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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday Aug. 10, 2017 Vol XXVIII Issue 32 northcoastjournal.com

‘Nibs’ and ‘The Taz’ The conflicting accounts of David Marcus’ professional life By Thadeus Greenson

6 Stay off my lawn, Arkley 11 Happy prohibition day! 30 Babylon and weed collide at Reggae


2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents

Serious Felonies Cultivation/Drug Possession DUI/DMV Hearings Cannabis Business Compliance Domestic Violence Juvenile Delinquency Pre-Arrest Counseling

4 Mailbox 5 News PenAir No More

6

Guest Views Don’t Live in a Murder House

8 11

NCJ Daily Week in Weed Happy Birthday, Prohibition!

12

On The Cover ‘Nibs’ and ‘The Taz’

16 Home & Garden Service Directory

18 Table Talk The Best Thing Since Homemade Bread

20 Arts! Arcata Friday, August 11, 6-9 p.m.

21

Art Beat Seeds and Surfing

22 Humboldt Made Special Advertising Section

24 Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

28 The Setlist Get Close

29 Calendar 35 Filmland Fight and Flight

37 Workshops & Classes 41 Field Notes Ötzi the Iceman

41 Sudoku & Crossword 42 Classifieds

Aug. 10, 2017 • Volume XXVIII Issue 32 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2017

Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com

FREE CONSULTATION

General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Andy Powell Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Jillian Butolph, Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Eric Mueller, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Assistant Sarah Green sarah@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Becca Oliver becca@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager/Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com

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Mailbox

‘Gifted and Devoted’ Editor: I am writing to thank Linda Stansberry and North Coast Journal for their brilliant cover story about Humboldt Wildlife Care Center (“Oh, Mercy,” July 20). I have been a fan of HWCC since shortly after I moved to Eureka in 1989 and I think the article captures its “spirit” and “intention” very well. I was privileged to volunteer during the pelican crisis on the North Coast in 2012, and that was when I met Monte Merrick, founder of Bird Ally X, for the first time and saw him in action, along with his colleagues and volunteers. I cannot imagine a more gifted and devoted wildlife rehabilitator and organization. HWCC and Bird Ally X came together in 2014 and as “Oh, Mercy” points out, they have grown to where they are treating more than 1,000 of our local wild animal and migratory populations a year. They are “on call” 24/7 and open seven days a week. If you have ever called them upon finding an animal in distress, then you know it is an experience you will never forget. I would invite all who don’t know HWCC, to educate yourselves by going to its website (www.birdallyx.net/humboldt-wildlife-care-center-2) because you never know when you, your family or friends might be in need of its services. And because HWCC is “operating on a shoestring,” I would invite all readers to support this organization through donations and/or volunteering. It is both a gift and blessing for us and our wildlife that HWCC/Bird Ally X is here on the North Coast. Harry Blumenthal, Eureka

‘A Tissue of Illusions’ Editor: A footnote to Douglas George’s letter to the editor (Mailbox, Aug. 3) about the fiction of free will and how the mechanics

Terry Torgerson

of cognition prove it is an illusion. Isaiah Berlin, the late Russian-British polymath and philosopher of intellectual history, wrote in his famous essay about Tolstoy that freedom is real but it is confined to trivial acts, like nodding one’s head or choosing a brand of toothpaste. Other than these petty undertakings, man is the animal who deceives himself. As Mr. George noted, echoing Gautama Buddha, man lives in, for and by illusion. His consciousness is a tissue of illusions. All of us are part of an inexorable stream, a protean existence at the center of which lie terror and mystery; thus our metaphysical anxieties about the limitlessness of time and space. These unbearable anxieties are relieved

by illusions completely beyond our conscious control and therefore beyond volition. The illusion of free will, like the illusions of romance, natural rights, the resurrection of the body, patriotism and God are the ineluctable results of human megalomania, our soaring hubris and mountainous vanity. Yes, the superstition of free will, like the superstition of God, is a necessity in the interests of law, the courts and social cohesion until at last humankind grows up and frees itself from superstition (not likely). In the meantime, as George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans) wrote in Middlemarch, “Chance has an empire which reduces choice to a fool’s illusion.”

Even if free will existed, it would be wiped out by chance, accident, chaos and entropy. All men are fools. Socrates is a man. Socrates is a fool. He had the virtue of knowing he was. Paul Mann, McKinleyville

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●

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News

PenAir No More

Airline abruptly drops Humboldt service, declares bankruptcy By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

A

bout 18 months after arriving in Humboldt County amid much fanfare, PenAir sent out a press release shortly before 7 p.m. on Aug. 7 announcing it was shuttering its route from Arcata/Eureka to Portland. Some 72 hours later, its last plane had departed the airport in McKinleyville and the airline had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, looking to end its flights into and out of Crescent City. “The steps we are taking today will allow PenAir to emerge as a stronger airline, while continuing to focus on safe operations,” PenAir CEO and Chair Danny Sybert says in a press release. The move leaves United, once again, as the last airline standing in Humboldt County, limiting the routes and schedules available to customers, and potentially driving up costs. It will, however, have little impact on the local workforce, as PenAir spokesperson Missy Roberts says the company only has one local employee — a longtime PenAir staffer who will have the option of relocating with the company — and contracts others through SkyWest, which has indicated it doesn’t expect any staffing changes stemming from PenAir’s decision. The stakes are substantially higher up in Crescent City, where PenAir is the only

airline service, offering a pair of daily roundtrip flights to Portland. But the small Del Norte County airport also has more protections, as it has the federal distinction of being an “Essential Air Service” airport. That means PenAir can’t pull up shop until it gets federal approval and another airline has agreed to service the airport, a process which typically takes at least 90 days. Del Norte County Airport Director Matthew Leitner says he expects the Department of Transportation will soon issue a request for proposals to all air carriers in the nation, seeking bids to take over Del Norte’s air service. The airport’s EAS status means its airlines get federal subsidies to service the market, which makes it a sought after contract for most airlines. The subsidies come from foreign overflight fees, or tariffs placed on foreign flights that pass over U.S. airspace — like, say, a flight from Havana to Toronto. The whole idea, according to Leitner, is to ensure that markets that need airport service due to their geographic isolation get it at an affordable cost. Unfortunately for Humboldt County, we don’t have that designation and there’s no guarantee — and possibly only limited optimism — that an airline will step in and take PenAir’s place. The good news is that Humboldt still has a pot of cash aimed at

luring another carrier. The shuttering of the route represents a relatively stunning turn of events for PenAir, which opened it without demanding a minimum revenue guarantee — the promised revenues that airports in small areas generally offer to airlines in case the companies are unable to fill seats as projected. While that move may represent a bit of irrational confidence on the part of the airline — a local official estimated it costs at least $8 million to start a new route in a new market — it also means Humboldt County still has some money to try to leverage into a replacement option. The group Fly Humboldt has raised more than $1 million in funds to offer minimum revenue guarantees, launch marketing efforts and make improvements intended to recruit new air service options locally. Because that money wasn’t spent on PenAir, it’s still available. Emily Jacobs, program coordinator for the county’s aviation division, says efforts to recruit another airline to Humboldt never stopped and remain ongoing. “We’re always interested in more flights to more destinations,” she says. “We’ve already been in contact and talking with airlines, and will be meeting with some in October.” But for the time being, those going

commercially airborne out of Humboldt will do so on United flights to San Francisco. And that has a bit of a potentially reverberating impact, from the airport’s grounds crew to Ramone’s, which recently opened a café there. Jacobs says United is adding another afternoon flight to San Francisco — sporadically this month and then daily in September — which will fortunately help offset the loss of PenAir. For those holding a PenAir ticket out of Arcata/Eureka, they’ll have to make other arrangements — either getting the purchase refunded or trying to channel their itinerary through Crescent City and making the hour-plus drive north. (Ticket holders can call (800) 448-4226 to explore their options.) PenAir, meanwhile, will continue operations in eight destinations in the Alaska and Boston areas, presumably because they remain profitable, as it enters bankruptcy proceedings and looks to reorganize as a company. Founded in 1955, PenAir is one of the largest family-owned airlines in the United States, with 700 employees nationwide. l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Guest Views

Don’t Live in a Murder House Returning Indian Island is good for all of us By Cutcha Risling Baldy newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

In March of 2014, a vigil crowd gathered on Woodley Island to mourn and remember the Wiyot people massacred on Indian Island in February 1860. File

ast week on Facebook I came across a post from the Wiyot Tribe in which it tagged my friend Rachel Sundberg. The tribe was thanking her for helping members learn about cultural protocols, dance regalia and continuing ceremonial practices. The Wiyot children in the photos were happy and in one photo a young girl was wearing a dress that I recognized, a dress that was worn by Wiyot tribal member Michelle Hernandez in 2014 when the Wiyot did their first women’s coming-of-age ceremony in more than 100 years. I must start here. Because most people would start on Feb. 26, 1864, when Humboldt County citizens massacred more than 150 Wiyot people who had just finished their World Renewal Ceremony. Humboldt County citizens came with hatchets and knives. They murdered mostly Indian women and children. That was the last time the Wiyot performed a World Renewal Ceremony on Tuluwat (what became known as “Indian Island”). I don’t want to start there. Because the Wiyot are so much more than the massacring of their people. They have not only survived, they have thrived and they continue to restore and revitalize. In 2014 they brought back their women’s coming-of-age ceremony and then they revitalized their World Renewal Ceremony on Tuluwat. The city of Eureka has been working with the Wiyot for the return of Indian Island for a few years. The Wiyot Tribe purchased some of the island in 2000, which included an ancestral village. In 2006, the Eureka City Council voted to return another large part of the island to the Wiyot people. Then last week, Rob Arkley went on the KINS’s Radio TalkShop and aired his opinions on the return of Tuluwat, stating, “Well, I use Indian Island. I like it. My kids do. I see people there all the time when I’m

over there. I don’t get how they can take one of our assets and give it. So I’m going to be offering over the appraised value for the property and if I get it, giving it away as surplus property …” A day later he (and his wife) issued a follow-up statement, including things like: “Now we have offered to purchase Indian Island, but we do not want to own it. We would rather preserve it for the entire community.” And, “It is not our wish to deny the Wiyot Tribe access to sacred ceremonial grounds, or to their heritage, but to preserve the rights to the island for all citizens. It is a property with great historical significance and it belongs to all of us.” Look, we can go over the history of genocide in Humboldt County, the “deranged frontier” (as Jack Norton called it), the indiscriminate murder of Native people that founded this place, details like “Indian hunting days” and killing babies by stomping on their heads or cutting out their hearts. We can talk about how Native peoples were called “savage,” while murderers were called “settlers.” We can go over the statistics like the $1 million paid for the hunting and killing of Indians in the state of California and how everyday people traded in the scalps and heads of Indian people for money. We can talk about the day that I was in the archive and came across a picture of Humboldt County “legend” Seth Kinman, who is described as a “hunter and early settler of the Humboldt County region,” when, in fact, he was murdering psychopath who liked to pose for photos with Indian scalps. We could look at the Indian slave records in Humboldt County and talk about Native people who were sold into slavery in Old Town Eureka and how records show most of them were children. We can call into question why the names of roads in our towns are the names

L

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

of men who “settled” this place when settlement was not benign — it was depraved. We can reiterate that there are some families who benefited and continue to benefit from this violent history more than others; that Humboldt County’s wealthy landowners did not get their land legally — they stole it, taking over large areas where Native peoples were forced out, often through massacres or enslavement. We have no public memorials to the Native people who fought, bled, died and survived. In school, while children learn about a benign mission system, a prosperous gold rush and a “fair” rancho system, Native children grow up hearing about what their ancestors did to survive, because we want them to know: You are from a strong, enduring people. This water runs through you, this land has built you, and you will heal the community to heal the land, heal the land to heal the community. That’s right, I said “community.” When Native people are talking about healing and preservation, they aren’t just talking about building a better future for Indians, they are talking about building a better future for the earth. You live here, right? Earth? We need to find tangible ways to address the issues that we all still carry with us from this depraved history. How do we do that in a way that matters? How do we benefit for generations? It’s pretty simple: Return the land. Let the Wiyot decide how to move forward. You know why. Because it’s not “giving Indian Island away,” it’s returning it to the rightful owners. Let’s say that you have this beautiful house that your family has been in for generations. And one day your dad sits you down and says, “You are about to inherit our family house. FYI, for us to gain ownership of the house, we came in the middle of the night and murdered everyone who

lived here. And then it was ours. Also the extended family and descendants live just down the way. They sometimes come and hold vigils outside the house.” What do you do? Live in the murder house? It’s not yours. At some point, a really wealthy dude turns up (maybe his name rhymes with Cob Carkley) and he says, “I understand that you are thinking about giving your house back to the family of the people your ancestors murdered. How about I offer you double the price and you don’t give it back because I also want to use your house and my kids like it.” Seems legit. When I’ve offered versions of this example in class students have very clear reactions. (1) Don’t steal other people’s stuff. It’s wrong; (2) if you inherit or benefit from someone who stole other people’s stuff, you should do what you can to rectify that situation; (3) the easiest way to rectify that situation is to give the darn things back. It’s that simple. I’m trying to break it down into the simplest form but the truth is Tuluwat is much more than “stolen stuff.” Tuluwat is not being returned because the Wiyot “want” it, it is being returned because that is the right thing to do. For everyone. For the entire community. We are a part of the community, too, us Natives. Have been since the beginning of time. Will be. Always. The water runs through our veins. The land builds us. We pray for the health and well-being of all things, we sing, we dance, we heal the community to heal the land, we heal the land to heal the community. All of the community. Everything. Together. l Cutcha Risling Baldy is an assistant professor in Humboldt State University’s Native American Studies Department. A version of this piece appears on her blog at www.cutcharislingbaldy.com.


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From NCJ Daily

DOJ to Head Public Administrator Probe

A

n investigator from the California Department of Justice is expected to arrive in Eureka this week to take over an investigation into possible wrongdoing involving the management of estates overseen by the county’s Public Administrator’s Office. District Attorney Maggie Fleming says she was notified by phone Aug. 3 of the state’s decision to run the probe, which is looking into whether current and former county employees violated state law by purchasing cars and other items from the estates. “Other than answering any questions they may have, we will have no role in the investigation,” Fleming writes in an email to the Journal. “We will also have no involvement in charging decisions or any prosecution.” At the center of the investigation is a California Government Code section that makes it a misdemeanor for a public administrator and “any deputy or agent of such officer” to purchase estate items directly or indirectly, or to otherwise benefit from such a transaction. A representative in the DOJ’s press office declined to respond to any questions about the office’s role, saying that was necessary to protect the integrity of the case. The Public Administrator’s Office, which came under the Humboldt Sheriff’s Office oversight in 2015 with the merger of the coroner’s office, manages the assets of people who die without a will or someone to oversee their holdings. Their property — ranging from cars and houses to dishes and

Besties

fishing poles — is sold off by the office, with the proceeds going to any heirs. If there are none, the money is sent to the state. Suspected improprieties involving those sales — which appear to date back years — surfaced publicly in late June, when Sheriff William Honsal announced that he and Fleming were launching a joint inquiry after his office received a complaint and media inquiry about the practice. Honsal says six current employees of either the sheriff’s office, the coroner’s office or the public administrator’s office were involved in purchases and those who still had the items returned them. “I requested that they do that and they all complied and they all saw the need to do it immediately,” he says. Fleming and Honsal reached out to the FBI, which declined to have any involvement, and the DOJ individually after Fleming says “it became clear the investigation would cover multiple individuals and extend back at least several years.” “The potential for some members of the public to perceive a potential conflict of interest seemed significant,” Fleming says in an email to the Journal. Honsal agrees, saying he and Fleming felt it was important for “someone totally outside of the organization and the county to independently take a look at the case.” Meanwhile, he says, new policies and procedures — which now include a blanket ban on employees of his office, their family members or close friends making purchases — are being drawn up. With an investigator expected to land

Wolford Dead at 85: Former Eureka City Councilmember Mary Beth Wolford, a longtime educator, died July 29 in Fairfield, where she moved in 2013. A former school teacher and the first female superintendent in Contra Costa County, Wolford moved to Eureka in retirement in 1996 and went on to direct the Humboldt Senior Resource Center, be elected to the council and serve as Heritage Society president. POSTED 08.04.17

(Left to Right) Pete and Belle Ciotti, of The Jam (best venue), Jonny Woods, of Object Heavy (best band), and Lucy Barnes land on the red carpet at the North Coast Journal’s Best of Humboldt party on Saturday, Aug. 5 to celebrate. See more photos from the night at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 08.09.17. Photo by Eric Mueller in Humboldt County on Aug. 9, Honsal says he doesn’t have a timeline on how long the review will take but he did let the DOJ know he was hoping to “get this done as quickly as possible.” The findings will be turned over to the attorney general.

Security Guard Shoots, Kills One: The Eureka Police Department is continuing its investigation into the fatal Aug. 1 shooting of 56-year-old Herbert Macias. According to EPD, an armed on-duty security guard was getting out of his vehicle in the alley behind the Shell gas station on Fifth Street when he was allegedly confronted by Macias, who attempted to stab the guard, prompting the shooting. Neither the guard nor his employer have been identified. POSTED 08.04.17

“At the end of this whole thing, we hope we and the DOJ will be able to issue a joint statement and detail out the reasons why things happened and how we’re taking responsibility for this,” Honsal says. — Kimberly Wear POSTED 08.07.17 Read the full story online.

Brius Trial Staying Put: The California First District Court of Appeals has declined to take up the appeal of skilled nursing mogul Shlomo Rechnitz, who was disputing a Humboldt County judge’s ruling that a pair of elder abuse and wrongful death trials can be fairly heard in the local court. Rechnitz, who owns Brius Healthcare, argued that media coverage had biased the local jury pool and the distance from his Los Angeles home would make attending the trial burdensome. POSTED 08.02.17

Digitally Speaking

They Said It

Comment of the Week

The amount of the reward being offered for information leading to the arrest of Shawn Eugene Hof Jr., who allegedly shot at a state law enforcement officer last year. Anyone with information is asked to call a tip line at (888) 334-2258. For more information, visit www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 08.09.17

“She was a real gem. She gave a lot to every community she lived in.”

“I just saw it this week. I love it!!! But, then again, I love Bladerunner.”

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

— Humboldt County 4th District Supervisor Virginia Bass, speaking about former Eureka City Councilmember Mary Beth Wolford. POSTED 08.04.17

— Laura Eaton Zerzan Jones commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on a post about last week’s Art Beat column, “The Faraway Nearby,” about Eureka’s polarizing new mural. POSTED 08.05.17


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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By Linda Stansberry n Aug. 2, 1937, the Marijuana Tax Act passed. Although later laws would codify punishment for cannabis smokers, sellers and cultivators, House Resolution 6385, drafted by Harry Anslinger, the first commissioner of the U.S. Treasury Department’s Federal Bureau of Narcotics, is regarded as the first time the federal government laid its heavy hand on the plant. The circumstances around its passage have resonance with modern events. The American Medical Association raised concerns about the bill, for example, because it had been “prepared in secret.” The association also said “marijuana” was a misleading and unknown term for what physicians then prescribed as “cannabis,” meaning that many doctors and pharmacists didn’t understand what they were losing. H.R. 6385 would nevertheless pass and go into effect on Oct. 1, 1937, initiating 80 years of bureaucratic cloddishness and reverberating consequences. Anslinger, a former railroad bull who rose to prominence during the era of alcohol prohibition, could not have foreseen how his signature legislation would impact many of the 20th century’s most important social and legal changes. It would be less than 30 years later, for example, that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 would pass, thanks to the persistent efforts of grassroots organizers and protestors. Other important civil rights cases, such as Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka (1954) and Loving vs. Virginia (1967) would course correct the moral trajectory of the United States, bending its long arc toward justice. But, with marijuana prohibition, federal and state governments would retain an important tool in perpetuating institutional racism. In 2013, the American Civil Liberties Union analyzed data compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Health. They found that “despite roughly equal usage rates, Blacks are 3.73 times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana.” And out of the 8.2 million marijuana arrests made between 2001 and 2010, 88 percent were for simple possession. Even now, as legalization is seeing a slow, state-by-state creep across the country, many would-be marijuana

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entrepreneurs are shut out of working in the industry by former convictions. Oakland’s city council recently approved the Equity Permit Program, allowing Oakland residents jailed for marijuana possession in the last 10 years to receive medical cannabis industry permits. Councilmember Delsey Brooks referred to the permit program as “economic reparations.”  Anslinger died in 1975, eight years after having resigned under President John F. Kennedy. In the decade before his death, the federal government passed several sweeping environmental reform acts, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the 1970 Clean Air Act and the 1972 Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. Almost every major industry would come under increased scrutiny for its environmental impacts. But prohibition would be the very thing to push large scale cannabis agriculture into mountains, hillsides and federal parkland, where – at least in our region – the industry would boom largely unregulated and under-prosecuted for decades, often having a deleterious effect on our watersheds and wildlife. And finally: Willie Nelson. The country music star turned 84 this year, and his most recent album, God’s Problem Child, went to No. 1 on the country charts. Over his 61-year career, the oft-stoned octogenarian has shaped his outlaw image around marijuana’s prohibition, having been arrested for possession several times, first in 1974. More recently, Nelson became co-chair for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws and frequently advocates for federal legalization. It’s unlikely Nelson ever made it into Anslinger’s infamous file “Marijuana and Musicians,” which the commissioner hoped to use to organize a dragnet on jazz musicians, but the life and career of Nelson has been indelibly shaped by Anslinger’s obsession and legacy. (Nelson, it should be noted, was also a notorious tax evader.) May the Red Headed Stranger outlive prohibition, if he doesn’t outlive us all. l Linda Stansberry is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or linda@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.

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On the Cover

‘Nibs’ and ‘The Taz’

confidentiality of personnel and employee grievance policies and procedures. The board’s strongest statement of support for its new hire came back in March, when, under the threat of a lawsuit and in the face of a public defender employee revolt, it met with Marcus in closed session and issued a statement touting Marcus’ 20 years of criminal defense experience in Lassen and San Bernardino counties. In recent weeks, the Journal has reached out to almost three dozen of Marcus’ former employees, colleagues and co-workers. More than half didn’t return calls or simply declined to comment. Others had a lot to say.

The conflicting accounts of David Marcus’ professional life By Thadeus Greenson

Anna Morrison sounds chipper

thad@northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt County Public Defender David Marcus in his sparsely decorated Eureka office. Photo by Mark McKenna

S

itting in a coffee shop on Harrison Street and sipping a latte shortly before 8 a.m., embattled Humboldt County Public Defender David Marcus pauses to consider a question. Throughout his 20 years of experience as a deputy public defender in San Bernardino County and as chief of Lassen County’s office, Marcus has faced waves of criticism and resistance from co-workers and colleagues. In the words of one former Lassen County supervisor, those around Marcus have a tendency to reach for their “long knives.” So just what is it about the 64-year-old attorney that draws this reaction? “Because I’ve always been controversial and aggressive,” Marcus says. “I mean, my nickname is ‘Taz,’ so I probably earned that.” Taz? As in the Tasmanian Devil? “Yeah, one of the bailiffs nicknamed me ‘The Taz’ and it kind of stuck.”

But how would that rub your coworkers in a zealous public defender’s office the wrong way? “You know, I’m not sure,” Marcus says, his voice trailing off as he glances down at his latte. “I have my own ideas about that. I think some people don’t work as hard as they should for their clients and I was vocal about that. Still am. Not everyone’s going to like you.” Thing is, that is the exact allegation that has been lobbed at Marcus, repeatedly, from his early days as a deputy public defender in San Bernardino County — a 13-year position he left with no notice, resigning via Post-it note — to Lassen County, where he left shortly after a scathing grand jury report accused him of only spending 30 to 40 percent of his days at work. And it is an allegation that followed him to Humboldt County, where his staff has accused him of being incompetent and indifferent, and has dubbed

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

him with a far more disparaging nickname: Nibs, defined as “a mock title used to refer to a self-important man.” As a lawsuit continues to work its way through the courts, challenging whether Marcus meets minimum state qualifications for the job he landed in February, much of the focus has been on his recent work history and whether he’s fulfilled the statutory requirement of having been “a practicing attorney in all the courts of the state for at least the year preceding the date of his election or appointment.” (He says he spent the five years after leaving Lassen County doing remote contract work on civil cases for the firm Cella, Lange and Cella, but has been unable to provide any documents, court filings, time cards or correspondence showing he did any such work in the year prior to his hire.) The board of supervisors, meanwhile, has been largely silent on Marcus’ hire, with members saying they’re bound by the

when she answers the phone at her southern California home. She’s a children’s author and teaches writing at a handful of colleges and universities down south but, almost two decades ago, she was the administrative assistant in the Redland’s branch of the San Bernardino County Public Defender’s Office, where Marcus worked as the supervising attorney from 1999 to 2001. “He’s a unique individual. He’s very charming, very pleasant,” Morrison says. “He certainly never made any waves with me.” But as the conversation goes on, it’s clear Morrison feels conflicted. On the one hand, she says Marcus was good to her. He let her work a nontraditional 7-4 schedule so she could go back to school, which ultimately paved the way for her second career. But his management of the office caused problems, most notably his penchant for ending his workday at lunchtime and pushing his caseload onto other attorneys in the office, she says. “That got pretty explosive. Yelling — there was, at one point, a lot of yelling,” she says, laughing quietly at the memory and adding that much of the fireworks came between Marcus and a young deputy public defender fresh out of law school named Dennis Wilkins. “Honestly, I think Dennis was just tired of Dave giving him all of the work — all of the work. Dennis did the brunt of the work there and when others came, they did the brunt of the work.” Wilkins, who still works at the San Bernardino County Public Defender’s Office and whom a former colleague calls a “true believer who would fight all the time,” confirms this, though he recalls Marcus’ daily departure time to be closer to 10 a.m. But Wilkins says he came to Redlands fresh off passing the bar, having started in the office as a volunteer for several weeks


APPLY TODAY! before being hired on. Marcus, he says, made an impression. “He did almost no work. He did barely any work at all,” he says. “He was too busy leaving, not doing his job, not fighting for his clients, not setting cases for trial, not filing motions, not learning the law. He would ingratiate himself with the deputies, with the DA, with the judges. He would ingratiate himself and sell his clients out. … I wish I could say he was just stupid. He was not.” A half dozen attorneys who worked with Marcus in the San Bernardino Public Defender’s Office all share similar stories of how he would plea out defendants who should have gone to trial, ask virtually no questions during evidentiary hearings and declare conflicts whenever cases got tough or complicated. They all say it appeared Marcus was more interested in running his construction business on the side than defending the rights of San Bernardino County’s poor, which they say is why he left so early on a daily basis. For his part, Marcus says he’s “not surprised” to hear some of his former colleagues had negative things to say about him. But he disputes ever prioritizing his construction business — which built single family homes and installed commercial display lighting — over his public defender work. “I don’t know who said that but that was always the rumor,” he says, adding that his bosses knew there was nothing to it and that his wife primarily managed the construction company. He also disagrees with the notion that he spent an inordinate time out of the office. “I don’t think that’s fair at all. I guess the thing that people perceive is that, if you’re not there at the same time as they are, that you’re not there.” Marcus says he frequently got into the office two or three hours before other attorneys trickled in. Morrison confirms this, saying it always seemed Marcus had been at the office for at least an hour when she showed up at 7 a.m. but she recalls other frustrations, like Marcus not returning phone calls from clients and their parents, sometimes leading to angry confrontations. Despite Marcus’ penchant for getting into work early, former colleagues say part of being a public defender is simply being present in court to pull your own weight when cases are called. Wilkins chuckles recalling one particular story. He was about 14 months into working with Marcus, “carrying his heavy ass,” as he puts it, when Wilkins took a couple of days off and a supervisor filled in for him. Recognizing how much of the Redlands caseload Marcus was sloughing

off on Wilkins, the supervisor immediately bumped the young attorney’s pay from $10 an hour to $25, Wilkins says. Another attorney who defended cases alongside Marcus for several stints in San Bernardino and declined to be named in the story, saying he feared Marcus might sue him in retaliaton for his honest opinion, says Marcus had a distinct reputation within the office. “It was understood that when you worked with the guy, you were going to carry his work,” he says. “It was obvious he didn’t give a shit about our clients. He was out for himself and his own convenience. But don’t get me wrong, he’s a smart guy. In trial, he’d be someone to watch because he always had a trick or two up his sleeve. The problem was he never really utilized his talent because was just too damn lazy.”

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While Marcus’

job application with the county indicates he spent his 13 years in San Bernardino entirely in the Redlands branch, according to those who worked with him, he spent the bulk of his tenure there working in other departments. And even the story of how he landed in Redlands — a sleepy retirement suburb assignment coveted by many senior attorneys in the office of 100 or so defense counsels — is the subject of controversy. George Taylor, a defense attorney in the office for decades until he semi-retired in 2010, says he was stationed in the Fontana branch, where he shared a courtroom with Marcus in the late 1990s, when word circulated that the senior attorney in Redlands was retiring. Taylor says he was in court one day when a man in the back caught his attention, called him over and told him he thought he was supposed to be in court but his case wasn’t on the day’s calendar. He asked the guy who his attorney was and he said it was Marcus. “I went over and talked to Dave,’” Taylor recalls with a laugh, saying Marcus responded by trying to dump the case on him. “He said, ‘You were the last person he talked to, you should take his case.’ I walked away.” About five minutes later, Taylor says he was walking down the courthouse hallway just outside the judges’ chambers. “Dave is walking toward me and said, ‘Fuck you, Taylor.’ I look at him and I’m thinking he’s kidding and as we get closer, he says it again, ‘Fuck you, Taylor.’ As we get closer, he says it again, ‘Fuck you.’ I said, ‘OK, fuck you, too.’ I don’t know what’s going on but I’m thinking we’re having a fuck-you contest. Next thing I Continued on next page »

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13


On the Cover Continued from previous page

know, he’s poking my chest and I’m telling him, ‘You better get your hands off me right now.’” “Then, he goes back to the office and tells my supervisor he can’t work with me, says I was dumping cases on him,” Taylor says. “Subsequently, he gets transferred to Redlands.” Marcus says he has no recollection of the altercation. “I’m not saying every conversation we had was friendly, but I don’t remember an actual confrontation,” he says, adding that he doesn’t recall his transfer to Redlands having “anything to do with George.” But allegations of laziness, absenteeism and indifference seem to have followed Marcus throughout his tenure in San Bernardino. One former high-level supervisor, who asked not to be identified disparaging Marcus, says he simply has a low opinion of the man because “he didn’t work.” “I do know that everyone, or at least my memory says that everyone who worked with him complained that they were doing all his work,” he says, quickly adding that, from a supervisor’s perspective, there were some silver linings to Marcus’ style. “You have to remember, you’re dealing with enormous numbers of cases and it drives you crazy. As a supervisor, you want to have in your arsenal of lawyers somebody who can basically move cases from open to closed as quickly as possible. Mr. Marcus excelled at that. He would go in with a big caseload and come out with nothing, all the cases having been pleaded or dealt away. … I can’t recall him ever trying a case.” For as long as Marcus worked in the San Bernardino County Public Defender’s Office — 13 years — his tenure came to an abrupt end. He’d transferred back from Redlands to one of the office’s more urban branches and, Morrison says, things weren’t going well. “The chief had to explain to him that he was expected to stay and to be in court,” she says. “There was some friction there but there were still days when he took off early. I don’t think he stayed very long.” One day a supervisor, Mark Shoup, cracked down on Marcus and he pledged to spend more time in the office, according to multiple sources familiar with the conversation. A couple of days later, Shoup arrived at the office to find Marcus’ keys sitting on his desk next to a Post-it note that said, “I quit.” Shoup declined to comment for this story — at some point during the Journal’s reporting, San Bernardino County counsel admonished employees not to talk about Marcus — but Marcus doesn’t dispute the account, though he says he also sent

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

an email notifying his bosses that he was giving two-week’s notice, to be served out of his accrued vacation time. Asked what pushed him to do that, Marcus says he had two young sons and wanted to spend more time with them, so he took a year off. Some years later, Marcus would apply when San Bernardino was hiring for a new chief public defender. Wilkins says he wrote a scathing email to the county administrative officer and the board of supervisors, detailing all his accusations against Marcus, who wasn’t offered the job. “I did everything I could to torpedo that,” Wilkins says, no small amount of pride in his voice.

Before Marcus

ever arrived in Lassen County, it was the scene of an epic battle pitting the public defender in one of California’s smallest offices against a law-and-order judge in a prison town, setting the stage for an upset that would become the stuff of public defender lore, law school lessons and legal magazine profiles. Some say it also left a small, rural courthouse in tatters. Jim Chapman, a retired Lassen County supervisor who served for 36 years on the board, says to understand the battle fully, you have to understand Lassen and its county seat, Susanville, a prison town populated by guards, cattle ranchers and loggers. Calling it a law and order place, Chapman says, undersells it, and nobody embodied that ethos more than Ridgely Lazard, a retired-district-attorney-turned-superior-court-judge. “It’s a prison town full of prison guards and Lazard played that to the hilt,” Chapman says. According to court documents, that meant not allowing defendants to speak to a public defender prior to entering pleas, saying that, if he felt it was “appropriate,” he would allow them to do so before sentencing. Lazard was also prone to doling out 30-day jail sentences for failures to appear in court, ignoring mandatory drug treatment sentencing options, sometimes locking the doors while court was in session and barring public defenders from in-chambers conferences while he allowed prosecutors and private attorneys to attend. In August of 2000, Lassen tapped Toni Healy as its next public defender and she quickly began butting heads with Lazard. In September of 2004, Healy filed a petition with the court seeking to bar Lazard from hearing the public defender’s office’s cases, which accounted for 90 percent of the county’s caseload. The following month, visiting Judge Galen Hathaway


TUESDAY SENIOR DISCOUNT 10% OFF SATURDAY STUDENT DISCOUNT (W/ID) 10% OFF ruled in Healy’s favor, finding Lazard to be “biased and prejudiced” against her office and stating that Healy’s allegations were supported by court records, transcripts and sworn statements. The decision prevented one of Lassen’s two judges from hearing 90 percent of the county’s caseload. It also left Healy battered, and within days of the ruling, she announced her retirement. Into this scene strolled Marcus, fresh off a year spent cross-country road tripping with his wife and kids. Initial reviews were glowing. “When he showed up, it was very evident he knew what he was doing,” says Robert Grant, a private investigator who worked with the public defender’s office at the time. “He immediately showed, ‘Hey, I got this.’” Paul Drevenstedt, now a supervising deputy public defender in Ventura County, was Marcus’ first hire, brought in a couple of months after he took over the office. Drevenstedt, who was fresh out of law school at the time, says he loved working for Marcus. “I’m a manager now and I, to this day, talk to public defenders about my first manager,” he says. “Dave did a very good job of instilling in me a dedication to this type of work, the clientele we serve and doing the best job you can for your clients. He stressed that this job can be emotionally taxing and that you have to find ways not to let it chew you up.” Drevenstedt says he always felt supported by Marcus but never micromanaged. Journal attempts to reach all other attorneys who worked under Marcus in Lassen — including current Public Defender Rhea Giannotti — were unsuccessful. For his part, Chapman says Marcus was like the golden child, who stepped competently into a chaotic situation and got along with everyone. “He was kind of a bright star within the county family,” Chapman says of Marcus, who brought his office in under budget six of his seven years there.

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On the Cover

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after getting assurances from the presidleave.” Chapman says he doesn’t “think ing judge that if there were problems, he Dave’s job was ever in jeopardy.” People would immediately have Lazard removed were trying to get him fired, Chapman from public defender cases. But Lazard says, but they didn’t have the votes on was fair upon his return, Marcus says, until the board. he was ultimately voted out of office But Marcus says the experience took seven months later. a toll and he was “irritated” by the grand Real turmoil began brewing when the jury report. In September of 2011, Marcus county’s chief administrative officer, John decided to resign, stepping away from Ketelsen, encouraged Marcus to get his a job that paid masters in public administration from him a salary of Chico State University. “The arrange$98,000, telling “Folks decided ment he had with Dave is he’d basically the Lassen come into work at like 6 a.m., do a County Times to pull out their couple of hours in office, be in court he was leaving in the a.m. and then, by mid afterto take a posilong knives and noon, he’d be freed up,” Chapman says, tion as the CEO adding that Marcus would then make of Alpha Dental, began a sort of the two-hour drive from Susanville to a lab owned by Chico to take classes before making his good friend concerted effort the hour-and-a-half drive back to his on the East home in Lake Almanor. “He put a lot of Coast. to denigrate Dave’s demand on himself in order to be able But Karen to do that.” Gossard, Alpha position within the Chapman says things turned south Dental’s current for Marcus in Lassen after Ketelsen — financial officer, organization.” who’d taken Marcus under his wing says Marcus — was pushed out under “less than didn’t really take — Jim Chapman desirable circumstances.” a position with “Then there’s Dave sitting there, the the company, fair haired boy of the guy who was just but instead served more as a part-time given his walking papers,” Chapman says. business consultant. Court filings would “Folks decided to pull out their long knives later show Marcus reported making and began a sort of concerted effort about $19,000 for six months of work to denigrate Dave’s position within the for the company. Asked how Marcus organization.” performed on the job, Gossard says only, And Marcus gave them ammunition, ac“I’d rather not say.” cording to Chapman, who says it was disNine months after departing Lassen covered that Marcus continued his school County, Marcus left Alpha Dental in June schedule of getting in early and leaving of 2012. The following month, he filed for early long after he’d finished his courseChapter 7 bankruptcy protection. work in Chico, leaving his office empty for Marcus — who reported personally long stretches. This rubbed co-workers owning four cars, including a BMW, a the wrong way, Chapman says. boat and a motorcycle — owed $155,000 The 2010-2011 Lassen County Civil in credit card debt, according to forms Grand Jury issued a scathing report on filed in the case. He also owed hundreds Marcus, accusing him of only spending 30 of thousands of dollars more on his to 40 percent of his days in court, failing home — a 3,000-square-foot house in a to carry his share of the caseload and gated community that he’d purchased in inappropriately using all his office’s con2005 for $700,000 — than it was worth. tinuing education funds on himself while Asked if there were any mitigating cirforcing his two deputies to pay for their cumstances that led to the filing and his ongoing trainings out of pocket. personal finances spiraling out of control, Marcus denies all the allegations in the Marcus says of the filing, “Largely, it was report — as well as Chapman’s charge to avoid several hundred thousands of that he kept his school schedule longer dollars in unearned income tax.” Asked to than he should have — and sees it as explain, he declines. the work of a Lassen County judge, Don He reported no tax debt in the bankSokol, who used to head the grand jury ruptcy filings. and allegedly turned on Marcus after learning he was considering disqualifying him from a case. Marcus also blames a on Harrison, Marcus is asked if there’s private investigator he had angered by anything he’d like to add to his interrefusing to work with him. view with the Journal, anything he’d like Asked why he decided to leave Lassen, to add to the public. To this point, the Marcus is quick to say he “wasn’t asked to

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Back at the coffee shop

conversation has remained focused on his relatively distant past — the subject of his qualifications that are at the heart of the lawsuit challenging his appointment is off limits, as are the letters of no confidence and grievances filed by his current employees. “I think just that things are getting substantially better,” Marcus says. “I think it’s indicated by the fact that we’re out there doing our jobs. I think we’re doing a great job for the public and our clients. I want people to know we’re working very hard to carry out our function defending — I hate to use the word indigents; I’d rather just say our clients.” Few in the office dispute this. But in a series of interviews with about a half-dozen employees — all of whom declined to be publicly identified criticizing their boss — staff and deputy public defenders make clear they feel the office is carrying on its function in spite of Marcus. There’s simply no choice, they say, as they have thousands of clients who depend on them and they carry more than 80 percent of the county’s caseload. If the office stumbles, so does the Humboldt County Superior Court. But they allege Marcus does little to fill a leadership role, pull his own weight or advise them on cases. When Deputy Public Defender Owen Tipps recently departed to take a job with the court, employees say it was the office’s deputies — not Marcus — who figured out how to divide up his duties and caseload. Multiple employees allege Marcus is “content to do as little as possible.” It is perhaps noteworthy that when filling out the references section of his application for the position in Humboldt, Marcus didn’t list anyone from the public defender’s offices he spent a combined 20 years in. Instead, he listed two “professional” references: his friend of 30 years Chris Cella — a partner in the law firm Cella, Lange and Cella — and a man named William Naeve, an Irvine attorney who Marcus had gone to law school with almost 40 years earlier. Reached by phone, Naeve seems surprised when asked about his impressions of Marcus. He’s ducking into a meeting and can’t talk, he says. “I never worked with the guy, just went to law school with him,” Naeve says, asking the reporter to call him back later in the day. Subsequent voicemails seeking additional comment went unreturned. ● Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


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17


Table Talk

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gain, folks, it’s flour, salt, water and yeast,” repeats Linda Barry, attempting to assuage her students’ fear of baking bread. In your granny’s day, baking bread was a household chore, as unassuming as hanging out the laundry. While a lucky few come home to the aromatic embrace of freshly baked bread, the majority of loaves on the American dinner table are store bought. Local Eureka Emblem Club members Suzie Owsley and Linda Barry take this as a personal challenge. The talented duo want to get Humboldt County baking, old-school style. On a Sunday afternoon in July, more than 50 students arrived at the Eureka Elks Lodge on Herrick Avenue. Mostly women, young and old, with a sprinkle of men, sit in front of large mixing bowls. Long tables are dressed with colorful tablecloths and a spread of fruit jams from Centerville Farms in Ferndale. Friendly volunteers dart between tables, making certain each student has the correct ratio of flour, salt and yeast, and refilling empty water glasses. Like our teachers, the volunteers are members of the Eureka Emblem Club No. 298. Founded in 1917, the original Emblem Club was a group of Elks ladies who came

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

together to wrap bandages during World War I. These days, the Eureka chapter is keen on community service and cultivating practical skills. “Have you tried the blueberry?” asks Joanne, a friendly woman seated opposite me, as she spreads a deep purple jam across a slice of bread. We chat while sampling bread accompanied by Kerry Gold butter, Irish cheddar cheese and local jam. Across the table, Norma, a stylish woman with a white coif, gets a laugh from our table saying she was “dragged here,” her first cooking class since home ec in high school. Owsley dons a headset and we settle down. She begins by telling us that anyone can bake a beautiful loaf of artisan bread — no kneading required. The Emblem Club volunteers spread across the room, measuring 2 cups of water into each of our mixing bowls. Owsley instructs us to stir the ingredients with a wooden spoon, the most demanding task of the afternoon. Next, the Emblem Club volunteers come by and stretch plastic wrap across our bowls. And voila! Suzie tells us to take the bowls home and let the dough rise for the next 12 to 23 hours (on the counter, in the laundry room — coastal Humboldt’s


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blem Club member Sandy Lambo will lead a class on Greek cuisine on Jan. 18.

Suzie Owsley’s No-Knead Bread Adapted from Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery. Makes 1 large loaf. Substitute 1 cup whole wheat flour for white or beer for 1 cup of the water for more flavor variation and fiber. Add 1 ½ cup Kalamata olives, chopped, squeezed and patted dry, to the initial mixture if desired. Just omit the salt if you do. Ingredients: 3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, plus flour for dusting (King Arthur recommended) heaping ¼ teaspoon instant yeast and 1 ¼ teaspoon salt 2 cups water (tap is fine) at about 70 F Instructions: In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add between 1 ¾ -2 cups water and stir until blended; dough will be sticky. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it rest for 12 to 23 hours at warm room temperature, about 70 F. Your kitchen counter works. The dough is ready when its surface is lightly dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place the dough on it. Sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let it rest about 15 minutes. Using just enough flour to keep the dough from sticking, gently and quickly shape the dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton (not terry cloth) kitchen towel with flour. Put the dough seam side down on the cloth and dust with more flour. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it’s ready, the dough will be more than doubled in size and won’t spring back readily when poked with your finger. At least 30 minutes before the dough is ready, heat the oven to 450 F. Put a 5- to 8-quart heavy covered pot with lid (castiron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in the oven to heat. When the dough is ready, carefully remove the pot from the oven. Uncover the dough and slide your hand under the bottom towel to turn the dough over into the pot, seam side up; it’s OK if it looks a mess. Shake the pan once or twice if the dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten during baking. Score the bread with a lame, (a French tool resembling razor blade) or a sharp knife to allow your loaf to expand while baking. Replace the lid and bake 30 minutes before removing the lid and baking another 20 to 30 minutes, until the loaf is browned. Cool on a rack for 1 hour. ●

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weather is ideal for letting dough rise). Owsley’s dead simple recipe comes from the teachings of Jim Lahey, owner of the Sullivan Street Bakery in New York City. Lahey developed the now famous recipe in 2006 and caught the attention of New York Times food columnist Mark Bittman. Bittman described Lahey’s bread as, “an artisan bakery loaf, with a crackling crust, open-holed crumb, light texture and fantastic flavor.” The magic formula of “no-knead bread” or “Dutch oven bread” depends on a slow countertop fermentation, anywhere from 12 to 23 hours. Owsley believes Lahey provided this window of time to appease our busy lives but she promises your bread will turn out beautifully regardless of whether the dough sits for 14 or 20 hours. Owsley assembles her own dough up front, demonstrating that an endless array of delicious “mixers” can be added before leaving the dough to rise, including chunks of white cheddar, Kalamata olives or shredded Parmesan. The second critical step to no-knead bread requires a cast iron or enameled ceramic Dutch oven (or heavy pot with a lid) to withstand the high baking temp of 450 F. The bread obtains its crackly crust and soft, chewy interior by self-steaming in the covered pot in the oven; commercial bakeries use convection ovens that automatically release moisture to achieve this same texture. Owsley prefers a timeworn clay pot that she inherited from her aunt, which requires pre-soaking, but I love using my 5-quart Lodge Dutch oven. This bread recipe fits inside perfectly and the pot comes out untarnished every time. You can use a Le Creuset pot but I warn you from experience: Remove your plastic lid handle with a screwdriver or it will corrode along with the color of your pot. Using large poster boards to illustrate each step, Owsley wraps up her lesson before turning the stage over to Linda Barry. She presents recipes for dinner rolls, which she promises freeze beautifully, and a rustic peasant bread. Barry demonstrates techniques for basic kneading, which she finds relaxing. For her, bread baking is more of a hobby than the necessity it was for her grandmother, who baked three times a week. We leave with a thick packet of recipes, coupons and step-by-by instructions for baking off our dough at home. Students proudly share photos of their bread for the Eureka Emblem Cooking Classes Facebook page. Find the Eureka Emblem Cooking Series on Facebook or email suziecooks@yahoo.com for information. Next up, the Big Easy comes to Eureka on Oct. 19 for a Cajun cooking class led by world-traveled chef Louise Zuleger ($45). And already on the schedule for 2018, Em-

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19


Arts Nights

Arts! Arcata Friday, August 11, 6-9 p.m.

GREAT EVENTS GREAT FOOD

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20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at locations in Arcata. Visit www.facebook.com/artsarcata for more information or call 822-4500. ANGELICA ATELIER 1101 H St. #2 “Overlap,” Marisa Kieselhorst and Abigail Nottingham, mixed media. ARCATA ARTISANS 883 H St. Featured artists Susan Bornstein, acrylic on canvas and Vaughn Hutchins, photography. Wine pour benefits the GYN Breast Health Project. ARCATA EXCHANGE 813 H St. “The art of recycled redwood: wood designs for the outdoors,” Zuretti “Zuey” Goosby, wood wall art; Acoustic music by Lizard and Turtle; Wine pour benefits Historical Site Society. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Music by Kentucky Livin’. CAFÉ BRIO 791 G St. Jesse Leimer, oil paintings; Music by Tim Randles group; Raw oyster bar on the patio from Aqua Rodeo Farms. FATBÖL CLOTHING 1063 H St. Hip Hop Cypher; Open Mic; Resident Turntablist DJ and Resident Hiphop MC Nac One. FIRE ARTS CENTER 520 S G St. Darius Brotman and Mary Egan, ceramics and mixed media. Light appetizers and live music. FOLIE DOUCE 1551 G St. “Pyne Trees,” Stephanie Pyne, acrylic paintings. FOODWISE KITCHEN 971 Eighth St. Bea Stanley, oil paintings. Ice cream social with raw or plant-based ice cream. GARDEN GATE 905 H St. Andrew Daniel, oil paintings; Music by Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers; Wine Pour benefits the Companion Animal Foundation. GRIFFIN 937 10th St. Aaron Brink, photography. Music by DJ EastOne and Goldylocks at 9 p.m. THE JAM 915 H St. Suki Berry, Artwork. JACOBY’S STOREHOUSE 791 Eighth St.: PLAZA GRILL (3rd floor) “All About Love,” Annie Parker, mixed media on canvas. PLAZA VIEW ROOM (3rd floor) “Wind and Water,” Jay Brown, various media on paper. JAY BROWN (3rd floor Suite 5) “Driven to Abstraction,” Jay Brown, multiple media on paper and other surfaces. LIBATION WINE BAR 761 Eighth St. David Howell, photography; Music by Jim Silva; Sparkling wine flight; Red wine flight by North Star Winery featuring winemaker Pat Knittel of North Story

Deco Morin’s “Alien Race 6” at Redwood Yogurt. and Wrangletown Cider. MOONRISE HERBS 826 G St. “The Many Muses of Moonrise,” employee art show. Music by Scott and Lynsey Feldman. MOORE’S SLEEPWORLD 876 G St Laurel McKay, printmaker; Sarah Conger, acrylics and watercolors; Music from Gin and Gents; Wine Pours benefits Humboldt Animal Rescue Team. Raffle tickets for every pillow/bed tested for a chance to win a variety of prizes. Northtown Books 957 H St. Lecture on Food Justice in the U.S. and China. Robert Gottlieb. 7 p.m. OM SHALA YOGA 858 Tenth St. “Kukuihaele,” Justine Bartow-Funk, watercolor. Free chair massages 6-7:30 p.m. PACIFIC OUTFITTERS 737 G St. R.E. Joice, oil on canvas. Music by Hogleg Sternwood. PLAZA 808 G St. “Birds, Trees, & Horse Hooves,” Amy Granfield, oil paintings. Wine pour benefits The Humboldt Area Center for Harm Reduction. REDWOOD YOGURT 1573 G St. Artwork from the outgoing 2016-2017 seniors from Arcata Arts Institute, graphic design, photography, drawing and painting. Senior showcase from Deco Morin, drawings and Photoshop. SANCTUARY 1301 J St. “POSTED: Views of the North Coast,” Miles Mattison, photography, “Ocean Energy,” Lee Mothes, watercolor, graphite and acrylic. SAVORY 1504 G St. “Portraits,” Roger Weston, life drawings in pencil. STOKES, HAMER, KIRK & EADS, LLP 381 Bayside Road. “Jazzical Glass,” Robin and John Praytor, mosaic art; Rick Park, acrylic on canvas; Music by Redwood Dixie Gators. WILDBERRIES MARKET 747 13th St. “Spirit Skins,” students of Arcata Arts Institute, photographs of costumes that students created. Photography by Mary Burns. ZEN 1091 H St. Reuben Mayes, abstraction expressionist acrylic on canvas. l


Art Beat

Seeds and Surfing Art at Reggae on the River By Gabrielle Gopinath artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

T

his past Sunday festivalgoers at Reggae on the River reveled in good vibes, positive sounds and gorgeous summer weather. Any storm clouds that might be gathering in Babylon were far from the collective consciousness of this happy crowd. Coot Wyman, the affable frontman of the Chico reggae fusion band Mystic Roots, exhorted us to smile and assured us we all looked beautiful. He moved to pre-empt any audience concerns regarding his fresh haircut with good humor: “I know you expect me to have some dreads, but I need more room for weed in me head.” The crowd loved it. Up next in the lineup, London-based singer Marla Brown reiterated a positive message in her upbeat, pop-infused songs. Later in the day, roots reggae vocalist and songwriter Dezarie, from the U.S. Virgin Islands, regaled an appreciative crowd with songs like “Mamma Knows Best,” speaking to women reggae artists’ ongoing struggle to achieve recognition and gender parity — no easy achievement in a genre still heavily influenced by the patriarchal beliefs prevalent in orthodox Rastafarianism. It was hard not to interpret Dezarie’s song selection as a callback to “Jah Knows Best,” one of the modern-day classics of the roots reggae genre, recorded by Sizzla in 2004. “Message music is the future,” she told the audience. “Recognize your true worth!” Three flags were waving in front of the stage: the flag of the U.S. Virgin Islands, a tricolor flag with a Rastafari lion rampant, and a flag reproducing the design of the United States flag in black and white, with a green cannabis leaf positioned in the upper quarter where the stars normally appear. Afternoon heat kept some festivalgoers in the shade, but those sun-worshippers who did get on their feet enjoyed a lot of space for personal expression. Hula-hoopers and hacky-sackers did their thing. Volunteers used fire hoses to cool the dancers down. Sweaty revelers went slip-sliding in the spray. One man danced on stilts; one played a didgeridoo. “I got

that ecstasy,” a third said quietly to passersby. “Is that a didgeridoo?” someone inquired. “No, it’s a dildo,” the drone purveyor shot back. Katherine Ramirez of Mystic Roots was calling from the stage, “How ‘bout the ladies? Can I get a ganja song for the ladies?” the crowd raised a cheer in response: yes she could. Over in the art zone, Ferndale-based surf artist Shawn Griggs made a strong showing with his signature oil paintings of skeleton surfers riding gnarly waves. The skeletons are among the elements of imagery Griggs draws from the Mexican holiday Dia de las Muertes, Day of the Dead, which, he says, “has found a firm hold within my imagination.” Griggs describes himself as “an avid Humboldt County surfer with a hunger for travel,” and the beaches and rocky headlands that appear in his paintings reflect the scope of that experience. The large landscape he was working on over the weekend may represent a new direction; it’s an intricately painted aerial view of the festival by night that shows packed dancers gyrating in the concert bowl and the hills rising up behind it, a full moon rising above. In the festival’s Art Cave, close-up photographic prints of cannabis stood out from the flights of red, green, black and gold paintings that surrounded them. They are credited to M.T. Hamilton of CannaGraphics, a fledgling Humboldt-based startup dedicated to “macro cannabis trichrome photography.” You’ve seen seeds and buds before, but maybe not like this. In these photographs, plant parts are isolated against clean monochrome backgrounds and viewed in extreme close-up. You are able to see individual pistils and stamens at this scale, as you would if you were inspecting a bud under a low-powered microscope. A macro view of the spiral nodule that forms when a seed has just begun to quicken re-enchants the germination process, making the plant’s birth seem like an event. Despite the photographs’ striking qual-

Macro trichrome photographic print by M.T. Anderson of CannaGraphics, 2017. Courtesy of CannaGraphics

ities, it’s fair to say the longstanding popularity of these types of close-up views in the cannabis press has tempered their novelty effect. Ever since indelibly colorful entrepreneur Tom Fourcade founded industry pioneer High Times in 1974, one of the most important parts of the magazine has been its centerfold spreads, where enticingly detailed close-up photographs of frosty buds appear each month in witty emulation of the Playboy template introduced by Hugh Hefner 20 years earlier. In short, these grower’s eye views will be familiar to the cannabis cognoscenti who make up a higher-than-average percentage of the ROTR viewing public. Like most other examples of contemporary cannabis imagery, Hamilton’s pictures straddle the art/commerce divide, illustrating the degree to which cannabis

imagery remains entwined with the industry’s commercial side. What any of this has to do with reggae music is, well, history. The degree to which the reggae establishment and the burgeoning cannabis industry are mutually supporting and cross-branded means that it is becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish commercial from non-commercial uses — ironic for a musical genre that promotes anti-corporate values. Maintaining a healthy distance from Babylon is likely to involve increasingly nimble acts of self-justification. Or maybe the fabled metropolis was never really as remote as some believed. For more information about the work of the artists mentioned in the article, see www.redeyelaboratories.com and www. canna-graphics.com. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


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on’t wa nn a d r ive for hours, pack water and fend your way through millions of people to see the eclipse? Don’t worry we have you covered with the 2nd Annual Humboldt Fervor Fest on Saturday, August 19 from 1 to 5. For one low price you will get unlimited samples of cider, beer, kombucha, wine and distilled spirits as well as cheese, kimchi, bread, and chocolate. You can also check out demonstrations on making cider, sourdough bread, pickles and more. There will be bands, dancing, food, and fun. All in the heart of the creamery District in Arcata. Have kids? Bring em with you. The Fervor Fest is at the same time as the Creamery Festival and there will be a kids zone and Flynn Creek Circus performs at 3 pm. That’s right you get all this

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and a tidy little glass to take home! … And there won’t be a threehour line for the bathroom. The Humboldt Fervor Fest, August 19 from 1 to 5 pm. It’s sure to spoil you rotten! Warning: side effects may include: euphoria, uncontrolled dancing, joyous laughter, mind expansion and community love. If symptoms appear, call your friends right away and tell them to join you. More information: www.humboldtfervorfest.org

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reetings, HEARTFIRE BAKERY is a locally owned, gluten free bakery located in Arcata, California. We bake artisan crafted breads, rolls, pastries and granola. We strive to include as many organic and local ingredients as available. Our goal is to provide our community with fresh, healthy, great tasting gluten free baked goods. HEARTFIRE BAKERY baked goods will amaze your palate. Try it yourself! Heartfi re Bakery was founded by Shamira Heinz after she became aware that she could not tolerate gluten. She has loved baking and cooking since she was a child, always looking for optimal ways to provide great nutrition for herself and her family. Shamira wanted to recreate the bread that she and her

mom baked every Saturday as a child… fresh baked bread with a wonderful whole grain flavor, hot from the oven. She was able to recreate that amazing flavor and also made it gluten free! Today, we’re happy to share our products with you and your family. It is included in the new business Humboldt Market Place that just opened in Old Town.

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Saturday, August 19, 2017 Cremery District Arcata, CA www.humboldt.fervorfest.org northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

Open Daily 8am - 2am

THUR 8/10

FRI 8/11

SAT 8/12

THE ALIBI 744 Ninth St. 822-3731

M-T-W 8/14-8/16 [W] Sci Fi Night ft. Repo Man (1984) (film) 6pm Free w/$5food/bev purchase

Ocean Night Film Screening 6:30pm $3 donation

BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata 822-2228 CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville, 839-2013 CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

The Roadmasters (country) 9pm Free

Nighthawk (classic rock, dance hits) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Dr. Squid (dance, rock, pop) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free

[W] Comedy Show w/Anthony K. Chris Teicheira 8pm Free

The Last-minute Men (international) 8pm Free Karoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free Silver Hammer (Beatles tribute) 9pm Free Legends of the Mind (blues, jazz) 6pm Free

FIELDBROOK MARKET & EATERY 4636 Fieldbrook Road, 839-0521 THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

[M] Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Reggae Revival - Dread Free, Savage Henry Stand up Open Lightning Hi-Fi 10pm Free Mic 9pm Free [W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free Friday Night Music 7:30pm Free

DJ L Boogie 9pm

DJ EastOne & Friends 6-9pm Free

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free

Yes We Cann Afterparty Ft. Elevate - HipHop Edition/Give Cold Blue Water, Rosewater, a Beat Benefit 9pm $7 and DJ Livingearth 9:30pm TBA

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739 THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

SUN 8/13

Top Down, La Cerca (punk, psych rock) 11 pm Free

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-1220

CLAM BEACH TAVERN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

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24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Deep Groove Society: SUNDAZE Give a Beat Benefit 9pm $5

[T] Open Mic 5-8pm TBA, Savage Henry Comedy Night 9pm TBA [W] Jazz at the Jam 6pm Free The Whomp 10pm $5


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 8/10

LARRUPIN 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad

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SAT 8/12

SUN 8/13

M-T-W 8/14-8/16

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake

[W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

Daily Driver, Electro Saloon (banjo- Queer Humboldt Hot Summer Potluck (food) 6pm Free driven pop-grass) 9pm Free Nights w/DJ Joe-E 8pm Free Live Art: RCMF 2018 Poster

Painting w/Matt Beard & MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-5680 Absynth Quartet (indie-grass) 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

FRI 8/11

Wild Otis (rock and roll) 6pm Free

[T] Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm Free [W] Pints Night for MLT at MRB 11:30am-9pm, West End Combo (live music) 6pm Free

The Detours (honky tonk, soul) 6pm Free Twin Peaks: the Return Zen Mother & White Manna 6pm, 7 pm Karaoke Sundays (psych rock) 9pm $10 9pm Free

Dungen (psych from Sweden) 8:30pm $20, $15 advance

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SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919

The Sound Of Ghosts (live music) 8pm Free

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Selector Dub Narcotic, Monster Women 8pm $10-$25 sliding All ages DJ Ray 10pm TBA

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SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 Central Ave., McKinleyville TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

[W] Pints for Non-Profits-Big Brothers Big Sisters North Coast

[T] Human Expression Open Mic 7pm Free

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REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 S G St., #4., Arcata 826-7222

[M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rudelion 8pm $5

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[T] Sonido Pachanguero (salsa/cumbia) 9pm

OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad

THE SANCTUARY 1301 J St., Arcata 822-0898

Taste Award Winning Spirits at JEWELL DISTILLERY

VH (folk duo) noon-3pm Free, Trivia Night 8pm Free DJ Ray 10pm Free

[T] Sunny Brae Jazz 7:30pm Free [T] Bomba Sonido w/DJ Pressure 10pm Free [W] Reggae w/Iron Fyah 10pm Free

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25


THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

GUYS & GIRLS! GET YOUR

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THUR 8/10

12th Anniversary Celebration BEAR RIVER CASINO HOTEL 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 DJ music/live music 8pm Free

BRASS RAIL BAR 923-3188 3188 Redwood Dr., Redway

Pool Tourney 8pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St., 497-6093

The Claudettes (blues, soul) 9pm $5

EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 442-2970

EUREKA & SOUTH

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway FRI 8/11

SAT 8/12

Lone Star Junction (outlaw country) 9pm Free 9pm Free

Ballroom: Comedy Night 7pm $15, $35 cocktail table for 2

SUN 8/13

M-T-W 8/14-16

[T] Karaoke 9pm [M] No Covers (jazz) 8pm Free [T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 7pm $5 [W] Comedy Open Mikey 7pm Free

The Trouble, Peach Purple (Americana, funk) 8pm $5 Hitchcock Month: Strangers on a Train (1946) 7:30pm $5

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THE FUZION 233 F St., Eureka 345-1040

Karaoke & Lip Sync Night 7pm $12, $8 All ages

Burgundy Blues (dance) 7pm $12, $8

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

The Gatehouse Well (Celtic, folk) 6pm Free

Open Irish/Celtic Music Session 3pm Free

MADAKET PLAZA Foot of C St., Eureka

Summer Concert Series w/LC Diamonds (rock and roll) 6pm Free

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free

PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

D’Vinity (DJ music) 10pm Free

PLAYROOM 1109 Main St., Fortuna 725-5438

DJ Stir Fry Willie 9pm Free

[T] Taco Tuesdays 9pm $12, $8 [W] Salsa Night 7pm $12, $8 All ages

DJ Pressure (DJ music) 10pm Free

[W] DJ D’Vinity 5pm Free [T] Karaoke 9pm

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27


Setlist

Get Close By Andy Powell

thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

Thursday It’s not often that you can find a free show from the Absynth Quartet but tonight is one of those rare nights. AQ4 will be up at the Mad River Brewing Co. Tap Room doing its polka-dot grass thing at 6 p.m. Bring the kiddos down to groove along. Out of Chicago comes the immensely talented The Claudettes, who have recently put out a really good EP called Pull Closer to Me: The Claudettes, Live in the Piano Room, which was born out of an accident at a small music festival last year in Connecticut. After the power went out at said festival, the band improvised and went acoustic for the rest of their set in the middle of the crowd and, after a standing ovation, they realized they were onto something. Out of that experience came the idea to record the acoustic-based record they’re on the road with now, while working on their upcoming album due later this year. I gave a listen to their EP and the band definitely sounds at home playing around with dynamics and weaving in and out of gentle breaks and swelling crescendos. They tip their collective hat nicely to T. Rex, Pink Floyd and Otis Redding among others on these recordings. They’ll be stopping by Eureka this evening at The Palm Lounge around 9 p.m. and they’re only asking $5 for a cover, which is well worth it. Pick up a copy of their EP and welcome them from the Windy City.

Friday It’s Arts Arcata! this evening, so stroll around the plaza and check out the many

The Claudettes play the Palm Lounge on Thursday, Aug. 10 at 9 p.m. Courtesy of the artists

local musicians providing the soundtrack to your night. I bumped into local bass superhero Dan Davis at the penultimate Crabs game of the season and, after a brief baseball chat, he informed me that Wild Otis would be rocking away at The Mad River Brewing Co. tonight at 6 p.m. So if you’re not feeling the Arcata vibe, head on up ol’ Blue Lake way and check out these rootsy rockers for free. Leave a tip if you enjoy their tunes. I’ve been talking Dead a lot lately due to Jerry’s recent birthday and the many celebrations that have taken place for that occasion. I’ve also been politely reprimanded from some of my Dead Head friends for not finding the time yet to watch the new Dead documentary Long Strange Trip, which I swear I’ll get around to. To get back on track here, you’ve got another chance to hear the Dead tunes courtesy of Hardly Deadly and Rosewater, who are sharing the stage at The Jam in Arcata around 7 p.m. from what I could tell. Seems like an unusually early start time but hey, gotta make time for “Fire on the Mountain” and “Morning Dew,” right? It’s only $10 for this show, so get in and get groovin’. The Last-minute Men return to Cafe Mokka at 8 p.m. to play their international tunes. It’s a free show and kids are welcome. Swedish pysch-rockers Dungen are in town and playing two sets at The Miniplex in Arcata.

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

They’ve put out their ninth album called Häxan, which was commissioned as an instrumental score to Lotte Reiniger’s 1926 film The Adventures of Prince Achmen (don’t worry, I’m not cool enough to have ever seen it either) by the Swedish Film Institute. The band will be playing some of their original compositions from this new release along with songs from their earlier albums, as well. Showtime is at 8:30 p.m. and has a $20 ticket price. Colin of new local band Daily Driver shares that they’re headlining their first show at The Logger Bar tonight. It’s a “banjo-driven pop-grass dance-machine” from Arcata comprised of brothers Colin and Cameron of the No Good Redwood Ramblers, along with Lyndsey Battle. They’re joined by local dark alt-folk duo Electro Saloon (featuring my better half) at 9 p.m. and this one’s free as well. Fresh off their show on the big stage at The Folklife Festival, The Trouble are at The Palm Lounge in Eureka tonight playing with “heavy minimalist” funkers Peach Purple at the same time and for $5.

Saturday As of press time, I think the Yes We Cann Parade and Hullabaloo is still on in Arcata, which parades through town and ends up at the Arcata Ballpark with music

starting around 3:20 p.m. with local artists Dynasty One, Winstrong, Silver Hammer, The New Traditions and B Swizlo’s Hip Hop Lounge. If you took part in the parade, I think you get in for free, otherwise it’s $20 for the festivities. Honky tonk/ soul band The Detours return to the Mad River Brewing Co. Tap Room at 6 p.m. It’s a free show, so buy ’em a beer or leave ’em a tip. Avant-psych rock is on the bill again at The Miniplex tonight with Seattle duo Zen Mother and local dune-trippers White Manna who are gearing up to tour Europe before too long. This show’s at 9 p.m. and $7 gets you in the door. If you had a good time at the Yes We Cann Hullabaloo, there’s an afterparty at Humboldt Brews in Arcata at 9:30 p.m. with Cold Blue Water, Rosewater and DJ Livingearth. The ticket price is unclear at the moment but I know you’ll save $5 when you show your wristband from said Hullabaloo. l Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Andy Powell is a congenital music lover and hosts The Album of the Week Show on KWPT 100.3 FM Tuesdays at 6 p.m. He still finds email pretty amazing.


Calendar Aug. 10-17, 2017

10 Thursday MUSIC

Selector Dub Narcotic, Monster Women. 8 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. All ages. $10-$25 sliding. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Music by LC Diamonds (rock and roll). Presented by Eureka Main Street. Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org.

THEATER The Liar. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Dorante is a charming young man with a bright future and one glaring personality quirk – he cannot tell the truth. Love and mistaken identity abound in this witty farce. $13-$16.

EVENTS Submitted

All of Rio Dell is coming out for Wildwood Days Friday evening through Sunday night, Aug. 11-13. The fest features food, fun for the kids, a soap box derby, plenty of vendors, a firefighter’s muster and live music. What better way to benefit the Rio Dell Volunteer Fire Department.

Full Kilt

Shutterstock

straightupracing.com

On your mark … The Humboldt Bay Marathon, Half Marathon, 5K and Mile Fun Run hits the road on Sunday, Aug. 13 from 7 a.m.-2 p.m. at Madaket Plaza at the foot of C Street in Eureka (see www.humboldtbaymarathon for prices). Lace up for a day in the sun or to earn a Boston qualifying time. Go on ahead — we’ll catch up.

Are the trucks around here just not big enough for you? The size and sound-obsessed can roll into Redwood Acres on Friday, Aug. 11 and Saturday, Aug. 12 at 5 p.m. to see monster trucks from Straight Up Racing jump, roar and spread some dirt around ($10-$25).

FOR KIDS Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. Eureka City School District brings free summer meals to all children and teens under the age of 18. There is no eligibility requirement and no paperwork to fill out. Breakfast 9-10 a.m. Lunch noon-1 p.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer Street, Eureka. Enter from Chester or “W” Street. Lunch from 11:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m. 441-2501. PBSNC Kids in the Garden. Second Thursday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, North Entrance, Eureka. Part of the “view, read and do” learning triangle. Each family/group leaves with a free storybook. Free. hbgf@hbgf.org. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

Submitted

The North Coast Scottish Society’s annual Frolic in the Glen and Highland Games are back in full kilt for more high-stepping, haggis-eating fun Saturday, Aug. 12 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Rohner Park (free admission, $5 admission to heavy athletics competition in the rodeo area). The frolicking kicks off at 10 a.m. with the Piper’s Call by Humboldt Highlanders Pipes and Drums and continues all day with events the whole family can enjoy. Bring the kiddos, too? Yes, we clan. The event is a great way to learn more about Scotland and Celtic history. There’ll be historical reenactments, clothing demonstrations, weaving, piping and drumming and for good fun, the popular Beard and Bonny Knees Contest. In the Village Marketplace, peruse Celtic-themed arts and crafts booths and pick up a kilt (that doesn’t have someone in it) or some chain mail for that special someone. And to fortify you for your turn at the wellie toss, there’s haggis and other Scottish food, fish and chips, hot dogs, drinks and more. New this year is the Scottish Heavy Athletic Association Heavy Athletics in the rodeo arena/grounds. These games are a big deal — they’re a full competition like the ones held at larger divisional highland games — and feature a stone put, a regulation-size caber toss (that’s the big, big one), a hammer throw and heavy weights thrown aboot. A real clash of the tartans. And if all that isn’t enough, Gatehouse Well, Good Company, Michael Ross and the Millbillies, Ukaleleians and the Academy of Irish Dance will keep things lively all day with music and dancing. — Kali Cozyris

CR Dinner and Sports Auction. 5:30 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. A benefit for CR student athletes and sports programs highlighting Dave Mogni as the honoree and featured speaker. No-host social and silent auction followed by dinner and speakers at 6:30 p.m. with the live auction to follow. $600/table of 10 or $500/table of eight.

FOOD Photo by Kali Cozyris

Woof! There It Is Leash up, dog lovers, it’s time for the coolest canine festival in Humboldt County. Sequoia Humane Society’s 22nd annual Mutt Strut Parade and Woofstock Festival trots into the Halvorsen Park on Saturday, Aug. 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ($5, $10 family max. four). Dig it. Fur is gonna fly. The fundraising event for the no-kill shelter starts with pooches on parade taking a pack walk through Old Town and ending up at Halvorsen Park, where attendees and their four, three and two-legged companions can enjoy a full day of contests, games, live music, prizes and more. Stop by and sniff hello to the variety of vendors offering services and swag for you and your furbabies, swing by the Tailwaggers Flea Market to see what’s scratching, check out the doggie fur tattoos, pet portraits and photo booth on site, and see who wins wagging rights in the dog Costume Contest. The Doggie Fun Zone and the Dash & Splash Dock Diving are back. The fun also includes live music from The Movers and the Shakers, Nate Zwerdling & Megan Hensley, Mystical Lion, The Jim Lahman Band, Band O’ Loko and Septacy. You’ve been a good human. Give yourself a treat at the SHS Barbecue Pit, which will be serving up grilled corn on the cob, grilled oysters and Barkin’ Dogs Hot Dogs with all the fixin’s, and cold beer from Six Rivers Brewery in the beer garden to wash it all down. — Kali Cozyris

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Local, GMO-free produce. Live music. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community Commons, State routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. The freshest Humboldt-County-grown and GMO-free produce along with plants, meats and other wonderful products.

MEETINGS Conservation Meeting. Second Thursday of every month, 12-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Discuss conservation issues of interest to the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www.rras.org/ calendar.html. 445-8311. Humboldt Grange 501. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Regular monthly meeting. nanettespearschade@ gmail.com. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 443-0045. Redwood Coast Woodturners. Second Thursday of every Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

29


Calendar Continued from previous page

month, 6-8:30 p.m. McKinleyville Middle School, 2285 Central Ave. All interested in are welcome, beginner to pro, no experience needed. $20. 499-9569.

ETC CASA Training. 6-9 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Help create a brighter future for a foster child by becoming a CASA volunteer. For more information call 443-3917 or visit humboldtcasa.org. andrea@humboldtcasa. org. humboldtcasa.org. Community Board Game Night. Second Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@northcoast.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 444-2288. Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. Take a historic house tour of Fern Cottage, the 150-year-old, historic 32-room estate of Joseph and Zipporah Russ. Hourly guided and self-guided tours from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. $10, $8 seniors, children under 18 free. info@ferncottage.org. www.ferncottage.org. 786-4835. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. Includes a booster for participating and the winner of each four-person pod also wins a booster. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 826-1228. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Come create with your community. Enjoy an evening of knitting, crocheting or whatever fiber craft you love. Food and drink available and bring something to share. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www.northcoastknittery.com. 442-9276.

Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

11 Friday

14TH ANNUAL

MOVIES

ART

Arts! Arcata. Second Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art. Downtown Arcata and surrounding area. Free. arcatamainstreet@ gmail.com. www.arcatamainstreet.com. 822-4500.

BOOKS Friday Afternoon Book Club. Second Friday of every month, 12-1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Fun and lively discussion group focusing on adult fiction and nonfiction. Call ahead for upcoming titles. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1905. Robert Gottlieb. 7 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. The author gives a talk based on two of his books: Food Justice, and Global Cities: Urban Environments in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, and China. Free.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Paso a Paso hosts dance therapy. Free. www. ervmgc.com. 725-3300. World Dance. 7:30 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor teaching and easy dances, 7-30-8:30 p.m., request dancing until 9:30 p.m. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. www.stalbansarcata.org. 839-3665.

LECTURE Going Up the River. 7 p.m. Rio Dell and Scotia Chamber

AHOY!

of Commerce, 406 Wildwood Ave. Historian Jerry Rohde presents sights and stories of early Humboldt County communities along the Eel, Klamath, Trinity, Van Duzen, Little and Mad rivers. Free. Ocean Night Film Screening. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. All ages. $3 donation, free for OC, Surfrider, and Baykeeper members/children 10 & under. www. arcatatheatre.com. Strangers on a Train. 7:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Alfred Hitchcock’s noir thriller about two men on a train who discuss swapping murder duties. One wasn’t joking and carries it out. $5. www.theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC Community Peace Sing-Along. 7 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. An evening of traditional songs and friendship. Finger foods or drinks to share are welcome. Materials provided to make a lantern for the Arcata Lantern Floating Ceremony. For more information, call 840-0826. Free. www.huuf.org.

THEATER

Ruddigore. 7:30-10 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Humboldt Light Opera Company presents this Gilbert and Sullivan musical in which a village cannot keep its professional bridesmaids busy due to starcrossed romances, and curses and crimes abound. $12-$18. info@hloc.org. www.hloc.org. 630-5013. The Liar. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing. Love’s Labour’s Lost. 7 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. The King of Navarre and his three companions vow to swear off women for one full year to focus on

their studies in this Shakespearean farce filled with mistaken identity, secret courtships and buffoonery. $13-$16.

EVENTS

Wildwood Days 2017. 5-11 p.m. Rio Dell Fireman’s Park, Wildwood Avenue and Center Street. A three-day festival with food, kids activities, soap box derby, vendors, firemen’s muster, live music and more. A benefit for the Rio Dell Volunteer Fire Department. info@wildwooddays.org. www. wildwooddays.org. 764-3329.

FOR KIDS

Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www.humlib.org. 725-3460. Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer Street, Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing.

FOOD Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, meats, baked goods and more, plus live music and family activities. Free.

MEETINGS A Call to Yarns. 12-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit, chat and relax at the library every week. Free. archuml@ co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954.

SPORTS

BMX Friday. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for practice and racing. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222. Monster Trucks. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris

Record Breaking

50 Breweries!

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Saturday, August 26 Fortuna’s Rohner Park

Fortuna Chamber of Commerce • Beverage Plus* • Eel River Brewery • Lost Coast Brewery Mad River Brewery • Six Rivers Brewery • Humboldt Beer Works • Redwood Curtain Brewery North Coast Co-op in Eureka & Arcata* • www.hopsinhumboldt.com/tickets* * VIP Ticket Locations

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

N

O

RT

RN H C OAST JOU

AL


St., Eureka. $10-$25. www.redwoodacres.com. 5 p.m. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Enormous trucks kicking up dirt. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

ETC Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Aug. 10 listing. Lunch Out Loud. 12-1:30 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Make calls to elected officials on current issues of concern. All information provided, just bring your charged cell phone and brown bag lunch or snacks to share. Hosted by North Coast People’s Alliance, with calling sheets provided by Elizabeth Conner. Free. hello@northcoastpeoplesalliance. org. northcoastpeoplesalliance.org. 599-2951. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

12 Saturday ART

Arts on the Avenue. Second Saturday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Eagle Prairie Arts District, 406 Wildwood Ave., Rio Dell. Local artists, artisans, kids’ activities and music all along the avenue. Free. www.facebook.com/info.epad/info. 506-5081. Yart Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The Studio, 139 3rd St., Eureka. Art sale to benefit artists in our community. There will also be chili dogs, baked goods, drinks and games. Free. thestudio. hcar@gmail.com. thestudioonline.org. 443-1428.

DANCE Hafla: A Middle Eastern Dance Party. 6 p.m. Beginnings, 4700 Briceland Thorn Road, Redway. Dancers from Southern Humboldt and beyond perform. Presented by Rockin’ Rubies Belly Dance. Dessert buffet available. $10, kids under age 12 are $5.. 986-7056.

MOVIES An Afternoon with Kiara Windrider. 2 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. As part of the series Films of Inspiration and Information, watch short films 5 Truths about Earth’s Magnetic Reversal, What a Magnetic Reversal Means for Earth, and The #1 Risk to Earth. Plus, a presentation about the journey of human evolution in context of long-range cycles of time. Refreshments served. $5-$15 sliding scale.

THEATER Ruddigore. 7:30-10 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Aug. 11 listing. The Liar. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing. Love’s Labour’s Lost. 7 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. See Aug. 11 listing.

EVENTS HAWC Walk/Run. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. United Indian Health Services (Potowat), 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata. The 26th annual United Indian Health Services event features keynote speaker Joseph Giovannetti and a 5K group run that starts at 11:30 a.m. Registration ends at noon. Free. Dennis. Hernandez@CRIHB.ORG. 825-4162. Arcata Lantern Floating Ceremony. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. 35th annual event honors those who lost their lives to the atomic bomb and all who have passed but are not forgotten. Bike, walk with a flashlight or take a shuttle from parking lots at I and Samoa streets or the G Street Marsh Interpretive Center parking lot. Free.

Friends of the Dunes Bee-Day Party. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Celebrate conserving coastal habitats for 35 years with activities to learn about native bees, bee crafts for kids, a special bee-day treat and a self-guided hike on the Wildberries Trail to the beach. Free. info@friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397. Frolic in the Glen & Highland Games. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. An all-day event with something to fill every Celtic heart. Live music, food, entertainment, vendors and Scottish Heavy Athletic Competition. Free. www.northcoastscots.org. Humbugs VW Car Show and BBQ. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Enter your VW (in any condition 25 years or older) or just come to see the cars. Visit Humbugs VW on Facebook. Spectators free, $24 VW entry fee, membership and barbecue. resherman46@ gmail.com. 822-6724. Wildwood Days 2017. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Rio Dell Fireman’s Park, Wildwood Avenue and Center Street. See Aug. 11 listing. Woofstock and Mutt Strut. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. A full-day of man’s best friend, live music and dog contests. Proceeds benefit the Sequoia Humane Society. $5, $10 family (max 4). 442-1782. Yes We Cann Parade & HullaBaloo. 2-10 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Celebrate cannabis culture. Walk in the free parade and get into Hullabaloo free. $20 for Hullabaloo, free for kids under 12. contact@gohumboldtgreen. com. yeswecannparade.com/. 443-3140.

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ENDS

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Vote with FACTS — not with EMOTIONS

AND

FOR KIDS Family Arts Day at the MGMA. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Children will make art inspired by Ann Holsberry’s exhibition New Navigation. $5, $2 students and seniors, free HAC members and children 17 and under. janine@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278. Story Time with Kathy Frye. Second Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.facebook. com/RioDellLibrary. 764-3333. Summer Reading Grand Finale. 2-3 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Kids can celebrate the end of summer reading by returning their Bingo Activity & Reading logs for a prize and enjoying watermelon, art, music and crafts. Bingo logs must be submitted by 5 p.m. Free. archuml@co.humboldt. ca.us. 822-5954. Weekend Play Group. Second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. The only weekend play group in Humboldt County. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. redwooddiscoverymuseum@ gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

Invite you to a free, nonpartisan, special presentation about how

to AVOID MISINFORMATION and VOTE SMART

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017 5:30 pm Sequoia Conference Center 901 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka

FOOD Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association market features fresh fruits and vegetables, humanely raised meats and eggs, goat cheese, honey, nursery starts for the garden, native and ornamental plants, flowers, fiber, prepared food, live music and more. Conscious reggae music by Ju Drum with Seed N Soil. Free. www.humfarm.org. Rabia’s Honey Nut Cake Demos. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St. Learn how to make Rabia’s Honey Nut Cake at this fundraiser for The Roshni Centre for Women in collaboration with Swat Relief Initiative. Bring a notebook to take notes about the recipe and method and a rolling pin. $35-$50 sliding. roshnicentreforwomen@ gmail.com. 826-7123.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife SancContinued on next page »

Richard, Kimball, Vote Smart President, will be offering a presentation about:

• Why facts matter —

• “A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is still putting on its shoes.” Mark Twain. • The Founding Fathers knew that without knowledge of facts, “factions” would take control.

The reasons behind political intolerance and the abandonment of facts —

How we can fight back with truth by using Vote Smart (votesmart.org) —

• Fun, famous and dangerous political commercials that manipulate people’s emotions, instead of engaging them intellectually.

• A nonpartisan nonprofit (mostly volunteers) that was founded by Presidents Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford, Senators Barry Goldwater and George McGovern, and several other notable politicians. • Provides free access to information on over 40,000 candidates and elected officials on VOTING RECORDS, PUBLIC STATEMENTS, CAMPAIGN FINANCE, PUBLIC STATEMENTS INTEREST GROUP RATINGS and BIOGRAPHICAL AND CONTACT INFORMATION.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Calendar Continued from previous page

HEY, BANDS. Submit your gigs online: northcoastjournal.com

tuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. With leader Barbara Reisman. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Cindy Moyer. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Forestry Practices Hike. 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Humboldt Redwood Company, 125 Main Street, Scotia. Led by a forester and wildlife biologist, the moderate hike provides a firsthand viewing of forestry, conservation and restoration in the Yager and Lawrence Creek watersheds. Includes some touring by vehicle. Bring lunch and plenty of water, and wear sturdy shoes and layers. Free. anna@sanctuaryforest. org. 986-2087. Hikshari’ Volunteer Trail Stewards Workday. 9-11 a.m. Hikshari’ Trail, Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary, Eureka. Help keep the Hikshari’ Trail and surroundings clean and well-maintained. The first 15 volunteers get a Humboldt Bay Trail sticker. Meet at the Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary parking lot at at 9 a.m. Bring water. Some gloves provided. Free. Parker Creek Trail to Old Home Beach Walk. 9-11 a.m. Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. Join a naturalist on a walk during low tide. Allie Lindgren and Zack Brown share stories and perspectives on the significance of the area to Yurok people, past and present. The trail is moderate with approximately 70 stairs. Meet at the Trinidad Coastal Land Trust Office. RSVP. Free. trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. 677-2501. Restoration Day. Feb. 8, 9 a.m. Trinidad Head, Trinidad State Beach. Remove invasive plants. Wear sturdy shoes. Gloves and tools are provided. Meet at the parking lot next to the Trinidad School. Free. Michelle.Forys@parks.ca.gov. 677-3109.

SPORTS Monster Trucks. 5 p.m. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See Aug. 11 listing. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. See Aug. 11 listing.

ETC Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Aug. 10 listing. Magic the Gathering: Standard. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Compete for prize packs and Standard Series Booster Packs only available at participating game stores. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

COMEDY Comedy Night. 7 p.m. Bear River Casino and Resort Ballroom, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Headliners Kabir Kabeezy Singh, Jessica Grant and Saul Trujillo. 21+. $15, $35 cocktail table for 2. www.bearrivercasino.com.

13 Sunday ART

Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Trinidad, Downtown. Local artisans present their arts and crafts. Enjoy live music each week and barbecue. Free.

DANCE Burgundy Blues. 7-9:30 p.m. The Fuzion, 233 F St., Eureka.

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

A blues/fusion social partner dancing group that meets every Sunday and Tuesday of the month. $8. burgundybluesdance@gmail.com. www.thefuzion.com.

MOVIES Wild & Scenic Environmental Film Festival. 4-8 p.m. Redwood Playhouse, 286 Sprowel Creek Road, Garberville. Lost Coast Interpretive Association’s annual benefit features six environmental adventure films to inspire you. $20, $15 seniors and students. info@lostcoast.org. www.lostcoast. org. 510-303-2189.

MUSIC Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic. org/Bayside. 499-8516. Humboldt Bach Festival. 2 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church, 90 Rusk Lane, Redway. Enjoy three Bach organ works plus Mozart and songs from England and America. Refreshments served. Donations appreciated. Trinity Alps Chamber Music Festival. 4-6 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. The Trinity Alps Chamber Music Festival presents concerts of classical chamber music to communities across Northern California. Benefits the organization and the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Suggested donation $20. janine@humboldtarts.org. www.trinityalpscmf.org/concerts--events.html. 442-0278.

THEATER Ruddigore. 2-4:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Aug. 11 listing. Merlin. 2 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Family-friendly show by Pam Service. Part of Plays in the Park. Free. Open Theater Sundays in August. 12-4 p.m. Poncho Polo Puppets, 625 Lighthouse Road, Petrolia. Poncho Polo Puppets present Lakas Canoe at 1 p.m. Audience volunteers perform puppet parade. Fundraiser for repair of the theater’s foundation. Free.

EVENTS Wildwood Days 2017. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Rio Dell Fireman’s Park, Wildwood Avenue and Center Street. See Aug. 11 listing.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Pancake Breakfast. Second Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. Breakfast with your choice of eggs, ham, sausage, toast, pancakes, coffee, tea and orange juice. $5, $2.50 kids ages 6-12, free for kids under 6. Veterans Pancake Breakfast. Second Sunday of every month, 8 a.m.-noon. Fortuna Veterans Hall/Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Pancakes, sausage, eggs and bacon. Coffee and orange juice included. Benefits local youth groups and veterans events in the Eel River Valley. $8. vfwpost2207@ gmail.com. 725-4480.


OUTDOORS North Group Sierra Club Hike. 10:15 a.m. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, 127011 Newton B Drury, Orick. A moderate, 6-mile hike in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park’s Ossagon Trail to Parkway Trail. Bring water, lunch and hiking footwear. No dogs. Rain/wind cancels. Free. mgroomster@gmail.com. 668-4275. Audubon Society Birding Trip. Second Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Learn the common birds of Humboldt on a two- to three-hour walk. Meet at the Visitor Center. Free. 822-3613.

901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. The League of Women Voters of Humboldt County and the Humboldt Branch of the American Association of University Women co-sponsor this multi-media presentation by Richard Kimball, president of Vote Smart, as part of the “Facts Matter” Western states tour. A non-partisan event. Refreshments served. Free. 443-1291.

MUSIC Ukulele Play and Sing Group. Third Tuesday of every month, 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All skill levels. Other instruments on approval. $2. veganlady21@yahoo.com.

SPORTS

FOR KIDS

BMX Practice and Racing. 1-3 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for some fun. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $11 race. www.facebook. com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222. Humboldt Bay Marathon, Half Marathon, 5K and Mile Fun Run. 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Enjoy a Mile Fun Run along the bay, earn your Boston qualifying time, finish your first half marathon or run the new 5K. Price varies by race. See website. info@humboldtbaymarathon.com. www.humboldtbaymarathon.com/.

Arcata Family Resource Center Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon. Arcata Elementary School, 2400 Baldwin St. Playgroup for children 0-5 and their parents and caregivers. 826-1002. Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum. org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Aug. 13 listing.

ETC

FOOD

Magic the Gathering: Standard. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. Come play Standard every Sunday, compete for prize packs and Standard Series Booster Packs only available at participating game stores! $5 to play. nugamesonline@ gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 826-1228.

Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. WIC and Cal Fresh accepted with $10 bonus match when using EBT card. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Pick up produce, baked goods, plant starts and more right across from the Miranda Gardens Resort. Free. www.mirandagardens.com/specials.htm. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Purchase GMO-free produce, humanely raised meats, pastured eggs, plant starts for your garden, flowers and more. Live music every week and CalFresh EBT cards accepted. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Fresh fruits, vegetables, ornamental trees and plants, plant starts, all with an ocean view. Free. 986-7229.

14 Monday DANCE

Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music. Tonight dance to Sonny Curtis (old time rock and roll). $5. www. facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

MUSIC Humboldt Harmonaires Weekly Gathering. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Singing at 7 to 9:30 p.m., with snacks and coffee break at 8:20 p.m. Free. Singfourpart@gmail.com. 445-3939.

SPOKEN WORD Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/ perform your original poetry or hear others. $1.

FOOD One-Log Farmers Market. 1-5:30 p.m. One-Log House, 705 US Highway 101, Garberville. On the lawn. 672-5224.

MEETINGS VFW Post 2207 Monthly Meeting. Second Monday of every month, 7-8:30 p.m. Fortuna Veterans Hall/Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Fostering camaraderie among U.S. veterans of overseas conflicts and advocating for veterans, the military and communities. Free. 725-4480. Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

15 Tuesday

COMEDY Savage Henry Comedy Night. 9 p.m. The Jam, 915 H St., Arcata. Local and out of town comedians bring the ha-has. $5. 822-4766.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games range from $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw St., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Lunch with Laura. 12-2 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Bring your favorite fiber craft project (or come find a new one) and a snack or sack lunch. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www.northcoastknittery. com. 442-9276. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. $5 gets you a booster for participating and the winner of each 4-person pod also wins a booster. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

LECTURE

Richard Kimball. 5:30 p.m. Sequoia Conference Center,

Continued on next page »

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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16 Wednesday BOOKS

Storytime with Ms. Sue. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Stories, songs, rhymes and more every Wednesday. Free. archuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954.

FOR KIDS

MOVIES

FOOD

Repo Man (1984). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A Los Angeles slacker and punk rocker lands a gig working for an eccentric repossession agent. Free w/$5 food/bev purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

FOR KIDS Four Shillings Short. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. A family concert featuring an array of instruments, songs in multiple languages and lively audience interaction with musicians Aodh Og O’Tuama and Christy Martin. Free. 269-1910. Storytime. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

MEETINGS AfterWork Network Healthy California Act. 5:30 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Learn about SB 562, the Healthy California Act, Guaranteed Healthcare for All, by Pat Kanzler. Free. www.eurekawomansclub.org. Citizen’s Law Enforcement Liaison Committee. Third Wednesday of every month, 4 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Learn more about the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office and ask questions. Free. Dow’s Prairie Grange. Third Wednesday of every month, 6 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Get involved in your community Grange. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

ETC

Let’s Be Friends

Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. www.nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Trivia Night. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Six rounds, five questions, various categories. Witty team names are rewarded. Fun for friends, family, dates, aliens, dinosaurs. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

17 Thursday MUSIC

Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet.com. 839-2816. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing.

What’s your food crush?

THEATER

We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email us your tip and we’ll check it out!

NCJ HUM PLATE

jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

from Flynn Creek Circus, the Elemental outdoor pageant, Fervor Fest and an outdoor interactive art exhibit by Lush Newton. david@arcataplayhouse.org. www.creameryfestival.com. 822-1575.

Flynn Creek Circus Inter-Active. 7-9 p.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. Featuring the best acts from the U.S., Canada, Belgium, France, Guatemala and Turkmenistan, Flynn Creek Circus’ show fuses comedy, improvisation and circus theater. Each showing is unique and full of surprises. $12-$50. circus@flynncreekcircus.com. 684-9389.

EVENTS Creamery Festival. 7-9 p.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. The Creamery District celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Creamery Building with tours, performances

Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing. Chocolate of the Solomon Islands. 7 p.m. Dick Taylor Chocolate Factory, 4 West Fourth St., Eureka. See and hear about the work Dick Taylor has been doing in the Solomon Islands for the last couple of years and taste a wide range of chocolates made from Solomon cacao. $20 (includes Solomon Island bar). Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Aug. 10 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community Commons, State routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. See Aug. 10 listing.

ETC Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Aug. 10 listing. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. See Aug. 10 listing. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See Aug. 10 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Aug. 10 listing.

Heads Up …

The Humboldt Arts Council is accepting entries for the 23rd annual Junque Arte Competition and Exhibition Sept. 20 from noon to 5 p.m. at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Entry guidelines available at the museum or at www. humboldtarts.org. The McKinleyville Community Services District announces two alternate member vacancies on the Recreation Advisory Committee. Letters of application may be mailed to the MCSD, Attn: Lesley Frisbee, P.O. Box 2037, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Contact the Parks and Recreation Office at 839-9003. Arcata Fire District is seeking a community-minded individual to serve on an elected five-person board of directors. Visit www.arcatafire.org to download an application. For more information, call 825-2000. Interested in volunteering for EPIC? Contact Briana Villalobos, briana@wildcalifornia.org or call 822-7711 to be added to the volunteer list Headwaters Fund mini-grants available for projects to promote local economic development. For more information call 476-4809 or visit www.humboldtgov.org/2193/ Mini-Grants. The Morris Graves Museum of Art seeks volunteer greeters for Friday and Saturday afternoons, noon to 2:30 p.m. and 2:30 to 5 p.m. Contact Janine Murphy, Museum Programs Manager at janine@humboldtarts.org or 442-0278 ext 202. North Coast Community Garden Collaborative seeks donated garden supplies, monetary donations and/or volunteers. Contact 269-2071 or debbiep@nrsrcaa.org. Volunteers needed for the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Call 826-2359 or email amic@cityofarcata.org. Volunteers wanted for Eureka VA clinic. Call 269-7502. ●


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Filmland

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“If the man comin’, make ready for the man.” Dark Tower

Fight and Flight

Tower wobbles, Detroit burns and Kidnap is on the run By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

THE DARK TOWER. It’s never surprising when a Stephen King novel series is adapted for film, but an eight-book series? In 95 minutes? The Dark Tower turns out to be a later chunk of that series, with a prequel TV show on the horizon. One hopes that project fares better and makes the most of the actors wasted here. We’re told in the opening shot that the only thing guarding our world is the tower at the center of the universe, which can be felled “by the mind of a child.” With that setup, we meet Jake (Tom Taylor), a gaunt adolescent obsessively drawing creepy scenes from his nightmares about another world filled with rodent-like creatures masquerading as humans, sapping the minds of children to power a laser attack on the aforementioned tower. There, the Gunslinger, a dusty, sad-eyed Idris Elba, duels with the Man in Black (Matthew McConaughey), who’s less like Johnny Cash and more like Gucci-era Tom Ford’s idea of Lucifer. Eventually, Jake leaps into that other world to team up with the Gunslinger, hike the barren landscape and battle the Man in Black back on Earth. The story connects to King’s other works and hits all his buttons: a troubled psychic boy, his well-meaning mother and cold stepfather, a heroic late father and even a wild-eyed prophetic homeless man. Director Nikolaj Arcel (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, 2009) moves through the exposition so quickly that it feels like a hasty book report, skimming past the

deeper themes in a story ultimately about fathers and sons. Action sequences are rushed and obscured by darkness, though the supernatural gunplay is good fun. The Dark Tower is, however, a chance to see Elba — who was alternately terrifying and charismatic as Stringer Bell in HBO’s The Wire and who overshadowed lead Charlie Hunnam in Pacific Rim (2013) — in a too-rare lead role. Paired with a young actor not quite up to the task, Elba carries the film with his glowering intensity, quiet grief and hesitant attempts at connecting. McConaughey, too, is at least having a good time, runway-strutting around with his disco-goth shirt unbuttoned, catching bullets and bullying his management staff. One wonders what they might have done with more time and script. PG13. 95M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

DETROIT. In making a movie based on a true story, even a documentary, there will always be something left out and there will always be some of the teller in the telling. In this moment, making a movie about racist police brutality seems doubly risky, but also doubly necessary. Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal, who teamed up for The Hurt Locker (2008) and Zero Dark Thirty (2012) have stitched together a fictionalized account of the crushing story of people killed during the 1967 Detroit riots based on witness testimony, records and interviews. It

707.825.0108 • 791 8th St., Arcata, CA, 95521

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Filmland Continued from previous page

Continuing

ATOMIC BLONDE. Stunt-man-turneddirector David Leitch brings Cold War cool, exceptional fight choreography and a quieter, better paced spy movie than the trailer suggests. Charlize Theron delivers a winking, knife-edged performance. R. 109M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

THE BIG SICK. Kumail Nanjiani and Zoe Kazan star in a romantic comedy that breaks new ground as boy meets girl and girl goes into coma. Michael Showalter directs this deceptively simple, unassuming movie in which the deeply funny is juxtaposed with the devastating. R. 120M. MINOR.

Listening to Democracy Now! in 2017. Kidnap may seem a departure from their previous projects but they build the film on familiar territory: fear, violence and the lingering price of survival. After a quick animated brush-up on the history of African American migration to industrial centers like Detroit, we cut to the social club bust that sparked the uprising in that city. Soon the revolt escalates from throwing bottles to looting and burning buildings, and the National Guard is rolling through the streets in tanks, shooting at kids in windows in its hunt for snipers. Into this ugly mess roll a trio of jittery, young, white cops led by Krauss (Will Poulter, all pink-faced rage), who’s put back on the street after an indisputably bad shooting/murder with a “Calm down out there” from his superior. He and his crew, aided by National Guardsmen, double down on abusing their authority to tragic results when a prank leads them to a possible sniper at the Algiers Hotel. There, Motown hopeful Larry (Algee Smith) and his pal/manager Fred (Jacob Latimore) are licking their wounds, chatting up a couple of white girls and waiting out the night after the riots cancel a performance in front of an A&R man. They, along with a handful of other black men will spend the night lined up with their faces to a wall, beaten bloody and interrogated, some of them killed. Throughout the night, Dismukes, a black security guard at a nearby grocery store, played by the earnest John Boyega (The Force Awakens, 2015), attempts to walk the tightrope of cooperating with the police when they are clearly bent on violence, looking the other way and urging calm among the hostages — and that is what they are — so they might “survive the night.” The film maintains an undercurrent of panic throughout, so we are braced for impact even when Larry is immersed in his own disappointment, singing to an empty auditorium. To a person, the actors put in

devastating performances, not only in the adrenaline-fueled night at the hotel, but in the aftermath, when the city is snowed over and the survivors are hobbled by the trauma of what they’ve endured. Aside from one ham-fisted “good cop” moment, the film and its cast succeed in showing us not only the extreme bad actors but the complicity, individual and systemic, that set the stage for their crimes and leave them unpunished. Somewhere in the relentless, unflinching violence, you may wonder if there is a point to showing all of it, face after bloodied face. The best justification comes within the movie itself, when Carl (an excellent Jason Mitchel) waves a gun and menaces his friend in imitation of a white cop, “demonstrating white power.” You’ve got to feel it to wrap your mind around it. It’s a story white Americans, directors and writers among them, can own and tell, too. R. 143M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. KIDNAP. Did three films with black lead actors open in the same weekend in Humboldt? So they did. And one is even a fun, if slightly goofy, thriller. Who knew? Halle Berry plays Karla, harried waitress and divorced single mom who is tirelessly upbeat with her son. While at the park and on the phone with her divorce lawyer, a couple (Chris McGinn and Lew Temple) snatch her son (Sage Correa) and take off with him in a beater car. Dropping her phone as she runs, Karla jumps in her minivan and sets off after the kidnappers in a wild highway chase that leaves a wake of piled up cars. Why they take him doesn’t really matter — we’re in it for the chase. Talking to herself in the car, Berry’s monologues can seem a bit like self affirmations and her tough talk is clunky, but she does a solid job on the action and the ebb and flow of panic throughout the film. Sure, you’ve got to suspend disbelief and look past some messy editing, but there are genuine thrills to be had, like

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

when the minivan runs low on gas or a cop tries to pull Karla over. Hell, there’s even a pivotal scene with a landline phone. And when the inscrutable kidnappers show themselves, McGinn, with her narrow, glinting eyes, and Temple, who may have just ended the trucker hat trend, set a new bar for greasy desperation. R. 82M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill For showtimes, see the Journal’s listings at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards’ Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

ANNABELLE: CREATION. Everybody is freaking out about scary clowns but the real threat is creepy dolls, right? R. 109M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

CITY OF GHOSTS. Documentary about activist citizen journalists and their underground resistance against ISIS. Directed by Matthew Heineman. R. 92M. MINIPLEX. THE GLASS CASTLE. Based on Jeannette Walls’ memoir, this family drama stars Brie Larson as a young woman growing up poor and on the road with her alcoholic father (Woody Harrelson). PG13. 127M. BROADWAY.

AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL: TRUTH TO POWER. This update on the original documentary starring Al Gore focuses on the possibility of an “energy revolution.” PG. 98M. BROADWAY.

THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE. Squirrely sequel about animals trying to save their park. Voiced by Will Arnett, Katherine Heigl, Maya Rudolph and Jackie Chan. PG. 91M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

JURASSIC PARK (1993). Yes, this is now old enough to be a “flashback” movie and those of us who saw it in the theater are officially dinosaurs. Please preserve me in amber. PG13. 127M. BROADWAY.

DESPICABLE ME 3. An out of work Gru (Steve Carell) returns to a life of crime, meets his long-lost twin and battles a villain stuck in the ‘80s (Trey Parker). With Kristen Wiig. PG. 156M. BROADWAY. DUNKIRK. Christopher Nolan’s focused and intimate telling of this World War II story of pinned troops, outnumbered airmen and hail-Mary civilian rescue effort brings each character to life with the wave-action of hope and hopelessness. PG13. 106M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. THE EMOJI MOVIE. *Eye-roll emoji. PG. 86M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

ENDLESS POETRY. Chilean filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s auto-biopic about joining the bohemian scene in his youth during the 1940s. NR. 128M. MINIPLEX. GIRLS TRIP. Almost 30 years after “Ladies First” dropped, Queen Latifah, Regina Hall, Jada Pinkett Smith and Tiffany Haddish star in this crass tale of four lifelong friends’ trip to the Essence Festival in New Orleans. R. 122M. BROADWAY. MAUDIE. Sally Hawkins stars in this biopic of arthritic artist Maud Lewis, who painted in Nova Scotia. With Ethan Hawke as her taciturn husband. PG13. 115M. MINOR. SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING. Co-writer/director Jon Watts (Clown, 2014; Cop Car, 2015) makes good on a tremendous opportunity here, utilizing a talented cast to great effect and bringing the franchise back to its sweetspot. PG13. 133M. FORTUNA, BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS. Luc Besson’s comic book adaptation feels misconceived with its story of an idyllic planet ravaged by humankind, poorly constructed military intrigue and a thin love story. PG13. 137M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES. Caser (Andy Serkis) sets out on a quest of vengeance after the apes are pulled into war with a ruthless colonel (Woody Harrelson). PG13. 150M. BROADWAY. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ●


Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts POETRY CLASS (ENG. 32): WITH DAVID HOLPER. Learn to write, improve, and revise your poetry. Info on publication. Meets Friday from 1:00−4:15 pm. Sept. 1 − Dec. 15, 2017. College of the Redwoods, Eureka Campus. Enroll at redwoods.edu or call 476−4370 for more information.(A−0810) POTTERY CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: FALL SESSION September 11 − November 18, 2017 Full Schedule of classes@fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826−1445. Sign up today! (A−0907)

Communication COMMUNITY MEDIATOR TRAINING An interac− tive 34−hour course in community board style mediation. Regular tuition: $375. Discounts avail− able, including early bird pricing before Aug. 29. Weekdays: Oct. 2, 3, 5, 10 & 12, 5:15 pm − 9:00 pm. Saturdays: Oct. 7 & 14, 8:45 am − 5:00 pm. Details at www.humboldtmediationservices.org or 445−2505. FICTION WRITERS’ GROUP seeks new member. Biweekly 3−hr mtgs in Eureka. No poems or non− fiction. 5p sample to 51frontier@suddenlink.net LEARN JAPANESE FROM A NATIVE SPEAKER. Wednesdays, 6−8pm, Sept 6−27. On HSU’s campus. $85. Call 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (C−0810) HOW TO COPE WITH GRIEF EXPLORED AT LIFE− TREE CAFÉ Strategies for finding peace after a loss will be discussed at Lifetree Café on Sunday, August 13, 7 p.m. The program, titled "Coping with Grief: Find Your Path to Peace,"features a filmed interview with Ken Doka, a grief counselor and author of more than 20 books, including Grieving Beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Woman Mourn. "It’s a common misunderstanding that grief follows a fairly predictable pattern,"says Doka. "But each of us has our own pathway; each of us takes our own journey as we grieve."During the program, Lifetree Café participants will have the opportunity to discuss self−care strategies they’ve used during times of grief. Admission to the 60−minute event is free. Lifetree Café is located at Campbell Creek Connexion on the corner of Union and 13th St., Arcata. Lifetree Café is a place where people gather for conversa− tion about life and faith in a casual, comfortable setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Bob at 707 672 2919 or robertdipert@gmail.com (C−0810)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0928)

CAPTURE A LITTLE BIT OF COUNTRY learning Country Two−step at Dance with Debbie’s work− shop Wed., July 26 and get back to the basics with our "Basics of Partnering" workshop Wed., Aug 33. Both workshops meet 7:00−9:00p.m., all levels welcome, no partner required, $10/person. (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (D−0817) EUREKA SYMPHONY CHORUS AUDITIONS! Are you a singer who loves being in a chorus? Come join the singing and audition for a place in this wonderful group of performers, led by Carol Jacobson. The auditions will be held September 8th and 9th for all voices. Want to join? Contact Vanessa at vkibbe@gmail.com FREE WEST AFRICAN DRUM CLASSES Friday 5:30− 7pm. HSU Music Room 131 Contact Joe Bishop 707− 601−5347 Drums available to use or purchase (DMT−0831) NORTH COAST DANCE COMPANY AUDITIONS! Monday, August 21st from 5:30−7:30pm at the North Coast Dance Studio. Come ready to dance with Pointe shoes, headshot, resume, and your calendar to note any conflicts. For ages 14+ (D−0817) NORTH COAST DANCE SUMMER INTENSIVE BLITZ, $200! August 17, 18, and 19 with Guest Artists Josh and Elizabeth at the North Coast Dance Studio. Partnering, Men’s Class, Pointe, Rep and more... Intermediate and above dancers welcome; partial scholarships available Call 707.442.7779 to register (D−0817) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0831) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0831)

Fitness NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−0831) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0831)

Continued on next page »

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0831)

Home & Garden SUSTAINABLE LIVING CLASSES AT HSU. Intro to Herbs. Green Building. $75/$65, 10 & 12−week sessions. Classes begin Aug. 30. www.humboldt.edu/extended (H−0810)

Kids & Teens STUDIO SCHOOL: PUPPETS & MARIONETTES! Art classes for kids ages 5−13. Saturdays, 10am−12pm starting Sept. 9. $110. www.humboldt.edu/ studioschool (K−0810) POTTERY CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: FALL SESSION September 11 − November 18, 2017 Full Schedule of classes@fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826−1445. Sign up today! (K−0810)

Lectures 2017 CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH SUMMIT Thu., Aug. 17, 1−8 p.m. and Fri., Aug. 18, 8 a.m.−4:30 p.m. $60 for Thursday, $100 for both days. CONTACT: 707−445−7087, http://www.0to8mhc.org/2017− childrens−mental−health−summit/ clampro@hcoe.org. The second annual Children’s Mental Health Summit brings a wide range of local and statewide experts with cutting edge informa− tion about brain development, working with chil− dren and building resilience into our community. Open to anyone who touches the life of a child and their family. (L−0810)

50 and Better FACEBOOK FOR SENIORS! August 21, 23, 28 & 30, 2017 10am − 11:30am This class is for beginners, will provide hands−on instruction, and teach students what they can do with Facebook. Instruction will be gentle and slow−paced to provide under− standing and practice with the main features of Facebook. Call 707−476−4500 for more information.(O−0810) OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0824) POTTERY CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: FALL SESSION September 11 − November 18, 2017 Full Schedule of classes@fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826−1445. Sign up today! O−0907) SENIORS! INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET: SAMPLE THE POSSIBILITIES. Sept. 11, 13, 18 & 20, 2017 10am − 11:30am Explore the possibilities the Internet has to offer by learning about various and popular web−based applications. This beginning class will offer hands−on instruction using computers and an internet browser. Class requires that students have basic computer skills. Call 707− 476−4500 for more information. (O−727)

Spiritual ANNUAL TEACHINGS WITH KHANDRO RINPOCHE August 25 − 27 at Rangjung Yeshe Gomde in Leggett. Gomde California is pleased to welcome Jetsun Khandro Rinpoche back this summer for her annual teachings. Visit gomdeusa.org for registration. (S−0824)

ANNUAL SEMINAR WITH CHOKYI NYIMA RINPOCHE AND LAMA TSULTRIM SANGPO. August 10 − 18 at Rangjung Yeshe Gomde in Leggett. Part 1: Gateway to Buddhist Practice − August 10−13. Part 2: Directly Meeting Your Buddha Nature − August 12−18. Ocean of Amrita Puja: August 13. Visit gomdeusa.org for registration. (S−0810) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sunday 7:55 a.m. at Trillium Dance Studio, 855 8th St (next to the Post Office). Dharma talks are offered two Sundays per month at 9:20 a.m. following meditation. EUREKA: Wed’s, 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte St., enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 12.For more information call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. (S−0831) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0831) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. www.tarotofbecoming.com (707) 442−4240 carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1102)

YOUR CLASS HERE

4 4 2 -1 4 0 0 × 3 0 5

Humboldt Honey Wine presents

Paint Night

“Booze and Brushes” Friday Nights at 6pm

Moonlight Dance 8/11/17

Check in starts at 6pm, we begin painting at 6:30. Reserve you spot by pre pay on our website at www.humboldthoneywine.com or calling us at (707)599-7973. $45 per person. Includes wine tasting & snacks. Humboldt Honey Wine 735 3rd Street (between H & I) Eureka (707) 599-7973

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


Workshops

Continued from previous page

Sports & Recreation BEAU PRE GOLF 2017 GOLF CLINIC SCHEDULE Four Lessons $80 Tuesday Evenings 6−7pm Clinic Start Dates Session 1 − July 11, 18, 25 & Aug 1 Session 2 − Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 Session 3 − Sept 12, 19, 29, Oct 3 Topics Covered − Putting, chipping, irons, woods, playing on the course. Great for Beginners and Intermediates. Call (707) 839−2342

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0831) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−0810) PARENT EFFECTIVENESS TRAINING Saturdays September 9 − November 11, 2017 10am − 1pm $350 Scholarships may be available. For more informa− tion call Ganansini at 707−923−3065. Located at CR Garberville Instructional Site. Whether you’re the parent of a toddler or a teenager, you know that parenting can be challenging˙even overwhelming at times. Unfortunately, children don’t come with an instruction manual. And, being a parent doesn’t always mean that you automatically or instinctively know what to do. Class offers proven communica− tion skills that really work. This program was created by award−winning psychologist and three− time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, Dr. Thomas Gordon, in 1962 and has been continually updated since. (T−0810)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0629) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0629)

Vocational ADVANCED MEETINGS LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP. Leading Organizational & Community Change program. Facilitate high−stakes meetings. Aug. 16− 18, 9am−5pm. $525. www.humboldt.edu/locc (V−0810) AUTO BODY COLLISION REPAIR INFORMA− TIONAL MEETINGS: August 16th and 30th 6−8pm. Class dates: 9/12/17 − 12/19/17 Classroom Days/ Time: TTH 2:30 − 5:30pm Externship Days/Time: TTH − 8:00am − 1:00pm, WF 1:00pm − 5:00p This course will cover all aspects of the Auto Body Collison Repair industry including safety, esti− mating, detailing, paint prep, removing and replacement of parts, frame rack setup and measuring techniques, weld on panels and suspen− sion and alignments. Body and dent repair, prep− ping, and masking for paint. The Externship portion will consist of hands on learning at local Auto Body Shops. Call 707−476−4500 for more information!! (V−0810) BECOME A PHLEBOTOMIST! Apply at 525 D St. in Eureka up until August 18th! Class Dates: Tuesdays and Sundays September 28, 2017 − January 18, 2018 5:30− 8:30pm. Call 707−476−4500 for more informa− tion. (V−0810) INJECTIONS AND VENIPUNCTURE CLASSES for those who are employed or seeking employment, in a medical office setting and will be working under the supervision of a physician. One−day trainings on September 17 & 23, 2017 8am−6pm Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0810)

BECOME A REAL ESTATE AGENT! Live Real Estate Principles, Practice, and Finance classes includes: textbooks, all course materials, instructors, and upon successful completion of each course, a Certificate of Completion! Tues & Thursdays starting in October. Call 707−476−4500 for more information! (V−0810) DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS CERTIFICATE Fall classes begin Aug. 22. InDesign, Photoshop, Photography, Illustrator. $125−$150/class. Take any 3 for certificate. www.humboldt.edu/extended/ digicomm (V−0810) LEARN MICROSOFT EXCEL FROM A PRO. Begin− ning & Intermediate evening classes begin Sept 12. $75/4 sessions. Convenient Eureka location. www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−0810) MEDICAL ASSISTING INFORMATIONAL MEETING: August 16, 2017 3 − 5pm at 525 D St. in Eureka, CA Class Dates: 9/20/17 − 12/22/17 College of the Redwoods Community Education offers training to become a Certified Medical Assistant. This not−for −credit class with lecture and in−class labs includes clinical rotation at a local medical office. Front and back office Medical Assistant skills will be covered in an interactive classroom format. Call 707−476− 4500 for more information! (V−0810) PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Aug 29 − Oct 17, 2017 Tues & Thurs 6 − 9:30pm. This comprehen− sive 50 hour program will prepare students to work as a pharmacy technician in a retail or other phar− macy setting and to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board’s PTCB exam. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0810) SERVSAFE MANAGER CERTIFICATE Aug 22, 2017 Time: 8:30am−5:00pm This comprehensive one−day workshop assists restaurants and other food handling businesses in complying with AB 1978/ Campbell. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0810)

Wellness & Bodywork DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Dandelion Herbal Center classes with Jane Bothwell. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 13 − Nov 1, 2017, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Festival of Herbs. November 2017 − April 2018. Meets the 1st weekend of the month for intermediate to advanced herb students and health care practitioners. Learn from renowned herbalists: Rosemary Gladstar, Kat Harrison, Pam Montgomery and more! Authentic Hawaiian Adventure. Jan 13−22, 2018, Join Jane and Co. for an unforgettable journey to the Big Island. Along with ethnobotanical adventures, herbal spa days and meeting Native healers, enjoy a Kava cere− mony and other cultural activities, lush beaches, lots of hikes, yoga and more! Herbal & Traditional Healing in Greece with Pamela Haynes. May 5 − 15, 2018. Discover the beauty, aromas, traditional and modern uses of many medicinal plants on this amazing journey of learning to the Aegean islands of Ikaria & Samos! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0907) FOOT REFLEXOLOGY CERTIFICATION Learn to relieve pain, improve alignment and body mechanics, promote detoxification and more. Combination in class and home study program begins September 15. Early registration discount. Alexandra Seymour ARC Board Certified Reflexolo− gist at the Center for Reflexology 707−822−5395 or as@reflexologyinstruction.com (W−0907)

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Legal Notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BARBARA A. SEEHAFER aka BARBARA A. JOHNSON, ETC. CASE NO. PR170219 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of BARBARA A. SEEHAFER aka BARBARA A. JOHNSON aka BARBARA A. SEEHAFER−JOHNSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, MITZI R. BARKS In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that MITZI R. BARKS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on August 31, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 4. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Robert D. Prior PO Box 23

ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Robert D. Prior PO Box 23 Eureka, CA 95502 August 3, 2017 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−191)

Freshwater School District is requesting Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) from qualified architectural firms to perform architecture/engineering services for the District’s future new construction and modernization projects. Interested firms must have experience with California public school projects which comply with all requirements set forth by the Office of Public School Construc− tion (OPSC). For more information please visit: www.freshwatersd.org 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−177)

T.S. No. 053958−CA APN: 502 021 074 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 9/14/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 8/25/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 9/17/2004, as Instrument No. 2004−31582−19, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: HEATHER L BENDALL, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURT− HOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2147 PLUNKETT RD BAYSIDE, CA 95524 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encum− brances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust,

PLUNKETT RD BAYSIDE, CA 95524 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encum− brances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $263,520.93 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280− 2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 053958−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280−


WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 053958−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−186)

T.S. No. 055905−CA APN: 052−301−016−000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROP− ERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 4/25/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 9/11/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 4/28/2006, as Instrument No. 2006−12524−18, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: JEFFREY D MULLIKIN & MARY E MULLIKIN, HUSBAND & WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIERS CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHO− RIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: At the front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 296 CENTER ST RIO DELL, CALIFORNIA 95562 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encum− brances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $239,315.14 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and

and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $239,315.14 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 758 − 8052 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.HOMESEARCH.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 055905−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 758 8052 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive San Diego, California 92117 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−190)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00383 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT ENDODONTICS, DENTAL PRACTICE Humboldt 2320 23rd Street Eureka, CA 95501 Richard J Welbert, D.M.D 4414 Cedar Street Eureka, CA 95503

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00383 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT ENDODONTICS, DENTAL PRACTICE Humboldt 2320 23rd Street Eureka, CA 95501 Richard J Welbert, D.M.D 4414 Cedar Street Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Richard J. Welbert, D.M.D. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 7, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−174)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00385 The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE SCRUFFY NERD HERDER Humboldt 226 F St Eureka, CA 95501 2101 McClaskey Eureka, Ca 95503 John N Coombs 2101 McClaskey Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s John N Coombs, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 7, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−183)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00392 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SLICE OF HUMBOLDT PIE Humboldt 828 I Street Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 4662 Arcata, CA 95518 Slice of Humboldt Pie Inc CA 3940432 828 I St Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this

Slice of Humboldt Pie Inc CA 3940432 828 I St Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kristen Thompson, Vice Presi− dent This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 12, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by lh, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−180)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00394 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SERVICES Humboldt 412 Humboldt Street Santa Rosa, CA 95404 C. Financial Investment Inc. CA 1435282 412 Humboldt Street Santa Rosa, CA 95404 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s R. Mark Epstein, CFO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 12, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/3, 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−187)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00396 The following person is doing Busi− ness as I−DETAIL 101 Humboldt 300 A Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562 Miguel Meras 300 A Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562 Carlos Meraz 300 A Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562

The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Miguel Meras,Co−Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 14, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−175)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00397 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ARBOR LANDSCAPES Humboldt 822 Murray Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 P.O. Box 4252 Arcata, CA 95518 Shane U Swanson 882 Murray Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shane U Swanson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 14, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−181)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00401 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CORE CARE MEDICAL SUPPLY Humboldt 2900 F Street Eureka, CA 95501 Core Care, LLC CA 20171150521 2900 F Street Eureka, CA 95501

Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars Continued on next page » ($1,000). /s Corey McCauley, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 17, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−176)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00406 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CITRINE CATERING Humboldt 475 I Street Arcata, CA 95521 1395 Stomberg Ave Arcata, CA 95521 Andrew G Abbott 1395 Stromberg Ave Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Andrew G Abbott, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 18, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−178)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00428 The following person is doing Busi− ness as STS RENTALS & MORE Humboldt 2431 Broadway Eureka, CA 95501 P.O. Box 4985 Eureka, CA 95502 Linda K Sellars 2075 Quaker St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Linda K Sellers, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 28, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true The business is conducted by any material matter pursuant to Copartners. Section 17913 of the Business and The date registrant commenced to Professions Code that the registrant transact business under the ficti− knows to be false is guilty of a tious business name or name listed misdemeanor punishable by a fine above on Not Applicable not to exceed one thousand dollars I declare the all information in this ($1,000). 8/10, 8/17, 8/24, 8/31 (17−194) statement is true and correct. /s Corey McCauley, Owner A registrant who declares as true This statement was filed with the any material matter pursuant to County Clerk of Humboldt County Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com Section 17913 of the Business and on July 17,• 2017 Professions Code that the registrant KELLY E. SANDERS knows to be false is guilty of a by kl, Humboldt County Clerk misdemeanor punishable by a fine 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−176)

39


Legal Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00364 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ANNIE’S CAMBODIAN FOODS Humboldt, 1917 5th Street Eureka, CA 95501 Sithol H Chau 5423 Alpine Ct Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sithol H Chau, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 27, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: sc, Deputy Clerk 7/6, 7/13, 7/20, 7/29, 8/3 (17−167)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00420 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FROM THE END DISTRIBUTORS Humboldt 4591 KJER Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 Carlos O Coradines Flores 4591 Kjer Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Carlos Coradines, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 26, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by lh, Humboldt County Clerk

WINK UPSTAIRS Humboldt 1660 Central Ave #G McKinleyville, CA 95519 Continued from previous page Lisa A Bishop−Rowe 741 Park Ave Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lisa Bishop−Rowe, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 18, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−184)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00412 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FAIR CURVE FARM Humboldt 1057 5th St Ferndale, CA 95536 PO Box 300 Loleta, CA 95551 Benjamin L Thompson 2590 Cannibal Island Rd Loleta, CA 95551 Aubreyanna N Schooley 2590 Cannibal Island Rd Loleta, CA 95551 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Benjamin L Thompson, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 24, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by lh, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−179)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00438 The following person is doing Busi− ness as OISHII Humboldt 2335 4th St Eureka, CA 95501 AJ Wang Inc CA C4034818 2335 4th St Eureka, CA 95501

2335 4th St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Yen Hsiang Wang, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 7, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

40

Obituaries ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME SAMANTHA MAY LEE CASE NO. CV170598 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALI− FORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: SAMANTHA MAY LEE TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: SAMANTHA MAY LEE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name WILLIAM HENRY KILLEBREW to Proposed Name WILLIAM HENRY LEE

7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−182)

8/10, 8/17, 8/24, 8/31 (17−192)

STATEMENT OF ABANDON− MENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. R−1500496 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name NORTH COAST LED Humboldt 3101 Concorde Dr Ste D McKinleyville, CA 95519 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on August 25, 2015 John F Vogelpohl 3101 Concorde Dr Ste D McKinleyville, CA 95519 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ John F Volgelpohl, Owner This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date July 27, 2017 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office Kelly E. Sanders s/ sc, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk 8/3, 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−188)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME ANGELA FULER CASE NO. CV170615 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALI− FORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: ANGELA FULER TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ANGELA FULER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name LEXI LAINE MIRANDA to Proposed Name ALEXA LAINE MIRANDA

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME appear before this court at the STATEMENT 17−00407 hearing indicated below to show The following person is doing Busi− cause, if any, why the petition for ness as change of name should not be WINK UPSTAIRS granted. Any person objecting to Humboldt the name changes described above 1660 Central Ave #G must file a written objection that The business is conducted by A McKinleyville, CA 95519 includes the reasons for the objec− Corporation. Lisa A Bishop−Rowe tion at least two court days before The date registrant commenced to 741 Park Ave the matter is scheduled to be heard transact business under the ficti− Arcata, CA 95521 and must appear at the hearing to tious business name or name listed show cause why the petition should NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug.Applicable 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com above on Not The business is conducted by An not be granted. If no written objec− I declare the all information in this Individual tion is timely filed, the court may statement is true and correct. The date registrant commenced to grant the petition without a A registrant who declares as true transact business under the ficti− hearing. 8/10, 8/17, 8/24, 8/31 (17−193)

granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 1, 2017 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 19, 2017 Filed: July 19, 2017 /s/ Timothy P. Cissna Judge of the Superior Court

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME LUCAS CARTER FUENTES CASE NO. JV160221 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: LUCAS CARTER FUENTES TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: LUCAS CARTER FUENTES for a decree changing names as follows: Present name LUCAS CARTER FUENTES to Proposed Name LUCAS CARTER PARISH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 12, 2017 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 26, 2017 Filed: July 28, 2017 /s/ Joyce D. Hinrichs Judge of the Superior Court 8/3, 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−189)

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×305

classified@north coastjournal.com

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 1, 2017 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 11, 2017 Filed: July 12, 2017 /s/ Timothy P. Cissna Judge of the Superior Court

Raul Lozano

Celebration of Life Raul Lozano passed away on July 30th, 2017. Good times spent with family and friends are what Raul cherished most, and in that spirit there will be a Potluck Celebration to honor Raul’s life Saturday, August 26th at the Westhaven Center for the Arts from 3-6 pm. Bring food, beverages, and instruments.

7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−173)

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s!

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eering through a small, double-glazed viewing window at the brown, desiccated body of a man who died 5,300 years ago is an uncanny experience. Should he even be on display, for the likes of me and several hundred thousand visitors a year, in this museum in Bolzano, Italy? I tell myself that, since being discovered high in the Italian Alps 26 years ago, he’s been examined more than any other human being, so a few non-invasive gazes won’t make much difference. But still ... Ötzi (ert-zi), the name given to him by an Austrian journalist (he was found in Italy’s Ötztal Alps) was discovered half-in, half-out of melting ice at 10,500 feet, close to the border with Austria (very close, resulting in years of ownership dispute between the two countries). As mummies go, Ötzi is unique, a wonderfully preserved “wet mummy,” unlike, say, dry Egyptian mummies, whose organs were removed as part of the process. Soon after his death, snow, then glacial ice, entombed Ötzi. Happily for us, the cold kept his body from decomposing. In life, he was a Caucasian male, about 110 pounds, 5 feet, 2 inches, age at death 45 years. (His weight and height were average for his time.) He’s now shrunk a little and weighs just 35 lbs. He was also a murder victim — a fact not appreciated until an X-ray taken 10 years after his discovery revealed a flint arrowhead lodged beneath his right shoulder. Ötzi probably bled to death soon after being shot from behind. Since the contents of his stomach showed that he’d stopped to enjoy a hearty meal just a few hours before the ambush, he probably didn’t realize he was in danger. And from a two-day-old deep cut on his hand, it seems he’d been in a recent fight, leading to a host of speculations about the circumstances of his murder. As interesting as the body is to researchers, his kit also tells us much about him. His copper-headed axe, for instance, was left next to him, presumably ruling out theft as a motive. Copper was the first metal to be used at the end of the Stone Age, and the 99.7 percent purity of Ötzi’s four-inch long ax-head (lashed to a yew

Reconstruction of Ötzi by paleo-artists Adrie and Alfons Kennis. Photo by Barry Evans handle) attests to the skill of metal-workers of the time, since after ore-bearing rock had been smelted, the copper was cast, cold-forged, polished and sharpened in an elaborate process. He also had an unfinished 6-foot yew longbow, together with 12 arrows in an elaborate leather quiver, a short dagger on his waist and a fire-lighting kit, complete with flint and pyrite (to create sparks) and tinder fungus. The photograph shows a reconstruction of Ötzi in life, created by twin-brother Dutch paleo-artists who based their model on computer tomography and CAT scans. Although he looks pretty hardy, he suffered from an arthritic knee, bad teeth, lyme disease, whipworm (an intestinal parasite) and possibly a head injury. Still, his strong leg muscles tell us he walked a lot — maybe he was a goat herder or a shepherd. Or was his ax a prestige item that only a tribal headman would have owned? His kit included some medicinal herbs — was he a shaman? It’s weird to realize that when the Great Pyramid of Giza was built, Ötzi had already been entombed in ice for 700 years. And he’ll be around for many years to come, since he’s kept frozen under ideal conditions to prevent decomposition. He probably won’t mind a visit if you find yourself in the South Tyrol. He may even appreciate all the attention. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) would be flattered if people paid to see his naked body 5,000 years in the future. Or anytime, really.

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man died” 33. Prompt again 34. “Hud” director Martin 35. energystar.gov org. 36. Bldg. units 37. National League’s 2012 Rookie of the Year ____ Harper 39. Den 40. B’way sellout sign 41. What mobsters pack 42. “Rome ____ built in a day” 43. Outback order 47. Thesaurus entry: Abbr. 48. River featuring steamship service from Cairo to Aswan 49. “Looking ____ is great -- if you’re sixty”: Joan Rivers 52. Cathedral recesses 54. Seller of Squishees on “The Simpsons” 57. Philip Roth novel whose title features the name of a Shakespeare character 60. Spanish 101 verb

12. Aim 13. Cabinet position: Abbr. 18. Mark in Spanish class 19. First person to win a Pulitzer Prize for film criticism, 1975 23. ____ papers (answer to the joke that asks DOWN “What do animals read 1. Francis, for one in zoos?”) 2. Pussy ____ (Russian girl 24. Seeger who won a group) Grammy in 2009 for his 3. Character who sings “Let It album “At 89” Go” in “Frozen” 25. Get 4. 1991 Nobel Peace Prize 26. Copy, for short winner Aung San Suu 27. Washington, for one ____ 5. Agency originally formed 28. “____ understand ...” to provide supplies for 29. Minute Maid brand 30. Bare minimum child victims in World 31. Think out loud War II 6. Capital city whose highest 32. Magna ____ point is the 358-feet-tall 37. Capital of Switzerland 38. “Go team!” Jose Marti Memorial 39. Zap 7. Kind of fee 41. 2003 hit song Rolling Stone 8. In great supply magazine called “a genre9. Letters in some church humping blur of acoustic names guitars ... and Andre 3000’s 10. Collection of signs funktastic charm” 11. “Mamma Mia!” group

61. Worry about, in slang 62. Object of adoration 63. Dove, e.g. 64. Argentine grassland 65. “I Feel Bad About My Neck” author Ephron

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO MIKE

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© Puzzles by Pappocom

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www.sudoku.com

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

By Barry Evans

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment Opportunities HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045.

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

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SIGN-ON BONUS FOR RNS!!! Clinical Manager: 4 or 5 days/week Float Nurse: 30-37 hours/week Visit Nurse: 30-37 hours/week or Part-time Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, Hoopa Valley Housing Authority, F/T, Regular, Salary: DOE. Performs general administrative work with supervisory and management responsibilities; has constant contact with the public, Tribal Chairman, Board of Commissioners, Tribal Council, departments and federal agencies; requires knowledge of project development, planning, accounting, financial management, budgeting, investments, and knowledge of sound business prac− tices. The HVHA operates under tribal and federal laws and is funded primarily through the Native American Housing Assistance and Self−Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA). Directs operations to provide low−income housing, rentals, and related services to eligible recipients and manages existing Mutual Help housing units. Minimum Requirements: Master’s Degree (M.A.) or equivalent and two (2) years of related experience; or a Bachelor’s Degree with four (4) years of related experience including two (2) years of management or supervisory experience; or at least eight (8) years of experience working with HUD programs including management experience, and extensive knowledge of HUD and NAHASDA regu− lations. Must have a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Must successfully pass an employment background check in accordance with Title 30A; Employment Background Check Policy of the Hoopa Valley Tribe. DEADLINE TO APPLY: August 22, 2017

JOB FAIR! Wednesday, Aug 16th 4-6pm Sapphire Palace Be interviewed that day Many Opportunities Available!

These positions are classified safety−sensitive.

Great Benefits & Fun Work Environment

For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625−9200 Ext. 13 or 17. Or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

Avoid waiting in line at the fair & apply now at

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www.bluelakecasino.com **Annual JOB POOL** NCS anticipates a number of Head Start, Early Head Start & State Program job openings for our 2017-2018 program yr. Potential positions are throughout Humboldt County & may be yr round or school-yr. Anticipated start date: late August/early September

CENTER DIRECTOR FAMILY WORKER HOME VISITOR TEAM TEACHER TEACHER ASSOCIATE TEACHER CLASSROOM ASSISTANT COOK ASSISTANT COOK NUTRITION AIDE SPECIAL AIDE SPECIAL AIDE/ INTERPRETER SPANISH ASSISTANT TEACHER COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER HOUSEKEEPER SUBSTITUTES

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                 

Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For additional information, please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

         

                    


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K’ima:w Medical Center

ResolutionCare                 

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

HOSPICE AIDE Provides personal care for patients, assisting with their activities of daily living. Qualified applicants must possess a current CNA license and have, or be willing to obtain, HHA certification. Candidates must also have a valid driver’s license and reliable transportation. Schedule: 4 days (32 hours/week) Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information.

CITY OF ARCATA

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (LMFT OR LCSW) CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST PHYSICIAN PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application. deffault

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City Manager’s Office Administrative Assistant

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Building Healthy Communities Health In All Policy Specialist This is an exempt, full time (40 hours/week) position based in Crescent City, CA. Compensation is $45,000 to $60,000 DOE, and includes health, retirement benefits, and paid holidays and sick time. The Building Healthy Communities Initiative (BHC) Health In All Policy Specialist will work with community stakeholders and policy makers across multiple sectors to ensure that health is considered when policies are developed, and to secure new resources from public and private entities to address health in Del Norte and the Adjacent Tribal Lands (DNATL). The Health In All Policy Specialist will be responsible for coordinating and implementing a “health in all policies” agenda including a focus in educational equity. General responsibilities include developing mechanisms to ensure that health and well-being are considered when policies are developed; using data to identify inequities and raise the profile of public health and educational equity; disseminating information about health disparities in DNATL to a wide variety of community stakeholders; and establishing connections with state and local agencies and organizations and creating relationships with local individuals and groups. Schedule may include some weekends, evenings and out of town travel. The ideal candidate believes that Del Norte and Adjacent Tribal Lands (DNATL) can be a healthy community for all of its residents and is eager to work collaboratively with others to achieve this vision. We seek applicants with a Bachelor’s degree in public policy, education or public health who are able to facilitate collaboration and communication between diverse groups of people to guide policies that will lead to health equity. A successful candidate will have excellent written and oral communication skills; ability to establish and maintain working relationships with individuals from diverse backgrounds; competence in working with Native American, Latino, Hmong, youth and rural communities; and possess a valid driver’s license, auto insurance, and access to a vehicle. Please visit our website for application procedures and the complete job announcement, including preferred qualifications at www.wildriverscf. org/About-Us/Employment-Opportunities. For more information, contact Michelle Carrillo at (707) 465-1238. Please submit your resume and cover letter to admin@hafoundation.org

Deadline: Friday, August 18, 2017

$44,852–$54,518/yr. Filing Deadline: 4pm, August 28, 2017. Performs a variety of administrative and technical work in support of all divisions and functions of the City Manager’s Office, including providing exceptional customer service, screening visitors and callers, and serving as the Deputy City Clerk. EOE. Application packet available at: www.cityofarcata.org or City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata; (707) 822-5953.

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             deffault



Utilities Supervisor  LOOKING FOR A MEANINGFUL JOB IN YOUR COMMUNITY? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for Full−Time, Part−time and On−Call LPTs, LVNs to join our dynamic team committed to teaching a "life worth living". Full−time benefits include medical, dental and vision plans; 401(K); scholarships; and lots of wonderful training Apply at 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka http://crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca/

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×305 classified@northcoastjournal.com

Filing Deadline: Friday, August 11, 2017.        

 www.cityofarcata.org City Manager’s Office 736 F Street, Arcata (707) 822-5953

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment default

  

BILINGUAL HOME VISITOR, EUREKA

Provide wkly home visits & facilitates parent & child play groups twice a month. Req AA/AS degree in Early Childhood Education, Psychology, Social Work or a related field OR 24 Head Start related units. Req 2 yrs exp in community service, working w/ children & families. Bilingual req. F-T $14.07-14.77/hr Open Until Filled

CLASSROOM ASSISTANT, EUREKA

Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a preschool program. 6-12 ECE units pref or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months exp working w/ young children. P/T (partial yr) 15 hrs/wk. $11.13-$12.27/hr Open Until Filled

CENTER DIRECTOR, FORTUNA

Responsible for the overall management of a State Program. Meet Site Supervisor level on Child Dev. Permit Matrix or qualify for a waiver. Req an AA degree & min of 2 yrs exp working w/preschool children in group setting. F/T 37.5 hrs/wk (M-F); $13.37-$14.04/hr Open Until Filled

ASSOCIATE TEACHER, MCKINLEYVILLE

Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req min of 12 ECE units—incl core classes— at least 1 yr exp working w/ children. F/T (partial yr) 32 hrs/wk,$11.70-$12.29/hr. Open Until Filled

COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER, ORLEANS Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req min of 12 ECE units—incl core classes—at least 1 yr exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24 hrs/week, $11.70-$12.29/hr Open Until Filled

COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER, WILLOW CREEK Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req min of 12 ECE units—incl. core classes— at least 1 year exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24-28 hrs/wk, $11.70-$12.29/hr. Open Until Filled

COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER, REDWAY

Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req a min of 12 ECE units—incl. core classes—at least 1 yr exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24 hrs/wk, $11.70-$12.29/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHER, MCKINLEYVILLE

Responsible for the dev. & implementation of classroom activities for preschool children. Meet Associate Teacher level on Child Dev Permit Matrix (3 units in administration pref ) & 1 yr exp teaching in a preschool setting. PT (school yr) 28 hrs/wk; $12.64-$13.27/hr Open Until Filled

ASSISTANT TEACHER, FORTUNA

Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months exp working w/children. P/T yr round, 20-25 hrs/wk. $11.13-$12.27/hr. Open Until Filled

EUREKA CAMPUS Assistant Professor, Biology 1-Semester Replacement, Non-Tenure Track Spring Semester 2018 Semester Salary Range: $24,157 - $31,753 First Review Date: September 1, 2017

GRAPHIC ARTIST One-Year Temporary Position 24 Hours / Week, 3 Days / Week Hourly Pay: $20.00 Send resume and cover letter to: Marty-Coelho@redwoods.edu

PART-TIME FACULTY POSITIONS Articulation Biology Business/Accounting Chemistry Communications (Speech) Computer Information Systems Counselor - CalWORKS Counselor – Disabled Students Programs English History Librarian Mathematics Nursing – Clinical Psychology Restaurant and Hospitality Management Welding

DEL NORTE

ASSISTANT COOK, MCKINLEYVILLE

Art Biological Sciences Business Communication Studies Counseling English Mathematics Sign Language Sociology

COOK TRINIDAD

Prep meals for preschool age children in a childcare ctr. Req basic cooking skills, plus exp in food service & volume meal prep. Pref candidate would have exp, training or education in nutrition, volume meal prep, menu planning, kitchen safety & sanitation & CACFP (CA Child Care Food Program) exp. P/T (school yr) M-F $11.13/hr. Open Until Filled

Prep meals for infants & toddlers in a childcare ctr. Pref candidate would have exp, training or education in nutrition, volume meal prep, menu planning, & food safety & sanitation. Req strong organizational & math skills, incl the ability to use decimals & fractions. P/T, Temp: 28 hrs/wk (Mon-Fri); (yr round) $11.13/hr Open Until Filled

SUBSTITUTESHUMBOLDT AND DEL NORTE COUNTY

Intermittent (on-call) work filling in for Classroom Assistant, Assistant Teachers, Cooks/Assistant Cooks or occasional childcare for parent meetings. Require exp working w/children or cooking. $11.13/ hr. No benefits. Submit Schedule of Availability form w/app.

Positions include vacation, holidays & sick leave benefits. Submit applications to:

Northcoast Children’s Services

1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtional info & application please call

707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

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TEMPORARY POSITION

Assist in the prep & organization of food, setting-up meals & snacks & kitchen cleanup for a preschool facility. Req basic cooking skills. Prior exp in food handling & service desired. P/T (school yr): M-Th 24hrs/wk $11.13/hr Open Until Filled

TEMPORARY COOK, CHILDREN OF THE REDWOODS INFANT/TODDLER CENTER

DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICES Seeking experienced & passionate RN to direct & coordinate all aspects of nursing for a 16− bed MHRC. Philosophies of care include recovery, trauma−informed and team wrap around. Full Time position with benefits including Health, Dental, Vision and 401K. EEO/AA/Minority/F/Vet/Disability Employer http://www.crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/eureka.html

KLAMATH-TRINITY (HOOPA) Addiction Studies Business Technology Communication Studies Computer Information Systems Early Childhood Education English Psychology More information about the positions is available through our website. http://www.redwoods.edu/hr College of the Redwoods 707-476-4140 • hr@redwoods.edu College of the Redwoods is an EO Employer

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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           

 

            

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   

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  

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  

  


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 

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The North Coast Journal is seeking

Distribution Drivers

IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Wednesday afternoon/Thursday morning routes. Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

RCEA is Hiring! Growing local government agency seeks to fill three open positions.

(FT, termed) $15.21 - $19.05 per hr

Program Coordinator

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home to share with an Receive ongoing support and a generous, monthly

Call Sharon at (707) 442-4500

2930 E St., Eureka, CA 95501

(707) 445.9641 The University Center invites applicants for the following full-time position:

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Now Seeking:

VAULT CASHIER/ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT II $14.48 - $20.28 per hour, DOE Cash Handling, Bank Deposits, A/R, A/P and Payroll Data Entry We offer an excellent benefits package including health, dental, and vision insurance; paid vacation, holidays, and sick leave; and CalPERS retirement. For Job description and application procedure, visit: http://tinyurl.com/zlg4llo First Review begins Wednesday, August 16, 2017 Open until filled

Registered Nurses The Registered Nurse is an essential part of the health care team. The role is focused on the delivery of primary care, facilitating access, providing follow-up and coordinating the efforts for the health care team with an emphasis on disease prevention and health maintenance. The Registered Nurse works closely with other clinical support staff and providers to assure the patients’ comfort and understanding of their individualized care plans. We are looking for individuals who have the ability to work with a team and use sound independent judgment in assessing new patients, triage and routine follow-up. Registered Nurses work at the top of their scope and license based upon nursing standards, policies, procedures and protocol. Registered Nurses should be detail oriented, accurate and organized. Registered Nurses serve as a patient advocate and education while working alongside the practitioner. California RN license required; prior experience in clinic setting preferred. Positions available in several ODCHC clinics in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties. Wage dependent on experience. For details and on-line applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×305 northcoastjournal.com

MentorsWanted.com

sequoiapersonnel.com

TO APPLY: Full details and application online at RedwoodEnergy.org

Community Health Centers

payment.

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(FT, termed, two openings) $15.21 - $19.05 per hr

open door

seeking families with an available bedroom in their adult with special needs.

Submit résumé to 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 or email sarah@northcoastjournal.com

Field Associate

California MENTOR is

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open door Community Health Centers

Investment Administrator Full Charge Bookkeeper • Welder Temporary Bookkeeper • CNC Operator Insurance Agent • Laborers • Valet Driver Admin Facility Mgr • Internet Technician Class A&B Drivers • HR Manager-Temp Mortgage Loan Officer • Planner Architect • Civil Engineer

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 



Now Seeking:



Office Manager



Office Managers are responsible for creating a welcoming and efficient experience for patients entering clinics of Open Door Community Health Centers (ODCHC).

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Office Managers collaborate to create and revise workflows that help patients, staff and providers interact smoothly and productively. Office Managers supervise receptionists, call staff and other front-line clerical support staff and works to create an atmosphere of caring and responsiveness to patients arriving for appointments, needing health care or calling the clinic for any number of reasons. These functions are essential to the comfort and engagement of patients and the efficiency of staff and providers. Office Managers are responsible for assuring high quality patient service. The Office Manager serves as member of the clinic management team and participates in ODCHC planning and improvement initiatives. Prior office management experience in a medical setting preferred. Position available in Eureka. Wage dependent on experience. For details and on-line applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com

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 

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Employment

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ď ‰ď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď łď ´ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Šď Žď€  ď ˇď Żď ˛ď Ťď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€  ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď Œď Ľď Ąď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď Šď Žď€  ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď …ď Łď Żď Žď Żď ­ď šď€  ď ˆď Żď łď °ď Šď ´ď Ąď Źď Šď ´ď šď€  ď Šď Žď ¤ď ľď łď ´ď ˛ď šď€ż Come fill out an application at your local Motel 6! ď —ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Ąď Łď ´ď Šď śď Ľď Źď šď€ ď ˆď Šď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€  ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď Ťď Ľď Ľď °ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď€­ď€ ď ?ď Ąď Šď Žď ´ď Ľď Žď Ąď Žď Łď Ľď€Źď€  ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď “ď ľď °ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď łď Żď ˛ď łď€Ž ď ‰ď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď Ľď ˇď łď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Łď Żď Žď ¤ď ľď Łď ´ď Ľď ¤ď€  ď Ľď śď Ľď ˛ď šď€ ď ?ď Żď Žď ¤ď Ąď šď€ ď ˘ď Ľď ´ď ˇď Ľď Ľď Žď€  ď€ąď€ąď Ąď ­ď€­ď€ąď °ď ­

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com

Auctions ď€´ď€ˇď€ľď€ľď€ ď –ď Ąď Źď Źď Ľď šď€ ď —ď Ľď łď ´ď€ ď ‚ď Źď śď ¤ď€Žď€ ď€ 

ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ą

ď€ąď€šď€łď€´ď€ ď ‚ď ˛ď Żď Ąď ¤ď ˇď Ąď šď€ ď “ď ´ď€ 

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LIVE−IN ASSISTANT wanted to transport adult male to and from work in Garberville. Light house− keeping, errands, cooking and laundry, with days free. Salary negotiable. Call (408) 483−0315.

Marketplace Miscellaneous

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

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Beautiful 6 pc. outdoor wicker set, chests, dressers & more!

LOCAL THRIFT Used Appliances Sales & Service

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11 am - 5 pm & Thurs. 11 am to Sale Time

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Thurs. Aug. 24th 4:15 pm

Humb. Co. Sheriff’s Surplus + Estate Furniture & Misc.

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

Clothing THE COSTUME BOX Party Ready Costume Rental Makeup*Wigs*Masks*Shoes Costume Thrift Sale Rack Dress−up Party Venue Open M−F 1−5:30 Sat 11−5 202 T St. Eureka 707−443−5200

FLASHBACK Featuring Tie-Dye & Batik

ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď€şď€ ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł

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60 day local in home warranty on all used appliances, small and large 1 year parts & labor on all service calls Nights and weekends No extra charge Call

Check us out on Facebook 100 West Harris St. Corner of Harris & California, Eureka. Licensed and insured

Estate Sale

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Song− writer. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

3351 MITCHELL HEIGHTS DR, EUREKA, CA 95503 ESTATE SALE HIGHLIGHTS: Wood tv cabinets, console, dresser, nightstands, bed, coffee table, side tables, desk wingback chairs, recliner, lamps.

ď ’ď Ľď §ď Šď łď ´ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Žď ľď ˛ď łď Ľď€ ď łď ľď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ ď ?ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď Ąď Źď€ ď ƒď Ąď ˛ď Ľ ď ď łď łď Šď łď ´ď Ąď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď ¤ď Ąď Šď Źď šď€  ď Ąď Łď ´ď Šď śď Šď ´ď Šď Ľď ł ď ’ď Ľď łď °ď Šď ´ď Ľď€ ď Łď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď€Śď€ ď ­ď ľď Łď ¨ď€  ď ­ď Żď ˛ď Ľ ď ‰ď Žď łď ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď€Śď€ ď ‚ď Żď Žď ¤ď Ľď ¤ ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Žď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Žď€ ď ƒď Ąď Źď Šď Śď Żď ˛ď Žď Šď Ąď€ ď€  ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Żď śď Ľď ˛ď€ ď€˛ď€°ď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€Ą

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YOUR AD

HERE

“Clothes with Soul�

Merchandise

442-1400 Ă— 305 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

Auto Service

ALL KID’S CLOTHES & SHOES BACK TO SCHOOL SALE 1/2 OFF August 10−16. Where your shop− ping dollars support local youth! Next door to Willow Creek Post Office. (530) 629−3006.

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

F r ď ?ď Ąď ˛ď Žď šď€ E ď †ď ˛ď Šď Ľď ¤ď ­ď Ąď Ž E ~Healing the Heart~ d ~Aligning with Soul~ o M 707-839-5910 iamalso@hotmail.com

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YOUR AD

HERE

Home repair tools, deer and moose horns and much more.

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to comple− ment your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

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PLACE

Mirrors, Figurines, dishes, glasses, vases, bowls, small appliances, clocks.

Cash only Red dot items not for sale Aug 12th, 10:00 AM−4:00 PM Rain or Shine

2115 1st Street • Eureka EurekaMassages.com Massage Therapy & Reiki Please call for an appointment. 798-0119

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116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Mon. 1-6 Weds.-Sat. 1-6

Eureka Massage and Wellness

ď Œď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď€ ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď Ťď Ľď Ľď °ď Šď Žď §

707-826-1806

Home Repair

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macsmist@gmail.com

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contrac− tors license. Call 845−3087

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

Ä†Ä—Ä›ÄŠÄžÇŻÄ˜Ä?ĆėĕnjēnjÄ?ĎēČĘ ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ

ď —ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď šď Żď ľ

Thurs. Aug. 10th 4:15 pm

ADVANCE NOTICE!

ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡

ď ‰ď Žď€ ď ˆď ?ď ?ď …ď€ ď “ď …ď ’ď –ď ‰ď ƒď …ď “

PUBLIC AUCTIONS

707-599-5824

CLEANING SPECIALIST Darrla’s Clean Team, LLC is looking for the right person to join our team of Cleaning Specialists. Valid drivers license, car and current insurance needed. For more info, email contact @darrlascleanteam.com or call 707−442−5071.

Cleaning

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EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039. (E−0625)

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Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

ď ƒď Ąď Źď ‚ď ’ď …ď€şď€ ď€Łď€°ď€ąď€ąď€´ď€´ď€śď€ąď€¸ ď Žď ?ď Œď “ď€şď€ ď€Łď€łď€˛ď€łď€˛ď€šď€ś

ALL TYPES COMMERCIAL LOANS

50 GLORIOUS YEARS ď łď Šď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď€ąď€šď€śď€´ Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027 2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

442-1400 Ă—305 classified@ northcoastjournal.com


Real Estate HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,650; 2 pers. $23,600; 3 pers. $26,550; 4 pers. $29,450; 5 pers. $31,850; 6 pers. $34,200; 7 pers. $36,550; 8 pers. $38,900 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

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100+ VACATION HOMES Throughout Humboldt, Del Norte & Trinity Counties

Find home and garden improvement experts on page 16.

Great Coastal Retreats, Cabins, Cottages, Large County Estates, Studios, Condos, Beach Houses, As well as Lake & Riverfront Homes

707.834.8355 RedwoodCoastVacationRentals.com

707.476.0435

Charlie Tripodi

Kyla Tripodi

Katherine Fergus

Dane Grytness

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor BRE #01927104

707.834.7979

Realtor/ Residential Specialist

BRE #01992918

BRE #01332697

707.502.9090

707.798.9301

707.476.0435

Myers Flat Home on Acreage - $725,000

Several New Listings in the Trinity Lakes and Alps Region just in time for summer! Call or Visit us online

315 P STREET • EUREKA

442-1400 ×319 melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

YOUR LISTINGS HERE Realtor Ads Acreage for Sale & Rent

BRE #01930997

BRE# 01956733

Bernie Garrigan

707.601.1331

NEW L

ISTING

!

±30 Beautiful acres conveniently located just 10 minutes from Myers Flat! This private parcel features a solid 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home, garage, shop, immaculately landscaped gardens, Redwood forest with roads throughout, 200 amp PG&E service, southern exposure, and a 30 gpm well! The 2 story home is a testament to quality craftsmanship and meticulous maintenance with 3 decks, wood heat, IB membrane roof, and large windows showcasing the surrounding mountain views. Home was thoughtfully built to maximize solar gain in the winter and coolness in the summer. Don’t miss your opportunity to see all this gorgeous property has to offer. Owner will carry!

Commercial Property for Sale & Rent Vacation Rentals callto442-1400 ×319 Build edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

or email melissa@ melissa@northcoastjournal.com

100+ Vacation Homes Throughout Humboldt, Del Norte & Trinity Counties Great Coastal Retreats | Cabins | Cottages | Large County Estates Studios | Condos | Beach Houses | Lake & Riverfront Homes Interested in staying at 2 entirely different locations during your trip? Experience the best of both worlds by taking advantage of our diverse selection of spectacular coastal homes as well as our amazing inland properties. Ask about the Surf & Turf Promo to receive special discounted rates!

For More Information Contact (707) 834-6555 or Visit www.RedwoodCoastVacationRentals.com

Phillipsville Land/ Property - $175,000 ±5 Acres in a nice gated community close to the town of Phillipsville. Parcel features two small building sites, year-round creek, and small spring. Existing old cabin holds no value. Owner may carry!

Willow Creek Land/ Property - $325,000

NEW L

ISTING

!

±28 Acres towards the top of Chezem Road, only 15 minutes outside of Blue Lake. This highly desirable piece of property allows you to enjoy all four seasons while conveniently located close to town. Boasting newly developed building sites, paved county road access and 180 degree views of Redwood Valley and Horse Mountain, this is the perfect property to build your dream home. Well application is on file with the county and power at the adjacent parcel. Owner will carry with $90,000 down.

Mad River Home on Acreage - $449,000 ± Fantastic ±11 acre summer retreat just 10 minutes from Ruth Lake! Comprised of two parcels, this rare find features a fully permitted 3 bedroom, 1.5 bathroom home, oversized 24’ x 40’ garage with unfished room above, well, and power. With river frontage, a fenced area for animals, and end of the road privacy, all this parcel is missing is you!

humboldtlandman.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Meet our Employee: Cody Caan Cody Caan moved to Humboldt County two years ago when a friend from Ohio, where he grew up, called him and told him that he should move out here and that he had a place for him to stay. “After my buddy told me that he had a room for me, I decided to move out here. I started shopping at Murphy’s Market in Sunny Brae when I moved here and noticed how much it reminded me of the grocery stores back home. I thought it would be a great place to work and I have been here since,” explains Cody. Cody has been working at Murphy’s in Glendale for a year and has moved his way up to grocery supervisor. “I love working at Murphy’s. It is a great

community and working in a small, local store is great. I have never had a job where I can recognize people and know their first and last name. It is a great feeling.” When Cody is not at work he enjoys experiencing all that the Humboldt County outdoors have to offer. “I really like to fish and hike, basically anything that you can do outside here. There is a lot to choose from.” So next time you are in Glendale swing by and say hi to Cody and the rest of the Glendale Murphy’s staff and make sure to pick up all of your grocery needs at any of the five local Murphy’s locations.

Cody Caan

HEALTH AND WELLNESS Newman’s Own Pasta Sauces 15 - 25 oz

5

2 for $

Newman’s Own Organics O’s Cookies 13 oz

3

$ 99

each

Newman’s Own Chilled Lemonades Selected Varieties 59 oz

1

$ 99 each

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Newman’s Own Microwave Popcorn 3 Packs

2

$ 99 each

North Coast Journal 08-10-2017 Edition  
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