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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday Feb. 8, 2018 Vol XXIX Issue 6 northcoastjournal.com

STILL MISSING Unlike The Bachelor’s Bekah M, these people aren't famous, their stories haven’t gone viral and they haven't been found By Thadeus Greenson and Linda Stansberry

10 Committee pitches committee 30 Eat your heart out 55 So much sax


2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 4

Editor

24

#StillMissing

5 5 10

Service Directory

Mailbox Poem

26

Heaven ain’t a Place

27

Get Out! Hand Making Skateboards in Arcata

News NCJ Daily Week in Weed

28

On The Cover

Art Beat Social Media

29

‘Left Behind’

19

Humboldt Made Special Advertising Section

Crisis Delayed

14 16

Serious Felonies Cultivation/Drug Possession DUI/DMV Hearings Cannabis Business Compliance Domestic Violence Juvenile Delinquency Pre-Arrest Counseling

Home & Garden

FREE CONSULTATION

Arts! Arcata

For Defense Work Only

Friday, Feb. 9, 6-9 p.m.

30

Still Missing

Table Talk

732 5th Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 info@humboldtjustice.com www.humboldtjustice.com

Heart on a Stick

34

Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

38

The Setlist Music and Poetry and Music

39 45

Calendar Filmland Love Makes Fools of Us All

47 55

Workshops & Classes Field Notes M. Sax’s Brass Clarinet

Bulldog beauty contestants at the Inked Hearts Expo. More on page 14.

55 56

Sudoku & Crossword Classifieds

Photo by Mark Larson

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Feb. 8, 2018 • Volume XXIX Issue 6 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2018 Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Creative Services Manager Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Linus Lorenzen linus@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager Annie Kimball annie@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com

Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

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The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

On the Cover Photoillustration by Jonathan Webster

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

#StillMissing By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

#

BekahM. #TheBachelor. There. I had to get the hashtags in right off the bat in the hopes someone will actually read this. In case you missed it, the Journal broke a story last week that went viral and wound up re-reported by publications from the New York Times and Vanity Fair to Golf Digest and the Hollywood Reporter. On one level, it was quite a phenomenon to behold. We posted a story to our website at about 3:45 p.m. on Feb. 1, noting that a woman — Rebekah Martinez — listed on the California Attorney General’s database of missing persons out of Humboldt County is currently a contestant on the hit television show The Bachelor, which airs on ABC and draws millions of viewers. We knew it was only a matter of time before the story went viral. It checked all the boxes — the man-bites-dog element of the unexpected with someone missing on national television and the inclusion of a celebrity — one who also happens to be young, female and objectively attractive. Add in the detail of a Humboldt County pot farm, and the story was click-bait gold. It was still fascinating to watch it unfold. The San Francisco Chronicle was the first to repost the story the evening of Feb. 1, but things didn’t really start moving until around 7 a.m. the following day, when New York Magazine Associate Editor Madison Kircher tweeted the Journal’s story out to her 5,000 followers, which include a who’swho of entertainment media. The stories quickly followed: Decided posted at 8:21 a.m. Buzzfeed at 9:14 a.m. The Daily Beast at 9:28 a.m. Vanity Fair at 10:31 a.m. The Washington Post at 11 a.m. People at 11:03 a.m. USA Today at noon, and the New York Times at 12:29 p.m. (Thanks to freelance journalist Kelly Donahue, who compiled the times in a story about the viral nature of our story.) Virtually all the reporting linked back to our coverage, and we watched our website numbers soar as hundreds of thousands of people who had previously been arguing about whether Martinez — known as Bekah M on the show — was too young to make out with Arie the bachelor, let alone marry him, flooded to read our coverage. Now don’t get us wrong, the clicks are nice and there’s something intoxicating about a piece you produced capturing so much attention. But we’re also keenly aware that this story captured all this attention

for all the wrong reasons. Its popularity was a by-product of our celebrity-obsessed, reality-TV culture. So in most iterations of the story we broke, which wound up read by millions of people, there was little if any mention of Humboldt County’s dubious distinction of having the highest per-capita rate of missing persons cases in the state, much less of the drug and alcohol abuse epidemic, the pervasive homelessness, the fractured families and the clandestine history of cannabis farming in the region that form the foundation of this distinction. There was little if any mention of the dozens of people truly missing from Humboldt, people disappeared or presumed dead, leaving grieving families searching for answers and grasping for closure. (Consider that almost 200 times more people read the Martinez story on our website than took the time to click through a slideshow of the people who are actually missing.) And there was similarly little, if any, examination of what this story says about our law enforcement agencies and their missing persons databases, or the general embarrassment of both ambling along totally oblivious to the fact that one of their listees was posting to Instagram and appearing on national television. Now please don’t read this as an indictment of the Humboldt County Sheriff ’s Office, which we realize has 4,000 square miles to patrol with limited staff and funding, not to mention a seemingly ever-increasing pile of confirmed homicide cases to investigate. But it should be impossible to read Martinez’s story and our coverage of missing persons cases in general without seeing that there are some very real flaws that need to be addressed if we as a community are really going to do all we can to find the missing. And that’s what this conversation should be about, right? There are people in this community who disappeared, seemingly without a trace. They left behind people who love them, people whose lives will be dominated by their absence and unanswered questions. This issue of the North Coast Journal is about them. #StillMissing. ● Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


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Editor: My sister is one of the disappeared (“The Humboldt 35,” Feb. 1). She vanished into thin air. How this happened remains a mystery. Possible explanations include murder, escape and assisted suicide. I like to imagine she was rescued from Humboldt by one of her old boyfriends, who whisked her off to a tropical paradise like Costa Rica. This is improbable but it comforts me. She has or had mental health issues, and although she is an extreme case, her disappearance puts a spotlight on our utterly, utterly inadequate mental health services environment, which has only worsened in the years since her disappearance, even as our county’s mental health problems have intensified. Ellen Taylor, Petrolia

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Keep Marching Forward Editor: The turnout for the Women’s March in Eureka was inspiring and heartening. Reading Cheri Ward’s letter (Mailbox, Feb. 1) it occurred to me that she is likely not alone in vacillating between the feelings of being empowered at the march and feeling defeated again afterward. If she and others are looking for a constructive outlet, may I suggest getting involved with The Power (to the People) Lunch group? These are local people making a difference on a national, statewide and local level. Lead by former Arcata City Coun-

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Mailbox Continued from previous page

Terry Torgerson

cilmember Elizabeth Conner, these are brief, fun and productive sessions where community-minded individuals gather for an hour or two twice a month to make phone calls to elected officials and other decision makers. Call sheets are well researched so they are effective and timely and include summaries of the issue, who to call with phone numbers and skillfully written scripts that make a simple ask or comment. You might be calling on a topic of economic or social justice, environmental protection or other key progressive issue but you can be assured that your time will be well used. Great homemade food is served and you rub shoulders with others in our community, many of whom were at the march and all of whom want to make a difference. The Power Lunch is held the second and fourth Thursday of each month on the Ninth Street side of the Creamery Building in Arcata (follow the sandwich board sign) and people can learn more details by going to the Power Lunch Humboldt page on Facebook. If you want

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

to take action and feel empowered, Power Lunch Humboldt is a great group to join! If you’re willing to travel this election season, or for friends of yours who might live in a Congressional swing districts (the closest is the 10th in Sacramento), I would also suggest signing up with SwingLeft. org to help us take back Congress this midterm election. Primaries start in a matter of months, so now is the time to get on board. The dream lives on. Richard Salzman, Arcata

‘Brilliant’ Editor: Carman Gentile’s recommendation for a statue of Mary, the Jewish mother to Jesus of Nazareth (Mailbox, Feb. 1) is brilliant. Not only does Mary stand as a tribute to women’s empowerment and is a statement against anti-semitism, as I have learned through my travels to Israel and other countries throughout the world, Continued on page 8 »


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Editor: Thank you to the North Coast Journal for your coverage of the recent Women’s March (From NCJ Daily, Jan. 25). Approximately 5,000 people gathered on Madaket Plaza for the Women’s March in Eureka on Saturday, Jan. 20, joining 1 million concerned people who marched nationwide. Many people came together quickly to make a local march a reality. We are grateful to the Humboldt Del Norte Central Labor Council for sponsoring the insurance and all those who raised $2,000 on GoFundMe! We are thankful to Lisa Stephenson for opening our event to respect the ancestral Wiyot land, and to our great MC, Denise Ryles. We appreciate all those who spoke at the rally: Brandie Wilson of Humboldt Area Center for Harm Reduction (HACHR), Vivian Deniston of SEIU Local 2015, Brenda Perez and Sanjuanita Medina of Centro del Pueblo, Tia Oros Peters of Seventh Generation Fund, Rhea McCoy and Danielle Vigil Matsen of Hupa, Paula Arrow-Smith Jones of Northcoast Rape Crisis Team, Gay Loo Gilchrist of Women in Black, Kelsey Reedy of Move to Amend, Pat Kanzler of Healthcare 4 All, Pastor Bethany Cseh of True North, Allen McCloskey of North Coast People’s Alliance and the Raging Grannies for kicking off the march with protest songs! We would like to thank Black Cap Medic Collective and HACHR for being our medics, HSU Theater Department for stage equipment, Tofu on sound, SEIU Local 2015 for logistical support, the city of Eureka and Eureka Police Department for assistance, Magic Communications for walkie-talkies and Broadway Medical for donating wheelchairs. I am submitting this letter on behalf of all of the 2018 Eureka Women’s March organizers: Tracy Katelman, Michele Pease Walford, Beth Wylie, Dani Burkhart, Rae Robison, Rick Cooper, Kerry Morgan, Pat Kanzler and Suzette Ott. Allison Edrington, Fortuna

Our Superior President @northcoastjournal

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Editor: I believe after one year in office that Donald Trump has earned the title of “Superior President” (Mailbox, Jan. 18). The first indication came right after his inauguration. Despite photos clearly

showing the contrary, Trump declared he “had the biggest audience in the history of inaugural speeches,” a declaration that was strongly supported by his representatives when challenged by the press. Then, over the summer, it was rumored that Secretary of State Tillerson had called him a “moron,” so Trump challenged him to compare IQ test scores, adding “I can tell you who is going to win.” Similarly, when North Korean leader Kim Jung Un stated he had a nuclear button at the ready, Trump quickly responded that he, too, has a button, “but it is a much bigger and more powerful one.” When Trump was recently accused of racism for allegedly making disparaging remarks about immigrants from some poor predominantly non-white countries, he defined himself as being the “least racist person,” a phrase he has used many times before when such accusations have been made. And finally, we find Trump gloating about his perfect score on a mental cognition test. He implied his score shows he’s smart even though the test is limited to measuring basic mental skills in order to detect mild cognitive impairment that could indicate the onset of dementia for instance. Given all these examples of his evident “superiority” (and I’m sure there are many others), I think that along with his title “Superior President,” Trump deserves a theme song as well, so I nominate from the musical Annie Get Your Gun Irving Berlin’s duet “Anything You Can Do (I Can Do Better).” Of course, if he were to adopt it, he would need to find someone who would dare to sing the second part with him. Yes, he can, no he can’t! Sherman Schapiro, Blue Lake

Correction A story headlined “Bench Clearing” in the Feb. 1, 2018, edition of the North Coast Journal misspelled Kim Bartleson’s name. Additionally, the article included the incorrect dates of Jerry Brown’s first stint as California governor, which ran from 1975 to 1983. The Journal regrets the errors.

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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News

Crisis Delayed

A committee pileup as the Board of Supervisors contemplates declaring a shelter crisis By Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com

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n Monday night, Bryan Hall, executive director of the Eureka Rescue Mission, received a call from the house manager of the men’s shelter. “There was a man dropped off in a wheelchair with one leg, no hands and a colostomy bag with nowhere to go,” Hall wrote on Facebook. “Needless to say, we brought him in and took care of him and tended to his needs. I met him this morning and he is a very nice man and has had a very rough life. Hopefully, we will be able to connect him with services that will suit his needs.” That man is just one of hundreds of homeless people in Humboldt County whom service providers are struggling to get warm, safe and sheltered. According to the most recent point-in-time count, there are 364 fewer shelter beds than there are homeless men, women and children in Humboldt County. One of the suggested methods of addressing this, brought before the Board of Supervisors on Jan. 9, is to declare a shelter crisis and/ or form a task force addressing homelessness. After a very long and spirited discussion with copious public comment, the board agreed to form an ad hoc committee consisting of First District Supervisor Rex Bohn and Second District Supervisor Estelle Fennell to explore and present on these options. On Feb. 6, Bohn and Fennell returned to the forum with a rather anticlimactic recommendation: Form another committee, this one focused on affordable housing trust fund expenditures. (A draft version of a shelter crisis declaration was also put forward but Bohn and Fennell were lukewarm on the idea.) It will be several weeks before the board sees and votes on a finalized draft of either the declaration or the committee. In the meantime, local homeless and housing advocates continue to work on a problem that has stymied cities up and down the West Coast. The discussion of how to address the immediate need of the homeless and

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

vulnerable in Humboldt County seemed to be gaining ground in November, when Sally Hewitt, senior program manager for the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services and co-chair of the Humboldt Housing and Homeless Coalition (HHHC), announced that there was a small pool of money to help create a 24-7, low-barrier emergency shelter, setting a goal start date of Dec. 1. Committee members from a wide spectrum of fields, including faith groups, law enforcement and various nonprofits pitched in to suggest potential sites and services. But the

trict Supervisor Virginia Bass mused at the Jan. 9 meeting. “There’s a lot that needs to be considered.” Hewitt, responding to questions from the board, said the declaration of a crisis could, at the very least, underscore what’s evident to the naked eye of everyone living in or driving through the county. “The reality is, everywhere you look there are homeless people,” she told the board, adding that 58 percent of all homeless people in the county had “no shelter at all” and 47 percent were chronically homeless, meaning they had been contin-

Screenshot from the Feb. 6 Board of Supervisors meeting. plan ran aground as one site after another was vetoed due to lack of accessibility, rejection from landlords or expense. As the Journal went to print, Hewitt responded to a request for comment by saying that a new, promising location had been identified and was being evaluated. A shelter crisis declaration could potentially free up land previously off-limits due to zoning restrictions, although its usefulness in this matter is dependent on what language the board may opt to include if it passes the declaration. “People are saying, ‘declare a crisis,’ but what does that really mean?” Fourth Dis-

uously homeless for more than a year. Darlene Spoor, executive director of Arcata House, added that a great deal of those seeking services are in grave physical health. “We get at least two calls a week [from hospitals or care providers] saying, ‘We cannot release this person to the streets or they will die,’” she told the board. In the most recent meeting of the HHHC on Feb. 1, which was dedicated to updating the Department of Health and Human Services’ “10 Year Plan to End Homelessness” so it would qualify for state funding, committee members dis-


cussed the challenges of housing our large and diverse population of homeless people. There is, they agreed “no one-size-fitsall,” solution. Some clients are legally blind, in wheelchairs or struggling with chronic health conditions. Some have partners. Others have pets. Many have addiction issues. Of the clients who qualify for some sort of assistance, almost none qualify for enough to pay market-rate rent. Of those who can afford a place to live, many have eviction histories that make rental companies pass them by. At the Feb. 6 meeting of the Board of Supervisors, Lynette Mullen, homeless services manager for the Eureka Police Department, spoke during public comment to say that wraparound strategies for those housed were essential. “Housing First is absolutely the strategy but it will need more than that,” she said. Fennell, rolling out the idea of a committee that would investigate funding sources for affordable housing, emphasized that the county had already committed to a Housing First strategy as recommended by Focus Strategies, and there were sufficient state tools in place for such a committee to implement creative solutions. “I have concerns about shelter crisis declaration,” Fennell said, adding that, “the majority of the homeless are within the Eureka city limits and the city of Eureka has already declared a crisis.” Bohn said he was concerned that an ersatz shelter on public land, one of the potential outcomes of a shelter crisis declaration, might put the county into conflict with the Americans with Disabilities Act. The county has already come under fire for its non-compliance with ADA restrictions. Bohn emphasized the importance of private citizens, faith groups and non-governmental organizations working to address homelessness. “I got a lot done before I got elected,” he said, calling the rules and regulations associated with government work an “anchor on your butt.” “I think the only way we’re going to do it is by working with the private sector,” Bohn went on. “We might have to work with the big nasty developers. That’s who gets it done, the DANCOs and the Strombecks. Nobody came in here with the tool belt today. We’re looking to Sacramento for help but they have 30 to 40 people camping on the Capitol lawn every night.” Public comment on the issue lasted approximately a half hour, with 12 people speaking. Several charged the ad hoc committee with being un-responsive to the original request, which was to declare a shelter crisis and authorize a task force. Bass and Third District Supervisor Mike

Wilson expressed some support for both the suggestion of a committee and a shelter crisis declaration, although they asked that the final version of the shelter crisis declaration come back before them with a modified timeframe, as the original draft scheduled the crisis declaration to expire June 1. Wilson also asked for some specific language to be added to the committee draft resolution that would go beyond seeking funding and into more specific efforts. He said he may have to vote no because the language, as written, “did not super sorry last change... the model numbers i guess got mixed up go far enough.” a little.

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Supervisor Mike Wilson expressed concern about a lack of concrete solutions in proposal language. Fifth District Supervisor and board Chair Ryan Sundberg referenced a recent incident in his district in which a woman and a barefoot child were found sleeping on top of a “pile of trash” in a parked vehicle. “I hope people realize we care about this issue,” he said. Bohn said he understood the passion for a shelter crisis declaration but he “wasn’t there yet,” saying that he was concerned about sound implementation. “I know we’ve got a housing problem,” he told those assembled. “We’ve got an opioid problem. We’ve got a marijuana problem. We got problems up our ass. We’ve got to have people willing to step up.” Hewitt and others, however, seem optimistic. While the board did not endorse a shelter crisis or present an immediate solution, there are still options on the table. “I believe we are on track to having multiple solutions available to end homelessness in Humboldt County,” Hewitt told the Journal. ●

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Linda Stansberry is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or linda@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.

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Rob & Zhao Parks Robert T. & Judy A. Hodgson Roger James & Mary Gelinas Rollie Lamberson & Michele Olsen Rotary Club of Eureka Shady Lady Window Coverings & Design Stephanie McCaleb Stephen Fox Steven Railsback & Margaret Lang Susan & Bob Ornelas Susan Buckley Susan Hansen Tom & Stephanie Perrett Wendy Ring & Michael Shapiro Wesley & Cindy Chesboro Wildberries Marketplace Zwerdling Law Firm

Mark & Margaret Shaffer Mark Drake Mark W. and Claudia N.Hapgood Marla Joy Marsha Clearwalker Marsha Davenport Martha Canclini Martha Traphagen Mathews, Kluck & Walsh, LLP Maya Conrad Michael Samuelson Michael Seeber Michael Strande Michael Welch Mike Wilson & Laura Kadlecik MikkiMoves Milo Jarvis Milton J. Boyd Mitchell Kerman Nancy Chuong Nancy Ihara Nancy J. Starck Nancy Lengyel Nancy Stephenson Neal & Suzanne Crothers Netra Khatri Noreen O’Brien Oona Smith Patricia Sennott Patricia Thomas Patsy Givins Paul & Kay Schulz Paul & Susan Abbott Paul Geck & Kenna Hyatt Paul Kinsey Paula Therese Scott Pete & Nancy Spruance Peter & Pat Hecht Peter Jain Peter Martin & Diqui Lapenta Philip & Sally Arnot Philippe & Amelia Lapotre Ranada Laughlin Redwood Coast Acupuncture Center Inc. Redwood Curtain Brewing Co., LLC Richard & Susan Benoit

Richard C. Brown Richard Engel & Basilia Lopez Richard Knapp Rick & Sally Botzler Rita Carole Robert & Mary Gearheart Robert & Susan Cherry Roger & Connie Miller Roger & Molly Schroeder Rotary Club of Arcata Sunrise Roxanne Heiob Sam King Sandra Haux Scott & Cindy Bradshaw Scott & Susan Keele Scott Burgess Sheryl Iwanski Sonya Jackson Stacy Becker Stan Binnie & Kimberly Tays Stephen Lunt Steve Salzman & Joan Levy Steven Kilburn Steven Luu Steven McDonald & Clara Sander-McDonald Surfside Palms Apartments LLC Susan Donovan Susan O’Connor Susan Waites Suzanne Courteau Sylvia Shaw Tamar Danufsky Teri Langs Terry Uyeki The Shaughnessy Family Thomas J. Clark Tiferet Center, Inc. Tom & Barbara Peters Tom & Susan Leskiw Verne & Nancy Frost William & Sharlene Evans YourCause, LLC

TRAIL SUPPORTERS Alan Wolski & Mary Ann Madej Allison Bronkall Alyson Hunter Amanda Piscitelli Angel Calderon Ann King Smith Ann Wallace Annie & James Floss Anthony Stubbs Audry Drynan Barbara Copperman Barbara Turner Bayfront Restaurant LLC Bea Stanley Ben & Juanita (Midge) Catching Ben Morehead Bill & Danise Tomlin Bill Thompson Bob & Susan Johnson Bob & Virginia Felter Bonnie Lesley Brooks & Carolyn Otis Bruce Griesenbeck C. John & Carol Ralph Candace Miller Carl Birks Carol & Steven Vander Meer Carolyn J. Mueller & James Carley Casey Leaf Catherine Walling Charis Arlett Charles Powell Chris Frolking & Margaret Nulsen Christina Stockwell Christine White Clark A. Fenton Colin Fiske Corey Tipton Corinne E. Frugoni Curtis Valko Daniel & Diane Larkin David & Jessica Loya David & Kimberley Ryan David & Lori Breyer David & Pamela Largent Deborah Claesgens Dennis & Marylyn Lewis

Dennis Kalson Dick Hansis Dr. Ellen Weiss & Dr. Nathan Copple Dr. Mark & Anne Harris Dr. Rollin & Dr. Ann Richmond Eli Asarian Elliott L. Levin Ellizabeth P. Johnson Eric & Joan Grantz Eric & Mary Almquist Eugene & Claire Perricelli Frances Madrone Frank & Sheila Lovio Fred Neighbor & Joyce Hough Gaela Mitchell Gail Popham Gary & Andrea Eitel-Bird Gene & Christine Callahan George & Kyoko Clark George Spinas & Family Gerry McGee Ginni Hassrick Glenn & Vickie Powell Gordon & Michael Van Zee Gordon Inkeles Greg Freer Han Medical Corporation Heather Verville & Rick Brazeau Ian & Elizabeth Schatz Ingrid Kosek & Kevin Fischer Irene E. Funk Jake A. Drake James L. Froland James Vandegriff & Illijana Asara James Zoellick & Rose Gale-Zoellick Jason Slyter Jay Schock & Kumi Watanabe Schock Jean Santi Jeanne E. Gale Jeanne Pendergast Jennifer Brown Jennifer Dojka Jennifer Hanson Jennifer Turley Jeremy & Deborah Ketelsen Jim & Charlene Sanders Jim & Francene Rizza

Jim & Pamela Ritter Joe & Karen Tyburczy Joe & Patricia Dougherty Joe Bonino John & Caroline Carson John & Joanne Bartow John A. & Jacqueline M. Petersen John Jaso & Joyce King John R. Stokes Jon & Wendy Robertson Jonathan Hill Joseph Ceriani Jr. Josh & Susan Wolf Joyce Houston Joyce King Judith A. Hinman Kai & Julie Neander Karen & Stephen Underwood Katherine P. Layton Kathie Kelly Kenneth & Ingeborg Aalto Kenneth & Kemset Moore Kenneth J. Collins Kenneth W. Weiderman Kevin and Amy Lennox Krista Duarte Larry & Peggy Buwalda Laura Pickens Lauri Rose Lawrence & Janis Strattner Leah & Morgan King Len & Kerry Mayer Leslie Keig Lewis Litzky & Suzanne Simpson-Litzky Linda Eckert Lisa Arnold-Fernandez Logger Bar, Inc. Lois Nipkau Revocable Trust Lorraine Dillon & Mike Metro, Jr. Louis Marak Lynn Jones Lynn Kerman Lynne Wells Marcy Manning Margaret A. Gainer Margaret Grossman, Family Practice Marjorie Anne Fay

*Please note, Founding Donors are those who made contributions in 2017. We have tried our best to be sure all Founding Donors were included on the list. Please let us know if we have inadvertently missed someone.

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


WALK RUN RIDE ROLL

Growing the Humboldt Bay Trail Fund is important for the long-term sustainability and development of a regional trail network. CONSIDER MAKING A MONTHLY OR ANNUAL DONATION TO THE FUND AT: HAFOUNDATION.ORG/HUMBOLDTBAYTRAIL

DON’T MISS THESE UPCOMING HUMBOLDT BAY TRAIL EVENTS Celebrate the Completion of the of the Eureka Waterfront Trail

Completing the Humboldt Bay Trail between Eureka and Arcata Public Meeting

SAT., FEB. 10TH, 4PM • WHARFINGER BUILDING, EUREKA

4-5pm Social Hour and a sneak peak at future trail amenities. Hors d’oeuvres provided by Eureka Natural Foods, no-host bar featuring local beer and wine • 5-7pm Premier of Documentary Film: Battle for the Eureka Waterfront Trail, the untold story of the trials and tribulations that led to the development of Eureka’s newest crown jewel. Call 441-4206 for more information.

TUES., FEB. 27, 5:30-7 PM, WHARFINGER BUILDING, EUREKA

The County of Humboldt is sponsoring a public meeting to discuss the plan to complete the Humboldt Bay Trail between Eureka and Arcata. The meeting will begin with an informal open house at 5:30 pm to view exhibits of the current design and talk with planners and engineers followed by a project update presentation with time for questions and comments.

More information about the trail and upcoming events is available at: Humboldtbaytrail.info THANK YOU AD SPONSORS

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

13


From NCJ Daily

Generational Ink

How to Get Involved 101

H

ow do we get rid of the ‘old boys club?” was the first question posed at Feb. 4’s Run, Serve, Lead! conference hosted by North Coast People’s Alliance to educate residents about becoming involved in the political landscape. The alliance grew out of the local efforts to elect Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders to office. The event’s panel included College of the Redwoods Trustee Danny Kelley, Arcata Mayor Sofia Pereira, Ferndale City Councilmember Patrick O’Rourke, former Supervisor Clif Clendenen and immigration rights activist Renee Saucedo, who each shared their unique experiences and thoughts on local government. “Forget about the good old boys,” advised Kelley, who defeated a nearly two-decade incumbent in November to take a seat on the college board. “Do what you think is right.” Pereira gave the keynote speech at the event, which focused on how to prepare for mounting an election campaign or working on one, noting that everyone has “different experiences that are valuable to local government.” “What’s that fire in your belly? What brought you here?” she asked the crowd of more than 100 gathered in the Multi-Generational Center in Fortuna. Echoing a similar sentiment, Saucedo urged those in attendance to take the

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For the news as it develops and all you need to understand politics, people and art on the North Coast, follow us online.

POSTED 02.05.18

Fisherman Lost at Sea: Three times in three days the local U.S. Coast Guard was dispatched to help fishermen in distress. Two of those rescues ended successfully, with fishing crews safely brought ashore. But the other rescue effort, on Feb. 4, was suspended after crews spent 11 hours searching 700 square miles of water off the coast before suspending rescue efforts without recovering Bryan Scott Moore, who fell off a crabbing boat, according to the Kym Kemp’s report on Redheaded Blackbelt. POSTED 02.05.18

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The number of lives lost in Humboldt County to drug- and alcohol-related deaths in 2017, roughly one per every 2,800 county residents. POSTED 01.31.18

responsibility of governance into their own hands. “The most meaningful change happens in this country when everyday people organize around issues they deeply care about,” she said. O’Rourke agreed, saying involvement in local government starts with figuring out what talents and capabilities one has that can be useful to their community. “It’s something you do from the heart,” he said. Clendenen, meanwhile, also noted that the lack of depth many people have about the workings of their local government can be shocking. “It’s a steep learning curve,” he said. “It makes for a better democracy when people understand their government.” The alliance distributed information packets about how to become more involved, which are available online at www. northcoastpeoplesalliance.org. NCPA Vice Chair and event coordinator Carrie Peyton-Dahlberg said the main aim was to encourage Humboldt residents to get involved, whether that means a fullfledged bid for office, a part-time role on a campaign or a couple hours a week of phone banking. “If you have an hour or two, whatever time you’ve got, there’s something you can do,” she said. — Andrew Butler

northcoastjournal

Tattoo artist Megan Franklin, of Springfield, Missouri, had Tye Harris, of Kyle, Texas, add a realistic tattoo of her grandparents on their wedding day to her arm at the Inked Hearts Tattoo Expo at Blue Lake Casino and Hotel this past weekend. See the full slideshow at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 02.06.18 Photo by Mark Larson

The Best: The nation’s go-to travel guide publisher, Lonely Planet, has named California’s Redwood Coast the No. 1 domestic travel destination for 2018. The publication picked its top 10 destinations with help from editors, contributors and researchers. In a press release, Eureka-Humboldt Visitors Bureau Executive Director Tony Smithers said the honor is “a huge endorsement from one of the world’s top travel brands.” Take that Boise, Idaho, which landed second on the list. POSTED 02.06.18

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

Body Recovered in Van Duzen: The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office recovered the body of an unidentified dead man from the Van Duzen River on Feb. 5 after a fisherman spotted it on a remote stretch approximately 1,000 feet from the river’s mouth. An autopsy was scheduled on the body, which officials said appears to have been “deceased for some time,” Feb. 7. No foul play is suspected at this time, according to the sheriff’s office. POSTED 02.05.18

northcoastjournal

newsletters

They Said It

Comment of the Week

“Methamphetamine is still killing more people than opiates. I believe that methamphetamine has carved out its place in our community and it’s just not going away.”

“Yep, Rebekah Martinez is on this season of The Bachelor…”

— Humboldt County Chief Deputy Coroner Lt. Ernie Stewart on the county’s high rate of drug and alcohol related deaths in 2017. POSTED 01.31.18

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

— Amy Bonner O’Brien, responding to a Journal Facebook post with a slideshow of people reported missing in Humboldt that asked readers, “See anyone you recognize?” POSTED 01.02.18


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

15


Week in Weed

Lines are a bummer. Photoillustration Wikimedia Commons/Jacqui Langeland

Left Behind By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

A

little more than five weeks have passed since recreational marijuana became legal in California and local dispensaries remain bustling. “We’ve been a lot busier than we expected,” says Ray Markland, company manager for Eureka’s EcoCann dispensary. “We expected a 20 to 30 percent bump in business but it’s been 200 to 300 percent.” Mariellen Jurkovich, owner of the Humboldt Patient Resource Center in Arcata, agrees things have been “super busy” since the dispensary opened recreational sales last month. And that’s brought a variety of changes. “It’s been a different atmosphere,” Jurkovich says, adding that lines have swollen with first-time customers who bring a litany of questions about various products, from flowers to edibles to concentrates. Markland says he’s already seen a fair number of repeat customers, intoning that there’s more to this legal green rush than novelty alone. While the transition to legal recreational cannabis sales is exciting, it hasn’t been a boon for everyone.

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

“I think medical patients feel somewhat left behind,” Markland says. Medical marijuana patients, who have enjoyed a fairly stable marketplace for more than a decade, have indeed seen their medical supply chain upended overnight as the state put medical and recreational cannabis under a single regulatory umbrella. For medical patients, that means they’re now waiting in longer lines to buy more expensive products that they now also have to pay taxes on. While the regulations do allow patients with a state-issued medical identification card to avoid some taxes, Markland says most patients don’t want to go to the Department of Health and Human Services to have their name put in a statewide database. (The cards cost $100 and, Jurkovich says, MediCal patients get a $50 discount.) Most patients, Markland says, have even bristled at new regulations requiring customers to offer up their identification so dispensaries can make sure they don’t purchase more than the single ounce a day that the law allows. In addition to the taxes — which run almost 25 percent locally and as high as


40 percent in other parts of the state — prices are going up with the added regulations. Consider the production of a hash oil. Markland says manufacturers, which must now go through the expensive process of getting licensed and permitted, now have to source their trim and buds from licensed and permitted growers. The trim and bud must then be tested at a licensed lab before it’s used to make the oil, which then needs to be tested again before being brought to market by a licensed distributor. Each step adds costs that trickle down to recreational customers and patients alike. And while some dispensaries and nonprofits used to run programs for the catastrophically ill and indigent that gave them cannabis products at little or no cost, that’s now generally considered verboten under the new state guidelines, which require dispensaries to pay taxes on any products that move through their doors. But as with many regulations, it appears this is open to some interpretation. “The more you read the guidelines, they’re like the Bible — every religion reads them a little bit differently,” says Jurkovich, adding that she believes dispensaries are still allowed to give “free samples” to medical patients with a state identification card. As to broader concerns about whether there would be enough licensed supply to meet demand, Jurkovich and Markland say so far, so good. Markland says there have been some hiccups as far as getting specific products — pointing out that some locally produced offerings are now being distributed through San Francisco or Santa Rosa, which causes some hangups. He also adds that EcoCann stocked up heavily on cannabis flowers prior to the rules taking effect Jan. 1, meaning it hasn’t yet had to source its 24 strains of flowers through the newly regulated supply chains. Both he and Jurkovich say they’ve worked to develop relationships with local growers and distributors who have helped keep them at the front of the line. Currently, Markland says all but a few of the EcoCann’s products are grown and produced in Humboldt County but he wants to be able to boast having 100 percent local products in the near future to showcase and celebrate cannabis country’s best. “This is our shot,” he says. ●

.

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Ca

Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

WE DELIVER! com

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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New store front. Same heart. The Heart of Humboldt is now open for both recreational and medical cannabis sales — two store fronts, right next door to each other, with the same great customer service. Please stop by to check out our newly renovated space, a large, welcoming and updated atmosphere ready to serve you. Medical patients can find us in the same original location providing them the confidentiality and consistency they have grown to count on.

We carry a wide variety of vape cartridges and edibles along with an array of flower strains, all available to everyone, fitting their unique personality for flavor and potencies.

THE HUMBOLDT CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION 707-822-9330 • 6TH & I ST., ARCATA • M-F 10-7, SAT & SUN 11-5

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


On the Cover

Still Missing

Unlike The Bachelor’s Bekah M, these people aren’t famous, their stories haven’t gone viral and they haven’t been found By Thadeus Greenson and Linda Stansberry newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

I

n some ways, Rebekah Martinez’s case isn’t that different from most of the hundreds of people who go missing in Humboldt County every year. Her mother expected her to call and, when she didn’t, phoned law enforcement at 1 a.m. on Nov. 18 to report her missing, saying her daughter had told her she was going to work on a marijuana farm but fell out of touch (also not atypical). And as happens in most of these cases, it seems Martinez quickly reconnected with her mother and both went on with their lives. Where Martinez’s story deviates from the norm is what happened next: She went on to become a burgeoning reality television star on the hit show The Bachelor, which began airing last month, though her name was never cleared from the state’s missing persons database. That set the stage for the story we broke Feb. 1 that quickly went viral, with newspapers and websites throughout the country running headlines about the reality star who was missing in plain sight. But lost in the viral coverage was how Martinez’s story, and some other less sensational ones like it, have exposed some major flaws with the state’s missing persons database and the way these cases are handled. It overshadowed the stories of dozens of people who are truly missing and the family members desperately waiting for closure. Vikki Joseph is one of those family members, her brother Jeff Joseph having gone missing near Willow Creek on June 21, 2014. She’s been researching his disappearance ever since and trying to bring attention to his case, which she fears isn’t being thoroughly investigated by the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. “It’s not fair to all these families who have been looking for answers for years and, because we’re not on a reality TV show, there’s no spotlight,” Vikki Joseph said. “Actually, it’s bullshit. It’s not right.” Last week, the Journal ran a cover story — “The Humboldt 35” — examining why Humboldt County has the highest per-capita rate of missing persons reports in California. As a part of the story, we posted a slideshow to Facebook featuring images of each of the 35 people listed on the California Attorney General’s database as having gone missing from Humboldt County and asked if readers recognized anyone. Within minutes, an astute reader — Amy Bonner O’Brien — replied with an emphatic yes, and pointed out that Martinez is currently vying for love — or at least stardom — on The Bachelor.

Rebekah Martinez’s Feb. 2 Instagram post (right) makes light of her once missing status, which was reported by news outlets throughout the country.

After some Googling returned Instagram images that appeared very similar to Martinez’s, we compared her missing persons profile with that on The Bachelor website and found a host of similarities. So we reached out to the sheriff’s office, which prompted an email from public information officer Samantha Karges to the deputy who initially took Martinez’s missing persons report, noting the similarity in images and asking if Martinez was still listed as missing. Ten minutes later, the deputy emailed Karges back: “I just got off the phone with Rebekah. She is in fact the same person. She has been removed from (the Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit).” We reported the story and it quickly went viral, fueled in part by a tweet from Martinez herself that linked back to the Journal’s reporting and said, “MOM. How many times do I have to tell you I don’t get cell service on the Bachelor??” She followed up with a crack about her driver’s license photo and a post on Instagram a short time later with a picture of herself on the side of a milk carton. While Martinez seemed to have some fun with the story that increased her newfound celebrity profile, others — including family members of the truly missing — found elements of her case unnerving. The timeline of events remains a bit murky, but The Bachelor began filming its current season Sept. 20. A few days prior, Martinez posted on her Instagram account that she was “giving up” her phone and social media for several weeks, which makes sense as the hit show reportedly requires contestants to turn in their phones to prevent any details of the show from leaking before it airs. At 1:06 a.m. on Nov. 18, Martinez’s mother called the sheriff’s office and reported her daughter missing, saying she last heard from her the morning of Nov. 12, when Martinez called on “a friend’s phone” to say she was going to work on a marijuana farm in Humboldt County and would see her in seven to eight days. “The deputy followed procedure, following up on all leads and forwarding the case to the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Investigations Division,” according to a press release. It’s unclear if Martinez was still on set at The Bachelor at this point and just made up the Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

19


On the Cover Continued from previous page

marijuana farm story or if she’d been eliminated and was actually headed to Humboldt County. What is clear is that on Nov. 23 she resumed posting photos to Instagram, breaking her Bachelor-imposed radio silence. On Dec. 12, according to the sheriff’s office, a deputy contacted Martinez’s mother by email, asking if she’d heard from her daughter. She responded that, in fact, her daughter had reached out to her the afternoon of Nov. 18 — the same day she’d been reported missing. The deputy reportedly asked the mother to have Martinez contact an investigator as soon as possible, as law enforcement can’t clear a missing persons case until making direct contact with its subject. Martinez apparently never reached out and her case consequently sat unnoticed until a Journal reader made the connection. And it’s worth noting here that Martinez’s case isn’t the only one that the Journal’s reporting helped clear from the system. The day before her story broke, just as last week’s Journal was hitting newsstands, we received a call from Daniel Ogden Stromberg, who’d been reported missing by family in July of 2017. Stromberg reported that he was living in Eureka with a roommate, entirely unaware that the Eureka Police Department had listed him as missing until he picked up a copy of the Journal and saw his name in print. And while researching an information request for this week’s story, Karges found that a man reportedly missing since February of 2010 — John Leyden — had been arrested four months later in Seattle and should have been cleared from the system almost eight years ago. So it’s understandable that family members of the missing — people like Vikki Joseph — would see all this and wonder just how much law enforcement attention is being paid to their loved ones. Tammy Jones Lankford, whose cousin Robert Tennison went missing in Alderpoint in January of 2009, said she has been frustrated at times with the sheriff’s office’s handling of his case, noting that she felt not much was done until she began personally working with a deputy on it in 2013. Lankford said she’s glad Martinez is safe but found her Twitter joke about the public release of her driver’s license photo being the “worst part” of the ordeal to be naïve. Until you have a family member go missing, she said, you can’t possibly understand the pain. “It’s really hard to understand how someone can be so flippant about being presumed missing … considering it’s a near epidemic in Humboldt County,” she said. “Why some get highly publicized and others go completely ignored is beyond me. I’m glad this story has a happy ending for her family. I just wish our family had the same.” The following is a list of every person currently listed as missing from Humboldt

County on the California Attorney General’s database, as well as a few others the Journal became aware of in researching this story. It’s unclear why they aren’t included in the AG’s list.

Mary Elizabeth Stuart was last seen

with her two small daughters, Fannie Fawn and Jessie Flo, then ages 1 and 2, on Dec. 10, 1977. She left her home in Honeydew with her two small daughters in tow to visit a television repair shop, do laundry and buy groceries. Her station wagon was found a month later but the family has never been seen again. Mary Elizabeth’s husband, Byron Stuart, was considered a key suspect but he died in 1996. A neighbor, Joe Paff, told the Journal that in the week after missing since the disappearance of his family, Stuart was Dec. 10, 1977 behaving erratically, using drugs and saying that Mary and the children had been taken by aliens. Mary Elizabeth, now 72, was described as standing 5 feet 5 inches tall and weighing about 135 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair. Her daughters would now be 42 and 43.

Edrel Mae Pierce was 57

when she disappeared on May 17, 1981. She reportedly walked a short way down her driveway in Honeydew to mail missing since some letters and never returned. An May 17, 1981 extensive search of the area by locals and law enforcement with cadaver dogs revealed nothing. She was said to be in poor health and suffering from a mental disorder. The area where she disappeared has been turned into a cannabis grow. Pierce, who would now be 93, is described as standing 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighing about 150 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair. She was last seen wearing a light blue London Fog raincoat and a small white gold Bulova watch.

20  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Ollie Letrell Cader, who would

now be 81, has been missing for more than 35 years, since he was last seen in Humboldt County on Oct. 9, 1981, when missing since he was 45. Cader is described as standing Oct. 9, 1981 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighing about 145 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair. He was last seen wearing a green shirt. According to the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, Cader’s case has been forwarded to the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office as a possible homicide.

John Stewart Campbell was last

seen Feb. 16, 1985. An 18-year-old Humboldt State University student, Campbell was reported missing by a residence hall advisor and a park ranger later missing since found his vehicle in a wilderness area but Feb. 16, 1985 there were no signs of a robbery, according to University Police Chief Donn Peterson. In the subsequent decades, the chief said, leads have taken the investigation to Canada, Ohio and elsewhere but the case remains an active, open missing persons investigation. Campbell’s family, Peterson said, has held out hope. “It’s a heartbreaking case,” Peterson said. “The parents have no closure.” Campbell is described as standing 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighing about 160 pounds, with blue eyes and blond hair. He has some discoloration on his face, as well as freckles. He would now be 51.

Charles Detweilder Allen

specified personality disorder at the time of her disappearance. Milbourn, who would now be 54, was described as standing 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighing 130 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair and a tattoo of roses on her upper right arm.

missing since

June 7, 1988

Thomas Page Locke was last

seen Dec. 12, 1988, in Redway. He had just turned 22 and would now be 51. Locke is described as standing 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighing about 165 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair.

missing since

Dec. 12, 1988

Daniel Thomas Pogue, who would

now be 53, was last seen by his family in Eureka on Oct. 1, 1990. Little is known about Pogue’s case except he has a tattoo of a rose on his left leg and was evidently missing since in police custody in Trinity County as of Oct. 1, 1990 April of 1991. He was reported missing in 1994, according to Eureka Police Department. Pogue, who was about 26 when last seen by family, is described as standing 5 feet 6 inches tall, weighing about 200 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes.

Andrea “Chick” Jerri White was a

was last seen Oct. 21, 1985, in Arcata, when he was 24. He was reported missing by a long-time friend on Nov. 4 and reportedly may have been suicidmissing since al and in possession of a handgun. He’s Oct. 21, 1985 described as standing 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighing about 140 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair. Allen would now be 56.

23-year-old living in Hoopa when was last seen in Blue Lake on July 31, 1991, hitchhiking back from a court date in Eureka. She left behind four missing since children, the youngest of whom was about July 31, 1991 1 year old. White, who would now be 49, had a 5-inch scar on her left temple. She’s described as standing 5 feet tall and weighing about 115 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes.

Penelope Jo Milbourn was 25 and

Roger A. Anderson was last seen Feb.

pregnant when she disappeared from Eureka on June 7, 1988. Her case file indicates that she was addicted to drugs and had an un-

15, 1993, in Eureka. He was 33 at the time and would now be 58. Anderson is described as standing 5 feet 9 inches tall and weighing


about 160 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair. He has a scar in the middle of a finger on his right hand.

Hannah Rowell

weighing 130 pounds, with blue eyes and blond hair.

Katie Elizabeth Wantz was last

missing since

Feb. 15, 1993

was last seen Sept. 1, 1993, and was reported missing six days later by a friend, according to EPD. Rowell, who was 29 at the time of her disappearance, is described as standing 5 feet 1 inch tall and weighing about 120 pounds missing since with hazel eyes and red hair. She was last Sept. 1, 1993 seen wearing a black sweater, flowered stretch pants and sandals. Today she would be 53.

Lorie Lynn Walters-Pope

was last seen by a California Highway Patrol officer on Nov. 19, 1996, on State Route 36 near Alton and was reported missing by her ex-husmissing since band. She is described as standing 5 feet 5 Nov. 19, 1996 inches tall and weighing about 200 pounds, with blue eyes and red hair. She was 44 at the time of her disappearance, WaltersPope would now be 66. She remains classified as an “at-risk missing person and/ or a voluntary missing person,” according to the sheriff’s office.

Karen Mitchell

disappeared while walking down Broadway on the afternoon of Nov. 25, 1997, at the age of 16. A witness described Mitchell as having possibly gotten in missing since a light blue fourdoor sedan driven Nov. 25, 1997 by a white man who looked to be around 60 to 70 years old. EPD has investigated a number of different leads, including information that she was alive and well and tending bar in Iowa (proven false) and that her disappearance was connected to eccentric scion Robert Durst (unproven). Mitchell, who would now be 37, is described as standing 5 feet 5 inches tall and

seen Oct. 28, 2001, in Eureka. She was reported missing Nov. 12 by a friend. Wantz, who would be 37 now, also goes by Katie Masterson and is demissing since scribed as standing 5 feet 6 inches tall and Oct. 28, 2001 weighing about 140 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair. She has a tattoo of roses on her back. She was 20 at the time of her disappearance.

Chris Robert Giauque was

reported missing Aug. 9, 2003, after the then 36 year old was last seen driving on Spy Rock Road in Southern Humboldt. Giauque, who also missing since went by James Anthony Beam, is Aug. 9, 2003 described as standing 6 feet tall and weighing about 145 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair in long dreadlocks. He was last seen wearing Carhartt pants and a Hawaiian print shirt. He would have celebrated his 51st birthday Feb. 2.

Joan Penderell Taylor left her

home in Bayside to go for a walk on Nov. 23, 2003. A neighbor reported seeing her on Jacoby Creek Road near Quarry Road later that evening. Taylor was 63 at the missing since time and reportedly suffering from Nov. 23, 2003 dementia or other, unspecified mental health issues. She was described as standing 5 feet 7 inches tall and weighing 135 pounds, with blue eyes and blond hair. She was last seen wearing a green rain parka and rain paints and silver Nike hiking boots. Today she would be 77.

Seamus Murphy, who had recently

changed his name from Michael Goggin, was last seen on Feb. 1, 2004. His truck was found down an embankment off the Mattole Road just south of the Mendocino Lighthouse on Continued on page 23 »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

21


PAID ADVERTISMENT

County Counsel Prepared Title and Summary of Proposed Measure Title: Humboldt County Immigration Sanctuary Ordinance Summary for the Proposed Measure (499 words) California state law limits the discretion of state and local law enforcement and other public agencies and public and private employers to cooperate with federal civil immigration enforcement agency activities. (Government Code sections 7282-7285.3.) State law recognizes that the discretion of local agency officials may be further limited by local law or policy (e.g., Gov. Code sections 7282.5 (a) and 7284.6 (a)(1)(C)). The proposed measure would enact an ordinance establishing more restrictive local law and policies for the County of Humboldt regarding immigration status and enforcement. Specific prohibitions, restrictions and polices are listed for the use of county funds, county law enforcement officials, all county agencies, and the welfare of children of deported parents. None of the limitations will prohibit county employees or officers from discussing immigration status as part of a service request, obeying lawful orders, taking action to protect persons or respond to emergencies, or investigating criminal activity other than violations of immigration law. Exceptions to the prohibitions, restrictions, and policies apply when the action is required by federal or state statutes or regulations, court orders or decisions. The Sheriff and Juvenile Probation Officer are each required to provide semi-annual reports to the Board of Supervisors on the number of any detentions based solely on civil immigration detainers for each sixmonth period beginning with the effective date of the ordinance. The report is to include a description of all communications to or from the federal agency charged with enforcement of immigration law. If enacted, the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors is required to send copies of the ordinance to all County departments, agencies and commission, U.S. Senators and Congresspersons representing California, the federal immigration enforcement agency, the U.S. Attorney General, Secretary of State, and the President. County employees are to be given written instructions for implementing the ordinance and be advised that failure to comply with prohibitions will be grounds for appropriate disciplinary action. The County Human Rights Commission is charged with reviewing compliance with the ordinance by County agencies in particular instances where there is a question of noncompliance or a complaint of non-compliance has been lodged. The Commission is to report its findings to the Board of Supervisors within a specified time period. Nothing in the proposed ordinance is intended to create any new rights or liabilities for which the County would be liable for money damages. Nothing in the proposed ordinance is to be construed to violate, be contrary to, or to be in defiance of any federal or state law. The proposed ordinance includes a severability clause that in the event some portion of the ordinance is determined to be invalid, it would not affect the validity of the remaining portions. Furthermore, should any provision of the proposed ordinance place federal funding for County services at risk as a result of federal or state legislation, a court order, or standing federal executive order, that provision shall be deemed invalid so long as the legislation, court order, or executive order remains in effect. PAID ADVERTISMENT

22  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


On the Cover

CA COUNTIES RANKED BY MISSING PERSONS REPORTS PER CAPITA 2010-2017

Continued from page 21

(Minimum 100,000 population.)

Christina Lindsey Walters

was last seen walking out of a copy store in Eureka on Nov. 14, 2008. The then 23-year-old Wisconsin native, who also goes by “Airy Meadow,” missing since had reportedly been suffering from mental Nov. 14, 2008 health issues. A week before disappearing, she’d been hospitalized after being found naked, bloodied and bruised on the doorstep of a stranger’s home near Eureka, saying someone was out to get her. Walters, who would now be 32, was reportedly planning to fly back to Wisconsin to reunite with her mother when she disappeared. She is described as standing 5 feet 1 inch tall and weighing about 125 pounds, with green eyes and red hair. She has tattoos on her hip and neck.

Robert Tennison

went missing from Alderpoint on Jan. 20, 2009, reportedly after visiting the area from Stanislaus County to sell a dirt bike. He was 37 at the time and left behind four children. Tennison, who would now be 45, is

missing since

Jan. 20, 2009

Kevin Michael Kelly was last heard

from Nov. 1, 2012, and was reported missing by his sister on Nov. 24, 2012. A known transient who lived in Humboldt County, Kelly is classified as missing since a “voluntary missing adult” and had been Nov. 1, 2012 reported missing out of Ukiah prior to being listed by the sheriff’s office. He is described as standing 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighing about 160 pounds, with blue eyes and blond hair. Kelly would now be 56.

Gregory James Kuljian was 16 when,

attempting to rescue his father, he was swept out to sea near Big Lagoon. Both of his parents drowned and Gregory’s body has never been recovmissing since ered. He has been a missing person since Nov. 24, 2012 Nov. 24, 2012. He was described as standing 6 feet tall and weighing about 140 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair. He was wear-

(Minimum 100,000 population.)

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known in his field for his underwater photography. He set sail from the Eureka marina on March 16, 2007, for Blunt’s missing since Reef near Cape Mendocino. His boat March 16, 2007 was found, half-submerged, the following day. Chetron, who would now be 43, remains missing. He is described as standing 5 feet 9 inches tall and weighing 150 pounds with brown eyes and red hair. He was last seen wearing a gray dry suit.

10

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was last seen Sept. 1, 2009, at the San Francisco Park Police Department and was believed to be en route to Texas or Washington. Leyden, a known transient who missing since would now be 54, has been classified as Sept. 1, 2009 a “voluntary missing adult” by the sheriff’s office. He was reported missing Feb. 22, 2010, by his estranged wife. He is described as standing 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighing about 150 pounds, with blue eyes, brown hair and a tattoo reading “Sacramento” on his abdomen. While pulling information for this report, sheriff’s office spokesperson Samantha Karges said she came across an attachment from the Seattle Police Department indicating Leyden was booked into jail there on June 12, 2010, at which time Leyden should have been cleared from the missing persons system, “so he should no longer be considered as a missing person.”

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described as standing about 6 feet tall and weighing 150 pounds, with sandy blond hair, a full beard and mustache and one blue and one green eye.

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Feb. 4. Murphy, who would now be 41, is described as standing 6 feet 3 inches tall and weighing 200 pounds, with brown hair and green eyes. He was last seen wearing a tan Carhartt coat, black jeans and work boots.

CA COUNTIES RANKED BY MISSING PERSONS REPORTS CANCELLED DUE TO FINDING MISSING DECEASED PER CAPITA 2010-2017 (Minimum 100,000 population.)

Source: Office of the Attorney General website, NamUs website and U.S. Census data.

ing a black shirt and gray jeans when he went into the water.

John Edward Morgan was last

seen Aug. 25, 2013 and reported missing by his mother the following day. Morgan, who would now be 65, had serious medical problems and missing since was believed to be depressed and suicidAug. 25, 2013 al, according to APD. He is described as standing 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighing about 140 pounds, with hazel eyes and gray hair. Morgan is a diabetic.

Sheila Franks

was last seen leaving a friend’s house in Fortuna to go for a walk on Feb. 1, 2014. Her disappearance is rumored to be connected to that of another woman, missing since Daniele Bertolini, whose remains were Feb. 1, 2014 recovered in 2015. Bertolini and Franks disappeared within a week of one another. Franks had a previous arrest for assault with

a deadly weapon in 2011. Also known as Sheila Sherrell, Franks would be 41 now. She is described as standing 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighing 130 pounds, with blue eyes and blond hair.

Jeff Joseph was

reportedly waiting to meet someone to make a deal near his Willow Creek farm when he stopped returning calls from his friends and family missing since on June 21, 2014. His sister believes he was June 21, 2014 murdered. Joseph was 45 years old at the time and would have just turned 48. He’s described as standing 6 feet 2 inches tall and weighing about 210 pounds, with hazel eyes, a shaved head and brown sideburns.

Victoria Tatro

reportedly had been in a fight after being accused of stealing someone’s money before she disappeared on Aug. 1, 2014, at the age of 24. Tatro, who

missing since

Aug. 1, 2014

Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

23


On the Cover

Home & Garden

Continued from previous page

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would now be 27, was described as standing 5 feet 4 inches tall and weighing 100 pounds, with green eyes and auburn hair. Tatro, who has a lip piercing, was also known to go by Kendra and Victoria Joy Scofield.

Daniel Michael Flanagan was last

seen Sept. 17, 2014, in Eureka, driving a white 1994 Chevy van with California license plate 4W52958. He was reported missing more than a month missing since later, on Oct. 27, by a roommate, according Sept. 17, 2014 to EPD. Flanagan, who would be 55 now, is described as being 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighing about 160 pounds, with hazel eyes and brown hair.

Kenneth Raymond Baker

was 63 when a friend reported him missing Aug. 18, 2015, after he failed to return from a motorcycle trip to South Dakota. According to APD, missing since Baker was last seen Aug. 13. On Jan. 31 of Aug. 13, 2015 this year, police found human remains and a motorcycle down a steep embankment off of Highway 50 near Austin, Nevada. According to APD, Baker’s wallet and other personal items were recovered at the scene. The remains have been sent for DNA testing. Baker is described as standing 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighing 210 pounds, with hazel eyes and gray hair.

Mitchell G. Hernandez was report-

ed missing on Nov. 23, 2016, by his mother.

Hernandez, then 47, was last seen wearing a gray sweatshirt, a Dodgers jacket and green and tan Coleman hiking boots, carrying a backpack and a pistol. His backpack was found missing since on the Eel River bar in Alderpoint by family Nov. 23, 2016 members searching for him. Members of Hernandez’s family have submitted DNA samples for testing purposes and they are currently being compared to a body that washed ashore at the South Jetty on Jan. 6, 2017, with results expected in a month or two. The investigation remains active, according to the sheriff’s office. Hernandez is described as standing 5 feet 9 inches tall and weighing about 200 pounds, with brown eyes and gray hair. He usually wore two bracelets and a silver necklace with a cross and dog tags.

Ariana Yvett Osorio was last seen

March 10 in Eureka and was reported missing March 21 by family members. According to EPD crime analyst Brittany Powell, Osorio, now missing since 31, has been in contact with family members March 10, 2017 since being reported missing but has not yet contacted law enforcement to be removed from the database. She’s described as standing 5 feet 3 inches tall, weighing about 170 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes.

Anesi Sauta is one of four Southern California men reported missing May 22 after coming to the Mad River area to pick some-


s

Home & Garden thing up for a friend, look for agricultural work or for a property to purchase, according to the various accounts of relatives. The men traveled in a rented silver Jeep, license plate missing since 7UGP903. Cell phones connected to the four May 17, 2017 men last pinged in the Stockton area on May 18 and 19. Numerous searches of properties associated with the case — all of which appeared to be recently abandoned marijuana grow sites — have come up empty. Sauta, who would now be 29 years old, stands 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs about 230 pounds. He has brown eyes and black hair, a tattoo reading “Family” on his chest, another of a lion on his right shoulder, one of an eagle on his forearm and four lines of script on his left breast.

Jeremy Dewayne Ashley

is presumed dead after being last seen Oct. 9, when he fell into the ocean from a rock near College Cove Beach. A Coast Guard helicopter missing since and members of the Humboldt County Oct. 9, 2017 Sheriff’s Office searched for Ashley for several hours before suspending efforts at nightfall. One of Ashley’s shoes was found the following day. Ashley, who now would have just turned 21, is described as standing 6 feet 3 inches tall and weighing 215 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes.

Ivan Liñan Cano

was last seen Nov. 28, when he reportedly attacked a friend in a car before fleeing into the woods along State Route 36 near Carlotta. Liñan Cano, 31, was reportedly missing since suffering mental N ov . 28, 2017 health issues that the friend was trying to get him help with at the time of his disappearance. Liñan Cano, who is from Spain, is described as standing 5 feet 8 inches tall with a thin build, brown hair, brown eyes and a reddish mustache and beard. He was last seen wearing a black jacket and dark, waterproof pants. l Two Rivers Tribune editor Allie Hostler contributed research to this report.

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Hand Making Skateboards in Arcata A backyard business for sidewalk surfers By Sam Armanino

getout@northcoastjournal.com

O

ver the last five years, the cracks and crannies of Arcata’s sidewalks have eaten me up and the unpredictable weather left me with a heavy and rusted cruising setup. It was time for me to get something new to roll around the sleepy town with. Steven Driedger’s boards caught my eye with their color and shape, so I visited his workshop. In a quiet corner of Sunny Brae in Arcata, the sounds of a small woodworking operation bounced through a redwood backyard. A workbench held a table saw, a sander, wood glue and everything else Driedger needs to build a custom skateboard. “The nose of the board is going to sit right there,” he said as he marked the edge of the wooden planks with a blue pen. He lined up six slices of nicely grained hardwood as he stepped back to picture the soon-to-be skateboard deck cut out and ready to ride through the Arcata streets. The home of the skateboard builder is full of college students, mismatched furniture and two dogs that never stop playing. It takes Driedger about five days to build a skateboard deck from scratch between a part-time job making coffee at Dutch Bros. and volunteering his time with the Arcata Fire District. “Now that I am up here, I’ve been getting that urge to build and create things again,” said Driedger, who moved to Arcata to attend Humboldt State University, graduating in 2014 with a degree in recreation administration. “I’ve learned to be picky with the wood I use,” Driedger said. “The first board I used had kind of a soft core and now I’ve become pretty picky with the strength of the wood.” The process is simple for him. He learned woodworking from his dad in his

Steven Driedger skates down his Sunnybrae road on one of the first boards he ever made. Photo by Sam Armanino

Southern California childhood home in Santa Clarita. Driedger was in community college when he built his first board — back then, he said, he had to park about 2 miles from his place because he wasn’t on the lease and couldn’t get a parking spot. “I got really tired of walking 2 miles to my car and back to my studio, so I needed a skateboard.” Some of his recent skateboards are made of purpleheart, zebra, Chechen and Wenge hardwoods that were imported from all over the world. The largest piece of wood will go in the center and bear the weight of the trucks and wheels. “I’m just building these skateboards in my backyard. I’m hanging out in Humboldt and feasting on all its goodies, going outside and adventuring and camping and backcountry hiking and enjoying breweries and the buddies that are still up here,” Driedger said. Driedger models and carves the boards with the design of a small surfboard, complete with an old-school ’70s fishtail. I had my eye on one made from a large slab of straight grained purpleheart that contrasted with the zebra wood to its side. The size was exactly what I wanted: not so big as to be bulky in my arms and not so small to be uncomfortable on the road. Of course, I had to get on one before making my final decision. With a confident push from my left foot, I began to carve my way down Driedger’s street. With these boards, you’re going to feel the character of the road under your feet — every bump and divot. There’s no flex and zero tail to pick up the nose. It takes a little getting used to. While this may seem like a negative for a cruiser, there’s something genuine about riding handmade artwork through Arcata roads. Once you get used to how they

ride, you’ll find they pump a lot more like a surfboard on a concrete wave. “It’s not compressed wood like the trick decks you see; those are designed to have some flex. These are hardwood so they’re not supposed to be stomped on and that’s why they’re meant for cruising,” Driedger said. After Driedger selects individual planks of wood, it’s time to measure and make the first cuts. He lines the strips of wood to his table saw and triple checks his measurements. After the pieces are in place, he cuts small indents in the woods and glues them together. Each board will sit tight, between six clamps, for more than 24 hours before it’s ready. When it’s dried solid, Driedger takes the board to Almquist Lumber Company to take down a few centimeters on the top and bottom. He cuts and sprays on a special glass epoxy for grip. “It’s really for the grain to pop out from under the grip,” he said. I was sold when he said he never makes the same board. Mind you, they aren’t cheap — they range from $150-$200 for a 30-inch cruiser and $180-$200 for a long board. Some may look similar and they all have the same short fishtail surf cut, but Driedger said he makes each board custom and isn’t interested in changing anytime soon. “Right now, I’m not taking it too seriously,” Driedger said. “I’m just rolling with it. It’s kind of a fun side hobby. As long as people want a board made, I enjoy making them and I’ll do it. But I’m not going to mass produce a bunch of boards.” You can reach Steven Driedger via email at humbalay@gmail.com and check out his work on Instagram @humbalay. Check out a short video of the boards in the making and in action at www.northcoastjournal.com. ●

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


Art Beat

Social Media

Ceramicist Joel Diepenbrock pours tea at the Sanctuary By Gabrielle Gopinath artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

A

rcata-based ceramicist Joel Diepenbrock’s exhibition this month at the Sanctuary is part traditional display, part interactive rite. Diepenbrock’s vessels are completed in the act of use. When he presents his wares during Arts Arcata, he will be hosting members of the public in a tea ceremony using his own pieces, inspired by traditional designs used in Chinese and Japanese tea rituals. “Most of the bowls are Japanese cha wan tea bowls, which are low and wide. It’s a really nice simple way to drink tea,” Diepenbrock observes. “Because of the way the bowl’s shaped, you get to see the leaves unfurl, which is nice.” The Chinese gong fu tea ritual, he points out, involves a wider range of paraphernalia than its Japanese equivalent. The ritual of tea in this tradition can involve several brewing vessels, a tea pitcher and a brewing tray, in addition to teaspoons, cups and bowls. All these forms are traditionally made from fired ceramics. Diepenbrock is animated as he describes the technical aspects of making the work, especially the process of firing vessels in a wood-burning kiln: “like painting with fire and ash.” “Everything you do influences the final outcome in ways that are impossible to predict,” he notes. “Loading the kiln influences the way the ash drifts around in the interior during the firing process. The type of wood you’re burning influences the vessel’s appearance. The type of ash makes a difference in terms of altering particle size and color,” he says. Firing vessels in a wood-burning kiln may take as long as 72 hours, during which the kiln demands skilled round-the-clock supervision. Its temperature, which may range from 1,200 to upwards of 2,500 degrees, needs to be maintained precisely for optimum results. As the vessels cool, complex glazed surfaces form. “Usually what comes out is a surprise,” Diepenbrock says. “Not always good! So many unexpected things happen.

Joel Diepenbrock’s wood-fired teapot and cup. Courtesy of the artist

Sometimes you don’t know the purpose of a pot until it comes into your life.” The tea ceremonies that inspire the artist most directly have been shaped by hundreds of years of Buddhist ritual in China and Japan. But since graduating from Humboldt State University with a degree in art last year, he has had no shortage of opportunities to practice his craft locally. Employed at Fire Arts in Arcata as a ceramics technician, he also fires vessels regularly at several noted area potters’ wood-fired kilns, including Thomas Fossier’s in McKinleyville, David Zdrazil and Shannon Sullivan’s in Myrtletown and Conrad Calimpong’s in Ferndale. He credits the camaraderie of the local wood-fired ceramics community and the emphasis placed by area potters on social networks as an inspiration. In Diepenbrock’s eyes, teaware finds its highest purpose when it is used to create communion among two or more people. Any such event, he points out, can be considered a tea ceremony — a way for human beings to be fully present and engaged with one another in real time, with tea and teaware playing key roles as humble but essential mediating agents. Smooth-surfaced and elegant in contour, the bowls and cups he makes please without presuming to demand. Like a relay runner’s baton, they are less important than the event that forms around them;

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

yet without their unobtrusive presence, that event would not occur. Taking part in a tea ceremony can make you recalibrate your sense of pace and time. The ceremony’s events take place at micro scale. Leaves unfold in boiling water. Steam rises. Tiny beads of sublimated moisture accrue on the lip of a stoneware cup. The scent that fills the air is simultaneously peachy, starchy and mossy. It smells both ancient and new. Diepenbrock uses different styles of tea but often prefers to brew fermented Chinese pu-erh tea in its traditional compressed form. Each tuo cha tablet is a nut-brown puck of fermented camellia sinensis leaves, arrested in some cases on the very cusp of decomposition, then compressed and dried. When these layers begin to unfold in simmering water, the vapors that rise fill the nose with a dark, earthy, mushroom-y smell reminiscent of the forest floor. Diepenbrock has given a lot of thought to the subject of matching of tea with vessel, not only in terms of appearance but in terms of the way the brewing vessel’s materials can affect tea’s flavor. Pairing delicate white or oolong teas with fine porcelain ware can bring out subtle aspects of their tastes, he says, while using an ironware teapot can infuse pu-erhs with a mineral tang that accentuates their flavor profiles.

In conversation, Diepenbrock emphasizes the cyclical nature of the various processes involved in his vessels’ creation and use. “It’s a full circle — the making, the firing and then the use. When you use your own teaware, it’s more like a closed circle. When you use vessels other people have made, that opens the circle up. It’s a way of transferring energy.” The ritual of tea is social, although not in the same way that Facebook is. Approached with intent, the act of pouring out tea for oneself and a companion can be a way to enter into contemplation of the here and now. It doesn’t matter, Diepenbrock said, whether the ceremony is humble or formal. Making a ceremony out of tea can be a way to put quotes around a discrete instance of human exchange. It articulates a space where people can get together in real space and time, leaving their mediating screens and twittering devices temporarily behind. ●

Joel Diepenbrock’s ceramics will be on view at the Sanctuary Arcata, 1301 J St., Arcata through February. The artist hosts a tea ceremony during Arts! Arcata on Friday, Feb. 9 from 5:30 - 9 p.m. For more information call 822-0898 or visit www.sanctuaryarcata.org.


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F E AT U R I N G O R G A N I C , H O U S E - M A D E PA S TA I N F R E S H , S E A S O N A L P R E PA R AT I O N S

Friday, Feb. 9, 6-9 p.m.

A

rts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at locations in Arcata. Visit www.facebook.com/ artsarcata for more information or call 822-4500.

MIDDLE OF G ST. ARCATA PLAZA 707.826.7578

Sun - Thurs 8 am - 3 pm Fri. & Sat. 7 am - 3pm

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826-2345 791 8th Street, Arcata abruzziarcata.com

Mixed media painting by Anna Oneglia at Arcata Artisans.

ARCATA ARTISANS 883 H St. “Believe in Love,” a group show by 25 members of Arcata Artisans including Amy Taylor, stained glass; Elaine Y. Shore, ceramics; Anna Oneglia, mixed media; Patricia Sennott, monotype, and others. Wine pour benefits Breast and GYN Health Project. ARCATA EXCHANGE 813 H St. Barbara Caldwell, watercolors; music by Viols, Recorders, Krumhorns and All; wine pour benefits Zero Waste Humboldt. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Music by Kentucky Livin’. EPIC HEADQUARTERS 145 S G. St. Suite A. Rob DiPerna, photography, EPIC membership mixer. GARDEN GATE 905 H St. Augustus Clark, artwork; Music by the Compost Mountain Boys; Wine pour benefits the Arcata House. THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St. Flor d’Luna will be pouring a pre-release tasting of their 2015 Sangiovese. HUMBOLDT JIU JITSU 1041 F. St. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu demonstrations; Local artwork, refreshments; music by Selectah Positive I-Diaz. JACOBY’S STOREHOUSE 791 Eighth St.: • PLAZA GRILL (3rd floor) “Created Images V,” Boshua Struve, Hal Work, Donna Rosebaugh, Kjerstine Jennings,

digital imagery. • PLAZA VIEW ROOM (3rd floor) “Captured Moments,” Rick Vance, digital photography. • JAY BROWN ART AND DESIGN (3rd floor Suite 5) Jay Brown, multimedia. MOONRISE HERBS 826 G St. Deborah Boni, acrylic paintings. Music by Eric Evstis and Chelsea Troyer Duo. OM SHALA YOGA 858 10th St. Joy Holland, mosaics. Free chair massages and snacks from 6-7:30 p.m. PLAZA 808 G St. Carol Anderson, artwork. Wine pour benefits Humboldt Area Center for Harm Reduction. REDWOOD YOGURT 1573 G. St. Arcata Art Institute students, cartography and pieces from the Arcata High Foundations Art 1 class. SANCTUARY 1301 J St. “Fire Stones and Tea Leaves,” Joel Diepenbrock, tea-ware. Teas from around the world will be served. STOKES, HAMER, KIRK & EADS, LLP 381 Bayside Rd. David S. Price, photography; Music by Wynsome Winds; Wine pour benefits the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. UPSTAIRS GALLERY 1063 G St. Work from the students of Pacific Union School. WILDBERRIES MARKETPLACE 747 13th St. Arcata Art Institute’s Mia Shope, portraits. ● northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Table Talk

STUF’T POTATO Reopening Valentine’s Day! Victoria Place, 3220 Suite #8 Broadway Eureka, Ca

Heart on a Stick

Marinated beef heart skewers for Valentine’s Day By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

Feel the love with grilled beef heart and green onions. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

707-444-6200 find us on Facebook! Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

new kitchen new menu

RESTAURANT 301 & CARTER HOUSE INNS 301 L St. Eureka 707.444.8062 carterhouse.com

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

F

or years I’ve flipped through an old Irish cookbook in my kitchen and smiled at a recipe for beef heart called Love in Disguise: You cut the heart open, strip the insides, stuff it, roast it and carve it at the table. If you’ve ever had a truly rough breakup, you might wonder at the word “disguise.” As much as I heart heart, and offal in general — from tripe to sweetbreads to the chewy gizzards tucked inside a roasting chicken — and as much as I enjoy imagining myself as Snow White’s evil-fabulous stepmother, I’ve never made that recipe. The great mass of smooth, lean muscle that is a beef heart, with its deep, blood-rich, gamey flavor and firm texture, has always seemed to me best in morsels. In my family, long before the gentrification of nose-to-tail cuisine, we ate it thinly sliced and pan fried with soy sauce and green onions, letting its thick gravy soak into hot rice. It was a treat that I now realize was on offer because we were broke. As an adult, I didn’t return to heart until I lived alone with no roommates to horrify when it showed up on a shelf in the fridge on a foam tray pooling with dark blood like a spill of Burgundy. And yeah, OK, I was broke again. Unlike so many other cuts, it has yet to take over high-end menus so you can still grab a bargain (around $2.50 will get you a whole one) and the brass hipster ring of saying you were eating it before it was cool. It does take a little more prep than a boneless, skinless chicken breast but that comes with more flavor and the payoff of knowing and appreciating what you’re eating. There, spread out on the cutting

board before you, are the left and right ventricles you may not have seen since high school biology, the pale, tough chordae tendinae to be snipped away — all the involuntary cardiac muscle it takes to pump life through a 1,000 to 2,000-pound animal that you are going to waste just a little less of. Beef heart, along with being cheap and pleasing the ghosts of your waste-notwant-not ancestors, is wonderful in place of flank steak in a stir fry or marinated and grilled. And if, on the cusp of Valentine’s Day, you’re looking for a strong metaphor, it’s tough to beat. May I suggest heart cut to ribbons, skewered and lightly charred? Call it Love Undisguised.

Love Undisguised or Skewered Heart These are best cooked on an outdoor grill but can be done in a broiler under a watchful eye and with the oven door propped open a couple of inches. Serves 4. 1 beef heart 3 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons mirin 1 tablespoon sake 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2-3 bunches green onions 2 cloves garlic, smashed and chopped Freshly ground black pepper Bamboo skewers Cover 10-12 bamboo skewers in water and set aside. To prepare the heart, first rinse it with


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cold water inside and out, then pat it very dry. If you’re buying it from a butcher, the insides will be mostly cleaned out but you’ll still need to trim away any stringy bits and the membrane. With a sharp knife, make a small cut in the surface and pull the membrane away and off. Don’t go crazy. A little membrane won’t kill you, just remind you you’re eating organ meat. Turn the meat over and trim away the patches of fat from the outside, renewing your vow to exercise more and cut back on the doughnuts. Using the same method as on the interior of the heart, cut and peel away most of the outer membrane. Slice the meat into long, thin strips and set aside. Clean, trim and chop 3 green onions. In a glass bowl, mix the soy sauce, mirin, sake, sesame oil, chopped green onions, garlic and a couple of grinds of black pepper. Add the meat, turning it until it’s coated in the marinade and place it covered in the refrigerator for 1-2 hours. Trim the remaining green onions and cut them into 1-inch pieces. Skewer the strips of meat in a zig-zag around the green onions. Heat up the grill and place the skewers over a medium flame for 4 minutes per side. (If you are skipping the green onions, reduce the time to 3 minutes per side.) Serve as an appetizer or over rice. ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or Jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

100 MOONSTONE BEACH RD. TRINIDAD • 677-1616 moonstonegrill.com

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FRI & SAT 5-10 (707)

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32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

MARKDOWN MADNESS MANY ITEMS ARE REDUCED TO 50% OFF (707) 822-3090 987 H ST, Arcata

(707) 476-0400 Bayshore Mall

www.humboldtclothing.com

THUR 2/8

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-1220

Ocean Night 6:30pm $3 suggested donation

BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 822-3453

Open Mic 7pm Free

BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

ARCATA & NORTH FRI 2/9

Backstreet Band (rock and roll) Blue Rhythm Revue (blues, 9pm Free rock) 9pm Free

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad

Eyes Anonymous (’80s hits) 9pm Free

FIELDBROOK MARKET 4636 Fieldbrook Road 633-6097

[W] Dub Cowboy (DJ music) 9pm Free

Jimi Jeff and the Gypsy Band (rock) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

[W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

The Yokels (classics) 7:30pm Free

[T] Trivia 6pm [W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free

DJ L Boogie 9pm Free

Arts! Arcata - DJ EastOne & Friends (DJ music) 9pm Free

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

John Kadlecik (solo acousti’lectric) 9:30pm $15

Money: Pink Floyd Tribute 9:30pm $10

Jahdan Blakkamoore, Dynasty One, Sarge One Wise 9pm $10

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

[M] Monday Night 8-Ball Tournament 6:30pm $5 buy-in

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free

THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

M-T-W 2/12-2/14

Jazz Jam 5:30pm Free

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

Legends of the Mind (blues, jazz) 6pm Free

SUN 2/11

[M] Monday Night Movies: Freaks 7:30pm $5 2018 Mr. Humboldt Pageant The Secret Life of Pets (film) [W] Sci-Fi Pint Fry Night: 7pm $29 6pm $5 Invasion of The Bee Girls (1973) 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev purchase

CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville, 839-2013

CLAM BEACH TAVERN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville

SAT 2/10

Diego’s Umbrella (Gypsy rock) 9:30pm $15 Daytime GetDown [T] Open Mic 6pm Free, Savage Henry for Mike Lee 1-6pm Comedy 9pm $5 [W] Jazz at the Jam Deep Groove Society 10pm 6pm Free, Whomp Whomp 10pm $5

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34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

Open Daily 8am - 2am


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 2/8

FRI 2/9

LARRUPIN 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151

Eureka and South on next page

SAT 2/10

SUN 2/11

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

[W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

Multimedia Trivia Night 8pm Free

Kingfoot 9pm Free

Rosewater (acoustic Grateful Dead) 9:30pm Free

Fred & Jr. (swing jazz) 6pm Free

For Folk Sake! (folk) 6pm Free

Live Music TBA 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

Dent May, Moon King & Mr. Moonbeam 9pm $10

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

Open Mic 7pm Free

Potluck (food) 6pm Free

15% off with this coupon!

[W] Cribbage Tournament 7pm $5

(Not good with any other discount)

[T] Native Harrow (folk rock, indie pop) 6pm Free [W] Piet Dalmolen (solo guitar) 6pm Free Karaoke 9pm

[T] Sonido Pachanguero (salsa/cumbia) 9pm Free [T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 677-35437 480 Patrick’s Point Drive., Trinidad REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 S G St., #4., Arcata, 826-7222

M-T-W 2/12-2/14

[M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5 The Lost Dogs (blues, R&B) 8pm Free

SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919

Wild Otis (rock and roll) 8pm Free

DJ Music 10pm

DJ Music 10pm TBA

DJ Tim Stubbs 10pm TBA Carnaval Party with Samba Na Chuva & The Undercover 8pm $10

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

DJ Music 10pm Free

WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS 501 S. Westhaven Drive. 677-9493

[M] Bingo 7pm Free

Trivia Night 8pm Free

[M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8:30pm [W] Belles of the Levee (jazz, blues) 8pm Free [T] Bomba Sonido w/DJ Pressure 10pm Free [W] Reggae w/ Iron Fyah 10pm Free

1504 G ST, ARCATA, CA 707-630-5083 W W W. S AV O R YG R I L L C A F E . C O M

RLA with Nicholas Dominic Talvola: Triubute to Miles Davis 6:30pm $5-$20 sliding

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northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Blue Lake | 668-1810

1901 Heindon Rd, Arcata

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ARCATA 1811 G St (707) 825-7400

EUREKA 3050 Broadway (707) 443-7400

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Live Entertainment Grid

Beauty 4 U Hair & Extensions

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616-4306 8 Wabash, Eureka

20% OFF our TEPPANYAKI menu

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

Music & More VENUE

FRI 2/9

SAT 2/10

BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

Karaoke 8pm Free

Marshall House Project (soul, funk) 9pm Free

Live Music 9pm Free

BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Drive, Redway 923-3188

Pool Tourney 8pm

CECIL’S NEW ORLEANS BISTRO 773 Redwood Drive, Redway 923-7007

SUN 2/11

M-T-W 2/12-2/14 [W] Laugh Your Heart Out Comedy Show 8pm $35 table for 2, $65 table for 4 [T] Karaoke 9pm

Jimmy D. Jazz Quartet 7:30pm Free

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St., 497-6093 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

[T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 7pm $5 [W] Comedy Open Mikey 7pm Free The Gatehouse Well (Irish/ Celtic) 6pm Free

Tristan Norton: Evening of Guitar 5:30-8:30pm Free

Open Irish/Celtic Music Session 3pm Free

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER 59 Rusk Lane, Redway 923-3368

[W] Matisyahu (rap, beatbox, dub) 9pm $30

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free

PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

Gabe Pressure w/Reggaton, Afro Beat, Cumbia 10pm Free

PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka

Laidback Lounge (DJ music) Caitlin Jemma w/violinist Meg 6-11 Free Graham (soulful folk) 8pm Free

DJ D’Vinity 10pm Free

DJ Pressure 10pm Free Bill Allison (jazz) 7pm Free

PACIFIC BAR & GRILL, THE RED LION INN 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844 THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

15% Off

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Pizzas & Calzones

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway

THUR 2/8

Select Your Savings! Steaks & Seafood

EUREKA & SOUTH

[T] Phat Tuesdays 7pm Free [W] Open Mikey 8pm [W] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 6-9pm All ages

Marble Makers Ball w/Doug Fir and the 2x4s 7-10pm $20 donation

Fetish Night - Mardi Gras 9pm $5

Barking Up the Wrong Meowntain (live bands) 8pm Free

kanpai (bottoms up)

[W] The Breakup Song Sing-Along w/Eyes Anonymous 8pm $5

MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR

VALENTINE’S DAY V I S I T U S O N FAC E B O O K TO V I E W O U R F E B . 1 4 T H M E N U .

Daily Specials

C U LT U R E D C U I S I N E 2 8 5 0 F S T , E U R E K A | 7 0 7. 7 9 8 . 6 4 9 9

Lunches M-Sat 11-3

Tues-Thurs 5pm - 9pm

Fri-Sat 5pm - 10pm

limit one item per person, per day Masaki’s Japanese Restaurant

Open Every Day For Lunch & Dinner 773 8th St. Arcata & 305 F St. Eureka

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

320 F St. Eureka

Open Tues - Sat 11:30 - 9:30 707. 443. 7777

$70 PRIX FIXE

Comes with a glass of Laurent Perrier Brut Champagne.


Special Valentine’s Day Menu & Raffle (reservations recommended)

Caitlin Jemma plays Phatsy Kline’s Parlor Lounge in the Historic Eagle House on Friday, Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. (free).

Win a $25 gift to Faces of the Moon Day Spa during dinner

613 3rd St. Eureka • 707.798.6300

The

VENUE

THUR 2/8

FRI 2/9

SAT 2/10

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

The Jazz Hours 7:30pm Free

Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band (funk, blues, soul) 9pm Free

STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 744 Redway Dr., Garberville

Upstate Thursdays 9pm Free

Beats and Rhymes hip-hop w/ Just One and JRiggs 9pm

TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

Friday Night Function (DJ music) Free before 10pm

VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950

Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free

SUN 2/11

M-T-W 2/12-2/14 [T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [W] LD51- Ultra Secret Wednesdays (alt. jazz) 8pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in

Always Sourcing The Freshest Sustainable Seafood Full Bar

Sexy Saturdays w/Masta Shredda Free before 10pm

Private dining room seats up to 50 for your party or event!

[M] Tony Roach (croons standards) 6-8pm Free [T] Tuesday Blues w/Humboldt’s veteran blues artists on rotation 7pm Free [W] Karaoke Nights 9pm Free

VISTA DEL MAR 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka

Sea Grill

316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187 D I N N E R : M O N D A Y- S A T U R D A Y 5 - 9 pm

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

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@surfsideburgershack northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


Setlist

Music and Poetry and Music By Collin Yeo

I

thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com t’s fitting that this year Valentine’s Day falls on Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent, when Catholics traditionally give something up to pay penance to a greater spiritual truth. Love and romance, in my experience, also involve giving things away and sometimes those things are just too much and the whole thing crumbles like the resolve of a fasting penitent after a week of withholding. Love and devotion are strange beasts, and their bite marks are often dire. I am navigating this macabre love holiday with my two perennial loves: music and poetry. Specifically, the music of my all-time favorite band, which I recently decided after much thought is Thin Lizzy. Why Thin Lizzy? Because on a very basic level it has it all: songs about love, heartbreak, nostalgic pitfalls of memory and fighting and drinking. An entire rainbow of complicated human experiences covered in the deceptively simple but brilliant language in which the Irish sometimes speak and sung through the heart-worn voice of the late Phil Lynott. Plus dual-harmony, hard-rock solos are just like heaven when pulled off correctly. Anyway, retreating into music is one thing — you can do that at top volume while firing down the highway, after all — but poetry is another critter entirely. One of my favorite melancholic creations is that stanza from Shelley’s “To A Skylark”: “We look before and after, And pine for what is not: Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught; Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought.” Or how about that message about intellectual love and devotion directed to a critic of high esteem by Willie S. from the final couplet of his 112th sonnet? “You are so strongly in my purpose bred, That all the world besides methinks are dead.” Woof, it would shiver my timbers and crack my foundations if the right person told me that. Maybe keep that one in your back pocket for when you meet the right person, dear reader. And bringing it back to the local nightlife, which is my beat and purview, what would be the proper mantra for that? How about the opening

lines from the love song of another famous poetic weirdo, Mr. Dent May plays the Miniplex at 9 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 9. Prufrock, as told Courtesy of the artist by Mr. Thomas Stearns Eliot: “Let us go then, you and I, When the evening is spread out against the sky Tim Randles on piano, Mike LaBolle on Like a patient etherized upon a table …” drums and world-famous luthier and elecEnjoy your evenings, however they end tric bass-maker Ken Lawrence on — what up spreading out. else — bass is the jazz trio RLA and tonight it plays with returning ex-pat champion Modern dancehall star Jahdan Blaktrumpeter Nicholas Dominic Talvola at 7 kamoore is arguably best known for his p.m. at the Westhaven Center for the Arts collaborations with Major Lazer and Snoop ($5-$20 sliding scale). The show’s theme is Dogg during his short-lived “Snoop Lion” a tribute to Miles Davis and Nicholas, who phase, as well as his position in the group tours full time as a jazz artist out of his Noble Society. However, the Grammy nomhome base in Spain, is more than up to the inee has a solid reputation as a dynamic task to interpret the master’s work. and exciting solo performer these days, his Bay Area’s Gypsy-influenced jam rock sound falling somewhere at the intersection hustlers Diego’s Umbrella — whose of dubstep and dancehall. He plays The Jam name I have always despised on a visceral tonight (doors at 9 p.m.) with local support aesthetic level — plays Humbrews tonight by Dynasty One and Sarge One Wise ($10). for the local happy-go-lucky set of groove music cognoscenti ($15). I won’t pretend that this genre is my cup of tea but having Dent May is the stage name of James caught one of the band’s sets years ago Dent May Jr., a native-Mississippian with at Summer Arts in Benbow, I understand the delicate features of a young Truman the live appeal and, to paraphrase the Capote and a sound that gives a smooth 19th century humorist Artimus Ward, for synth sheen to decades of cool pop people who like this sort of show, this is influences from new wave to French lounge exactly the show for them. If you are one music. He is signed to Animal Collecof those folks catch ya’ boys at 9:30 p.m. tive’s Paw Tracks record label, where he is something of a poster boy for the next The Eureka Orchestra is putting on its generation of that group’s pleasantly outré annual Chamber Music Benefit Concert at aesthetics. He is joined at the Miniplex at the Eureka Woman’s Club today at 3 p.m. 9 p.m. by Canada’s dreamy act Moon King Your $30 buys a spot to watch the masterand local Gene Autry/Dave Gilmour hybrid ful playing of violinist Terrie Baune, cellist Mr. Moonbeam ($8 advance). and Eureka Symphony conductor and muSpeaking of Dave Gilmour, local Pink sic director/local treasure Carol Jacobson, Floyd tribute act Money plays two sets pianist John Chernoff and guest saxophontonight at Humbrews beginning at 9:30 p.m. ist Scott Seaton as they work through ($10/ $7 advance). Featuring visuals by local what will likely be an exciting matinee. artist and tie-dye maven Marmalade Sky The Jam is holding a daytime GetDown and my Setlist predecessor and last year’s for local musician and electric cellist Mike No. 7 dick move-maker (according to my Lee, who died tragically last month while editor, anyway: “Top 10 Dick Moves,” Dec. surfing in Morocco. The informal jam kicks 28, 2017) Andy Powell on bass/vocals/Rogoff at 1 p.m. and it is suggested that people er Waters duty, this quartet is as good as it bring a dish to share or money to donate gets when it comes to faithfully translating to one of Lee’s favorite charities. Expect a the pink gospel for the North Coast crowds.

Saturday

Thursday

Friday

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Sunday

Journal blog post soon about Mike as told by his friends and contemporary musicians. Rest in peace, Mike Lee.

Monday It’s Monday night, which means that the Rude Lion Sounds is hosting its Dancehall Mondayz at the Ocean Grove at 9:30 p.m. Come on out and dance and spit hot fire on the slanted floors of Trinidad’s best ad hoc night club ($5).

Tuesday Tuesdays are normally pretty slow here in the north end of the 707 but tonight has a couple of low-key fun and free joints out in scenic Blue Lake. First up at 6 p.m., the Mad River Brewery Tasting Room hosts indie folk rock act Native Harrow. Then within walking distance over at the Logger Bar at 8 p.m. there’s an Irish music session. Come one, come all and pre-game some Celtic tunes a month ahead of St. Paddy’s day.

Wednesday (Valentine’s Day) What started out as a curio act — how many beatboxing Hasidic reggae artists have there been in the history of music, let alone those that have toured with Madonna? — has become long-range career for Matthew Paul Miller, aka Matisyahu. Tonight he brings his shine to the Mateel Community Center at 9 p.m. to show you exactly why he has enjoyed near two decades of critical and commercial acclaim ($30).Rock and soul sextet Eminence Ensemble provide support and opening vibes. l Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo is fortune’s fool. He lives in Arcata.


Calendar Feb. 8 – 15, 2018

8 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

BOOKS Ultimate Fantastic. Submitted

13th

Submitted

Take your sweetie or someone you’re sweet on to Cupid’s Arrow, a Deities & Divas Ball on Wednesday, Feb. 14 from 6 p.m.-2 a.m. at The Historic Eagle House ($120 dinner and show, $25 music only). Fall in love with the five-course dinner from chef Brett Shuler at 6 p.m., then dance the night away to beats by Esch, Jumpsuit Artist’s saQi and Ultimate Fantastic. Music-only portion starts at 9 p.m.

The Eureka branch of the NAACP kicks off its three-part Black History Month Documentary series starting Thursday, Feb 8 with Ava DuVernay’s award-winning documentary 13th at 6:30 p.m. at the D Street Neighborhood Center (free). Come back for Unsolved Hate on Feb. 22 and Whose Streets? showing Feb. 28. And stick around for the Q&A and panel discussion after each.

No need for a sitter. Have a fun-filled night out with the kids Feb. 9 and 10 at 7 p.m. at Synapsis Nova, when local circus professionals and Humboldt State University students present Tossed! This Dr. Seuss-inspired circus journey through Whoville showcases “outstanding displays of skill, creativity and darn good entertainment” ($15, $5 for ages 6-10, free for 5 and under). Who knew?

Trinidad Library Book Buddies Club. Second Thursday of every month, 11 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. This casual community gathering discusses books, shares recent reads and offers new suggestions of titles to read. No mandatory reading, just a love of books. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

LECTURE Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. 5:30-7 p.m. Founders Hall 118, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Frederica Bowcutt presents The Tanoak Tree: An Environmental History of a Pacific Coast Hardwood. Free. envcomm1@humboldt.edu. www.envcomm.humboldt. edu/spring-2018. 826-3653.

MOVIES Black History Month Documentary Series: 13th. 6:30 p.m. D Street Neighborhood Center, 1301 D St., Arcata. In the first of three films presented by the Eureka NAACP, filmmaker Ava DuVernay explores the history of racial inequality in the United States, focusing on disproportionate imprisonment of African-Americans. Q&A, panel discussion follows. Ocean Night. 6:30-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Marnin Robbins of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife showcases a new 10-minute film about the Marine Protected Area Network, featuring topside and underwater video. The film’s producers will be on hand to answer questions. Two other films follow. $3 suggested donation. nec@yournec.org. www. arcatatheatre.com. 822-6918. Submitted

Submitted

Hunters Gathering

Where’s the Beef(cake)?

Marbles, those gorgeous, colorfully swirled little glass balls of art, have their days in the sun (or fog) when Humboldt Marble Weekend rolls around Feb. 8-11, with a meet-and-greet night, marble show and mega marble hunt. It’s a real glassy affair. The fun kicks off with the all-ages, family friendly Marble Makers Ball at The Siren’s Song Tavern on Thursday, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. (your $20 donation to the Humboldt County Search and Rescue Posse gets you a drink and a free hider marble). Meet marble artists and fellow hunters/collectors, and enjoy music by Doug Fir and the 2x4s. Then on Friday, Feb. 9 and Saturday, Feb. 10, head to the big Marble Show at Redwood Acres Fairgrounds from noon to 6 p.m. (free admission) to meet marble makers and see the work of more than 40 glass artists from around the country who’ll be creating, showing, selling and hiding the little glass worlds. You’ll also see live glass blowing demonstrations. For such small things, marbles are kind of big deal. Especially here in Humboldt, where we have our share of glass artists. Then it’s the big day. Sunday, Feb. 11, when Humboldt loses its marbles. And it’s up to you to find them. The Massive Marble Hunt starts at noon with the tiny orbs spread around the county in spots of varying degrees of difficulty. Like fingerprints, no two marbles are alike. And traipsing around Humboldt’s gorgeous scenery hunting for these beauts makes for a double dose of awe. Join a marble hunting group on Facebook, watch for clues, then participate in the fun by finding the marbles. Go to www.humboldtmarbleweekend.com for list of groups and how to get in on the hunt. —Kali Cozyris

How do you approach an event that bills itself as “very dumb?” Well, you gather your friends who are so inclined (you know the ones) for a silly, fun and “very dumb” night and act accordingly. We’re clearly talking about one event: The Mr. Humboldt Pageant. Back for its fifth year, the hilarity takes place Saturday, Feb. 10 at the Arcata Theatre Lounge with doors opening at 7 p.m. ($29). “We started the pageant as a spoof and made it male for so many reasons,” Mr Humboldt Pageant co-founder Johanna Nagan says. Turning the tables on traditional female beauty pageants that emphasize a cookie-cutter Barbie aesthetic, this one puts the mens on the menu and up on stage for good-natured revelry. And all for a great cause. The event raises money for local causes such as last year’s recipient, Pacific Union School. This year there are nine contestants of varying ages and backgrounds vying to be top dog, putting brains and brawn into four segments: Question and Answer, Beachwear, Talent and Formal Wear. “Each contestant has an alter ego they use throughout the night to tie in their theme. Mr. Rabbit and Mr. Science are a couple that will be at this year’s pageant.” Nagan says. The contestants are judged (not too harshly) on creativity, humor and their “Humboldtness” and those who don’t make the cut are ceremoniously eliminated at the end of each segment. Get your tickets now because, like a dude competing for a crown and a sash, they sell out quickly. Tickets are available at Brown Paper Tickets, The Works, Blondies Food & Drink and Arcata Liquors. The event is 18 and up because, at least ostensibly, we’re all adults here. —Kali Cozyris

MUSIC HSU Wind Ensemble Open Auditions. 3-5 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Community musicians are invited to attend open rehearsal auditions Tuesdays and Thursdays through Feb. 8. For more information, contact Paul Cummings. Free. paul.cummings@humboldt.edu. 826-5435.

THEATER Feet First Takes Broadway. 7 p.m. Redwood Playhouse, 286 Sprowel Creek Road, Garberville. Feet First Dancers present songs from traditional and contemporary Broadway in a variety of styles including modern, African and belly dance. Refreshments available. $15-$20, $10 for 12 and under, kids on laps are free. King Lear. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Tired of ruling, King Lear divides his empire among his daughters, setting the stage for an epic tale of unchecked ambition, deceit, war and madness. Through Feb. 10. $16, $14 seniors/students.

EVENTS Humboldt Steelhead Days. Countywide, A hatchery steelhead fishing contest from Jan. 13 to Feb. 17 on the Mad and Trinity rivers with countywide events. Go online to sign up for the contest and for a list of events. www.humboldtsteelheaddays.com.

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Calendar Continued from previous page

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Toddler storytime at the Trinidad Library. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

MEETINGS Conservation Meeting. Second Thursday of every month, 12-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Discuss conservation issues of interest to the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www. rras.org/calendar.html. 445-8311. Humboldt Grange 501. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Regular monthly meeting. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/ humboldt.grange. 443-0045. Humboldt Rose Society. 7 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Pete Haggard provides a program on which insects help and which ones get the munchies on your roses and how to recognize them. Redwood Coast Woodturners. Second Thursday of every month, 6-8:30 p.m. McKinleyville Middle School, 2285 Central Ave. All interested are welcome, beginner to pro, no experience needed. $20. 499-9569.

ETC Community Board Game Night. Second Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@ northcoast.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 444-2288. Early Literacy Volunteer Training. 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Become a volunteer in reading, math or both. Volunteers receive free training, resources, placement and ongoing support. Tutor training and standard background checks are required. To register or for more information, contact Literacy Program Coordinator Chérie Zygaczenko. Free. czygaczenko@hcoe.org. www. decadeofdifference.org/early-literacy.php. 445-7007. Game Night at The Board Room. 5-10:30 p.m. The Boardroom, 3750 Harris St., Redwood Acres, Eureka. www.boardroomeureka.com. Homeowner Workshop. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Redwood Coast

Energy Authority (RCEA), 633 Third St., Eureka. Learn more about energy efficiency in your home, business and community. Learn how to make your home more comfortable and energy efficient while taking advantage of available rebates, financing, and tax credits. Homeowners from throughout Humboldt County are invited to attend. Free. outreach@redwoodenergy. org. 269-1700. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Come create with your community. Enjoy an evening of knitting, crocheting or whatever fiber craft you love. Food and drink available and bring something to share. Free. info@northcoastknittery.com. www. northcoastknittery.com. 442-9276. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

9 Friday ART

Arts! Arcata. Second Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art. Downtown Arcata and surrounding area. Free. arcatamainstreet@gmail.com. www.arcatamainstreet. com. 822-4500.

BOOKS Friday Afternoon Book Club. Second Friday of every month, noon-1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Fun and lively discussion group focusing on adult fiction and nonfiction. Call ahead for upcoming titles. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1905.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Paso a Paso hosts dance therapy. Free. www. ervmgc.com. 725-3300. World Dance. 7:30 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor teaching and easy dances, 7:30-8:30 p.m.; request dancing 8:30-10 p.m. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. www. stalbansarcata.org. 839-3665.

THEATER Feet First Takes Broadway. 7 p.m. Redwood Playhouse, 286 Sprowel Creek Road, Garberville. See Feb. 8 listing.

King Lear. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Feb. 8 listing. Tossed!. 7 p.m. Synapsis Nova, 212 G St., Suite 102, Eureka. Local circus professionals and Humboldt State University students present a Dr. Seuss-inspired circus journey through Whoville. Featuring Trish “The Dish,” Rilo, Cornelius, Aerialist Ana, Thing 1 & Thing 2, The Cat in The Hat and Old Man Schnee. Benefits the Humboldt Juggling Society. $15, $5 for ages 6-10, free for 5 and under. www.synapsisperformance.com. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Ferndale Rep presents. A modern tragicomedy by the late Edward Albee, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is an unforgettable night with the most toxic marriage ever imagined. Appropriate for ages 16+. Through Feb. 18.

EVENTS Adopt-a-Block Volunteer Appreciation Party. 5-7 p.m. The Northcoast Environmental Center, 415 I St, Arcata. Join the NEC for a brief clean-up, followed by a free meal. Current volunteers will receive a big thank-you, and there will be sign-up opportunities and supplies for future volunteers. We will also be awarding the Golden Broom Award to an extra special volunteer. Free. anne@ yournec.org. 822-6918. Creamery District Night Market. 6-9 p.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. Explore the eclectic stylings at Seapod Studios with guest artist Stefan and Phoebe Elliot, try the new cider unveiled at Wrangletown, check out specials at local shops, take a mobile sauna for $5, see Ferndale Rep’s new play at the Arcata Playhouse, check out The Round Story video installation and more. Humboldt Marble Weekend. Noon-6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Experience Humboldt’s first ever marble show. The weekend line up includes a marble Makers Ball on Thursday, collector day Friday, marble show on Saturday and a huge marble hunt on Sunday. Free admission. www.redwoodacres.com. Humboldt Steelhead Days. Countywide. See Feb. 8 listing.

FOR KIDS Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460.

MEETINGS A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh

St. Knit, chat and relax at the library every week. Free. archuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954.

SPORTS BMX Friday. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for practice and racing. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5. Roller Skating. 6-8:30 p.m. Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St. Old-fashioned roller skates and roller blades. Skate rental is included in the admission price and is on a first-come, first served basis. $5.25, $4.50 ages 17 and under.

ETC Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Stop by and lend your hand organizing and helping the environment at the only creative reuse nonprofit between Eugene, Oregon and Oakland, California. Free. volunteer@SCRAPhumboldt.org. www. scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

10 Saturday ART

Arts on the Avenue. Second Saturday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Eagle Prairie Arts District, 406 Wildwood Ave., Rio Dell. Local artists, artisans, kids’ activities and music all along the avenue. Free. www.facebook.com/info. epad/info. 506-5081. Family Arts Day. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Children and families are invited to an afternoon of animation story writing, painting and drawing focusing on the storytelling aspect of animation. $5, $2 seniors/students/military, free for Humboldt Arts Council members, children under 17 and families with EBT card. www.humboldtarts.org.

BOOKS Book Sale. 1-4 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Friends of the McKinleyville’s monthly used book sale celebrates National Library Lovers’ Month with an entertaining collection of books about Love and Romance. There will also be a $2/bag sidewalk sale in front of the store.

Optimizing health while treating the underlying cause of illness

DANCE

North Coast Naturopathic Medicine

MOVIES

Moscow Festival Ballet: Cinderella. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. The timeless fairy tale ballet features costumes, lush scenery, comical evil stepsisters and Prokofiev’s score.

1727 Central Ave, McKinleyville, CA (707) 840-0556 www.ncnatmed.com

PROLOTHERAPY AND PLATELET RICH PLASMA: REGENERATIVE INJECTION THERAPIES SUPPORTING YOUR BODY’S ABILITY TO HEAL ITSELF. For chronic joint pain due to arthritis, old injuries, tendonitis of the shoulder, knee, wrist, neck, back & sacroiliac joint.

40  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Dr. Deborah Anqersbach, ND.

Now Accepting New Patients!

A River’s Last Chance (Eel River). 6-9 p.m. Lost Coast Brewery, 1600 Sunset Drive, Eureka. Humboldt Steelhead Days will be screening A River’s Last Chance: A Story of Salmon, Timber, Weed and Wine along California’s Mighty Eel River, by former Humboldt State University student and the director of storytelling for Pacific Rivers, Shane Anderson. www.lostcoast.com.

MUSIC An Evening of Song and Story. 7-8:30 p.m. HLOC’s


THEATER Feet First Takes Broadway. 2 p.m. Redwood Playhouse, 286 Sprowel Creek Road, Garberville. See Feb. 8 listing. King Lear. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Feb. 8 listing. Tossed!. 7 p.m. Synapsis Nova, 212 G St., Suite 102, Eureka. See Feb. 9 listing.

EVENTS 2018 Mr. Humboldt Pageant. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A competitive, all-male spoof pageant, with proceeds going to charity. $29. www. arcatatheatre.com. Eureka Waterfront Trail Celebration. 4-7 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Get a sneak peek at the trail amenities to be installed between now and September, watch a premiere of the documentary Battle for the Eureka Waterfront Trail. Enjoy complimentary hors d’oeuvres and a no-host bar. Free. www. ci.eureka.ca.gov/depts/pw/wharfinger/default.asp. February Wine Club & Open House. Noon-5 p.m. Fieldbrook Winery, 4241 Fieldbrook Road. Enjoy an afternoon of wine tasting, appetizers, bocce and paddleboat rides in one of the winery’s ponds. $15$10, free for members. www.fieldbrookwinery.com. Hearts Together Auction. 4-8 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Silent and live auction of dinners, parties, outings, goods and services, original art, quilts and much more. Soup, homemade breads, elegant Valentine desserts. Child care. $10. www.huuf.org. 407-0047. Humboldt Marble Weekend. Noon-6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See Feb. 9 listing. Humboldt Steelhead Days. Countywide. See Feb. 8 listing.

FOR KIDS Baby Sign Workshop. 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Families and young children are invited to attend together to learn and play. This month the theme is “Leah’s Farm,” and the program includes signs for barnyard animals and other things associated with farms. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1910. Story Time with Kathy Frye. Second Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.facebook. com/RioDellLibrary. 764-3333.

Storytime and Crafts. Second Saturday of every month, 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Every second and fourth Saturday of the month. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. Weekend Play Group. Second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. The only weekend play group in Humboldt County. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market - Winter Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Local winter produce, humanely raised meats, pastured eggs, local honey, olive oil, baked goods, hot prepared foods, locally-handcrafted artisanal products and more. Rain or shine. Free. laura@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999.

GARDEN Fruit Tree and Scion Exchange. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Experienced fruit growers and the general public are invited to share quality graft wood (or scion), roots and shoots of all fruit producing plants. The event will feature workshops, grafting demonstrations and some varieties of rootstock will be for sale. Free. fogwoodworking@gmail.com. www.baysidegrange. org. 672-3102. Rose Pruning Class. 10 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, North Entrance, Eureka. Learn from Richard and Paula Grabowski from the Rose Society how to prune, water and fertilize your prize roses for the best flower show in the spring. Bring sharp pruners, warm boots and warm gloves. $10, Free for HBG Members. www.hbgf.org. www. hbgf.org/events/annual-rose-pruning-class. 499-3133.

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

HOLIDAY EVENTS Mardi Gras for a Cause. 6-10 p.m. The Historic Eagle House, 139 Second St., Eureka. Annual fundraiser for Rotary Club of Eureka featuring Certainly Circus, the Marching Lumberjacks, The Redwood Dixie Gators, costume contest, live and silent auctions, Cajun food and N’awlins cocktails. Tickets at www.rotary1.org. $60, $75 Rotary members.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. With leader Alex Stillman. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Rob Fowler. Free. www.rras. org/calendar. Dune Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help remove invasive plants to make room for native plant diversity. Tools, gloves and snacks provided. Bring water and wear work clothes. Free. jess@ friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397.

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Rental package: $

per person

Open Sat. & Sun. 11-5 Call 707.498.3835 to book private parties humboldtpaintballcommunity.com 601 Vance Ave. Samoa, CA 95564

paintball in the humboldt nation

Space, 92 Sunny Brae Center, Arcata. Join singer and guitarist Steven Russin, storyteller Paul Woodland and folk music trio Sugar Butter Cinnamon. Reservations are encouraged. $10. info@hloc.org. www.hloc.org. 822-3319. Huayllipacha. 7:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. Playing a blend of traditional and contemporary music from their homeland are Peruvian brothers Fredy, David and Juan Salazar-Quispe. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. $10. fortunaconcert@live.com. www.fortunaconcertseries.com. RLA with Nicholas Dominic Talvola: Tirubute to Miles Davis. 6:30 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. RLA and trumpeter Nicholas Dominic Talvola return for an evening of jazz, this time as a tribute to Miles Davis. RlA is Tim Randles on piano, Mike Labolle on drums, and Ken lawrence on electric bass. $5-$20 sliding.

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Calendar Continued from previous page

Bike Party Humboldt’s Eureka: Mardi Gras Cruise. 3 p.m. Fresh Freeze, 3023 F St., Eureka. Hosted by Bike Party Humboldt to celebrate Mardi Gras. The route will include much of the waterfront trail and will be largely a hill-free ride. Roll out at 3:30 to the Eureka Waterfront Trail celebration from 4:30-7 p.m. at the Wharfinger building, then back to Henderson Center. Free. www. facebook.com/335594505068. Hikshari’ Volunteer Trail Stewards Workday. 9-11 a.m. Hikshari’ Trail, Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary, Eureka. Plant dozens of native plants and grasses. Meet at the parking lot at the south end of Hilfiker Lane at 9 a.m., rain or shine. We have some gloves or bring your own. Please bring your own water. Free. Restoration Day. 9 a.m. Trinidad Head, Trinidad State Beach. Remove invasive plants. Wear sturdy shoes. Gloves and tools are provided. Meet at the parking lot next to the Trinidad School. Free. Michelle.Forys@parks. ca.gov. 677-3109.

SPORTS Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. See Feb. 9 listing. Women’s Climbing Night. 6-9 p.m. HSU Student Recreation Center, Humboldt State University (1 Harpst St.), Arcata. Climb in a supportive environment with the help of knowledgeable and experienced staff, meet other climbers and explore opportunities for adventure. All levels of experience encouraged to attend. $5. src@ humboldt.edu. 826-4197.

ETC Women’s Peace Vigil. Noon-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

11 Sunday BOOKS

Science Fiction Club of Humboldt. 5-7 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Monthly meeting to discuss all things Science Fiction. Locus recommended reading for 2017. Hugo Award nominations. www. oldtowncoffeeeureka.com.

DANCE Afternoon of Dance. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Join Debbie Weist, owner and instructor for Dance with Debbie, for a lesson in the rumba, then dance to romantic playlist. All levels of dancers are welcome; couples are preferred for this class but not required. $5, $2 students/seniors/military, free for museum members, kids under 18, and families with an EBT card. www.humboldtarts.org.

MOVIES The Secret Life of Pets. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The quiet life of a terrier named Max is upended when his owner takes in Duke, a stray whom Max instantly dislikes. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org.

www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 499-8516. Eureka Symphony Benefit Concert. 3 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Featuring special guest Scott Seaton on the saxophone, and chamber music trio favorites Terrie Baune on violin, Carol Jacobson on cello and John Chernoff on piano. www.eurekasymphony. org. 845-3655.

THEATER Feet First Takes Broadway. 2 p.m. Redwood Playhouse, 286 Sprowel Creek Road, Garberville. See Feb. 8 listing.

EVENTS February Wine Club & Open House. Noon-5 p.m. Fieldbrook Winery, 4241 Fieldbrook Road. See Feb. 10 listing. Humboldt Marble Weekend. Noon-6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See Feb. 9 listing. Humboldt Steelhead Days. CountywideHumboldt. See Feb. 8 listing. Pawsitively In Love. 2-4 p.m. Humboldt Pet Supply, 145 G St., Arcata. A day of games for both pets and humans benefiting Companion Animal Foundation. Free.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Humboldt County Historical Society Luncheon. 12:30 p.m. Sequoia Conference Center, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Author Ray Raphael will present Trees and Grass: Boom, Bust, and the American Way, exploring Humboldt’s economic booms, from the harvesting of trees to the cultivation of cannabis. A full-service banquet will be served, with vegan option available. Reservations must be made by Feb. 5. $45. 445-4342. Pancake Breakfast. Second Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. Breakfast with your choice of eggs, ham, sausage, toast, pancakes, coffee, tea and orange juice. $5, $2.50 kids ages 6-12, free for kids under 6. Veterans Pancake Breakfast. Second Sunday of every month, 8 a.m.-noon. Fortuna Veterans Hall/ Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Pancakes, sausage, eggs and bacon. Coffee and orange juice included. Benefits local youth groups and veterans events in the Eel River Valley. $8. vfwpost2207@gmail.com. 725-4480.

OUTDOORS Audubon Society Birding Trip. Second Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Learn the common birds of Humboldt on a two- to three-hour walk. Meet at the Visitor Center. Free. 822-3613.

SPORTS BMX Practice and Racing. 1-3 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for some fun. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $11 race. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222.

42  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

12 Monday DANCE

Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music. Tonight dance to Sonny Curtis & Steve Pines — good time oldies. $5. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

MOVIES Monday Night Movies: Freaks. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The 1932 cult classic that inspired American Horror Story: Freak Show. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Humboldt Harmonaires Weekly Gathering. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Singing at 7 to 9:30 p.m., with snacks and coffee break at 8:20 p.m. Free. Singfourpart@ gmail.com. 445-3939. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Get together with like-minded people who love to make music. All choral voices are welcome with a particular call for male voices. There are opportunities for solos and ensemble groups, along with the full choir. $50 registration fee w/scholarships available. 839-2276.

SPOKEN WORD Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/perform your original poetry or hear others. $1.

EVENTS Humboldt Steelhead Days. Countywide. See Feb. 8 listing.

FOOD One-Log Farmers Market. 1-5:30 p.m. One-Log House, 705 U.S. Highway 101, Garberville. On the lawn. 672-5224.

MEETINGS VFW Post 2207 Monthly Meeting. Second Monday of every month, 7-8:30 p.m. Fortuna Veterans Hall/Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Fostering camaraderie among U.S. veterans of overseas conflicts and advocating for veterans, the military and communities. Free. 725-4480. Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

13 Tuesday

Ron Finley. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The self-proclaimed “Gangsta Gardener” is a community leader in South Los Angeles who has sparked a food revolution by converting unused urban areas into community gardens growing healthy, local foods.

MOVIES Film Screening & Discussion: The Settlers. 6-8:30 p.m. Temple Beth El, Hodgson and T streets, Eureka. An award-winning film that takes a look at the world of Israeli settlers on the West Bank. Free, donations encouraged. 444-2846. Water and Power: A California Heist. 7 p.m. Turf Club, Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, Eureka. The North Group Redwood Chapter Sierra Club presents this 80-minute National Geographic documentary about water barons and drought. Discussion follows. 826-3740.

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816.

SPOKEN WORD Word Humboldt Featuring Billy Tuggle. 6-8 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. A spoken word open mic and community-based space held every Tuesday. Featuring the Chicago poet and performer Billy Tuggle. $3 to $5 donation. wordhumboldt@ gmail.com. www.facebook.com/wordhumboldt/. (919) 909-7109.

EVENTS Humboldt Steelhead Days. Countywide. See Feb. 8 listing.

OUTDOORS Kayak Tour Humboldt Bay. 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Explore North Coast Kayak Club hosts a 2-hour morning paddle on Humboldt Bay, launching off the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center Dock and using the high tide to paddle the hidden waterways of Woodley Island and Daby Island. The tour is designed for kayaks, canoes and all paddling abilities. Limited rentals available. Contact Larry Buwalda at 496-8266 for details. $5 non-club members.

FOR KIDS Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Feb. 11 listing.

ART

MEETINGS

The Hills are Alive Reception. 4-6 p.m. College of the Redwoods Creative Arts Gallery, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Featuring new work by Michigan-based artist Brian Spolans, on display Feb. 13 to March 22. Free.

Open Enrollment Meetings. 6 p.m. Redwood Prep Charter School, 1480 Ross Hill Road, Fortuna. Redwood Preparatory Charter School hosts enrollment meetings for the upcoming 2018-2019 school year. Interested families must submit an “Intent to Enroll” form and attend one of the meetings. All new students selected by lottery on Wednesday, March 7 at 4:30 p.m. www. redwoodprep.org. 682-6149.

LECTURE Einstein’s Relativity For Everyone. 6-7:30 p.m. Center Activities, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. The material in these three classes will be presented simply but true to Einstein’s ideas. Located at Humboldt State University in Forestry 105. Registration deadline Feb. 5. $25, $20 HSU students. cntract@humboldt.edu. 826-3357.

COMEDY Savage Henry Comedy Night. 9 p.m. The Jam, 915 H St., Arcata. Local and out of town comedians bring the ha-has. $5. 822-4766


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Happy Hour Specials M-F ETC

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games range from $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw St., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Lunch with Laura. Noon-2 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Bring your favorite fiber craft project (or come find a new one) and a snack or sack lunch. Free. info@northcoastknittery. com. www.northcoastknittery.com. 442-9276.

Cupid’s Arrow, a Deities & Divas Ball. 6 p.m.-2 a.m. The Historic Eagle House, 139 Second St., Eureka. Fivecourse dinner by Brett Shuler, music by Esch followed by Jumpsuit Artist’s saQi and Ultimate Fantastic from Nevada City. Full bar benefits Bird Ally and Humboldt Wildlife Care Center. Photo booth by Forget-Me-Not and live Fruit art by Kristi Nola. $25, $20 advance. fraktalmusicproductions@gmail.com. 444-3344.

14 Wednesday ART

Inspiration and Reflection Reception. 5-7 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. View the Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse through the eyes of several local artists. Enjoy a no-host wine bar and appetizers. Benefits the Memorial Lighthouse preservation and permanent relocation fund.

LECTURE Conservation Lecture Series. Second Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Refreshments at 6:30 p.m. prior to event. Two-part presentation by brothers Phil and Jon Johnston: River Otters of Lake Earl: Engineers, Guardians and Predators and The Wildlife of Ecuador’s Disappearing Coastal Dry Forests. Free. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. Winter Lecture Series: Bees Getting Busy in the Dunes. 6 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join Friends of the Dunes’ Executive Director Kim McFarland for an evening lecture on mating habits of solitary bees found in the dunes. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., lecture will begin promptly at 6 p.m. For more information call 444-1397 or email info@friendsofthedunes.org. $5-$10 suggested donation.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Pint & Fry Night: Invasion of The Bee Girls (1973). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. An army of beauties seduce men to death. Free w/$5 food/bev purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Konevets Quartet. 7-8:15 p.m. St. Innocent Orthodox Church, 939 F St., Eureka. The Saint Petersburg-based vocalists perform sacred music from the Eastern Christian tradition, as well as a repertoire of Slavic folk songs. RSVP to guarantee seating. Free, donations accepted. rector@eurekafirstchurch.com. www. eurekafirstchurch.com. 443-2099. Matisyahu. 9 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Singer, rapper, beatboxer, reggae, dub and rock artist. $30. www.mateel.org.

EVENTS Humboldt Steelhead Days. Countywide. See Feb. 8 listing.

FOR KIDS Storytime. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

COMEDY Laugh Your Heart Out - Comedy Show. 8-10 p.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Come Laugh Your Heart Out with us here at Bear River Casino Resort with your significant other or feel to roll solo and take a chance to meet someone. We have returning Headliner Anthony K featuring Mark Smalls. Tickets on sale Jan 8th. Doors at 8 p,m,, show at 8:30. $35 cocktail table for two, $65 table for four. kylehudson@bearrivercasino. 733-9644

$9 Regular Meat Burritos 10-2pm $3 Draft Beer 3-5pm $3.50 Margaritas 5-7pm

offer good through 2-28-18

1718 4th St. Eureka •Tues-Fri 10am-9pm •Sat & Sun 9am-9pm

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

15 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See Feb. 8 listing.

MUSIC Dr. Calvin Taylor. 6:30 p.m. Eureka Seventh-day Adventist Church, 4251 F St. The pianist and recording artist performs sacred music. Free. www.calvintaylormusic. org. (615) 295-5795. Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. See Feb. 13 listing.

THEATER Adaptations: The Yellow Wallpaper and King Pest. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. An evening of original stage productions of short stories and poems adapted and performed by Dell’Arte’s second-year MFA ensemble. Pay what you can. www. dellarte.com. 668-5663.

EVENTS Humboldt Steelhead Days. Countywide. See Feb. 8 listing.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See Feb. 8 listing. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See Feb. 8 listing.

$

8

VALENTINE’S DAY SPECIAL Heart Shaped Pepperoni Pizza

Limited time offer good thru 2/14/18

ETC Career and Volunteer Expo. Noon-4 p.m. West Gym, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The Academic and Career Advising Center is hosting the Career and Volunteer Expo with more than 40 nonprofits with volunteer and paid positions, more than 30 government agencies and more than 30 for-profit businesses. Game Night at The Board Room. 5-10:30 p.m. The Boardroom, 3750 Harris St., Redwood Acres, Eureka. See Feb. 8 listing. Continued on next page »

McKINLEYVILLE 839-8763

ARCATA 822-6220

EUREKA 443-9977

FORTUNA 725-9391

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Calendar

now accepting ncj smartcard northcoastjournal.com/NCJsmartcard

menu changes seasonally

RESTAURANT 301 & CARTER HOUSE INNS 301 L St. Eureka 707.444.8062 carterhouse.com

44  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Continued from previous page

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See Feb. 8 listing. Sip & Knit. 6-8:30 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See Feb. 8 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Feb. 8 listing.

Heads Up … Humboldt Bee Fest 2018 call for artists. Theme: “Dance of the Pollinators.” On paper or canvas, up to 40 inches by 40 inches. Submit entry to Adorni Center in Eureka or Cafe Phoenix in Arcata by May 1. For more information, call Lorna at 443-4424. The Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA) is seeking members for its Community Advisory Committee (CAC) to support public engagement efforts and to provide decision-making support and input to the RCEA Board. The CAC will have up to 15 members representing a diverse mix of the community. Four members will be selected through an open application process, and eleven will be appointed and voted on by the full RCEA Board. CAC members will be appointed for tow-year terms, and all CAC members must reside in Humboldt County. For more information or to apply, visit www.redwoodenergy. org or 269-1700. Deadline to be considered for the first review is Feb. 20 Tri County Independent Living (TCIL) is looking for Trail Volunteers to visit a few trails to identify future accessibility signage needs. Volunteers will be provided guidelines about what information about the trail needs to be gathered. Information gathered will be compiled and the appropriate signage will be added to the trails in the future. If you wish to be involved, please contact Charlie at Tri-County Independent Living at 445-8404 or email Charlie@tilinet.org. The Seven Gill Shark Review, College of the Redwoods’ literary magazine, is accepting submissions of original poetry and fiction from community members, as well as CR staff, faculty and students until noon on March 21. Mail entries to david-holper@ redwoods.edu (For details go to www.redwoods.edu/ events/poetswriters/submit). The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is currently seeking applications from Humboldt County residents for its Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship/Grant, designed to support projects that promote peace and/or social justice, locally or globally. Application and information available at www.wilpfhumboldt. wordpress.com. Due by 4 p.m. on April 9. Mail applications to WILPF at P.O. Box 867, Arcata, CA 95518 or email them to: wilpf@humboldt1.com. Call 822-5711 with any questions. Online registration is now open at www.godwitdays.org for the 23rd annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival to be held April 20-22 at the Arcata Community Center. Pre- and post-festival events extend from April 18 to 24. Redwood Region Audubon Society is sponsoring its 13th annual children’s nature writing contest on “What Nature Means to Me” by Humboldt or Del Norte County students in grades four through 12. Send submissions to tomleskiw@gmail.com with “Nature Writing Contest” in the subject line by March 23. Submissions can be attached Word

documents or text within the body of the email (no Google docs). Or mail a printout to Tom Leskiw, 155 Kara Lane, McKinleyville, CA 95519. The Student Bird Art Contest in conjunction with Godwit Days is accepting submission. Deadline is March 23. A flier with complete rules and a list of suggested birds to draw is posted at www.rras.org and www.arcatamarshfriends.org or can be picked up at the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center, 569 South G St., Arcata. Grant applications through Humboldt Sponsors are now available for the year 2018 to local nonprofit organizations serving Humboldt County youth. Completed application packets must be returned to Humboldt Sponsors by the postmark deadline of Feb. 9. Please mail completed application packets to: Nancy C. Mathews, Funding Chair, Humboldt Sponsors, 1171 Marsh Road, Eureka, CA 95501. The city of Eureka is accepting applications for appointments to following boards and commissions: Art and Culture Committee, Eureka Energy Committee, Finance Advisory Committee, Historic Preservation Commission and Transportation Safety Commission. Applications may be obtained by phone at 441-4144, in person from the Mayor’s Office, City of Eureka, 531 K St., Eureka, CA 95501, or on the city clerk’s website. For more information, call 441-4175, or go to www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Applications accepted until posts are filled. The Sanctuary announces the 2018 open call for internship and artist residency programs. Interested applicants should email info@sanctuaryarcata.org, mail to 1301 J St., Arcata, or call 822-0898. Humboldt State University’s Humboldt International Film Fest announces the call to entry for local short narrative, documentary, animation and experimental films (1-30 minutes long) made within the past five years. Deadline is midnight Feb. 28. Entry fee is $10 for Humboldt County residents and free for HSU students and alumni. Visit www.hsufilmfestival.com, call 826-4113 or email filmfest@humboldt.edu. The McKinleyville Community Services District announces two alternate member vacancies on the Recreation Advisory Committee. Letters of application may be mailed to the MCSD, Attn: Lesley Frisbee, P.O. Box 2037, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Contact the Parks and Recreation Office at 839-9003. Interested in volunteering for EPIC? Contact Briana Villalobos, briana@wildcalifornia.org or call 822-7711 to be added to the volunteer list. Headwaters Fund mini-grants available for projects to promote local economic development. For more information call 476-4809 or visit www.humboldtgov. org/2193/Mini-Grants. The Morris Graves Museum of Art seeks volunteer greeters for Friday and Saturday afternoons, noon to 2:30 p.m. and 2:30 to 5 p.m. Contact museum programs manager Janine Murphy at janine@humboldtarts.org or 442-0278, extension 202. North Coast Community Garden Collaborative seeks donated garden supplies, monetary donations and/or volunteers. Contact 269-2071 or debbiep@nrsrcaa.org. Volunteers needed for the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Call 826-2359 or email amic@cityofarcata.org. Volunteers wanted for Eureka VA clinic. Call 2697502. l


Filmland

“There is no mistaking a real book when one meets it. It’s like falling in love.” — Christopher Morley

Used Books

New Books

Special orders welcome for new books!

402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

Me skating past your bullshit memo. I, Tonya

Love Makes Fools of Us All I, Tonya and Call Me by Your Name By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

I, TONYA. In aging and being slowly, reluctantly drawn into what someone decided to call adulthood, I have developed what I consider a cagey defense that some might consider paranoia regarding those most dangerous among us: the Dumbass and the Devious. Dumbass, devious people, in my experience, possess what I would call a gift for turning their often clinically insignificant intellect toward the fulfillment of their own villainous ends (the Office of the President of the United States being one example). An innate lack of curiosity, usually twinned with an absence of empathy, allows formidable focus — a dogged, singular drive toward their own often ill-defined and harmful goal. Their success rate is deeply troubling. I, Tonya, written by Steven Rogers and directed by Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl, 2007; Million Dollar Arm, 2014), is populated largely by the Dumbass and the Devious, and examines the shambolic, near-accidental nature of their “success” in harming others and undoing their decades of hard work. (It was, of course, also one of the more talked

about releases of last year, but not much to be done about that.) Told in kinetic flashback and framed by reenacted interview footage with Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie) and her abusive ex-husband Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan), the movie describes Harding’s gradual ascent, from hardscrabble beginnings — thanks to the ministrations of her drunken, spiteful mother LaVona Golden (Allison Janney) — to the upper echelon of competitive figure skating. Her success is tempered by the fact that she can’t seem to stay away from Gillooly, whose presence in her life and association with the incalculably delusional Shawn (Paul Walter Hauser) eventually lead to her professional undoing. Some not-unfair comparisons have been drawn between the style of I, Tonya and that of Goodfellas (1990): There are pop-rock songs on the soundtrack, tracking shots and scenes of domestic strife aplenty. The similarities are enough to make it occasionally difficult not to think of the earlier movie, but the aesthetic also fits Tonya’s perpetually dingy, seedy, autumnally lit Portland, Oregon milieu. This

@northcoastjournal

Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

45


Filmland Continued from previous page

is a movie very much of the ’80s and early ’90s, and the feel of the time and place is palpable. Janney gives a stand-out performance, with Stan and Hauser doing commendable work just behind her. Robbie, a consummately capable actor, goes a little big here, leaning into Harding’s sneer and perpetual blamelessness, but this may have more to do with the real-life figure than the performance. If any of us had abiding questions regarding the Harding/Kerrigan affair, I suppose this might answer some of them, but that hardly seems the point. I, Tonya works more toward the telling of a topical, painfully fractured version of the American dream, in which hard work and dedication can lead to great accomplishment and, in turn, be entirely undone by the machinations of the small and venal. R.

Relaxing to the sound of Kinsey scale numbers sliding. Call Me By Your Name

120M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINIPLEX.

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME, yet another of 2017’s most-acclaimed, finally arrived on our hidden shores, tells a languorous, minutely observed story of first love and loss, and I haven’t really made up my mind about it. In 1983, “somewhere in northern Italy,” (one of several indulgent tricks I assume screenwriter James Ivory retained from Andre Aciman’s novel), the family of antiquities professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) summers in a delightfully decaying villa in the lush countryside. The professor busies himself with indeterminate work regarding Greek sculpture, for which he requires the assistance of a research assistant, in this summer’s case the roguish Oliver (Armie Hammer). Polyglot Mrs. Perlman (Amira Casar) occupies herself mostly off-camera, leaving precocious, 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) largely to his own devices. He reads, swims, transcribes classical music, has an on-again off-again sexual relationship with charming Parisian Marzia (Esther Garrel) and gradually falls in love with Oliver. The characters here, all impeccably played and constructed, live complex, full-blooded lives within a tactile and vividly imagined world; there doesn’t seem to be a detail out of place, nothing to distract from the notion that this is taking place outside a small town in Italy in 1983. And the burgeoning relationship between the leads, charged with excitement and secrecy and the shame of new discovery, is often painfully real. The whole movie is suffused with a torturous, long-Sunday-afternoon quality: the feeling that something is ending, something less pleasant beginning. But there is an element of indulgence here, from the meticulous details of the

props and sets and costumes, to the occasional fancifully novelistic runs of dialogue, that can interrupt the immersive atmosphere and remind us that we are watching actors on a screen. (Those actors, to a one, do exquisite work, don’t get me wrong.) And then, of course, there was the tinny voice of long-suffering adolescent me, who had difficulty mustering much sympathy for Elio who, while raw and real, seems more like a smug conqueror with the world at his feet than a heartbroken teen. But we all suffer in our own way. R.

gags. With James Corden voicing Peter, Domhnall Gleeson as Mr. McGregor and Rose Byrne as the rabbit-sympathizing object of the farmer’s wooing. PG. 93M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

Continuing

FIFTY SHADES FREED. Sweet mother of fan fiction, this series is finally wrapping up. Starring Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan and the high-end shower you fantasize about when you think about renovating the downstairs. R. 101M. BROADWAY, FORTU-

12 STRONG. Chris Hemsworth stars in a drama about a Special Forces unit sent to Afghanistan in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. With Michael Peña and Michael Shannon. R. 130M. BROADWAY. DARKEST HOUR. Gary Oldman plays Winston Churchill as a new prime minister of an England with little appetite for conflict on the cusp of war with Germany. Good news: If you saw Dunkirk, you get a pass on this one. With Kristin Scott Thomas. PG13. 125M. MINOR. THE GREATEST SHOWMAN. Hugh Jackman sings and dances as P.T. Barnum, an abolitionist and social reformer who made his money off “freak shows” and minstrelsy. Michelle Williams and Zac Efron also star. Statue of Barnum on the Arcata Plaza unlikely. PG. 105M. BROADWAY. HOSTILES. Despite strong performances, Scott Cooper’s Western about a fearsome army captain (Christian Bale) transporting a dying Cheyenne chief (Wes Studi) and a traumatized woman (Rosamund Pike) lacks the moral ambiguity and bite its copious violence might otherwise convey. R. 134M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE. A remake of a 1995 Robin Williams vehicle that somehow combines Breakfast Club teen dynamics, bodyswap comedies, aggressive hippos and The Rock’s skeptical eyebrow? Sure, why not?

NA, MILL CREEK.

PG-13. 119M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

PETER RABBIT. A live-action/CG animation comedy based on the Beatrix Potter books but with more electric fence

MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE. The last of the video game-inspired action series with a boy band of rebels,

132M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

—John J. Bennett For showtimes, see the Journal’s listings at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards› Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

15:17 TO PARIS. Clint Eastwood hikes his trousers up to direct the true tale of American servicemen who foiled a terrorist attack on a train in 2015. Instead of actors, Alek Skarlatos, Anthony Sadler and Spencer Stone star as themselves. With Jenna Fisher and Thomas Lennon. PG13. 94M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

now freed from their maze, fighting an oppressive regime of lame adults who are sacrificing teens to find a cure for a deadly disease. Starring Dylan O’Brien and Rosa Salazar. PG13. 142M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

THE PHANTOM THREAD. Paul Thomas Anderson directs Daniel Day-Lewis and Vicky Krieps in a romance about a couturier who falls in love with his muse. Immersive settings, costumes and a nuanced story reward the viewer’s patience. R. 130M. MINOR.

THE SHAPE OF WATER. Guillermo del Toro’s exquisitely designed and executed love story/fable/tribute to monster movies of yesteryear showcases career-best performances from its cast, including Sally Hawkins as a mute woman who falls in love with an amphibian played by the lithe Doug Jones, with Michael Shannon as an evil scientist. R. 123M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI. A sterling cast (Woody Harrelson, Frances McDormand, Sam Rockwell, Abbie Cornish, Zeljko Ivanek and Peter Dinklage) does admirable work in a drama about a small-town murder but the film unravels in the last act. R. 115M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

WINCHESTER: THE HOUSE THAT GHOSTS BUILT. Guns don’t kill; ghosts do. Tour 500 rooms (and counting) of haunted house with Helen Mirren in head-to-toe black lace as the heir to the Winchester rifle empire. With Jason Clarke as the doctor sent to assess her sanity. PG13. 99M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA. l — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill and Linda Stansberry


Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts BEG WATERCOLOR @ PLUM BLOSSOM STUDIO, ARCATA Painting techniques/mindfulness practice. Fridays (03/02−04/06), (04/27−05/01) $120/6 spaces (707) 601−9955 www.thaoart.biz

Communication ACCESS TO THE WORLD: BEGINNING INTERNET − March 12th − 21st Mon. & Wed. 10:00am − 11:30am. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (C−0208) BEGINNING WORD − March 20th − 29th Tues. & Thurs. 4:00pm − 7:00pm.525 D St. Eureka. This course provides the basic, hands−on instruction needed to work with Microsoft Word 2013. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (C−0208) INTERMEDIATE EXCEL − March 6th −15th Tues. & Thurs. 4:00pm − 7:00pm. 525 D St. Eureka. This course provides the basic, hands−on instruction needed to work with Microsoft Excel 2013. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (C−0208) SEXUAL MISCONDUCT SCANDALS DISCUSSED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ The fallout from recent sexual abuse allegations will be explored at Lifetree Café on Sunday, February 11 at 7 p.m. The program˙ti− tled "In the News: Sexual Misconduct"˙provides an opportunity for participants to discuss the recent avalanche of sexual misconduct accusations. "From Hollywood to the media to politics, accusations of sexual misconduct are impacting prominent insti− tutions in our cultural landscape,"says Lifetree Café national director Craig Cable. "This Lifetree program will explore factors prompting the recent flood of allegations."During the program, partici− pants will have the opportunity to discuss how to know when someone has crossed a line from acci− dental misconduct to sinister behavior. Admission to the 60−minute event is free. Lifetree Café is located at Campbell Creek Connexion on the corner of Union and 13th St., Arcata. Lifetree Café is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual, comfortable setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Bob at 707 672 2919 or robertdipert@gmail.com. (C−0208)

DANCE WITH DEBBIE: WILL YOU BE READY FOR HUMBOLDT’S DANCE EVENT OF THE YEAR? Join us in celebrating the annual Redwood Coast Music Festival! Learn to dance swing, Latin and more. No partner required, all levels welcome. (0301) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0222) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0222)

Fitness NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−0222) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0222) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0222)

Home & Garden FREE NATURAL FARMING CLASSES T, W, TH 3−4:30 @ TeaLAB. CompostTeaLab.com for details. (HG−0222)

Continued on next page »

CHAIR YOGA WITH JAMES GADD. Practice the basics of Yoga without getting up and down from the floor and stressing your joints. Mon. & Wed., Feb. 26−March 7, 9−10:15 a.m. OLLI Members $50. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−0208) CREATING CALM & WELL BEING IN A STRESSFUL WORLD WITH MARILYN MONTGOMERY. Explore simple and fun mindfulness practices that create states of happiness and joy. Wed., Feb. 21−March 14, 2−4 p.m. OLLI Members $70. Sign up today! 826− 5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0208) PLANT INTELLIGENCE WITH BRIAN DYKSTRA. Designed to make you think, this class summarizes historical and contemporary scientific literature for the non−scientist. Mon., Feb. 19, 6−8 p.m. OLLI Members $30. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0208) THE OLD STEEPLE WITH PAUL BEATIE. Tour the building and learn about the unique history and its current use as a music store and world class concert venue.Tues., Feb. 20, 10−11 a.m. OLLI Members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0208)

Spiritual ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sunday 7:55 a.m. at Trillium Dance Studio, 855 8th St (next to the Post Office). Dharma talks are offered two Sundays per month at 9:20 a.m. following meditation. EUREKA: Wed’s, 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte St., enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 12.For more information call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. (S−0222) FINDING IMMEDIATE ACCESS TO INNATE CAPAC− ITIES OF LOVE, COMPASSION, AND WISDOM: a workshop with John Makransky, PhD, March 9−11 at Rangjung Yeshe Gomde California, a center for Buddhist Study and Practice. Visit gomdeusa.org. (S−0301) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0222) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. www.tarotofbecoming.com (707) 442−4240 carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0222)

Kids & Teens

Sports & Recreation

HUMBOLDT JIU JITSU ACADEMY− FIRST WEEK FREE! Kids & Youth Classes. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu & Muay Thai Kickboxing HumboldtJiuJitsu.com Arcata (K−1228)

RIVER GUIDE SCHOOL Looking for an awesome summertime job? GREAT JOB OPPORTUNITY. Redwoods and Rivers Guide School Scheduled during HSU Spring Break, March 11−16 (800) 429− 0090 www.redwoods−rivers.com

SPANISH Instruction/Tutoring Marcia 845−1910 (C−0405)

50 and Better

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0125)

STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m.− 8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0222)

YOGA WITH JAMES GADD. Get useful yogic philosophies and tools for daily release of muscular tension. Mon. & Wed., Feb. 26−March 7, noon−1:15 p.m. OLLI Members $50. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0208)

HEY, BANDS

Therapy & Support SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (TS−0222) ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0222) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0629)

Submit your gigs online at www.northcoast journal.com and/or email with high-res photo to music@northcoast journal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

47


Legals

Workshops FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−0810)

Vocational AUTO BODY COLLISION REPAIR − Mandatory Informational Meetings −Wed. Feb. 21st, Feb. 28th, March 7th or March 14th 5:30pm −7:30pm 525 D St. Eureka, 95501. Only need to attend one. Class starts March 26th Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (S−0208) EPA LEAD SAFETY FOR RENOVATION, REPAIR AND PAINTING (RRP) − March 9th 8am − 5pm. This 8 hour EPA mandated class, required in addi− tion to the CA DPH worker and supervisor certifi− cation. Call CR Community Education at 707−476− 4500. (V−0208) FIRELINE SAFETY for Hired Vendors now has dates and locations, Call CR Community Education at 707 −476−4500 for more information. (S−0208) FREE BEGINNING COMPUTER CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0208) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0208) FREE LIVING SKILLS CLASSES FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0208) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0208)

YOUR CLASS HERE

50 and Better

Theatre & Film

Arts & Crafts

Spiritual

Computer

Support

Fitness

Therapy

Kids & Teens

Wellness

Lectures

Bodywork

Dance & Music

Vocational

442-1400 × 305 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

FREE CLASS TO PREPARE FOR THE GED OR HISET Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707 476−4520 for more information. (V−0208) INTRODUCTION TO ADOBE LIGHTROOM. Orga− nize your photo library. Earn a digital communica− tion certificate. Sat. 2/24. 10am−4pm. $125. www.humboldt.edu/extended/digicomm (V−0208) MA CERT REVIEW − March 20 − May 1, Tues/Thurs− days : 5:30 − 8:30pm Eureka Main Campus AT 103 Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0208) MAPPING: DATA VISUALIZATION. Learn new tools for creating amazing maps. Sat., 2/24 & 3/3. 10:30am−5:30pm. $235. www.humboldt.edu/ extended (V−0208) SERVSAFE MANAGER CERTIFICATE − Tuesday, March 13th 8:30am − 5:00pm. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0208) TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING Mandatory Informa− tional Meetings − Tues. Feb. 20th, Thurs. Feb. 22nd, Tues. Feb. 27th or Thurs. March 1st 6p.m. − 8p.m. at 525 D St. Eureka. Only need to attend one. Class starts March 26th. Call CR Community Education at 707−476−4500. (V−0208)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDA COOKING IMMERSION. 5−Days w/ Traci Webb @ Ayurveda Culinary Institute. 3−Part Ayurveda Chef Training−Detox Module. March 28−April 1, www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0322) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2018. meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Herbal & Traditional Healing in Greece with Thea Parikos. May 4 − 14, 2018. Discover the beauty, aromas, traditional and modern uses of many medicinal plants on this amazing journey of learning to the Aegean islands of Ikaria & Samos! Beginning with Herbs. Mid−Sept − Early Nov, 2018, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442− 8157. (W−0215)

INTRODUCTION TO AYURVEDA. at Moonrise Herbs w/Traci Webb & Guests. 3 Tuesdays, Feb 27−March 13, 6:30−8:30pm, $108 (FREE for Ayurvedic Living & Shaktified! Students register− ed by 2/27). 8 CEUs.Register @ Moonrise or: www.ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601−9025 (W−0222) PAMPERED GODDESS DETOX. with Traci Webb. 3− Week Ayurveda Self−Nurturing Detox. Enjoy Deep Rest & Digestive Ease . March 26−16, $297 www.ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601−9025 (W−0322) SHAKTIFIED!: AYURVEDA WOMEN’S PROGRAM. w/Traci Webb, 9−Month Total Life Transformation. Ancient and modern life mastery skills & mindset. Level 1 of "Ayurveda Life Coaching Program". Starts April 5. REGISTER EARLY FOR FREE CLASSES! www.ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601−9025 (W−0329) WOMEN’S HEALTH THROUGH THE AGES − Thurs− days March 15 − 29, 4 − 6pm. CR Garberville Instruc− tional Site. Call CR Community Education at 707− 476−4500. (W−0208)

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF FLORENCE B. BUREK aka FLORENCE BLAKE BUREK CASE NO. PR180008 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of FLORENCE B. BUREK aka FLORENCE BLAKE BUREK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner BARBARA GRACE BUREK In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that BARBARA GRACE BUREK be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 15, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 4. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street

ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−6744 Filed: January 17, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 1/25, 2/1, 2/8 (18−012)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS # 17−2460 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED: 08/01/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANA− TION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obli− gation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: LINDA LYMAN, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Fore− closure Specialists LLC RECORDED 08/16/2005 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 2005−27477−6 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of HUMBOLDT County, California. DATE OF SALE: Thursday, 03/01/2018 at 11:00AM PLACE OF SALE: At the front entrance to the County Courthouse at 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 THE COMMON DESIGNATION OF THE PROPERTY IS PURPORTED TO BE: 1492 SEELY MCINTOSH ROAD, WILLOW CREEK, CA 95573 APN: 522−311−033 Esti− mated opening bid: $195,579.79 Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount. The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated above, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear owner− ship of the property. You should

time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear owner− ship of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be respon− sible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be post− poned one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at 530−246−2727; Toll Free: 844−333− 6766, or visit this Internet Web site: calforeclosures.biz, using the file number assigned to this case: TS #17 −2460. Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. NPP website and sales line number: www.nationwideposting.com Trustee Sales Automated Number: 916−939−0772 DATE: 02/06/2018 FORECLOSURE SPECIALISTS LLC P.O. Box 994465 REDDING, CA 96099− 4465 530−246−2727; Toll Free: 844− 333−6766 JANELLE ST. PIERRE / MANAGER Foreclosure Specialists LLC is assisting the Beneficiary in collecting a debt. Any and all infor− mation obtained may be used for that purpose. NPP0325762 To: NORTH COAST JOURNAL 02/08/ 2018, 02/15/2018, 02/22/2018 (18−026)

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Mid/ Town Storage intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property, pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. Mid/Town Storage will sell the contenets of the following storage units listed below (where property has been stored) at public auction by competitive bidding on Friday, February 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM on its premises at: 1649 Sutter Rd., McKinleyville, CA, County of


21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. Mid/Town Storage will sell the contenets of the following storage units listed below (where property has been stored) at public auction by competitive bidding on Friday, February 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM on its premises at: 1649 Sutter Rd., McKinleyville, CA, County of Humboldt.

−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at a public auction by competitive bidding on the 16th of February 2018, at noon, on the premises where said prop− erty has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini−Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as follows. Items to be sold include but are not limited to the following:

Name of Tenant and Storage Unit: Brandon Albert, Unit 211 Colt Baker, Unit 116 Colt Baker, Unit 285 Michael Cringle, Unit 136 Hillary Dahl, Unit 233 Sharon Erickson, Unit 751 Debbie French, Unit 90 Debbie French, Unit 91 Jesse Kaminski, Unit 127 Lance Lorenzen, Unit 107 Tanner McGuire−Edwards, Unit 819 Keith Parry, Unit 51 Joan Rios, Unit 653 Matthew, Rivas, Unit 206 Eugene Steele, Unit 613 Eric Staack, Unit 301 Nina Viescas, Unit 479 & 2 more units owend by the busi− ness Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: power tools, hand tools, several rolling toolboxes, truck bed toolbox, compressor, garden tools, musical instruments, household furniture, household appliances, exercise equipment, televisions, electronics, misc. art, housewares, camping items, sporting good equipment, grow equipment and accessories, sewing machines, plastic totes & boxes, bicycles, vacuum cleaners, janitorial supplies and much more! Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale and can be paid by Cash or Credit Card. A Cash Deposit of $40 is required for every unit purchased. Anyone interested in bidding must sign in at the office prior to 10:00 am on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as they are, where they are, and must be removed entirely by Sunday, February 25, 2018 by 8pm.

Unit#524 Chanthachone Phounleuth − truck tires, truck seats, lights Unit#707 Michael A Benson − furni− ture, bike, heater, misc boxes Unit #333 Travis M Coyle − burl slabs, kitchen items, misc boxes Unit#313 Dennis Lucas − sporting goods, tools, boxed items Unit#230 Shawn T Devore − radio flyer horse, furniture, car seats Unit#140 John Urich − tool box, luggage, misc boxes Unit #134 Rhonda Hamilton − clothes, misc boxes Pallet #1 bike parts/pieces, misc items Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items are sold "as is"and must be removed from the premises within 24 hours. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Bring a flashlight and padlock(s) Dated this 31st day of January and February 7th of 2018. CA BOND NO. 0336118 (18−017)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code.

Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obliged party. Auction will be conducted by Auctioneer: David Johnson, 707−443−4851, Bond # 9044453. Sale will take place rain or shine.

The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 21st of February, 2018, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said prop− erty has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage.

For further information, please call (707) 839−1555

The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt.

2/1, 2/8 (18−021)

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at a public auction by competitive bidding on the 16th of February 2018, at noon, on the premises where said prop− erty has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini−Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as

Dagan Short, Space # 5118 Kevin Eberwein, Space # 5309 Robert Kells, Space # 5512 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Lisa Terry, Space # 2309 Victor Wellington, Space # 2510 Casey Woods, Space # 3010 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units.

sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Lisa Terry, Space # 2309 Victor Wellington, Space # 2510 Casey Woods, Space # 3010 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Linda Stewart, Space # 1112 Adam Sheley, Space # 1201 Jasmin Ward, Space # 1211 Anna Schnurman, Space # 1384 Wesley Wignot, Space # 1572 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Marco Ramirez, Space # 384 Betty Earley, Space # 438 James Eller, Space # 511 Melissa Bardin, Space # 585 Ivy Kelso, Space # 603 Yesenia Nevarez, Space # 710 (Held in Co. Unit) Robert Plitnikas, Space # 745 Joaquina Quintanilla Aguilar, Space # 784 Christopher Zenittini, Space # 809 Philina Birindelli, Space # 851 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self−Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 8th day of February, 2018 and 15th day of February, 2018 (18−025)

T.S. No. 060929−CA APN: 203−271−060−000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROP− ERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 7/2/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 2/26/2018 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 7/10/2007, as Instrument No. 2007−20538−23, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: SHYLA DEWBERRY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH,

On 2/26/2018 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR bidder at the auction, you are or the person, the vehicle of the RECON CORP, as duly appointed may be responsible for paying off person, the job or workplace of the trustee under and pursuant to Deed all liens senior to the lien being person. of Trust recorded 7/10/2007, as auctioned off, before you can Instrument No. 2007−20538−23, of Continued on next » receive clear title to the property. The name, address, and page telephone Official Records in the office of the You are encouraged to investigate number of Daniel R. Krauchuk’s County Recorder of Humboldt the existence, priority, and size of attorney is: County, State of CALIFORNIA outstanding liens that may exist on David S. Nims executed by: SHYLA DEWBERRY, this property by contacting the Janssen Malloy LLP AN UNMARRIED WOMAN WILL county recorder’s office or a title 730 Fifth Street SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO insurance company, either of which PO Box 1288 HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, may charge you a fee for this infor− Eureka, CA 95501 CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A mation. If you consult either of 707−445−2071 STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A these resources, you should be 2/1, 2/8, 2/14, 2/22 (18−020) CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR aware that the same lender may FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A hold more than one mortgage or FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR deed of trust on the property. STATEMENT 18−00032 FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The The following person is doing Busi− ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− sale date shown on this notice of ness as TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED sale may be postponed one or more BIGFOOT APPLIANCE REPAIR IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL times by the mortgagee, benefi− CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant Humboldt BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: At the to Section 2924g of the California 1755 Felix Avenue front entrance to the County Civil Code. The law requires that Arcata, CA 95521 Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, information about trustee sale CA 95501 all right, title and interest postponements be made available Thomas A Koors conveyed to and now held by it to you and to the public, as a cour− 1755 Felix Avenue under said Deed of Trust in the tesy to those not present at the Arcata, CA 95521 property situated in said County sale. If you wish to learn whether and State described as: AS MORE your sale date has been postponed, The business is conducted by an FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED and, if applicable, the rescheduled Individual. OF TRUST The street address and time and date for the sale of this The date registrant commenced to other common designation, if any, property, you may call (800) 758 − transact business under the ficti− of the real property described 8052 or visit this Internet Web site tious business name or name listed above is purported to be: 3511 WWW.HOMESEARCH.COM, using above on Not Applicable TRINITY ST FORTUNA, CA 95540 the file number assigned to this I declare the all information in this The undersigned Trustee disclaims case 060929−CA. Information about statement is true and correct. any liability for any incorrectness of postponements that are very short A registrant who declares as true the street address and other in duration or that occur close in any material matter pursuant to common designation, if any, shown time to the scheduled sale may not Section 17913 of the Business and herein. Said sale will be held, but immediately be reflected in the Professions Code that the registrant without covenant or warranty, telephone information or on the knows to be false is guilty of a express or implied, regarding title, Internet Web site. The best way to misdemeanor punishable by a fine possession, condition, or encum− not to exceed one thousand dollars verify postponement information is brances, including fees, charges and ($1,000). to attend the scheduled sale. FOR expenses of the Trustee and of the /s Thomas A Koors, Owner SALES INFORMATION: (800) 758 − trusts created by said Deed of Trust, This statement was filed with the 8052 CLEAR RECON CORP 4375 to pay the remaining principal sums County Clerk of Humboldt County Jutland Drive San Diego, California of the note(s) secured by said Deed on January 17, 2018 92117 of Trust. The total amount of the KELLY E. SANDERS 1/25, 2/1, 2/8 (18−010) unpaid balance of the obligation by sm, Humboldt County Clerk secured by the property to be sold NOTICE OF CIVIL HARASS− 2/8, 2/15, 2/22, 3/1 (18−031) and reasonable estimated costs, MENT RESTRAINING ORDER expenses and advances at the time FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME AFTER HEARING of the initial publication of the STATEMENT 18−00033 HUMBOLDT COUNTY SUPE− Notice of Sale is: $230,627.12 If the RIOR COURT CASE NUMBER: The following person is doing Busi− Trustee is unable to convey title for ness as CV170620 any reason, the successful bidder’s EMERALD SEAMLESS GUTTERS −−−−−−−− sole and exclusive remedy shall be TO: JOLLY JUNIOR EUBANKS the return of monies paid to the Humboldt Trustee, and the successful bidder 376 Glenwood Lane DANIEL R. KRAUCHUK obtained the shall have no further recourse. The McKinleyville, CA 95519 following Civil Harassment beneficiary under said Deed of Restraining Order, issued December Trust heretofore executed and Patrick J O’Dwyer 11, 2017 and expiring three years delivered to the undersigned a 376 Glenwood Lane from date of issuance. written Declaration of Default and McKinleyville, CA 95519 Demand for Sale, and a written You must not do the following Notice of Default and Election to The business is conducted by an things to Daniel R. Krauchuk: Sell. The undersigned caused said Individual. Harass, intimidate, molest, attack, Notice of Default and Election to The date registrant commenced to strike, stalk, threaten, assault (sexu− Sell to be recorded in the county transact business under the ficti− ally or otherwise), hit, abuse, where the real property is located. tious business name or name listed destroy personal property of, or NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If above on Not Applicable disturb the peace of the person. you are considering bidding on this I declare the all information in this Contact the person, either directly property lien, you should under− statement is true and correct. or indirectly, in any way, including, stand that there are risks involved in A registrant who declares as true but not limited to, in person, by bidding at a trustee auction. You any material matter pursuant to telephone, in writing, by public or will be bidding on a lien, not on the Section 17913 of the Business and private mail, by interoffice mail, by property itself. Placing the highest Professions Code that the registrant email, by text−message, by fax or by bid at a trustee auction does not knows to be false is guilty of a other electronic means. Take any automatically entitle you to free misdemeanor punishable by a fine action to obtain the person’ s and clear ownership of the prop− not to exceed one thousand dollars address or location. erty. You should also be aware that ($1,000). You must stay at least 100 yards the lien being auctioned off may be /s Patrcik O’Dwyer away from the person, the home of a junior lien. If you are the highest This statement was filed with the the person, the vehicle of the bidder at the auction, you are or County Clerk of Humboldt County person, the job or workplace of the may be responsible for paying off on January 17, 2018 person. all liens senior to the lien being KELLY E. SANDERS auctioned off, before you can by sm, Humboldt County Clerk The name, address, and telephone receive clear title to the property. 1/25, 2/1, 2/8, 2/15 (18−014) number of Daniel R. Krauchuk’ s You are encouraged to investigate attorney is: the existence, priority, and size of David S. Nims outstanding liens that may exist on Janssen Malloy LLP Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, this property by contacting the 730 Fifth Street county recorder’s office or a title PO Box 1288 insurance company, either of which Eureka, CA 95501

49


Legals FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 17−00647

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00049

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00026

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00006

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SOUTHERN HUMBOLDT DISTRIBU− TION COMPANY Humboldt Manufacturing Humboldt Delivers Lost Coast Elixers Briceland Key System Patient Group

The following person is doing Busi− ness as PARADISE FLAT FARM/CANN−DO ATTITUDE OLD SCHOOL CULTIVA− TIONS 78 Shively Flat Rd Scotia, CA 95565

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CHRONIC CREEK

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LOST COAST CATERING

The following person is doing Busi− ness as THREE CREEKS SOLUTIONS, LLC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LIFE ON WHEELS

1005 Patterson Rd Willow Creek, CA 95573 P.O. Box 285 Arcata, CA 95518

Humboldt 2045 Scott Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt 4184 Browns Rd Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 550 S. G St STE 29 Arcata, CA 95521

Emma A Stenborg−Davies 2045 Scott Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

Three Creeks Solutions, LLC CA 201711510167 4184 Browns Rd Eureka, CA 95503

Life On Wheels LLC CA 201736410012 550 S. G St STE 29 Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ethan Aronson, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 12, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brian Sharkey, Owner/Officer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 4, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

1/18, 1/25, 2/1, 2/8 (18−008)

1/25, 2/1, 2/8, 2/15 (18−015)

Humboldt 3354 Redwood Drive Redway, CA 95560 SHDC, LLC CA 201524610295 300 Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Suite 370 Oaklnd, CA 94612 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Keenan Whitehurst, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 8, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 1/18, 1/25, 2/1, 2/8 (18−007)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00025 The following person is doing Busi− ness as THREE CREEKS FARMS Humboldt 3990 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt Elizabeth A Dunlap 78 Shively Flat Rd Scotia, CA 95565

Armco II, LLC CA 201631510016 10304 Banner Lava Cap Nevada City, CA 95959

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elizabeth Dunlap, Owner/Oper− ator of Sole Proprietorship This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 8, 2017 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Amy Wiser, Managing Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 10, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk

1/25, 2/1, 2/8, 2/15 (18−013)

2/8, 2/15, 2/22, 3/1 (18−029)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00059

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00019

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HEADIES

The following person is doing Busi− ness as 101 PLUMBING

359 Main Street Trinidad, CA 95570 P.O. Box 902 Trinidad, CA 95570

Humboldt 1924 Albee Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 633 Eureka, CA 95502

Humboldt Healing Collective CA C3845682 3990 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503

Charles M Vanderpool 707 Underwood Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 Sherry L Vanderpool 707 Underwood Drive Trinidad, CA 95570

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ethan Aronson, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 12, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Charles M Vanderpool, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 31, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk

1/18, 1/25, 2/1, 2/8 (18−009)

2/8, 2/15, 2/22, 3/1 (18−028)

Isaac A Kennedy 1924 Albee Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Isaac Kennedy, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 11, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

2/8, 2/15, 2/22, 3/1 (18−027)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Emma A. Stenborg−Davies This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 26, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 2/1, 2/8, 2/15, 2/22 (18−024)

STATEMENT OF ABANDON− MENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 17− 00611 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name BRANDENBURG INVESTMENT GROUP Humboldt 3429 Glenwood St Eureka, CA 95501 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on November 17, 2017 John E Brandenburg 3429 Glenwood St Eureka, CA 95501 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ John Brandenburg, Owner This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date January 25, 2018 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office Kelly E. Sanders s/ sm, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk 2/1, 2/8, 2/15, 2/22 (18−023)

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NOTICE INVITING BIDS

NOTICE INVITING BIDS

1. Notice is hereby given that the Governing Board of the Orick School District (“District”), of the County of Humboldt, State of California, will receive sealed bids for the Orick HVAC Project (“Project”) up to, but not later than, 3:00 p.m., on Tuesday, March 6, 2018, and will thereafter publicly open and read aloud the bids. All bids shall be received at the office of the Greenway Partners, located at 1385 8th Street, in Arcata, California 95521. 2. Each bid shall be completed on the Bid Proposal Form included in the Contract Documents, and must conform and be fully responsive to this invitation, the plans and specifications and all other Contract Documents. Copies of the Contract Documents are available for examination at the office of the Orick School District, County of Humboldt, California, and may be obtained by licensed contractors for free. Electronic copies of the Contract Documents can also be obtained from the Humboldt Builders Exchange (http://www.humbx. com/) or by emailing the Project Engineer (Nathan Sanger at sanger@ greenwaypartners.net). 3. Each bid shall be accompanied by cash, a cashier’s or certified check, or a bidder’s bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California as a surety, made payable to the District, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the maximum amount of the bid. The check or bid bond shall be given as a guarantee that the bidder to whom the contract is awarded will execute the Contract Documents and will provide the required payment and performance bonds and insurance certificates within ten (10) days after the notification of the award of the Contract. 4. The successful bidder shall comply with the provisions of the Labor Code pertaining to payment of the generally prevailing rate of wages and apprenticeships or other training programs. The Department of Industrial Relations has made available the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which the work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Contract, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. Copies of these prevailing rates are available to any interested party upon request and are online at http://www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR. The Contractor and all Subcontractors shall pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the Contract. It is the Contractor’s responsibility to determine any rate change. 5. The schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work shall be at least time and one half. 6. The substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments in accordance with Public Contract Code §22300 is permitted. 7. Pursuant to Public Contract Code §4104, each bid shall include the name and location of the place of business of each subcontractor who shall perform work or service or fabricate or install work for the contactor in excess of one-half of one percent (1/2 of 1%) of the bid price. The bid shall describe the type of the work to be performed by each listed subcontractor. 8. Minority, women, and disabled veteran contractors are encouraged to submit bids. This bid is not subject to Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise requirements. 9. The project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the California Department of Industrial Relations. In accordance with SB 854, all bidders, contractors and subcontractors working at the site shall be duly registered with the Department of Industrial Relations at time of bid opening and at all relevant times. Proof of registration shall be provided as to all such contractors prior to the commencement of any work. 10. Each bidder shall possess at the time the bid is awarded the following classification(s) of California State Contractor’s license: Class B (General Building Contractor) or a Class C-20 HVAC Contractor’s License. 11. A non-mandatory bidders’ conference will be held on Tuesday, February 13, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Project site.

1. Notice is hereby given that the Governing Board of the Big Lagoon School District (“District”), of the County of Humboldt, State of California, will receive sealed bids for the Big Lagoon HVAC Project (“Project”) up to, but not later than, 3:00 p.m., on Wednesday, March 14, 2018, and will thereafter publicly open and read aloud the bids. All bids shall be received at the office of the Greenway Partners, located at 1385 8th Street, in Arcata, California 95521. 2. Each bid shall be completed on the Bid Proposal Form included in the Contract Documents, and must conform and be fully responsive to this invitation, the plans and specifications and all other Contract Documents. Copies of the Contract Documents are available for examination at the office of the Big Lagoon School District, County of Humboldt, California, and may be obtained by licensed contractors for free. Electronic copies of the Contract Documents can also be obtained from the Humboldt Builders Exchange (http://www.humbx. com/) or by emailing the Project Engineer (Nathan Sanger at sanger@ greenwaypartners.net). 3. Each bid shall be accompanied by cash, a cashier’s or certified check, or a bidder’s bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California as a surety, made payable to the District, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the maximum amount of the bid. The check or bid bond shall be given as a guarantee that the bidder to whom the contract is awarded will execute the Contract Documents and will provide the required payment and performance bonds and insurance certificates within ten (10) days after the notification of the award of the Contract. 4. The successful bidder shall comply with the provisions of the Labor Code pertaining to payment of the generally prevailing rate of wages and apprenticeships or other training programs. The Department of Industrial Relations has made available the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which the work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Contract, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. Copies of these prevailing rates are available to any interested party upon request and are online at http:// www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR. The Contractor and all Subcontractors shall pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the Contract. It is the Contractor’s responsibility to determine any rate change. 5. The schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work shall be at least time and one half. 6. The substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments in accordance with Public Contract Code §22300 is permitted. 7. Pursuant to Public Contract Code §4104, each bid shall include the name and location of the place of business of each subcontractor who shall perform work or service or fabricate or install work for the contactor in excess of one-half of one percent (1/2 of 1%) of the bid price. The bid shall describe the type of the work to be performed by each listed subcontractor. 8. Minority, women, and disabled veteran contractors are encouraged to submit bids. This bid is not subject to Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise requirements. 9. The project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the California Department of Industrial Relations. In accordance with SB 854, all bidders, contractors and subcontractors working at the site shall be duly registered with the Department of Industrial Relations at time of bid opening and at all relevant times. Proof of registration shall be provided as to all such contractors prior to the commencement of any work. 10. Each bidder shall possess at the time the bid is awarded the following classification(s) of California State Contractor’s license: Class B (General Building Contractor) or a Class C-20 HVAC Contractor’s License. 11. A non-mandatory bidders’ conference will be held on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Project site.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME NICOLE GREY SCHILLER CASE NO. CV180038 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME ELIZABETH SHAWN DELL GUNDLACH CASE NO. CV180040 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

PETITION OF: NICOLE GREY SCHILLER TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: NICOLE GREY SCHILLER

PETITION OF: ELIZABETH SHAWN DELL GUND− LACH TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ELIZABETH SHAWN DELL GUNDLACH

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name NICOLE GREY SCHILLER to Proposed Name NICOLE GREY LOVE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 6, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: January 22,2018 Filed: January 22, 2018 /s/ Joyce D. Hinnchs Judge of the Superior Court 2/1, 2/8, 2/15, 2/22 (18−016)

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name ELIZABETH SHAWN DELL GUND− LACH to Proposed Name SHAWN DELL GUNDLACH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 6, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: January 22,2018 Filed: January 22, 2018 /s/ Joyce D. Hinnchs Judge of the Superior Court 2/1, 2/8, 2/15, 2/22 (18−022)

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51


Legal Notices NOTICE OF INTENTION TO CIRCULATE INITIATIVE PETITION

Notice is hereby given by the persons whose names appear hereon of their intention to circulate the petition within the County of Humboldt for the purpose of moving forward the civil and human rights of the County’s most marginalized communities. A statement of the reasons of the proposed action as contemplated in the petition is as follows: The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement(ICE)is responsible for enforcing the civil immigration laws. ICE’s programs seek to enlist local law enforcement’s voluntary cooperation and assistance in its enforcement efforts. Collaboration between County law enforcement and federal immigration cause County expense, mistrust by local, immigrant communities, and fear of accessing services to which they are legally entitled. Humboldt County must declare itself a Sanctuary County and formalize the policy of non-collaboration that the County Sheriff already supports. ________________________________ ________________________________ Renee Saucedo Proponent 900 Hodgson St. Eureka, CA 95503 ________________________________ ________________________________ Eric Kirk Proponent 900 Hodgson St. Eureka, CA 95503 ________________________________ ________________________________ Courtney Blake Proponent 900 Hodgson St. Eureka, CA 95503 ________________________________ ________________________________

INITIATIVE MEASURE TO BE SUBMITTED DIRECTLY TO THE VOTERS

Proponents request that the County Counsel of Humboldt County prepare the following title and summary of the chief purposes and points of the proposed measure:

PROPOSED TITLE:

Humboldt County Sanctuary Law

TEXT OF MEASURE:

The people of the County of Humboldt ordain as follows: It is hereby affirmed that the County of Humboldt County is a sanctuary in its affirmation and support for SB 54 codified as Chapter 495 (An act to amend Sections 7282 and 7282.5 of, and to add Chapter 17.25 (commencing with Section 7284) to Division 7 of Title 1 of, the Government Code, and to repeal Section 11369 of the Health and Safety Code, relating to law enforcement), and additionally as stated in this Chapter.

PURPOSE OF THIS CHAPTER.

The purpose of this Chapter is to support Humboldt County’s mission of providing competent, effective, and responsive public safety services to the citizens of Humboldt County and visitors to our community, recognizing its responsibility to maintain order, while affording dignity and respect to all persons and maintaining the highest of professional and ethical standards. The provisions of this Chapter are designed to assure that local law enforcement and other agencies are free from improper interference in the conduct of their duties, that County resources are expended only in furtherance of the objectives for which they are allocated, that participation in the investigation and prosecution of criminal matters is in no way discouraged and that all residents of the County may confidently enjoy the benefits and privileges of life in Humboldt County. Additionally, the intent of this Chapter is to address requests for civil immigration detainers, voluntary notification of release of individuals, transmission of personal information, and civil immigration documents based solely on alleged violations of the civil provisions of immigration laws. Nothing in this Chapter shall be construed to apply to matters other than those relating to federal civil immigration detainers, notification of release of individuals, transmission of personal information, or civil immigration documents, based solely on alleged violations of the civil provisions of immigration laws. In all other respects, local law enforcement agencies may continue to collaborate with federal authorities to protect public safety.

FINDINGS.

The following findings are included in this ordinance to guide in interpretation for clarification in the implementation of the policies herein and to guide in the judicial determinations of compliance with it. The County of Humboldt (the “County”) is home to persons of diverse racial, ethnic, and national backgrounds, including a large immigrant population which is hereby recognized as integral and vital to the communities of the County. The County respects, upholds, and values equal protection and equal treatment for all of our residents, regardless of immigration status. Undocumented persons pay taxes and therefore are entitled to access county services, including but not limited to protection by the police and firefighters. Undocumented persons are entitled to

access all County facilities, including libraries, recreation centers, parks and senior centers. Undocumented persons may choose not to exercise these rights because of a concern that County officials will cooperate with federal authorities in the investigation of immigration status. It is important that the Board of Supervisors clarify the County’s policy regarding inquiries into and actions based on a person’s immigration status. Fostering a relationship of trust, respect, and open communication between County employees and County residents is essential to the County’s core mission of ensuring public health, safety, and welfare, and serving the needs of everyone in the community, including immigrants. The purpose of this Chapter is to foster respect and trust between law enforcement, County agencies and personnel, and residents, to protect limited local resources, to encourage cooperation between residents and County officials, including especially law enforcement and public health officers and employees, and to ensure community security, and due process for all. The United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) is responsible for enforcing the civil immigration laws. ICE’s programs seek to enlist local law enforcement’s voluntary cooperation and assistance in its enforcement efforts. In its descriptions ICE has held and continues to hold the position that all requests under their programs are for voluntary action and that any request is not an authorization to detain persons at the expense of the federal government. These policies amount to what many critics have referred to as “unfunded mandates” demanding of local jurisdictions that they not only participate in ICE actions, but dedicate money and resources to such ends. The federal government should not shift the financial burden of federal civil immigration enforcement, including personnel time and costs relating to notification and detention, onto local law enforcement by requesting that local law enforcement agencies continue detaining persons based on non-mandatory civil immigration detainers or cooperating and assisting with requests to notify ICE that a person will be released from local custody. It is not a wise and effective use of valuable County resources. Given that civil immigration detainers are issued by immigration officers without judicial oversight, and the regulation authorizing civil immigration detainers provides no minimum standard of proof for their issuance, there are serious questions as to their constitutionality. Unlike criminal warrants, which must be supported by probable cause and issued by a neutral magistrate, there are no such requirements for the issuance of a civil immigration detainer. Several federal courts have ruled that because civil immigration detainers and other ICE “Notice of Action” documents are issued without probable cause of criminal conduct, they do not meet the Fourth Amendment requirements for state or local law enforcement officials to arrest and hold an individual in custody. (Miranda-Olivares v. Clackamas Co., No. 3:12-cv-02317-ST *17 (D.Or. April 11, 2014) (finding that detention pursuant to an immigration detainer is a seizure that must comport with the Fourth Amendment). See also Morales v. Chadbourne, 996 F. Supp. 2d 19, 29 (D.R.I 2014); Villars v. Kubiatowski, No. 12-cv-4586 *10-12 (N.D. Ill. filed May 5, 2014).) According to Section 287.7 of Title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the County is not reimbursed by the federal government for the costs associated with civil immigration detainers alone. The full cost of responding to a civil immigration detainer can include, but is not limited to, extended detention time, the administrative costs of tracking and responding to detainers, and the legal liability for erroneously holding an individual who is not subject to a civil immigration detainer. Compliance with civil immigration detainers and involvement in civil immigration enforcement diverts limited local resources from programs that are beneficial to the County. The County seeks to protect public safety, which is founded on trust and cooperation of community residents and local law enforcement. However, civil immigration detainers and notifications regarding release undermine community trust of law enforcement by instilling fear in immigrant communities of coming forward to report crimes and cooperate with local law enforcement agencies. A 2013 study by the University of Illinois, entitled “Insecure Communities: Latino Perceptions of Police Involvement in Immigration Enforcement,” found that at least 40% of Latinos surveyed are less likely to provide information to police because they fear exposing themselves, family, or friends to a risk of deportation. Indeed, civil immigration detainers have resulted in the transfer of victims of crime, including domestic violence victims, to ICE. The County has enacted numerous laws and policies to strengthen communities and to build trust between communities and local law enforcement. Local cooperation and assistance with civil immigration enforcement would undermine community policing strategies. ICE has used and continues to use forms which request notification from local jails about an individual’s release date prior to his or her release from local custody. As with civil immigration detainers, these notification requests are issued by immigration officers without judicial oversight, thus raising questions about local law enforcement’s liability for constitutional violations if any person is over detained when immigration agents are unable to be present at the time of the person’s release from local custody. ICE will continue to issue civil immigration detainer requests where local law enforcement officials are willing to respond to the requests, and in instances of “special circumstances,” a term that has yet to be defined by DHS. Despite federal courts finding civil immigration detainers do not meet Fourth Amendment requirements, local jurisdictions are often unable to confirm whether or not a detention request is supported by probable cause or has been reviewed by a neutral magistrate. The increase in information-sharing between local law enforcement and immi-

52 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

gration officials around the country raises serious concerns about privacy rights. Across the country, including in the California Central Valley, there has been an increase of ICE agents stationed in jails, who often have unrestricted access to jail databases, booking logs, and other documents that contain personal information of all jail inmates. The County has an interest in ensuring that confidential information collected in the course of carrying out its municipal functions, including but not limited to public health programs and criminal investigations, is not used for unintended purposes that could hamper collection of information vital to those functions. To carry out public health programs, the County must be able to reliably collect confidential information from all residents. To solve crimes and protect the public, local law enforcement depends on the cooperation of all County residents. Information gathering and cooperation may be jeopardized if release of personal information results in a person being taken into immigration custody. The impact of ICE policies and local cooperation with them is against the interests of the health and safety of every County resident and its many visitors. According to a recent study, seventy percent of undocumented immigrants and forty percent of Latinos are less likely to report crime to the police because they feared that police would enforce immigration laws. (Nik Theodore, Insecure Communities: Latino Perceptions of Police Involvement in Immigration Enforcement, University of Illinois at Chicago, May 2013.) Furthermore, individuals who perpetrate domestic violence, trafficking and other forms of violence against immigrants often instill fear of law enforcement to control their victims. (Leslye Orloff & Olivia Garcia, Dynamics of Domestic Violence Experienced by Immigrant Victims, National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project,2013). And since undocumented immigrants commonly live in households where at least one member has legal status, U.S. citizens and lawful residents also fear that contacting the police will result in the arrest of a family member. ICE agents are not police officers. They do not receive the same amount of training and they are not trained in criminal investigations such that local law enforcement is likely to benefit from any joint operations. According to a report issued by the International Association of Chiefs of Police: State and local law enforcement should not be involved in the enforcement of civil immigration laws since such involvement would likely have a chilling effect on both legal and illegal aliens reporting criminal activity or assisting police in criminal investigations. (“Enforcing Immigration Law: The Role of State, Tribal and Local Law Enforcement”). In short, cooperation between local agencies and federal immigration enforcement with regard to the latter is detrimental to the health and safety of all residents. Keeping local law enforcement out of the deportation business not only allows community members to cooperate with local law enforcement, it also benefits the community at large in other ways. The Immigration Legal Resource Center, through a Freedom of Information Act request, obtained ICE data and contributed to a report on how sanctuary counties perform across a range of social and economic indicators when compared to non-sanctuary counties. Among the main findings: On average, 35.5% fewer crimes are committed per 10,000 people in sanctuary counties compared to non-sanctuary counties. Median household annual income is, on average, $4,353 higher in sanctuary counties compared to non-sanctuary counties. The poverty rate is 2.3 percent lower, on average, in sanctuary counties compared to non-sanctuary counties. Unemployment is, on average, 1.1 percent lower in sanctuary counties compared to non-sanctuary counties. While the results hold true across sanctuary jurisdictions, the sanctuary counties with the smallest populations see the most pronounced effects. By keeping out of federal immigration enforcement, sanctuary counties are keeping families together—and when households remain intact and individuals can continue contributing, thus strengthening local economies and lowering crime. (Tom K. Wong, Center for American Progress, The Effects of Sanctuary Policies on Crime and the Economy). Sanctuary laws do not prevent undocumented immigrants from being prosecuted for criminal activity, and state and federal laws address the situation of serious, criminal offenders. The California Trust Act and SB 54, while prohibiting ICE holds on jail inmates who are otherwise eligible for release, also requires that those charged or convicted with serious and violent felonies be held for ICE agents. Crimes added to the list that expose immigrants to deportation include child abuse, gang-related crimes, drug trafficking, weapon sales, using children to sell drugs and aggravated federal felonies. (California Trust Act, 2014). Additionally, the same fears herein can deter individuals and families for seeking medical treatment, which can have serious health and safety impacts on everyone residing in the County. In summary, any County involvement in partnership with ICE through any Joint Law Enforcement Task Force or other arrangement is in contradiction with the values of the County of Humboldt and against its material interests.

DEFINITIONS.

“Administrative warrant” means a document issued by the federal agency charged with the enforcement of the Federal immigration law that is used as a non-criminal, civil warrant for immigration purposes. “Eligible for release from custody” means that the individual may be released from custody because one of the following conditions has occurred: (a) All criminal charges against the individual have been dropped or dismissed. (b) The individual has been acquitted of all criminal charges filed against him or her.


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(c) The individual has served all the time required for his or her sentence. (d) The individual has posted a bond, or has been released on his or her own recognizance. (e) The individual has been referred to pre-trial diversion services. (f) The individual is otherwise eligible for release under state or local law. “Civil immigration detainer” means a non-mandatory request issued by an authorized federal immigration officer under Section 287.7 of Title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations, to a local law enforcement official to maintain custody of an individual for a period not to exceed 48 hours and advise the authorized federal immigration officer prior to the release of that individual. “Law enforcement official” means any County Department or officer or employee of a County Department, authorized to enforce criminal statutes, regulations, or local ordinances; operate jails or maintain custody of individuals in jails; and operate juvenile detention facilities or maintain custody of individuals in juvenile detention facilities. “Notification request” means a non-mandatory request issued by an authorized federal immigration officer to a local law enforcement official asking for notification to the authorized immigration officer of an individual’s release from local custody prior to the release of an individual from local custody. Notification requests may also include informal requests for release information by the Federal agency charged with enforcement of the Federal immigration law. “Personal information” means any confidential, identifying information about an individual, including, but not limited to, home or work contact information, and family or emergency contact information.

USE OF COUNTY FUNDS PROHIBITED.

No department, agency, commission, officer, or employee of the County of Humboldt shall use any County funds or resources to assist in the enforcement of Federal immigration law or to gather or disseminate information regarding release status of individuals or any other such personal information in the County of Humboldt unless such assistance is required by Federal or State statute, regulation, or court order or decision. The prohibition set forth in this Chapter shall include, but shall not be limited to: (a) Assisting or cooperating, in one’s official capacity, with any investigation, detention, or arrest procedures, public or clandestine, conducted by the Federal agency charged with enforcement of the Federal immigration law and relating to alleged violations of the civil provisions of the Federal immigration law, except as permitted herein. (b) Assisting or cooperating, in one’s official capacity, with any investigation, surveillance, or gathering of information conducted by foreign governments, except for cooperation related to an alleged violation of County, State, or Federal criminal laws. (c) Requesting information about, or disseminating information, in one’s official capacity, regarding the release status of any individual or any other such personal information, except as permitted herein, or conditioning the provision of services or benefits by the County of Humboldt upon immigration status, except as required by Federal or State statute or regulation, County public assistance criteria, or court order or decision. (d) Including on any application, questionnaire, or interview form used in relation to benefits, services, or opportunities provided by County of Humboldt any question regarding immigration status other than those required by Federal or State statute, regulation, or court order or decision. Any such questions existing or being used by the County at the time this Chapter is adopted shall be deleted within sixty days of the adoption of this Chapter.

RESTRICTIONS ON LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS.

In addition to the limitations set forth by the laws of the State of California, including but not limited to the above-described laws currently described in summary as “SB 54” the following restrictions shall apply. (a) No enforcement official shall detain an individual on the basis of a civil immigration detainer. (b) No agency shall participate in a Joint Law Enforcement Task Force which includes ICE, or for which a purpose is enforcement of federal immigration laws. (c) Law enforcement officials shall not arrest or detain an individual, or provide any individual’s personal information to a federal immigration officer, on the basis of an administrative warrant, prior deportation order, or other civil immigration document based solely on alleged violations of the civil provisions of immigration laws. (d) Where federal law, state law, or court orders or decisions require that law enforcement arrest and detain immigrants for reasons pertaining to their immigration status (as opposed to the committing of violent crimes as defined herein) that the following protocols shall be followed: No arrests shall be made at the arrestee’s home from 12:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. No arrests shall be made at a courthouse or other government building based upon the timing of a court hearing or appointment with government representative No arrests shall be made near a school and every reasonable precaution shall be made to avoid arrests in the presence of the arrestee’s children. No arrests shall be made at hospitals, nursing homes, or other medical facilities. Law enforcement officials shall make good faith efforts to seek federal reimbursement for all costs incurred in continuing to detain an individual, after that individual becomes eligible for release, in response each civil immigration detainer. (e) In the event that an agency is required to act on a warrant, subpoena, or other order which does not involve and arrest or detention, but which merely requires the sharing of personal information and/or release dates, the individual named in the warrant or subpoena shall be notified in writing immediately upon

receipt by the agency. (f) Except as shall be required for booking upon arrest upon suspicion of criminal activity not pertaining to immigration status, no individual shall be required to submit to a fingerprint check of any sort unless there is an outstanding warrant on the individual. Law enforcement agencies shall be prohibited from random fingerprint checks.

RESTRICTIONS ON ALL COUNTY AGENCIES

(a) Except as stated herein, no county employee shall inquire or investigate into a person’s immigration status. (b) No county employee shall take any action based on a person’s immigration status unless required by federal law, state law, or court order or decision. (c) No county employee shall cooperate with any federal authority with respect to any investigation of a person’s immigration status unless required by federal law, state law, or court order or decision. (d) No county employee shall assist with any investigation into a person’s immigration status or to assist with the enforcement of federal immigration law unless required by federal law, state law, or court order or decision. (e) No county employee shall assist, directly or indirectly, in the detention of any person solely based on a person’s suspected immigration status unless required by federal law, state law, or court order or decision.

WELFARE OF CHILDREN OF DEPORTED PARENTS

Findings: According to a study conducted by the Migration Policy Institute approximately 5 million children under 18 have at least one parent who is an undocumented immigrant. Of these children, 79 percent are American citizens. In the second half of 2015, ICE removed 15,422 parents who said they have at least one U.S.-born child, according to ICE data. Research has shown that separation from parents can generate or exacerbate child mental health problems such as depressive or anxiety disorder and can impact a child’s development and education. There is no uniform national policy with regard to the status of children who are separated from one or both parents due to deportation. In some instances the involved government agencies have assisted families in reunifying. In others children have been placed into Foster care and in some cases agencies have taken legal action to oppose reunification or placement with guardians of the parents’ choice. The lack of clear policy guidelines or criteria for specific action (or inaction) has led to inconsistent actions and policies at the discretion of agents charged with securing the best interests of the children. Policy: It shall be the policy of all agencies acting under County jurisdiction that in the absence of evidence of abuse, neglect, or other physical or emotional danger to the child due to parental conduct the policy shall be to assist the families according to the wishes of the parents as federal and state law allow and to the extent resources are available. Guardians appointed by parents through formal process or power of attorney shall be recognized and respected, and guardianship as intended by the parents shall not be opposed on the basis of residential or citizenship status. In the event that an agency shall make the determination that appointed guardianship and/or parental reunification is not in the best interests of the child, the determination shall be made in writing which shall be mailed to the parents and appointed guardians if an address can be ascertained, and that such written determination shall be mailed at least 15 days prior to any legal action unless the agency determines that the child is in immediate danger.

PERMITTED ACTIVITIES OF ALL AGENCIES

Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit: (a) Any County employee from discussing a person’s immigration status as part of a service request from that person; (b) Any County employee from obeying any lawful order issued with all of the protections of the United States Constitution, including but not limited to probable cause and due process; (c) Any County employee from taking any action to protect a person or respond to an emergency; or (d) Any County police officer from investigating or assisting with any investigation of criminal activity other than violation of the immigration laws.

SEMIANNUAL REPORT.

By no later than July 1, 2019, the Sheriff and Juvenile Probation Officer shall each provide to the Board of Supervisors a written report stating the number of detentions that were solely based on civil immigration detainers (if any) during the first six months following the effective date of this Chapter, and detailing the rationale behind each of those civil immigration detainers. Thereafter, the Sheriff and Juvenile Probation Officer shall each submit a written report to the Board of Supervisors and the Mayor, by January 1st and July 1st of each year, addressing the following issues for the time period covered by the report: (a) a description of all communications received from the Federal agency charged with enforcement of the Federal immigration law, including but not limited to the number of civil immigration detainers, notification requests, or other types of communications. (b) a description of any communications the Department made to the Federal agency charged with enforcement of the Federal immigration law, including but not limited to any Department’s responses to inquires as described herein.

UNDERTAKING FOR THE GENERAL WELFARE.

In enacting and implementing this Chapter the County is assuming an undertaking only to promote the general welfare. It is not assuming, nor is it imposing on its officers and employees, an obligation for breach of which it is liable in money damages to any person who claims that such breach proximately caused injury. CLERK OF BOARD TO TRANSMIT COPIES OF THIS CHAPTER; INFORMING COUNTY EMPLOYEES. The Clerk of the Board of Supervisors shall send copies of this Chapter, including any future amendments thereto that may be made, to every department, agency and commission of the County of Humboldt, to California’s United States Senators, and to the California Congressional delegation, the Commissioner of the Federal agency charged with enforcement of the Federal immigration law, the United States Attorney General, and the Secretary of State and the President of the United States. Each appointing officer of the County of Humboldt shall inform all employees under her or his jurisdiction of the prohibitions in this ordinance, the duty of all of her or his employees to comply with the prohibitions in this ordinance, and that employees who fail to comply with the prohibitions of the ordinance shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary action. Each County employee shall be given a written directive with instructions for implementing the provisions of this Chapter.

ENFORCEMENT.

The Human Rights Commission shall review the compliance of the County departments, agencies, commissions and employees with the mandates of this ordinance in particular instances in which there is question of noncompliance or when a complaint alleging noncompliance has been lodged. The Commission will inform the agency being complained of and shall allow for comments and materials from all parties named in the complaint. A written report with the Commission’s findings shall be submitted to the Board of Supervisors within sixty (60) days after the first meeting following the submission of a complaint. COUNTY UNDERTAKING LIMITED TO PROMOTION OF GENERAL WELFARE. In undertaking the adoption and enforcement of this Chapter, the County is assuming an undertaking only to promote the general welfare. This Chapter is not intended to create any new rights for breach of which the County is liable in money damages to any person who claims that such breach proximately caused injury. This section shall not be construed to limit or proscribe any other existing rights or remedies possessed by such person. CONSTRUCTION WITH OTHER LAWS Nothing in this ordinance shall be construed to violate 8 USC 1373, the California Trust Act, the provisions stated above in California Chapter 495 currently referenced by bill number SB 54 or any state or federal laws with regard to immigration or other law enforcement. Nothing in this Chapter shall be construed as contrary to or in defiance of any Federal or State Law.

SEVERABILITY.

If any section, subsection, sentence, clause, phrase, or word of this Chapter or its application, is for any reason held to be invalid or unconstitutional by a decision of any court of competent jurisdiction, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this Chapter. The Board of Supervisors hereby declares that it would have passed this Chapter and each and every section, subsection, sentence, clause, phrase, and word not declared invalid or unconstitutional without regard to whether any other portion of this Chapter would be subsequently declared invalid or unconstitutional. To this end, the provisions of this ordinance, and each of them, are severable. Furthermore, should any provision herein place federal funding for County services at risk due to an act of federal or State of California legislature, a Court order, ruling, or decision, or a standing federal executive order, said provision shall be deemed invalid until such law, order, ruling, or decision remains in effect and so long as it is upheld by the state or federal Courts. Should the issue arise, documentation of the federal or state action or imperative which is brought to the attention of the Board of Supervisors shall be presented to County Counsel for evaluation and recommendation. The office of County Counsel shall immediately contact the authorities or origin or their legal representation for clarification as to which provisions herein place the County in jeopardy of the loss of federal or state funding for any of its programs, and shall request written direction to address the funding risk. The Board of Supervisors shall then receive the documentation and recommendations of County Counsel and act in the best interests of the County balancing the interests addressed by this Chapter with the conflicting interests. Any such decision to nullify or limit this Chapter shall be revoked upon information that the law, order, or ruling has been reverse, overturned, repealed, or otherwise rendered legally moot.

PROPONENT STATEMENT OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I, Renee Saucedo, acknowledge that it is a misdemeanor under State Law, Section 18650 of the California Elections Code, to knowingly or willfully allow the signatures on an initiative petition to be used for any purpose other than qualification of the proposed measure for the ballot. I certify that I will not knowingly or willfully allow the signatures for this initiative to be used for any purpose other than qualification of the measure for the ballot. Renee Saucedo Proponent Dated this 26th day of January, 2018.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

53


Legal Notices

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION ON MARCH 2ND- 5TH 2018 OF TAXDEFAULTED PROPERTY FOR DELINQUENT TAXES

Made pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3702 On, December 12th 2017, I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, was directed to conduct a public auction sale by the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, California. The tax-defaulted properties listed on this notice are subject to the Tax Collector’s power of sale and have been approved for sale by a resolution dated December 12th 2017 of the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors. The sale will be conducted at www.bid4assets.com, from March 2nd through March 5th 2018 as a public auction to the highest bidder for not less than the minimum bid as shown on this notice. Parcels receiving no bids will be reoffered at www.bid4assets.com on May 18th at a minimum price appropriate to stimulate competitive bidding. Due diligence research is incumbent on the bidder as all properties are sold as is. The winning bidder is legally obligated to purchase the item. Only bids submitted via the Internet will be accepted. Pre-registration is required. Register on-line at Bid4Assets.com by February 27th, 2018. Bidders must submit a refundable deposit of $2,500.00 electronically, or by certified check or money order at www.bid4assets.com. The deposit will be applied to the successful bidder’s purchase price. Full payment and deed information indicating how title should be vested is required within 48 hours after the end of the sale. Terms of payment are limited to wire transfers, certified checks or money orders. A California transfer tax will be added to and collected with the purchase price and is calculated at $.55 per each $500 or fraction thereof. All property is sold as is. The county and its employees are not liable for the failure of any electronic equipment that may prevent a person from participating in the sale. The right of redemption will cease on Thursday March 1st, at 5 p.m. and properties not redeemed will be offered for sale. If the parcel is not sold, the right of redemption will revive and continue up to the close of business on the last business day prior to the next scheduled sale. If the properties are sold, parties of interest, as defined in California Revenue and Taxation Code Section 4675, have a right to file a claim with the county for any excess proceeds from the sale. Excess proceeds are the amount of the highest bid in excess of the liens and costs of the sale that are paid from the sale proceeds. Notice will be given to parties of interest, pursuant to California Revenue Taxation Code section 3692(e), if excess proceeds result from the sale. More information may be obtained by contacting the Tax Collector at www.humboldtgov.org or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free at 877-448-6829.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION

The Assessor’s Assessment Number (Parcel No.), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map (if applicable), and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and an explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s Office. The properties subject to this notice are situated in Humboldt County, California, and are described as follows: *Some item numbers are missing due to redemption of taxes or withdrawals.

26 27 28 29

71 71

Gary A McDonald Sharion Windom Chau N Pham American Land Investments LLC 109-311-024-000 Ting C Pan 109-331-039-000 Steve & Yvonne Duran 109-341-014-000 New Horizon Marketing group LLC 109-341-040-000 Harry Tanner 110-021-002-000 Paul Dean 110-021-006-000 Michael & Tawny L Laos 110-041-004-000 Vernon & Geraldine Paige Family Trust of 1993 Geraldine V Paige/ Richard & Jennifer Gay 110-041-027-000 Sybille M Dean 110-091-021-000 Gerilyn D Wilhelm & Janine M Brown 110-091-024-000 Renee M Weaver 110-121-007-000 Monica Kelly 110-121-017-000 David S & Joan H Wilson 110-141-032-000 New Horizon Marketing Group LLC 110-181-008-000 Reginald J Grant 110-191-048-000 Jose L Perez 110-201-021-000 Suzanne L Holub 110-201-022-000 William C/ Robert L/ John T & Calvin F Crews 110-211-032-000 Debora Hakimzadeh 110-211-033-000 Jeffrey P & Linda S Schoeffner 110-211-041-000 Ernest E & Marguriette M Ford 110-231-029-000 Capital Investment Enterprises 110-231-043-000 Albert Shahid 110-231-063-000 Renee Tilden 110-241-010-000 Zohreh Safaee 110-251-016-000 Douglas K Hishinuma 110-251-025-000 Inez & Gunther Enderle 110-261-014-000 Kenneth C Clarke II & Nancy L Rhodes 110-301-042-000 Richard K Dyer 111-012-017-000 The Shelter Cove Land & Trust Investments 111-031-022-000 Erik & Jacqueline Gunnerson 111-031-037-000 Clearwater Real Estate Holdings LLC 111-031-039-000 Capital Investments Enterprises 111-051-019-000 Elmer H & Angelynne S Gabinay 111-112-008-000 Stephen E Mobley 111-112-013-000 Paul W & Elenita Stack 111-152-039-000 Susan G Thompson 111-191-020-000 Luisa Deaton 111-202-008-000 Michael C Sorenson 111-202-024-000 Louis & Randolyn Serrato 111-202-027-000 David S & Joan H Wilson 111-202-028-000 Louis & Randolyn Serrato ** Item # 71 is a Combined Sale** 214-115-013-000 John W Hagan 214-116-008-000 John W Hagan

72 73 74

214-116-006-000 214-201-041-000 217-121-002-000

76 79 80 81 82 82 83

300-242-064-000 505-325-010-000 509-076-006-000 511-341-047-000 512-121-031-000 512-221-020-000 519-252-019-000

84

520-071-015-000

85

522-131-001-000

30 31 32 33 34 35 36

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61

ITEM NO.

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO.

1 2 4

004-182-003-000 017-171-033-000 052-152-012-000

5 6

052-291-006-000 106-061-059-000

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

108-141-027-000 109-033-018-000 109-061-024-000 109-071-027-000 109-081-048-000 109-091-051-000 109-111-003-000

14 15 16 17 18

109-121-018-000 109-141-022-000 109-141-032-000 109-141-036-000 109-161-012-000

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

109-192-042-000 109-211-002-000 109-211-031-000 109-241-056-000 109-221-010-000 109-261-032-000 109-261-038-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME Stephen P Egan Linda A Wright Lillie M Barker/ Lillie M Barker Revocable Trust Richard W & Marilyn K Fielder Daniel Whyte & Shari Hullings Kevin J Riley Azucena De Leon Nneka T Eni Larita J Pennell Gary S White Bruce A Siemon Qudsia Roston/ Qudsia Roston 2012 Amended and Restated Sep Pr Trust Thomas A Bailey Paul V Porreca Peter Williamson Josefina D Esteban Samia Dodin/ Dodin Family Trust Djamal Mazouni Nga-To-Thi-Trinh Josefina D Esteban Jeffrey Cordle Vitaly & Irina Onishchenko Sassan S Kouchekpour George M W Formby

MINIMUM BID

$16,300.00 $9,100.00 $7,500.00 $2,500.00 $31,500.00

$12,300.00 $10,300.00 $5,400.00 $1,700.00 $4,400.00 $4,100.00 $2,600.00 $3,950.00 $5,250.00 $5,250.00 $3,400.00 $8,900.00 $4,700.00 $5,400.00 $3,700.00 $12,750.00 $4,300.00 $3,900.00 $4,100.00

62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

109-271-052-000 109-292-017-000 109-292-047-000 109-302-029-000

54 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

John W Hagan John A & Evelyn Hagan Christopher W Trent/ Christopher W Trent Living Trust Melissa Burdick Barbara A Richter David F & Dorothy A Mielke Kathryn Kepler Garry D Barrick Deborah D Edwards Ronnie L Verilhac & Maxine Pelroy Fred A Swide/ Donnie D & Linda L Humphrey Bernard P Bunce Best Buy Containers LLC

$5,300.00 $6,700.00 $7,350.00 $4,000.00 $4,000.00 $4,150.00 $5,200.00 $4,600.00 $3,450.00 $3,900.00 $5,700.00

86 87 88 89 90 91

522-451-015-000 525-201-034-000 525-291-009-000 526-062-046-000 529-131-008-000 529-351-006-000

Judith A Coffer New Life Church Robert H & Beverly J Graeber Marilyn E Overturf Stan P & Diane L Rabideau Charles R Sparks

$22,850.00 $5,950.00 $2,600.00 $19,400.00 $48,000.00 $4,700.00

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector $4,250.00 $4,900.00 $3,600.00 $5,300.00 $4,200.00 $5,400.00 $4,000.00 $4,750.00 $5,000.00 $3,800.00 $3,450.00 $7,250.00 $3,800.00 $6,850.00 $4,900.00 $6,200.00 $4,350.00 $4,150.00 $3,200.00 $3,500.00 $4,400.00 $7,100.00 $4,800.00 $9400.00 $5,550.00 $6,650.00 $3,750.00 $7,250.00 $11,900.00 $8,900.00 $23,900.00 $8,800.00 $5,850.00 $10,450.00 $7,200.00 $7,700.00 $1,550.00 $14,000.00 $33,950.00 $8,200.00 $23,900.00 $20,100.00 $31,700.00 $5,000.00 $28,600.00 $30,900.00 $4,200.00

Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on January 22nd 2018. Published in the North Coast Journal on January 25th and February 1st & 8th 2018.

JACOBY CREEK SCHOOL DISTRICT JACOBY CREEK SCHOOL NEW LIBRARY/CLASSROOM WING PROJECT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR LEASE LEASEBACK SERVICES

The Jacoby Creek School District (“District”) is requesting Proposals (“RFP”) from licensed General Contractors for Lease Leaseback (“LLB”) related services for the development and construction of the District’s New Library/Classroom Wing Project pursuant to the Lease/Leaseback provision of Education Code section 17406. The District desires to engage a licensed contractor to provide preconstruction and construction services for the project. The firm should have extensive experience with the Division of the State Architect (“DSA”), the Uniform Building Code (“UBC”), and Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Interested parties should contact the Jacoby Creek School District as shown below for a copy of the Request Proposal for Lease Leaseback Services. Submittal of Proposals: The District will not be responsible for errors in any proposal. The District reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, to waive any irregularities or informalities in the proposals, or to request further information. The mandatory walk-through is on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 @ 1:00 p.m. at Jacoby Creek School, 1617 Old Arcata Road, Bayside, CA 95524. The proposal is due Tuesday, March 20, 2018 @ 1:00 p.m. at the following location: Attention: Jacoby Creek School District Tim Parisi, Superintendent 1617 Old Arcata Road, Bayside, CA 95524 Questions regarding this RFP LLB shall be directed to Siskiyou Design Group, Inc., Guy Fryer, Architect, phone (530) 842-1683.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Jacoby Creek School District, New Library/Classroom Wing Project (3296 SF), including without limitation: 1. New Library/Classroom Wing. 2. New path of travel improvements including replacement of existing sidewalks, new bus loading zone, parking improvements, new ramps and sidewalks, and site drainage improvements. 3. Fire and Life Safety improvements including new fire main and hydrant, fire lane, gates and turn-around. 4. Associated mechanical, plumbing and electrical improvements. 5. New fire alarm system.

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×305

classified@north coastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices


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Although it looks very much like a brass clarinet, the soprano saxophone has greater range and volume. Here, the writer’s stepbrother Rob Middleton plays.

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home to the Zach Galifianakis series “Between Two Ferns” 37. 53rd “state quarter” locale 38. April fools’ sign? 39. Dragon roll ingredient 40. Bygone U.S. Postal Service mascot 41. Trucker on a radio 42. Hearty guffaw 44. “Qué ___?” (“What’s up?”: Spanish) 45. Address not in a phone book 46. Mark, as a survey square 47. Discounted 49. NNW’s opposite 51. Infomercial, e.g. 55. Making jokes ... or a phonetic clue to solving three squares in this puzzle’s grid 58. Fight 61. Bullwinkle, e.g. 62. King Kong, e.g.

63. It’s rubbed on a cue tip 64. Many an early Internet adopter 65. Dim sum additive 66. Very, in slang 67. Matchmaking site with the slogan “Find your special Jewish someone”

9. Rock’s ____ Mode 10. Billed to be 11. “Selma” director DuVernay 12. “Rumour ____ It” (2011 Adele hit) 13. Loved, with “up” 19. Satanic 21. Boss of fashion 25. Car brand once hawked by an eponymous “Joe” DOWN 26. Bond player after 1. Undo Brosnan 2. Gaggle : geese :: 27. Vigor exaltation : ____ 29. Hertz rival 3. Prestigious school 30. Pickle variety group 32. De ____ (in practice) 4. Mogul who, when 33. Keith who, despite asked to name his his surname, sings greatest achievement, country said “CNN” 5. Like some fans and 34. Nobelist Bohr 35. Film library unit fences: Abbr. 36. Joe Biden’s home: 6. Artist’s garb Abbr. 7. Vessel often stowed 37. “American Gothic” upside down artist 8. “Lemme ____!”

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO NOPE G O R I E R E P I C C S A

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40. 1051, on monuments 42. Instruction to a woman in labor 43. Prancer’s partner on Santa’s team 45. Metallica drummer Lars ____ 48. Top fighter pilot 49. Head of a crime lab? 50. Alaskan panhandle city 52. Davis who won a 2018 Oscar for Best Supporting Actress 53. Positive quality 54. Company with a buck in its logo 56. Fuel that contributes to global warming 57. Key with only one sharp: Abbr. 58. Beaver’s construction 59. FedEx rival 60. Big beer order

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

1. Crème de la crème 6. A lot 11. Cry upon getting a tough crossword clue 14. “Boléro” composer 15. San ____, California 16. Winery container 17. Words after bum or thumb 18. Request at a ticket window 20. TV genre of “Key & Peele” or “Portlandia” 22. “Mi casa ____ casa” 23. Hawaiian instrument, for short 24. Spotted cat 28. Low-quality paper 30. The National League doesn’t allow them, for short 31. Sign for a sold-out show 32. Website that’s

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©2018 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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M. Sax’s Brass Clarinet By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

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dolphe Sax, were he alive today at age 203, probably wouldn’t be surprised that Macklemore’s 2012 hip hop hit “Thrift Shop” featured the saxophone because he designed it for versatility. By combining the agility of woodwind with the projection of brass, Sax created an instrument that is at home in virtually every musical genre. With a single reed mouthpiece, the saxophone is officially a woodwind instrument, even though it’s made of brass. In fact, in its soprano form, the sax looks like a brass clarinet (see photo). Structurally, the sax is a thin, brass, conical tube, flared at the end, with about 20 tone holes covered by keys that the player opens or closes (some holes are open by default, some closed). In the alto, tenor and baritone versions, the tube is bent into the traditional folded U, while the soprano sax is usually straight. The soprano sax is what drew me to the instrument in the first place — my 10-year-old self, transfixed by Sidney Bechet’s “Summertime” on my parents’ wind-up gramophone in all the high fidelity of a 10-inch shellac record. My early flirtation with jazz was soon swept away by Bill Haley, Elvis, Fats Domino and Jerry Lee Lewis. Rock ‘n’ roll was my thing in those awesome (and awful) pubescent years and rock bands had plenty of use for the sax — most combos included one or two of them to help pump out that insistent 4/4 beat. Somewhere in late ’50s, though, Paul Desmond wrote “Take Five” for the alto sax and it became the biggest-selling jazz single of all time. I loved it and was at the same time vaguely aware that someone called John Coltrane played a mean tenor sax on his Giant Steps LP. The sax kept popping up in popular culture, too: Henry Mancini’s chromatic Pink Panther sax

theme from 1963; a year later, Stan Getz’s “Girl from Ipanema” again showed the sax’s versatility as it embraced the bossa nova. The ’70s brought us Bobby Key’s tenor sax solos on such Stones’ hits as “Brown Sugar,” Bob Seger’s opening alto wail on “Turn the Page” and Clarence Clemons on Springsteen’s Born to Run album. Saxophones are found just about everywhere there’s music: in the classical repertoire (Ravel’s Bolero, Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition), military bands (many of Sousa’s marches), William Lovelock’s chamber music, bebop (pioneered in 1939 by jazz sax pioneer Coleman Hawkins in “Body and Soul”), Lester Young’s “cool” jazz and, of course, in rock, pop and rap. Adolphe Sax, from Dinant and later Brussels, Belgium, was looking to fill the gap between woodwind and brass instruments. Before inventing the saxophone, he was already experimenting with a precursor of the tuba (the last brass instrument to join the orchestra) and the euphonium (the bass “saxhorn”). Both his parents were instrument designers — they were responsible for improvements to the French horn that have lasted to the present time. Adolphe learned to play the clarinet early on, experimenting with a design for a bass clarinet that would have won the gold prize in the Brussels Industrial Exhibition — except the judges said he was too young. In 1842, he moved to Paris, where, four years later, he patented his saxophone designs: seven pairs of them in different sizes and tonal ranges. Later, a tangle of lawsuits over his patents led to repeated bankruptcies and he died penniless in Paris in 1894, an unworthy ending for the man who gave us the magic of the sax. ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) plans on being reincarnated as a tenor sax virtuoso.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment Opportunities PPNorCal is recruiting for following jobs: Center Director, III – Eureka

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×305 northcoastjournal.com

Job Description: EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custo− dians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

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ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT ASSISTANT Seeking Admin Assist to provide day to day operations including grant reporting, accounting, HR and event planning for regional non−profit. Wage: $13−$20/hr DOE Hours: Full Time Benefitted. Location HSU Campus, Arcata Deadline: February 15, 2017, 5pm For details visit: https://hraps.humboldt.edu/other−employment default

County of Humboldt

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST–CAO $4935–$6332 mo. plus benefits Responsible for planning and developing economic development projects or programs; assesses community needs, gathers and analyzes data, identifies funding sources and prepares grant applications, assists in coordinating activities of advisory committees and community groups, prepares reports of program activities. Must have knowledge of legislation relating to economic development and know sources of funding for economic development, community development and redevelopment programs and activities.

   

CDL req. Two yrs exp in community or economic development and a fouryear degree in urban planning, public administration or a related field is desired.

   

Filing deadline: February 23, 2018. Apply online at www.humboldtgov.org/hr Human Resources, 825 5th St., Rm. 100, Eureka, CA (707) 476-2349 AA/EOE

 

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  

     

  

 

 

  

  

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 

56 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

Planned Parenthood Northern California (PPNorCal) is currently seeking a fulltime Center Director III at our Eureka Health Center. The Center Director III has direct oversight for the overall development, management, and supervision of center staff and services at the designated health center site. The Center Director is responsible for the internal systems and personnel management of the health center while assuring compliance with regional and state regulations and standards, and cost-effective functioning while providing excellent, responsive, client-centered services. The Center Director III reports to the Senior Regional Director and is an integral part of the Client Services department. This is an exempt, full-time position, working 40 hours per week including evenings and Saturdays as needed. Salary is DOE + benefits package including Medical, Dental & Vision, ETO and 403B! CLOSING DATE: Until Filled APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: **Please include a cover letter along with your resume when applying for this position.**

ESSENTIAL RESPONSIBILITIES

• Monitor client volume, capacity and productivity for assigned health center. Create and maintain staffing levels and appointment schedule templates that meet or exceed PPFA productivity goals for visits/hour and RVU, and meet or exceed annual estimated visits proposed in organization annual budget. • May directly supervise 1-4 subordinate supervisors such as Program Managers and Lead Clinicians and between 4-12 center employees such as RHS IV-Program Coordinators and Clinicians. Carries out supervisory responsibilities in accordance with the organization’s policies and applicable laws. Responsibilities include interviewing, hiring, and training employees; planning, assigning, and directing work; appraising performance; rewarding and disciplining employees; addressing complaints and resolving problems. • Achieve health center’s annual goals regarding number of patients served, patient waiting time, appointment show rate, and customer satisfaction. • Ensure processes are in place and followed for excellent clinical quality, and patient and staff safety, including successful completion, and remediation of audits. Coordinate Quality Assurance program along with Lead Clinician/Physician. • Oversee maintenance of facility and manage inventory of equipment and supplies. • Provide direct patient care approximately 10-20% of the time. • Plan and implement new programs and services as needed.

QUALIFICATIONS

• Bachelor’s degree (B. A.) from four-year college or university; or one to two years’ related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. • Knowledge of spreadsheet software and word processing software. Knowledge and experience with EHR & EPM systems preferred. • Reliable automobile transportation and a valid California Driver’s License and insurance required. • Leadership skills including vision, enthusiasm, common sense, proven management skills, and a commitment to excellent customer service and the mission of Planned Parenthood. • Two or more years’ experience in health care supervision/management including personnel management, program management and fiscal management. • Direct patient care experience, preferably in women’s health/reproductive health care. Experience in family practice or community health preferred. • Commitment to working with low-income and culturally-diverse clients with an emphasis on prevention and empowerment. • Knowledge of the assigned county preferred. • Ability to influence and secure cooperation from others, and works collaboratively toward “win-win” solutions. • Ability to communicate effectively, make decisions, solve problems and function as a team leader. • Excellent organizational skills, a sense of responsibility and a high level of motivation. • Ability to think and act strategically. • Bilingual English/Spanish preferred. • Commitment to quality healthcare. Planned Parenthood Northern California is an equal opportunity employer and works affirmatively to include diversity among its staff and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex/gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, age, disability, income, marital status or any other irrelevant dimension of diversity. PPNorCal values collaboration between employees of diverse backgrounds and experiences. Planned Parenthood Northern California champions healthy communities and increases access to quality health care, information and reproductive freedom by providing medical services, education, and advocacy. We provide healthcare and education services to 136,000 adults and youth every year at 17 sites located throughout 20 Northern California counties. Planned Parenthood Northern California offers high-quality, affordable health care to all, regardless of income or insurance status. We care. No matter what! Our experienced and caring medical staff gives each client honest information and personal attention. We provide a full range of services including: birth control, breast exams, cancer screenings, medication and surgical abortion, pregnancy testing and counseling, prenatal care, PrEP and nPEP to prevent HIV infection, STD screening and treatment, vasectomy and female sterilization, and more.


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County of Humboldt

SENIOR FISCAL ASSISTANT - PROBATION

open door Community Health Centers

$2952- $3788 mo. plus benefits Provides difficult or specialized fiscal, financial and accounting office support work in County offices; may assign, direct and review the work of a small staff.

445-9641 • 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

www.sequoiapersonnel.com

Must be skilled in resolving fiscal office administrative problems; preparing fiscal, accounting, payroll and statistical records; reviewing and assigning the work of others; and the use of personal or online computers.

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The Housing Authorities of the City of Eureka and County of Humboldt Invites applications for the position of

Front Office Assistant This is a full time permanent position in the Tenant Services Department with an anticipated starting date of March 01, 2018. Salary is $2689/month.

Filing deadline: February 16, 2018. Apply online at www.humboldtgov.org/hr or contact Human Resources, 825 5th St., Rm100, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 476-2349 AA/EOE default

Education/Experience: Any combination of education and experience that demonstrates general office and receptionist duties.

NOW SEEKING:

Pediatric Registered Nurse The Pediatric Registered Nurse holds a vital role in the care team in the clinical setting for the delivery of health care. Open Door is looking for an energetic individual able to work in a fast pace environment. This role is focused on the delivery of primary care in the pediatric clinic setting, facilitating access, providing follow-up and coordinating the efforts of the health care team with an emphasis on disease prevention and health maintenance. The RN works closely with other clinical support staff and providers. California Registered Nursing License required. Prior training preferred. Wage dependent on experience.

Complete job description and application package can be obtained at the Housing Authorities’ office at 735 West Everding Street, Eureka CA 95503. Application deadline is Thursday, February 15, 2018 at 4:30 p.m. Our office will be closed on February 2, & 12, 2018.

Positions Available at: Eureka Community Health Centers For details and online applications, visit:

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.” Join our dynamic team and support the UIHS vision!

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This week’s featured job The Housing Authorities are Equal Opportunity Employers default

K’ima:w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

NURSE MANAGER/DIRECTOR OF NURSES PHYSICIAN DENTAL HYGIENIST LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT RN (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) RN CARE MANAGER SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (MEDICATIONASSISTED TREATMENT) MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN (LMFT OR LCSW) CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CLERK (MEDICAL CODER) For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Health Promotion and Education Technician – Arcata Assists tribal and American Indian communities with health promotion and disease prevention activities. Humboldt County Office of Education

The following opportunities are available

Quality Improvement Director – Arcata Diabetes Program Manager – Arcata Behavioral Health Counselor – Arcata Medical Assistant – Arcata Laboratory Assistant – Arcata Visit our website www.uihs.org to see all of our opportunities and print out an application. Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

Personnel Services Coordinator (Classified Management) Humboldt County Office of Ed., FT, Perm., M-F, 8 Hrs./Day, Placement on the Management Schedule A, DOE, not to exceed Column 10.

Qualifications: Grad. from an accredited 4 yr. college or university & a min of 4 years responsible exp. in personnel administration or any combination of education, specialized training, and exp. totaling not less than 8 yrs. in the field of personnel services. Previous exp. in a school system personnel department is desirable. Previous supervisory or coordination exp. required. Eligible for H&W, PERS retirement. App. available at HCOE or online www.hcoe.org/pers/appinfo.php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 Deadline 2/21/18, 4 pm

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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  

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NOW HIRING!

Graphic Artist Local company is recruiting for the position of Graphic Artist. Candidates must have 3-5 years of experience as a designer in a high volume, demanding environment. Adobe Creative Suite expertise is required and certificates are preferred. Company offers a competitive wage and benefits package. To apply, please send your resume and a link to your portfolio to humboldt.recruiter@gmail.com.

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  

 

           

 

    



   



  



  

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   



   

California MENTOR is seeking families with an available bedroom in their home to share with an adult with special

JOIN OUR TEAM OF END-OF-LIFE CARE SPECIALISTS! FULL-TIME, BENEFITED POSITIONS Hospice Aide Provides personal care for patients in their place of residence and assists with their activities of daily living. Must possess a current CNA license, valid driver’s license, and reliable transportation. Float Nurse Provides care to hospice patients in various hospice nursing capacities to cover absences of regularly scheduled staff. This position requires the ability to work a variety of shifts and schedules, including nights and weekends. Must have a current California RN license. Sign on-bonus offered! Hospice House Support Assistant Prepares food for patients residing in our in-patient facility. Provides light housekeeping and general support to the care staff. Must have a valid driver’s license, an excellent driving record, and reliable transportation.  Hospice House Nurse Provides nursing care for patients living in our in-patient facility. Must have a current California RN license. Night shift; full or part-time options. Sign-on Bonus offered! PART-TIME POSITIONS Social Worker Assesses and responds to the psychosocial, financial, and legal concerns of hospice patients and family.  Must have a master degree in Social Work (MSW) and two years of social work experience in the health care field. Works as-needed. Dietitian Implements nutritional care plans appropriate for patients with advanced disease in order to maximize their comfort. Must have a bachelor degree in nutrition or a related field, experience in dietary counseling and a Registered Dietitian license or equivalent proficiency. Works as-needed. Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information.

58 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

needs. Receive ongoing support and a generous,

Call Sharon at (707) 442-4500

monthly payment.

MentorsWanted.com

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Come join Mad River Community Hospital and enjoy the satisfaction of working with a team. Yes, you can be happy at work…here. If you have to work, why not do so with some of the best in the business. We are looking to hire FT Occupational Therapist, Registered Nurses, FT Biller, Home Health Social Worker, Clinic Supervisor and other positions. Look on our web site for openings: www.madriverhospital.com default

Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full--time time openings. Take a look at the job descriptions on our website at www.changingtidesfs.org.

MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST This position provides support to children, youth and families in a variety of settings including home, school, and community; provides 1:1 behavior coaching in a home, school or community setting; provides referral and linkage to community resources; provides parent education and support as directed. $18.00/hour plus mileage reimbursement. Paid sick and vacation days, 13 paid holidays, health, vision, life, and dental insurance, and 401(k) Retirement Plan. Must be able to pass DOJ/FBI criminal history fingerprint clearance and possess a valid CDL, current automobile insurance, and a vehicle for work. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato, Human Resource Director, at nprato@changingtidesfs.org or via U.S. mail to: 2259 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501. Open until filled. EOE


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

SALON AT BLUE LAKE CASINO NOW HIRING!

   

    

The Salon at Blue Lake Casino & Hotel is currently accepting applications for the following positions:

Hair Stylist, Manicurist, and Skin Care LOOKING FOR AN EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO YOUR CAREER AND WELL−BEING? ARE YOU A PART−TIME LVN/RN LOOKING FOR SUPPLEMENTAL HOURS? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for Full−time, Part−time & On−call LPTs/LVNs to join our dynamic Team. Full−time benefits include medical, dental and vision plans; 401(K); sick & vacation time; scholarships; & lots of career−furthering training.

To apply, visit the “Careers” page at www.bluelakecasino.com and click the “Salon” link for more information. All positions will be offered as Independent Contractors. default

$500 SIGN−ON BONUS, please inquire for details!

  

WIYOT TRIBE

Social Worker

Apply at: 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka 707−442−5721 http://crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca/

Provides direct social services, develops plans, completes assessments and reports, attends court, advocates for clients in the service area. B.A. in Psychology, Social Work or related field or 4 or more years of experience required.

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   DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY The Humboldt Waste Management Authority (HWMA) is soliciting applications for the Position of Director of Environmental Health and Safety. The position closes at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, February 16, 2018. For full job postings, see http://www.hwma.net/employment −opportunities or call (707) 268−8680. www.hwma.net/about/ employment−opportunities

TEMPORARY ASSISTANT TEACHER, Fortuna Assist staff in day-to-day operation of the classroom for a preschool program. 6-12 ECE units pref or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months exp working w/ children. PT (school yr) 20 hrs/wk $11.13-$12.27/hr. Open Until Filled

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Infant Toddler Center Crescent City

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Humboldt County Resource Conservation District is seeking to hire a

Registered Professional Civil Engineer/Agricultural Engineer to perform engineering services to support implementation of the USDA – Natural Resources Conservation Services (NRCS) Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). The full job description and application instructions can be found the HCRCD’s website at http://humboldtrcd.org/index_files/JobOpportunity.htm. Position is open until February 19, 2018 or until filled. Application review will begin immediately and early submission of application is encouraged. Applications may be hand-delivered or mailed to: Humboldt County Resource Conservation District, 5630 South Broadway, Eureka, CA, 95503 or sent electronically to: Executive Director Jill Demers 707-442-6058 x 5 | jillhcrcd@gmail.com

Now accepting resumes, must complete a Wiyot Application for Employment. For a full job description and Wiyot Application of Employment visit www.wiyot.us. Please send resumes and completed applications to: 1000 Wiyot Dr. Loleta, CA 95551, Fawn@wiyot.us or fax to (707) 733-5601 default

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350

Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a preschool program (implementing and supervising activities). Requires a minimum of 6 ECE units and 6 months experience working with young children (12 units of ECE core classes preferable). P/T (year round) 25hrs/wk $11.13-$12.27/hour

RG/FT WEITCHPEC $15.86-20.62 2/16/18

TEMP MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT, Del Norte

RG/FT KLAMATH $21.84-28.39 2/9/18

Performs a variety of site repairs, alterations, construction projects and general yard maintenance for NCS sites. Cleans and schedules vehicle maintenance. 2 years of construction experience desirable. Part-Time Temporary (year round) 20 hours/wk $11.13/hr Open Until Filled

SUBSTITUTES-Humboldt and Del Norte Intermittent (on-call) work filling in for Classroom Assistant, Assistant Teachers, Cooks/Assistant Cooks or occasional childcare for parent meetings. Req exp working w/children or cooking. $11.13/hr. No benefits. Submit Sched of Availability form w/app. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

#0936 JOM Tutor

RG/PT ALL AREAS $12.68-20.69 2/9/18

#0947 Bus Driver/Custodian #0857 Webmaster

#0928 Computer Technician II RG/FT KLAMATH $24.12-31.46 2/9/18

#0959 Accountant

RG/FT KLAMATH $45,576-72,068 2/16/18

#0975 Administrative Assistant I Council Support RG/FT KLAMATH $14.22-18.49 2/9/18

#0976 Fish Technician I

RG/FT WILLOW CREEK/WEAVERVILLE $12.68-18.49 2/9/18

#0977 ESA Survey Technician III

RG/FT KLAMATH/WEITCHPEC $15.94-23.06 2/16/18

#0978 Receptionist

RG/FT KLAMATH $12.68-18.49 2/9/18

#0979 Transit Manager

RG/FT KLAMATH $50,337-72,068 2/9/18

#0982 Police Sergeant

RG/FT KLAMATH $26.15-33.01 2/16/18

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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60 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com


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WE BUY CARS

All advertised prices excludes government fees and taxes, any finance charges, and any emission testing charge. On approved credit. Ad exp. 2-16-18

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

61


Employment

Marketplace SB&D LICENSED & BONDED RESIDENTIAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR provides a wide range of home remodeling and repair services. (707) 362−9058 SBandD.com

CITY OF ARCATA

Transit Operations Assistant $37,807.90 - $45,955.74/yr. Filing Deadline: 4 p.m., February 16, 2018. Performs a wide variety of administrative and support functions for Arcata’s public transportation system including ticket sales, providing scheduling and fare information, and responding to customer inquiries and complaints. The position will also serve as a back-up driver when necessary. Application packet available at: www.cityofarcata.org or City Manager’s OfďŹ ce, 736 F St., Arcata; (707) 822-5953. EOE.

Auctions

HUGE ANTIQUE AUCTION

FLASHBACK

Preview for this sale: Friday 11 am - 5 pm & Saturday 9 am - Sale Time

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM For Information Call 443-4851

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka

Clothing

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

Auto Service

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027

Cleaning

Let’s Be Friends

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ď ‰ď Žď€ ď ˆď ?ď ?ď …ď€ ď “ď …ď ’ď –ď ‰ď ƒď …ď “

’90s! 116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Mon. 1-6 Weds.-Sat. 1-6

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

“Clothes with Soul�

Computer & Internet

Merchandise ALL KID’S CLOTHES & SHOES 1/2 OFF SALE Dream Quest Thrift Store February 8−14. Plus...Daily Bonus Sales, Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednesdays, New Sale Thurs− days, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Saturdays. (530) 629−3006.

Miscellaneous

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806

THE COSTUME BOX Costume Rental & Sales Makeup*Wigs*Masks Costume Thrift Boutique Character Deliveries Dress−up Party Venue

macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in busi− ness for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

ď —ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď šď Żď ľ

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ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡ Â?‹˜‡•ČˆŽƒ†‡•ČˆŠ‡ƒ”• ”‹Â?Â?‡”•Čˆ—•–‘Â?”†‡”• ‹…Â?Â’ƒÂ?†”‘’ÂˆÂˆÇŁ

ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď€şď€ ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž

ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł

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YOUR AD

62 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • northcoastjournal.com

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $21,000; 2 pers. $24,000; 3 pers. $27,000; 4 pers. $29,950; 5 pers. $32,350; 6 pers. $34,750; 7 pers. $37,150; 8 pers. $39,550 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

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featuring

Open M−F 1−5:30 Sat 11−5 202 T St. Eureka 707−443−5200

HERE

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February is

Sat. Feb. 10th at 11 am Rare collection of fine furniture, antiques & collectibles. Very nice collection from many European areas.

Real Estate default

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Body, Mind & Spirit default

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 default

Eureka Massage and Wellness

2115 1st Street • Eureka EurekaMassages.com Massage Therapy & Reiki Please call for an appointment. 798-0119

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Consider Vasectomy‌ Twenty-minute, in-office procedure In on Friday, back to work on Monday Friendly office with soothing music to calm you

Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400


Katherine Fergus

Charlie Tripodi

Kyla Tripodi

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

707.476.0435

NEW LIS

TING!

WILLOW CREEK-$1,100,000

±40 Acres in Mendocino w/2 springs, pond, and 26k water storage, 2 cabins, greenhouses, garden areas.

HAWKINS BAR-LAND/PROPERTY-$145,000

±73.5 Acre clean turn-key ag site w/ equipment, generator, well, septic, rocked roads.

NEW LIS

TING!

SHOWERS PASS-$330,000

Double wide modular home on ±1.24 acres w/access to the Salmon River and Blue Hole.

210 PANTHER RD, WILLOW CREEK – $289,000

±80 Acres w/timber spring-fed pond, outbuilding & terraced flats. 5,000 sf RRR permit on file.

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±160 Acres w/spring, pond, well permit, flats, roads, shed. Permit app on file for 14,283 sf ml. NEW LIS

TING!

±400 Acres on 6 parcels. Good road access, views. Redwoods & Douglas Fir. Existing NTMP.

WILLOW CREEK-LAND/PROPERTY-$949,000 REDUCE

D PRICE

NEW LIS

±40 Acres w/privacy, 2 springs, pond, cabin, garden sites, shop. Permit app for 30,000 sf outdoor. TING!

FERNDALE-LAND/PROPERTY-$1,690,000

±480 Acres. Ocean views, springs, creek, open meadows, flats, timber, easy access. Undeveloped.

!

3/2 home w/creek access, pond, well, outbuildings, paved roads, PG&E. Cultivation permit app for 15,000 sf.

NEW LIS

TING!

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±160 Acres w/ water, PG&E, lg flats, greenhouse. Permit app filed with the county for 1 acre outdoor.

KETTENPOM-LAND/PROPERTY-$699,000

HARRIS-LAND/PROPERTY-$449,000

NEW LIS

3/2 home on 1.9 acres, fully fenced w/river views. Detached garage & outbuildings.

WILLOW CREEK-$950,000

TING!

TING!

1110 SALMON RIVER RD, SOMES BAR-$282,000

±22 Acre private homestead w/PG&E, community water, privacy, views & flat usable land.

NEW LIS

NEW LIS

±1.45 Acres in Trinity Village. Stunning views w/flat building sites. OWC with 50%.

270 SKYLINE DR, BENBOW-$1,500,000

CARLOTTA-LAND/PROPERTY-$2,000,000

Hailey Rohan

WHITETHORN-LAND/PROPERTY-$350,000

±21 acres w/PG&E, well, pond, w storage, shop, garden, shop. Permit app on file for 43,560 sf of outdoor.

DOUGLAS CITY-$440,000

Tyla Miller

MYERS FLAT-LAND/PROPERTY-$799,000

±80 Acres w/PG&E. Meadows, timber, garden sites, outbuildings, cabin. Permit app for 30,000 sf outdoor.

TING!

LEGGET-LAND/PROPERTY-$1,850,000

±954 Acres on 11 parcels in Mendocino. Multiple water sources, house, cabin, outbuildings, undeveloped flats.

MAD RIVER-LAND/PROPERTY-$349,000

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±40 Acres w/southern exposure, pond, meadows, lg flats, cabin, outbuildings, w/views of Ruth Lake. REDUCE

D PRICE

!

RUTH-LAND/PROPERTY-$229,000

±11.8 Acres near Ruth Lake w/PG&E, well, water storage, septic & yr-round access.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

63


North Coast Journal 2-8-18 Edition  

Unlike "The Bachelor's" Bekah M, these people aren't famous and their stories haven't gone viral.

North Coast Journal 2-8-18 Edition  

Unlike "The Bachelor's" Bekah M, these people aren't famous and their stories haven't gone viral.

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