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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday Aug. 3, 2017 Vol XXVIII Issue 31 northcoastjournal.com

Best of HUMBOLDT


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Contents 5 5

Mailbox Poem Fog

8

News The Bridgeville Beat

11

Week in Weed A Snowball’s Chance in D.C.

12 15

NCJ Daily On The Cover THE BEST OF HUMBOLDT Introduction . . . . . . . . . . .15 Food & Drink . . . . . . . . . .15 Arts & Entertainment . . .21 Retail and Services . . . . 25 Cannabis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Bonus! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

33

Art Beat The Faraway Nearby

34

Arts Alive! Saturday Aug. 5, 6-9 p.m.

35

Trinidad Arts Night Friday, Aug, 4, 6-9 p.m.

36

Table Talk Shared Secrets

38

Home & Garden Service Directory

39

Front Row Tangled Tales of Love

40 In Review Wicked Bugs: The Meanest, Deadliest, Grossest Bugs on Earth

41

The Setlist Festivals and More Festivals

42

Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

46 Calendar 52 Filmland Trailer vs. Movie

53 57 58

Workshops & Classes Sudoku & Crossword Classifieds

Thank you Humboldt County for voting Kathleen Bryson

Aug. 3, 2017 • Volume XXVIII Issue 31 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

BEST Attorney & Law Office!

ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2017

Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com

Serious Felonies Cultivation/Drug Possession DUI/DMV Hearings

General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Andy Powell Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Jillian Butolph, Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Eric Mueller, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com

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CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE IN GARBERVILLE BY APPOINTMENT

Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Assistant Sarah Green sarah@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Becca Oliver becca@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager/Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

The cat’s meow: Sunny Brae Animal Clinic won Best Vet. Read more on page 15. Photo by Jillian Butolph

On the Cover Illustration by Jonathan Webster

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

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Mailbox

Fog The Smell Test Editor: I have been retired now for 15 years. My hearing isn’t what it used to be and I have to wear glasses when I drive. However, my nose still works and something smells about the current situation with the Public Defender’s Office (“Nothing in Writing,” July 27). When all nine deputy public defenders send a letter to the supervisors alleging that the new hire is incompetent and unqualified, that certainly creates an olfactory effect. During a 45-year teaching career, I saw my share of politics when it came to hiring instructors. In more than a few cases, a person was hired not on the basis of what that person knew but rather on the basis of whom that person knew. Considering the fact that the new public defender’s resume was not exactly sparkling, I wonder what would happen if someone were to investigate that particular thread. Bill Morris, Eureka Editor: In preparing for his lawsuit against the county arguing that Humboldt County Public Defender David Marcus is unqualified under California statute, Patrik Griego deposed Mr. Marcus on July 3. During the approximately 80 minutes of the deposition, Mr. Griego posed a series of questions to Mr. Marcus, who responded under oath. Many of Mr. Griego’s questions concerned Mr. Marcus’ legal work prior to being hired by Humboldt County in February of 2017. Many of Mr. Marcus answers indicated memory lapses, and below is a tally of some of his responses: “I don’t recall the specific matter:” 1 “I don’t recall for sure:” 1 “Not that I recall:” 9 “I’m not sure:” 6 “Not that I know of:” 3 “I’m not sure I didn’t, but I’m not sure

that I did:” 1 “I’m not positive on that particular matter:” 1 “I don’t recall:” 1 “I’m not certain:” 1 “Not that I recall specifically:” 1 “Not that I’m certain about:” 1 “Not that I’m aware of:” 1 “No specific recollection:” 3 “Not for sure:” 2 “I can’t remember for sure:” 1 Was Mr. Marcus dodging the questions or does he just have poor memory skills? Either way, it’s not good. Marilyn Andrews, Arcata

A ‘Trumpian’ Rant Editor: I am extremely disappointed to see the NCJ (“It’s Watson for the Interim,” July 27) and its usually highly competent reporter Linda Stansberry give Steve Watson an unchallenged venue to present a completely non-tested theory: “… that many of the homeless and transient people in Eureka were attracted to the area by the pot industry … .” We would love to conduct scientific studies to test urban-legend “theories” such as this but governmental, law enforcement and media hostility to our region’s largest multibillion-dollar industry is such that funding opportunities for large-scale social science research projects are severely constrained. The Journal/Stansberry should have tempered this Trumpian-level rant with sources working with the homeless or in the industry. Faculty such as myself at Humboldt State University’s Institute for Interdisciplinary Marijuana Research is readily available for comment, if all else fails. Considering the high level of ad revenue the Journal receives from cannabis-related businesses, it is the least the citizens of Humboldt should expect. Fred Krissman, Eureka

Duck! Editor: Barry Evans’ article (“Westworld vs. Realworld,” July 27) on the “boondoggle” of free will was a pleasant surprise. I was happy to learn that there is someone around who agrees with me. Benjamin Libet’s discovery of the half-second it takes for your brain to build a conscious thought completely undermines the notion of free will. Whatever you’re thinking about right now has been in the pipeline for a half-second already. How do you have any conscious control over that which is producing your consciousness? Beyond the issue of free will, the picture gets even more complicated when you consider that consciousness itself is an illusion. What you see is not what’s out there. “Out there” there are no such things as color, sound, texture or smells. You brain creates all of them (collectively called qualia) and nobody knows yet how the brain does it. Optical illusions nicely illustrate this business of seeing what’s not really there but only on a small scale; it really applies to the whole of consciousness. What you “see” is an internal model of reality. At about 40 frames per second (20 to 90 depending on the urgency) your brain shows you an internal movie of what it guessed things would be like in half a second. Since it took about a half-second for the picture to work its way through the pipeline, what pops up in your awareness coincides with the impinging reality. Any difference between the prediction and newly arriving signals sets off alarm bells. And just to really confuse things, your perception of “now” as an instant in time

Fog languidly cloaks this seaside town spreading over rooftop and door stoop creeping into the cracks of my soul slowly breaking brick apart with an imposing silence I have learned not to hear. Fog has no mercy. It hovers cruelly over this town relentless in summer like the focused stillness of a velvet, black cat ready to pounce, a precious, winged creature she will not spare. There is no escape. This fog will break you like tree roots under a crumbling sidewalk, like the moss growing on your back like the weeds growing in your ears feel the slow decaying of your heart you are deaf to the outside world. Yet redwood trees release sighs of dearness damp, dripping. I lean back in my rocking chair and wait endlessly for the generous sun-cast days of autumn. — Laurissa Wieler

is actually an interval of time (about 1/10 of a second in duration as I recall) during which events are rearranged in your memory to make logical sense — like the conviction that you saw that baseball Continued on next page »

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Mailbox

THANKS FOR MAKING US A STAR! Best Gift Shop 2017

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coming and then decided to duck (you actually ducked before you were consciously aware of the ball). Douglas George, Eureka

Where Have the Birds Gone? Editor: Thank you, Amy Gustin, for continuing to speak out for wildlife (“Our Shrinking Habitat,” July 6). Is anyone listening? My property is mostly forested. Until a few years ago, the woods were crisscrossed with deer paths. Brush in the clearings was nibbled down and my pet roses had to be fenced. Squirrels rustled the leaves overhead and argued with one another. Hawks and eagles perched on the treetops and dived for prey in the meadow. Wild turkeys browsed in the tall grass. All are now conspicuous by their absence. The woods have become silent and empty. Very few songbirds remain. Where are the owl-lovers of yesteryear, they who helped run Big Timber out of town? Perhaps they’ve forgotten that owls rely on their acute senses of sight and hearing to hunt in the dark. Both of these are severly compromised by traffic and generator noise, and glowing hoops. Diminished territory and natural prey have forced many animals to depend on garbage dumps and domestic livestock for their survival. While county officials tweak ordinances and haggle over land usage, the Green Rush destroys more and more of our biodiversity and quality of life. Please, let’s get it under control and have peace again. Betty Crowder, Honeydew

Correction The Journal’s July 17 blog post about the proposal to move a welcome center into the Clarke Museum (“Clarke Museum May Make Room for Welcome Center”) inaccurately stated that the museum’s current Apothecary exhibit might become a bar. In fact, the exhibit may be moved to make room for a tasting room and café. The Journal regrets the error.

Write a Letter!

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Continued from previous page

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●


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News

The Bridgeville Beat Resident deputies return to rural Humboldt By Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com

H

umboldt County Sheriff’s deputy Ben Filippini is 24 years old and just three years out of College of the Redwood’s Police Academy. Beneath the back of his short blond hair, his neck is sunburned a dark red where a tactical helmet and mask did not cover his skin at a recent outdoor training session. He’s quick to smile, quick to laugh and he listens more than he talks. All of these things work in his favor at his current job — resident deputy for State Route 36 from Fortuna to Blocksburg. Filippini’s appointment as a rural deputy is one of several positions funded by Measure Z, a sales tax measure that county voters passed in November of 2014. A re-

Deputy Ben Filippini stands next to his rig at the Bridgeville Community Center. Linda Stansberry cent report by the Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury described rural areas of the county as being “seriously underserved by law enforcement and other emergency services.” Among the problems described were slow response times to 911 calls, fears of retribution from criminals should someone call law enforcement and — in Eastern Humboldt County — a “culture of ‘lawlessness’ which prevails due to the lack of law enforcement services.” (The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office has yet to formally respond to the report.) Filippini knows the region and its culture well. He grew up near Hydesville, just outside Fortuna, although he went to Ferndale High School. It’s common for people to examine his name badge and

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ask about his father or grandfather. Many of the people he talks to on his daily beat, driving from Fortuna to Bridgeville and back, are family friends or neighbors. It’s a different dynamic than the one he was trained to handle at the police academy, or the one he experienced when working the graveyard shift in Eureka. “You handle things a little different,” he says. “If people you know are messing up, they don’t get any wiggle room, but you find your formula.” According to the grand jury report, roughly two-thirds of the county’s population live in rural or unincorporated areas. Until 2008, many of those areas had their own resident deputies. But a nationwide recession and subsequent budget cuts

in the sheriff’s office led to the loss of resident deputy positions and staffing of substations of many rural areas, including Garberville and Willow Creek. Measure Z’s passage allowed the HCSO to unfreeze 30 vacant positions and staff the Garberville and Willow Creek substations. Orick, Orleans and Bridgeville now have resident deputies, and efforts are underway to bring community service officers to Eastern and Southern Humboldt. Finding funding and housing for these positions continues to be a challenge, and a combination of a lengthy hiring process and poor retention rates due to low salaries exacerbates the issue. And, while residents in these outlying areas consistently express concerns in community meetings


about crime and criminal behavior, officers still struggle with establishing trust in regions that have effectively had to police themselves for close to a decade, even as cannabis cultivation grew exponentially. “We just hear about a fraction of what goes on,” Filippini says. While he assists the county’s Drug Enforcement Unit on raids, his primary concern is the criminal issues sometimes associated with grow ops, such as theft and rape, not ferreting out illegal scenes. “At the end of the day, we don’t care about the plants, we care about the people,” he says. The unwillingness of some victims to report crimes or follow up can be frustrating for the deputy. He knows where the hot spots of crime and dysfunction are — the house where a mentally ill man beats his wife, the trailer where an elderly woman has a squatter’s nest of heroin addicts, the recently permitted grow where chainsaws and gasoline routinely disappear — but more often than not, people just want to vent, not file a formal report. And if they don’t want to officially report a crime, there’s not much Filippini can do besides listen. Such is the case when he gets his first

call of a day, from a road rage incident on U.S. Highway 101, where a man flipped off a bad driver and had a pistol pointed at him in return. Although the call happened off his beat, close to College of the Redwoods, he goes to the victim’s business and takes a report anyway, nodding and writing down a description of the brandisher and his car. But when he asks the man if he would like to “be a victim of a crime,” the man says no. Filippini nods amiably, though he says afterward, “If you don’t have a victim, you don’t have a crime.” A different deputy will try to track down the gun waver and check as to whether his weapons are registered, but he won’t arrest him for “brandishing” without the witness’ testimony. “It’s still really weird out this way,” he says. “Half the population is really excited I’m here, the other half would rather handle it on their own.” Heading east toward Bridgeville, Filippini gets a call on his flip phone. He listens closely to the voice on the other end, repeats an address and gives an ETA. It’s a Hydesville resident complaining about people speeding on a private road. Filippini will go and, after the obligatory questions about his father and grandfather, patiently

listen to the complainant’s long oral history of bad driving and near-misses on the shared road. Although he sees action — Filippini has been a first responder to several murder scenes and broken up his share of domestic disputes — a great many of his calls are about bad neighbors, bad drivers, trespassing and other matters that won’t necessarily generate a report, much less an arrest. The trespassing and property line disputes can be particularly time consuming. He usually refers people to the county surveyor to get their boundaries redrawn. But nevertheless, he listens. He drives down backroads at the request of Neighborhood Watch participants, making his presence known. He stops and talks to senior citizens on their morning walks, catching up on gossip. He follows up on calls about loud music and public nudity, and when the property maps inevitably come out, he examines them and nods politely while slapping mosquitoes. Part of it might be his upbringing — his dad’s a retired Marine, his mom a schoolteacher — but a larger part is self-preservation. “Being out here by myself, the last thing you want is to make people angry with you,” he says. “You’re so far away from back up. You’ve got to pick and choose

your battles.” And when he chooses a battle, he tries to be ready. Filippini trains seven days a week — cardio, free weights and jiu jitsu — to make himself as hard a target as possible. Working alone in one of the most remote regions of the county, he wants to be able to put up a good fight. Such was the case when he spotted a wanted warrant suspect — Wade Harris — who had broken down on State Route 36 on June 14. Filippini got out of his car to talk to Harris, who allegedly shouted, “I’m not going to let you take me, you’re going to have to kill me.” After a short chase through the brush, Filippini tackled and subdued Harris, taking him into custody. News about the incident broke on local media before Filippini could tell his mom he was safe and she left several frantic messages on his phone wanting to make sure he was OK. The deputy says when he finally called back, she gave him an earful. l Linda Stansberry is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or linda@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.

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Week in Weed

A Snowball’s Chance in D.C. By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

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.S. Sen. Cory Booker introduced a bill Aug. 1 that would legalize marijuana federally. “Our country’s drug laws are badly broken and need to be fixed,” the New Jersey Democrat said in a statement. “They don’t make our communities any safer — instead they divert critical resources from fighting violent crimes, tear families apart, unfairly impact low-income communities and communities of color, and waste billions of taxpayer dollars each year.” The bill, dubbed the Marijuana Justice Act, would remove cannabis entirely from the Controlled Substance Act and could be implemented retroactively, meaning it could expunge the records of scores of folks convicted in past possession cases. It would also earmark budget savings from legalization to be spent encouraging restrictive states to loosen local laws. As the bill’s name attests, Booker views this as a social justice issue and there’s plenty of data to back him up. The American Civil Liberties Union analyzed cannabis-related criminal cases from 2001 through 2010 and found more than 8 million Americans had been arrested for possession, use or distribution. But while black and white people report using marijuana at similar rates, black people are nearly four times more likely to be the subject of a possession arrest, the ACLU found. But in addition to giving some police a tool to disproportionately incarcerate people of color, marijuana’s current federal status also brings almost a blanket prohibition on badly needed research on cannabis, which some studies have linked to everything from reducing opioid overdose rates to improving the memory of dementia patients. Booker’s bill would end that, paving the way for real research. But it should be noted that a snowball in hell is going to fare better than Booker’s bill, which has exactly zero chance of passing both houses of Congress and being signed into law under President Donald Trump. Now, you might say, “Wait, haven’t 29 states legalized recreational or medical marijuana at this point? Aren’t we experiencing a sea change?” While it’s true that 21 states have legalized med-

ical marijuana and another eight have green-lighted recreational use, very few of those — and none of the recreational use laws — came from state legislatures. They were voter-passed initiatives. Lawmakers, it seems, are trailing far behind the general public, 57 percent of which supports federal legalization, according to an October Pew Research Center survey. Federal legalization efforts far more timid than Booker’s have been introduced annually for close to two decades and not one has even gone to hearing. And lest we forget, that includes some years when Democrats controlled the House and the Senate and admitted former tokers inhabited the White House. Now we have Republican majorities in both houses and a president who appointed a drug war crusader and eradication evangelist as the nation’s chief law enforcement officer. But snowball’s chance aside, there are some really positive aspects to Booker’s legislation, if you’re among the rational Americans who believe the war on drugs has been an abject failure. First and foremost, Booker is currently being hyped as one of the Democratic anointeds for a potential presidential bid in 2020. The fact that he doesn’t view introducing this legislation as some kind of scarlet letter that would leave him among the Ralph Naders of the world is a sign that views — even among the D.C. bigwigs and campaign consultants — are starting to change. The bill is also stronger than many of its predecessors, most of which simply relegated the issue back to states and would have done nothing to expunge records and bring some sort of retroactive justice to the conversation. The mere fact that Booker addressed the issue through a social justice lens represents progress. It’s also worth noting that Booker’s introduction of the bill made headlines in virtually every major news outlet. So in short, there’s a lot to like about Booker’s bill. Just not its chances to become law. l Thadeus Greenson is the news editor at the Journal. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.com.

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From NCJ Daily

Goodbye MAC, Hello Waterfront Treatment Services

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he dramatic debate in Washington, D.C., over the fate of national healthcare policy almost scuttled plans to bring more addiction treatment to Humboldt

“It’s finally happened,” McManus told the Journal. “The way it’s come together is better than I could have ever imagined.” Martha Shanahan, director of community benefits at St. Joseph, said ADCS has been operating on a “shoestring” budget as McManus tried to bring together the necessary pieces to best serve his patients: staff, location and money. Meanwhile the MAC, which was operating as a homeless intake and transitional housing facility, was experiencing its own chicken-egg problem around homelessness. According to the summary prepared by Melinda Peterson, the city’s housing project manager, the persistent problem of substance use disorders “severely negatively affected the long-term success of program participants.” Peterson stated that “close to 90 percent of participants were diagnosed with either mental illness, Substance Use Disorder, or both. Many program participants have been unable to successfully complete the process to housing because of their substance use disorder(s).” So marrying the addiction program in need of a modern facility and the facility in need of comprehensive treatment seems like a win-win for both entities, and most importantly, a community which has an extremely high rate of addiction, addiction-related diseases and deaths due to opiate overdose. Previous Journal coverage has examined our region’s dearth of comprehensive treatment for addicts and alcoholics. But in order for the program to continue, a continuous funding stream needs to be in place, and until recently, the fate of Drug MediCal was in question. Shanahan says that it was touch-and-go for a while as Congress wrestled over a partial or

County. A July 18 vote by the Eureka City Council allowed City Manager Greg Sparks to negotiate a lease agreement for the property at 139 Y St., formerly known as the Multiple Assistance Center. The MAC, which has been used as a transitional facility for homeless folks, will see a new incarnation as Waterfront Treatment Services, a detox and residential treatment facility for people struggling with addiction. The facility will be managed by the Redwood Coast Action Agency and Alcohol Drug Care Services. St. Joseph Hospital, under Providence St. Joseph and the Well Being Trust, recently administered a $1.6 million grant to sponsor “the first and only dual-diagnosis, medical detoxification and residential treatment facility in the county” for its first 18 months. John McManus, who helms ADCS, has been trying for several years to implement a medically-based detox in Eureka. ADCS’s current detox center relies on St. Joseph Hospital to medically assess patients and clear them before they’re admitted to treatment. Withdrawal from some drugs, including alcohol, can be fatal or life-endangering and require medical intervention. Drug MediCal, a program covered under the Affordable Care Act, offers reimbursement for these services. His efforts to get ADCS services and medical detox covered under MediCal were hampered by infrastructure problems in ADCS buildings, many of which were built in the 1930s and could not be brought up to compliance to be eligible for MediCal.

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The number of roadway fatalities in Humboldt County so far this year after two men were killed when a Nissan coupe hit a tree off U.S. Highway 101 near Pepperwood and burst into flames shortly before 2 a.m. Aug. 1. POSTED 08.01.17

northcoastjournal

Angelic Transformation

Amelie (foreground) and Dele Rebstock, of Arcata, got brushes of their own and joined the Playful Magic team in painting the mural on the Angels of Hope Thrift Shop wall. Visit www.northcoastjournal.com for the full story and slideshow. POSTED 07.31.17 — Photo by Mark Larson complete repeal of the ACA, which would have put MediCal funding in question, meaning the program might have petered out once granting funding was used up. But they pushed forward with the hope the funding would stay in place and, after several years of struggle, the right formula of time, place and money seems to have coalesced to bring McManus’ vision to fruition. St. Joseph is also establishing a program called Humboldt Accountable Community for Health, a branch of a national program devoted to improving health outcomes, particularly in regards to mental health and addiction. “This is really going to kind of raise the bar to expand capacity and provide

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

a higher quality, better level of care for folks needing those detox services, also treatment services,” says Shanahan. The 30-day residential treatment program, which will implement case management from RCAA to help connect patients with resources, such as housing after treatment, is expected to open this September. Residents will have the option to stay up to a maximum of six months, depending on their case. According to the city’s summary, all previous residents of the MAC have been housed and “it is an expectation of the city that the facility will result in a measurable reduction of homelessness in Eureka.” — Linda Stansberry POSTED 07.28.17

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newsletters

They Said It

Comment Of The Week

“It’s just more evidence to what we basically already expected.”

“‘Universally liked’ … Go talk to the houseless community. They won’t miss him. I won’t miss him either.”

— North Coast Concussion Program Coordinator Beth Larson on a groundbreaking Boston University study that examined the brains of 111 deceased NFL players and found that 110 had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the degenerative disease believed to be caused by repeated blows to the head. Read the full story at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 07.31.17

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— Noah Corallo-Titus commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on last week’s package of cover stories, “Goodbye, Chief,” about the departure and legacy of former Eureka Police Chief Andrew Mills. Corallo-Titus joined others in taking issue with the Journal’s claim that Mills left Eureka “almost universally liked.” POSTED 07.27.17


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The toast of the county

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verybody get a glass — it’s time for the Journal’s annual Best Of list. Our readers have once again voted on their favorite people, places, businesses, things to eat, drink and enjoy in our county. That includes everything from where to get the tastiest Bloody Mary to the finest midwife. This is our chance to toast the winners, as well as a couple of our favorite local characters. And like a good party, it turns out some of them are already pals, like the Best Musician, who happens to have a day job at the Best Bookstore. Who knew? Here’s to your besties, Humboldt. Maybe we’ll see you at Saturday night’s Best Of party at the Carson Block Building — if not, we’ll raise a glass to absent friends. Cheers. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

15 Arts, ENTERTAINMENT & RECREATION21 Retail & Services25 Cannabis31 BONUS!32 FOOD & DRINK

FOOD & DRINK FOOD BAKERY

Brio Breadworks

1309 11th St., Arcata; 822-0791; www.briobaking.com Second Place: Ramone’s Bakery & Cafe Third Place: Old Town Coffee & Chocolates

ABOVE: Bill Chino, of Plaza Grill, winner for Best Happy Hour, with Natalie Walston, manager of Plaza, Best Furniture Store (see page 25). Photo by Jillian Butolph

BBQ

Sammy’s BBQ & Catering

1709 Fifth St., Eureka; 443-4227; www.sammysbbqcatering.com Second Place: Humboldt Smokehouse Third Place: Southside Mike’s Bar-B-Que BREAKFAST

Big Blue Cafe

846 G St., Arcata; 826-7578; Second Place: The Greene Lily Third Place: The Village Pantry Family Restaurant

RIGHT: Nina Tillman, who works at Lima’s Pharmacy, winner for Best Pharmacy (see page 30), with Ray Schick, owner of neighboring Stars Hamburgers, winner of Best Burger and Milkshake. Photo by Jillian Butolph

Continued on page 17 »

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THANK YOU

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BEST

CHINESE RESTAURANT!

FOOD TO GO CHINESE & ASIAN FOOD 823 BROADWAY • EUREKA 707 269 2618

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Thanks for voting us

BEST Ice Cream!

OPEN DAILY • Noon to 10pm • 1 F Street, Eureka (707) 407-3508 • humboldticecream.com

of $30 or more PLU #77235

“We Fit Humboldt” 6th & E, Eureka • 444-9201

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for voting us

Best Food Truck! 1621 Broadway Eureka, CA 95501 1584 Reasor Rd., McKinleyville, ca 95521 16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com


FOOD & DRINK continued from page 15

BREAKFAST SANDWICH

FOOD TRUCK

McIntosh Farm Country Store

Speedy Taco Truck

BUFFALO WINGS

FREE CHIPS & SALSA

Humboldt Brews

Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill

1264 Giuntoli Lane, Arcata; 822-0487; www.mcintoshfarm.com Second Place: Black Lightning Motorcycle Cafe Third Place: Big Blue Cafe

856 10th St, Arcata; 826-2739; www.humboldtbrews.com Second Place: Six Rivers Brewery Third Place: Eel River Brewing Co. BURGER

Stars Hamburgers

1535 G St., Arcata; 826-1379; 2009 Harrison Ave., Eureka; 445-2061 Second Place: Sixth and E Neighborhood Eatery Third Place: Surfside Burger Shack Fourth Place: Humboldt Brews

1223 Broadway, Eureka; 442-1626; Second Place: Southside Mike’s Bar-B-Que Third Place: Simmer Down Caribbean Cafe Fourth Place: Tako Faktory

1111 Fifth St., Eureka; 443-5458; 427 W. Harris, Eureka; 476-8565 855 Eighth St. Ste. 3, Arcata; 822-1010 www.ritashumboldt.com Second Place: Esmeralda’s Mexican Food Third Place: La Patria Mariscos & Grill FRENCH FRIES

Arcata Pizza & Deli

BURRITO

1057 H St., Arcata; 822 4650; www.arcatapizza.com Second Place: Lost Coast Brewery & Cafe Third Place: Surfside Burger Shack

Esmeralda’s Mexican Food

GRILLED CHEESE

328 Grotto St., Eureka; 442-0887; www.esmeraldasmexicanfood.com Second Place: Tako Faktory Third Place: Taqueria La Chiquita

Queso Kings Grilled Cheese Bar

CHINESE RESTAURANT

252 Loleta Dr., Loleta; 733-5470; www.quesokings.com Second Place: Old Town Coffee & Chocolates Third Place: Surfside Burger Shack

Liu’s Oriental Cuisine

GROCERY STORE

823 Broadway, Eureka; 269-2618; www.liuseureka.com Second Place: Hunan Village Third Place: Szechuan Garden DELI

Eureka Natural Foods

North Coast Co-op

25 Fourth St., Eureka; 443-6027; 811 I St, Arcata; 822-5947 www.northcoast.coop Second Place: Eureka Natural Foods Third Place: Wildberries Marketplace

1450 Broadway, Eureka; 442-6325; 2165 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-3636 www.eurekanaturalfoods.com Second Place: Wildberries Marketplace Third Place: North Coast Co-op Fourth Place: Murphy’s Deli

HOT DOG

DONUT

ICE CREAM

Don’s Donuts, Pizza & Deli

Livin’ the Dream Ice Cream

933 H St., Arcata; 822-6465; Second Place: Happy Donuts Third Place: Donut Mill EATS IN SOHUM

Cecil’s New Orleans Bistro

773 Redwood Drive, Garberville; 923-7007; www.garbervillebistro.com Second Place: Nacho Mama Third Place: Sicilito’s Pizzeria FISH & CHIPS

Eel River Brewing Co.

1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna; 725-2739; www.eelriverbrewing.com Second Place: SALT Fish House Third Place: Humboldt Brews

Wolf Dawg

525 Second St., Eureka; 442-3294; Second Place: Costco Wholesale Third Place: Bulldoggies of Humboldt

1 F St., Bayfront One, Eureka; 407-3508; www.humboldticecream.com Second Place: Arcata Scoop Third Place: Fresh Freeze Drive-In ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Abruzzi Ristorante

780 Seventh St., Arcata; 826-2345; www.abruzziarcata.com Second Place: Mazzotti’s Old Town Third Place: La Trattoria JUICE BAR

Wildberries Marketplace 747 13th St., Arcata; 822-5211; www.wildberries.com Second Place: Eureka Natural Foods Third Place: Humboldt Juice Works

Continued on page 19 »

Paula Tweedy (front) with her daughter Alyssa. Photo by Jillian Butolph

Serving up Smiles

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or many children in Arcata and McKinleyville, the first harbinger of spring isn’t a shift in the weather or fresh flower blooms unfolding on shrubs just waking up from a winter slumber. Instead, the heralding of a change comes in the form of a robin-egg blue ice cream truck with flames melding from yellow to red painted on the sides that returns to their neighborhoods like clockwork each April. Behind the wheel is McKinleyville native Paula Tweedy, who has been signaling her arrival for the summer season with tunes like “The Candy Man” ringing through the streets for nearly two decades. There to greet her are gaggles of youngsters, dollar bills clutched in their tiny hands. But, that’s not to say that kids are the only ones who look forward to seeing her. “I think sometimes the grownups are just as happy about me coming as the kids are,” she says. Paula’s road to becoming Humboldt County’s first ice cream truck owner was paved by a matter of chance. She was visiting relatives in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, when she noticed little kids standing along the road. When she was told they were waiting for the ice cream truck, Paula joined the group. “My kids had never seen an ice cream truck,” she says. When Paula found out the owner had another truck for sale, something clicked.

Staff Pick A stay-at-home mom with two young ones at the time, the truck seemed like a fun, family-friendly way to make a little extra money. A short time later, her husband loaded the truck on a trailer and drove the small, van-like vehicle all the way back to McKinleyville. Her husband set about fixing the truck up and eventually they settled on the current design — decorated to resemble a race car. “I wanted it to look cool,” Paula recalls. When not driving her regular routes, Paula also brings her truck to private gatherings and community events, including Wildwood Days in Rio Dell later this month. Over the years, she’s become a community fixture in her own right. Paula says she is still often asked about what happened to the little girl — her now pregnant 24-year-old daughter Alyssa — who began working as her helper 16 years ago and did so until her teen years made the job lose its luster. And sometimes she’s stopped by young men, their once boyish faces now obscured by mustaches and beards, who want to know if she remembers them. The best part of the job, she says, is watching the children she once delighted now bringing their own children to enjoy the simple pleasure of buying ice cream from her truck. “I don’t make a lot of money, but I get to see the kids grow up,” she says. To contact Paula Tweedy, call 498-5165. — Kimberly Wear

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Moonstone Crossing THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

Best Winery

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BEST HAMBURGER & MILKSHAKE

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2009 Harrison Ave., Eureka (707) 445-2061 1535 G St., Arcata (707) 826-1379

Change a life forever

Teach kids that their communities care about them. Become a foster partent. Foster parents are needed throughout Humboldt County. Stipends and other supports are provided. If there’s room in your home for a child or teen, please call 707-499-3410

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com


FOOD & DRINK continued from page 17

Best Taco Truck: Speedy Taco

LATE-NIGHT FOOD

Let us all now toast Speedy Taco, whose name is accurate and whose chile verde burritos are the perfect size and composition for sneaking into an afternoon matinee. First introduced to me when it would park outside of Broadway Cinema, I followed it down the street to its current incarnation at the parking lot of Sport N’Cycle, where the diligent guys behind the counter humor my broken Spanish and taunt my inability to handle spiciness on a weekly basis. The truck’s commercial kitchen is in my neighborhood, meaning that at the right time of the day, I can walk past and be engulfed in the smell of taco truck heaven. Heaven, I tell you. Salud, Speedy Taco!

Toni’s 24 Hour Restaurant

1901 Heindon Road, Arcata; 822-0091; Second Place: Don’s Donuts Pizza & Deli Third Place: Taco Bell Fourth Place: Denny’s LOCAL CHEF

Josh Wiley at 511 Restaurant

511 Second St., Eureka; 268-3852; www.fiveeleveneureka.com Second Place: Gary Holler at The Greene Lily Third Place: Jeff Dunker at DD’s Steakhouse LOCAL CHOCOLATIER

Dick Taylor Craft Chocolate

4 W. Fourth St., Eureka, 798-6010; www.dicktaylorchocolate.com Second Place: Old Town Coffee & Chocolates Third Place: Humboldt Chocolate LOCALLY MADE FOOD

Cypress Grove Chèvre

— Linda Stansberry

1330 Q St., Arcata; 825-1100; www.cypressgrovechevre.com Second Place: Brio Breadworks Third Place: Josh Fox Bread MEAT MARKET/COUNTER

Eureka Natural Foods

1450 Broadway, Eureka; 442-6325; 2165 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-3636 www.eurekanaturalfoods.com Second Place: Ferndale Meat Co. Third Place: Myrtle Avenue Market & Deli MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Esmeralda’s Mexican Food

328 Grotto St., Eureka; 442-0887; www.esmeraldasmexicanfood.com Second Place: Carmela’s Mexican Restaurant Third Place: Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Fourth Place: Pachanga Mexicana MILK SHAKE

Stars Hamburgers

1535 G St., Arcata; 826-1379; 2009 Harrison Ave, Eureka; 445-2061 Second Place: Fresh Freeze Drive-In Third Place: Surfside Burger Shack NATURAL FOOD STORE

Eureka Natural Foods

1450 Broadway, Eureka; 442-6325; 2165 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-3636 www.eurekanaturalfoods.com Second Place: North Coast Co-op Third Place: Wildberries Marketplace NEW RESTAURANT

Humboldt Bay Bistro

1436 Second St., Eureka; 443-7339; www.humboldtbaybistro.com Second Place: The Diver Bar & Grill Third Place: Savory Grill & Cafe

Photo by Drew Hyland

ONION RINGS

SANDWICH

THAI RESTAURANT

Sixth and E Neighborhood Eatery

Hole in the Wall

Annie’s Cambodian Cuisine

603 E St., Eureka; 445-8783; www.6thande.com Second Place: Toni’s 24 Hour Restaurant Third Place: Surfside Burger Shack Fourth Place: AA Bar & Grill PIE

Slice Of Humboldt Pie

828 I St., Arcata; 630-5100; www.sliceofhumboldtpie.com Second Place: Marie Callender’s Third Place: The Village Pantry Family Restaurant PIZZA

Paul’s Live From New York 665 Samoa Blvd., Arcata; 822-6199; 604 F St., Eureka; 442-5800 www.paulslivefromnewyorkpizza.com Second Place: Babe’s Pizza & Pasta Third Place: Smug’s Pizza SALAD

Eureka Natural Foods

1450 Broadway, Eureka; 442-6325; 2165 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-3636 www.eurekanaturalfoods.com Second Place: The Greene Lily Third Place: The Village Pantry Family Restaurant

590 S G St., Arcata; 822-7407 1331 Broadway, Eureka; 443-5362; Second Place: Central Sandwich Third Place: North Coast Co-op

1917 Fifth St., Eureka; 442-1556; Second Place: Pho Thiên Long Third Place: Siam Orchid Thai Cuisine VEGAN OPTIONS

SEAFOOD [TIE]

SALT Fish House

761 Eighth St., Arcata; 630-5300; www.saltfishhouse.com

Sea Grill

316 E St., Eureka; 443-7187; www.seagrillrestauranteureka.com Second Place: Jack’s Seafood STEAK

AA Bar & Grill

929 Fourth St., Eureka; 443-1632; Second Place: Shamus T Bones Third Place: Double D Steak & Seafood

Wildflower Cafe & Bakery 1604 G St., Arcata; 822-0360; www.wildflowercafebakery.com Second Place: Bless My Soul Cafe Third Place: Japhy’s Soup & Noodles VEGETARIAN OPTIONS

Bless My Soul Cafe

29 W Fifth St., Eureka; 443-1090; www.blessmysoulcafe.com Second Place: Japhy’s Soup & Noodles Third Place: Wildflower Cafe & Bakery Fourth Place: North Coast Co-op

SUSHI RESTAURANT

DRINK

Sushi Spot Arcata

BAR

670 Ninth St., #101, Arcata; 822-1221; www.sushispotarcata.com Second Place: Masaki’s Kyoto Japanese Restaurant Third Place: Tomo Japanese Restaurant

Logger Bar

510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake; 668-5000; Second Place: Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Third Place: The Speakeasy Continued on next page »

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FOOD & DRINK continued from previous page

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BARTENDER

LOCAL HARD CIDER

Cameron, The Speakeasy

Humboldt Cider Company

BLOODY MARY

LOCAL SPIRIT

The Alibi

Redwood Rye Whiskey, Humboldt Craft Spirits

411 Opera Alley, Eureka; 444-2244; Second Place: Jessica, AA Bar and Grill Third Place: Greg, Salt Fish House

744 Ninth St., Arcata; 822-3731; Second Place: Cafe Waterfront Third Place: Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room BREWERY

Mad River Brewing Company & Tasting Room

Thank you f or vo ting us

BEST Bakery

7 0 7. 8 2 2 . 5 9 2 2 • 7 9 1 G S t r e e t , A r c a t a cafebrioarcata.com

195 Taylor Way, Blue Lake; 668-4151; www.madriverbrewing.com Second Place: Lost Coast Brewery & Cafe Third Place: Redwood Curtain Brewing Co. COFFEE HOUSE

Old Town Coffee & Chocolates 211 F St., 445-8600 502 Henderson St., Eureka; 442-1522; www.oldtowncoffeeeureka.com Second Place: Because Coffee Third Place: Northtown Coffee COFFEE ROASTER

Humboldt Bay Coffee Company

535 Third St., Eureka; 444-3969; www.humboldtcoffee.com Second Place: Old Town Coffee & Chocolates Third Place: Muddy Waters Coffee Co. DIVE BAR

The Alibi

Eureka; 499-9999; www.humboldtcraftspirits.com Second Place: Boldt, Alchemy Distillery Third Place: Vodka, Humbolt Distillery Fourth Place: Vodka, Dutch and Dewey Distillery Fifth Place: Moonshine, Jewell Distillery MARGARITA

Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill

1111 Fifth St., Eureka; 443-5458 427 W. Harris, Eureka; 476-8565 855 Eighth St., Suite 3, Arcata; 822-1010 www.ritashumboldt.com; Second Place: Logger Bar Third Place: Fiesta Grill & Cantina MARTINI

The Speakeasy

411 Opera Alley, Eureka; 444-2244; Second Place: Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Third Place: Five Eleven SPECIALTY/SEASONAL BEER

Raspberry Lambic Six Rivers Brewery

HAPPY HOUR

1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-7580; www.sixriversbrewery.com Second Place: Macadamia Nut Porter, Six Rivers Brewery Third Place: Watermelon Wheat, Lost Coast Brewery

Plaza Grill

SPORTS BAR

744 Ninth St., Arcata; 822-3731; Second Place: Shanty Third Place: Ernie’s

780 Seventh St., Arcata, 826-0860; www.plazagrillarcata.com Second Place: Carter House Inn Third Place: Five Eleven Fourth Place: Shamus T Bones IPA

Eel River Brewing Co.

1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna; 725-2739; www.eelriverbrewing.com Second Place: Redwood Curtain Brewing Co. Third Place: Mad River Brewing Co. LOCAL BEER

Steelhead, Mad River Brewing Co.

195 Taylor Way, Blue Lake; 668-4151; www.madriverbrewing.com Second Place: Tangerine Wheat, Lost Coast Brewery Third Place: Imperial Golden Ale, Redwood Curtain Brewing Co.

20  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

3750 Harris St., Eureka; 798-6023; www.humboldtcidercompany.com Second Place: Wrangletown Cider Company

Humboldt Brews

856 10th St, Arcata; 826-2739; www.humboldtbrews.com Second Place: AA Bar & Grill Third Place: Sidelines Sports Bar WINERY

Moonstone Crossing Winery 1000 Moonstone Cross Road; Trinidad; 677-3832 www.moonstonecrossing.com Second Place: Fieldbrook Winery Third Place: Briceland Vineyards Winery


Arts, ENTERTAINMENT & RECREATION ART GALLERY

Morris Graves Museum of Art 636 F St., Eureka; 442-0278; www.humboldtarts.org Second Place: HSU Third Street Gallery Third Place: Piante BAND

Object Heavy

www.objectheavy.com; Second Place: Dr. Squid Third Place: Scuber Mountain BEER FESTIVAL

Hops in Humboldt

Nancy Short (left) and Jen McFadden (right), owners of Best Bookstore Booklegger (see page 25) with Best Musician Aber Miller, who works at the shop. Photo by Mark McKenna

Rohner Park, Fortuna; www.hopsinhumboldt.com Second Place: Brew at the Zoo Third Place: Homebrew Fest BIKE TRAIL

Arcata Community Forest

End of 14th St., Arcata; 800-346-3482; Second Place: Patrick’s Point State Park Third Place: Hikshari’ Trail CAMPSITE

Patrick’s Point State Park

4150 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad; 677-3570 Second Place: Grizzly Creek Redwoods State Park Third Place: Mattole Campground CASINO

Blue Lake Casino Hotel

777 Casino Way, Blue Lake; (877) 252-2946 www.bluelakecasino.com; Second Place: Bear River Casino Resort Third Place: Cher-Ae Heights Casino and Bingo CLUB DJ

Gabe Pressure

booking@pressureanya.com; Second Place: Goldylocks Third Place: Lightning Boom Productions DAY HIKE

Fern Canyon

Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park; 488-2039 Second Place: Strawberry Rock Trail Third Place: Headwaters Forest Trail EXOTIC DANCER

Stevie D Luxe

Second Place: Ophelia Cox Third Place: Gypsy Jezebel

FAIR

KARAOKE NIGHT

MUSICIAN

Humboldt County Fair

Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room

Aber Miller

Ferndale; 786-9511; www.humboldtcountyfair.org Second Place: Arcata North Country Fair Third Place: Redwood Acres Fair GOLF COURSE

Baywood Golf & Country Club

3600 Buttermilk Lane, Arcata; 822-3686; www.baywoodgcc.com Second Place: Eureka Municipal Golf Course Third Place: Lighthouse Plaza HISTORIC BUILDING

Carson Mansion

143 M St., Eureka; 442-3738; Second Place: Eureka Inn Third Place: Carson Block Building HUMBOLDT CLOTHING LINE

Humboldt Republic

535 Fourth St., Eureka; 497-6270; www.humboldtrepublic.com Second Place: The Bodega | nothing-obvious Third Place: Humboldt Clothing Company

401 I St., Arcata; www.richardsgoat.com Second Place: Vista Del Mar Third Place: Lightning Boom Productions LIVE-MUSIC VENUE

The Jam (Jambalaya)

915 H St., Arcata; 822-4766; www.jambalayaarcata.com Second Place: Arcata Theatre Lounge Third Place: Humboldt Brews LOCAL ARTIST

Duane Flatmo

www.duaneflatmo.com; Second Place: Jason Whitcomb Third Place: Thomas Bethune LOCAL AUTHOR

Amy Stewart

www.amystewart.com; Second Place: David Holper Third Place: Jerry Martien

Second Place: Ric Nelson, Dr. Squid Third Place: Ian Yeo MUSIC FESTIVAL

Redwood Coast Music Festival 523 Fifth St., Eureka; 445-3378; www.rcmfest.org Second Place: Summer Arts and Music Third Place: Reggae on the River PLACE FOR A BIRTHDAY PARTY

Sequoia Park

3600 W St., Eureka; 441-4248; Second Place: E & O Lanes Third Place: Flips for Kids PLACE TO GET MARRIED

Moonstone Beach Park

100 Moonstone Beach Road, Trinidad www.humboldtgov.org/Facilities/Facility/ Details/Moonstone-Beach-14 Second Place: Ceremonial Rock Third Place: Mitchell Grove Continued on page 23 »

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Thank you to all of our patients and customers for making us N

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“BEST PLACE TO ADOPT AN ANIMAL”

Pocket of Posies

Thanks for voting us best florist in Humboldt County!

Thank you to all of our customers and local growers.

4050 Broadway, Eureka

(707) 496-5146

Thank you for your continued support in our effort to find new homes for stray and abandoned animals.

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HUMBOLDT COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER

980 Lycoming Ave, McKinleyville

707.840.9132

GLAMOROUS BOUTIQUE CARRIES: TRUE RELIGION • JOE’S JEANS • FREE PEOPLE LUCKY • BCBG • KUHL • BLACK SWAN HUDSON • SUPERDRY • GUESS • HOBO • ANGIE

Strongs Creek Plaza 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd, Fortuna 725-9933

THANK YOU FOR VOTING DIANE DICKINSON, MD  BEST 420 PHYSICIAN

North Coast

Medical

PO Box 1127, Arcata, CA 95518 Phone: (707) 826-1165 Fax: (707) 825-1116 www.northcoast-medical.com Arcata | Crescent City | Garberville

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Arts, Entertainment & Recreation continued from page 21

Thank you Humboldt County for voting us the BEST BAR!

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With love & appreciation, the Logger Bar girls

Let’s Be Friends

Best Place for a Birthday Party: Sequoia Park Raise a SpongeBob paper cup for the sunny weekends spent festooning picnic tables at Sequoia Park, for those arriving early to snag a grill or the prized gazebo. May the slides that spill from the redwood tree’s base be cool; may the woodchips under the swings be dry. And may the ice cream truck always roll up to save the day when you run out of cake. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill A little man enjoying Humboldt’s Best Place for a Birthday Party. Photo by Drew Hyland

PLACE TO SEE A PLAY

TATTOO ARTIST

Ferndale Repertory Theatre

Luis Lopez, Primal Decor

PLACE TO SHOOT POOL

WINE FESTIVAL

Logger Bar

Fieldbrook Art & Wine Festival

447 Main St., Ferndale; 786-5483; www.ferndalerep.org Second Place: North Coast Repertory Theatre Third Place: Arcata Playhouse

510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake; 668-5000; Second Place: Toby & Jack’s Third Place: Vista Del Mar PLACE TO TAKE VISITORS

1908 Myrtle Ave., Eureka; 445-2609; www.primaldecor.com Second Place: Michael Arneson, Primate Tatu Third Place: Dan Dozier, Primal Decor

4241 Fieldbrook Road, Fieldbrook; 834-5369; Second Place: Wine by the Sea Friends of the Dunes Third Place: Humboldt Wine Festival Arcata Rotary

Fern Canyon

Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park; 488-2039 Second Place: Trinidad State Beach Third Place: Patrick’s Point State Park

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2017

Thank You

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for voting us

BEST TIRE SHOP 2017

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WE APPRECIATE YOUR TRUST IN US

Eureka 443-3507 | Fortuna 725-1169 | McKinleyville 839-8986

AHOY! 14TH ANNUAL

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Saturday, August 26 Fortuna’s Rohner Park 24  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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Retail & Services

RETAIL ADULT CLOTHING STORE

HEAD SHOP

Good Relations

S.T.I.L.

223 Second St., Eureka, 441-9570; www.goodrelations.com Second Place: Belle Starr Third Place: Hot Knots ANTIQUE STORE

Daisy Drygoods

959 H St., Arcata; 822-1893; Second Place: Anglin Second Hand Third Place: Annex 39 Antiques BICYCLE SHOP

Revolution Bicycles

1593 G St., Arcata; 822-2562; 2811 F St., Eureka; 443-9861 www.revolutionbicycle.com Second Place: Pacific Outfitters of Eureka Third Place: Adventure’s Edge BOOKSTORE

2940 Broadway # E, Eureka; 269-0210; Second Place: Humboldt Glassblowers Third Place: Stuff ‘n’ Things HOBBY SHOP

S.T.I.L.

2940 Broadway # E, Eureka; 269-0210; Second Place: Good Relations Lovers’ Boutique Third Place: Art Center HORTICULTURE SUPPLY STORE

Pierson Building Center

4100 Broadway, Eureka; 441-2700; www.thebighammer.com Second Place: Northcoast Horticulture Supply Third Place: Root 101 Nursery JEWELRY STORE

Holly Yashi

402 Second St., Eureka; 445-1344; Second Place: Northtown Books Third Place: Eureka Books

1300 Ninth St., Arcata; 822-5132; www.hollyyashi.com Second Place: Primal Decor Third Place: Abraxas Jewelers Fourth Place: James Darin Joaillier

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING STORE

LIQUOR STORE

Lots 4 Tots Plus The Clothing Closet

John’s Myrtlewood Liquors and Fine Cigars

Booklegger

3008 Broadway, Eureka; 445-3477; www.lots4totsplus.com Second Place: Sassafras Third Place: Bev’s Real Kids

1648 Myrtle Ave., Eureka; 444-8869; www.johnsfinecigars.com Second Place: Arcata Liquors Third Place: Express Liquors

CRAFT STORE

MATTRESS STORE

Scrapper’s Edge

Living Styles Furniture & Mattress Showroom

728 Fourth St., Eureka; 445-9686; www.scrappersedge.net Second Place: Art Center Third Place: Ellis Art & Engineering Supplies FEED STORE

A & L Feed and Pet Supply

2308 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-3265; www.humcoaandlfeed.com Second Place: The Farm Store Third Place: Nilsen Co. FURNITURE STORE

Plaza

808 G St., Arcata; 822-2250; www.plazaarcata.com Second Place: Living Styles Furniture & Mattress Showroom Third Place: Furniture Design Center

37 W. Second St., Eureka; 443-3161; www.livingstyles.net Second Place: Moore’s Sleep World Third Place: Delta Mattress & Sofa Outlet Store MUSICAL INSTRUMENT STORE

Wildwood Music Co.

1027 I St., Arcata; 822-6264; www.wildwood-music.com Second Place: Mantova’s Two Street Music Third Place: Northcoast Audio NURSERY/GARDEN SUPPLY STORE

Mad River Gardens

3384 Janes Road, Arcata, 822-7049; www.madrivergardens.com Second Place: Miller Farms Nursery Third Place: Pierson Garden Shop Fourth Place: Root 101 Nursery

GIFT SHOP

Many Hands Gallery

438 Second St., Eureka; 445-0455; www.manyhandsgallery.net Second Place: Good Relations Lovers’ Boutique Third Place: Plaza

Aaron Ostrom of Pacific Outfitters, winner of Best Outdoor Gear Store and Best Sporting Goods Store, with pal Jason Whitcomb of S.T.I.L., which won a hat trick of Best Head Shop, Best Hobby Shop and Best Vape Shop. Photo by Jillian Butolph

Best Hobby Shop: S.T.I.L. I’ll admit it, I snickered a bit when reading that S.T.I.L. managed to take home this year’s crowns for Best Head Shop, Best Vape Shop and Best Hobby Shop. Don’t get me wrong — I’m sure they have all the vape pens, blunt wraps and “functional glass art” needed to lock down the first two honors. It was the last one that threw me for a loop. Maybe I’m a bit dated, but the term “hobby shop,” in my mind, brings visions of model trains, scrapping materials and yarn. Maybe, I wondered aloud, Humboldt County’s most popular hobby is just getting really, really high. So it was with a bit of a jaundiced eye that I wandered into S.T.I.L. recently to see what they had to offer up to the hobby enthusiasts among us. It turns out S.T.I.L. has a host of Roller Derby gear, all the way down to pink leather skates with black flames and a rainbow glitter helmet. They also have an impressive novelty sock collection, a host of bath supplies, a collection of Venus fly traps and enough incense varieties to keep the Humboldt State University dorms covered for the school year. So if fumigating the house with vanilla lavender incense, dropping a bath bomb and watching a mysterious carnivorous plant do its thing while unwinding after your latest Roller Derby match fall among your hobbies, this is your shop. And if you like doing all that while wicked high, I think you’ve found your people. — Thadeus Greenson

Continued on page 27 »

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Retail & SErvices continued from page 25 OUTDOOR GEAR STORE

SERVICES

Pacific Outfitters

ACUPUNCTURIST

737 G St., Arcata; 822-0321; 1600 Fifth St., Eureka; 443-6328 www.pacificoutfitters.com Second Place: Adventure’s Edge

Ryan Vodden

PAWN SHOP

2107 Harrison Ave., Eureka; 444-9446; www.redwoodcoastacupuncture.com Second Place: Stacey Kett Third Place: Linda McDevitt

Humboldt Bay Trade & Pawn

ATTORNEY

1435 Fifth St., Eureka; 442-7777; www.humboldtpawn.com Second Place: Eureka Trading Co. PET STORE

Fin-N-Feather

2931 F St., Eureka; 443-4914; www.fin-n-feather.com Second Place: A & L Feed and Pet Supply Third Place: The Farm Store Fourth Place: Myrtle Avenue Pet Center SCREEN PRINT SHOP

Swag

2326 Third St., Eureka; 444-3332; Second Place: Lotus Mountain Third Place: Sports World SHOE STORE

Annie’s Shoes

3005 F St., Eureka; 445-8612; Second Place: Plaza Shoe Shop Third Place: Abraxas Shoes And Leather SOIL COMPANY

FoxFarm

2200 Bendixon St., Samoa; 443-4369; www.foxfarmfertilizer.com Second Place: Royal Gold Third Place: Soilscape Solutions SPORTING GOODS STORE

Pacific Outfitters

737 G St., Arcata; 822-0321; 1600 Fifth St., Eureka; 443-6328 www.pacificoutfitters.com Second Place: Adventure’s Edge Third Place: Sport and Cycle THRIFT STORE

American Cancer Society & Discovery Shop

2942 F St., Eureka; 443-2155; Second Place: Angels of Hope Thrift Store Third Place: Tailwaggers Thrift Shop VAPE SHOP

S.T.I.L.

2940 Broadway # E, Eureka; 269-0210; Second Place: The Humboldt County Collective Third Place: Cigarettes Cheaper Fourth Place: The Humboldt Corner - THC VINTAGE CLOTHING STORE

Vintage Avenger

1101 H St., Arcata; 822-3300; Second Place: Little Shop of Hers Third Place: Shipwreck

Kathleen Bryson

732 Fifth St., Eureka; 268-8600 www.humboldtjustice.com Second Place: Allison Jackson Third Place: Patrik Griego AUTO BODY SHOP

Kreations Auto Body

1560 Bates Road, McKinleyville, 839-4000; 750 Wildwood Ave., Rio Dell, 764-3525 www.kreationsautobody.com Second Place: Quality Body Works Third Place: Myrtletown Body Shop Fourth Place: Peterson’s Collision Repair, Auto Body Shop & Windshield Replacement AUTO REPAIR

Leon’s Car Care Center

929 Broadway, Eureka; 444-9636; www.leons-carcare.com Second Place: Antich Automotive Third Place: Auto Masters Auto Repair BANK/CREDIT UNION

Coast Central Credit Union

2650 Harrison Ave., Eureka; 445-8801; Locations in Arcata, Eureka, Fortuna, Hoopa, McKinleyville and Willow Creek www.coastccu.org Second Place: Redwood Capital Bank Third Place: Umpqua Bank

Best Hardware Store: Pierson’s Building Center Here’s to Pierson’s Building Center, whose staff have made my experience as a first-time homeowner a relatively easy ride. Sure, there’s still a tarp on my roof and pickets falling off my front fence, but every time I walk through the front door of Pierson’s and smell the free coffee, I’m inspired to do projects I never before thought possible. The staff have never “little lady’d” me, nor tried to upsell me on mildew-resistant anything. They’ve patiently cut lengths of wire that — upon inspection — were the wrong size, and cut another length again, without charging me. They’ve helped me flick through the color racks in the paint department, warned against splinters in the lumber yard and humored my poorly behaved dog when he leaped out of my truck looking for treats. And they’re open at 7:30 a.m., meaning I can cruise through before work and feel like I’ve made a productive start to my day. — Linda Stansberry Courtesy of Pierson’s Building Center

CLEANING SERVICE

DANCE STUDIO

A-1 Cleaning Service

Dance Scene Studio

308 F St., Eureka; 443-5557 Second Place: City Barbershop Third Place: Fade Away Barber Lounge

12 W. Seventh St., Eureka; 442-3229; www.a1clean.net Second Place: The Finer Details Third Place: Restif Cleaning

BED & BREAKFAST

COMPUTER REPAIR SERVICE

DENTIST

The Lost Whale Inn

Cornerstone Computers

Richard F. Wolven, DDS

CHIROPRACTOR [TIE]

CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

Dr. Fogg, Grace and Active Care Chiropractic

Alchemy Construction

BARBER

Rocky’s Barber Shop

452 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad; 677-3425; www.lostwhaleinn.com Second Place: The Historic Requa Inn Third Place: Turtle Rocks Oceanfront Inn

1775 Harrison Ave., Eureka, 445-8080, www.grace-chiro.com

Sarah Griffith, Griffith Luoma Chiropractic

2456 Buhne St., Eureka, 443-0695; Second Place: Dr. Martha, Humboldt Back and Neck Pain Center

437 Henderson St., Eureka; 442-9998; www.cornerstone-computers.com Second Place: Network Management Services Third Place: Shaw Computers

330 S G St., Arcata; 822-8013; www.alchemyinc.com Second Place: Pacific Builders Third Place: DCI Builders Inc.

1011 H St., Eureka; 502-2188; www.danceeureka.com Second Place: North Coast Dance Third Place: Redwood Raks World Dance Studio

2750 Harrison Ave., Eureka; 443-9413 Second Place: David R Kime, DDS Third Place: Richard Benoit, DDS DOCTOR

Eloi J. Hoopman, DO North Country Clinic

785 18th St., Arcata; 822-2481 www.opendoorhealth.com Second Place: Greg Holst, MD, Eureka Family Practice Third Place: Christopher Lee, MD

CUSTOMER SERVICE

Good Relations

223 Second St., Eureka, 441-9570; www.goodrelations.com Second Place: S.T.I.L. Third Place: Coast Central Credit Union

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Geraldine Goldberg with her dogs. Photo by Jillian Butolph

Geraldine Goldberg Can Do Anything

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Thank You for Voting Us: Best Seeds in Humboldt! Intended for use in CA only, according to Prop 215

HUMBOLDTSEEDCOMPANY.COM

28  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

eraldine Goldberg arrived in Humboldt County on the back of a motorcycle in 1981, soaked to the skin after traveling down from Portland in the midst of a February rainstorm. She fell in love with the place immediately. “I was ready for an adventure,” she says. She found one. Goldberg and her partner moved into the woods near Whitethorn, a tiny town in Southern Humboldt where everyone hung out under a giant tree. There were no phones. Messages were left at the little store. It was a lot of fun. And there was a lot of drama. Guns were waved, hard drugs floated through the community and pot deals occasionally went wrong. Goldberg says she “didn’t know enough to be scared.” But then she got pregnant. The couple planned to buy a pistol on the day her water broke. It would be a few more hours before she went into labor and, by that time, it would be the middle of the night. Because her partner couldn’t drive their truck (only a motorcycle), Goldberg drove herself to the hospital in Garberville while in labor. Their son Harry was born 10 minutes after she walked into the emergency room. He came home in a cardboard box. When Harry was 2, the couple split up and Goldberg found work in Arcata. She moved in with another single mom

in an apartment on 12th Street. School was cheap in the 1980s, so she enrolled at Humboldt State University, earning a bachelor’s in social work at age 40. Being an older student was “exhilarating,” she says. She went to work for KHSU, eventually writing a history of the station. Between working, single-handedly raising her son and beating breast cancer three times, she earned her masters degree in sociology at the age of 50. Her thesis subject was Julia “Butterfly” Hill, whom she visited often during her 738day sit-in of a redwood tree on Pacific Lumber Co. land. Goldberg still has fragments of the tree’s bark in a necklace that she wears daily. She says the thesis has been checked out of the library dozens of times. Now retired, Goldberg still volunteers at KHSU. She also launched the Arcata Plaza beautification project, helping plant the thousands of flowers that now decorate that space. She was once in charge of removing the garbage and ripped up petals after weekend bacchanals. “There’s a heartbreak of gardening in a public space,” she says. “You have to take the heartbreak.” There’s beauty sown in with the heartbreak. Geraldine Goldberg persists. — Linda Stansberry


Retail & SErvices continued from page 27

DOGGIE DAYCARE

It’s All About the Dogs

449 W. Clark St., Eureka; 444-9663; www.itsallaboutthedogs.com Second Place: Happy Dog Third Place: North Bank Kennels DRY CLEANER

Best Dry Cleaners

632 E St., Eureka; 442-7917; 2023 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-1333 www.humboldtdrycleaners.com Second Place: Norman’s Dry Cleaners FLORIST

Pocket of Posies

4050 Broadway, Eureka; 496-5146; Second Place: Blossoms Florist Third Place: Country Living Florist & Fine Gifts GYM

HealthSPORT

Best Thrift Shop: American Cancer Society Discovery Shop My beloved studded clutch bag, the throw pillow in my office with the hand painted face of a sad whippet, my daughter’s first motorcycle jacket — I owe them all to you, Discovery Shop. Here’s to your trippy window displays, the kitschy souvenir madness of your “global events” and the joy of rifling through other people’s vinyl records, odd glasses and party dresses. Cheers to the donors and volunteers who keep it going. And to whoever drops off the steady stream of size 10 platform stilettos: Honey, you are an inspiration.

300 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Arcata; Also in Eureka, Fortuna and McKinleyville 822-3488; www.healthsport.com Second Place: Fit Nor Cal Third Place: Humboldt Jiu Jitsu HARDWARE/LUMBER STORE

Pierson Building Center 4100 Broadway, Eureka; 441-2700; www.thebighammer.com Second Place: Almquist Lumber Third Place: Shafer’s Ace Hardware HOSPITAL

Mad River Community Hospital

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill Photo by Jillian Butolph

LAUNDROMAT

MAILING CENTER

MORTGAGE COMPANY

Emerald City Laundry Co

Post-Haste Mail Center.

Coast Central Credit Union

LAW OFFICE

MASSAGE THERAPIST

Kathleen Bryson

Christine Finta

1210 G St., Arcata; 825-6802 www.emeraldcitylaundry.com Second Place: Best Dry Cleaners Third Place: East Side Laundromat

3800 Janes Road, Arcata; 822-3621; www.madriverhospital.com Second Place: St. Joseph Hospital

732 Fifth St., Eureka; 268-8600 www.humboldtjustice.com Second Place: Owens & Ross, Attorneys at Law Third Place: Gallegos Law Firm

HOTEL

LOCAL NONPROFIT

Inn at 2nd & C

Food For People

Formerly Historic Eagle House; 139 Second St, Eureka; 444-3344 www.theinnat2ndandc.com Second Place: Best Western Plus Bayshore Inn Third Place: Victorian Inn Hotel

307 14th St., Eureka; 445-3166; www.foodforpeople.org Second Place: Breast and GYN Health Project Third Place: Companion Animal Foundation Fourth Place: Hops in Humboldt

600 F St., Arcata; 825-8295 www.posthastemail.com Second Place: Scrapper’s Edge Third Place: FedEx Ship Center

2650 Harrison Ave, Eureka; 445-8801; Locations in Arcata, Eureka, Fortuna, Hoopa, McKinleyville and Willow Creek Second Place: Bay Pointe Mortgage Third Place: Humboldt Home Loans NAIL SALON

123 F St., Eureka; 498-9762; Second Place: Sarah Maier, Myrtletown Healing Center Third Place: Soul To Soul Spa & Foot Bar Fourth Place: Maralana Fulton, Go. Do. Be.

Polished Nail Salon

MIDWIFE

NEW CAR LOT

Moonstone Midwives

Mid-City Motor World

4677 Valley East Blvd., Suite 2, Arcata; 633-3009; www.moonstonemidwives.com

625 11th St., Suite B, Arcata; 822-1399; www.polishedarcata.com Second Place: Redwood Nails Spa Third Place: Platinum Studio

4800 U.S. Highway 101, Eureka; 443-4871; www.midcitymotorworld.com Continued on next page »

Susana King, R.N. Clinical Specialist in Non-Surgical Cosmetic Treatments working with Dr. Chen.

Skin Resurfacing • Botox • Fillers Laser Hair Removal Chin/Tummy/Buttocks Tightening

Se Habla Español Redwood Aesthetic Medicine 2451 Buhne Street, Eureka Redwoodaestheticmedicine.com Consult: 707.442.2088

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Retail & SErvices continued from previous page

Second Place: McKinleyville Chevrolet and Buick Third Place: McCrea Nissan OPTOMETRIST

A to Z Eye Care

851 Bayside Road, Arcata; 822-7641; www.atozeyecare.com Second Place: Eureka Optometric Center Third Place: McKinleyville Optometric Center ORTHODONTIST

Howard L. Hunt, DDS

707 I St., Eureka; 443-1390; www.huntsmiles.com Second Place: Gabriel Enriquez, DDS, Arcata Orthodontics OUTDOOR GUIDE SERVICE

Kayak Trinidad MAD RIVER PLUMBING

THE #1 PLUMBING COMPANY IN THE GAME.

Trinidad, 329-0085; www.kayaktrinidad.com Second Place: Pacific Outfitters of Eureka Third Place: Mad River Tackle PET GROOMING SERVICE

It’s All About the Dogs

449 W. Clark St., Eureka; 444-9663; www.itsallaboutthedogs.com Second Place: Myrtle Avenue Veterinary Hospital Third Place: Pawlor PHARMACY [TIE]

EXPERT PLUMBING & DRAIN SERVICES.

Cloney’s Prescription Pharmacy 2515 Harrison Ave., Eureka; 443-7086; 1567 City Center Road, McKinleyville; 840-9923 525 Fifth St., Eureka; 443-1614 www.cloneys.com

Lima’s Professional Pharmacy 2097 Harrison Ave., Eureka; 441-8500; www.limasrx.com Second Place: Barnes Arcata Family Drug PHOTOGRAPHER

• RESIDENTIAL PLUMBING & DRAINS • WATER HEATERS • WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION • EMERGENCY SERVICES

Chris Tuite Photography

www.christuitephoto.com; Second Place: Kimberly Ann Photography Third Place: JM Photography PLACE TO ADOPT AN ANIMAL

Humboldt County Animal Shelter

980 Lycoming Ave., McKinleyville; 840-9132; Second Place: Miranda’s Rescue Third Place: Sequoia Humane Society PLUMBING BUSINESS

ROTO-ROOTER 707.822.2688 700 S G St, Arcata, CA 95521 www.rotorooter.com

Roto-Rooter

700 South G St., Arcata; 822-2688; Eureka, 445-0571; Fortuna, 725-3735 McKinleyville, 839-2646 www.rotorooter.com Second Place: Maple Service Plumbing Third Place: The Plumberman

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Besties Timothy Rex, Jennifer Metz, Rebecca Rex and Tammy Rex of The Inn at Second & C, winner of Best Hotel. Photo by Mark McKenna REAL ESTATE AGENT

Jeremy Stanfield

125 12th St., Fortuna; 725-2852; www.jeremystanfieldhomes.com Second Place: Victoria Copeland Third Place: Jill McDonald REAL ESTATE COMPANY

Mikki Moves

805 Seventh St., Eureka; 515-6683; www.mikkimoves.com Second Place: Cutten Realty Third Place: Ming Tree, Eureka Fourth Place: Ming Tree, McKinleyville ROOFING COMPANY

A & I Roofing

4935 Boyd Road, Arcata; 826-2653; www.aandiroofing.com Second Place: McMurray & Sons Roofing, Inc. Third Place: Redwood Empire Roofing STORAGE CENTER

Rainbow Self-Storage

4055 Broadway, Eureka; 443-1451; Locations in Arcata, Eureka and McKinleyvillea www.rainbowstorage.com Second Place: Indianola Storage Third Place: Myrtletown Mini-Storage TIRE SHOP

Les Schwab Tire Center

2440 Broadway, Eureka; 443-3507; 275 N Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna; 725-1169 2210 Central Ave., McKinleyville; 839-8986

www.lesschwab.com Second Place: Tony Gosselin & Sons’ Tire Third Place: T P Tire Service TREE TRIMMING SERVICE

That Tree Guy

725-2609; www.thattreeguymf.com Second Place: Charleston Tree Service Third Place: Dan Collins Tree Service USED CAR LOT

Bob’s Fine Cars

526 Broadway, Eureka; 443-7055; www.bobsfinecars.com Second Place: Roy’s Auto Center Third Place: Fraga’s Sweetheart Motors VETERINARIAN

Sunny Brae Animal Clinic

900 Buttermilk Lane, Arcata; 822-5124; www.sunnybraeanimalclinic.com Second Place: Myrtle Avenue Veterinary Hospital Third Place: Broadway Animal Hospital Fourth Place: Arcata Animal Hospital VOLUNTEER ORGANIZATION

Humboldt Animal Rescue Team 8 W. Sixth St., Eureka; 616-6440; Second Place: Betty Kwan Chinn Day Center Third Place: PacOut Green Team


Cannabis Thanks For Voting Us Best Auto Body Shop in Humboldt County

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Humboldt’s Best Budtender Savannah Snow toasting with Synergy Gummies, winner of Best Local Cannabis Product. Photo by Jillian Butolph 420 PHYSICIAN

LOCAL CANNABIS PRODUCT

Diane Dickinson MD

Synergy Gummies

1448 G St., Arcata; 826-1165; www.northcoast-medical.com Second Place: MC2 Medical Cannabis Consulting & Evaluations Third Place: Dr. Ken I. Miller, MD BUDTENDER

Savannah Snow, The Humboldt County Collective 1670 Myrtle Ave., Eureka; 442-2420; Second Place: Michelle Rose, HPRC Third Place: Fiona Harris, The Humboldt County Collective CANNABIS COLLECTIVE

The Humboldt County Collective

1670 Myrtle Ave., Eureka; 442-2420; Second Place: The Heart of Humboldt Third Place: Wonderland Nursery CANNABIS FESTIVAL

Cannifest

www.cannifest.com; Second Place: Mecca Cup Third Place: Golden Tarp

Second Place: Space Gem Candy Third Place: Humboldt Hemp Wick MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY

The North Coast’s choice for the best in mattresses

✓ Voted BEST Mattress Store

The Humboldt County Collective

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0% APR

36 months OAC

SEEDS

On any Beautyrest Black Mattress Purchase.

Humboldt Seed Co.

www.humboldtseedcompany.com; Second Place: CSI Humboldt Third Place: Rebel Grown

Ends 08/14/17

STRAIN

Girl Scout Cookies Second Place: Green Crack Third Place: ACDC

FREE Delivery FREE Set Up FREE Removal

Dream in Black.

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THANK YOU FOR THE VOTES HUMBOLDT! BEST BIKE TRAIL

Best Parking Lot: Clam Beach Vista Point Well, this is a bit awkward, seeing as the Clam Beach Vista Point isn’t really a parking lot — hence the “vista point” in its name. Maybe I’m a being a bit of a stick in the sandy mud here, but I’m of the opinion that to qualify as a parking lot it must be a location where you actually park your car and leave it there: sitting and enjoying a view isn’t enough. But seeing as there are really no standout parking lots in Humboldt County — I’m going to offer up a toast to what is hands down the region’s worst, the small lot outside the WIC office in Old Town Eureka. The lot sits shaded by a huge tree, which might appeal at first glance. But don’t be fooled. About six months of the year, the trees are populated by a virtual army of small birds. Now I don’t know exactly what these birds eat but I do know they leave no car spared a thorough fecal dousing, the likes of which may land you at a carwash at 8 p.m. So here’s to you, WIC lot, and your tree full of very angry birds. — Thadeus Greenson

BEST SKATEBOARD SPOT

BATHROOM

PARKING LOT

The Speakeasy

Clam Beach Lookout Point

EMT/PARAMEDIC

PLACE TO EAVESDROP

Brandon Amis

Arcata Plaza

FIRE FIGHTER

PLACE TO READ THE JOURNAL

Matt McFarland

Los Bagels Co

411 Opera Alley, Eureka; 444-2244; Second Place: Leon’s Car Care Center Third Place: Cafe Phoenix

Second Place: Paco Willard Third Place: Penny Eckert

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Thanks for voting us

Second Place: Crash Waddell Third Place: Mike Landry LOCALLY MADE PRODUCT

Cypress Grove Chèvre

BEST Midwives!

1330 Q St., Arcata, 825-1100; www.cypressgrovechevre.com Second Place: Larrupin sauce Third Place: Tickle Soap MAYOR

Frank Jager

Contact us 707-633-3009

moonstonemidwives@gmail.com www.moonstonemidwives.com

Consider donating to the Arcata Community Forest, Arcata City Parks and the Arcata Skateboard Park. All donations are tax deductible.

736 F Street, Arcata (707) 822-7091 www.cityofarcata.org/rec

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Off U.S. Highway 101 South, McKinleyville Second Place: Arcata Community Center Third Place: Target

Second Place: WinCo Foods Third Place: Dave’s Place

1061 I St., Arcata; 822-3483 1 Harpst St., Arcata; 826-5308 403 Second St., Eureka; 442-8525 www.losbagels.com; Second Place: Home Third Place: Work work work work work POLICE OFFICER

Andy Mills

Twitter: @ChiefAndyMills Second Place: Deputy Daniel Keating Third Place: CHP Officer Cy May

Second Place: Susan Ornelas Third Place: Sue Long

SKATEBOARD SPOT

NEW BUSINESS

1090 Sunset Ave., Arcata; 822-7091; www.cityofarcata.org/rec Second Place: Ramp Art Third Place: Humboldt State University l

Leaf Detective

408 Seventh St., Suite A, Eureka; 599-1998; www.leafdetective.com Second Place: Just My Type Letterpress Paperie Third Place: The Shadow Gallery: Videos & More Fourth Place: Mid Century Humboldt

Arcata Skate Park


Art Beat

The Faraway Nearby Dan Kitchener’s mural on Eureka’s Buhne Building

By Gabrielle Gopinath “Electric City” by Dan Kitchener puts a Tokyo scene in Old Town. Photo by Mark Larson

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ld Town Eureka twanged with the shock of the new last week when street artist Dan Kitchener unveiled an enormous new mural in its midst, the first to grace the city in several years. “Electric-City” is executed entirely in freehand spray paint on the east side of the Buhne Building at the corner of G and Second streets. It breaks with the pale masonry of the buildings around it, conjuring an illusion of deep perspective from a flat brick facade. Kitchener’s latest noir cityscape is a flickering neon matrix, all reflection and glare. We’re staring into the dark heart of the metropolis. Neon signs tower above the street. Streaks and smears of color bleed from ads and traffic lights, reflecting in the city’s rain-slicked surfaces. The mural makes no effort to perpetuate the line of the buildings around it. In fact, it negates the architecture, opening up an illusionistic boulevard that transects the Buhne building at right angles. It’s almost as if the wireless links that connect devices and minds around the globe are more important than bricks and mortar. The street scene is inspired by Kitchener’s experience of the Shinjuku district of Tokyo, Japan. Kitchener completed the mural, his largest to date, in eight days. At a massive 50 feet high and 70 feet wide, it ranks among the city’s biggest works of public art — a major statement, and not only in terms of square footage. Kevin Bourque of the Eureka-based Black Faun Art

artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

Project Group, who curated and sponsored the work’s creation, said in a statement that he wants the piece “to represent the onset of a new phase in the development of Eureka as an arts community.” Kitchener, who lives in London and also goes professionally by the street art handle DANK, started working as a freelance mural artist after a decade-long career in animation and design, benefiting from the surge of interest in all forms of “street art” that the U.K.’s anonymous graffiti artist Banksy generated in the early aughts. Unlike Banksy, whose guerrilla approach to placing art in public space has typically required speedy execution, Kitchener works with building owners’ permission and paints his murals on-site, rejecting stencils, grids, projections and other labor-saving tools that allow an artist to execute some of the work in advance. He has secured numerous commissions for his signature cityscapes, completing works in England, Sweden, Italy, Cambodia, Vietnam, the United States and Canada — mostly on a similarly enormous scale. Last summer he completed his first project in the United States, a multi-story mural on the side of a Pittsburgh restaurant. Two days after completing “Electric-City,” the globetrotting artist had already moved on to his next commission: a nightclub in the English city of Canterbury. Bourque said that his decision to sponsor the mural was inspired by a recent trip to Art Basel in Miami, where he was impressed by the wealth of graffiti and street art in the

Wynwood Walls district. He has said that he hopes this project will kickstart a new era of public art in Eureka, eventually resulting in “something like an annual summer mural festival that is inclusive of different styles of mural art around the world, while embracing the tone of this community.” Timeliness puts the “street” in street art. Rap music was created to be “the CNN of the streets,” as Chuck D. of the groundbreaking group Public Enemy is credited with saying. Street art, which grew out of the grassroots complex of hip-hop-related art forms developed in and around New York City in the 1970s, has similarly been defined by its response to the moment. While Eureka has a rich tradition of mural painting, the pace of new work has slowed in recent years. Duane Flatmo and the associates who worked under the aegis of the whimsically named Rural Burl Mural Bureau created dozens of murals in and around Eureka during the early 2000s, many of which are now beloved institutions. Bourque wants to see that period’s dynamic spirit return. “We have a lot of murals here; we’re an artistically conscious community,” he noted. “At the same time, it feels like we need new blood.” “Electric-City” stirred up modest controversy in the comments section of the Lost Coast Outpost, where evolving views on public art were on display. The unfamiliar urban imagery, so obviously not from here, displeased some viewers on principle. In addition, Kitchener’s London roots generated a certain amount of discomfort. “Hire a local artist!” some said. Some commenters accused the work of “clashing with the architecture” or simply felt that it was “out of place.” “Redwoods being parted by a river would’ve better suited this area,” one commented. Much critique was motivated by the shared assumption that murals should represent the place where they are located. But the commentariat could not agree on basics of the work’s appearance. Did the nocturne vision look like Eureka, or did it not? Some residents said it did (“Have you ever gone Christmas shopping in Old Town Eureka, in the rain?”), while others angrily demurred. The unspoken assumption underpinning much of the criticism was actually the idea that murals should represent not just the place where they were made, but a particular vision of that place — in this case, one that would mesh easily with “Victorian seaport” branding. Anonymous natterings about the ominous presence of “Asian writing” in Kitchener’s mural, along with comments along the lines of like “looks like a South Korean puked on the wall. Demand a

refund,” made it clear that the knee-jerk hostility the mural elicited among a minority of respondents had a lot to do with the fact that it depicts a faraway Asian city populated by nonwhite people, whose cultural difference is perceived by some locals as a threat. But the work inspired an equally passionate defense from locals, as well as satire in the Outpost by author and Eureka resident Amy Stewart. In a video interview, Kitchener said he enjoyed the fact that while he was painting, “around 50” local workers and residents came by to chat or just to rubberneck each day. Real-world response, he said, had been overwhelmingly positive. Twenty-first century geography is connected in many ways. Existing socially, culturally and professionally in two or more places at once is the new norm in the “gig economy.” The fantasy metropolis depicted in Kitchener’s mural might look exotic but such cities are scarcely remote from area residents’ concerns. Many people who choose to live here do so because digital technology gives them the option to live remotely while maintaining professional links to major urban centers that might be thousands of miles away, as the crow flies. Quite a few of the murals around this city celebrate a sanitized version of the past and/or nostalgia for industries that provided the mainstay of the local economy 100 years ago. Love it or hate it, “Electric-City” serves as a timely corrective to these backward glances — a reminder that a world exists beyond the Redwood Curtain. In fact, it suggests that the wellworn curtain metaphor may no longer be that applicable. Words, pictures, data, dollars and cents move instantaneously and unceasingly from one side of the world to another, making a border curtain about as relevant today as a border wall. Successfully defining regional identity will likely be more important than ever in a globalized, decentralized environment. But artists now misrepresent what regional identity means if they do not make the effort to show how regional and local issues are entwined with global dynamics. Muralists of the future: Tell us something we don’t already know! A city the size of Eureka has room for multitudes and there are still a lot of blank walls out there. l Dan Kitchener’s mural can be seen on the Opera Alley side of the Buhne Building on the corner of Second and G streets in Old Town Eureka. Visit www. northcoastjournal.com to see a short documentary video about the mural’s creation made by Black Faun Art Projects.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

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Arts Nights

Jon Exley, “Writhing Enchantment” at Redwood Art Association Gallery.

Arts Alive!

Saturday Aug. 5, 6-9 p.m. Presented by Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and performances are held the first Saturday of each month. For more information, call 442-9054 or go to www.eurekamainstreet.org

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ADORNI CENTER 1011 Waterfront Drive. Demario Williams, pencil illustrations; Barbara Saul, pastels; and Paul Rickard, oils. A TASTE OF BIM 613 Third St. Susan Strope, artwork. BACK ROOM GALLERY 525 Second St. “Abstracts in the Back Room,” Reuben T. Mayes, acrylic paintings. Live painting with Reuben. BELLA BASKETS 311 E St. Chelcie Startk, artwork, Robin and John Praytor, artwork. BLACK LIGHTNING MOTORCYCLE CAFÉ 440 F St. “Depictions of Classic Italian Scooters,” Ben Vaughn Zeitlin, mixed

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media drawings. Music by Mike Craghead and Family. BLUE OX BOUTIQUE 325 Second St., Suite 102. “Boudoir,” Angela Tellez, photography. BRENDA TUXFORD GALLERY at Ink People 525 Seventh St. “MAD CREATIVE,” Multiple artists, mixed media artwork. CAFÉ NOONER 409 Opera Alley. Sarah Gross, paintings. Music by John Myers and Jim Silva. CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. Kylan Luken, photography. CHERI BLACKERBY GALLERY and THE STUDIO 272 C St. “The Hidden Treasures of California,” Chris Johnson, paintings and sculptures. CIARA’S IRISH SHOP 334 Second St. Pani Dickson, photography. CLARKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM 240 E St. “Quilts from Humboldt County,” featuring the Grant Quilt; Sequoia Park Zoo display, celebrating its 110-year anniversary. C STREET STUDIOS & HALL GALLERY 208 C St. “Plein Air Passage,” Stock and Racheal Schlueter, paintings; Tyson Ritter, photography; Lida Penkova and studio artists, various media. DALIANES TRAVEL 522 F St. Dana Utman, photography. Music by Redwood Dixie Gators. DISCOVERY MUSEUM 612 G St. Kids Alive Drop-off Program from 5:30 to


8 p.m. for kids 3-12. $15 members/$20 nonmembers. EUREKA BOOKS 426 Second St. “Wicked Bugs-Young Readers Edition,” Amy Stewart, author and co-owner of Eureka Books, national book release. FIVE ELEVEN 511 Second St. Andrei Hedstorm, oil paintings. F STREET FOTO GALLERY at SWANLUND’S 527 F St. “Photographers’ Choice,” Steve Conger, David Callow and John Lynch, photography. F STREET PLAZA Rueda by the Bay, social dancing; Salsa in the Round to popular Cuban and Latin music; Music by DJ Jack. GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St. Ron Thompson, oil paintings. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. “Art of Winn Wright,” Winn Wright. HSU THIRD STREET GALLERY 416 Third St. “Rooster Summer,” graduating seniors from the HSU Art Department. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL at the Morris Graves Museum of Art 636 F St. Performance Rotunda: Music by La Patinas. William Thonson Gallery: “Feral Kingdom,” Andrea Bergen and Adrienne Heloise, collage. Knight Gallery: Selections from HAC Permanent Collection. Anderson Gallery: “New Navigation” Ann Holsberry, mixed media paintings. Homer Balabanis Gallery/Humboldt Artist Gallery: Patricia Sundgren Smith, artwork. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE 526 Opera Alley. “Sheik vs Wong,” Sonny Wong and Sam Kagan, artwork. Music by Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers. HUMBOLDT CHOCOLATE 425 Snug Alley. Rob Hampson, artwork. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Reuben T. Mayes, acrylic on canvas. Music by Skyline Swing Band. HUMBOLDT HONEYWINE 723 Third St. “Inspired by Nature,” Caitlan Fowler, watercolors; David Macuish, photography; chocolate tasting. HUMBOLDT MARKETPLACE 317 E St. Grand Opening; David Walker, local, lifelong artist; Live music, classical; Live demos, Humboldt Makers. INN AT 2nd AND C Historic Eagle House. Jesse Allen, silk screen, lithographs and etchings. JACK’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 4 C St., Suite B Richard Dunning, paintings. JUST MY TYPE LETTERPRESS 501 Third St. Claire Harkins, painted silk scarves and hand knit goods. Dick Taylor Chocolates. LINEN CLOSET 127 F St. “Hammered Posy,” Ashley English, jewelry. MADAKET PLAZA Foot of C St. Music by the Eureka Pentecostal Church Choir. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. “Crystalline Cranium,” Robert Mauch,

crystal encrusted skulls and antlers. MID CENTURY HUMBOLDT 212 G St., suite 103. Tina Dille, watercolors, abstract animal images and live demonstration. OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING 203 F St. John Palmer, landscape paintings. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 417 Second St. “Gibbons Glass-Ocean,” John Gibbons, blown glass. OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOLATES 211 F St. Jess Aldeghi, psychedelic landscapes; Galen Luker, art nouveau watercolor paintings; Music by Jim Lahman. PIANTE GALLERY 620 Second St. Kelly Leal, oil and mixed media paintings, and Leslie Allen, watercolors. RAMONE’S 209 E St. “Women in Nature,” Erica M. Davis, photography; Daniel Hackett, poetry; Music TBA. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. Humboldt Photography Exhibition 2017 winners. Sanford Pyron, new works. REDWOOD CURTAIN 220 First St. Patricia Sennott, artwork. REDWOOD MUSIC MART 511 F St. Music by the Good Old Boys. SHIPWRECK! Vintage and Handmade 430 Third St. 10th anniversary party. Group show featuring favorite artists over the years. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and Engineering, 401 Fifth St. “Political Figures,” Terry Torgersen. SMUG’S PIZZA 626 Second St. Brandon Garland, pen and ink. STEVE AND DAVE’S First and C streets. Barry Evans, photography. Music by Dr. Squid. STONESTHROW BOUTIQUE 423 F St. Stephanie McMahill, acrylic flow paintings. STUDIO 424 424 Third Street. “Pen&Pine Show & Pop-up Shop,” Jenna Catsos, illustrations, and Color Me Humboldt, Jenna Catsos and Tibora Bea, colorable postcards. STUDIO S 717 Third St. “Summer,” featuring the work of 20 artists. THE BLACK FAUN GALLERY 212 G St. “Sorry Mom,” Arta Marie, nudes and abstracts, and “In Memoriam,” Jeff Russell, abstract canvases. THE BOOTH BREWING CO. 123 W. Third St. “Arts Alive After Party at the Booth,” DJ music. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Devon Brady Feilding, oil paintings, and Seana Burden, paintings. THE SIREN’S SONG 325 Second St.Aaron Hypha, photography. THE WINE SPOT 234 F St. Frank Speck, large format artwork. VISTA DEL MAR First and Commercial streets. Music by ShinBone à Deux, 8-10 p.m. l

Trinidad Art Nights Friday, Aug, 4, 6-9 p.m. Upper Trinidad

SIMMONS’ GALLERY 380 Janis Court (Trinidad Coastal Land Trust). “Paintings of the Trinidad Land Trust Properties,” Paul Rickard, watercolors. Music by Tim Breed. TRINIDAD MUSEUM 400 Janis Court (next to library). “Scenic Drive Then and Now,” photography. Quillwork in Native American Baskets. TRINIDAD TRADING COMPANY 460 Main St. Anna Oneglia, artwork. WIND N SEA 410 Main St. Featuring variety of local artisan jewelry.

Trinidad East

SAUNDER’S PLAZA (parking lot near Murphy’s Market on Main Street). Music by Rosewater. THE LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 355 Main St. Paul Rickard, watercolors. BERGERON WINERY 359 Main St. Featured art TBA. STRAWBERRY ROCK GALLERY 343 Main St. Claudia Lima, paintings.

Trinidad West

BEACHCOMBER CAFÉ 363 Trinity St. Martin Wood, artwork. Music TBA. TRINIDAD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 300 Trinity St. “Kids Zone,” boffer ring, face painting and skate ramps provided by the Trinidad Skatepark Alliance. TRINIDAD ART GALLERY 490 Trinity St. Elaine Shore, ceramics; Barbara Wright, glass mosaics; Music by Howdy Emerson and JD Jeffries. TRINIDAD EATERY 607 Parker Road. Larry Ulrich, photography; Music by For Folk Sake; Appetizers and wine tasting. MOONSTONE CROSSING 529 Trinity St. Amber Van-Dunk and Jill Garinger mosaics. SEASCAPE RESTAURANT AND PIER 1 Bay St. “California Coastal Landscapes,” Kristina Letson.

After Party

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Drive. Disco Trinidad Hosted by DJ KNUTZ. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. l

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35


Table Talk

Shared Secrets

The mushroom cobbler recipe you’ll never get By Malcolm Terence

tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com The coveted mushroom cobbler at Brick and Fire. File

I

t makes sense for restaurant cooks to be jealous of their best recipes. I remember years ago teaching myself to make croissants. Nena Creasy, a great cook who lived nearby above the Klamath River, even gave me a big marble slab to roll out the layers of dough with butter and then more butter. I tried making them with whole wheat flour, as though that would make them healthy, but they always flopped. I heard of a health food bakery out along Interstate 5 that made them with whole wheat as light and flaky as their white flour cousins. I made the pilgrimage and the rumors were true. So I asked the baker how he did it. The guy exploded and almost threw me out of the joint. I’d been a restaurant cook myself years earlier and most, but not all, the veteran cooks I knew shared everything. If somebody asked how I made our Hollandaise sauce, I’d tell them to look at page 357 in the 1979 edition of the Joy of Cooking. And I’d whisper, “Use the blender version. If you use the regular version you’ll probably need two able-bodied helpers and a barometer.” In 2014, when my daughter Erica Terence was in charge of the vegetarian food at the Mid Klamath Watershed Council’s annual fundraiser, she told me she was going to ask the cooks at Brick and Fire in Eureka how they made their mushroom cobbler. I thought she didn’t stand a chance in the world. At Brick and Fire, owner Jim Hughes and his staff of five to six cooks serve about 25 portions of the cobbler a day — each filled with a variety of wild mushrooms and infused but not drowned in a savory cream sauce. He likes the availability of wild mushrooms in Humboldt and has col-

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

lectors who call him whenever they have a supply — especially fog-drip chanterelles. One key to the cobbler’s success is that Brick and Fire, located in an un-gentrified neighborhood along Eureka’s F Street, is heir to a huge wood-fired brick oven. Hughes says it may have been the biggest factor in his decision to open the restaurant there seven years ago. The massive oven was built 20 years ago. It measures 6 feet wide and 9 feet deep inside, and the cooks monitor the temperatures with a laser thermometer. Near the entrance it’s 550 F and climbs about 100 degrees every foot closer to the flames. The cobbler cooks there quickly, very quickly. Still, like many cooks, he is shy of spelling out the details of his recipes, including the cobbler, despite having made it on camera for Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives. He says that a couple of his specialty items have already shown up on the menus at other restaurants in the community. Besides, Hughes is not a strict recipe kind of cook. “It’s never the same thing twice,” he says, “even though the title might be the same. I just like to keep exploring.” Diners seem to find the explorations rewarding. But when Erica talked to Hughes about the fundraiser, she said he was surprisingly forthcoming, not just with the trademark recipe, but with an invite to come work with the Brick and Fire cooks. The morning she showed up to work with the cooks was highly productive. “That’s where you learn how slowly to cook the onions and little details like whether to use the better grade white wine or the other white wine.” Fortunately for the MKWC dinner, the little upriver town of Orleans has several brick ovens — none that big, but just as hot. Erica used one at Sandy Bar Ranch,


THE a small eco-resort on the banks of the Klamath. MKWC has crews out all over the landscape with projects on fisheries, fire protection, invasive weed control, watershed education, food security and more, and many staffers were happy to add wild mushroom collection for the mid-December fete to their chores. It was not an easy dish to prepare, even in small portions. Still, the dish was a huge success, drawing carnivores to defect for the night. The 100 servings disappeared in a flash. Erica took it on again this winter, this time making 200 servings. In the week before the event, volunteers, who themselves jealously guard secret hunting spots, started bringing mushrooms in. Tanya Chapple, who trained as a botanist at UC Berkeley and is director of the nonprofit’s plants program, even found black trumpets, a mushroom variety prized for its taste and renowned for how hard it is to spot. Will Harling, a founder and director of MKWC, took advantage of a prime year for oyster mushrooms and contributed a bushel to the cause. Michael Eagan, who operates Mycality Mushrooms in Arcata, contributed several cases of shitakes and hericiums, the lions’ mane mushrooms usually only found wild, and then inconveniently up the trunk of a tall tree. The stack grew and grew. Erica woke one morning to find a bucket of tanoak mushrooms on her doorstep. Other locals brought her chanterelles. There were also some cases of store-bought: creminis, dried shitakes and dried porcinis. Again, it was a great success. “We still had a meat entrée,” Erica said, “but we’d made so much of the cobbler that people no longer had to pretend they were vegetarians. We may take another year off before we make it again. You wouldn’t want to do this too often — gallons of cream, buckets of wild harvest mushrooms.” As for replicating the dish at home, well, it took Erica more than a recipe to make the cobbler. She had neighbors with brick ovens and a flock of co-workers out in the woods during mushroom season. I wondered the other day if I could have approached that guy years ago who baked the whole wheat croissants better than I did. I told the story to one of Orleans’ great cooks. She nodded reflectively and grinned. “I can guess why he wouldn’t tell you. He didn’t want you to know that he mixed in white flour with the whole wheat — probably a lot. He needed to keep that secret. It was a health food place, right?” Besides, it’s a cook’s right to keep secrets. I just won’t tell them how I make that perfect Hollandaise. ●

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Love’s Labour’s Lost at Redwood Park

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W

hat happens when King Ferdinand of Navarre and his three companions decide to improve themselves by dedicating three years to study and fasting, forswearing women by forbidding any member of the fair sex from coming within a mile of the court? A challenging prospect in the best of circumstances, but when the Princess of France and her three ladies arrive on a state visit to discuss the secession of Aquitaine, the scholars’ masculine resolve is sorely tested. So opens North Coast Repertory Theatre’s open-air production of Love’s Labour’s Lost at Redwood Park. The twists and turns of this fast-paced farce bear some untangling — spoilers ahead (if you can spoil a play that’s more than 400 years old). Don Adriano de Armado, a Spanish nobleman visiting the court, catches the rustic Costard in a tryst with the wench Jaquenetta and turns him in to the King for breaking the 1-mile rule. Plot twist No. 1: The Don is also enamored of the wench and sends an unknowing Costard off with a love letter for Jaquenetta. So that the decree does not interfere with matters of state, the King agrees to meet with the Princess at her encampment outside the court. Plot twists No. 2 and No. 3: The King falls for the Princess and his companions fall for the ladies. Fickle creatures that they are, the men convince themselves that what they have actually been studying is love and dispatch carefully composed declarations of adoration to the ladies. Plot twist No. 4: various letters get mixed up and misdelivered, resulting in plot twist No 5: Both ladies and gentlemen don disguises to hide their identities while broadcasting their passions. The play itself ends with unexpected plot twist No. 6: The gentlemen must prove themselves by waiting a year before any declarations of love can be consummated by marriage. Whether any will abide by this is up for speculation; as one of the gentlemen declares, “12

Caitlin Wik and Charlie Heinberg in the park for Shakespeare. Courtesy of North Coast Repertory Theatre

months and a day is too long for a play.” Santosh Hass as King Ferdinand, along with his companions Berowne (Charlie Heinberg), Dumain (Clint Forka), and Longaville (Zedekiah Minkin), all turn in nicely timed performances. Heinberg has a long history of performing Shakespeare in Humboldt, and displayed a masterful command of the play’s sometimes complex language, but his fellow noblemen more than kept pace with him. As the Princess of France, Chyna Leigh was at times hard to hear; hopefully her projection skills will improve as the run continues, as she does have a deft touch with the pointed one-liners. Her ladies — Jewel Blanchard as Katherine, Brianna Schatz as Maria and Caitlin Wik as Rosaline — deliver excellent performances on their 16th-century equivalent of a giggling girls’ night out. Anders Carlson is wonderfully entertaining as Costard, alternating between confusion and collusion, while his erstwhile paramour Jaquenetta is played with fun and flirtatiousness by Sarah Traywick. But the comic stars of this production are Morgan Cox as Don Adriano de Armado and Adrienne Ralsten as his page Moth. Cox’s portrayal is a comedic masterpiece, complete with over-the-top accent and exaggerated gestures, and Ralsten is a delightful foil, tossing tidbits of tattletale-ing to the audience as he attempts to keep up with his lovesick master. Rounding out the cast are Tyler Elwell as the Princess’s attendant Boyet, Brian Pike as the aptly named Officer Dull (“I am Dull”), Ray Olson as the curate Sir Nathaniel, who attempts to bring some gravitas to the proceedings, and Rigel Schmitt in an almost-perfect impersonation of Drew Carey as the schoolmaster Holofernes. Director Evan Needham moves the play along at a cracking pace, which occasionally causes some of the more complex lines to get lost, also a few of the actors — the blocking needs some work so that key characters are not hidden from half

the audience’s view at times when facial expressions are part of the action. Jared Sorenson’s scenic design and construction works well in the challenging performance area, making smart use of the fixed elements — especially when Don Armado declaims dramatically from the roof. The most confusing aspect of this otherwise well-executed production is the costumes. When we first meet the King and his companions, they are attired in World War II-era military uniforms. For the rest of the play, they and Don Armado mostly sport zoot suits — perhaps because they have moved from making rules to breaking them? Even less clear is the decision to dress the Princess, her entourage and the wench Jaquenetta in 1920s flapper dresses — particularly the latter, since Costard is costumed in standard-issue Shakespearean rustic tunic and breeches. However, the play’s the thing, so suspend (dis)belief and enjoy this delightful diversion. Love’s Labour’s Lost blends bawdiness and courtliness, history and fantasy, song and dance, to deliver an evening of comedy that will entertain, amuse and send you home with a smile on your face. Remember to bring a blanket — while it’s still light when the play ends a little after 9 p.m., it can get chilly under the redwoods in a Humboldt summer. Love’s Labour’s Lost runs Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m. through Aug. 19. Call 822-7091 or visit www.ncrt.net.

Continuing Plays in the Park is also presenting Pam Service’s family-friendly Merlin on Sundays at Redwood Park through Aug 20. Call 822-7091.

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Opening Humboldt Light Opera Company brings Gilbert and Sullivan’s Ruddigore, with its schemers, lovers and cursed baronets to the stage from Aug. 11-20. Call 630-5013 or visit www.hloc.org. ●

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Eureka ■ 442-2527 Burre Center Arcata ■ 822-3570 Sunny Brae Center Fortuna Call Eureka for pick up/delivery

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

Eureka 442-2527

Burre Cente

39


Home & Garden

In Review

Continued from previous page

Wicked Bugs: The Meanest, Deadliest, Grossest Bugs on Earth

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40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Review by JoAnn Bauer newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

M

any benign and useful insects, spiders and arthropods do exist in the world, but you will not find them in this adaptation of Wicked Bugs: The Louse that Conquered Napoleon’s Army & Other Diabolical Insects for young readers. Local author Amy Stewart is intrigued by the dark side of the bug universe; the dangerous, destructive and sometimes downright macabre (see the chapter on zombies). The thing about bugs is that there are so many of them. As Stewart warns in the introduction, “We are seriously outnumbered.” And many of their adaptations for survival are at serious cross purposes with ours. Divided into wicked categories, each bug is given a page or two describing the harm they do. The stories are not abstractions — whenever possible dates, places and sometimes names are given of those who have had interactions with the species. There is an immediacy in learning that it was a family in North Carolina who discovered they had bats living in their attic. Once they had bat-proofed their home, they found they had a worse problem. The African bat bugs that also lived in the attic now came downstairs to feed on the blood of the humans. These

fascinating and horrific stories beg to be read aloud and shared. This kids’ version is somewhat abridged but Stewart does not soften the content or dumb down the vocabulary. What she does do is provide context for terms and concepts that might be unfamiliar to a younger audience. The main difference is in the formatting to make the information more attractive and accessible. This is a very handsome book, as the illustrations by Briony Morrow-Cribbs are very detailed and lifelike copper plate etchings. (You can watch the process for creating the bugs in a YouTube video.) Each chapter begins with a four-color etching of the bug in question and smaller etchings are scattered throughout. The bugs seem to be skittering and sometimes falling off the page, as if they are trying to escape the confines of the book. Despite the accuracy of the illustrations, Stewart is clear that this book is not designed to be used as an identification guide. There is a section in back that does suggest useful resources and an excellent bibliography lists titles for further research. On Saturday, Aug. 5 during Arts Alive!, Eureka Books will host the official release of the book. Beginning at 6 p.m., Amy Stewart will be available to autograph books and talk to readers of all ages. l


Setlist

Festivals and More Festivals By Andy Powell

thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

Thursday It’s been festival season here on the North Coast for a bit now as we’re well over a month into summer, but the jewel in Humboldt County’s festival crown shines in SoHum starting today. The Mateel Community Center is putting on the 33rd Reggae on the River at French’s Camp right before the Humboldt/Mendocino line. There will be more than 30 reggae and world music artists along with DJs, crafts, food vendors, camping and activities for the kiddos to boot all weekend long. You can peruse the enormous performance schedule, which boasts Slightly Stoopid, Assassin aka Agent Sasco, Sly and Robbie with Marcia Griffiths, Judy Mowatt and Cherine Anderson, Walshy Fire with Kabaka Pyramid and a host of others. Prices vary depending how many days you want to stay and if there’s camping involved. DJs start around noon. Have fun, be safe and keep it mellow. Or irie. For the non-reggae crowd, you’ll find folky fiddle tunes on the bill at the Mad River Brewery Tap room this evening at 6 p.m. played by Fingal for free. Out of Memphis comes “acid-tinged proto-punkers” Ex-Cult, who “bring their trademark technicolor, bad-trip vibes” to The Miniplex tonight. They’re on the road supporting their recent release of Negative Growth bringing them all the way out to our West Coast. Of their album, recorded in Los Angeles, the press release states that it’s a “nine-track nightmare, a death trip in the crystal ship.” I don’t know if that’s a Doors reference but if so, I’ll have to think about it for a while. Joining them is L.A.based punk quartet Enemy and local punks Drown in Piss — what a way to go — and The Sturgeons. The show starts around 9 p.m. and $10 will get you in.

Friday At the Outer Space on M Street in Arcata you’ll find former locals Gunsafe returning to town. I don’t recall exactly when this Americana/country/punk band uprooted itself but it’s nice to hear they’re returning while touring the States. This all ages show starts at 7 p.m. and the bill includes Bow Legged Buzzard and locals Lyndsey Battle with Cory Goldman doing

the folky bluegrass thing, as well as local singer/songwriter and utterly charming musical maniac John Ludington with Andrea Zvaleko. Just $6 gets you in for this four-band bill. Up at Blue Lake’s Logger Bar, Humboldt Free Radio Presents Duane Mark out of Lancaster — according to the press release — but from Austin, Texas from what I could find online. Let’s just assume he’s from Lancaster, California and Lancaster, Pennsylvania and Austin, Texas all together. He plays American roots music, so I guess that could work to a degree. He’s joined at the Logger by local country/ folk duo Gabe & Turtle, who’ll be going on around 9 p.m. for free. Don’t hesitate to throw some money in the tip jar for these musicians.

Saturday Another festival is afoot today, this time in Blue Lake’s Perigot Park. The Humboldt Folklife Society is putting on the 17th annual Buddy Brown Blues Festival, which helps raise funds for the Humboldt Folklife Society’s Folk School. The festival starts off around 11 a.m. and is eventually headlined by local hero Buddy Reed & the Rip It Ups before Buddy heads out ol’ Nashville way to do some recording from what I’m hearing. Before things get too ripped up, you’ll hear from the Mad River Rounders, Blues Through the Years, Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band, Blues Rollers, and Uptown Kings who are all bringing you their take on the blues. Tickets are $12 for this day-long festival and don’t forget the broad-spectrum sunblock. Starting at the same time, another one-day festival kicks off at Halvorsen Park in Eureka. A Music Extravaganza features True Gospel Singers, The Paula Jones band, The Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir, Pat Holland and The Movers and The Shakers along with others and all for free. There’ll be food, a motorcycle and car show, and skate ramps, as well. Although a free festival, donations benefit the Redwood Teen Challenge’s proposed Women’s Transitional Center. Elsewhere, The Yokels return to the Mad River Brewery Tap Room at 6 p.m. to play you some rockabilly soul for free. Arts Alive! kicks off in Old Town Eureka around the same

Marcia Griffiths takes the stage at 10 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 6 during Reggae on the River, which runs Aug. 3-6. Courtesy of the artist

time. For those of us not in the Facebook world, we’d be forgiven for not hearing anything about a show happening at the Siren’s Song Tavern in Eureka tonight. I was tempted to not even mention the show as way to teach Colin of Electro Saloon a lesson in local show promotion, but seeing as how my wife is the other half of said band, I thought better of it. So let this be a lesson to you other musicians who have been doing this not quite as long as Colin. Some of us find Facebook to be a colossal waste of time — perhaps a column topic someday — and may not surf around that digital data collection monstrosity to find out about your show. Send a quick email (which stands for electronic mail) to music@northcoastjournal.com so this grumpy stick-in-the-mud can help promote your show. If you don’t want help, I totally get it. Also on this bill tonight is above-mentioned Gunsafe and fellow locals Belles of the Levee. My wife informs me that the show starts around 8 p.m. and is free. George of Cafe Mokka tells me that they’re hosting a duo who’ve been playing at Mokka for a decade — Kroy of Joe & Me is moving out of the area so tonight at 8 p.m. will be a special show. Hear the Greek tunes of the band before they go their separate ways. It’s a free event and kids are welcome.

Sunday Jerry Garcia’s birthday was just five days ago and the anniversary of his passing

is in just three days. So doubly timely is an Acoustic Celebration of Jerry Garcia happening this evening at the Mad River Brewery Tap Room starting at 4 p.m. and running until about 8 p.m. Multiple local performers will be paying tribute to the man, so join them for this free celebration. The Outer Space in Arcata hosts a solo set from Ghost Mice singer/songwriter Chris Clavin who will not only play some folk/punk but will then also speak as the author of Free Pizza for Life and Cursed in Cairo. Other poets and authors will be a part of tonight’s presentation which starts at 7 p.m. for just $5.

Wednesday

Local Dead Head Piet Dalmolen is back from the East Coast and playing his guitar for you this evening at the Mad River Brewery at 6 p.m. He does the solo guitar thing with loops and fancy fingerwork. If you leave a tip — it’s a free show — I’m sure it’ll be easy to get him to pay a tribute to Jerry. l Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Andy Powell is a congenital music lover and hosts The Album of the Week Show on KWPT 100.3 FM Tuesdays at 6 p.m. He’s never been to RotR.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

41


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

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THUR 8/3

FRI 8/4

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Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata 822-2228 CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville, 839-2013 CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad CLAM BEACH TAVERN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville FIELDBROOK MARKET & EATERY 4636 Fieldbrook Road, 839-0521 THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

Miracle Show (Grateful Dead tribute) 9pm Free

Full Moon Fever (Tom Petty tribute) 9pm Free

SUN 8/6

M-T-W 8/7-8/9

Big Hero 6 (2014) (film) 6pm $5

[W] Sci Fi Night ft. Indestructable Man (1956) (film) 6pm Free w/$5food/bev purchase

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Joe & Me (Greek music) 8pm Free All ages Karoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free Jimi Jeff & the Gypsy Band (rock n roll) 9pm Free Legends of the Mind (blues, jazz) 6pm Free

Christina D’Alessandro & the Northcoasters (dance, rock, pop) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [M] Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free, Savage Henry Stand up Open Mic 9pm Free [W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free Friday Night Music 7:30pm Free

DJ L Boogie 9pm

First Fridays - Sign Of The Times w/DJ EastOne 9pm Free Phish - Live Webcast from Madison Square Garden 4:30pm

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[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free [T] Live Dead ’69 ft. Tom Constanten, Mark Karan, Slick Aguilar, Robyn Sylvester, Ezra Lipp 8pm $25 [T] Open Mic 5-8pm TBA Deep Groove Society: Savage Henry Comedy Night SUNDAZE 9pm $10 9pm TBA [W] Jazz at the Jam 6pm Free The Whomp 10pm $5 Moonstone Midwives Birth Center - Main Logo Pantone 221 c

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Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 8/3

LARRUPIN 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

Fingal (folky fiddle tunes) 6pm Free

OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad

SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 Central Ave., McKinleyville TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

SUN 8/6

Duane Mark, Gabe & Turtle (outlaw country, folk)

DJ D-Funk 9pm Free

Ultra Secret (funky jazz improv) 6pm Free

The Yokels (rockabilly soul) 6pm Free

Potluck (food) 6pm Free [W] Cribbage Tournament 6:45 signup, 7pm $5 An Acoustic Celebration of Jerry Garcia (multiple musicians) 4-8pm Free

[T] The Low Notes (jazz) 6pm Free [W] Piet Dalmolen (solo guitar) 6pm Free

Karaoke Sundays 9pm Free

[T] Sonido Pachanguero (salsa/cumbia) 9pm

Open Mic 7pm Free

[T] Human Expression Open Mic 7pm Free

Loose Joints presents Disco Trinidad w/DJ Knutz 9pm $5

[M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rudelion 8pm $5

Crosby Tyler (folk, blues) 8pm Free DJ Ray 10pm TBA

[M] Trivia Night 7pm Free DJ Ray 10pm TBA

OPEN 24 HOURS

M-T-W 8/7-8/9 [W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

Ex-Cult, Enemy, Drown in Piss, The Sturgeons (punk) 9pm $10, $7 advance

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 S G St., #4., Arcata, 826-7222

SAT 8/5

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-5680

FRI 8/4

Eureka and South on next page

DJ Tim Stubbs 10pm TBA Balance Tric (reggae rock) 9pm Free DJ Ray 10pm Free

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43


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Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More

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Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway

VENUE

THUR 8/3

FRI 8/4

SAT 8/5

BEAR RIVER CASINO HOTEL 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

Karaoke 8pm Free

Live Music 9pm Free

DJ Music 9pm Free

THE BOOTH BREWING CO. 123 W. Third St., Eureka 572-5728

SUN 8/6

Arts Alive After-Party at The Booth ft. Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

BRASS RAIL BAR 923-3188 3188 Redwood Dr., Redway

Pool Tourney 8pm

[T] Karaoke 9pm [M] Brian Post & Friends (New York jazz) 7pm Free [T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 7pm $5 [W] Comedy Open Mikey 7pm Free

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M-T-W 8/7-9

Hitchcock Month: Notorious (1946) 7:30pm $5

FERNBRIDGE MARKET RIDGETOP CAFE 786-3900 623 Fernbridge Dr., Fortuna

[M] Open Mic 5:30pm Free

THE FUZION 233 F St., Eureka 345-1040

Karaoke & Lip Sync Night 7pm $12, $8 All ages

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 MADAKET PLAZA Foot of C St., Eureka

Burgundy Blues (dance) 7pm $12, $8

[T] Taco Tuesdays 9pm $12, $8 [W] Salsa Night 7pm $12, $8 All ages

Seabury & Evan (Celtic, Irish) 6pm Free Summer Concert Series w/Tom Rigney (zydeco and Cajun) 6pm Free

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free

Queer Dance Nights w/Pressure PEARL LOUNGE Anya 9 pm Free 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

Dub Cowboy (DJ music) 10pm Free

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Get your 215 and get Legal Cannabis NOW! Ex-Cult plays the Miniplex, Aug. 3 at 9 p.m. ($10, $7 advance).

VENUE

THUR 8/3

FRI 8/4

SAT 8/5

SUN 8/6

[T] Karaoke 9pm

SHOOTERS OFF BROADWAY 1407 Albee St., Eureka 442-4131

[W] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 9 pm Free

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 44-2244

Signals Presents: Goth Night (DJ music) 8pm Free The Jazz Hours (jazz) 7:30pm Free

Gunsafe, Belles of the Levee, Electro Saloon 8pm Free

[M] DOC & Triac (grind, noise) 7:30pm $5

Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (blues) 9pm Free

[T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [W] LD51- Ultra Secret Wednesdays (alt. jazz) 8pm Free

STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 Upstate Thursdays (DJ music) 9pm TBA 744 Redway Dr., Garberville TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950 VISTA DEL MAR 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka

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M-T-W 8/7-9

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[M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 Fridays w/DJ Pressure (DJ music) Free before 10pm Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free

Sexy Saturday w/Masta Shredda (DJ music) Free before 10pm

[M] Bomba Sonido (DJ music) Free before 10 pm [M] Hugh Gallagher (folk/country) 6pm Free

Bayfront Restaurant

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825 W 14th St., Eureka 707-443-0934 • www.btmetals.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

45


Calendar August 3 - 10, 2017

3 Thursday MOVIES

Movie Night: The Zookeeper’s Wife. 6-8 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Based on a true story about a husband-wife team who rescued hundreds of Polish Jews during World War II’s occupation of Warsaw. For ages 14 and older and adults. Free. archuml@co.humboldt. ca.us. 822-5954.

MUSIC Submitted

Take a walk on the wild side at the 11th annual Zootini Saturday, Aug. 5 from 5-9:45 p.m. at Sequoia Park Zoo ($100). Sip signature cocktails, dine on hors d’oeuvres, dinner and dessert, and dance the night away with party animals like Senator Mike McGuire. All proceeds benefit the animals, educational and conservation programs and new projects.`

Jillian Butolph

Photo by Mark McKenna

Looking for a swanky downtown party? Treat yourself to the NCJ Best of Humboldt Party Saturday, Aug. 5 from 7-11 p.m. in the renovated Carson Block Building’s third floor ballroom ($20, $10 advance). We’ve got food and drinks, and it’s your chance to meet your Best of Humboldt winners. 21 and up.

The tracks are flat and that’s a fact — ain’t holding nothin back. Motorcycle racing is alive and well in Humboldt. Catch the handlebar-to-handlebar action at Lost Coast Flat Track Friday, Aug. 4 from noon to 6 p.m. at Rohner Park ($5 -$10), and Pacific Motorsports Humboldt Half Mile Pro/Am Motorcycle Flat Track Race Saturday, Aug. 5 at 4:30 p.m. at the Humboldt County Fairgrounds ($12-$25).

Humboldt Folklife Society Sing-along. First Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Sing your favorite folk, rock and pop songs of the 1960s with Joel Sonenshein. Songbooks are provided. Free. joel@asis.com. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Presented by Eureka Main Street. Music by Tom Rigney (zydeco and Cajun) Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org.

EVENTS Reggae on the River. 4 p.m.-1 a.m. French’s Camp, SoHum, Piercy. Four days of reggae and world music with more than 60 arts and crafts vendors, nonprofit booths, food vendors and a lively Kidlandia. $90-$500. office@mateel. org. www.reggaeontheriver.com. 923-3368.

FOR KIDS

Notorious

Photo by Mark McKenna

Tell It Like It Is Blues, the down-and-dirty foundation of most popular music — rhythm and blues, rock ‘n’ roll, rockabilly, country — tells our stories of suffering, sadness and sorrow, and how we rise up out of the mess and start all over. It connects us and sets our troubles free. The grit is real. Lovers of the blues have a whole day of the good stuff when the 17th annual Buddy Brown Blues Festival slides into Blue Lake’s Perigot Park Saturday, Aug. 5 with music starting at 11 a.m ($12, $10 advance, free for kids under 12). Playing homage to the memory of Richard Duggins (better known as Buddy Brown), who opened the festival the first year and passed away shortly after, the festival is a showcase of the area’s best blues musicians and is a benefit for the Humboldt Folklife Society Folk School Program. This year’s headliner is bluesman Buddy Reed, known for rippin’ it up with his band in spots around the county. Maybe you’ve read about him (“Buddy’s Blues,” July 13). Buddy’s hitting the road, heading out on his “Road to Nashville” tour, and the 2017 fest is sending him off with some hometown love. Also bringing the emotion to the stage are favorites Mad River Rounders, Blues Through the Years, Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band, Blues Rollers and the Uptown Kings. In addition to serving up tasty blues all afternoon, the festival’s got beer from Lost Coast Brewery, fine local wine and smokin’ barbecue from Blackberry Bramble BBQ. — Kali Cozyris

Twist! If this week’s national news cycle hasn’t given you enough sudden plot turns, fear not. Well, fear a little — the Eureka Theater is showing a month’s worth of Alfred Hitchcock films sponsored by the North Coast Journal. Start the suspense on Friday, Aug. 4 at 7:30 p.m. with Notorious ($5). Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant run hot and cold in this 1946 romantic thriller about a G-man who falls in love with the playgirl he sends undercover to bust Nazis hiding out in Argentina. Makes us nostalgic for the days when Nazis had to hide out. On Friday, Aug. 11 at 7:30 p.m., see Farley Granger and Robert Walker make a killer deal in the 1951 classic Strangers on a Train ($5). The plan is to trade out murders — a father for a wife — so there’s nothing to connect each man to the crime. But when one of them wants to back out, they go round and round. Nowhere to go on Friday, Aug. 18 at 7:30 p.m.? There’s room in the theater and at the Bates Motel when Psycho (1960) cuts loose on the big screen ($5). Anthony Hopkins and Janet Leigh star in this iconic Hitchcock screamer and just keep telling yourself that’s just Hershey’s syrup going down the drain. Hey, bring your mother. In one final twist, the series wraps up on Saturday, Aug. 26 at 7:30 p.m. with The Birds (1963), sponsored by Seamoor’s novelty shop. Tippi Hedren gets her feathers ruffled alongside Fred Taylor as flocks of angry birds dive bomb the residents of Bodega Bay. Bring a sweater for the chills and get your popcorn early so you don’t miss Hitchcock’s cameos. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Free Summer Meals for Kids. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. Eureka City School District brings free summer meals to all children and teens under the age of 18. There is no eligibility requirement and no paperwork to fill out. Breakfast 8:30- 9:30 a.m. Lunch noon-1 p.m. Sites closed July 3-4. 441-2501. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St. Breakfast 9-10 a.m. Lunch noon-1 p.m. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. Enter from Chester or “W” Street. Sites closed July 3-4. Lunch from 11:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m. 441-2501. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. Music by Rick Park. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Local, GMO-free produce. Live music. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community Commons, state routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. The freshest Humboldt-County-Grown and GMO-free produce along with plants, meats and other wonderful products.

MEETINGS PFLAG Meeting. First Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The national organization of parents, families, friends and allies united with LGBTQ people to move equality forward. Everyone welcome. Free. www.ci.eureka. ca.gov. 845-6337.

ETC CASA Training. 6-9 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 Myrtle


Ave., Eureka. Help create a brighter future for a foster child by becoming a CASA volunteer. For more information call 443-3917 or visit humboldtcasa.org. andrea@humboldtcasa.org. www.humboldtcasa.org. 443-3197. Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. Take a historic house tour of Fern Cottage, the 150-year-old, historic 32-room estate of Joseph and Zipporah Russ. Hourly guided and self-guided tours from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. $10, $8 seniors, children under 18 free. info@ferncottage.org. www.ferncottage. org. 786-4835. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. Includes a booster for participating and the winner of each four-person pod also wins a booster. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 826-1228. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Come create with your community. Enjoy an evening of knitting, crocheting or whatever fiber craft you love. Food and drink available and bring something to share. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www. northcoastknittery.com. 442-9276. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

Poetry, Music, Shadow Puppets. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. A night of poetry, story telling, music, shadow puppets and sound exploration. For more information, contact Sean at 382-2792. $7-$12 sliding, no one turned away for lack of funds.

EVENTS Reggae on the River. noon-1 a.m. French’s Camp, SoHum, Piercy. See Aug. 3 listing. Shinerfest 2017. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. “Badass” camp and music festival featuring comedian Noel G., Hellzapoppin Circus Sideshow, Moonshine Bandits and more. www.shinerfest.com.

FOR KIDS

Art Therapy. First Friday of every month, 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Express yourself through projects in a safe and supportive environment. All ages. Supplies are provided. Free. ahennessy@ervmgc. com. www.ervmgc.com. 725-3300. Trinidad Art Nights. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Downtown Trinidad. A town-wide event including many venues, galleries, wine tasting, outdoor music, live art, fire dancing, kids activities and various performances throughout the night. Free. www.trinidadartnights.com.

Baby Read and Grow - New Start Time. 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. Babies and their families are invited to share songs, finger plays and short stories at this early literacy event. Following the program, there’s time for play with developmentally appropriate toys and socializing for both parents and children. Free. 269-1910. Children’s Clothing Swap. First Friday of every month, 3:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Bring your kids’ hand-me-downs to trade for fresh new-to-yous. Sizes newborn-12, in wearable condition (no holes, stains, etc.). Free. www.facebook.com/ChildrensClothingSwapArcata. 985-8084. Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www.humlib. org. 725-3460. Free Summer Meals for Kids. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. See Aug. 3 listing. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. See Aug. 3 listing. Youth Summer Exploratory Programs. 9 a.m.-noon. HSU Natural History Museum, 1242 G St., Arcata. Half-day workshops pertaining to geology and paleontology for kids ages 5-12. Kids will explore rocks, minerals and fossils through a variety of activities. $25 per participant. mjb11@ humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu/natmus. 826-4480.

DANCE

FOOD

Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Paso a Paso hosts dance therapy. Free. www. ervmgc.com. 725-3300.

Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, meats, baked goods and more, plus live music and family activities. Free.

4 Friday ART

LECTURE Saloons, Stores and Schools. 7 p.m. Phillips House Museum, Seventh and Union streets, Arcata. Historian Jerry Rohde presents a program about Humboldt County buildings, from the great Brizard store robbery in Willow Creek to the “Saloon of the Holey Ceiling” in Dyerville. Free.

MOVIES Notorious. 7:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman star in this Alfred Hitchcock film noir romantic thriller kicking off Hitchcock Month at the theater. $5. www.theeurekatheater.org.

THEATER The Liar. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Dorante is a charming young man with a bright future and one glaring personality quirk — he cannot tell the truth. Love and mistaken identity abound in this witty farce. $13-$16. Love’s Labour’s Lost. 7 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. The King of Navarre and his three companions vow to swear off women for one full year to focus on their studies in this Shakespearean farce filled with mistaken identity, secret courtships and buffoonery. $13-$16.

MEETINGS A Call to Yarns. 12-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit, chat and relax at the library every week. Free. archuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954.

OUTDOORS Friday Night at the Refuge. First Friday of every month, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Enjoy a walk along the trail and a natural resource-related presentation at 7 p.m. at the Visitor Center. Free. denise_seeger@fws.gov. 733-5406. Humboldt Baykeeper Boat Tour. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. Take a Humboldt Bay tour aboard the Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District’s motor boat. RSVP required. Se habla español. Free. tours@humboldtbaykeeper. org. 407-6183.

SPORTS BMX Friday. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for practice and racing. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222.

Flat Track Racing. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. Pit gates open at 9 a.m. Spectator gates at noon. $10, $5 seniors/veterans/kids, free for under 5 w/adult. www. friendlyfortuna.com. Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. The semi-professional, wood bat summer ball team swings away. Season is June through August. Humboldt B-52s vs. Redding Ringtails Aug. 4-5 $5, $3 kids under 10, free for kids under 4. www. humboldtb52sbaseball.com. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. The oldest continuously operated summer collegiate baseball program takes the plate. Games through Aug. 6. Crabs vs. Auburn Wildcats Aug. 4-6. $9, $6 students and seniors, $4 kids 12 and under. Lost Coast Flat Track. 12-6 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. Race or watch. Race gates open at 9 a.m. Spectator gates open at 11 a.m. Heat races start at 1 p.m. Mains follow. Aug. 4 only: Heat races start at 3 p.m. Mains follow $10 spectator/pit pass, $5 seniors/veterans, $5 under 12 (with adult), Free under 5 (with adult). lostcoastflattrack@gmail.com. www.friendlyfortuna.com. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

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ETC Community Yard Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. SOHA Community Neighborhood Network, South of Harris St., Eureka. Yard sale encompassing the area of Harris to Union to Ingley to Highland streets, and to the ends of Summer, California and Pine streets to New Street. Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Aug. 3 listing. Lunch Out Loud. 12-1:30 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Make calls to elected officials on current issues of concern. All information provided, just bring your charged cell phone and brown bag lunch or snacks to share. Hosted by North Coast People’s Alliance, with calling sheets provided by Elizabeth Conner. Free. hello@ northcoastpeoplesalliance.org. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org. 599-2951. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.NorthCoastPeoplesAlliance.org.

5 Saturday MOVIES

The Oracles of Pennsylvania Avenue. 6 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. The film follows three people on their 25-year peace vigil calling for an end to nuclear weapons. Doors open at 6 p.m. and there will be an opportunity before the movie to make lanterns for the Arcata Lantern Floating Ceremony.

MUSIC Music Extravaganza. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Music by True Gospel Singers, the Paula Jones Band, the Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir, Pat Holland and The Movers and the Shakers and others. Watts Poet, Amde Hamilton. Also food, motorcycle and car show, skate ramps, a raffle and more. Free, donations appreciated. jh707tgs@gmail.com. www.redwoodtc.org. 362-4479.

THEATER The Liar. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 4 listing.

HUMBOLDT

FLEA MARKET Sun., August 6th 8am-3pm Redwood Acres Fairground Admission Fee: $2 Kids 12 & Under FREE For Reservations Call Dayton

(707) 822-5292

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

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Calendar DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

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Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years.

Best Childrens Clothing Store

DR. KENNETH KAISER OPTOMETRIST Previously with Eye of the Phoenix

4 Years in a row!

616 H STREET • EUREKA

(707) 445-3477

3008 Broadway, Eureka lots4totsplus.com

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Love’s Labour’s Lost. 7 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. See Aug. 4 listing. Sanctuary Cabaret. 9-11 p.m. Synapsis Nova, 212 G St., Suite 102, Eureka. The Synapsis Collective will be exploring “sanctuary” through song, dance, aerial, spoken word and clowning. $5-$10, no one turned away for lack of funds. sgcampagna@hotmail.com. www.synapsisperformance. com. 298-8645.

EVENTS Arts Alive. First Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Art, and a heap of it. All around Old Town, Eureka. Free. www. eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054. Buddy Brown Blues Festival. 11 a.m. Perigot Park, 312 South Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Live music all day from Buddy Reed, Mad River Rounders, Blues Through the Years, Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band, Blues Rollers and the Uptown Kings. $12, $10 advance, free for kids under 12. Handlebars, Hot Rods and V-Dubs Auto Show. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Granada Rehabilitation & Wellness Center, 2885 Harris St., Eureka. Barbecue, music, raffle, kids games. Free. NCJ Best of Humboldt Party. 7-11 p.m. Carson Block Building, 517 Third St., Eureka. Food, drinks, vendors. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Humboldt Bay Trails. In the ballroom on the third floor. 21 and up. $20, $10 advance. People’s Party in the Park. 12-4 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. The North Coast People’s Alliance invites its volunteers and supporters to relax, recharge and enjoy summer together during a potluck picnic and party. Please bring a dish to share and a musical instrument for jamming if you have one. Free. Reggae on the River. 11-1 a.m. French’s Camp, SoHum, Piercy. See Aug. 3 listing. Shinerfest 2017. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See Aug. 4 listing. Zootini. 5-9:45 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Enjoy signature cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, a three-course dinner, silent and live auctions, raffle dessert and dancing at this zoo fundraiser. Honoring the Hilfiker Family. Featuring guest auctioneer Sen. Mike McGuire and honorary event chairs Cherie and Rob Arkley. $100. ashley@sequoiaparkzoo.net. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. 442-5649 ext. 202.

FOR KIDS Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. See Aug. 3 listing. Kids Alive. First Saturday of every month, 5:30-8 p.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. This is a drop-off program for confidently potty trained children ages 3-12. Includes free play, arts and crafts and a snack. Call to reserve. Price may vary by number of participants. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. PBSNC’s Kids Club at the Morris Graves. First Saturday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. This monthly workshop includes PBS Kid’s programming, story time, tours of current art exhibitions and art activities. Each family takes home a free book. This month’s book is My Name is Yoon by by Helen Recorvits Free. janine@humboldtarts.org. humboldtarts.org/pbsnckids-club. 442-0278. Story Time. First Saturday of every month, noon. Willow Creek Library, state routes 299 and 96. Introduce your preschooler to the fun of books. Free.

FOOD Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association market features fresh fruits and vegetables, humanely raised meats and eggs, goat cheese, honey, nursery starts for the garden, native and ornamental plants, flowers, fiber, prepared food, live music and more. Stompy, soulful live music by Daily Driver. Free. www.humfarm.org.

MEETINGS AHHA General Assembly. First Saturday of every month, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. A gathering of advocates for homeless housing, homeless residents and the wider community to develop affordable homeless housing villages. Free.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. With leader Elliott Dabill. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Alexa DeJoannis. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Hammond Trail Work Day. First Saturday of every month, 9-11 a.m. Hammond Trail, McKinleyville. Work, clean and paint. Dress for work. New volunteers welcome. Changing locations each month. Contact for meeting place. sbecker@reninet.com. www.humtrails.org. 826-0163. Orchids of the Dunes. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Bay NWR Lanphere Dunes Unit, 6800 Lanphere Road, Arcata. Join naturalist Carol Ralph to learn about five species of orchid that live in the Lanphere Dunes, four of which may be blooming. Be prepared to walk 1 to 2 miles, partly on soft sand. Meet at Pacific Union School to carpool to the protected site. For more information and to R.S.V.P., contact Friends of the Dunes. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. www.fws.gov/refuge/humboldt_bay. 444-1397. Reed Canary Grass Removal Volunteer Work Day. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. TBA, In the area of, Eureka/Arcata. Meeting location TBA. Wear a long sleeve shirt, work pants and boots and bring rain gear and water. Gloves, tools, snacks and beverages. Free. eservices@cityofarcata.org. 825-2163. Twilight Paddle on Humboldt Bay. 6-9 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. This popular evening paddle provides a view of the evening skies from Humboldt Bay. Warm gear, experienced guides and a wide range of kayaks provided. All levels of paddlers. Registration required. $45, $35 HSU students. hbac@ humboldt.edu. 443-4222. Wildlife Tracking Workshop. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. HSU Natural History Museum, 1242 G St., Arcata. Learn the art of tracking wildlife animals with professional tracker, Phil Johnston. Animals are active this time of year and you are bound to find tons of scat, tracks, markings and more. $25. natmus@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu. 826-4479.

SPORTS Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 5:30 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See Aug. 4 listing. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See Aug. 4 listing. Pacific Motorsports Humboldt Half Mile Pro/Am Motorcycle Flat Track Race. 4:30 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Flat track motorcycle racing. Gates at 3:30 p.m. $12-$25. Stock Car Points Race. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Stock car races. Grandstands open at 5 p.m., racing at 6 p.m. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion,


9 Park St. See Aug. 4 listing.

ETC Community Yard Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. SOHA Community Neighborhood Network, South of Harris St., Eureka. See Aug. 4 listing. Flea Market and Rummage Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Free admission. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Aug. 3 listing. Magic the Gathering: Standard. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Compete for prize packs and Standard Series Booster Packs only available at participating game stores. $5. nugamesonline@gmail. com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

6 Sunday

Merlin. 2 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Family-friendly show by Pam Service. Part of Plays in the Park. Free. Open Theater Sundays in August. 12-4 p.m. Poncho Polo Puppets, 625 Lighthouse Road, Petrolia. Poncho Polo Puppets present Lakas Canoe at 1 p.m. Audience volunteers perform puppet parade. Fundraiser for repair of the theater’s foundation. Free.

EVENTS Reggae on the River. 11-midnight. French’s Camp, SoHum, Piercy. See Aug. 3 listing.

FOR KIDS Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. See Aug. 3 listing. Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

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FOOD

Art Talk with Anne Holsberry. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Join the artist as she discusses her exhibition New Navigation. $5, $2 students and seniors, free HAC members and children 17 and under. janine@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts. org. 442-0278. Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Trinidad. Local artisans present their arts and crafts. Enjoy live music each week and barbecue. Free.

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Pancake Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Community Hall, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Enjoy buttermilk and whole grain pancakes, ham, sausages, scrambled eggs, apple compote, orange juice, tea and French roast coffee. Top your eggs with homemade salsa and cheese. $6, $4 kids. 442-5464.

DANCE Burgundy Blues. 7-9:30 p.m. The Fuzion, 233 F St., Eureka. A blues/fusion social partner dancing group that meets every Sunday and Tuesday of the month. $8. burgundybluesdance@gmail.com. www.thefuzion.com.

MOVIES Big Hero 6 (2014). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. An action-packed comedy-adventure about a robotics prodigy who learns to harness his genius thanks to his brother and their like-minded friends. $5. www. arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Alexander Kobrin. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The 2005 Van Cliburn Winner and pianist performs. Free. Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic. org/Bayside. 499-8516. Summer Music Series. First Sunday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods campus, north entrance, Eureka. Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy music in the garden. $8, $5 seniors,students, active military & children over 6, Free for members and children under 6. www.hbgf.org. www.hbgf.org.

THEATER The Liar. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 4 listing.

OUTDOORS Dune Restoration. First Sunday of every month, 1-4 p.m. Lake Earl Wildlife Area, 2591 Old Mill Road, Crescent City. Ensure that diverse native dune plants can survive and spread, providing homes and food for native animals. Free. 954-5253. EPIC Hike to Trillium Falls. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Environmental Protection Information Center, 145 South G St., Suite A, Arcata. A 3-mile, moderate hike though ancient redwoods on a well-maintained trail. Bring water, snacks and hiking shoes. No dogs. RSVP. Free. rob@wildcalifornia. org. 822-7711. Kayak Tour. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Hikshari’ Trail, Truesdale Street (west end), Eureka. Humboldt Baykeeper hosts this tour on Elk River, beginning with a short walk along the trail. Beginners welcome, 12 and older. Reservations required. Se habla español. Free. tours@humboldtbaykeeper.org. 407-6183.

SPORTS BMX Practice and Racing. 1-3 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for some fun. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $11 race. www. facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See Aug. 4 listing.

ETC Humboldt Flea Market. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Peruse the tables for treasures. In the main events building. $2. www. redwoodacres.com. Magic the Gathering: Standard. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. Come play Standard every Sunday, northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

NEW O UNDER

Calendar

HIP! WNERS

Continued from previous page

compete for prize packs and Standard Series Booster Packs only available at participating game stores! $5 to play $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 826-1228.

7 Monday DANCE

Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music. Tonight dance to Bradley Dean (country rock). $5. www. facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

Catch a Wave into Surfside Catch a Wave into Surfside!

MUSIC Humboldt Harmonaires Weekly Gathering. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Singing at 7 to 9:30 p.m., with snacks and coffee break at 8:20 p.m. Free. Singfourpart@ gmail.com. 445-3939. Humboldt Ukulele Group. First Monday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet.com. 839-2816.

FOR KIDS Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. See Aug. 3 listing.

FOOD

For a truly local experience, catch a wave into Surfside and bite into one of our juicy specialty burgers and delicious homemade fries or onion rings.

One-Log Farmers Market. 1-5:30 p.m. One-Log House, 705 U.S. Highway 101, Garberville. On the lawn. For more info call 672-5224. Rabia’s Honey Nut Cake Demos. 7-9 p.m. Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St. Learn how to make Rabia’s Honey Nut Cake at this fundraiser for The Roshni Centre for Women in collaboration with Swat Relief Initiative. Bring a notebook to take notes about the recipe and method and a rolling pin. $35-$50 sliding. roshnicentreforwomen@gmail.com. 826-7123.

NCJ SMARTCARD

northcoastjournal.com/NCJsmartcard

445 5 th St • Eureka

707-268-1295

@surfsideburgershack

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Main Street, Fortuna. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. WIC and Cal Fresh accepted with $10 bonus match when using EBT card. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Pick up produce, baked goods, plant starts and more right across from the Miranda Gardens Resort. Free. www.mirandagardens. com/specials.htm. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Purchase GMO-free produce, humanely raised meats, pastured eggs, plant starts for your garden, flowers and more. Live music every week and CalFresh EBT cards accepted. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Fresh fruits, vegetables, ornamental trees and plants, plant starts, all with an ocean view. Free. 986-7229.

COMEDY Savage Henry Comedy Night. 9 p.m. The Jam, 915 H St., Arcata. Local and out of town comedians bring the ha-has. $5. 822-4766.

ETC

CASA Training. 6-9 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing.

MUSIC

BOOKS

Bayside Grange Monthly Meeting. First Monday of every month, 7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Lively conversation, noshing and discussions about the restoration and program diversity of the Bayside Grange. Free. hallmanager@baysidegrange.org. www. baysidegrange.org. 822-9998. Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

ETC

Mon-Thurs &Sun 11-8 Fri & Sat 11-9

FOOD

Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games range from $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw St., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Lunch with Laura. 12-2 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Bring your favorite fiber craft project (or come find a new one) and a snack or sack lunch. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www.northcoastknittery. com. 442-9276. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. $5 gets you a booster for participating and the winner of each four-person pod also wins a booster. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com/events-2/. 497-6358.

MEETINGS

Now Accepting:

Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. See Aug. 3 listing. Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Aug. 6 listing.

8 Tuesday

Humboldt Ukulele Group. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. See Aug. 7 listing.

FOR KIDS Arcata Family Resource Center Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon. Arcata Elementary School, 2400 Baldwin St. Playgroup for children 0-5 and their parents and caregivers. 826-1002.

9 Wednesday

Storytime with Ms. Sue. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Stories, songs, rhymes and more every Wednesday at 11:00. Free. archuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954.

MOVIES Sci Fi Night ft. Indestructible Man (1956). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. An executed killer


called the Butcher (Lon Chaney Jr.) is zapped back to life in Los Angeles. Free w/$5 food/bev purchase. www. arcatatheatre.com.

FOR KIDS Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. See Aug. 3 listing. Storytime. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. www.nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Trivia Night. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Six rounds, five questions, various categories. Witty team names are rewarded. Fun for friends, family, dates, aliens, dinosaurs. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

10 Thursday MUSIC

Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing.

THEATER The Liar. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 4 listing.

EVENTS CR Dinner and Sports Auction. 5:30 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. A benefit for CR student athletes and sports programs highlighting Dave Mogni as the honoree and featured speaker. No-host social and silent auction followed by dinner and speakers at 6:30 p.m. with the live auction to follow. $600/table of 10 or $500/table of eight.

FOR KIDS Free Summer Meals for Kids. 9 a.m. & noon. Marshall Family Resource Center, 2100 J St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. 11:30 a.m. Washington Elementary School, 3322 Dolbeer St. See Aug. 3 listing. PBSNC Kids in the Garden. Second Thursday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods campus, north entrance, Eureka. Part of the “view, read and do” learning triangle. Each family/group leaves with a free storybook. Free. hbgf@hbgf.org. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Aug. 3 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community Commons, state routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. See Aug. 3 listing.

MEETINGS Conservation Meeting. Second Thursday of every month,

12-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Discuss conservation issues of interest to the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www.rras.org/ calendar.html. 445-8311. Humboldt Grange 501. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Regular monthly meeting. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/humboldt. grange. 443-0045. Redwood Coast Woodturners. Second Thursday of every month, 6-8:30 p.m. McKinleyville Middle School, 2285 Central Ave. All interested in are welcome, beginner to pro, no experience needed. $20. 499-9569.

ETC CASA Training. 6-9 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. Community Board Game Night. Second Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@northcoast. com. www.baysidegrange.org. 444-2288. Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Aug. 3 listing. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. See Aug. 3 listing. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See Aug. 3 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Aug. 3 listing.

Heads Up … The Humboldt Arts Council is accepting entries for the 23rd annual Junque Arte Competition and Exhibition Sept. 20 from noon to 5 p.m. at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Entry guidelines available at the Museum or at www. humboldtarts.org. The McKinleyville Community Services District announces two alternate member vacancies on the Recreation Advisory Committee. Letters of application may be mailed to the MCSD, Attn: Lesley Frisbee, P.O. Box 2037, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Contact the Parks and Recreation Office at 839-9003. Arcata Fire District is seeking a community-minded individual to serve on an elected five-person board of directors. Visit www.arcatafire.org to download an application. For more information, call 825-2000. Interested in volunteering for EPIC? Contact Briana Villalobos, briana@wildcalifornia.org or call 822-7711 to be added to the volunteer list. Headwaters Fund mini-grants available for projects to promote local economic development. For more information call 476-4809 or visit www.humboldtgov. org/2193/Mini-Grants. The Morris Graves Museum of Art seeks volunteer greeters for Friday and Saturday afternoons, noon to 2:30 p.m. and 2:30 to 5 p.m. Contact Museum Programs Manager Janine Murphy at janine@humboldtarts.org or 442-0278 ext 202. North Coast Community Garden Collaborative seeks donated garden supplies, monetary donations and/or volunteers. Contact 269-2071 or debbiep@nrsrcaa.org. Volunteers needed for the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Call 826-2359 or email amic@cityofarcata.org. Volunteers wanted for Eureka VA clinic. Call 269-7502. l northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

51


Filmland

This Month at THE EUREKA THEATER

Reclaiming my time. Atomic Blonde

NOTORIOUS - Fri. Aug. 4

Trailer vs. Movie

And the real Atomic Blonde By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN

Fri. Aug. 11

PSYCHO - Fri. Aug. 18

THE BIRDS - Sat. Aug. 26 SPONSORED BY:

Reviews

ATOMIC BLONDE. So we return to the conundrum of The Good Trailer. On one hand, good trailers can surprise us like beautiful gifts. Because so many movies register as just above unwatchable these days, a lively little glimpse of something promising can be just the thing to get us through the long, dark night of the feature presentation. The trailers for Mad Max: Fury Road and Sicario made the desolate hellscape of cinema-year 2015 feel a little less bleak. They served as beacons of better things to come, distant mile-markers on a broken highway, giving some indication that, yes, it does get better. And they present a miniaturized version of cinema craft: tiny examples of the magic produced by the union of keen-eyed editing and the right piece of music. Two good trailers in a row can almost medicate against the ill effects of a whole bad movie. However, a trailer can occasionally be too good for its own good. The examples cited above work as well as they do because they deliver just enough of the whole to leave the audience wanting more. They distill the essence of the source material, while retaining the fullness of its tone and texture. And ultimately, that is the highest purpose of a trailer: to

52 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

suggest enough of the totality of a movie to make us eager to see it, without making us feel as though we already have. Someone — an editor, presumably — must decide what to include and what to excise. Should the trailer retain the pacing of the movie from whence it sprang? Should it be set to original music, an element of the score? Or to some rousing popular song that will win the audience over, with or without accompanying imagery? When these decisions are made in a vacuum — in service of the trailer as its own work of art — these can get a little out of hand. The trailer becomes a short with a life of its own, separate but still connected to the thing it ostensibly represents. The trailer for David Gordon Green’s Pineapple Express (2008), cut together from the more incendiary sequences and set to M.I.A’s undeniable and ubiquitous “Paper Planes,” made the movie look like the past, present and future of action movies — a perfect thing. The movie itself is not that, of course, though I love it very much. It is a stoner buddy comedy with a few shootouts that are not as well handled as the rest of the movie. And “Paper Planes” does not appear on the soundtrack. The trailer was a whole lot of fun, in and of itself. But it didn’t summarize the tone and pacing of Pineapple Express;

it gave glimpses of moments from within it. To approach the movie on its own terms took a second viewing, at least for me. (It’s possible I assign too much importance to stoner buddy action comedies.) Which brings us, in a roundabout way, to the beautiful problem of Atomic Blonde. I hung a lot of hopes on this one, based on the indelible effect of its trailer. The first time I saw it, some months ago, during a glut of soul-draining studio dreck, I brought it close to me and clung to it, heartened by its cold, blue glow. As we watched Charlize Theron’s battered back emerge from an ice bath, as German cars careened gorgeously across rain-slicked Berlin streets, as our heroine brutally dispatched countless Soviet thugs, all set to a mash-up of “Black Skinhead” and “Personal Jesus,” I saw hope for the future. That hope remains, though slightly altered. The trailer for Atomic Blonde plays as if bespoke just for me. The pace, the ferocity of the fighting, the automotive eye candy, the selection of music all feel as if they were taken from some deeply pleasurable part of my subconscious. It is a fantastic little taste of the movie from which its constituent parts were drawn but it also sets up some unfair, or at least misaligned, expectations. One would expect that Atomic Blonde moves from car chase to fist fight with John Wick-ian pacing and certitude — wall-to-wall action. While there is ample excitement to be had, the trailer neglects to hint at the negative space within the movie, the deliberate pacing and slow humor, the nods to the long and storied history of espionage cinema that inspired it and to which it pays homage. Berlin, 1989: as the wall between East


and West begins to topple, Lorraine Broughton (Theron) arrives at the behest of MI6 and the CIA to clean up a mess involving the KGB and a purloined list of deep-cover operatives. She engages with David Percival (James McAvoy), an opportunistic British agent with a little self-made fiefdom and questionable motives, gains the trust of winsome French operative Delphine Lasalle (Sofia Boutella) and beats the living shit out of a bunch of big Russians. Stuntman-turned-director David Leitch (uncredited as co-director on John Wick, 2014), aided by cinematographer Jonathan Sela, pours on the style here, recreating Cold War Berlin in exquisite, dense detail: a cool, gray world set off with pops of neon and suggestive windows lit from within. The fight choreography is exceptional, as expected, and Theron delivers a winking, knife-edged performance that suits perfectly. While Atomic Blonde doesn’t sustain the full-throttle pacing I had expected, it might actually be all the better for its moments of space and quietude. R. 109M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

— John J. Bennett For showtimes, see the Journal’s listings at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards’ Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

DARK TOWER. A boy who has visions crosses into another world just as the forces of good and evil are about to bring their eternal duel to Earth in this Stephen King adaptation. Starring Idris Elba and Matthew McConaughey. PG13. 95M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

DETROIT. John Boyega and Anthony Mackie star in this drama about people killed during the 1967 riots. Directed by Kathryn Bigelow. R. 143M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. ENDLESS POETRY. Chilean filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s auto-biopic about joining the bohemian scene in his youth during the 1940s. NR. 128M. MINIPLEX. KIDNAP. Thriller starring Halle Berry gives her minivan a workout as a woman pursuing her son’s abductors. R. 82M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

LANDLINE. Sisters (Jenny Slate, Abby Quinn) come to grips with their messy lives and their father’s affair in 1990s New York. R. 97M. MINIPLEX. TOP GUN (1986). *Insert sound of shirtless Val Kilmer snapping his teeth at shirtless Tom Cruise in the locker room. PG. 110M. BROADWAY.

Continuing

THE BIG SICK. Kumail Nanjiani and Zoe Kazan star in a romantic comedy that

breaks new ground as boy meets girl and girl goes into coma. Michael Showalter directs this deceptively simple, unassuming movie in which the deeply funny is juxtaposed with the devastating. R. 120M. BROADWAY, MINOR.

DESPICABLE ME 3. An out of work Gru (Steve Carell) returns to a life of crime, meets his long-lost twin and battles a villain stuck in the ‘80s (Trey Parker). With Kristen Wiig. PG. 156M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. DUNKIRK. Christopher Nolan’s focused and intimate telling of this World War II story of pinned troops, outnumbered airmen and hail-Mary civilian rescue effort brings each character to life with the wave-action of hope and hopelessness. PG13. 106M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. THE EMOJI MOVIE. *Eye-roll emoji. PG. 86M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

GIRLS TRIP. Almost 30 years after “Ladies First” dropped, Queen Latifah, Regina Hall, Jada Pinkett Smith and Tiffany Haddish star in this crass tale of four lifelong friends’ trip to the Essence Festival in New Orleans. R. 122M. BROADWAY. THE LITTLE HOURS. Quiet life in a medieval covenant turns decidedly lustful when a young servant fleeing his master takes refuge. The raunchy comedy boasts an all-star cast that includes Molly Shannon, John C. Reilly, Aubrey Plaza and Nick Offerman. R. 90M. MINIPLEX. MAUDIE. Sally Hawkins stars in this biopic of arthritic artist Maud Lewis, who painted in Nova Scotia. With Ethan Hawke as her taciturn husband. PG13. 115M. MINOR. SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING. Co-writer/director Jon Watts (Clown, 2014; Cop Car, 2015) makes good on a tremendous opportunity here, utilizing a talented cast to great effect and bringing the franchise back to its sweetspot. PG13. 133M. FORTUNA, BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS. Luc Besson’s comic book adaptation feels misconceived with its story of an idyllic planet ravaged by humankind, poorly constructed military intrigue and a thin love story. PG13. 137M. FORTUNA, BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES. Caser (Andy Serkis) sets out on a quest of vengeance after the apes are pulled into war with a ruthless colonel (Woody Harrelson). PG13. 150M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MINOR. WONDER WOMAN. Director Patty Jenkins and company handle the seriousness of justice and love overcoming prejudice and hate without turning pompous, and still entertain with outsized battle sequences in this fine DC adaptation. Starring Gal Gadot and Chris Pine. PG13. 141M. BROADWAY.

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill l

Workshops & Classes

Continued on next page »

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Communication CELEBRATING DIVERSITY AND INCLUSIVITY Deepen your understanding of yourself and tap into your inner wisdom. The community is invited to this workshop with Revs Bonnie and Andy Anderson at which we will explore our feelings about diversity as we create SoulCollage cards. SoulCollage is a dynamic, intuitive exploration into self−discovery using images and collage. It will allow us to look at diversity and inclusivity in a visual way. We will use scissors, glue, and images cut from magazines to create our cards. All mate− rials are provided. It takes place on Saturday, August 5, 2017, from 10:00 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the Eureka Center for Spiritual Living, 239 Buhne Street, Eureka. Suggested donation is $20 − $25. Call 707 443−5743 for more information. (C−0803) COMMUNITY MEDIATOR TRAINING An interac− tive 34−hour course in community board style mediation. Regular tuition: $375. Discounts avail− able, including early bird pricing before Aug. 29. Weekdays: Oct. 2, 3, 5, 10 & 12, 5:15 pm − 9:00 pm. Saturdays: Oct. 7 & 14, 8:45 am − 5:00 pm. Details at www.humboldtmediationservices.org or 445−2505. FICTION WRITERS’ GROUP seeks new member. Biweekly 3−hr mtgs in Eureka. No poems or non− fiction. 5p sample to 51frontier@suddenlink.net TENSION BETWEEN SCIENCE AND RELIGION EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ Perceived conflicts between religion and science will be discussed at Lifetree Café on Sunday, August 6, 2017 at 7:00 p.m..The program, titled "Science and Religion: Can They Coexist?"features a filmed interview with Brother Guy Consolmagno, a scientist with the Vatican Observatory. "Science is understanding, seeking truth. Religion is truth, seeking under− standing,"says Consolmagno. "They are on the same road."During the program, Lifetree Café participants will also discuss potential clashes and commonalities between the two ideologies. Admission to the 60−minute event is free. Lifetree Café is located Corner of 13th Street and Union, Arcata. Lifetree Café is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual, comfortable setting. Questions about Life− tree may be directed to Pastor Bob at 707−672− 2919 or robertdipert@gmail.com (C−0803)

JOIN SAMBA DA ALEGRIA IN THE 2017 NORTH COUNTRY FAIR SAMBA PARADE! All levels, drums provided, $5/class. Sundays 12−3, 1301 D St. Arcata, 7/16 to 9/10. Parade on 9/17. bost.neil@gmail.com NORTH COAST DANCE COMPANY AUDITIONS! Monday, August 21st from 5:30−7:30pm at the North Coast Dance Studio. Come ready to dance with Pointe shoes, headshot, resume, and your calendar to note any conflicts. For ages 14+ (D−0817) CAPTURE A LITTLE BIT OF COUNTRY learning Country Two−step at Dance with Debbie’s work− shop Wed., July 26 and get back to the basics with our "Basics of Partnering" workshop Wed., Aug 33. Both workshops meet 7:00−9:00p.m., all levels welcome, no partner required, $10/person. (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (D−0817) FREE WEST AFRICAN DRUM CLASSES Friday 5:30− 7pm. HSU Music Room 131 Contact Joe Bishop 707− 601−5347 Drums available to use or purchase (DMT−0831) NORTH COAST DANCE SUMMER INTENSIVE BLITZ, $200! August 17, 18, and 19 with Guest Artists Josh and Elizabeth at the North Coast Dance Studio. Partnering, Men’s Class, Pointe, Rep and more... Intermediate and above dancers welcome; partial scholarships available Call 707.442.7779 to register (D−0817) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0831)

Fitness NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−0831)

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0928)

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0831)

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0831)

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0831)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

53


Workshops

Continued from previous page

Kids & Teens 17TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP Water enthusiasts of ALL levels will enjoyable learn the aquatic skills necess. for all types of wave riding & SURFING while immersed in Jr LIFEGUARD water safety, surf etiquette, beach & ocean aware− ness. Lead by former California State Lifeguard & school teacher along w/male & female instructors. Where: Moonstone Beach Ages: 8 and up When: July 10−14, July 31−Aug 4, Aug 7−11 Cost: $195 Contact: (707) 822−5099 Website: www.moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com (K−0803) LEARN TO ROW WITH HUMBOLDT BAY ROWING ASSOCIATION Juniors aged 11 and up. 2−week sessions for new rowers start on July 17, July 31 or Aug 14. More info and sign up on our website. www.hbra.org

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0824) FACEBOOK FOR SENIORS! August 21, 23, 28 & 30, 2017 10am − 11:30am This class is for beginners, will provide hands−on instruction, and teach students what they can do with Facebook. Instruction will be gentle and slow−paced to provide under− standing and practice with the main features of Facebook. Call 707−476−4500 for more information. (O−0803)

Humboldt Honey Wine presents

Paint Night

“Booze and Brushes” Friday Nights at 6pm

Moonlight Dance 8/11/17

Check in starts at 6pm, we begin painting at 6:30. Reserve you spot by pre pay on our website at www.humboldthoneywine.com or calling us at (707)599-7973. $45 per person. Includes wine tasting & snacks. Humboldt Honey Wine 735 3rd Street (between H & I) Eureka (707) 599-7973

SENIORS! INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET: SAMPLE THE POSSIBILITIES. Sept. 11, 13, 18 & 20, 2017 10am − 11:30am Explore the possibilities the Internet has to offer by learning about various and popular web−based applications. This beginning class will offer hands−on instruction using computers and an internet browser. Class requires that students have basic computer skills. Call 707− 476−4500 for more information. (O−727)

Spiritual ANNUAL SEMINAR WITH CHOKYI NYIMA RINPOCHE AND LAMA TSULTRIM SANGPO. August 10 − 18 at Rangjung Yeshe Gomde in Leggett. Part 1: Gateway to Buddhist Practice − August 10−13. Part 2: Directly Meeting Your Buddha Nature − August 12−18. Ocean of Amrita Puja: August 13. Visit gomdeusa.org for registration. (S−0810) ANNUAL TEACHINGS WITH KHANDRO RINPOCHE August 25 − 27 at Rangjung Yeshe Gomde in Leggett. Gomde California is pleased to welcome Jetsun Khandro Rinpoche back this summer for her annual teachings. Visit gomdeusa.org for registration. (S−0824)

HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOW− SHIP. We are here to change lives with our love. . Services at 9am and 11am on Sunday. Child care is provided at 9am. Childrens religious education is at 11am. 24 Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0831) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. www.tarotofbecoming.com (707) 442−4240 carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1102)

Sports & Recreation BEAU PRE GOLF 2017 GOLF CLINIC SCHEDULE Four Lessons $80 Tuesday Evenings 6−7pm Clinic Start Dates Session 1 − July 11, 18, 25 & Aug 1 Session 2 − Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 Session 3 − Sept 12, 19, 29, Oct 3 Topics Covered − Putting, chipping, irons, woods, playing on the course. Great for Beginners and Intermediates. Call (707) 839−2342

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0831) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0629) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0629)

Vocational AUTO BODY COLLISION REPAIR INFORMA− TIONAL MEETINGS: August 16th and 30th 6−8pm. Class dates: 9/12/17 − 12/19/17 Classroom Days/ Time: TTH 2:30 − 5:30pm Externship Days/Time: TTH − 8:00am − 1:00pm, WF 1:00pm − 5:00p This course will cover all aspects of the Auto Body Collison Repair industry including safety, esti− mating, detailing, paint prep, removing and replacement of parts, frame rack setup and measuring techniques, weld on panels and suspen− sion and alignments. Body and dent repair, prep− ping, and masking for paint. The Externship portion will consist of hands on learning at local Auto Body Shops. Call 707−476−4500 for more information! (V−0803) BECOME A PHLEBOTOMIST! Phlebotomy Informa− tional Meeting: August 3, 2017 located at College of the Redwoods main campus in room HU 129 5:30p.m. − 8:30p.m. Class Dates: Tuesdays and Sundays September 28, 2017 − January 18, 2018 5:30− 8:30pm. Call 707−476−4500 for more information. (V−0803)

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sunday 7:55 a.m. at Trillium Dance Studio, 855 8th St (next to the Post Office). Dharma talks are offered two Sundays per month at 9:20 a.m. following meditation. EUREKA: Wed’s, 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte St., enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 12.For more information call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. (S−0831)

MEDICAL ASSISTING INFORMATIONAL MEETING: August 16, 2017 3 − 5pm at 525 D St. in Eureka, CA Class Dates: 9/20/17 − 12/22/17 College of the Redwoods Community Education offers training to become a Certified Medical Assistant. This not−for −credit class with lecture and in−class labs includes clinical rotation at a local medical office. Front and back office Medical Assistant skills will be covered in an interactive classroom format. Call 707−476− 4500 for more information! (V−0803)

KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0831)

BECOME A REAL ESTATE AGENT! Live Real Estate Principles, Practice, and Finance classes includes: textbooks, all course materials, instructors, and upon successful completion of each course, a Certificate of Completion! Tues & Thursdays starting in October. Call 707−476−4500 for more information! (V−0803)

54 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

ADVANCED MEETINGS LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP. Leading Organizational & Community Change program. Facilitate high−stakes meetings. Aug. 16− 18, 9am−5pm. $525. www.humboldt.edu/locc (V−0803) DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS CERTIFICATE Fall classes begin Aug. 22. InDesign, Photoshop, Photography, Illustrator. $125−$150/class. Take any 3 for certificate. www.humboldt.edu/extended/ digicomm (V−0803) INJECTIONS AND VENIPUNCTURE CLASSES for those who are employed or seeking employment, in a medical office setting and will be working under the supervision of a physician. One−day trainings on September 17 & 23, 2017 8am−6pm Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0803) PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Aug 29 − Oct 17, 2017 Tues & Thurs 6 − 9:30pm. This comprehen− sive 50 hour program will prepare students to work as a pharmacy technician in a retail or other phar− macy setting and to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board’s PTCB exam. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0803)

SERVSAFE MANAGER CERTIFICATE Aug 22, 2017 Time: 8:30am−5:00pm This comprehensive one−day workshop assists restaurants and other food handling businesses in complying with AB 1978/ Campbell. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0803) TRUCK DRIVING INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS: August 1 & 3, 2017 located at 525 D St. in Eureka, CA from 6−8pm. Mandatory Pre−Class Meetings: Tues− days and Thursdays, August 8 − 17, 2017 Class Dates: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays August 21 − October 2, 2017 This is an intensive six−week course! 6 − 8:30pm There is additional time with the truck arranged with students and the instruc− tors in the mornings, afternoon, and/or weekends. Call 707−476−4500 for more information. (V−0727)

Wellness & Bodywork ANUSARA YOGA August 9 − 30, 2017 Wednesdays! 1p − 2p $20 College of the Redwoods Main Campus. Elsa Dearth teaches Anusara style yoga with a loving, tantric philosophy, this style weaves together different yoga practices, incorporating breathing and mediation techniques, in a fun, open minded environment for all. In order to keep the costs low at least 16 participants must be regis− tered by August 4, 2017. (W−0727) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Dandelion Herbal Center classes with Jane Bothwell. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 13 − Nov 1, 2017, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Festival of Herbs. November 2017 − April 2018. Meets the 1st weekend of the month for intermediate to advanced herb students and health care practitioners. Learn from renowned herbalists: Rosemary Gladstar, Kat Harrison, Pam Montgomery and more! Authentic Hawaiian Adventure. Jan 13−22, 2018, Join Jane and Co. for an unforgettable journey to the Big Island. Along with ethnobotanical adventures, herbal spa days and meeting Native healers, enjoy a Kava cere− mony and other cultural activities, lush beaches, lots of hikes, yoga and more! Herbal & Traditional Healing in Greece with Pamela Haynes. May 5 − 15, 2018. Discover the beauty, aromas, traditional and modern uses of many medicinal plants on this amazing journey of learning to the Aegean islands of Ikaria & Samos! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0907)


Legal Notices Freshwater School District is requesting Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) from qualified architectural firms to perform architecture/engineering services for the District’s future new construction and modernization projects. Interested firms must have experience with California public school projects which comply with all requirements set forth by the Office of Public School Construc− tion (OPSC). For more information please visit: www.freshwatersd.org 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−177)

T.S. No. 050423−CA APN: 011− 163−02 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 5/18/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 8/11/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 5/26/2006, as Instrument No. 2006−15428−17, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: BRUCE TURNER, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE−THIRD INTEREST, AND CONSTANCE M TURNER, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE−SIXTH INTEREST, CONSTANCE M TURNER, AS CUSTODIAN FOR, AND DEVON S. TURNER, A MINOR, UNDER THE CALIFORNIA UNIFORM TRANSFERS TO MINOR ACT, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE−SIXTH INTEREST AND, AND RONALD TURNER, AS TO AN UNDIVIDED ONE−THIRD INTEREST WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIERS CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHO− RIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2612 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums

liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $156,304.66 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280− 2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 050423−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego,

file number assigned to this case 050423−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 7/20, 7/27, 8/3 (17−172)

T.S. No. 053958−CA APN: 502 021 074 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 9/14/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 8/25/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 9/17/2004, as Instrument No. 2004−31582−19, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: HEATHER L BENDALL, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURT− HOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2147 PLUNKETT RD BAYSIDE, CA 95524 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encum− brances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $263,520.93 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a

expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $263,520.93 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280− 2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 053958−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−186)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00401

STATEMENT 17−00401 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CORE CARE MEDICAL SUPPLY Humboldt 2900 F Street Eureka, CA 95501 Core Care, LLC CA 20171150521 2900 F Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Corey McCauley, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 17, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−176)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00412 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FAIR CURVE FARM Humboldt 1057 5th St Ferndale, CA 95536 PO Box 300 Loleta, CA 95551 Benjamin L Thompson 2590 Cannibal Island Rd Loleta, CA 95551 Aubreyanna N Schooley 2590 Cannibal Island Rd Loleta, CA 95551

any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable a fine» Continued on nextby page not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Benjamin L Thompson, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 24, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by lh, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−179)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00407 The following person is doing Busi− ness as WINK UPSTAIRS Humboldt 1660 Central Ave #G McKinleyville, CA 95519 Lisa A Bishop−Rowe 741 Park Ave Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lisa Bishop−Rowe, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 18, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−184)

LEGALS?

The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to County Public Notices transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed Fictitious Business above on Not Applicable Petition to I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. Administer Estate A registrant who declares as true Trustee Sale any material matter pursuant to Other Public Notices Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant classified@north knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine coastjournal.com not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). 442-1400 ×305 /s Benjamin L Thompson, General Partner This statement was filed with PUBLIC the NOTICE County Clerk ofNOTICE Humboldt OFCounty ADOPTION OF FINAL BUDGET on July 24, 2017 FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 KELLY E. SANDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, by lh, Humboldt County Clerk that the Preliminary Budget for the Bridgeville Fire Protection District of Humboldt County for the fiscal year 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−179) BEGINNING July7/27, 1, 2017, has been adopted by the District Board of Directors and is available for inspection by interested taxpayers through the District’s mailing address: Bridgeville Fire Protection District P. O. Box 51 Bridgeville, CA 95526 That on July 10, August 14, and September 11, 2017, at 5:00 PM at the Bridgeville Community Center, Bridgeville, CA, the Board of Directors of the District will meet for the purpose of finalizing the budget, and that any taxpayer may appear at said time and place and be heard regarding the increase, decrease, omission or inclusion of any items. Maryliz O’Connell Board Secretary

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CORE CARE MEDICAL SUPPLY Humboldt 2900 F Street Eureka, CA 95501 Core Care, LLC CA 20171150521 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 2900 F Street Eureka, CA 95501

55


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00377

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 1−00364

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00392

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00383

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00397

The following person is doing Busi− ness as KLAMATH RIVER CUISINE Humboldt, 37497 Hwy 96 Orleans, CA 95556 P.O. Box 394 Orleans, CA 95556 Nancy N. Doman 37497 Hwy 96 Orleans, CA 95556

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ANNIE’S CAMBODIAN FOODS Humboldt, 1917 5th Street Eureka, CA 95501 Sithol H Chau 5423 Alpine Ct Eureka, CA 95503

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SLICE OF HUMBOLDT PIE Humboldt 828 I Street Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 4662 Arcata, CA 95518 Slice of Humboldt Pie Inc CA 3940432 828 I St Arcata, CA 95521

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT ENDODONTICS, DENTAL PRACTICE Humboldt 2320 23rd Street Eureka, CA 95501 Richard J Welbert, D.M.D 4414 Cedar Street Eureka, CA 95503

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ARBOR LANDSCAPES Humboldt 822 Murray Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 P.O. Box 4252 Arcata, CA 95518 Shane U Swanson 882 Murray Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Nancy Doman, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 5, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: lh, Deputy Clerk 7/13, 7/20, 7/27, 8/3 (17−170)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00365 The following person is doing Busi− ness as PERFECT YARDS Humboldt, 2409 Meadow Lane Eureka, CA 95503 Shawn M Palot 2409 Meadow Lane Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shawn Palot, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 27, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: sc, Deputy Clerk 7/13, 7/20, 7/27, 8/3 (17−171)

The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sithol H Chau, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 27, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: sc, Deputy Clerk 7/6, 7/13, 7/20, 7/29, 8/3 (17−167)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00385

The business is conducted by A Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kristen Thompson, Vice Presi− dent This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 12, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by lh, Humboldt County Clerk 7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−180)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00394

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Richard J. Welbert, D.M.D. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 7, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−174)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00396

The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shane U Swanson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 14, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SERVICES Humboldt 412 Humboldt Street Santa Rosa, CA 95404 C. Financial Investment Inc. CA 1435282 412 Humboldt Street Santa Rosa, CA 95404

The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s John N Coombs, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 7, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by A Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s R. Mark Epstein, CFO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 12, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by Copartners. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Miguel Meras,Co−Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 14, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Andrew G Abbott, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 18, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−183)

8/3, 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−187)

7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−175)

7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−178)

56 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

8/3, 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−188)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00406

The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE SCRUFFY NERD HERDER Humboldt 226 F St Eureka, CA 95501 2101 McClaskey Eureka, Ca 95503 John N Coombs 2101 McClaskey Eureka, CA 95503

ONLINE or by E-MAIL @ northcoastjournal.com / calendar@northcoastjournal.com PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name NORTH COAST LED Humboldt 3101 Concorde Dr Ste D McKinleyville, CA 95519 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on August 25, 2015 John F Vogelpohl 3101 Concorde Dr Ste D McKinleyville, CA 95519 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ John F Volgelpohl, Owner This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date July 27, 2017 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office Kelly E. Sanders s/ sc, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk

7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−181)

The following person is doing Busi− ness as I−DETAIL 101 Humboldt 300 A Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562 Miguel Meras 300 A Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562 Carlos Meraz 300 A Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562

Submit your Calendar Events

STATEMENT OF ABANDON− MENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. R−1500496

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CITRINE CATERING Humboldt 475 I Street Arcata, CA 95521 1395 Stomberg Ave Arcata, CA 95521 Andrew G Abbott 1395 Stromberg Ave Arcata, CA 95521

What’s your food crush?

We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog. Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com

LEGALS? classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 × 305

NCJ HUM PLATE


for a decree changing names as follows: Present name LUCAS CARTER FUENTES to Proposed Name LUCAS CARTER PARISH

PETITION OF: ANGELA FULER TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ANGELA FULER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name LEXI LAINE MIRANDA to Proposed Name ALEXA LAINE MIRANDA

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 12, 2017 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 26, 2017 Filed: July 28, 2017 /s/ Joyce D. Hinrichs Judge of the Superior Court 8/3, 8/10, 8/17, 8/24 (17−189)

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 1, 2017 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 19, 2017 Filed: July 19, 2017 /s/ Timothy P. Cissna Judge of the Superior Court

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME SAMANTHA MAY LEE CASE NO. CV170598 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALI− FORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: SAMANTHA MAY LEE TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: SAMANTHA MAY LEE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name WILLIAM HENRY KILLEBREW to Proposed Name WILLIAM HENRY LEE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 1, 2017 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 11, 2017 Filed: July 12, 2017 /s/ Timothy P. Cissna Judge of the Superior Court 7/20, 7/27, 8/3, 8/10 (17−173)

7/27, 8/3, 8/10, 8/17 (17−182)

YO U ’ R E I N V I T E D T O T H E PA R T Y ! AUGUST 5 7 pm - 11 pm

CARSON BLOCK BALLROOM, THIRD FLOOR

WANT TO COME? GRAB A TICKET: $10 presale, $20 at the door, ticket includes one complimentary drink. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Humboldt Bay Trail

LOCAL SMALL BUSINESS? BE A VENDOR: $100 for booth space, only 10 spots available! this is a 21+ event To buy your tickets or become a vendor, call Sarah Green at (707) 442-1400 ext. 312

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53. River bottom 56. Actress Loughlin of “90210” 57. Bug ... or what’s found in 17-, 27and 44-Across 61. Suffix with bachelor 62. Zone 63. Like some wine casks 64. Homer Simpson outbursts 65. Line of jeans? 66. Rod in a henhouse

32. Magnetite and bauxite 33. Totally rules 34. Fallopian tube travelers 35. Achieved great success 38. Listen 40. Top-left button on most keyboards 41. Liqueur which means “bitter” in Italian 43. Knight in shining armor 44. TV host who once explored running for “the president of the United States of South Carolina” 48. Wicked ones 49. Thurman of “Pulp Fiction” 50. Authorized substitute 52. Singer DiFranco

DOWN

1. Way too uptight 2. Igloo, essentially 3. Ben & Jerry’s alternative 4. Clear the tables 5. Lincoln Center institution 6. It seeks pledges annually 7. Body part to lend

or bend 8. Six-Day War weapon 9. ____ Moines 10. Prenatal procedures, informally 11. Dracula’s creator 12. Oscar winner for “Dallas Buyers Club” 13. Sistine Chapel depiction 18. Sunup 22. “Stars and Stripes Forever” composer 23. Hand ball? 24. The Equality State: Abbr. 25. Sound before a blessing 26. Miss Daisy’s driver in “Driving Miss Daisy” 27. Seize (from) 28. From now on 29. What a gofer is sent on 30. In the open

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO LGBT B O O B

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1. Paid ____ to society 6. Ongoing dispute 10. Fit for the job 14. “Ob-vi-ous-ly!” 15. Demolish 16. Sitcom equine of the ‘60s 17. “Strangers With Candy” actress 19. Silver of fivethirtyeight.com 20. TV exec Moonves 21. It’s stretched out in yoga class 22. Original “American Idol” judge with Randy and Paula 23. Not many 24. Cries at a Wild West show 27. Her 1991 Super Bowl rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner” became a Billboard Top 40 hit

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S L A I U L U B D O W N O J N Q B A R E S E W T T I R I G E M M P A

31. iPod Mini successor 32. Has debts 36. “Lost” actor Jeff 37. “You can say that again!” 39. Perlman of “Cheers” 42. Some colas, familiarly 45. Magical dusters 46. “Clair de ____” 47. Key of Bach’s most famous Mass 50. Begged 51. ____-Rooter 52. Singer Lambert 53. Anti-apartheid activist Steve 54. Barely manages, with “out” 55. A little progress, idiomatically 57. Dines on 58. Wrath 59. Narc’s org. 60. Portrait overlooking Tiananmen Square

© Puzzles by Pappocom

I N S T I T C H E S

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VERY EASY #80

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www.sudoku.com

PETITION OF: LUCAS CARTER FUENTES TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: LUCAS CARTER FUENTES

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME ANGELA FULER CASE NO. CV170615 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALI− FORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME LUCAS CARTER FUENTES CASE NO. JV160221 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

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©2017 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

57


Employment Opportunities

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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262. HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. LIVE−IN ASSISTANT wanted to transport adult male to and from work in Garberville. Light house− keeping, errands, cooking and laundry, with days free. Salary negotiable. Call (408) 483−0315.

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      Come fill out an application at your local Motel 6!      

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information Build edge of the document callto445−7039. (E−0625)

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Provides personal care for patients, assisting with their activities of daily living. Qualified applicants must possess a current CNA license and have, or be willing to obtain, HHA certification. Candidates must also have a valid driver’s license and reliable transportation. Schedule: 4 days (32 hours/week) Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information.

Margins are just a safe area

DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com 

HOSPICE AIDE

Hiring?

442-1400 ×305 northcoastjournal.com

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The team at Hensel’s Ace Hardware is looking for experienced team members to come on board! We need a full time team member to help answer customer service calls in our tool department, help with some department inventory counting, backstocking and cleaning. We are also seeking for an individual to join our paint department team! All positions are FULL TIME and team members must be able to work full time year round. We would love to have someone who wants to stay and grow with our company. Please apply inside Hensel’s Ace Hardware, submit an application at our register station and our management team will reach out to you.

Tool Department Team Member – Must have full availability year round

Hensel’s is looking for hard working individuals to fill a position in our tool department. We need individuals with complete open availability, including weekends. We are looking for individuals who want to grow with our company. Ideal candidates will be knowledgeable and have experience working with power tools, hand tools etc. and are able to multi task under pressure, will have various amounts of product knowledge and experience in customer service, cashiering and or knowledge of retail hardware is preferred.

Paint Department Team Members/Mixer Hensel’s is looking for hard working individuals to fill a position in our paint store. Ideal candidates will have paint/ paint mixing experience, are able to multi task under pressure, will have various amounts of product knowledge and experience in customer service, cashiering and or knowledge of retail hardware is preferred. We need someone with complete open availability, including weekends. We are looking for some who wants to grow with our company. Other hardware retail experience and knowledge is also a plus. Again, for any above the above positions, please apply inside Hensel’s Ace Hardware, submit an application at our register station and our management team will reach out to you. Thank You

Rachel A. Bowler Store Manager Hensel’s Ace Hardware 884 9th St. Arcata CA 95521 • 707-8222965 Ext 110 • Fax: 707.822.8177

58 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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Native Cultures Fund Program Director This is an exempt, full time (40 hours/week) position based in Bayside, CA. Compensation is $55,000-$90,000, DOE and includes health benefits, retirement benefits, and paid holiday and sick time. Occasional evening/ weekend work hours and out of town travel expected. The Native Cultures Fund (NCF) focuses on cultural and language revitalization in Native communities in California. The Program Director for NCF is responsible for providing leadership, growth and guidance to the NCF program; planning and visioning for the program; and implementation of all program-related work including project oversight, grantmaking, networking, donor development, fundraising, grantwriting, reporting and communications. The ideal candidate has at least five years of experience working in advancing cultural revitalization efforts in Native communities; excellent organizational and project management skills; ability to effectively manage a program, including related budgets, grants, staff, communications and partnerships; ability to build relationships with Native cultural leaders, organizations, and potential donors; experience as an effective convener and facilitator of people of all backgrounds and beliefs; knowledge of grantmaking procedure and processes; excellent oral and written communication skills; ability to work independently, to take initiative, and to participate as an effective team member; ability to handle multiple responsibilities, set priorities and meet critical deadlines; ability to handle situations with creativity and diplomacy; strong analytical thinking and problem solving skills; willingness to follow existing policies and procedures and ability to learn, adapt to, and track new systems and procedures; familiarity with office equipment and proficiency with Microsoft Office applications; and possesses a valid California driver’s license and current auto insurance. Please visit our website for application procedures and the complete job announcement, including preferred qualifications at www.hafoundation. org/About-Us/Employment-Opportunities. For more information, contact Jen Rice at (707)442-2993. Please submit your resume, cover letter, and writing sample to admin@hafoundation.org

Deadline to Apply: August 18, 2017


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Distribution Drivers Wednesday afternoon/Thursday morning routes. Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

EUREKA CAMPUS Assistant Professor, Biology

GRAPHIC ARTIST One-Year Temporary Position 24 Hours / Week, 3 Days / Week Hourly Pay: $20.00 Send resume and cover letter to: Marty-Coelho@redwoods.edu

PART-TIME FACULTY POSITIONS Articulation Biology Business/Accounting Chemistry Communications (Speech) Computer Information Systems Counselor - CalWORKS Counselor – Disabled Students Programs English History Librarian Mathematics Nursing – Clinical Psychology Restaurant and Hospitality Management Sign Language Welding

DEL NORTE Art Biological Sciences Business Communication Studies Counseling English Mathematics Sign Language Sociology

KLAMATH-TRINITY (HOOPA) Addiction Studies Business Technology Communication Studies Computer Information Systems Early Childhood Education English Psychology More information about the positions is available through our website. http://www.redwoods.edu/hr College of the Redwoods 707-476-4140 • hr@redwoods.edu College of the Redwoods is an EO Employer

RCEA is Hiring! Growing local government agency seeks to fill three open positions.

Submit résumé to 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 or email sarah@northcoastjournal.com

1-Semester Replacement, Non-Tenure Track Spring Semester 2018 Semester Salary Range: $24,157 - $31,753 First Review Date: September 1, 2017 TEMPORARY POSITION

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The North Coast Journal is seeking

Field Associate (FT, termed) $15.21 - $19.05 per hr

Program Coordinator

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Come join Mad River Community Hospital and enjoy the satisfaction of working with a team.

Yes, you can be happy at work…here. If you have to work, why not do so with some of the best in the business. We are looking to hire Respiratory Therapists, RN’s, Housekeepers and other positions. Look on our web site for openings: www.madriverhospital.com

(FT, termed, two openings) $15.21 - $19.05 per hr TO APPLY: Full details and application online at RedwoodEnergy.org deffault

**Annual JOB POOL** NCS anticipates a number of Head Start, Early Head Start & State Program job openings for our 2017-2018 program yr. Potential positions are throughout Humboldt County & may be yr round or school-yr. Anticipated start date: late August/early September

CENTER DIRECTOR FAMILY WORKER HOME VISITOR TEAM TEACHER TEACHER ASSOCIATE TEACHER CLASSROOM ASSISTANT COOK ASSISTANT COOK NUTRITION AIDE SPECIAL AIDE SPECIAL AIDE/ INTERPRETER SPANISH ASSISTANT TEACHER COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER HOUSEKEEPER SUBSTITUTES Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For additional information, please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

CITY OF ARCATA

Utilities Supervisor

$51,128 - $62,146 /yr. Filing Deadline: Friday, August 11, 2017. This position schedules, trains, supervises and reviews the work of assigned staff within the Utilities Division of the City. The position also performs and supervises the construction, installation, maintenance, and repair of water distribution systems, wastewater collection systems, and water/ wastewater treatment plant equipment and related facilities. EOE. Application materials available at: www.cityofarcata.org or City Manager’s Office 736 F Street, Arcata (707) 822-5953

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, Hoopa Valley Housing Authority, F/T, Regular, Salary: DOE. Performs general administrative work with supervisory and management responsibilities; has constant contact with the public, Tribal Chairman, Board of Commissioners, Tribal Council, departments and federal agencies; requires knowledge of project development, planning, accounting, financial management, budgeting, investments, and knowledge of sound business prac− tices. The HVHA operates under tribal and federal laws and is funded primarily through the Native American Housing Assistance and Self−Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA). Directs operations to provide low−income housing, rentals, and related services to eligible recipients and manages existing Mutual Help housing units. Minimum Requirements: Master’s Degree (M.A.) or equivalent and two (2) years of related experience; or a Bachelor’s Degree with four (4) years of related experience including two (2) years of management or supervisory experience; or at least eight (8) years of experience working with HUD programs including management experience, and extensive knowledge of HUD and NAHASDA regu− lations. Must have a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Must successfully pass an employment background check in accordance with Title 30A; Employment Background Check Policy of the Hoopa Valley Tribe. DEADLINE TO APPLY: August 22, 2017 These positions are classified safety−sensitive. For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625−9200 Ext. 13 or 17. Or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply. default

TEMPORARY COOK, CRESCENT CITY, NCS INFANT & TODDLER CENTER Temp yr round position prep meals for toddlers. Req. basic cooking skills, plus exp in food service & volume meal prep. Pref candidate would have exp, training or education in nutrition, menu planning, kitchen safety & sanitation & CACFP (CA Child Care Food Program) exp. 35 hrs/wk, M-F $11.13/hr Open Until Filled

CENTER DIRECTOR, FORTUNA Responsible for the overall management of a State Program. Meet Site Supervisor level on Child Dev. Permit Matrix or qualify for a waiver. Req an AA degree & min of 2 yrs exp working w/preschool children in group setting. F/T 37.5 hrs/wk (M-F); $13.37-$14.04/hr Open Until Filled

COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER, ORLEANS Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req min of 12 ECE units—incl core classes—at least 1 yr exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24 hrs/ week, $11.70-$12.29/hr Open Until Filled

COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER, WILLOW CREEK Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req min of 12 ECE units—incl. core classes— at least 1 year exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24-28 hrs/ week, $11.70-$12.29/hr. Open Until Filled

COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER, REDWAY

                            

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Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req a min of 12 ECE units—incl. core classes—at least 1 yr exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24 hrs/ week, $11.70-$12.29/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSOCIATE TEACHER, MCKINLEYVILLE Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req minimum of 12 ECE units—incl core classes— at least 1 yr exp working w/ children. F-T (partial yr) 32 hrs/ wk,$11.70-$12.29/hr. Open Until Filled

TEAM TEACHER, EUREKA/MCKINLEYVILLE Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities for preschool children. Meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix (3 units in administration pref) & 1 yr exp teaching in a preschool setting. PT (school yr) 28 hrs/wk; $12.64-$13.27/hr Open Until Filled

ASSISTANT TEACHER, FORTUNA Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool age children. Min of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months exp working w/children. P/T yr round, 20-25 hrs/wk. $11.13-$12.27/hr. Open Until Filled

SUBSTITUTESHUMBOLDT AND DEL NORTE COUNTY Intermittent (on-call) work filling in for Classroom Assistant, Assistant Teachers, Cooks/Assistant Cooks or occasional childcare for parent meetings. Require exp working w/children or cooking. $11.13/hr. No benefits. Submit Schedule of Availability form w/app. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

60 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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  

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           

 

            

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   



  



  

  


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





 

            

Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. Take a look at the job descriptions on our website at www.changingtidesfs.org.

BILINGUAL CHILD CARE CASE MANAGER

Under general supervision, this full- or part-time position interviews Spanish-speaking applicants to determine eligibility for subsidized child care programs; may assist parents in identifying their child care options and selecting a child care provider that will best meet the child’s and family’s needs; assists clients in determining eligible child care schedules; maintains a caseload of clients; ensures proper payment for authorized child care schedules; performs work in Spanish and English, verbally and in writing; performs related work as assigned. Course work in social services or related field and experience which has involved the explanation of rules and regulations to the public desired. Starts at $14.83/hr. Benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays, insurance, and 401k retirement plan. Closes 5 p.m., Monday, August 7, 2017

445-9641 • 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

www.sequoiapersonnel.com deffault

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DIRECTOR OF NURSING SERVICES Seeking experienced & passionate RN to direct & coordinate all aspects of nursing for a 16− bed MHRC. Philosophies of care include recovery, trauma−informed and team wrap around. Full Time position with benefits including Health, Dental, Vision and 401K. EEO/AA/Minority/F/Vet/Disability Employer http://www.crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/eureka.html

          

    

LOOKING FOR A MEANINGFUL JOB IN YOUR COMMUNITY? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for Full−Time, Part−time and On−Call LPTs, LVNs to join our dynamic team committed to teaching a "life worth living". Full−time benefits include medical, dental and vision plans; 401(K); scholarships; and lots of wonderful training Apply at 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka http://crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca/ default

open door Community Health Centers Now Seeking:

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Registered Nurses The Registered Nurse is an essential part of the health care team. The role is focused on the delivery of primary care, facilitating access, providing follow-up and coordinating the efforts for the health care team with an emphasis on disease prevention and health maintenance.

JOB FAIR!

The Registered Nurse works closely with other clinical support staff and providers to assure the patients’ comfort and understanding of their individualized care plans.

Wednesday, Aug 16th 4-6pm Sapphire Palace

We are looking for individuals who have the ability to work with a team and use sound independent judgment in assessing new patients, triage and routine follow-up.

Be interviewed that day

Additional requirements for positions listed: Must be able to pass DOJ/FBI criminal history fingerprint clearance and possess a valid CDL, current automobile insurance, and a vehicle for work.

Many Opportunities Available!

Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato, Human Resource Director, at nprato@changingtidesfs.org or via U.S. mail to: 2259 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501. EOE

Avoid waiting in line at the fair & apply now at

Great Benefits & Fun Work Environment

www.bluelakecasino.com

Registered Nurses work at the top of their scope and license based upon nursing standards, policies, procedures and protocol. Registered Nurses should be detail oriented, accurate and organized. Registered Nurses serve as a patient advocate and education while working alongside the practitioner. California RN license required; prior experience in clinic setting preferred. Positions available in several ODCHC clinics in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties. Wage dependent on experience. For details and on-line applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

61


Employment

Marketplace

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Humboldt County Office of Education

Intermediate Account Technician, Accounts Payable FT, M-F, 7.5 Hrs./Day, Grad. from High School, two yrs. of gen. clerical/fiscal exp. Training or exp. in accts. payable, purchasing, payroll accounting & computer operations.

THE COSTUME BOX Party Ready Costume Rental Makeup*Wigs*Masks*Shoes Costume Thrift Sale Rack Dress−up Party Venue Open M−F 1:00−5:30 Sat 11−5 202 T St. Eureka 707−443−5200

$14.09 - $18.01/hr Salary DOE. H&W, PERS retirement. App. available at HCOE or online: www.hcoe.org/pers/appinfo.php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eka, CA 95501 Closes: 8/7/2017, 4:00 PM.

Community Health Centers Now Seeking:

60 day local in home warranty on all used appliances, small and large 1 year parts & labor on all service calls Nights and weekends No extra charge Call

FLASHBACK Featuring Tie-Dye & Batik

ď ‘

ď ‘ ď ‘

Prior office management experience in a medical setting preferred. Position available in Eureka. Wage dependent on experience. For details and on-line applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com

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CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

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“Clothes with Soul�

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair ď ƒď Ąď Źď ‚ď ’ď …ď€şď€ ď€Łď€°ď€ąď€ąď€´ď€´ď€śď€ąď€¸ ď Žď ?ď Œď “ď€şď€ ď€Łď€łď€˛ď€łď€˛ď€šď€ś

ALL TYPES COMMERCIAL LOANS

50 GLORIOUS YEARS ď łď Šď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď€ąď€šď€śď€´

Merchandise ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to comple− ment your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN) ALL KITCHENWARE 1/2 OFF SALE Dream Quest Thrift Store, August 3−9. Where your shop− ping dollars support local youth! Next door to Willow Creek Post Office. (530) 629−3006.

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027 2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

Sporting Goods

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contrac− tors license. Call 845−3087

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Song− writer. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. default

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Thurs. Aug. 10th 4:15 3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

• Nursing Care • Recreational Activities • Nutritious Hot Meals • Physical, Speech & Occupational Therapy • Socialization/ Companionship • Transportation to and from Adult Day Center

Now Accepting Patients

Call for more information

707-822-4866 3800 Janes Rd, Arcata www.adhcmadriver.org

IN HOME SERVICES We are here for you

ď€Źď ‘ď ‡ď ’ď ’ď •ď€ƒď€ľď „ď ‘ď Šď ˆ ď€Şď ˜ď ‘ď –ď€ƒď€‰ď€ƒď€¤ď ?ď ?ď ’ ď€Şď ˜ď ‘ď€ƒď€ľď ˆď ‘ď —ď „ď ?ď –

Registered nurse support Personal Care

 

Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities

Miscellaneous

Respite care & much more Insured & Bonded

Auto Service

Thurs. Aug. 3rd 4:15

Preview Weds. 11 am - 5 pm & Thurs. 11 am to Sale Time

Ä†Ä—Ä›ÄŠÄžÇŻÄ˜Ä?ĆėĕnjēnjÄ?ĎēČĘ ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ

Licensed and insured

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Weds.-Sat. 1-6 Sun. 3-6

PUBLIC AUCTIONS Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM

ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł

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Auctions

Eleanor Seeley sculpture, Wm. Zorach watercolor, sports shelter, hunting pack & more!

ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď€şď€ ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž

Check us out on Facebook 100 West Harris St. Corner of Harris & California, Eureka.

Office Managers are responsible for creating a welcoming and efficient experience for patients entering clinics of Open Door Community Health Centers (ODCHC).

Office Managers are responsible for assuring high quality patient service. The Office Manager serves as member of the clinic management team and participates in ODCHC planning and improvement initiatives.

ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡

707-599-5824

Office Manager

Office Managers collaborate to create and revise workflows that help patients, staff and providers interact smoothly and productively. Office Managers supervise receptionists, call staff and other front-line clerical support staff and works to create an atmosphere of caring and responsiveness to patients arriving for appointments, needing health care or calling the clinic for any number of reasons. These functions are essential to the comfort and engagement of patients and the efficiency of staff and providers.

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Â?‹˜‡•ČˆŽƒ†‡•ČˆŠ‡ƒ”• ”‹Â?Â?‡”•Čˆ—•–‘Â?”†‡”• ‹…Â?Â’ƒÂ?†”‘’ÂˆÂˆÇŁ

LOCAL THRIFT Used Appliances Sales & Service ď ‘

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open door

Cleaning

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Clothing

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

@northcoastjournal

62 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

Serving Northern California for over 20 years!

Toll free

1-877-964-2001 `

YOUR AD

HERE classified@north coastjournal.com


Real Estate HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,650; 2 pers. $23,600; 3 pers. $26,550; 4 pers. $29,450; 5 pers. $31,850; 6 pers. $34,200; 7 pers. $36,550; 8 pers. $38,900 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

 default

NORTH COAST FURNISHED RENTALS, INC. FULLY FURNISHED, CLEAN HOMES & CORPORATE RENTALS FROM $1600 PER MONTH

100+ VACATION HOMES Throughout Humboldt, Del Norte & Trinity Counties

Great Coastal Retreats, Cabins, Cottages, Large County Estates, Studios, Condos, Beach Houses, As well as Lake & Riverfront Homes

THERE’S A NEW WAY TO STAY IN A CITY:

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL.

(707) 445-9665

Several New Listings in the Trinity Lakes and Alps Region just in time for summer!

NORTHCOASTFURNISHEDRENTALS.COM

CA BRE #01983702

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FORTUNA | ARCATA | EUREKA FERNDALE | REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK CRESCENT CITY

Call or Visit us online

707.834.8355 RedwoodCoastVacationRentals.com

Home & garden improvement experts on page 38. 442-1400 ×319 melissa@northcoastjournal.com

New

429,427

UNBELIEVABLE INVESTMENT PROPERTY $ OPPORTUNITY AWAITS! Two units located close to Henderson Center. Main house is approx. 2500 sq ft with 4 bedrooms/2.5 baths and a master bedroom with a Jacuzzi tub. The second bedroom would make a great additional family room with its own woodstove. Lots of storage and an inside laundry room. This home features dual zone heating for the upstairs and down. There is a two car garage and a covered patio for year-round BBQ. The second unit is a nice 2 bedroom with its own laundry and single car garage. Both units are separately metered. Call soon! MLS# 248203 $415,000

Pric

e!

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Body, Mind & Spirit default

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 default



Eureka Massage and Wellness

2115 1st Street • Eureka EurekaMassages.com Massage Therapy & Reiki Please call for an appointment. 798-0119

YOUR AD 



HERE classified@north coastjournal.com

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



  Est. 1979

   )RUWXQDQRZRQO\RͿHUV  

 



 

315 P STREET • EUREKA

707.476.0435

Willow Creek Land/Property $1,250,000

Charlie Tripodi

Kyla Tripodi

Katherine Fergus

Dane Grytness

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor BRE #01927104

707.834.7979

Realtor/ Residential Specialist

BRE #01992918

BRE #01332697

707.502.9090

707.798.9301

707.476.0435

BRE #01930997

BRE# 01956733

Bernie Garrigan

707.601.1331

NEW L

ISTING

!

±160 Acres just off Route 1. Property features large flats, meadows, power, 30’ yurt, bathhouse, green houses, water storage, spring, and a well is in the process of being developed. Both Cow & Grouse creeks run through the parcel providing great swimming holes. Permit application filed with the County for 1 acre of outdoor!

Alderpoint Land/Property $275,000 ±9 Acres conveniently located just 10 minutes from Alderpoint! This parcel features Eel River frontage with an awesome swimming hole and nice rock formations, developed flat, easy access, and power nearby. Owner will carry!

Larabee Valley Land/Property $995,000 ±50 Acres perched above the rolling hills of Larabee Valley! Property features a 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom ranch home, pond, well, water storage, rolling meadows, and, beautiful views. The house includes a wood burning stove, vaulted ceilings, laundry room, and large detached garage. Home is off grid with solar & wind power and well water. Cultivation application filed with the County.

Ruth Land/Property $299,000 T±50 Acres with beautiful views of Ruth Lake! Property features two newly developed flats and a year round creek. Close to the Ruth Store and recreational activities!

humboldtlandman.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017

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Best of 2017 N

O

RT

RN H C OAST JOU

AL

Family Owned & Operated since 2012

Thank you for voting us “Best Of” 2 years in a row.

We appreciate you!

Oasis • Kiva • Heavenly Sweet • Over 30 Different Strains

Friendly & Knowledgeable Staff

1670 Myrtle Ave., Ste. B | Eureka, CA | (707) 442-2420 M-F 10:00a - 6:00p | Sat & Sun 11:00a - 5:00p

North Coast Journal 08-03-2017 Edition  
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