Page 1

HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday April 12, 2018 Vol XXIX Issue 15 northcoastjournal.com

One Year Later Twelve months after David Josiah Lawson’s death, his killing remains unsolved, sparking protests, pleas for help and an effort to heal 15 Unresolved 16 #JusticeforJosiah 18 ‘We Are Your Community’


SALES ALL WEEK MONDAY 4/16 THROUGH SATURDAY 4/21 WITH AN EVENT ON FRIDAY 4/20

ALL WEEK LONG: 10% OFF

20% OFF Topicals & Swag

Top Shelf Flower Selection

Great Selection of 2 grams for$10

25 Half Gram

$

Cartridges from AbsoluteXtracts

ON 4/20:

Buy 1 gram Live Resin from Beezle Extracts get 1 FREE

(LIMITED STOCK)

5¢ Indoor Bud Rolls HPRC GSC (LIMITED STOCK)

HPRC ARCATA 980 6TH ST., ARCATA 707-826-7988 hprcarcata.com

$

Mon-Fri 10am-6pm

of Wax & Live Resin

Sat 10am-6 pm

25 Full Grams

20 8th s of Sungrown Flower FREE Swag bag from vendors $ Edibles $5-$10 30 Indoor HPRC GSC

$

(SELECTIONS)

(LIMITED STOCK)

FREE customer BBQ with any purchase! Buy 1 PEAK .5 gram get 1 for 25¢

2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

(LIMITED STOCK)

Permit #A12-18-0000025-TEMP

Permit #M12-18-0000027-TEMP

THE CONNECTION • 334 F ST., EUREKA • 707-407-5550


Contents 4

Editor

22

We Are Humboldt — All of Us

5 6 6

25

Poem by the Condominium President’s Council on Aging

26

News

27

Guest Views Week in Weed Don’t Smoke Fake Weed

14 15

NCJ Daily On The Cover Unresolved

21

Art Beat Face/Off

The Setlist Knock, Knock, Knock on Wood

28

Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

32 34

Calendar Home & Garden Service Directory

38

Filmland Silence is Golden

Seriously? Breakup Letter from President McKinley’s Statue

22

Arts! Arcata April 13, 6-9 p.m.

A Parent’s Worst Nightmare

11

Open House

Mailbox Poem

Drama at the A/C

8

Table Talk

Humboldt Made Special Advertising Section

39

Washed Up Shark Evidence

40 Workshops & Classes 45 Sudoku & Crossword 45 Classifieds

IN APRIL, LET’S KICK BUTTS HUMBOLDT! #HumboldtKicksButts

5 STEPS OF A CIGARETTE BUTT LITTER CLEANUP

1 2 3 4 5

Gather your materials. Get some friends / family together. Choose an area to clean up and GO! Take pictures! Share your pictures on social media & use the hashtag! #HumboldtKicksButts

Questions? Call/Email us: 707-268-2132 tobaccofreehumboldt@co.humboldt.ca.us

PARTS AND SERVICES ON:

Honda Yamaha Polaris Suzuki KTM Kawasaki Harley-Davidson Can-Am

CUSTOM BUILDS & FABRICATIONS ATVS • UTVS • TRUCKS • MOTORCYCLES PARTS • REPAIR • SALES

CNC MILL & CNC PLASMA SERVICES

3990 BROADWAY, EUREKA 707.269.0991 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

3


Editor April 12, 2018 • Volume XXIX Issue 15 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2018

Cultured Cuisine 2850 F ST, EUREKA 7 0 7.7 9 8 . 6 4 9 9

Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30am-2pm Dinner: Tue-Thu 5pm-9pm Fri-Sat 5pm-10pm

Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Creative Services Manager Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Linus Lorenzen linus@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Social Media Coordinator Sam Armanino sam@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager Annie Kimball annie@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

On the Cover Photo by Mark McKenna

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

We Are Humboldt — All of Us By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

W

e see it overtly in online comments sections, the sentiment that “if they don’t like it here, they should leave.” And we see it subtly in things like the recently minted Facebook page pushing for a public vote on the fate of President McKinley’s statue in the Arcata Plaza, which the city council voted to remove in February in the face of growing public pressure, much of it coming from the Humboldt State University campus. The page is titled “Let the People Vote on Our McKinley Statue,” gently intoning that those new-to-town campus folk can’t possibly hold any ownership of the thing. Even more subtly, we see it in the comments of a heartfelt woman who during Arcata’s recent Community Dialogue on Race said, seemingly directed at HSU students of color, “If you want friends, show yourself friendly.” There’s nothing wrong with the sentiment on its own — it holds true in most venues. But Humboldt County needs to recognize that this proves most true for those who have been here years, decades or generations. Humboldt County is better for having Humboldt State University and the brains, diversity, vibrancy, ingenuity and dollars it brings here. And all of us who have staked lives here had better recognize that we need friends — especially smart, hard-working, motivated ones — to help us make this a better place for our children and our children’s children. So we damn well better show ourselves friendly. And maybe if we did show ourselves friendlier, in time, these new-to-towners will set down roots. Maybe they’ll love it so much they’ll go to medical school and come back as much-needed doctors and nurses. Maybe they’ll become so enthralled with the redwoods and the folksy smiles that they’ll start a business and hire you to work there. Maybe they’ll get a credential and teach your kids’ elementary school class. If you read this week’s cover package,

you’ll see that there’s a growing segment of our community that doesn’t like it here, that doesn’t feel safe here. And that’s not on them. It’s on those of us who have long called Humboldt home and it’s up to us to change it. People of color in this community have already done too much work in this conversation. They’ve stood up at public meetings and forums to speak of their experiences — to tell stories of being made to feel unwelcome, of receiving side-eyes and subtle accusations. And they’ve done this — repeatedly — simply to get this community to acknowledge their experiences as real problems that need to be addressed. Their work should be finished. It’s now on the rest of the local community — the part that’s 84 percent white, according to the U.S. Census — to push this conversation forward, to show itself friendly, as it were. There is a lot at stake. HSU is the county’s largest employer and generates an estimated $190 million to the regional economy annually, including an estimated $10.5 million in local sales tax, according to a recent California State University system study. According to a 2010 report, there are some 10,000 HSU alumni currently living in Humboldt, with somewhere around 30 percent of graduating seniors looking to stay locally each year. In a county with an economy that’s slumping amid the legalization of our largest agricultural export, these aren’t numbers that can be dismissed. We need students to want to keep coming to HSU and we need them to build lives here after graduation. But all that pales in comparison to the moral imperative. Humboldt County needs to make students — and community members — of all races, ethnicities, sexual identities and orientations feel welcome here because it’s the right thing to do. So we at the Journal will come out and say it. We will continue to work to make this community one that strives to welcome all people and to keep them safe. We’ll work to make it a place where you can be you, so long as you’re not causing harm to anyone else. We’ll strive to make it a place where people understand, respect and celebrate our differences while sharing our common interests, goals and passions. As HSU student Jibril says in this week’s cover package, “We are Humboldt.” And if you can’t get behind that, well, you should probably leave. ● Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


Mailbox

‘The Bug Dude’ Editor: Hats off to the Bug Dude, Anthony Westkamper (HumBug, posts Sundays at www.northcoastjournal.com). I always enjoy the details in his columns, maybe because I’m a plant person: Bugs are part of the scene. Also, I like his self-deprecating humor. Zephyr Markowitz, Bayside

Who’s Erasing History? Editor: You know all of “Humboldt County” is stolen land, right? This narrative (Mailbox, March 29) by white people about wanting to keep the McKinley statue where it’s located, or around town, even at the museum in Ohio, is some racist nonsense. Preference to white supremacy, which McKinley and the colonists who committed all sorts of atrocities here stood for, goes against any idea of equality based on culture or race. Feeling entitled to have a vote about a matter, in a place that the people living Terry Torgerson

there before you were forcefully removed with violence, is a disgusting opinion. How do we acknowledge that we are only in this place because some crude humans showed up one day claiming rights to the land and continue living our lives here as if that’s not true? If we understand now that doing all the things Europeans and early Americans did to Native people is wrong, bad, improper, cruel, etc., then why do we honor or pay tribute to it? You know Arcata’s “plaza” is a way to erase the history of Wiyot people? Does that sit well with you? Stanton Wood, Eureka

‘Shining a Light’ Editor: Thank you for the great cover story about the successes of the brave individuals who triumphed over their addictions via drug court (“The Graduates,” April 5). Shining a light on the drug programs that are working gives we community members a more balanced look at what is possible when confronting the crisis of drug abuse. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

5


Elevated American fare & craft cocktails

News

Mailbox Continued from previous page

For so long the lock-them-up mentality that has proven to be so ineffective, and yet it is still embraced, perhaps because folks are unaware of the drug court. The courage of the individuals featured in your article is inspiring. By featuring the stories behind their faces, we get to understand that, as you said so eloquently in your editorial (April 5), “We won’t get anywhere constructive without recognizing the inherent humanity of those involved.” Right on! Sheila Evans, Eureka

Write a Letter!

SAVE 20%

With this coupon (Exp. 3/31/18) Not valid with any other offers

100 MOONSTONE BEACH RD. TRINIDAD • 677-1616 moonstonegrill.com

THE

Serving Breakfast & Lunch All Day M-F 8am-3pm • Sat & Sun 9am-3pm 307 2nd St. Eureka • (707) 798-6083

Open on Easter Try Our Special Egg Benedicts!

Specializing in comfort food in a comfortable space

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday.

Poem by the Condominium President’s Council on Aging Frequently things return when we’re older some forms of love and osteoarthritis. Love comes in memories, beyond reach after years. A euphoria of sensory moments. A skin whose texture we cannot recall, the tingle of welcome touch a taste of lips, caress of hair and a tongue which could destroy us. Arthritis, the joint freezing prince of pain and immobility, like love whispers barely audible caution warnings, then summarily deserts us. After Council review The Board has decided love and arthritis are much the same, and worst, both outlive our sex drive. — Lawence Strattner

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Assistant Auditor Karen Paz Dominguez Access Humboldt

Drama at the A/C

Power struggles, security breaches, a sexual harassment complaint and a Brown Act violation rock auditor controller’s office By Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com

A

lthough it’s elected, the position of county auditor-controller is rarely the stuff of headlines. But the county’s top fiscal job, which involves financial oversight of county agencies, budgeting and disbursement of county funds, has recently garnered some controversy, thanks in part to Assistant Auditor Karen Paz Dominguez, who first stepped into the spotlight at a Humboldt County Board of Supervisors meeting Nov. 7, using her allotted three minutes of public comment to tell the board the office was so severely understaffed it could not do its job properly. That comment launched a series of longform pieces by Ryan Burns at the Lost Coast Outpost about dysfunction in the department, Paz Dominguez’s decision to run for the position of auditor-controller and the surprise resignation of current Auditor-Controller Joseph Mellett, who is due to retire April 27. Paz Dominguez’s outspokenness about the department’s failings has earned her both public and private censure — some from the very people whom, if she triumphs in June’s election, she will be responsible for supervising. If Paz Dominguez’s assessment is correct, many of the issues in the department stem from a power struggle between herself and the payroll department, which she says has been responsible, in part, for a series

of security breaches that left confidential employee information vulnerable to theft. In March, she alleges, an employee in the office sent digital copies of the entire county workforce’s W-2s to another employee’s private email account by accident. The employee, who had asked for his or her own W-2, opened it and saw Fourth District County Supervisor Virginia Bass’ name. The employee’s supervisor alerted the auditor-controller’s office, according to Paz Dominguez. This was one of a series of incidents Paz Dominguez tells the Journal she felt left out of the loop about but, when she went to Mellett for support, he reportedly told her to “not to interfere.” Paz Dominguez went to the Human Resources Department, which advised her to write a step-by-step guideline for payroll staff about her expectations. She did so but found out that the guidelines had to be given to the staff by Mellett. Mellett, she alleges, refused. “He accused me of insubordination,” says Paz Dominguez. “I told him, ‘I’m just trying to do my job.’” Paz Dominguez says Mellett then threatened to discipline her. “He said, ‘Go to your office, stop being hormonal, get your emotions in check,’” she says, demonstrating a dismissive hand wave Mellett allegedly directed at her afterward. Following the incident, Paz Dominguez says


she filed a sexual harassement complaint against Mellett. We reached out to county spokesperson Sean Quincey to discuss Paz Dominguez’s allegations. Quincey said many of our questions would be better directed toward Mellett. The embattled auditor-controller — who had pledged to serve the year but, after Paz Dominguez’s alleged complaint, announced he will instead resign April 27 — said he “could not discuss ongoing investigations.” But Paz Dominguez has also been hit with complaints by her coworkers, who allege that she has created a hostile work environment. Quincey confirmed that there have been “multiple complaints filed in the auditor-controller’s office recently.” We also asked Mellett about issues with the W-2s and the chain-of-command relationship between his position and the payroll department, as well as Paz Dominguez’s job performance. He declined to answer them. He is — he said — happy to be retiring. “The beautiful weather and a variety of courthouse dramas made me decide to accelerate my exit date and I’m leaving in good conscience,” he told the Journal in an email. With Mellett’s early departure, his post will be vacant until voters decide the race between Paz Dominguez and Michael Lorig, an accountant in the county Department of Health and Human Services, in June. But someone has to run the office in the interim and on the Saturday she sat down with the Journal, Paz Dominguez was anxiously looking ahead to the April 3 meeting of the board of supervisors, which was scheduled to discuss Mellett’s departure and the possible recruitment process for an interim replacement. Paz Dominguez fumed, calling the recruitment “retaliatory.” She attended that meeting and again spoke at public comment, telling the board it should not engage in the “needless spending of public funds” to recruit someone for a temporary job, someone, she added, she would have to take time to train. In a surprise move, First District Supervisor Rex Bohn seemed to agree with her, saying that he liked the idea of “circumventing the process.” Maybe, he said, they could ask someone who’s already in the system to step in, such as a retired annuitant. He pointed to Cheryl Dillingham, a retired annuitant and former employee with the auditor-controller’s office currently aiding the county with ADA compliance, who happened to be in the room. The board asked Dillingham if she would temporarily take the job. She agreed. They unanimously voted her in. “I had a few people from AC’s office speak to me over the last few days, this was by far the most palatable option, by far,”

Bohn said during the meeting. “It’s funny when the most obvious solution walks into the room.” Whether Dillingham’s presence was a coincidence or some civic process theater is unclear, but it was, according to Terry Francke, legal counsel and founder of public forum watchdog CalAware, almost certainly a violation of California’s open meetings law, the Ralph M. Brown Act. We asked Francke to watch the video of the meeting for which Mellett’s resignation and the recruitment

process were agendized. “The Brown Act requires that a local government body like the board of supervisors refrain from taking action on any item not appearing on the posted agenda for the meeting with a few exceptions not applicable in this instance,” Francke replied in an email. “The board’s reaction to the offer presented to them made it clear that not even they, much less the public, were given advance notice that the offer would be made. The board could cure and correct

the violation by rescinding the appointment and placing the proposal on a future agenda, giving interested members of the public the opportunity to address the board on the issue.” We reached out to Bohn for comment on this issue but have not heard back. l Linda Stansberry is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or linda@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

7


Guest Views

A Parent’s Worst Nightmare By Charmaine Lawson views@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s been a year since my son — David Josiah Lawson — was senselessly murdered and I’m still waiting for justice. His murderer or murderers are still walking free and this tragedy has sent me through a whirlwind of emotions. I’m sometimes left numb to what has happened but my fight for DJ’s justice has kept me from falling apart. My strength and courage come from an amazing network of family and friends, the Humboldt community and Humboldt State University students and faculty. God has blessed this group of positive influencers in my life because, without them, I don’t know if I would have made it this far. This tough journey has been filled with disappointments, from the lack of justification for the first responders’ actions, the delay in receiving the autopsy report, the police report that I have still not seen, the dwindling communication from the Arcata Police Department and the lack of availability from the HSU president. What I’ve learned through my son’s murder is that

if policies and procedures were followed, I don’t believe I would be living this terrible nightmare. The first responders’ lack of following policies and procedures has led to many unanswered questions. The first account was when the Arcata Police Department did not attend to DJ immediately. Officers also failed to secure the scene to allow the paramedics to get to my son in a timely manner. Many of the witnesses felt racial discrimination played a big part in the first responders’ lack of quick reaction to render aid to my son. Arcata Police Chief Tom Chapman has openly admitted that the defibrillator used by his first responders was slow to function because it was not fully charged. Due to the APD responders’ incompetence when controlling the scene, this delayed the response of the paramedics getting to DJ in time. Through all of this, my biggest question in this disappointment was the first responders’ complaint regarding how crowd control

played a factor in their ability to do their jobs. I find it strange how the prime suspect, a white male, was somehow taken from the “uncontrolled” scene to be placed safely in a police vehicle while my black son lay there bleeding to death. The delays with the first responders bring about more concerns regarding the report of my son’s murder. To this day I have not been able to view my son’s police report. I was told by the APD chief that the police report would be available to the first lawyer that I appointed and it was never provided to him. My second attorney also requested the police report and she was denied the report because she was told it was an open investigation, per the chief of police, Tom Chapman. Another delay was in the months spent waiting for the autopsy report. I was just recently notified on March 13 by City Manager Karen Diemer that the autopsy report was submitted to the Humboldt County coroner. The attorneys who have been working patiently on this case have expressed to me that this timeframe to receive an autopsy report is completely unacceptable. Even though these delays with my son’s case have caused frustration, I have received endless support from faculty and staff of HSU. Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

The support I have received to this day has been incredibly amazing. However, the lack of support from HSU President Lisa Rossbacher has been disappointing. I have traveled from Southern California to Humboldt County to stand in solidarity with HSU students and community members. I’ve only seen Lisa Rossbacher three times while traveling over the last 11 months to attend my son’s monthly vigils and city council meetings. The person ultimately accountable for student safety, Lisa Rossbacher, was not present. The HSU president should be available for all student issues and concerns. Students and parents should feel confident that their loved ones are left in an environment that provides safety and accountability, and that allows students to nurture career goals. There are many unanswered questions. The first responders’ answers to questions of why their policies and procedures were not followed have been very inadequate. The prime suspect, a white male, was given priority over my son, a black male, whose attention was needed the most due to the injuries that he suffered. My first question to the Arcata mayor is: When is APD going to be investigated for its incompetence when officers were dis-

Thank you Child Care and Early Childhood Educators!

no sales tax On any product $399 and up Monday, April 16 through

Saturday, April 21

In honor of Week of the Young Child, Changing Tides Family Services thanks you for your dedication to the children of our community. Together we grow the future. For information and assistance in becoming an Early Childhood Educator and Child Care Provider please give us a call.

1001 Main St. in Fortuna • 707.725.6734 www.eelvalleyappliance.com

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Changing Tides Family Services 2259 Myrtle Avenue Eureka, CA 95501 707-444-8293


patched to Spear Avenue that early morning? The urgency in the reporting of my son’s case has been very poor from APD. The timeframe from which the autopsy report was submitted was much longer than normal. Also, a year later, we are still waiting for DNA evidence to be completed. My second question to the mayor is, why are we waiting a year later for DNA evidence and how much longer do I have to wait? A growing concern for the safety of HSU students and city of Arcata residents is now in the forefront. My third question to the mayor is, when is Tom Chapman going to be replaced to assure the safety of the residents of Arcata? To the mayor, city manager, and the president of HSU: Why doesn’t my son’s life matter enough? All local resources have been exhausted, so why haven’t you as decision makers reached out to the Department of Justice to come take over the case from APD? And why did Chapman ask for the riot squad to be on standby April 20, the day of my son’s memorial service at HSU? APD’s fear of students of color and lack of accountability seem to play a consistent role throughout this investigation and I worry this may hinder justice being served for my son.

Overall, I am thankful for the support that I have received in pursuing justice for my son DJ. This fight will continue until I get justice for David Josiah Lawson. My son was a loving, caring, compassionate and ambitious man with integrity. He understood that it is not about the quantity in one’s life, but the quality of how you treat others around you. Although this journey has been hard, I will continue to make sure that his legacy lives on. My son was destined for greatness, and that is how he will be remembered. To all mothers who have lost a child, invest your tears. l Editor’s Note: Charmaine Lawson submitted this piece to the Journal on April 9, a day before Arcata Police Chief Tom Chapman resigned his post with the city. Reached April 10, Lawson said she stands by the piece and for months had been urging the city to terminate Chapman’s employment. In the weeks after Josiah Lawson’s death, Chapman indicated he’d heard concerns about first responders’ performance and would investigate them after the conclusion of the criminal investigation. For more on the initial response, see the Journal’s May 4, 2017, cover story “What Now?”

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

9


4:20 SALE 1¢ Grab Bag

with any purchase! Limit one per person, per purchase, while supplies last

All indoor eighths

$35 • • • • • •

For med only

20% OFF select edibles

Humboldt Apothecary Demo 12-4 only! Free water bottle with purchase of HA tincture, while supplies last

Open for medical & rec Family owned since 2010 Local, organic products Best prices in Humboldt Rewards program Veteran/senior discount

License No. M10-18-0000181-Temp A10-18-0000138-Temp 1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka 707.442.2420 1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka 707.442.2420 M-F 10am-6pm Sat & Sun 11am-5pm M-F CA 10am-6pm Sat & Sun 11am-5pm 10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


Week in Weed

E K FA

. D E WE

Watch it, people. Shutterstock

Don’t Smoke Fake Weed When real news loses its novelty By Linda Stansberry

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

T

he science of why smoking cannabis screws with your memory is kind of fascinating. Memory itself is kind of fascinating. The current understanding is that our brains are kind of like computer processors that take immediate, short-term data and processes it during sleep’s REM-cycle to be stored as long-term memories. Cool, huh? Anecdotally, we might have observed that heavy pot smokers can have memory problems, which has been backed up by several scientific studies. A 2015 study published in the scientific journal Molecular Psychiatry also indicates a relationship between heavy cannabis use and susceptibility to false memories. (If you haven’t been following the science on neuroplasticity, false memories are totally

a thing, although they are usually less like those crazy kindergarten sex cult tabloid stories from the ’90s and more like your belief that you definitely used your blinker before the cop pulled you over.) Cannabis’ impact on memory is directly related to one of its more pleasurable effects, specifically the stimulation of CB1 receptors in our brain’s amygdala, which increases the novelty of items or ideas that you might otherwise think are boring (e.g. reruns of Xena: Warrior Princess). Which is all to say, I am over the novelty factor in reports of people getting ill/dying/having psychotic breaks after smoking fake weed. The latest story, which comes from a May 6 alert from the CenContinued on page 13 »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

11


707-822-9330 • 6TH & I ST., ARCATA • M-F 11-7, SAT & SUN 11-5

the Servingunity comm2004! since

4/20 & 4/21 WEEKEND EVENT SPECIALS AND VENDOR DEMOS ALL WEEKEND!

oldt

b 4.20 of Hum t r Hea Rolls e Pr

$

3 off 4.20 ainwise nt Mou

s King

z.

-1o

$

0 $ 4.2 ips nad t 1 for n a C 1 ge buy

Every $150 spent = 1 free prize wheel spin!

NEW STORE FRONT. SAME HEART. The Heart of Humboldt is now open for both recreational and medical cannabis sales — two store fronts, right next door to each other, with the same great customer service. Please stop by to check out our newly renovated space, the largest rec location in Humboldt, ready to serve you. Medical patients can find us in the same original location providing them the confidentiality and consistency they have grown to count on.

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


Week in Weed Continued from page 11

ters for Disease Control and was reported by CNN, hinges around some horror movie-type bleeding that sent 94 people in Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri and Wisconsin to the emergency room. Three people died. The connection all seems to hinge on heartlanders smoking synthetic weed, which is often sold in gas stations or online, not subject to any federal oversight (it’s sometimes labeled as “incense”) and contains a number of nasty chemicals that potentially include rat poison. A lot of how we do our job ethically as journalists hinges on what we choose to report, when and why. So this isn’t to say that if a wave of deaths or illnesses related to synthetic weed hit Humboldt County (unlikely, considering the abundance of the real stuff) I wouldn’t cover it. I just feel as though the stuff’s temporary presence at the top of the internet charts does a disservice to the real, systemic and more challenging issues that remain below the fold. According to the CNN article, it isn’t kids who are dying from fake weed. Thanks in part to a robust public awareness campaign, use of synthetic cannabis by minors has dropped drastically in the last decade. The people addicted to, using and getting sick from synthetic weed in Illinois are the same people who our system consistently fails in most other respects — the homeless and mentally ill. The fact that we have a large population of underhoused, chronically homeless people in the United States, a population that overlaps with a large, underserved population of mentally ill people, is not new news. But it is one of the most pressing and challenging issues of our times. The fact that while a handful of people are dying after smoking synthetic weed, scores more are dying each day from our nation’s opiate epidemic is also not new news. As the aphorism goes, “Dog Bites Man,” is not news, but “Man Bites Dog” might be. Still, I feel compelled to keep these issues in our consciousness. Oh, you thought this was the Week in Weed? Nope, this week you’re getting the synthetic Week in Weed, complete with a toxic frosting of depressing facts about some of our most intractable social problems. It’s not Fake News, it’s just news that has, sadly, lost its novelty. l Linda Stansberry is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or linda@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.

COUNTDOWN TO 4/20 SALE

$

25

$

Swell

Chem Dawg, Goo Berry, or Sour Diesel Cartridges

$

24

Cannadips CBD

$

20

True Humboldt

Chocolate Hashberry, or Apphrodite 1/8 packs

10 Prism

CBD XL Prerolls

$

49

Purple Punch

Premium Indoor 1/8 oz.

$

8

CBD Lollipops

$

45

Black Candy Land

Premium Indoor 1/8 oz.

$

220

HILLSTRONG

Nitro 1/8 Cans

$

35

True Humboldt

Cannatonic Cartridges

MUST BRING IN AD FOR SPECIALS 3 0 6 F S t . E u r e k a | 7 0 7 . 24 0 . 4 2 2 0 | We D e l i v e r ! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST · Lic.# A10-17-0000006 M10-17-0000008 · Exp. 4.22.18

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

13


From NCJ Daily

Officers Bust ‘International Conspiracy’ to Steal Succulents

T

he growing popularity of using succulents — here and abroad — for decorative plant arrangements is resulting in what state officials are calling a “rising poaching trend on the North Coast,” including the the discovery of an alleged international poaching ring. California Department of Fish and Wildlife officials arrested Taehun Kim, 52, and Taeyun Kim, 46, both of Korea, and Liu Fengxia, 37, of China, near Trinidad for allegedly “poaching over 2,300 dudleya succulent plants near Trinidad in Humboldt County.” Wildlife officers intercepted and seized 1,334 of the plants in boxes being prepared for overseas shipping on April 4 and found another 1,000 dudleya after serving a search warrant on the suspects’ hotel room. The three are now facing a series of charges, including the illegal taking of the plants and felony conspiracy, according to a CDFW release. The generally hearty and drought-resistant plants can bring $40 to $50 apiece on

Make us a part of your daily life

For the news as it develops and all you need to understand politics, people and art on the North Coast, follow us online.

the Asian market — upwards of $100,000 for what was discovered last week. Coupled with the environmental damage the poaching can cause, many of California’s dudleya varieties are at risk of going extinct, officials said. “We have seen a remarkable amount of concern over this from botanists and the public alike,” David Bess, CDFW deputy director and chief of law enforcement, said in the release. “A public tip started this investigation and ultimately uncovered an international conspiracy to poach Dudleya succulents and ship them overseas for profit.” According to its press release, CDFW initially noticed the poaching trend earlier this year, after learning that a man was shipping Dudleya to China out of a Mendocino County post office. In recent months, wildlife officers have cited three individuals for misdemeanor violations, including illegal taking and trespassing, near Mendocino County’s Point Arena. According to the press release, the Mendocino County District Attorney’s

Wheetley Out: Fortuna City Manager Mark Wheetley resigned his post April 3, just one year after leaving his post on the Arcata City Council to take the job. The resignation came one week after Wheetley was placed on paid administrative leave by the city, following his sentencing in a DUI case, his second in less than two years. Public Works Director Merritt Perry will serve as interim city manager until further notice, according to the city. POSTED 04.04.18

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The number of vehicle-related fatalities in Humboldt County so far in 2018 (as of April 10) after a 56-year-old Eureka man was killed in a single car crash on State Route 299 when he lost control of his 2001 Porsche, causing it to roll off the roadway. POSTED 04.04.18

northcoastjournal

Pilfered succulents. Courtesy of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Office elevated the charges to felony conspiracy and grand theft due to the estimated value of the stolen plants. Law enforcement from the U.S Postal Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife and East Bay Regional Parks, as well as personnel from the California Native Plant Society, U.C. Santa Cruz’s Botany Department and others assisted with the investigation. CDFW asks anyone who believes they have witnessed unlawful poaching or pollution to call its confidential tip line

So Long, Third Street: The Humboldt State University budget ax has fallen on the popular Third Street Gallery in Old Town, the university announced April 9. The budget-cutting measure had been hanging over the gallery for months since being included in a January cost-cutting proposal looking to bridge a projected $9 million budget shortfall over the next two years. Exhibitions scheduled through the summer are expected to proceed as planned. POSTED 04.10.18

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

at (888) 334-2258 or send a text to tip411. Callers may remain anonymous if desired and, in some cases, a reward can result from information leading to successful arrests and prosecutions. CDFW personnel has replanted the seized succulents in the areas from which they had been taken, with the assistance of the native plant society and Santa Cruz botanists. — Kimberly Wear POSTED: 04.06.18

Body Identified: The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office has identified the body of a man found in the Trinity River near Hoopa last September as that of 53-year-old Russell Dean Graeber, of Hoopa. When his body was discovered, police estimated it had been in the water for as long as three weeks. An autopsy determined Graeber’s cause of death to be freshwater drowning. POSTED 04.04.18

northcoastjournal

They Said It

Comment of the Week

“We took it very seriously.”

“It’s like we’re ashamed.”

— Fortuna Police Chief Bill Dobberstein on the Ukrainian email hoax that threatened mass casualty events on school campuses throughout the country April 9. Several Fortuna schools were placed on lockdown for about 40 minutes before Fortuna police and the FBI confirmed the threats were, in fact, a hoax. POSTED 04.09.18

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

newsletters

— Sharon Ross Catlett commenting on a Journal Facebook post about last week’s Week in Weed column, which detailed how Humboldt County Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Director Tony Smithers declined to mention cannabis when detailing his tourism marketing plan to the board of supervisors April 3. POSTED 04.06.18


On the Cover

Unresolved

As frustrations grow and the anniversary of an HSU student’s slaying approaches, a police chief resigns abruptly By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

A

rcata Police Chief Tom Chapman abruptly resigned his post April 10, sending a departmentwide email saying he felt the timing was right “not only for [him] but for the department.” He offered no reason for his sudden departure, which was effectively immediately. However, the Journal has learned that Chapman’s resignation followed that of a consultant brought in to advise the department on the ongoing investigation into the April 15, 2017, killing of Humboldt State University sophomore David Josiah Lawson, who was 19. Reached after news broke of Chapman’s resignation, Tom Parker, the former FBI agent who had been volunteering his services pro-bono as a consultant on the Lawson case, confirmed that he’d “regrettably terminated” his contract with the city April 9 and was stepping away from assisting the investigation. Parker declined to discuss any details of his decision or Chapman’s resignation, other than to say he’d become “frustrated with a lack of cooperation” in the case. Asked if he’d consider coming back into the case now that Chapman has resigned his post, Parker said “that would have to be a topic of further discussion and negotiations with the city.” The resignations come as the anniversary of Lawson’s still unsolved killing approaches and amid an escalating outcry from HSU students and community members who have been critical of the city’s handling of the investigation. A student-led 12 days of action — with each day representing a month that Lawson’s killing has gone unsolved — remains ongoing, with a celebration of life planned for

Students hang a “Justice for Josiah” banner on the Humboldt State University quad. At the rally, organizers encouraged those in attendance to scrawl messages of hope, unity and protest on it. Mark McKenna Lawson Sunday at the D Street Community Center in Arcata. Throughout last week, student protests gripped the HSU campus. On April 6, a male student lay splayed on his back, his hands folded in front of him, purple bruises covering his right eye and blood dripping from his nose, the work of a couple of make-up artists from the theater department. His female counterpart lay next to him motionless on her side, with a deep gash across her forehead, a trickle of blood falling from her split lip. Behind them, two students stood century with signs. “This is what happens to (People of Color) on campus!” read one. “Protect your children!” read the other. The silent protest was taking place outside Humboldt State University’s “The J” dining commons on campus during a Spring Preview event for prospective students and their families, many of whom filed by the grisly scene. Some stopped to inquire what it was all about. A couple of student tour guides halted their regular itinerary in order to explain to the prospective students and their families what they were seeing. Lawson’s killing is currently Arcata’s only open homicide case going back decades and, from the start, it has fissured a community already rife with racial tensions. As Lawson lay bleeding to death from two stab wounds shortly after 3 a.m. on April 15, police found 23-year-old Kyle Zoellner, a McKinleyville man, battered and beaten at the scene and — after people on scene fingered him as Lawson’s assailant — arrested him on suspicion of murder. Almost immediately, the case took on racial overtones as Lawson was black and Zoellner is white. One of Lawson’s

friends publicly alleged racial bias hampered efforts to get Lawson to a hospital in time to save his life and others alleged Zoellner’s girlfriend used a racial slur to describe Lawson as he lay bleeding, saying she hoped he would die. The stabbing didn’t occur in a vacuum. About a year and a half prior, two female black students reported that they were in downtown Arcata when two unidentified white men in a truck threw a beer bottle at them before continuing to “taunt, harass and chase them.” HSU President Lisa Rossbacher responded to the incident by sending out a campuswide letter saying the assault was racially motivated and not the first “incident like this” to happen on campus or in the community. “Harassment based on race, gender or other characteristics continues to be a serious problem,” she wrote. About a year later, Rossbacher drew widespread backlash on campus when she sent another letter to faculty and students stating that “racism is not a norm on campus.” In October of 2016, the university convened a couple forums on racism, both of which were widely attended and saw frustrated students speak out about what they deemed pervasive instances of overt and subtle racism in the community, and blasted the university administration for not doing more to support students of color. With that history as a backdrop, some quickly came to see Lawson’s killing as a potentially preventable result of unheeded warnings. Tensions escalated further on May 4, 2017, when after a two-week hearing that saw dozens of witnesses testify, Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Dale

Reinholtsen found police and prosecutors had gathered insufficient evidence to hold Zoellner to stand trial on the charge that he’d murdered Lawson and ordered him released from custody. Reinholtsen explained that there was no physical evidence linking Zoellner to Lawson’s killing and, while numerous witnesses testified that the two men had been engaged in a fight, along with others, no one said they had actually seen the stabbing. A string of protests followed the ruling, with hundreds of people marching through campus, the streets of Arcata and congregating on the plaza. In the following weeks, demonstrators would flood Arcata City Council chambers during meetings to demand updates on the investigation into Lawson’s death and action to ensure people of color are safe in the community. The city later agreed to offer regular Lawson case updates in a separate forum but that seemed to add to simmering frustrations when the police department released only very limited information, citing the need to protect the integrity of the ongoing homicide investigation. Over the ensuing months, the city also held a series of dialogues on race, which saw students and community members of color step to the microphone to describe feeling unsafe and discriminated against in the community. At the last such meeting in March, some questioned why minorities are being asked to repeatedly and publicly revisit these traumas in order to validate that the problem is real and pervasive. And throughout all this, the Arcata Police Department’s investigation has quietly continued with Zoellner remainContinued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

15


On the Cover Continued from previous page

A student signs the “Justice for Josiah” banner. Mark McKenna

ing the only publicly named suspect. The department released its last public update on the case in February, reporting that it continues to work “through a defined investigative strategy based on all the physical evidence and witness statements, much of which has been developed after” Zoellner was released from custody in the case. Additionally, the department reported that it has interviewed almost four dozen people as a part of its investigation. Back in August, then-Police Chief Tom Chapman said the California Department of Justice’s crime lab had returned some forensic testing results, some of which were “very valuable,” adding that one “key piece of evidence” would necessitate further DNA testing. The department also agreed last fall to work with Parker, a 73-year old former FBI agent who most notably led the bureau’s investigations into the Rodney King beating and the Rampart scandal in the Los Angeles Police Department. Parker was given access to the complete investigative file in the Lawson case in order to give APD feedback and advice, Chapman said. Parker has now walked away frustrated and Chapman, who had pleaded for patience in the investigation, has resigned. And on campus, anyway, patience seems in short supply. On April 5, students walked out of class and gathered in the pouring rain on the university quad to hold a rally. Huddled under umbrellas, the students pressed a couple of university administrators in attendance for answers. They asked where Rossbacher was, why she hadn’t been attending the community dialogues on race. They pressed for answers on what the university was doing to keep pressure on the police to resolve the case. They chanted Lawson’s name. They demanded to know why their administrators deserved their faith any longer. HSU Vice President of Academic Affairs

Alex Enyedi stepped up to address the crowd. “I believe with all my heart in justice for Josiah,” Enyedi said, explaining that in the days after Lawson’s death, he was one of the first representatives to meet with Lawson’s mother. “We talked about David, we talked about the tragedy and we cried and we cried.” Enyedi paused, clearly emotional. “This thing has hit me really hard and I understand your grief and I understand your anger, because it pisses me off, too,” he said. “I understand it shouldn’t take this long and I understand there needs to be more done. … I feel your pain. I understand the frustration.” A few moments later, student Barbara Singelton picked up a megaphone and urged those gathered to stay engaged, to stay active and to keep pushing. “The fact of the matter is he was a student, he was murdered and it could have been any of us,” Singleton said. On the anniversary of Lawson’s death, students and community members will gather on the Arcata Plaza at 3:30 p.m. for a vigil before walking to the D Street Community Center, where a celebration of his life will be held from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tickets for the evening — which will feature music and Jamaican and soul food — are $3 for students and $5 for community members, with proceeds going toward “continuing investigation efforts.” For more information, contact the HSU African American Center for Academic Excellence at 826-4588. Meanwhile, what Chapman and Parker’s departures mean for the Lawson investigation remained unclear as the Journal went to press. l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

16  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

North Coast Journal / Shuttertock

#JusticeforJosiah

Activists work to get national attention, one hashtag at a time By Collin Yeo

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

T

hey sat in a group in the small living room of an Arcata apartment one afternoon in late March, scattered across a couch and the floor. They were all in their early 20s, students at either College of the Redwoods or Humboldt State University. With laptops and cellphones at their hands, they tapped away in studious attention as a young woman called out email address and Twitter handles. There were five of them, including three of non-white ethnicities. Cookies sat on the nearby coffee table and a cat walked around the room, purring at the distracted pets from guests fixated on their screens. The young woman giving out the information broke momentarily from her task. “I can make coffee. Does anyone else want some?” The woman, Rain Flotho, a 22-year-old student at CR, organized this event and volunteered her apartment for the day’s effort. She had been calling out email addresses, Twitter handles and Facebook pages for a half-hour as her guests typed

away and pensively munched snacks. The gathering came as a part of an ongoing effort at bringing national attention to the death of 19-year-old HSU sophomore David Josiah Lawson, who was fatally stabbed at an off-campus party April 15, 2017, and whose killing remains unsolved. The idea is simple: Under the hashtag #JusticeforJosiah, the people gathered, along with others participating remotely, to send out information about the nearly year-old homicide case that they want to keep from going cold. They are targeting their messages to prominent members of civil rights and social movements, as well as journalists who cover social justice issues in the national press. For Flotho, the project is personal and was spontaneously born out of frustration and a desire to do something about Lawson’s killing, which she feared to be losing traction in both the local media and the criminal justice system. “Over winter break, I was reading up Continued on page 18 »


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

17


On the Cover Continued from page 16

more about the case and I felt really devastated, so I just started emailing people,” Flotho says. “And I thought that no one was going to notice my one email but I kept doing it and I felt that it would be really effective if a bunch of people did this at the same time. There’s, like, a hope that this would get out there.” Flotho points out that social media activism has been effective, noting the hashtag origins of the Black Lives Matter and Occupy Wall Street movements. “I feel like I am just learning as I am going, but it’s something that I felt like needed to happen and it’s one of the only things that I could really think to do to get our voices heard,” she says. “[Social media] can be a way where people who feel like they are not being supported can get the word out.” Tony Silvaggio, an assistant professor in Humboldt State University’s Sociology Department specializing in social movements and community organizing, sees the positive potential of grassroots social media activism. “Social media and online platforms certainly have some positive effects, as they play a major role in helping activists [and] movements spread their message to the wider public,” Silvaggio says. “We saw that in the Arab Spring and during the protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline, with activists using online platforms to dispute state propaganda and false information about what was happening on the ground. It can be a very effective tool for movements to frame their issues clearly and provide a space for movements and activists to engage with one another, disseminate information, share videos and photos.” About a half-dozen people attended another social media push organized by Flotho, this one on the HSU campus earlier this month. The students, who requested not to be named for fear of backlash from the public and school administrators, all voiced a top-down frustration with the handling of the case by police and the response from local officials. When asked if race was a factor in the unsolved status of the investigation, assent was unanimous. Similarly, all present voiced a distrust of the police and city government’s response to Lawson’s killing, and were critical of the institutions’ ability to provide safety and justice for people of color living in the community. When asked why they felt uncom-

fortable using their names in the press, the students’ responses varied. One non-binary student mentioned that as a non-African American person, they didn’t want to be a dominating presence in a discussion they felt should be headed by African Americans. Another student noted that she had heard first-hand accounts of other activists and non-white students being harassed by members of the public. One young woman mentioned that the amount of scrutiny being levelled toward student activists by the university administrators made her cautious about having her name attached to any activism, no matter how legal or benign. Others voiced frustration at what they felt were unfair portrayals of activists in the local press. The social media campaign has already drawn some attention. In the days since Flotho organized the first event at her apartment March 21, she has gotten a response from prominent civil rights activist Shaun King. Johnetta Elzie, a Twitter activist and Black Lives Matter leader who helped organize the Ferguson, Missouri, response to the police shooting of Michael Brown, has tweeted about Lawson’s case numerous times. The website www.afropunk.com, an aggregator of African-American music, culture and news, published a piece Flotho wrote about the killing. And that is just in the last few weeks. But there’s the sense that things aren’t getting better locally. April 15 will mark the year anniversary of Lawsons’ death and many feel there are no signs of justice on the horizon. And Flotho and others worry the case will remain unsolved, alleging it has been mishandled by police. Flotho says she plans to move away from Humboldt, seeking a more diverse environment, which gives her some freedom to speak out. “[The Lawson case] means a lot,” she says. “For me, I know what it is like to be a person of color here, a black student, and it’s not fucking fun. I am doing this now because I feel like if I were going to be here longer, it really wouldn’t be safe for me. A lot of activists have experience with being targeted and threatened, which is why a lot of people usually don’t want to put their name on stuff.” l Collin Yeo writes the Journal’s weekly Setlist music column. He lives in Arcata.

18  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

‘We Are Your Community’ An effort born from tragedy seeks to bridge the campuscommunity divide By Thadeus Greenson

thad@northcoastjournal.com

A

t first blush, Erin Youngblood-Smith and Amy Mathieson couldn’t be more different. And that could have been a problem. A white woman born and raised in rural Montana, Mathieson moved with her family to McKinleyville at 16 when her father, a pastor in the Baptist church, got a job there. She never really experienced diversity until she stepped onto the Humboldt State University campus to study psychology. After graduating, Mathieson was inspired to work with addicts and at-risk populations after a loved one’s overdose death. She found herself Googling, “How do I work with substance abusers,” and decided to pursue her masters in social work. In contrast, Youngblood-Smith, a black woman, grew up in Oakland in the center of the culturally, ethnically and racially diverse Bay Area and spent some years working for an airline after high school. Inspired by a teacher at Merritt College in Oakland, Youngblood-Smith went on to earn an African American History degree from the University of California at Berkeley and set her sights on a master’s in social work degree, viewing it as a stepping stone toward becoming a teacher. When the two met, having joined a cohort of 10 students in HSU’s master’s in social work program, they were paired for an internship working with dependency attorneys in the county courthouse. They

quickly found that despite their differences — religion, race, geography, upbringing — they were both outspoken, passionate and loud, with a similar sense of humor, and the same basic goals in life. “We just clicked,” Mathieson says. “Our differences didn’t divide,” Youngblood-Smith says. “I think that can be said of a lot of people once you get the opportunity to learn about each other from each other.” The two became close friends and, although they didn’t know it at the time, their final project for their social work program began to take root. Over the ensuing months, the pair would meet for “wine Wednesdays” and talk. Often, their conversations turned toward the growing discord on campus regarding how students of color felt they were treated when out in the community. The two shared their perspectives, with Mathieson talking about the good she knows is in the local community and Youngblood-Smith sharing how, while she hasn’t been the target of overt acts of racism, she’s felt the cumulative, exhausting impacts of micro-aggressions — instances when she was treated differently than the white people around her. Mathieson and Youngblood-Smith say they often talked about how to change this dynamic locally, how to impress upon community members how students of color are sometimes made to feel, how


Erin Youngblood-Smith (right) stands in front of PastaLuego in Arcata as Amy Mathieson (left) hangs a We Are Your Community poster in the window. Sam Armanino to change whatever it is about the local culture that empowers some to treat people differently based on skin color. What the community needed, they felt, was a media campaign that specifically celebrated the diversity students of color bring to Humboldt. Then tragedy struck. David Josiah Lawson was stabbed to death at an off-campus party April 15, 2017. The news hit Youngblood-Smith hard. “I was considering moving home,” she says. But seeing how hard Mathieson was also hit by Lawson’s death gave her hope. The pair decided they needed to do something and decided to use their master’s project as the vehicle.

In order to get a master’s in social work through HSU, each student has to complete a “sustainable project that meets a community need.” The program offers no clearer direction than that and Mathieson and Youngblood-Smith felt they had their project. They decided to highlight the experiences of four HSU students of color in a media campaign that would underscore that while they love many of the same things about Humboldt as their white counterparts, they experience the local community very differently. A year later, the campaign is in full swing. About 22 Arcata businesses now Continued on next page »

Email us Here:

press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: music@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: classified@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

19


On the Cover Continued from previous page

NOW LEASING SUNSET TERRACE APARTMENTS

1200-1310 FOSTER AVENUE ARCATA NEW 1 bedroom/1 bath Onsite parking & laundry Efficiency units Upgraded finishes

707.444.2919 www.kkramer.com 20  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

have posters hanging in their windows with the smiling face of a black student. Next to the photos are a few lines of text offering the student’s major, something he or she loves about the local area and how they connect with community. While the posters are upbeat and hopeful, the accompanying videos — uploaded to the We Are Your Community Facebook page — offer more of a gut punch. There’s Dani, a 24 year old from Los Angeles, who says she was drawn to HSU because she loved the trees and the clean air. “I decided to attend HSU because I felt it was away from the noise, the chatter, the busy life of Los Angeles and I felt like it would be better for me mentally, spiritually, holistically,” she says. But Dani later adds that she feels like her “body has been criminalized” living here, recounting instances when she’s walked past white people on the street only to feel them freeze up or “clutch their pearls, so to speak.” She says she’s felt “unwelcome” to the point that she’s not really comfortable leaving campus and going out in the community. There’s Angel, a 20 year old from the Bay Area, who says she was excited to come to HSU because it was a “school in a forest” and the only college that accepted her and also offered free housing. With a beaming smile, she says she likes to go to the forest to write poetry. But she also says she feels like she’s living in a racist community, recounting times when people have come up and touched her hair and asked if it was real, when she wore a scarf wrapped around her hair to class only to have a professor ask if all black people wear do-rags and another instance when she heard a clerk tell another store employee to “check the cameras” when she left a local pharmacy. “I just feel like when I walk in the community people just look down on me,” she says, adding that it has affected her studies. “I will probably withdraw from my classes this semester because it’s so hard living here. … I am leaving. I don’t feel safe here. I don’t feel like this place is for me.” And there’s Jibril, a 27-year-old HSU graduate from Oakland who will be enrolling in the master’s in social work program in the summer and has been working with local youth as a social services provider. Rather than a videotaped interview, Jibril reads a poem he wrote. “You might want to be mindful of how y’all treat people here, because I’m someone who tells your kids what’s wrong or right, I teach your kids life skills, kids coming up to me with their darkest secrets telling me everything about their lives and

I know this community inside out,” Jibril says. “I sometimes question why I’m fighting for this community when I’m treated at times like shit, I’m told by people I talk funny, I act funny, I act wrong, I drive the wrong car, I spend my money wrong. When you have money, they ask how you got it like your job doesn’t pay.” In an interview with the Journal, Jibril says he agreed to participate in the project because of the people involved — Youngblood-Smith and Mathieson. And he believed in what they were trying to do. Jibril says he likes it in Humboldt and has met a lot of good people. But he also thinks it’s important for the larger community to hear students’ stories, to understand how some students of color are made to feel here. “This is their story,” he says. “You don’t have to like it and you don’t have to love it, they’re just letting people know what it is.” For their parts, Youngblood-Smith and Mathieson are busily preparing for the culmination of their project — a “Diversity Day” event at the Arcata farmers market that will have a variety of organizations tabling, cultural demonstrations, a children’s area where volunteers will be reading an assortment of culturally diverse stories. The idea, Mathieson says, is to celebrate diversity and get white community members to “think about what we can do as a community to be allies to people of color.” The pair say they are proud of the project, proud of the response it’s getting in Arcata and, most of all, proud of the students who participated. They hope it will be a catalyst for future change and they hope someone will step in to sustain it. But in the meantime, they’re happy to have had the chance to show that — like their friendship —if people would just sit down and get to know each other, they might find out they have a lot more in common than they might think. It’s a note that Jibril hit in the closing lines of his poem. “I would just say that we are Humboldt,” he says. “We breath the North Coast air. We enjoy Moonstone Beach, just as you. We enjoy climbing Strawberry Rock, just as you. We love listening to the birds chirp and the ocean air, the silence in the mountains. We go to Headwaters, we use the ocean, just as you. We enjoy the redwoods, just as you.” l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


Seriously?

Breakup Letter from President McKinley’s Statue By Jennifer Fumiko Cahilll jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

Breaking up is tough when you’ve got history. Photo illustration by Miles Eggleston

D

ear Arcata,

I didn’t want to do this by letter but I know if I try to get this all out in person, I’ll freeze up. We’ve had a good run together — a century! — and I just think it’s time to move on. For a while now I’ve felt — what’s the word? Stuck. Getting shot in the gut makes a man think. And I’ve had 112 years up here to mull things over. Anybody who says they have no regrets is nuts. Before you fight me on that, let’s remember I had a front row seat when you got tossed from Everett’s for clogging up the jukebox with Def Leppard. Yeah. Just be glad nobody cast you in bronze while you were wearing that sleeveless half shirt. Meanwhile I’m over here drowning in a long coat that makes me look like that shrimp James Madison. Listen, it’s not you; it’s me. I’ve changed. Maybe after gazing down at a couple dozen war protests and homeless veterans sleeping rough at my feet I’m feeling a little less hawkish, less reckless about human life. Maybe standing in the middle of Wiyot land and seeing firsthand the murder and misery my policies wrought, I’m not so proud. And yet here I am, frozen with this look of conviction on my face and the Women’s Peace Vigil over there judging. Yeah, I know you’re over there, ladies. Every goddamn week. We’ve had some good times together, Arcata, but it hasn’t all been family picnics on the grass. I’ve been egged, climbed and covered in Silly String, strewn with condoms and dressed up like a purse dog. I’ve lost count of the number of penises that have been drawn on me. Losing your thumb and standing stock still while people hunt for it like a bronze Easter egg isn’t dignified, folks. And I’ll tell you something else — the thumb they sol-

dered back on my hand? Not mine. I think I know my own damn thumb. The rain out here is terrible. And so is the endless parade of dudes with poi sticks. And when some guy on the plaza starts talking about chem trails, maybe you can brush him off but I can’t escape. I’m literally welded in place for the whole fucking spiel. For the love of God, let me go. When I was younger and, you know, alive, I was more ambitious. Now I wish I’d just coasted through my term, cut the ribbon on the presidential library, maybe done a little public speaking. If I hadn’t gotten shot, I could have slipped into the mists of history between Roosevelt and Lincoln. I could have gone out like Chester A. Arthur or Millard Fillmore — the ones they skip in school plays. They’re not on money and only the hardcore nerds remember them, much less all the bad shit they did. And those two? Both assholes. I mean that on a historical and personal level because between you and me, even in the afterlife they’re pretty smug for a couple of guys named Chester and Millard. But have you seen a statue of them? No. So nobody’s coming after them for the Chinese Exclusion Act or enforcing the Fugitive Slave Act. Those bastards have it made. I hear there’s a petition going around and a group of concerned citizens out to keep me right where I am. Hey, I’m flattered, but we’ve both got to move on. Ask yourself — and remember this is me you’re talking to — how much do you really care about me, like, for me? I mean, you just didn’t seem that into me until you heard I might leave. Do you even like me as a sculpture? I’ve seen how you look at that giant flaming octopus. Is it possible you’re holding on this tightly because deep down you know it’s over? We both deserve better than that. I may

not be perfect but I deserve to be in a museum or a weird private home or a mini golf course that really wants me, not just a symbol of a past that felt comfortable for you. Frankly, some of the guys rooting for us to stay together are creeping me out. First that debate team dropout Tucker Carlson on Fox News came out Team McKata, then Karl Rove poked his head out of his haunted mansion to croak out his support. Does it not bother you that a professional racist like Richard Spencer is in our cheering section? I’d punch him myself if I thought this thumb would hold. Arcata, we’ve got history and that’s not going away. Where we go from here is part of our history, too. You’re still a fun, attractive town and there are plenty of other statues out there for who you are

1-Medium 1-Topping Pizza ONLY $5.99 * BRING IN THIS AD *

now, who’ll grow with you. I’ll take the blame for our breakup since what I did in life, hey, that’s on me. But you’ve got to take me off this pedestal. Sincerely, Bronze President McKinley l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or Jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill. Got a humorous take or tale to share? Then the North Coast Journal wants to hear from you. Contact us at editor@northcoastjournal.com to pitch your column ideas.

600 F Street 432 S. Fortuna Blvd. ARCATA FORTUNA (707) 822-9990 (707) 725-9990

Order Online westsidepizza.com

@northcoastjournal northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Tofu Shop

Rover’s Choice

Locally made, organic, artisan tofu – fresh, baked, smoked – since 1980.

Handcrafted in Humboldt County from local Grass-fed Beef.

Beck’s Bakery

Jessicurl

www.tofushop.com

becksbakery.com

West End Rye from Stone Ground Locally Grown Whole Grains.

Table Talk

roverschoice.com

jessicurl.com

Made locally, sold around the world since 2002.

The Camp Wanna’Beer troupe with its Girl Scout cookie-inspired brews. Photo by Grant Scott-Goforth

Open House

Nerding out with Humboldt’s homebrewers By Grant Scott-Goforth tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt Hemp Wick www.humboldthempwick.com The ONLY locally made hemp wick!

Old Town Coffee & Chocolates oldtowncoffeeeureka.com Voted Best Coffee House by North Coast Journal readers.

Lost Coast Roast

Tomaso’s

Introducing Lost Coast Roast Coffee Concentrate Available At A Store Near You.

Humboldt Made’s #1 selling Pasta Sauce. Now With Organic Tomatoes.

tomasosspecialtyfoods.com

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

W

ith beer geekery on full display, the Humboldt Homebrew Festival might be the North Coast’s most interesting beer party. A showcase for a large and dedicated amateur brewing community in Humboldt County and beyond, the festival sees inventive and off-the-wall notions come to life, as well as solid examples of traditional beer and cider styles. Even with a commercial craft brewing industry that’s given every gas station a great beer selection, the festival — featuring 69 homebrewers and more than 100 different beers, ciders and kombuchas flowing from bottles, kegs and barrels — gives thirsty folks a glimpse at what’s trending in barns and kitchens around Humboldt and beyond. Some of those follow wider trends. The big “new” style at this year’s festival was East Coast IPA, a juicy, unfiltered brew that has taken the craft brew market by storm in the last year or so. There were a couple of good examples, even though haziness, until a few years ago, indicated a mistake in the brewing process. Like Silly Putty, I guess you never know what happy accidents will become a fad. I appreciated a few throwbacks to the trends of yesteryear: There were a few tasty black IPAs, a couple of common

beers and, of course, plenty of hopheavy IPAs. Fruit had a big showing. I’m a fan of fruit-aged sour beers, less so of fruit in other beer styles. Kevin Naset’s table — always a stop recommended by the other homebrewers — offered a deliciously tart elderberry brew. But despite the increased popularity of sour styles, not many were at the festival this year. Ciders had a moment, though, and I counted only one apple among them. There were mango, peach and blueberry varieties, and two standouts made from kiwi and pineapple. “The Elvis,” a peanut butter banana porter, couldn’t quite get the moves right but the banana definitely came through. A barrel-aged maple stout was downright syrupy — it felt like drinking a port — and went well with the bacon bits the brewers were handing out. The inevitable Big Lebowski reference — a Kahlua-infused milk stout after The Dude’s affinity for white Russians — missed its mark but I commend the effort. Milk stouts — brewed with lactose for a smooth, creamy finish — were having a bit of a moment, too. One hazy version featured mangoes, vanilla and strawberries in a nod to milkshakes. Continued on page 24 »


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Bubbles

Ohana Organics

Celebrations

For the bath or shower.

Herb infused toes to the nose skin care. Hand-crafted with Aloha!

We’re in the freezer section at the grocery store. Also, available at the farmer’s market!

bubbles-arcata.com

www.ohanaorganics.com

SPRING /SUMMER EDITION

AVAILABLE SOON! FIND IT ON NEWSTANDS

Redwood Wishing Wells

Living The Dream Ice Cream

Working hand cranks, various sizes, garden or gifts

Can’t choose just one flavor? Try a flight!

707.362.2808

ltdicecream.com

Shamus T Bones

AND ONLINE: HUMBOLDTINSIDER.COM

Humboldts Steak & BBQ Destination since 2002. Learn more at Shamustbones.com

Rolling

Through Humboldt

Picnics by the Bay, the River and the Sea

Dining on the Town

and Drinking on the Waterfront

Los Bagels losbagels.com

Fresh organic bagels available at your favorite local markets!

Eureka Natural Foods

eurekanaturalfoods.com Eureka Naturals Organic Corn Chips available in three different flavors.

Muddy Waters Coffee www.ilovemud.com Deliciously Organic!

Kinetic Koffee Available at many of the finest stores and restaurants in Humboldt County! Caffeinating Humboldt County since 2005.

We grow Humboldt County Businesses.

LIFESTYLE OUTDOOR FUN PERFECT TRIPS

Contact the North Coast Journal sales staff for more information.

FOOD & DRINK

Melissa Sanderson Sales Manager

90-DAY CALENDAR

Linus Lorenzen Tyler Tibbles Kyle Windham

REGIONAL MAPS

442-1400

SHOPPING SOUVENIRS

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CALL: 442-1400 x319

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


Table Talk Continued from page 22

Homebrew champs Fat Cat Brews. Photo by Grant Scott-Goforth

Chili pepper-infused beers made a bit of comeback, as well. One highlight was Kara Bennett’s jalapeño saison, which had a light, crisp flavor and just enough heat to make it pop. Already having cooked my palate, I skipped her accompanying garlic and herb saison, and now I’m having remorse. My favorite strange and ambitious beer that totally worked was Michael Kraft’s Mexican coffee cream ale — a perfectly balanced and unusual American cream ale with cold brew coffee, chili, cinnamon and cocoa nibs. The heat was much subtler than other chili brews, complementing the rich smoothness. Other standouts were bottle competition winner Kenneth Berry’s Belgian dark strong ale, one of the bigger beers of the day at 10.35 percent. A good example of a classic, Berry’s beer may have stood out because it went with a traditional style that was not well represented at the festival. His brewing partner, Caitlin Hoy, also made a showing with her hoppppy IPA, based off of Booth Brewing’s Kukmin IPA. Using a Lost Coast experimental hop and ingredients from other local breweries, it was a tasty mashup of our commercial big shots. If there were an award for pageantry, it would’ve gone to the team of Girl Scoutthemed brewers at “Camp Wanna’beer,” who named and brewed their beers after Girl Scout cookie varieties. I started with the one simply labeled “drank,” which was Kool-aid-y, for lack of a better term. I didn’t try the s’more beer, though, because while this festival is an opportunity to try outrageous beers, I have to draw the line at those that taste like things I don’t like in their original corporeal form. For the creative anachronism set, Doug

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Hickey’s sour “flip” was a hot, mulled, mixed fermentation sour beer that was surprisingly welcome. Based on the historical pub tradition of sticking a hot poker in a mug of beer to heat it up, the flat, spiced beer was tea-like, herby and barely sweet. This would not fly in July, but it felt like a suitable drink for our wintery spring. When I’m getting in the mood for holiday drinks in the fall, I’ll be Googling around for flips and other warm ales. The beauty of putting a bunch of excited homebrewers in a room together is that no one’s trying to sell anything. All that’s on the line is a good time and the (hopefully good) reactions of your friends and neighbors. And if it makes homebrewing seem easy — that’s because it is. With more brewers every year, and increasing diversity in brewers and attendees, we should all hope this inspires more and more DIY brewing. Cheers!

On Tap Your homebrew hangover should wear off by May 5, when the 12th annual Brew at the Zoo returns to the Sequoia Park Zoo. Featuring more than 20 local and regional breweries, live music and kettle corn, this is your chance to find out what beers pair best with making kissy faces at red pandas. Visit www.sequoiaparkzoo. net to find tickets and more information. The Booth Brewing recently signed with Humboldt Beer Distributors, meaning you should be seeing its seriously fun can art in local stores. Booth is putting out very good hazy IPAs in its EurekaSeoul series, so get searching. l


Arts Nights

- 3 DAYS ONLY -

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

FIRE ARTS CENTER

POTTERY

THE

I SION VCENTER

& Kiln-formed glass

SALE

APRIL 27-29

Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years.

Fri. Noon-9 | Sat. & Sun. 9-4 Planters, vases, bird feeders, bowls, platters, kiln-fused glass, jewelry…and more!

DR. KENNETH KAISER OPTOMETRIST Previously with Eye of the Phoenix

FIRE ARTS CENTER

520 South G St., Arcata Across from the Marsh Interpretive Center

616 H STREET • EUREKA

(707) 826-1445

www.fireartsarcata.com

REAL Joyce Jonte, paintings, at Arcata Artisans. Submitted

Arts! Arcata,

15% OFF

Not valid with any other offers or coupons

April 13, 6-9 p.m.

Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at locations in Arcata. Visit www.arcatamainstreet.com, Arts! Arcata on Facebook, or call 707-822-4500 for more information. ALCHEMY DISTILLERY 330 South G. St. Open from 6pm-9pm. Bring your sewing, knitting, crochet, drawing, or other art projects or they have adult coloring books to enjoy while having tasty cocktails. ARCATA ARTISANS 833 H. St. Joyce Jonte, paintings, and Loryn White, ceramics. Wine pour benefits Breast and GYN Health Project. ASTRONOMERS OF HUMBOLDT Center of Plaza. Weather permitting, the Astronomers of Humboldt will be celebrating Yuri’s Night with public telescope viewing and fun educational displays. BELLE STAR 863 H. St. Music by The Attics. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Music by Kentucky Warblers. THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St. Flor D’Luna Winery wine tasting. HUMBOLDT JIU JITSU 1041 F St. Matt O’Brien, SkullFace Art; Cosmic Roll, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu demonstrations; Music by DJ Selectah Positive I-Diaz. THE GARDEN GATE 905 H. St. Jody Himango, photography; Music by the Old Dog; Wine pour benefits the efforts to rebuild the Presbyterian Church bell tower on the 11th and G streets. JACOBY STOREHOUSE 791 Eighth St. PLAZA GRILL (3rd floor): Steven Infantino,

with coupon

(exp. 4/30/18)

ARCATA 1811 G St (707) 825-7400

EUREKA 3050 Broadway (707) 443-7400

FORTUNA 1095 S Fortuna Blvd (707) 617-2502

acrylic on canvas. GAZEBO (Plaza Level): Tony Gonsalves, bird carving demonstration and sales. LIBATIONS 761 Eighth St. Joshua, artwork. Music by Tim Randles. MOONRISE HERBS 826 G St. Jesse Ryno, digital art and Steven Driedger, exotic hardwood skateboards; Music TBA; tea. PLAZA 808 G St. Leslie Price, art. Wine pour from Septentrio Winery benefits Redwood Parks Conservancy. REDWOOD CURTAIN 550 G. St. Adriano Martinez, drano art. MIA BELLA 1041 H. St. Amanda Hart, acrylic paintings; Music by Savannah Rose Band; Wine pour benefits Redwood Women’s Association. THE PRANCING PONY 1075 K. St. “Behind the Walls: Artwork by formerly and currently incarcerated people of Humboldt County.” SANCTUARY 1301 J. St. Collection of local artists, “Future Formers: A Visual Art Exhibition of College of Redwoods Alumni,” mixed media. UPSTAIRS GALLERY AT UMPQUA BANK 1063 G St. “From the Artist’s Imagination,” Bosha Struve, Donna Rosebaugh, Diane Williams, Kjerstine Jennings, Mary Ann Machi, Steve Conger, Hal Work and Pam Cone, photography and art. ● northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

25


Art Beat

Classics by the Bay Face/Off

HUMBOLDT

BAY BISTRO

College of the Redwoods alumni at the Sanctuary

N

O

RT

RN H C OAST JOU

AL

2017 BEST NEW RESTAURANT

20% OFF SINGLE ENTREE

NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS GOOD THROUGH 05/18/2018

CALIFORNIA-FRENCH CUISINE

1436 2ND ST. EUREKA, CA • 707.443.7339

everything for the

Modern Child in sizes 0-16

330 2nd St. Eureka CA 707.798.6326

By Gabrielle Gopinath artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

I

n Dominique Birdsong’s painting “Temporality,” a young African-American woman appears from the neckline up against a luminous backdrop of 1980s teal. A mandala in a deeper shade of teal blooms behind her head, throwing the kinky strands of her short Afro into relief. Her face is rendered in flatly painted passages of acrylic paint, with each sequence of closely related hues, from cocoa to taupe, delineating a single plane. The effect is machine-like but low-tech, (707) 443-7339 recalling the rote technique of midcentury paint-by-number projects as well as the characteristic pixellated appearance of early computer graphics. Birdsong’s subject poses in three-quarter view, her head tilted as if she is about to engage the viewer in conversation. The effect is almost engaging enough to distract from the fact that something terrible seems to be happening to her face. The part that’s closest to the viewer has been violently rearranged in a way that feels disconcertingly familiar from our experience with images on screens. The edges of forms appear to crumble or disintegrate, revealing stepped contours: We’re in the realm of pixels here, not flesh. A matrix of brushmarks in an aggressively unnatural palette of lavender and mauve seems to be expanding, viruslike, from some central point of contagion. The architecture of the subject’s face breaks down; from somewhere in the cheekbone vicinity, a fragmentary second form emerges. The face of a young woman with dark hair and light skin takes shape. Does the double consciousness depicted here come from without or within? Is this accessory face a digital succubus engaged in an excruciatingly personal act of colonization? Or is it a figment of the character’s own psyche? Birdsong’s portrait prompts these questions even as it activates a host of cinematic allusions: from the double negative effects in the climactic scene of Ingmar Bergman’s Per-

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Dominique Birdsong’s painting “Temporality.” Courtesy of the artist

sona to that scene in Terminator II where Arnold Schwarzenegger strips back flesh to reveal android circuitry, to the effects in last year’s horror blockbuster Get Out, in which black people’s minds and spirits are consigned to a “sunken place” and forced to passively witness while their bodies and speech are appropriated to perpetuate a racist culture of white supremacy. Birdsong’s painting is a high point, but there are plenty of strong works in this month’s exhibition at the Arcata Sanctuary, titled Future Formers: A Visual Art Exhibition of College of the Redwoods Alumni at the Sanctuary. Shannon Sullivan, a ceramics artist and art professor at CR, curated the show by drawing on the extensive network of contacts she has made in 11 years of teaching, focusing on former students and recent graduates. Participating artists include Carissa Clark, Genevieve Kjesbu, Janiel Giraldo, Jessica Swan, Katharine Payne, Katie Holt, Keith Fleury, Meredith Smith, Michael B. Rude, Philip Kumsar, Shawn Frost, Sue Kimpel and Samantha Williams-Gray, all of whom live in the area and have studied with Sullivan within the past five years. Works of art include narrative ceramic masks, ink drawings, ceramics, portraits, woven textile panels, mono-printed ceramic tablets and metal sculptures. The artists place emphasis on the low-tech,

homegrown and handmade. Surfaces are gnarly and a wabi-sabi ethos of imperfect and impermanent beauty reigns. Survey exhibitions like this one are valuable, in part, because they give viewers the opportunity to make sense of regional tendencies. Tropes become apparent both in terms of choices made and not made. What artists collectively don’t make is just as striking as the shared themes that emerge. In this case, the absence of video or animation reflects our region’s remoteness and that penchant for the crunchy that is manifested at all levels of the local arts, but it also reflects the degree to which electronic media have yet to make much of an impact on local arts education. At the same time, Birdsong’s media critique reminds us that sometimes a work of art can bring out the conversation surrounding screen culture and self-image without deploying anything more hightech than acrylic paint and wood. The show Future Formers: A Visual Art Exhibition of College of the Redwoods Alumni will be on display at the Sanctuary from April 2-May 27. A public reception for the artists will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, April 13. For more information, contact the Sanctuary at 822-0898 or visit www.sanctuaryarcata.org. l


Setlist

Knock, Knock, Knock on Wood By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

T

his is a special week because this one has — cue the Theremin music — a Friday the 13th in it! Ooooh. Ahhhh. Spooky. Why is Friday the 13th especially spooky exactly? Ask five different people and unless you get any overlap on the “I honestly have no idea” response, you are very likely to get five different answers. You might hear something about the Knights Templar being betrayed and executed, or the number of knots in the hangman’s rope for a very special someone from history. In fact, if you are in certain countries, you might hear a greater emphasis put on Tuesday the 13th or Friday the 17th. Like most superstitions, we all seem to know the what but not necessarily the why. I would argue not only does the latter not matter, but it gets in the way of some good old creepy fun. Our shared superstitions are best as little notes and eerie threnodies punctuating our lives. They serve as ghostly companions to our rote religious practices and secular routines — the salt thrown over our shoulders as we knock on the wood of the ladders we don’t walk under. Only I think that last one is practical: Anyone who has worked construction knows you don’t walk under a ladder. After all, you might have a mirror dropped on you that an umbrella opened indoors couldn’t stop from breaking and cursing you to seven years of bad luck and clichés. I promise on the cracks in the sidewalk upon which I don’t walk on that I won’t do this again until July, when we have our last Friday the 13th of 2018. Have a nice week.

Thursday Remember all of the superstitious paranoia surrounding outer space? From the pre-space age fear of invasion that hit an apocryphal peak during Orson Welles’ War of the Worlds radio broadcast to the moon landing-era fear of returning spacecraft and satellites bringing game changing radiation back from the vacuum — watch George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead

for further information — we have long been suspicious of the final frontier and its contents. Gird yourself tonight and face those fears head on with an evening of awesomeness when The Siren’s Song is invaded at 8 p.m. by returning space-rock conquerors Paleons with help local cosmonauts Ultramafic and Knot Ewe. $5.

Friday Apart from the spooky mumbo jumbo about Friday the 13th mentioned earlier, the day Friday itself is named after the Scando-Germanic goddess Freya (or Frigga or Frija) who, aside from being married to ultra-god Odin, was also considered to be a sort of barbarian version of the goddess Venus by the Romans. Love personified: What’s not to be feared? Fear not though, gentle readers, it’s Arts Arcata night and here are three aprés art-stroll shows to help your heart go tick tock regularly. Fantastic roots-rock maestros Kingfoot play a free show at Redwood Curtain Brewery at 8 p.m. Maybe start a new tradition for the 13th of the month at The Jam for $5 at 9 p.m. with local reggae jammers New Traditions, as the band plays the supporting role for Jamaican vocalist Prince Levy. And finally, head over to The Griffin to hear DJ Goldylocks and East One spin fat wax tracks for a special free Arts After Dark session. Am I the only one who thinks that sounds like a WW II-era jazz tune? It’s also at 9 p.m., by the way.

Saturday

Local singer-songwriter Melanie Barnett hosts a special album release show for her debut Grayscale at the Sanctuary tonight at 7 p.m. Just $10 gets you in the door with a CD in hand and do not worry, I am told by the artist that the album is named after the complex moral shades of gray in our lives and not the zombifying leprosy disease in Game of Thrones so you will not require any special cleansing afterward. Meanwhile, down south at The Mateel, you can spend $25 to see Andre Nickatina

Melanie Barnett plays the Sanctuary on Saturday, April 14 at 7 p.m. Photo by Beau Saunders, courtesy of the artist

work his way through his deep catalog of tracks at 7 p.m. I am not a gambling man but I do study history and if it repeats itself then the odds are good that opener Smoove-E will be the more exciting act to see live. Finally, tonight the fates have convened to deliver us a show at 11 p.m. at The Alibi with two local bands that just belong together. Hollow Down is a fuzzy trio that sounds like a rockabilly band if it dropped the bullshit greaser act and just got high and cool, and Opossum Sun Trail is a San Pedro cactus growing out of the skull that is your eternal youth in love with an endless summer of music ($5). Ahhh.

Sunday The Outer Space has a really good rock show going on tonight at 7 p.m. when Seattle’s own grunged-out riff-lord power trio Wild Powwers comes to town. Local support is provided by Arcata’s perfect little “frog”-rock band Frog and Eureka’s own The Handies playing their first gig ($6).

Monday At 8 p.m. the Arcata Playhouse hosts NYC musician Ryan Keberle and his quintet Catharsis for an evening of protest-charged jazz played by some of the very best and brightest on the scene (price TBA). An hour later at the Miniplex, you can dance your … well I don’t want to say dance your ass off because that makes no sense really. Have you seen professional dancers? They usually have a pretty shapely anchor filling out the back end of their Anchor Blues, so that saying makes no sense. Anyway, you can dance toward whichever goal makes the most sense at

this electro dance-stravaganza as Oakland’s Diesel Dudes descend with Los Angeles’ Sashcloth & Axes to bring the fun, fun, fun. Arcata’s strutting metronomic muses Grocery Outlit provides local support ($5).

Tuesday

Instrumental funk eight-piece Polyrhythmics plays a fusion of Afrobeat-influenced tightness tonight at Humbrews at 9 p.m. ($15). Paired perfectly with this fusion machine is Ghost Note, an offshoot of Brooklyn-based jazz and jam master act Snarky Puppy and led by the latter’s beat makers, drummer Sput Searight and percussionist Nate Werth.

Wednesday Stones Throw Records artist and founder of tastemakers the Klipmode Collective, MNDSGN is a tough artist to define. Part hip-hop producer and part composer/ brainiac, the Los Angeles-based beat farmer has made a name for himself on the fringes of the game for a decade now. He brings a brand new trio to the Van Duzer tonight at 8 p.m. make the place shake and groove like a Martian living room. Fellow traveler Swarvy opens ($15). Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. l Collin Yeo belongs in the stars but he’ll gladly settle for a cabin in the sky. Maybe even a duplex on a raincloud. He lives in Arcata.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

THUR 4/12

ARCATA & NORTH FRI 4/13

THE ALIBI 744 Ninth St., Arcata 822-1220 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-3731

ARcATA's FReshEst bOWl SAVE 20%

with this coupon (Exp. 4/30/18)

Masaki’s MONGOLIAN GRILL AND SAKE BAR 475 I ST. ARCATA 707-822-2241

BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville, 839-2013 CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad CLAM BEACH TAVERN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville

Ocean Night: River Night Takeover 7pm $3 donation Open Mic 7pm Free

World Famous 10-Year Anniversary-special guests TBA 9:30pm TBA

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Kinetik: Latin Nights 9pm Free Wave: Uptown (dance hits) 9pm Free Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

Lone Star Junction (outlaw country) 9pm Free

Eyes Anonymous (’80s Hits) 9m Free

Dr. Squid (dance, rock) 9pm Free

Legends of the Mind (blues, jazz) 6pm Free

FIELDBROOK MARKET 4636 Fieldbrook Road 633-6097 THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

SAT 4/14

SUN 4/15

M-T-W 4/16-18

The Iron Giant (1999) (movie) 6pm $5

[T-W] Banff International Film Festival TBA

Opossum Sun Trail, Hollow Down (country, roots) 11pm $5

DJ L Boogie 9pm Free

Jazz Jam 5:30pm Free Nighthawk (dance hits) 9pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm Psychedelvis and The Rounders (rock, blues) 7:30pm Free Arts! Arcata - DJ EastOne & Friends (DJ music) 9pm Free

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

Marty O’Reilly & Old Soul Orchestra (American roots) 9:30pm $15

THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

The New Traditions w/Prince Levy (reggae) 9:30pm $5

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

[W] Wave: Dub Cowboy (reggae) 9pm Free [M] Monday Night 8-Ball Tournament 6:30pm $5 buy-in

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

Foxtrot, No Pardon (jazz, folk) 9pm $5 Deep Groove Society 9pm $5

[W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free [T] Polyrhythmics, Ghost Note (funk, soul, psychedelic rock, R&B) 9pm $15 [W] The Brevet (rock) 9pm $10 [T] Open Mic. 6-9 pm; 1’s and Tuesdays 9pm TBA [W] Jazz at the Jam 6pm Free, Whomp Whomp 10pm $5

HOW’S THE REST OF YOUR TRUCK? LEON’S CAR CARE CAN HELP WITH ALL YOUR MAINTENANCE & REPAIRS

M-F 7:30-5:15

(707) 444-9636

929 BROADWAY • EUREKA

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 4/12

LARRUPIN 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad

FRI 4/13

Eureka and South on next page

SAT 4/14

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake

Trivia Night 8pm Free

Absynth Quartet (indie-grass) 9pm Free

The Stallions (Ween songs) 9pm Free

MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151

Fred & Jr. (swing jazz) 6pm Free

The Yokels (rockabilly soul) 6pm Free

Home Cookin’ (rock classics) 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

Sambamonium! 10pm Free

MC Chris with Bitforce (hip-hop) 9pm $15

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

Humboldt Green Week Open Mic 7pm Free

SUN 4/15

M-T-W 4/16-18

Tim Randles (jazz piano) 6pm Free

[W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

[T] Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm Free [W] Pints for Non-Profits: Jefferson Pipe Band - music w/ The Humboldt Highlanders TBA [M] Diesel Dudes, Sashcloth & Axes 8:30pm $5 [T] Sonido Pachanguero (salsa/cumbia) 9pm Free

Karaoke 9pm

[M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7224

Kingfoot (Americana) 8pm Free

THE SANCTUARY 1301 J St., Arcata 822-0898

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

[T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Point Drive., Trinidad

SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919

Open Daily 8am - 2am

Potluck (food) 6pm Free

DJ Music 10pm

DJ Music 10pm TBA

8 Year Anniversary Party noon-midnight, Diggin’ Dirt 8pm Free

[M] Bingo 7pm Free

Barnett - Album Release Show 7pm $10 (includes CD)

[W] Misty Mountain Pony Club (fiddle, country) 7pm $5-$20 sliding

DJ Tim Stubbs 10pm TBA Humboldt Green Week Family Fun Fest w/Silver Hammer 2-6pm Free Trivia Night 8pm

After Work Sessions with DJ D’Vinity 4-7pm Free

TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

DJ Music 10pm Free

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

[M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8:30pm [T] Bomba Sonido w/DJ Pressure 10pm Free [W] Reggae w/ Iron Fyah 10pm Free

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Breakfast Served all day Coffee & Espresso Lunch & Specialty Dishes

All Bareroot Fruit and Ornamental Trees

50% off

420 SALE AT OUR ARCATA LOCATION

20% OFF

We still have a nice selection of apples, cherries and peaches. We are open Sundays now from 10-4 Check out our website for more specials and workshops.

839 -1571 | www.millerfarmsnursery.com MON – SAT: 8:30am to 5:30pm | SUN: 10am to 4pm (Nursery Only) | 1828 Central Ave, McKinleyville

MIDDLE OF G ST. ARCATA PLAZA 707.826.7578

Sun - Thurs 8 am - 3 pm Fri. & Sat. 7 am - 3pm

ALL GLASS, VAPES, AND SMOKING ACCESSORIES THROUGH APRIL STAY TUNED FOR 4/20 FREEBIES & DISCOUNTS (707) 822-3090 987 H ST, Arcata

(707) 476-0400 Bayshore Mall

www.humboldtclothing.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

29


Live Entertainment Grid

20% OFF our TEPPANYAKI menu

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

Music & More

EUREKA & SOUTH

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway

VENUE

THUR 4/12

FRI 4/13

SAT 4/14

BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

’90s Night - DJ Music 9pm Free

707 Band (funk, rock) 9pm Free

Claire Bent & Citizen Funk (funk, soul, R&B) 9pm Free

BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Drive, Redway 923-3188

SUN 4/15

[W] Lone Star Junction Line Dance 7-8pm Free, Johnny Young Band (rockin’ country) 8pm Free

Pool Tourney 8pm

[T] Karaoke 9pm [W] Open Mic/Jam Session 7pm Free [T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 7pm $5 [W] The James Zeller Trio (jazz) 6:30pm Free

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St., 497-6093 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

The Gatehouse Well (Irish/Celtic) 6pm Free

LIVE IN HUMBOLDT 415 Fifth St., Eureka 672-3701

Devin The Dude D-Tour w/BSE & The Dirty Rats 7pm $20

LOST COAST BREWERY TAPROOM 1600 Sunset Dr., Eureka 267-9651

John Nelson (music) 6-9pm Free

Pints for Non Profits - June & Ken’s Kinetics 50th Grand Championship Race 5-8pm

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER 59 Rusk Ln., Redway 923-3368 OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Andre Nickatina, Smoov E (rap) 7pm $25 Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free

PACIFIC BAR & GRILL, THE RED LION INN 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844

A Caribbean Bistro

613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

Select Your Savings! 15% Off

15% Off

15% Off

20% Off

Steaks & Seafood

Pizzas & Calzones

M-T-W 4/16-18

Daily Specials

Lunches M-Sat 11-3

limit one item per person, per day

[W] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 6-9pm All ages Reggae Thursdays w/DJ D’Vinity, Selecta Arms 9:30pm Free

Selecta Arms (hip-hop, reggae hits) 10pm Free

DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, top 40) 10pm Free

This Summer Discover

Reggae night

Dinner starts at 3:30pm on weekdays

every thursday

at the

Pearl Lounge 9:30pm-1:30am no cover

HAPPY HOUR AT THE BAR M-F 2:30-6PM TELEVISED BASEBALL$• BIG SCREEN TV TVs $

2 Coors Light 2.50 Sliders $ 3 Microbrews 2.50 Street Tacos $ 5 house margaritas or shots of Jameson $

featuring music by:

Open Every Day For Lunch & Dinner 773 8th St. Arcata & 305 F St. Eureka

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

dj divinity selecta arms & Special Guests


Claire Bent & Citizen Funk play Bear River Casino Saturday, April 14 at 9 p.m. (free)

VENUE

THUR 4/12

FRI 4/13

SAT 4/14

SUN 4/15

PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka

M-T-W 4/16-18 [T] Phat Tuesdays 7pm Free [W] Open Mikey 8pm

THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN Paleons, Ultramafic, Knot Ewe Fetish Night: Jungle of Love 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778 (heavy rock) 8pm $5 9pm $5 THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

Comedy Night 8pm $5

The Ghost Trio (jazz) 9pm Free

STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 744 Redway Dr., Garberville

Upstate Thursdays 9pm Free

[T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free Beats and Rhymes hip-hop w/ Just One and JRiggs 9pm TBA

TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

Friday Night Function (DJ music) 9pm Free before 10pm

VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950

Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free

[W] 420 Pre Funk w/ Dr Green Dreams and FHOG 8pm TBA

[M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in

Sexy Saturdays w/Masta Shredda 9pm Free before 10pm

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Always Sourcing The Freshest Sustainable Seafood Full Bar

[T] Tuesday Blues w/Humboldt’s veteran blues artists on rotation 7pm Free [W] Karaoke Nights 9pm Free

VISTA DEL MAR 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770

The

Sea Grill

Private dining room seats up to 50 for your party or event!

316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187 D I N N E R : M O N D A Y- S A T U R D A Y 5 - 9 pm

Tues-Thurs Special

$2.

00

N

O

RT

RN H C OAST JOU

AL

All Beer on Tap!

M-Sat 11am-3pm & 5-9pm | Closed Sundays 1917 5th St, Eureka | (707) 442-1556 | anniescambodian.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

31


Calendar April 12 - 19, 2018

12 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309. Japanese Bast Fibers with Mari Yamaguchi. 6:45-8:30 p.m. Wharfinger Building Bay Room, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Learn how textile plants like ramie, banana and hemp are turned into fabric using traditional Japanese methods. Free. hhsguild. org@gmail.com. 599-2729.

BOOKS Trinidad Library Book Buddies Club. Second Thursday of every month, 11 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. This casual community gathering discusses books, shares recent reads and offers new suggestions of titles to read. No mandatory reading, just a love of books. Free. trihuml@ co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

Shutterstock

Nerds, gather your herds. The Great Humboldt Trivia Challenge is back. This time the fun takes place on a Thursday (what?), at a new location (huh?) and features a new menu (stop it, already). And you thought you knew everything. Put on your stylish thinking caps and head to Eureka Woman’s Club, April 19 at 5:30 p.m. for Humboldt Literacy Project’s super fun trivia competition ($15, $10 advance).

DANCE Divergence: A Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Original dance by students and faculty of the Theatre, Film and Dance Department at HSU, featuring styles from hip-hop/Latin fusion to contemporary. $10, $8. 826-3928. Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www. redwoodraks.com. Submitted

Dangerous Times

Submitted

Redwood Acres Fairgrounds opens its gates this weekend for the popular Home and Recreation Show, paired this year with the Salvage Decor Festival on Saturday, April 14 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, April 15 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (free admission). See what your home’s been missing, from gardening supplies to hot tubs, and then peruse used, refurbished, recycled and reclaimed treasures.

Shutterstock

Spring is here and so are the shoots and starts of things of beauty, like the exotic orchid. The Humboldt Orchid Society wants you to know orchids aren’t that hard to grow. Stop by the Humboldt Orchid Society Orchid Show, Saturday, April 14 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center to pick up some tips from the experts, see what’s blooming and prepare to grow your own ($2 donation).

Mia McKenzie’s visit couldn’t come at a better time. The author of Black Girl Dangerous, will be doing a book signing at College of the Redwoods on Thursday, April 12 at 6 p.m. in Humanities Room 129 for a talk and Q&A. McKenzie’s novel, The Summer We Got Free won the 2013 Lambda Literary Award for debut fiction and has been nominated for a number of literary prizes. McKenzie writes about race, gender, queerness, class and their intersections, and Black Girl Dangerous is a pointed, poignant, fiery collection of essays and blog posts previously published on the website she founded, www. blackgirldangerous.com. McKenzie’s way of melding her quirky brand of sarcasm and raw, focused social analysis sets this collection apart. It is both unique and fresh, featuring straightforward titles like, “White Silence,” “On Rape, Cages, and the Steubenville Verdict,” “To the Queer Black Kids,” “4 Ways to Push Back Against Your Privilege” and “The Myth of Shared Womanhood and How It Perpetuates Inequality.” She also has a knack for creating lists that call attention to the hypocrisies and inequities of American society that are so relevant today. McKenzie’s visit seems especially timely as the removal of Arcata’s statue of President McKinley is garnering national attention and local racial tensions are at the forefront during student and community protests over the investigation into the killing of Humboldt State University student David Josiah Lawson last year. — Donel Arrington

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

LECTURE Mia McKenzie. 6-7 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Talk by the 2013 Lambda Literary Award-winning writer and author of Black Girl Dangerous on Race, Queerness, Class and Gender. Followed by a Q&A and signing. In room Humanities 129. Free. My Favorite Lecture. 7 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Presenting lectures from local educators. Free.

MOVIES Ocean Night: River Night Takeover. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Featuring Water + Oil, Dan Menton Videos, 7 Rivers Expedition. $3 donation, Free for OC, Surfrider/Baykeeper members and children 10 and under. www.arcatatheatre.com.

THEATER Jane Doe In Wonderland; Theatre Against Sex Trafficking. 6:30-8:45 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Drawing parallels between Alice in Wonderland and young women and men lured into the world of sex trafficking. Survivor talkback and audience Q&A. Appropriate for ages 14+. $15, Free for educators and youth under 18. janedoeinwonderlandplay@ gmail.com. www.janedoeinwonderland.com.

EVENTS Humboldt County Cannabis Chamber Mixer. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Southern Humboldt Chamber of Commerce, 782 Redwood Drive, Garberville.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

GARDEN Humboldt Rose Society. 7 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Learn about new products on the market developed to combat rose diseases. Refreshments,

door prizes and silent auction. 839-2684. Free.

MEETINGS Conservation Meeting. Second Thursday of every month, 12-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Discuss conservation issues of interest to the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. html. 445-8311. Humboldt Grange 501. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Regular monthly meeting. nanettespearschade@ gmail.com. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 443-0045. Toastmasters. Second Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

ETC Community Board Game Night. Second Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@northcoast.com. www. baysidegrange.org. 444-2288. Enrollment Information Night. 5-7 p.m. Big Lagoon Union Elementary School, 269 Big Lagoon Park Road, Trinidad. Find out about the school’s environmentally focused curriculum. Enrollment information at 5 p.m., dinner at 5:30 p.m. Free, donation for dinner. jglueck@nohum.k12.ca.us. 677-3688. Homeowner Workshop. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA), 633 Third St., Eureka. Learn about energy efficiency in your home, business and community, including taking advantage of rebates, financing and tax credits. Free. outreach@redwoodenergy.org. 269-1700. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Come create with your community. Enjoy an evening of knitting, crocheting or whatever fiber craft you love. Food and drink available and bring something to share. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www.northcoastknittery. com. 442-9276. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

13 Friday ART

Arts! Arcata. Second Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art. Downtown Arcata and surrounding area. Free. arcatamainstreet@ gmail.com. www.arcatamainstreet.com. 822-4500. A Call to Yarns Knitting Group. 12-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. 822-5954. SKULLface Project. Every 7 days, 6-9 p.m. Humboldt Jiu Jitsu, 1041 F St., Arcata. Designs by Matt O’Brien featuring icons from Janis Joplin to Che Guevara. Refreshments, chair massage and more. Free. info@humboldtjiujitsu.com. www. humboldtjiujitsu.com. 822-6278.

BOOKS Bryan Radzin. 6-8 p.m. Library Fishbowl, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The author will read from his books, followed by a discussion and book signing. Free. kw1@ humboldt.edu. 826-5656. Friday Afternoon Book Club. Second Friday of every month, 12-1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Discussion group focusing on adult fiction and nonfiction. Call ahead for upcoming titles. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1905.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Paso a Paso hosts dance therapy. Free. www.ervmgc. com. 725-3300. Divergence: A Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre,


Humboldt State University, Arcata. See April 12 listing.

LECTURE

Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www. northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: Nature, Culture and Conservation. 7:30-9 p.m. Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road, Arcata. Jeff Hart talks about one of California’s most controversial regions and the hub of California’s water supply, the “Delta.” Free. www.rras.org/calendar1.aspx.

14 Saturday

MUSIC

Artist Talk. 5:30 p.m. Black Faun Gallery, 212 G St., Eureka. Richard Duning talks about his exhibit “Relationship,” on display from April 7-28. Arts on the Avenue. Second Saturday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Eagle Prairie Arts District, 406 Wildwood Ave., Rio Dell. Local artists, artisans, kids’ activities and music all along the avenue. Free. www.facebook.com/info.epad/info. 506-5081.

Composers Concert. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata. New music by HSU student composers. $10, $5 seniors/children, Free to HSU students. music@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu/music. 826-3531. Eureka Symphony The Language of Love. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. An evening of Chopin and Shakespeare, featuring Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2, with pianist Robert Satterlee. $19-$49. World Famous 10-Year Anniversary. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Special guests TBA. www.worldfamousparty.com.

ART

BOOKS Used Book Sale. 1-4 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Friends of the McKinleyville Library’s sidewalk sale has books at $2 per bag. Bring a recyclable bag and fill it. Large selection of recent arrivals.

SPOKEN WORD

DANCE

Pat McCutcheon and Vinnie Peloso. 7-8 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. An evening with two popular local poets. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1905.

Divergence: A Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See April 12 listing.

THEATER

Eureka Symphony The Language of Love. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. See April 13 listing. Guitar Ensemble. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Music for guitar trios and quartets. $10, $5 seniors/children, Free to HSU students. music@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu/music. 826-3531. The La Patinas. 7:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. Storytelling and rocking, foot stomping Americana and waltzing songs. Doors at 6:45 p.m. $10. fortunaconcert@live. com. fortunaconcertseries.com.

Basquette Quese. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Arcata Playhouse 2018 Family Series presents French clown Iman Lizarazu. $14, $12 students, $10 children 12 and under.

EVENTS Creamery District Night Market. 6-9 p.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. A night market with art, music, food and festivities. Free. creameryinfo@gmail.com. 822-1575. Friday Night Magic Draft. 5-10 p.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. Gaming and prizes. Participate in the draft or just play. All ages. $15. aprilsousa13@gmail.com.

FOR KIDS Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www.humlib.org. 725-3460. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@ gmail.com. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx/. 845-0094.

OUTDOORS Backpacking the Lost Coast. 4:30 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Hike a moderate-level section of the Lost Coast trail and learn wilderness skills, Leave No Trace principles and essential outdoor tips. $185, $160 HSU students. cntract@humboldt.edu. 826-3357.

SPORTS Cosmic Roll. 6-9 p.m. Humboldt Jiu Jitsu, 1041 F St., Arcata. Watch martial artists sparring and grappling under black and strobe lights to the beat of reggae Selectah Positive I-Diaz. Free. info@humboldtjiujitsu.com. www.humboldtjiujitsu. com. 822-6278.

ETC Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Lend your hand organizing and helping the environment at the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@SCRAPhumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt. org. 822-2452. Leave a Legacy Humboldt. 12-1:30 p.m. Hospice of Humboldt, 3327 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. “Transforming Our Community,” a catered lunch and conversation facilitated by Julie Fulkerson, with panelists Gail Saunders, Bryan Hall and Jerry Rohde. $20 (lunch included). info@leavealegacyhumboldt. org. 267-9922. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St.,

MUSIC

SPOKEN WORD Down to the Atom, the Poems of Christa Laririt and Rick Park. 1-2 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Reading and artwork, including haiku paired with paintings. Portion of book sales benefit the library. Free. www.humlib. org. 269-1905.

THEATER Basquette Quese. 2 & 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. See April 13 listing.

EVENTS Home Show & Salvage Decor Festival. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Home needs, from gardening to hot tubs to local businesses devoted to bettering your home. Plus reused, refurbished, recycled, reclaimed items. Free admission. www.redwoodacres.com.

FOR KIDS Family Arts Day. Second Saturday of every month, 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Offering hands-on art projects and activities for youth and families inspired by current exhibitions. Sponsored by PBS North Coast $5 adults, $2 students/seniors, free for children and members. alex@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts. org. 442-0278. Funky Chicken Music Storytime. 11 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Dance the funky chicken with Ms. Sue and hear a good story. Children ages 9 months to 6 years and their caregivers play instruments, sing, dance, and listen to stories. Story Time with Kathy Frye. Second Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.facebook.com/ RioDellLibrary. 764-3333. Storytime and Crafts. Second Saturday of every month, 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Every second and fourth Saturday of the month. Free. blkhuml@ co.Humboldt.ca.us. Continued on next page »

A tradition since 2006. Find the 2018 Wedding Guide at wedding business retailers throughout Humboldt County.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

33


Home & Garden

L�t Coast Cleaning Services

IPE Hardwood Decking • Naturally Beautiful Deep Brown Color • Lasts 30+ Years • Proven Durability and Hardness • Low Maintenance • Twice as Strong as Redwood

707 825-8880

Monday - Friday 7:30am to 5:30pm Saturday & Sunday 9am to 5pm www.almquistlumber.com

Windows, Gutters, Roofs, Power Washing & More Commercial/Residential

(707) 798-1778 lostcoastcs@gmail.com

licensed/insured/bonded lic. #1175

Se Habla Español

Introducing...

The Glacial Facial Cryo-skin-rejuvenation, chemical free, non-abrasive resurfacing.

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

with

Susana King, R. N.

Clinical Specialist in Non-Surgical Cosmetic Treatments Working with Dr. Chen at: Redwood Aesthetic Medicine 2451 Buhne Street, Eureka 707.442.2088 Skin Resurfacing, Botox, Fillers, Laser Hair Removal, Thermage Chin/Tummy/Buttocks Tightening, Sun-Damage, Rosacea Treatments and Stem-Cell Skin Care.


Calendar Continued from previous page

Weekend Play Group. Second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. The only weekend play group in Humboldt County. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Live music. Customers with CalFresh EBT cards are welcome at all NCGA markets, and are also eligible to receive Market Match.

GARDEN Humboldt Orchid Society Orchid Show. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. View and learn about blooms and carnivorous plants. Peruse local vendors. $2 suggested donation. wdpinnix@gmail. com. 845-6858. Monarch Butterfly Workshop. 1-2:30 p.m. Miller Farms Nursery, 1828 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Tom Landis presents a workshop on creating Monarch Butterfly waystations. Call 839-1571, ext. 5, to sign up. Free.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. With leader Leslie Scopes Anderson. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Cindy Moyer. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Backpacking the Lost Coast. 4:30 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. See April 13 listing. Dune Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help remove invasive plants to make room for native plant diversity. Tools, gloves and snacks provided. Bring water and wear work clothes. Free. jess@friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Humboldt Pet Supply’s Monthly Marsh Cleanup. 9:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Enjoy coffee and donuts before helping clean dog waste. Cleanup materials provided. Meet at the South G St. parking lot near the Interpretive Center. Pet food raffle. Free. humboldtpet@gmail.com. 633-6216. Introduction to Sailing at Big Lagoon. 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Learn the fundamentals of sailing, from assembly to capsize recovery. $165, $155 HSU students. hbac@humboldt.edu. 443-4222. Potawat Garden Nature Tour. 8-10 a.m. United Indian Health Services (Potawat), 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata. Moe Morrissette leads a gentle 1.2 mile tour through pastureland that has been transformed into a native plant garden by United Indian Health Services. Free. Restoration Day. Feb. 8, 9 a.m. Trinidad Head, Trinidad State Beach. Remove invasive plants. Wear sturdy shoes. Gloves and tools are provided. Meet at the parking lot next to the Trinidad School. Free. Michelle.Forys@parks.ca.gov. 677-3109. Shorebird Workshop, Part III. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Foot of W. Del Norte Street, Eureka. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society and Alexa DeJoannis to watch the rising tide bring in waves of godwits, willets, turnstones and curlews. Tide will turn around noon. Dress for wind. Free. 202-288-5174. Stand Up Paddleboard (SUP) Introduction. 9-11 a.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Learn the fundamentals on the water in a safe, inclusive environment. $42, $32 HSU students. hbac@humboldt.edu. 443-4222. Volunteer Trail Stewards. 9-11 a.m. Hikshari’ Trail, Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary, Eureka. Help eradicate non-native plants. Meet at the Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary parking lot at the

south end of Hilfiker Lane, rain or shine. Gloves available or bring your own. Please bring your own water. Free. kzm@ employees.org. Willow Creek Bird Walk. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Studio 299, 75 The Terrace, Willow Creek. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society and leader Melissa Dougherty. Meet at Studio 299 after 9 a.m. to arrange carpooling. The group will depart promptly at 9:30 a.m. and end around noon. All ages. Free. willowcreekbirdwalks@gmail.com. www.studio299.tripod. com. 530-859-1874.

SPORTS Aro Galo. 12-2 p.m. Humboldt Jiu Jitsu, 1041 F Street, Arcata. The fourth-degree black belt from the Carlson Gracie Team in Rio de Janeiro conducts a Brazilian jiu jitsu seminar. Barbecue follows. $65, $55 advance, $10 barbecue. info@ humboldtjiujitsu.com. www.humboldtjiujitsu.com. 822-6278. Spring Bouldering Competition. 5-10 p.m. HSU Student Recreation Center, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. A night of competition-grade climbing. Prizes awarded to beginner, intermediate and advanced level men and women. $20, $15 HSU students. src@humboldt.edu. 826-4197.

ETC Adult and Pediatric CPR. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Learn to recognize an emergency, prevent disease transmission and care for breathing and cardiac emergencies for certification from the American Red Cross. $90, $75 HSU students. cntract@humboldt.edu. http://www2.humboldt.edu/centeractivities/activity/certifications-and-trainings/cprfirst-aid/adult-and-pediatric-cpr. Project Learning Tree Workshop. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Learn to use the curriculum and receive a copy of the PLT PreK-8 curriculum guide. $35, $30 HSU students. cntract@humboldt.edu. 826-3357. Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

15 Sunday ART

Artist Reception. 3-5 p.m. Trinidad Art Gallery, 490 Trinity St. Printmaker/various 2-D artist Patricia Sundgren Smith and ceramicist/sculptor Diane Sonderegger are honored. Music by harpist Howdy Emerson. Tea and snacks provided. Free. dunebean@gmail.com. www.trinidadartgallery.com. 677-3770.

DANCE Divergence: A Dance Concert. 2 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See April 12 listing.

MOVIES The Iron Giant (1999). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A young boy befriends a giant robot from outer space that a paranoid government agent wants to destroy. $5. www. arcatatheatre.com. Martini Matinees: The Big Trees. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. The Humboldt-Del Norte Film Commission and the Eureka Theater present classic movies filmed in the Redwood Region. Cocktails, beer, wine and concessions available. www. theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC Babes and Guys Chorus Spring Sing. 2-4 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Celebrating the return of spring, the Humboldt Light Opera Company entertains with an eclectic mix of songs. Donation. info@hloc.org. www.hloc.org. 822-3319. Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations.

gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 499-8516. Faculty Artist Series: Cindy Moyer, violin and John Chernoff, piano. 2 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Beethoven Sonata plus music from every continent. $10, $5 seniors/children, free to HSU students. music@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu/music. 826-3531. Wine and Jazz. Third Sunday of every month, 3-5 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Sip and listen. After every performance, audience members with instruments can jam with the band. $5, $2 students/seniors, free to HAC members and children 17 and under. alex@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

EVENTS Celebration of Life for David Josiah Lawson. 3:30-8:30 p.m. D Street Neighborhood Center, 1301 D St., Arcata. Gather with his family, friends and the community. Special remarks, music and Jamaican soul food. Money raised goes toward investigation efforts. $5, $3 for HSU/CR students. aacae@ humboldt.edu. 826-4588. Home Show & Salvage Decor Festival. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See April 14 listing.

Continued on next page »

10% OFF

*

FINAL PURCHASE PRICE

with this coupon

*Excludes power tools. Not valid with other discounts.

(707) 822-2965 884 9th Street, Arcata

Joan Woodcock Insurance Services

FOR KIDS Children’s Storytelling Hour. 1-2 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Listen to The Extraordinary Voyage of Kamome: A Tsunami Boat Comes Home with author Dr. Lori Dengler. Kids of all ages are welcome. Free. dana@clarkemuseum.org. www.clarkemuseum.org. 443.1947. Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See April 13 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Pancake Breakfast. Third Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. All the homemade pancakes you can eat, organic oatmeal, local fresh eggs and sausage, and more. $8, $3. evenson@igc.org. 629-3421.

OUTDOORS Backpacking the Lost Coast. 4:30 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. See April 13 listing. Drop-in Bocce Ball. 1-3 p.m. Perigot Park, 312 South Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. No experience necessary. Bring your own balls or borrow. Rules available. Free. cityclerk@bluelake. ca.gov. Inflatable River Kayaking. 9 a.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Learn about operating your own self-bailing inflatable kayak from an experienced whitewater specialist. $95, $85 HSU students. cntract@humboldt.edu. 826-3357. Redwood Hike: Headwaters Forest Reserve. 10 a.m. EPIC Headquarters, 145 S G St # A, Arcata. Join EPIC and Latino Outdoors for a bilingual redwood hike along the South Fork Elk River Trail in the Headwaters Forest Reserve. This moderate 3-mile hike should take three to four hours. RSVP. Free. briana@wildcalifornia.org. 822-7711.

16 Monday MUSIC

Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational Continued on next page »

I CAN HELP!

Medicare Supplements • Life Prescription Drug Plans • Dental Plans 725-1200 • 1506 a Main Street Fortuna, 95540 CA Lic. # 0E34152

furniture sale beat the tax man!

no tax on sofas hurry in

Mon - Fri 9 to 5:30

Sat 9 to 5

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

35


Home & Garden

Continued from previous page

Calendar Continued from previous page

United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing fourpart men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Free. singfourpart@gmail.com. 445-3939. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. All choral voices are welcome with a particular call for male voices. Opportunities for solos and ensemble groups, along with the full choir. $50 registration fee w/ scholarships available. 839-2276. Roy Zimmerman ReZist. 7 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. A fast-paced concert of original songs that address the current social condition. 822-3793. $20, or pay what you can, $10 HSU. www.huuf.org. Ryan Keberle and Catharsis. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. The Redwood Jazz Alliance presents its last show of the season. Contemporary jazz. $15, $10 students/seniors.

FOR KIDS Spring Zoo Camp: Earth Day Every Day. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Cub Club (ages 5-7) and Junior Zookeepers (ages 8-11) will each spend the week celebrating wildlife and nature through exploration, lessons, games, arts and crafts. $100. education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. 441-4217.

FOOD One-Log Farmers Market. 1-5:30 p.m. One-Log House, 705 U.S. Highway 101, Garberville. On the lawn. 672-5224.

MEETINGS Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@foodforpeople.org.

Celebrating One Year in McKinleyville!

EXTENDED NO TAX SALE

• Adjustable Bed Bases To Improve Circulation & Health •

• Natural Sheets w/Healing Properties MON - SAT 10 - 6 • SUN 11-5 www.mooressleepworld.com

Arcata 876 G St. (707) 822-9997

Eureka 3 W. 5th St. (707) 444-2337

Fortuna McKinleyville 1201 Main St. 2000 Central Ave. (707) 725-2222 (707) 840-9233

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

17 Tuesday ART

Juried Student Exhibition. 4-6 p.m. College of the Redwoods Creative Arts Gallery, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Reception for student work in ceramics, photography, jewelry and small metals, sculpture, painting, watercolor and drawing for viewing and for purchase. Free.

DANCE Complexions Contemporary Ballet. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Styles ranging from ballet to hip hop. Founded by former members of Alvin Ailey, Desmond Richardson and Dwight Rhoden, the company has been featured on So You Think You Can Dance. $49, $25. Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music. Tonight dance to Fake News, variety music with Sonny & Steve. $5. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

MOVIES Banff International Film Festival. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Celebration of movies about mountain culture and sports. Tickets available at Adventure’s Edge. All ages. www.arcatatheatre.com. Gold Diggers of 1933. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Part of the Based on the Book Classic Film Series — Sin in Soft Focus: Pre-Code Hollywood Films. Comedy about three out-of-work showgirls. Hosted by Charity Grella. Free. www.humlib.org.

MUSIC Humstrum Ukulele Play and Sing Group. Third Tuesday of every month, 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All skill levels. No experience necessary. Harmonicas, fiddles and guitars welcome along with other instruments. Singers welcome, too. All ages. For more information, email Lynne at lynne@dalianes.com. $2 optional donation.

EVENTS Garberville Rotary Club Celebrates Humboldt Green Week. 12-1:30 p.m. Healy Senior Center, 456 Briceland, Redway. Native species planting and lunch.

FOR KIDS Free Admission Week. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. California State and Federal Employees Credit Union sponsors admission to the Clarke Museum for kids and adults. admin@clarkemuseum. org. www.clarkemuseum.org. Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See April 15 listing. Spring Zoo Camp: Earth Day Every Day. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. See April 16 listing.

MEETINGS Soroptimist of McKinleyville monthly General Meeting. Third Tuesday of every month, 5:45 p.m. Luzmila’s, McKinleyville, 1751 Central Ave. A local volunteer organization working to improve the lives of women and girls. Free. aprilsousa13@gmail.com.

OUTDOORS Surfing Seminar On Land. 6-7 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Learn the basics of surfing equipment, understanding tides, proper paddling techniques, the pop-up, standing on your board and surfing etiquette. Free. 826-3357.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games range from $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Lunch with Laura. 12-2 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Bring your favorite fiber craft project (or come find a new one) and a snack or sack lunch. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www.northcoastknittery.com. 442-9276.

18 Wednesday BOOKS

Zev Levinson. 7-8 p.m. Library Fishbowl, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The author of Song of Six Rivers explores the history, diversity and geography of the Humboldt Bay/ Six Rivers region through poetry and archival photography. Free. 826-5602.

LECTURE The Neurobiology of Success. 6 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Learn how to maximize success in your profession, your studies, and other goal-directed activities with Elizabeth Connors-Keith, certified hypnotherapist. Free. www. eurekawomansclub.org.

MOVIES Banff International Film Festival. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See April 17 listing. Humboldt International Film Festival. Minor Theatre, 1013 H Street, Arcata. The 51st annual festival of short independent films from around the world. Hosting narrative, documentary, animation and experimental films. $5 for 4/18-4/20, $10 for 4/21.

MUSIC Misty Mountain Pony Club. 7-10 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Old-time fiddle music and honky-tonk country. $5-$20. 822-0898.


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

EVENTS

EVENTS

Godwit Days Birding Festival. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. The 23rd annual festival features Sharon “Birdchick” Stiteler, author of 1,001 Secrets Every Birder Should Know, and Jack Dumbacher, curator of birds and mammals at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. www.godwitdays.org. 826-7050.

El Leñador Five-Year Anniversary Celebration. 4-6 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, Humboldt State University, Arcata. HSU’s student bilingual newspaper celebrates with food and fun. Free. Godwit Days Birding Festival. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. See April 18 listing. Great Humboldt Trivia Challenge. 5:30 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. An evening of friendly, cutthroat trivia competition befitting the mission and work of Humboldt Literacy Project. $10, $15 at the door. www.eurekawomansclub.org. IdeaFest: A Showcase of Research and Creative Projects. 3-5 p.m. Humboldt State University Library, 1Harpst St., Arcata. HSU students, faculty and staff showcase research, live performances, digital projects and more. Free. kacie. flynn@humboldt.edu. 826-5159.

FOR KIDS Free Admission Week. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. See April 17 listing. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See April 13 listing. Spring Zoo Camp: Earth Day Every Day. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. See April 16 listing. Storytime. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Stories, songs, rhymes — something for everyone, especially preschoolers. Flower Fling Story Ring with Ms. Kim. Cosmos, marigolds, zinnias, stories and planting at this special Storytime. Free. 822-5954. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

MEETINGS Dow’s Prairie Grange. Third Wednesday of every month, 6 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Get involved in your community grange. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

SPORTS Kettle Bell Yoga Class. 8:30-9:30 a.m. Humboldt Jiu Jitsu, 1041 F Street, Arcata. Move and breathe, strengthen and stretch. Mats and kettle bells provided. Free. info@HumboldtJiuJitsu. com. www.humboldtjiujitsu.com. 822.6278.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

19 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See April 12 listing. Sculpture Walk. 3-5 p.m. Humboldt State University Library, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Reception for sculpture exhibit showing from April 19-May 10. Free.

BOOKS Teen Movie and Book Club, Bridge to Terabithia. 4-6 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Watch a movie based on a book.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See April 12 listing.

MOVIES Banff International Film Festival. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See April 17 listing. Humboldt International Film Festival. Minor Theatre, 1013 H Street, Arcata. See April 18 listing.

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet.com. 839-2816.

THEATER Tragedy. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Dell’Arte’s second year MFA ensemble stages original tragedies. Reserve tickets by phone or online. Pay what you can. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663.

5-9 pm Tues-Thurs

5-10 pm Fri & Sat

FOR KIDS Free Admission Week. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. See April 17 listing. Spring Zoo Camp: Earth Day Every Day. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. See April 16 listing. Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See April 12 listing. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See April 12 listing.

ETC Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See April 12 listing. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See April 12 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See April 12 listing.

Heads Up This Week Artists are invited to submit up to three works of art inspired by the redwoods for a juried show. Deadline is June 7. Call 442- 0278 or visit www.humboldtarts.org. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Dove Banding Program seeks volunteers. More information at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Science-Institute. The Ferndale Repertory Theatre offers its annual $500 scholarship award for a Humboldt County graduating senior interested in pursuing a career in the performing arts. Deadline is May 1. For applications call 786-5483, email info@ferndalerep.org or download at www.ferndalerep.org. The Images of Water Photography Competition and Exhibition is open to all photographers. Information at the Morris Graves Museum of Art or at www.humboldtarts.org. Submissions accepted by mail and in person on April 25, noon to 5 p.m. at the museum. Humboldt Bay Fire seeks residents within the city of Eureka and the greater Eureka area to join the HBF Steering Committee. Letters of interest can be mailed, dropped off or emailed to Humboldt Bay Fire, Attn: Deputy Chief Bill Reynolds, 533 C St., Eureka, CA 95501, or wreynolds@hbfire. org. Call 441-4000. Scotia Band’s 2018 Sewell Lufkin Memorial Scholarship is now open. Applicants must submit the form (available at www.scotiaband2.org), one letter of recommendation and an essay of up to 250 words on their musical accomplishments and aspirations by April 20. Humboldt Bee Fest call for artists. Theme: “Dance of the Pollinators.” On paper or canvas, up to 40 inches by 40 inches. Submit entry to Adorni Center or Cafe Phoenix by May 1. Call 443-4424. Tri County Independent Living is looking for trail volunteers to visit trails to identify future accessibility signage needs. Call 445-8404 or email Charlie@tilinet.org.

NCJ SMARTCARD

2 8 5 0 F S T, E U R E K A 707.798.6499

l northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


SEMIT E IVOM JCN

MOVIE TIMES. TRAILERS. REVIEWS.

!semitwohS dniF

Filmland

Silence is Golden

And flipping a teen sex comedy is risky By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com Waiting to hear from the Mueller investigation. A Quiet Place

Reviews

Browse by title, times and theater. northcoastjournal.com

A QUIET PLACE. I’ve probably written more than one ought to about the state of contemporary horror movies and my on-again, off-again love affair with them. For a time, the genre seemed like it might be a bellwether of an upwelling of creativity in American cinema. It looked like a return to the rough and tumble birth of the “independent” movement in the 1970s and its golden age in the 1990s, when inventiveness, drive and ingenuity might, for a minute, have been more important than profit and loss (well, almost). Now it seems like a quaint, naively optimistic perspective. For a moment, though, low-budget horror seemed like the outlier that could be a catalyst to revolution. And then every Marvel movie went on to make a gazillion dollars internationally and it began to feel like all hope was lost, all over again. The truth is probably less dramatic than all that. Despite efforts in the right direction, the mainstream, mega-budget part of the movie business isn’t going anywhere. The audience has been conditioned to want and expect certain things from the theater experience (to covet products, basically) and those things are delivered with consistent frequency and quality. Give the people what they want. Or train the people to want what you’ve got, and then sell it to them over and over and over again. In the midst of this crushing testament to open-market capitalism, though, small-to mid-budget movies, modest endeavors of the imagination, do seem to making something of a comeback. The horror movement may have sparked a revolution, after all — just a slower, gentler one than I might have liked. As part of what is hopefully an actual progressive movement in mainstream movies, we get things like A Quiet Place, an inventive, smart, scary, modestly-scaled

38  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

movie that enlarges and transcends genre by adhering to its tenets. It is a mid-sized horror picture and in that alone there is mass appeal. But it is also deceptively well-executed, emotionally honest and subtly innovative. It’s scary and entertaining but also quite good. In the very near future, the world (or at least much of the U.S. but it’s hard to say) has been set upon by nasty beasties of indeterminate origin. Blind, gigantic, vaguely arachnoid, they hunt with hypersensitive auditory organs, and they’re frighteningly good at it. What remains of humanity has been driven underground, subsisting in terrified silence. Among the survivors is the Abbott family. Mom Evelyn (Emily Blunt), dad Lee (John Krasinski), older daughter Regan (Millicent Simmonds) and younger son Marcus (Noah Jupe) have managed to carve out a relatively comfortable existence on an isolated farm. Due to Regan’s presumably congenital deafness, the family is conversant in sign language and better able than most to fend for themselves, absent the conveniences of modern society. Still, they’ve suffered tragic loss, straining their relationships, particularly between father and daughter. A little over a year after the onset of the crisis, things get especially difficult. A Quiet Place marks Krasinski’s sophomore directorial effort, after The Hollars (2016), which I will now make a point of seeing, and he shares writing credit with the team of Bryan Woods and Scott Beck. Starting with a clever take on an old, old premise (basically an alien/monster invasion), the story moves into the realm of innovation by imposing rules. Because the story plays out largely in silence, the scares that punctuate it have to rely on precise visual composition, timing and editing, rather than the usual Pavlovian musical stabs and other, overlaid effects.

But the absence of sound also moves the story into a deeper, more nuanced place, suggesting the repression and interpersonal distance that have become as much a part of life for the Abbotts as survival. This element imparts a sense of narrative significance and emotional authenticity that lifts the movie beyond the “limits” of genre even as it hits the marks thereof. Maybe there’s hope after all. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

BLOCKERS. Someone, driven by myopia and greed, decided that R-rated comedies are a “risky” proposition. History and everybody’s general sensibility seem to say otherwise, but what do I know. To take a boilerplate teen-sex comedy, though, and to tell it from the perspective of the parents? That’ a dicey proposition and precisely what Blockers sets out to accomplish. It kind of succeeds. Julie (Kathryn Newton), Kayla (Geraldine Viswanathan) and Sam (Gideon Adlon), friends since elementary school, make a pact to all lose their virginity on prom night. Their parents — Julie’s clingy mom Lisa (Leslie Mann), Kayla’s control freak dad Mitchell (John Cena) — find out and decide to intervene. Sam’s maybe/maybe not deadbeat dad Hunter (Ike Barinholtz) tries to stop them and is dragged along for the ride. Julie’s gung-ho for the whole thing and in love with her unremarkable boyfriend, Kayla just wants to get it out of the way and selects the school’s drug chef as her partner, and Sam is struggling with her sexuality. Unfortunately, the movie isn’t really about them. It’s ostensibly about their parents struggling with the looming adulthood of their kids. Sort of. It’s also trying to be a raunchy slapstick comedy but can’t quite pull off the balance. R. 102M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

—John J. Bennett


Washed Up

Shark Evidence Bits and bites left behind By Mike Kelly

washedup@northcoastjournal.com

I

ASL translation of Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony before Congress. Blockers

For showtimes, see the Journal’s listings at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards’ Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

BACK TO THE FUTURE (1985). Michael J. Fox in the classic comedy-adventure about time travel and Oedipal awkwardness. PG. 116M. BROADWAY. ISLE OF DOGS. Wes Anderson’s canine stop motion set in Japan, starring the voices of Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin and Ed Norton, and inspired by, I don’t know, maybe the semester abroad he never got to. PG13. 101M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. RAMPAGE. Dwayne Johnson plays a primatologist whose brainy gorilla buddy is super-sized by a genetic experiment and wilds out with other overgrown creatures. With Naomie Harris and Jeffrey Dean Morgan. PG13. 107M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

SGT. STUBBY. Animated biopic about a stray that became a highly decorated World War I army dog. Starring Helena Bonham Carter PG. 85M. BROADWAY. TRUTH OR DARE. It’s all fun and games until cursed students start hallucinating and dying grisly deaths. Starring Lucy Hale and Tyler Posy. PG13. 100M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

Continuing

ACRIMONY. Taraji P. Henson stars as the wife of a cheating husband (Lyriq Bent) in a Tyler Perry movie without his name in the title. R. 120M. BROADWAY. CHAPPAQUIDDICK. Director John Curran’s drama based on Ted Kennedy’s 1969 car crash and the drowning death of Mary Joe Kopechne for everyone who’s nostalgic for Democratic scandals. Starring

Kate Mara and Jason Clarke. PG13. 101M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA.

I CAN ONLY IMAGINE. This is based on the true backstory of a song about a young musician’s (J. Michael Finley) troubled relationship with his father (Dennis Quaid) and now I don’t know how people make movies anymore. Call your dad. PG. 110M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA.

LEANING INTO THE WIND: ANDY GOLDSWORTHY. Thomas Riedelsheimer’s documentary about the filmmaker and artist. PG. 93M. MINIPLEX. THE LEISURE SEEKER. Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland hop in an RV for a road trip from Boston to Key West just to see if we will watch literally anything she’s in. R. 132M. MINOR.

PACIFIC RIM: UPRISING. Co-writer/ director Steven S. DeKnight’s sequel is still fun, despite a flimsy premise and an overwrought plot. With John Boyega, Cailee Spaeny and Scott Eastwood in the battle bots. PG13. 111M. BROADWAY. READY PLAYER ONE. Steven Spielberg’s self-referential adventure about revolution via virtual reality gaming is a showcase for immersive world making and ultimately distracting effects. The familiar story goes too long, frying the audience’s eyes and wearing out its patience. PG13. 140M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

A WRINKLE IN TIME. Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s fantasy novel about a girl’s (Storm Reid) search for her father (Chris Pine) with the help of a mystical trio (Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling) lacks the narrative coherency and consistency of character needed to appeal to those who aren’t already devoted fans. PG. 92M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill l

should warn you that I own a large pack of imaginary dogs. They are all rescue dogs that needed a forever home, so it’s cool. And I’ve taught them not to bark. Instead, they shark. Whenever they see a stranger they go, “SHARK! SHARK! SHARK!” It scares the hell out of people. But I can’t take the pack to the beach anymore after they triggered that stampede, which killed more surfers than have all actual sharks combined. So if you hear an imaginary dog yelling “Shark!” at the beach, and you don’t actually see a shark, how can you be sure it’s not an imaginary shark? Well, you might get lucky and find evidence washed up on the beach. I guess I’ve probably found a couple hundred Dungeness crab trap marker floats on local beaches over the years. Exactly two of them had obvious shark bites. A float probably looks enough like food to be worth a shark’s attention. Or maybe sharks are smart enough to simply be curious about odd objects in their environment. So if you are willing to eat multicolored marshmallows, don’t get judgmental about sharks. Also check any washed up soft plastic fishing lures. It’s not uncommon for lures to end up with rows of little triangular divots that most likely were made by some small shark’s teeth. Similarly, I found a chunk of Humboldt squid at Cape Mendocino a few years back that had scalloped wounds like it had been assaulted with giant pinking shears. (Warning: The next paragraph is particularly nasty.) Sea lion carcasses are worth checking for bites. I found a nice rotten one that looked like a marinated, maggoty mega Swiss cheese. It was pocked with holes that seemed shark-ish in origin. I found another adult sea lion bitten in half — nice and fresh with healthy-looking pink intestines tumbling out. I guess it could have been halved by orcas or a ship strike, but I’m going with white shark. And another time I saw a sad-looking sea lion clinging to the edge of an offshore rock with a big chunk missing from its bum. I waited but

The shark-bitten pectoral fin of a sei whale. Photo by Mike Kelly

never saw a shark. And you should definitely check washed-up whales for shark evidence. The sperm whale that washed up on Clam Beach in 2003, and the sei whale (I think that’s what they decided it was) near Freshwater Lagoon in 2005 both had a bunch of bites on their bits. Some of the bites were big enough to have been made by adult white sharks, I believe. Probably the most classic shark evidence is the bitten surfboard. Rather than washing up, these boards are always best when delivered to shore personally by the owner. This is what happened in 1990 when I happened to be standing near Trinidad Head watching a surfer, whom I’ll call Mister S, paddling back out and then straddling his board. He was then roughly investigated by a white shark — launched into the air and flung sideways with his board in a rooster tail of seawater. I didn’t actually see the shark as far as I could tell. But Mister S got back on his board and paddled in strong, thereby delivering his evidence-laden board to the beach in the preferred manner. And then later he was gracious enough to let me take a picture of the board in the parking lot of Mad River Community Hospital. l Mike Kelly writes other stuff as M. Sid Kelly on Amazon.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

39


Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts BEG WATERCOLOR @ PLUM BLOSSOM STUDIO, ARCATA Learn basic watercolor techniques with mindfulness practice. 6 Fridays; 04/27− 06/01; 9− 11:30; $120 (707) 601−9955 www.thaoart.biz INTRODUCTION TO GLASS FUSING WITH MELISSA ZIELINSKI. SAT 2 − 5PM APRIL 14 & 21 OR WEDS. 9 − NOON MAY 16 & 23 Learn the basics of glass fusing while creating unique works of Art ! Create a sun catcher and a 4.5 " square dish all while becoming familiar with the Fire Arts Glass Studio. No experience required. $150.00 + 15 materials fee. Class size limited. Sign up today! Call 707−826−1445. 520 South G St. Arcata (A−0412) PRINTMAKING CLASS @ ARTS & DRAFTS Design your own image for printmaking, carve a soft block reversal of your design, and print a one−color relief print. Class fee includes tools, supplies, and one drink of your choice. $45 April 21, 6pm www.artsanddraftseureka.com/event

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BEGINNING RUEDA DE CASINO, CUBAN SALSA 6− WEEK DANCE SERIES APR 18 − MAY 23 Salsa in the round to the sounds of timba, son, and reggaton! Motions and partner changes are called. Six−week starter series is $40; Wednesdays 7:15−8:15pm. At the Redwood Raks World Dance Center, 824 L St. Arcata. (707) 822−2652 jacaronda@gmail.com https://sites.google.com/site/arcatarueda/home DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Remember the innocence of dancing when you were little? Remember moving to the music and just feeling the joy of dancing? That’s what we work on recapturing. We are your ballroom dance experts, offering group and private lessons to all levels of dancers. (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (D−0531) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0405) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0405) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m.− 8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0426)

Fitness PICKLEBALL CLINIC − May 1 − 22, Tuesdays 10:30am − noon. Fortuna’s Fireman Pavilion. Call CR Commu− nity Education at 707−476−4500. (F−0412)

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−0426) PRIVATE KICKBOXING TRAINING Want to learn kickboxing? Now offering 1 on 1 and small group training. Learn an effective martial art while getting into shape! $35 for a half hour, $60 for an hour! (703) 398−9606 david_kirlin@yahoo.com SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0426) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0426)

Food & Drink FOODWISE whole. plant based. kitchen * Cooking classes * Nutritional education * Sunday meal prep www.foodwisekitchen.com (F−0705)

Kids & Teens SPRING BREAK CAMP 8:30 a.m. − 12:30 p.m. RampArt Indoor Skatepark 700 S. G St. Arcata. Skateboards, BMX, Scooters. Instruction, safety and more. Open to all skill levels. Ages 6−15 rampartskateparg.org or call 826−0675 to sign up. (K−0412)

Lectures FREE FIRST TIME HOME BUYER WORKSHOP. 11 − 12pm. MikkiMoves Real Estate, 805 7th St, Eureka. Light lunch. Please RSVP. mikkimoves.com. Kimberly@MikkiMoves.com. 599−3788. (L−0412)

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0426) THIRTY MINUTES & EAT WITH LOUISA ROGERS. Explore how to create fast, filling, delicious non− meat dishes in 30 minutes, tops. Recipes included. Mon., April 23, 2−4 p.m. OLLI Members $30. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0412)

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

USING GENETICS FOR GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH WITH MICHAEL COOLEY. Discover types of genetic tests helpful to genealogists and the ways in which they dovetail with conventional genealogical methods. Thurs. April 26 & May 3, 1−4 p.m. Class fee is $60 for OLLI Members. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0412)

Spiritual ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sunday 7:55 a.m. at Trillium Dance Studio, 855 8th St (next to the Post Office). Dharma talks are offered two Sundays per month at 9:20 a.m. following meditation. EUREKA: Wed’s, 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte St., enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 12.For more information call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. (S−0426) HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOW− SHIP. We are here to change lives with our love. Services at 9am and 11am on Sunday. Child care is provided at 9am. Childrens religious education is at 11am. 24 Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0426) INTUITIVE READINGS by donation 541−324−3855 (S−0426) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0426) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. www.tarotofbecoming.com (707) 442−4240 carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0405)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0405) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (TS−0405) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0629)

Vocational BEGINNING MICROSOFT ACCESS − May 1 − 10, Tues/Thurs 4pm − 7pm. Call CR Community Educa− tion at 707−476−4500. (M−0412) COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICES TRAINING − June 12 − August 16, Tues./Thurs. 8:30am − 12:30pm. Contact the Job Market at (707) 441−4627 for scholarship opportunities. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500 (V−0412) FINDING YOUR FUTURE: WORKPLACE READI− NESS SKILLS − May 23 − June 6, Wednesdays 4pm − 6pm. CR Garberville Site. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0412) FIRELINE SAFETY AWARENESS for Hired Vendors − Saturday, April 21st 8am − 5pm. CR Main Campus. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500 (V−0412)

FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0426) FREE BEGINNING COMPUTER CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0426) FREE CLASS TO PREPARE FOR THE GED OR HISET Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0426) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0426) FREE LIVING SKILLS CLASSES FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0426) INJECTIONS − Sunday May 20th, 8am − 6pm. CR Main Campus. Call CR Community Education at 707 −476−4500 (V−0412) IV THERAPY − June 3 − 17, Sundays 8am − 8pm. CR Main Campus. Call CR Community Education at 707 −476−4500. (V−0412) LEAVE NO TRACE TRAINER CERTIFICATE. Expand your knowledge of the outdoors. Includes overnight camping trip! May 2, 5 & 6. $100. www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−0412) LOAN SIGNING − Monday, April 23 5:30pm− 9:30pm. Must have or be in the process of obtaining a California State Notary Public Commis− sion. Call CR Community Education at 707−476− 4500. (V−0412) NOTARY − Tuesday, April 24 8am−6pm. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0412) OFFICE SPECIALIST TRAINING − May 14 − June 27, Mon./Tues./Wed. 8:30am − 12:30pm. Contact the Job Market at (707) 441−4627 for scholarship opportunities. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500 (V−0412) VENIPUNCTURE − Sunday May 27th, 8am − 6pm. CR Main Campus. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V0412)

Wellness & Bodywork AIKIDO − April 17 − May 31, Tues/Thurs. 5:30pm − 6:30pm. Jefferson Community Center. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0405) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Herbal & Traditional Healing in Greece with Thea Parikos. May 4 − 14, 2018. Discover the beauty, aromas, traditional and modern uses of many medicinal plants on this amazing journey of learning to the Aegean islands of Ikaria & Samos! Beginning with Herbs. Sept 26 − Nov 14, 2018, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2019. meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0426) MINDFULNESS − Saturdays, April 28 − June 9, 10:30am − 12:30pm. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (W−0412)


Legal Notices PUBLIC SALE

AYURVEDIC SELF−CARE & AYURVEDIC LIVING PROGRAM W/TRACI WEBB. @ NW Institute of Ayurveda. "Ayurvedic Self−Care Immersion": May 26 −27, Enjoy Daily Yoga, Self−Care & Lunch! Prerequi− site To & FREE for "Ayurvedic Living Program"regis− trants by 5/5, OR $200 by 5/5, $250 after. "Ayurvedic Living Program", 9−Month Self−Healing Journey, Nationally Approved "Ayurvedic Health Counselor" Certification Program, Learn Optimal Nutrition, Lifestyle, Psychology, Women−Children− Pregnancy, Constitution, Habit Change, Counseling, Herbs, Essential Oils, Detox, Starts June 5, Register: www.ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601−9025 (W−0329) REFLEXES AS FOUNDATIONS FOR BRAIN−BODY HEALTH − Saturday, May 19th 10am − 4pm. CR Garberville Site. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (W−0412) SET YOURSELF FREE! − June 7 − July 19, Thursdays 5:30pm − 7:30pm. CR Garberville Site. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (W−0412)

YOUR CLASS HERE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Penal Code and provi− sions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 21st of April 2018 at 10:00 am on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Four Star Mini Storage at 271 N. Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna, California County of Humboldt the following:

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog. Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com

Ryan Hill, unit 12 Ryan Hill, unit 28 Charles Roybal, unit 20 Tracy Perkins, unit 36 Dawson Phillips, unit 42 Dawson Phillips, unit 43 Fred Elliott, unit 61 Marcie Standart, unit 75 Items to be sold include but are not limited to: Antiques, Tools, House− hold furniture, sporting equipment, books, clothing and miscellaneous household items and boxes and bags of unknown contents. Purchases must be paid in cash at the time of the sale plus a $100.00 deposit to be returned when the unit is cleaned out. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed on the day of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Four Star Mini Storage, 707−725−0702. Dated this 6th day of April, 2018. 4/12, 4/19 (18−086)

50 and Better

Public Notice Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will sell by competitive bidding on Saturday, April 21, at 10:00 am on the premises where said property has been stored and which is located at Fields Landing Storage 6790 Fields Landing Dr. Fields Landing, CA the following:

Arts & Crafts Computer Fitness Kids & Teens

#34 Kevin Burroughs #64 Teddy Cassella #22 Mary Cruz #47 Brian Hickey #73 Simon Kang #68 Dax Kinsey #33 Elliot Kuderiz #67 Artina Lowery #36 Joshua Malsie #72 William McCoard #35 Williwam McCoard #58 Kevin Nazelrod #55 Harun Mulhammed

Lectures Dance & Music Theatre & Film Spiritual Support Therapy

Bodywork

4/12, 4/19 (18−084)

Vocational

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Scott Steven Eskra CASE NO. PR180086

NCJ HUM PLATE

Diva Deverraux April 1, 2018 Diva Deverraux, of Eureka CA, died suddenly Easter Sunday, April 1, 2018. She was born in Los Angeles CA on April 22,1965 to Marco and Cynthia Dean Julian, joining brother David. The family spent Diva’s childhood in Santa Monica, CA. As a tiny girl, she sat at the family’s piano with her father, making music together. Music, dance and the arts continued to be a big part of her entire life. She had 3 daughters, Brynne, Kailey and Arielle, now 26, 16 and 14 years of age. As a young mother she attended college and worked diligently, achieving a Bachelor of Science degree in business from Regis University. She was a successful insurance broker in Eureka for 17 years, earning the love and appreciation of many of her clients. Those whose lives she touched will remember her sense of humor, her quick wit, kind nature, strong spiritual beliefs and her love of animals. Her greatest joy was spending time with her 3 daughters. She was preceded in death by her father. She is survived by her husband Paul Goodman, her daughters Brynne Marie Gerardi, Kailey Marie Fuerstenberg, and Arielle Kathryn Fuerstenberg, her mother Cynthia Dean Julian and her brother David Julian. Other survivors include a niece, Anja Julian, numerous aunts and uncles and many cousins. The love and joy she brought to those whose lives she touched lives on in our memories and in addition, because she chose to be an organ donor, she now lives on through many others. A memorial service to celebrate Diva’s life and mourn her passing will be held on Sunday, April 29 at 2 p.m. at the Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka CA. 95501. In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to an animal rescue organization.

Obituary Information

Units have personal & misc. house− hold items. Must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. $100.00 deposit plus bid price.

Wellness

442-1400 × 305 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

Memorials

Obituary may be submitted via email (classifieds@northcoastjournal.com) or in person. Please submit photos in jpeg or pdf format. Photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for the weekly edition is at 5 p.m., on the Sunday prior to publication date.

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, 310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401 the will or estate, or both, of Scott Steven Eskra, Scott S. Eskra, and Scott Eskra northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner Brandy L. Eskra In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition

41


Scott Steven Eskra CASE NO. PR180086

Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

default

Humboldt Waste Management Authority is soliciting proposals for Recycling Processing and Marketing of Regional Curbside Collected Recyclable Materials. For more information, please visit www.hwma.net/about/open-proposals-services NOTICE OF RIGHT TO CLAIM EXCESS PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Made pursuant to Section 4676, Revenue and Taxation Code

Excess proceeds have resulted from the sale of tax defaulted property listed on this notice on March 5th, 2018. Parties of interest, as defined by California Revenue and Taxation Code section 4675, are entitled to claim the excess proceeds. All claims must be in writing and must contain sufficient information and proof to establish a claimant’s right to all or any part of the excess proceeds. Claims filed with the county more than one year after recordation of the Tax Collector’s deed to the purchaser on March 23rd, 2018, cannot be considered. ASSESSMENT NO.

ADDRESS/LOCATION

EXCESS PROCEEDS

052-291-006-000

No Situs, Rio Dell

$5,601.60

109-111-003-000

846 Wolverine Way, Shelter Cove

$1,316.02

109-211-002-000

91 Otter Ln, Shelter Cove

$118.45

109-211-031-000

8115 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove

$272.07

109-302-029-000

168 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove

$139.06

110-021-002-000

7813 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove

$274.74

110-091-024-000

452 Willow Glen Rd, Shelter Cove

$265.88

111-012-017-000

745 Redwood Rd, Shelter Cove

$144.02

111-152-039-000

34 Cove Ct, Shelter Cove

$48,518.37

111-202-027-000

9306 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove

$158.18

111-202-028-000

9290 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove

$144.10

522-131-001-000

No Situs, Willow Creek

$11,151.31

525-201-034-000

No Situs, Hoopa

$6,514.22

525-291-009-000

No Situs, Hoopa

$8,746.17

529-131-008-000

37756 St Hwy 96, Orleans

$112,676.07

Claim forms and information regarding filing procedures may be obtained at the Humboldt County Tax Collector’s Office, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501 or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free (877) 448-6829 between 8:30 am-Noon and 1:00pm-5:00pm, Monday through Friday. I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on March 27th, 2018

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Scott Steven Eskra, Scott S. Eskra, and Scott Eskra A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner Brandy L. Eskra In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Brandy L. Eskra be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Daniel E. Cooper Morrison, Morrison & Cooper 1437 Third Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−8011 Filed: April 5, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

Published in North Coast Journal on March 29th, April 5th & 12th, 2018

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−089)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Brenda L. Basler, aka Brenda Lee Basler CASE NO. PR180085 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Brenda L. Basler, aka Brenda Lee Basler A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner Robert Basler In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Robert Basler be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−6744 Filed: April 5, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−093)

1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−6744 Filed: April 5, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−093)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Raymond Eugene Alves CASE NO. PR180080 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Raymond Eugene Alves A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner Betty Joy Alves In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Betty Joy Alves be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 26, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court

attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Leon A. Karjola, CSB NO. 69056 Attorney at Law 732 Fifth Street, Suite C 707−445−0804 Filed: April 3, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−092)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Marc Gerard Pelletier CASE NO. PR180084 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Marc Gerard Pelletier, Marc G. Pelletier, and Marc Pelletier A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner Amina A. Allen In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Amina A. Allen be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali−


of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Daneil E. Cooper Morrison, Morrison & Cooper 1437 Third Street Eureka, CA 95501 Filed: April 4, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−090)

SUMMONS (Parentage Custody and Support) CASE NUMBER: FL180133 -------NOTICE TO Defendant: Ruben Amador Miranda You are being sued by Plaintiff: Maira Alegrandra Vega Rodriquez You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response at the court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your right to custody of your children. You may also be ordered to pay child support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self−Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local bar associa− tion. NOTICE: The restraining order remains in effect against each parent until the petition is dismissed, a judgement is entered, or the court makes further orders. This order is enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforce− ment officer who has received or seen a copy of it. FREE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Maira Alegrandra Vega Rodriguez 205 Seahorse Cir Fendale, CA 95536 Date: February 23, 2018 Clerk, by

is: Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Maira Alegrandra Vega Rodriguez 205 Seahorse Cir Fendale, CA 95536 Date: February 23, 2018 Clerk, by Kim M. Bartleson/Jackson W., Deputy 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 (18−067)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00177 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EARTHEN HEART ACUPUNCTURE & BOTANICALS, EARTHEN HEART ACUPUNCTURE, EARTHEN HEART BOTANICALS Humboldt 1460 G Strreet Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 112 Arcata, CA 95518

Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Melina Volz, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 26, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19 (18−077)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00199 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MONUMENT MTN REDWOOD SHADOWS Humboldt 2501 Monument Rd Rio Dell, CA 95562 PO Box 105 Rio Dell, CA 95562 Beverly L Chang 2501 Monument Rd Rio Dell, CA 95562

Yasmin L Spencer 988 9TH Street Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Yasmin Spencer, Owner, Acupuncturist This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 2, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk 4/12, 4/19, 4/26, 5/3 (18−088)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00166 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HEALTHY HUMBOLDT Humboldt 36 7th St Arcata, CA 95521 Melina V Volz 480 Maple Lane Garberville, CA 95542 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Melina Volz, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 26, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Beverly L Chang, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 9, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 4/12, 4/19, 4/26, 5/3 (18−087)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00152 The following person is doing Busi− ness as WOODFOOT SURFCRAFT

knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gretchen Anderson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 (18−071)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00173 The following person is doing Busi− ness as RICARDO’S WINDOW TINTING Humboldt 20369 Broadway, Suite B Eureka, CA 95501 Ricardo M Garcia−Herrera 3840 Rohnerville Rd Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ricardo M Garica−Herrera, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 27, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−082)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00149 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT BROTHERS Humboldt 5600 West End Rd, Suite D Arcata, CA 95521 Humboldt Sun Farms Collective, MBC CA 3975867 460 Valle Vista Oakland, CA 94610

Humboldt 3517 Park St Eureka, CA 95501 Lucas D DavisThornton 3517 Park St Eureka, CA 95501 Gretchen A Anderson 3517 Park St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gretchen Anderson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 (18−071)

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Michael Earls, COO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 16, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 (18−068)

Continued on next page »

NOTICE OF CITY COMMISSION VACANCY Notice is hereby given that the Fortuna City Council is accepting applications for the position of Alternate Planning Commissioner. Appointments will be made by the City Council at the Regular Meeting on May 7, 2018. Applicants will be requested to partake in interviews prior to this meeting. The purpose of the Planning Commission is to oversee the development of the General Plan, formation and administration of the zoning map and ordinance, and review of development applications. To qualify for membership on any Council appointed board, Commission or Committee, a person must be 18 year of age or older and a registered elector of the City OR be the owner of a business located within the City limits. However, in no event shall less than a majority of any board or commission be made up of qualified registered electors of the City. City Commission application forms can be obtained at City Hall, 621 11th Street, Fortuna or on the City’s website www.friendlyfortuna.com. Applications for the Alternate Planning Commissioner position will be accepted until Monday, April 23, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Buffy Gray, Deputy City Clerk (707) 725-1411 default

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR EXECUTIVE OFFICER SERVICES FOR HUMBOLDT COUNTY LAFCO.

The Humboldt County Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo) is seeking proposals from qualified individuals or professional consulting firms to provide Executive Officer staffing services on a part time, independent contractor basis. Humboldt LAFCo intends to enter into a two-year contract for Executive Officer staffing services with the potential for renewal, commencing with the fiscal year July 1, 2018. Services will include managing the day-to-day operations of the Commission; scheduling and preparing for regular and special meetings of the Commission; maintaining the Commission’s website; processing applications for Commission permits, approvals, etc.; preparing special reports and studies as mandated by statute; administering the budget; and related administrative duties. Qualifications generally include experience, education and training related to LAFCo activities and local governmental entity organization, structure, services and planning. General information about California Local Agency Formation Commissions is available at the California Local Agency Formation Commission website, www.calafco.org. Information specific to Humboldt LAFCo and additional details about this Request for Proposals, including information concerning duties and responsibilities; experience, education and training; minimum qualifications; proposal requirements; submittal requirements; selection process; and insurance requirements are available at the Humboldt LAFCo website, www.humboldtlafco.org. Proposal submittals are due on or before 5 p.m. on April 27, 2018. Proposals are to be submitted to Humboldt LAFCo’s legal counsel, Mitchell, Brisso, Delaney & Vrieze LLP; 814 Seventh Street; Eureka, CA 95501. For questions concerning the Request for Proposals and the selection process please contact Humboldt LAFCo Counsel Paul Brisso at 707-443-5643.

RESTAURANTS A-Z

`

Search by food type, region and price. northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

43


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00165

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00167

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00138

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00158

The following person is doing Busi− ness as INN OF THE LOST COAST/CALD− WELL ENTERPRISES

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HAPPY HUMBOLDT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CALIFORNIA GLASS/HUMBOLDT STUDIOS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SPEEDEX #2

Humboldt 205 Wave Drive Shelter Cove, CA 95589

Humboldt 1834 Golf Course Rd Bayside, CA 95524 Box 358 Bayside, CA 95524

Humboldt 550 South G Street #7 Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 790 Redwood Drive Garberville, CA 95542 781 Samoa Blvd Arcata, CA 95521

Shelter Cove Ocean Front Suite Inc CA 04−247706 205 Wave Drive Shelter Cove, CA 95589

Tara E Mahony 1834 Gold Course Rd Bayside, CA 95524

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Michael Caldwell, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 23, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19 (18−075)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Tara E. Mahony, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 26, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk

Gabriel Watson 467 G Street Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gabriel Watson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 12, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 (18−070)

3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19 (18−078)

Ahmad Corporation CA 3012755 781 Samoa Blvd Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Toheed Ahmad, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 21, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−083)

United Indian Health Services, Inc.

IMMEDIATE RELEASE UIHS is seeking interested Indian Community Members in serving as potential Candidates to be members of the UIHS Board of Directors. Potential Candidates must reside in and around the UIHS Service area within one of the following areas:

Area 1: Area 2: Area 3:

Del Norte County Orick, Trinidad, McKinleyville, and Blue Lake Arcata, Eureka, Table Bluff, and all points south (within Humboldt County) Area 4: Hoopa and Willow Creek Area 5: Johnson’s and Orleans All interested Indian Community Members may request a Declaration of Candidacy packet at www.uihs.org or call 707.825.4121 or 707.825.4123. The Declaration of Candidacy forms must be submitted no later than April 13, 2018 to: UIHS Election Committee, P.O. Box 4238, Arcata, CA 95521.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. R-1400118 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name ANDY’S INDEPEN− DENT VOLVO SERVICE Humboldt 33 Chartin Rd Blue Lake, CA 95525 PO Box 912 Blue Lake, CA 95525 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on March 11, 2014 Anderson C Adams 33 Chartin Road PO Box 912 Blue Lake, CA 95525 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ Anderson C Adams, Owner This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date March 1, 2018 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office Kelly E. Sanders s/ se, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12 (18−069)

LEGALS? classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 × 305

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Dean Perkins CASE NO. CV17117 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Kathleen Williams CASE NO. CV170995 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

PETITION OF: Dean Perkins TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Dean Perkins

PETITION OF: Kathleen Williams TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: Kathleen Williams

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Dean Perkins to Proposed Name Buddy D Perkins Sr

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Kathleen Williams to Proposed Name Kathleen Crosby Williams

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 21, 2018 Time: 1:30 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: February 13, 2018 Filed: February 13, 2018 /s/ Kimberly H Judge of the Superior Court

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 15, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: December 20, 2017 Filed: December 20, 2017 /s/ Leonard LaCasse Judge of the Superior Court

4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26 (18−081)

3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19 (18−076)

NCJDAILY No longer just a weekly, the Journal covers the news as it happens, with depth and context readers won’t find anywhere else.

Click f or New

s!

northcoastjournal.com/NCJDaily

@northcoastjournal

Click f


2

3

4

5

6

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

8

9

10

11

15

14 17

18

20

21

27

22

33

35

39

40

49

59

60

61

62

63

64

57

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

26. British artist Hirst 27. Long times 29. Audi toe work? 30. Pico de gallo, e.g. 31. They’re often worn by performers with names like Dee Licious and Toni A. Ward 33. What a meteorologist might predict? 39. Animal sounds heard in “(How Much Is) That Doggie in the Window” 40. Chocolate-andcaramel Hershey candies 42. Something to hold when learning to walk? 47. How Union soldiers were dressed 48. Macedonia’s capital 49. Two capsules, say 51. Dict. fill 52. Ankle bones 53. “Bull Durham” actor Robert

54. Suffix with Dixie 55. Shtetl interjections 56. Classic antiwar cry ... or a message aimed at 17-, 29-, 33- and 42-Across 59. “Can’t Fight This Feeling” band ____ Speedwagon 60. Grammy-winning group named after a radio command 61. Charged 62. OB/GYNs, e.g. 63. “Coal Miner’s Daughter” director Michael 64. Inks

DOWN

1. They may be two-car or three-car 2. Better than average 3. Droid maker 4. Steinbeck’s “East of ____” 5. ____ room 6. Church council 7. Mink who was the

first Asian-American woman elected to Congress 8. “Reader, I married him” heroine 9. Punk offshoot 10. California racetrack city 11. Friend made on the first day of college, perhaps 12. Loosened, as a knot 13. “You’re not the only one!” 18. Cries of discovery 23. In “Casey at the Bat,” the “him” in “Kill him!” 25. Jackie of “Shanghai Noon” 26. Recipe amount 28. Hit series starring Ted Danson 29. Lions and tigers, but not bears 31. Snoozefest 32. Bug spray brand with an exclamation point in its name

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO NOISE

34. For ____ 35. Predatory seabird 36. 6/13/1986, for Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen 37. Completely false 38. “Well done!,” in slang 41. Sonnet sections 42. Brief shower? 43. Gave a thumbs-up 44. Some sculptures 45. “Oh, one more thing,” at the bottom of a letter 46. Language from which the word “Mississippi” comes 47. Capri, e.g. 49. Ignoramus 50. “What awful news!” 53. Unfortunate first name of an NBA star considering he claimed to have slept with over 20,000 women 54. ____ tea 57. Tear 58. Virginia Woolf’s “____ Dalloway”

© Puzzles by Pappocom

I C E S A W

S U S A N N

P R A I S E

S L I D E R

I S A W

S O L O

E F T O E R D

M M E R R O N Y T O V E

6 8

4 2 www.sudoku.com

L I E

41

58

BRING ‘EM HOME

O R A L

38

54

56

R A Y A D E Z Z A A I L A D H O P O U N I T M E N O P G O S K I N A C O I N A W H A D A I S S S

37

51

53

X F I L E S

36

50

55

F O U L S O U T I E P I Z Z A P L A E V I L E Y R O S E G O T A N A M A K E S W K S C U B A M H A I R G E U L N A E T I T I C A I C A N N O S Y L

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045.

47

46

52

1. Minecraft fan, e.g. 6. 1994 action film with the tag line “Get ready for rush hour” 11. Neighbor of Poland: Abbr. 14. Dwelling 15. “I deserve a pat on the back!” 16. Singer/artist with the website imaginepeace.com 17. What an expert at memorization possesses? 19. Like Advil: Abbr. 20. “The company for women” 21. Garden ____ 22. “Live from Death Row” author ____ Abu-Jamal 24. Neighbor of Poland: Abbr. 25. Wyoming city served by Yellowstone Regional Airport

23

32

34

48

ACROSS

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

29 31

45

Opportunities

26

30

44

Employment

13

19

28

43

12

16

25

24

42

7

©2018 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

1

8 5 3

5 6 8

3 9 7

2 7

VERY EASY #89

1

9 6 6 7 3 9 1 8 5 2 4 7 2 3 4 4 3 6 5 2

CHURCH SECRETARY Part time − primarily responsible for providing general clerical, receptionist and secretarial support for the Pastor and the Church. 10 to 15 hours a week, starting at $13 per hour. Contact joantempas@gmail.com for more information and to resume. Build tosubmit edge of the document

default

Westhaven Community Services District, Trinidad, CA

GENERAL MANAGER/LEAD WATER TREATMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OPERATOR Requires CA Grade 2 Water Treatment and Grade 1 Distribution Operator Certificates. Full-time position providing health benefits and modest retirement contribution. Full position description and application details available from rswisher.wcsd@suddenlinkmail.com. Submit resume, copies of Operator Certificates, references and cover letter (responding to full position description) as single combined pdf to indicated email address by 15 May 2018. Position to be filled by 01 July 2018.

Margins are just a safe area

DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custo− dians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

Full-Time Medical Assistant Will train those motivated to learn. Must have at least one year of experience working in a healthcare setting. Experienced, Certified Medical Assistant or Phlebotomy Tech preferred.

Part-Time CPSP Health Educator Health Educator coordinates the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program and completes client orientation, health assessments, and Individualized Care Plans. Candidates must have at least one year of full-time practical experience providing Perinatal care. Certified Childbirth Educator, licensed registered nurse, and/or candidates with a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in community or public health education are preferred.

Part-Time Registered Dental Hygienist Candidates must possess a current CA RDH license, as well as, excellent communication skills, clinical experience, computer proficiency and teamwork abilities. Bilingual Spanish and experience with Electronic Dental Records preferred. Qualifies for National Health Services Corps Loan Repayment. RRHC is an EOE and offers a flexible schedule, 4-day work week, and competitive compensation packages. Health benefits, paidtime-off, and retirement match available to full and part-time employees. Visit our website - http://www.rrhc.org/. CVs should be submitted to Tina Tvedt, 101 West Coast Rd./ PO Box 769, Redway, CA, 95560 or via e-mail. Call for more info (707) 923-2783 ext. 336.

Hiring? 442-1400 ×305 northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

45


Employment default

default

deffault

CITY OF FORTUNA

Hiring? • Nursing Care • Recreational Activities • Nutritious Hot Meals • Physical, Speech & Occupational Therapy • Socialization/ Companionship • Transportation to and from Adult Day Center

LEAD STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER

Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

FULL TIME $36,344 - $44,218/YR

Lead Street Worker is a full time, frontline supervisor, with responsibility to lead crews and participate in a variety of work assignments in the maintenance, repair, and construction of City Public Works facilities.

442-1400 ×305 classified@ northcoast journal.com

default

sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E St., Eureka, CA 95501

(707) 445.9641

Now Accepting Patients

Call for more information

707-822-4866 3800 Janes Rd, Arcata www.adhcmadriver.org

K’ima:w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

MEDICAL DIRECTOR, CONTRACTED DIABETES NURSE EDUCATOR-CASE MANAGER/COORDINATOR DIABETES PROGRAM MANAGER REGISTERED DIETITIAN, SUPERVISORY PHARMACY CLERK CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CLERK (MEDICAL CODER) PHYSICIAN DENTAL HYGIENIST (STAFF OR CONTRACTED) HOUSEKEEPER DENTAL ASSISTANT LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT RN (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) RN CARE MANAGER SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (MEDICATIONASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (LMFT OR LCSW) For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Leasing Agent • Medical Scribe Lead Cook • Social Worker • CPA Administrative Assistant • Optician Medical Assistant • General Laborers Planner • Class B Driver • Forester GeoTech Engineer • Biologist Warehouse Laborers

Applicants must possess valid CDL at the time of hire and obtain a Class B license within one year of employment, and be at least 18 years of age. Complete job description and application available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th St. or friendlyfortuna.com. Application packets must be received by 4 pm on April 27, 2018.

default

SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT $2,842–$3,455 MONTHLY

Humboldt County Office of Education

Personnel Services Coordinator (Classified Management) Humboldt County Office of Ed., FT, Perm., M-F, 8 Hrs./Day, Placement on the Management Schedule A, DOE, not to exceed Column 10.

Qualifications: Grad. from an accredited 4 yr. college or university & a min of 4 years responsible exp. in personnel administration or any combination of education, specialized training, and exp. totaling not less than 8 yrs. in the field of personnel services. Previous exp. in a school system personnel department is desirable. Previous supervisory or coordination exp. required. Eligible for H&W, PERS retirement. App. available at HCOE or online www.hcoe.org/pers/appinfo.php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 Deadline: 4/16/18, 4 pm

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

This position provides administrative support functions for an assigned City department and provides information and assistance to the public regarding the department to which assigned. Current vacancy is in the Development Services Department. However, the eligibility list created from this recruitment may be used to fill other Senior Administrative Assistant full-time, part-time and temporary vacancies which occur during the 12 months following establishment of the list. A combination of experience and training equivalent to a high school diploma or equivalent supplemented by college or other courses sufficient to provide the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities and at least three years of clerical and/ or administrative support experience preferably involving public contact. Apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. We will be accepting applications until 5 pm on Monday, April 23, 2018. EOE


default

default

The City of Rio Dell Is now accepting applications for

UTILITY LEAD $16.67 – $18.76 / Hr. + Benefits LOOKING FOR AN EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO YOUR CAREER AND WELL−BEING? ARE YOU A PART−TIME LVN/RN LOOKING FOR SUPPLEMENTAL HOURS? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for Full−time, Part−time & On−call LPTs/LVNs to join our dynamic Team. Full−time benefits include medical, dental and vision plans; 401(K); sick & vacation time; scholarships; & lots of career−furthering training.

The City of Rio Dell is hiring for small field crew leader who will organize, supervise and participate in the regular maintenance activity of City facilities. Selfmotivation and discipline are required. Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue, www.riodellcity.com or call (707)764-3532.

$500 SIGN−ON BONUS, please inquire for details! Apply at: 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka 707−442−5721 http://crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca/

Positions are open until filled.

This week’s featured jobs:

Temporary Registered Dental Assistant Needed – Arcata This position will last approximately one year. Works directly with the dentist and the dental healthcare team to provide quality oral healthcare for United Indian Health Service (UIHS) clients.

Human Resources Coordinator – Arcata Assists the Human Resources Director with all functions within the Human Resources section including; but not limited to, the establishment of an in-house employee and management training system that addresses company needs and employee assessments.

Health Promotion and Education Technician – Arcata Assists tribal and American Indian communities with health promotion and disease prevention activities which will mobilize them to become involved in their communities. Visit our website www.uihs.org to see all of our opportunities and print out an application. Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

SPECIAL AIDE, McKinleyville Provide support & supervision to one child following an individualized plan to accommodate the child’s special needs &/or behavior issues. Req exp working w/ children. 6-12 ECE units pref. P/T (school yr): 10-20 hrs/wk (M-F); $11.13$12.27/hr

CENTER DIRECTOR, Eureka

 

Join our dynamic team and support the UIHS vision!

*ANTICIPATED OPENINGS*

default

default

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.”

  

    

     

                          

Responsibilities include overall management of an Early Head start program. AA/BA in Child Dev. or related field pref. Must meet req. for Site Supervisor permit. Must have 1 course in Infant Toddler Coursework. F/T (yr round), 40 hrs/wk (MF); $15.46-$17.04/hr Open Until Filled

ASSOCIATE TEACHER, Eureka Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for Toddlers. Req a min. of 12 ECE units—incl core classes & 1 course in Infant Toddler—& at least 1 yr exp working w/ children. FT (yr round) 32 hrs/wk,$11.82-$12.41/hr Open Until Filled

CLASSROOM ASSISTANTS, Eureka Assist center staff in day-to-day operation of the classroom for a Toddler program. 6-12 ECE units preferred or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months exp working w/ children. Two P/T positions open, (yr round) 20 and 28 hrs/wk $11.13-$12.27/hr Open Until Filled

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Eureka Assist teacher in implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months exp working w/children. P/T (yr round), 22 hrs/wk $11.13-$12.27/hr Open Until Filled

SUBSTITUTES-Humboldt and Del Norte County Intermittent (on-call) work filling in for Classroom Assistant, Assistant Teachers, Cooks/Assistant Cooks or occasional childcare for parent meetings. Req exp working w/children or cooking. $11.13/hr. No benefits. Submit Sched of Availability form w/app. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

47


Employment default

deffault

default

The City of Rio Dell Is now accepting applications for

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS

UTILITY WORKER I/II

Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707)923-3921

($27,400 - $33,939 + Benefits) This is a hands-on position involving the maintenance and repair of City facilities, systems and equipment. This position will require employee to be on-call and reside in or within 30 minutes of Rio Dell. The work involved is physically demanding. Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue, www.riodellcity.com or call (707)764-3532. Positions are open until filled.

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×305 northcoastjournal.com default

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS

open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350

Substance Abuse Counselor

#0936 JOM Tutor RG/PT EUREKA/HOOPA $12.68-20.69 4/13/18

#0947 Bus Driver/Custodian RG/FT WEITCHPEC $15.86-20.62 4/20/18

#0959 Accountant RG/FT KLAMATH $45,576-72,068 4/20/18

#0983 Computer Technician I RG/FT WEITCHPEC $17.75-23.06 4/13/18

#0991 Survey Specialist-Spatial Analyst RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $29.19-37.93 4/27/18

#0993 Construction Manager-Fisheries RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $29.19-37.93 4/27/18

#0994 IT Director RG/FT KLAMATH $72,999-94,898 4/20/18

#0995 Head Start Teacher Aide RG/FT EUREKA $13.01/14.60 4/13/18

#0996 Forester RG/FT KLAMATH $24.12-31.35 4/20/18

#0997 EHS Teacher RG/FT KEPEL $18.22-23.67 4/13/18

#0998 Transit Driver RG/FT WEITCHPEC $15.91 4/13/18

#0999 Jet Boat Deckhand SEA/FT KLAMATH $12.68 4/13/18

#1000 Water Operator

Open Door Community Health Centers offers an array of services to our surrounding communities. Our Substance Abuse Counselor works one-onone and in groups with patients the help them overcome substance abuse dependencies. The Substance Abuse Counselor facilitates support groups, assists with the integration of the Suboxone Program and Needle Exchange Programs, develops curriculum and educational material for substance abuse programs, and works alongside patients and families to create a specific care plan that fits their schedule. This position requires a hardworking individual who is patient, caring and community minded. California Drug and Alcohol Counselor certification required. Minimum two years’ experience required.Or a Registered intern Counselor in the State of Californian certifying organization or proof of enrollment within two months of hire is required. Certification must be completed in no more than one year from date of hire to maintain employment.

#1001 Wildland Fire Tech III

Full-Time position. Current California RN license and BLS certification required. Work closely with the Clinic Manger in providing leadership and management within the Rural Health Clinic. 8-hour shifts in our outpatient Rural Health Clinic. Amazing growth potential.

ER/ACUTE NURSE MANAGER Full Time Position. Critical Access ER/Acute Department Nursing Manager; 4-bed Emergency room & 9-bed Acute care unit, seeking a Nurse Manager to provide leadership, administrative responsibility and oversight of the ER and Acute care departments. Current California RN license required. BSN, PALS, & ACLS required. Minimum 2 years ER experience required. Minimum 1 year Management Experience strongly preferred.

ER/ACUTE CARE REGISTERED NURSE Full-Time, 12-hour shift, 3 days/week. Current California RN License, BLS, ACLS, & PALS certification required. Work 12-hour shifts in our critical access acute care & emergency room. Willing to train the right New RN Graduate. Looking to hire 3 RN’s ASAP.

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE Full Time position. Current LVN license and CPR certification required. Work 12-hour shifts in our 8-bed skilled nursing facility. 2 LVN positions available to start ASAP.

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTANT Full Time, Part Time, or Per Diem Positions. Direct Patient Care, activities with the residents/ patients. Must possess CNA Certificate and CPR Certification. 2 CNA positions available.

CT TECHNOLOGIST Per Diem Positions. Current AART, California licensure, and BLS required. Minimum 1 year imaging technologist experience in an acute care facility or clinic, preferred. Proficiency in CT and On-call required. Brand new GE Revolution Evo 770, 64-slice, low dose CT. New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment!

***NHSC QUALIFYING FACILITY / NURSE CORPS LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM*** Candidates are eligible for NHSC Nurse Corps Loan Repayment which pays up to 85% of unpaid nursing education debt for registered nurses (RNs) in exchange for two years of service at our clinic location

Experience and familiarity with community resources is a bonus!

Visit NHSC.HRSA.GOV to learn more about the program

Position Available in: Arcata

SHCHD wages start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $15.91-20.69 4/20/18 RG/FT WEITCHPEC $15.91/17.75 4/13/18

ASSISTANT CLINIC MANAGER – REGISTERED NURSE

For details and online applications, visit:

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

opendoorhealth.com


Marketplace

open door

default

Art & Collectibles default

Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

PARK/WATERFRONT RANGER $4,283–$5,206 Monthly

$20,000 SIGNING BONUS – Lateral Peace Officers $5,000 SIGNING BONUS – Entry Level Peace Officers Half of total bonus amount paid upon hiring, quarter of total paid upon completion of FTO, final quarter paid upon successful completion of probationary period.

Registered Nurse

California Registered Nursing License required. Wage dependent on experience.

Successful Lateral Candidates may be hired at any step in the salary range, depending on experience. Applicants who hold POST Professional Certifications will be eligible for certification pay as follows: POST Intermediate: 7% of Basic Salary

This sworn, working-level law enforcement class performs all non-supervisory assignments found in a municipal police department, and is exclusively assigned to the City’s parks, trails, harbor, and waterfront areas for patrol and all functional areas of the law enforcement field, with a highly visible and engaging community presence. Based upon needs of the assignment, duties are carried out on foot, bicycle, from vehicles and/or aboard watercraft. This class is distinguished from Police Officer in that the latter is assigned varied law enforcement responsibilities throughout the entire city while the former’s duties are primarily constrained to proactive, high visibility patrol within the city’s parks and waterfront areas. For a complete job description, and to apply, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. This recruitment will remain open until positions are filled. EOE

Auctions

PUBLIC AUCTIONS Thurs. April 12th 4:15 pm

Position Available in: McKinleyville

Storage tools & electronics, 10 Sheriff’s surplus bikes, estates + additions

For details and online applications, visit:

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM

opendoorhealth.com

Preview Weds. 11 am - 5 pm & Thurs. 11 am to Sale Time

default

POST Advanced: 14% of Basic Salary Come join the City of Eureka’s team with this very unique opportunity in the Eureka Police Department. Help carry out EPD’s mission to enhance community-oriented police service by protecting our beautiful trails, parks, and historic waterfront. Engaging with the local public and visitors will be a primary aspect of this position, by providing information as well as protection to those who utilize the City’s abundant and varied public recreational areas.

THE COSTUME BOX 202 T St. (2nd & T) Eureka 707−443−5200

The Registered Nurse holds a vital role in the care team in the clinical setting for the delivery of health care. Open Door is looking for an energetic individual able to work in a fast pace environment. This role is focused on the delivery of primary care in a clinic setting, facilitating access, providing follow-up and coordinating the efforts of the health care team with an emphasis on disease prevention and health maintenance.

COSTUMES Year ’round Costume Rental Makeup*Wigs*Masks Thrifty Costume Boutique Dress−up Party Venue Character Deliveries. Open Mon−Fri 1−5:30 Sat 11−5

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

Clothing

Merchandise HUGE SALE: ALL CLOTHING 1/2 OFF SALE Dream Quest Thrift Store April 12−18. Where your shopping dollars support local youth! Daily Bonus Sales, Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednesdays, New Sale Thurs− days, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Saturdays. (530) 629−3006.

Miscellaneous VISITATION SPECIALIST This full-time position provides supervised visitation for children, youth and their families in a variety of settings, providing parenting skills coaching , as well as related tasks. . Requirements include: transporting clients in employee’s own vehicle throughout Humboldt County (mileage is reimbursed), ability to lift and carry car seats and children, minimum two years of experience working with children, youth or families or two years working in a social service agency . Stipend available for qualified bilingual candidates (English/ Spanish). Starts at $14.11/hour. Please see job description for comprehensive list of requirements and detailed list of duties. Excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and paid insurance. Must be able to pass DOJ/FBI criminal history fingerprint clearance. Must possess a valid California driver’s license, current automobile insurance, and a dependable vehicle for work. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or by calling (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org.

Review Date 4/16/18

default

23rd Annual

$

1 SALE 

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com default

April 13th 15th at

What’s New 335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079 Open Mon.-Sat.,10am-5pm

Rental Property Loans

50 GLORIOUS YEARS 

Let’s Be Friends

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027

2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka CalBRE: #01144618, NMLS: #323296

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

49


Marketplace COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACES FOR LEASE Includes janitorial, utilities, off−street parking. 2 blocks from banks, courthouse, post office. 730 7th St., Eureka (corner 7th & I St.) slackandwinzler.com 707−443−2246

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

Auto Service

Real Estate ď€ ď€ ď€ ď€ ď ?ď Ąď ˛ď §ď Šď Žď łď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Şď ľď łď ´ď€ ď Ąď€ ď łď Ąď Śď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ą default

default

NORTH COAST FURNISHED RENTALS, INC. FULLY FURNISHED, CLEAN HOMES & CORPORATE RENTALS FROM $1600 PER MONTH THERE’S A NEW WAY TO STAY IN A CITY:

LIVE LIKE A LOCAL.

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

(707) 445-9665 NORTHCOASTFURNISHEDRENTALS.COM

CA BRE #01983702 FORTUNA | ARCATA | EUREKA FERNDALE | REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK CRESCENT CITY

Cleaning

Body, Mind & Spirit Other Professionals CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 default

Done Making Babies?

Consider Vasectomy‌ default

ď ‰ď Žď€ ď ˆď ?ď ?ď …ď€ ď “ď …ď ’ď –ď ‰ď ƒď …ď “

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in busi− ness for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

ď —ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď šď Żď ľ

In on Friday, back to work on Monday Friendly office with soothing music to calm you

ď ’ď Ľď §ď Šď łď ´ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Žď ľď ˛ď łď Ľď€ ď łď ľď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ ď ?ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď Ąď Źď€ ď ƒď Ąď ˛ď Ľ ď Œď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď€ ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď Ťď Ľď Ľď °ď Šď Žď § ď ď łď łď Šď łď ´ď Ąď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď ¤ď Ąď Šď Źď šď€  ď Ąď Łď ´ď Šď śď Šď ´ď Šď Ľď ł ď ’ď Ľď łď °ď Šď ´ď Ľď€ ď Łď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď€Śď€ ď ­ď ľď Łď ¨ď€  ď ­ď Żď ˛ď Ľ ď ‰ď Žď łď ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď€Śď€ ď ‚ď Żď Žď ¤ď Ľď ¤ ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Žď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Žď€ ď ƒď Ąď Źď Šď Śď Żď ˛ď Žď Šď Ąď€ ď€  ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Żď śď Ľď ˛ď€ ď€˛ď€°ď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€Ą

ď€

ď ”ď Żď Źď Źď€ ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€ ď€ąď€­ď€¸ď€ˇď€ˇď€­ď€šď€śď€´ď€­ď€˛ď€°ď€°ď€ą default

ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡ REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Power Washing, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 382−8655 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

Twenty-minute, in-office procedure

Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400

YOUR AD

HERE

Â?‹˜‡•ČˆŽƒ†‡•ČˆŠ‡ƒ”• ”‹Â?Â?‡”•Čˆ—•–‘Â?”†‡”• ‹…Â?Â’ƒÂ?†”‘’ÂˆÂˆÇŁ

ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď€şď€ ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł

Ä†Ä—Ä›ÄŠÄžÇŻÄ˜Ä?ĆėĕnjēnjÄ?ĎēČĘ ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ

442-1400 Ă—305 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $21,000; 2 pers. $24,000; 3 pers. $27,000; 4 pers. $29,950; 5 pers. $32,350; 6 pers. $34,750; 7 pers. $37,150; 8 pers. $39,550 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Home & garden improvement experts on page 34.

442-1400 Ă—319 melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

LE GAL S ? 4 4 2 -1 4 0 0 Ă—3 0 5

$330,000

â– Arcata

Some Nice Upgrades to this Comfortable Arcata Home on an Oversized Lot! Bamboo ooring, newer birch Shaker-style cabinetry in the remodeled kitchen with black granite countertops and tile floor. There is a cozy pellet stove for chilly evenings in the dining/ family room. Lots of storage with 2 sheds in the spacious yard with lots of plants and a raised bed for growing your fresh vegetables. Established neighborhood convenient to town. MLS# 250367

New Listing!

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com


Katherine Fergus

Charlie Tripodi

Kyla Tripodi

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

707.476.0435

2 UNI

TS!

337 BACCHETTI DRIVE-$409,000

3 bed/2.5 bath home on ±7.5 wooded acres w/ attached carport, privacy, trails, redwoods, large fenced yard.

ELK PRAIRIE VINEYARD-$1,750,000

NEW LIS

TING!

±80 Acres w/year-round creek, flat, mountain views. Permit app for 17,500 sf outdoor and 2500 sf mixed light. NEW LIS

TING!

Cute 3 bed/2 bath home w/detached garage & large backyard. C-1 neighborhood commercial zoning. REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±40 Acres w/privacy, 2 springs, pond, cabin, garden sites, shop. Permit app for 30,000 sf outdoor.

±80 Ac on river w/ house, water, flats, outbuildings, cabin, roads, power. Interim for 39,400 sf od & 5425 sf ml. NEW LIS

TING!

Stamped permit for 10,000 sf ml cultivation. ±5 Acres w/ solar, PG&E, community water, shop.

WEITCHPEC-LAND/PROPERTY-$2,900,000

±320 Acres south-facing w/spring, creeks, pond, nice home Permit app for 1 acre od & 22,000 sf ml.

PETROLIA-LAND/PROPERTY-$650,000

±80 acres w/privacy, creek, river views, gardens, shed, outbuilding. Permit app for 20,198 sf. D PRICE

!

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY-$849,500

Stamped permit for 10,000 sq ft ML on 5 Ac! ADA compliant processing, septic, shop, water, PG&E

9591 KNOX COVE-$987,000 Brand new 3000sf 4 bed 3 bath custom home on flat ¾ acre ocean view lot in Knox Cove subdivision.

MAD RIVER-LAND/PROPERTY- $1,350,000

REDUCE

3943 GLENWOOD CT, EUREKA -$379,000

WILLOW CREEK -LAND/PROPERTY $525,000

1740 MYRTLE AVE, EUREKA-$259,000

WILLOW CREEK-LAND/PROPERTY-$750,000

Hailey Rohan

Nice 3/2.5 bath duplex investment. Radiant heat tile floors, garage, fenced in backyard, woods view.

Established ±20 acre vineyard w/ 3 homes, winery, cellar, tasting room, mature grapes & olive trees.

HARRIS-LAND/PROPERTY-$395,000

Tyla Miller

BRIDGEVILLE-LAND/PROPERTY-$325,000

±40 Acres w/ southern exposure, end of road privacy, 2 creeks, rustic 3 bed house, 30’x50’ shop.

WILLOW CREEK-$950,000

±160 Sunny acres w/spring, pond, well permit, flats, roads, shed. Interim permit for 6,896 sf od & 4,380 sf of ml.

RUTH-HOME ON ACREAGE-$749,000

±40 Acres w/ views of Ruth Lake, privacy, meadows, well, 4 bed/3 bath home, deck, garage.

WILLOW CREEK-HOME ON ACREAGE-$1,350,000 ±50 Private acres w/ Willow Creek frontage, 3 bed/3ba log home, spring water system & open meadows.

WILLOW CREEK-LAND/PROPERTY-$949,000

±160 Acres w/ water, PG&E, lg flats, greenhouse. Interim permit for 24,500 sf outdoor.

1443 THE TERRACE RD, WILLOW CREEK-$850,000

Rental income property on just over an acre w/ 10 apt units in good condition &14 mini storage units.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 12, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

51


Redwood Laboratory Better serving our community, we are open to everyone

High Deductible? No Insurance? No Problem. We offer fairer prices than any lab in the area. We send your results to your doctors immediately or on the same day. No extra charge!

Fear of Needles?

With the most experienced staff in the area, you have minimal chance of an extra stick. And we’re friendly, come to the professionals you can trust!

Need Electronic results sent to your Doctor?

We send electronically to most practices in the area, we have ability to send results to any doctor in the Humboldt County area. Please ask your Doctor to accept our electronic results – so you don’t need to suffer from high prices and painful visits.

Remember,the laboratory you choose is up to you!

Open Monday - Friday, 7:30am - 4:30pm

Affiliated with Redwood Urgent Care

2440 23rd Street, Eureka, CA

707-798-6214

redwoodlaboratory.com

North Coast Journal 4-12-18 Edition  
North Coast Journal 4-12-18 Edition  

One Year Later — Twelve months after David Josiah Lawson’s death, his killing remains unsolved, sparking protests, pleas for help and an eff...

Advertisement