Page 1

FOR AN END TO THE HOUSING CRISIS • 5,646 LETTERS SENT TO SENATE TO PROTECT CHILDREN 5 MILLION LATINOS IN AMERICA • 30,000 FANS ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK • 350 PEOPLE FROM OTED IN THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION • 7,813 LETTERS SENT TO SUPPORT THE NOMINATION SERVED THROUGH NCLR’S HOMEOWNERSHIP NETWORK • 1 IN 4 AMERICAN KIDS ARE HISPANIC MILITARY ARE HISPANIC • 10,000 BENEFITTED FROM AMERICORPS BEAUTIFICATION AND EDUCAT 0,000 FANS ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK • 7,813 LETTERS SENT TO SUPPORT THE NOMINATION OF Y ENLISTED MILITARY ARE HISPANIC • 1 IN 4 AMERICAN KIDS ARE HISPANIC • 30% OF THE POP T MEDICAID • 5,646 LETTERS SENT TO SENATE TO PROTECT CHILDREN FROM LOSING CHILD TAX THE HOUSING CRISIS • 10,000 BENEFITTED FROM AMERICORPS BEAUTIFICATION AND EDUCATION 0 FAMILIES SERVED THROUGH NCLR’S HOMEOWNERSHIP NETWORK • 350 PEOPLE FROM MORE THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION • 4,500 LETTERS SENT TO CONGRESS TO PROTECT MEDICAID T TO SENATE TO PROTECT CHILDREN FROM LOSING CHILD TAX CREDIT • 9,000+ YOUTH ENGAGED ER AND FACEBOOK • 350 PEOPLE FROM MORE THAN 100 ORGANIZATIONS AT NATIONAL LATINO RS SENT TO SUPPORT THE NOMINATION OF A STRONG DIRECTOR FOR THE CONSUMER FINANCIAL IN 4 AMERICAN KIDS ARE HISPANIC • 30% OF THE POPULATION PROJECTED TO BE HISPANIC IN 2050 RPS BEAUTIFICATION AND EDUCATION PROJECTS • 3,000 LATINOS REACHED WITH CULTURALLY ENT TO SUPPORT THE NOMINATION OF A STRONG DIRECTOR FOR THE CONSUMER FINANCIAL DS ARE HISPANIC • 30% OF THE POPULATION PROJECTED TO BE HISPANIC IN 2050 • 4,500 LETTERS REN FROM LOSING CHILD TAX CREDIT • 50.5 MILLION LATINOS IN AMERICA • 10,600+SIGNATURES UTIFICATION AND EDUCATION PROJECTS • 3,000 LATINOS REACHED WITH CULTURALLY COMPETENT • 350 PEOPLE FROM MORE THAN 100 ORGANIZATIONS AT NATIONAL LATINO ADVOCACY DAYS • RESS TO PROTECT MEDICAID • 10,600+ SIGNATURES SENT TO CALL FOR AN END TO THE HOUSING T • 9,000+ YOUTH ENGAGED WITH NCLR LÍDERES INITIATIVE • 50.5 MILLION LATINOS IN AMERICA AT NATIONAL LATINO ADVOCACY DAYS • 9.7 MILLION LATINOS VOTED IN THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL HE CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU • 64,000 FAMILIES SERVED THROUGH NCLR’S TION PROJECTED TO BE HISPANIC IN 2050 • 16% OF ALL NEWLY ENLISTED MILITARY ARE HISPANIC • TINOS REACHED WITH CULTURALLY COMPETENT HEALTH EDUCATION • 4,500 LETTERS SENT TO USING CRISIS • 5,646 LETTERS SENT TO SENATE TO PROTECT CHILDREN FROM LOSING CHILD TAX CA • 30,000 FANS ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK • 350 PEOPLE FROM MORE THAN 100 ORGANIZATIONS IAL ELECTION • 7,813 LETTERS SENT TO SUPPORT THE NOMINATION OF A STRONG DIRECTOR


NCLR MISSION The National Council of La Raza (NCLR)—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. Through its network of nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations, NCLR reaches millions of Hispanics each year in 41 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. To achieve its mission, NCLR conducts applied research, policy analysis, and advocacy, providing a Latino perspective in five key areas— assets/investments, civil rights/immigration, education, employment and economic status, and health. In addition, it provides capacity-building assistance to its Affiliates who work at the state and local level to advance opportunities for individuals and families. Founded in 1968, NCLR is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan, tax-exempt organization headquartered in Washington, DC, serving all Hispanic subgroups in all regions of the country. It has regional offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix, and San Antonio and state operations throughout the nation.

NCLR thanks the many staff who contributed to the 2011 NCLR Annual Report and gives special thanks to the following people. Ruben J. Gonzales, Deputy Vice President of Resource Development, and Ashley Thompson, Consultant, managed the production of this report. Sherry San Miguel, Graphic Designer and Production Coordinator, designed and supervised the artistic production. Kari Nye, Senior Development Editor, edited and prepared this publication for dissemination.

NCLR · Raul Yzaguirre Building · 1126 16th Street, NW, Suite 600 Washington, DC 20036-4845 · (202) 785-1670 · www.nclr.org © 2012 by the National Council of La Raza. All rights reserved Printed in the United States of America


IMAGE: Plaza de Ni単os Preschool at NCLR Affiliate, Guadalupe Center, Inc.

CONTENTS 2

Message from the President and the Board Chair

3

Board of Directors

4

Corporate Board of Advisors

6

Affiliate Council

7

Affiliate Network Affiliate Partners

12

26

Program and Policy Highlights Health & Nutrition Education Youth Leadership Economy & Workforce Wealth-Building Civil Rights & Immigration Advocacy & Empowerment Special Events

28

Contributors Our Funders Individual Contributors

32

Financial Summary

36

Mark Your Calendar

37

Lead the Way Executive Staff Offices and Operations Select Publications


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT AND THE BOARD CHAIR

For nearly 45 years, NCLR has advocated equal opportunity for Hispanic Americans, with improvements in economic and political empowerment and socioeconomic status as our guiding vision. While Hispanics have made advancements in numerous areas, in recent years we have battled a rise in anti-Latino sentiment; naysayers depict Hispanics as a drain on the economy and continue attempts to enact anti-Latino legislation at the state and local level. Such tactics distract Americans from the real issues affecting the country, such as epidemic foreclosure rates, record job loss, our faltering education system, and the need for comprehensive immigration solutions. In truth, the numbers tell a different story. According to the U.S. Census, Latinos account for 16% of all newly enlisted military; Hispanic-owned firms have grown at nearly three times the rate of non-Hispanic-owned firms; and by 2050, nearly one-third of the total American workforce will be Hispanic. Simply put, Latinos are the backbone of America’s future. Stories of success, as well as the challenges that still must be overcome, motivate NCLR to continue pursuing its mission—to create and improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. Our growing network of community-based Affiliates and our partnerships with influential leaders and socially responsible individuals, organizations, and corporations throughout the country are the cornerstone upon which NCLR helps strengthen America. Engaging Hispanics in the American democratic process is an area that is high on our agenda, and with the acquisition of Democracia U.S.A. in 2011, NCLR is now one of the largest Latino voter registration organizations in the nation.  Hispanics have the potential to wield great influence in the political process, and in the coming year our efforts will seek to expand the clout of the Latino community by linking eligible immigrants to citizenship, citizens to registration and voting, and the community at large to advocacy.  NCLR recognizes the power of the nation’s 50.5 million Latinos, and it is time to harness their voice. Stand with us! By investing in America’s Latinos, you’re shaping our country’s future. Please join us in propelling the nation forward—a better America depends on the strength of all of its individuals, families, and communities.

Janet Murguía NCLR President and CEO 2 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

Daniel R. Ortega, Jr. NCLR Board Chair


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

OUR FUNDERS

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE CHAIR

SECRETARY

JANET MURGUÍA

RENATA SOTO

DANIEL R. ORTEGA, JR.

DR. JUAN SANCHEZ

Attorney at Law Ortega Law Firm Phoenix, AZ

El Presidente/CEO and Founder Southwest Key Programs, Inc. Austin, TX

President and CEO National Council of La Raza Washington, DC

Executive Director Conexión Américas Nashville, TN

VICE CHAIR

TREASURER

JORGE PLASENCIA

ANSELMO VILLARREAL

Chairman and CEO República Miami, FL

President and CEO La Casa de Esperanza, Inc. Waukesha, WI

JIM PADILLA

CID WILSON

Retired from Ford Motor Company Sarasota, FL

Senior Research Analyst Cabrera Capital Markets, LLC Leonia, NJ

NILDA RUIZ

President and CEO Asociación Puertorriqueños en Marcha, Inc. Philadelphia, PA

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP JULIE CASTRO ABRAMS

FRED R. FERNANDEZ

ERNEST (GENE) ORTEGA

TONY SALAZAR

CEO Women's Initiative for Self Employment San Francisco, CA

President Fred R. Fernandez and Irma R. Rodriguez Foundation, Inc. Johns Creek, GA

President Rural Housing, Inc. Albuquerque, NM

President, West Coast Operations McCormack Baron Salazar Los Angeles, CA

CESAR ALVAREZ

Executive Chairman Greenberg Traurig, LLP Miami, FL THOMAS H. CASTRO

President and CEO El Dorado Capital, LLC Houston, TX

VICTOR LEANDRY

Executive Director El Centro de Servicios Sociales, Inc. Lorain, OH LUPE MARTINEZ

President and CEO UMOS Milwaukee, WI

CATHERINE PINO

BEATRIZ OLVERA STOTZER

Co-Founder and Principal D&P Creative Strategies, LLC Falls Church, VA

CEO NEWCapital, LLC Los Angeles, CA

DR. CLARA RODRIGUEZ

J. WALTER TEJADA

Professor Department of Sociology Fordham University New York, NY

Vice Chair Arlington County Board Arlington, VA

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 3


CORPORATE BOARD OF ADVISORS Established in 1982, NCLR’s Corporate Board of Advisors (CBA) is made up of senior representatives from 25 industry-leading corporations. This passionate group of leaders meets twice per year to review NCLR’s accomplishments and initiatives, discuss issues affecting both the Latino and corporate communities, and establish areas for mutual collaboration. CBA members also work with NCLR to maximize financial support to both the institution and its Affiliate Network, through vital financial, in-kind, and programmatic support. CHAIR JOHNSON & JOHNSON Principal Russell C. Deyo Vice President, General Counsel; Member, Executive Committee

Liaison Freddy Jimenez Assistant General Counsel

Liaison Darrel Jodrey Executive Director, Federal Affairs

AMERICAN AIRLINES Principal Vacant Liaison Martha Pantin Director, Corporate Communications

AT&T Principal Carol Wilner Vice President, Public Affairs

Liaison Norelie Garcia Associate Vice President, Federal Public Affairs

BANK OF AMERICA Principal Angie Garcia Lathrop Community Affairs Executive

Liaison Vacant CHEVRON CORPORATION Principal Carole Young General Manager, Global Offices of Diversity and Ombuds

Liaison Vacant CITI Principal Salvador Villar Chairman & CEO, Citibank (Banamex USA)

Liaison Sandy Fernandez Vice President, National Initiatives

THE COCA-COLA COMPANY Principal Rudy Beserra Vice President, Corporate Latin Affairs

Liaison Frank Ros Assistant Vice President, Corporate Latin Affairs

COMCAST CORPORATION Principal David L. Cohen Executive Vice President

Liaison Jacquelyn (Jackie) Puente Senior Director, External Affairs

CONAGRA FOODS, INC. Principal Christopher P. Kircher Vice President, Corporate Affairs; President, ConAgra Foods Foundation

Liaison Maria Valentin Community Relations Manager

FORD MOTOR COMPANY Principal James G. Vella President, Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services

Liaison Joedis (Joe) Avila Community Outreach Manager

4 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT


GENERAL MILLS, INC. Principal Peter J. Capell

PRUDENTIAL Principal Sharon C. Taylor

Senior Vice President, Wholesome Snacks

Senior Vice President, Human Resources

Liaison Rudy Rodriguez

Liaison René O. Deida

Director, Multicultural Marketing

Senior Director, Integrated Strategy

GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION Principal Eric Peterson U.S. Vice President, Diversity; Director, Industry Dealer Affairs

Liaison Alma Guajardo-Crossley Director, Diversity Initiatives

KRAFT FOODS, INC. Principal Anne Alonzo Vice President, Global Public Policy

Liaison Vacant MCDONALD'S CORPORATION Principal J.C. Gonzalez-Mendez President, Latin America

Liaison Gus Viaño Director, Inclusion and Diversity Initiatives

MILLERCOORS Principal N. Cornell Boggs, III Chief Responsibility and Ethics Officer

Liaison Jose R. Ruano Multicultural Relations Manager

PEPSICO, INC. Principal Albert (Al) P. Carey CEO, PepsiCo Americas Beverages

Liaison Marie Quintana Senior Vice President, Multicultural Sales

SHELL Principal Francene Young Vice President of Talent & Development for Upstream Americas; Vice President of Diversity & Inclusion for Shell U.S.

Liaison Luis Pinto Corporate Affairs Advisor

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES Principal Joe Formusa Senior Vice President

UPS Principal Christine Owens Senior Vice President, Communications and Brand Management

Liaison Eduardo Martinez President, The UPS Foundation

VERIZON Principal Howard Woolley Senior Vice President, Wireless Public Policy and Government Relations

Liaison Emilio Gonzalez Vice President, Public Policy and Strategic Alliances

WALMART Principal Tom Mars

Liaison Art Ruiz

Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer, Walmart U.S.

Director, Consulting Services for Multi-Cultural Business Development

Liaison Mark Espinoza

TIME WARNER INC. Principal Steve Vest Senior Vice President, Global Public Policy

Liaison Jonathan Beane Executive Director, Workforce Diversity and Inclusion

TOYOTA MOTOR NORTH AMERICA, INC. Principal Patricia Salas Pineda Group Vice President, National Philanthropy and the Toyota USA Foundation

Senior Director, Corporate Affairs

Liaison Roger Guzman Senior Manager, Hispanic Markets

WELLS FARGO Principal Oscar Suris Executive Vice President, Head of Corporate Communications

Liaison Georgette (Gigi) Dixon Director, National Partnerships

Liaison Luis Rosero National Manager, Corporate Communications

Liaison Andrea White Chief Privacy Officer 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 5


AFFILIATE COUNCIL

The Affiliate Council serves as a voice for, and represents the partnership between, NCLR and its most important constituency. It provides guidance to NCLR on its programmatic priorities and public policy agenda, and on strengthening regional networks and promoting the work of Affiliates. In addition, the Affiliate Council works closely with the NCLR Affiliate Member Services (AMS) team to implement the AMS strategy, reaching out to Affiliates in all regions of the country to solicit new perspectives and share information on NCLR’s priorities and direction.

MIDWEST

CALIFORNIA

TEXAS

CHAIR

VICE CHAIR

SECRETARY

Victor Leandry

José Rodriguez

J. Oscar Ramirez

Executive Director

President and CEO

President and CEO

El Centro de Servicios Sociales, Inc.

El Concilio, Council for the Spanish Speaking

Avenida Guadalupe Association

Martha Gonzalez-Cortes

Carol Ornelas

Beatrice Garza

Executive Director

CEO

President and CEO

Hispanic Center of Western Michigan

Visionary Home Builders of California

Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans

FAR WEST

NORTHEAST

SOUTHEAST

John Martinez

Raul Rodriguez

Maria Gomez

Executive Director

Executive Director East Harlem Council for Community Improvement, Inc.

President and CEO

HELP–New Mexico, Inc.

Irma Morin

Mary’s Center

Andres Tobar

Executive Director

Yanil Terón

Executive Director

Community Council of Idaho, Inc.

Executive Director

Shirlington Employment and Education Center

Center for Latino Progress – CPRF

6 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT


AFFILIATE NETWORK The NCLR Affiliate Network consists of nearly 300 autonomous, nonprofit organizations working to improve the lives of millions of Latinos each year. NCLR’s Affiliates reflect the breadth and depth of the Hispanic experience in the United States and address the gamut of issues and priorities of the community. Through their daily service, they are uniquely positioned to create innovative approaches to policy and program development. Together, NCLR and its Affiliates promote responsive civic engagement, influence strategies and programs, improve outcomes for Latino families, and nurture the development of strong and responsible community leaders.

2011 Highlights Affiliate Engagement. Affiliates participated in record-breaking numbers in NCLR events, including the Affiliate Leadership Summit, National Latino Advocacy Days, and the Annual Conference, and demonstrated a strong showing at the Affiliate Regional Meetings throughout the country. AmeriCorps. For the past 16 years, NCLR has promoted service as an AmeriCorps national partner. As part of this effort, NCLR’s work with eight Affiliates in 2011 engaged 126 AmeriCorps members to benefit more than 10,000 individuals through beautification projects and education activities in different communities across the nation. Special Affiliate Awards. Mary’s Center of Washington, DC received the 2011 NCLR Affiliate of the Year Award for its exemplary health services programs that reach a wide array of immigrants and lowincome families in the area. Three Affiliates received the prestigious Family Strengthening Award: Centro Hispano of Dane County, Mary’s Center, and Women’s Initiative for Self Employment. These Affiliates host training sessions to teach and extend their approaches to other community-based organizations. Regional Strategy. Through increased financial, human, and technical resources, NCLR bolstered its regional strategy—supported by the Campaign for Stronger American Communities—and expanded its capacity to serve its Affiliates. In 2011, the California

Regional Office’s collaboration with Affiliates and partners resulted in increased advocacy, engagement, and leadership development and allowed for in-depth analysis of the status of Californians in education, employment, and health, in addition to promoting the strengths of the regional Affiliate Network. In 2011, NCLR expanded its regional strategy to its Texas Regional Office and rolled out elements of the strategy in the Midwest and the Northeast.

INVESTMENTS IN OUR COMMUNITIES We are thankful to the many corporate, foundation, and individual supporters who invested in NCLR’s Campaign for Stronger American Communities, which has made regional strategy implementation and Affiliate capacity-building possible. NCLR is especially grateful to its primary partners in these efforts: NCLR Board of Directors

UPS

The Ford Foundation

Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation

General Mills Marguerite Casey Foundation State Farm Insurance Companies

Walmart W.K. Kellogg Foundation

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 7


AFFILIATE PARTNERS BY STATE AND REGION

Far West Region 46 AK

Midwest Region 60

WA 4

OR 5

ND

ID 1

SD

UT 3

ARIZONA Mesa Housing Our Communities, Inc. www.housingourcommunities.org (480) 649-1335 Nogales Mexicayotl Academy www.mexicayotlacademy.com (520) 287-6790 Phoenix Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce www.azhcc.com (602) 279-1800

8 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

KS 3 OK 3

Phoenix

MI 10

IL 16

OH 10

WV

KY TN 3

AR 1

SC 1 AL 1

GA 2

LA

FL 11

MA 5 RI 1

PA 10

IN 1

MO 4

MS 1 TX 24

NH

NY 13

IA

NM 9

NCLR Regional Offices NCLR State Operations NCLR Affiliate Partners NCLR Affiliate Satellite Sites

ALABAMA

CO 8

AZ 13

Los Angeles

VT

MI WI 7

NE 2

CA 60

Birmingham Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (¡HICA!) www.hispanicinterest.org (205) 942-5505

MN 4

WY

NV 3

California Region 60

ME

New York City Chicago

MT

HI

Northeast Region 37

CT 3 NJ 1

VA 3

DE 2

NC 5

MD 2 NCLR Headquarters

Washington, DC 13

Southeast Region 43

San Antonio

PR 2

Texas Region 24 Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. www.cplc.org (602) 257-0700 Community Housing Resources of Arizona www.communityhousingresources.org (602) 631-9780 Espiritu Community Development Corporation www.espiritu.org (602) 243-7788 Friendly House, Inc. www.friendlyhouse.org (602) 257-1870 Hispanic Women’s Corporation www.hispanicwomen.org (602) 954-7995 Valle del Sol www.valledelsol.com (602) 248-8101

San Luis Comité De Bien Estar, Inc. www.comiteaz.com (928) 627-8559 Somerton Campesinos Sin Fronteras www.campesinossinfronteras.org (928) 627-1060 Housing America Corporation www.housingamericacorp.com (928) 627-4221 Tucson Luz Social Services, Inc. www.luzsocialservices.org (520) 882-6216

ARKANSAS Springdale Hispanic Women’s Organization of Arkansas www.hwoa.org (479) 751-9494

CALIFORNIA Anaheim Neighborhood Housing Services of Orange County www.nhsoc.org (714) 490-1250 Arleta El Proyecto del Barrio www.elproyecto.us (818) 830-7133 Brawley Campesinos Unidos www.brawleycui.com (760) 351-5100

Clinicas de Salud del Pueblo, Inc. www.clinicasdesalud.org (760) 344-6471 Burbank Partnerships to Uplift Communities, Inc. www.pucschools.org (818) 559-7699 Calexico Calexico Community Action Council www.ccac-vtc.org (760) 357-2995 Chula Vista MAAC Project www.maacproject.org (619) 426-3595 Covina California Association for Bilingual Education (CABE) www.bilingualeducation.org (626) 814-4441


Hayward La Familia Counseling Service www.lafamiliacounselingservice.com (510) 881-5921 Keene Cesar Chavez Foundation www.nfwsc.org (661) 823-6201 Los Angeles Academia Avance www.academiaavance.org (323) 230-7270 The Accelerated School Community of Schools www.accelerated.org (323) 235-6343 Alliance for a Better Community (ABC) www.afabc.org (213) 250-0052 AltaMed Health Services Corporation www.altamed.org (323) 725-8751 Camino Nuevo Charter Academy www.caminonuevo.org (213) 736-5542 Centro Latino for Literacy www.centrolatinoliteracy.org (213) 483-7753 East LA Community Corporation www.elacc.org (323) 269-4214 Eastmont Community Center www.eastmontcommunitycenter.org (323) 726-7998 El Centro del Pueblo www.elcentrodelpueblo.org (213) 483-6335 Los Angeles Leadership Academy www.laleadership.org (213) 381-8484 New Economics for Women www.neweconomicsforwomen.org (213) 483-2060 Para Los Niños www.paralosninos.org (213) 250-4800 Semillas Sociedad Civil www.dignidad.org (323) 225-4549 Synergy Academies www.wearesynergy.org (323) 459-5463 Watts/Century Latino Organization www.wattscenturylatino.org (323) 564-9140 Youth Policy Institute www.ypiusa.org (213) 688-2802 Modesto Mujeres Latinas de Stanislaus (209) 572-2437 Montebello Mexican American Opportunity Foundation (MAOF) www.maof.org (323) 278-3601 Montebello Housing Development Corporation www.mtbhousingcorp.com (323) 722-3955

Oakland La Clínica de La Raza, Inc. www.laclinica.org (510) 535-4000 Lighthouse Community Charter School www.lighthousecharter.org (510) 271-8801 Spanish Speaking Citizens’ Foundation www.sscf.org (510) 261-7839 The Unity Council www.unitycouncil.org (510) 535-6900 Ontario Neighborhood Partnership Housing Services, Inc. nphs.info (909) 988-5979 Perris TODEC Legal Center www.todec.org (909) 943-1955 San Bernardino Neighborhood Housing Services of the Inland Empire, Inc. www.nhsie.org (909) 884-6891 San Diego Chicano Federation, Inc. www.chicanofederation.org (619) 285-5600 Community HousingWorks www.chworks.org (760) 432-6878 La Maestra Community Health Centers www.lamaestra.org (619) 280-4213 Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) www.piqe.org (858) 483-4499 San Diego Home Loan Counseling and Education Center (SDHLCEC) www.sdhomeloan.org (619) 624-2330 San Francisco Central American Resource Center (CARECEN) www.carecensf.org (415) 642-4400 Mission Asset Fund www.missionassetfund.org (415) 839-8840 Mission Economic Development Agency (MEDA) medasf.org (415) 282-3334 Women’s Initiative for Self Employment www.womensinitiative.org (415) 641-3460 San Jose Center for Training and Careers, Inc. www.ctcsj.org (408) 251-3165

Community Child Care Council of Santa Clara County, Inc. www.4c.org (408) 487-0747 Mexican American Community Services Agency, Inc. www.macsa.org (408) 928-1122 San Ysidro Casa Familiar, Inc. www.casafamiliar.org (619) 428-1115 San Ysidro Health Center www.syhc.org (619) 428-4463 Santa Ana Delhi Center www.delhicenter.com (714) 481-9600 El Sol Science and Arts Academy www.elsolacademy.net (714) 543-0023 Santa Monica National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP) www.nalip.org (310) 457-4445 Stockton El Concilio, Council for the Spanish Speaking www.elconcilio.org (209) 547-2855 Visionary Home Builders of California www.visionaryhomebuilders.org (209) 466-6811 Tehachapi Farmworker Institute for Education and Leadership Development (FIELD) www.farmworkerinstitute.org (661) 823-6140 Union City Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center, Inc. www.tvhc.org (510) 471-5880 Ventura Cabrillo Economic Development Corporation www.cabrilloedc.org (805) 659-3791 Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE) www.coastalalliance.com (805) 658-0810 Visalia Self-Help Enterprises www.selfhelpenterprises.org (559) 651-1000

COLORADO Colorado Springs Scholars to Leaders Academy www.scholarstoleadersacademy.org (719) 575-9380 Denver CLLARO (Colorado Latino Leadership, Advocacy & Research Organization) www.larasa.org (303) 722-5150

Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation www.delnortendc.org (303) 477-4774 Mi Casa Resource Center www.micasadenver.org (303) 573-1302 SouthWest Improvement Council www.swic-denver.org (303) 934-2268 Longmont El Comité de Longmont www.elcomitedelongmont.org (303) 651-6125 Pueblo Dolores Huerta Preparatory High www.cca-pueblo.org (719) 295-1623 Westminster GOAL Academy www.goalac.org (415) 839-8840

CONNECTICUT Hartford Center for Latino Progress – CPRF www.ctprf.org (860) 247-3227 Hispanic Health Council www.hispanichealth.com (860) 527-0856 Rocky Hill Humanidad, Inc. (860) 563-6103

DELAWARE Georgetown La Esperanza, Inc. www.laesperanza.org (302) 854-9262 Wilmington Latin American Community Center, Inc. www.thelatincenter.org (302) 655-7338

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Ayuda, Inc. www.ayudainc.org (202) 387-4848 Carlos Rosario International Public Charter School www.carlosrosario.org (202) 797-4700 Central American Resource Center (CARECEN) www.carecendc.org (202) 328-9799 CentroNía www.centronia.org (202) 332-4200 La Clínica del Pueblo www.lcdp.org (202) 462-4788 Latin American Montessori Bilingual (LAMB) Public Charter School www.lambpcs.org (202) 726-6200 Latin American Youth Center www.layc-dc.org (202) 319-2225

Latino Economic Development Corporation (LEDC) www.ledcmetro.org (202) 588-5102 Mary’s Center www.maryscenter.org (202) 483-8196 Multicultural Career Intern Program www.checdc.org (202) 939-7700 Multicultural Community Service www.mcsdc.org (202) 238-9355 Spanish Catholic Center of Catholic Charities DC www.catholiccharitiesdc.org (202) 939-2437 Spanish Education Development (SED) Center www.sedcenter.org (202) 462-8848

FLORIDA Florida City Centro Campesino Farmworker Center, Inc. www.centrocampesino.org (305) 245-7738 Coalition of Florida Farmworker Organizations www.coffo.org (305) 246-0357 Mexican American Council, Inc. (305) 245-5865 Fort Myers Pine Manor Improvement Association Inc. pmiafl.org (239) 275-5180 Hollywood Hispanic Unity of Florida, Inc. www.hispanicunity.org (954) 964-8884 Homestead Rural Neighborhoods, Inc. (305) 242-2142 Immokalee Redlands Christian Migrant Association www.rcma.org (239) 658-3560 Miami Amigos for Kids www.amigosforkids.org (305) 279-1155 Orlando Latino Leadership, Inc. www.latino-leadership.org (407) 895-0801 Tampa Hispanic Services Council, Inc. www.hispanicservicescouncil.org (813) 936-7700 Housing and Education Alliance, Inc. www.myhomeamerica.org (813)932-4663

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 9


GEORGIA Dalton Dalton-Whitfield Community Development Corporation www.dwcdc.org (706) 876-1630 Norcross Clinic for Education, Treatment and Prevention of Addiction, Inc. (CETPA) www.cetpa.org (770) 662-0249

IDAHO Caldwell Community Council of Idaho, Inc. www.communitycouncilofidaho.org (208) 454-1652

ILLINOIS Alsip Veterans Outreach Program of Illinois, Inc. www.illinoisveterans.org (708) 371-9800 Chicago Alivio Medical Center www.aliviomedicalcenter.org (312) 829-6303 Association House of Chicago www.associationhouse.org (773) 772-7170 Brighton Park Neighborhood Council www.bpncchicago.org (773) 523-7110 El Hogar del Niño www.elhogardelnino.org (773) 523-1629 Enlace Chicago www.enlacechicago.org (773) 542-9233 Erie Neighborhood House www.eriehouse.org (312) 563-5800 Gads Hill Center www.gadshillcenter.org (312) 226-0963 Illinois Migrant Council www.illinoismigrant.org (312) 663-1522 Instituto del Progreso Latino www.idpl.org (773) 890-0055 Latino Policy Forum www.latinopolicyforum.org (312) 376-1766 Latinos Progresando www.latinospro.org (773) 542-7077 Mujeres Latinas en Acción www.mujereslatinasenaccion.org (773) 890-7676 Poder Learning Center www.poderlc.org (312) 226-2002

10 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

Spanish Coalition for Housing www.sc4housing.org (773) 292-5784 The Resurrection Project www.resurrectionproject.org (312) 666-1323

INDIANA Fort Wayne United Hispanic Americans, Inc. www.unitedhispanicamericans.org (260) 422-2651

KANSAS Kansas City El Centro, Inc. www.elcentroinc.com (913) 677-0100 Harvest America Corporation www.harvestamerica.org (913) 342-2121 Wichita SER Corporation Kansas www.sercorp.com (316) 264-5372

MARYLAND Gaithersburg Identity, Inc. www.identity-youth.org (301) 963-5900 Silver Spring CASA de Maryland, Inc. www.casademaryland.org (301) 270-0419

MASSACHUSETTS East Boston East Boston Ecumenical Community Council (EBECC) www.ebecc.org (617) 567-2750 Jamaica Plain Hyde Square Task Force www.hydesquare.org (617) 524-8303 Lawrence Lawrence CommunityWorks www.lcworks.org (978) 722-2603 Roxbury La Alianza Hispana, Inc. www.laalianza.org (617) 427-7175 Sociedad Latina www.sociedadlatina.org (617) 442-4299

MICHIGAN Detroit Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation www.dhdc1.org (313) 967-4880

Latin Americans for Social and Economic Development, Inc. (LA SED) www.lasedinc.org (313) 554-2025 Latino Family Services www.latinofamilyservices.com (313) 841-7380 Southwest Housing Solutions www.swsol.org (313) 841-9641 Grand Rapids Hispanic Center of Western Michigan www.hispanic-center.org (616) 742-0200 Kalamazoo Hispanic American Council www.hispanicamericancouncil.org (269) 385-6279 Lansing Cristo Rey Community Center www.cristo-rey.org (517) 372-4700 Hispanic/Latino Commission of Michigan www.michigan.gov/mdcr (517) 373-8339 Traverse City Northwest Michigan Health Services, Inc. (231) 947-1112 Ypsilanti Migrant Health Promotion www.migranthealth.org (800) 461-8394

MINNESOTA Minneapolis El Colegio Charter School www.el-colegio.org (612) 728-5728 Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Minnesota www.hispanicmn.org (612) 312-1692 St. Paul Academia Cesar Chavez www.cesarchavezschool.com (651) 294-4640 Comunidades Latinas Unidas En Servicio (CLUES) www.clues.org (651) 379-4203

MISSISSIPPI Jackson Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance (MIRA) www.yourmira.org (601) 968-5182

MISSOURI Kansas City Cabot Westside Health Center www.saintlukesgiving.org/cabot (816) 471-0900 Guadalupe Center, Inc. www.guadalupecenters.org (816) 421-1015

Hispanic Economic Development Corporation (HEDC) www.kchedc.org (816) 221-3442 Mattie Rhodes Center www.mattierhodes.org (816) 471-2536

NEBRASKA Lincoln Latino American Commission www.latinoac.nebraska.gov (402) 471-2791 Omaha OneWorld Community Health Centers, Inc. www.oneworldomaha.org (402) 734-4110

NEVADA Las Vegas Community Services of Nevada – CSN www.csnv.org (702) 307-1710 Housing for Nevada www.housingfornevada.org (702) 270-0300 Reno Mariposa Dual Language Academy www.mariposaacademy.net (775) 826-4040

NEW JERSEY Camden Latin American Economic Development Association, Inc. www.laeda.com (856) 338-1177

NEW MEXICO Albuquerque Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce www.ahcnm.org (505) 842-9003 HELP–New Mexico, Inc. www.helpnm.com (505) 265-3717 La Academia de Lengua y Cultura www.laspanteras.org (505) 563-4242 YES Housing, Inc. www.yeshousing.org (505) 254-1373 Youth Development, Inc. www.ydinm.org (505) 242-7306 Conchiti Lake National Latino Behavioral Health Association www.nlbha.org (703) 400-8103 Embudo Rio Grande Alcoholism Treatment Program, Inc. (505) 579-4253 Siete del Norte Community Development Corporation (505) 579-4217

Española Hands Across Cultures www.handsacrosscultures.org (505) 747-1889

NEW YORK Brooklyn Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation www.cypresshills.org (718) 647-2800 Make the Road New York www.maketheroad.org (718) 418-7690 Buffalo The Latino Housing Development Corporation latinohousing.webs.com (716) 823-0634 Glen Cove La Fuerza Unida, Inc. www.lfuinc.org (516) 759-0788 Mamaroneck Hispanic Resource Center www.hrclm.org (914) 835-1512 New York Amber Charter School ambercharter.echalk.com (212) 534-9667 The Committee for Hispanic Children and Families www.chcfinc.org (212) 206-1090 Community Association of Progressive Dominicans www.acdp.org (212) 781-5500 Dominican Women’s Development Center www.dwdc.org (212) 994-6060 East Harlem Council for Community Improvement, Inc. www.promesa.org (718) 299-1100 Rochester Ibero-American Action League, Inc. www.iaal.org (585) 256-8900 PathStone www.pathstone.org (585) 340-3300 Syracuse Spanish Action League of Onondaga County, Inc. www.laligaupstateny.org (315) 475-6153

NORTH CAROLINA Charlotte Latin American Coalition www.latinamericancoalition.org (704) 531-3848


Durham El Centro Hispano, Inc. www.elcentronc.org (919) 687-4635 Latino Community Credit Union www.latinoccu.org (919) 688-9270 Raleigh El Pueblo, Inc. www.elpueblo.org (919) 835-1525 Silver City Hispanic Liaison of Chatham County/El Vínculo Hispano www.evhnc.org (919) 742-1448

OHIO Cleveland El Barrio, Inc. (216) 651-2037 Esperanza, Inc. www.esperanzainc.org (216) 651-7178 Nueva Luz Urban Resource Center www.nuevaluzurc.org (216) 651-8236 Spanish American Committee www.spanishamerican.org (216) 961-2100 Columbus Ohio Hispanic Coalition www.ohiohispaniccoalition.org (614) 840-9934 Elyria Lorain County Community College www.lorainccc.edu (440) 365-5222 Lorain El Centro de Servicios Sociales, Inc. www.childrenservices.org (440) 277-8235 Toledo Adelante, The Latino Resource Center www.adelantelrc.org (419) 244-8440 Campaign for Migrant Worker Justice www.cmwj.org (419) 243-3456 Youngstown Organizacion Cívica y Cultural Hispana Americana, Inc. www.youngstownoccha.org (330) 781-1808

OKLAHOMA Oklahoma City Latino Community Development Agency www.latinoagencyokc.org (405) 236-0701 ORO Development Corporation www.orodevcorp.org (405) 840-7077 Santa Fe South Schools, Inc. www.santafesouth.org (405) 631-6100

OREGON

RHODE ISLAND

Eugene Centro LatinoAmericano centrolatinoamericano.org (541) 687-2667 Hillsboro Bienestar www.bienestar-or.org (503) 693-2937 Portland Hacienda Community Development Corporation www.haciendacdc.org (503) 595-2111 Portland Housing Center www.portlandhousingcenter.org (503) 282-7744 Salem Salem/Keizer Coalition for Equality www.skcequality.org (503) 363-3909

Providence Center for Hispanic Policy and Advocacy (CHisPA) www.chispari.org (401) 467-0111

PENNSYLVANIA Allentown Casa Guadalupe Center www.casalv.org (610) 435-9902 Hispanic American Organization www.hao-lv.org (610) 435-5334 Lancaster SACA Development Corporation www.sacapa.org (717) 397-6267 Spanish American Civic Association (SACA) www.sacapa.org (717) 397-6267 Philadelphia Asociación Puertorriqueños en Marcha, Inc. (APM) www.apmphila.org (267) 296-7200 Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc. www.congreso.net (215) 763-8870 Council of Spanish Speaking Organizations of Philadelphia www.elconcilio.net (215) 627-3100 Esperanza www.esperanza.us (215) 324-0746 Esperanza Academy Charter High School www.neacademy.org (215) 457-3667 Reading Centro Hispano Daniel Torres www.centrohispano.org (610) 376-3748

PUERTO RICO San Juan Asociación de Salud Primaria de Puerto Rico, Inc. www.saludprimariapr.org (787) 758-3411 Consejo Vecinal Pro-Desarrollo de la Península de Cantera consejovecinal.chdos.org (787) 727-5051

SOUTH CAROLINA Columbia Acercamiento Hispano de Carolina del Sur www.schispanicoutreach.org (803) 419-5112

TENNESSEE Memphis Latino Memphis, Inc. www.latinomemphis.org (901) 366-5882 Nashville Conexión Américas www.conamericas.com (615) 320-5152 Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition (TIRRC) www.tnimmigrant.org (615) 833-0384

TEXAS Austin American YouthWorks www.americanyouthworks.org (512) 744-1900 East Austin College Prep Academy www.eaprep.org (512) 287-5001 Southwest Key Programs, Inc. www.swkey.org (512) 462-2181 Corpus Christi Gulf Coast Council of La Raza, Inc. www.gcclr.org (361) 881-9988 Dallas The Concilio www.theconcilio.org (214) 818-0481 Vecinos Unidos, Inc. www.vecinosunidos.com (214) 761-1086 Edinburg Information Referral Resource Assistance, Inc. www.irra.org (956) 393-2227 El Paso Centro de Salud Familiar La Fe www.lafe-ep.org (915) 534-7979 YWCA El Paso Del Norte Region www.ywcaelpaso.org (915) 533-2311 Harlingen Su Clinica Familiar www.suclinica.org (956) 365-6750 Houston Association for the Advancement of Mexican Americans (AAMA) www.aamainc.us (713) 926-4756

D.R.A.W. Academy www.drawacademy.org (713) 706-3729 Houston Gateway Academy, Inc. www.hgaschools.org (713) 644-8292 KIPP Houston www.kipphouston.org (832) 633-1796 Tejano Center for Community Concerns www.tejanocenter.org (713) 644-2340 Laredo TMC–Teaching and Mentoring Communities www.tmccentral.org (956) 722-5174 Lubbock LEARN, Inc. www.learnprograms.org (806) 763-4256 Midland Midland Community Development Corporation www.midlandcdc.org (432) 682-2520 San Antonio Avenida Guadalupe Association www.avenidaguadalupe.org (210) 223-3151 First Mexican Baptist Church (210) 737-6113 KIPP San Antonio www.kippsa.org (210) 787-3197 Mexican American Unity Council, Inc. (MAUC) www.mauc.org (210) 978-0500 Student Alternatives Program, Inc. www.stdsapi.com (210) 227-0295 San Benito South Texas Adult Resource and Training Center www.startcenter.org (956) 399-7818

UTAH

Falls Church Hispanic Committee of Virginia www.hcva.org (703) 671-5666

WASHINGTON Seattle El Centro de la Raza www.elcentrodelaraza.com (206) 329-9442 Sea Mar Community Health Centers www.seamar.org (206) 763-5210 Sunnyside Washington State Migrant Council www.wsmconline.org (509) 839-9762 Yakima Rural Community Development Resources www.rcdr.biz (509) 453-5133

WISCONSIN Madison Centro Hispano of Dane County micentro.org (608) 255-3018 Milwaukee Council for the Spanish Speaking, Inc. www.spanishcenter-milw.org (414) 384-3700 La Causa, Inc. www.lacausa.org (414) 647-8750 UMOS, Inc. www.umos.org (414) 389-6000 United Community Center/ Centro de la Comunidad Unida www.unitedcc.org (414) 384-3100 Waukesha HBC Services, Inc. (262) 522-1230 La Casa de Esperanza, Inc. www.lacasadeesperanza.org (262) 547-0887

Salt Lake City Comunidades Unidas www.cuutah.org (801) 566-6191 Utah Coalition of La Raza www.utahlaraza.org (801) 359-8922 South Salt Lake City Centro de la Familia de Utah www.cdlfu.org (801) 521-4473

VIRGINIA Arlington East Coast Migrant Head Start Project www.ecmhsp.org (703) 243-7522 Shirlington Employment and Education Center www.seecjobs.org (703) 933-1101

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 11


TITLE & HEALTH NUTRITION SUBTITLE

Good health is the foundation of a good life. NCLR and its Affiliates work to promote and improve the health and well-being of Hispanic Americans through activities and programs that focus on access to quality health care, health education and disease prevention, linguistically and culturally competent resources, community-based research, and advocacy for national policies.

2011 Highlights Comer bien: The Challenges of nourishing laTino Children and families

Research and Publications. NCLR published an HIV/AIDS report that combines a review of existing literature, an overview of findings from numerous community-based organizations, and data collected by government agencies to provide a cutting-edge analysis of the growing Comer bien: The Challenges of HIV/AIDS crisis among Latinos in nourishing laTino Children and families the U.S. NCLR also issued a report addressing Latinos’ mental health needs, and another outlining Latinos’ awareness and attitudes concerning clinical trials. The Health Policy Project released a storybanking publication, Comer Bien: The Challenges of Nourishing Latino Children and Families, and a professionally edited ten-minute film of the same name to tell the stories of Hispanic families working to overcome barriers to nutrition.

12 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

Hispanic Health Leadership. In conjunction with 21 community-based partners, NCLR’s Institute for Hispanic Health trained 80 promotores de salud (community health workers) who reached more than 3,000 Latinos with culturally competent messages on important health issues. NCLR also presented on the genomic literacy of Latinos at the National Human Genome Research Institute’s Community Genetics Forum. The Health Policy Project led NCLR’s national calls, congressional outreach, and social media action initiatives on topics ranging from Medicaid defense to food insecurity and obesity, and was featured as an expert on many Hispanic health equity panels. Health Care Reform Implementation. The Health Policy Project approaches health care reform implementation through both legislative and administrative advocacy. NCLR submitted formal comments to implementing agencies on the new public health insurance option and proposed rules to the Exchanges, health care affordability programs, and Medicaid. NCLR also took a leadership role in crafting the Health Equity and Accountability Act of 2011, a health disparities bill that builds on the promise of health care reform.


IMAGES LEFT TO RIGHT: NCLR storybanking publication, Comer Bien: The Challenges of Nourishing Latino Children and Families; migrant worker receives dental screening from NCLR Affiliate, Migrant Health Promotion

4,500 letters sent to Congress to protect Medicaid from more than $10 billion in cuts that would have jeopardized access to affordable health care for millions of Latino families. 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 13


IMAGES LEFT TO RIGHT: students at a college access center run by NCLR Affiliate, Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation; NCLR tool kit, Access to Common Standards for All: An Advocacy Tool Kit for Supporting Success

350

22% of the nation’s high school students

people representing more than 100 organizations 11% of college students attended National and Latino Advocacy Daysare Hispanic. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Decennial Census. 14 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT


EDUCATION Quality education is a priority in the Latino community as parents, educators, community leaders, and corporate partners strive to narrow the achievement gap between Latinos and other Americans. NCLR’s Education department supports school improvement as the foundation for increasing student achievement, and policy efforts focus on improving the education system—from preschool through high school—to better serve Latinos. NCLR’s network of education Affiliates and allies also informs the public education system at national and regional levels while strengthening the community-based sector; tests and documents best practices of successful education programs for national dissemination; and engages stakeholders as advocates for Hispanic students.

2011 Highlights Early Childhood Education. To support the improvement of services to Latino children and families, NCLR facilitated the exchange of best practices among a number of organizations providing early childhood education services. NCLR identified organizations to serve as models on the implementation of programs and application of practices in dual-language development and the integration of cultural elements, family engagement, and continuous datadriven assessment. As a result, NCLR is formalizing a process of peer mentorship where service providers engage in structured activities to support program improvement. A continuing priority for NCLR is to increase awareness among federal policymakers and professional development providers of effective practices in community-based programs serving young Hispanic children and their families. Parent Organizing Project. In 2011, NCLR completed the first year of a pilot project that empowers parents to organize other parents

in their community to improve the education of their children. The project is a partnership with NCLR and Academia Avance, a charter school in Los Angeles, California, and the Salem/Keizer Coalition for Equality, a community-based organization in Salem, Oregon, focused on parent organizing for education improvement. Professional Development for Math Teachers. Twenty-five teachers from 12 schools across the NCLR network are taking part in a project that improves their ability to integrate student assessments as an essential part of math instruction. The teachers are trained to apply pilot assessments in their classrooms and observe each other’s progress. NCLR is one of several partners selected by The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to refine and disseminate the effective use of assessments. Model for School Improvement. At the culmination of its three-year pilot project, NCLR solidified a model for schools serving Latino students which develops leadership, improves instructional practices and curricula, and helps charter school boards be more effective. The four participating schools demonstrated great gains that included increased graduation rates, significant increases in state achievement tests, and more rigorous course offerings.

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 15


YOUTH LEADERSHIP The NCLR Líderes Initiative is a national program that increases opportunities for Latino youth to maximize their influence as leaders in the United States. By supporting a network of high school and college students, as well as young professionals, Líderes strives to develop future generations of civically minded professionals, corporate executives, public officials, and community leaders who will promote social justice at the local and national levels.

2011 Highlights Líderes Network. The Líderes website and biweekly e-newsletter reached more than 9,000 Hispanic students with information about grants, scholarships, internships, fellowships, conferences, and network events. Líderes was also active on Facebook and Twitter, daily updating its tech-savvy followers with leadership opportunities and alerts about NCLR’s national campaigns and efforts. In 2011, the Líderes Youth Advisory Committee also launched its own blog, which will be used to increase awareness of leadership resources provided by the program. Líderes Summit. Convening nearly 500 students each year, the NCLR Líderes Summit has become one of the most comprehensive leadership conferences for Hispanic youth in the U.S. The 2011 Summit featured more than 20 educational workshops on civic engagement, community empowerment, and professional development, as well as a town hall session about the future of leadership which was attended by more than 350 students. Cecilia Muñoz, then-White House Director of Intergovernmental Affairs, and Ken Salazar, U.S. Secretary of the Interior, each spoke at a Summit event, motivating students to continue pursuing leadership opportunities. One of the biggest highlights was the arrival of President Barack Obama, who made it a point to shake hands with Summit participants after his address at the NCLR Annual Conference. Líderes Empowered. Launched in 2009, Líderes Empowered is a ten-month cohort program that equips and empowers young

16 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

people to become agents of positive change in their communities. The program leads youth to identify the most pressing issues and promising opportunities for their schools and neighborhoods and then challenges them to respond with potential solutions at local congresos and civic engagement activities over the course of the year. Among their communities of Latino youth, participants have explored increasing college entrance rates, decreasing high school dropout rates, and decreasing gang-related violence. Congresos, which are coordinated by program partners, convened nearly 500 students and incorporated 240 new members into the Líderes Network in 2011. Community response activities coordinated by the Affiliate Youth Leadership Committees at each site included parent conferences, community forums, workshops at street festivals, and beautification days at schools.

Learn to expand your horizons ĺ nspire the next generation D ream of a brighter future E mpower your community R each those in need E ngage your leadership S hare your vision


Latinos, let's prepare our youth to be the future leaders of our nation...

Sトコ SE PUEDE!

窶認acebook post from NCLR supporter

IMAGE: Winner of an essay contest sponsored by NCLR Affiliate, Latino American Commission 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 17


IMAGES LEFT TO RIGHT: Green Construction & Energy career training program at NCLR Affiliate, Mi Casa Resource Center; NCLR storybanking publication, We Needed the Work: Latino Worker Voices in the New Economy; NCLR publication, Plugged In: Positive Development Strategies for Disconnected Latino Youth

44% growth in Hispanic-owned firms from 2002 to 2007, while non-Hispanic-owned firms grew by just 15%. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Decennial Census. 18 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT


ECONOMY & WORKFORCE The strength of the American economy is increasingly linked to the strength of the Hispanic workforce. NCLR and its Affiliates help ensure the Latino community’s ability to contribute to and share in the nation’s economic opportunities by promoting Latino employment in good jobs, safe and fair workplaces, and Latino workers’ education and skills acquisition.

2011 Highlights Workforce Development Forum. NCLR’s 2011 Workforce Development Forum—¡Fuerza! Stronger Economy, Stronger Latino Workers—was held in Chicago and attended by 42 Affiliate organizations and other representatives from 35 states. The forum featured more than 30 workshops and roundtable sessions presented by workforce development experts, and keynote and plenary session remarks by leaders from the Department of Labor, city workforce agencies, and private foundations. The convening provided a setting to discuss solutions, share strategies, and forge partnerships to improve services for Hispanic workers in communities across the country. Research and Publications. NCLR held panel discussions in Washington, DC in conjunction with the releases of important publications documenting the state of Latino workers and youth. We Needed the Work: Latino Worker Voices in the New Economy is a collection of stories illustrating the vulnerability of Hispanic workers in the low-wage, low-skill labor market. A second report, Plugged In: Positive Development Strategies for Disconnected Latino Youth, documents the lessons learned and best practices of programs Latino Worker Voices in the New Economy

PLUGGED IN: Positive Development Strategies for Disconnected Latino Youth A Report of the NCLR Escalera Program

serving Latino youth who are disconnected from school and work. NCLR also releases a Monthly Latino Employment Report that details the latest Hispanic employment statistics, provides snapshots of key growth industries, and offers NCLR’s analysis of policy proposals to create jobs.

Program Outcomes and Impact. NCLR’s Workforce Development programs prepare workers for lifelong economic and career advancement. The NCLR Career Pathways Initiative, which targets low-skilled and limited-English-proficient adults in the green, health care, and customer service sectors, provided training and critical support services to approximately 1,400 participants, resulting in an average wage gain of $2.32 per hour for those placed in jobs. The NCLR Escalera Program: Taking Steps to Success, which serves at-risk and disconnected youth, has reached nearly 1,500 Latino youth to date in seven cities, with 92% of participants completing the program and graduating from high school, and 89% enrolling in postsecondary education.

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 19


WEALTH-BUILDING Despite making significant contributions to American society, Hispanics do not enjoy equal economic opportunities. Latinos rely on assets—such as their home—to weather a financial emergency, send their children to college, or save for retirement. Unfortunately, Latino wealth fell by 66% between 2005 and 2009, the largest drop of any ethnic group. The assets owned by White households exceed those of Hispanic households by 18 to one, a figure known as the racial wealth gap. NCLR works to narrow this staggering gap through policies and programs that address structural and economic barriers.

2011 Highlights Wealth-Building Policy Project. NCLR launched the Home for Good (H4G) campaign to respond to the rapidly changing housing reform debate. H4G engaged NCLR’s Action Network and informed the public on housing issues, collecting 10,609 signed petitions and postcards that called for an end to the housing crisis and delivering them to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner. The campaign also provided expert congressional testimony and released numerous policy materials, including eight principles that are essential to secondary market reform; a five-part foreclosure series; and fact sheets on credit scoring and prepaid cards. As a result, new policy related to foreclosure prevention and neighborhood stabilization includes priorities for Latino families, and the federal Housing Counseling Assistance Program regained its funding.

program’s training methods have been replicated in more than 300 organizations that are meeting their communities' counseling needs.

NCLR Homeownership Network (NHN). The largest network of community-based organizations working to build Latino wealth through homeownership, NHN develops programs that blend research, advocacy, and consumer counseling. This counseling intermediary, approved by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), consists of 50 NCLR Affiliates in 27 states, serving more than 64,000 families each year. NCLR’s technical assistance and quality control measures are the foundation of the renowned NHN Learning Alliance, a HUD-approved training and certification program for housing counselors. The

A major achievement for the organization was an award of New Markets Tax Credits from the CDFI Fund, a division of the Department of Treasury. This allocation provided access to a new source of capital for transactions in low-income communities. In fiscal year 2011, RDF closed two transactions that leveraged nearly $28 million of private capital to fund school projects that will provide opportunities to more than 1,000 students in Indiana and Massachusetts.

20 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

Raza Development Fund, Inc. (RDF). As a support corporation to NCLR, RDF worked with the Affiliate Network in both lending and technical assistance, providing over $5 million in debt capital and Latino Social Venture Fund grants. In direct alignment with its mission, RDF’s lending directly benefitted the Hispanic community by funding projects that produced 546 housing units and increased capacity for charter schools to serve more than 2,295 students. In financial terms, RDF underwrote and closed over $19 million in loans with a focus on charter schools (66%) and housing (28%) in the 2011 fiscal year.


IMAGE: Postcards and petitions collected by NCLR calling for an end to the housing crisis

10,600+ signed petitions and postcards were sent to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner to call for an end to the housing crisis. 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 21


IMAGES LEFT TO RIGHT: NCLR Affiliate, CASA de Maryland calls for an end to failed immigration programs; map illustrating the status of anti-immigrant legislation

We are here to advocate

for the rights of those people who cannot advocate for themselves.

We are here to offer support and to encourage a better life. 窶認acebook post from NCLR supporter 22 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT


CIVIL RIGHTS & IMMIGRATION Our nation’s immigration system remains broken, and the Latino community is feeling the effects of federal inaction to find solutions. Working with partners throughout the country, NCLR’s immigration team coordinates national and local policy and advocacy activities to push back on the toxic environment that is poisoning the waters of policy debates involving immigrants and challenging the very presence of Hispanics in America. NCLR’s work aims to achieve an immigration system that serves the national interest and upholds human dignity.

STATUS OF ANTI-IMMIGRANT LEGISLATION AS OF DEC. 2011

AK

Passed SB 1070-style legislation* Rejected or refused to consider SB 1070-style legislation in 2010 and 2011

ME

WA ND

MT OR

ID WY NV

CA

WI

SD

AZ

CO

IL

KS OK

NM

MI

IA

NE UT

VT NH NY MA RI CT NJ PA MD DE

MN

MO MD

OH

IN

AR

VA NC

TN MS AL

TX

WV

KY

SC GA

LA FL

HI

PR

* With the exception of Alabama, each state coded in blue has blocked portions of its law, including the “papers please” provision. In Alabama, however, other provisions were blocked while the “papers please” provision remains.

2011 Highlights Fighting Anti-Immigrant Legislation. After the passage of SB 1070, Arizona’s anti-Latino, anti-immigrant law, many states sought to imitate the state and its extreme measures. In combating this legislation, NCLR joined a boycott of Arizona which resulted in $750 million in losses to the state. Through its Affiliate Network and partners, NCLR is working with advocates to educate the Latino community about state and local copycat laws and seeking to bring about the best possible policy outcome. In a number of states, such as Virginia and Texas, NCLR worked with Affiliates to defeat anti-immigrant initiatives. NCLR has published tool kits for advocates and legislators to combat these bills, as well as two major reports on the negative impact of state-level anti-immigrant legislation. In Alabama, where the nation’s most punitive immigration law was signed into law in June 2011, NCLR has been working closely with

its Affiliate, the Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (¡HICA!), to respond to the crisis created by the enactment of HB 56. Advocating for Immigrants and Their Families. NCLR’s continued advocacy on behalf of undocumented immigrants and their families contributed to several important announcements from the Obama administration. Chief among them is the Department of Homeland Security’s intention to review deportations on a case-by-case basis, focusing on serious criminals. NCLR has been working to get the information to the Latino community through the media, as well as bringing Affiliates together with administration officials to discuss concerns about how immigration policies are affecting communities and the changes that are needed. 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 23


ADVOCACY & EMPOWERMENT Advocacy, civic engagement, and community-based support are essential parts of any community empowerment strategy. NCLR strengthens Latino participation in the political process through its various civic engagement projects and by building the advocacy capacity of its Affiliate Network of community-based organizations. With the acquisition of Democracia U.S.A. in 2011, NCLR is now one of the largest Latino voter registration organizations in the country.

2011 Highlights Emerging Latino Communities (ELC) Initiative. ELC combines training and technical assistance to strengthen organizations in areas where the Hispanic population has experienced rapid growth, but lack infrastructure to support the community. In 2011, NCLR awarded $100,000 in subgrants to eight organizations in eight states through the ELC program.

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

NCLR Latino Leadership Institute. This is a new component in NCLR’s strategy to build the advocacy capacity of its Affiliate Network; it is a five-day training program that teaches campaign strategy, issue development, base-building, and advocacy skills, and focuses on deepening Affiliates’ understanding of the forces affecting their communities. NCLR conducted the inaugural session with 20 staff members from 12 California Affiliates.

California Affiliate Capacity-Building Initiative. As part of NCLR’s project to increase the civic engagement of its California network, 33 California Affiliates actively participate in committees focused on advocacy. In 2011, 332 people representing 22 Affiliates participated in NCLR’s California Latino Advocacy Day. These efforts contributed to important policy reforms, including passage of the California Dream Act, which extends affordable education to more than 2,500 Californians each year.

We Will Not Forget. On the heels of the failed vote on the “Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act,” NCLR launched We Will Not Forget, a campaign to report how Congress voted. The ad produced for the campaign was the most downloaded document from NCLR’s website in 2011, with 37,852 downloads in Spanish and English. It ran in a selection of Spanishlanguage newspapers and was promoted through Facebook ads.

NCLR National Latino Advocacy Days. Representing more than 100 organizations, 350 Latino advocates came to Washington, DC to participate in the 2011 NCLR National Latino Advocacy Days. They conducted more than 130 legislative visits on Capitol Hill to urge members of Congress to find real solutions to issues affecting Hispanics.

24 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

NATIONAL CAMPAIGNS

Online Advocacy. NCLR’s online action network generated a record 30,157 actions from 42 advocacy campaigns. The efforts focused on the federal budget; threats to cut WIC, Pell Grants, and Medicaid; housing counseling funding and wrongful foreclosures; and anti-immigrant legislation and attacks on the 14th Amendment. In addition, the mobile action network grew from 3,322 to 7,048 members.


IMAGE: Registering voters at NCLR Affiliate, Hispanic Women’s Organization of Arkansas

9.7 million Latinos voted in the 2008 general election, an increase of 29% from the 2004 general election. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Decennial Census. 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 25


IMAGES LEFT TO RIGHT: NCLR National Latino Family Expo ribbon-cutting ceremony; NCLR ALMA Award

Reflecting on an amazing #NCLRconf experience. What a wonderful gathering of brave, fabulous, brilliant, and gorgeous people. I'm hooked! —One of nearly three million Twitter users reached during the 2011 NCLR Annual Conference 26 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT


SPECIAL EVENTS NCLR’s Integrated Marketing and Events (IME) team plans events that highlight the institution and its partnerships, programs, and Affiliate Network. NCLR’s key partners—which include Fortune 500 companies, foundations, philanthropists, community organizations, media entities, nonprofit organizations, national leaders, and newsmakers—come together to further improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. Composed of experts in events, marketing and communications, fundraising, and graphic design and publications, the IME team helps generate unrestricted revenue for the entire organization.

2011 Highlights NCLR Capital Awards. Each year, NCLR recognizes members of Congress from both sides of the aisle for their support of public policies that include and engage Hispanic Americans. In 2011, the black-tie gala at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC honored Representative Barney Frank (D–MA) and Representative Mario Diaz-Balart (R–FL), while the Capital Award for Public Service went to the band Ozomatli for its work in engaging the Latino community to vote, as well as its participation in the Vote for Respect campaign. NCLR Annual Conference. The 2011 NCLR Annual Conference took place in the heart of Washington, DC at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, July 23–26. Fifty-seven workshops were offered, along with four town halls and various networking events. Select Conference events were live-streamed to more than 14,000 viewers, including the Monday Luncheon keynote address delivered by President Barack Obama, during which he discussed the Latino community and its role in advocating for continued change. Arianna Huffington, President and Editor-in-Chief of the Huffington Post Media Group, was live-streamed during the Latinas Brunch, where she discussed her immigrant experience and personal successes. NCLR marked a series of firsts at the 2011 Annual Conference as it unveiled its official mobile app for smartphone devices and launched its first partnerships with media entities such as The Washington Post and Twitter.

NCLR National Latino Family Expo®. Held in conjunction with the Annual Conference, the National Latino Family Expo brought together thousands of attendees for vision, glucose, HIV, kidney, and COPD screenings, healthy cooking demonstrations, a fashion show, musical performances, appearances by beloved children’s characters, and more. The Diversity Career Fair hosted 26 exhibitors and brought in more than 1,000 attendees, while Eva Longoria hosted a book-signing for her new cookbook. NCLR ALMA Awards®. The NCLR ALMA Awards originally began in 1995 to promote the fair and positive portrayal of Latinos in the media arts such as film, television, and music. These awards honor artists for their outstanding achievements in various fields, helping enhance the Hispanic image. This year, with NBCUniversal as the new broadcast partner and the continued support of PepsiCo, the ALMA Awards achieved a 60% viewer increase. The show also strengthened its influence through integral partnerships with Telemundo.com and Mun2, as well as social media.


OUR FUNDERS Visionaries from American corporations and leading foundations recognize the Hispanic community’s ever-increasing economic impact. They also value NCLR’s mission, work, credibility, and passion for improving opportunities for Hispanics throughout the country. Whether providing financial support at the national level or direct involvement at the community level, NCLR funders make a difference. Their investment in America’s Latinos is an investment in America’s prosperity.

$5,000 AND ABOVE

Bipartisan Policy Center

ConAgra Foods Foundation

AARP Foundation

Birth to Five Policy Alliance

ConAgra Foods, Inc.

Alliance for a Better Community The Allstate Foundation Alzheimer’s Association American Airlines American Federation of Teachers American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Amgen Amtrak Anheuser-Busch The Annie E. Casey Foundation

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Corporation for National and Community Service The Boeing Company BP America

Cox Enterprises

Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation through Peers for Progress, American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation

Darden Restaurants Diageo NA

Burlington Coat Factory

Eli Lilly and Company

Caesars Entertainment The California Endowment California Forward

Arbitron Inc.

California State University, Long Beach (CSULB)

AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals

Center for American Progress

The Atlantic Philanthropies

CenturyLink, Inc.

AT&T

Charles Stewart Mott Foundation

Bank of America

Chevron

Bank of America Foundation

Citi

Baxter

The Coca-Cola Company

BBVA Compass

The College Board

Best Buy Co. Inc.

Comcast Corporation

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Comcast Foundation

28 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

Eastman Kodak Company Enterprise Rent-A-Car Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund Fannie Mae Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation FedEx Corporation The Ford Foundation Ford Motor Company Four Freedoms Fund, Public Interest Projects Freddie Mac Fundación Banco Popular GEICO Insurance Company General Mills, Inc. General Motors


The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company

Nationwide Insurance

Time Warner Cable

Google

Time Warner Inc.

Hyundai Motor America

NBCUniversal & Telemundo NeighborWorks America— National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling Program, Loan Scam Alert Campaign, and Emergency Homeowners’ Loan Program

Interlex Communications, Inc.

The Nielsen Company

The UPS Foundation

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Nissan North America, Inc.

jcpenney

Ocwen Financial Corporation

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—Centers for Disease Control

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Open Society Foundations

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Peace Corps

Hilton Hotels Corporation Humana Hyatt Hotels Corporation

Johnson & Johnson The Joyce Foundation JPMorgan Chase & Co. Kellogg Company Kraft Foods Levi Strauss Foundation Lowe’s Companies, Inc. Macy’s Marathon Oil Company Marguerite Casey Foundation Marriott International, Inc. McDonald’s Corporation MetLife Auto & Home MetLife Foundation MGM Resorts International Microsoft Corporation MillerCoors LLC Morgan Stanley Smith Barney The Nathan Cummings Foundation National Academy of Social Insurance National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute

Patton Boggs LLP PepsiCo, Inc. Pfizer Helpful Answers Praxair, Inc. J.B. and M.K. Pritzker Family Foundation The Procter & Gamble Co. Progress Energy Prudential Raza Development Fund Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) República Robert Wood Johnson Foundation The Rockefeller Foundation Service Employees International Union (SEIU) ServiceMaster

The TJX Companies, Inc. TOYOTA TracFone Wireless, Inc. UPS

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—Health Resources and Services Administration U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—Office of Minority Health U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development—Mortgage Modification and Mortgage Scam Assistance U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Department of Labor UnitedHealthcare University of Phoenix Univision Communications Inc. Verizon Walmart The Walt Disney Company Wells Fargo Western Union W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Shell Sodexo, Inc. Southwest Airlines Co. Sprint Nextel Corporation Starbucks Coffee Company State Farm Insurance Companies

For more information, please visit www.nclr.org/SupportUs or contact the Resource Development team at friends@nclr.org.

Target Corporation 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 29


INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTORS Our familia of individual donors sustains the very core of NCLR, and their donations allow us to quickly and effectively address the most pressing issues faced by the Hispanic community. We extend a heartfelt thank-you to all of our individual donors who make monthly, quarterly, or annual contributions to support our work. Our major donors provide the vision and resources that allow NCLR to thrive, and their generosity has been critical to the successes outlined in this report. PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL Advisors $10,000–$24,999 Anonymous Cesar Alvarez Russell C. Deyo Ingrid Duran and Catherine Pino Monica Lozano and David Ayón Jim and Alice Padilla Jeffrey Urbina and Gaye Lynn Hill

Executives $5,000–$9,999 John and Minerva Esquivel Ramón and Sally Murguía Robert Ontiveros Hector, Norma, and Andrew Orcí Cid D. Wilson

Leaders $2,500–$4,999 Felix E. DeHerrera Dr. John Diaz Octavio N. Espinal* and Eric O. Meyer Fred Fernandez and Irma Rodriguez Deborah Hevia Richard C. Miller and Linda Miller Janet Murguía* Gene and Monica Ortega Isabel M. Valdés and Family Anselmo and Elvira Villarreal

Advocates $1,000–$2,499 Anonymous Julie Castro Abrams Fuad and Debbie Abuabara Felipe E. Agredano-Lozano, MTS Nelson Albareda 30 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

Dalia and Blanca Almanza Audrey R. Alvarado, Ph.D. and Katie Loughary Aida Alvarez Liany Arroyo* and Jesse Mejia Andrea Bazán Cornell and Melissa Boggs Kathryn Brown Luis Burgos Linda Cabral Maria Elena Campisteguy and Metropolitan Group Jovita Carranza Alcario and Carmen Castellano Martin R. Castro Tom and Jacqui Castro Filiberto Cavazos Gus and Victoria Chavez David and Rhonda Cohen Susan Colby Pelayo and Donna Coll Roy Cosme Dino J. DeConcini and Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini Delia de la Vara* Jaime Atanacio Diaz Lautaro “Lot” Diaz* Romulo L. Diaz, Jr. Rita DiMartino Carla Giovannetti Dodds Dorene Dominguez Darcy M. Eischens* Anthony Eredia and Diana Bermudez Tommy and Elvira Espinoza Ron Estrada* and Roxana Estrada Flor de Maria Flores and Family Mareth Flores de Francis* Thomas R. “Tom” Flores Joe Formusa Maricela Monterrubio Gallegos Juan M. Garcia Beatrice G. Garza

Ruben Gonzales* and Joaquin Tamayo Leni Gonzalez J.C. and Deborah Gonzalez-Mendez Zac and Sarajane Guevara Jaime and Linda Gutierrez Sonia Gutierrez Frank and Cecilia Herrera JoAnn Holland Delia Ibarra Mickey Ibarra Antonia Lopez* Monika Mantilla Tom Mars Arabella Martinez and David B. Carlson Eduardo Martinez Dr. Herminio Martinez Leroy V. Martinez* Lupe Martinez Ruben, Annette, and Andréa Martinez Jessica Mayorga* and Dr. Hector Rivera Emily Gantz McKay The Mills Family Foundation Elba Montalvo Alma Rosa Montanez Dave Montez and Stephan Hampton Cynthia Morales William Moreno, III George Muñoz

For more information, please visit www.nclr.org/SupportUs or contact the Resource Development team at friends@nclr.org.


Lisa Navarrete* James and Kimberly Norman Ricardo Oquendo Daniel R. Ortega, Jr. Felix W. Ortiz III Pete Perez Sonia Pérez* and Luis Duany Maria and David Pesqueira Jorge Plasencia Delia Pompa* Elizabeth Provencio Maria S. Quezada Carmen Ramirez Michael Ramirez Oscar T. Ramirez Athena Ramos Mario Reyna Eric Rodriguez* and Ilia Rodriguez Maria E. Rosa Russell D. Roybal Art Ruiz Nilda Ruiz and Sasha Singh Tony Salazar and Denise De La Rosa Dr. Dennis Sanchez and Virginia Sanchez El Presidente of Southwest Key Programs, Inc. Mark and Lucia Savage Renata Soto and Pete Wooten William and Susan E. Soza Jaime Suarez Deborah Szekely Andres and Lori Tapia Sharon Taylor Kenneth I. Trujillo Hon. Arturo Valenzuela Gilbert R. Vasquez, CPA Carmen Velásquez José and Jennifer Velázquez Victoria Villalba Salvador and Ana Villar José H. Villarreal George Walz Peter Wilkins Alex Wilson and Alan Abramson Dr. Tamar Diana Wilson Howard Woolley Carole Young Raul Yzaguirre

FOUNDERS’ CIRCLE $250–$999 Anonymous Natalie Abatemarco Danilo Aranaga

Ramiro Atristain Jacqueline Bacher Zulma X. Barrios Marvin Bellin Diana Lopez Blanks Deydra Bordoy-Pacheco Christiaan Brown Margarita Bruther John Brydels Eddy Casaus Manuel Castaneda Angel and Isabel Chavez Mary Alice Cisneros Laura Arce Cloutier Barbara Cooper Michael Corrigan Irma Cota Marco Davis Elisa de la Vara Georgette Dixon E.B. Duarte Elias Family Philanthropic Fund Robert Ellis Maria Esteves Samantha Irene Ferm* Sandy Fernandez Maria C. Fernandez-Greczmiel David Field Kasper A. Francis Rosina Franco Andrew Gamboa Elsa Garcia Lino Garcia David Gleason Fernando and Susan Godinez Dolores Gomez* Jimmie Gonzalez Victoria Gonzalez Tito Guerrero, III Pastor Herrera, Jr. Kristin Holm Dan Honeycutt Enrique Jimenez Mayra and Brice Kirkendall-Rodriguez Raul Lazarte, M.D. Armando Lopez Carlos Lopez Romulo and Roseanne Lopez Christian Lozano Ignacio Lozano Ray and Sylvia Lucero Jose Lugaro Maria Madocks Gilbert H. Martinez, Sr.

* An asterisk denotes NCLR staff members who have made a personal contribution. We are truly grateful for their generosity and commitment to NCLR.

OUR FUNDERS

John Martinez Serena Maurer Danielle Montes Frime Realty Mauro Morales David Raul Morin Irma Morin Cecilia Muñoz Mary Helen Murguía Jesus R. Muro, M.D. Joel Najar Anthony Nidea Family Diego Osuna Lupe Pearce Bruce Pietrykowski Luis and Ana Pons Christopher C. Pulido* Arturas Rainys Helen Ramirez Robert A. Rapoza David and Mildred Reyes Monica Richart Vanessa Rini-Lopez Jessica Rivera Fernando Robledo Clara Rodriguez Giovanni Rodriguez Jose G. Rodriguez Jose R. Rodriguez Frank Ros Nelson Rosario Freddy and Isabel Rubio Georgina Salguero* Patricia Sanchez Susan Santana Drs. Elena O. and Fernando F. Segovia Theodore and Mischelle Serr Christine Sierra, Ph.D Samuel Skrivan Jim Slattery Drew Smith* Monica H. Smith Fernando Soto Jaime Suarez Maria Tapia-Belsito Fania Tavarez* J. Walter Tejada Sidney Townsend and Carlos Ramirez Townsend Francisco and Janet Vasquez Dimas Villarreal, Jr. Randall Welch Lupe Williams Raquel Ybarra

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 31


FINANCIAL SUMMARY For more than 40 years, NCLR has worked to elevate the Hispanic American social, political, and economic status. Over the next several decades, the size of the community is projected to nearly double and will form one-third of the American workforce by 2050. Simply put, if our nation’s future is to be prosperous, Latinos must thrive in school and the workplace. NCLR’s mission has remained constant since its founding, yet we have adapted to the rapidly changing demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic realities of American Latinos—and to the ever-shifting economic realities of the nation. We have been successful thanks to the financial support of individuals, corporations, and foundations that share in our vision.

2011 Highlights Program Maximization. NCLR spearheads efforts from its national, regional, and state operations in direct collaboration with its network of nearly 300 community-based Affiliates. This approach ensures that NCLR makes the greatest possible impact through wise resource management and streamlined expenses. NCLR is proud of its proven track record of financial health. In 2011, NCLR allocated 92% of its total expenses directly to community programs. The remaining expenditures funded advocacy and administrative activities and are continually analyzed for financial efficiency. NCLR’s fiscal responsibility, accountability, and transparency have been commended by Charity Navigator, America’s premier independent charity evaluator. It has bestowed NCLR with its highest 4-star rating for three consecutive years, indicating that the organization “Exceeds industry standards and outperforms most charities in its Cause.” Direct Funding. In 2011, NCLR allocated 70% of all of its subgrants totaling $7. 2 million directly to its Affiliate Network.

32 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

These grassroots organizations reach all pockets of the Hispanic community and facilitate NCLR’s mission at the local level. Distribution of grants and subgrants through this infrastructure has empowered NCLR to improve education programs, job training, financial counseling, health services, and more. Investments in Our Future. NCLR is uniquely positioned to strengthen the lives of America’s Latinos, but we need your help. Progress relies on generous support from business, individual, and foundation partners. Together, we can improve the lives of the nation’s 50.5 million Latinos and ensure a prosperous national future. Please visit our website to view the options available to fit your philanthropic goals.

Take an active role in ensuring a prosperous America. Visit www.nclr.org/SupportUs or contact us directly at (202) 776-1750.


IMAGE: Students at NCLR Affiliate, East Austin College Prep Academy

NCLR EXPENSES

NCLR SUBGRANTS TO AFFILIATES

Program/Support Ratio

(2011)

45 40

General Support Expenses

35

Program Expenses

$ Millions

30 25 20 15

93%

87%

92%

Program expenses as defined by the audited statements, which include all programs and mission support.

Other Program Expenses

30%

Subgrants to Affiliates

70%

In 2011, 70% of all NCLR subgrants were made to Affiliates, totaling $7.2 million.

10 5 0

FY 2009

FY 2010

FY 2011

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 33


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITY

Year ended September 30, 2011*

UNRESTRICTED

TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED

PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED

TOTAL

Federal Nonfederal

$9,847,498 1,900,000

$18,534,029

$ -

$9,847,498 20,434,029

Total Grants

11,747,498

18,534,029

-

30,281,527

967,500 8,265,568 306,101 453,659 (44,152) 3,996,767 1,206,063 19,693,060 34,844,566 $46,592,064

1,342 75,381 (19,693,060) (19,616,337) $(1,082,308)

$ -

967,500 8,265,568 1,342 306,101 453,659 31,229 3,996,767 1,206,063 15,228,229 $45,509,756

6,484,050 7,959,056 3,838,566 7,511,397 1,759,421 7,446,015 423,897 767,665 2,103,187 4,030,081 (963,710)

-

-

6,484,050 7,959,056 3,838,566 7,511,397 1,759,421 7,446,015 423,897 767,665 2,103,187 4,030,081 (963,710)

41,359,625

-

-

41,359,625

2,015,237

-

-

2,015,237

760,710 44,662 181,373 1,259,091 661,272

-

-

760,710 44,662 181,373 1,259,091 661,272

  SUPPORT AND REVENUE Grants

Contributions and Other Revenue Corporations and Foundations Special Events Capital Campaign Contributions Associate Member Dues Other Contributions Investment and Interest Return Interest and Fee Income on Loans Other Revenue Net Assets Released from Restrictions Total Contributions and Other Revenue Total Support and Revenue EXPENSES Program Services CORE and ORAL Community Development and Fellowship Program Center for Educational Excellence Integrated Marketing and Events Institute for Hispanic Health Research and Strategic Initiatives Legislative Advocacy Mission Democracia U.S.A. Raza Development Fund—Program Operations Raza Development Fund—Loan Loss Reserve Total Program Services Supporting Services Management and General Fundraising: General Fundraising Endowment/Capital Campaign Membership Marketing Raza Development Fund—Administration Strategic Investment Fund Governance Total Supporting Services Total Expenses Change in Net Assets Net Assets, Beginning of the Year Net Assets, End of Year

4,922,345

-

-

4,922,345

$46,281,970

-

-

$46,281,970

310,094 37,098,001

(1,082,308) 59,350,542

1,500,000

(772,214) 97,948,543

$37,408,095

$58,268,234

$1,500,000

$97,176,329

*Audited The complete audited financial statements prepared by BDO Seidman, LLC may be obtained by calling Johanna Greene, NCLR Controller, at (202) 776-1711.

34 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION

September 30, 2011 and 2010* September 30,

2011

2010

$35,736,213 40,000 1,889,589 9,011,384 12,309,866 712,902 14,041,630 144,049

$36,843,995 100,000 782,790 10,227,126 19,169,498 11,029 15,318,500 161,829

Total Current Assets

73,885,633

82,614,767

Noncurrent Assets Investments Long-Term Loans Receivables, Net Property and Equipment, Net Long-Term Capital Campaign Receivables, Net Long-Term Contract, Grant, and Other Receivables, Net Due from Hogar Hispano, Inc.—Related Party Assets Designated to Fund Deferred Compensation Other Total Noncurrent Assets

31,103,811 47,592,120 2,021,702 1,244,472 8,137,674 212,239 213,767 90,525,785

32,641,452 33,822,124 2,158,551 58,658 845,706 8,289,004 223,445 254,353 78,293,293

ASSETS Current Assets Cash and Cash Equivalents Current Portion of Capital Campaign Receivables, Net Special Events Receivables Current Portion of Contract, Grant, and Other Receivables, Net Current Portion of Loans Receivables, Net Due from Hogar Hispano, Inc.—Related Party Restricted Investments Other

Total Assets

$164,411,418

$160,908,060

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Accounts Payable Accrued Expenses Accrued Interest Expenses Deferred Revenue Committed Grants Pledges Held in Trust Current Portion of Notes Payable Total Current Liabilities

4,370,004 2,505,425 64,396 3,917,725 161,000 104,300 1,700,000 12,822,850

2,632,148 1,958,256 85,863 1,672,523 161,000 326,282 6,836,072

Noncurrent Liabilities Long-Term Notes Payable Long-Term Deferred Compensation Liability

54,200,000 212,239

55,900,000 223,445

Total Noncurrent Liabilities Total Liabilities COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES Net Assets Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted Total Net Assets Total Liabilities and Net Assets

54,412,239

56,123,445

$67,235,089

$62,959,517

37,408,095 58,268,234 1,500,000 97,176,329

37,098,001 59,350,542 1,500,000 97,948,543

$164,411,418

$160,908,060

*Audited The complete audited financial statements prepared by BDO Seidman, LLC may be obtained by calling Johanna Greene, NCLR Controller, at (202) 776-1711.

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 35


IMAGE: President Barack Obama greets attendees of the 2011 NCLR Annual Conference

Can't wait for next year's #NCLRconf in Vegas! —Tweet from an @NCLR supporter MARK YOUR CALENDAR July 7–9, 2012 NCLR National Latino Family Expo® Las Vegas, NV

July 7–10, 2012

Fall 2012

March 6–7, 2013

NCLR ALMA Awards®

NCLR National Latino Advocacy Days

Stay tuned for broadcast information.

Washington, DC

www.almaawards.com

NCLR Annual Conference

March 5, 2013

Las Vegas, NV

NCLR Capital Awards Washington, DC

36 | 2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT

For details on these and other events, visit www.nclr.org.


LEAD THE WAY CEO CABINET

LEADERSHIP TEAM

JANET MURGUÍA

SONIA M. PÉREZ

RON ESTRADA

DELIA DE LA VARA

President and Chief Executive Officer

Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives

Vice President, Integrated Marketing and Events

Vice President, California Region

CHARLES KAMASAKI

DELIA POMPA

ERIC RODRIGUEZ

Executive Vice President

Senior Vice President, Programs

Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation

Vice President, Housing and Community Development

HOLLY BLANCHARD Chief Financial Officer

LAUTARO “LOT” DIAZ

RUBEN J. GONZALES Deputy Vice President, Resource Development

OFFICES AND OPERATIONS Headquarters

Regional Offices

State Operations

Support Corporation

Washington, DC

California (Los Angeles)

Colorado

Raza Development Fund (Phoenix)

Far West (Phoenix)

Florida

Midwest (Chicago)

Nevada

Northeast (New York) Texas (San Antonio)

SELECT PUBLICATIONS The titles below represent just a sampling of publications from 2011. You can find these materials and more at www.nclr.org. 2010 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book ¿A Dónde Vamos? Directions for Culturally Relevant Latino Community Involvement in HIV/AIDS Prevention and Services Research Access to Common Standards for All: An Advocacy Tool Kit for Supporting Success

Bringing Opportunity Home: A Latino Public Policy Agenda for the 112th Congress Comer Bien: The Challenges of Nourishing Latino Children and Families Core Qualities for Successful Early Childhood Education Programs: Exemplars of Best Practices Counting Latino Youth in the Illinois Juvenile Justice System

Culturally Relevant Service-Learning Tool Kit

Preschool Education: Delivering on the Promise for Latino Children

Engaging the Latino Electorate

Seleccion Sana, Vida Saludable

Nationwide Growth in the Latino Population Is a Boon for the Country

Speaking Out: Latino Youth on Discrimination in the United States

Niños en Forma, Comunidad Saludable Plugged In: Positive Development Strategies for Disconnected Latino Youth

The Wrong Approach: State AntiImmigration Legislation in 2011 We Needed the Work: Latino Worker Voices in the New Economy

2011 NCLR ANNUAL REPORT | 37


4,500 LETTERS SENT TO CONGRESS TO PROTECT MEDICAID • 10,600+ SIGNATURES SENT TO CALL FROM LOSING CHILD TAX CREDIT • 9,000+ YOUTH ENGAGED WITH NCLR LÍDERES INITIATIVE • 50. MORE THAN 100 ORGANIZATIONS AT NATIONAL LATINO ADVOCACY DAYS • 9.7 MILLION LATINOS VO OF A STRONG DIRECTOR FOR THE CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU • 64,000 FAMILIES • 30% OF THE POPULATION PROJECTED TO BE HISPANIC IN 2050 • 16% OF ALL NEWLY ENLISTED ION PROJECTS • 3,000 LATINOS REACHED WITH CULTURALLY COMPETENT HEALTH EDUCATION • 3 A STRONG DIRECTOR FOR THE CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU • 16% OF ALL NEWL ULATION PROJECTED TO BE HISPANIC IN 2050 • 4,500 LETTERS SENT TO CONGRESS TO PROTECT CREDIT • 50.5 MILLION LATINOS IN AMERICA • 10,600+ SIGNATURES SENT TO CALL FOR AN END TO PROJECTS • 3,000 LATINOS REACHED WITH CULTURALLY COMPETENT HEALTH EDUCATION • 64,00 THAN 100 ORGANIZATIONS AT NATIONAL LATINO ADVOCACY DAYS • 9.7 MILLION LATINOS VOTED IN • 10,600+ SIGNATURES SENT TO CALL FOR AN END TO THE HOUSING CRISIS • 5,646 LETTERS SEN WITH NCLR LÍDERES INITIATIVE • 50.5 MILLION LATINOS IN AMERICA • 30,000 FANS ON TWITT ADVOCACY DAYS • 9.7 MILLION LATINOS VOTED IN THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION • 7,813 LETTE PROTECTION BUREAU • 64,000 FAMILIES SERVED THROUGH NCLR’S HOMEOWNERSHIP NETWORK • 1 • 16% OF ALL NEWLY ENLISTED MILITARY ARE HISPANIC • 10,000 BENEFITTED FROM AMERICO COMPETENT HEALTH EDUCATION • 30,000 FANS ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK • 7,813 LETTERS S PROTECTION BUREAU • 16% OF ALL NEWLY ENLISTED MILITARY ARE HISPANIC • 1 IN 4 AMERICAN K SENT TO CONGRESS TO PROTECT MEDICAID • 5,646 LETTERS SENT TO SENATE TO PROTECT CHILD SENT TO CALL FOR AN END TO THE HOUSING CRISIS • 10,000 BENEFITTED FROM AMERICORPS BEA HEALTH EDUCATION • 64,000 FAMILIES SERVED THROUGH NCLR’S HOMEOWNERSHIP NETWORK 9.7 MILLION LATINOS VOTED IN THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION • 4,500 LETTERS SENT TO CONG CRISIS • 5,646 LETTERS SENT TO SENATE TO PROTECT CHILDREN FROM LOSING CHILD TAX CRED 30,000 FANS ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK • 350 PEOPLE FROM MORE THAN 100 ORGANIZATIONS ELECTION • 7,813 LETTERS SENT TO SUPPORT THE NOMINATION OF A STRONG DIRECTOR FOR T NCLR’S HOMEOWNERSHIP NETWORK • 1 IN 4 AMERICAN KIDS ARE HISPANIC • 30% OF THE POPULA 10,000 BENEFITTED FROM AMERICORPS BEAUTIFICATION AND EDUCATION PROJECTS • 3,000 LA CONGRESS TO PROTECT MEDICAID • 10,600+ SIGNATURES SENT TO CALL FOR AN END TO THE HOU CREDIT • 9,000+ YOUTH ENGAGED WITH NCLR LÍDERES INITIATIVE • 50.5 MILLION LATINOS IN AMERI AT NATIONAL LATINO ADVOCACY DAYS • 9.7 MILLION LATINOS VOTED IN THE 2008 PRESIDENT


2011 NCLR Annual Report  

For nearly 45 years, NCLR has advocated equal opportunity for Hispanic Americans, with improvements in economic and political empowerment an...

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