Page 1

ADVANCING

OUR NATION

A N N UA L R E P O RT 2 0 0 5


National Council of La Raza Mission Statement The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) – the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States – works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. Through its network of nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations (CBOs), NCLR reaches millions of Hispanics each year in 41 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. To achieve its mission, NCLR conducts applied research, policy analysis, and advocacy, providing a Latino perspective in five key areas – assets/investments, civil rights/immigration, education, employment and economic status, and health. In addition, it provides capacity-building assistance to its Affiliates who work at the state and local level to advance opportunities for individuals and families. Founded in 1968, NCLR is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, tax-exempt organization headquartered in Washington, DC. NCLR serves all Hispanic subgroups in all regions of the country and has operations in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix, Sacramento, San Antonio, and San Juan, Puerto Rico.


Contents 2 Message from the PRESIDENT and the BOARD chair 4 NCLR BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2006-2007 5 NCLR Affiliates NCLR Affiliate Council NCLR Affiliate Network Affiliates by State 12 In the Community Education Health Community and Family Wealth-Building Employment and Economic Opportunities Building Bridges 22 On the Hill Civil Rights and Immigration Advocacy and Electoral Empowerment 26 Hurricane katrina 29 Into the Future Youth Leadership AmeriCorps Emerging Latino Communities 35 In the Spotlight Capital Awards, Tribute to Raul Yzaguirre, NCLR Annual Conference 37 CONTRIBUTORS Empowering an American Community Campaign NCLR Corporate Board of Advisors Corporations and Foundations Individual Contributors Financial Summary 51 NCLR Executive Management NCLR Regional Field Offices NCLR Program Area Contacts NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

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Message from the President and the Board Chair As you read the National Council of La Raza’s (NCLR) 2005 Annual Report, we ask you to consider its theme – Advancing Our Nation. Every service NCLR provides aims to move the entire nation forward by empowering Latinos to attain new levels of educational, economic, and social well-being. Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO

Monica Lozano, NCLR Board Chair

The work NCLR completed in 2005 was significant, and we continue to be a leader in many critical areas. We advanced educational programs around the country; we highlighted health needs of the Latino community; and we helped many Latinos fulfill their dream of owning a home. NCLR also continues to invest heavily in civil rights and advocacy issues that impact the entire Latino community’s future. In addition to these invaluable programs, in 2005 NCLR established its permanent headquarters in the heart of Washington, DC, just four blocks from the White House. This new home is more than a mere structure − it is an American institution that will serve the Hispanic community and America for years to come. With the retirement of NCLR’s former President and CEO Raul Yzaguirre, 2005 marked a turning point in our history. Raul’s 30 years of service, as well as the many people who worked with him, allowed NCLR to establish a new level of commitment and preserve the vital services that meet the needs of Hispanics in America. Our NCLR Annual Conference and Capital Awards continue to bring together thousands of nonprofit, business, government, and youth leaders to engage in constructive dialogue and take the necessary steps in

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

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ensuring that all Latinos have the opportunity to achieve the American Dream. The lifeblood of NCLR’s mission is the nearly 300 nonprofit community-based organizations who work tirelessly to make positive changes for every Latino they serve. These organizations play an indispensable role in our work and in the community as a whole. Together with its Affiliates, NCLR planned and charted a course to move the needle on issues such as youth leadership, and workforce and community development. Our Affiliates are America’s most valuable assets in advancing our nation by strengthening Latino families, as well as being NCLR’s most important and trusted partners. We must also take this opportunity to thank our donors for their financial support and active engagement in furthering NCLR’s mission. Premier corporations and foundations, government agencies, and thousands of individuals throughout the country make it possible for us to work toward our goal of advancing the Hispanic community. Again, on behalf of NCLR’s Board of Directors, we are honored to share with you the work of our institution for 2005. We hope you will agree that by investing in the well-being of America’s Latinos we are truly Advancing Our Nation.

Janet Murguía President and CEO

Monica Lozano Chair, NCLR Board of Directors

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NCLR Board of Directors 2006-2007 Executive Committee Second Vice Chair/ Secretary

Chair

Monica Lozano

Daniel Ortega Partner Roush,McCracken, Guerrero, Miller & Ortega Phoenix, AZ

Publisher and CEO, La Opinión Los Angeles, CA First Vice Chair

Andrea Bazán-Manson President Triangle Community Foundation Research Triangle Park, NC

Treasurer

Ernesto “Gene” Ortega President Rural Housing, Inc. Albuquerque, NM

Janet Murguía National Council of La Raza Washington, DC

President and CEO

Hon. Phyllis Gutiérrez Kenney Representative 46th Legislative District Seattle, WA

Salvador Balcorta Executive Director Centro de Salud Familiar La Fe El Paso, TX

Herminio Martinez Executive Director Bronx Institute, Lehman College Bronx, NY

Elba Montalvo Executive Director Committee for Hispanic Children and Families, Inc. New York, NY

Hon. Arturo Valenzuela Director Center for Latin American Studies, Georgetown University Washington, DC

Arturo S. Rodriguez President United Farm Workers of America Keene, CA

Isabel Valdés President Isabel Valdés Consulting Palo Alto, CA

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP

Tom Castro President and CEO Border Media Partners Houston, TX Dorene Dominguez Chairman Vanir Construction Management, Inc. Sacramento, CA Patricia Fennell Executive Director Latino Community Development Agency Oklahoma City, OK Maria S. Gomez President/CEO, Mary’s Center for Maternal and Child Care Washington, DC Hon. Arabella Martínez Oakland, CA Warren Maruyama Partner, Hogan and Hartson, LLP Washington, DC

Maricela Monterrubio Gallegos Galt, CA Hon. Rafael Ortega County Commissioner – Dist. 5, Ramsey County Board Office St. Paul, MN Maria Pesqueira Executive Director Mujeres Latinas en Acción Chicago, IL Jorge Plasencia Vice President/Operating Manager Univision Radio Coral Gables, FL Robin Read President and CEO National Foundation for Women Legislators, Inc. Washington, DC Hon. Felipe Reinoso Principal, Bridge Academy Bridgeport, CT

Juan Romagoza, MD Executive Director La Clínica del Pueblo Washington, DC

Anselmo Villarreal Executive Director La Casa de Esperanza Waukesha, WI DIRECTORS EMERITI

Isabel Rubio Executive Director Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama Birmingham, AL

Rita DiMartino Washington, DC

Angela Sanbrano Executive Director Central American Resource Center Los Angeles, CA

Christopher R. Lipsett, Esq. Washington, DC

Lionel Sosa Sosa Consultation and Design Floresville, TX

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Herman E. Gallegos Galt, CA

Frank Medina Washington, DC R.P. Bob Sanchez Esq. McAllen, TX Gilbert R. Vasquez Los Angeles, CA


| N C L R A F F I L I AT E S |

NCLR Affiliate Network NCLR’s Affiliates are independent, Hispanic-serving community-based organizations governed by local community leaders. These organizations share NCLR’s mission to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans and are provided a range of training and technical assistance from NCLR to increase and improve their capacity to serve the distinct needs of their respective communities.

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| N C L R A F F I L I AT E S |

NCLR Affiliate Council Regional Representatives NCLR’s Affiliate Council serves as a voice for, and represents the bond between, NCLR and its Affiliates. Chair

Elvíra A. Díaz (California) Vice President of Resource Development MAAC Project National City, CA Vice Chair

Luis Ibarra (Far West) President/CEO Friendly House, Inc. Phoenix, AZ Secretary

Sonia Gutierrez (Southeast) Executive Director Carlos Rosario International Career Center Washington, DC Mary Capello (Texas) President/CEO Texas Migrant Council Laredo, TX Richard Farias (Texas) Executive Director Tejano Center for Community Concerns Houston, TX

Linda Mazon-Gutierrez (Far West) President Hispanic Women’s Corporation Phoenix, AZ Nicholas Torres (Northeast) Executive Director Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc. Philadelphia, PA José Velázquez, PhD (Southeast) Executive Director Latino Memphis, Inc. Memphis, TN Alicia Villarreal (Midwest) Executive Director Latino Family Services Detroit, MI Anselmo Villarreal (Midwest) Executive Director La Casa de Esperanza, Inc. Waukesha, WI Alfredo Villaseñor (California) Executive Director Community Child Care Council of Santa Clara County San Jose, CA

Maria Matos (Northeast) Executive Director Latin American Community Center, Inc. Wilmington, DE

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| N C L R A F F I L I AT E S |

Affiliate Network From its inception, NCLR’s work has been guided by its deep understanding of the importance of building financially and organizationally stable Hispanic institutions at the local, regional, and national levels. Today, NCLR serves as a source of capacity-building assistance for nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations throughout the country. NCLR’s active and productive relationships with its Affiliates are at the heart of its work and key to its ability to fulfill its mission. Through capacity-building assistance, policy analysis, advocacy, and special initiatives that complement the work of Affiliates, NCLR is able to work “on the front lines” to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans throughout the country.

Carlos Rosario International Career Center, Inc.

NCLR’s Affiliate Network is divided into six regions: the Northeast, the Southeast, the Midwest, the Far West, Texas, and California. NCLR Affiliates offer a wide variety of services to their communities including: education and workforce development programs; public health centers; Head Start centers and other activities for children and youth; financial services information; homeownership and housing counseling; church-based ministries; social, relief, and refugee services; and legal/immigration services.

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| N C L R A F F I L I AT E S | AK 1

Far West Region 53

Northeast Region 39

Midwest Region 59

WA 6

ME 1

MN 5 OR 4

NV 3 CA 66

WI 8

ID 1 NE 5 UT 2

CO 9

OK 2

AZ 17

NM 9

California Region 66

MO 5

IL 13

IN 8

NJ 2

OH 7

TN 2

DE 2

NC 3

MD 3

SC 1

AR 1

DC- 15 Affiliates DC Headquarters

AL 1

Southeast Region 37

FL 8

ALABAMA Birmingham Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (HICA) (205) 591-5545 www.hispanicinterest.org

ALASKA Anchorage Council of Latin Americans in Alaska for Special Services (907) 222-3710 www.claseak.tripod.com

ARIZONA Guadalupe Centro De Amistad, Inc. (480) 839-2926 Mesa Housing For Mesa, Inc. (480) 649-1335 www.housingformesa.org Nogales Mexicayotl Academy (520) 287-6790 Phoenix Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation (602) 279-1800 www.azhcc.com Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. (602) 257-0700 www.cplc.org Community Housing Resources of Arizona (602) 631-9780 www.communityhousing resources.org

CT 4

VA 3

TX 38

HI 1

RI 1

PA 9

IA 1

KS 4

MA 6

NY 13

MI 8

Texas Region 38

Espíritu Community Development Corporation (602) 243-7788 www.espiritu.com Friendly House, Inc. (602) 257-1870 www.friendlyhouse.org Hispanic Women’s Corporation (602) 954-7995 www.hispanicwomen.org James Sándoval Preparatory High School (623) 845-0781 www.newbeginningschurch.com Tertulia Pre-College Community Charter School (602) 262-2200 Valle Del Sol, Inc. (602) 248-8101 Somerton Campesinos Sin Fronteras (928) 627-1060 Housing America Corporation (928) 627-4221 www.hacorp.org South Tucson Aztlan Academy (520) 573-1500 Tucson Calli Ollin Academy (520) 882-3029 www.calliollin.com Luz Social Services, Inc. (520) 882-6216 www.socialservices.org

PR 2

ARKANSAS Springdale Hispanic Women’s Organization of Arkansas (479) 751-9494 www.hwoa.org

CALIFORNIA Anaheim Neighborhood Housing Services of Orange County, Inc. (714) 490-1250 www.nhsoc.org Arleta El Proyecto del Barrio, Inc. (818) 830-7133 Brawley Campesinos Unidos, Inc. (760) 351-5100 www.cuibrawley.com Clínicas de Salud del Pueblo, Inc. (760) 344-9951 www.clinicasdesalud.org Calexico Calexico Community Action Council (760) 357-6464 Covina California Association for Bilingual Education (626) 814-4441 www.bilingualeducation.org Escondido Community HousingWorks (760) 432-6878 www.communityhousing works.org

Fresno Multiethnic Small Farm and Community Development Corporation (559) 486-3670 Hayward La Familia Counseling Service (510) 881-5921 www.lafamiliausa.org Keene Farm Workers Institute for Education & Leadership Development (661) 823-6133 Los Angeles Academia Semillas del Pueblo (323) 225-4549 www.dignidad.org AltaMed Health Services Corporation (323) 725-8751 www.altamed.org California Academy for Liberal Studies (323) 254-4427 www.calscharter.org Camino Nuevo Charter Academy (213) 413-4245 www.caminonuevo.org CHARO Community Development Corporation (323) 269-0751 www.charocorp.com Chicana Service Action Center, Inc. (213) 253-5959 Eastmont Community Center (323) 726-7998 El Centro del Pueblo (213) 483-6335 Los Angeles Leadership Academy (213) 381-8484 www.laleadership.org National Latino Arts, Education, and Media Institute (310) 281-3770 New Economics for Women (213) 483-2060 www.neweconomicsfor women.org Para los Niños (213) 250-4800 www.paralosninos.org Pueblo Nuevo Development Corporation (213) 413-3838 www.pueblonuevo.org Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (323) 725-3970 www.shpe.org

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Watts/Century Latino Organization (323) 564-9140 Youth Policy Institute (213) 688-2802 www.ypiusa.org Madera Darin M. Camarena Health Center, Inc. (559) 664-4000 www.cvhnclinics.org/ Modesto Mujeres Latinas de Stanislaus (209) 572-2437 www.geocities.com/ mujereslatinasdestanislaus Montebello Montebello Housing Development Corporation (323) 722-3955 www.mtbhousingcorp.com Moreno Valley TODEC Legal Center, Perris (909) 943-1955 National City MAAC Project (619) 426-3595 www.maacproject.org North Hollywood Valley Community Clinic (818) 763-1718 www.valleycommunity clinic.org Oakland Eastbay Spanish Speaking Citizens’ Foundation (510) 261-7839 www.sscf.org Growing Children Charter School (510) 568-0500 La Clínica de La Raza (510) 535-4000 www.laclinica.org Lighthouse Community Charter School (510) 271-8807 Unity Council (510) 535-6900 www.unitycouncil.org Oceanside San Diego County SER/ Jobs for Progress, Inc. (760) 754-6500 Oxnard El Concilio del Condado de Ventura (805) 486-9777 elconcilioventura.org


| N C L R A F F I L I AT E S | Pomona Pomona Valley Center for Community Development (909) 629-4649 The School of Arts and Enterprise (909) 622-0699 www.the-sae.com San Diego Centro Cultural de la Raza (619) 235-6135 www.centroraza.org Chicano Federation of San Diego County, Inc. (619) 285-5600 www.chicanofederation.org Parent Institute for Quality Education (858) 483-4499 www.piqe.org San Diego County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (619) 702-0790 www.sdchcc.com San Diego Home Loan Counseling and Education Center (619) 624-2330 www.sdhomeloan.org San Fernando Latin American Civic Association (818) 361-8641 San Francisco Centro Latino de San Francisco (415) 861-8758 Women’s Initiative for Self Employment (415) 641-3460 www.womensinitiative.org San Jose American GI Forum San Jose Chapter (408) 288-9470 www.sjgif.org Center for Training and Careers, Inc. (408) 251-3165 www.ctcsj.org Community Child Care Council of Santa Clara County (408) 487-0747 www.4c.org Mexican Heritage Corporation (408) 928-5500 www.mhcviva.org National Hispanic University (408) 273-2712 San Ysidro Casa Familiar, Inc. (619) 428-1115 www.casafamiliar.org San Ysidro Health Center (619) 662-4104 syhc.org Santa Ana Delhi Community Center (714) 481-9600

El Sol Science and Arts Academy of Santa Ana (714) 543-0023 www.elsolacademy.org Santa Barbara Cesar Chavez Dual-Language Immersion Charter School (805) 966-7392 Santa Monica National Association of Latino Independent Producers (310) 457-4445 www.nalip.org Stockton Asociación Campesina Lazaro Cardenas (209) 466-6811 www.aclc.org Council for the Spanish Speaking-CA (209) 547-2855 www.elconcilio.org Union City Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center (510) 471-5907 www.tvhc.org Ventura Cabrillo Economic Development Corporation (805) 659-3791 www.cabrilloedc.org Visalia Self-Help Enterprises (559) 651-1000 www.selfhelpenterprises.org West Sacramento Rural Community Assistance Corporation (916) 447-2854

COLORADO Denver Brothers Redevelopment, Inc. (303) 202-6340 www.briathome.org Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation (303) 477-4774 www.delnortendc.org Latin American Research and Service Agency (303) 722-5150 www.larasa.org Mi Casa Resource Center for Women, Inc. (303) 573-1302 www.micasadenver.org NEWSED Community Development Corporation (303) 534-8342 www.newsed.org Servicios de la Raza, Inc. (303) 458-5851 www.tripod.com

SouthWest Improvement Council (303) 934-2268 Pueblo Cesar Chavez Academy (719) 295-1623 www.cesarchavez academy.org Westminster Colorado Rural Housing Development Corporation (303) 428-1448 www.crhdc.org

Connecticut Bridgeport Bridge Academy (203) 333-6961 www.bridgeacademy.org Hartford Connecticut Puerto Rican Forum, Inc. (860) 247-3227 www.ctpuertoricanforum.org Hispanic Health Council (860) 527-0856 www.hispanichealth.com Rocky Hill Humanidad, Inc. (860) 563-6103 www.partnersfor community.org

delaware Dover Delmarva Rural Ministries, Inc. (302) 678-3652 www.1drm.com Wilmington Latin American Community Center, Inc. (302) 655-7338 www.thelatincenter.org

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Ayuda, Inc. (202) 387-4848 www.ayudainc.org Carlos Rosario International Career Center, Inc. (202) 797-4700 www.carlosrosario.org Central American Resource Center (202) 328-9799 www.dccarecen.org CentroNía (202) 332-4200 www.centronia.org Council of Latino Agencies (202) 328-9451 www.consejo.org La Clínica del Pueblo, Inc. (202) 462-4788 www.lcdp.org Latin American Youth Center (202) 319-2225 www.layc-dc.org

Latino Economic Development Corporation (202) 588-5102 www.ledcdc.org Mary’s Center for Maternal and Child Care, Inc. (202) 483-8196 www.maryscenter.org Mi Casa, Inc. (202) 232-1375 www.micasa-inc.org Multicultural Career Intern Program (202) 673-7314 www.mcip.org National Association for Bilingual Education (202) 898-1829 www.nabe.org Spanish Catholic Center, Inc. (202) 939-2437 Spanish Education Development Center (202) 462-8848 www.sedcenter.com Teaching for Change (202) 588-7204 www.teachingforchange.org

Florida Florida City Centro Campesino Farmworker Center, Inc. (305) 245-7738 www.centrocampesino.org Coalition of Florida Farmworker Organizations, Inc. (305) 246-0357 www.coffo.org Mexican American Council, Inc. (305) 245-5865 Homestead Everglades Community Association (305) 242-2142 www.farmworker.org Immokalee Redlands Christian Migrant Association (239) 658-3572 www.rcma.org Miami Hispanic Coalition, Inc. (305) 262-0060 Orlando Latino Leadership, Inc. (407) 249-9100 www.latino-leadership.org Tampa Housing and Education Alliance (813) 261-5151

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HAWAII Wailuku Maui Economic Opportunity, Inc. (808) 248-2990 www.meoinc.org

IDAHO Caldwell Idaho Migrant Council, Inc. (208) 454-1652 www.idahomigrantcouncil.org/

ILLINOIS Chicago Alivio Medical Center (312) 829-6303 www.aliviomedicalcenter.org Association House of Chicago (773) 772-7170 www.associationhouse.org El Hogar del Niño (773) 523-1629 Erie Neighborhood House (312) 563-5800 www.eriehouse.org Gads Hill Center (312) 226-0963 www.gadshillcenter.org Illinois Migrant Council (312) 663-1522 www.illinoismigrant.org Instituto del Progreso Latino (773) 890-0055 www.idpl.org Latinos United (312) 782-7500 www.latinosunited.org Little Village Community Development Corporation (773) 542-9233 Mujeres Latinas En Acción (312) 226-1544 mujereslatinasenaccion.org Resurrection Project (312) 666-1323 www.resurrectionproject.org Elgin Elgin Community College (847) 888-7998 www.elgin.cc.il.us

INDIANA Fort Wayne United Hispanic Americans, Inc. (260) 422-2651

IOWA West Des Moines Midwest Educational Resource Development Fund, Inc. (515) 261-7270


| N C L R A F F I L I AT E S | KANSAS

MICHIGAN

Kansas City El Centro, Inc. (913) 677-0100 www.elcentroinc.com Harvest America Corporation (913) 342-2121 www.harvestamerica.org Topeka Kansas Hispanic and Latino American Affairs Commission (785) 296-3465 www.khlaac.org Wichita SER Corporation of Kansas (316) 264-5372

Detroit Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation (313) 967-4880 www.dhdc1.org Latin Americans for Social and Economic Development, Inc. (313) 554-2025 Latino Family Services (313) 841-7380 New Detroit, Inc. (313) 664-2000 www.newdetroit.org Southwest Nonprofit Housing Corporation (313) 841-3727 www.swsol.org Kalamazoo Hispanic American Council, Inc. (269) 385-6279 www.hispanicamerican council.org Lansing Michigan Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs (517) 373-8339 www.michigan.gov Traverse City Northwest Michigan Health Services, Inc. (231) 947-1112

maINE Lewiston Maine Rural Workers Coalition (207) 753-1922

maryland Baltimore Centro de la Comunidad, Inc. (410) 675-8906 www.centrodelacomunidad.org Landover Center for the Advancement of Hispanics in Science and Engineering (301) 918-1014 www.cahsee.org Silver Spring Casa de Maryland (301) 431-4185 www.casademaryland.org

MASSACHUSETTS Cambridge Centro Presente (617) 497-9080 Concilio Hispano de Cambridge, Inc. (617) 661-9406 www.conciliohispano.org Holyoke Friends of the Holyoke Community Charter School (413) 533-0111 Jamaica Plain Hispanic Office of Planning and Evaluation (617) 524-8888 Hyde Square Task Force, Inc. (617) 524-8303 www.hydesquare.org Springfield New England Farm Workers Council (413) 272-2200 www.partnersforcommunity.org

mINNESOTA Minneapolis El Colegio Charter School (612) 728-5728 www.el-colegio.org Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Minnesota Foundation (612) 312-1692 www.hispanicmn.org Saint Paul Academia Cesar Chavez (651) 778-2940 www.cesarchavezschool.org Chicano Latino Affairs Council (651) 296-9587 www.clac.state.mn.us Chicanos Latinas Unidas En Servicio (651)379-4203 www.clues.org

mIssouri Kansas City Cabot Westside Clinic (816) 471-0900 www.cabot.org Guadalupe Center, Inc. (816) 421-1015 www.guadalupecenters.org

Hispanic Economic Development Corporation of Greater Kansas (816) 221-3442 www.kchedc.org Mattie Rhodes Counseling and Art Center (816) 471-2536 www.mattierhodes.org Westside Housing Organization (816) 421-8048 www.westsidehousing.org

nebraska Lincoln Hispanic Community Center (402) 474-3950 Mexican American Commission (402) 471-2791 www.mex-amer.state.ne.us North Platte NAF Multicultural Human Development, Inc. (308) 534-2630 www.nafmhdc.org Omaha Chicano Awareness Center (402) 733-2720 www.cacinc.org One World Community Health Centers (Indian Chicano Health Center) (402) 734-4110 www.oneworldomaha.org

neVADA Las Vegas East Las Vegas Community Development Corporation (702) 307-1710 Nevada Association of Latin Americans, Inc. (702) 382-6252 Reno Nevada Hispanic Services, Inc. (775) 826-1818 www.renosparks.com/nhs/

new jersey Camden Asociación de Puertorriqueños en Marcha- NJ (856) 338-9492 www.apm-thila.org Latin American Economic Development Association (856) 338-1177 www.laeda.com

new Mexico Albuquerque Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce (505) 842-9003 www.ahcnm.org

HELP - New Mexico, Inc. (505) 265-3717 www.helpnm.com Southwest Creations Collaborative (505) 247-8559 www.southwestcreations.com YES Housing, Inc. (505) 254-1373 www.yeshousing.org Youth Development, Inc. (505) 831-6038 www.ydinm.org Embudo Rio Grande Center (505) 579-4251 Siete Del Norte (505) 579-4217 Española Hands Across Cultures (505) 747-1889 www.la-tierra.com/HACC Santa Fe Southwest Institute for Educational Research and Professional Teacher Development (505) 982-5225

neW YORK Bronx Promesa Systems, Inc. (718) 299-1100 www.promesa.org Brooklyn Latin American Workers’ Project (718) 628-6222 latinamericanworkers.tripod.com/ lawp/id9.html Glen Cove La Fuerza Unida, Inc. (516) 759-0788 www.lfunida.org New York City Alianza Dominicana, Inc. (212) 740-1960 www.alianzadominicana.org Amber Charter School (212) 534-9667 www.ambercharter.echalk.com Audubon Partnership for Economic Development (212) 544-2470 www.audobonpartnership.org Committee for Hispanic Children and Families (212) 206-1090 www.chcfinc.org Community Association of Progressive Dominicans (212) 781-5500 www.acdp.org

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Dominican Women’s Development Center (212) 994-6060 www.dwdc.org Spanish Theater Repertory Co., Ltd (212) 889-2850 www.repertorio.org Rochester Rural Opportunities, Inc. (585) 546-7180 www.ruralinc.org Syracuse Spanish Action League (315) 475-6153 www.spanishactionleague.com Woodside Latin American Integration Center, Inc. (718) 565-8500 www.laicnvc.org

north carolina Charlotte Latin American Coalition (704) 531-3848 www.latinamericancoalition.org Raleigh El Pueblo, Inc. (919) 835-1525 www.elpueblo.org Siler City Hispanic Liaison of Chatham County/El Vínculo Hispano (919) 742-1448 www.hispanicliaison.org

OHIO Cleveland Commission on Catholic Community Action (216) 281-3839 www.dioceseofcleveland.org Hispanic Urban Minority Alcoholism & Drug Abuse Outreach Program (216) 459-1222 www.umadaops.com Elyria Lorain County Community College (440) 365-5222 www.lorainccc.edu Lorain El Centro de Servicios Sociales, Inc. (440) 277-8235 Toledo ADELANTE, Inc. (419) 244-8440 www.adelante-inc.org Farm Labor Research Project (419) 243-3456 www.floc.com


| N C L R A F F I L I AT E S | Youngstown Organización Cívica y Cultural Hispana Americana (330) 781-1808

OKLAHOMA Oklahoma City Latino Community Development Agency (405) 236-0701 www.latinoagencyokc.org ORO Development Corporation (405) 840-7077

PUERTO RICO San Juan Asociación de Salud Primaria de Puerto Rico (787) 758-3411 www.saludprimariapr.org Consejo Vecinal Pro-Desarrollo de la Península de Cantera (787) 727-5051 www.consejovecinal.org

RHODE ISLAND

Providence Center for Hispanic Policy and Oregon Advocacy Hillsboro (401) 467-0111 Housing Development Corporation www.chispa.org (503) 693-2937 south carolina Newberg Columbia CASA of Oregon Acercamiento Hispano de (503) 537-0319 Carolina del Sur www.casaoforegon.org (803) 419-5112 Portland www.schispanicoutreach.org Hacienda Community TENNESSEE Development Corporation (503) 595-2111 Memphis www.haciendacdc.org/ Latino Memphis, Inc. Oregon Council for (901) 366-5882 Hispanic Advancement www.latinomemphis.org (503) 228-4131 Nashville www.ocha-nw.org Conexión Americas pennsylvania (615) 320-5152 www.conamericas.com Lancaster SACA Development Corporation (717) 397-6267 Spanish American Civic Association (SACA) (717) 397-6267 www.sacapa.org Philadelphia Asociación de Puertorriqueños en Marcha- PA (215) 235-6788 www.apmphila.org Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc. (215) 763-8870 www.congreso.net Hispanic Association of Contractors and Enterprises (215) 426-8025 www.HACE.org Norris Square Civic Association (215) 426-8723 Nueva Esperanza Academy (215) 324-0746 www.neacademy.org Nueva Esperanza, Inc. (215) 324-0746 www.nueva.org Reading The Hispanic Center Daniel Torres, Inc. (610) 376-3748 www.centrohispano.org

TEXAS Austin American YouthWorks (512) 472-8220 www.ail.org Southwest Key Program, Inc. (512) 462-2181 www.swkey.org Corpus Christi Gulf Coast Council of La Raza, Inc. (361) 881-9988 www.gcclr.org Dallas Dallas Concilio of Hispanic Service Organizations (214) 818-0481 www.dallasconcilio.org SER Child Development Center (214) 637-8307 www.serkids.org Vecinos Unidos, Inc. (214) 761-1086 www.vecinosunidos.net Edinburg City Information Referral Resource Assistance, Inc. (956) 682-3436 El Cenizo La Gloria Development Corporation (956) 791-3034

El Paso Centro de Salud Familiar La Fe, Inc. (915) 534-7979 YWCA El Paso Del Norte Region (915) 533-2311 www.ywcaelpaso.org Fort Worth Near Northside Partners Council, Inc. (817) 625-9816 www.partnerscouncil.org Harlingen Su Clínica Familiar (956) 365-6750 www.tachc.org Houston AAMA Community Development Corporation (713) 923-5433 www.aamacdc.org Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans (713) 926-4756 www.aamainc.com D.R.A.W. Academy (713) 706-3729 www.drawacademy.org Galaviz Academy (713) 694-6027 Housing Opportunities of Houston, Inc. (713) 644-8488 www.housingopphouston.com Houston Community Services (713) 926-8771 www.houstoncommunity services.com Houston Esperanza (713) 926-2794 KIPP Houston High School (832) 328-1051 www.kipphouston.org Latino Learning Center (713) 223-1391 www.latinolearning.org Tejano Center for Community Concerns (713) 644-2340 www.tccc-ryss.org Kingsville South Texas Youth Development Council, Inc. (361) 592-4901 Laredo Asociación Pro Servicios Sociales (956) 724-6244 Texas Migrant Council, Inc. (956) 722-5174 tmccentral.org Lubbock LEARN, Inc. (806) 763-4256 www.learninc.com

McAllen McAllen Affordable Homes, Inc. (956) 687-6263 www.mcallenaffordable homes.com Midland Midland Community Development Corporation (432) 570-9824 Mission Amigos del Valle, Inc. (956) 581-9494 www.advrgv.org Pharr Nuestra Clínica del Valle (956) 787-8915 www.TACHC.org San Antonio Avenida Guadalupe Association (210) 223-3151 www.agatx.org First Mexican Baptist Church (210) 737-6113 www.primeriglesiabautista.org Heroes and Heritage (770) 667-3054 Mexican American Unity Council, Inc. (210) 978-0500 www.mauc.org Our Casas Resident Council, Inc. (210) 208-9691 Student Alternatives Program, Inc. (210) 227-0295 Uvalde Community Council of Southwest Texas, Inc. (830) 278-6268 Community Health Development, Inc. (830) 278-5604 www.chdi4health.org

UTAH Salt Lake City Utah Coalition of La Raza (801) 359-8922 users.sisna.com/armstrong/ uclr.htm South Salt Lake City Centro de la Familia de Utah (801) 521-4473

VIRGINIA Arlington East Coast Migrant Head Start Project (703) 243-7522 www.ecmhsp.org Falls Church Hispanic Committee of Virginia (703) 671-5666 www.hcva.org

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Hispanos Unidos de Virginia (703) 533-9300

WASHINGTON Granger Northwest Communities Education Center (509) 854-1900 www.kdna.org Pasco Community Health Center La Clínica (509) 547-2204 Seattle El Centro de la Raza (206) 329-9442 www.elcentrodelaraza.com SEA MAR Community Health Center (206) 763-5210 www.seamar.org Sunnyside Washington State Migrant Council (509) 839-9762 www.wsmconline.org Yakima Rural Community Development Resources (509) 453-5133

WISCONSIN Madison Centro Hispano (608) 255-3018 centrohispanomadison.org Milwaukee Aurora Weier Educational Center (414) 562-8398 Centro de la Comunidad Unida/ United Community Center (414) 384-3100 www.unitedcc.org Council for the Spanish Speaking-WI (414) 384-3700 La Causa, Inc. (414) 902-1500 www.lacausa.org United Migrant Opportunity Services, Inc. (414) 389-6000 www.umos.org Waukesha HBC Services, Inc. (262) 522-1230 www.hbcservices.org La Casa de Esperanza, Inc. (262) 547-0887 www.lacasadeesperanza.org


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NCLR Affiliate, Latin American Youth Center

Education NCLR is dedicated to increasing the quality of education of Latino students and in 2005 worked to substantially impact Latino education at two of the most critical points in the educational pipeline where the levels of disparity are most acute: preschool and high school. Through NCLR’s network of charter schools and education initiatives, NCLR has set forth a vision to build a society in which rigorous education is equally provided to all students and where multiple approaches of education are recognized as critical components of a communitybased educational system.

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Education Highlights n In 2005, NCLR participated in

a business plan process that yielded an increased focus on early care and education and a shift from school startup operations to improving student achievement in high schools in the NCLR Affiliate Network. This realignment enables NCLR to concentrate its efforts on improving its services to support schools and programs, thereby measurably improving the academic achievement of students. n The Lee y serás (Read and

You Will Be) early literacy development initiative was nationally launched in 2005 in Washington, DC in conjunction with our local partner CentroNía, along with the official website (www.leeyseras.net). This fully bilingual initiative seeks to enable

local communities to support Latino families in promoting early literacy. The initiative was also launched with our community partners in New York City (Committee for Hispanic Children and Families) and Dallas (Mi Escuelita Preschools). NCLR continues to be a leader in the community school movement around the country. To date, out of the broader NCLR school network, 50 charter schools have received grants from NCLR, 38 of which are now operational. In addition, NCLR is working with 11 early college high schools. In 2005, NCLR especially focused on strengthening data collection and analysis activities with schools to inform appropriate service delivery strategies that will result in improved student achievement. n

NCLR worked with the U.S. House of Representatives on reauthorization of the Head Start program, the nation’s federallyfunded preschool program. NCLR produced a white paper titled, “Head Start Reauthorization: Enhancing School Readiness for Hispanic Children,” which included legislative recommendations for making Head Start more n

NCLR Affiliate, CentroNía

NCLR Affiliate, Latin American Youth Center

effective in serving Latinos. “The School Readiness Act of 2005” (H.R. 2123), which would renew Head Start, contains many of NCLR’s proposals to significantly improve Head Start for Latino children. NCLR continued to work with Congress and national and statebased partners to push for enactment of the “Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act” (S. 2075).  For example, NCLR held a rally in Philadelphia during the 2005 NCLR Annual Conference in support of the “DREAM Act.”  As a result of NCLR’s long-time advocacy on the issue, and the overwhelming grassroots support for the bill, the “DREAM Act” was reintroduced in mid-November with seven Republicans and six Democrats. It continues to garner broad bipartisan support in Congress. n

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NCLR Affiliate, Alivio Medical Center

Health NCLR’s Institute for Hispanic Health (IHH), in partnership with its network of community-based Affiliates, conducts community-based research on specific diseases, conditions, and health issues affecting Latinos. Based on this knowledge, it also develops, implements, and evaluates culturally-competent and linguistically – appropriate health education and prevention programs and collaborates on advocacy activities to protect the health and well-being of the Latino community.

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Health Highlights n IHH has trained more than

400 promotores de salud (lay health educators) over the last ten years on a range of health topics, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, stroke, nutrition, genomics, and HIV/AIDS. These promotores have reached approximately 20,000 Hispanics in 11 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. n NCLR’s Atlanta Health Program

Office has emerged as a leader in highlighting the status of Latino health in the South. In 2005, NCLR produced and released a statistical report, Latinos in Georgia: A Closer Look, which highlighted the health-related disparities facing Georgia’s Hispanics.

This information is being used to develop a Latino/Hispanic health agenda for Georgia and as a tool by local Latino organizations to advocate for the health-related needs of Hispanics in the South. n IHH joined forces with

California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) to develop, establish, and inaugurate the NCLR/CSULB Center for Latino Community Health, Research, and Evaluation (the Center). The Center strengthens NCLR’s commitment to rigorous evaluation of existing programs and will provide leadership in the area of community-based evaluation. n NCLR participated in a

successful effort to preserve immigrant access to food assistance. In partnership with a broad base of advocates, NCLR fought to overturn budgetary cuts to the Food Stamp Program which would have further limited food stamp eligibility for legal immigrants and persons receiving services under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. n NCLR sponsored AB 1195,

which requires all continuing medical education courses in

NCLR Affiliate, Alivio Medical Center

California to include curricula on cultural and linguistic understanding. The passage of the legislation is a critical step to ensure that California’s medical professionals can meet the health care needs of the Latino population. n NCLR continued to play a

key role in advocating for the repeal of the 1996 bar on public safety-net programs, particularly children’s and pregnant women’s access to Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, via the bipartisan “Immigrant Children’s Health Improvement Act.”

NCLR Affiliate, Alivio Medical Center

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| I N T H E C OMMU N I T Y |

NCLR CFO. Gerald Borenstein with family

Community and Family Wealth-Building NCLR develops and implements programs and engages in policy advocacy to address barriers to wealth for Latino families. This work is carried out through NCLR’s Community Development component and Asset Development Initiative and covers a range of issues including access to bank accounts, credit issues, auto and mortgage lending, homeownership, remittances, personal financial counseling, and retirement and other tax-preferred savings.

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Community and Family Wealth-Building Highlights n NCLR Homeownership

n NCLR released an issue brief

Network (NHN). In 2005, NHN expanded to include 41 Affiliates, which receive subgrants and/or technical assistance from NCLR to implement NHN’s intensive one-on-one housing counseling model. Members of NHN provided counseling services to more than 20,000 families in 2005, resulting in more than 2,700 closed mortgage loans to Latino first-time homebuyers.

on predatory lending, entitled Jeopardizing Hispanic Homeownership: Predatory Practices in the Homebuying Market. The brief is the first to look at the full range of experiences and challenges of the Latino homebuyer and homeowner; it identifies barriers to affordable home loans and common predatory tactics used in the community.

n Economic Mobility Centers

Remittance Transfer Market, an analysis of remittances – the money sent by immigrant workers in the U.S. to family members abroad – which affirms that reforming the $45 billion Latino remittance transfer market could help put Hispanics on a path toward greater prosperity and wealth.

(EMCs). NCLR’s research indicates that one-on-one financial counseling is the most effective way to transfer information about personal financial matters to low-income Latinos. The findings led NCLR to develop and refine the concept of Economic Mobility Centers (EMCs) – community-based financial service centers. EMCs build on Affiliates’ existing program infrastructure to provide wealth-building programs and financial information. In 2005, NCLR worked with Affiliates in Colorado, Kansas, and Arizona on the planning stages to pilot the EMC model.

n NCLR released Reforming the

provide workers with social insurance and encourage personal retirement savings. n NCLR released Financial

Counseling: A Meaningful Strategy for Building Wealth in the Latino Community, which shows that current policies to improve financial literacy for Latinos fail to include one-onone financial counseling programs, the linchpin of any strategy to close the wealth gap for Hispanics.

n NCLR released two major

reports on retirement security: The Social Security Program and Reform: A Latino Perspective and Retirement Security for Latinos: Bolstering Coverage, Savings, and Adequacy. Both reports emphasize the need to improve public policies that aim to Home built by NCLR Affiliate, Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation

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NCLR Affiliate, Carlos Rosario International Career Center, Inc.

Employment and Economic Opportunities NCLR seeks to advance the economic well-being of Latinos by focusing its program and policy work on closing the employment and skills gaps between Latinos and other Americans. NCLR supports program development and implementation in the areas of job readiness, career exploration and advancement, industry and corporate engagement strategies, public workforce system collaboration, and training and skills acquisition. Research and policy work emphasize refining the nation’s job training system, examining industries that employ large numbers of Latinos, worker protection issues, and a special focus on Hispanic women workers.

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Employment and Economic Opportunities Highlights n NCLR collaborated with

Affiliates Multicultural Area Health Education Center in Los Angeles and Instituto del Progreso Latino in Chicago on the NCLR Escalera Project: Taking Steps to Success. The program promotes economic mobility for at-risk Latino youth by increasing educational attainment, career planning, and access to support systems. In 2005, 97% of the 35 participating students completed the program, 100% of the completing students graduated from high school and enrolled in a college or university, and nearly 60% received scholarships. n NCLR and The Home Depot

(THD) collaborated on the NCLR/ THD National Hispanic Hiring Partnership, which seeks to create employment and career opportunities for Latinos by establishing networks between NCLR Affiliates and local THD

stores. In particular, four NCLR Affiliates hosted outreach and recruitment activities with nearby THD stores: Chicana Service Action Center in Los Angeles, Chicanos Por La Causa in Phoenix, El Proyecto del Barrio in Sun Valley, California, and Instituto del Progreso Latino in Chicago. In addition, a webpage for this effort registered more than 4,000 visits in its initial six-month period. n NCLR Affiliates Instituto del

Progreso Latino and Association House of Chicago, together with NCLR and Humboldt Park Vocational and Education Center, enrolled 175 students in different levels of training through the Carreras En Salud: Chicago’s Bilingual Health Care Employment Partnership. Carreras En Salud was created to address the professional health care labor shortage in Chicago and the need for qualified bilingual/bicultural hospital staff. The partnership incorporates industry-specific vocational English-as-a-second-language and contextual learning strategies that increase educational attainment and skills acquisition. n NCLR analyzes industries

with high Latino participation, especially those in which Latinos

NCLR Affiliate, Latin American Youth Center

are overrepresented in low-wage positions with limited opportunity for advancement. In 2005, NCLR released “Latinos in Construction: Breaking Barriers, Building Hope,” which documents the current status of Hispanic participation in the construction industry. The white paper examines characteristics of the construction industry, challenges for Latinos, career mobility, and workforce and economic development program and advocacy models. n NCLR released a statistical

brief, “Hispanic Women at Work,” which examines the employment status of the nearly 20 million Latinas living in the U.S. The brief shows the significant contributions that Latina workers are making to the financial growth and security of their households and to the U.S. economy.

NCLR Affiliate, Alivio Medical Center

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Photography by Ayana Vellissia Jackson, NCLR’s Photographic Exhibition on Afro-Mexico

Building Bridges NCLR seeks to enhance the understanding of transnational issues that have an impact on the Latino community, highlighting Hispanics’ inherent diversity and many links to Latin America and the Caribbean. In the development of sessions, workshops, roundtable discussions, and other activities, NCLR’s International Projects partners with a broad spectrum of institutional counterparts including government agencies, nonprofit entities, foundations, ethnic groups, human rights organizations, and others.

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Building Bridges Highlights n NCLR organized a workshop

at the 2005 NCLR Annual Conference, Afro-Latino Youth Leaders: Ethnicity and Culture as Catalysts for Community Organizing, which was the fourth consecutive Annual Conference session on Afro-Latinos. The activity, which was sponsored by the Inter-American Foundation (IAF), explored issues of ethnicity, community organizing, and leadership as they develop among Afro-Latino youth.

communities residing in the U.S. The program was organized in collaboration with the InterAgency Consultation on Race in Latin America (IAC) and the Inter-American Foundation (IAF). NCLR also hosted a Photographic Exhibit on AfroMexico: African By Legacy, Mexican By Birth, by photographer Ayana Vellissia Jackson. Both activities were funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the InterAmerican Foundation.

n NCLR hosted a post-

n NCLR coordinated with

Conference Roundtable Discussion on Youth Activism Among Afro-Latino Communities, which presented comparative community-organizing experiences and institutional developments implemented by nonprofit groups serving Afro-descendants in Uruguay, Paraguay, and Ecuador. Parallels were drawn with experiences among community-based groups in the U.S.

the Chicago Chapter of the American Jewish Committee (AJC) a roundtable discussion – Latino-Jewish Dialogue – which was hosted by the Chicago Alliance of Latinos and Jews, an all-volunteer organization created in 1994 to build relationships between the two communities. During the 2005 NCLR Annual Conference, NCLR hosted its second Conference workshop on Latino-Jewish Dialogue, Latinos and Jews: Bridging the Gaps, Sharing a Future. The panel, organized in collaboration with the AJC, consisted of community representatives and activists who explored the current level of Latino-Jewish collaboration and assessed the potential for an expanded and broad intercommunity cooperation.

n In the context of NCLR’s Afro-

Latino Discussion Series, NCLR hosted Afro-Mexico: Africa’s Legacy in Mexican Culture, presenting Mexican and American scholars who discussed historical, social, and current aspects of the African presence in the country and the issue of Afro-Mexican migrant

n NCLR organized a public

program on Andean Cultures, African Roots: A Discussion on Blackness, Community, and Culture in Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia, which presented Afro-Latino scholars and activists from the region and the U.S. who discussed ethnic dynamics in those South American countries as Afrodescendants continue their struggle for greater visibility, enhanced access to social and economic development, and greater civic and political participation. Presenters also approached the Afro-Latino community in the U.S. and its bonds with communities of origin. The program was implemented in partnership with the Inter-Agency Consultation on Race (IAC) and was funded by the Inter-American Foundation.

Photography provided by Ayana Vellissia Jackson

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Civil Rights and Immigration As a leading national civil rights organization, NCLR advocates on key civil rights issues and is well-recognized for its efforts aimed at reducing discrimination in housing, employment, delivery of services, and law enforcement. In addition, NCLR addresses issues such as hate crimes, police abuse, voting rights, disparities in the criminal justice system, and post-9/11 civil liberties concerns. Finally, NCLR continues to defend immigrants’ rights and fight for fair and equitable immigration policies that strike a balance between national security concerns and the U.S. tradition as a nation of immigrants in welcoming newcomers.

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Civil Rights and Immigration Highlights n Within the context of growing

frustration over the broken immigration system, NCLR has put a great deal of work into encouraging comprehensive immigration reforms that go well beyond simple “band-aids” and fix the underlying causes of undocumented immigration. Along with a diverse array of coalition partners, including faith-based organizations, the business community, and key labor unions, NCLR has helped craft immigration policy proposals that aim to create an orderly, controlled, fair system. NCLR strongly supports the bipartisan “Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act of 2005 which includes: 1) a path to legal status for current undocumented workers and for future temporary workers; 2) a guestworker program that includes significant labor

protections and a path to permanent status; and 3) a reduction in family immigration backlogs. n NCLR has advanced its

efforts to identify and address disparities in the criminal justice system which have a substantial negative impact on Latino families and communities. Its 2004 publication, Lost Opportunities: The Reality of Latinos in the U.S. Criminal Justice System, established NCLR’s reputation as a credible source of accurate information in this arena. This report was followed in 2005 by the development of a major initiative to build Latino coalitions to address criminal justice disparities in several states. NCLR anticipates that its work will build a strong, significant Latino voice on criminal and juvenile justice issues in key regions of the country, as well as in the federal policy debate in Washington, DC. n NCLR also mobilized its

staff, Affiliates, and partners throughout the country to address the civil rights implications of an increasingly heated debate on immigration reform. NCLR’s Affiliates report growing rates of harassment, racial profiling, hate speech, and even attacks against Latinos

perceived to be immigrants and against legislators who work with Affiliates to support immigrant communities. One of NCLR’s strategies in this area has been the development of the National White Ribbon Campaign for Dialogue (www.whiteribbon.org), which built on the experience of NCLR’s Arizona Affiliates during a particularly ugly ballot initiative debate. This campaign developed a national call for tolerance and dialogue on the immigration debate which was joined by hundreds of individuals and organizations throughout the country, and which has been replicated in several local communities as a response to an increasingly hostile and ugly debate. NCLR will work in 2006 to expand these efforts, supporting and empowering local groups to lead the way toward a constructive dialogue on key issues.

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Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition

Advocacy and Electoral Empowerment NCLR is committed to building a strong culture of participation among its network of CBOs and the larger Latino community. Believing that increased civic engagement is an essential part of any community empowerment strategy and crucial to the full inclusion of Latinos and immigrants in the nation’s democracy, NCLR is creating opportunities for CBOs to engage in policy advocacy, electoral mobilization, and citizenship promotion activities and campaigns. NCLR leverages the work of its Field Advocacy Project, Latino Empowerment and Advocacy Project (LEAP), and Emerging Latino Communities Initiative (ELC) and fosters collaboration within the organization and with outside partners – leading to greater Latino engagement in federal and state policy debates.

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Advocacy and Electoral Empowerment Highlights n In seeking to link electoral

activities with community advocacy and positive immigrant integration efforts, NCLR’s LEAP worked with three of its electoral mobilization partners – Chicanos Por La Causa-Tucson, El Pueblo, Inc., and the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition – to improve dialogue on and build community participation in immigration issues in their states. These partnerships represent the next steps in building on LEAP’s nonpartisan electoral mobilization activities to promote naturalization and achieve sustained community participation in the political process. n NCLR Affiliates and members

of NCLR’s Emerging Latino Communities Initiative and youth Líderes Network convened in Washington, DC for the second annual NCLR National Issue Briefing and Advocacy Day. The event provided advocacy tools and an opportunity to coalesce behind a broad-based issue agenda that addresses Latino concerns and is designed to build strong communities. Under the banner “Investing in America,” more than 200

advocates representing 31 states and the District of Columbia made 200 visits to members of Congress and their staff to educate them on Latino concerns in the areas of education, health, workforce development, security, and immigration. n Inspired by the work that

Affiliates are conducting in their communities to build bridges between established and new communities, NCLR helped launch the National White Ribbon Campaign for Dialogue in July 2005. By bringing together a broad-based coalition of organizations and opinion leaders, this campaign seeks to create and protect the public space necessary for the immigration debate to take place in a way that strengthens our country, rejects fear, and helps Americans arrive at solutions to complex problems. More than 200 organizations have signed on in support of the campaign, and NCLR distributed more than 5,000 White Ribbon Campaign pins to local organizations promoting its principles in their communities.

n NCLR Affiliates play a central

role in building a culture of participation. NCLR is strengthening peer-to-peer training and networks in the areas of advocacy and organizing – regionally and at its Annual Conference. Similarly, in California and Texas, the states with the two largest Latino populations in the country, NCLR is working with Affiliates to solidify Latino participation in policy debates, particularly on health and education, and in 2005 organized State Advocacy Days in the capitals of both states.

NCLR Affiliate, El Pueblo Inc. Youth Advocacy Group

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| HU R R I C A N E K AT R I N A |

Photography courtesy of American Red Cross

Hurricane Katrina Policy and Advocacy NCLR’s work on Hurricane Katrina issues has focused on policy and advocacy, addressing the treatment of Latinos in the post-Katrina relief and recovery efforts.

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| HU R R I C A N E K AT R I N A |

Highlights of NCLR’s Hurricane Katrina Efforts n

Prepared a white paper report titled In the Eye of the Storm: How the Government and Private Response to Hurricane Katrina Failed Latinos, which analyzes the response of the federal government and private relief agencies, primarily the American Red Cross (ARC), to the needs of Latinos living in the affected areas along the Gulf Coast and makes recommendations to government agencies, policy-makers, and relief agencies.

n

Conducted a site visit and subsequent media event with Emerging Latino Communities Initiative partner, the Mississippi Immigrant Rights Alliance (MIRA), to highlight the plight of Latino immigrant workers in the rebuilding effort.

n

Met several times with ARC staff and with minority organizations to discuss concerns with the ARC’s performance in the aftermath of Katrina. NCLR’s analysis is that ARC has both structural and attitudinal challenges that hamper its ability to deal with an increasingly diverse American population, including Latinos, immigrants, and English language learners (ELLs).

n

Advocated on behalf of immigrants adversely affected by the federal government’s policies during the recovery effort. NCLR has sent letters and participated in meetings with the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Department of Labor (DOL) requesting the following, respectively: 1) The Administration should publicly articulate and vigorously enforce an unambiguous policy that under no circumstances will DHS officials take advantage of natural disasters or man-made emergencies to detain or deport immigrants; 2) DOL should allocate more resources and investigative staff to its Wage and Hour Division and OSHA to expedite the efficient processing of worker wage and hour claims, impose sanctions on bad contractors, and investigate poor working Photography courtesy of American Red Cross NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

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conditions on behalf of those workers, mostly Latino immigrants, who have been aggressively recruited in the reconstruction effort. n

Established the NCLR Katrina Fund, a short-term relief fund to assist its Affiliates and Emerging Latino Communities Initiative partners in meeting the immediate needs of those affected by Katrina who are currently not being served by federal or relief agencies. NCLR is grateful for the generous support of the NCLR Corporate Board of Advisors’ contributions to the entire relief effort and those who have made significant donations to the Katrina Relief Fund: McDonald’s Corporation, Allstate

Photography courtesy of American Red Cross

Insurance, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., Citigroup, Coors Brewing Company, the American Jewish Committee,

and many individual donors. NCLR also thanks the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a grant to support our relief efforts in the Gulf Coast. n

NCLR AmeriCorps was awarded $334,875 to expand three of its current sites and bring aboard two new sites to address the needs caused by the destruction of Hurricane Katrina. The 19 additional AmeriCorps members provide direct support to Latino and other minority evacuees.

Affiliate and Emerging Latino Communities Initiative Partners As of 11/05 tenNessee

Latino Memphis, Inc., Memphis Texas

KIPP Houston High School, Houston

The Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans, Inc. (AAMA), Houston Tejano Center for Community Concerns (TCCC), Houston

MISSISSIPPI

The Mississippi Immigrant Rights Alliance (MIRA), Gulfport/Biloxi Florida

Latino Leadership, Orlando Redlands Christian Migrant Association, Immokalee

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| INTO THE FUTURE |

NCLR Líderes Summit

Youth Leadership NCLR’s Center for Emerging Latino Leadership provides opportunities for young people to develop leadership skills and experience. The Center seeks to increase the number, capacity, and influence of young Latino leaders through a national Líderes (leaders) Network that supports and strengthens Latino youth development programs and organizations. The Center serves as an information and resource clearinghouse, a technical assistance provider, and a convener of the network at the regional and national levels. The national Líderes Network includes more than 600 programs and organizations and an electronic newsletter subscriber list of more than 5,200 individuals. The Líderes website receives an average of 50,000 hits per month.

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| INTO THE FUTURE |

Youth Leadership Highlights n Congresos

The 2005 Latino Youth Leadership Conference was inspired by the Líderes Summit. More than 60 young people from throughout Oklahoma City attended. The 10th Annual Florida Hispanic-Latino Collegiate Forum was attended by more than 150 Latino college students from nine colleges and universities throughout the state. The 15th Annual National Latino Collegiate Conference was attended by more than 300 Latino students from throughout the Northeast. NCLR held two Líderes Congresos by organizing NCLR Affiliates and other CBOs for a one-day event on a college campus. In the spring, NCLR collaborated with the Bronx Institute of Lehman College to hold a Líderes Congreso sponsored by Sprint for more than 100 Latino youth from throughout New York City. Affiliates involved included Audubon Partnership, Alianza Dominicana, and Asociación Comunitaria de Dominicanos Progresistas (ACDP). In the fall, NCLR worked with East Los Angeles College to hold

a Líderes Congreso sponsored by Sodexho. The event attracted more than 100 participants from the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Involved Affiliates included AltaMed Health Services, El Proyecto del Barrio, MAHEC, and Para Los Niños. n Líderes de Hoy National Essay Contest NCLR held the Allstate-NCLR Líderes de Hoy National Essay Contest, awarding ten $5,000 scholarships and a trip to Washington, DC to high school-age students who answered the question: “As a young leader, how have you been a catalyst for positive change and contributed to inspiring your community?” n Líderes Summit

The fifth annual NCLR Líderes Summit for young Latino leaders attracted 350 young people from throughout the U.S. Summit highlights included a community service event, 17 workshops (most of them peer-led), a town hall session on young people in politics, a community rally in support of the “DREAM Act,” and a plenary session on financial literacy featuring Suze Orman.

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Suze Orman at Líderes Summit


| INTO THE FUTURE |

AmeriCorps Through the NCLR AmeriCorps program, youth gain valuable skills by taking part in meaningful community service activities. They serve at affiliated community-based organizations and provide needed services to empower communities in meeting critical needs in education, health, safety, and other areas. Participating youth are eligible to earn an education award which can be used to pay for past, present, and future education expenses.

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| INTO THE FUTURE |

AmeriCorps Highlights n NCLR was awarded

$1.2 million from the Corporation for National and Community Service for the AmeriCorps program, which supported ten Affiliate sites in six states and the District of Columbia. In 2005, 177 members were enrolled and 137 members successfully completed their service. Members tutored 1,272 children, youth, and adults, provided job-skills training to 976 individuals, and recruited and trained 1,026 non-AmeriCorps volunteers for Affiliate-based programs and community service events. n NCLR AmeriCorps organized

the second annual community service event at the 2005 NCLR Annual Conference in Philadelphia. More then 300 volunteers from the Líderes Summit, AmeriCorps, corporate partners, Affiliates, and the community took part in the event which included the installation of a new state-of-theart playground; construction of picnic tables, flower boxes, benches, and a shade structure; collection and removal of trash; and planting decorative flowers and plants around the park. The project benefited local NCLR Affiliates and the emerging Latino population in South Philadelphia.

n Twenty NCLR AmeriCorps

members and ten program directors participated in a oneday civic engagement “Train the Trainer” workshop as part of the NCLR Annual Conference. The training, entitled “A Roadmap to Civic Engagement,” began a yearlong initiative designed to educate NCLR AmeriCorps members and youth in their communities about civic engagement. The “Roadmap” training underscored the importance of serving and working cooperatively in their communities through real-life experiences. The yearlong process will culminate with service projects taking place on Youth Service Day, a national day of service.

together for a special evening of recognition at the second annual AmeriCorps Recognition Dinner. This year’s event included the presentation of the First Annual NCLR AmeriCorps Awards, honoring excellence in service among members serving at NCLR AmeriCorps operating sites. More then 120 members, program directors, and guests were in attendance.

n NCLR AmeriCorps members

and program directors came

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| INTO THE FUTURE |

Emerging Latino Communities The Latino population continues to grow at rapid rates in areas of the country not traditionally associated with Hispanics. The promise of these emerging communities, as well as the very real contributions they are making to the economies and social fabric of their new home states, are the heart of the work undertaken by NCLR’s Emerging Latino Communities (ELC) Initiative. Working with CBOs in the Northwest, the Midwest, and particularly the South, NCLR provides training and capacity-building assistance in a variety of areas to support the development of Latino organizational infrastructure, which helps Latinos improve their social and economic status, gain influence, and become fully integrated into American society. ELC groups organize their communities around critical local issues such as increasing parental involvement in schools, providing Spanishlanguage services, increasing civic participation, increasing access to health care for Latino families, and decreasing youth violence. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

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| INTO THE FUTURE |

Emerging Latino Communities Highlights n ELC has established a tradition

of convening its participants at the NCLR Annual Conference to provide members an opportunity to forge relationships with other established Latino CBOs and attend workshops designed to build strong organizations. In 2005, 12 ELC CBOs worked with staff to solidify work plans and attended intensive workshops focused on community organizing, policy and advocacy, resource development, and media training. n Through funding from

the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, ELC awarded $120,000 in seed grants to emerging organizations in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Oregon, and Tennessee. These seed funds are coupled with intensive, tailored training and technical assistance provided in accordance with the needs identified by each organization, including organizational capacity, advocacy and policy strategy, and coalition-building.

Jose Velasquez, Executive Director of NCLR Affiliate (right), Latino Memphis, Inc. with team

n In collaboration with Wal-Mart

Stores, Inc. and State Farm Insurance, ELC provided management, organizing, and technical assistance to organizations in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Oregon, and Tennessee. n In March 2005, ELC groups

joined Affiliates in the NCLR network in Washington, DC for NCLR’s National Issue Briefing and Advocacy Day to learn about a broad-based agenda that addresses Latino concerns, to participate in an advocacy training, and met with their

congressional delegates to educate them about emerging Latino communities. n ELC worked with the

Mississippi Immigrant Rights Alliance and Latino Memphis, providing assistance and support to respond to Latinos affected by Hurricane Katrina. These organizations became the lead advocates for Latino immigrant communities along the Gulf Coast.

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| IN THE SPOTLIGHT |

NCLR Annual Conference

NCLR Special Events NCLR showcased three high-quality events in 2005: the Capital Awards gala; the high-energy, activity-filled NCLR Annual Conference; and a moving tribute to the life and career of former NCLR President Raul Yzaguirre.

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| IN THE SPOTLIGHT |

n NCLR

Capital Awards

The NCLR Capital Awards annually recognizes members of Congress from both sides of the aisle for their outstanding support of public policies that are vital to Hispanic Americans. More than 700 guests attended the 2005 black-tie gala held at the National Building

Janet MurguĂ­a with Art Ruiz of State Farm Insurance and NCLR Corporate Board of Advisors member

Museum in Washington, DC. Special honorees included Senator Chris Dodd (D-CT) and Representative Chris Cannon (R-UT) for their leadership on legislation that has had a significant impact on the Hispanic community, especially children. The 2005 Public Service Award went to Llano Grande Center for Research and Development for providing outstanding education and youth leadership programs. n Tribute

to Raul Yzaguirre

NCLR hosted a tribute dinner to celebrate the life and career of former NCLR President Raul Yzaguirre, who retired in December 2004 after leading the organization for 30 years. Guests included prominent leaders from the Hispanic, civil rights, business, labor, advocacy, and philanthropic communities – people who were inspired, motivated, and mentored by Raul. Today, he is Presidential Professor of Practice and Executive Director for the Center for Community Development and Civil Rights at Arizona State University. n NCLR Annual Conference

The four-day NCLR Annual Conference in Philadelphia attracted 20,000 attendees. Featured speakers included, among others, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY), U.S. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings, DNC Chair Howard Dean, and RNC Chair Ken Mehlman. In addition, author and actor Sonia Manzano, U.S. Treasurer Anna Escobedo Cabral, Univision Co-Anchor Maria Elena Salinas, and actor Lupe Ontiveros shared their personal stories and discussed the importance of balancing family responsibilities and traditional mother/daughter roles with leadership positions in the government, media, and business. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

Empowering an American Community Campaign NCLR recognized that to build organizational strength, stability, and endurance it would need to achieve two goals. The first was to build an institutional endowment that would give the organization access to strategic funds for expanding its programs and, thereby, extending NCLR’s reach in the Hispanic community. The second was to raise funds to secure a permanent home for the organization in Washington, DC. These goals were realized through a comprehensive fundraising effort called the Empowering an American Community Campaign, which was launched in November 2002.

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

Endowment and Building Campaign Highlights n In early 2005, NCLR opened

n Thanks to 100%

the doors to its permanent headquarters building in the heart of the nation’s capital, just four blocks from the White House. The building is an historic symbol of the legacy and permanence of NCLR and its mission to empower all Hispanic Americans to achieve the American Dream.

participation from our Board of Directors and the tremendous response of our corporate, foundation, and individual campaign donors, NCLR has made the dream of a permanent institutional endowment and center of operations a reality.

n The NCLR Board of Directors

campaign, how to participate, and recognition opportunities, please contact the Campaign Office at empower@nclr.org.

unanimously approved naming the new headquarters the Raul Yzaguirre Building in honor of NCLR’s former President and CEO who led the organization for 30 years.

HONOR ROLL OF DONORS Visionary Society

MERIDIAN Society

LEGACY Society

n For more information on the

Anonymous • Anonymous

VANGUARD Society

PATRON Society Dr. Catalina Garcia

PRESIDENT’S Society Raul Yzaguirre • James A. Johnson & Maxine Isaacs The Murguía Family • Arturo Torres Chairman’S Society Tom and Jcqui Castro • Henry Cisneros • Thomas Valenzuela • Monica Lozano • Cristina Saralegui and Marcos Avila • José Villarreal NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

Corporate Board of Advisors Established in 1982, the Corporate Board of Advisors (CBA) is made up of senior executives from 28 major corporations, as well as liaison staff from each company. The CBA meets twice a year, and presentations and discussions keep the CBA updated on NCLR’s activities and provide opportunities for dialogue and decision-making about issues and programs of common concern. Throughout the year NCLR benefits from advice and assistance from these closest corporate associates. CBA members also assist NCLR and its network through financial, in-kind, and programmatic support. JOHNSON & JOHNSON Chair

Principal Russ Deyo Vice President, General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer

Liaison Laura J. Hernandez Executive Director, Public Affairs Communications

Liaison José Sosa Director, State Government Affairs

Bank of America

Allstate Insurance Company

Principal Peter Debreceny Vice President of Corporate Relations

Liaison Michelle Bolinger Communications Consultant, Corporate Relations American Airlines

Principal Jeff Brundage Senior Vice President, Human Resources Liaison Billy Sanez Manager, Corporate Communications

Liaison Natalie Abatemarco Director, Global Community Programs

AT&T

Principal Laura Sanford President, AT&T Foundation

Principal Leticia Aguilar Senior Vice President, Regional Program Executive, Corporate Philanthropy Liaison Alfred J. Arguello Senior Vice President Chevron Corporation

Principal Carole Young General Manager, Global Diversity

The Coca-Cola Company

Liaison Rudy Beserra Vice President, Corporate Latin Affairs Liaison Frank Ros Assistant Vice President, Corporate Latin Affairs COMCAST CORPORATION

Principal David L. Cohen Executive Vice President

FORD MOTOR COMPANY

Principal Francisco “Cisco” Codina Group Vice President, North America Marketing, Sales and Service

Liaison Raquel “Rocky” Egusquiza Director, Community Development and International Strategy General Mills

Principal Peter Capell Senior Vice President and Big G Division President

Liaison Susan Gonzales Senior Director, Federal Government Affairs

Liaison CeLois J. Steele Senior Manager, Multicultural Community Relations

Coors Brewing Company

General Motors Corporation

Liaison Sharon N. Craig Carter Community Engagement Representative

Principal Troy Dickerson Vice President, Corporate Relations

Principal Roderick D. Gillum Vice President, Corporate Relations and Diversity

Citigroup

Liaison Olga Garcia Corporate Relations Manager

Liaison Orlando Padilla Director, Public Policy Center

Principal Calixto Garcia-Velez President, Citibank West

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

J.C. Penney Company, Inc.

Principal Michael Boylson Executive Vice President, Chief Marketing Officer Liaison Vicki Lynn Cartwright Diversity and Worklife Manager Kraft Foods, Inc.

Principal Dave Johnson President, Kraft North America Commercial Liaison Carlos Abrams-Rivera Senior Business Director, Global Convenient Meals and Grocery Sector McDonald’s Corporation

Principal Jim Johannesen U.S. Senior Vice President – Chief Support Officer The McGraw-Hill Companies

Principal Charlotte K. Frank Vice President for Research and Development, Educational and Professional Publishing Group

Miller Brewing Company

Principal Barbara Cowden Executive Vice President

Liaison Emilio Gonzalez Director of Public Policy and Strategic Alliances

Liaison Art Ruiz Director of Community Alliance, Corporate Communications and External Relations

Principal Lawrence Jackson President and CEO, Global Procurement

State Farm Insurance

Principal Mike Jones Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary Liaison Jose R. Ruano Manager, Corporate Relations

Time Warner

PepsiCo, INC.

Liaison David Gonzales Vice President, Community Affairs Prudential Financial

Principal Sharon C. Taylor Senior Vice President, Corporate Human Resources Liaison Rene O. Deida Program Officer, The Prudential Foundation Rockwell Automation

Principal Mary Jane Hall Senior Vice President, Human Resources for Control Systems Liaison Joseph P. Tria Chief Learning Officer

Principal Tom Kinney President, Time Warner Cable, Austin Division Liaison Luis Castro Director of Corporate Responsibility Liaison Lidia Graciela Agraz Vice President, Public Affairs, Time Warner Cable, Austin Division UPS

Liaison Bernard Collins Director, Corporate Relations Verizon Communications

Principal Kathryn Brown Senior Vice President, Public Policy Development and Corporate Social Responsibility

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| 40 |

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

Liaison Jose “Pepe” Estrada Director of Hispanic Markets, Diversity Relations


| CONTRIBUTORS |

Ford Partnership for Advanced Studies (Ford PAS)

Corporations and Foundations “Corporate America and premier foundations throughout the country have long understood the significance, in both economic and societal impact, of America’s growing Hispanic community. Since its founding in 1968, NCLR has worked closely with major corporations and foundations to promote and implement initiatives that strengthen the Hispanic community and ensure the well-being and future prosperity of America. We are deeply honored to have their support.” — Janet Murguía, President and CEO

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

AARP

Citigroup

GEICO Direct

Allstate Insurance Company

Coalition for Comprehensive Immigration Reform

General Electric Company

Alzheimer’s Association

The Coca-Cola Company

American Airlines American Express Company American Honda Motor Co., Inc. American Legacy Foundation The Annie E. Casey Foundation Anheuser-Busch Companies ARAMARK AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals AT&T

The College Board Comcast Corporation ConAgra Foods, Inc. Coors Brewing Company Corporation for National and Community Service Countrywide Home Loans DaimlerChrysler Corporation Fund

The Atlantic Philanthropies

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Bank of America Corporation

Dell Inc.

BBVA/Bancomer USA

Denny’s Corporation

BellSouth

Diageo

Berlex Laboratories

Don’t Count Us Out

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

E* TRADE Financial

BlueCross BlueShield Association The Boeing Company

Eastman Kodak Company Eli Lilly and Company

BP America

Embassy of Mexico in the United States of America

Bridgestone Firestone Trust Fund

Epilepsy Foundation

Brinker International

Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund

Burger King Corporation

ExxonMobil Foundation

The California Endowment

Fannie Mae

California State University, Long Beach

Fannie Mae Foundation

Cardinal Health Carnegie Corporation of New York Caterpillar Foundation Catholic Healthcare West Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Charles Stewart Mott Foundation Chevron Corporation Cingular Wireless

FedEx Fomento Firme Associates, Inc. Ford Foundation Ford Motor Company Fox News Corporation Freddie Mac Friends of Chris Dodd

General Mills, Inc. General Motors Corporation Genetic Services Branch of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau The George Washington University Center for the Study of Language and Education GlaxoSmithKline The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Goya Foods, Inc. Hallmark Cards Incorporated Harrah’s Entertainment Hasbro, Inc. Healthcare Georgia Foundation Hess Foundation, Inc. The Home Depot Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees International Union Household International Hudson Highland Group Hyatt Hotels Corporation Intel Corporation International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftworkers International Union of Painters and Allied Trades J.C. Penney Corporation, Inc. Jobs for the Future, Inc. John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Johnson & Johnson JPMorgan Chase

Frito-Lay

The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Fuji Photo Film USA, Inc.

Kaiser Permanente

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

Kraft Foods, Inc.

Nissan North America

The UPS Foundation

The Kroger Company

Nordstrom, Inc.

U.S. Bank

LA Inc., The Convention and Visitors Bureau

Novo Nordisk

U.S. Department of Education

Office Depot

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services – Administration for Children & Families

Leadership Conference on Civil Rights Education Fund Lowes Companies, Inc. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Office of Minority Health Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide Open Society Institute PECO, An Exelon Company

Marathon Oil Company

PepsiCo, Inc.

Marriott International, Inc.

Pfizer, Inc.

Mexican Americans Thinking Together

PhRMA

McDonald’s Corporation The McGraw-Hill Companies Merck/Schering-Plough Pharmaceuticals MetLife Foundation

Pitney Bowes The PMI Group, Inc. Pre-K Now Prudential Financial Qwest Communications The Rockefeller Foundation

MGM Mirage

Rockwell Automation

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Public Health and Science U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Sallie Mae

UAW-GM Center for Human Resources

Sara Lee Branded Apparel

United States Marine Corps

Schneider National

Univision Communications Inc.

NASCAR

Scholastic Inc.

Verizon Communications

The Nathan Cummings Foundation

Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Verizon Foundation

Shell Oil Company

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

National Cancer Institute

Smith Barney

Wachovia

National Education Association

SODEXHO

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

National Grocers Association

Sprint Nextel

The Walt Disney Company

National Health Law Program, Inc.

Starwood Hotels & Resorts

The Walton Family Foundation, Inc.

The National Human Genome Research Institute

State Farm Insurance Companies

Washington Mutual, Inc.

Grupo Televisa

Wells Fargo

The Procter & Gamble Company

Wyndham International

The TJX Companies, Inc.

Xerox Corporation

Time Warner

YUM! Brands, Inc.

Microsoft Corporation Miller Brewing Company Morgan Stanley Mortgage Guarantee Insurance Co.

Nationwide Insurance NeighborWorks America New American Alliance New Century Financial Corporation

Toyota Motor Sales

Nextel Communications Nielsen Media Research

Union Bank of California UPS

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

Individual Contributors President’s Council $1,000+

Lidia Agraz Mari C. Aponte, Esq. Andrea Bazán-Manson Frank Benavidez Fabian Calvo Tamara Casey Alcario G. Castellano Carmen Castellaño Russell C. Deyo Maricela Monterrubio Gallegos David Gaona Juan M. Garcia Zac Guevara Deborah Hevia Michael Lopez Monica C. Lozano Herminio Martinez Cynthia Morales George Muñoz Ramon Murguía Robert Ontiveros Edward T. Reilly William Soza Jeffrey Urbina Arturo Valenzuela Ernesto Galarza Circle $500-$999

Mary Rose Cardenas Jovita Carranza Dino J. DeConcini Dorene Dominguez Maria Echaveste Annette Flores Ian Friendly F. Garcia David Gleason

Tito Guerrero Mickey Ibarra Jessica LaSalle Evelyn Lisojo David C. Lizarraga Ignacio E. Lozano Richard C. Miller A. Christopher Nogales Ben O’Brien Ernesto “Gene” Ortega David Pena Robin Read Antonio Reyes John H. Rodgers Javier Rodriguez Fred Rodriguez Mark and Lucia C. Savage Dixon Slingerland Andrew M. Small Hortensia Torres David Valdez Leadership Circle $250-$499

Blanca Alvarado Christine Alvarado Sylvia Alvarez Danilo Aranaga Robert Aronson Augustine Baca Xavier Becerra Ana Bermudez Andy and Delia Bernal Ronald and Cordelia C. Beveridge Hugo and Gloria Cardona Joe M. Cavazos Jessie Ceja Victore Chavez James Bonilla

Maria Del Carmen Cruz Rita DiMartino Consuelo Eckhardt Mark Enriquez Jaime Espasas Daniel Feder Patricia Fennell Gerald Fernandez Maria C. Fernandez-Greczmiel Liz Garcia Vincent Gonzales Angel Gonzalez Jimmie Gonzalez Wilmarie Gonzalez Jaime Garcia Roberta Grzelak Peter A. Guerrero Joseph A. Gutierrez Giulina Halasz Philip Hernandez Jorge J. Herrera Michael Hieb Josie Ippolito Enrique Jimenez John Kelly Adrienne Lara-Fuller Leslie Lavander Carlos Lopez Robert Lopez Roseanne M. Lopez Ray and Sylvia Lucero Jim Mahoney Warren Maruyama Francisco E. Mendez Regina Montoya Juan Morales David Morin Tommy Nuñez

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Luciano E. Orozco Diego Osuna Hugo Patiño Lupe Pearce Susan and Eric Poncelet Luis Pons James R. Potter Helen Ramirez Henry A. Ramos Ramiro Rodriguez Mayra Rodriguez Valladare Duane and Maria Rodriguez-Winter Rose Romero Nelson Rosarion Elva Ruiz Tom and Lorna Saiz Steven Salop Angela Sanbrano R. P. (Bob) Sanchez Jesse Sandoval Fernando F. Segovia Lynn Sendejo Monica H. Smith Eileen Storey Ignacio Taboada Carlos F. Truan Mario Trujillo Louis Valadez Francisco M. and Janet R. Vasquez Peter Vegso Olga Villalpando Margie Lopez Waite Eva Walle James H. Williams Cid D. Wilson Robert E. Zeigler Tere Zubizarreta


| CONTRIBUTORS |

PepsiCo Foundation and NCLR Escalera Project

Financial Summary Rarely are great things accomplished alone. For nearly 40 years, NCLR has counted on its many supporters to help further its objective – to strengthen America by promoting the advancement of Latino families. As in years past, we are extremely grateful to our 2005 contributors, many of whom are noted in this report. Each donor, whether an individual, corporation, foundation, or government entity, plays a critical role in keeping our institution robust, both in terms of mission and financial well-being.

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

With regard to the overall financial standing of NCLR, we ended fiscal year (FY) 2005 with investments in program services totaling $21.8 million, or 89% of total expenses excluding fundraising. This is an increase from the previous year, when expenses totalled $20.7 million. We also experienced a slight decrease (amounting to a 1% drop) in management and general expenses over last year. NCLR continues to deliver a high percentage of funds through program-related activity. Fundraising and administrative costs totaled $3.8 million, an increase from the $3.1 million expensed the previous year primarily related to nonrecurring Capital Campaign and Building Fund expenses. The program-to-operation ratio includes 85% of total expenses going to program initiatives in education, health, housing, civil rights. The remaining 15% includes 5% for fundraising and 10% for finance and administration. Revenue remained stable, at $25.3 million, in FY 2005 with general support from individual and Affiliate organization members, special events registrations and sponsorships, and corporate donors and foundations – totaling $21.2 million – and $4.1 million from government entities. Significantly, the growth of NCLR is demonstrated in its ability to secure diverse funding sources and converting these funds into long-term programmatic and advocacy services to the Latino community. In addition, NCLR’s net asset growth (see Graph 2) over the past few years, initiated in part by a very successful Capital Campaign, has 2005: Program activity by component ($21.8 Million) (GRAPH 1) OTHER 1%

HEALTH 7%

SCG 14% ORAL 16%

MISSION 5% ADVOCACY 2%

EDUCATION 34% COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 21%

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| CONTRIBUTORS |

redefined NCLR as a financially secure

CONSOLIDATED ASSETS (GRAPH 2)

institution that is more readily able to

140

focus on strategic initiatives with farreaching benefits extended over a long

FY 2005 marked the beginning of an organization-wide effort in redefining

72 46

40

our partnerships with our nearly

20

300 nonprofit Affiliate organizations

93

80 60 36

114

104

TOTAL ASSETS

100 $ MI LLI O N S

life cycle.

NET ASSETS

120

80

83

68

49

25

15

0

across the country. In order to achieve

2000

2001

our shared objective of having

2002

2003

2004

FISCAL YEAR

maximum positive impact on behalf of all Hispanics in America, NCLR must work closely and in more strategic partnership with these frontline organizations – those working in your community today. Our stable financial well-being is a positive foundation on which to build this new paradigm. However, the shift in approach and implementation will require sustained and substantial financial investment. This new and critical initiative will most significantly depend on the continued support and commitment of all NCLR stakeholders. In sharing the vision we have with our individual, corporate, and foundation donors, we will empower current and future generations of Latinos contributing to the prosperity of our nation.

Strategic Investment Fund for La Raza NCLR’s Capital Campaign, the first step in creating the Strategic Investment Fund for La Raza (SIFLR), has fulfilled the dream of creating an endowment to perpetually support the institution. In addition, the fund has made it possible for NCLR to establish a permanent home in Washington, DC. This is a significant and symbolic achievement, reflecting financial stability and strength. Buoyed by additional collections of pledged amounts and by a strong performance from its diversified investments, SIFLR continued to grow in FY 2005. Collections added $9 million to the portfolio, and operations netted an increase of $440,987 after expenses.

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2005


| CONTRIBUTORS |

Raza Development Fund Established in 1999 as the community development arm of NCLR, the Raza Development Fund, Inc. (RDF) has become the largest Latino Community Development Financial Institution in the United States. To date, more than 100 institutions have received technical and organizational assistance and a wide variety of loan products through RDF. With a total capitalization of $44.6 million and net assets of $23.7 million in FY 2005, RDF continues to extend the impact of flexible but high-quality loans to low-income Latino communities seeking a full range of human development. By offering loans with major institutional co-lenders, RDF has leveraged its lending capacity well beyond its own limit to more than $100 million in loans for predevelopment, construction, rehabilitation, credit, and acquisition for a variety of public service projects.

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| CONTRIBUTORS | National Council of La Raza: Consolidated Statements of Activity Year ended September 30, 2005

Unrestricted

Temporarily Restricted

Permanently Restricted

Total

Support and revenue

GRANTS

Federal

$5,782,654

Nonfederal TOTAL GRANTS

$

$

$5,782,654

2,965,000

10,463,270

13,428,270

8,747,654

10,463,270

19,210,924

Contributions and other revenue

Corporations and foundations Special events Empowering American Capitol Campaign contributions Associate member dues Other contributions Investment and interest income Interest and fee income on loans Other revenue Net assets released from restrictions

526,410 4,043,321

— 14,110

— —

526,410 4,057,431

— 165,671 142,315 2,070,022 1,419,161 135,031

3,338,886 — — (109,139) — —

— — — — — —

3,338,886 165,671 142,315 1,960,883 1,419,161 135,021

15,721,646

(15,721,646)

Total contributions and other revenue 24,223,567

(12,477,789)

11,745,778

32,971,221

(2,014,519)

30,956,702

Total support and revenue

EXPENSES PROGRAM SERVICES

Mission 986,286 Legislative advocacy 415,761 TACS-Community Development and Housing 4,618,704 TACS-Education Activities 7,713,697 OSIP-Strategic Communications Group/Special Events 2,957,480 OSIP-Special and International Projects 208,495 OSIP-Institute for Hispanic Health 1,461,057 Office of Research, Advisory, and Legislation 3,484,817 Raza Development Fund-Program Operations 2,220,029 Raza Development Fund- Loan Losses 552,879

— — — — — — — — — —

— 986,286 — 415,761 — 4,618,704 — 7,713,697 — 2,957,480 — 208,495 — 1,461,057 — 3,484,817 — 2,220,029 — 552,879

24,619,205

TOTAL PROGRAM SERVICES

24,619,205

SUPPORTING SERVICES

Management and general 2,266,215 Fundraising:

2,266,215

General fundraising

358,592

358,592

Endowment/Capital Campaign

633,567

633,567

Membership marketing

173,388

173,388

35,527

35,527

Building Fund/Strategic Investment Fund Governance 477,322

477,322

3,944,611

28,563,816

28,563,816

4,407,405 (117,208)

(2,014,519) 117,208

— —

2,392,886 —

4,290,197 15,698,864

(1,897,331) 63,172,841

— 1,500,000

2,392,886 80,371,705

$19,989,061

$61,275,530

$1,500,000

$82,764,591

Raza Development Fund-Administration TOTAL SUPPORTING SERVICES TOTAL EXPENSES CHANGE IN NET ASSETS–BEFORE TRANSFERS Other changes in net assets–transfers CHANGE IN NET ASSETS NET ASSETS, beginning of the year NET ASSETS, end of year

3,944,611

The complete financial statements have been audited by BDO Seidman, LLP and may be obtained by calling Denise Moye, Director of Finance, at (202) 776-1742. NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

| 49 |


| CONTRIBUTORS | National Council of La Raza: Consolidated Statements of of Financial Position September 30, 2004 and 2005

2005

2004

Assets Current assets

Cash and cash equivalents $3,554,428 $12,856,191 Current portion of Capital Campaign receivables, net 7,018,715 6,625,950 Special events receivables 998,281 712,450 Current portion of contract, grant, and other receivables, net 16,402,060 13,645,089 Current portion of loans receivable, net 1,310,126 4,455,471 Investments 32,590,222 21,437,919 Other 143,678 100,126 TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS 62,017,510

59,833,196

NONCURRENT ASSETS

Long-term loans receivable, net Property and equipment, net Long-term Capital Campaign receivables, net Long-term contract, grant, and other receivables, net Due from Hogar Hispano, Inc.- related party Assets designated to fund deferred compensation Restricted investments Other

15,235,261 9,005,783 9,046,283 584,042 6,826,042 10,704,409 1,660,928 4,853,307 6,451,590 5,506,870 89,390 708,182 12,897,780 12,950,546 130,187 384,820

TOTAL NONCURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS

52,337,461

44,697,959

$114,354,971

$104,531,155

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES

Accounts payable Accrued expenses Accrued interest expense Committed grants Pledges held in trust Current portion of notes payable Current portion of capital lease obligations TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

$1,350,692 1,360,011 632,864 206,540 318,905 — 32,237

$866,173 1,933,308 644,484 — — 507,303 —

3,901,249

3,951,268

NONCURRENT LIABILITIES

Long-term notes payable Long-term deferred compensation liability

21,213,957 19,500,000 89,390 708,182

Long-term capital lease obligations

6,385,784

TOTAL NONCURRENT LIABILITIES

27,689,131

20,208,182

TOTAL LIABILITIES

31,590,380

24,159,450

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

NET ASSETS

Unrestricted Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted

19,989,061 61,275,530 1,500,000

TOTAL NET ASSETS TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

15,698,864 63,172,841 1,500,000

82,764,591

80,371,705

$114,354,971

$104,531,155

The complete financial statements have been audited by BDO Seidman, LLP and may be obtained by calling Denise Moye, Director of Finance, at (202) 776-1742.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

| 50 |


NCLR Executive Management Janet Murguía President and Chief Executive Officer

Cecilia Muñoz Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation

Delia de la Vara Deputy Vice President, Strategic Communications Group

Charles Kamasaki Senior Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation

Lisa Navarrete Vice President, Office of Public Information

Anne Mathis Deputy Vice President, Resource Development

Gerald Borenstein Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Lautaro Díaz Vice President, Community Development

Sonia M. Pérez Vice President, Research and Strategic Initiatives Delia Pompa Vice President, Education

NCLR Regional Field Offices Raza Development Fund, Inc. (RDF) (602) 417-1400

Los Angeles, California (213) 489-3428

Sacramento, California (916) 448-9852

Atlanta, Georgia (404) 658-1711

New York, New York (212) 260-7070

San Antonio, Texas (210) 212-4454

Chicago, Illinois (312) 269-9250

Phoenix, Arizona (602) 417-1400

San Juan, Puerto Rico (787) 641-0546

NCLR Program Area Contacts Affiliate Member Services (202) 776-1713

Emerging Latino Communities (202) 776-1563

AmeriCorps (202) 776-1564

Health (202) 776-1722

Community Development (202) 776-1731

International Projects (202) 776-1773

Corporate, Foundation, and Individual Donor Relations (202) 776-1784

NCLR Annual Conference and Special Events (202) 776-1745

Education (202) 776-1797

Public Policy and Legislation (202) 776-1747

Wealth-Building Programs: Homeownership and Access to Financial Services (202) 776-1748 Workforce Development (202) 776-1714 Youth Leadership (202) 776-1741

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

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national council of la raza

SAVE THE DATES for 2007

MARCH Capital Awards National Building Museum, Washington, DC March 6, 2007 National Issue Briefing and Advocacy Day Washington, DC March 7-8, 2007

JUNE ALMA Awards Los Angeles, CA Dates to be determined www.almaawards.com

JULY NCLR Annual Conference Miami, FL July 21-24, 2007 For details, log on to www.nclr.org.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF L A RAZ A | 2005 ANNUAL REPORT

| 52 |


NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA Raul Yzaguirre Building 1126 16th Street, NW Washington, DC 20036 (202) 785.1670 • www.nclr.org

NCLR 2005 Annual Report  

NCLR 2005 Annual Report

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