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NCSA TODAY A PUBLICATION OF THE NEBRASKA COUNCIL OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS

Senator Kate Sullivan Takes the Reins as Education Committee Chair Senator Jeremy Nordquist Introduces Legislation Addressing Retirement Fund Shortfall

Nebraska Council of School Administrators

Winter 2013

www.NCSA.org


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CONTENTS

2 Sen. Kate Sullivan Takes the Reins as Education Committee Chair BY ELISABETH REINKORDT

4 Sen. Jeremy Nordquist Introduces LB 553 Addressing Retirement Fund Shortfall BY ELISABETH REINKORDT

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Building Relationships with Legislators Keeps NASES Conversation Current

NCSA EXECUTIVE BOARD 2012-2013 Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Dave Kaslon Vice Chair . . . . . . . . . . .Greg Barnes Past Chair . . . . . . . . . . . Jack Moles NASA Representatives President . . . . . . . . . . .Tim DeWaard President-elect . . . . . . .Mike Teahon Past President . . . . . . . .Greg Barnes

BY JANE BYERS and ELLEN STOKEBRAND

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Educating the Citizens of Tomorrow BY DR. CHRIS STOGDILL

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The Principal’s Office BY ANN JABLONSKI

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Insurer Tax Affects EHA Rates BY GREG LONG

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Legislative Session Begins!!! BY DR. MIKE DULANEY and DR. DAN ERNST

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NSASSP Announces Distinguished Service Award

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NSASSP Announces Assistant Principal of the Year Award

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Education and Poverty in Nebraska: What Increasing Poverty Means in Nebraska Classrooms

NSASSP Announces Outstanding New Principal of the Year

BY TED STILWILL

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NAESP National Distinguished Principal from Nebraska is Announced

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NAESP Announces Outstanding New Principal of the Year

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NASA Longevity Awards Special Announcements NSASSP Longevity Awards NAESP Longevity Awards Calendar of Events

NCSA Mission The mission of the Nebraska Council of School Administrators (NCSA) is to be an effective leader for quality education and to enhance the professionalism of its members. NCSA Today is a benefit of membership in the Nebraska Council of School Administrators, 455 South 11th Street, Suite A, Lincoln, NE 68508. Telephone 402.476.8055 or 800.793.6272. Fax 402.476.7740. Annual membership dues are $335 (active members), $100 (associate members), or $40 (student members). NCSA Today is published quarterly. Send address changes to NCSA, Membership, 455 South 11th Street, Suite A, Lincoln, NE 68508. Copyright ©2013 by NCSA. All rights reserved.

NASBO Representatives President . . . . . . . . . . . .Jill Pauley President-elect . . . . .Kelli Ackerman Past President . . . . . . . Dave Kaslon NAESP Representatives President . . . . . . . . . .Ann Jablonski President-elect . . . . . .Mike Janssen Past President . . . . . . . .David Kraus NASES Representatives President . . . . . . . . . . .Jane Moody President-elect . . . . . . .Brenda Tracy Past President . . . . . . . .Stuart Clark NSASSP Representatives President . . . . . . . . . .Chris Stogdill President-elect . . . . . Brian Tonniges Past President . . .Mitch Bartholomew NARSA Representative President . . . . . . . .Robert Bussmann NCSA STAFF Dr. Michael S. Dulaney Executive Director/Lobbyist Dr. Dan E. Ernst Associate Executive Director/Lobbyist Kelly Coash-Johnson Training and Development Director Amy Poggenklass Finance and Membership Coordinator Angie Carman Executive Administrative Assistant Carol Young Administrative Assistant Elisabeth Reinkordt Staff Correspondent The opinions expressed in NCSA Today or by its authors do not necessarily reflect the positions of the Nebraska Council of School Administrators. WINTER 2013

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FEATURE

Sen. Kate Sullivan Takes the Reins as Education Committee Chair BY ELISABETH REINKORDT, Staff Correspondent

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hen Senator Kate Sullivan looks out on her family farm in Valley County, she can see the one-room schoolhouse she attended as a child. “We’re considering what to do to preserve its future, and maybe move it to a location where we can better document the history of one-room country schools,” she said, “but that’s another story!” Sullivan was elected as chair of the Education Committee on January 9th, and the rural senator is excited to take on her new leadership role. As the Legislature’s 2013 session begins, Sullivan is optimistic that after a few years of tightening budgets in difficult economic times, the future is looking brighter. “I’m proud to say that Nebraska is a state that values education,” she said. Senator Sullivan is a rural Nebraskan through and through. After grad…“there are a lot of uating from Ord High societal changes taking School, Sullivan attended the University of place that make a big Nebraska-Lincoln, where impact on education, and she earned both a bachthere are challenges that elor’s and master’s degree in Home Economics. the teacher in the She spent ten years on classroom faces, and the faculty at the Nebraska Cooperative Exthose of us who have to tension Service before decide an equitable form she and her husband Mike moved to Mason of funding to meet some City, in Custer County. of those challenges”… Her husband is a banker, and from Mason City, 2

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they moved to Cedar Rapids, where they have lived for the past 30 years. Sullivan served 12 years on the local board of education in Cedar Rapids, and both of her daughters graduated from high school there. Her daughter Mollie Morrow is now a teacher in the Elkhorn Public Schools, and Sullivan herself has continually remained involved in education in one way or another throughout her life. “It’s been pretty much ingrained in me to see the importance of a quality education no matter where a child lives,” she said, adding, “It’s a high quality education that leads to a child becoming a productive citizen.” First elected to the Legislature in 2008, Sullivan immediately expressed her preference for serving on the Education Committee, and she was pleased that her interest was recognized. She has served on the committee for four years, and ready to step into the helm. “In some respects, I think and hope that these last four years have been different than what I hope the future will be. We’ve taken some big hits in education—as our whole state budget has—because of the nationwide economic recession and because of the shortfalls we’ve had in our state budget.” Looking to the future, Sullivan said that while she doesn’t think the Legislature will become “wild-eyed spenders,” at least finances are beginning to level off. “We’re not in crisis mode anymore.” As a foundation of her educational philosophy, Sullivan reflected on the fact that “there are a lot of societal changes taking place that make a big impact on education, and there are challenges that the teacher in the classroom faces, and those of us who have to decide an equitable form of funding to meet some of those challenges,” will have their work cut out for them in terms of policy changes to meet those needs. Of course, state aid to education is one of the leading issues for the Legislature, and Sullivan anticipated introducing the updated State Aid bill on January 21st. In developing the legislation, Sullivan explained that over the summer, the committee held public hearings related to state aid across the state, and the main watchwords that emerged were “equity, predictability, and sustainability.” While there was little comment on the (continued on page 3)


FEATURE Kate Sullivan, Education Committee Chair (continued from page 2) formula itself, she said, they heard many concerns on the burden being placed on property owners because of increasing land values. She said she was “pleased to see that the Governor will continue his support for education,” with a proposed five percent increase for two years and a five percent increase in special education funding. “But ultimately, what the Education Committee is going to have to look at is that current estimates show a ten perSenator Sullivan confers with Tammy Barry, Committee Legal Counsel, and Kris Valentin, Research Analyst. cent increase, but we currently involved in early childhood. “We heard that everything realistically know that that’s not realistic, nor is it sustainable.” seemed to be working really well, and we’ve given them some asHowever, she was quick to note, she would reserve any definite sistance through the lottery dollars,” she said. However, this fundopinions or predictions on changes to the formula, emphasizing, ing structure will need to be revisited, because the current uses “the bill will be deliberated in committee, and that’s where the of lottery dollars under the Education Innovation Act will be endreal work will happen.” ing after this year. Sullivan’s committee will therefore be introThe second issue that has been prevalent in the Education ducing legislation calling for a study on the use of those dollars Committee’s work is accountability, and Sullivan noted that now and plans for the future. that the state test is in place and operational, it is time to look Sullivan laughed that it remains to be seen “just how Senator ahead. One of the leading questions in state education policy reSullivan will operate as Chair of the Education Committee, bemains whether Nebraska will be adopting the Common Core, and cause I’m still trying to figure that out as well!” She added, Sullivan was pleased that she and Dr. Breed were in agreement though, that she considers herself to be very open-minded and that “as a state, we should tread slowly on this,” focusing on what flexible, and she values keeping the lines of communication open. the state is doing now before making any changes. “It’s not re“I welcome the opportunity for dialogue,” she said, “and we’ve ally the Legislature’s decision,” she added, “but if the State Board got 249 school districts that are very, very different and we’ve of Education decides to adopt, we need to have the framework in got changing demographics in this state.” In closing, even though place.” In looking at the state tests in place now, Sullivan noted, her passion as a rural senator is for encouraging young people to “We have a good base.” get a quality education and invest in rural communities, she takes Another topic that the Education Committee investigated in very seriously the state’s constitutional responsibility to educate the interim was early childhood education. “Early childhood seems all children. “It is one of our biggest challenges as a state to make to be one of the hot-button topics right now,” she explained, and sure that we live up to that responsibility,” she emphasized, “to “the business community is starting to take note.” With the educate every child, whether they are in Arthur, Nebraska or in amount of entities involved in early childhood education, the North Omaha.” I committee decided to narrow its focus just on the public schools

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RETIREMENT LEGISL ATION

Sen. Jeremy Nordquist Introduces LB 553 Addressing Retirement Fund Shortfall BY ELISABETH REINKORDT, Staff Correspondent

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s the 2013 Legislative session gets underway, Senator Jeremy Nordquist makes clear: state aid to schools and pension liabilities for public employees are both going to be big topics of discussion. “State Aid to Education and [Retirement] are the two biggest issues driving our budget shortfall right now, so we need to find a balance on both of them,” he said in a January 11th interview, just as the session began. As Chair of the Retirement Committee, however, Nordquist is entering the session with confidence, thanks to the hard work and collaboration of NCSA, NSEA, and NASB representatives in crafting a …“we have previously raised piece of legislation contribution rates on [school with solutions for both short-term and employees] to a point that long-term needs. certainly I—as well as NSEA, “Members of our NCSA, and the school boards new committee are very committed to can all agree that the rate maintaining our Defined Benefit Plan we’re at is probably about as for our school emhigh as we should reasonably ployees and for all of our public sergo.” vants. It’s up to us 4

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as policymakers to find ways to maintain that promise that we have made for decades. It’s up to us to figure out how to live up to our end of the bargain,” he said. “We knew we had a big hole to climb out of after the 2008-2009 market crash,” he said, setting the stage for the changes underway. Indeed, in the years since the start of the recession, the state’s pension fund has come up short, and is currently facing $108 million actuarial shortfall. But, he noted, “We’re not going to be like other states that just ignore this issue.” The bill, LB 553, was introduced by Nordquist’s Retirement Systems Committee on January 16th and has since been referred to committee. Nordquist underscored the fact that “this legislation would help create some additional sustainability in our pension plans for school employees,” noting that “the state has long-term liabilities and we have short-term liabilities that we have to meet, and this package would ultimately be an attempt to address both these long-term and short-term liabilities.” So, what exactly is at stake for school employees? First, Nordquist praised school administrators and teachers for being willing to increase their contribution rates when the country’s financial woes began. “The contribution that teachers are making—which is just at about 10 percent—is, on top of Social Security, already a pretty substantial proportion of their income,” Nordquist explained, adding that “we have previously raised contribution rates on [school employees] to a point that certainly I—as well as NSEA, NCSA, and the school boards can all agree that the rate we’re at is probably about as high as we should reasonably go.” However, the Retirement Committee has suggested that the rate increases remain at the increased level rather than sunsetting. Again, Nordquist praised the leadership of the three organizations, noting, “Teachers and administrators have come to the table and have agreed that they’ll continue with this increased rate to their pension plans. I greatly appreciate that,” he added. Additionally, Nordquist is proposing that the state increases its rate of contribution, too. “The state con(continued on page 5)


RETIREMENT LEGISL ATION Jeremy Nordquist Addresses Retirement Fund Shortfall (continued from page 4) tributes, right now, 1 percent of salary to the plan. We raised that, in 2009, from 0.7 percent to 1 percent, and now I’m going to propose taking that to 2 percent in the legislation I introduce,” he said. But keeping the contribution rates of current employees at their current level is still not enough to address the shortfall, and even with an increase in the state’s contribution, Nordquist explained further that a change in the way the state handles its amortization is also part of the plan. “We know the state can’t come up with the whole $108 million shortfall, and we aren’t going to move the contribution rates on teachers and administrators any higher. But what we can do is change our amortization methods,” he said. Instead of looking at the state’s liability and spreading it out over 30 years of equal payments, the state would instead move to a “level percent of pay” method, which assumes that as pay increases over time, the state’s contribution toward the unfunded liability would increase over time, too. Laughing that he was sounding like a policy wonk, Nordquist explained that this system—which is what is used in most other states—takes into account the “time value of money, because the value of a $500 payment 30 years from now is not going to be the same as it is today.” Nordquist anticipates that there might be questions about the change in amortization rate, about whether “we might be kicking the can down the road,” so to speak, but he is confident it is a workable part of the solution for Nebraska. Finally, LB 263 also introduces another piece agreed upon by NCSA, NSEA, and NASB—a plan for new hires that addresses longterm challenges in benefit funding. Once again, Nordquist praised the collaborative efforts of the school associations. “We also have great agreement from the organizations to put together a new benefit package for new hires,” he said, explaining that “that’s a long term fix—we bring down benefits for new hires…and we’re not going to see those savings for many, many years.” The plan for new hires makes two basic changes: one related to cost of living increases, the other to calculating a payment rate based on highest salary. “The benefit package for new hires is going to reduce their cost-of-living increase—right now it’s at 2.5 percent, and we’ll take that down to 1 percent,” Nordquist explained. And as far as a calculation of pay based on salary, Nordquist noted that while this is currently calculated using the employee’s top three years of salary, the new plan will increase that range to five years, thus bringing down the average slightly and discouraging a last-minute run-up of salary before retirement.

In discussing the rea- “We’re not just trying soning for these to get by today, but changes, Nordquist noted that “This will trying to make this help reassure policy- plan sustainable for makers that we won’t see as much spiking decades to come” … in the plans.” In summary, he explained that this legislation will address long-term needs by “pushing off some of the liability by changing the amortization method, and by bringing in new employees at a lower benefit, which will help balance it all out over time.” “We’re not just trying to get by today, but trying to make this plan sustainable for decades to come,” he said, noting that an additional challenge has been a reduction in the state’s annual return on investment rate from 8 percent to 7.75 percent, resulting in an additional annual $39 million shortfall. When asked how he thought his fellow senators would greet the legislation, Nordquist was confident they knew what to expect. “When we talk about the short-term liabilities, I think my colleagues will understand that we don’t have a whole lot of options.” “It is extremely helpful that all three organizations are in agreement,” Nordquist emphasized, adding, “It would be easy for everyone’s membership to dig in and say ‘We’re not going to give ground,’ but luckily the teachers, administrators and the boards have been so willing to work together. It certainly makes my job easier as a Chair!” Leaders from NCSA’s partner organizations agreed. “We are pleased to be working with our peer organizations to find a solution to this problem,” said NASB Executive Director John Spatz. Craig Christiansen, Executive Director of NSEA, was equally enthusiastic, and agreed it was great to have all the organizations working together. Mike Dulaney, NCSA Executive Director, also agrees, stating: “This collaborative effort is a great testament to the ability of our three organizations to address issues facing education.” I

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ADVO CACY

Building Relationships with Legislators Keeps NASES Conversation Current BY JANE BYERS, Special Services Director, Papillion-La Vista Public Schools and ELLEN STOKEBRAND, Special Education Director, ESU #4, NASES Legislative Representative

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Byers

Stokebrand

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here’s a saying that goes something like this… “If the mountain won’t come to Mohammed, then Mohammed must go to the mountain.” Never is this saying more true when you have an important story to tell. When it comes to sharing information with the Nebraska Unicameral, the Nebraska Association of Special Education Supervisors (NASES) decided that we had a story that must be heard. And, in order to be heard, we had to go to the mountain. Each spring during Nebraska’s Unicameral’s legislative session, NASES would invite the Senators to join them for a terrific lunch or breakfast at the Cornhusker. Schedules were always tight and conversations were always rushed. Substantial discussions about special education in Nebraska, the provision of services to children with disabilities, and funding those services were rare and incomplete. In 2006, term limits began to impact the legislative landscape in Nebraska. Historical knowledge concerning the funding of school districts and special education began to disappear. It was time to go to the mountain. That year, NASES hosted an informational session for state senators and their aides concerning special education in Nebraska. Held at the Capitol for Senators and their aides, a small NASES delegation shared the history of special education in Nebraska, the funding process and the stories of success for students with disabilities and their families. The presentation was well received and a new relationship between NASES and the legislature was created. Despite the successful training, changes and reductions to state aid formulas and funding in Nebraska became another tilting point for NASES in 2007. Districts were experiencing increased pressure from the Governor and Legislature to reduce costs. Special education costs were rising and for the first time in several years, the legislature did not match the allowable increase (?) of previous years’ funding levels. In July 2007, NASES sent a small delegation to the CASE “Sustaining Excellence Through Special Education Leadership” Seminar in Washington DC. While at the seminar, the delegation spent a day on Capitol Hill visiting with Nebraska’s Congressional delegation and their aides. Though the meetings were

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short, the conversation concerning issues in education were intense. Questions were asked and answered and relationships were created. The next January, that Capitol Hill experience was recreated in Lincoln, and NASES members went to ‘the mountain.’ In kicking off the Legislative Conference, Mike Dulaney continued the tradition of sharing a legislative update with members, providing information on the hot topics regarding special education, state aid, and funding. Talking points for the meetings were provided. NASES leadership shared tips in having that initial conversation with their senators. Members were advised to set appointments with their state senators prior to the conference. However, if appointments weren’t set, members were still encouraged to head to the Capitol and take the opportunity to have a 5-10 minute ‘rotunda conversation’ with their senator. Relationships were formed and NASES members were able to educate their senators about the issues surrounding the provision of special education and its funding. An important component of the Capitol visits is the ‘debriefing’ of the visits as an organization. Conversations are shared and members are able to follow up with their senators and provide additional information. Comments regarding the process are discussed and ideas for the next legislative conference begin to take shape. Each year, NASES has continued to refine its Legislative conference. Members began to schedule meetings within their regions to maximize their time and support each other in the conversation. Because of geography, multiple meetings with area senators were held. Conversations continued in the Rotunda, just outside the legislative chamber. Senators began to recognize the expertise of the special education directors and coordinators in their districts. And conversations were no longer short and limited, but rather extended over the session and throughout the year. Again, in 2011, NASES experienced a tilting point. After a second year of a decreased percentage in state funding, a one-page explanation and history of special education funding beginning with the 2000-2001 school (continued on page 7)


ADVO CACY Building Relationships (continued from page 6) year was created. Costs of special education continued to rise and state funding continued a flat trajectory. For the first time, local districts shouldered more of the burden of the costs than state or federal funds. Trend data regarding the percentages of students with significant disabilities as well as frequently asked questions was also included. This one-page document was updated and shared during the 2012 legislative session. The document was also shared with Nebraska’s Congressional delegation during visits to Capitol Hill in July. During the 2012 debriefing, NASES recognized that term limits would again become an issue as the legislature would be welcoming 11 new senators during the 2013 Legislative session. At that time, members recommended that we continue to be proactive by sharing information concerning special education and funding prior to the legislative session. Letters of congratulations were sent to the new senators, welcoming them to the Legislature and sharing with them the challenges and costs of providing special education during an economic recession. Emails welcoming returning senators back to the 2013 Legislative session were also sent. In both communications, the dates of our upcoming leg-

islative conference were included, with an invitation to the senators to participate in the continuing conversation regarding special education and funding in Nebraska. The updated funding document is again being shared with senators prior to our actual visits to the Capitol. It is our hope that providing this preview prior to our visits allows NASES to maintain and continue to deepen the level of communication with our representatives in the legislature. In 2006, it became apparent that NASES needed to take a different approach in telling the story of special education in Nebraska. In taking our story to ‘the mountain,’ NASES began a progression of events that have evolved into a proactive and productive relationship. While issues with funding and the provision of appropriate services remain, legislators have information and data prior to the discussions held in committee and on the floor of the legislature. When there are questions to address, the relationship between the NASES membership and their senators allows for the conversation and a discussion of the answers. To be effective in supporting our students, families and districts, we needed to make a change. We couldn’t wait for the mountain to come to NASES—so, NASES went to the mountain. I

NASA Longevity Awards (These individuals were recognized at the 2012 State Education Conference, November 14-16)

35 Years (Joined in 1978) Michael Cunning, Hershey Public Schools Rick Black, Papillion-LaVista Patrick Osmond, Callaway Public Schools 30 Years (Joined in 1983) Dwaine Uttecht, Ravenna Public Schools Larry Harnisch, Sterling Public Schools 25 Years (Joined in 1988) Dan Hoesing, Alliance Public Schools Ronald Wymore, Pleasanton Public Schools Patrick Nauroth, South Sioux City Community Schools Larry Weaver, Arapahoe Public Schools 20 Years (Joined in 1993) Stephen Sexton, Fremont Public Schools Michael Sieh, Stanton Community Schools Henry Eggert, Thedford Public Schools 15 Years (Joined in 1998) Casper Ningen, Hemingford Public Schools Vernon Fisher, South Sioux City Community Schools

Kathryn Griesse, Crawford Public Schools James Sutfin, Millard Public Schools Kevin Chick, Millard Public Schools Peggy Rupprecht, Westside Community Schools Steve Sampy, Eustis-Farnam Public Schools Alan Garey, Medicine Valley Public Schools Matthew Fisher, Northwest Public Schools Cynthia Huff, Wood River Rural School Jeffery Hoesing, Mullen Public Schools Jay Bellar, Battle Creek Public Schools Donald Graff, Twin River Public Schools Daniel Fehringer, Winnebago Public Schools Rex Pfeil, Blair Community Schools Tangela Sylvester, Lewis & Clark Elementary School 2012-2013 NASA Awards Honor Awards Region I – John Lopez, Presented Posthumous, Beatrice Public Schools Region II – Rick Black, Papillion-LaVista Public Schools Region III – William McAllister, West Holt Public Schools Region IV – John Grinde, Cozad Public Schools Region V – Jamie Isom, Valentine Community Schools WINTER 2013

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AF FIL IATE LEA DERSHIP

Educating the Citizens of Tomorrow BY DR. CHRIS STOGDILL, President, NSASSP, Principal, Gerald Otte Blair Middle School

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Stogdill

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othing is more important to this country than the transformation of children into educated, productive citizens. It is the study of the history of education, which helps us understand the needs for the future. It provides an understanding of change and how the “past causes the present, and so the future.” The founding fathers of this country based their education decisions in part on ideas that were used to form the country. Many philosophies emerged over time, but the underlying current was to provide an educational experience that allowed students the equal opportunity to learn. From this early education philosophy evolved the idea of common core values. The goal of a community was to have core values and an organized system in which to pass these values on to the young members of the same community. Although no provision was made for education in the Constitution, the institution was in the minds of the founding fathers as they worked to form a new country. Who was to be educated? What did citizens need to be productive? How best to teach these students who were citizens of tomorrow? Thomas Jefferson believed in educational opportunity for all citizens and that no society is safe without an educated population. His educational philosophy centered on the concept of literacy. He further believed that it was critical to the development of a new country to provide a free education while looking for “new blood” for the development of a new society and its ideals. New innovations and social issues have made it necessary to rethink and adjust those philosophies without losing the fundamental ideals. Technology has changed the face of education. The evolution of the information age has allowed material to be real-life experiences with commentary and interpretations available the moment it takes place.

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Education is the vehicle that moves this process along. We educate everyone and allow him or her to have the opportunity to explore their interests and decide where they fit in society. As educators, we strive to create moments of authentic learning for our students. Problem solving skills are vital for all students. The comprehension of material allows the student to apply it to solve a problem. A community needs a variety of people to help it function. In the movie Dead Poets’ Society, Robin Williams portrayed a high school English teacher who encourages students to become independent thinkers and challenges what they know. The greatest attribute to Williams’s character is the passion for knowledge and commitment to the way he believes life should be lived. Dead Poets’ Society is a movie that stirs emotions in your heart for those of us that feel passion for our profession. The story is more than the final outcome, but is the journey to get there and conquering adversity along the way. It reveals a powerful message that we need to examine things in a different light; it is passion and striving for excellence that matters most. Education is not a cookie-cutter institution. We need to challenge and inspire our students to be the creative and innovative thinkers of tomorrow. I


AF FIL IATE LEA DERSHIP

The Principal’s Office BY ANN JABLONSKI, President, NAESP, Principal, Kooser Elementary School, Lincoln

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Jablonski

everal weeks ago an upset mother confronted me for “humiliating” her child when I simply met with him in my office. The situation was the result of her fourth grade son repeatedly not turning in his assignments. This visit to the principal’s office resulted in a pleasant, productive conversation. Plans were made to ensure that quality homework would be turned in on time, and I acknowledged how capable he was as a student in fulfilling his school obligations. I wanted to ask this mother, “Hey, don’t you know I am a teacher and an instructional leader who truly cares that all students are successful and follows through to ensure students are on the right path?” It wouldn’t have mattered; this student went to the office and the negative connotations of this were too much for the mother to handle. Just this week as I was returning to my office, a kindergartener, who had been dropped off by his teacher, was waiting to see me. Realizing that I was about to reteach a school-wide expectation, I invited him to join me in my office. He did not budge and began to cry, pointing to my office and yelling that he did not want to go in there. When I asked why, he responded that he would never get to leave. I wanted to tell him that this wasn’t the Hotel California, but instead assured him that I only wanted to help him make good choices and that he would in fact be able to return to his classroom. As I reflect on such incidents I realize that there clearly is a perception problem with the principal’s office and the work we actually do. We are all aware of the most common perception: going to the office is synonymous with being in trouble. While we see ourselves as instructional leaders, others may still see us as the authoritarian who was put in an office to primarily enforce the rules. In this age of accountability we all know this could not be further from the truth. I believe there are things we can do to effectively communicate to our stakeholders the important role we play as school leaders and dispel any misconceptions around our position and the principal’s office. Foremost, we must clearly articulate our vision, our beliefs, and what we stand for. This is done when our everyday actions consistently match our principles as we demonstrate that we are here for students and that their learning is paramount. We cannot let our conversations

with stakeholders stray from what is most important: students and their learning. When working with students we must emphasize what we expect, the impact of them not doing their work or how their behavior is getting in the way of their learning, always coming back to our vision for them. Too often we do the right thing, holding others accountable for quality work, good attendance, acceptable behavior, but fail to make the connection to the bottom line: learning. When others see that our actions are aligned with our strong beliefs they will better understand us and come to appreciate the integrity with which we do our work. Most perception problems with the principal’s position are unavoidable thanks to authors like Roald Dahl. But there is no better way to reinvent who we truly are than by getting to know others and strengthening our relationships with them. We must recognize that every face-to-face interaction is an opportunity to reach out and positively connect, be it parents or students. We must be genuine, show care, and demonstrate that we have their best interests at heart in all situations. What matters most to others is how you treat them and we must make every encounter count. Know that you cannot be of influence if you do not first have a positive connection. As long as I am a principal I will expect to hear the line, “I told my kid that he better stay out of your office.” I may go along with their attempt at humor, but inside I know they most likely mean it. Despite the misconceptions, I will continue to use the principal’s office as my classroom and the place I can make a difference one person at a time. I

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HEALTHCA RE

Insurer Tax Affects EHA Rates BY GREG LONG, EHA Field Representative

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Long

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t the October 16th, 2012 Educators Health Alliance (EHA) Board of Directors meeting, the EHA addressed with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska the annual renewal of rates and benefits for the 2013-2014 school year. The challenges facing the EHA in addressing the renewal were numerous, as health care has changed since the passing of the Affordable Care Act. This year’s rate increase has been affected by multiple factors including health care legislation, inflation trends on health care premiums, and the EHA membership health care claims experience. One regulation that will soon affect health insurance cost is the Insurer Tax that begins in 2014, which imposes an aggregate annual tax apportioned among health insurers of “United States health risks” based on relative market share. “United States health risks” mean the health risk of any individual who is a U.S. citizen, a resident of the U.S. [IRC § 7701(b)(1)(A)], or located in the U.S. as to the period this individual is located in the U.S. Insurers required to pay the tax are those providing health insurance during the calendar year in which the tax is due. This new tax will be passed down from the health insurers to the consumer through premium increases. The Oliver Wyman Group, an actuarial consulting firm, estimates a total increase in family health premiums in the large group market of approximately $7,200 over a tenyear period beginning in 2014 and lasting through 2024. The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) estimates that the tax will increase the cost of family coverage by nearly $5,000 by 2020. Unfortunately, the EHA is not immune to the new tax and its effect on our rates. Nationally, the annual tax burden shared by health insurers will begin as an $8 billion tax starting in 2014 and will grow to $14.3 billion, by 2018. As estimated by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska, the Insurer Tax will require EHA premiums to increase by 1.9 percent in 2014 and grow to approximately

NCSA TODAY WINTER 2013

2.5 percent in subsequent years. Since only eight months of the 2013-14 EHA year is in 2014, the impact on our rates for this period will be approximately 1.5 percent. It is anticipated the EHA premiums will have the higher tax amount in years after 2014. Currently, there are two bills in Congress that deal with the Excise Tax and its repeal. The Senate’s bill, S. 1880 was introduced by Senator John Barrasso of Wyoming, Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah, and Senator

Olympia Snowe of Maine. There are currently 25 cosponsors, including Senator Mike Johanns of Nebraska. Senator Johanns stated to the EHA, “Studies have shown that this tax is likely to be handed down to consumers in the form of higher insurance premiums. That’s why I joined 25 of my colleagues during the last Congress to sponsor a bill to repeal the health insurance tax. Now is not the time to further burden the American people with higher taxes and skyrocketing premiums, and I will continue to push for policies that put more money back in the pockets of our families and small businesses.” Representative Charles Boustany of Louisiana, in the United States House of Representatives, sponsored H.R. 1370, which currently has 226 cosponsors and has been referred to the Subcommittee on Health. I


NCS A REPO RT

Legislative Session Begins!!! BY DR. MIKE DULANEY, Executive Director; and DR. DAN ERNST, Associate Executive Director

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Dulaney

Ernst

anuary marked the opening of the 103rd Nebraska Legislature, First Session. The Nebraska Council of School Administrators (NCSA) would like to welcome and congratulate the eleven new members that were sworn into office. In addition we wish to extend our appreciation to all senators for their dedication and willingness to participate in the hard work that is required to create sound and effective policy to govern our state. One new member is actually a returning member. Senator Ernie Chambers of Omaha returns after serving 38 years in the Legislature and leaving as a result of term limits. Other new members sworn in were Sens. Kate Bolz of Lincoln; Sue Crawford of Omaha; Al Davis of Hyannis; Sara Howard of Omaha; Jerry Johnson of Wahoo; Bill Kintner of Papillion; Rick Kolowski of Omaha; John Murante of Gretna; Jim Scheer of Norfolk; and Dan Watermeier of Syracuse. We look forward to working with all new senators throughout the session. Senator Greg Adams of York, after serving successfully as the chairperson of the Education Committee and earning the support of his colleagues was uncontested to become the Speaker of the Legislature. NCSA has worked closely with Senator Adams and believes he will prove to be an outstanding leader for the legislative body. With Senator Adams’ ascent to the position of Speaker of the Legislature, Senator Kate Sullivan of Cedar Rapids was elected to chair the Education Committee. It is our belief that Senator Sullivan, with her prior experience on the Education Committee and a true commitment to education and the students of Nebraska, will perform admirably in her new role. Senator Sullivan is noted for her willingness to listen and has been instrumental in crafting sound education policy in recent years. We look forward to her leadership. We also wish to acknowledge our appreciation to Governor Dave Heineman for his commitment to education as noted in his “State of the State” address. His budget includes a proposed increase in state aid to education (TEEOSA) in the amount of $895 million for the next fiscal year and to $939 million for the following year of the biennial budget. In addition, Governor Heineman is proposing a five percent increase in special education funding in each of the next two years. We are certainly understanding of the many requests and requirements that must be considered in the development of a budget

for the state and highly value the positive support for education. We remind you of a great resource available to you at our “NCSA Legislative Information” website (http://legislative.ncsa.org). We take great pride in providing accurate, useful and timely information to our members on important legislative issues. In addition we would also invite you to sign up to receive text alerts on breaking legislative news. Text alerts are currently provided via Alert Now. It is important for NCSA members to have a positive and productive relationship with your district’s state senator. Please work to help them understand the many complexities of proposed legislation which in turn will assist them in educating our states’ most precious resource— children. Your efforts are sincerely appreciated. I

Bolz

Crawford

Davis

Howard

Johnson

Kintner

Kolowski

Murante

Scheer

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AFF ILIATE AWARDS

Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals Announces 2012 Distinguished Service Award

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Wortman

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he Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals is proud to recognize Dr. Mike Wortman, Principal at Lincoln High School, as the Distinguished Service Award winner for 2012. Dr. Mike Wortman has been selected as the Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals recipient of the Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Wortman received his education from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln where he earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Math Education ’70, a Masters of Science in Educational Administration ’74, and an Educational Doctorate in Administration, Curriculum, and Instruction ‘80. Dr. Wortman is currently in his 18th year as the Principal at Lincoln High School. He previously served as the High School Principal for Hutchinson (KS) High School from 1980-1995, Principal for Valley (NE) Jr-Sr High School from 1975-1980, Director of High School Equivalency Program in Lincoln, NE, and as a Teacher at Lexington (NE) St. Ann’s High School from 1970-1973. Dr. Wortman has a long and distinguished list of contributions made to many state and national professional organizations and has held several community leadership positions. Most recently serving as the NSASSP State Coordinator from 2004-2012. Dr. Wortman has served as State President for the Kansas Association of Secondary Schools Principals Association (1988), a NASSP National Convention Presenter (1981), KASSP State Coordinator (1990-1995), and as a member of the Nebraska delegation to visit Washington, DC (2004-2012). Dr. Wortman has served in his community as President of Rotary (2012-2013), as a Board member of the Lincoln Public Schools Foundation and Nebraska Human Resources Institute. Dr. Wortman has been selected as the KASSP: Kansas Principal of the Year in 1989 and the NSASSP: Nebraska Principal of the Year in 2008.

NCSA TODAY WINTER 2013

Dr. Marilyn S. Moore, retired Lincoln Public Schools Associate Superintendent, states: “You can read Dr. Wortman’s résumé and see all the service he has provided to NSASSP, the profession, and the community. … What the resumé doesn’t show you is the zeal, the passion, the commitment, and the energy that Dr. Wortman brings to each task, each committee, each office, and each opportunity.” Patricia A. Koch Johns, retired teacher, Lincoln High School, noted: “In my personal work with Dr. Wortman, I have experienced a person who leads with kindness and that same loyalty he demonstrates in other facets of his career. He is willing to allow others to use their personal talents and makes every effort to positively support his students, his parents, his teachers, and the staff he leads.” Cheyanna Kempel, a senior at Lincoln High School, commented: “Dr. Wortman is highly respected by the students and staff of Lincoln High. …he does a quality job of getting to know many of his students and their interests. He genuinely cares about building relationships within the school and furthering those relationships outside of Lincoln High.” I


AFF ILIATE AWARDS

Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals Announces New Principal of the Year

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Ricenbaw

he Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals has selected Ross Ricenbaw as the 2012 New Principal of the Year. This award is presented annually to a Principal who has demonstrated outstanding leadership in their school, their region and at the state level. The winner will have demonstrated their enthusiasm for the Principalship by support from students, parents, teachers and peers. Ross Ricenbaw was selected as the NSASSP Outstanding New Principal for 2012. Mr. Ricenbaw has been the Principal at East Butler Public Schools since 2010. During his tenure at East Butler, Mr. Ricenbaw initiated the district in moving towards becoming accredited through AdvancED, implemented a new teacher evaluation policy, served as chair for the Nebraska Frameworks external visit to Blue Hill Public Schools, and is currently implementing the initial phase of a high school 1:1 computer initiative. Jim Koontz, Superintendent of East Butler Public Schools, praised Mr. Ricenbaw, noting, “Mr. Ricenbaw’s leadership style includes being a consensus builder and a team player. He likes to utilize the strengths of others by motivating them and giving them empowerment when that is appropriate. He has a vision for the future while keeping a close eye on the present.” Marty Gilson, Counselor at East Butler Public Schools, states, “Mr. Ricenbaw possesses qualities that make him an effective and competent leader. Ross is intelligent,

articulate, and a person of integrity. His understanding of curriculum, assessment, and instruction allows him to not only run a school efficiently and effectively but also improve it.” East Butler parent and School Foundation Board President Darell P. Aerts writes, “Mr. Ricenbaw was instrumental in doing the groundwork and providing guidance to the Foundation when establishing a $5,000 teacher grant given to a staff member or members each year…he has gone above and beyond as a Principal in our school.” Ross Ricenbaw is a graduate of Grinnell College (Bachelors of Arts in Mathematics Education ’02) and Doane College (Masters Degree in Curriculum and Instruction ‘05). Mr. Ricenbaw also graduated from Wayne State’s Leadership Program in 2010. Ross served as CADRE Associate for Ralston Public Schools in 2009-2010 after a successful tenure as a math teacher and coach from 2003-2009. Mr. Ricenbaw is a member of the Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals, the Nebraska Council of School Administrators, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. I

Special Announcements Mark your calendars for GRIT March 12, 2013 Cornhusker Hotel Lincoln, NE

NASES Sprin g Conference March 21-22, 2013 Younes Confe rence Cente r Kearney, NE

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AFF ILIATE AWARDS

Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals Announces 2013 Assistant Principal of the Year Award Winner

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Daniell

rian Daniell has been recognized by the Nebraska State Secondary School Principals as the 2013 Assistant Principal of the Year. He has served as Assistant Principal at Waverly since 2010 and also taught at Boys Town High School from 2001 to 2010. Mr. Daniell is a graduate of Peru State College (BS in Secondary Special Education) and Doane College (MA in 7-12 Educational Leadership). Mr. Daniell is a member of the Nebraska State Association of Secondary School Principals, the Nebraska Council of School Administrators, and the National Association of Secondary School Principals. Locally, Mr. Daniell has served as an adult Sunday school teacher, youth baseball and football coach, and reading mentor. Mr. Daniell was recognized as the 2012 NSASSP Region I Assistant Principal of the Year. Mr. Ryan Ricenbaw, Principal at Waverly High School states: “Mr. Daniell is focused on making a difference. His focus on the ‘school experience’ allows him to play a

much bigger role than just an assistant principal. … Brian has implemented character seminars that allow students to have conversation with peers about charter issues students face everyday…they are focused, meaningful, and leave a lasting impact on our students.” Lisa J. Graham, Waverly High School English Teacher notes: “Mr. Daniell has made the school better by improving the climate and culture of learning. His support of staff is evidenced by his seemingly ubiquitous presence. He is sincerely and relentlessly positive.” Kelly Verkamp, a parent of a Waverly High School junior states: “Brian has an innate ability to generate positivity in others—he does his best to get students and staff to look at all situations for a perspective of growth. Because of this, students respect him because they truly know that he wants them to succeed despite their setbacks. … He fully believes in each of our students’ abilities to make a positive change in their behavior.” I

NSASSP Longevity Awards 25 Years (Joined in 1988) Stanley Turner – Bennington Secondary School Gerald Reinsch – Schuyler Middle School 20 Years (Joined in 1993) Brent Williamson – Harvard Public Schools Michelle Rinas – Ponca Public Schools Victor Young – Wilcox-Hildreth Public Schools Linda Hix – Lincoln Public Schools Jacquelyn Kelsay – Johnson-Brock Public Schools James Rose – Fillmore Central High School Randall Schlueter – Beatrice Middle School David Bottrell – Palmyra Jr-Sr High School

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15 Years (Joined in 1998) David Barrett – Adams Central Public Schools Bruce Parish – Hyannis Area Schools Thomas McGuire – South Sioux City Middle School Matthew Brandl – Morton Middle School Michael Tomjack – Elkhorn Middle School John Jarosh – Beatrice High School Angela Leifeld – Columbus High School Jerome Smith – McCook Senior High School Tod Meyer – Milford Elementary School Thomas Kiburz – Thayer Central Community Schools James Larson – Papillion-LaVista South High School


PROGRA M SPOTLIG HT

Education and Poverty in Nebraska—

What Increasing Poverty Means in Nebraska Classrooms BY TED STILWILL, CEO, Learning Community of Douglas and Sarpy Counties

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hat’s the biggest challenge in the future for Nebraska education? It’s not NCLB or Charter Schools. It’s poverty, particularly the deep poverty that robs the very young of the quality care and nurturance that supports healthy cognitive and emotional development. The research is clearly telling us that this is a significant obstacle to academic success when children enter school.

Stilwill

Data Speaks on Poverty We’ve all heard the national debate about the wage gap with the incomes of the now famous “1 percent” growing 134 percent while low wage earners barely squeaked out a raise. Take a look at this snapshot and you’ll see Nebraska is part of these changing demographics. Family poverty levels have gone up more than 30 percent in the last ten year to 12.7 percent, with more than one in eight families living in poverty. It’s even higher for Hispanic families—one in four families live in poverty. Additionally, 30 percent of Nebraska’s five-year-olds are now Hispanic. If we want state policy leaders and our constituents to understand the challenges of these changing demographics, we need to get comfortable with the latest data and talk about it.

Family poverty levels have gone up more than 30 percent in the last ten year to 12.7 percent, with more than one in eight families living in poverty.

Nebraska Poverty 2000 to 2011 • Free and reduced price lunch participation is up 44 percent over the last ten years. Eligible families have incomes of $680 per week or less. • Families in extreme poverty increased 31 percent. Those families have incomes of $367 per week or less, much less than the families qualifying for reduced price lunch. *all figures 2011 Census Bureau As education leaders, most of us haven’t done enough to help state pol-

icy makers or even our own constituents come to grips with exactly what these economic and demographic changes mean for families and for education in Nebraska. If we are going to advocate well for our kids, we need to explain that families living in extreme poverty, are going to have children in need of great support. We must prepare and plan, helping our policy makers and supporters understand that we must act early or pay a much higher price later on. For these families, chronic unemployment, exposure to violence or abuse, and, of course, much less access to quality childcare, are common. And remember, the lack of quality childcare during the critical first and second year of a child’s life, takes a toll on a child’s elementary learning ability. Researchers know these mothers are often depressed and isolated. This hopelessness interferes with healthy brain development in newborns and infants. See Harvard Center for the Developing Child website: http://developingchild.harvard.edu/topics/science_of_ early_childhood/. New Classroom Dynamics What does that mean for education? It means that many Nebraska Kindergarten teachers have a very challenging range of student experience and language ability to accommodate. Some five-year-olds enter Kindergarten able to read every book in the school library and other five-year-olds can barely speak a threeword sentence. In these circumstances, it is unrealistic for a single teacher, even with an associate, to personalize an educational program that will help every student grow to his or her full potential. Nationally, and in Nebraska, we have seen what happens when students start school lagging behind their peers. Statistically, in spite of our best efforts, they tend to fall farther behind every year. That means increased Special Education costs, more high school dropouts, fewer students qualifying for affordable community colleges and a low-wage future. Research shows it also (continued on page 16) WINTER 2013

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PRO GRAM SP OTL IGHT What Increasing Poverty Means in Nebraska Classrooms (continued from page 16) means a 70 percent chance of arrests for violent crime. The increased economic costs are staggering. If the number of students in need of significant extra help is only one or two, then perhaps a good teacher can give all the kids in a classroom what they need. Even the most talented, committed teachers have limits in meeting the needs of all their kids. When the proportion of high poverty students becomes too great, classrooms hit a tipping point. In these schools, the traditional K-6 model simply doesn’t work anymore.

3. Partner with Parents. We need to find ways to engage and partner with parents in more substantial ways. Educare Centers learned how and now parents are truly a part of their child’s education.

What Now? We have been working very hard, but we have to recognize that the game has changed in these schools. We must re-design our schools which have high degrees of deep poverty. We can learn from the Educare programs that have operated in North and South Omaha for the last several years. With exactly the students and families that I have been describing, and family incomes under the poverty line, Educare has shown tremendous positive impact. In just two years, working with children and their families, students followed from grades three to seven, are reading above the state average score for NeSA Reading. Lessons from Educare and the research suggest several avenues:

4. Share Student Data. We can better advocate for student needs with policy makers when we openly share our success or failure. Evidence-based strategies take calculated trial and error. We need to track what’s working and what’s not. And we need data to help policy makers see trend lines and progress.

1. Quality early childhood care and education is the single best way to improve student success in elementary school. The research is clear that waiting until age five to help these kids is no longer a tenable education position. Certainly we will need even more classes for three- and four-year-olds, but some districts have also found ways to reach out to link with private and in-home childcare providers. School districts need to actively engage in supporting new policies for healthier birth outcomes and better childcare standards. 2. Expand Family Support. Schools, particularly elementary schools need to develop strong, genuinely collaborative relationships with expert community organizations helping these same families. In high poverty schools, if schools are not intelligently engaging community resources, schools become part of the problem. It requires a team effort with a jointly crafted plan, coordinated services and monitoring to make sure the plan is effective for the student and family. A broader school role is a big change but may not be as unwieldy as administrators might fear. It often takes one dedicated staff person to effectively manage those relationships and free teachers to teach.

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We are all learning more about the challenges that real poverty brings to education, but collectively we can accelerate our success.Why not find new ways to share our best strategies to meet the urgent educational needs of these children and our communities?

Data can move us towards the collaboration that will help us deliver the greatest student benefit. We can celebrate our successes and together evaluate strategies when they don’t produce the student gains we hoped for. We are all learning more about the challenges that real poverty brings to education, but collectively we can accelerate our success. Why not find new ways to share our best strategies to meet the urgent educational needs of these children and our communities? To research poverty data in your school district: If the community served by your district is large enough for the Census Bureau to draw a sample, then you can find out US Census estimates for poverty in your district. View the link below. You can increase the accuracy by averaging three years of data. I http://www.census.gov/did/www/saipe/data/ interactive/#view=SchoolDistricts


AFF ILIATE AWARDS

NAESP National Distinguished Principal from Nebraska is Announced

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Wood

he Nebraska Association of Elementary School Principals is pleased to announce Lisa Wood, Principal at LaVista West Elementary School in the Papillion-La Vista School District has been named the 2012 National Distinguished Principal from Nebraska. Lisa has been Principal at La Vista West for the previous eight years, having assumed that position after serving in the same capacity at St. Paul Elementary School for eight years. During her time as Principal at La Vista West, Lisa has created a climate within her school community that ensures a focus on their mission of high achievement for all students. Her efforts have extended beyond the school walls, seeking legitimate input and active involvement from parents in the educational process. Success has been achieved as evidenced by the 97 percent attendance at Parent/Teacher Conferences. In addition, Lisa has been a driving force behind a successful summer school for children throughout the District. This summer school served over 300 students from 14 buildings this past summer, providing added opportunity for children to improve their reading skills. According to a parent in the district, “Mrs. Wood works to build relationships with the families and teaches her staff ways to do the same. … I am grateful every day to have her in the lives of my children and myself.” A teacher in her building states: “Mrs. Wood has the unique ability to bring material resources and human resources together to do what is best for students. When I think of someone who exhibits leadership skills and knowledge, I think of Mrs. Wood.” Dr. Rick Black, Superintendent at Papillion-La Vista Schools, writes: “She has molded a diverse community into a cohesive, supportive team focused upon what is best for students. Lisa not only welcomes parent and

community involvement, she seeks it out. She readily understands the importance of stakeholders being involved for their sake; AND she recognizes the potential gains for students when they see other adults involved in school life. Lisa’s leadership has been evident during her tenure as a Principal. She has performed the role of mentor to new and aspiring administrators and teachers in the District and is a long-time member of NAESP and NCSA. She is also locally active in her community through involvement with the Optimist Club and Reach for Success Mentor Program. Mrs. Wood will be officially recognized at a celebration in La Vista on a date yet to be determined. She’ll represent Nebraska in Washington, DC in the Fall of 2013. NAESP is extremely proud to have Lisa represent our organization as NDP for 2012. She is very deserving of this recognition and will serve our profession well during her year of tenure as the reigning NDP from Nebraska. Congratulations, Lisa! I

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AFF ILIATE AWARDS

NAESP Outstanding New Principal of the Year

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Ellsworth

eff Ellsworth, Principal of Chapman School in the Grand Island Northwest School District, has been named the Nebraska Association of Elementary School Principals Outstanding New Principal for 2012-2013. Ellsworth is described as dedicated to his students and a true difference maker in the lives of students, staff, and parents. He has worked hard to improve academic success for all through implementation of noon hour study halls, an after-school homework program and acquisition/integration of technology in the classrooms. His skills include being a leader, a listener, a supporter, and a team player. Jeff is also known for his fun-loving personality, positive attitude, and work ethic, all of which makes working in his building a rewarding experience. A fifth-grade teacher at Chapman School, states: “I have found Mr. Ellsworth to be a good listener, a prob-

lem solver, and very approachable for students, parents, and teachers. He is supportive of his staff and always has students’ best interests in mind.” Mr. Ellsworth is an active member of the Nebraska Association of Elementary School Principals. He is currently the NAESP Federal Relations Representative and travels to Washington, DC regularly, carrying to the National level our message about what works best for students. Mr. Ellsworth is also a member of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development and the Nebraska Council of School Administrators. He was recognized in early December at the Joint Principal’s Conference in Kearney. Congratulations, Jeff! I

NAESP Longevity Awards 25 Years (Joined in 1988) Harold Jochem – Kearney Public School Elizabeth Replogle – Paddock Lane School Scott Dodson – Woodland Park Elementary School Wesley Reed – Springfield Elementary School 20 Years (Joined in 1993) Sarah Williams – Ainsworth Elementary School Mary Yilk – Doniphan Elementary School Jeffery Bartels – Lost Creek Elementary School 15 Years (Joined in 1998) Midge Mougey – North Platte Public Schools Jill Clevenger – Kenwood Elementary School Alberta Nelson – Edison Elementary School

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15 Years (Joined in 1998, continued) Bradley Sullivan – Bryan Elementary School Sondra Irish – Loveland Elementary School Maureen Oman – Engleman Elementary School Wendy Bonaiuto – Randolph Elementary School Vicki Schulenberg – Rudolph Fredstrom Elementary Mary Derby – Eisenhower Elementary School Tim Kwapnioski – Bel Air Elementary School Ronald Oltman – Birchcrest Elementary School Troy Juracek – Rumsey Station Elementary Kirk Kuxhausen – Mitchell Elementary School Charlotte Browning – Westmoor Elementary Michael Janssen – Blair Arbor Park Middle School Susan Anglemyer – Upchurch Elementary School Ann Jablonski – Kooser Elementary School


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CALENDA R OF EVENTS

FEBRUARY 15

NASES Region V

9:00 am

Community Center

Bridgeport

28

NASES Region III

9:00 am

Lifelong Learning Center

Norfolk

6

NSASSP Region I

5:30 pm

Seward Country Club

Seward

13

NASA Region IV

10:00 am

ESU #10

Kearney

13

NAESP Region III

2:00 pm

Lifelong Learning Center

Norfolk

13

NSASSP Region II

2:00 pm

TBD

Papillion

14

NSASSP Region III

2:00 pm

NECC

Norfolk

15

NASES Region II

8:30 am

ESU #3

La Vista

19

NAESP Region V

9:00 am

WNCC

Sidney

19

NSASSP Region V

9:00 am

WNCC

Sidney

21-22

NASES Spring Conference

8:30 am

Younes Conference Center

Kearney

27

NASA Region III

9:00 am

Lifelong Learning Center

Norfolk

29

NASES Region III

9:00 am

Lifelong Learning Center

Norfolk

2

NASA Region V

1:00 pm

Quality Inn & Conv Center

Ogallala

9

NAESP Executive Board

9:00 am

NCSA Offices

Lincoln

9

NSASSP Executive Board

4:00 pm

TBD

Lincoln

10

NCSA Executive Board

9:00 am

NCSA

Lincoln

17

NSASSP Region IV

2:30 pm

ESU #10

Kearney

19

NASES Region II

8:30 am

Plattsmouth Public Schools

Plattsmouth

19

NASES Region IV

9:00 am

ESU #10

Kearney

23

NAESP Region IV

12:00 pm

Bernardos

Hastings

24

NSASSP Region I

5:30 pm

Evening w/ Friends

Milligan

24

NSASSP Region II

5:00 pm

TBD

Omaha

30

NASES Region III

9:00 am

Lifelong Learning Center

Norfolk

30

NASES Region V

8:00 am

Community Center

Bridgeport

MARCH

APRIL

National Convention Dates ASBO – October 25-28, 2013 – Boston, MA ASBO – September 19-22, 2014 – Kissimmee, FL AASA – February 21-23, 2013 – Los Angeles, CA AASA – February 13-15, 2014 – Nashville, TN NASSP – February 28-March 2, 2013 – National Harbor, MD NAESP – July 11-13, 2013 – Baltimore, MD

20

NCSA TODAY WINTER 2013


Gold Sponsorships Ameritas

DLR Group

National Insurance

Marc Munford, Bruce Lefler, Scott Keene 440 Regency Parkway Drive, Ste 222 Omaha, NE 68114 800-700-2362 jspearman@ameritas.com www.ameritas.com

Pat Phelan, Whitney Wombacher 400 Essex Court | Omaha, NE 68114 402-393-4100 pphelan@dlrgroup.com www.dlrgroup.com

Steve Ott 9202 W. Dodge Rd., Ste 302 Omaha, NE 68114 800-597-2341 sott@nis-sif.com www.nis-sif.com

ESUCC John Baylor Test Prep

Matt Blomstedt 455 S. 11th Street | Lincoln, NE 68508 402-499-6756 matt@esucc.org

John Baylor P.O. Box 30792 | Lincoln, NE 68503 402-475-7737 john@johnbaylortestprep.com www.johnbaylortestprep.com

Horace Mann

George Schuler 333 South 9th Street | Lincoln, NE 68508 402-318-4794 gschuler@boydjones.biz

Cindy Dornbush 10612 Monroe Street, #4 Omaha, NE 68127 402-680-9382 cindy.dornbush@horacemann.com www.horacemann.com

D.A. Davidson & Co.

Humanex Ventures

Dan Smith, Paul Grieger, Cody Wicklham, Andy Forney 1111 N. 102nd Ct., Ste 300 Omaha, NE 68114 402-392-7986 dsmith@dadco.com www.davidsoncompanies.com/ficm

Katie Shanahan 2900 S. 70th St., Park One, Ste 100 Lincoln, NE 58506 402-486-1102 katie.shanahan@humanexventures.com www.humanexventures.com

Boyd Jones Construction

NLAF Barry Ballou 455 S. 11th St. | Lincoln, NE 68508 402-705-0350 balloub@pfm.com www.nlafpool.org

Pickering Creative Group Kasey Matoush 8001 South 13th Street Lincoln, NE 68512 402-680-9382 kasey@pickering.com www.pickeringcreative.com

TRANE Danny Szegda, Dave Raymond 5720 S. 77th St. | Ralston, NE 68127 402-935-9040 dave.raymond@trane.com www.trane.com/omaha

Tyco Integrated Security

Silver Sponsorships Awards Unlimited Larry King 1935 O Street | Lincoln, NE 68510 402-474-0815 larryking@awardsunlimited.com www.awardsunlimited.com First National Capital Market Craig Jones 1620 Dodge Street, Suite 1104 Omaha, NE 68197 402-598-1218 craigjones@fnni.com Jostens Don Bartholomew 309 S. 8th Street Broken Bow, NE 68822 308-872-5055 don.bartholomew@jostens.com

Nebraska Public Agency Investment Trust Becky Ferguson PO Box 82529 | Lincoln, NE 68501 402-323-1334 becky.ferguson@ubt.com www.npait.com

Siemens John Hay 8066 Flint Street | Lenexa, KS 66214 913-905-6723 johnhay@siemens.com usa.siemens.com

Bill Dynek 8719 S. 135th Street, Ste. 300 Omaha, NE 68138 402-935-5449 wdynek@tyco.com

Wells Fargo Jenni Christiansen 1248 O Street | Lincoln, NE 68508 402-434-6188 jenni.l.christiansen@wellsfargo.com www.wellsfargo.com

Bronze Sponsorships Dream Box Learning Jeff Enough 305 108th Ave., NE | Bellevue, WA 98004 336-236-5560 jeff@dreambox.com www.dreambox.com

Benchmark 4 Excellence Rick Imig PO Box 29646 | Austin, TX 78755 512-215-0928 rick@benchmark4excellence.com www.benchmark4excellence.org


PRSRT STD. U. S. POSTAGE PAID LINCOLN, NE PERMIT NO. 951

Nebraska Council of School Administrators 455 So. 11th Street, Suite A • Lincoln, NE 68508-2105 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

Experience the New NASSP Conference

Redefined and Refocused s %NGAGING AND INTERACTIVE SESSIONS s !DVANCED CUTTING EDGE CONTENT FROM THOUGHT LEADERS IN EDUCATION s )N DEPTH EXCHANGES FOR MEANINGFUL LEARNING s 3TRATEGIES TO EMPOWER YOUR STUDENTS TO BE COLLEGE AND CAREER READY National Harbor, MD February 28–March 2, 2013

Register today at www.nasspconference.org

National Association of Secondary School Principals


Winter, 2013