Dean Vesperman, Kailee Keyser, Deanna Grelecki, Koltin Pfaffle, Luther College, Decorah, IA

NCSS + TCSS + NCGE will co-locate at the 99th Annual Conference Call for Proposals opens in December 2018 Registration opens in June 2019

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

125


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 10 • 2:45–3:50pm

2:45–3:45pm

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

VITAL ISSUE SESSION

Grand Ballroom, East Tower

Civic Education & Media Literacy: Preparing Learners to Thrive in the Digital World This panel explores the intersections between civic education and media literacy education from both a local and national perspective. Moderated by the National Association for Media Literacy Education (NAMLE), the conversation includes examples of best practices, discussion of the challenges educators face, and a brainstorm about how best to align efforts moving forward. Abby Kiesa, CIRCLE; Jessi McCarthy, Newseum; Keta Glenn, Free Spirit Media; Heather Van Benthuysen, Chicago Public Schools. Moderated by Tony Streit, Education Development Center. The panelists’ appearances are generously sponsored by the National Association for Media Literacy Education. COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SESSION

AWARD SESSION

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower 2018 Outstanding Middle Level Social Studies Teacher of the Year

Tonight In the Classroom—Incorporating The Tonight Show’s Games into your Classroom Teachers will learn how to incorporate games from The Tonight Show into their classroom to increase student engagement through creativity, collaboration and critical thinking. Persenter: Tracey Zaval, Midlothian Middle School, VA Chair: Anthony Angelini, Conewago Valley School District, New Oxford, PA

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Glenn Mitoma “Human Rights Education: The Last, Best Hope for Social Studies”

Past is Prologue: Present Students Lead Democratic Social Action

Sponsored by the Human Rights Education Community How do we unleash students’ passion for building a humane, just, and equitable world and transform our classrooms and schools into vibrant, inclusive spaces? How do we support our communities as they deepen their democratic commitments? Explore principles and practices of human rights as a paradigm for making social studies relevant in our current moment of crisis and recurring community conflict. Glenn Mitoma, Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Contrast lesser-known social action by students to secure Black citizens’ right to vote with inspirational lessons for present student-heroes. Teachers and students synthesize courageous civic action. Receive handouts. Lois McFadyen Christensen, Monisha Moore, Taajah Witherspoon, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL; Janie Hubbard, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Disciplinary Literacy and Integration: Elementary My Dear Watson Find out how to keep disciplinary literacy and integration of social studies in elementary schools true to what social studies is, and not have it become just more time for reading. Joseph Schmidt, Maine Department of Education, Augusta, ME

Ogden, 3rd floor, West Tower

Institutional Members' Networking Lounge Calling all Institutional Members! Join us for a new professional networking opportunity to meet other institutional leaders and share in opportunities and challenges across your organizations. This special session is for representatives from our Institutional Members only and is designed to provide a strong way to make new connections and exchange leadership strategies. As a special bonus, meet Hall Davidson, our Featured Speaker from Discovery Education, who will share deeper insights on how to build a future for social studies! NCSS President India Meissel and Executive Director Lawrence Paska will also share thoughts with you about NCSS supports for your organization. Refreshments provided courtesy of Discovery Education.

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SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 10 • 2:45–3:50pm PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GEOGRAPHY

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Engage EL Learners by Exploring Literature, Primary Sources, and Technology

A Creative Curriculum for a Crowded World [REC]

Learn interactive strategies that investigate literature, primary sources, technology and 4-8 literacy skills. Return to class ready to engage EL learners using teacher-tested lessons, text sets and online resources. Nancy Rogers-Zegarra, Carla Peterson, California Reading Association, Santa Rosa, CA; Molly Snider, Mendocino County Office of Education, Ukiah, CA

Combine world history, geography, and life sciences in this hands-on session exploring how human numbers and activities have shaped the Earth and atmosphere since the Industrial Revolution. Sara Fry, Boise State University, Boise, ID; Pamela Wasserman, Population Connection, Washington, DC MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

Antiques Roadshow: Using Artifacts to Explore the Past Explore social studies strategies using show and tell in the elementary grades. Learn how to use artifacts in classroom practice to engage students in real-life meaningful inquiry experiences. Heather Hagan, Kimberly Carroll, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC

Girls in the Movement: Teaching Young People’s Civil Rights Stories Explore girls’ stories from the civil rights movement, using historical fiction and primary sources, and discover how kids from the past can inspire students to be agents of social change. Jessica Ellison, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN; Renee Watson, New York, NY; Ilyasah Shabazz, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York, NY MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Cherry Picking the Truth! Disrupting Myths about George Washington [REC] Engage elementary students’ minds with primary and secondary sources to reveal the truth about myths about George Washington, including stories about his wooden teeth, wig, and the “cherry tree incident.” Eric Groce, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC; Michelle Bauml, Texas Christian University, Ft. Worth, TX; Tina Heafner, UNC Charlotte, NC

US HISTORY

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Using American Art as a Bridge to Deeper Historical Thinking Discover how analyzing art strengthens critical thinking and deepens engagement with history. Experience readyto-use strategies for meaningfully integrating art into your curriculum. Phoebe Hillemann, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; Peggy Veltri, Elgin Academy, Elgin, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Encouraging Historical Thinking Through Picture Books Using non-fiction or historical fiction picture books in read alouds offers an important approach to teaching history and historical thinking to young learners. Receive a method and book recommendations. Daniel Krutka, University of North Texas, Denton, TX

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions

Connecting Your Students with Real World Solutions Drawing connections between present-day news and real historical problems has never been more important. Empower your lesson plans with strategies to help your students analyze and discuss political issues. Bert Bower, Teachers’ Curriculum Institute, Rancho Cordova, CA

Secondary Level-High School Sessions SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Empowering Students: Teaching Civic Action in American History Engaging students in civic action is both practical and necessary. American history courses can take a hybrid approach to teaching students their rights and how to defend those rights. CherylAnne Amendola, Peter Gaynor, Montclair Kimberley Academy, Montclair, NJ

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Creating Argumentation and Critical Thinking in the Classroom Explore argumentative writing strategies and multiple readings on current social and governmental topics using the College, Career and Community Writers Project miniunits and student samples. Deborah Plummer, Lakeland High School/Tidewater Writing Project, Suffolk, VA

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

127


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 10 • 2:45–3:50pm

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Plaza Ballroom A, Lobby Level, East Tower

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower

Getting Out of the Way: Teaching Civic Competence Through PBL

Challenging Immigration Myths in a Social Studies Classroom

Although concepts of rights are written into our founding documents, it takes guided civic engagement to impassion and empower young people towards civic competence. Gail Barker, Suffolk Public Schools, Suffolk, VA

From travel bans to eliminating DACA: misleading rhetoric creates an atmosphere of exclusion and misunderstanding. Challenge popular myths of immigration through poetry and stories that reveal harsh realities that immigrants face. Kim Kanof, Camila Arze Torres Goitia, Zinn Education Project, Portland, OR

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

When Current Events Make You Cringe Students have instant access to information of varied reliability in a social climate filled with divisiveness. Gain tools for navigating respectful dialogue of current events with grit, trust, and compassion. Andrea Chavez-Kopp, National Catholic Education Association, Arlington, VA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Cultural Values and Economic Behaviors: Teaching Intentional Economic Decision-Making Explore the underlying role personal values play on financial economic attitudes and behaviors. Learn strategies to help students uncover their own values, changing intuitive choices to intentional money management decisions. Kimberly Roy, Peggy Muldoon, National Endowment for Financial Education, Denver, CO SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

PSYCHOLOGY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Psychology Labs—Sneaking High Level Learning into Your Course Walk away with labs and activities grounded in authentic research. Great for all levels of psych, including AP, but designed to support the new IB Psychology curriculum. Leah Greene, Needham B. Broughton High School, Raleigh, NC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Printing History: NCSS Publications and You Explore the core publications produced by NCSS and their strategic direction while discovering how you can share your insights by submitting articles for review and publication. Andrew Potter, Envision, Vienna, VA; Michael Simpson, NCSS, Silver Spring, MD; Scott Waring, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Crystal Ballroom C, Lobby Level, West Tower

Beyond the Hashtags: Social Media’s Role in Social Justice Can “online activism” have an impact in areas of social justice? Wrestle with this question yourself while also hearing how students and researchers have addressed the topic. Kristen Mattson, Adam Dyche, Indian Prairie School District 204, Aurora, IL

Science and the Social Studies: Where Two Worlds Meet Dive into the natural cross-curricular connections between the sciences and the social studies. The cross-curricular approach leads to greater content retention. Curriculum guides will be provided. Jennifer Alvis, Bay District Schools, Panama City, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Can You Visit Houses of Worship? A Global Competency Dilemma Learn about academically rigorous and constitutionally appropriate ways to visit houses of worship to help develop students’ global competencies. Seth Brady, Naperville Central High School, Naperville, IL; Benjamin Marcus, Religious Freedom Center of the Newseum Institute, Washington, DC; John Camardella, Prospect High School, Mt. Prospect, IL

US HISTORY

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

And Now…Back to the Sources: Challenging Students with BeWashington.org [REC] Infuse your teaching of founding era politics with interactive experiences paired with primary sources to ensure student engagement, debate historical relevance, model informed decision making, and practice historical empathy. K. Allison Wickens, George Washington’s Mount Vernon, VA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Teaching Difficult History Through Film Explore the relationship between film and pedagogy, using scholarship from history, film, and education, to consider models for how best to teach difficult history. Jeremy Stoddard, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA; David Hicks, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA; Alan Marcus, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 10 • 2:45–3:50pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

What Does It Mean to Be American? Artists Respond

Grand Suite 3, Ballroom Level, East Tower

What can we learn from art and artists about our history and ourselves? Explore the diversity and complexity of “America” with the National Gallery of Art, using images and activities. Reema Ghazi, Rachel Trinkley, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Exhibitor Sessions

WORLD HISTORY

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Free Trade…Fair Trade…Who Pays the Tariff? Experience the Foundation for Teaching Economics' activelearning approach to teaching economics with a simulation that used Dum Dum lollipops and tic-tac-toe to teach about the economics of trade barriers. Ken Leonard, Foundation for Teaching Economics, Davis, CA; Debbie Henney, Mesa Community College, Mesa, AZ ***EXHIBITOR SESSION***

Facing History and Ourselves: Teaching Elie Wiesel’s Night [REC]

Grand Suite 5, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Explore and receive a copy of Facing History and Ourselves’ guide, “Teaching Night.” Weave an analysis of Wiesel’s powerful Holocaust memoir with an exploration of the historical context underlying his experience. Sarah Shields, Denise Gelb, Facing History and Ourselves, Chicago, IL

Find out how InquirED moves beyond the textbook, developing 21st-century skills in students and providing teachers with the support they need to bring inquiry to life in the classroom. Martin Andrews, InquirED, Davenport, IA

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Nick Lawrence, East Bronx Academy for the Future, Bronx, NY

Learn about various pedagogical strategies and resources that foster critical comparisons between the Holocaust, the Bosnian Genocide, and the Syrian refugee crisis. Allison Weller, Teachers College, Columbia University and Copiague Public Schools, New York, NY; Michelle Penyy, Copiague Public Schools, Copiague, NY; Brittany Klein, Northport Public Schools, Northport, NY

Supervisory-Administrative Sessions GEOGRAPHY

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Maximize Your Impact! Leveraging Partnerships to Enhance Social Studies Education Make your partnerships a win-win! Using case studies from Washington, D.C., and Hawai’i’s work with National Geographic, learn the principles and practices necessary to create effective partnerships for your districts! Rosanna Fukuda, Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu, HI; Scott Abbott, District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC; Brenda Barr, National Geographic Society, Carmichael, CA; Alexandra Perrotti, National Geographic Society, Washington, DC SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

Tech Lounge, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Getting Involved with the NCSS Tech Community

Never Again? Using Historical Case Studies to Teach Current Events

SUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

Make the Shift to Inquiry

SOCIAL SCIENCES

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Discover, Develop, and Deploy: Creating a Teacher Leader Corps Program How do we create pathways for leadership in social studies? Examine the Houston ISD Teacher Leader Corps Program and learn how to develop classroom teachers into instructional leaders. Montra Rogers, Cynthia Fairbanks, Jamie Filipow, Houston Independent School District, Houston, TX

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 2:45–3:15pm

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Integrate Global Learning with the UN Sustainable Development Goals The Global Goals address gender equality, migration, climate change, and so much more! Learn how you can use them to build students’ global knowledge and active citizenship skills. Susan Zeiger, Ann Marie Gleeson, Primary Source, Watertown, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Law Day 101: Giving Legal Topics Life in the Classroom Learn effective and engaging ways to discuss current legal news and rule of law concepts with students. Receive programming models and resources. Chandra Fitzpatrick, American Bar Association Division for Public Education, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Teach with AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: “A Beacon of Intelligence and Purpose” Explore AMERICAN EXPERIENCE free digital resources on PBS LearningMedia including teaching tips and short clips. A PBS gift bag with AMERICAN EXPERIENCE DVDs will be given away! Carolyn Jacobs, WGBH, Boston, MA; Bonnie Belshie, Monte Vista High School, Danville, CA 98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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Concurrent Sessions 10 • 2:45–3:50pm / Poster Sessions 3:15–4:15pm PREK-ELEMENTARY

30-MINUTE POWER SESSIONS 3:20–3:50pm

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 3 GEOGRAPHY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Introducing the Geo-Pack! Bring Geography Back to Class Learn how to align your curriculum to geography using the Geo-Pack concept. Ray Kinzie, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL

Thematic Units: The Best Kept Secret for Teaching Social Studies Explore the thematic unit approach as a method for teaching social studies. Learn innovative strategies and receive numerous resources that are appropriate for elementary students. Daneell Moore, Middle Georgia State University, Macon, GA; Mellanie Robinson, Reinhardt, Waleska, GA PREK-ELEMENTARY

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Water Tower, Concourse Level, West Tower

Not Just White Men’s Wars: America’s Revolution and Civil War

Justice-Oriented Civic Education: Best Practices in Curriculum and Pedagogy Learn the best practices of social-justice oriented urban high schools including curricular resources and culturally-relevant pedagogies that foster students’ critical consciousness and help them become agents of change in their communities. Glen Water, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI HIGHER EDUCATION

US HISTORY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

The Possibilities are Endless: Archival Databases and Strengthening Research Skills Learn to use lesser-known, well-cultivated archival databases to make your historical research stand out. Learn to access newly digitized material, strengthen search returns, and refine research through judicious browsing. Jennifer Hinkle, Ohio University / Athens City School District, Athens, OH

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Crystal Ballroom Foyer, Lobby Level, West Tower

3:15–4:15pm

Move past one-page handouts that make diversity an add-on. Create lesson plans, and use new strategies and materials to integrate the experiences of all Americans into your history teaching. Janis Michael, Avoca West School, Glenview, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Analyzing News in Social Studies: Fake-News in the “Post-Truth” Era Since the election of President Trump, the media has characterized this period as the “post-truth” era. Tools to analyze news from a critical perspective for students’ civic engagement are discussed. Alberto Lopez, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Literary Landscapes: Connecting Books and Maps to Get the Story Learn about the USBBY’s annual Outstanding International Books lists, digital map, and primary source tools to enrich stories and broaden global understanding. Michelle LeBlanc, Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center, Boston, MA; Bindy Fleischman, Kingsley Montessori School, Boston, MA

Mastering Mastery Learning Discover what a self-paced, technology-rich mastery unit looks like, and how to implement it. Amanda Magee, Olathe School District, Olathe, KS US HISTORY

Table 7

It is the year 1901 and Mexican-American Gregorio Cortez stands accused of killing a Texas sheriff. Reconstruct what really happened that fateful day through movie clips and primary sources. Timothy Monreal, Lexington Middle School/University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 2

Promoting Compassion and Understanding by Analyzing “Big Screen” Bullying Learn how to cultivate compassion and understanding among elementary students by analyzing the dynamics of bullying in popular films. Receive handouts and resources. Stewart Waters, Matthew Hensley, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

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US HISTORY

Table 6

No Me Puede Arrestar Por Nada: Case of Gregorio Cortez

Table 1

PREK-ELEMENTARY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Table 5

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL PREK-ELEMENTARY

US HISTORY

Table 4

WORLD HISTORY

Table 8

“Teachers Assemble”: Using Marvel Movies to Teach Religion and Mythology Explore various methods to teach about religion and mythology using scenes from the Marvel Cinematic Universe films. Jason Allen, St. Joseph School, Martinsburg, WV

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Poster Sessions 3:15–4:15pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 9

Table 15

Environment and Revolution: Imagery of the “Arab Spring”

“Iran is Playing with Fire!” Investigating U.S. and Iranian Relations

Evaluate, through stunning visual resources, how climate change greatly contributed to the revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East beginning in 2010. Cristina Viera, University of South Florida, Department of Social Science Education, Tampa, FL

Investigate the 1953 Iranian coup through primary and secondary sources including declassified State Department documents. Station and scenario activities synthesize implications of the coup on United States and Iranian relations. Autumn Magliocca, Anthony Pellegrino, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 10

Performance Enhancing Disaster? Baseball’s Steroid Era

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Explore the previous era in baseball that traditionalists would love to forget: The Steroid Era. Nicholas Chrimes, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Apollo, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 11

No Time for Assessment? Making Multiple Choice Meaningful

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 12

Resuscitate the Art of Debate While Using Inquiry-Based Instruction Are you having students research and debate in your classroom? Have students incorporate inquiry through a respectful debate framework to experience empathy while navigating through controversial and political issues. Russell Hammack, Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL; Lisa Matherson, Elizabeth Wilson, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Table 13

Discover how a classroom museum using inquiry and research can transform your classroom into a learning environment where students act like historians to create exhibits based on content area topics. Susan Sullivan, Duxbury High School, Duxbury, MA WORLD HISTORY

Table 17

Speeding into the Future: How Racing Identifies Automotive Advancement Explore the fascinating evolution of auto racing. Discover how auto racing represents the pinnacle of automotive technology and will spur the evolution of the automobile into the future. Austin Cessna, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Elderton, PA; Isaiah Griebel, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Clarion, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Table 18

Using Comics in the Classroom Explore how comics, graphic novels, and histories can be used in the classroom to hook and inspire students to dig deeper into historical topics. Ed McGovern, Wayne Memorial High School, Wayne, MI HIGHER EDUCATION

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Table 19

The Life of a City in Six Steps Teach the history of any major U.S. city in six important steps, using an example of the history of Chicago. Antonio Cercone, Clarion Council for the Social Studies, Trafford, PA; Linda Somerville, Clarion University Council for the Social Studies, Clarion, PA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Creating an Authentic History Museum

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Discover ways to limit teacher stress and provide timely feedback to students by making assessments manageable. Learn strategies for writing effective multiple-choice questions that do more than assess recall. Cathy Covington, Pearson, Iowa City, IA; Sharon Staples, Pearson, LeClaire, IA

WORLD HISTORY

Table 16

US HISTORY

Table 14

Truth, Half-Truths, and Lies: Teaching Complexities in American History History is messy, complicated, and complex, but teaching history well doesn’t need to be difficult. Use a variety of methods to help students understand the truths in history. Handouts provided. Melissa Marks, Tiffany DeMartino, Sarah Raptosh, Mina Waldron, University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg, PA

Using Images from Nagasaki in the Classroom Joe O’Donnell’s 1945 photos from on the ground in the atomic wastelands of Nagasaki can be used to spark classroom discussions on war and peace. Anne Prescott, Five College Center for East Asian Studies, Northampton, MA HIGHER EDUCATION

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Table 20

Teacher Voices: Empower Educators and Improve Social Studies Education Research Empower your profession by using your voice to inform researchers, create collaborative relationships, or even engage in action research. Let yourself be heard; it’s time that your knowledge was honored. Lindsey Stevenson, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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Available Now in the NCSS Bookstore!

Not an NCSS member? Join at www.socialstudies.org/membership

Not an NCSS member? Join at www.socialstudies.org/membership

Not an NCSS member? Join at www.socialstudies.org/membership

Not an NCSS member? Join at www.socialstudies.org/membership

132

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 11 • 4:00–5:05pm

4:00–5:00pm

PREK-ELEMENTARY

FEATURED SPEAKER

The Storypath Approach: Engaging Learners in Critical Thinking about Elections

Grand Ballroom, East Tower

Kenneth C. Davis

“More Deadly Than War: The 1918 Spanish Flu and World War I” As we mark the 100th anniversary of the worst disease outbreak in modern history, the story of the Spanish Flu and its connection to World War I is more relevant than ever. The author of the bestselling Don’t Know Much About History and YALSA Finalist In the Shadow of Liberty, Kenneth C. Davis describes in dramatic detail how this global epidemic was intertwined with the horrors of World War I— and how it could happen again. COMMUNITY SCHOLAR SESSION

Crystal Ballroom B, Lobby Level, West Tower

Emily Reeves “Critical Literacy, Language Barriers, and Responsible Civic Engagement” Sponsored by the Educators for Social Justice Community Critical literacy for responsible civic engagement is impacted by accessibility of quality information. Lack of access to necessary information impedes political presence. Language barriers are a significant factor in limited political presence. Emily Reeves, Midwestern State University, Wichita Falls, TX

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS AWARD SESSION

The Storypath approach uses setting, characters, and plot to organize learning experiences about an election campaign. Research underscores the power of story as students imagine themselves as campaign workers and candidates. Margit McGuire, Seattle University, Seattle, WA; Bridget Walker, Mukilteo, WA PREK-ELEMENTARY

GEOGRAPHY

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

New Directions in Elementary Inquiry: Is Happiness Based on Location? Redesigned C3 geographic inquiries incorporating the research on happiness will enable students to connect geography to their lives. Experience a Western Hemisphere meeting of the minds to find the answer. Kevin Sheehan, Molloy College, Massapequa, NY PREK-ELEMENTARY

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Comiskey, Concourse Level, West Tower

Day Zero: Implementing Service Learning to Address the Global Water Crisis Experience ways to address the global water crisis through service learning. Investigate Day Zero when large cities, like Cape Town, South Africa, face the reality of running out of water. Erik Byker, UNC Charlotte, Concord, NC; Patty Hall, H2O for Life, Bear Lake, MN; Vicki Thomas, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX

Middle Level-Jr. High School Sessions

Wrigley, Concourse Level, West Tower 2018 Outstanding Secondary Social Studies Teacher of the Year

Using Deductive Reasoning to Uncover History Teaching history in reverse to strengthen historical thinking skills and foster authentic work in the social sciences. Presenter: Alicen Morley, Boone High School, Boone, IA Chair: Jesse Haight, Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA

PreK-Elementary Sessions PREK-ELEMENTARY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Better, Faster, Stronger, and More Civically Aware [REC] Discover the importance of fostering a strong civic foundation in the elementary grades, by demonstrating how young learners can actively tackle complex activities such as Socratic seminars and soapbox speeches. Cathy Marston, Glendora Unified Schools, Glendora, CA

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower

A Framework for Multi-Partisanship in the Classroom [REC] Strip away partisan rhetoric and use the provided values framework to help students understand why it is so hard for people to reach consensus on pressing policy issues. Emily Gibson, Close Up Foundation, Alexandria, VA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

New York City as a Living Museum: Modeling Place-Based Inquiry Use primary sources from the Library of Congress and local cultural institutions and leave with classroom-ready resources that illustrate how to make local and global connections when planning lessons. Elise Langan, Bronx Community College (CUNY), Bronx, NY; Salika Lawrence, Medgar Evers College (CUNY), Brooklyn, NY; Julie Maurer, The Gotham Center for New York History (CUNY), New York, NY

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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Concurrent Sessions 11 • 4:00–5:05pm

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Visit Germany with Virtual Reality and the Transatlantic Outreach Program

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Explore lessons about Germany and enhance them utilizing inexpensive Google Cardboard to take students on a VR journey. Receive TOP’s free resources and learn about free teacher travel to Germany! Matthew Cottone, Van Hoosen Middle School, Rochester Hills, MI; Jennifer Windell, Transatlantic Outreach Program, Washington, DC MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Supporting English Learners’ Reasoning and Writing with Sources Through Inquiry How can teachers support diverse learners as they work on reasoning and writing with sources? Get specific examples from tested curriculum that can be integrated into any setting. Chauncey Monte-Sano, Sara Thomson, Ryan Hughes, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Kimberly Harn, Scarlett Middle School, Ann Arbor, MI; Jared Aumen, Scarlett Middle School, Ann Arbor, MI MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

A Kinesthetic Approach to Teaching LGBTQ Civil Rights

US HISTORY

Burnham, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Anti-Racist, Authentic Assessment: Moton Museum Resources and Teacher Tips Explore authentic tasks, assessments, and rubrics created as part of a university-museum curricular collaboration that uses the C3 Framework to help students explore and address historical and contemporary racial injustices. Evan Long, Longwood University, Farmville, VA; Cameron Patterson, Robert Mussa Moton Museum, Farmville, VA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

Awaken Your Instructional Force! Join this interactive session filled with primary sources, evidence boards, music and more, designed to help students make connections and deepen their understanding of history through the lens of inquiry-based learning. Roxane Edgerton, Chesapeake Public Schools, Chesapeake, VA

134

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Empowering Civic Engagement through Gameplay: PolitiCraft Experience how PolitiCraft, an action civics card game for elementary, middle, and high school levels, can help students expand their vision of civic engagement and promote understanding and collaboration. Rachel Lyle, PolitiCraft, Inc., Los Angeles, CA; Mary Ellen Daneels, PolitiCraft, Inc., Chicago, Il SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

The Third Branch Today: Challenges Facing the American Judiciary [REC} Leading members of the judiciary discuss threats to the independence of the American judicial system in a rapidly changing world and its importance in civics education. Judge Lorna Propes, Circuit Court of Cook County, Chicago, IL; Judge Thomas Durkin, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Illinois, Chicago, IL; James Vera, Oswego East High School, Oswego, IL; David Halpern, The Texas A & M University System, Austin, TX; Jill M. Webb, ABOTA Illinois Executive Committee, Chicago, IL, and other esteemed members of the judiciary SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Join LGBTQ Civil Rights activist Zandra Amato and History UnErased and learn a kinesthetic approach for engaging students as they study civil rights activism! Miriam Morgenstern, Debra Fowler, History UnErased, Inc, Westford, MA; Zandra Amato, History UnErased, Inc, Soquel, CA MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

Secondary Level-High School Sessions

GEOGRAPHY

Crystal Ballroom A, Lobby Level, West Tower

Let Them Eat Profits: Hunger, Capitalism, and Peasant Agriculture This Zinn Education Project workshop explores inequalities and injustices of the global food system, and uses role play to learn from the grassroots solutions of small farmers around the world. Tim Swinehart, Zinn Education Project, Portland, OR SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower

Community-Based Approaches to Environmental and Sustainability Education Authors of a planned NCSS Bulletin focusing on environmental and sustainability education in social studies will present materials for classroom teachers across the K-12 spectrum. Matthew Hollstein, Kent State University, North Canton, OH; Bethany Vosburg-Bluem, Otterbein University, Westerville, OH; Jeff Passe, California State University Pomona, CA; Marie Heath, Towson University, Towson, MD; Jay Shuttleworth, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY; Mark Kissling, Penn State University, University Park, PA; Greer Burroughs, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ; Anand Marri, Columbia University, New York, NY; Lori Kumler, University of Mount Union, Alliance, Oh

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


SAT.

Concurrent Sessions 11 • 4:00–5:05pm SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Dusable, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Infuse Technology Into the Social Studies Classroom

Sparking Student Interest: Utilizing Question Formulation Technique to Drive Inquiry

Infusing technology into the social studies curriculum creates an amazing impact on student learning. From multimedia creation to interactive timelines, explore how technology can impact your classroom. Ben Sondgeroth, Regional Educational Technology Coordinator, Dixon, IL

Learn the basic steps of the question formulation technique through a hands-on experience. Receive an annotated bibliography of resources for future usage. Angela Smith, New Jersey Council for the Social Studies, New Brunswick, NJ SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

McCormick, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Teaching Immigration and Debunking Myths in the “Fake News” Era

Let’s Talk About It: From Civil Discord to Civil Discourse Explore ways to encourage students to respectfully discuss hot topics using evidence-based responses and structured conversation protocols. Practice civil discourse strategies using media sources. Resources will be shared. Sharon Thorne-Green, Celaina Huckeba, Katy ISD, Katy, TX SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Incorporate records of Native Communities throughout U.S. history into your curriculum, guide student research at the National Archives, and help make National Archives primary sources more accessible to everyone. Carol Buswell, National Archives, Washington, DC; Sara Davis, National Archives, New York, NY US HISTORY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Anti-Racist Education: Choosing Resources for Your Social Studies Classroom Examine an anti-racist framework inspired by Kendi’s 2016 book, Stamped from the Beginning. Practice techniques to discover bias in your curriculum and steps you can take to address it. Maia Sheppard, Rachel Talbert, George Washington University Graduate School of Education and Human Development, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Your Story, Our Story: Connecting the Personal and the Historical [REC]

NEW Native American Resources from the National Archives

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

Discover classroom-ready lessons for teaching the latest trends in immigration scholarship and debunking contemporary immigration myths. Jessica Barbata Jackson, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO

US HISTORY

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

HBO Sonic Highways Hometowns: Student-Led Documentary Film Projects Learn how project-based work inspired by the Dave Grohlproduced HBO series “Sonic Highways” encourages students to unlock the unique history and sound of their location. Christine Nick, Rock and Roll Forever Foundation, New York, NY; Barry Thomas, Omaha Public Schools, Omaha, NE

Explore the Tenement Museum’s online collection of personal stories centered on im/migration and American identity. Discover how to use these stories as primary sources and have students contribute their stories. Julia Mushalko, Tenement Museum, New York, NY SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Field, 3rd Floor, West Tower

Africans in Europe: Shifting Images of Race and Gender Explore shifting attitudes about race by examining art depicting men and women of African descent in European society from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment (1500–1800). Andrea Watson-Canning, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict with Primary Sources Explore the Arab-Israeli conflict and peace process through a diverse set of primary sources and experience innovative source analysis strategies that address Common Core, C3, and National Geography standards. Karla Suomala, Institute for Curriculum Services, San Francisco, CA; Steve Goldberg, Institute for Curriculum Services, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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Featured Speaker Speaker •• 5:15–6:15 5:15–6:15pm pm Featured

SSECONDARY ECONDARY LEVELLEVEL-HIGH -HIGH SCHOOL SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY WORLD HISTORY

Tech Lounge, Lounge, Ballroom Ballroom Level, Level, East East Tower Tower Tech

Using Digital Digital Collaborative Collaborative Projects Projects Using to Build Build Professional Professional Bridges Bridges Between between to Pre- and and In-Service In-Service Teachers Teachers Pre-

Crystal Ballroom Ballroom C, C, Lobby Lobby Level, Level, West West Tower Tower Crystal

The Impact Impact of of Ideology Ideology Over Over Time: Time: The Korea and and Global Global History History Korea Explore how how ideologies ideologies have have impacted impacted political political and and Explore economic systems systems over over time time in in North North and and South South Korea Korea economic through the the use use of of primary/secondary primary/secondary sources, sources, questioning, questioning, through and even even an an escape escape room. room. and Ryan New, New, Boyle Boyle County County High High School, School, Danville, Danville, KY; KY; Ryan Samantha Fraser, Fraser, Cherokee Cherokee High High School, School, Woodstock, Woodstock, GA; GA; Samantha Barbara Coulter, Coulter, Chillicothe Chillicothe High High School, School, Chillicothe, Chillicothe, OH OH Barbara

Duane Fleck, Fleck, Laura Laura Fleck, Fleck, Lee's Lee's Summit Summit High High School, School, Lee’s Lee’s Duane Summit, MO; MO; Alyssa Alyssa Overfield, Overfield, Ottawa Ottawa Middle Middle School, School, Ottawa, Ottawa, Summit, KS; Benjamin Benjamin Archaki, Archaki, Brendon Brendon Clair, Clair, Veronica Veronica Belvedere, Belvedere, KS; University of of Kansas, Kansas, Lawrence, Lawrence, KS KS University

5:15–6:15pm 5:15–6:15pm Grand Ballroom, Ballroom, East East Tower Tower Grand

SSECONDARY ECONDARY LEVELLEVEL-HIGH -HIGH SCHOOL SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY WORLD HISTORY

Columbus Hall Hall IJ, IJ, Ballroom Ballroom Level, Level, East East Tower Tower Columbus

The Indian Indian Ocean Ocean from from World World The History into into the the Global Global Future Future History Explore the the Indian Indian Ocean Ocean as as zone zone of of interaction interaction from from the the Explore early migration migration of of humans humans to to ancient ancient maritime maritime trade trade and and early today’s globalization, globalization, and and gather gather primary primary source source examples. examples. today’s Susan Douglass, Douglass, Harrison Harrison Guthorn, Guthorn, Sultan Sultan Qaboos Qaboos Cultural Cultural Susan Center, Washington, Washington, DC DC Center,

Supervisory-Administrative Session Session Supervisory-Administrative SSUPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE UPERVISORY-ADMINISTRATIVE

SOCIAL SCIENCES SOCIAL SCIENCES

Plaza Ballroom Ballroom A, A, Lobby Lobby Level, Level, East East Tower Tower Plaza

Leveraging Title Title IV IV Part Part A A Funding Funding Leveraging for Social Social Studies Studies Education Education for Title IV IV Part Part AA funding funding contributed contributed to to aa Florida Florida C3 C3 Hub. Hub. Title Learn the the who, who, what, what, and and how how of of leveraging leveraging these these funds funds for for Learn social studies studies education education in in actionable actionable steps. steps. social Michael DiPierro, DiPierro, Florida Florida Department Department of of Education, Education, Michael Tallahassee, FL; FL; Jane Jane Lo, Lo, Florida Florida State State University, University, Tallahassee, Tallahassee, FL FL Tallahassee,

Eric Liu Liu Eric American politics politics has has never never been been more more polarized. polarized. Our Our American democracy isis at at risk risk unless unless we we learn learn how how to to come come together. together. democracy But we we don’t don’t need need fewer fewer arguments arguments in in American American civic civic life life But today; we we need need fewer fewer stupid stupid ones. ones. That That means means we we need need today; arguments that that are are more more emotionally emotionally intelligent intelligent and and more more arguments deeply rooted rooted in in our our history. history. ItIt also also means means recognizing recognizing deeply that America America isis an an argument: argument: between between liberty liberty and and equality, equality, that strong national national government government and and local local control, control, color color strong blindness and and color-consciousness, color-consciousness, pluribus pluribus and and unum. unum. blindness The Aspen Aspen Institute’s Institute’s program program on on Citizenship Citizenship and and American American The Identity, Facing Facing History History and and Ourselves, Ourselves, and and The The Allstate Allstate Identity, Corporation have have come come together together to to create create the the Better Better Corporation Arguments Project Project to to equip equip people people to to engage engage productively productively Arguments across difference. difference. Mr. Mr. Liu Liu will will address address all all types types of of citizen citizen across power that that educators educators and and students students can can access, access, and and will will power invite you you to to involve involve your your students students in in the the Better Better Arguments Arguments invite Project. Project. Eric Liu Liu isis founder founder and and CEO CEO of of Citizen Citizen University. University. His His Eric appearance isis generously generously sponsored sponsored by by Facing Facing History History and and appearance Ourselves. Ourselves.

Social Studies for the Next Generation: The C3 Framework for Social Studies

Expanded Edition

Purposes, Practices, and Implications of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies Standards •

Includes New Supplement! - Religious Studies Companion Document to the C3 Framework

Learn the Inquiry Arc of the C3 Framework

Develop C3 Framework Questions and Plan Inquiries

Apply Disciplinary Tools Concepts and Tools

Evaluate Sources and Use Evidence

Communicate Conclusions and Take Informed Action

Discover the Links Between C3 and the National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies

Available Now in the NCSS Bookstore!

Item 130113 - NCSS Bulletin 113, 152 pages. Price: NCSS Members $19.95 / Non-Members $29.95 Not an NCSS member? Join at www.socialstudies.org/membership Not an NCSS member? Join at www.socialstudies.org/membership

136

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building Building the the Future Future of of Social Social Studies Studies Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow:


SUN.

Workshops/Sessions 8:30–10:30am

Sunday At-A-Glance Time

Event

Page

8:30–10:30am

Workshops Sessions 8:30–9:30am / 9:45–10:45am

137

11:00AM–12:00pm

Keynote Speaker: Jose Antonio Vargas

139

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

TWO-HOUR WORKSHOPS 8:30–10:30am

PreK-Elementary Workshops PREK-ELEMENTARY

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall KL, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Won’t I Get In Trouble?: Fearlessly Teaching Controversial Current Events Empower your students to stay abreast of our changing world in troubled times by learning principles and strategies to effectively teach controversial current events without fears of getting in trouble. Genevieve Caffrey, University of Missouri-Columbia, St. Louis, MO PREK-ELEMENTARY

GEOGRAPHY

Acapulco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

The Sneaky Teacher’s Guide to Integrating Geography Everyday Receive ready-to-implement tips and techniques at this interactive workshop to help alleviate the challenge of incorporating geography and social studies into the demanding schedule of elementary classroom. Gabrielle Likavec, Michigan Geographic Alliance, Mount Pleasant, MI; Brandi Platte, Michigan Geographic Alliance, Saint Clair Shores, MI PREK-ELEMENTARY

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Hong Kong, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Teaching Social Studies in an AlreadyPacked Elementary Classroom K-5 teachers will discover how to begin designing a quality social studies curriculum in an “already packed” classroom. Resources and ideas for development will be shared. Kathi Rhodus, Illinois State Board of Education, Carlinville, IL

Middle Level-Jr. High School Workshops MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall EF, Ballroom Level, East Tower

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Plaza Ballroom A, Lobby Level, East Tower

Teaching Civics in a Digital Age?! Slacktivism, Selfie-Humanitarianism, and Agency Learn how to implement the civics programs, Project Citizen and Youth Participatory Politics, so you can empower students to create change in their communities now, and in the future. Hailey Hancock, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

ECONOMICS

Regency Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, West Tower

M&Ms, PlayDoh, and Fishing: Critical and Traditional Economics through Simulations What are critical and traditional economic narratives and how can simulations support inquiry into both? Come to this exciting workshop and leave with answers and readymade ideas for these questions. Jennifer Gallagher, Christina Tschida, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Grand Ballroom A, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Become a National Geographic Certified Educator Join us for the official launch of the National Geographic Educator Certification Program. Complete Phase 1 today to join a community of educators committed to creating a more sustainable world. Meghan Modafferi, Mary Adelaide, National Geographic Education, Washington, DC MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Toronto, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Knowledge is Our Power: Finding Your Voice About Islam/Muslims Explore ways to teach hot contemporary topics, such as radicalization and anti-Muslim bigotry, at the same time. Receive curricular materials to be able to do so with confidence and courage. Alexandra Souris, Center for the Study of Jewish-ChristianMuslim Relations, North Andover, MA; Kathy Garms, Abdelkader Education Project, Elkader, IA

Demonstrating Disapproval: Citizens Taking a Stand (or a Knee) Analyze courageous individuals’ actions that draw attention to problematic policies by demonstrating disapproval. Compare evidence from historic and modern cases to evaluate the role of public demonstrations as civic engagement. Jeffery Nokes, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

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SUN.

Workshops/Sessions 8:30–10:30am

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

San Francisco, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Columbus Hall IJ, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Make Your Job Easier: Teach Students to Ask Better Questions

The Refugee Crisis: Effectively Empower Students to Create Feasible Solutions

Experience the Question Formulation Technique (QFT), a simple, powerful strategy to teach students to ask, improve, and strategize on how to use their own questions to drive inquiry. Sarah Westbrook, Right Question Institute, Cambridge, MA; Erica Ferguson, Cynthia Benoit, Erica Montoya, Joseph Janovjak, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL

Make the plight of 22.5+ million refugees worldwide come alive in your classroom. Hear refugees’ accounts and use project-based resources to develop engaging and socially conscious instruction. Laura Michalski, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL; Gloria Alter, Northern Illinois University (retired), DeKalb, IL ; Kevin Zickterman, Amnesty International Chicago, Chicago, IL; Blaine Mineman, Illinois Amnesty International USA, Marissa, IL; Susan Chestnut, IL; Randall Harper, Maine West High School, Des Plaines, IL

MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Columbian, Concourse Level, West Tower

Rise Up! Culturally Responsive Curriculum through the Lens of Hamilton Explore the life of Alexander Hamilton and different ways to teach about the “Ten Dollar Founding Father.” The musical will serve as a model for engaging in culturally responsive teaching. Brian Carlin, Jenna Ryall, New York City Department of Education, New York, NY MIDDLE LEVEL-JR. HIGH SCHOOL

WORLD HISTORY

Columbus Hall CD, Ballroom Level, East Tower

From Tongue-Tied to Responsive: Navigating Difficult Questions About the Holocaust Explore strategies to respond to tough questions about the Holocaust using free, high-quality resources from three leading Holocaust/genocide education organizations, contributing to secondary students’ critical thinking and commitment to justice. Amanda Friedeman, Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center, Skokie, IL; Esther Hurh, Echoes & Reflections, New York, NY; Danny Cohen, Unsilence, Chicago, IL

Secondary Level-High School Workshops

SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

PSYCHOLOGY

Randolph 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Col-laborative Teaching: AP Psychology as a Laboratory for Responsive Teaching Teachers are increasingly expected to prepare all students (first-timers to career AP-ers) for college. AP Psychology melds rigorous content, vital study skills, strategies, and social-emotional supports for our learning communities. Sabrina Ehmke, Matthew Walsh, David Allen, Makoto Ogura, Kate Kerwin, Evanston Township High School, Evanston, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Randolph 2, Concourse Level, East Tower

SPEAQ!: Student Podcasting that is Easy, Accessible, and Quality Learn how to create a student-centered podcasting project. Your students will be able to produce a variety of subjectspecific podcasts of good quality without complication and expense. Sean Hiland, St. Pius X Catholic High School, Atlanta, GA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Regency Ballroom D, Ballroom Level, West Tower SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Grand Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, East Tower

Digital Forensics Bootcamp: How to Hook Students on Fact-Checking Learn to use the tools of professional fact-checkers to debunk visual misinformation and create captivating, meaningful pathways to spark news literacy and civic learning across grade levels and content areas. Peter Adams, John Silva, The News Literacy Project, Chicago, IL; Jordan Maze, The News Literacy Project, Chicago, IL SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

CIVICS/GOVERNMENT

Columbus Hall GH, Ballroom Level, East Tower

When Democracy Fails: Using the Weimar Republic to Analyze Modern Democracies Explore issues of choice and civic responsibility in democratic societies through a historical case study of the Weimar Republic that seamlessly integrates Common Core literacy strategies. Brittany Burns, Algonquin Regional High School, Northborough, MA

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“The Forgotten War” No More: Using C3 to Teach World War I Deliberate as a 1915 citizen deciding the role that the U.S. should play in international conflict. This forum blends World War I history and civics, reinforcing the relevance of timeless societal dilemmas. Cherie Kelly, National World War I Museum and Memorial, Kansas City, MO SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Plaza Ballroom B, Lobby Level, East Tower

Exploring Inquiry and Visual Literacy for All Learners: Industrial Revolution Explore hands-on activities that show how building visual literacy skills for all-learners promotes inquiry into historical content, using the Industrial Revolution as the example. Mark Newman, Xiaoning Chen, National Louis University, Chicago, IL

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SUN.

Workshops/Sessions 8:30–10:30am SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Regency Ballroom B, Ballroom Level, West Tower

8:30–9:30am

FAKE NEWS? RACISM? ANTISEMITISM? Citizen History to the Rescue! Connect local history to today’s toughest subjects. Hone your students’ media literacy and historical thinking skills via original research for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s History Unfolded newspapers project. Eric Schmalz, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Roosevelt 1AB, Concourse Level, East Tower

Lakota Winter Counts: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Join a discussion of indigenous historical documentation as primary documents. The lesson demonstrates the interactive and reflective process of creating personal Lakota winter counts. Christian Pirlet, Aberdeen Central High School, Aberdeen, SD SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

US HISTORY

Randolph 3, Concourse Level, East Tower

Teaching with Primary Sources in the 21st Century History Classroom Explore best practices for teaching content, historical literacy, media literacy, and critical thinking through examining exemplary unit plans, lessons, assessments, and student work. Eric Shed, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA SECONDARY LEVEL-HIGH SCHOOL

ONE-HOUR SESSIONS

WORLD HISTORY

Regency Ballroom C, Ballroom Level, West Tower

Teaching for Human Rights: Creating a Student-Led Human Rights Conference Learn how to plan and execute a student-led human rights conference. Receive the tools to empower your students to take action on today’s critical human rights issues. Andrew del Calvo, Roxanna Ruedas, Dalwin Corcino, Kaitlyn Velazquez, Alessandra Flores, Harvest Collegiate High School, New York, NY

Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Stephen Armstrong: Experiences and Visions of an NCSS President The Archives Committee welcomes all conference attendees to their annual Past President interview. Special guest Stephen Armstrong will discuss NCSS policies and his experiences during his time in office. Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh Johnstown, PA; Michael Lovorn, University of Pittsburgh, PA; Linda McKean, Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH

9:45–10:45am Gold Coast, Concourse Level, West Tower

Kim O’Neil: Experiences and Visions of an NCSS President The Archives Committee welcomes all conference attendees to their annual Past President interview. Special guest Kim O’Neil will discuss NCSS policies and experiences during her time in office. Mark Previte, University of Pittsburgh Johnstown,PA; Michael Lovorn, University of Pittsburgh, PA; Linda McKean, Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH

11:00am–12:00pm FEATURED SPEAKER

Grand Ballroom, East Tower Jose Antonio Vargas An American by choice, Jose Antonio Vargas came to the U.S. from the Philippines when he was twelve. He’s lived here for 25 years, but his status as undocumented has meant he's spent those years unmoored and anxious. He knows no other home but this one, yet can’t feel fully at home in a place where he has to lie to get by. In his new memoir, Dear America: Notes from an Undocumented Citizen, he describes the reality of living as an “illegal” and makes the case that people should not be defined by their legal status, but by who they are. Jose Antonio Vargas is founder and CEO of Define American.

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EXHIBITS National Council for the Social Studies National Council the Social Studies November 30 – for December 1, 2018 November 30 – December 1, 2018

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EXHIBITS EXHIBITORS More than 180 exhibitors are displaying the latest educational products, programs, services, and travel opportunities. Make sure to spend time learning about the vast array of organizations serving the professional needs of social studies educators. We thank all exhibitors for their commitment to NCSS, and for joining us at the 98th NCSS Annual Conference. Bold numbers at the end of exhibitor listings indicate booth or table numbers corresponding to the Booth Floor Plan on page 140. ABA Division for Public Education www.americanbar.org/publiced 321 N. Clark St. 17th Floor, Chicago, IL 60654 The American Bar Association Division for Public Education promotes public understanding of the law and its role in society through educational materials, resources and programs. Initiatives include Insights on Law & Society and Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases. Visit www. americanbar.org/ publiced for more information. 807 ABC-CLIO www.abc-clio.com 130 Cremona Dr. Suite C, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 303 ABOTA Foundation www.abotacivics.org 2001 Bryan St. Suite 8000, Dallas, TX 75201 513 ABRAMS The Art of Books www.abramsbooks.com 195 Broadway 9th Floor, New York, NY 10007 1222 ACIS www.acis.com 343 Congress St. #3100, Boston, MA 02210 512 Adams State University 208 Edgemont Blvd., Alamosa, CO 81101 1311 American Archive of Public Broadcasting, WGBH Educational Foundation www.americanarchive.org 1 Guest Street, Boston, MA 02135 1330 American College of Education www.ace.edu 101 West Ohio St., Suite 1200, Indianapolis, IN 46204 1137 American Experience & Frontline on PBS Learning Media www.pbslearningmedia.org WGBH, One Guest St., Boston, MA 02135 American Experience and Frontline resources for the classroom are available free on PBS LearningMedia, pbslearningmedia.org. Film clips from these award-winning series, produced by public media

station WGBH, are contextualized for the classroom with support resources such as background essays, teaching tips, and discussion questions. 105 American Psychological Association www.apa.org 750 First St. NE, Washington, DC 20002 607 American Revolution Institute at the Society of the Cincinnati www.societyofthecincinnati.org 2118 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20008 The American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati promotes knowledge and appreciation of the achievement of American independence by supporting advanced study, presenting exhibitions and public programs, advocating preservation and providing resources to teachers and students to enrich understanding of our War for Independence and its principles. 309 American Sikh Council www.americansikhcouncil.org P.O. Box 932, Voorhees, NJ 08043 619

805 Ashbrook Center at Ashland University www.teachingamericanhistory.org 401 College Ave., Ashland, OH 44805 Ashbrook’s TeachingAmericanHistory.org offers resources for American history teachers and students, including professional development seminars, webinars, interactive online exhibits, and document-based teacher toolkits. In addition to our free resources, TAH.org offers online graduate courses and a complete Master of Arts program in American History and Government with Ashland University. 715 Asian Art Museum www.asianart.org 200 Larkin St. , San Francisco, CA 94102 Visit the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco’s education team to gather free curriculum resources and talk with museum staff about bringing the Asian Art Museum into your classroom. Discover diverse cultures and histories of Asia and make connections to your students’ lives today. 1333 Bedford, Freeman & Worth High School Publishers http://highschool.bfwpub.com 300 American Metro Blvd. Suite 140, Hamilton, NJ 08619 1204

Amnesty International USA www.amnestyusa.org One North LaSalle St., Chicago, IL 60602 811 AOA Medical www.unimedmessager.com 47 Cedarlake, Irvine, CA 92614 1221 Aramco Services Company www.aramcoservices.com 1200 Smith St. 27th Floor Mail Center-Attn: Public Affairs, Houston, TX 77002 1119 Archaeology Education Clearinghouse http://archaeologyeducationclearinghouse. wordpress.com Society for American Archaeology, 1111 14th St. NW #800, Washington, DC 20005

Benchmark Education www.benchmarkeducation.com 145 Huguenot St., New Rochelle, NY 10801 Benchmark Education publishes resources that build social studies knowledge and content-area literacy. Make your curriculum accessible and engaging with leveled texts for diverse students, big books, and text pairs that provide matching content at two reading levels. Our newest series, Spot on Social Studies (K-5) teaches social studies and genre studies using a workshop model. 414 Big History Project www.bighistoryproject.com P.O. Box 9700, Kirkland, WA 98083 315 Bill of Rights Institute www.billofrightsinstitute.org 1310 North Courthouse Rd. Suite 620, Arlington, VA 22201 815

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EXHIBITS Booksource www.booksource.com 1230 Macklind Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110 1211

Choices Program www.choices.edu Box 1948 , Providence, RI 02912 1020

Brightspark Travel www.brightsparktravel.com 8750 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. #450e, Chicago, IL 60631 1234

Civics 101 www.civics101podcast.org 2 Pillsbury St., Concord, NH 03301 1313

Britannica Digital Learning www.brittanicalearn.com 325 N. LaSalle Dr. Suite 200, Chicago, IL 60654 Britannica Digital Learning provides high-quality, standards-aligned digital education materials that make teaching and learning more effective. Recognized for curriculum relevant content, unparalleled expert knowledge, deep research capabilities, and multimedia resources, Brittanica brings state-of-the-art products to all grade levels. 1102/1200

Civics Renewal Network www.civicsrenewalnetwork.org 202 South 36th St. , Philadelphia, PA 19104 707

C-SPAN Classroom www.c-span.org/clasroom 400 N. Capital St. NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC 20001 608 Capstone www.mycapstone.com 1710 Roe Crest Dr. , N. Mankato, MN 56003 612 Center for Civic Education www.civiced.org 5115 Douglas Fir Rd. Suite J, Calabasas, CA 91302 711 Center on Representative Government http://corg.indiana.edu 201 N. Indiana Ave., Bloomington, IN 47408 Engaging Congress, a fun, FREE digital app, utilizes primary sources to explore themes related to civics and representative government. The game builds content and critical thinking skills as students work through 30 primary sources across 5 themes. The session’s hands on activities focus on incorporating EC into existing curriculum. www.engagingcongress.org 816 Certell www.certell.org 3077 E. 98th St. Suite 275, Indianapolis, IN 46280 411 Charleston County School District www.ccsdschools.com 75 Calhoun St., Charleston, SC 29401 1314

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Climate Generation: A Will Steger Legacy www.climategen.org 2801 21st Ave. S. Suite 110, Minneapolis, MN 55407 A Will Steger Legacy empowers individuals and their communities to engage in solutions to climate change. Stop by our booth for free climate change resources for all social studies classes and opportunities for professional development. 1039 Close Up Foundation www.closeup.org 1330 Braddock Place Suite 400, Alexandria, VA 22314 604 Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation www.themedalofhonor.com 1501 Lee Highway Suite 300, Arlington, VA 22209 Inspire your students through the stories of heroes. Stop by the booth to learn more about our FREE resources, which include lessons, videos, webinars, and professional development workshops. Lessons focus on the values of courage, commitment, sacrifice, integrity, citizenship, and patriotism and are built to engage students in collaboration, critical thinking, and personal reflection. 1216 Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs www.claspprograms.org 6801 Freret Ave. , New Orleans, LA 70118 1028 Dar al Islam www.daralislam.org 10147 Allwood Ct., Manassas, VA 20110 1023 The DBQ Project www.dbqproject.com 1234 Sherman Ave. Suite 100, Evanston, IL 60202 413 Destination Gettysburg, Discover PHL, Valley Forge Tourism & Convention Board Students can make their own history with their next trip to Pennsylvania by visiting Philadelphia, Valley

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

Forge and Gettysburg. Learn about the history of our Founding Fathers, including the Revolutionary War and Civil War, with interactive experiences that will excite and engage students of all ages. Contact Discover PHL, Valley Forge CVB and Destination Gettysburg for more information. 1326 DC Vote www.dcvote.org 1111 14th St. Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005 618 Dr. Annette Laing: Non-Boring History www.annettelaing.com 1323 Echoes and Reflections www.echoesandreflections.org Anti-Defamation League, 605 Third Ave., New York, NY 10158 Echoes and Reflections is dedicated to reshaping the way that teachers and students understand, process, and navigate the world through the events of the Holocaust. Through digital resources and professional development programs, we partner with educators to help them introduce students to the complex themes of the Holocaust and to understand its lasting effect on the world. 1321 Educational Travel Adventures www.etadventures.com 4400 Route 9 South Suite 1000, Freehold, NJ 07728 Educational Travel Adventures strives to provide unique learning opportunities through student travel. We know that there is no tool more powerful than seeing your classroom come to life in the real world and are excited to help bring your students their next adventure! 1208 Educurious Project-Based Learning www.educurious.org 2815 Eastlake Ave. East, Suite 220, Seattle, WA 98102 1322 EF Explore America www.efexploreamerica.com Two Education Circle, Cambridge, MA 02141 208 eMapshop & Klett International www.emapshop.com 11634 Busy Street, Richmond, VA 23236 1121 EMC School www.emcp.com 875 Montreal Way, St. Paul, MN 55102 610


EXHIBITS Esri www.esri.com/connected 380 New York Ave., Redlands, CA 92373 410 “Eva A-7063” Documentary www.thestoryofeva.com WFYI Public Media, 1630 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis, IN 46202 As a 10-year-old “Mengele Twin,” Eva Kor suffered the worst of the Holocaust. Now at 84, she circles the globe to promote the lesson her journey has taught: healing through forgiveness. The “Eva” documentary and corresponding educator’s guide will help carry her critically important message to future generations. 609 Facing History and Ourselves www.facinghistory.org 16 Hurd Rd., Brookline, MA 02445 403 Feat Travel www.feattravel.com 16232 Birchwood Way, Orlando, FL 32828 1029 Federal Courts www. uscourts.gov One Columbus Circle, NE, Washington, DC 20544 1037 Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago www.chicagofed.org 230 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, IL 60604 1230 Feel Good, Inc. www.feelgoodinc.org 1460 Gemini Blvd. #8, Orlando, FL 32837 1316 The Film Foundation www.film-foundation.org 7920 Sunset Blvd. 6th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90046 500 Ford’s Theatre Society www.fords.org 514 10th St. NW, Washington, DC 20004 Ford’s Theatre Society education initiatives explore the leadership and legacy of Abraham Lincoln and the world of Civil War Washington through engagement with performance and primary sources. We offer programming for teachers, students and life long learners. 1318 Foundation for Individual Rights in Education www.thefire.org 510 Walnut St. Suite 1250, Philadelphia, PA 19106 The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education

defends and sustains the individual rights of students and faculty members at America’s colleges and universities, including free speech, freedom of conscience, due process and legal equality. FIRE is at NCSS exhibiting newly-developed free speech curricular materials for use with high school students. 712 Foundation for Teaching Economics www.fte.org 260 Russell Blvd. Suite B, Davis, CA 95616 1104

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History www.gilderlehrman.org 49 W. 45th St. 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10036 1213

Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge www.freedomsfoundation.org P.O. Box 67, Valley Forge, PA 19481 714 Friends of the National World War II Memorial www.wwiimemorialfriends.org 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE Suite 316, Washington, DC 20003 606 Generation Citizen www.generationcitizen.org 110 Wall St. 5th Floor, New York, NY 10005 Generation Citizen is a national organization that partners with schools to implement our Action Civics curriculum. Action Civics is a PBL method in which students learn about the political process by engaging in it. We’re showcasing student work, offering curricular resources, and information about bringing Action Civics to your students. 508 The Genocide Education Project www.genocideeducation.org 51 Commonwealth Ave., San Francisco, CA 94118 1120

Grand Classroom www.grandclassroom.com P.O. Box 7166, Charlottesville, VA 22906 507 Gratz College www.gratz.edu 7605 Old York Rd., Melrose Park, PA 19027 Gratz College offers online programs in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, including: a Graduate Certificate, Master of Arts, and Ph.D. Individual courses are also available for professional development. Gratz College also offers an online Doctorate of Education in Leadership (Ed.D.), M.A. in Education, as well as a Master’s Plus certificate for those who already hold a master’s degree. Contact admissions@gratz.edu; 215635-7300, x 140. gratz.edu. 1320 H2O for Life www.h2oforlifeschools.org 1310 E. Hwy 96 Suite 235, White Bear Lake, MN 55110 1034

George Washington’s Mount Vernon www.mountvernon.org P.O. Box 110, Mount Vernon, VA 22121 703

Heifer Project International www.heifer.org 1 World Ave., Little Rock, AR 72202 1024

George Washington’s Mount Vernon/Be Washington www.mountvernon.org P.O. Box 110, Mount Vernon, VA 22121 George Washington’s Mount Vernon invites you to test our a new interactive experience, Be Washington: It’s Your Turn to Lead, which invites you to step into Washington’s booths to make tough decisions at key points in history—playable on site at Mount Vernon and online in your classroom. 916 German Embassy www.germany.info 4645 Reservoir Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20007 1126

Gibbs Smith Education www.gibbssmitheducation.com P.O. Box 667, Layton, UT 84041 Gibbs Smith Education is an award-winning publisher of customized state social studies programs. Each program aligns with an individual state’s distinctive social studies standards, covering history, geography, economics, and government. They also feature English Language Arts as a key element. Gibbs Smith programs are factual, unbiased, and grade-level appropriate. 205

Hemisphere Educational Travel www.hemispheretravel.com 1375 E. Woodfield Rd. Suite 530, Schaumburg, IL 60173 407 Hemispheres, The University of Texas http://liberalarts.utexas.edu/hemispheres 2300 Red River St. DO800, Austin, TX 78712 1026 Hindu American Foundation www.hafsite.org 910 17th St. NW Suite 316A, Washington, DC 20006 1201

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EXHIBITS Historical Tours for Teachers 125 Winthrop Street, Quincy, MA 02169 Historical Tours for Teachers is offering a three-day professional development opportunity. The goal is to study and explore Boston's historic Revolutionary War sites. Professional development points and college credit will be available and the workshop has been approved by the Massachusetts D.O.E. 1312 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt www.hmhco.com 9400 Southpark Center Loop, Orlando, FL 32819 1103 The Hot 100+ Song Activities 20 Stratford Lane, St. Louis, MO 63144 The Hot 100+ Song Activities is a valuable resource with over 250 songs and 70 lesson plans for teaching Social Studies with music. The book is available at the booth and a workshop is scheduled for Saturday from 11:30-12:30 in Regency C, Ballroom Level in the West Tower. 1325 iCivics Inc. www.icivics.org 1035 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA 02141 705 IEEE REACH http://reach.ieee.org IEEE History Center at Stevens Institute of Technology Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, NJ 07030 Through the lens of history, IEEE REACH offers FREE educational resources that enable teachers and students to examine the history of technology and innovation and its relations with society, economics, culture and politics over time. The resources include a repository of C3, Inquiry Design Units; teacher background information; short historical, documentary style videos; primary and secondary source materials; formative performance tasks; printable documents and hands-on activities for the classroom. IEEE REACH also offers professional development workshops. 518 Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center www.ilholocaustmuseum.org 9603 Woods Dr., Skokie, IL 60077 The mission of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center is perhaps best expressed in our founding principle: Remember the Past, Transform the Future. The Museum is dedicated to preserving the legacy of the Holocaust by honoring the memories of those who were lost and by teaching universal lessons that combat hatred, prejudice and indifference. The Museum fulfills its mission through the exhibition, preservation and interpretation of its collections and through education programs and initiatives that foster the promotion of human rights and the elimination of genocide. 603

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Independent Publishers Group www.ipgbook.com 814 N. Franklin St., Chicago, IL 60610 115

izzit.org www.izzit.org 2002 Filmore Ave., Erie, PA 16506 206

InquirED www.inquired.org 102 E. 2nd St., Davenport, IA 52801 401

James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation www.jamesmadison.gov 1613 Duke St., Alexandria, VA 22305 517

Institute for Curriculum Services www.icsresources.org 131 Steuart St. Suite 205, San Francisco, CA 94105 1324

Karama www.karamanow.org 2467 Marilouise Way, San Diego, CA 92103 313

Institute of Arabic & Islamic Studies www.islamic-study.org 31534 Indian Oak Rd., Acton, CA 93510 1309

Keizai Koho Center Fellowship www.japansocietypa.org 2735 Mosside Blvd. Suite 402, Pittsburgh, PA 15146 1027

International Academic Competitions www.iacompetitions.com PO Box 875, Tenafly, NJ 07670 International Academic Competitions organizes social studies-themed academic competitions in 30+ countries. Learn how your students can participate in our National History Bee and Bowl, US History Bee, US Geography Olympiad, and International Geography Bee. We also oversee the International History Olympiad, which students can qualify for through our other competitions. 1310

Kendall Hunt Publishing Company https://k12.kendallhunt.com 4050 Westmark Dr. , Dubuque, IA 52002 419

Irena Sendler: The Life in a Jar Project www.irenasendler.org lowellmilkencenter.org Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes, 15 Main, Ft. Scott, KS 66701 Come see the best seller Irena Sendler: the Life in a Jar Project plus great teaching materials on the Holocaust, Civil Rights, 19th and 20th Centuries and stories of unsung heroes/role models. Our focus is project based learning, K-12. Free lesson plans are available. See more at lowellmilkencenter.org and irenasendler.org for student competitions. 405 IREX www.irex.org 1275 K St. NW #600, Washington, DC 20005 1133 iScore5 www.iscore5.com 1302E F St., Russellville, AR 72801 803 Iwo Jima Association of America www.iwojimaassociation.org P.O. Box 680, Quantico, VA 22134 510

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group www.randomhouse.com/highschool 1745 Broadway, New York, NY 10019 Knopf Doubleday is the acclaimed publisher of award-winning social sciences titles in the subjects of History, Economics, Psychology, Political Science, Sociology, Anthropology, Law, and Human Geography. Please stop by our booth to pick up complimentary copies of selected titles and sign-up for our e-newsletter. 308 Lead2Feed/Foundation for Impact on Literacy and Learning www.lead2feed.org PO Box 4144, Broadlands, VA 20148 1233 Library of Congress www.loc.gov 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540 809 Listenwise www.listenwise.com 132 Eliot St., Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 1319 Macmillan Adult www.macmillanacademic.com 175 5th Ave., New York, NY 10010 1205


EXHIBITS Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group www.mackids.com 175 5th Ave., New York, NY 10010 1203 Marginal Revolution University www.mruniversity.com 3434 Washington Blvd. 4th Floor, Arlington, VA 22201 Marginal Revolution University is building the world’s largest library of free economics teaching videos, weighing in at more than 900 videos. MRU video can be used to supplement social studies, economics, or personal finance courses. Visit MRUniversity.com to view the full video library. 310 Middle East Outreach Council www.meoc.us 1025 Midway Institute for Teachers www.midway.org/education/teacher-programs/ midway-institute-for-teachers/ 910 N. Harbor Dr., San Diego, CA 92101 812 Mikva Challenge www.mikvachallenge.org 322 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60604 708 National Consortium for Teaching About Asia www.nctasia.org 1019 National Constitution Center www.constitutioncenter.org 525 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA 19106 706 National Council for Geographic Education www.ncge.org 1775 I St. NW, Suite 1150, Washington, DC 20006 The National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) is a nonprofit membership organization that works to strengthen the quality and effectiveness of geography teaching and learning. Now in our 103rd year, NCGE provides a global forum for educators at all levels to exchange ideas and engage in professional learning opportunities to improve their geography teaching. 311 National Endowment for Financial Education www.hsfpp.org 1331 17th St. Suite 1200, Denver, CO 80202 The National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) is a private nonprofit 501c(3) organization dedicated to inspiring empowered decision making for individuals and families through every stage of life. Since 1984 NEFE has provided noncommercial, credible resources to help you empower others with

skills for sound financial decisions. NEFE offers a suite of free personal finance resources to fit any program and complement other resources. 713

Navajo Jewelry and Crafts 6008 Hemlock Ave. NW , Albuquerque, NM 87114 720

National Gallery of Art www.nga.gov 6th St. & Constitution Ave. NW , Washington, DC 20565 The National Gallery of Art is the nation’s art museum. We provide high quality, free resources to teachers to integrate art into the classroom. 1214

Nearpod www.nearpod.com 18305 Biscayne Blvd. Suite 301, Aventura, FL 33160 806

National Geographic www.natgeoed.org 1145 17th St. NW , Washington, DC 20036 National Geographic believes in the power of science, exploration, education, and storytelling to change the world. For more than 130 years, we have pushed the boundaries of knowledge, exploring our planet from its highest peaks to its deepest depths. Bring this excitement and spirit of exploration into your classroom with National Geographic resources for students and educators, all available on NatGeoEd. org! 1112 National Geographic Learning http://ngl.cengage.com/school 20 Channel Center St., Boston, MA 02210 National Geographic Learning, a part of Cengage, is a leading publisher of PreK–12 School educational materials including social studies, science, mathematics, language arts, world languages, career & technical education and advanced, honors, and electives. Through our digital and classroom learning resources, experience the excitement and joy of learning that National Geographic explorers, scientists, writers and photographers experience.1111 National History Day www.nhd.org 4511 Knox Rd. Suite 205, College Park, MD 20740 611 National Resource Centers on CANADA www.umaine.edu/teachingcanada 1129 The National WWII Museum www.nationalww2museum.org 945 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70130 The National WWII Museum tells the story of the American experience in the way that changed the world—why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today—so that all generations will understand the price of freedom and be inspired by what they learn. 1202 Nations Classroom www.nationsclassroom.com 2211 Dickens Rd. Suite 204, Richmond, VA 23230 417

The News Literacy Project www.thenewsliteracyproject.org 533 Wisconsin Ave. NW Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015 1106 Newseum www.newseum.org 555 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, DC 20001 1207 NewsGuard www.newsguardtech.com 25 W. 52nd St., 15th Floor, New York, NY 10019 NewsGuard is a new tool created to fight false news and help students understand the sources they encounter online. NewsGuard’s team of experienced journalists review news websites to help readers know which sources they can generally trust. Visit newsguardtech.com and download the free browser extension to try it today. 1328 Nomad Press www.nomadpress.net 2456 Christian St., White River Jct., VT 05001 605 Norton http://books.wwnorton.com 500 5th Ave., New York, NY 10110 1210 NSLI-Y & YES Abroad Scholarships www.nsliforyouth.org 1828 L St. NW, Washington, DC 20036 The National Security Language Initiative for Youth (NSLI-Y) and the Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) Abroad programs are merit based programs of the U.S. Department of State for high school students and recent high school graduates to study abroad. 1132 Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum www.okcnm.org 620 N. Harvey Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102 The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum provides a variety of resources to teach civic principles and virtues using the lessons learned from the Oklahoma City bombing. Explore primary and secondary sources to help students understand valuable life lessons and the importance of respect, resilience and responsibility. 1329

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EXHIBITS OneHistory www.onehistory.org 3512 W. McLean, Chicago, IL 60647 OneHistory exhibits resources for teaching with primary sources in history and all aspects of social studies. While we will present resources for all ages, we have a special focus on younger learners (K-8). As with all OneHistory projects, the exhibit will emphasize diversity and multiculturalism. 1317 Opportunity Education www.opportunityeducation.org 10156 L St., Omaha, NE 68127 Opportunity Education is a non-profit organization, seeking to make quality education accessible to students in the developing world. We facilitate a Free Sister School Pen Pal Program, connecting schools in Africa and Asia with schools in English-speaking countries. Students become interactive members of a global society. 514 Oregon-California Trails Association www.octa-trails.org 524 S. Osage St, Independence, MO 64050 1139 Pearson www.pearsonschool.com 501 Boylston St. #900, Boston, MA 02116 107 Penguin Random House Education Marketing www.penguinrandomhouse.com 375 Hudson St., New York, NY 10014 Penguin Random House publishes trade fiction and nonfiction through a wide range of imprints and on diverse topics such as: world and U.S. history, political movements, geography and cultural experiences. Please visit our booth to browse our titles, subject catalogs and brochures, teacher’s guides, and information on our high school essay contests. 304 PenPal Schools www.penpalschools.com 411 W. Monroe St., Austin, TX 78704 1127 Perfection Learning Corporation www.perfectionlearning.com 2680 Berkshire Dr. , Clive, IA 50325 Perfection Learning is a leading publisher of curriculum materials for grades Pre K through 12. Our growing line of social studies programs covers AP prep; United States, world, European, and global history; government; economics; psychology; and more with newly-revised AMSCO titles and collegelevel Oxford University Press titles. 516

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The Periodic Table of the Presidents www.periodicpresidents.com 1113 Keats Way Ct., O’Fallon, IL 62269 History matters to us. It’s our mission to make history relevant, fun, and connected. Check out our vibrant approach to teaching the presidency and government. NEW for the conference…The Periodic Table of the Constitution! 1038 Personal Finance Lab www.personalfinancelab.com 3575 Ashby Rd., Montreal, PQ H4R 2K3 Many schools have biology labs, but why don’t they have finance labs? Let us show you how to transform your dull classroom into a Wall Street style Finance Lab with scrolling stock tickers, financial LCD screens and our Personal Finance, Economics, Business and Social Studies curriculum and customizable stock market game. 409 Polish Perspectives www.polishcultureacpc.org 1134 PolitiCraft, Inc. www.politicraft.org 16026 Highland Bluff Ct., Baton Rouge, LA 70810 813 Population Connection www.populationeducation.org 2120 L St., NW #500, Washington, DC 20037 Population Connection provides quality professional development workshops and teaching materials for K-12 educators. Their interdisciplinary curricula address human geography topics including world population trends and their impacts on environmental health and human well-being. Stop by the booth for lesson plans, posters and to find your individual Population Number! 1215 POV & Doc Academy www.amdoc.org/engage/resources 20 Jay St., Suite 940, Brooklyn, NY 11201 PBS’ POV offers free resources for educators to use award-winning documentary films to bring today’s most pressing social issues into the classroom. Doc Academy offers free documentary clips to engage students in critical media literacy, fostering empathy and civic engagement. 1231 Pritzker Military Museum & Library www.pritzkermilitary.org 104 S. Michigan Ave. Suite 400, Chicago, IL 60603 The Pritzker Military Museum & Library is a fantastic resource for educators, researchers, and students. Located in downtown Chicago, the institution specializes in books, periodicals, rotating exhibits, and original programming to tell the story of the citizen soldier, connecting the public with the role the

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

military plays in our democracy. 302 Project Look Sharp www.projectlooksharp.org 1119 Williams Hall, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY 14850 710 Publisher Spotlight www.publisherspotlight.com 6670 New Nashville Hwy. #220, Smyrna, TN 37167 503 Pulitzer Center www.pulitzercenter.org 1779 Massachusetts Ave. NW Suite 615, Washington, DC 20036 1030 Qatar Foundation International www.qfi.org 1225 New York Ave. NW Suite 500, Washington, DC 20002 1031 Rand McNally www.randmcnally.com 9855 Woods Dr., Skokie, IL 60077 511 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame www.rockhall.com 1100 Rock and Roll Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44114 1219 Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Institute www.reaganfoundation.org/education 40 Presidential Dr., Simi Valley, CA 91311 804 Rosen Publishing www.rosenpublishing.com 29 East 21st St., New York, NY 10010 Rosen Publishing’s core mission is to engage and motivate students by providing compelling, just-right content correlated to curriculum standards. Careful editing and design is brought to a range of subjects and formats across the K-12 environment, which allows us to positively impact student learning and outcomes. 814 School Tours of America www.schooltoursofamerica.com 9610 Long Point Rd. Suite 215, Houston, TX 77055 614 Second Avenue Learning www.secondavenuelearning.com 280 E. Broad St. Suite 310, Rochester, NY 14604 509


EXHIBITS SGAP www.sgap.org 2435 N. Central Expwy. #300, Richardson, TX 75080 704

UChicago STEM Education http://financialeducation.uchicago.edu 1427 East 60th St. , Chicago, IL 60637 116

Smart Student Travel www.smartstudenttravel.com 12587 Fair Lakes Circle #281, Fairfax, VA 22033 1220

U.S. Institute of Peace www.usip.org 2301 Constitution Ave. NW , Washington, DC 20037 1021

Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery http://npg.si.edu PO Box 37012 MRC 973, Suite 410, Washington, DC 20013 The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery tells the diverse story of America through leaders, rebels, artists, entrepreneurs, and other prominent personalities who shaped our culture. Integrating portraiture into the classroom provides exciting opportunities to connect students with history, biography, visual art, and many other subjects. 307

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum www.ushmm.org 100 Raoul Wallenberg Place, SW, Washington, DC 20024 1033

Social Studies School Service www.socialstudies.com 10200 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232 211

United States Mint www.usmint.gov/educators 801 9th St. NW, Washington, DC 20001 The United States Mint offers more than 300 free social studies lesson plans, classroom activities and educational games designed for K-12 classrooms. Based on national teaching standards, all lesson plans are available online at www.usmint.gov/educators and include reproducible worksheets and links to supporting material. 810

Studies Weekly www.studiesweekly.com 1140 N 1430 W, Orem, UT 84057 111

Unity Productions Foundation www.upf.tv 801 Wayne Ave. #201, Silver Spring, MD 20910 1341

Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center www.sqcc.org 1100 16th St. NW, Washington, DC 20036 1032

University of Arizona http://moralsicence.arizona.edu 1145 E. South Campus Dr. Suite 213, Tucson, AZ 85721 Ethics, Economy, and Entrepreneurship is a dual enrollment course offered to high school students through the University of Arizona. Also available through UA are summer graduate courses for teachers seeking professional development in Political Economy. In addition, TCT offers a range of free Financial Literacy lessons available to teachers online. 1228

TCI www.teachtci.com 2440 W. El Camino Real 4th Floor, Mountain View, CA 94040 404 Teacher Created Materials www.tcmpub.com 5301 Oceanus Dr., Huntington Beach, CA 92649 317 Teacher’s Discovery www.teachersdiscovery.com 2741 Paldan Dr., Auburn Hills, MI 48326 504 Teaching Tolerance www.tolerance.org 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104 218 Transatlantic Outreach Program www.goethe.de/top 1990 K St. NW Suite 03, Washington, DC 20006 1124

University of Nebraska http://online.nebraska.edu 3835 Holdredge St., Lincoln, NE 68503 University of Nebraska at Kearney offers an online History, MA program designed for everyone, including teachers and others desiring further professional development. Enjoy a fully online program with thesis/non-thesis options, low student to faculty ratio and extensive course offerings in areas such as American, European, World, Public and Digital History. 102

University of Wisconsin Press uwpress.wisc.edu 1930 Monroe St. Third Floor, Madison, WI 53711 The University of Wisconsin Press has 14 journals and more than 1400 titles currently in print, including books of general interest (biography, fiction, natural history, poetry, fishing, travel, etc.), scholarly books (American studies, anthropology, art, classics, environmental studies, ethnic studies, history, literary criticism, etc.) and regional books about Wisconsin and the Upper Midwest. 1327 Veterans Legacy Project www.cem.va.gov/legacy/index.asp 1100 1st St. NE, Washington, DC 20002 808 Witness to War Foundation www.witnesstowar.org 5555 Triangle Pkwy. Suite 300, Peachtree Corners, GA 30030 Witness to War is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the stories of combat veterans. Our mission is to: Preserve these stories for the veterans, their families, and future generations; Honor the veterans by sharing their stories with the public; and Educate people on the sacrifices made to preserve freedoms. 1336 Wohl Publishing www.wohlpublishing.com 45 South Park Place #223, Morristown, NJ 07960 1209 World History Digital Education www.worldhistoryde.org 310 Summerhaven Dr., East Syracuse, NY 13057 1123 WorldStrides www.worldstrides.org 218 W. Water St. Suite 400, Charlottesville, VA 22902 1108 XanEdu Publishing www.xanedu.com/k-12 4750 Venture Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48108 1315 Yahad-In Unum www.yahadinunum.org 25 W. 45th St. Suite 1405, New York, NY 10036 1308

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee American Geographical Society Library https://uwm.edu/libraries/agsl 2311 E. Hartford Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 1331

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EXHIBITS Youth for Human Rights International www.youthforhumanrights.org 6331 Hollywood Blvd. Suite 720, Los Angeles, CA 90028 Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a nonprofit organization, founded in 2001 with the purpose to inspire youth to become advocates for tolerance and peace through education on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. With over 150 chapters and its educational materials translated into 27 languages, YHRI brings the message of human rights to 195 nations. 1122

Youth Leadership Initiative—Jamestown: American Evolution 1619-2019 www.youthleadership.net University of Virginia Center for Politics, PO Box 400806, Charlottesville, VA 22904 YLI provides FREE online civics and government resources for K-12 educators nationwide, including over 100 lesson plans, online National Mock Elections, the National E-Congress, the Democracy Corps government engagement and service learning programs, and the newly released online Free Speech Wall funded by Jamestown: American Evolution 1619–2019. 519

Zinn Education Project www.zinnedproject.org P.O. Box 73078, Washington, DC 20056 The Zinn Education Project promotes and supports teaching people’s history in middle and high school classrooms. Based on the lens of history highlighted in Howard Zinn’s book, A People’s History of the United States, the website offers free lessons and articles organized by theme, time period, and reading level. 118/1000

PARTICIPANT INDEX A Abbott, Scott....................................110, 129 Abdullah, Osman........................................66 Abel, Laura..................................................67 Abrahamson, Heather................................49 Acevedo, Sylvia.............................................9 Ackerman, Melissa....................................125 Adair, Jennifer Keys.....................................96 Adamian, Erik............................................122 Adams, Erin.......................................... 56, 58 Adams, Mike.............................................116 Adams, Peter.............................................138 Adekile, Adebowale............................. 13, 90 Adelaide, Mary..........................................137 Adeli, Lisa.....................................72, 92, 117 Adler, Susan................................................30 Adrian, Sherry.............................................30 Ahlquist, Greg.................................... 71, 111 Aiken, Carolina............................................54 Alarcón, Jeanette........................................58 Albrecht, Luke.............................................90 Al-Hayina, Mona.........................................81 Allen, Amy..................................................74 Allen, David...............................................138 Allen, Jason...............................................130 Allen, Jonathon.........................................105 Almarez, Mayra.................................... 16, 88 Alter, Gloria...............................................138 Altoff, Peggy................................................30 Alvey, Elaine......................................... 50, 81 Alviar-Martin, Theresa................................60 Alvis, Jennifer............................................128 Amato, Zandra..........................................134 Amendola, CherylAnne............................127 An, Sohyun........................................... 51, 58 Anderson, Crystal........................................60

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Andolina, Molly..........................................60 Andrews, Martin.......................................129 Angelini, Anthony.............................. 32, 126 Anthony, Kenneth.......................................99 Apanius, Avery............................................68 Aponte-Martinez, Gerardo.................. 49, 58 Arbetman, Lee..................................... 63, 92 Archaki, Benjamin.....................................136 Archuleta, Charlee......................................30 Arjunan, Aruna.........................................118 Armstrong, Jill..................................104, 121 Armstrong, Steve.........................1, 122, 139 Arnold, Ashley..........................................122 Arnold, Bryan..............................................51 Arntzen, Betsy...................................... 77, 97 Asencio, Miguel........................................110 Askuvich, Andrew................................ 25, 78 Atkins, Laura...............................................39 Aumen, Jared..................................... 21, 134 Avery, Patricia..............................................60 B Bacak-Egbo, Carol.......................................91 Bacon, Scott................................................92 Badias, Samantha.......................................94 Bagwell, Lauren..........................................49 Baildon, Mark..............................................60 Bailey, Bea....................................66, 68, 110 Bailey, Tim...................................................64 Bain, Bob.............................................. 53, 88 Balantic, Jeannette.....................................96 Banaszak, Ronald......................................123 Bang, Hyeyoung..........................................56 Baraf, Arthur...............................................91 Bardo, Nicholas..............................53, 66, 67 Barker, Gail................................................128 Barker, Kathleen..........................................99

Baron, Christine.................................... 52, 56 Barr, Brenda...............................................129 Barrow, Elizabeth............................... 99, 123 Barstow, Leslie............................................44 Bass, Jill................................................ 70, 75 Batenhorst, Katie.......................................104 Bates, Dolores.............................................89 Bauer, Mary Jo..........................................107 Bauman, Lisa..............................................79 Bauml, Michelle...........................59, 81, 127 Bavaro, Elisabetta.........................32, 96, 120 Bean, Amber...............................................77 Beasley, Steve..............................................63 Beccaris-Pescatore, Jill......................... 24, 97 Bechard, Brian............................82, 117, 122 Becker, Linda...............................................70 Beeson, Sherrie.................................. 54, 110 Behrends, William................................ 14, 82 Bell, Jonathan.............................................61 Bell, Monita...............................................117 Bellino, Marissa...........................................57 Bellows, Elizabeth................................ 57, 58 Belshie, Bonnie...........................................82 Beltran, Ana Carolina Diaz..........................58 Belvedere, Veronica...................................136 Bennett, Alex............................................110 Bennett, John..............................................72 Benoit, Cynthia..........................................138 Benthuysen, Heather Van....... 1, 12, 16, 126 Berg, Lauren......................................... 14, 81 Berger, Victoria..........................................106 Bernard, Barbara.........................................98 Bernhardt, Philip.........................................53 Berson, Ilene...................................... 18, 106 Berson, Michael.........................18, 106, 117 Bertelsen, Kris...........................................118

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

Bess, Joy....................................................121 Best, Cheryl.......................................... 24, 96 Best, Michelle............................................108 Bestwick, Angel..........................................74 Bihr, Nicholas............................................122 Binford, Paul...................................20, 74, 99 Bisland, Beverly Milner................66, 67, 109 Blair-Broeker, Charles...............................111 Blanchette, Sue...........................................82 Blanco, Yianella...........................................58 Bleemel, Rick............................................121 Blevins, Brooke........................53, 59, 60, 81 Blitz, Jennifer..............................................64 Blythe, Stephen.........................................114 Bodle, Aaron...............................................57 Bohan, Chara........................................ 53, 54 Bolgatz, Jane...............................................52 Bolly, Sue...................................................109 Bomberger, Karen.......................................30 Boots, Amy................................................112 Bordwell, Daniel...........................53, 56, 122 Bos, C. Renee..............................................91 Bostick, Brad........................................ 81, 87 Boswell, Becky..........................................110 Bouchard, Jennifer.....................84, 118, 125 Boucher, Michael........................................92 Bower, Bert...............................................127 Bower, Kevin...............................................25 Bowman, Kimberly.....................................49 Boyd, Shaquila............................................99 Brady, Brian.................................................75 Brady, Chip...................................71, 98, 105 Brady, Seth............................14, 70, 81, 128 Brady-Myerov, Monica.............................117 Brandão, José António......................... 13, 86 Branick, Caroline.................................. 14, 82


PARTICIPANT INDEX Brannon, Lee Anne...................................100 Brant, Cathy.................................................52 Brasfield, Kristy................................104, 121 Brashears, Kathy.......................................103 Breakstone, Joel....................20, 58, 64, 116 Brenann, Andrea.......................................105 Breuer, Jenna...............................................94 Bridgeforth, Eva..........................................99 Bridges, Donny..................................... 16, 87 Briggs, Jacqueline.......................................18 Brimner, Larry Dane....................................39 Broderick, Anne........................................123 Bronstein, Erin.................................... 49, 105 Brooks, Charley...........................................50 Brooks, Keturah...........................................20 Brooks, Sarah....................................... 57, 60 Broome, John....................................... 53, 58 Brown, Anthony L.......................................60 Brown, Georgia.........................................121 Brown, Michael.........................................116 Brown, Sarah...................................... 21, 100 Bruckman, Marilyn...................................103 Brugar, Kristy.....................40, 53, 56, 86, 91 Bucci, Karen...............................................124 Buchanan, Lisa...............................53, 58, 59 Buckley, Christopher........................104, 111 Burgard, Karen..................................... 59, 92 Burke, Jennifer..................................... 52, 84 Burns, Brittany..........................................138 Burroughs, Greer..........................55, 57, 134 Burson, Ruth.............................................105 Burton, David C.........................................109 Bush, Jeff...................................................114 Bush, Rebecca J.........................................116 Buswell, Carol............................................135 Butefish, Kurt..............................................92 Byford, Jeffrey.....................79, 85, 100, 114 Byker, Erik.....................................53, 68, 133 Byrne, Galen..............................................117 C Cadwell-Vaughan, Jennifer........................20 Caffrey, Genevieve.............................. 49, 137 Cain, Leia.....................................................52 Cairn, Rich.......................................... 20, 103 Call, Hadyn B...............................................84 Callahan, Cory...................................... 56, 94 Calvo, Andrew del.....................................139 Camardella, John......................................128 Camardese, Amy.........................................55 Cambre, Belinda........................................107 Camicia, Steven...........................................52 Cangemi, Craig............................................70 Canning, Ann B...........................................21 Cantu, D. Antonio........................................93 Capone, Stephen.......................................106 Capps, Joanna...........................................112 Carano, Kenneth................................... 60, 67 Carey, Elaine..............................................112 Carey, Joshua.............................................113 Carey, Susan................................................84

Carlin, Brian...............................................138 Carlson, Christi............................................81 Carney, Mary...............................................58 Carrera, Gustova................................. 38, 109 Carson, Craig.............................................109 Carter, Hannah............................................60 Carter, Summer...........................................85 Casey, Erin......................................51, 60, 77 Cashman, Timothy G...................................67 Casini, Kara..................................................75 Castillo, Jyoti...................................... 59, 115 Castro, Antonio J............................34, 53, 86 Castro, Eliana...............................................54 Ceaser-Jones, Keishla..........................77, 118 Cercone, Antonio..............................125, 131 Cerone, Danielle..........................................14 Cessna, Austin..................................107, 131 Chadwick, Jocelyn A...................................72 Chamberlin, Adam......................................95 Chambers, Heather.............................. 88, 93 Chandler, Prentice.......................................53 Chan, Yun-Wen..............................51, 66, 67 Charette, Katherine...................................113 Chaudhri, Amina.......................................112 Chavez-Kopp, Andrea...............................128 Chavez-Thibault, Malissa..................... 81, 87 Chee, Min Fui....................................... 66, 68 Chen, Xiaoning..........................................138 Cherry, Terry......................................... 8, 122 Chestnut, Sam.............................................72 Chestnut, Susan........................................138 Chisholm, James.......................................122 Choi, Dongsoo...........................................118 Choi, Jongnam..........................................114 Choi, Yoonjung............................................57 Choi, Young Whan.......................................91 Chrimes, Nicholas.............................. 95, 131 Christ, Rebecca......................57, 58, 66, 121 Christensen, Lois McFadyen............... 74, 126 Christy, Partigya..........................................58 Ciabattari, Teresa............................75, 82, 88 Cipolletta, Teresa.......................................104 Clabaugh, Kile...................................... 24, 71 Clabough, Jeremiah..................................110 Clair, Brendon............................................136 Clark, Christopher...................49, 53, 55, 58 Clark, Megan........................................ 70, 74 Cleaver, Rebekah.........................................94 Clifton-Roach, Keanya..............................113 Clyde, Rozella..................................... 30, 122 Coddington, Nicholas.................................56 Coffman, Robert..........................................91 Cohan, Sara...............................................105 Cohen, Cathy...............................................46 Cohen, Danny............................................138 Colburn, George........................................114 Coleman, Julianne....................................113 Colley, Lauren.................................53, 55, 56 Collins, Helen..............................................52 Collins, Scott..............................................105 Collum, Melissa...................................30, 104

Conklin, Hilary.............................................60 Conlon, Jennifer........................................104 Conneen, Andrew..........................14, 82, 99 Conrad, Jenni....................................... 56, 57 Cooley, Jennifer.................................... 20, 93 Cooper, Sarah..............................................96 Corcino, Dalwin.........................................139 Cornett, Ariel..................................50, 52, 78 Cornwell, Charlene....................................106 Cottone, Matthew.....................................134 Coulter, Barbara.................................. 71, 136 Covington, Cathy.......................................131 Crady, Nicholas............................................95 Creel, Marty.................................................64 Crocco, Margaret............................56, 58, 60 Crooks, Betsy...............................................89 Crowley, Ryan.................................53, 55, 56 Crown, Keating.................................9, 73, 80 Crowther, Ed................................................70 Crum, Thea........................................... 16, 81 Cruz, Barbara...............................................67 Cruz, Mabel...............................................106 Cude, Michelle..................................... 67, 68 Cuenca, Alexander............................... 53, 56 Culpepper, Hope........................................113 Cummins, Joan.........................................109 Curcio, Shelly...............................................58 Currin, Elizabeth..........................................58 Curry, Kristal................................................83 Curry, Michael.............................................71 Curtis, Shawn..............................................77 Cyrus, Vuanya..............................................30 D Dabach, Dafney Blanca........................ 13, 90 Daemicke, Songju Ma.................................18 Dalbo, George...............................48, 93, 124 Dales, Brenda..............................................89 Dalton, Kason..............................................99 Daly, James.......................................... 55, 67 Dammann, Doug........................................91 Daneels, Mary Ellen................1, 16, 87, 134 Danz, Danielle.............................................77 Daugherity, Brian........................................56 David, Joseph..................................... 38, 109 Davidson, Hall.................................... 10, 120 Davis, Amy..................................................64 Davis, Danne...............................................92 Davis, Jennifer.............................................85 Davis, Kenneth C................................ 10, 133 Davis, Pryce.................................................52 Davis, Sara.................................................135 Davis, Tamara..............................................88 Davis, Taylor.................................................78 Daw, Colleen...............................................52 Dawley-Carr, Jenny.....................................59 Dawson, Jennifer........................................98 Deen, Ashley...............................................85 DeLeon, Abraham.......................................53 DeMartino, Tiffany....................................131 Demoiny, Sara..............................57, 58, 124

Despaigne, Evelina......................................96 Detmers, Justin.........................................107 Dewitt, Scott...............................................55 Diaz, JesĂşs.................................................107 Digiacomo, Daniela.....................................91 Dinkelman, Todd............................53, 55, 56 DiNovo, Michael................................... 14, 82 DiPierro, Michael.......................................136 Doornbos, Linda..........................................56 Doppen, Frans.............................................67 Dougherty, Mary.........................................20 Douglass, Susan........................................136 Dow, Peter...................................................58 Dowie-Chin, Tianna..............................55, 59 Dozono, Tadashi..........................................60 Dua, Kevin.......................................... 93, 112 Duckworth, Megan.....................................64 Duer, Zachary..................................... 52, 118 Duke, Kira....................................................20 Duncan, Kristen..............................51, 55, 56 Durham, B. Scott.........................................49 Durkin, Thomas.........................................134 Durury, Sara................................................87 Duton, W. Aaron..........................................20 Dyche, Adam........................... 103, 113, 128 E Easter, Carla...............................................111 Echols, Darrell....................................... 16, 88 Edgerton, Roxane......................................134 Edginton, Jennifer.......................................91 Ehmke, Kelsey...........................................121 Ehmke, Sabrina.........................................138 Eisworth, Hillary.........................................77 Elfer, Chalres................................................78 Elias, Alex....................................................94 Elliott, Shanti........................................ 17, 88 Ellison, Jessica...........................................127 Ellsworth, Tina.............................53, 56, 115 Emert, Holly..............................................118 Endacott, Jason...........................................53 Ender, Tommy........................54, 58, 59, 121 Enright, Kristin............................................90 Epperson, Barbara.....................................100 Epps-Johnson, Tiana............................ 16, 87 Epstein, Shira..............................................60 Epstein, Terrie..............................................60 Ernst, Randal.............................................111 Evans, Kelsey...............................................79 Evans, Ronald.................................54, 58, 76 Everett, Natasha Murray.............................56 Eysturlid, Lee.............................................105 F Faerber, David..............................................72 Failoni, Judith............................................117 Fain, Gabe.......................................... 71, 111 Fairbanks, Cynthia.....................................129 Falkner, Anna....................................... 59, 96 Fallace, Thomas...........................................54 Farrow, Molly..................................... 84, 114 Farr, Wendy.....................................81, 85, 87

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PARTICIPANT INDEX Faust, Aubrie...............................................94 Fay, Jacob....................................................91 Feinberg, Joe.................................................8 Feinzimer, Laurie.........................................94 Ferguson, Erica..........................................138 Fernรกndez, Sahily......................................106 Fernekes, William........................................76 Ferrara, Margaret......................................100 Fielder, Dawn..............................................62 Filipow, Jamie...........................................129 Finch, Breana...................................100, 107 Finney, Ed................... 82, 89, 112, 117, 122 Fischer, Lauren Krizner................................63 Fish, Robert...............................................114 Fisher, Doug................................................52 Fisher, Ellen.................................................91 Fitchett, Paul........................................ 55, 60 FitzGerald, Kathleen..................................116 Fitzpatrick, Colleen......................................52 Flanagan, Candra......................................111 Fleck, Duane..............................................136 Fleck, Laura........................................ 95, 136 Fleischman, Bindy.....................................130 Flock, Jessica...............................................78 Flores, Alessandra.....................................139 Flynn, Kerri................................................108 Fogel, Jeremy D.................................. 12, 109 Foley, Stephen...........................................104 Fones, Aliza.......................................... 13, 90 Ford, Alex....................................................99 Fousi, Diana.................................................58 Fouts, Dan...................................................93 Fowler, Debra..................................... 20, 134 Fralicks, Elizabeth........................................64 Franks, Stephanie............................... 88, 104 Fransen, Fred.............................................114 Fraser, Samantha............................... 71, 136 Freeman, Lee...............................................74 Frey, Lou......................................................91 Freydin, Michael........................................112 Friedeman, Amanda.......................... 70, 138 Friedman, Adam............................55, 58, 59 Fritszhall, Fritzie................................... 12, 86 Fromm, Megan.........................................110 Fry, Sara.....................................................127 Fujii, Rayna................................................115 Fukuda, Rosanna..............................115, 129 Fullerton, Ryan............................................82 Furgione, Brian............................................20 G Gabb, Daniela Jimenez...............................75 Gallagher, Jennifer............................. 55, 137 Garcia, Adriana............................................98 Garcia, Jamie...............................................14 Gardner, Elizabeth.....................................112 Garms, Kathy.............................................137 Garnet, Clemisha.........................................85 Garrett, H. James............................55, 58, 60 Garrity, Norma..................................... 16, 86 Garver, Jane.................................................21 Gates, Jacob......................................... 49, 55

150

Gaudelli, William............................52, 55, 57 Gaynor, Peter.............................................127 Geidner, Susan..........................................104 Gelb, Denise..............................................129 Gersmehl, Phil...........................................116 Ghazi, Reema............................................129 Gibbs, Brian.................................................56 Gibbs, Christopher......................................50 Gibson, Emily............................................133 Gibson, Lindsay...........................................61 Gibson, Lisa...............................................110 Gibson, Melissa.................................... 52, 59 Gillikin, Margaret........................................55 Gilman, Kimberly.............................117, 122 Girard, Brian................................................53 Glaser, Susan...............................................85 Glaser, Tom..................................................85 Glenn, Keta......................................... 12, 126 Glew, Scott..................................................49 Glos, Kelly..................................................121 Goitia, Camila Arze Torres.................. 77, 128 Goldberg, Steve.................................. 25, 135 Golden, John.............................................111 Golston, Syd................................................30 Gonterman, Vicki.........................................44 Gonzalez, Cynthia.......................................91 Good, Amy..................................................53 Goode, Jon..................................................54 Gordo, Tyler................................................110 Goss, Jennifer............................................110 Gothart, Pamela................................... 63, 95 Goulding, Cathlin........................................52 Grabowski, Christine...................................94 Graff, Johnna.............................................122 Grant, John......................................... 85, 100 Grant, S.G................................53, 55, 58, 62 Graslie, Emily..............................................46 Gravell, Jamie..............................................60 Graves, Allison...........................................108 Graves, Story...............................................84 Gray, Susan..................................................71 Greco, Marsha...........................................105 Green, Erin.................................................103 Green, Kori........................................117, 122 Greene, Leah.............................................128 Greiner, Jeff.................................................55 Grelecki, Deanna.......................................125 Griebel, Isaiah.................................... 95, 131 Grimes, Patrice............................................52 Grinstead, Wayde................................. 64, 70 Grisham, Hannah........................................49 Groce, Eric.........................................109, 127 Gruszczynski, Jack.......................................70 Guerrero, Karen.................................. 88, 103 Guthorn, Harrison.....................................136 H Haas, Brandon.............................................99 Haas, Maggie............................................123 Haas, Mary E...............................................80 Haas, Melissa..............................................99 Hackman, Georgette...................................44

Haddix, Michelle.......................................111 Haemig-Lehman, Rachel..........................122 Hagan, Heather.........................................109 Hahn, Carole................................................58 Haight, Jesse..................................8, 32, 133 Haines-Troutman, Calgary..........................82 Haj-Broussard, Michelle.............................68 Hall, Delandrea.................51, 53, 55, 56, 59 Hall, Patty..................................................133 Hall, Rogers.................................................52 Hall-Barrett, Rebecca..................................86 Hallock, Robert...........................................72 Halpern, David..........................................134 Halvorsen, Anne-Lise....................53, 56, 58 Hammack, Russell...........................124, 131 Hammill, Drew............................................75 Hamot, Greg......................................... 66, 67 Hancock, Hailey........................................137 Handler, Laura.............................................60 Hansen, Sheila............................................79 Hanson, Megan...........................................63 Haren, Kate Van.........................................122 Harn, Kimberly................................... 21, 134 Harney, Brent............................................106 Harper, Randall.........................................138 Harris, Laura................................................95 Harris, Lauren....................................... 51, 56 Harris, Leslie................................................99 Harris, Nancy...............................................99 Harris, Wendy..................................... 83, 109 Harshman, Jason..............37, 53, 57, 65, 67 Hartman, Stephanie.................................109 Hartshorne, Richard.....................13, 90, 123 Hartwick, James M. M................................20 Harvey, Damian...........................................89 Haskell, Hilary...........................................105 Hasley, Mike................................................78 Hawke, Cathie.............................................97 Hawkman, Andrea..................34, 53, 58, 86 Hawley, Todd........................................ 53, 60 Hayes, Leslie................................................98 Heafner, Tina..... 8, 34, 60, 75, 86, 116, 127 Healy, Shawn............................ 1, 16, 80, 87 Heath, Kimberly........................................110 Heath, Marie................................56, 76, 134 Heckart, Kimberly.................8, 74, 109, 120 Heddy, Eileen..............................................55 Hedgepeth, Wesley.............................. 8, 114 Heinze, Christopher...................................123 Helmsing, Mark.....................54, 58, 95, 105 Hemenway, Eric..........................................91 Henderson, Shelley.....................................63 Heng, Jufang...............................................66 Hennessy, Amy...........................................75 Henney, Debbie.........................................129 Henning, Mary Beth............................ 16, 87 Hensley, Matthew................... 114, 125, 130 Herbst, Haley...............................................94 Herman, Thomas.......................................109 Herold, Dwight..........................................110 Herrick, Susan.............................................30 Hess, Diana........................................... 14, 73

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

Heubach, Kathleen...................................120 Heubeck, Meg...........................................103 Hickey, M. Gail............................................80 Hicks, David.................. 52, 53, 78, 118, 128 Hiland, Sean..............................................138 Hilbert, Tyler................................................79 Hilburn, Jeremy...........................................53 Hillemann, Phoebe...................................127 Hiller, Anthony..........................................110 Hinitz, Blythe..............................................74 Hinkle, Jennifer.........................................130 Hinojosa, Eliel..............................................77 Hinton, Anthony Ray............................. 9, 73 Hitchcock, Chris............................31, 98, 112 Hitchcock, Jennifer....................................110 Hodges, Tracey..........................................113 Hodgin, Erica........................................ 58, 91 Hodgson, Sherene.......................................20 Hoelter, Lynette...........................................75 Hoffman, Devin................................107, 108 Hollett, Alexandria....................................118 Hollstein, Matthew...................................134 Holmes, Casey.............................................49 Holmes, Mary-Owen..................................31 Honaker, Abby.............................................93 Honish, John...............................................87 Hood, Susan....................................... 10, 102 Hoover, Jania...............................................88 Hostetler, Andrew................................ 52, 60 Hover, Stephanie van.....................52, 54, 78 Howell, James...................................... 56, 94 Huang, Wei..................................................66 Hubbard, Brad...................................... 16, 88 Hubbard, Janie................................... 80, 126 Huckeba, Celaina.......................................135 Hudson, Kelsey..........................................123 Huebner, David............................................44 Hughes, Richard..........................................98 Hughes, Ryan......................21, 49, 120, 134 Huiyong, Yang.............................................57 Hulten, Jessica.............................................70 Hultman, Dylan.........................................118 Humphries, Emma............................... 18, 78 Hung, Yu-Han........................60, 66, 67, 106 Hunter, Marjorie...............................8, 44, 76 Hussain, Nick.............................................124 Hutzel, Kim..................................................63 I Ingram, Lynn...............................................30 Irby, Daman...............................................103 Israelsen, Laura.................................... 71, 88 Iwamoto, Ellen............................................46 J Jackson, Jessica Barbata...........................135 Jacobs, Benjamin........................................57 Jacobs, Carolyn..................................... 82, 93 Jacobs, Nick.................................................49 Jaffee, Ashley Taylor............................. 52, 59 Jago, Carol...................................................72 Jagodzinski, Jack.......................................118 Jahani, Shiva...............................................79


PARTICIPANT INDEX James, ArCasia............................................54 James, Keshia..............................................20 James, MeLisa...........................................100 Janis, Sonia.......................................... 52, 56 Janovjak, Joseph.......................................138 Janson, Christopher..................................104 Jenkins, Anise...........................................107 Jenkins, Kevin..............................................64 Jimenez, Daniel.................................... 17, 88 Jimenez-Silva, Margarita................... 88, 103 Johnson, Aaron...........................................52 Johnson, David..................................... 63, 64 Johnson, Kara..............................................70 Johnson, Kurt............................................109 Johnson, Mary............................................24 Johnson, Tabora..........................................20 Johnston, Morgan.......................................57 Jones, Denisha............................................74 Jones, Megan..................................... 75, 121 Jones, Peggy O’Neill............................ 24, 71 Jones-Clark, Jennifer......................... 64, 111 Jones-Wagy, Kelly.......................................76 Jorgensen, Gregg........................................76 Journell, Wayne.36, 53, 55, 58, 60, 86, 123 Jun, Hana....................................................49 Justice, Sarah............................................111 K Kahne, Joe...................................................91 Kahne, Joseph.............................................46 Kaka, Sarah.................................................59 Kambutu, John...........................................67 Kane, Allison.............................................107 Kang, Jiyoung..............................................60 Kanof, Kim.......................................... 77, 128 Karb, Joseph..................................................8 Katzmann, Robert.............................. 12, 109 Kauffman, Jeremy.......................................83 Kaur, Pritpal...............................................100 Kawaguchi, Hiromi.....................................65 Kawashima-Ginsberg, Kei................... 16, 87 Keating, William..........................................50 Keefer, Natalie.................................... 68, 115 Keegan, Patrick.................................... 55, 60 Keller, Ryan................................................108 Kelley, Kitty.................................................39 Kelley, Lynn.................................................74 Kellison, Jaclyn............................................25 Kelly, Cherie...............................................138 Kendrick, David............................44, 96, 124 Kenna, Joshua...........................................125 Kennedy, Ruth.............................................98 Kerwin, Kate..............................................138 Kesler-Lund, Alisa................................ 61, 97 Kessel, Cathryn van.............................. 51, 58 Kessner, Taylor.............................................50 Keyes, Laura................................................97 Keyser, Kailee............................................125 Khalaieff, Sue....................................... 17, 88 Khan, Khizr...................................10, 72, 115 Khan, Nafees...............................................54 Kho, Ee Moi.................................................66

Khoury, Shaadi..........................................123 Kiel, Donna..................................................95 Kiesa, Abby........................................ 12, 126 Kim, Esther.....................................53, 59, 74 Kim, Hannah...............................................53 Kim, Jimin...................................................66 Kim, Jiwon..................................................94 Kim, Jongsung............................................65 Kim, Yeji.......................................................57 King, LaGarrett........................54, 55, 57, 58 King, Sarah..................................................58 Kinzie, Ray........................................124, 130 Kirby, Barbara............................................108 Kirby, Elizabeth...........................................14 Kisat, Courtney..........................................108 Kissling, Mark..................................... 61, 134 Kizer, Susan...............................................116 Klein, Brittany...........................................129 Knapp, Katie................................................74 Knoell, Donna.............................................72 Knowles, Ryan T.............................34, 55, 86 Kobayashi, Madeline........................... 14, 81 Koeppen, Kim..............................................76 Kohlmeier, Jada...........................................56 Komatsu, Mariko.........................................65 Kopish, Michael..........................................57 Korematsu, Karen......................................115 Koren, Mike...................................................1 Kraemer, Dianne.......................................110 Krahling, Italia...........................................117 Krug, Howard..............................................78 Krutka, Daniel.... 31, 55, 56, 59, 60, 76, 127 Kubik, Chris..................................14, 82, 117 Kuepker, Laurel..........................................108 Kuethe, Mike...............................................21 Kumar, Kamiya............................................65 Kumler, Lori........................................ 93, 134 Kusahara, Kazuhiro.....................................65 Kysia, Alison................................................92 L Labossiere, Natalie....................................119 Ladd, Vivian.................................................91 Lagasse, Jennifer................................ 75, 121 Lai, E-von....................................................66 Laimin, Barbara.................................... 17, 88 Laing, Annette............................................91 Lambrecht, Paul........................................111 Landorf, Hilary............................................54 Lane, Barbara............................................124 Langa, Elizabeth..........................................95 Langan, Elise.............................................133 Larsen, Pier..................................................64 LaSpina, Maria............................................84 Lawlor, Laurie..............................................18 Lawrence, Anna Marie..............................113 Lawrence, Nick........................ 117, 122, 129 Lawrence, Salika..........................18, 20, 133 Leatherman, Grace......................................78 LeBlanc, Michelle............................... 20, 130 Ledford, Alexander............................. 94, 122 Lee, Deborah........................................ 14, 82

Lee, John.................................53, 55, 62, 80 Lee, June Jo.................................................18 Leegan, Kimberly......................................105 Leet-Otley, Jill.............................................58 Lehr, Dick.....................................................71 Lemley, Chris...............................................60 Lennon, Sean..................................... 79, 114 Lent, Timothy...................................100, 118 Leonard, Ken.............................................129 Lesser, Mishy........................................ 18, 72 Levasseur, Michael....................................123 Levenbrook, Stephanie...............................94 Levicky, Michael..........................................53 Levin, Robert...............................................84 Levinson, Cynthia........................................39 Levinson, Meira...........................................91 Liberto, Ben...............................................116 Libresco, Andrea.............................59, 80, 96 Likavec, Gabrielle......................................137 Lim, Marilyn...................................51, 66, 67 Lin, Lin.................................................. 66, 68 Lineberger, Mallory.....................................98 Lintner, Timothy..........................................53 Lipp, Allison..............................................105 Liu, Eric.........................................10, 17, 136 Liu, Lihua.....................................................66 Liu, Shu.......................................................66 Liu, Yan........................................................66 Lo, Jane.................................51, 54, 55, 136 Logothetis, Kalliopi.....................................67 Long, Evan.................................................134 Long, Kate...................................................63 Loosbrock, Rich...........................................70 Lopez, Alberto...........................................130 Lotspeich, Hayley........................................88 Lovett, Norah.............................................107 Lovorn, Michael........................................139 Lowe, Zachariah..........................................44 Lowery, Arine..............................................99 Lucas, Ashley........................................ 67, 68 Lucey, Thomas.............................................59 Lucianek, Christine......................................97 Lucker, Sarah.............................................114 Luevanos, Ruth...........................................88 Lund, Stephanie................................... 81, 87 Lundgren, Lisa.............................................58 Lyle, Rachel...............................................134 M Mace, Lesley................................................75 Maddox, Lamont................................. 56, 94 Maddux, Cynthia Wood............................122 Madokoro, Kayo..........................................67 Magee, Amanda.......................................130 Magill, Kevin........................................ 51, 59 Magliocca, Autumn..................................131 Maguth, Brad.. 54, 57, 60, 65, 68, 100, 106 Makaiau, Amber..............................115, 125 Makasdjian, Roxanne................................105 Malak-Minkiewicz, Barbara.......................67 Mallory, Julie.............................................117 Manfra, Meghan.................................. 20, 55

Mansouri, Behzad.....................................113 Marchese, Ryn.............................................25 Marcus, Alan...................................... 52, 128 Marcus, Benjamin.............................. 70, 128 Marks, Melissa................................... 55, 131 Markwald, Brian.........................................94 Marmorale, Vincent....................................98 Marri, Anand.............................................134 Marshall, Jessica.................1, 14, 16, 46, 88 Marston, Cathy..........................................133 Martell, Christopher.......................52, 53, 55 Martin, Kevin..............................................75 Martin, Randy...........................................109 Martin, Rosemary.....................................118 Martinelle, Rob...........................................59 Martinez-Alvarez, Patricia..........................52 MascareĂąaz, Lauryn..................................117 Masi, Kenneth de........................................30 Mason, Lance....................................... 52, 58 Massey, Dixie.............................................116 Masters, Stan..............................................63 Matejic, Svetoslav.......................................95 Matera, Michael........................................121 Matherson, Lisa...............................124, 131 Mathew, Sonia..................................... 16, 80 Mathews, Sarah............. 36, 54, 66, 86, 110 Mattson, Kristen........................................128 Maurer, Julie....................................... 18, 133 Maxwell, Lindsey........................................95 Mayo, J.B.............................................. 55, 56 Maze, Jordan.............................................138 McAnulty, Joseph................................ 51, 52 McAvoy, Paula.............................................46 McBrady, Jared............................................59 McCafferty-Wright, Jennice............... 66, 121 McCarthy, Jessi....................12, 76, 110, 126 McClimans, Melinda.................................116 McClure, Don..............................................50 McCorkle, William.................61, 83, 93, 125 McCormick, Robert R........................... 16, 87 McCoy, Meredith.........................................54 McCracken-Villanueva, Kelly......................96 McCullagh, Mary..............................104, 121 McDermott, Meghan..................................85 McGovern, Ed............................................131 McGregor, Ian....................................... 49, 52 McGrew, Sarah......................20, 58, 61, 116 McGuire, Margit..................30, 71, 120, 133 McKean, Linda..........................................139 McKee, Kelly................................................90 McLaughlin, Rebecca................................107 McManamon, Sean..................................112 McMillan, Nora.........................................110 McVey, Valerie.............................................91 Mead, Katharine.........................................98 Mead, Sarah......................................... 65, 67 Means, Nicole..................................... 99, 113 Medina, Gregorio............................... 91, 103 Mednick, Fred.............................................65 Meehan, Kim.............................................100 Meeks, Kathleen.................................. 14, 81

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

151


PARTICIPANTS Meggitt, Alisa....................................... 37, 90 Mehlbauer, Kathryn....................................77 Mein, Catherine...........................................95 Meissel, India.....................................1, 8, 73 Mena, Yuleisy............................................110 Menger, Andrea..........................................49 Merchant, Natasha Hakimali............... 13, 90 Merryfield, Merry........................................60 Mesle, Mark......................................... 17, 88 Meyer, Michael................................... 13, 120 Meyers, Laura..................................... 54, 109 Michael, Janis...........................................130 Michalski, Laura........................................138 Middleton, Tiffany.......................................94 Middleton, Tracy...........................................8 Mieri, Magdalena.......................................79 Mijajlovic, Steven......................................110 Miles, James......................................... 49, 61 Miller, Bruce..............................................110 Miller, Grant R.............................................25 Miller, Jason....................................... 50, 107 Miller, Nicole..................................20, 74, 99 Miller, Noel..................................................95 Miller, Pamala...........................................112 Millhausen, Barbara....................................89 Milligan, Andrea.........................................68 Mills, Gary...................................................52 Milton, Michael.................................... 31, 60 Minarik, Darren.................................. 54, 117 Mineman, Blaine......................................138 Mink, Andy...................................................8 Misco, Thomas...............................54, 66, 67 Missias, Matthew T.....................................56 Mitchem, Melissa................................ 57, 66 Mitoma, Glenn................................... 13, 126 Miyazaki, Takeshi........................................67 Mize, Bruce..................................................44 Modafferi, Meghan...................................137 Moffa, Eric...................................................57 Mohr, Rachel.............................................107 Moisan, Heidi....................................... 70, 71 Monreal, Timothy.........................61, 78, 130 Monson, Heather......................................111 Montemayor, Steven...................................56 Monte-Sano, Chauncey..................... 21, 134 Montgomery, Beth............................ 98, 105 Montgomery, Sarah........................... 74, 115 Montoya, Erica..........................................138 Mooney, Evan..............................................59 Moore, Daneell..........................................130 Moore, James..............................................92 Moore, Monisha........................................126 Morely, Alicen.............................................96 Morgan, Jennifer.......................................104 Morgan, Katy....................................... 49, 78 Morgan, Patrick...........................................54 Morgenstern, Miriam......................... 20, 134 Morley, Alicen.................................... 32, 133 Morris, Julia.................................................30 Morris, June................................................44 Morris, Sarah...............................................72

152

Morrison, Isabelle.............................. 95, 100 Mueller, Jon........................................ 13, 115 Mueller, Rebecca............................54, 55, 56 Muente, Kari....................................... 54, 117 Muetterties, Carly................................. 53, 59 Muladore, Sara............................................21 Mulder, Nate.............................................107 Muldoon, Peggy.......................................128 Mullaney, Tom...........................................122 Mullin, Chris..............................................105 Mullins, Ricky........................52, 59, 78, 118 Muminovic, Mirsad...................................112 Mungur, Amy.................................52, 55, 56 Munslow, Amy............................................80 Murphy, Brianna.......................................122 Murray, Shelley...........................................93 Mushalko, Julia.........................................135 Myers, John.................................................67 N Nagawiecki, Mia.........................................94 Nagel, Paul.....................................37, 72, 90 Nam, Chaebong..........................................87 Nance, Star..................................................54 Narayanan, Sandhya K......................... 12, 90 Nash, Ron........................................... 64, 118 Neff, Jenny..................................................24 Neiman, Dulcie...........................................30 Neloms, Quan...........................................100 Nelson, Adrienne............................... 12, 109 Nelson, Peter M...........................................50 NeSmith, Adam........................................106 Neukirch, Sydney......................................103 New, Ryan....................................30, 71, 136 Newhalfen, Nathan...................................112 Newkirk, April...........................................123 Newman, Mark.........................................138 Newton, Elizabeth............................... 14, 81 Nganga, Lydiah...........................................67 Nick, Christine...........................................135 Nielsen, Laura Beth.....................................82 Niklasch, Amy.............................................74 Nkire, Flora..................................................66 Noble-Healy, Juliann..................................51 Nokes, Jeff...................................................46 Nokes, Jeffery..................................... 61, 137 Noraian, Monica..........................................98 Norton, Cody.............................................109 Norton, Dawn...........................................100 Norton, Ginney...........................................56 Nowell, Shanedra........................................92 O Oatts, Ashleigh..........................................124 Obenchain, Kathryn............................. 53, 60 Oberle, Alex...............................................121 Oberle-Dahm, Cyndi............................ 14, 81 O’Brien, Joe....................................53, 56, 88 Odebiyi, Oluseyi..........................................74 O’Donnell, Barbara......................................24 Ogbomo, Queen........................................103 Ogle, Todd.......................................... 52, 118

Ogura, Makoto..........................................138 O’Hara, Lynne............................................121 Oldham, Rhett..........................................109 Olesen, Elizabeth........................................87 Olson, David..............................................112 Olson, Kelly.................................................55 Oltman, Gretchen.....................................122 O’Meara, Pat................................................25 O’Neil, Kim.......................................104, 139 O’Neill-Jones, Peggy............................ 24, 76 Orr, Angela......................................... 30, 100 Ortega, Teresa..................................... 20, 116 Osborn, Elizabeth........................................18 Oto, Ryan.....................................................60 Oulevey, Pierre..........................................124 Overfield, Alyssa.......................................136 Owens, Dave...............................................52 Owens, Kelly..............................................121 Owens, Sherry.............................................63 P Pace, Judy............................................. 60, 91 Palmer, David..............................................75 Pamperin, Sarah..........................................55 Parker, Walter..............................................55 Parkhouse, Hillary................................ 54, 58 Paskozim, Clint..........................................122 Passe, Jeff..............................30, 34, 54, 134 Patterson, Cameron..................................134 Patterson, Carolyn.....................................110 Patterson, Keith...........................................71 Patterson, Tim...................................... 51, 55 Pauly, Richard............................................125 Pawola, James............................................52 Payne, Katherina..........................53, 96, 103 Pearcy, Mark....................................... 54, 123 Pearson, Emma...........................................67 Pearson, Michelle...........................25, 71, 88 Peavey, Scott.............................................114 Pederson, Jeffery.......................................118 Pellegrino, Anthony..................................131 Pena, Valerie................................................18 Pendergrass, Amanda.................................74 Pennington, Julie........................................60 Penyy, Michelle.........................................129 Pereira, Carolyn.................................... 14, 82 Perkins, Amy...............................................97 Perrotti, Alexandra....................................129 Perry, Anne..................................................78 Peters, Chris...............................................122 Petersen, Kristine......................................113 Peterson, Carla..........................................127 Petzen, Barbara...........................................70 Pfaffle, Koltin............................................125 Pfisterer, Abby.............................................98 Phillips, Hoyt.............................................125 Philpott, Emily..........................................109 Phool, Mirin..............................................104 Piercy, Mallory............................................94 Pietracatella, Melissa..................................94 Pillsbury, Jeannette.....................................58 Piombino, Elizabeth..................................105

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies

Piotrowski, Sara..........................................98 Piper, Jennae...............................................84 Pirlet, Christian..........................................139 Platte, Brandi............................................137 Plummer, Deborah....................................127 Pochedley, Lakota..........................53, 54, 57 Polley, Seth..................................................72 Pombo, Jose..............................................110 Pond, Michael...........................................117 Ponder, Terri.................................................84 Pope, Alexander..........................................54 Popielarz, Kaitlin.........................................49 Post, Danyelle..............................................77 Potter, Andrew..........................................128 Powell, David..............................................54 Powell, Wood............................................123 Power, Carolyn............................................91 Prescott, Anne...........................................131 Presley, Amy....................................... 98, 112 Previte, Mark...................................... 76, 139 Propes, Lorna............................................134 Pugh, Shannon.............................................8 Purdum, Kelsey...........................................77 Q Quaynor, Laura............................................65 Quinlan, Alice............................................111 Quintero, Ileana.........................................106 Quong, Sarah..............................................95 R Rabgey, Losang.................................... 12, 90 Radaker, Ryan...................................107, 125 Radhakrishnan, Ritu....................37, 74, 109 Raia, Jason..................................................87 Ramos, Liz.................................................124 Raptosh, Sarah..........................................131 Rasheed, Kameelah.........................100, 118 Rasmussen, Elizabeth...............................100 Rath, Shelley.............................................121 Ratway, Beth...............................................46 Rauch, Noah..............................................113 Ray-Hill, Carrie............................................18 Reaves, Rebecca........................................124 Reddout, Lauren..........................................92 Reddy, Shawn...................................... 16, 86 Redman, Daniel..........................................85 Redrick, Earl................................................63 Reetz, Elizabeth...........................................82 Reeves, Emily..................................... 13, 133 Regan, Bob..................................................80 Reich, Gabriel..............................................56 Reichle, Ron................................................44 Reidel, Michelle........................................123 Reiter, Jen.........................................109, 116 Renfrow, Pam..............................................93 Resch, Madeline........................................117 Rezac, Annie......................................... 14, 81 Rhodus, Kathi............................................137 Richardson, Judy.........................................71 Ritter, Martha............................................103 Rivero, Keith................................................67


PARTICIPANTS Rizzuto, Kaye.............................................114 Robbins, Amber........................................121 Robbins, Liz.......................................... 16, 82 Roberts, Kathryn.........................................91 Roberts, Scott....................................... 48, 78 Robinson, Chanda.........................................8 Robinson, Heath.........................................53 Robinson, Ingrid.................................. 66, 68 Robinson, Mellanie...................................130 Roden, Phil..................................................71 Rodríguez, Noreen Naseem...52, 53, 57, 59, 74, 115 Rodriguez, Sophia.......................................61 Rogers, John................................................91 Rogers, Melissa...........................................93 Rogers, Montra.................................. 44, 129 Rogers-Zegarra, Nancy.............................127 Rohde, Leigh...............................................59 Rolison, Dana..............................................74 Rollins, Quinn..............................................72 Roncone, John..........................................112 Ronen, Shonda.................................... 14, 80 Ronzino, John............................................112 Rookwood, Sarah......................................106 Rosa, Luke.................................................106 Rose, Chris...................................................70 Rose, Colin...................................................71 Rosenberg, Ginelle....................................110 Rosenkrans, Amy......................................111 Ross, E. Wayne............................................53 Rouleau, Heidi.............................................71 Roy, Anthony.......................................... 8, 30 Roy, Kimberly..................................... 82, 128 Rubinson, Andrew......................................96 Ruedas, Roxanna.......................................139 Runaas, Dee................................................70 Ruscitti, Darlene................................... 16, 88 Russ, Matthew............................................72 Russell, William.............. 60, 65, 68, 79, 123 Ryall, Jenna......................................107, 138 Ryckeley, Becky...........................................63 Rydal, Benjamin..........................................52 Ryter, Di.......................................................67 S Sabzalian, Leilani................................. 54, 57 Sagal, Peter......................................9, 73, 89 Sakai, Kihachiro...........................................67 Sakata, Josue...............................................89 Salciccoli, Anthony......................................18 Saleh, Muna................................................55 Salgado, Cristina............................14, 81, 91 Salinas, Cinthia............................................52 Salituro, Chris..............................................88 Saltmarsh, Sarah.................................. 81, 87 Samuels, Semeka......................................124 Santiago, Maribel........................................54 Santos, Chiara.............................................99 Santos, Rosela Balinbin............................115 Sattely, Rebecca........................................125 Saunderson, Karen......................................91 Sautner, Kerry............................................116

Saylor, Elizabeth..........................................58 Scatorchia, Brianna D'Alessio......................78 Schaefer, Melissa........................................97 Schendel, Roland................................. 24, 71 Schettino, Allyson.......................................75 Scheurman, Geoffrey..................................58 Schirmacher, Amanda..............................124 Schissler, John...................................... 82, 95 Schlict, Jennifer...........................................88 Schlitz, Mark...............................................95 Schmaltz, Jennie.......................................109 Schmalz, Eric.............................................139 Schmeichel, Mardi......................................52 Schmidt, Jon........................................ 14, 81 Schmidt, Joseph................................. 44, 126 Schmidt, Sandra............................52, 55, 60 Schmitt, Adam..................................... 49, 58 Schocker, Jessica.....................24, 55, 56, 97 Schooler, Ron..............................................30 Schou, Brian..............................................111 Schroeder, Stephanie..................................58 Schroeder, Stephen.....................................82 Schug, Mark..............................................117 Schulzki, Anton.................................. 44, 112 Schupman, Edwin.............................. 55, 116 Schwab, Jennie.........................................124 Schwarze, Karla.................................... 14, 82 Schwarzrock, Corinne.................................83 Schweber, Simone......................................52 Schweiker, Claire.......................................113 Schwinn, Steven.........................................70 Scott, Natacha.............................................89 Sealy, Patricia..............................................66 Seay, Travis L......................................... 53, 61 Sedaghat, Lillygol................................ 12, 90 Sedita, Melissa............................................93 Segal, Sarah....................................... 40, 115 Segall, Avner...........................52, 55, 58, 60 Self, Elizabeth..............................................60 Sell, Corey.....................................54, 56, 109 Sella, Adina.......................................... 12, 86 Shabazz, Ilyasah........................................127 Shahri, Bahman................................... 57, 67 Shanks, Neil............................37, 55, 57, 74 Sharp, Kayeleigh.......................................106 Sharp, Kimberlee........................................77 Shatara, Hanadi................................. 57, 116 Shaugnessy, Kathryn................................112 Shaver, Allison.............................................88 Shea, Jeffrey..............................................105 Shea, Laura.................................................77 Shear, Sarah B... 32, 51, 54, 57, 58, 72, 120 Shed, Eric...................................................139 Sheehan, Kevin................................103, 133 Sheffield, Caroline.............................. 79, 122 Shekitka, John.............................................57 Shelbourn, Abi..........................................110 Shelbourne, Suzanne................................118 Shepard, Ray Anthony......................... 18, 39 Sheppard, Maia.........................................135 Shields, Sarah...................................111, 129

Shin, Euikyung............................................99 Shin, Sunghee.............................................66 Shiveley, James..............................66, 67, 89 Shively, Christina.........................................76 Shomaker, Matt.................................. 85, 119 Shreiner, Tamara..........................................61 Shuttleworth, Jay........ 51, 60, 76, 123, 134 Sibbett, Lisa....................................55, 59, 87 Sibille, Jena.................................................25 Sievert, Anthony.........................................99 Silva, Carolyn...............................................59 Silva, Eran De............................................105 Silva, John.......................................... 97, 138 Silverman, Allison.....................................106 Sim, Jasmine B-Y................................. 66, 68 Simpson, Michael.....................................128 Sinclair, Jenny.............................................55 Sitler, Heather.............................................86 Sklarwitz, Sherri..........................................56 Sleeter, Nate................................................18 Smith, Angela...........................................135 Smith, Colleen...........................................116 Smith, Kevin................................................89 Smith, Mark....................................... 64, 116 Smith, Sheila...............................................95 Smith, Stacia...............................................82 Smith, Taylor........................................ 88, 95 Smith, William L.........................................53 Smith, Zoland..............................................20 Smoot, Katy.................................................72 Snider, Molly.............................................127 Snow, Bert.......................................... 18, 106 Snyder, Jimmy.............................................51 Soltys, Beata.............................................112 Somerville, Linda............................... 95, 131 Sondgeroth, Ben.......................................135 Sotherden, Amy................................... 77, 84 Soules, Kate...............................................104 Souris, Alexandra......................................137 Southall, Aubrey............................52, 55, 58 Sovis, Roy....................................................64 Spear, Steven.............................................112 Speed, Kim Edmondson.............................49 Sperry, Chris................................................81 Spiegler, Jinnie............................................91 Spikes, Michael...........................................63 Spinale, Christopher....................................91 Stanton, Christine................................ 54, 58 Stapert, Natalie...........................................97 Staples, Sharon.........................................131 Staubs, Melinda..........................................80 Stefano, Marialuisa Di.................................52 Steiber, David....................................... 16, 88 Stengel, Barbara..........................................60 Stephens, Mimi.................................. 92, 118 Sterling, Fran.............................................111 Stevens, Geraldine............................. 81, 104 Stevenson, Lindsey...................................131 Stigall, Janelle.............................................74 Stoddard, Jeremy.........................52, 58, 128 Stovall, David....................................... 48, 51

Streit, Tony...................................................12 Strelke, Melissa...........................................87 Stricker, Kristi...................................... 55, 124 Stringer, Megan........................................110 Strom, Adam.............................................117 Stuckart, Daniel.................................... 65, 67 Sturm, Elizabeth.................................. 65, 80 Stutts, Christoph.........................................50 Su’a, Pam.....................................................21 Subedi, Binaya..................................... 53, 57 Sudnik, Matthew........................................89 Suh, Yonghee..............................................56 Sullivan, Alice..............................................53 Sullivan, Susan..........................................131 Sunal, Cynthia..............................60, 74, 123 Sunal, Dennis W..........................................74 Suomala, Karla..........................................135 Suri, Jennifer.............................................112 Surovek, Chelsea.........................................52 Surprenant, Kirsten.....................................84 Sussman, Bonnie........................................79 Swain, Holly....................................... 74, 113 Swain, Suzanne..........................................97 Swalwell, Katy..................................... 53, 59 Swan, Andrew............................................31 Swan, Kathy............................53, 55, 62, 80 Swarts, Gabriel............................................57 Swearengin, Rachel..................................115 Sweet, Kyla..................................................77 Swift, Arren......................................107, 122 Swinehart, Tim..........................................134 Szany, Kelley..................................12, 70, 86 T Taft, Chuck...................................................93 Talbert, Rachel.................................111, 135 Talbert, Tony................................................54 Tambuscio, Colleen.....................................79 Tang, Jim.............................................. 14, 82 Tannebaum, Rory................................. 57, 84 Taylor, Ashley..............................................25 Taylor, Chris...............................................114 Taylor, John...............................................124 Taylor, Julie Anne......................................100 Tefft, Stacie......................................... 25, 106 Thacker, Emma...............................54, 55, 56 Thieman, Gayle...................................30, 122 Thomas, Barry..............................44, 88, 135 Thomas, Sam............................................124 Thomas, Vicki............................................133 Thomson, Sara..........................................134 Thorne-Green, Sharon..............................135 Thornton, Stephen.........................34, 52, 80 Tilotta, Tracy......................................... 84, 94 Tipton, Joshua.............................................89 Tipton, Megan...........................................124 Tirado, Jesús...................................51, 53, 56 Toledo, William............................................53 Toporek, Amanda......................................117 Torney-Purta, Judith...................................67 Torregano, Michelle..................................113 Torres, Heidi........................................ 67, 120

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PARTICIPANTS Torti, Cameron Dexter.................................60 Towns, Erin................................................122 Tran, Van Anh.................................49, 66, 68 Tregoning, Janelle.....................................110 Trent, Kristen.............................................103 Trinkley, Rachel.........................................129 Trofanenko, Brenda.....................................52 Troyen, Joe..................................................98 Trubowitz, Lara...........................................91 Tschida, Christina..................55, 58, 59, 137 Tucker, Eleesha............................................82 Tucker, Thomas..........................................118 Turk, Diana..................................................98 Turner, Marc................................................99 Turner, Rachel K..........................................77 Tuttle, Lynn M.............................................24 U Ukpokodu, Omiunota.......................... 66, 67 Urban, Dennis.............................................76 V Valbuena, Rebecca......................................44 Valenzuela, Angela........................48, 57, 61 Van, Peter....................................................83 VanBenthuysen, Heather............................87 Varga, Bretton...................................... 52, 56 Vargas, Jose Antonio.......................... 10, 139 Vaughan, Charles........................................63 Velazquez, Kaitlyn.....................................139 Veltri, Peggy..............................................127 Venafro, Mia..............................................114 Vera, James...............................................134 Vesperman, Dean............................... 58, 125 Vickery, Amanda...............51, 54, 55, 59, 74 Viera, Cristina............................................131 Villafranca, Nancy.......................................74 Villagomez, Adriana...................................90 Villarreal, Christina............................... 52, 60 Virgin, Robb..............................................100

Vita, Maria...................................................75 Vora, Jig.......................................................83 Vosburg-Bluem, Bethany.........................134 Vrana, Barbara............................................62 W Wager, Stefanie... 8, 20, 30, 44, 46, 93, 115 Wagner, Alex....................................9, 73, 96 Wagner, Kevin A................................. 34, 102 Waldron, Mina..........................................131 Walenga, Kelly............................................83 Waligora, Lisa............................................104 Walker, Amy................................................74 Walker, Bridget...........................71, 120, 133 Walker, Juan................................................20 Walsh, Matthew.......................................138 Walworth, Valerie.......................................94 Ward, Cara...................................................53 Ward, Marci...............................................108 Ward, Wanda L............................................74 Waring, Scott.....13, 20, 44, 60, 76, 80, 90, 123, 128 Warren, Shelina........................................111 Washington, Elizabeth Yeager....................61 Wasserman, Pamela.......................... 30, 127 Water, Glen................................................130 Waters, Jasmine..........................................54 Waters, Stewart................60, 114, 123, 130 Watson-Canning, Andrea.........................135 Watson, Renee..........................................127 Watson, Tiffani M...........................14, 82, 96 Watton, Rhonda..................................... 8, 44 Wdowiarz, Matthew...................................14 Weatherford, Carole Boston........................39 Weaver, Lindsay..........................................77 Webb, Jill M..............................................134 Weber, Carolyn................................... 80, 109 Wegman, Peter...........................................76 Welle, Virginia.............................................75 Weller, Allison.................................... 52, 129 Wells, Jamin..............................................120

Wendt, Bruce..............................................30 Wertheimer, Linda K.................................104 Wesson, Stephen......................................120 Westbrook, Sarah......................................138 Wewers, Justine........................................122 Weyrauch, Clifford......................................78 Whaples, Frederick.....................................44 Wheeler-Bell, Quentin................................53 Whelan, Patrick.................................. 71, 111 White, Briana..............................................97 Whitlock, Annie.............................44, 52, 55 Whyte, Heather...........................................44 Wick, Terry...................................................75 Wickens, K. Allison....................................128 Wilbur, Christopher.............................. 16, 87 Wilda, Whitney.................................... 16, 87 Wiley, Adam..............................................107 Wiley, Christina.................................. 18, 116 Wilkerson, Jessica.......................................44 Wilkinson, Amy.................................... 24, 96 William, Princeton....................................116 Williams, Brian............................................54 Williams, Jing.................................65, 66, 68 Williams, Melissa................................. 52, 56 Williams, Shannon......................................88 Williams, Torrence.............................. 99, 113 Williamson, Jason.............................. 59, 107 Willis, Aaron................................................63 Willman, Kent.............................................54 Willox, Lara.................... 49, 55, 80, 84, 124 Wilson, Elizabeth.............................124, 131 Wilson, Jerry...............................................51 Wilson, Scot..............................................118 Wing-Leonard, Deborah.................... 71, 111 Winnik, Mariana.......................................106 Winters, Daniel............................................96 Wise, Sue...................................................108 Witherspoon, Taajah.................................126 Wolfe-Rocca, Ursula........................111, 119 Wolla, Scott........................................ 46, 118 Wood, Diane...................................... 12, 109 Wood, JoAnn........................................ 74, 80

Wood, Kevin................................................97 Wood, Linda Sargent..................................76 Woodson, Ashley................................. 54, 58 Worster, Anneliese......................................59 Wright, Ed.................................................117 Wright, Jennice...........................................49 Wright, Katherine......................................113 Wu, Annie...................................................84 Wu, Gloria.................................................106 Wylie, Scott........................................ 76, 123 X Xia, Xueyan.................................................66 Xiao, Hong...................................................66 Y Yamaguchi, Misato............................ 65, 100 Yeager, Elizabeth.........................................58 Yeo, Lloyd....................................................66 Yerdon, MaryBeth.....................................116 Yezzi, Sarah.................................................80 Yoder, Paul............................................ 55, 59 Yogi, Stan....................................................39 You, Wenxiu................................................66 Young, Skeffington...................................114 Yousuf, Ayesha..........................................112 Z Zajac, Alexa...............................................112 Zaker, Jessica...............................................51 Zaval, Tracey.................................32, 96, 126 Zhao, Xiaoying............................................49 Zhao, Yali.....................................................66 Zickterman, Kevin.....................................138 Zielinski, Gary............................................104 Zlatnik, Joe................................................114 Zolotsky, Jessica..........................................60 Zong, Guichun...................................... 66, 67 Zytveld, Karen Van............................... 16, 86

ADVERTISER INDEX

Center for Civic Education......................................................................... 25 Discovery Education.................................................................................... 44 Eastern Illinois University Graduate School........................................ 38 Federal Reserve Education.org............................................... Back Cover Generation Citizen....................................................................................... 38 George Washington’s Mount Vernon.................................................... 11 German Embassy.......................................................................................... 33 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt........................................Inside Front Cover Knopf Doubleday......................................................................................... 46 Lead2Feed..................................................................................... 17, Coupon Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group............................................... 50 Macmillian....................................................................................................... 19 McGraw-Hill Education..................................................................................3

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National Geographic Learning / Cengage.......................................... 27 The News Literacy Project............................................................................8 Newseum ED....................................................................................... Coupon Penguin / Random House........................................................... 21, 22, 23 Perfection Learning..................................................................................... 15 Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery................................................ 40 Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center................................................................ 24 Teaching Tolerance........................................................ Inside Back Cover UChicago STEM Education........................................................................ 36 University of Alabama................................................................................ 43 University of Nebraska Online....................................................................7 The Week Magazine Education Program............................................. 29

Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


NCSS Officers

Board of Directors

India Meissel (President) Lakeland High School, Suffolk, VA

Joe Feinberg Georgia State University Atlanta, GA

Tina Heafner (President-Elect) University of North CarolinaCharlotte, Charlotte, NC Stefanie Wager (Vice-President) Des Moines, IA Terry Cherry (Past-President) Social Studies Consultant, Mesquite, TX

Jesse Haight Clarion University Clarion, PA Kimberly Heckart Prairie Ridge Elementary School Cedar Rapids, IA Wesley Hedgepeth Collegiate School Richmond, VA

Marjorie Hunter West Memphis High School West Memphis, AR

Chanda Robinson Richland County School District One Columbia, SC

Joseph Karb Springville Middle School Springville, NY

Anthony Roy Connecticut River Academy East Hartford, CT

Tracy Middleton Hidden Valley Middle School Escondido, CA

Rhonda Watton Templeton Middle School Sussex, WI

Andy Mink National Humanities Center Durham, NC Shannon Pugh Anne Arundel Public Schools Annapolis, MD

Chicago Program Planning Committee India Meissel, Co-Chair Shawn Healy, Co-Chair Steve Armstrong Sue Blanchette Laura Broderick Christopher Busey Rebecca Bush Terry Cherry Alex Cuenca Kathleen Duffy Tracy Freeman Rosanna Fukuda Susan Fuhrer Joseph Geiger Lisa Gibson Kevin Hale Tina Heafner

Kim Heckart Marjorie Hunter David Kendrick Michael Koren Teresa Kruger Meredith Lewis Ashley Lucas Mert Martens Catherine Mein Kathy Miller Carolyn Pereira Erica Pilon Shannon Pugh Ranjana Rajendran Noreen Naseem Rodriguez Dee Runaas Daria Schaffeld

Sejal Schullo Bob Seidel Amanda Seider Christopher Shugart Brian Traxler Kathy Uhlich Rebecca Valbuena Peter Van Tyler VanLandegham Jim Vera Stefanie Wager Becky Walters Cary Waxler Heather Weisenburger Kurt Weisenburger MaryAnne Zears

Ex Officio Kristin Ayala (HOD Steering Committee Chair 2018) Fox Ridge Middle School Aurora, CO

Local Arrangements Committee Mary Ellen Daneels, Co-Chair Jessica Marshall, Co-Chair Andrew Conneen Patricia Feierberg Maureen Gilligan Mary Beth Henning Barbara Laimins Alex Mayszak Heather Monson Jennifer Morgan Mark Newmann Lauren Woods

NCSS Staff Lawrence M. Paska, Ph.D. Executive Director

Joy D. Lindsey Director of Marketing and Membership

Sojan Alex Staff Accountant

Brenda Luper, CAE Director of Finance and Administration

David Bailor Director of Meetings and Exhibits

Richard Palmer Art Director

Jennie Bauduy Editor

Angel Robertson Membership Program Manager

Timothy Daly Director of Information Technology

Michael Simpson Director of Publications and Resources

Future NCSS Conference Cities and Dates 2019 Austin, Texas.................................... November 22–24 2020 Washington, DC*................................. December 4–6 2021 Minneapolis, Minnesota.............. November 19–21 2022 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania............. December 2–4 2023 Nashville, Tennessee.......................... December 1–3 2024 Boston, Massachusetts................ November 22–24 2025 Washington, DC................................... December 5–7

Ashanté Horton Meetings and Education Program Manager

* 100th NCSS Annual Conference

98 th NCSS Annual Conference

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HOTEL MAP WEST TOWER Third Floor Founders Suites

Elevators

Ogden

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Skyway Fitness center

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Exhibit Hall Up to Grand Ballroom NCSS Booth # 1000

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Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow: Building the Future of Social Studies


TEACHING HARD HISTORY

AMERICAN SLAVERY An award-winning, groundbreaking resource for teaching the history of slavery in America k Lessons k Podcast k Teaching tools

k Primary source texts k Quizzes k Webinar

LEARN MORE AT TOLERANCE.ORG/HARDHISTORY

For materials, visit us in booth 218 or attend our session on Teaching Hard History at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday.

TEACHING TOLERANCE


Friday, November 30

Saturday, December 1

Does the Minimum Wage Still Matter?

Ten Years After: How the Financial Crisis Changed Our World

Will Robots Take Our Jobs? Economics, Technology, and Inequality

9:00 -10:00 AM Session Hong Kong

11:30 AM -12:30 PM Session Columbus GH

11:30 AM -12:00 PM Power Session Gold Coast

Participate in this interactive lesson demonstrating minimum wage facts and myths. Learn how to access primary sources via an online data tool to tell the story of the minimum wage.

Ten years after the financial crisis, we see significant changes in our economy. Learn about our “new normal” for GDP growth, discuss technological disruption, and explore changing employment dynamics.

Do your students fear the robot apocalypse? Learn the history and economics of the issue, participate in a simulation, and discuss how technology might affect economic inequality.

Presenters Lesley Mace, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta - Jacksonville, FL Branch; Amy Hennessy, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Presenters Susan Kizer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas - Houston Branch; Princeton Williams, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Presenters Scott Wolla, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; Kris Bertelsen, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Little Rock, AR Branch

Come Visit the Money Museum While You’re in Chi-town! Drop in and take your souvenir photo with a million dollars and learn more about how the Federal Reserve works. Open 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Monday thru Friday. Free admission. Conveniently located at 230 S. LaSalle Street in the lobby of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

Profile for National Council for the Social Studies

98th NCSS Annual Conference Program and Exhibits Guide  

Program of the 2018 NCSS Annual Conference

98th NCSS Annual Conference Program and Exhibits Guide  

Program of the 2018 NCSS Annual Conference

Profile for ncss

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