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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday June 15, 2017 Vol XXVIII Issue 24 northcoastjournal.com

10 Mills moves on 24 MSG 4-ever 44 Mini nukes


2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 4 5

Mailbox Poem The shadows of ravens

7

News Causes and Conditions

10

News EPD Chief Headed to Santa Cruz

12

Guest Views Black Lives and Good Faith

13

Week in Weed A Cannabis Chasm

17 18

NCJ Daily On The Cover Unpopular Opinions

22

Home & Garden Service Directory

24

Table Talk In Defense of MSG

26

Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

34

The Setlist The Kids are All Right

35 42

Calendar Filmland House of Horrors

43 Workshops & Classes 48 Field Notes “Nuclear Batteries”

49 Sudoku & Crossword 49 Classifieds

June 15, 2017 • Volume XXVIII Issue 24 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2017

Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Andy Powell Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Jillian Butolph, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Assistant Sarah Green sarah@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Becca Oliver becca@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager/Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

View from the tail turret of a B-24 flying to Humboldt. Read more on page 17. Photo by Mark McKenna

Now Open!

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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Mailbox

Smells Fishy Editor: The letter from Mr. Brennan (Mailbox, June 8) regarding the news media was very direct and accurate. Particularly the New York Times and the Washington Post, in that they publish information from a “reliable source.” How true is it? There is no way of validating this information. They are using their name to promote something. Their reputation is decreasing as a reputable news source. Sen. Feinstein has previously stated that there is no evidence in this Terry Torgerson “Russian collusion” story. Now she backs an investigation into the matter. Is this a “witch hunt?” Getting back to my original statement, the printed news media as mentioned before does not report news, they create news to “influence the uninformed through innuendo, accusations, character assassination and even falsehoods.” They never print retractions of any reported item. This brings to mind a statement by Rep. Pelosi regarding Obamacare, “We have to pass this bill so that you can find out what’s in it.” Thank you Mr. Brennan for your very accurate and informative letter. Just a thought. Dale Bridges, Eureka

‘A True Friend’ Editor: I strongly disagree with the letter to the editor in the June 8 North Coast Journal titled “Enemy of the People.” A free press is integral to our democracy. While journalists make mistakes, I believe the overwhelming majority take their jobs seriously in seeking the truth. The writer has obviously accepted the President’s propaganda line: The press is the enemy of the people. Would the writer prefer a system like that in Nazi Germany, where Joseph Goebbels, the “Minister of Propaganda,” communicated to Germans only the messages that Hitler demanded? The Third Reich: One of the original “fake news” organizations that led to World War II and the extermination of 6 million Jews.  I believe the stories of the serious,

4  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

skilled journalists of the New York Times, Washington Post, PBS TV and NPR Radio over the words of a documented obsessive liar, President Trump. Or does the letter writer seriously believe that former President Obama was not born in this country and that he wiretapped then President-elect Trump in Trump Tower? Both have been proven to be lies. The press is a true friend of the American people. America without a free, independent press is like a heart without a beat. Paul DeMark, Eureka Editor: Rick Brennan, you are the fish and your June 8 letter to the editor to the NCJ the wrapper. No facts, just propaganda and untruths. Thank you for your clear and accurate example of “Fake News.” You rely on “the press” as enemy to propagate your mistruths. Well done; clever! But we see through your fifth column lies. I believe in journalism as bastions of unfiltered truth. I believe in the journalistic excellence of our local reporters at the Eureka Times-Standard. I believe in the journalistic integrity of the NCJ investigative reporters. I trust the journalists of the San Francisco Chronicle and the New York Times. Those “enemies of the people” published your letter. Lucky you to utilize the very media you decry. Thank you for your beautiful example of hypocrisy.  James Floss, Freshwater

Editor: Mr. Brennan, apparently a fish wrapper would be relevant for you to wrap yourself in as soon as possible. Your inane, deluded perspective stinks to high heaven with tinges of Alt Right permeating, I guess, what you think passes as a thesis! I remember decades ago standing in a grocery checkout line and catching out of the corner of my eye the headline, “Man Receives Brain Transplant.” It was The Enquirer or one of its ilk. Perhaps you took advantage of this cutting edge technology. And perhaps it was a watershed moment that left you with a shattered dislike of free speech! A disgust regarding the printed word! Wrap yourself in said fish wrapper, flop around to your heart’s content and, most of all, let it absorb your venom. Printer’s ink is the salve that can maybe heal your nonsensical written ramblings! Eric Christensen, Trinidad

A ‘Nonviolent Force’ Editor: Knowing both of the men featured in your (June 8) cover story, “Masterpiece,” I read it with great interest. I thought Thad did a great job of capturing the intelligence, compassion and decency I have come to recognize in both Chief Mills and Blaze. It was gratifying to see them exchange points of view without rancor and with a level acceptance. Good journalism! Having known Blaze somewhat well over the past four or five years, I find it incomprehensible that he could have


The shadows of ravens Over and over Again Colliding colliding with reality with desires, with ires Colliding with demands with dreams, with needs Colliding with rages and appeases With limits with visions With Nightmares Colliding with the shadows of ravens — Lynn Robbins

been the instigator of the hostile encounter with the officer(s) and that he might have physically resisted or lashed out in the manner alleged. I don’t know Sgt. LaFrance, so I’m not able to comment on his character or veracity but, as between the Blaze I do know and the allegations leveled against him, I find only Blaze’s side of the story to be credible. For as long as I’ve known him, Blaze has always been a positive nonviolent force in our community. He has always encouraged more participation in community events and I’ve never known him to utter a harsh word about anyone, whether law enforcement or civilian. I also find it odd that an off-duty officer would take it upon himself to apprehend a simple trespasser with the reported level of force, given the long history of trespassing into the Balloon Track and all of the waterfront buildings

with little proactive policing. The constant graffiti on the engines and the multiple fires in the NCRA building and the ice plant provide evidence of this lack of police having prioritizing such trespasses. I hope this will all be resolved as a millisecond of misinterpretation that led to an unnecessary physical confrontation and that cooler heads will prevail before the legal process drags a good man into the meat-grinder system. Bronco Weseman, Eureka

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

@northcoastjournal

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 

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News

Causes and Conditions Grand Jury investigates child welfare system By Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com

H

umboldt County’s children are not being afforded the protection they deserve. This is the conclusion of the Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury, which recently released two reports about our child welfare system. One, about response times for “at risk” children, includes a triangle of finger-pointing between the three entities most responsible for responding to signs of neglect and abuse. The report, which comes at the end of a nine-month investigation conducted by the grand jury, is based on multiple interviews within the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, school districts and Child Welfare Services. Interviewees discussed frustrations with the mandated reporter process. Mandated reporters are adults — like clergy, bus drivers, teachers and others — who are required by law to report signs of abuse in the children with whom they work. The scope of the problem in Humboldt County is potentially huge, as data from the Lucille Packard Foundation shows that we have one of the highest rates of abuse and neglect reports in the state (85 out of every 1,000 children, compared to the state average of 55). According to grand jury foreperson Jim Glover, the decision to investigate the county’s child welfare system originated from a couple of different complaints, one from the parent of a child in a rural school and another from a school superintendent. Grand jury members visited school districts across Humboldt County and spoke to personnel who had made mandated reports. The report describes the personnel as “vociferous in their complaints” about child welfare services, saying many cases were dismissed, CWS failed to reply or follow up, and case workers took so long to respond to reports (even after calling about a particular family or child as many as six to 21 times) that situations “deteriorated” significantly in the meantime. School personnel also allege they were told that CWS workers “don’t go that far South” or that they should call the Sheriff’s Office instead. At least one district said it had not kept a repository of mandated reports on students, meaning staff weren’t always aware that a particular child or family had ongoing issues. Another said it had been lax

on following through with written reports about allegations, which the law requires to be filed within 36 hours of the time an allegation is made. Through spokesperson Heather Muller, the county Department of Health and Human Services declined to respond to the grand jury, saying it is still reviewing the reports but will issue an official response “well within the established timeframe.” “Nothing our community does is more important than keeping children safe and we will continue to work with our families and partners to improve child welfare,” Muller said in a brief statement emailed to the Journal. Humboldt County Office of Education Superintendent Chris Hartley released a statement saying he appreciated the thoroughness of the investigation and looks forward to “further developing partnerships” with DHHS and law enforcement. “There is tremendous opportunity to continue to foster deeper interagency collaboration,” he said. “When we partner, we are stronger and our students and families directly benefit.” For their part, deputies with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office described insufficient training of new deputies and supervisors, according to the report, which alleges some deputies did not file reports after making investigations and, in some cases, broke the anonymity of mandated reporters. Officers also had complaints about CWS, saying there were delays in receiving reports and CWS often sent a week’s worth on Friday afternoon, meaning that, in some cases, the HCSO wouldn’t be able to investigate until Monday. Stunningly, cases possibly involving physical or sexual abuse, meant to be reported within hours, sometimes did not get called in to the sheriff for days or weeks. Like the school personnel interviewed by the grand jury, law enforcement reported inadequate follow-up from case workers and problems with getting calls answered. Attempts to improve this relationship have failed, the grand jury said. “While the grand jury supports apparent current efforts to create a task force to improve transparency and communication,

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

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News Continued from previous page

the history of such past efforts gives us reason to be skeptical at this time,” the report states. Sheriff William Honsal pushes back on some of these findings, particularly in regard to training. Honsal says his office has negotiated a new memorandum of understanding with CWS that should close the “communication loop.” The Friday afternoon dumping of multiple cases will no longer happen, he says, adding that the sheriff ’s office has also assigned a new detective to child abuse cases, and its ranks will swell by nine new recruits in the coming months. Honsal says the challenges of recruiting and housing deputies in rural communities has contributed to staffing concerns in time-sensitive cases, such as those involving child abuse. But he denies that a lack of training is a factor. “We teach our people, when they respond to a child abuse case, we don’t want to further traumatize the child,” he says, explaining that the methodology of the Child Abuse Services Team involves an officer watching a social worker interview the child and taking a single report, rather than doing multiple interviews and potentially re-traumatizing a child. “What needs to be relayed is that we do take this very, very seriously at

the sheriff ’s office.” The CAST interview system does highlight a potential bottleneck in processing reports, as the grand jury report refers to a general dearth of social workers in the field. “CWS admitted they are badly in need of additional staff to handle their work,” the report reads. “Best estimates of unfilled social worker vacancies ranged from 10 to 22.” Exacerbating an overall deficit of workers, according to the report, is a recent shift in policy in which skilled social workers have been pulled from the field in order to staff the phones for hotline intakes. This is one of the changes in policies and procedures that appears to have taken place mid-investigation. The grand jury reports that CWS “abruptly made notable changes to their policies and procedures at intake” after twice denying the grand jury access to intake process data. In a report titled “Getting the Door Open,” the grand jury details its attempts to track response times by CWS, saying it had been denied name-redacted copies of intake forms and has reported this denial to the presiding judge. Despite the denial, the jury was able to review 50 reports sent by mandated reporters. It found “shockingly slow response times,” with only six receiving

attention within 24 hours (the mandated amount of time). The average time for CWS to respond to a mandated reporter, according to the grand jury’s data, was 12 days. It also found that, over a one-year period, CWS “evaluated out” more than half of reported abuse and neglect incidents, meaning they were disregarded, many without personal contact with reporters or alleged victims. The report states that the social workers interviewed in the course of the investigation “appeared to be seriously dedicated to the work they were doing” but were hamstrung with internal frustrations, such as not receiving proper training, a high turnover rate, management issues and overwhelming caseloads, according to interviews conducted with CWS personnel. If there are problems with CWS, Native American children appear to be suffering most in the system, representing approximately 38 percent of those in foster care despite comprising only 7 percent of all children in Humboldt County. The California Attorney General’s Office has also focused on examining this dynamic, attempting to make sure the county is adhering to the federal Indian Child Welfare Act. The grand jury found a “disproportionate number of

American Indian children removed from their homes.” The remote location of many tribal members may contribute to delayed response times by a small CWS staff already spread thin. The grand jury studied outcomes for one full year of reports, finding that a full 62 percent of calls were deemed not to meet requirements for an investigation, 32 percent were referred out to other agencies, such as family or marriage counseling (without follow up to see if these referrals were heeded), and only 6 percent of all reports received in the year resulted in opening a case for investigation. CWS, the report adds, appears to be “going through many rapid changes,” one of which may include a task force to improve transparency and communication with law enforcement and school districts. The Department of Health and Human Services, Humboldt County Sheriff ’s Office and Humboldt County Office of Education are expected to release official responses to the report later this month. ● Linda Stansberry is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or linda@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.

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News

EPD Chief Headed to Santa Cruz

Mills looks forward to new challenges, better travel options By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

T

he straw that broke Eureka Police Chief Andrew Mills’ will to stay in Humboldt County seems to have come not through politics or crime reports but, instead, through a pair of familiar local foes: weather and failing infrastructure. Mills, who announced last week that he’s accepted an offer to become Santa Cruz’s next police chief, said he recently celebrated a spring birthday at the Arcata home he and his wife, Cathy, bought shortly after Mills took over EPD three and a half years ago. The couple had planned on flying their adult children and grandchildren up from San Diego to celebrate in the 3,800-squarefoot home they’d purchased with just such family get-togethers in mind. But all the flights into the California Redwood Coast Humboldt County Airport were canceled and both U.S. Highway 101 and State Route 299 were closed due to rockslides. The family never made it north and, about a month later, the house went up for sale. The plan, Mills said, was to sell the house and rent or buy a small place in Eure-

ka. But then Santa Cruz posted its position, a recruiter came calling and Mills started weighing his options. “Santa Cruz is in a location where I can drive down for the weekend if I need to or fly down in a couple of hours,” he said, adding that he has two grandchildren with a third on the way, and he’d like to be a larger part of their lives. “For Cathy and I personally, it’s in a good location.” But Mills said the change is bittersweet on a number of levels. Personally, he noted his pull toward the grandchildren who have entered his life since he took over Eureka’s chief position from Murl Harpham in September of 2013. And professionally, the chief said, he likes the challenges Santa Cruz’s position brings: The city, which has a population about double Eureka’s, has substantial homeless issues, gang problems and needs to continue building a stronger relationship between the community and its police department. Those are things Mills feels align with his strengths. “It seems like a good fit,” he said. That feeling seems mutual. Santa Cruz

Chief Mills.

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City Manager Martin Bernal issued a statement last week announcing Mills’ selection, pending a background check, and gushing about the city’s first outside police chief hire in more than three decades. “Andy has proved to be an innovator, an advocate for civil rights, a strategic thinker, as well as inclusive and forward thinking police leader,” Bernal said. “Andy went through an extensive review and vetting process that included a nationwide search and community process, and I am confi-

dent that he will build upon the already strong department in the coming months and years.” The hire isn’t yet final, as it is pending a background check that is only just beginning. If he passes background, Mills would then give Eureka 30-days notice before his official resignation. He estimated that if all goes smoothly, his last day in Eureka will fall somewhere in late July or early August. When hired by Eureka, Mills was commanding San Diego’s Western District in a

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department he’d worked for three decades. Originally from Michigan, Mills came to Eureka with a strong background in problem-oriented and community policing, and was well known in San Diego for his community walks and general accessibility. In Eureka, Mills stepped into a department in turmoil. It had been under the direction of Harpham, who was 80 at the time he retired, for two years after the controversial firing of former Chief Garr Nielsen, who’d proven a divisive figure within the department during his four-year tenure. Shortly after stepping into Eureka’s chief position, Mills was tasked with addressing the city’s entrenched homeless issues, most notably the encampments behind the Bayshore Mall. Under Mills’ leadership, the department also saw the exodus of a number of long-tenured officers and a restructuring designed to make it more responsive to community needs. There was also controversy, most notably a pair of officer-involved shootings. The first, the fatal shooting of 22-year-old Tommy McClain in his front yard, ended with a federal jury determining officer Stephen Linfoot and McClain were both negligent when Linfoot opened fire and awarded McClain’s family $150,000 in damages. The second shooting — which saw four officers combine to fire 43 rounds at a fleeing suspect shortly before 5 p.m. in downtown — remains under investigation. Pointing in part to Mills’ handling of officer-involved shootings, Eureka City Manager Greg Sparks said that Mills brought a “high level” of leadership to his post on a daily basis, no matter the circumstances, and that extended from within the department to City Hall and the greater community. “In the city’s management team, Andy was universally respected and demonstrated strategic thinking,” Sparks said. “Whether it was on budget issues, homelessness, crime prevention — the chief’s words carried weight.” Mills said he learned a lot from his time in Eureka and is eager to carry that over to Santa Cruz. “My wheelhouse is really fostering and building a relationship with the community and I know that Santa Cruz has done a lot in that area and whatever I can do to help further that and foster that, I’m really intent on doing,” he said. But Mills said he’s also very sad to be leaving behind a group of friends in Humboldt County who have become like family.

“There are truly some salt-of-the-earth, great people here,” he said. “We have, I think, as adults, much closer friends here than we’ve ever had before. We have met people that will be lifelong friends.” As far as EPD is concerned, Mills said he feels like he’s helped usher in some progress toward a “more progressive ideology of policing,” helped improve the relationship between EPD and the community, and built trust between the department and the citizens it serves. “That could not have been possible without the men and women of EPD jumping in with both feet,” he said. “They were ready for that.” Mills also said he feels like he’s leaving some work undone, noting that he and his captains are just now in the process of mapping out which officers will cover which geographic beats in the city, so individual officers can get to know specific neighborhoods and their residents. “We’re thinking through the functionality of how that works,” he said. But Mills said one of the most significant challenges facing the department is fostering a communitywide culture that pulls officers to stay here and reduces attrition within EPD’s ranks. “One of the important things we need to do as a community is help the officers understand how much we love them, how much we appreciate them and how much we need them,” he said. Asked what’s next for EPD, Sparks said he’d like to see someone take over who will “build upon the foundation that has been established in the last four years,” someone who can manage resources effectively, attract and retain talented staff, and “maintain and expand” public trust in the department. Mills said he’s confident all that work will continue without him, pointing to the good work of his captains, Brian Stephens and Steve Watson, and the city leadership in place, mentioning City Manager Greg Sparks, Commmunity Development Director Rob Holmlund, Parks and Recreation Director Miles Slattery and City Clerk Pam Powell. “This is much greater than one person,” he said. “I’m just one spoke of many and I think this community has a great opportunity ahead of it.” l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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11


Guest Views

Black Lives and Good Faith By Brenna Silbory

views@northcoastjournal.com

L

ast week, the Humboldt Bay Fire District Joint Powers Authority told firefighter Matt McFarland after a hearing that he can’t wear a small Black Lives Matter pin on his uniform. McFarland may just want to wear that pin, but the rest of us need him to. This is for all of our safety. I live in Eureka but, in 2001, I moved from Chico to San Francisco to become a poverty lawyer. My thinking then on the subject of race wasn’t complex. I was aspiring to “color-blindness,” believing it necessary to overcome our country’s awful history of racial division. But this changed when I began working with very poor people. At law school, I would mingle with overwhelmingly white judges, lawyers and students at my school’s social events while enjoying champagne, grilled prawns and vast platters of savory morsels. Then, when it was time for my volunteer shift, I would step outside that lovely little bubble and cross the street to meet with my homeless clients. It was a different crowd. Many had profound psychiatric impairments that impeded everything they tried to say or do, in addition to physical ailments ranging from chronic immune disease and severe seizure disorders to literally rotting limbs. Nobody in the crowded lobby where they waited had access to grilled prawns. Many didn’t have access to food. They were primarily people of color. The color line represented in that neighborhood — white privilege, black and brown poverty — bothered me. It still does. It should bother you, too. After law school, I worked for several years at a nonprofit in San Jose, where my vulnerable clients often sobbed their way through interviews explaining the cold hard facts of their lives: vicious abuse, terrible losses and the hectic uncertainty of trying to survive poverty in a country without a real social safety net. One client asked me to help extricate her from a difficult housing situation. And then her ex set that house on fire with her in it and she was dead.

The color line persisted. It became impossible not to notice segregation and inequality, usually legal, nearly everywhere I looked. In housing. In employment. In civic life. My work often took me into local hospitals and the jail, and it was obvious there, too. Some contexts were more dramatic than others, and the divisions weren’t limited to black and white. But white people like me had disproportionate power and wealth. We were still predominantly in charge, even where, as in San Jose, we were in the minority. It didn’t seem right. I sought out skilled local leaders of color to learn what to do. Retired Judge LaDoris Cordell, one of the first African-American women to serve on the bench in California, hired me when she was newly appointed as San Jose’s independent police auditor. We were civilians and we didn’t work for the police. Our job, roughly summarized, was to do what we could to prevent a Rodney King-type situation in San Jose. Do you remember Rodney King? If you do, it’s because it was the first time a bystander’s video footage of police violence against an unarmed African-American man went viral. It was 1991, and the footage showed white officers beating the snot out of Mr. King, and then Los Angeles burnt for six days during the riots that erupted after the officers were acquitted. More than 50 people died in those riots, thousands more were injured, and 10,000 businesses literally went up in smoke. That event birthed the civilian police oversight movement. I wish every white voter had a chance to learn what I did in that job. My own interactions with police had always been positive but I learned that many people felt unsafe asking law enforcement for help because they were likely to hurt you or treat you unfairly. It was rare that I heard this from white people, except the disabled. But I heard it frequently from community members of color, this visceral fear among law-abiding people. This can be hard for white people like me to understand but it is true. It was as if

12  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

our most vulnerable neighbors didn’t see a badge pledging honor and service when they saw police uniforms. Instead, where I saw a badge, they saw an invisible button. And the button said: “Your life doesn’t matter because you’re not white.” Imagine the fear of living every day believing that, even if a criminal hurts you, police involvement will likely hurt you worse. You might even turn to extra-legal strategies like vigilantism to protect yourself, such as joining a street gang. I thought back to my client who’d been murdered. She was Latina. Had she felt safe asking for help? Some people will say, can’t you just point out to these folks that most officers aren’t racist, that they’re good people who try really hard? Unfortunately, no. First, as many of us have experienced in this modern political climate, simply telling people they are wrong about their perception of reality is not always an effective way to change minds. Researchers describe the so-called “backfire effect,” in which people tend to double-down on closely held beliefs when confronted with facts that contradict them. In other words, arguing the facts can make them harder to hear. But also that color line, which many people have noticed and thoroughly mapped, is awfully suspicious. And we’re now witnessing frequent bystander videos like the one that introduced us to Mr. King back in 1991, images of people in uniforms hurting and killing black and brown people in shocking and disturbing ways. Our justice system still seems to have no answers for any of it. And riots still sometimes follow. How can all this not, frankly, affirm the suspicions of many, including an increasing number of white people like me, that something is deeply wrong? Perhaps we all are, in fact, living together — whether we mean to or not — in a white supremacist culture? And how on Earth is a well-meaning first responder supposed to do his or her very hard job in this context? A true public servant, like McFarland, wants to make sure the public sees that badge pledging service, rather than the invisible button that says only some deserve protection. That’s why, as a white man, McFarland fought to wear a Black Lives Matter pin on his uniform. He’s often mistaken for a police officer and wanted to clearly communicate good faith to vulnerable people so he can do his job well. Humboldt, we need this for him and his public safety colleagues, too. We need them to signal that the brutality of the past isn’t their own. And to live that way, too. If we want more violence, then, by all means, let’s keep arguing about whether peoples’ fears are legitimate, make sure so-

ciety is run by bullies who insult everyone whose lived experiences are different from their own and dismiss perspectives that are hard to hear. Or we can embrace the intrinsic value of human life, reflected in the statement Black Lives Matter. The founders of the movement are getting this year’s Sydney Peace Prize, recognition all the way from Australia. We should also honor their work here. This is the paragraph where I have to expressly state what some readers will be straining to hear. Yes. White lives, and police lives, and firefighter lives matter. For the thousandth time, yes. You matter, my fellow white people. But if you’re like me, you already knew that. You grew up knowing that, because your culture reflected your value back to you from every direction. Because you are white. Not all white people are equally privileged. Poor lives matter, too, and some white people have led very hard lives. But this reflexive insistence on “all lives” or “blue lives” whenever someone says “black lives” is whistling Dixie amid hundreds of years of targeted violence against black people. Who was chained to slave ships, made to work under the whip without pay, and forced into centuries of systemic persecution designed to silence and marginalize them, right up to the present generation? Black Americans. Not whites or police. Might it now be appropriate, in light of this history, to spotlight the value of black lives for a change? Justice goes deeper than legality. Fairness, not laws, prevents riots. It’s terrible for everyone’s safety when law enforcement is not trusted. It hamstrings and endangers our officers. Witnesses don’t come forward. Crimes go unsolved. Criminals cause more harm. And communities and individuals suffer when they ought to thrive. What our brave first responders must do to confront this problem is to proudly demonstrate that black and brown lives matter, every day, in every way they can. It’s not hard, really. Wearing a button to that effect is, frankly, the obvious and professional place to start. l Brenna Silbory is a writer, survivor of chronic illness and recovering attorney. You can read more of her work at www. flourishingedge.com. Have something you want to get off your chest? Think you can help guide and inform public discourse? Then the North Coast Journal wants to hear from you. Contact us at editor@northcoastjournal. com to pitch your column ideas.


Week in Weed

A Cannabis Chasm By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

C

ommunity Development Director Rob Holmlund found himself navigating some strange territory last week while taking the Eureka City Council’s input on the future of recreation marijuana in the city. Instead of focusing on zoning districts and buffers, Holmlund was left to fact check one councilmember’s understanding of chemical compounds in medical marijuana. He also heard calls to turn on the pot sales spigot and skirted debates on the impacts of alcohol versus cannabis. It had all seemed simple enough. After all, the council passed medical marijuana regulations just last September. But the ensuing council conversation — much of it centered on the retail and dispensary side of the issue — left little doubt about the recreational cannabis chasm that exists on the dais. On one side — literally — were Councilmembers Kim Bergel and Austin Allison, who took a put-out-the-welcome-mat approach, saying they didn’t see a real difference between selling alcohol and legal weed. “I think we need to be pioneers and just go with the flow and see what happens,” said Allison, who noted the potential tax revenue in tight economic times minus the destructive societal impacts associated with alcohol abuse. Bergel joined in, saying the city needs to “join the new generation” and agreed with Allison’s view that there was no need to limit the number of recreational retail outlets because the free market would balance itself out. “We might start with plenty but that doesn’t mean we’re going to end up with plenty,” she said. Meanwhile, their counterparts on the opposite side of the dais — Councilmembers Heidi Messner and Marion Brady — stood firm that there were distinct differences between medical and recreational marijuana, even as Brady seemed surprised to find out that both products can, in fact, get you high. “You’re not smoking or eating or whatever recreational marijuana because you want a medical effect … if you want a medical effect you’ll get medical marijuana, which doesn’t contain THC,” Brady said. “Uh, that’s not true,” Holmlund replied. “No?” Brady asked, receiving a brief explanation about CBDs before she pressed

on. “But the point of the medical is not to get high and the point of recreational is to experience an altered reality state.” Messner, meanwhile, left Holmlund at a bit of a loss when she posed the scenario that a person could drink alcohol without getting drunk, but questioned whether the same was true of “imbibing” marijuana in any of its forms. “There’s some pretty deep semantics,” Holmlund said, briefly stumbling for a reply. “I don’t know how to answer that question.” In a more central position, Councilmember Natalie Arroyo simply said she wants to see consistency between the city’s medical and recreational marijuana guidelines that represent the will of the voters. She also asked that odor control be part of personal cultivation requirements and, along with other councilmembers, asked staff to look at expanding the same buffer zones that exist for public schools to private campuses, daycares and youth centers. Holmlund had presented a vision to establish the city as a manufacturing hub for the state while leaving commercial cultivation and sales of non-medical pot fallow inside city limits, at least until a future date. From his perspective, he said after the meeting, manufacturing is where the money is and a look at the county’s permitting list likely means a massive amount of grows are already in the region’s future — more than needed for local use even if everyone took up a “cannabis habit.” But the council majority, at least, seems to have given retail sales a green light. A bit hazier is the cultivation question and what marijuana uses — medical and non-medical — to allow in service commercial zones. With a January 2018 deadline looming, Holmlund is set to get a draft ordinance to the planning commission in August and then back to the council in September for another review. Holmlund said he’s optimistic that he has a handle on the council’s directions and the process will go smoothly. “We will determine the accuracy of my understanding when we bring the ordinance to them,” he said last week. l Kimberly Wear is the assistant editor and a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 441-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

13


Best of Humboldt 2017 CHEERS TO YOUR BESTIES

ROUND 2: VOTE Round 2 Rules: You can vote for as many or as few subcategories as you like, and you can vote every day from June 1 to June 29. (But just once a day!) Most of the categories have the top three nominees to choose from, but a few have ties. We need you to break those ties!

Round 2 Bribes: Everyone has a chance to win $100 in restaurant certificates. ...but the person who votes the most can win a Best of Swag Bag, with $200 in certificates and local goodies.

Round 2, Vote: June 1 - June 29 Party: August 5

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From NCJ Daily

HSU Axes Pepsi Contract

H

umboldt State University President Lisa Rossbacher has decided to sever the school’s ties with PepsiCo after some students came forward opposing its ongoing 40-year relationship with the multi-billion-dollar company. Under the contract, PepsiCo gave HSU about $58,000 in sponsorship funds for athletic scholarships and scoreboard maintenance in exchange for “pouring rights” guaranteeing Pepsi 80 percent of on-campus food and beverage retail space. With the five-year contract slated to expire June 30 and up for renewal, students urged administrators yo end the school’s relationship with the soft drink giant — which owns a host of multi-billion-dollar subsidiaries, including Quaker, Cheetos, Doritos, Gatorade and Tropicana. Specifically, students argued that partnering with PepsiCo wasn’t in line with the school’s stated commitment to promoting social and environmental justice due to environmentally unsustainable practices, deceptive marketing techniques and its litany of unhealthy offerings. Additionally, they said the contract denies local businesses the opportunity to sell their products on campus. Through a series of campus meetings attended by many students last semester, it became apparent that the potential of losing almost $60,000 in revenue was daunting to administrators, who face a

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Getting Propped

budget shortfall, including a $500,000 structural deficit in the athletic department. “There is no easy solution,” HSU VP of Administrative Affairs Joyce Lopes said at a meeting in April. “We are in a deficit environment and I honestly don’t know where to find that $58,000.” HSU spokesperson Grant Scott-Goforth said in an email to the Journal that Rossbacher made her decision with input from the Division of Administrative Affairs, which oversees all contracts and procurement for the university, the athletic department and the University Center, which operates dining services. Scott-Goforth said Rossbacher is confident that dining services will be able to meet student needs while providing them with more product options, which may still include some Pepsi offerings, just without the “pouring rights” contract. As to that $58,000, it’s unclear if athletics scholarships will be maintained, though the department can look to contract with Pepsi directly to make up some of the lost funding, if it so desires. Editor’s note: In the interest of full disclosure, Scott-Goforth spent three years working for the Journal as an assistant editor and staff writer before leaving to work at HSU. — Thadeus Greenson POSTED 06.09.17 READ THE FULL STORY ONLINE.

On Monday, June 12, Collings Foundation volunteers at Buchanan Field Airport rotate the propellers on The Witchcraft, a World War II B-24 Liberator, before takeoff for Humboldt County, where the historic plane and others will be on view through Wednesday. Read more on www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 06.14.17. Photo by Mark McKenna

Miles to Go: Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Marilyn Miles has announced that she will be retiring at the end of next month after 19 years on the bench. The announcement comes just weeks after Gov. Jerry Brown tapped defense attorney Greg Elvine-Kreis to fill the seat left vacant by Judge Bruce Watson’s retirement in January of 2016. If history is any indicator, the governor’s office will not move quickly and Miles’ seat will be vacant for some time. POSTED 06.12.17

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Fifteenth Roadway Death: The death of Wende Dolores Carroll, a 58-year-old Bridgeville resident, marks the county’s 15th traffic fatality of 2017. Carroll was driving westbound on State Route 36 shortly before 11 a.m. on June 7 when, for reasons still under investigation, her pickup crossed into the eastbound lane and she overcorrected, leaving the road and hitting a redwood tree. Alcohol was not believed to be a factor in the crash. POSTED 06.08.17

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Digitally Speaking

They Said It

Comment of the Week

The amount of a reward announced for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whoever killed 19-year-old HSU sophomore David Josiah Lawson at an April 15 house party. Read more at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 06.13.17

“I can see the prosecutor has a bit of a conundrum here.”

“Thank you, Marilyn Miles, for all the good you have done for the people of Humboldt County.”

— University of California Hastings law professor David Levine, explaining the factors prosecutors should consider in the face of pressure to file assault charges against a number of people involved in fights that preceded David Josiah Lawson’s stabbing death. Read the full story at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 06.13.17

— Dena Magdaleno, commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on a post about the judge’s pending retirement. POSTED 06.12.17

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

17


Unpopular Opinions

This is Genius

I

Photo by Mark McKenna

Crimes against salmon.

On the Cover

n this oh-so-polarized country of ours, it’s important to give voice to the voiceless, to make sure people hear the unpopular opinions of the day, right? After all, without unpopular opinions we never would have had child labor laws, women’s suffrage, the civil rights movement or an end to the Vietnam War. But we live in a day and age when it can be hard to give voice to an unpopular opinion — even a trivial one — and that’s a problem. If we can’t honestly discuss sports fandom, drum circles and prayer flags, how are we going to talk it out on real problems, like accessible healthcare, income inequality and racism? In this issue, we start mostly with the easy stuff to prime the pump — I’m pretty sure I just made

that term up — so we can maybe move onto the heavy stuff. So take some time to read and consider, and please join the conversation at www.northcoastjournal. com and on Facebook. What could go wrong? — Thadeus Greenson

Wait, This is a Terrible Idea Within minutes of someone broaching the idea of an unpopular opinions issue, Jennifer Fumiko Cahill piped up: What’s with that Bill statue at the zoo? Oh, lord. Here we go. It’s bad enough that our national politics is a virtual train wreck, now we’re going to go out of our way to insert wedg-

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

es between us? Do we really need to fight over the proper uses of mustard dill sauce and the San Francisco Giants? If by prime the pump, you mean weighing each of us down with enough hatred and resentment to ensure no ground will be gained in the next healthcare debate, then we might be on the right track. I mean, with all the true horrors at play in the world right now, we’re going to take aim at a statue of a beloved chimpanzee? Did I mention that this is a terrible idea? — Thadeus Greenson

Hold the Larrupin’ Do what you will with poultry, grilled fish, a turkey sandwich or salad, but keep Humboldt’s beloved Larrupin’ mustard dill sauce the hell away from lox. Is it

the flecks of dill that make this crime against salmon seem like a good idea? Some poor Nova Scotian — or worse, an Alaskan without that cushy Canadian health insurance — worked hard to catch and cold smoke or cure that salmon, to bring out its delicate texture and rich fat. What are we paying, $10, $20 or more per pound? And then we go ahead and drown it in sticky sweet dressing. Neither lox nor its Nordic cousin gravlax can stand up to this abuse, to say nothing of the bagel beneath it forced to bear witness. Maybe our sturdier, spicier smoked local salmon has a fighting chance against the onslaught of canola oil, turmeric and sugar, but don’t our precious few salmon deserve better? Stop this madness at once. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill


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I Don’t Like Eureka I love this town, but it’s no romance. Romance is for places like Ferndale. We can “like” places like Loleta the way you think your barista is cute or your friend’s friend is charming. My love for Eureka is the same kind of love we’re forced to admit for our bullying siblings or least hip musical tastes. I love driving back from the hot, mosquito-choked inland and seeing a thick belt of fog on the horizon. I love the prefabricated houses built on the remains of old farms, sitting next to the dilapidated Victorians with Tibetan prayer flags in their eaves. I love my old Craftsman, the first home I’ve owned, my neighborhood of pit bull owners, young parents and retirees. I love WinCo, at all hours, and, yes, with all of its people, united in our thrift and utilitarianism. I love riding my bike to work on cold mornings, down quiet side streets, past the renovated churches, past the auto repair shop already blasting classic rock, with the scent of wet pavement in my nose. I love the dive bars, the sagging garages, the gunmetal sky, the mildewed sills, the slight air of entropy that infects everything. Oh, and I love all of the other things as well, the ones people come here to see — the coffee shops, the waterfront, bookstores, the parks — but none of these things seduce or charm me. I don’t like Eureka, but I don’t think I’ll ever be totally done with it. Isn’t that love? — Linda Stansberry

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On the Cover Continued from previous page

results in anything other than an exhausted parent whose self-neglect certainly won’t guarantee perfected offspring. Sleep training, strollers, cribs — these can be great! Or if you love co-sleeping and hauling your baby around in a Bjorn, do that! What matters is that you love them in a way that makes sense to you and never feel shackled to a theory based solely on making money for its proponents and unattached to any facts at all. — Jennifer Savage

You’re Probably not a Warriors Fan I get it, you like the Golden State Warriors. They’re damn good and heck of a lot of fun to watch. And I’m sure you’re rooting for them. It’s just that being a true fan — short for fanatic — demands more than simple admiration. It demands loyalty, and I can’t help but wonder where all these blue and yellow hats, hoodies and jerseys I see parading through Humboldt County were hiding just a few years ago, you know, back when Stephen Curry was just a skinny kid with flimsy ankles. It’s easy to be seduced by the poetry that is the Warriors on the court these days — the unselfish play, the gritty hustle, the swishes. So. Many. Swishes. But if you’ve spent much of the last four decades rooting for the Lakers, Bulls, Kings and Spurs — as the Warriors missed the playoffs 29 times in 35 years and went 15 without an All Star — you don’t get to claim allegiance now. Let’s back up a bit and be really clear. If you’re over the age of 35 and think of Chris Webber as a Sacramento King, you’re just not a Warriors fan. Think that’s unfair? Then tell me about Tom Gugliotta, P.J. Carlesimo, Todd Fuller and Marcus Williams. Can’t? How about Ekpe Udoh, Speedy Claxton and Monta Ellis’ moped? Drawing blanks? That’s fine. It doesn’t make you a bad person. It just means you’re not a Warriors fan. Editor’s note: For the record, despite being born and raised in Oakland, I am — and will always be — a Lakers fan. — Thadeus Greenson

Fear and Self-loathing in Humboldt Now, at the risk of totally alienating myself from the ranks of Humboldt County sports enthusiasts, I’ll get one last thing off my chest: Fuck the Giants. As a lifelong Oakland Athletics fan,

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

I can say that the Giant adoration up here has always confused me. After all, if Humboldt County were a baseball team, it would certainly be the A’s — a scrappy squad from a blue collar city that just can’t seem to have nice things — not the team with the $180 million payroll, sleek uniform colors and a new stadium full of hipsters. And maybe that’s just it. There’s an undercurrent of self-loathing here in Humboldt, where we often seem convinced we can’t have nice things and trip all over each other bickering about it. The thing is, Humboldt, we can have nice things. We just need to look in the mirror and love what we see looking back. It’s OK that, collectively, we may never be as well groomed or high salaried as we’d like. And it’s OK to admit we may never get the sparkling infrastructure we surely deserve. But we’re going to keep scrapping and there’s a lot to love about that. — Thadeus Greenson

‘From Here’ Doesn’t Make You Better I am a fourth-generation local on both my mom and dad’s sides of the family. My family name is on stones in pioneer cemeteries in rural corners of our county. I love my family but I’m not convinced of the practical value of being “from around here,” other than I can spell place names correctly and have a shirttail cousin in every town. Some of the people contributing the most to our community have a Humboldt tenure younger than my sourdough starter. Our fetish for “localdom” is weird. But maybe that’s me exercising my privilege, like a fish breathing through gills with no concept of water. The only other place I’ve lived long-term, San Francisco, was full of transplants and immigrants. I never got frozen out for pronouncing “Duboce” incorrectly. (FYI: I have always called it “the 101” and it’s not a big deal.) I can never fully understand what it means to be shut down for not being “from around here.” Being a medium-sized fish in a small, warm, familiar pond chock-full of cousins can be stifling sometimes, but it’s ultimately a comfortable place for me. So let’s get uncomfortable: I am the descendent of an invasive species. I inherited my privilege of place due to the systemic murder, rape and enslavement of the Wiyot, the Yurok, the Hupa, the Wailaki, the Karuk, the Lassik, the Nongatl, the Sinkyone and the Mattole. I’m going to be honest with you and say I don’t totally know what to do with that inheritance. It’s not something I can cover in 200 words, or maybe even 200 pages. I am terrified


Let it burn. Photo by Rich Paselk of doing it wrong, this apology. But I am more terrified of not doing it at all. I cannot forfeit being “from around here.” Invasive species or no, this little pond is my home. I love my name and the people who gave it to me. What I can do, until I am given better direction, is insist that being “from around here” should be less important than what you do once you get here. If you have an old name, a grand name, then use your life to make it stand for something you can be proud of. Maybe if we all cherished our legacy as much as we do our history, we could sprout some legs and move forward. — Linda Stansberry

Kill Bill Never have I been warned by so many people to drop a subject. Don’t do it. People will hate you. Are you out of your mind? Here come the torches and pitchforks. It’s been nice working with you. But

it’s time for the cramped Sequoia Park Zoo to get rid of Bill the Chimp’s memorial exhibit. (Quickly looks over shoulder.) Of course people are attached. I know about his tragic backstory — stolen from the wild, performing in a British circus where he picked up boxing skills and a smoking habit before local school children raised money to buy him — and that he performed for the queen and once hung out with Jane Goodall. And sure, when he finally passed at the age of 61, he was like a loveable drunk uncle about whom everybody has a story. People actually smile recalling the time he lobbed his feces at them. A co-worker told me, not without fondness, “I think he masturbated in front of my mother once.” Keep the statue somewhere, if you must, as a memorial both to Bill and the archaic conditions modern zookeepers have abandoned. In fact, the zoo’s master Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

21


Home & Garden

On the Cover Continued from previous page

plan over the next several years includes nixing the space and expanding to include large predator exhibits. It’s time, Humboldt. Say your goodbyes and let him go. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Facebookers Weigh In: “Prayer flags = red flags” — Kirsten Tamara PeachyKeen “Drum circles are even worse than playing a stereo in public spaces. I have yet to hear a drum circle with good rhythm, and I’ve stumbled across many in Humboldt. No one wants to hear that, take it home!” — Norton McGregory

all the services they need than to stand by and watch them destroy themselves.” — Steven Bridenbaugh “Taxis that do not provide accommodations for users of wheelchairs should not be allowed to operate!” — Charles Bean “Eureka is spending too much money moving homeless people around instead of designating a place where they can legally live.” — Janelle Egger “You don’t have to eat organic to be healthy.” — Austin Allison

“GMOs are a benign, beneficial technology that helps improve nutrition, lower food cost and reduce the environmental impact of farming.” — Kevin Hoover

“Vaccines save lives.”

“I support a tourist rail that would also serve as light rail public transit since both colleges are near a rail line and almost all our large communities are connected by the rail corridor. … I do not support turning our bay into another shipping port.” — Bill Pavloff

“There are no more hippies in the North Coast.” — William Busuttil

“Ten hours a month of compulsory civic service (along with greatly expanding what civic service means) for all Americans would do wonders for community building, solving social problems and create alternatives to ‘call the police’ when dealing with the needs of people.” — Stephen Seer Snively

“Tomo’s is just OK.”

“Whole Foods and/or Trader Joe’s would be good fits for Humboldt County.” — Christine Winters Johnson “It would be feasible and vastly less expensive to give the homeless and the addicts

Email us Here:

— Julia Green “Flouride aren’t makin me dumb” — Julia Green

“The Bayshore Mall is the best thing in Humboldt.” — Danny McClure — Nick Painter “Cash is so Humboldt!” — Helen McKenna Ridley “Unions exist so whiney losers can keep a job.” — Nicki El-Aguas “Can’t speak up. I must live here.” — Joe Ashenbrucker ●

press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: music@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: classified@northcoastjournal.com

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com


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24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

In Defense of MSG By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

T

hey’re not like salt crystals, exactly. They’re longer, like white bugle beads from a glamorous 1920s dress. In a pile, they sparkle like dreamy snow in a stop-motion Christmas movie. And when judiciously added to food, they’re goddamn magic. Monosodium glutamate, or MSG, is much maligned, right up there with high fructose corn syrup and trans fats as an evil, unhealthy additive that makes us sick. But MSG is a naturally occurring compound found, for example, in tomatoes and some cheeses. More than 100 years ago, Japanese chemist Kikunae Ikeda figured out how to draw the rich, satisfying umami flavor of glutamic acid, a common amino acid, from kombu seaweed and bond it to salt. And so monosodium glutamate in a bottle was born. Pour out some instant ramen broth for the man. Umami, that buzz word on every chef’s tongue, describes the rounded, satisfying flavor in foods, the depth that, say, anchovies and Parmesan give Caesar salad, the earthy richness of mushrooms, meat’s, well, meatiness (think unsalted stock). It’s a recognized basic flavor, too, right along with sweet, salty, bitter and sour. But since MSG powder is an artificially produced shortcut — a sprinkle replacing those hours of stock boiling time — with a scientific name, many believe it’s unhealthy and/or semi-poisonous. (Shhh, MSG. Don’t listen to them, baby.) This despite the fact that, according to the Food and Drug

Administration, “MSG is produced by the fermentation of starch, sugar beets, sugar cane or molasses. This fermentation process is similar to that used to make yogurt, vinegar and wine.” Used in reasonable amounts as a seasoning, it’s fine. Despite anecdotal reports of MSG’s side effects — a combination of sluggishness, headaches, numbness and palpitations that used to be called “Chinese Restaurant Syndrome” (not cool, man) — research has shown little hard evidence. In a study published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology, double-blind tests showed the same rate of symptoms with MSG and a placebo. An FDA study found that some people experienced symptoms after consuming 3 grams or more with water, an amount it deemed “unlikely.” (The agency also ditched the pejorative name for the symptoms.) In fact, the FDA website states most MSG-spiked meals hover around .5 grams, so that headache you got might be from drinking too much Tsing Tao or all the sugar in your sweet and sour, even if you are one of those sensitive types. As for the Chinese restaurants people regard with such suspicion, they’re not the only places you’ll find human-made MSG. That psychedelic orange dust on your Doritos is full of it. Maybe you’re not your best after plowing through a bag but is anybody complaining about Extreme Nacho Syndrome? MSG shows up in ranch dressing, fast food fried chicken (that’s


right, the least Chinese man to ever front a restaurant, the Colonel, is pouring the finger-lickin’ stuff on) and plenty of other foods. And if you’ve ever made a recipe that calls for a pinch of Aji-no-moto, well, that’s MSG in that little red and white bottle. No shame. My family sprinkled it in scrambled eggs. Mind you, some cooks use it as a kind of duct tape (the Colonel could ease up, truthfully), the quick and dirty solution to a flavorless dish, much like throwing hot sauce or salt at a problem. But MSG’s flavor pumping effect is something that many of us have come to expect, like HDTV, even when the sharpness gets creepy. The last time I was in San Francisco Airport, friends I was visiting asked me to pick up an order of beef chow fun with no MSG from their favorite takeout stand. They’d gotten it there before, no problem, they said. But when I placed my order, the woman behind the counter frowned like an auntie tasked with delivering bad news and said no. She waved me over to the side and glanced back at the kitchen. “Everybody has it,” she whispered, explaining that while the chef doesn’t sprinkle the stuff on, plenty of Asian kitchen staples, like oyster sauce and bouillon, come standard with MSG. “If somebody tells you there’s no MSG, they lie. Or they don’t know.” It was a hard truth and I was both grateful and disoriented by the sudden intimacy of a shared secret. Surely there are exceptions. But the labor it would take to make those staple ingredients from scratch isn’t something most people are willing to pay (or wait) for, at least not at notoriously underpriced Asian restaurants. And let’s not forget that naturally occurring MSG — do you even want to go to an Italian place without tomatoes and Parmesan cheese? I thanked my new airport restaurant confidant and got the fried noodles to go anyway, along with a couple of dumplings that I ate by my gate. By the time I popped open the takeout container they were a slightly droopy from too much time wheeling my baggage through the terminal. Even so, the minced shrimp filling was tender and rich with that comforting umami flavor — slightly artificial but totally honest. l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the arts and features editor at the North Coast Journal. Reach her at 442-1400 extension 320 or Jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

29


Setlist

The Kids are All Right By Andy Powell

thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

A

s I wrote this column on Sunday evening in my “office” (a shed in our backyard) a serendipitous moment occurred. Over the occasional sounds of our dogs barking at absolutely nothing, I heard our son and daughter listening to Van Morrison’s “Brown Eyed Girl” while lying in the hammock and grass (respectively). Perhaps as Father’s Day is right around the corner, this moment had me thinking about our kids listening to “our” music and how I used to do the same thing when I was their age. I specifically remember hearing “Brown Eyed Girl” on the front porch of our childhood home in Southern California when I was just a bit younger than our son is now. I don’t recall if this was the first time I had heard the song, but it was the first time it really slid its way into my memory. I recall the infectious groove and the heavenly perplexing “sha la la las” and “la dee dahs” that peppered the song. I also remember my Aunt’s friend Don on the porch singing along with his young daughter while I just stood motionless, letting the sound swirl around me and take me somewhere. The music took a hold of me, and would never let me go. This wasn’t “my” music in the sense of it being created by someone in my generation, it was from my parent’s generation, but it became mine, and it’s now becoming my kids’. Next up, I heard my kids listening to The Beatles’ “Here Comes the Sun,” another one that will always be a part of me. Our son in particular has not only been a fan of The Beatles now for a bit, but has been asking me for Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Pink Floyd, and Led Zeppelin recommendations. Outside of my obvious pride in his “correct” taste in music, I began to wonder what it was that makes us want our children to like “our” music. Is it a sense of connecting our kiddos to what we define as meaningful art? Is it just a way of getting validation that we’re still just as hip as we think we are? Or does it have simply to do with nostalgia? I’m still not sure but I love seeing our son begin the same musical journey that I did at his age. I wouldn’t want his path to lead him along the exact route it took me but I can’t help but feel excited it’s beginning along the same direction. I hope he’ll be

more in tune with music that is being created and released as he grows up than I was, to have some sort of musical touchstone with his peers, but if he’s already settling in with authentic, creative, curious, reflective and truthful music at his age, then I feel I have little to worry about. Perhaps there’s no better gift to receive on Father’s Day than a request for Dark Side of the Moon, Physical Graffiti, Astral Weeks, Abbey Road, Beggar’s Banquet or Who’s Next. Maybe the kids are all right after all.

Thursday Longtime and local bluegrass band the Compost Mountain Boys return to their gig at the Mad River Brewery and Tap Room up in oft-sunny Blue Lake. They’ll start playing at around 6 p.m. and will probably keep picking away for about two and a half hours. It’s a free show — as MRB does — but don’t be afraid to the tip the band.

Friday Sticking with Mad River Brewery here for a minute, local country lovers Cadillac Ranch are making the blocks-long trip to the Tap Room to get you up and swaying the night away. As you guessed, it’s a free show starting around 6 p.m. Kids are welcome and so are dogs as long they’re on leash, but feel free to leave both at home if possible. The Westhaven Center for the Arts is hosting an Open Blues Jam with Seabury Gould & Friends at 7 p.m. tonight. Players of acoustic or electric blues are asked to bring their instrument along to participate in the community jam. Should that be your jam, you’ll be able to get in for free. If you’d rather be a spectator — nothing wrong with that — you’ll be asked for a $5-10 cover charge to get in. Up from the lovely armpit of California, Fresno’s roots-rock duo Cloudship is stopping by Six Rivers Brewery at 9 p.m. for a free show influenced by alternative rock, grunge rock and progressive rock. Welcome the band to our strange land with trees and water.

Saturday It’s Oyster Fest today, so come up with a game plan in your head before getting silly day-drunk and making a total ass of yourself. If you want to frontload it pretty

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

hard while the sun’s out, who am I to judge? Just have a plan to get home safely and try not to be that person keeping the party/drinking going when the non-daylight shows kick off. Belligerent drunks with sunburns and bellies full of raw oysters at 6 p.m. isn’t most bands’ target audience. Let’s be fair and just pick two out of the three. With those warnings issued, there’s nothing like bagpipe music to Seabury Gould & Friends play the Open Blues Jam at Westhaven make you think Center for the Arts on Friday, June 16 at 7 p.m. you can throw a Photo courtesy of the artist few more down the hatch. The Humboldt Highlanders make a rare appearance at the Mad River Brewery at 6 p.m. and New York Jazz is on tap tonight at the for free. If a piper goes down, it’s probably Palm Lounge in the Eureka Inn starting at 7 due to dehydration. Buy a John Barleycorn p.m. and for free. I’m told that Brian Post to help him or her back up on their feet. & Friends are playing standards and “Blue I’m surprised more of these shows haven’t Note” which I’m assuming has something been billed “Oyster Fest After-party,” and to do with Blue Note records. This talentas we know, every void needs to be filled. ed quartet is made up of HSU professor So with that, let’s call this the official unofBrian Post on the piano, Val Leone on ficial Oyster Fest After-party (as there is no guitar, Tom Lopes on bass and Don Baraka elevation change from the Plaza): Diggin’ on woodwind instruments. Dirt and fellow locals Object Heavy are l throwing the grooves down at Humboldt Full show listings in the Journal’s Music Brews tonight at 9 p.m. and for only $10. A and More grid, the Calendar and online. little out of walking distance from the fest, Bands and promoters, send your gig info, local rockers the Sleepwalkerz are having preferably with a high-res photo or two, a CD release show at Six Rivers Brewery to music@northcoastjournal.com. at the top of the hill in McKinleyville at 9 p.m. It’s a free show, but grab a copy of Andy Powell is a congenital music lover their new album if you like their tunes. and hosts The Album of the Week Show on KWPT 100.3 FM Tuesdays at 6 p.m. He Happy Father’s Day. Sober up. wonders if he’s all right.

Monday

Sunday


Calendar June 15 - June 22, 2017

15 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music on Eureka’s waterfront. Featuring music by the Johnny Young Band (rockabilly). Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org. Singles

Submitted

This Friday, remember what it was like to be young, single and looking for love — and the grungy soundtrack that accompanied all of that — at the “tribute for Seattle musician Chris Cornell” screening of Singles (1992) — a film in which Cornell and Soundgarden were featured prominently — on June 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Eureka Theater ($5).

The Humboldt Junkies Vintage Market & Trailer Rally is back at Rohner Park this Friday and Saturday, June 16-17. Find treasure at the Friday night Junk Jubilee from 4-9 p.m., and come back Saturday for the Market & Trailer Rally from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to dream about your next vacation. There, you’ll find vintage glampers, trailers, live music, food vendors and more. $8 both days, $3 Saturday only, 12 and under free.

Submitted

Take a strip through time with Va Va Voom Burlesque’s Dancin’ thru the Decades! On Saturday, June 17 at 8 p.m. at the Eureka Theater ($20 premier, $15 premier advance, $15 general, $12 general advance). Meet the newest members and participate in games and a 50/50 raffle. Doors at 7 p.m., 21 and up.

THEATER HMS Pinafore. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Gilbert and Sullivan’s beloved musical classic about a Victorian woman who falls in love with a sailor. $18-$20. The State of Jefferson Picnic: This Land Is Your Land, But Mostly My Land. 8-10 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. A political farce with music and song and laughs. $18, $15 student/senior, $10 age 12 and under. roman@dellarte.com. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, exit 5. Dell’Arte’s annual summer festival features a family big-top series, an experimental theatrical laboratory, a saucy late-night cabaret, a week of local music with the Humboldt Folklife Festival and more. Through July 15. Prices vary. www.dellarte.com.

FOR KIDS Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Photo by Mark McKenna

Photo by Terrence McNally

Sea You There!

The International Stage

Humboldt’s bounty of seafood gets its day in the sun times two this weekend. We love our oysters (and so does the rest of the state — oysters from Humboldt Bay make up about 70 percent of those eaten). We grill ’em, shoot ’em raw, spice ’em up and eat ’em pretty much any way we can. And we can’t get enough, judging by the throngs that turn out each year for the Arcata Bay Oyster Festival, happening this Saturday, June 17 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the Arcata Plaza (free admission). It’s one of Humboldt’s biggest parties, drawing thousands who are happy as clams to sample Pacific and Kumamoto delicacies and other food options, plus beer, wine and cider, and live music by Diggin’ Dirt, the Bayou Swamis, Timbata, Motherlode, Ghost Train, Dynasty One, Anna Hamilton, the A.T.F. Trio, and the Lost Coasters Hawaiian Island Band. Save room for more, though. The Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce hosts the 60th annual Trinidad Fish Festival Sunday, June 18 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Trinity Street, where you can enjoy hearty plates of traditional fish and chips or grilled salmon, and party all day with music from Doug Fir & the 2x4s, Lizzy and the Moonbeams, Blue Rhythm Revue and Rosewater: A Tribute to the Grateful Dead. There’s also a street fair with arts and crafts vendors, community organizations, a cake sale, food vendors and beverages, and an “ultimate Kid Zone” at Town Hall featuring characters Peg + Cat. Bonus: HSU’s Marine Lab and the working lighthouse will be open for tours. It’s a sweet, sweet life living by the salty sea. — Kali Cozyris

Each summer, Dell’Arte International sets the stage(s) for five weeks of performances known collectively as the Mad River Festival. The school’s annual showcase of original plays, comedy, street theater, live music and family fun is back for its 27th year June 15 through July 15 and, as always, has something for everyone. If you haven’t been, make this your year. It’s world-class theater, music, comedy and larger-than-life theatrical thrills right here in sunny Blue Lake. Starting things off is the festival’s main stage show and Dell’Arte world premiere, The State of Jefferson Picnic: This land is your land, but mostly my land, a new political farce with music, song and laughs playing Thursdays through Sundays, June 15 - July 2 at 8 p.m. at the Rooney Amphitheatre ($10-$18). Other festival highlights include the Big Top Family Series: Cowgirl Tricks featuring “America’s Funniest Cowgirl” Karen Quest, returning for her second year whip-cracking her way in the Pierson Pierson Big Hammer Tent, June 18 at 2 p.m. ($10, $5 12 and under). The festival’s Mad Lab 1 and Mad Lab 2 performances offer a glimpse of the “work-in-progress” of experimental theater created by Dell’Arte faculty and alumni on June 21 (Mad Lab 1) and June 28 (Mad Lab 2) in the Carlo Theatre at 8 p.m. (pay-what-you-can), followed by more original plays by international Dell’Arte MFA graduates (see www.dellarte. com for full festival schedule), and ending with the rousing, foot stomping Humboldt Folklife Festival, July 8-15, a week of folk music events culminating in a free all-day festival at the Rooney Amphitheatre on July 15. — Kali Cozyris

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Local, GMO-free produce. Live music. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community Commons, state routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. The freshest Humboldt-County-Grown and GMO-free produce along with plants, meats and other wonderful products.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. The oldest continuously operated summer collegiate baseball program takes the plate. Games through Aug. 6. The Crabs vs. the California Expos June 9-11, and the San Luis Obispo Blues June 13-15 $9, $6 students and seniors, $4 kids 12 and under.

ETC 119th Basic Law Enforcement Academy Graduation. 1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Theatre, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. 31 cadets will participate in this class ceremony. Free. Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Continued on page 34 »

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

31


NEW MEMORIES AWAIT

d o A o c w re s’ d e R mb

u H f o t s e B

old t Fair

California Carnival

Tim Hurley Truck Pulls

Come Experience the Redwoods Redwood Acres Fairgrounds 3750 Harris Street, Eureka • 707-445-3037

32  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com


Come Join Us! June 22nd-25th

Jr Livestock Shows

Haai Shark Encounter

Steve, the Pretty Good Magician

Walk on the Wildside

Brad Wilson Blues Band

Nature Joe

Kidz Science Safari

Carnival, Youth Performers, Food Vendors, Livestock, Quilts, Floral Shows, Shark Encounters, Cowgirl Tricks, and Much More!! ADMISSION

$12 - Adults $5 - Seniors & Kids (6-12)

THURSDAY FREE! Thanks to Blue Lake Casino

Pre-Sale Wristbands $25 *Active Military & Kids Under 6 Free*

SATURDAY

Sponsored by Harper Ford

SUNDAY

Sponsored by Pierson’s Lumber

For a complete schedule of events visit WWW.REDWOODACRES.COM or find us on Facebook northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 

33


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Calendar Continued from page 31

Centerville Road, Ferndale. Take a historic house tour of Fern Cottage, the 150-year-old, historic 32-room estate of Joseph and Zipporah Russ. Hourly guided and self-guided tours from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. $10, $8 seniors, children under 18 free. info@ferncottage.org. www. ferncottage.org. 786-4835. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. Includes a booster for participating and the winner of each four-person pod also wins a booster. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com/events-2/. 826-1228. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Come create with your community. Enjoy an evening of knitting, crocheting or whatever fiber craft you love. Food and drink available and bring something to share. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www. northcoastknittery.com. 442-9276. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

16 Friday BOOKS

Daniel Duncan. 6-7 p.m. Booklegger, 402 Second St., Eureka. The author reads from and signs copies of his book Jim’s New York Novel. Free. Gabrielle Bell. 7-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. The author reads from and signs her graphic memoir, Everything is Flammable. Free. info@northtownbooks.com.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Paso a Paso hosts dance therapy. Free. www. ervmgc.com. 725-3300. World Dance. 7:30 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor teaching and easy dances, 7:30; request dancing, 8:309:30 p.m. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. www.stalbansarcata.org. 839-3665.

LECTURE Sea Level Rise. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 South G St. Human-caused climate change has put us in the midst of a “slow-motion flood.” Learn how sea level works, why it matters, how it has changed in the past, what is vulnerable, what we may expect in the coming decades and what can be done about it. Free.

MOVIES The Matrix (1999). 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A massive artificial intelligence system has tapped into people’s minds and created the illusion of a real world. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com. Singles (1992). 7:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Twenty-somethings in Seattle in the 1990s look for love while navigating their jobs and social scene. A tribute screening for Seattle musician Chris Cornell (1964-2017). $5. www. theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC Third Friday Blues. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Open blues jam with Seabury Gould. Listen or play. Players of acoustic or electric blues are encouraged to bring instruments. A celebration of uplifting, fun and humorous blues. $5-$10 sliding, free for performing musicians. 845-8167.

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

THEATER HMS Pinafore. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 15 listing. The State of Jefferson Picnic: This Land Is Your Land, But Mostly My Land. 8-10 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 15 listing.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, exit 5. See June 15 listing. Humboldt Junkies Vintage Market & Trailer Rally. 4-9 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. Friday night Junk Jubilee. Saturday market & trailer rally. Featuring live music and food vendors. $8 both days, $3 Saturday only, 12 and under free. www.friendlyfortuna.com. Rodeo in the Redwoods. 7 p.m. Greycliff Rodeo Grounds, Greycliff, Benbow. Barrel racing, Bull-O-Rama, junior rodeo, parade, greased pigs, animal scramble and crowning the king and queen are all part of this fun weekend. www.garbervillerodeo.org.

FOR KIDS Baby Read and Grow. Third Friday of every month, 1111:45 a.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. Share songs, fingerplays and short stories followed by play with developmentally appropriate toys and socializing for parents and children. Sponsored by First 5 Humboldt. Free. 269-1910. Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertains children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460.

FOOD Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, meats, baked goods and more, plus live music and family activities. Free.

SPORTS BMX Friday. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for practice and racing. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222. Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. The semi-professional, wood bat summer ball team swings away. Season is June through August. Humboldt B-52s vs. the Mendocino Dirtbags June 16-18, and the Humboldt Eagles June 21 $5, $3 kids under 10, free for kids under 4. www.humboldtb52sbaseball.com. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See June 15 listing. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

ETC Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See June 15 listing. Lunch Out Loud. 12-1:30 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Make calls to elected officials on current issues of concern. All information provided, just bring your charged cell phone and brown bag lunch or snacks to share. Hosted by North Coast People’s Alliance, with calling sheets provided by Elizabeth Conner. Free. hello@ northcoastpeoplesalliance.org. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org. 599-2951. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.NorthCoastPeoplesAlliance.org.


17 Saturday DANCE

Va Va Voom Burlesque Presents: Dancin’ thru the Decades!. 8 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Contests, games, 50/50 raffle and special guests. 21 and up. Doors at 7 p.m. $20 premier, $15 premier advance, $15 general, $12 general advance. www.theeurekatheater.org.

MOVIES The Condors’s Shadow. 3 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Yurok Tribe wildlife biologist Ken Burton will discuss the challenge and adventure of recovering an endangered species. $5-$20 sliding.

MUSIC Deobrat Mishra Indian Sitar. 8-10 p.m. Community Yoga Center, 890 G St., Arcata. The celebrated sitarist will be accompanied by his nephew, Prashant Mishra, on the Tablas. Proceeds benefit two non-profits, DAYA Foundation and Benares Academy of Indian Classical Music. $28, $23 advance. innerfreedomyoga@gmail.com. 616-1457.

THEATER

FOR KIDS Young Inventors’ Club. Third Saturday of every month, 10:30 a.m.-noon Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Hands-on science program with one or more activities planned each month. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-musuem.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Breakfast and Flea Market. Third Saturday of every month, 8:30 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Enjoy pancakes, eggs and browsing knick knacks. Flea market ends at 3 p.m. $5, $3 for kids. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange. org. 840-0100. Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association Farmers’ Market features fresh fruits and vegetables, humanely raised meats and eggs, goat cheese, honey, nursery starts for the garden, native and ornamental plants, flowers, fiber, prepared food, live music and more. Free. www. humfarm.org.

MEETINGS

HMS Pinafore. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 15 listing. The State of Jefferson Picnic: This Land Is Your Land, But Mostly My Land. 8-10 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 15 listing.

Photoshop User Group. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. Prosperity Center, 520 E St., Eureka. Adobe Photoshop or LightRoom beginners and power users gather to swap ideas and techniques. Informal lunch usually follows. Free. wrishel@gmail.com. www.eurekaphotoshop.com/. (510) 410-3310.

EVENTS

OUTDOORS

Adoption Event and Bake Sale. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Animal Rescue Team, 531 Summer St., Eureka. 13 adult cats available and several kittens fixed just in time for Father’s Day. Adult cats $100, Kittens $135 (All spayed/ neutered, FVRCP vaccinated, dewormed, flea treated and test negative for FIV and FeLV.) All proceeds benefit H.A.R.T. animals. Arcata Bay Oyster Festival. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Live music all day, shucking contests, kids activities and a bevy of local chefs selling their oyster creations and vying for the coveted Best Oyster title. Arcata Plaza Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Farmers’ Market (off the plaza), Eighth and I streets. Located in front of the Co-op for Oyster Fest. Pick up farm fresh groceries for the week, a delicious snack for Oyster Fest, or plant starts to fill your garden. Free. info@humfarm. org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 15 listing. Humboldt Junkies Vintage Market & Trailer Rally. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. See June 16 listing. PFLAG Pride Picnic. 1-4 p.m. Carson Park, H and Buhne streets, Eureka. Free. Rodeo in the Redwoods. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Greycliff Rodeo Grounds, Greycliff, Benbow. See June 16 listing. Spring Queen Fling Bingo. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Be you drag queen, Rutabaga Queen or fashion queen, this bingo is for you. Hosted by the Eureka Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. Potluck, please bring a dish. $15. www.eurekasisters.org. Steam Up. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. Special activities, a logging show, running vintage equipment and train rides will be provided. Summer at the Sanctuary. 6-10 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Celebrate summer with food, beer, kombucha, live music by Midnight Band Practice and Will Layng & the Ribs, dancing in the Great Hall and more. All ages. $10-$20 sliding, free for teachers.

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 South G St. Meet trained guide Leslie Scopes Anderson for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Backpacking Seminar. 1-2:15 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Learn about equipment, layering, food packs, water purification and Leave No Trace principles. Meet other hikers who are looking for local backpacking adventures. At the HSU Recreation & Wellness Center. Free. cntract@humboldt.edu. 836-3357. Kayak Tour. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Hikshari’ Trail, Truesdale Street (west end), Eureka. Humboldt Baykeeper hosts this tour on Elk River, beginning with a short walk along the trail. Beginners welcome, 12 and older. Reservations required. Se habla español. Free. tours@humboldtbaykeeper.org. 407-6183. Orienteering Seminar. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Learn to navigate with a map and compass in the backcountry. The seminar will cover appropriate equipment, how to properly read a topographic map, identify natural terrain features, interpret the steepness of slopes how to plan a route and connect points of the same elevation. Free. cntract@humboldt.edu. 826-3357.

SPORTS

Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See June 15 listing. Magic the Gathering: Standard. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Compete for prize packs and Standard Series Booster Packs only available at participating game stores. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

18 Sunday ART

Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Trinidad. Local artisans present their arts and crafts. Enjoy live music each week and barbecue. Free.

SUBMIT your

Calendar Events

DANCE Burgundy Blues. 7-9:30 p.m. The Fuzion, 233 F St., Eureka. A blues/fusion social partner dancing group that meets every Sunday and Tuesday of the month. $8. burgundybluesdance@gmail.com. www.thefuzion.com.

MUSIC Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone Continued on next page »

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northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Father’s Day is June 18th. Call the store nearest you to order a cake for your Dad!

Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 5:30 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See June 16 listing. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. See June 16 listing.

ETC Media Center Orientation. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School, Eureka. Learn about the recording studio, field equipment, editing stations and cable TV channels available at Access Humboldt. Free. 476-1798. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

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playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic. org/Bayside. 499-8516. McKinleyville Community Choir Spring Concert. 3 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Solos, duets, ensembles and the full choir performing a capella and accompanied by keyboard, multiple percussion instruments, banjo and guitar. Refreshments served. Donations accepted. Summer Solstice Brass Music. 12-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, North Entrance, Eureka. HSU’s Ft. Humboldt Brass Band performs music from Renaissance, Baroque and Classical eras as well as 1840s-1890s brass music. The HSU Commencement Brass Choir also performs. Admission to garden: $8, $5 seniors/students/ children over 6, Free for kids under 6 and HBG members.. www.hbgf.org. Wine and Jazz at the Morris Graves. Third Sunday of every month, 3-5 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Sit back, sip and enjoy a different group each month. Featuring Acoustic Blues. $5 adults, $2 students and seniors, free HAC members and children 17 and under. janine@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts. org. 442-0278.

THEATER Big Top Family Series: Cowgirl Tricks. 2-3 p.m. Dell’Arte Big Top Tent, 131 H St., Blue Lake. “America’s Funniest Cowgirl” Karen Quest brings her trick roping, whip cracking, magic, music, audience interaction and improvisational shenanigans to the Mad River Festival. $10, $5 children. roman@dellarte.com. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663. The State of Jefferson Picnic: This Land Is Your Land, But Mostly My Land. 8-10 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 15 listing.

EVENTS Adoption Event and Bake Sale. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Animal Rescue Team, 531 Summer St., Eureka. See June 17 listing. Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, exit 5. See June 15 listing. Rodeo in the Redwoods. Greycliff Rodeo Grounds, Greycliff, Benbow. See June 17 listing. Trinidad Fish Festival. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Trinity Street. Fish and chips or grilled salmon, food vendors, beer, live music, art fair, kids zone and more. www.trinidadcalif.com. 677-1610.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Pancake Breakfast. 8 a.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Pancake Brekafast. 7:30-11:30 a.m. Willow Creek VFW Hall, 20 Kimtu Road. Willow Creek Kiwanis Father’s Day pancake breakfast features pancakes, ham, egg, fruit, juice and coffee. All proceeds benefit the WC Kiwanis scholarship fund. $10, $5 for kids 15 and under.

OUTDOORS Canoe the Slough: Solstice Paddle. Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Join naturalists and other supporters of the Northcoast Regional Land Trust on a paddle in kayaks or canoes through Humboldt Bay, Freshwater Slough and Freshwater Farms Reserve. Call NRLT to reserve your spot at 822-2242. $45, $5 discount for members. Seabird Walk. 9-10:30 a.m. Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. After brief introduction to seabirds at the at the Trinidad Coastal Land Trust office, walk to the Memorial Lighthouse to view local seabirds through spotting scopes. After, stay and enjoy Trinidad’s annual Fish Festival which opens at 11 a.m. Free. www.trinidadcoastallandtrust.org.

SPORTS BMX Practice and Racing. 1-3 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for some fun. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $11 race. www. facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222. Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 11 a.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See June 16 listing.

ETC Geoengineering Protest March. 12-2 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Bring masks, signs and join others in this march. For more information or if you would like to speak, call Tara at 223-8803. Free. Magic the Gathering: Standard. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. Come play Standard every Sunday, compete for prize packs and Standard Series Booster Packs only available at participating game stores! $5 to play $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 826-1228. Modern Ways with Wool. 11 a.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Mattole Valley Historical Society’s annual meeting featuring tables where wool-workers will display their arts and crafts.

19 Monday DANCE

Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music. Tonight dance to Val and his Smooth Jazz Cats. $5. www. facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

MUSIC Humboldt Harmonaires Weekly Gathering. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Singing at 7 to 9:30 p.m., with snacks and coffee break at 8:20 p.m. Free. Singfourpart@ gmail.com. 445-3939.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, exit 5. See June 15 listing.

FOOD One-Log Farmers Market. 1-5:30 p.m. One-Log House, 705 U.S. Highway 101, Garberville. On the lawn. 672-5224.

MEETINGS Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

36  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

20 Tuesday MUSIC

Ukulele Play and Sing Group. Third Tuesday of every month, 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All skill levels. Other instruments on approval. $2. veganlady21@yahoo.com.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 15 listing.

FOR KIDS Arcata Family Resource Center Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon. Arcata Elementary School, 2400 Baldwin St. Playgroup for children 0-5 and their parents and caregivers. 826-1002. Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See June 18 listing.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. WIC and Cal Fresh accepted with $10 bonus match when using EBT card. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Pick up produce, baked goods, plant starts and more right across from the Miranda Gardens Resort. Free. www.mirandagardens. com/specials.htm. Old Town Eureka Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. North Coast Growers’ Association farmers markets are GMO-free and all agricultural products are grown or raised within Humboldt County. Live music every week. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Machi Road. Fresh fruits, vegetables, ornamental trees and plants, plant starts, all with an ocean view. Free. 986-7229.

COMEDY Savage Henry Comedy Night. 9 p.m. The Jam, 915 H St., Arcata.Local and out of town comedians bring the ha-has. $5. 822-4766.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games range from $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw St., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Humboldt Walk to End Alzheimer’s® Team Registration Event. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Elk’s Lodge, 445 Herrick Ave., Eureka. Register your team, share fundraising and team recruitment ideas with other team captains, enjoy food and beverages and pick up your 2017 Team Captain Kit. Please RSVP by e-mailing: humboldtcountywalk@alz.org or by calling 296-9060. Lunch with Laura. 12-2 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Bring your favorite fiber craft project (or come find a new one) and a snack or sack lunch. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www.northcoastknittery.

com. 442-9276. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. $5 gets you a booster for participating and the winner of each 4-person pod also wins a booster. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com/events-2/. 497-6358. Think Like a Marketer Class. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Community Credit Union of Southern Humboldt, 757 Redwood Drive, Garberville. Learn what a marketing plan is, how to identify a target market, competitive analysis, features and benefits analysis, collateral marketing materials and excellent market research resources. dtoste@ northcoastsbdc.org. www.northcoastsbdc.org/events/ think-marketer-garberville. 445-9720.

21 Wednesday MOVIES

Sci Fi Night ft. Escape from New York (1981). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. In this grim science fiction film, the island of New York City has been transformed into a gigantic prison state. When Air Force One crashes on the island, mercenary Snake Plissken is sent to rescue the President from the island’s ruling felons — or die trying. Free w/min $5 food/bev purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

THEATER Mad Lab Night 1. 8-9 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. A glimpse of the work-in-progress of experimental theatre, created by Dell’Arte faculty and alumni. Pay What You Can. roman@dellarte.com. www. dellarte.com. 668-5663.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, exit 5. See June 15 listing.

FOR KIDS Family Cowgirl Tricks. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Cowgirl Karen Quest rides into Fortuna Library to teach all kids some fun ropin’ and ridin’ tricks. Get prepared for the rodeo in July! Free. 725-3460. Storytime. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free. Summer Reading by Design. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. Enjoy stories with friends, and then design a book, make jewelry, build forts and bridges, design a board game and make a cardboard robot. Free. 269-1910.

MEETINGS Citizen’s Law Enforcement Liaison Committee. Third Wednesday of every month, 4 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Learn more about the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office and ask questions. Free. Dow’s Prairie Grange. Third Wednesday of every month, 6 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Get involved in your community Grange. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

OUTDOORS All About Sailing - On Land. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. This two-hour onland session focuses on the anatomy of boats, navigation, knots and everything else you need to know before you get your toes wet. Free. hbac@humboldt.edu. 443-4222. Native Landscaping Volunteers. Third Wednesday of every month, 5-6:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Participants learn to recognize


native and non-native plants so they can volunteer any time. Bring gardening gloves if you have them and come dressed for the weather. Free. info@friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397. Weeding Wednesday. 5-8 p.m. Humboldt Bay NWR Lanphere Dunes Unit, 6800 Lanphere Road, Arcata. Unwind after work while meeting new people and learning about native plants by doing light weeding and landscaping around the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center. Latecomers welcome, drop-in when you can. Tools, gloves and training provided. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. www.fws. gov/refuge/humboldt_bay. 444-1397.

SPORTS Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See June 16 listing.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. www.nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Trivia Night. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Six rounds, five questions, various categories. Witty team names are rewarded. Fun for friends, family, dates, aliens, dinosaurs. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

22 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See June 15 listing.

THEATER The State of Jefferson Picnic: This Land Is Your Land, But Mostly My Land. 8-10 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 15 listing.

EVENTS Best of Humboldt Fair. 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Local arts, crafts, food and more at an old-fashioned fair. www.redwoodacres. com. 445-3037. Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, exit 5. See June 15 listing.

FOR KIDS Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See June 15 listing.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See June 15 listing. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See June 15 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 5-8 p.m. Community Commons, state routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. See June 15 listing.

ETC Fern Cottage Tours. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See June 15 listing. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See June 15 listing. Magic the Gathering: Commander. 6-8 p.m. NuGames Arcata, 1075 K St. See June 15 listing. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

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Filmland

Calendar Continued from previous page

Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See June 15 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See June 15 listing.

Heads Up … The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is asking for your donations of newer, good quality books for their annual 4th of July Book Sale. Paperbacks preferred, no textbooks. The sale benefits the Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship. Call 822-5711 to arrange for a donation. The Board of Directors for Redwood Coast Regional Center is seeking interested persons to fill board vacancies in Humboldt, Mendocino and Lake counties. Currently, there are six vacancies available for appointment. Application deadline is July 7, 2017. Call 445-0893, ext. 317, for an application or more information. The Blue Lake Chamber of Commerce has $45 vendor booths at this year’s Annie and Mary Day celebration on Sunday, July 9. Deadline for booth applications is July 3. Go to www.sunnybluelake.com or call 668-5567. Arcata School District seeks new board members. Letters of interest are being accepted immediately, with applicant interviews scheduled for the upcoming June board meeting. Include applicant contact information, a statement of interest and a summary of qualifications. Submit to the district office by mail (1435 Buttermilk Lane, Arcata CA 95521), email (jdaparma@arcatasd.org) or fax (822-6589). Call 822-0351 with any questions. Any Arcata citizen or anyone who lives or works within the Arcata Planning area is invited to apply to serve on the Arcata Planning Commission. The seven-member commission has final decision making authority for most planning and physical development permits in the Arcata area. Applications accepted until 5 p.m. on Friday, July 7, and are available on the city’s website as well as the City Manager’s Office. Arcata Fire District is seeking a community minded individual interested in participating in local government to serve on an elected five-person board of directors. Visit www.arcatafire.org to download an application. For more information, call 825-2000. Interested in volunteering for EPIC? Contact Briana Villalobos, briana@wildcalifornia.org or call 822-7711 to be added to the volunteer list. Headwaters Fund mini-grants available for projects to promote local economic development. For more information call 476-4809 or visit www.humboldtgov. org/2193/Mini-Grants. The Morris Graves Museum of Art seeks volunteer greeters for Friday and Saturday afternoons, noon-2:30 p.m. and 2:30-5 p.m. Contact: Janine Murphy, Museum Programs Manager: janine@humboldtarts.org or 4420278 ext 202. The McKinleyville Community Services District announces two regular voting member vacancies and one alternate member vacancy on the Recreation Advisory Committee. Mail letters of application to the MCSD, Attn: Lesley Frisbee, P.O. Box 2037, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Contact the Parks and Recreation Office at 839-9003. North Coast Community Garden Collaborative seeks donated garden supplies, monetary donations and/or volunteers. For more information, contact 269-2071 or debbiep@nrsrcaa.org. Volunteers needed for the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Call 826-2359 or email amic@cityofarcata.org. Volunteers wanted for Eureka VA clinic. Call 269-7502. l

House of Horrors

A dark horse and a classic blunder By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com When my song comes on. The Mummy

Reviews

IT COMES AT NIGHT. As the recent tidal wave of smaller, independent horror movies seems to have receded a bit, we have the opportunity to consider their merits and shortcomings. As I’ve remarked (probably too many times) before, there were within that group a few very pleasant surprises. As with anything of value, though, there were dramatically outnumbered by cheap slasher pics and exploitative pseudo-shockers. Whether or not our greater cultural taste as improved and whether the “market” has (or will) self-adjust remains to be seen. But we find ourselves now in a period of relative calm and it feels like an entirely appropriate moment for a movie like It Comes At Night. If pressed, I suppose one would have to call it “horror” but even if it hits some of the marks — with great precision — it seems unfair to so limit it. Maybe because it calls back to some of the slower, headier forbearers of the genre more than the graphic, pandering recent school, it feels like more than just a horror movie. It deals in horrific things, to be sure, but in a more measured, contemplative, artful way. As an indeterminate plague sweeps the cities (of the country? the world?), one family subsists in a crazy, rambling old house on a remote, densely forested property. As the movie opens, we observe grandfather Bud (David Pendleton) succumbing to the mystery illness. His daughter Sarah (Carmen Ejogo) watches, bereft, gloved and gas-masked, until her husband, Paul (Joel Edgerton), and their son Travis (Kelvin Harrison Jr.) expedite the end of life and dispose of the body. Such is the new normal. Life goes on in a numbed, precarious way. Travis alternates between insomnia

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

and cataclysmic nightmares, finding some solace in the companionship of his grandfather’s dog Stanley. Paul busies himself with the routine of survival. Sarah inures herself to the constant shocks and pain of their new lifestyle. One night, the family awakens to the noise of an intruder. After subduing him, Paul ties the man, Will (Christopher Abbott), to a tree, waiting to see if he will manifest symptoms of the dreaded disease. When he does not, Paul interrogates him and, satisfied by his answers, aids Will in bringing his wife Kim (Riley Keough) and young son Andrew (Griffin Robert Faulkner) to live with his family. After an early easy period, Paul’s vigilance/paranoia permeates the situation, which proves to be ultimately untenable. Had I been asked, on leaving the theater, what I thought of It Comes At Night, I likely would have responded with mild approbation; damning it with faint praise. The aesthetic is strong, the camera moves deliberate and measured, the music atmospheric but never intrusive. Days later, though, the movie has continued to grow in my mind. There are images (not terribly shocking ones) that linger in the memory, made all the more indelible by the air of dread and unknowing that so permeates them. Writer/director Trey Edward Shults (Krisha, 2015) plays it smart here, keeping his story small, focusing his energy on tone and mood, and imbuing every scene (every shot, really) with that mood. This results in a contemplative, cohesive work that defies genre even as it plays to it. To a degree this is a horror movie, sure. But it is also dystopian futurist, a wilderness family drama and a coming-of-age story. Ultimately, it is a distinct and significant work of art

— a precise, compact, well-considered story told with great restraint and style. It may not be my favorite new movie and its atmosphere of claustrophobia and distrust will likely be too off-putting for some, but it succeeds where many have failed. R. 97M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

THE MUMMY. I find myself guardedly optimistic about Universal’s self-reinvention as a monster house with its Dark Universe imprint. Even though the constant reaching back that has come to define Hollywood speaks to a lack of invention, I’m a sucker for classic monster movies. The sticking point here, of course, is that word “classic.” These are movies from 70-plus years ago and, for the most part, not exactly fresh in our minds. But the iconography, the design and the characters are very much a part of our cinematic consciousness. So by all means, Universal, bring back the classics but give us new classics to replace or stand beside them. The Mummy, for all its fun and minor stylistic successes, makes me think that is not what we are going to get. Through a series of perhaps too-convenient coincidences, opportunistic Nick Morton (Tom Cruise) and his sidekick Chris Vail (Jake Johnson) — who are apparently active-duty Army on long range recon patrol, but who have the leeway and autonomy to spend all of their time gallivanting around the Middle East, stealing antiquities — find themselves aligned with Jenny Halsey (Annabelle Wallis), some kind of archaeologist (?) searching for the tomb of an ancient Egyptian princess. Said princess, Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella), made a pact with the god of death some years back, angling to secure ultimate and everlasting power. She got caught before she could seal the deal, though, and was imprisoned


in the above-mentioned tomb. But Nick and Chris, being bumbling and hubristic, let her out; the race to get her back in the box is on. The Mummy differentiates itself from some of the more forgettable monster shows of recent years by calling back the classics stylistically and infusing the story with some much-needed humor. But it still suffers from over-slickness and under-writing, despite or because of the presence of seven (!) credited screenwriters. Tom Cruise does his movie star thing, Jake Johnson provides some perhaps too obvious comic relief, despite his best efforts; Boutella doesn’t have much to work with. Russell Crowe appears as Dr. Henry Jekyll and briefly as the other guy as well. PG13. 110M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

— John J. Bennett For showtimes, see the Journal’s listings at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards’ Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

47 METERS DOWN. Not to victim blame but if you choose to go into a shark cage with your sister (Mandy Moore, Claire Holt) on vacation in Mexico and you don’t turn back when the guy running it turns out to be Matthew Modine, that’s on you. PG13. 89M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

ALL EYEZ ON ME. Demetrius Shipp Jr. stars as iconic rap artist Tupac Shakur in this biopic directed by Benny Boom. With Danai Gurira and Kat Graham. R. 140M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

BATMAN: THE MOVIE (1966). Pay your respects to Adam West with this groovy film featuring Burt Ward, Cesar Romero, Lee Meriwether, Burgess Meredith and Frank Gorshin. NR. 105M. MINOR. CARS 3. Lightning McQueen (Owen Wilson) goes up against younger, faster cars in the race for the Piston Cup in this Pixar sequel. With Larry the Cable Guy and Cristela Alonzo. G. 109M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

I, DANIEL BLAKE. An out-of-work carpenter recovering from a heart attack meets a struggling young mother who’s also falling through the cracks and decides to fight the system. R. 100M. MINOR. ROUGH NIGHT. Scarlett Johansson, Kate McKinnon, Zoe Kravitz, Jillian Bell and Ilana Glazer star as college besties reunite for a hedonistic bachelorette weekend in Miami that goes south with the accidental death of a stripper. R. 101M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

Continuing

ALIEN: COVENANT. Ridley Scott’s post-Prometheus, pre-Alien installment of the sci-fi/horror/action franchise he started lands colonists on a planet infested with deadly parasitic creatures. Michael Fassbender excels as a pair (!) of androids and Katherine Waterston hoists the big guns as the human heroine as Scott ticks off everything on the fan wish list. R. 89M. BROADWAY.

CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE. Kevin Hart, Ed Helms and Thomas Middleditch voice the animated kids’ movie about a pair of troublemakers who hypnotize their school principal into thinking he’s a superhero. PG. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

CITIZEN JANE. Documentary about Jane Jacobs, a writer and activist who fought for New York historical landmarks is the face of the 1960s wave of development. NR. 92M. MINIPLEX. DAVID LYNCH: THE ART OF LIFE. Just in time for your Twin Peaks binge: a documentary about the life and aesthetics of the director. NR. 88M. MINIPLEX. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2. This buoyant, funny follow-up to Marvel’s trip to space with a motley crew of outlaws and misfits is surprisingly heartfelt — like a love-letter from writer-director James Gunn to the material and its fans. PG13. 136M. BROADWAY.

THE LOVERS. Debra Winger and Tracy Letts star as a cheating, disconnected married couple who fall back in love and throw their respective affairs into chaos. R. 97M. MINIPLEX.

MEAGAN LEAVEY. True story of a marine and the combat dog she trained and served with in Iraq. I’m not crying, you’re crying. Starring Kate Mara. PG13. 116M. BROADWAY.

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES. Johnny Depp returns to the waterlogged franchise with an excellent Javier Bardem as Captain Salazar, the cursed captain of the month and the only saving grace of the movie. PG13. 129M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER (2001). The summer camp genre comedy set in 1981 stars Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Michael Showalter and Paul Rudd. Wear knee-high athletic socks. R. 97M.

Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts POTTERY CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS : Summer Session June 19− August 26, 2017 Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826−1445. Sign up today ! (A−6/15)

Communication IMPERFECT PARENTS EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ The challenges and rewards of parenting will be explored at Lifetree Café on Sunday, June 18 at 7 p.m. The program, titled "Imperfect Parents: Making Peace and Moving On," features a screening of And What Remains, an award−winning short film. "We’ve all learned lessons from our parents that have shaped who we are," says Lifetree repre− sentative Craig Cable. "This program is dedicated to unpacking how those lessons have changed us for good or for bad." Admission to the 60−minute event is free. Lifetree Café is located at Campbell Creek Connexion on the corner of Union and 13th St., Arcata. Come join the Conversation about life and faith in a casual, comfortable setting. Free coffee and snacks. Contact: 707 672 2919 or robertdipert@gmail.com. (C−0615)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Have you always wanted to dance well with a partner? We break things down so they are easy to learn in our ’Beginning Social Dance’ class! Our ’Last Wednesday Workshops’ topics will be Hustle for June and Country Two− step for July. We give private lessons, too! (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (D−0601) FREE WEST AFRICAN DRUM CLASSES Friday 5:30− 7pm. HSU Music Room 131 Contact Joe Bishop 707− 601−5347 Drums available to use or purchase (DMT−0629)

FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ●

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0928) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0629) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0629)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0629)

Humboldt Honey Wine presents

Paint Night “Booze and Brushes” Friday Nights at 6pm

“Rooster” 6/16/17

SUBMIT your

Calendar Events Check in starts at 6pm, we begin painting at 6:30. Reserve you spot by pre pay on our website at www.humboldthoneywine.com or calling us at (707)599-7973.

MINOR.

WONDER WOMAN. Director Patty Jenkins and company handle the serious of justice and love overcoming prejudice and hate without turning pompous, and still entertain with outsized battle sequences in this fine DC adaptation. Starring Gal Gadot and Chris Pine. PG13. 141M. BROADWAY,

Continued on next page »

ONLINE or by E-MAIL northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

$45 per person. Includes wine tasting & snacks. Humboldt Honey Wine 735 3rd Street (between H & I) Eureka (707) 599-7973

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

39


Workshops

Continued from previous page

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−0629) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0629)

Kids & Teens 17TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP Description: Water enthusiasts of all levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skill necessary for all types of wave riding & SURFING while being immersed in JR LIFEGUARD water safety, surf etiquette and beach and ocean awareness. Lead by former California State lifeguard & school teacher along with male and female instructors. Ages: 8 and up. When: 5 sessions: June 26−30, July 5−7, July 10−14, July 31−Aug 4, Aug 7−11 Where: Moonstone Beach. Cost: $195 for a full four−day session. Contact: 707−822−5099. Website: www.moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com (K−0615)

POTTERY CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS : Summer Session June 19− August 26, 2017 Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826−1445. Sign up today ! (K−6/15) POTTERY CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: KIDS 7−12 YEARS OLD Four 5 week classes offered. June 19− July 17, June 20−July 25, July 24 − August 21 and August 1 − August 29. $85.00 for 5 weeks. Full Schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com. Call 707− 826−1445 or come by and sign up today! 520 South G Street Arcata. (K−0629)

Lectures FINANCIAL PEACE UNIVERSITY What if you knew you would have enough money to pay for your retirement and your children’s college? Financial Peace University is a course on personal money management that teaches a simple plan to help you meet those goals, even on a modest income. How would it feel if you had no debt, not even a mortgage? How do we raise our kids to be smart about money? Learn more about protecting your family by making wise decisions about money. Can a course on personal money management really be fun? Yes, it can! FPU is a light−hearted approach to a serious subject. Preview on Tuesday, June 20 at 7pm. Class runs Tuesdays 7pm−9pm June 27 to August 25. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellow− ship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside CONTACT: Margot Julian, 707−499−1474 or margot@questforexcellence.org. (L−0622)

50 and Better

HEY, BANDS

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0824) POTTERY CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS : Summer Session June 19− August 26, 2017 Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826−1445. Sign up today ! (O−6/15)

Spiritual ANNUAL SEMINAR WITH CHOKYI NYIMA RINPOCHE AND LAMA TSULTRIM SANGPO. August 10 − 18 at Rangjung Yeshe Gomde in Leggett. Part 1: Gateway to Buddhist Practice − August 10−13. Part 2: Directly Meeting Your Buddha Nature − August 12−18. Ocean of Amrita Puja: August 13. Visit gomdeusa.org for registration. (S−0810)

Submit your gigs online at www.northcoast journal.com and/or email with high-res photo to music@northcoast journal.com

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sunday 7:55 a.m. at Trillium Dance Studio, 855 8th St (next to the Post Office). Dharma talks are offered two Sundays per month at 9:20 a.m. following meditation. EUREKA: Wed’s, 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte St., enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 12.For more information call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. (S−0525) DZIGAR KONGTRUL RINPOCHE − INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE UTTARATANTRA SHASTRA. June 23 − 25 at Rangjung Yeshe Gomde in Leggett. In this weekend of teachings Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche will continue his exposition of the classic Mahayana text on buddha nature, the Uttaratantra Shastra. Visit gomdeusa.org for registration. (S−0622)

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0525) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. www.tarotofbecoming.com (707) 442−4240 carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1102)

Sports & Recreation LEARN TO ROW WITH HUMBOLDT BAY ROWING ASSOC. Summer rowing clinics for beginners. Adult sessions start June 6 or July 11. Teens start June 5 or 19, and other dates in July and August. More info and signup at our website. www.hbra.org

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0629) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−0810) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0629) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0629)

Vocational BECOME A NOTARY! July 19, 2017 8AM − 6PM $105 (Plus a $40 check made payable to the Secretary of State) Masters Notary Academy shall present the approved Notary Public course for the State of California. We shall provide the necessary mate− rials required for the class including: an extensive workbook, State paperwork, code book and hand− outs necessary for the course. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0615) BECOME A REAL ESTATE AGENT! Live Real Estate Principles, Practice, and Finance classes includes: textbooks, all course materials, instructors, and upon successful completion of each course, a Certificate of Completion! Tues & Thursdays starting in October. Call 707−476−4500 for more information! (V−0615) COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICES TRAINING Training June 20 − Aug 17, 2017 Tues & Thurs 8:30A − 12:30P For scholarship information contact The Job Market! (707) 441−5627 Learn about best practices while building an understanding for the empathy, confidentiality, and self−awareness the field of social services demands. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0615) PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Aug 29 − Oct 17, 2017 Tues & Thurs 6 − 9:30pm. This comprehen− sive 50 hour program will prepare students to work as a pharmacy technician in a retail or other phar− macy setting and to take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board’s PTCB exam. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0615)

LOAN SIGNING SPECIALIST July 20, 2017 8A − 12P $135 California’s real estate industry needs notaries who would like to become Loan Document Signing Specialists. Call 707−476−4500 to register! (V−0615) NOTARY TRAINING Earn additional income. 1−day seminar. July 7, 8:30am−5:30pm. $120 plus fees. HSU campus. www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−0615) MEDICAL ASSISTING INFORMATIONAL MEETING: July 12, 2017 Class Dates: 9/20/17 − 12/22/17 College of the Redwoods Community Education offers training to become a Certified Medical Assistant. This not−for−credit class with lecture and in−class labs includes clinical rotation at a local medical office. Front and back office Medical Assistant skills will be covered in an interactive classroom format. Call 707−476−4500 for more information! (V−0615) TRUCK DRIVING REFRESHER COURSE. Students are eligible to attend refresher if they have attended a truck driving program or have had a CDL previously. Call (707) 476−4500 for more infor− mation and scheduling. (V−0615)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC CULINARY ACADEMY Become a certified Ayurvedic Chef! with Traci Webb & Guests, June 7−11, Cost: $600/module stand alone by May 10, $700 by June 5, or $1,650 program discount. Register: www.ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601−9025 (W−0601) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 13 − Nov 1, 2017, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Festival of Herbs: Shamanistic Herbalism. Dec. 2017 − May 2018. Meets the 1st weekend of the month. Celebrate the traditional & ritualistic uses of plants as sacred medicine with renowned herbalists: Rosemary Gladstar, Kat Harrison, and more! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0511) RESONANCE: CELEBRATING THE TRANSFORMA− TIVE POWER OF SOUND with Marjo Lak, Bruce Burger, April Martin, Jodie DiMinno, Terra Pearson, Joan Richards, Chris BOA and guests. June 30 to July 2 at Heartwood Institute/Garberville. This Sound Healing, Yoga and Dance Retreat is a three−day journey deep into relaxation and rejuvenation, integrating healing modalities to align your chakras and restore balance in your life. Includes Sound Baths, Gong Puja, Sonic Mandala Meditation, Mantra Yoga, Hatha and Restorative Yoga, Pranic Sound Bath and Chakra Balancing, Organic Vege− tarian Cuisine and more. July 1st. 8pm dance cele− bration with DJs Marjo Lak, Mr 415, Cooperton3 and BRIAN HARTMAN (Nevada city). For more information, please visit: www.heartwoodinstitute.org or social@heartwoodinstitute.org / fraktalmusicproductions@gmail.com (W−0615) YOGA IN FORTUNA THURS 9:30AM − 10:45AM W/LAURIE BIRDSONG. Multigenerational Center 2280 Newburg Rd. Breathe, stretch, strengthen the body, calm the mind. All levels. $11 drop−in or 6 class pass $57. Scholarships avail. info Laurie 362− 5457 (W−0330)


Legal Notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILLIAM W WRIGHT CASE NO. PR170161 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of WILLIAM W WRIGHT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, KENNETH WALTER WRIGHT In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that KENNETH WALTER WRIGHT be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 29, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 4. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: KENNETH WALTER WRIGHT 5291 W LINDA LANE CHANDLER, AZ 85226 June 2, 2017

with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: KENNETH WALTER WRIGHT 5291 W LINDA LANE CHANDLER, AZ 85226 June 2, 2017 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/8, 6/15, 6/22 (17−144)

T.S. No. 051173−CA APN: 510−151−085−00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROP− ERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 6/9/2009. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 7/14/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 6/23/2009, as Instrument No. 2009−13924−14, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: NICHOLAS S CRINGLE, AND JULIA A CRINGLE, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROP− ERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVOR− SHIP WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURT− HOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1375 BELNOR RD MCKINLEYVILLE, CA 95519−3415 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encum− brances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $268,467.55 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder

of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $268,467.55 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280− 2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 051173−CA. Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−137)

LE GAL S ? 4 4 2 -1 4 0 0 ×3 0 5

Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280− 2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 051394−CA. Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117

NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER

On 7/14/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed T.S. No. 051394−CA trustee under and pursuant to Deed APN: 522−432−009−000 of Trust recorded 9/17/2004, as NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Instrument No. 2004−31582−19, of IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROP− Official Records in the office of the ERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN County Recorder of Humboldt DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF County, State of CALIFORNIA TRUST, DATED 5/23/2011. executed by: HEATHER L BENDALL, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO AN UNMARRIED WOMAN WILL PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A NATION OF THE NATURE OF STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A THE PROCEEDING AGAINST CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A A LAWYER CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN On 6/30/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− RECON CORP., as duly appointed TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED trustee under and pursuant to Deed IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL of Trust recorded 5/26/2011, as CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO Instrument No. 2011−11347−13, of BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE Official Records in the office of the FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE County Recorder of Humboldt HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURT− County, State of CALIFORNIA HOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, executed by: SHANE D. QUINN, A CA 95501 all right, title and interest SINGLE MAN WILL SELL AT PUBLIC conveyed to and now held by it AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR under said Deed of Trust in the CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN property situated in said County ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A and State described as: MORE CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A OF TRUST The street address and CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR other common designation, if any, FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN of the real property described ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− above is purported to be: 2147 TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED PLUNKETT RD BAYSIDE, CA 95524 IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL The undersigned Trustee disclaims CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO any liability for any incorrectness of BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE the street address and other FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE common designation, if any, shown HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURT− herein. Said sale will be held, but HOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, without covenant or warranty, CA 95501 all right, title and interest express or implied, regarding title, conveyed to and now held by it possession, condition, or encum− under said Deed of Trust in the brances, including fees, charges and property situated in said County expenses of the Trustee and of the and State described as: MORE trusts created by said Deed of Trust, FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED to pay the remaining principal sums OF TRUST The street address and of the note(s) secured by said Deed other common designation, if any, of Trust. The total amount of the of the real property described unpaid balance of the obligation above is purported to be: 56 secured by the property to be sold SUNSET LANE WILLOW CREEK, CA and reasonable estimated costs, 95573 The undersigned Trustee expenses and advances at the time disclaims any liability for any incor− of the initial publication of the rectness of the street address and Notice of Sale is: $260,645.85 If the other common designation, if any, Trustee is unable to convey title for shown herein. Said sale will be held, any reason, the successful bidder’s but without covenant or warranty, sole and exclusive remedy shall be express or implied, regarding title, the return of monies paid to the possession, condition, or encum− Trustee, and the successful bidder brances, including fees, charges and shall have no further recourse. The expenses of the Trustee and of the beneficiary under said Deed of trusts created by said Deed of Trust, Trust heretofore executed and to pay the remaining principal sums delivered to the undersigned a of the note(s) secured by said Deed written Declaration of Default and of Trust. The total amount of the Demand for Sale, and a written unpaid balance of the obligation 6/8, 6/15, 6/22 (17−136) Notice of Default and Election to secured by the property to be sold T.S. No. 053958−CA Sell. The undersigned caused said and reasonable estimated costs, APN: 502 021 074 Notice of Default and Election to expenses and advances at the time NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Sell to be recorded in the county of the initial publication of the IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROP− where the real property is located. Notice of Sale is: $153,212.61 If the ERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If Trustee is unable to convey title for DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF you are considering bidding on this any reason, the successful bidder’s TRUST, DATED 9/14/2004. property lien, you should under− sole and exclusive remedy shall be UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO stand that there are risks involved in the return of monies paid to the PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT bidding at a trustee auction. You Trustee, and the successful bidder MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC will be bidding on a lien, not on the shall have no further recourse. The SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− property itself. Placing the highest beneficiary under said Deed of NATION OF THE NATURE OF bid at a trustee auction does not Trust heretofore executed and THE PROCEEDING AGAINST automatically entitle you to free delivered to the undersigned a YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT and clear ownership of the prop− written Declaration of Default and A LAWYER erty. You should also be aware that Demand for Sale, and a written the lien being auctioned off may be On 7/14/2017 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR Notice of Default and Election to a junior lien. If you are the highest RECON CORP., as duly appointed Sell. The undersigned caused said bidder at the auction, you are or trustee under and pursuant to Deed Notice of Default and Election to may be responsible for paying off of Trust recorded 9/17/2004, as Sell to be recorded in the county northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June all liens senior to the15, lien2017 being Instrument No. 2004−31582−19, of where the real property is located. auctioned off, before you can Official Records in the office of the NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If receive clear title to the property. County Recorder of Humboldt you are considering bidding on this You are encouraged to investigate County, State of CALIFORNIA property lien, you should under−

41


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

NOTICE INVITING BIDS

1. Notice is hereby given that the Governing Board of the Big Lagoon School District (“District”), of the County of Humboldt, State of California, will receive sealed bids for the Roof Installation Project (“Project”) up to, but not later than, 3:00 p.m., on Thursday, June 29, 2017, and will thereafter publicly open and read aloud the bids. All bids shall be received at the office of the Greenway Partners, located at 1385 8th Street, in Arcata, California 95521. 2. Each bid shall be completed on the Bid Proposal Form included in the Contract Documents, and must conform and be fully responsive to this invitation, the plans and specifications and all other Contract Documents. Copies of the Contract Documents are available for examination at the office of the Big Lagoon School District, County of Humboldt, California, and may be obtained by licensed contractors for free. Electronic copies of the Contract Documents can also be obtained from the Humboldt Builders Exchange (http://www.humbx.com/) or by emailing the Project Engineer (Nathan Sanger at sanger@greenwaypartners.net). 3. Each bid shall be accompanied by cash, a cashier’s or certified check, or a bidder’s bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California as a surety, made payable to the District, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the maximum amount of the bid. The check or bid bond shall be given as a guarantee that the bidder to whom the contract is awarded will execute the Contract Documents and will provide the required payment and performance bonds and insurance certificates within ten (10) days after the notification of the award of the Contract. 4. The successful bidder shall comply with the provisions of the Labor Code pertaining to payment of the generally prevailing rate of wages and apprenticeships or other training programs. The Department of Industrial Relations has made available the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which the work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Contract, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. Copies of these prevailing rates are available to any interested party upon request and are online at http://www.dir.ca.gov/ DLSR. The Contractor and all Subcontractors shall pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the Contract. It is the Contractor’s responsibility to determine any rate change. 5. The schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work shall be at least time and one half. 6. The substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments in accordance with Public Contract Code §22300 is permitted. 7. Pursuant to Public Contract Code §4104, each bid shall include the name and location of the place of business of each subcontractor who shall perform work or service or fabricate or install work for the contactor in excess of one-half of one percent (1/2 of 1%) of the bid price. The bid shall describe the type of the work to be performed by each listed subcontractor. 8. Minority, women, and disabled veteran contractors are encouraged to submit bids. This bid is not subject to Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise requirements. 9. The project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the California Department of Industrial Relations. In accordance with SB 854, all bidders, contractors and subcontractors working at the site shall be duly registered with the Department of Industrial Relations at time of bid opening and at all relevant times. Proof of registration shall be provided as to all such contractors prior to the commencement of any work. 10. Each bidder shall possess at the time the bid is awarded the following classification(s) of California State Contractor’s license: C-39 Roofing Contractor’s License. 11. (Optional) By approving these bid documents, the Governing Board finds that the Project is substantially complex and unique and therefore requires a retention amount of __% for the following reasons:. 12. A non-mandatory bidders’ conference will be held at Big Lagoon Elementary School on Monday, June 26, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Project site.

property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280− 2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 053958−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−145)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF EVELYN SIMONS AVILA CASE NO. PR170166

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of EVELYN SIMONS AVILA, EVELYN S. AVILA, and EVELYN AVILA A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, GERALD M. AVILA In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that GERALD M. AVILA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the BIG LAGOON DISTRICT Independent Administration of By: Jennifer Glueck Estates Act. (This authority will _____________________________________ allow the personal representative to Signature take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before DATED: _______________, 2017 taking certain very important Publication Dates: 1) 6/15/17 2) 6/22/17 actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration

42

Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 6, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 4. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Daniel E. Cooper Morrison, Morrison & Cooper 1437 Third Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−8011 June 8, 2017 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−148)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARLENE ANN DOKE aka MARLENE A. DOKE CASE NO. PR170165 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MARLENE ANN DOKE aka MARLENE A. DOKE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, LLOYD TUTTLE In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that LLOYD TUTTLE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 6, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 4. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at

In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that LLOYD TUTTLE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 6, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 4. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Carlton D. Floyd Floyd Law Firm 819 Seventh Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 445−9754 June 8, 2017 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−149)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00297 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HEALTHY LIVING EVERYDAY Humboldt 1197 Buttermilk Lane Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 392 Arcata, CA 95518 Catherine R McGourty 1197 Buttermilk Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Catherine McGourty, Individual This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 30, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Catherine McGourty, Individual This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 30, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−134)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00300 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LOST COAST WIZARDS Humboldt 1136 Main St Ste 102 Fortuna, CA 95540 1485 Golden West Ct Unit C Pedro A Lucero 1485 Golden West Ct Unit C James Langdon 1675 Ronald Ave Apt C Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Pedro A Lucero, Individual This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 31, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−141)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00274 The following person is doing Busi− ness as GREENER HORIZONS LANDSCAPING Humboldt, 1672 29th Street Arcata, CA 95521 Gary Sousa 1672 29th Street Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gary Sousa, Owner/Operator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 15, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: sc, Deputy Clerk 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15 (17−128)


Continued on next page »

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00277

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00292

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00304

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SPOTLESS WITH JENN Humboldt, 2446 16th Street Eureka, CA 95501 Jennifer L Kerr 2446 16th Street Eureka, CA 95501

The following person is doing Busi− ness as NORCAL RECOVERY SERVICES Humboldt, 381 Bayside Road Ste C Arcata, CA 95521 Shawna K Bell 381 Bayside Rd Arcata, CA 95521

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BYTE JOCKEYZ Humboldt 1962 Quaker St Eureka, CA 95501 Andrew K Martin 1962 Quaker St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Andrew Martin, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 1, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer L Kerr, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 16, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: kl, Deputy Clerk 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15 (17−127)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00313 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CALINATURE Humboldt 328 2nd St Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 6865 Eureka, CA 95502 Jeffrey A. Hart 51 New St Eureka, CA 95502 Toni T Hart 51 New St Eureka, CA 95502

The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shawna K. Bell, Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 24, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: lh, Deputy Clerk 6/15, 6/22, 6/29, 7/6 (17−150)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00267 The following person is doing Busi− ness as STEELHEAD CREEK FARMS Humboldt, 77000 USAL Road Whitehorn, CA 95560 PO Box 82 Redway, CA 95560 Alchemy Ateiler LLC CA 201635610192 77000 USAL Road Whitehorn, CA 95560

The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Toni T. Hart, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 2, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer Parent, Owner/Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 10, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: lh, Deputy Clerk

6/15, 6/22, 6/29, 7/6 (17−147)

5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15 (17−130)

Let’s Be Friends

6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−139)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00301 The following person is doing Busi− ness as RENIA MAE’S VINTAGE ROSE Humboldt 982 Courtyard Cir Arcata, CA 95521 Renia R Hungerford 982 Courtyard Cir Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Renia R Hungerford, Individual This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 1, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−138)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

442-1400 ×305

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY] NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED 注:本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약서가 있습니다 NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED May 3, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE, IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on June 29, 2017, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., at the front entrance to the Humboldt County Courthouse, located at 825 5th Street, City of Eureka, CA 95501, County of HUMBOLDT, State of California, PRIME PACIFIC, a corporation, as Trustee will sell at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, all payable at the time of sale, real property situated in the County of HUMBOLDT, State of California, and the purported address is 1460 Blue Slide Creek Road, Garberville, CA 95542, (APN: 220-051-022), and is more particularly described in the Deed of Trust referenced below. Directions may be obtained pursuant to a written request submitted to the beneficiary: c/o Prime Pacific, a California corporation, 215 W. Standley St., Suite 3, P.O. Box 177, Ukiah, CA 95482, telephone : (707) 468-5300 or by contacting the Trustee, Prime Pacific at (707) 468-5300 or mailing request to Prime Pacific, P.O. Box 177, Ukiah, CA 95482–within 10 days from the first publication of this notice. If a street address or common designation of property is shown in this notice, no warranty is given as to its completeness or correctness. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid obligation, together with reasonable estimate of the costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this notice is $219,625.65. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. The sale will be made without covenant or warranty of title, possession, or encumbrances to satisfy the obligation secured by and pursuant to the power of the sale conferred in that certain Deed of Trust, all advances thereunder, interest provided therein, and fees, charges and expenses of the trustee. The Deed of Trust was executed by PETER M. GRAY and KIM A. GRAY, husband and wife as joint tenants, as the original Trustor, recorded May 18, 2005, in Document No. 2005-16203-5, Official Records of HUMBOLDT County, and said property will be sold “as is” and no warranty or representation is made concerning its present condition. Notice of Default and election to sell the described real property under the mentioned deed of trust was recorded on February 7, 2007, Document No. 2017-002449, Official Records of HUMBOLDT County. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call PRIME PACIFIC at (707) 468-5300. You may also visit our website–primepacificforeclosures.com. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the website. THE BEST WAY TO VERIFY POSTPONEMENT INFORMATION IS TO ATTEND THE SCHEDULED SALE. The mortgagee or beneficiary is not required to give notice under CA Civil Code Section 2923.5. Dated: May 30, 2017 PRIME PACIFIC, a California corporation –Trustee By: JANE H. LEONARD, President No. LAMOUREUX S-16-03F northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

43


Legal Notices

Field Notes

Continued from previous page

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00279

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00288

The following person is doing Busi− ness as AS YOU WISH IMPORTS Humboldt, 1827 27th St Arcata, CA 95521 Lee Torrence 1827 27th St Arcata, CA 95521

The following person is doing Busi− ness as GO−GETTER ENETERPRISES Humboldt 1957 Simmons Road Eureka, CA 95503 PO Box 6218 Eureka, CA 95502 Sarah J Smith 1957 Simmons Road Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lee Torrence, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 15, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: lh, Deputy Clerk 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15 (17−129)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00280

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sarah Smith, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 22, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−143)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00314

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUNSET COAST CONSULTING LLC Humboldt 2252 Baldwin St Arcata, CA 95521 Sunset Coast Consulting LLC CA 201510510068 2252 Baldwin St Arcata, CA 95521

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SIDE SHOW DESIGN Humboldt 930 Bayview St Arcata, CA 95521 Scott A Cocking 930 Bayview St Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Joseph Barclay, Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 16, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by lh, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Scott Cocking, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 2, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk

5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15 (17−132)

6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29 (17−140)

Hiring?

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME KRYSTAL PETERSON CASE NO. CV170405 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALI− FORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: KRYSTAL PETERSON TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: KRYSTAL PETERSON for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JOSHUA RAY ALLEN to Proposed Name JOSHUA RAY PETERSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: JuLY 7, 2017 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: May 17, 2017 Filed: May 22, 2017 /s/ Timothy P. Cissna Judge of the Superior Court 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22 (17−135)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 ×305

Post your job opportunities here. 442-1400 • northcoastjournal.com

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

“Nuclear Batteries” The future of electricity? By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

I

n keeping with the “unpopular opinions” theme of this issue, I want to make a case for nuclear power. Not nuclear power as we normally think of it — vast generating stations (and equally vast price tags) with their domed reactor buildings and shapely cooling towers — but small modular reactors, or SMRs. Comparing SMRs with conventional nuclear stations is almost like equating nuclear power with nuclear weapons, which, however irrational, is often done, as if generating electricity from nuclear fission is on a par with the evils of weaponry. Currently, 99 large (1,000- to 2,000-megawatt) nuclear reactors in the United States provide about 20 percent of the nation’s electricity needs, compared to about 15 percent from renewable energy sources (hydro, solar and wind). Meanwhile, two-thirds of our electricity comes from the burning of greenhouse gas-spewing fossil fuels. Paris Accords or not, none of these numbers is going to change in the short term. And with the future of renewables still a long-term proposition, we’re going to have to rely on nuclear power to handle our insatiable demand for electricity — or else live with the ravages of coal and other fossil fuels. In the medium term, nuclear power is our best bet for relatively clean energy. While no nuclear plant is ever going to be 100 percent problem-free, newer systems are far, far safer than the older Three Mile Island-style designs. The third-generation, 1,100-megawatt Westinghouse AP1000, for instance, incorporates a gravity-fed passive core cooling system, meaning it doesn’t rely on external power to cool the reactor in the event of a catastrophic malfunction (the main design failure at Fukushima). Large nuclear power plants have been and will continue to be financial boondoggles, costing anywhere from $5 billion to $15 billion and taking up to 20 years from initial design to operation. (More than two-thirds of the cost of nuclear power goes into paying back construction costs and associated finance charges, plus funding future decommissioning.) The AP1000, for instance, was supposed to be economically viable, yet Westinghouse declared bankruptcy even before the first plant, in China, was brought on line, and the design is now only kept alive by the resources of

NuScale 65-foot-long, 9-foot-diameter modular reactor. Image by NuScale/ Creative Commons license

Toshiba, its parent company. Compared to 1,000-megawatt conventional plants (rule of thumb: one megawatt powers 1,000 households), the output of SMRs is a modest 25100 megawatts. These modular “nuclear batteries” will be pre-fabricated at a plant, shipped to the site by barge, train or truck, and installed — typically underground in a pool of water — singly or in banks. Currently, the most advanced SMR is NuScale’s 65-footlong, 9-foot-diameter light water reactor (originally designed at Oregon State University). Relying on convection and gravity to circulate water, the module’s passive-safe design needs no external power to cool it down in an emergency. Each NuScale module will generate 4550 megawatts of electricity, so a bank of 12 could supply the needs of a million-plus population. Building identical units at a central manufacturing facility is inherently safer than in-situ construction of a conventional nuclear power station, while the cost of a single NuScale SMR is estimated at about one-twentieth of that of a 1,000-megawatt plant. Plus, the modular units can be readily swapped out and/or decommissioned. This optimistic scenario is all in the future, with the first NuScale scheduled to come on line in 2026. My fingers are firmly crossed for the success of this and other SMRs, which have the potential to transform the nuclear electric industry with safe and economical alternatives to huge power stations. ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) never believed nuclear power would give us electricity too cheap to meter.


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35. The year 1550 36. Swimming unit 39. Ryan of “Sleepless in Seattle” 40. Suffix with winter 41. Opposite of WNW 42. “Selma” director DuVernay 43. “____ the ramparts ...” 44. Pitchers Darling and Guidry 46. Be part of the opposition 48. “Explorer” channel 52. NAACP part: Abbr. 53. TV producer Michaels 57. Defeat 58. Greeted silently from afar 60. Shish ____ 61. Nontext part of a text 63. “Relax!” 65. Bareilles and Gilbert

66. Plant swelling 67. You can bank on it 68. “Top Chef” host Lakshmi 69. Eager as heck 70. Amal Clooney ____ Alamuddin

10. “Stay!” 11. Doctor’s diagnosis 12. High/low card 13. “Damn right!” 18. Tuscan tourist city 22. Sports-themed restaurant chain since 1998 24. Bug DOWN 26. Hefty refs. 1. Sign of neglect 27. MacLachlan of 2. Big and muscular “Twin Peaks” 3. Nicole Kidman’s role in “Moulin Rouge” 29. Actor Edward James ____ 4. Automotive plural 31. Evil animal in “The selected in a 2011 Lion King” promotion 5. Coffee order: Abbr. 33. The “A” of USDA: Abbr. 6. Org. that calls itself “the high IQ 34. It’s mostly nitrogen 36. Newswoman society” Spencer or Logan 7. To no ____ 37. NYC’s 5th and Park (fruitlessly) 38. A strong one 8. Harper Lee’s given includes a special name character (see 9. Dry country whose 17-Across), a number name is an anagram (see 63-Across) of wet weather

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO KIPLING

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and a capital (see 11-Down?! Not THAT kind of capital. Look at the grid’s center ... THAT kind of capital ...) 45. Pope with a Nov. 10 feast day 47. Stuck 49. “The Prophet” author Kahlil 50. Relative of euchre 51. “No problem here” 54. More bizarre 55. “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” spinoff 56. What Montana was in the ‘80s 59. Big name in plastic 60. Olympic skater Michelle 61. Parapsychologist’s study 62. Goat’s cry 64. “More than I needed to know!”

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EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information callto445−7039. (E−0625) Build edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com

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LOOKING FOR A MEANINGFUL JOB IN YOUR COMMUNITY? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for Full−Time, Part−time and On−Call LPTs, LVNs to join our dynamic team committed to teaching a "life worth living". Full−time benefits include medical, dental and vision plans; 401(K); scholarships; and lots of wonderful training Apply at 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka http://crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca/

OFFICE SUPPORT COORDINATOR Location: HSU Campus, Arcata. Hours: 20 hours/wk (flexible). Wage: $16−$23/hr DOE. Seeking a half−time Office Support Coordinator for the Norcal Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC). We are a grant− funded nonprofit assisting small businesses with government contracting. Perform intake interviews, assist with grant proposal and reporting, database tracking, coordinate events, process payments. Knowledge of government procurement preferred but not required. More details & application instructions, visit https://tinyurl.com/NorcalPTAC or email kristina@norcalptac.org. Includes vacation & sick accrual; retirement eligibility after 2 yrs. New Deadline: Monday, June 26 5pm. default

Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District

Maintenance Worker (Arcata, CA) Under direct supervision performs a variety of light and heavy maintenance work. Assists journeyman Maintenance Mechanics and other staff as requested with a variety of maintenance activities, system inspections, and periodic construction activities. Under general supervision performs a variety of grounds keeping work, right-of-way clearing, painting, and other general maintenance.

EASY #77

© Puzzles by Pappocom

D A Y O I R O N A C M E Z P B S N E A L O T T O I E S

www.sudoku.com

S H I L O H

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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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©2017 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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GENERAL MANAGER The Eureka Symphony Board of Directors is seeking a General Manager. Deadline is June 30. For complete details about applying, please refer to the Eureka Symphony Website at www.eurekasymphony.com

Hiring? 442-1400 ×305 northcoastjournal.com

Must possess a valid California driver’s license, must acquire Grade 1 Water Distribution and Grade 1 Water Treatment certifications within 2 years of employment date. Requires strong teamwork orientation and good interpersonal skills. May work weekends and holidays as needed. Salary range $2,814–$3,421, plus benefits, including deferred compensation. Employment applications available online at www.hbmwd.com, or at the business office located at – 828 7th Street, Eureka or you may call 707-443-5018 and ask to have one mailed to you. Please return completed and signed application to HBMWD, PO Box 95, Eureka, CA, 95502-0095 or fax to 707-443-5731. Applications accepted until 5 pm, June 16, 2017

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

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Hiring?

The Trinity County Department of Transportation is recruiting for an

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SPECIALIST I FAMILY SERVICES PROGRAM *Case Manager I - $13.75/hour Fulltime with complete benefit package *Family Support Specialists - $12.00/hour Fulltime & Part-time available Go to www.rcaa.org or 904 G St. Eureka for a complete Job description & required application; positions are open until filled & interviews will be on-gong.

Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

This is a full-time, benefitted position. For a job description and application form please visit www.trintycounty.org or contact Trinity County Personnel, P.O. Box 1613, Weaverville, CA 96093, phone (530) 6231325 or fax (530) 623-4222. Resumes alone will not be accepted in lieu of the completed application form. EEO/ AAE. Open until June 27th, 2017. default

442-1400 ×305 classified@northcoastjournal.com default

Pierson Company is

NOW HIRING for the following positions:

LABORER • CARPENTER • MASON PROJECT MANAGER • SUPERINTENDENT General knowledge of construction terms as well as a “safetyfirst” mindset is required. Construction experience preferred. Each position has different requirements for consideration of employment. Please call or email for more information. Pay DOE. Submit a resume with application. Pre-employment physical and drug test req’d.

PRODUCTION & FARM WORKERS Coast Seafoods is hiring. Pre− employment screening required. EEO Company. For more info or to apply please visit our website or apply in person at: 25 Waterfront Dr, Eureka, CA 95501. https://www.pacseafood.com/careers

Applications may be filled out at:

www.piersoncompany.com Pierson Company, 1200 West Harris St., Eureka 8am-5pm M-F | 707-268-1800 x310

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HSU Dining Services invites applicants for the following positions:

**Annual JOB POOL** NCS anticipates a number of Head Start, Early Head Start & State Program job openings for our 20172018 program yr. Potential positions are throughout Humboldt County & may be yr round or school-yr. Anticipated start date: late August/early September

CENTER DIRECTOR FAMILY WORKER HOME VISITOR TEAM TEACHER TEACHER ASSOCIATE TEACHER CLASSROOM ASSISTANT COOK ASSISTANT COOK NUTRITION AIDE SPECIAL AIDE SPECIAL AIDE/INTERPRETER (SPANISH) ASSISTANT TEACHER COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER HOUSEKEEPER SUBSTITUTES Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For additional information, please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

Catering Coordinator Cook II Full-time positions with excellent benefits including health, dental, and vision insurance; vacation, sick leave, and retirement For job descriptions and application procedure, visit: http://tinyurl.com/zlg4llo First Review: July 6, 2017 Open until filled default

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46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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  

 

           

 

            

 

    



   



  



     


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County of Humboldt

NUTRITION AIDE

PPNorCal is recruiting for following jobs:

NP/PA/CNM Clinician II-III Current CA licensure required

Reproductive Health Specialist II-III AA and/or related work/volunteer experience required. Apply online at www.ppnorcal.org. EOE

$2632–$3378 mo.

Provides basic nutritional evaluation and counseling to participants in prenatal, infant and child health programs; determines program eligibility and explains program requirements. Must be skilled in interviewing and providing nutritional assessments. College coursework in nutrition or a related field and one year of work experience in a nutrition program or setting that provided nutrition counseling is desired. CDL req.

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS

Filing deadline: July 7, 2017. Apply online at www.humboldtgov.org/hr or contact Human Resources (707) 476-2357 Humboldt County Courthouse 825 5th St, Eureka AA/EOE

For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350

#0835 WILDLAND FIRE COORDINATOR

RG/FT TULLEY CREEK $55,435-79,173 OUF

CENTER DIRECTOR, FORTUNA

#0896 JET BOAT CAPTIAN

Responsible for the overall management of a State Program. Must meet Site Supervisor level on Child Dev. Permit Matrix or qualify for a waiver. Req an AA degree & a min of 2 yrs exp working w/preschool age children in a group setting. F/T 37.5 hrs/ wk (M-F); $13.99-$14.69/hr Open Until Filled

#0907 PARALEGAL

ASSOCIATE TEACHER, WILLOW CREEK

#0880 FORESTER

RG/FT KLAMATH $50,337-65,434 OUF

#0886 FINANCE DIRECTOR

RG/FT KLAMATH $86,806-NEG OUF SEASONAL/FT KLAMATH $21.84-28.39 6/30/17 RG/FT KLAMATH $24.12 6/30/17

#0911 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT III (SS) RG/FT KLAMATH $17.75-23.06 OUF

#0915 FORESTRY TECHNICIAN I-FIRE

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $10.33-14.62 6/23/17

#0916 FISHERIES BIOLOGIST II

RG/FT WILLOW CREEK $24.12-34.54 6/19/17 default

open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

Medical Assistants Medical Assistants are an important part of the patient care experience and essential to the health care team. Open Door family practice clinics are fast-paced and expanding to meet our patients’ needs. Medical Assistants work with providers in the exam room, implement treatment and care orders and provide follow-up activities, including patient education, conversations and communication. Attention to detail, organization and strong communications skills are needed. The Medical Assistant needs to possess excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to exercise sound and responsible judgments in high stress situations. Credentialed (certified, recognized) Medical Assistants with prior clinic experience preferred. Wage dependent on experience. Positions Available in Arcata, Eureka, McKinleyville and Crescent City For details and online applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com

Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req a min of 12 ECE units—incl. core classes—& at least 1 year exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24-28 hrs/ week, $11.70-$12.29/hr. Open Until Filled

COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER, REDWAY

Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req a min of 12 ECE units—incl. core classes—& at least 1 yr exp working w/children. P/T (school yr) 24 hrs/week, $11.70-$12.29/hr. First Review Date: 06/16/2017

ASSISTANT TEACHER, FORTUNA

Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool age children. Min of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months exp working w/children. P/T yr round, 20-25 hrs/wk. $10.07-$11.11/hr. Open Until Filled

CLASSROOM ASSISTANT TEMP EUREKA

Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a preschool program. 6-12 ECE units pref. or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months exp working w/children. P/T temp (partial yr) 2024 hrs/wk. $10.60-$11.69/hr. Open Until Filled.

SUBSTITUTESHUMBOLDT AND DEL NORTE COUNTY Intermittent (on-call) work filling in for Classroom Assistant, Assistant Teachers, Cooks/Assistant Cooks or occasional childcare for parent meetings. Require exp working w/children or cooking. $10.60hr. No benefits. Submit Schedule of Availability form w/app. Positions include vacation, holidays & sick leave benefits. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

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open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

Grants Administrator Northern California’s largest Community Health Center and FQHC, serving Humboldt and Del Norte Counties, is seeking a full-time Grants Administrator. Federal, state, local and private grants support uncompensated and comprehensive care and account for 10% of ODCHC’s annual budget. This professional position offers a competitive compensation package, DOE. Position available in Arcata. For details and online applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

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Employment Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings .Take a look at the job descriptions on our website at www.changingtidesfs.org .

PROGRAM ASSISTANT- FAMILY EMPOWERMENT SERVICES

Under general supervision, this full-time position provides administrative and clerical support and services by implementing administrative systems; ensuring procedures and policies are followed; monitoring administrative projects, maintaining client and staff confidentiality; and providing high quality customer service. Two years of experience working in a fast paced office environment and experience working in a social service setting desirable. Starts at $12.77/ hr. Benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays, insurance, and 401k retirement plan. Open until filled. First review Thursday, June 1, 2017

RESOURCE AND REFERRAL SPECIALIST This full-time position provides a range of office based and community services which support parents, child care providers, and community planning initiatives. Conducts activities to support the expansion of the CalFresh program and the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP); supports enrollments on CalFresh. Starts at $14.11/ hour. Benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays, insurance, and 401k retirement plan. Closes 5 p.m. Monday, June 19, 2017

VISTITATION SPECIALIST

Full-time, benefitted position provides supervised visitation for children, youth and their families in a variety of settings, provides  parenting skills coaching, as well as related tasks.  Requirements include: transporting clients in employee’s own vehicle throughout Humboldt Co. (mileage is reimbursed), ability to lift and carry car seats and children, min. 2 years of experience working with children, youth or families or 2 years working in a social service agency. Starts at $14.11/hr. Benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays, insurance, and 401k retirement plan. Open until filled

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COLLEGE OF THE REDWOODS EUREKA CAMPUS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, BIOLOGY

1-Semester Replacement, Non-Tenure Track Spring Semester 2018 Semester Salary Range: $24,157 - $31,753 First Review Date: September 1, 2017

DEL NORTE CAMPUS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, COUNSELING (TITLE IVA)

Assistant Professor, Counseling (Title IVA) Full-time, Non-Tenure Track Annual Salary: $48,314 - $63,506 Closing Date: June 28, 2017

PART-TIME FACULTY POSITIONS EUREKA CAMPUS Adaptive Physical Education Biology Business/Accounting Chemistry Communications (Speech) Computer Information Systems Counselor - CalWORKS Counselor – Disabled Students Programs History Librarian Mathematics Nursing – Clinical Psychology Sign Language Welding

DEL NORTE

Art Biological Sciences Business Communication Studies Counseling English Mathematics Sign Language Sociology

MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST This intermittent position provides support to children, youth and families in a variety of settings including home, school, and community; provides 1:1 behavior coaching in a home, school or community setting; provides referral and linkage to community resources; provides parent education and support as directed. $18.00/hour plus mileage reimbursement. Open until filled Additional requirements for all positions listed: Must be able to pass DOJ/FBI criminal history fingerprint clearance and possess a valid CDL, current automobile insurance, and a vehicle for work. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato, Human Resource Director, at nprato@changingtidesfs.org or via U.S. mail to: 2259 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501. EOE

KLAMATH-TRINITY (HOOPA)

Addiction Studies Business Technology Communication Studies Computer Information Systems Early Childhood Education English Psychology More information about the positions is available through our website. www.redwoods.edu/hr College of the Redwoods 707-476-4140 • hr@redwoods.edu

College of the Redwoods is an EO Employer

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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                

                           

                 

        

        


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sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E St., Eureka, CA 95501

Come join Mad River Community Hospital and enjoy the satisfaction of working with a team.

Millwright

(707) 445.9641

Seeking a highly experienced, hardworking and reliable individual to join our Maintenance department and fill the role of Millwright. Night shift. Full time position includes benefits.

Planner • Metal Fab Supervisor Administrative Assistant • Architect Class A&B Drivers • Insurance Agent Receptionist • Full Charge Bookkeeper Geotech Engineer • Property Manager General Labor • Pest Control Trainee Investment Administrator

Yes, you can be happy at work…here. If you have to work, why not do so with some of the best in the business. We are looking to hire Lab Managers, RN’s, Housekeepers and other positions. Look on our web site for openings: www.madriverhospital.com

Millwright Knowledge, Skill and Experience: The Millwright is responsible for assembling, disassembling, maintaining, fabricating and repairing machinery and other equipment. -High School Diploma or GED preferred. -Strong mechanical aptitude. -Knowledge of general and preventative maintenance and repair. -Strong math skills. -Experience with fabrication and welding. -Knowledge of pneumatics and hydraulics. -Knowledge of electrical including 3-phase and PLC’s. -Ability to read and understand schematics, blue prints, and instructions.

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K’ima:w Medical Center

To apply please bring your resume and complete an Application for Employment in person at 1900 Bendixsen Street, Samoa, CA at the North Gate entrance to the Fairhaven Business Park or email jobs@ foxfarmfertilizer.com. Pre-employment drug screen required.

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Wiyot Tribe

Office Assistant Position This position requires computer knowledge including Word, Excel spreadsheets, and Outlook. The applicant needs to be able to multitask; some bookkeeping knowledge helpful, and must love dogs.

Finance Director FT, Year Round Under the direction of the Tribal Administrator, the Finance Director works independently under fiscal policies to achieve organizational objectives.

This is a permanent part time position paid hourly $13.00-$l4.00. M-F 9 am-2 pm

Directs other persons within the administration department, while supervising the use of funds for multiple departments. Monitoring budget expenditures, preparing the budget financial reports, provide information to other departments.

Send Letter and Resume to npacademy@sbcglobal.net or mail to NPA, Attention Dee, P.O. Box 276, Arcata, CA 95518.

Develop, implement and maintain services in compliance with established guidelines, regulations and GAAP and complete annual external audits. Serves as a member of the leadership team. Position Open Until Filled. Now accepting resumes, must complete a Wiyot Application for Employment. For a full job description and Wiyot Application of Employment visit www.wiyot.us.

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Please send resumes and completed applications to: 1000 Wiyot Dr. Loleta, CA 95551, Fawn@ wiyot.us or fax to (707) 733-5601

                      

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (LMFT OR LCSW) PHYSICIAN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PREVENTION COORDINATOR PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER DENTAL RECEPTIONIST CHR (COMMUNITY HEALTH REPRESENTATIVE) SAVE THE DATE: K’ima:w Medical Center Health Fair open to all, June 28, 10a-2p, Neighborhood Facilities, Hoopa For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application. default

Kokatat is seeking to hire several Production workers in order to meet the demands of our new government contracts.

Production Workers We have several Full-Time positions available as well as a few Part-Time positions. We are looking to fill our evening shift (12pm – 8:30pm) however we also have a few morning positions available (6am – 2:30pm). No experience necessary although experience with machinery and/or sewing machines is a plus. We offer free medical insurance to Full-Time Employees as well as paid sick, vacation & holidays and 401k match just to name a few. Applications available at 5350 Ericson Way, Arcata or contact our HR Department at (707) 822-7621 for an application. Visit our website at www.kokatat.com to learn more about Kokatat. Kokatat is an Equal Opportunity Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

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Marketplace

Body, Mind & Spirit

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045.

Auctions

Thurs. June 15th 4:15 pm

MISS ME JEANS $40/PAIR What’s New 335 E St., Eureka 445−8079

LIVE−IN ASSISTANT wanted to transport adult male to and from work in Garberville. Light house− keeping, errands, cooking and laundry, with days free. Salary negotiable. Call (408) 483−0315.

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM

FLASHBACK

PUBLIC AUCTION 2 Pelican 100 SE kayaks & more! Estate Furniture + Additions Preview Weds. 11 am - 5 pm & Thurs. 11 am to Sale Time nd

Thurs. June 22 4:15 pm

Clothing

Featuring India Imports

MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855−732−4139 (AAN CAN) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877−362−2401

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HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

Eureka Massage and Wellness

707-839-5910 iamalso@hotmail.com

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3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

QUICKBOOKS INSTRUCTOR WANTED Call 707−476−4500 for more information!

Let’s Be Friends

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Weds.-Sat. 1-6 Sun. 3-6

“Clothes with Soul�

Merchandise

NURSES NEEDED We are looking for team-oriented individuals to coordinate care for patients in collaboration with an interdisciplinary team and under physician’s orders. Full-time, 3/4-time, and per diem options available. We offer outstanding benefits, competitive wages, and professional growth opportunities. Current California RN license and graduation from an accredited nursing program required.

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to comple− ment your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN) ELECTRONICS (TVS, STEREOS, SPEAKERS, ALARM CLOCKS, CAMERAS, CABLES, GADGETS & MORE) 1/2 OFF Fathers Day Sale. Dream Quest Thrift Store, June 15−21. (530) 629−3006.

Miscellaneous

Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information.

LOCAL THRIFT Used Appliances Sales & Service

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Multiple Day Center & In-Home Care Positions Available

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Program Aides (day center) –– PT benefited

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Substitute Program Aide (day center) – Hours vary, some FT

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Personal Care Attendant (day center) – PT benefited

ď ƒď Ąď Źď ‚ď ’ď …ď€şď€ ď€Łď€°ď€ąď€ąď€´ď€´ď€śď€ąď€¸ ď Žď ?ď Œď “ď€şď€ ď€Łď€łď€˛ď€łď€˛ď€šď€ś

ALL TYPES COMMERCIAL LOANS

50 GLORIOUS YEARS ď łď Šď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď€ąď€šď€śď€´ Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027 2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

707-599-5824 Licensed and insured

Computer & Internet

Personal Care Attendants (in-home) – FT benefited

A list of application requirements and job description can be found at: www.humsenior.org. For more information, please call (707) 443-9747 ď€

ď ”ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď ˆď ľď ­ď ˘ď Żď Źď ¤ď ´ď€ ď “ď Ľď Žď Šď Żď ˛ď€ ď ’ď Ľď łď Żď ľď ˛ď Łď Ľď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď Šď łď€ ď Ąď Žď€  ď …ď ąď ľď Ąď Źď€ ď ?ď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ď ľď Žď Šď ´ď šď€ ď …ď ­ď °ď Źď Żď šď Ľď ˛ď€Ž

YOUR AD HERE

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017 • northcoastjournal.com

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ď Žď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Łď Żď Ąď łď ´ď€­ď ­ď Ľď ¤ď Šď Łď Ąď Źď€Žď Łď Żď ­

Marketplace Home Repair

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2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contrac− tors license. Call 845−3087

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Power Washing, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 382−8655 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Song− writer. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

Your Business Here YOUR AD HERE

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

ď „ď Šď Ąď Žď Ľď€ ď „ď Šď Łď Ťď Šď Žď łď Żď Žď€Źď€ ď ?ď „

Cleaning

60 day local in home warranty on all used appliances, small and large 1 year parts & labor on all service calls Nights and weekends No extra charge Call

100 West Harris St. Corner of Harris & California, Eureka.

2115 1st Street • Eureka EurekaMassages.com Massage Therapy & Reiki Please call for an appointment. 798-0119

442-1400 Ă—305 northcoastjournal.com

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•

F r ď ?ď Ąď ˛ď Žď šď€ E ď †ď ˛ď Šď Ľď ¤ď ­ď Ąď Ž E ~Healing the Heart~ d ~Aligning with Soul~ o M

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com default

ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡ Â?‹˜‡•ČˆŽƒ†‡•ČˆŠ‡ƒ”• ”‹Â?Â?‡”•Čˆ—•–‘Â?”†‡”• ‹…Â?Â’ƒÂ?†”‘’ÂˆÂˆÇŁ

ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď€şď€ ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł 442-1400 Ă—305 northcoastjournal.com

Ä†Ä—Ä›ÄŠÄžÇŻÄ˜Ä?ĆėĕnjēnjÄ?ĎēČĘ ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ


Real Estate HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,650; 2 pers. $23,600; 3 pers. $26,550; 4 pers. $29,450; 5 pers. $31,850; 6 pers. $34,200; 7 pers. $36,550; 8 pers. $38,900 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

 default

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100+ VACATION HOMES Throughout Humboldt, Del Norte & Trinity Counties Great Coastal Retreats, Cabins, Cottages, Large County Estates, Studios, Condos, Beach Houses, As well as Lake & Riverfront Homes Several New Listings in the Trinity Lakes and Alps Region just in time for summer! Call or Visit us online

707.834.8355 RedwoodCoastVacationRentals.com

NORTH COAST FURNISHED RENTALS, INC. PROVIDES FULLY FURNISHED, CLEAN, COMFORTABLE HOMES AND CORPORATE RENTALS.

315 P STREET • EUREKA

707.476.0435

THERE’S A NEW WAY TO STAY IN A CITY:

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL.

(707) 445-9665 NORTHCOASTFURNISHEDRENTALS.COM

CA BRE #01983702 FORTUNA | ARCATA | EUREKA FERNDALE | REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK CRESCENT CITY

YOUR LISTINGS

HERE

Willow Creek Land/Property $510,000

Charlie Tripodi

Kyla Tripodi

Katherine Fergus

Dane Grytness

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor BRE #01927104

707.834.7979

Realtor/ Residential Specialist

BRE #01992918

BRE #01332697

707.502.9090

707.798.9301

707.834.3241

BRE #01930997

BRE# 01956733

Bernie Garrigan

707.601.1331

NEW LISTIN

G!

±60 Acres just 35 minutes from Willow Creek! Property features multiple flats, year round creek, well, AG barn, bath house, and end of the road privacy. Cultivation permit for 10,000 sq. ft. filed with the County!

Larabee Valley Land/Property $995,000 ±50 Acres perched above the rolling hills of Larabee Valley! Property features a 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom ranch home, pond, well, water storage, rolling meadows, and, beautiful views. The house includes a wood burning stove, vaulted ceilings, laundry room, and large detached garage. Home is off grid with solar & wind power and well water. Cultivation permits filed with the County.

Trinity Lake Land/Property $199,000 ±100 Acres on the west side of Trinity Lake. This developed parcel features a new well, building site, and timber. Owner will carry!

Realtor Ads Acreage for Sale & Rent Commercial Property for Sale & Rent Vacation Rentals call 442-1400 ×319 or email melissa@northcoastjournal.com

Willow Creek Home on Acreage $1,600,000 Enjoy seclusion and privacy just minutes from town on this serene ±50 acre property. Parcel is host to a solid 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom log home and features power, developed spring water system, open flat meadows, old orchard, bunk house with outdoor shower, and shed. All of this, plus Willow Creek frontage! Truly a spectacular piece of property you will need to see to believe!

humboldtlandman.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 15, 2017

51


Josh Abrams, Cutten

Jessie James, Sunny Brae

Murphy’s BBQ It’s that time of the year again! Your local Murphy’s Markets are rolling out the BBQs and grilling up some of your favorites. This year’s menu consists of Tri Tip and Pulled Pork Sandwiches, Hamburgers, Hotdogs, Polish Dogs, Hot Sausages, Half Chickens and Baby Back Ribs. There are four

Murphy’s locations doing BBQ this year. Sunny Brae is open T-F 11AM-5PM, Trinidad is open TH-SUN and all holidays from 11AM-5PM, Glendale is open M-F 10AM-2PM, and Cutten is grilling M-F 10AM-4PM. So swing by your local Murphy’s Market and get yourself some BBQ before they Ben Tucker, are gone for the summer. Glendale

Max Rivet, Trinidad

HEALTH AND WELLNESS Alba Botanica Sunscreen 4oz selected varieties

6

$ 99

Andalou Naturals Shower Gels 8.5oz selected varieties

6

$ 99

Tiger Balm Pain Relieving Products

3

$ 99

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Manitoba Protein Powder–Hemp Protein Powder with Fiber 16 oz

9

$ 99

North Coast Journal 06-15-2017 Edition  
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