North Coast Journal 10-28-2021 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 Vol. XXXI Issue 43 northcoastjournal.com

A Tale of

(Maybe) BY ALEX SERVICE AND DAVID JERVIS

6 A mayor steps aside 9 New superintendent in town 15 Spooky strolls


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 5 Mailbox 5 Poem

FIRST RAIN for Sylvie

6 News

Mayoral Misconduct?

9 NCJ Daily Online 10 On The Cover

A Tale of Two Hauntings (Maybe)

14 On the Table

Sweet Offerings

Oct. 28, 2021 • Volume XXXII Issue 43 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2021

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

15 Get Out

ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

17 Fishing the North Coast

DIGITAL EDITOR

A Walk with the Departed Coastal Rivers Full, Smith Best Bet for Salmon

18 Arts Nights

Trinidad Art Night

19 Art Beat

Reimagining the Paint

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com

20 Seriously?

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

21 Calendar 23 Home & Garden

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Dead Blonde

Service Directory

26 Screens

Favorite Spooky Movies that Still Have Bite

27 Workshops & Classes 27 Cartoon 28 Sudoku & Crossword 28 Free Will Astrology 31 Humboldt Geographic Losing California

32 Classifieds

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Rod Kausen, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com ART DIRECTOR

Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston, Rory Hubbard, Jacqui Langeland ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Natalie Passen natalie@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com DISTRIBUTION/PUBLISHER ASSISTANT

Tracy McCormack tracy@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

On the Cover The Historic Eagle House, circa 1900, with the Eagle Saloon’s bartender Bill Knoll out front. Courtesy of the Fortuna Depot Museum

FINAL DAYS RETIREMENT SALE! After 53 years it’s time to begin a new adventure!

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER

An epic marker at Trinidad Cemetery. Read more on page 16. Photo by Meg Wall-Wild

KOKOPILAU

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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10 TH ANNIV

Don’t forget to check out our week long Virtual Silent Auction www.ncbbbs.org

ERSARY

The 10th anniversary of the BIG Chili Cook Off is back for another weeklong event! Visit these participating places and vote for your favorite Chili Dish and a chance to win $100 gift card from Pierson’s Building Center

October 29 - November 5 November 1st Humboldt Bay Provisions is hosting a Spicy Oyster challenge with new signature chili oil sauces.

Bear River Casino’s Code 3 Chili is a spicy southwestern style chili looking to bring the heat.

Six Rivers Brewery is serving up Black Jack Chicken Chili , pair it with a Chili Pepper Ale for an extra Kick!

Vista Del Mar is making a Creamy Buffalo Chicken Chili with white beans, fire roasted tomatoes, corn and buffalo sauce!

This Buddha Bowl is Nirvana! A classic beef & bean chili, served Chicago-style, topped with onion & cheese & served with cornbread

Gallagher’s Irish Corned Beef Chili is slow stewed in Irish whiskey

A Smokey Poblano & Short Rib Chili with tender chunks of grass fed short ribs with a subtle heat from local poblano peppers

The Diver Bar and Grill are coming back with a colorful smoked tri-tip chili!

The Jam is cooking up Grandma Judy’s Homestyle Chili with sweet cornbread !

Chicago Dog House’s famous Vienna all beef hot dog on a poppy seed bun topped with chili and cole slaw!

November 4th –7th, The Alibi is serving Awesome Vegetarian Chili. You can al-ways add to fries, burgers or even cheese omelets!

This meltdown in your mouth starts with crispy beer battered fries topped with a thick beef chili with beans. Simmered in a rich demiglace all made from local steer and a variety of house smoked peppers topped with crema, cheese, and scallions

This Redwood Logger Chili comes spicy with elk, beans, veggies and habaneros!

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Chili ‘G’ Fries is braised short rib chili on with pepper jack, cornmeal crusted okra, candied jalapeños with sweet corn sour cream & roasted red pepper aioli.

Check businesses for operating hours! Dine in or take out!

Vote Here

Beneft for Big Brothers Big Sisters of the North Coast 4

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

MAILBOX

Kreations Auto Body is opening two new locations, and looking to grow our team!

We have a wide range of opportunities available and positions open in every aspect of the industry. Openings are available at our new shops located in Fortuna and Eureka, as well as our current locations, in McKinleyville and Rio Dell. Mentorship and work training available for newcomers to the industry, as well as leadership roles and advanced level technician positions.

Terry Torgerson

‘Henching is Alive and Well’

FIRST RAIN for Sylvie

Ms. Cahill’s lament about the difficulty of hiring henchx The rains came support is typical of trailand you—who have known ing-edge Humboldt business only a handful of winters— owners (“Nobody Wants to Hench Anymore,” Oct. danced on the side 21). Rather than adapting to of the road innovation, she blames her arms raised difficulties on the “laziness” of others. Henching is alive and palms open well, Ms. Cahill, but poison welcoming the glory darts have gone the way of of it all buggy whips. If she would put in the effort, she’d find that today’s henching takes place while I, with more than on Facebook, and that she, seventy first rains like the Russian government behind me and the GOP, can easily find watched out for traffic skilled Chinese and Russian students eager to hench on and opened my heart her behalf for pennies on the to your joy. dollar. Putting some elbow — Carolyn Lehman grease in, she’d also find that many GOP politicians right here in America view henching as a synergistic sideline to their day jobs (“owning the libs”), and are willing to hench for next to nothing, when it is routed to Please make your letter no more than them via the Caymans. In reality, it’s never 300 words and include your full name, been a better time for the henching indusplace of residence and phone number try, but only for those who keep up with (we won’t print your number). Send it recent developments in technology. Wake to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The up, Ms. Cahill! weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●. Mitch Trachtenberg, Trinidad

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Mayoral Misconduct?

Arcata weighs investigation options as councilmember heads to rehab By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

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he city of Arcata is currently weighing whether and how it investigates allegations against Councilmember Brett Watson, at least some of which were the subject of a closed session meeting earlier this month to discuss the city’s potential exposure to litigation and later prompted a very public rebuke from his colleagues on the dais. “Information will be released as appropriate considering personal and privacy concerns,” City Manager Karen Diemer writes in an email to the Journal. She said no formal complaints or claims have been filed against Watson or the city related to the matter. Meanwhile, Watson, who was arrested in August for driving under the influence, is out as mayor but — as of Oct. 26 — still sits on the council. Two days after his city council colleagues voted unanimously Oct. 22 that they have no confidence in his ability to serve on the council and to replace him as mayor, Watson issued a statement saying that he was entering “a 30-day residential rehabilitation program to focus on depression and personal issues.” “My goal is to get myself better before making any decisions on how I can continue to best serve my community,” Watson’s statement reads. “I’m very grateful for the outpouring of support I’ve received and I’ll inform the community of my decision as soon as possible.” That statement — which Watson sent on city letterhead from his private email without informing the council or city staff, according to Diemer — culminated a week of confusion about Watson’s status and speculation about what he might have done after his fellow councilmembers made it clear that they no longer believed he is fit to serve and publicly accused him of wrongdoing. Just two days earlier, now Mayor Stacy Atkins-Salazar was selected to replace him during a special session called before the regular council meeting. Watson was absent due to what she described as “personal reasons.”

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Vice Mayor Emily Goldstein, who was also appointed to her position at the meeting, then read a somewhat lengthy but vague statement before moving that the council cast a no-confidence vote, which — she noted — Watson had been informed would take place. “We have no legal ability to remove him from the city council. However, I believe we owe it to the people of Arcata to make it clear — we do not align ourselves with the actions of Councilmember Watson,” Goldstein read at the Oct. 20 meeting. “This last week, information came to light regarding alleged behaviors of Councilmember Watson that negatively affected the city and some of its staff members. “It is our responsibility now, as the council, to protect the well-being of our employees and the ability of our city to run smoothly,” she continued. “While to some of you it may seem unfair that we are moving forward with this vote of no confidence when Councilmember Watson is not present, we did feel it was important to be transparent with the residents of Arcata and share that this decision of leadership rotation and this proposed vote were made based on a body of information, although some of this cannot be shared publicly at this time. I have previously conveyed my thoughts to Councilmember Watson and he has been made aware that this vote would move forward at this evening’s council meeting. I do not take this decision lightly. I have shared all I can at this time and the city will address the alleged actions in a confidential manner.” The four council members then cast their unanimous vote. “I would just like to say Vice Mayor Goldstein summed up the situation quite well and we’ve been elected to help run and guide the city of Arcata and that’s what we want to do and are trying to do, and so it’s important that we move forward,” Atkins-Salazar said. “To reiterate, this was not taken lightly.” Watson was arrested in August on suspicion of driving under the influence and cocaine possession and a few days later re-

leased a statement saying he was having a difficult time dealing with the anniversary of his father’s suicide. The next month, the Mad River Union reported, Watson pleaded guilty and was placed in diversion programs that included counseling sessions. But all of that took place well before the timeline that Goldstein outlined in her admonishment. And, so far, not much more has come to light. But at least some of the issue seems to tie back to the Oct. 13 closed session — at which Watson was present — to discuss his alleged conduct and the city’s potential exposure to litigation. Muddling the situation further, however, is that the closed session took place two days after Diemer says Watson informed her and the city attorney that he “had informally stepped down as mayor as he considered his options.” Diemer says she isn’t sure which, if any, councilmembers Watson had informed at the time but says she and the city attorney were verbally told “as of Oct. 11.” But when Watson — who was first appointed to fill an open seat on the council in 2017 before being elected to serve in the next election — didn’t follow up with a formal announcement of his decision to step down as mayor for a week as the next council meeting drew near, Diemer says the Oct. 20 special session was placed on the agenda to replace him. “Ultimately, he did not share his final intent prior the Tuesday deadline to send out the special meeting agenda, so it went out as it did,” she wrote in an email to the Journal. Arcata Police Chief Brian Ahearn tells the Journal that his department is not conducting a criminal investigation into the allegations against Watson referenced at the Oct. 22 meeting and Diemer says the city is limited in what can be said at this time. She did say that the council has not given or been asked to give Watson permission to be absent from meetings during his time in treatment. Under state law, according to the Arcata City Council Protocol Manual, a council


Mayor Stacy Atkins-Salazar (left) and Vice Mayor Emily Goldstein pictured in the council chambers following their selection Oct. 21 to serve in the positions until December of 2022. Courtesty of the city of Arcata

seat is considered vacated “if a councilmember is absent without permission from all regular city council meetings for 60 days consecutively from the last regular meeting he or she attended.” Councilmembers are also required to inform the city manager if they are going to be absent from the city for more than 24 hours and state how long they intend to be away. Meanwhile, Atkins-Salazar, in comments to the Union before Watson’s statement was released, offers a bit but not much more about the situation by saying that other people’s privacy needed to be considered before releasing any more information. “I was elected to serve the City of Arcata and that is and has been my top priority,” Atkins-Salazar says in the Oct. 21 comments. “The actions taken last

night were necessary for us to be able to move forward productively as a council, and they were not taken lightly. Vice Mayor Goldstein’s statement adequately put forth the details of the situation we have been dealing with, so the public is informed as much as is possible and appropriate at this time. There are other people and their privacy to consider in this situation, therefore I will be treating the details of the matter confidentially. I was elected to serve Arcata and I would like to focus on doing just that.” The next regularly scheduled Arcata City Council meeting is Nov. 3. l Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the Journal’s digital editor. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Davies-Hughes Tapped To Lead HCOE

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he Humboldt County Board of Education voted after a marathon Oct. 25 special session to appoint Michael Davies-Hughes as the county’s next superintendent of schools. Davies-Hughes will take over for Superintendent Chris Hartley, who has held the post since March of 2017 when he took over for Garry Eagles but has announced he will step down from the post Nov. 2 to take a position as the deputy executive director of the California Collaborative for Education Excellence. But Davies-Hughes’ tenure could prove brief, as Hartley’s term expires in January of 2023, meaning Davies-Hughes will go before voters in June of 2022. The board repeatedly praised the deep pool of candidates for the position — which also included Fortuna Union High School District Superintendent Glen Senestraro, Arcata Elementary School District Superintendent Luke Biesecker, McKinleyville Unified School District Heidi Moore-Guynup and Assistant County Superintendent of Schools Colby Smart — before bringing the matter to a vote. It then saw motions to appoint Moore-Guynup and Smart fail before considering Davies-Hughes. “My goal,” Davies-Hughes wrote in a

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Witches on the Water

statement to the board as a part of his application, “is to lead a dynamic team of skilled and committed staff at the Humboldt County Office of Education in the work of providing relevant and effective support to the school districts in Humboldt County, resulting in measurable and sustainable growth in academic achievement and college and career readiness for all students.” Hartley’s unexpected resignation — accepted by the board Oct. 5 — prompted the board to conduct an expedited search for the county’s next top education official, and this evening’s discussion saw the board wrestle with the ramifications of that, as some supported the continuity Smart would bring to the position and concerns about the “domino effect” of multiple officials changing positions during a school year already complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic. But a majority of the board ultimately supported the appointment of Davies-Hughes to the post. Currently the assistant superintendent of educational services for Eureka City Schools, the county’s largest district, Davies-Hughes previously served as the principal of Morris Elementary School and the superintendent of McKinleyville Union School District from 2012 to 2015, where

No Official Connection: The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office announced Oct. 25 that it has not “officially determined a connection” between the homicides of two men — 65-year-old Eugene Steve Segal and 29-year-old Levi Harold Hernandez Howard — whose bodies were found on month apart in similar parts of Blue Lake under similar circumstances. The cases remain under investigation.

Photo by Mark Larson

Participants in the Witches Paddle on Oct 23 paused at the foot of F Street along the Eureka Boardwalk to enjoy being out of the wind before turning back to their put-in site at the Eureka Boat Basin Public boat launch dock. See the full slideshow at www. northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 10.26.21 he oversaw a controversial reconfiguration of its elementary schools. Davies-Hughes has also made local headlines for his passion for distance bicycling, which he used to raise $30,000 for local literacy programs while embarking on a 3,000-mile ride as a part of the Race Across America in 2018. He made the ride again in 2021, raising more than $15,000 for

COVID Counts: Humboldt County Public Health reported 112 new COVID-19 cases in the seven-day period before the Journal went to press Oct. 26, along with seven new hospitalizations and two deaths. Over the week, the county saw a test-positivity rate of 7.75 percent, outpacing that of the nation (5.4 percent) and the state (2.1 percent). POSTED 10.26.21

POSTED 10.25.21

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Hopecam, an organization dedicated to helping overcome the social isolation experienced by children undergoing cancer treatments by bringing them virtually into classrooms. Davies-Hughes will be sworn in Nov. 22. — Thadeus Greenson POSTED 10.25.21 Read the full story online.

Otter Art Initiative Nets $300K: The North Coast Otter Art Initiative, which saw more than 100 otter sculptures scattered throughout five North Coast counties, has raised $300,000 that will support continued otter research and student internships at Humboldt State University. Professor Jeff Black, who began the initiative in 2019, said the “merger of art and science was an absolute joy.” POSTED 10.22.21

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Digitally Speaking

They Said It

Comment of the Week

The number of digits you now need to dial for all phone calls in the 707 area code, as the Federal Communications Commission is now requiring dialers to use the area code as well as the seven-digit number.

“As the western U.S. faces a potential third year of drought, it’s critical that Californians across the state redouble our efforts to save water in every way possible.”

“This is the best story I have heard. It made me so happy.”

POSTED 10.24.21

­ California Gov. Gavin Newsom in a statement declaring a drought — emergency for the entire state, giving regulators authorization to ban wasteful water use, such as spraying down sidewalks. POSTED 10.20.21

­— Pat Brooks-Morales on Facebook commenting on the Journal’s Oct. 21 story about local efforts to reunite Bertie, a pit bull mix who’d been lost for 18 days, with his family. POSTED 10.25.21

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER The view from the Historic Eagle House’s balcony, overlooking the ballroom. File.

Who Haunts the Stairways of the Historic Eagle House? By Alex Service

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

H

A Tale of Two Hauntings (Maybe) 10

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

ave you been in an old house or historic building and heard footsteps on the stairs? You hear the distinct creak of footfalls on each step and you’re certain that some living person must be there. And then ... . You see no one. Maybe you even realize you’re alone in the house. Or, at least, you’re the only living person there. Before we moved to Eureka, my husband, kids and I lived in a century-old house near Boston. A friend of ours had visited that house many times as a child; his grandparents had lived there and his grandfather died in the house. This friend told us after his grandfather died, his grandmother told him she heard her late husband’s distinctive footsteps many times, climbing the stairs to the room in which he’d died. That story made a big impression on us. It was a sound we had often heard in that house: the sound of footsteps on those creaking stairs, when, as far as we could see, no one was there. Staircases seem to be among the world’s most haunted locations. When people describe the “things that go bump in the night” in apparently haunted houses, one of the most common experiences is hearing disembodied footsteps on the stairs. This may be because staircases are what academics refer to as “liminal spaces” — transitional boundaries between two locations, sharing some characteristics of each. Staircases are literally liminal spaces between two floors. Is it possible they also tend to be boundaries between the living world and another plane of existence? Eureka’s Old Town Haunted History Ghost Tours was founded in 2010 by local historian and educator Eric Vollmers. I joined the venture as an assistant tour guide the next year, after going on the tour myself with out-of-town guests. Becoming a ghost tour guide made perfect sense as a career move for me. As a kid, I would regularly check out “true haunting” books from our local library. Then, in my grad school days, I studied in England at the University of York, named for its city, which claims the title of most haunted city in Britain. After several years living in a town that boasts up to seven rival ghost tours during the tourist season, frequent interactions with ghosts seem like a normal part of life (although sadly, I am

probably one of the world’s least psychically-sensitive people). Old Town Haunted History Ghost Tours are two-hour walking tours of Old Town’s haunted streets and alleyways, with indoor stops in some of the most notoriously haunted hot spots. In these pandemic times, the tours are on hold until our dayto-day lives become less spooky. We hope to bring the tours back to life sometime in the new year. In Eureka’s Inn at 2nd and C, the huge, rambling Victorian hotel historically known as the Eagle House, the staircases seem particularly rich in reports of haunting activity. During the decade that the Old Town Haunted History Ghost Tours have been in operation, the Eagle House’s stairways have provided some of our most intriguing paranormal encounters. One night in 2012, I was leading a tour group through the Eagle House. We stopped on the elegant balcony overlooking the ballroom, where I began telling stories of the old hotel’s reported hauntings. One woman on the tour tentatively asked if any of us had heard a voice speak as we climbed the stairs from the lobby to the balcony. None of us, including me, had heard anything. The woman gave a mystified frown. She told the rest of us she was sure she had heard, while we were climbing the stairs, someone clearly speaking the word “diphtheria.” The Eagle House was built in the 1880s, when Humboldt County was ravaged by frequent diphtheria epidemics. Referred to as “the strangling angel,” this respiratory disease was particularly deadly to children. Hearing the woman’s description, I wondered if one of the spirits haunting the Eagle House lost a child or children in the local diphtheria epidemics. “Diphtheria” seemed to make sense as a word that would be spoken by someone from the Eagle House’s past. It didn’t make sense as a word that a modern person would imagine hearing. Another seemingly haunted Eagle House staircase is in a section of the hotel on Second Street that used to be a separate building: what was known in the early 20th century as the First Chance Hotel. That staircase, leading up to a fire escape on the roof, is said in local legends


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The Eagle House in its past life as the Buon Gusto Hotel, circa 1907. Photo by Kenneth Kilburn. Courtesy of Peter E Palmquist Collection / Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. to be the location where someone hanged themselves, although the story is so vague, we don’t know any other details. One night, a self-identified psychic on the ghost tour told me she was in contact with the spirit on that staircase. She said the ghost was a man and that he told her he had not committed suicide. The ghost said he was murdered and his killer arranged the scene to make it look like he’d hanged himself. So far, we’ve learned nothing more of this story. We hope to someday find a trace of it in the historical record — or perhaps the ghost will tell another psychic more of his story. A third ghostly staircase connects a cozy — but apparently very haunted — lounge on the third floor with the fourth floor penthouse level. At the end of the tour one night in 2018, a tour guest grabbed a paper napkin from the bar at the Oberon Grill (also very haunted, according to local legend) and sketched on it the portrait of the ghost she said she’d seen when she looked up the Eagle House’s stairs from that lounge. She drew a man on the staircase, wearing an overcoat and a fedora-style hat, and said she had the feeling he was watching over the room we were standing in. The ghost, she

said, wanted to protect the people in that room. Maybe he’s the same ghost a 10-yearold girl told me about one night. This girl told me that as soon as our tour went inside the Eagle House, a man’s ghost joined us and accompanied us throughout the hotel. When we left again, he walked outside with us for a brief way and then went back inside because the Eagle House is where he belongs. The girl told me he’d gone on the tour with us to make sure we were safe, to see that none of the other Eagle House ghosts did anything to frighten us. That girl’s story became one of my own favorite stories to tell my guests on the Old Town Haunted History Ghost Tours. If the stairways, rooms and corridors of the historic Eagle House are truly haunted, I’m glad to know some of the things that go bump in the night are the footsteps of friends. Alex Service (she/her) is the curator at the Fortuna Depot Museum and is an Old Town Haunted History Ghost Tours guide. Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

hot & take n' bake pizza • sandwiches coffee & espresso • juice & smoothies

Continued from previous page

Fast Favorites. Minor Scares Things that went bump in the Minor Theatre By David Jervis

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

A

rcata’s Minor Theatre opened way back in 1914, so long ago that’s it never been established if it was the first one in the nation built primarily as a cinema, but it was sure close. It’s never been made clear whether Harry Houdini performed there in the 1920s but the lore is more fun if it’s accepted as a (non-verifiable) fact. So, can a 107-year-old local cinema

really not be haunted? That’s one worth pondering. In the early 1990s, while in college, I got a job at the Minor, which at that time was jointly owned and operated with the nearby Arcata Theatre. So I worked at both, then climbed up to manager, which also included some projectionist work on the two theater’s now long-gone 35mm projectors. Eventually, I got kicked upstairs to working as PR flak/jack-of-all-trades, although my small office was at the Arcata Theatre. That place was a relative youngster, only dating back to 1938, and while it had the oddest staircase in the county and a pretty recurrent problem with silverfish, haunted it did not seem to be. The Minor, however, was another story. The Minor was built by Arcata dry goods and land magnate Isaac Minor, who had such a fortune late in his years that he was looking to spend some coin. After founding a bank, he sought more and built a grand-for-a small town cinema across the street, and his bearded, stoic visage

View from outside of the Minor on opening day, Dec. 13, 1914. File.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


can be seen in an aisle seat in the Minor’s iconic opening night photo. He died less than a year later. Now, a structure built the year the Titanic sank is bound to be a little creaky, despite the millions spent in upgrades and restoration over the years. (The original auditorium has never been altered; the two smaller theaters were built in a directly adjacent building in 1989.) But I had heard tales of strange sounds and odd happenings before I even worked there. I had a natural curiosity but also a strong streak of skepticism. But then … . One night at the Minor, I sat at the box office counting the till, around 9:45 p.m. It was a slow night and the only other employee was Heather, who was sitting on the south stairs and reading a book. Lobby deserted, not a soul in sight. For whatever reason, I had just looked up from my work and out at the corner of 10th and H streets. No one, not even a car. Looked back down.

And then, loudly: “Shhhh!” I froze and then looked around again. No one indoors or out, but a silent reading Heather on the stairs. And then from Heather:“Did you hear that?” “What?” “Someone going ‘Shhhh’!” “No,” I lied, for whatever reason. I was still a little freaked out, I guess. We both heard it. No one was in sight. Again, not a soul. No vent or anything in the building made that sound. And about a year later, when I was backing out of the third-story projection booth in the main auditorium while checking in on how the projector and platters were doing on Short Cuts, I had a sense that somebody was walking up the stairs behind me — I turned around and again, not a living soul. Co-workers quite often talked about odd noises, hushed voices or sounds of footsteps. And while I dismissed most of the stories as the result of a building doing what TV’s Mike Brady (an architect, remember) would call “settling,” some other accounts were spooky. After all, my then-girlfriend, as she walked around with me while I was closing up one night, had the double whammy: She felt steps coming up behind her and heard a loud “Shhhh” when I was nowhere nearby. Joshua Neff, the current owner of the Minor, did not return my request for comment. David Phillips, who along with various partners owned the Minor from 1972 to 2016, said simply in an email, “I have to believe it’s runaway imagination or just enhancing the mysteries of the Minor deliberately. All of which is OK but for me to believe it, I’d have to be there.” Well, jeez. That’s no fun. Phillips did, as he did way back when he my boss, point out that that are a lot of places in the Minor for non-ghost pranksters to hide and do their mischief: There’s a floor trapdoor, for instance, which goes to the old Vaudeville-era dressing rooms under the stage, plus some odd passages in the upstairs. He also mentioned that decades back there had been séances held in the lobby, with “plenty of opportunity to be spooky if you know the building.” Séances do suggest a case of searching for what one seeks to find, much like setting off on the hunt for the abominable snowman and keeping at it until you find some shreds of evidence (or fall for someone pulling your leg). But in my long ago days at the Minor, I came aboard as a skeptic and would eventually leave curious, and still a little baffled. l David Jervis (he/him) is an Arcatabased freelance writer and editor.

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ON THE TABLE

Sweet Offerings

El Pueblo’s pan de muerto By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill onthetable@northcoastjournal.com

I

n the little workroom in the back of El Pueblo Market Panaderia (312 Washington St., Eureka), a young man in a flour-dusted apron leans over the worktable to knead a pale yellow dough, putting his weight into it. Engelberto Tejeda, the shop’s owner, reaches over, the sleeves of his crisp, white button down rolled to his elbows, and pinches off a couple pieces. These he quickly rolls into bone shapes with the flat of his palm before pressing them into the top of a round of dough, a final button at the center to form a traditional Mexican pan de muerto, or “bread of the dead.” There are small buns and one big enough to serve as a generous throw pillow, as well as muertitos, little figures splashed with pink sugar. All these will adorn local tables and ofrendas, or altars for lost loved ones, ahead of Dia de Los Muertos Nov. 1 and 2. And while El Pueblo won’t be nearly as busy as it is in January with the sale of Rosca de Reyes, or King’s Day bread, a steady stream of loaves will make their way out the door this week. Tejeda’s practiced ease flipping dough into crescent rolls and rolling it into bright, sugar-topped conchas was not always so natural. After first coming to the U.S. from Jalisco, Mexico, in 1978, with stints working in asparagus and tomato fields in Stockton and at a vegetable market in San Francisco, at a tortilla factory and truck driving school, Tejeda started working in distribu-

tion, setting up Mexican goods sections in markets big and small. On a trip to Eureka to visit family, he noticed few places to buy Mexican goods and moved to Humboldt with his wife and three children to open a shop. Tejeda started out with an even tinier shop (the retail space at El Pueblo’s current digs take only a couple strides to cross) on California and Wabash streets, before moving to Broadway, which had plenty of room for baking and pastry cases. To fill those cases, he hired Antonio Noguéz, an older baker from Mexico who’d worked in bakeries since he was an adolescent, and he whipped up everything from pan dulce to cookies and cheesecake. “When he came in, he told me he wanna teach me to bake,” says Tejeda with a shrug. He declined, preferring to stick to the retail sales skills he’d already honed. But when Noguéz fell ill and went into the hospital, his absence left the shelves bare. Tejeda says his wife helped care for Noguéz, who recovered enough to come back to work, but it was clear retirement was imminent. So Tejeda yielded and learned to make the sweets for which the shop had earned a devoted following. Noguéz would sit and give instructions, pointing and estimating measurements for the recipes he’d baked from memory for decades. Tejeda says the older man would tell him, “‘OK, put two scoops of flour, one sugar,’ … but nothing come out.” He laughs and passes his hand over his slicked

Cooling pan de muerto loaves crossed with “bones.” Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

back hair. It took long hours of apprenticeship and practice until he could turn out Noguéz’s specialties. Noguéz died years ago, but the sweets behind the counter and the pan de muerto that appears at El Pueblo every October are faithful to the recipes he knew by memory and taught by look and feel. When the Broadway location burned down in 2017 (“Customers Rally Behind El Pueblo Market Hit by Fire,” Feb. 8, 2017), the operation moved to Redwood Acres and finally found its home on Washington Street, where the Tacos El Pueblo food truck, a business expansion started a few years ago, sits parked out front. “Everybody make different,” says Tejeda, his splayed hands circling in the air. But El Pueblo’s pan de muerto are made with a yeast dough enriched with egg and flavored with cinnamon. Some are brushed with an egg-and-milk wash for a glossy finish, some get sprinklings of sesame seeds

or a swipe of butter before they’re dusted with sugar. At the register, Tejeda says the buns will last at least a week — they’ll still be soft after days on a family ofrenda, surrounded by candles, flowers and photos of the departed. But to pull off a piece in your fingers when it’s still warm from the oven is something else; the fine crumb of the interior is tender and fragrant with cinnamon, the browned crust and cinnamon add a slight, nutty bitterness against the sugar. It makes sense to welcome back the spirits of loved ones who’ve died with something so soft and familiar, with nourishing bread and the memory of sweetness. ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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GET OUT

A decorated grave at Myrtle Grove Memorial Cemetery, circa 1900. Humboldt County Photographs Collection, Humboldt State University Library

AA tour Walk with the Departed of three cemeteries By Meg Wall-Wild

M

getout@northcoastjournal.com ist floats along the grass, flowing around headstones and disappearing with a swirl as it meets the afternoon sun. Instead of searching for gauzy materializations down long hallways, I stroll local cemeteries for restless spirits. First is lumber magnate William Coleman Carson (1825-1912). If any house should be haunted, it’s his magnificent Victorian, the Carson Mansion. Perhaps he wanders the halls, muttering about labor costs or board feet, but the private Ingomar Club, its current owner, is tight lipped. Instead, I find his bones moldering not in Myrtle Grove Memorial Cemetery, where he was originally interred, but where he was moved when the tonier Sunset Memorial Park opened, being more suitable for a man who left an estate valued between $15-20 million. In 1912 dollars. At the bottom of the hill, a funeral is taking place as we turn into the cemetery. The massive mausoleum commands the top of the hill. There, Carson and his family claim the cherry spot, just inside the right ell, in climate-controlled comfort. Chairs are set up for a service, so we tarry only a moment to take in the hushed, golden atmosphere of Carson’s final resting place. No ghosts, just silence. I move on to Myrtle Grove Memorial Cemetery, burial ground of Eureka’s wealthy founders and site of Carson’s original interment. I am no longer looking for the lumber king but ship owner Captain

Hans Henry Buhne (1822-1894), another of Eureka’s early movers and shakers. The graveyard was handed over to the city of Eureka in 1958 and, after years of vandalism and disrepair, a recent volunteer effort has restored its grounds and gravestones (“Cemetery Rising,” Aug. 31, 2017). Many markers were not in their original location, separated from their owners, broken and damaged, pieced together and reset. The mausoleums are still standing in situ, having stubbornly borne the insults of time that toppled lesser memorials. We pass hotelier John Vance’s mausoleum, replete with swag and granite columns that suit the builder of Eureka’s grand hotel. The next mausoleum is bereft of the aforementioned Carson, though his name still adorns a classical lintel. A trio of weathered gravestones lead up to Captain Buhne’s place of repose, the mausoleum anchoring the back corner. Each bears the mark of a Civil War veteran but not their lifespans: “20th ME INF,” “39th NY INFT, 24th” and “A6 KANS CAV.” The bones that lie here fulfilled their service to the nation more than 150 years ago and would more likely haunt battlefields than gravesites. Myrtle Grove is the final resting place for veterans of many wars, including an infantryman from the Spanish-American War and a U.S. Navy coal heaver who died in 1935. The stairs to Buhne’s mausoleum have the air of benign neglect, yet two open crypts hold small offerings of feathers Continued on next page »

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GET OUT Continued from previous page

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and plastic flowers. There are no names or dates inscribed on any of the crypt faces. Perhaps the Captain planned it that way, preferring the privacy of the Buhne Building to mourn the wife who drowned in the waters that made him rich. I turn to enjoy Buhne’s commanding view of his peers. No wonder Carson decamped for the preeminent location in swankier digs. C.S. Ricks doesn’t seem to care about the captain’s primacy, still proudly proclaiming himself “A California Pioneer of 1849” from his mausoleum, resting after building Eureka’s first waterworks. We wander and my spouse points out the A poignant marker in the Myrtle Grove Memorial The Buhne mausoleum at Myrtle Grove Memorial Coffin family. “Ended up Cemetery. Photo by Meg Wall-Wild Cemetery. Photo by Meg Wall-Wild in the right place.” We ponder over the mystery proud Freemason, is a diminutive marker gravestone with a simple low arch and L. of the McMillans: William J., native of with a small dove that simply reads: “Our I. engraved on its smooth top. Nearby, a Antrim County, Ireland, is buried next to Clare.” Beyond the graveyard stand rows gravestone obscured by lichen fascinates his son (also William J.), and fellow Antrim of apartments, a sweep of bright autumn me. Another one is weathered to of anonative Robert J. Clyde, all died in 1937. Wiltrees and Myrtle Avenue traffic. No ghosts nymity. Would these unnamed be moved liam J. the younger was just 17. Did they all follow but sorrow is hard to shake. to haunt? Or would loss of name set them die together? We speculate as we mourn We almost miss the entrance to Trinidad free? Margaret, who not only suffered this loss, Cemetery. With a quick right turn onto Five concreted plots at cattywampus but that of her younger son when U.S. Air a dirt track up into tall trees we were angles could hold restless spirits at bay Corps lieutenant Archie was killed in 1944. secluded, removed from the living. Now by sheer weight. But just beyond them is Margaret carried her grief until 1976. Her this is a place of hauntings. No manicured where I find my ghosts. I thought I would headstone is plain, none of the florid wilheadstones marching in low straight lines, find them among the long lost, like little lows and sobbing angels of the Victorians. bending to the groundskeeper’s will. This Natie Winton, aged 6 years, 2 months, 27 A massive bench catches our eye. The graveyard is organic, moving, pushed around days with a tombstone willow so weepy I inscription tells a heavy tale, recounting by massive tree roots and shifting soil. still feel his parents’ grief keenly nearly 150 the early settlers of Eureka who “took in” The first graves I encounter are more reyears later. I was wrong. a 13-year-old Wiyot survivor of the 1860 cent. An eclectic mix of concrete dragons Achingly fresh is the handsome football massacre. The inset photo of her is a study and traditional granite. One gravestone is a player who stares confidently from his of suffering, having survived the deadly rock with colorful mosaics and the motto school photo. Further along, the sun attack that orphaned her only to be made “eschewed obfuscation.” I made note to bleeds through a yellow plastic wand, an indentured servant, never allowed to look for this man’s obituary. Right behind casting a star shaped outline on the rock return to her people. If anyone deserves rests an enigma — a tall, dark marker for marking a young boy’s resting place, with to haunt us it is Silva. E.B. Schnaubelt, “Murdered by Capitalism,” the scattered contents of a toy box and Along the path, the pain of early death seems a guarantee spectral presence. But Halloween decorations. This graveyard is is everywhere. We pass tales of woe: Schnaubelt is certain to haunt his stolen still accepting members into its club. It Sophea Alice, age 3; Ian, age 6. Sharp grief sawmill. is the new residents that will haunt, the chiseled into limestone that has softThe Victorian trend of gating oneself names I leave unwritten here. These are ened with time. Someone has left a small off for eternity is set in beautiful wrought the spirits that float in my subconscious. I offering on both graves. Robert, son of iron. Four unconnected posts show the am haunted by a little boy with a starJoseph and Ann, aged 22. Anderson, Baby, short-lived chain enclosure was not worth shaped wand clutched in a sticky hand. I 1900-1900. George and Mary hanging on the investment. I stroll through tall trees see him everywhere. ● to every second they shared with George and undulating shadows to 20-year-old S., died 9 years, 3 months, 26 days. The Maggie Johnnie, 1901 to 1921, with only Meg Wall-Wild (she/her) is a freelance young mother who, by age 22, had lost a name to her stone. Later, my cursory writer and photographer who loves her two children before their first birthday search finds nothing of her. All I know books, the dunes of Humboldt and her Ralph and Clifford sleep together beneath of Henry John is that he shook off his husband, not necessarily in that order. an engraved cherub in nightdress, nestled mortal coil on Dec. 23, 1929. Brevity in When not writing, she pursues adventure in a crescent moon. Particularly poignant is stone matched and beaten by another in her camper, Nellie Bly. a duo of markers: Next to Syrus B. Sinclair,

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Coastal Rivers Full, Smith Best Bet for Salmon By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

T

rying to decipher last week’s rain and river level predictions was not for the faint of heart. But when it was all said and done, all of the North Coast rivers got the flushing they desperately needed. Some rivers, especially to our south, went far beyond what was forecast and eventually hit flood stage. Coastal rivers from the Smith to the South Fork Eel mostly fell short of predictions, but are plum-full of water, nonetheless. Considering it’s still October, the future is looking bright. As for fishing, the Smith was the only green river on the coast. The river opened to fishing Thursday but was on a steep rise for most of the day and night. Boats were on the water Friday but conditions weren’t great. By Saturday, the river had dropped and the fishing was much improved, with just about all the boats landing fish. Looking toward the weekend, the Smith peaked Tuesday afternoon at 11.25 feet on the Jed Smith gauge. It’s predicted to be on a slow drop through the weekend and should be full of fresh kings. The Chetco will likely draw a crowd this weekend, as the flows settle into the range of 2,000 cubic feet per second. For current Smith River conditions, visit https://cdec.water.ca.gov/river/smithStages.html. For the Chetco, visit www.nwrfc. noaa.gov/river/station/flowplot/flowplot. cgi?lid=CHTO3.

Weather ahead According to Jonathan Garner of Eureka’s National Weather Service office, after the storms clear out Wednesday, the next chance at rain will be Friday. “There is a chance of rain Friday and Saturday, but the amounts are uncertain,” he said. “It will be more hit and miss and we probably won’t see widespread rainfall. We’ll definitely be heading into more of a drier pattern at least for the next seven days.”

The Rivers: As of Tuesday, all North Coast rivers

subjected to low-flow fishing closures, including the Smith, Eel, South Fork Eel, Mad, Redwood Creek and Van Eight-year-old Bryson Blevin, along with dad Tyler, landed this Duzen are open to nice king salmon Saturday while fishing the Smith River. angling, but don’t Photo courtesy of Tyler Blevin expect green water on rivers other than the Smith. Be sure Upper Trinity closed to the take and call the low-flow closure hotline at 822-3164 to determine if the river is open of adult kings prior to fishing. The California Department In a press issued Oct. 20, the California of Fish and Wildlife will announce whether Department of Fish and Wildlife projected rivers will be open by a telephone recordthe Upper Trinity River quota will have ed message each Monday, Wednesday and been met as of 11:59 p.m. on Oct. 24. This Friday. triggers the closure of the adult fall-run Smith River Chinook salmon fishery on the Trinity The Smith fished well Saturday, with River from the Old Lewiston Bridge to the most boats getting limits of bright kings. State Route 299 West Bridge at Cedar Flat. Fishing was a little tougher Sunday, as the The Lower Trinity River quota will be river was on the rise for most of the day. met as of 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 31. This There are bright as well as dark salmon triggers the closure of the adult fall-run spread from the forks to the outfitters. Chinook salmon fishery on the Trinity RivMost of the fish are being caught on plugs er from the Denny Road Bridge at Hawkins but back-bouncing the deeper slots with Bar to the confluence with the Klamath roe has also produced. Conditions look River. Both sectors will remain open for good through the weekend. fishing and the harvest of jack Chinook salmon less than or equal to 23 inches. For Chetco River more information, visit www.wildlife. High water has made salmon fishing ca.gov/News/trinity-river-adult-chitough on the Chetco, but flows will be nook-salmon-quota-met. close to ideal as the weekend approaches, ● reports Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. He said, “Salmon are spread throughout Read the complete fishing report at the system. Bobbers must still be used unwww.northcoastjournal.com til Nov. 5, as ODFW said it is sticking with the published low-flow regulations. Last Kenny Priest (he/him) operates week’s brood stock seining for the Chetco Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide hatchery program produced nearly 75 service out of Humboldt specializing kings over two days. Some of the salmon in salmon and steelhead. Find it on were close to 40 pounds. Flows reached Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and 8,000 cfs. Less than 4,000 is considered www.fishingthenorthcoast.com. For good, and anything between 1,500 and up-to-date fishing reports and North 2,500 cfs is prime. Catches during high waCoast river information, email kenny@ ter have been nearly a 50-50 split between fishingthenorthcoast.com. hatchery and wild fish.”

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Jennifer J Peterson, photography at Trinidad Coastal Land Trust. Courtesy of the artist

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

T

he last Trinidad Art Nights for the year. As the days get shorter, the event is being held a little earlier. Please follow updated Humboldt County guidelines and wear a mask indoors and at outdoor gatherings. Hosted by Community Arts Trinidad, a DreamMaker Project of the Ink People Center for the Arts. MOONSTONE CROSSING 529 Trinity St.

Antoinette Magyar, paintings. TRINIDAD ART GALLERY 490 Trinity St. Patricia Sundgren Smith, prints and Loryn White, ceramics. TRINIDAD COASTAL LAND TRUST 380 Janis Court Jennifer J Peterson, photography. TRINIDAD MUSEUM 400 Janis Court Explore Trinidad’s past and its place in the American west. ●


ART BEAT

Reimagining The Paint Project Rebound puts murals on local basketball courts By Collin Yeo

artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

L

ast month, during a week of the sort of mid-September sunshine that Humboldt County residents dream of, a bright and colorful attraction took form at the edge of Shay Park in Arcata. Specifically, in the basketball court next to the Twin Parks apartments, a dazzling mural crept over the halfcourt’s cement and up onto the boundary curbs like a technicolor hoop dream. Unusually bright colors created a palette that could live perfectly at home in the sunny world of Venice Beach in the 1990s, creating a vivid contrast with the autumning leaves and brooding evergreens of the nearby forest. The mural is the inaugural work of Project Rebound, created by local artist Benjamin Funke, who also serves as associate faculty at College of the Redwoods and tenured staff in Humboldt State University’s art department. “Rebound was a project I had been wanting to execute for a long time. My personal artwork has drawn inspiration from professional sports. I have a penchant for extremely loud colors and bold design,” Funke says. “I loved the idea of taking our local courts that either fell into the ‘concrete gray’ color palette or ones in need of a little TLC, and hit them with some good design and bright colors.” Funke also notes he drew inspiration from the reality of the pandemic, where indoor social restrictions and free time created a situation where he was spending a lot of time “walking outside, shooting hoops, thinking about art and life.” The process from thought to execution started a year ago in the fall of 2020, when Funke applied for and was awarded a Funds for Artists’ Resilience Grant. “The FAR Grant really made the start of this project possible,” says Funke. “It encouraged me to take the next step and become a DreamMaker with the Ink People Center for the Arts. Becoming a DreamMaker project established us as a 501c3 and allowed us access to liability insurance for events.” Executive director of the Ink People Libby Maynard explains, “The FAR program was created in response to talks with Humboldt Area Foundation and Wild

Rivers Community Foundation staff, which provided the funding to create opportunities for artists to do public art projects in response to the pandemic. After receiving the award, Ben Funke decided to become a DreamMaker project to facilitate additional fundraising and to leverage our community relationships with the city of Arcata and others,” she says. “The DreamMaker Program supports over 100 self-directed projects created by people who want to make their community a better place through arts and culture. We offer administrative support, management and capacity building training.” After becoming a Dreammaker, Funke had to sell his idea to the city and get approval for the site and the mural’s design. “During one of my Zoom meetings with the parks and recreation committee, they voiced concern of the court designs being too busy, confusing or distracting for the players. I applied that feedback into this design, limiting the amount of abstraction to the lane and keeping the color palette as electrifying as possible,” he says. “Wanting to create visual movement on a 2D surface, I used repetition, asymmetry and variation mimicking two consecutive film stills side-by-side.” By mid-summer of 2021, the design had been approved by the city — a bright palette of aqua, yellow and purple following the lines of the court and coming together in a riot of color in the key. Although the timeline from design to approval was long, Funke was positive about the experience, saying that the overall it was “great” and noting that there was a lot of enthusiasm from the city planners, which helped keep him encouraged throughout the negotiations. One aspect of Project Rebound that sets it apart from other public art installments is the financial compensation paid to the artists involved. “The fact that everyone involved got paid for the day was really awesome,” says Trent Franks, one of the artists who collaborated with Funke on the design and execution of the mural. “Artists are almost always undervalued — or not at all — for the hours they put into their work. So when we are offered

Project Rebound’s basketball court mural at Arcata’s Shay Park. Photo courtesy of Project Rebound

a paycheck to work on something we’re passionate about, it feels really rewarding.” Maynard agrees. “The commitment to pay artists and assistants is one of the hallmarks of the best way to run art projects. I get so frustrated when people want artists to do things for ‘exposure.’ You can’t eat exposure and your landlord won’t accept it for rent,” she says. Artists, she notes, develop over years of practice and study, just like other professionals. Maynard doubts a doctor or lawyer would give their services in exchange for the same exposure artists are frequently offered. “This project and the manner in which it has been carried out are testament to the care, planning and professionalism of Ben Funke and his supporters. I feel we can be assured of the thoughtfulness and beauty of future projects.” What does the future hold for Project Rebound? The curious need look no further than G Street in Arcata, on the low wall behind the company parking spots for Café Brio, where, between the deluge of

welcome October showers, a bright vision is taking shape. The piece in question, a leafy strip of blues and greens, is designed by artist Blake Reagan, and Funke hopes the weather will allow it to be completed by Halloween. Funke explains that, like the G Street location, Rebound isn’t bound to b-ball courts only. “What is great about Rebound is that it isn’t necessarily all about basketball. While ‘rebounding’ is a very important aspect to the game of basketball, the rebounding team gains possession of the ball and goes on offense; it applies more broadly in life,” he says. “So while we are looking into projects at other basketball courts around the county, we are also eyeballing slivers of walls, skateparks and baseball stadiums.” Here’s hoping this incursion of color into the gray life of pandemic-era Arcata continues. ● Collin Yeo (he/him) is learning to enjoy this interregnum between “bad” and “worse.” He lives in Arcata.

Muralist Blake Reagan’s contribution to Project Rebound off G Street in Arcata. Submitted

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ou found me!” He did not look happy to have found me, which I thought was strange. He was looking for me, wasn’t he? Isn’t that why he was here, in the brushy highway median, with a shovel in one hand and a USB microphone in the other? Wasn’t searching for my body the point of his penultimate podcast episode “Finding Feronica,” to be followed by his final episode, “Further Findings?” He definitely didn’t seem happy to hear me speak. I haven’t listened to “Further Findings” yet. I just haven’t had time and, if I’m being honest, I really want to catch up on Radiolab first. Maybe he wasn’t happy because I no longer look like I did in my high school yearbook photo, the one that was plastered all over local papers and that he rendered in sepia for the artwork for Carnage in Corkville, the No. 13 most popular Midwestern true crime podcast on Podland.com. My long, blonde hair had mostly fallen out and my eyes were, well, sunken. I didn’t smell very good. My breasts were no longer displayed, as described in great detail in Episode No. 3 (“Staying Abreast of the Carnage”), “poking perkily from the form-hugging Corkville Cougars’ cheerleader uniform.” A great lover of alliteration, the podcast host. No, I wasn’t as pretty as I’d been in high school. But then, who is when they’ve been dead for two years? Still, you would think that after all the rabbit holes the host of Carnage in Corkville had gone down while “chronicling the cold criminality churning in the creeping charnel house of the Corn Belt,” he would be excited to actually find me, the Feronica, who had disappeared on the night of her junior prom in 2018, seemingly into thin air, “with only the low, rustling whisper of the corn fields to witness her exit from this world.” But, no, dude just fell backwards onto the seat of his khakis and scuttled backward like a crab, destroying any evidence that might have remained there. Not that it matters, you know, because I can tell you who killed me, and it’s pretty disappointing. No, it wasn’t my stepfather.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

And thank you very much to the randos who kept calling him at the hardware store and harassing him after Episode No. 13, “Sins of the Stepdaddy,” aired, eventually causing him to lose his job. We were just starting to have a decent relationship before I died and now everything’s weird again. No, it wasn’t my high school “boyfriend,” who wasn’t actually my boyfriend, just a friend I went to the prom with because backward-ass Corkville High wouldn’t let him bring a same-sex date. Thanks for outing him a full year before he was ready, by the way, and getting him kicked out of his parents’ house. And I swear to God, if I find out which Carnage in Corkville “superfan” dug up my mom’s azalea bushes while she was at work last spring, I am going to find you and slap you across the face with what’s left of my hand. I don’t care what kind of “clues” Episode No. 45, “Beneath the Bushes?” might have “revealed.” Adding a question mark doesn’t take away your culpability, asshole. Thanks for ruining gardening — the only thing that brought my mother any joy after I died. No, like I told Mr. True Crime — and I seriously hope this is in “Further Findings,” but like I said, I haven’t listened to it — the man who picked me up wasn’t a serial killer, wasn’t the “Cornbelt Creeper,” an entirely fictional persona based on a data group the podcaster put together from a grab bag of other dead blondes disappeared or murdered in the tri-state area over the last 20 years. He was a friend’s dad, the same dude who got picked up by the Cornville Sheriff ’s deputies every

six months or so for beating up his wife or random women he met in bars. (I didn’t know this, or obviously, I wouldn’t have gotten in the car with him.) Maybe he would have killed again but who knows, because he wrapped his car around a tree three months after I died. Disappointing, right? No serial killer, no story. But look, now I’m doing the same thing everyone else did, focusing on my death, like my murder is the most interesting thing going on. Like my mom always says, there are lots of other things to focus on besides what people are saying on the internet. Like my future. Did you know how hard it is to get your GED when you’re the undead? Or other people’s murders, the kinds that don’t make headlines. One thing about being a reanimated corpse and crime against nature and God, you find out who your friends are. Some people just aren’t ready to catch up now that I’m walking and talking again. Well, lurching and rasping, technically. Like Carnage in Corkville’s host and my stepfather, and the county sheriff. (Ep. No. 62, “Carnival of Corruption,” was a real doozy.) But I have a whole legion of other people who have questions for me. Mostly friends and family of other people who have gone missing. Did you know there actually is a serial killer sweeping through the Midwest, targeting prostitutes? At least 30 of them have disappeared and nobody’s talking about it. No blondes, I’m afraid, but it might make a decent sequel for our host once Carnage in Cornville wraps up. Maybe he’ll get lucky. Maybe he’ll find them, too. Or maybe they’ll find him first. ● Linda Stansberry (she/her) is a writer and journalist who lives in Eureka. You can find more of her work at www. lindastansberry.com.


Calendar Oct. 28 – Nov. 4, 2021 Submitted

Adobe Stock

Sugar Bear is on tour! Don’t miss this once in a lifetime chance to see our hometown hero, the 2021 U.S. Capitol tree, up close. SB is making its way to Washington, D.C. — stopping at 25 celebrations across the country. Send our glorious fir off with some local love at these three U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Viewing celebrations. On Friday, Oct. 29 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. it’s at Madaket Plaza. The next day, Saturday, Oct. 30, the big tree is in Willow Creek from 10 a.m. to noon. Later on Saturday, Sugar Bear visits the Fortuna River Lodge from 4 to 6 p.m. There will be music, treats, ornament kits and other fun activities at each event.

Celebrate Dia de los Muertos (aka the Day of the Dead), a two-day holiday that reunites the living and the dead, with the Day of the Dead Festival of Altars on Tuesday, Nov. 2 from 4 to 8 p.m. at Old Town Gazebo, featuring music, food and dancers (free). There’s also a Dia de los Muertos community ofrenda inside Jacoby’s Storehouse from Oct. 28 - Nov. 3 (free), where you can pay respects to those who have passed. Centro del Pueblo, Arcata Playhouse, Los Bagels and Arcata Main Street will also hold a special event during Arcata’s Farmers Market on Saturday, Oct. 30, with Outer Space Arcata from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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Pull up your bootstraps and get ready to do a bit of good for the ol’ Trinidad Lighthouse. The Trinidad Lighthouse Stewardship Work Day is Saturday, Oct. 30 from 9:30 a.m. to noon. This work day is in preparation for the 150th Anniversary Celebration of the Trinidad Lighthouse, so the work you do is especially important. Help with paint removal, minor repairs in and around the lighthouse, invasive plant species removal and putting in native plants. Snacks provided. Email michelle@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org to sign up or find out more.

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For Little Monsters Trick-or-treating is on this year, with the CDC’s blessing. But we’re not out of the spooky woods yet. Keep these COVID-safe practices in mind when taking the ghouls and boos out trick-or-treating: Have them wear masks in addition to their costume masks or incorporate their cloth masks into their costumes; go with family or those in your close social group; give wide berth to other trick-or-treaters; let homeownHalloween Fairy, Shoshanna, Submitted ers place candy in kids’ buckets rather than having kids reach in; use hand sanitizer where you see it; and have the kids hold off on ripping into their loot until they get home and can wash their paws and claws. Here’s where you can go for the goods. In Old Town, Eureka, The Great Pumpkin Hunt replaces Eureka Main Street’s usual trick-or-treat. There’s still candy but with a scavenger-hunt twist. Every day from Oct. 29-31 from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., kids 18 and under can pick up a participation form at Eureka Visitor Center (240 E St.), search out pumpkins in storefront windows and return the form to receive a treat bag. Fortuna businesses are handing out candy during Trunk or Treat on Friday, Oct. 29 from 3 to 5 p.m. on Main Street. Mask up and head to friendly Henderson Center for Trick or Treat in Henderson Center on Saturday, Oct. 30 from noon to 2 p.m. Get Cujo a cookie and the kids a coloring book and candy while supplies last at Trunk or Treat for Kids & Pets on Saturday, Oct. 30, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Sequoia Humane Society. Social distancing and masking are required for ages 2 and up. On the Arcata Plaza, it’s the Halloween Fairy’s Plaza Party with Shoshanna on Sunday, Oct. 31 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. A safe and convenient way to trick-or-treat is simply pulling up in your car and receiving goodies! Swing by the Drive-By Trick-or-Treat on Sunday, Oct. 31 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Humboldt Grange Hall. Drive through costumed scenes, vote for your favorite at the end and receive a candy bag at the Drive-Through Trick-or-Treat on Sunday, Oct. 31 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at First Covenant Church Eureka. Have fun! — Kali Cozyris

For Grown Ghouls

Hot Buttered Rum, Lech Naumovich

Same safety spiel goes for you adults, too. Many Halloween events are back on this year but keeping safe is paramount during a pandemic. Outdoor events are best but for any indoor haunts you choose this Halloween, be sure to follow all the COVID guidelines, whether that’s honoring an event’s vaccine mandate, keeping your mask on and worn correctly (keep that witch nose covered), social distancing or any number of communal courtesies we employ now. Have fun. And keep in mind, the spirits are watching you. The Mateel Community Center is once again hosting its annual Halloween Masquerade Ball on Saturday, Oct. 30 starting at 7 p.m. ($30, $25 advance). Boo-gie to music by Hot Buttered Rum, Twango and the Absynth Quartet. There are costume contests, a full bar and Halloween treats for purchase. Take note: Proof of vaccinations or a negative COVID test within 24 hours of the event are required. COVID tests available at the event for a fee. Old Town, Eureka is the scene of Halloween Party 1: The Boozening, a pay-as-you-go “pub crawl,” happening Oct. 29-31 from 6 to 9 p.m. at participating bars and restaurants. They’ll be serving up Halloween-themed specials for the weekend, while you serve the looks — costumes are encouraged. The Humboldt Bay Social Club’s got a spooky thing going, too. It’s offering guided tours every 15 minutes through five outdoor stages with theater performances during Spooky Trails, Oct. 29-30 from 7 to 9 p.m. ($40, $30 advance). And if you’ve still got some shriek left in you by Halloween night, bring it to the SpookTacular Cabaret on Sunday, Oct. 31 from 7 to 9 p.m. located outside of Arcata Playhouse ($10-$15 sliding). It’s drag, comedy, theater and music. Debauchery galore. Get there a little early and grab a bite to eat at The Pub at the Creamery and witness horror characters around the grass from 4 to 6 p.m. — Kali Cozyris

eads up, folks: Due to the increase in COVID-19 cases in the area, many events are in flux. Please check our online calendar for event changes and contact information before heading out. We’ll do our best to update the rapidly changing info. At press time, these events are still on. Please remember the county mandatory masking ordinance is in place and mask up for yourself and your neighbors.

28 Thursday ART

BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Fall exhibition celebrating Karuk artist Brian Tripp’s five-decade art career with work from 1969 to present. In-person viewing hours: Tuesday-Wednesday noon-5 p.m.; Thursday-Friday 1 p.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

LECTURE Black Liberation Through the Arts. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Participants review non-mainstream Black artists that have provided space and conversations around Black liberation. Followed by a writing workshop. Facilitated by Mo HD and Lexxi Reid. Free. cdor@humboldt.edu. www.dialogue.humboldt. edu/events-calendar. 826-5656. State of the Black College Student. 2:30-4 p.m. This workshop will engage black student leaders in critical conversations regarding their education, well-being, future career aspirations and ways to collectively support their communities. Student leaders will share personal stories regarding their experiences navigating a global pandemic. Facilitated by Dr. Phillip “Flapp” Cockrell. Free. cdor@humboldt.edu. www.dialogue. humboldt.edu/events-calendar. 826-5656. Whiteness Accountability Space. 1-2 p.m. Virtual World, Online. This special Campus Dialogue on Race session focuses on why the group exists, the goals for the group, the group’s experiences and lessons learned. Free. www.dialogue.humboldt.edu/events-calendar.

SPOKEN WORD Speed and Grace Poetry Workshops. 6-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Word Humboldt offers this series of online poetry writing workshops connected with the PBS documentary series Muhammad Ali. Register online. Free. www.KEET.org/ali. The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web. zoom.us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

THEATER Radio Play: Hard Boiled Humboldt - a Half-Baked Detective Story. 4:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A radio play by Zack Rouse and Damian Sharpe. One episode per day starting Oct. 25, then full play at 5 p.m. on Oct. 31. 94.1 FM. The Lounge.

EVENTS EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon. Virtual World, Online. Bid on local getaways, arts and crafts, spirits Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

and treats before the holidays. Bids accepted until noon on Nov. 5. All funds go to forest protection. epic@wildcalifornia.org. www.32auctions.com/EPICAUCTION2021. 822-7711. Fire Relief Donation Drive. 2-5 p.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J St. Updated list of needs and a monetary donation site online. legionprograms@gmail.com. www.battlenhomefronts.org. 610-6619. Humboldt Botanical Garden Gala Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. New items still being added. Take another look. Auction extended until Oct. 30. www.hbgf.org.

FOR KIDS MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Humboldt and Del Norte county youth ages 12 to 26 learn to express themselves creatively in visual art, audio and video production. All MARZ students have free access to equipment, software and training. Meets via Zoom by appointment. Free. marzproject@ inkpeople.org. 442-8413. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

FOOD Free Produce Market. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Fresh fruits and vegetables for income-eligible people. Bring your own reusable bags. Drive-thru only. Please wear a mask at the distribution. Eligibility information online. www.foodforpeople.org. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org/. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Local, GMO-free produce. Live music. Free. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org/. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. www.foodforpeople.org/volunteering. 445-3166 ext. 310.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Dia de los Muertos. -Nov. 3. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Centro del Pueblo, Arcata Playhouse, Los Bagels, Arcata Main Street and others present a community ofrenda inside Jacoby’s Storehouse through Nov. 3. There’s also a special event during Arcata’s Farmers Market with Outer Space Arcata from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 683-5293. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. Pumpkin patch, corn maze, farm stand. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. Open now for pumpkin hunting. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Open weekdays Noon-6 p.m. and weekends 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. Voting for the contest runs from Oct. 15 to Oct. 30. Winners will be chosen by the number of “likes” their image receives on Clarke Museum Facebook page. Winners will be announced on Oct. 31. $5-$15 per entry suggested donation. dana.f@clarkemuseum.org. www.

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clarkemuseum.org/events.html. 443-1947. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 1-6 p.m. 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. Six acres of pumpkins and some corn at the Pifferini Ranch — a community tradition for more than 30 years. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. Celebrate Halloween with Food for People by donating and sending friends spooky lawn decorations like Franken-carrot, Mummy Pear and more. Kids can enter a Count Brocc-ula coloring competition for a chance at prizes from Wildberries Marketplace. Proceeds help rebuild Food for People. Sign up online. $25-$200. crobbins@foodforpeople.org. www. foodforpeople.org. 599-0855.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. For BIPOC families. See www. facebook.com/HC-Black-Music-Arts-Association-104727504645663 for more information. hcblackmusicnarts@gmail.com. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from Equity Arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www.facebook.com/ NorthCoastRedwoods.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www. englishexpressempowered.com. How to Get Women Owned Small Business (WOSB/ EDWOSB) Certified. 10-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. This webinar session covers the WOSB/EDWOSB requirements and how to certify in beta.certify.sba. gov. Register at www.eventbrite.com/e/how-to-getwomen-owned-small-business-wosbedwosb-certified-registration-173100537367. Free. info@norcalptac. org. 267.7561. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3-$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@gmail.com. www. sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

29 Friday ART

Art Hike Adventure Tour: Victorian Village. 9 a.m. Ferndale Main Street, Ferndale. Join Margaret Kellermann on a walking art workshop through Ferndale with some history and architecture. All levels of artists, ages 10-17 must be accompanied by adult. Tickets online. $40. www.ferndalemusiccompany.com. 786-7030. BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

LECTURE

flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

History of TRIO (CDOR). 2-2:45 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Overview of TRiO programs and how they have increased access to education for traditionally underrepresented students in postsecondary education. Free. cdor@humboldt.edu. www.dialogue.humboldt. edu/events-calendar. 826-5656. Raising Black & Brown Bodies While White. 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. This session invites white, multiracial and BIPOC identities to talk mixed/ blended and adoptive families and their struggles. Free. cdor@humboldt.edu. www.dialogue.humboldt. edu/events-calendar. 826-5656.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

MOVIES Unspoken Conversations: Queerness Within (CDOR). 1-1:45 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Screening of award-winning short films that explore the dynamics of being queer within Filipinx family dynamics: Bakla by Brandon English and PBS 2020 Juried Winner In the Family by Drama del Rosario. Free. cdor@humboldt. edu. www.dialogue.humboldt.edu/events-calendar. 826-5656.

MUSIC Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www. facebook.com/groups/224856781967115.

THEATER Radio Play: Hard Boiled Humboldt - a Half-Baked Detective Story. 4:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

EVENTS The Big Chili Cook Off Week. -Nov. 5. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. Local chefs and restaurants serve up chili to support local youth with proceeds benefitting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the North Coast. Share your chili pics on social media, because you are the judges. Virtual silent auction, live tastings and pop-up drive thru dishes from local chefs. EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Humboldt Botanical Garden Gala Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Viewing. 4:30-6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. View the tree in the gravel lot adjacent to Madaket Plaza. Music, cookies, hot cocoa and cider. Toy drive. Kids crafts. Homemade ornament kits will be given to take home. Free.

FOR KIDS MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

FOOD Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farmers, prepared food vendors and crafters bring their bounty to Southern Humboldt. Non-GMO produce. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce.

Dia de los Muertos. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 28 listing. The Great Pumpkin Hunt. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Eureka Visitor Center, 240 E St. Children 18 and under can pick up a participation form at the Eureka Visitor Center and begin searching for decorated pumpkins in shop windows. Once they have located a predetermined number of pumpkins they can return their forms for a treat bag. www.humboldtmade.com. Halloween Party 1: The Boozening. 6-9 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. A pay-as-you-go “pub crawl.” Bars and restaurants will be offering Halloween-themed specials for the weekend. Eureka Main Street will be sharing the participating businesses and their specials on social media, online and in the North Coast Journal the week before Halloween. Costumes are encouraged. www.eurekamainstreet.org. A Haunted Humboldt Hike. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Kimber Farms, 3331 North Bank Road, McKinleyville. Hike through an old barn and along a trail uphill into the dark forest. The trail is wide and not too steep. Be ready for spooks and scares. Wear sensible, close-toed shoes. Dress for the weather. Carpooling encouraged. For ages 16+. $10. www.facebook.com/ events/1055087058589978. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 28 listing. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 28 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 1-6 p.m. 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing. Scream-A-Torium Haunted House. 6-11:30 p.m. Antique Depot, 1122 Main St, Fortuna. Day and night walkthroughs, one scary and one for the younger kids/ families. Tickets online. Griffin Loch’s Scream-A-Torium encourages guests be fully vaccinated and/or obtain a negative COVID-19 test result prior to visiting. Masks and temperature check required. Get tickets online. $20, $10 child nighttime tours, $10, $5 daytime tours. www.screamatoriumhaunt.com. Spooky Trails. 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Bay Social Club, 900 New Navy Base Road, Samoa. Tours every 15 minutes guided by Apprentice Entertainment from the Arcata Playhouse. Includes five outdoor stages. Also featuring the Dell’Arte alumni Sleeper Theater, Outer Space and a performance from The Rocky Horror Picture Show. $40, $30 advance. sociable@humboldt-social. com. www.humboldtbaysocialclub.com/-events/ spookytrails. 502-8544. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Trick or Treat at the Tap Room. 4-8 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Handing out candy to monsters, ghouls, superheroes and creatures of every kind for some early Halloween festivities outside the Tap Room. Free. www.fb.me/e/5B7XkJCvX. 668-4151. Trunk or Treat. 3-5 p.m. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Join Fortuna Downtown Business Association for candy on the spookiest main street around.


HOME & GARDEN

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

SPORTS

30 Saturday ART

BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing. Community Painting Day on the Plaza. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Help paint the initial panels for a mural to be installed on the east side of the G Street bridge. Paint and brushes provided. Meet the Playhouse Arts bridge team at Lush Newton’s 16-foot “Polka Dot Pony.” Bring a mask and observe social distancing. Trinidad Art Nights. 3-6 p.m. Trinidad, Downtown. A town-wide event including venues, galleries, wine tasting, outdoor music, live art, fire dancing, kids activities and various performances throughout the night. Free.

BOOKS Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms.gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

MOVIES Robo-Cat Productions Presents: Haunted Happening! 5-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Two hours of mesmerizing horror thrills to put you in a scary mood and mode for the rest of the weekend. Prizes. Free. robocatproductions@gmail.com. www.fb.me/e/1oJB2KSn4. 267-4771.

MUSIC HSU Wind Ensemble and Jazz Orchestra. 8-10 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Hear classic music for concert band featuring brass, woodwinds and percussion, as well as jazz music arranged for big band. Proof of vaccination is required for admission. $10, $5 child aged 12-18, Free for HSU students with ID. mus@humboldt.edu. www. humboldt.edu/music. 826-3566.

THEATER Radio Play: Hard Boiled Humboldt - a Half-Baked

FOR KIDS HCBMAA Reading and Book Discussion. Noon-1 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Presented by the HC Black Music and Arts Association every Saturday during farmers market. For youth and families. info@ hcblackmusicnarts.org. www.hcblackmusicnarts.org.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday Humboldt County farmers bring their non-GMO bounty, rain or shine. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Information and COVID rules online. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown onsite, fresh sourdough bread from Humboldt Baking Company and farm fresh eggs. Art from local artists as well as goods from a variety of local artisans. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

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A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email invitation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/ CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@ gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com.

The Big Chili Cook Off Week. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County, Humboldt. See Oct. 29 listing. EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Humboldt Botanical Garden Gala Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Celebration. 10 a.m.noon. Willow Creek Library, State Routes 299 and 96. Watch the Bigfoot Parade lead the tree into town then enjoy speakers, a pumpkin carving contest, best business decoration contest and raffle, music, treats and more. Free. U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Viewing. 4-6 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. See the Six Rivers National Forest tree that was selected to be the 2021 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree. Free.

ila

ETC

EVENTS

* N o t Av a

Monster Truck Racing. 7 p.m. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Rock Star, California Kid, Identity Theft, Spitfire and Power House battle. Identity Theft the Ride will be giving rides. Plus, Megasaurus, a 30-foot tall car eating, fire breathing, transforming dinosaur. Gates at 4:30 p.m. Pit Party at 5 p.m. $20, $10 kids.

Detective Story. 4:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

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GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Oct. 29 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Dia de los Muertos. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 28 listing. The Great Pumpkin Hunt. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Eureka Visitor Center, 240 E St. See Oct. 29 listing. Halloween Masquerade Ball. 7 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Music by Hot Buttered Rum, Twango and the Absynth Quartet. Costume contests, full bar and Halloween treats for purchase. Proof of vaccinations or a negative COVID test within 24 hours of the event required. COVID tests available at the event for a fee. Incorporate your required mask into your costume if possible. $30, $25 advance. www.mateel.org. Halloween Party 1: The Boozening. 6-9 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. See Oct. 29 listing. Haunted Halloween at Humboldt Redwoods. 6-10 p.m. Humboldt Redwoods State Park Visitor’s Center, 17119 Avenue of the Giants, Weott. A spooky, guided candlelit walk through the redwoods with spirits and stories along the way. Games, candy and fun, rain or shine. Tour times at 6:15, 6:30, 7:25, 7:40, 8:35 and 8:50 p.m. All proceeds support the Humboldt Redwoods

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


HOME & GARDEN

Continued from previous page

CALENDAR Continued from previous page

Interpretive Association. Tickets online at Brown Paper Tickets. $15, $5. vc@humboldtredwoods.org. www. humboldtredwoods.org. 946-2263. A Haunted Humboldt Hike. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Kimber Farms, 3331 North Bank Road, McKinleyville. See Oct. 29 listing. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 28 listing. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 28 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing. Scream-A-Torium Haunted House. 6-11:30 p.m. Antique Depot, 1122 Main St, Fortuna. See Oct. 29 listing. Spooky Trails. 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Bay Social Club, 900 New Navy Base Road, Samoa. See Oct. 29 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Trick or Treat in Henderson Center. Noon-2 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Masks required. Please maintain social distancing. Outdoor event. Free. Trunk or Treat for Kids & Pets. 12:30-3:30 p.m. Sequoia Humane Society, 6073 Loma Ave., Eureka. Coloring books and sealed treats for children and friendly dogs while supplies last. Costumes encouraged. Social distancing and masking required for age 2 and up.

MEETINGS Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Lynn Jones in front of the Interpretive Center for a 90-minute pre-Halloween walk focusing on how Arcata Marsh wetlands provide habitat, protection, recreation and wastewater filtration. Bring a mask to comply with current COVID rules. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Guided Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Celebrate Halloween in costume. Meet leader Janelle Chojnacki at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake). Bring your binoculars. COVID-19 guidelines online. Text or email with the walk date and name, email and phone number for each participant. Free. thebook@reninet.com. www.rras.org/home.aspx. 499-1247. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Trinidad Coastal Ambassador Training. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. This three-week program combines hands-on training, Zoom sessions and field trips to coastal properties to prepare for leadership roles in coastal conservation. Free. michelle@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. www. trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. Trinidad Lighthouse Stewardship Work Day. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. Help with interior paint removal in preparation for a

24

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

fresh coat, minor repairs, invasive plant removal and native plant planting. Snacks provided. You’ll need closed-toed shoes, a long sleeve shirt to protect against poison oak, warm layers and a water bottle. Email to sign up. michelle@trinidadcoastallandtrust. org. www.trinidadcoastallandtrust.org.

SPORTS Monster Truck Racing. 7 p.m. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See Oct. 29 listing.

ETC Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www. facebook.com/clubtriangl English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

31 Sunday ART

BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing.

THEATER Radio Play: Hard Boiled Humboldt - a Half-Baked Detective Story. 4:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

EVENTS The Big Chili Cook Off Week. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. See Oct. 29 listing. EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Boo at the Zoo. Noon-4 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Conservation-minded candy stations while supplies last, a spooky science lab, animal Pumpkin Stomp & Chomp and more. Face masks (not just costume masks) whether indoors or outdoors, as many animal species are susceptible to COVID-19 and are unable to be vaccinated. Regular zoo admission. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. Dia de los Muertos. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 28 listing. Drive-Through Trick-or-Treat. 5-6:30 p.m. First Covenant Church Eureka, 2526 J St. Drive through costumed scenes, vote for your favorite at the end and receive a candy bag while supplies last. Drive-By Trick-or-Treat. 3-5 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Drive up to the Grange hall and all the kiddos get a bag of candy and treats. Free. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. Drive-Thru Trick-or-Treat. 5:30 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church, 200 Wabash Ave., Ukiah. Have a happy and safe Halloween. Free goodies while supplies last. The Great Pumpkin Hunt. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Eureka Visitor Center, 240 E St. See Oct. 29 listing. Halloween Fairy’s Plaza Party. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Shoshanna hosts a party with local artist vendors, school fundraisers, music by The Dead Drops and others, a Halloween belly dance


show, trick-or-treating on the plaza and around the downtown area, and other family-friendly activities. Wear a mask and costume. Free. arcatamainstreet@ gmail.com. 822-4500. Halloween Party 1: The Boozening. 6-9 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. See Oct. 29 listing. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing. Las Calabazas Embrujadas. Noon-5 p.m. Carlson Park, 5201 Carlson Park Drive, Arcata. Support local entrepreneurs of food and goodies, participate in a costume contest, adventure a haunted house, paint a pumpkin to take home, explore a petting zoo with Foggy Bottom Boys Farm and get supplies for a Dia de los Muertos ofrenda to take home. Face masks required. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 28 listing. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 28 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing. Rohner Park Spook-A-Thon. 3-5 p.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. An outdoor, carnival-style celebration geared towards youth ages 10 and under, featuring games, a photo stop with a costume contest, vendors with resources for families and goodies for the kids, a pumpkin-carving contest and more. Free. www. friendlyfortuna.com. Scream-A-Torium Haunted House. 11:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Antique Depot, 1122 Main St, Fortuna. See Oct. 29 listing. SpookTacular Cabaret. 7-9 p.m. Outside of Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Live music by The Left Fields. Hosted by Megan D’Arcy. Comedy by Melissa Gordon. Burlesque and drag by Felix Flex, Vivienne Vidette, Miss Leading, Amber Lust, Spooky Spice and Gino Gigglio. Costumes encouraged. Horror characters around the grass in front of the Pub from 4-6 p.m. $10-$15 sliding. www. facebook.com/events/s/spooktacular-cabaret/1566673503679854/. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

1 Monday

ART

BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing.

BOOKS Equity Arcata’s Community Book Club. First Monday of every month, 4-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Alia Dunphy and Meridith Oram discuss Adrienne Marie Brown’s book, Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds. On Zoom. Register online. www. equityarcata.com.

EVENTS The Big Chili Cook Off Week. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. See Oct. 29 listing. EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Humboldt History Symposium. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Online presentations and events connecting local historians, representatives of regional historical organizations, and students and academics with the community. Hosted by the Clarke Historical Museum, the Humboldt Historical Society and Humboldt State University library. www.clarkemuseum.org.

FOOD Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See Oct. 28 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Dia de los Muertos. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 28 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Ham Radio Technician License Class. Virtual World, Online. The Humboldt Amateur Radio Club prepares students for the Amateur Radio Technician Class license examination. Via Zoom and in-person at the Humboldt Bay Fire Training room at 3030 L St. in Eureka. Call or email to reserve a seat. Free. ke6hec@arrl.net. www.humboldt-arc.org. 834-0042. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 29 listing.

2 Tuesday

ART

BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing.

EVENTS The Big Chili Cook Off Week. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. See Oct. 29 listing. EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Humboldt History Symposium. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. See Nov. 1 listing.

FOR KIDS MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Day of the Dead Festival of Altars. 4-8 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. This cultural celebration honors loved ones that have passed with altars around the gazebo, music, food and flamenco dancers. Free. humboldtbrujas@gmail.com. Dia de los Muertos. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 28 listing.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbage Club 6 game tournament. 6:15-

9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly 6-game cribbage tournament. Experienced players are welcome to come and play in a 6-game tournament every Tuesday. Inexperienced players are welcome to come watch and learn and play games on the side. Moose dinner available @ 5:30. Questions call Rick at 599-4605. $3-$8. 31for14@gmail.com. 599-4605.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

3 Wednesday

ART

BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

EVENTS The Big Chili Cook Off Week. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. See Oct. 29 listing. EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Humboldt History Symposium. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. See Nov. 1 listing.

FOR KIDS MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Oct. 29 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Dia de los Muertos. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 28 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 29 listing. Trivia Night. Every other Wednesday, 6-8 p.m. The Madrone Taphouse, 421 Third St., Eureka. Reel Genius Trivia hosts. Free. www.reelgeniustrivia.com.

4 Thursday

ART

BDT: A Retrospective. Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 28 listing.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

EVENTS The Big Chili Cook Off Week. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. See Oct. 29 listing. EPIC’s Virtual Silent Auction. Noon. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Fire Relief Donation Drive. 2-5 p.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J St. See Oct. 28 listing. Humboldt History Symposium. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. See Nov. 1 listing.

FOR KIDS MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

FOOD Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See Oct. 28 listing.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 28 listing.

Heads Up … Ink People Center for the Arts, Humboldt County Library and Word Humboldt, in partnership with KEETTV, seek submissions of works of visual art and poetry from youth ages 13-18 and adults for “Stand Up and Be Counted: Art and Poetry Inspired by Muhammad Ali.” Entries will be accepted online through Nov. 19. The exhibition will go live at the Brenda Tuxford Gallery in early 2022. See www.inkpeople.org for details. The city of Arcata seeks applicants for the Public Safety Committee. Applicants must live within Arcata city limits or live or work within the Arcata Planning Area. Committee applications may be emailed to bdory@cityofarcata.org, faxed to 822-8018 or dropped off in the city manager’s office at Arcata City Hall between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. The city of Arcata seeks applicants for the Economic Development Committee. Email applications to citymgr@cityofarcata.org, fax to 822-8081 or drop off in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office” at the City Hall drop boxes. For more information visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. The Humboldt-Del Norte County Medical Society’s Humboldt-Del Norte PreMedical Education Task Force offers two $1,000 Future Physician scholarships to students planning on attending medical school. Application at www.hafoundation.org/Grants-Scholarships/Scholarships-Apply-Now. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

25


SCREENS

Favorite Spooky Movies that Still Have Bite By Michael Logan

screens@northcoastjournal.com

H

alloween is just days away and if you’re like me, you’re wondering how you’ll pass the evening this year — ears tuned to the front door, bowl of semi-edible candy at the ready, childlike hopes that finally this year more than four children will venture into the dystopian no-man’s-land that lies beyond Lundbar Hills. As you calculate the bare minimum of Reese’s that decency demands you leave unconsumed, you might say to yourself, or to your partner, or to that persistent shadow that lurks in the corner and defies all reason, “Let’s watch something.” But what? There are only so many times you can watch Hocus Pocus this month and let’s face it, you’ve probably already hit that wall. Fortunately for you, I’ve got you covered. I may not have a fancy malevolent entity manifesting in the corner but I do have some cracking good flickers to recommend, just right for All Hallow’s Eve. All are available to stream for a nominal fee or available on disc from your local public library. If you’re over handsome, guilt-ridden vampires that brood and/or (shudder) sparkle in sunlight, dial it back a century, to when they were the stuff of freaking nightmares. F.W. Murnau’s silent classic Nosferatu (1922) still has the mojo and actor (?) Max Schreck’s bald, rat-incisored Count Orlock — the original Slender Man — is the personification of the global plague still recent in moviegoer’s memories. Later, as you lie sleepless in bed, you’ll have time to marvel at the fact you’re terrified by images filmed exactly 100 years ago, during the fall of 1921. If you have time for a double feature, it pairs nicely with either Werner Herzog’s 1979 remake Nosferatu the Vampyre, which manages to retain or surpass the original’s creep factor, or 2000’s clever Shadow of the Vampire. Shadow depicts the making of the 1922 classic, in which director Murnau, to achieve maximum realism, has employed a real vampire. But what do you pay a star who has no use for money? Halloween and haunted houses go

26

together like candy corn and garbage cans, and the gold standard is The Haunting (1963), director Robert Wise’s adaptation of the classic Shirley Jackson novel, The Haunting of Hill House. Unlike the 1999 remake abomination, this version is mercifully free of CGI, decapitations and director Jan de Bont. Instead, it relies on masterful cinematography, unsettling sound effects and faithfulness to Jackson’s truly creepy story. A slightly more recent haunted offering is the under-appreciated The Changeling (1980), starring George C. Scott as a grieving composer who rents a vacant Seattle mansion. Along with utilities and garbage, the suspiciously reasonable rent includes a decades-old murder mystery and a sad but none-too-friendly ghost. Before you can say “Oh, hell no,” innocent red rubber balls will send the hair up on the back of your neck. Living here in the Pacific Northwest — the heart of Bigfoot Country — is something 9-year-old me swore would never happen. And really, the source of that childhood terror was The Legend of Boggy Creek (1972), a docudrama about the Fouke Monster, a Bigfoot-like creature prowling the swamps of southern Arkansas. Made on a shoestring budget by Arkansas’ low-budget maverick filmmaker Charles B. Pierce, it’s an odd but compelling hybrid — part documentary (many Fouke locals play themselves) and part drive-in exploitation horror flick. And even part musical, if you count the two songs (!) that pop up midway through. Younger folks might find it too tame or hokey, but for Sasquatch-fearing GenXers like me, it still gets the job done. If Boggy and The Blair Witch had an unholy, curiously hairy baby, it would be Willow Creek (2013), director Bobcat Goldthwait’s found-footage Bigfoot flick, filmed right here in Humboldt County. Like its Boggy predecessor, Willow Creek uses locals to great effect — look for Bigfoot Books’ and Bluff Creek Project’s Steven Streufert and Tom Yamarone’s surprisingly catchy tune “Roger and Bob (Rode Out That Day),” which is a far more

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Trick-or-treaters hearing about a house with full-size candy bars. Nosferatu

welcome earworm than Legend’s “Hey, Travis Crabtree.” This hirsute double feature is best enjoyed post-camping season. Want something a little lighter? Try the completely batshit Bubba Ho-Tep (2002). Elderly Elvis Presley (Bruce Campbell) and John F. Kennedy (Ossie Davis) — not dead, long story — are living their sad final days in a run-down Texas nursing home. They team up to fight for the souls of their fellow residents, battling an ancient, cowboy hat- and boots-wearing Egyptian mummy. This deliciously weird, sad, hilarious horror-comedy should have been terrible. But instead it’s brilliant. So, turn out the lights, cuddle up on the couch with your S.O. or your fur babies or that nameless horror in the corner that bleeds madness (Jesus, what is that thing?), and remember the tagline from 1972’s The Last House on the Left: “To avoid fainting, keep repeating: ‘It’s only a movie, only a movie, only a movie …’” ● Michael Logan (he/him) is a librarian by day and the author of the nonexistent reference work One Thousand Years of Cinema (Volume 1).

NOW PLAYING

THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Animated movie about your favorite Goth role models. Voiced by Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron and Chloë Grace Moretz. PG. 93M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. ANTLERS. A grisly death in an Oregon mining town starts to look like the work of a supernatural creature, especially since Guillermo Del Toro directs thsi horror fantasy. Starring Kerri Russell, Jesse Plemons and Graham Greene. R. 99M. BROADWAY. DUNE. This screen adaptation of the sci-fi tome by director Denis Villenueve spices it up with Zendaya, Timotheé

Chalamet, Oscar Isaac and Jason Momoa. PG13. 155M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. HALLOWEEN KILLS. Jamie Lee Curtis came to eat probiotic yogurt and kill Michael Myers, and she’s all outta yogurt. R. 106M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. THE HARDER THEY FALL. Idris Elba, Regina King, LaKeith Stanfield and Jonathan Majors mount up for a Western about rival outlaws. (*casually drops handkerchief in dusty street) R. 130M. BROADWAY. LAMB. Noomi Rapace plays an Icelandic woman who longs for a child and gets a lamb in a deeply strange drama/horror/fable/dark Muppet movie. R. 106M. MINOR. LAST NIGHT IN SOHO. Edgar Wright’s fashion-time-travel-murder-mysteryghost story swings back and forth to swinging London with Thomasin McKenzie, Anya Taylor-Joy and Matt Smith. R. 116M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. MY HERO ACADEMIA: WORLD HEROES MISSION. Earnest anime superheroes battle terrorists in this big-screen adventure. 104M. BROADWAY. NO TIME TO DIE. Daniel Craig dusts off the tux one last time to do spy stuff with Lashana Lynch, Ana de Armas and Rami Malek. PG13. 203M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. RON’S GONE WRONG. Animated adventure about an awkward kid (Jack Dylan Grazer) and his malfunctioning robot (Zach Galifianakis). PG. 106M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. VENOM: LET THERE BE CARNAGE. Tom Hardy returns in the sequel to the dark Marvel movie about a man and his symbiotic frenemy. PG13. 90M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456.


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EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1230)

50 and Better

SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1230)

OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1230) OLLI ONLINE: MISUSING THE MILWAUKEE WITH JERRY ROHDE. In 1917, the USS Milwaukee was grounded on the beach at Samoa. We’ll look at this masterpiece of nautical malfeasance, while high and dry in our OLLI Zoom class. Sat., Nov. 13 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI members $20. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1028) OLLI ONLINE: ONE POT: THE SIMPLE, ELEGANT COOKING SOLUTION WITH LOUISA ROGERS. Get tips for designing a user−friendly kitchen, what foods to have on hand, which tools to keep (and avoid!), and secrets for quick stews, soups, stir− fries and salads. Recipes included. Thurs., Nov. 18 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI members $30. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1028) OLLI ONLINE: ONLY HOPE: MY MOTHER AND THE HOLOCAUST BROUGHT TO LIGHT WITH IRV LUBLINER. Learn about the Holocaust through the eyes of a survivor as her son shares about her captivity in Polish ghettos and two Nazi concen− tration camps. Tues., Nov. 16 from 10−11:45 a.m. OLLI members $20. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1028)

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Local tickets. One place.

Therapy & Support

FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA HISET PREPARA− TION visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/ adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707− 476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125)

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1230)

FREE WORK RELATED SKILLS CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1230)

INJECTIONS 1/5/22. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−1028)

SMARTRECOVERY.ORG CALL 267 7868

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format. Visit https://w ww.ed2go.com/crwce/SearchResults.aspx?Sort=R elevance&MaxResultCount=10 (V−1028)

LEARN JAPANESE FROM A NATIVE SPEAKER. Mon. & Wed., Nov. 8−17, 5−6:30 p.m. Online. $80. https://extended.humboldt.edu/extended− education/course/japanese−language

MEDICAL ASSISTING INFORMATIONAL MEETING 11/3/21 10am. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−1028) PHLEBOTOMY INFORMATIONAL MEETING 12/1/ 21 6pm. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−1028) VENIPUNCTURE 1/6/22. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707)476− 4500. (V−1028)

Wellness & Bodywork 2022 AYURVEDA HEALTH & LIFE COACH & HERBALIST TRAININGS NOW ENROLLING. Do you ever feel your childhood upbringing or educa− tion was lacking in the life−skills needed to be the healthiest most successful version of yourself? Ready to learn the health & life skills & get the ongoing support you need to truly thrive in all areas of your life? Join the Ayurvedic Living School w/Traci Webb & Guests for our 100% online Ayurveda Health & Life Coach Training Starting: January 12. Ayurveda Herbalist Training Starts: March 22. Spaces fill fast. Early registration advised. Visit: www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−1/13) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Herbal & Traditional Healing in Greece with Thea Parikos. May 21 − 31, 2022. Discover the beauty, aromas, traditional and modern uses of many medicinal plants on this amazing journey of learning to the Aegean island of Ikaria. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0428)

CARTOONS

EMT REFRESHER 11/4/21 − 11/14/21. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. (V−1028)

Our platform is free to event creators. Work with the team you trust, who cares about your business or organization and the success of the Humboldt county area. Contact Melissa Sanderson at 707-498-8370 or melissa@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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38. Where Ross taught paleontology on “Friends,” for short 39. *Rolling Stones guitarist 40. Leader namechecked in the Beatles’ “Revolution” 41. Understand 42. “Full House” twins 43. Skating flub 44. Suit to ____ 45. Singer whose birth name, Ashley, is an anagram of her stage name 47. *”Newhart” actor 52. Online admin 53. Curled-lip expression 54. Hilarious folks 56. Zenith 57. *First Korean to win an Oscar for Best Director 62. “Brooklyn NineNine” detective Diaz

63. Welcome in Waikiki 64. Big name in theaters 65. Part of a cherry you don’t eat 66. Eponymous California museum founder 67. Prophetic sign ... or a two-word description of the answers to the five starred clues?

when doubled, means “very strong” 6. Ed of “Elf” 7. “Ted ____” (Apple TV+ comedy) 8. Texter’s “As I see it ...” 9. Blood, so to speak 10. Passions 11. Tiring problem for bicyclists? 12. Middle part of the body 13. “This came as no surprise” 18. Air France hub DOWN 21. On and on and on 1. Do sum work 2. Setting for Hitchcock’s 22. Fetch at auction 23. Return to brunette, “Notorious” that, say coincidentally, can be found in the word 24. Tennis score after deuce, maybe “notorious” 3. ____ Taylor (fashion 26. “Blade Runner” actor ____ James chain) 27. “Holy moly!” 4. Make sparkle, in 29. Places to study a way anglais, perhaps 5. Hawaiian for 33. Inception “strong,” which,

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34. Fin. neighbor 35. Stockpile 36. “Caveman” diet 37. Coral component 39. Chopper blade 43. Go it alone 44. Test worth coll. credit 46. Concerning 47. Rulers before the Bolsheviks 48. High, in a way 49. 1980s U.S. attorney general 50. “... unless I’m wrong” 51. “Sweet dreams” 55. Any singer of the 1973 #1 hit “Love Train” 57. Sack 58. Cheer for Real Madrid 59. ____ de plume 60. ____-haw 61. Take responsibility for

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries philosopher Emil Cioran wrote, “When I meet friends or people I know who are going through a difficult period, I usually have this advice for them: ‘Spend 20 minutes in a cemetery, and you’ll see that, though your worry won’t disappear, you’ll almost forget about it and you’ll feel better.’” I don’t think you’re weathering a terribly difficult phase right now, Aries, but you may be dealing with more riddles and doubts and perplexities than you’re comfortable with. You could be feeling a bit darker and heavier than usual. And I think Cioran’s advice would provide you with the proper stimulation to transform your riddles and doubts and perplexities into clarity and grace and aplomb. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the spirit of a dead ancestor. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): According to some spiritual teachers, desire interferes with our quest for illumination. It diverts us from what’s real and important. I know gurus who even go so far as to say that our yearnings deprive us of freedom; they entrap us and diminish us. I strongly disagree with all those ideas. I regard my longing as a primary fuel that energizes my drive to free myself from pain and nonsense. How about you, Taurus? In alignment with astrological omens, I authorize you to deepen and refine and celebrate the yearning in your heart. Your title/nickname could be: 1. Yearning Champion. 2. Desire Virtuoso. 3. Connoisseur of Longing. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Author Jessamyn West confessed, “I am always jumping into the sausage grinder and deciding, even before I’m half ground, that I don’t want to be a sausage after all.” I offer her testimony as a cautionary tale, Gemini. There’s no astrological reason, no cosmic necessity, that decrees you must become like a sausage anytime soon. Such a fate can be easily avoided. All you must do is commit yourself to not jumping into the sausage grinder. Also: In every way you can imagine, don’t be like a sausage. (To meditate on sausage-ness, read the Wikipedia entry: tinyurl.com/SausageMetaphor) CANCER (June 21-July 22): Our fellow Cancerian, author Franz Kafka, told us, “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free.” And yes, some of us Crabs go through phases when we crave safety so much that we tolerate, even welcome, being in chains. But the fact is that you’re far more likely to be safe if you are free, not in chains. And according to my reading of the astrological omens, that’s extra true for you now. If you can celebrate Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: runaway prisoner, escape artist, freedom fighter. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Some of us yearn for allies who can act like saviors: rescue us from our demons and free us from our burdensome pasts and transform us into the beauties we want to become. On the other hand, some of us do all this hard work by ourselves: rescue ourselves from our demons and free ourselves from our burdensome pasts and transform ourselves into the beauties we want to become. I highly recommend the latter approach for you in the coming weeks, Leo. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here is a costume suggestion: your own personal savior. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “One of the reasons people are so unhappy is they don’t talk to themselves,” says author Elizabeth Gilbert. “You have to keep a conversation going with yourself throughout your life,” she continues, “to see how you’re doing, to keep your focus, to remain your own friend.” Now is a favorable time to try such an experiment, Virgo. And if you already have skill in the art of carrying on a vibrant dialog with yourself, now is a perfect moment to upgrade and refine it. Try this experiment: Imagine having a conversation with the Future You. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “In the absence of willpower, the

most complete collection of virtues and talents is worthless.” Libran occultist Aleister Crowley wrote that, and I agree. But let’s phrase his idea more positively: To make full use of your virtues and talents, you must develop a strong willpower. And here’s the good news, Libra: The coming weeks will be a favorable time to cultivate your willpower, along with the assets that bolster it, like discipline, self-control, and concentration. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are accessories I recommend for you to carry with you, no matter what your costume is: a wand, a symbolic lightning bolt, an ankh, an arrow, a Shiva lingam stone or crystal. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Mardi Gras is a boisterous festival that happens every February all over the planet. One hotspot is New Orleans. The streets there are filled with costumed revelers who enjoy acting in ways that diverge from their customary behavior. If you want to ride on a float in the parade that snakes down Royal Street, you must, by law, wear a festive mask. I invite all of you Scorpios to engage in similar festivities for the next three weeks—even if you’re not doing much socializing or partying. It’s a favorable time to experiment with a variety of alternate identities. Would you consider adopting a different persona or two? How could you have fun playing around with your self-image? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Jungian psychotherapist and storyteller Clarissa Pinkola Estés reminds us, “In fairy tales, tears change people, remind them of what is important, and save their very souls.” I hope you’re open to the possibility of crying epic, cathartic, catalytic tears in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. According to my analysis, you have a prime opportunity to benefit from therapeutic weeping. It could chase your fears and cure your angst and revivify your soul. So please take advantage of this gift from life. Be like a superhero whose superpower is to generate healing by crying. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Filmmaker Wim Wenders said, “Any film that supports the idea that things can be changed is a great film in my eyes.” I’ll expand upon that: “Any experience, situation, influence, or person that supports the idea that things can be changed is great.” This is a useful and potentially inspiring theme for you to work with right now, Capricorn. In accordance with astrological rhythms, I hope you will be a connoisseur and instigator of beneficial, beautiful transformations. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Fitness buff Jack LaLanne was still doing his daily workout when he was 95. He was also famous for performing arduous feats. At age 65, for example, he swam a mile through Japan’s Lake Ashinoko while towing 65 boats filled with 6,500 pounds of wood pulp. I think you’re currently capable of a metaphorically comparable effort, Aquarius. One way to do it is by mastering a psychological challenge that has previously seemed overwhelming. So meditate on where your extra strength would be best directed, and use it wisely! If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: fitness buff, bodybuilder, marathon runner, yoga master. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): When birdwatchers describe a bird, they speak of its “jizz.” This term refers to the distinctive character of its habitual movements, flying style, posture, vocal mannerisms, and coloring. One aficionado defines jizz as the bird’s “indefinable quality,” or the “vibe it gives off.” I’ve got a theory that right now you’re as bird-like as you’ve ever been. You seem lighter and freer than usual, less bound to gravity and solemnity, and more likely to break into song. Your fears are subsiding because you have the confidence to leave any situation that’s weighing you down. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the bird that has your favorite kind of jizz.

Homework: Tell me why you’re such a gorgeous creature. https://Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

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©2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KARL N. JOHNSON, ETC. CASE NO. PR2100295 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of KARL N. JOHNSON, also known as KARL NICHOLAS JOHNSON AND NICK JOHNSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner CHRISTINE LAW In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that CHRIS− TINE LAW be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 18, 2021 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate

affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James K. Morrison Morrison & Morrison 3005 G Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−8012 Filed: October 21, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/21, 10/28, 11/4 (21−396)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ROBERT F. NELSON aka ROBERT F. NELSON SR. CASE NO. PR2100290 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of ROBERT F. NELSON aka ROBERT F. NELSON SR. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner MICHAEL TATE In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that MICHAEL TATE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 18, 2021 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6, Room: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or

IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 Filed: October 14, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/21, 10/28, 11/4 (21−386)

Public Notice I, Margaret Christina Belli, have sold the property commonly known as 3029 Eel River Drive, Loleta, Cali− fornia, near [Zip Code 95551] [309−051−075−000, 309−061−005− 000, 309−041−016−000] In a private sale in Lawful Money. Dated: September 13th, 2021 By Seller: Margaret Christina Belli By Buyer: Undisclosed Witness: Jason Penrod 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 1028, 11/4, 11/11 (21−354)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00653 The following person is doing Busi− ness as DOC DASH LEGAL SERVICES Humboldt 2036 Irving Dr Eureka, CA 95503 PO Box 724 Eureka, CA 95502 Elizabeth E Stephens 2036 Irving Dr Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on September 30, 2021. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elizabeth Stephens, Owner This September 30, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 (21−376)

Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elizabeth Stephens, Owner This September 30, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 (21−376)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00655 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CALLIE MAPLE COLLECTION Humboldt 4169 Cedar St Eureka, CA 95503 PO Box 481 Cutten, CA 95534 Jamie A Andresen 4169 Cedar St Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 13, 2021. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jamie Andresen, CEO This October 1, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

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PUBLIC NOTICE HUMBOLDT COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS NOTICE OF INTENTION TO PURCHASE INTEREST IN REAL PROPERTY HUMBOLDT BAY TRAIL SOUTH (APN 501-241-031, 501-241-030, 501-241-033, 017-081-001, 404-141-004) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to Government Code section 25350, that on November 16, 2021, at 9:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing to receive public comment and testimony regarding the proposal for Humboldt County to purchase interest in real property as described below. The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors intends to consider approving the acquisition of fee title ownership of two land parcels (Assessor Parcel No. 501-241-031 & 501-241-030) adjacent to Bracut Industrial Park and a temporary construction easement on a portion of Bracut Industrial Park (Assessor Parcel No. 501-241-033). The parcels and the easement would be acquired from Bracut Lumber Company, a willing seller, with state transportation funds for the sum of $355,200. The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors intends to consider approving the acquisition of permanent and temporary easements over portions of two parcels (Assessor Parcel No. 017-081-001 & 404-141-004) associated with the Brainard mill site. The easements would be acquired from California Redwood Company, a willing seller, with state transportation funds for the sum of $770,000. The purpose of the acquisitions described herein is to acquire a portion of the right-of-way necessary for development of a Class 1 bike path (multi-use trail) connecting Arcata and Eureka. Any and all interested parties are invited to participate in the hearing and provide public comment. The hearing will be held on Tuesday, November 16, 2021, at 9:00 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. In accordance with Executive Order N-29-20, this meeting will be held virtually. The agenda and live stream of the meeting can be accessed here: https://humboldt.legistar.com. The agenda will have instructions for providing public comment during the hearing. Written comments can be e-mailed in advance of the hearing to cob@co.humboldt.ca.us or mailed to Clerk of the Board, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501. KATHY HAYES, Clerk of the Board

10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 (21−377)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00692 The following person is doing Busi− ness as DOOR−TO−DOOR AIRPORTER Humboldt 1434 Railroad McKinleyville, CA 95519 PO Box 8241 Eureka, CA 95502 Margie C Vitalie 1434 Railroad McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Margie C Vitalie, Owner This October 19, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 10/28, 11/4, 11/11 (21−392)

We Print Obituaries Submit information via email to classified@northcoastjournal. com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00677 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LA CHAPARRITA MARKET Humboldt 461 S Fortuna Blvd Fortuna, CA 95540 Ricardo M Garcia−Herrera 110 Gulliksen Dr Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ricardo M Garcia−Herrera, Owner This October 12, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/21, 10/28, 11/4, 11/11 (21−387)

Fortuna, CA 95540

Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ricardo M Garcia−Herrera, Owner This October 12, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Leendert DeVries, President This October 14, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

10/21, 10/28, 11/4, 11/11 (21−387)

Philip Michael Arnot 1937 - 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00681 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUN VALLEY FLORAL FARMS Humboldt 3160 Upper Bay Road Arcata, CA 95521 The Sun Valley Group, Inc. CA C1810212 3160 Upper Bay Road Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Leendert DeVries, President This October 14, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/21, 10/28, 11/4, 11/11 (21−385)

Philip Michael Arnot was born on March 10, 1937, in Los Angeles California to Maynard “Jocko” and Lucille Arnot. He lived in Glendale until 1944 when his parents moved Phil and his older brother James D. Arnot to Eureka. Jocko wanted the family to experience living on a farm like he had growing up in Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1947, the family purchased a small 9-acre farm with a horse, a cow, pigs, and rabbits in the Freshwater basin. After two years, the family moved back to Eureka where Phil lived until he graduated from Eureka High School in 1954. Phil attended Humboldt State College in 1955 and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 1958. Phil graduated from Lincoln Law School in San Francisco in 1963 and was admitted to the California state bar in 1964. Phil and Sally were married in 1957. They returned to Eureka in 1964 where Philip worked for Humboldt Land Title Company for two years. He went into private practice for Fred Hilger in 1966. Phil and Sally had their first child, Michael in 1964, and their second child Stephen in 1966. Michael is a chiropractor in Portland, Oregon. Steve is a lawyer for the Federal Department of Justice in Portland, Oregon. Phil was a skilled bankruptcy practitioner and personal injury litigator. In 1985, Phil and Rory Hanson tried the case of Baker v. PG&E and obtained a jury verdict of 2.1 million, the largest verdict at that time in a personal injury case. Phil’s 50 year legal career is credited with numerous published decisions in landmark bankruptcy cases. Those decisions have been the basis for numerous appellate court opinions. Phil was active in local and state politics. During Ronald Reagan’s campaign for Governor, Phil was the campaigns representative on the north coast and hosted Reagan while he campaigned in Humboldt County. A memorable experience. Phil was also the Humboldt County chair for governor George Deukmejian for two terms. In his later years, Phil spent a decade providing community comments on KINS radio. I can still hear him now, “this is Phil Arnot signing off for community comment” Phil and Sally celebrated their 64th wedding anniversary in Portland Oregon in 2021 with their family following a recent move to Lake Oswego to be closer to Michael and Stephen. It was quite an event. Philip’s wife of 64 years recently passed away in September at the age of 82. Heartbroken, he followed her by passing a month later. Phil is survived by his two sons Michael and Stephen, Stephen’s wife Andrea, and 5 grandchildren, Eloise, Sam, Camille, Nicholas, and Alexis. He also leaves behind his brother-in-laws Chris and Rick Watson. He additionally leaves behind on his brother James Arnot’s side of the family, Sharon his sister-in-law, nieces Michelle and Sheri-Lynn, nephews Joe, David, Randy, and Rodney and Janet Arnot’s children, Philip, James and Jeanette. Phil passed away on October 18, 2021. He was a wonderful man, a loving husband and father, and good friend to many and an exemplary community member to the Eureka and Humboldt Bay area. He will be missed. A service will be held at Ocean View Sunrise Memorial Park at 2 pm on October 29, 2021.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

10/21, 10/28, 11/4, 11/11 (21−385)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00682 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BILLYBOYSALES Humboldt 123 Barley Road Arcata, CA 95521 William S McIntire 123 Barley Road Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on September 23, 2019. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s William S McIntire, Owner This October 12, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00689 The following person is doing Busi− ness as STEVES HANDY SERVICE Humboldt 1644 Linton Ave Eureka, CA 95501 Stephen N Saige 1644 Linton Ave Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stephen Saige, Owner This October 19, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/28, 11/4, 11/11 (21−391)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2101364 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

PETITION OF: SARAH KATHLEEN GREEN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name SARAH KATHLEEN GREEN to Proposed Name SARAH KATHLEEN MCCUE−GREEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter 10/21, 10/28, 11/4, 11/11 (21−388) appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be 4 4 2 -1 4 0 0 × 3 1 4 granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that default includes the reasonsAPPOINTfor the objec− NOTICE OF PROVISIONAL least two courtSCHOOL days before MENT TOtion THEatFIELDBROOK the matter scheduled to be heard DISTRICT BOARDis OF TRUSTEES and must appear at the hearing to Be advised that thewhy Fieldbrook School show cause the petition should District Boardnot ofbe Trustees hasIfprovisionally apgranted. no written objec− pointed Andrea Broughton on Monday, October tion is timely filed, the court may 11, 2021, to a grant vacanttheposition petitionrepresenting without a the Fieldbrook School District area pursuant to California Education Code, hearing. Section 5091. NOTICE OF HEARING The vacant position, effective September 2021 were12, created Date: 16, November 2021 because of the resignation of board member. Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 Unless a petition bearing sufficient SUPERIOR number ofCOURT signatures of the regisOF CALIFORNIA, tered voters of the Fieldbrook School District calling for a special election OF HUMBOLDT pursuant to California Education Code,COUNTY Section 5091 is filed in the Office 825 FIFTH of the County Superintendent of Schools (901 STREET Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501 CA) within 30 days of the provisional EUREKA, appointment, they shall become information on how to appear effec- tive appointments until the nextForregularly scheduled election for remotely for your hearing, please school district governing boards. FIELDBROOK SCHOOL DISTRICT visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Justin Wallace Date: September 27, 2021 Principal/Superintendent Filed: September 28, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

LEGALS?

10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4 (21−381)

persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 12, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: September 27, 2021 Filed: September 28, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4 (21−381)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2101365 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: TEXAS JOSHUA GREEN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name TEXAS JOSHUA GREEN to Proposed Name TEXAS JOSHUA MCCUE−GREEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 12, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: September 27, 2021 Filed: September 28, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/4 (21−382)

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HUMBOLDT GEOGRAPHIC

Losing California By Rowdy Kelly

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2101507 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

PETITION OF: HAILEY ALICE JOY WOHLWEND he Centerville cliffs are eroding for a decree changing names as into the Pacific Ocean. Over follows:the past 25 years, I have watched Presentthis name HAILEY part of the coastline slide intoALICE JOY WOHLWEND to Proposed the ocean. The landscape feels Name HAILEY like it is straight out of an apocalyptic ALICE JOY VELTRI THE COURT ORDERS that all movie. In fact, in the late 1990s, while at-interested in this matter persons tending Humboldt State University, I shot appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show a few student films here on land that has cause, if any, why the petition for now fallen into the ocean. change of name should not be l granted. Any person objecting to Rowdy Kelley (he/him) is a TVtheand film name changes described above location scout/manager, producer must fileand a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− director with family roots in Humboldt at least two court days before going back to 1900. He’s an avid tion outdoors the matter person into mountain biking and SUPing.is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to See more of his photos on the Humboldt show cause why the petition should Geographic Facebook not bepage. granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 10, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 LEGAL NOTICES SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT CHANGE OF NAME 825 FIFTH STREET CASE NO. CV2101507 EUREKA, CA 95501 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFor information on how to appear FORNIA, COUNTY OF remotely for your hearing, please HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. visit https://www.humboldt.courts. EUREKA, CA. 95501 ca.gov/ PETITION OF: Date: October 20, 2021 HAILEY ALICE JOY WOHLWEND Filed: October 21, 2021 for a decree changing names as /s/ Kelly L. Neel follows: Judge of the Superior Court Present name 10/28, 11/4, 11/11, 11/18 (21−395) HAILEY ALICE JOY WOHLWEND to Proposed Name ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR HAILEY ALICE JOY VELTRI CHANGE OF NAME THE COURT ORDERS that all CASE NO. CV2101514 persons interested in this matter SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIappear before this court at the FORNIA, COUNTY OF hearing indicated below to show HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. cause, if any, why the petition for EUREKA, CA. 95501 change of name should not be PETITION OF: granted. Any person objecting to TARREN ANAIS MOSES the name changes described above for a decree changing names as must file a written objection that follows: includes the reasons for the objec− Present name tion at least two court days before TARREN ANAIS MOSES the matter is scheduled to be heard to Proposed Name and must appear at the hearing to TARREN ANAIS WILSON show cause why the petition should THE COURT ORDERS that all not be granted. If no written objec− persons interested in this matter tion is timely filed, the court may appear before this court at the grant the petition without a hearing indicated below to show hearing. cause, if any, why the petition for NOTICE OF HEARING change of name should not be Date: December 10, 2021 granted. Any person objecting to Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 the name changes described above SUPERIOR COURT must file a written objection that OF CALIFORNIA, includes the reasons for the objec− COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT tion at least two court days before 825 FIFTH STREET the matter is scheduled to be heard EUREKA, CA 95501 and must appear at the hearing to For information on how to appear show cause why the petition should remotely for your hearing, please not be granted. If no written objec− visit https://www.humboldt.courts. tion is timely filed, the court may ca.gov/

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2101514 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: TARREN ANAIS MOSES for a decree changing names as follows: Present name TARREN ANAIS MOSES to Proposed Name TARREN ANAIS WILSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Build to edge of the document NOTICE OF HEARING Margins are just a safe area Date: December 10, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

Photo by Rowdy Kelley

ONS I S S I SUBM NOV. 8 CLOSE

For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: October 22, 2021 Filed: October 22, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 10/28, 11/4, 11/11, 11/18 (21−397)

LEG AL S ? classified@north coastjournal.com

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Well, that went by fast. It’s already time again for the annual North Coast Journal Flash Fiction Contest, so get typing. Make your original stories 99 words or fewer (like this announcement), not including the title, for a chance to see your work of genius and brevity in the Journal. Email up to three entries as attachments or in the body of your email (no PDFs, please) to fiction@northcoastjournal.com with your full name and contact information (sorry, we don’t do pen names) by 5 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 8. The judges’ favorites will be published in December. Don’t procrastinate.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL


EMPLOYMENT Opportunities

City of Arcata

   

Code Compliance/ Permit Technician

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is now hiring. Clean record. Driver’s license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262

$51,646.76 - $64,346.40/yr.

ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

YOUR AD HERE 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

Now Hiring: Dental Support Manager The Dental Support Manager directs staff and plays a hands-on role in coordinating, delivering, and ensuring high-quality services as well as effective payment for all dental services. Responsible for staff selection, review and discipline, staff, and provider schedules, purchasing and supplies, dental staff training, patient appointments, reminders and flow, charts and electronic records planning, patient education and referrals, patient satisfaction and compliance with clinic policies and procedures. Job Duties and Responsibilities Hands-on manager who regularly is in an assisting role (DA) or working at the front desk or on projects that involve him/her in patient care. Works with Dental Director to ensure patient and employee safety- including occupational health planning, assessment and staff training, orientation, physical exams and/or tests and re-training and monitoring. Supports the Dental Director to ensure full and complete coding and other documentation for clinical quality and optimal and correct billing practices. Supports the Dental Director with clinical quality audits, chart reviews, tracking and follow-up using manualand electronic systems.

The City is seeking an energetic candidate for this exciting new position! The Code Compliance/Permit Technician will perform a variety of technical duties in support of the City’s code compliance programs, including the new Residential Rental and Inspection Program (RRIP), and will monitor and enforce a variety of applicable ordinances, codes and regulations related to building, housing, health and safety, and property maintenance. Visit: https://www.cityofarcata. org/Jobs for application materials or contact Arcata City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE. First review: 4:00 p.m. Friday, November 12, 2021.

                       

JOB OPENINGS 241 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 • (707) 445-8451

Full Time positions available • Indigenous Education Advocate • Staff Accountant • Operation/Human Resources Director • Emergency Response Coordinator • AP Bookkeeper

Temporary Work Experience

training positions available for eligible Native Americans include training in the following paid positions: • Retail Clerk/Reception Desk • Building Maintenance • Warehouse/Delivery • Brushing/Hand Tool Cleanup/Repair For more information, job descriptions, and application, please visit jobs.ncidc.org

Experience / Skills / Talents Minimum three years’ experience with both front and back-office functions of a dental practice or dental clinic. Please send updated resume including references to:

www.sthsclinic.org

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 www.northcoastjournal.com

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Redwood Community Action Agency is hiring! ADULT & FAMILY SERVICES DIVISION • •

Family Support Specialist F/T 40 hrs. weekly, $15.00 hr. Case Worker F/T 40 hours weekly, $17.00 hr.

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION •

Program Coordinator for Financial Literacy Project F/T 32 hours weekly $17.00/hr.

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES • •

Intake & Outreach Specialist. F/T 37.5 hours weekly $17.00/hr. Weatherization Field Crew F/T 40 hours weekly $18.00/hr.

YOUTH SERVICE BUREAU DIVISION • •

Youth Shelter Worker/Residential P/T $15.00/hr. - $15.50/hr. for overnight (NOC) shifts. Program Coordinator for the RAVEN Project. F/T 40 hours weekly $17.00/hr.

All fulltime positions have complete benefit packages that include Medical, Dental, Vision, Employee Assistance Plan, & 401K Retirement Plan. Go to www.rcaa.org for complete job descriptions, qualifications & required job application. Positions are open until filled. RCAA is an EOE

PLACE YOUR JOB LISTINGS CLASSIFIEDS.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM Place Ad

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   MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN, Arcata Main Office

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                                       

YOUR AD HERE classified@northcoastjournal.com

(707) 442-1400 ×314

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Redwood Community Action Agency is hiring! AMERICORPS MEMBERS AFACTR Program – looking for members to serve at Community and Family Resource Centers throughout Humboldt County. Benefits include: $17,750 living allowance per 1700 hour term of service $ 14,040 living allowance per 1200 hour term of service NEW increased Educational Award totaling $10,000 per service term for 1700 hour members Rental assistance for all members Health benefits Professional trainings and development Childcare if eligible Eligible student loans can be placed in forbearance For more information call Erika 707-269-2047 press releases & news tips: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: music@northcoastjournal.com advertising: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: classified@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT

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City of Arcata

MAINTENANCE WORKER/SENIOR - UTILITIES MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR/ ADMIN ASSISTANT

The Fortuna Chamber of Commerce is seeking an organized, versatile, and passionate Membership Coordinator/Admin Assistant to enhance and grow our member-based organization and visitor center through social media promotions, outreach, workforce development, and business retention/recruitment. The ideal candidate is highly motivated, personable, articulate with excellent verbal and written communication skills, and adept at social media. This position will require an average of 20 hours per week depending on workload, events, and President/CEO scheduling. The position will be part-time, nonexempt with a salary range of $15.00-$19.00, depending on experience and qualifications. Schedule is flexible during the workweek. The full job description and application instructions can be found online at www.fortunachamber.com/employment.

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Hiring?

ARCATA POLICE DEPARTMENT

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314

POLICE BUSINESS MANAGER

northcoastjournal.com

District Nurse Klamath Trinity Joint Unified School District $46,526.62-$70,277.04 195 days, 6 hours per day The School Nurse shall report to the Superintendent or designee and assume responsibility for program planning, coordination and implementation of student health services as prescribed by the Education Code and other applicable state/federal law. The School Nurse shall observe, consult with and assist other school personnel regarding the various health related needs of students, both those enrolled in regular and special education programs. The School Nurse shall also serve as a liaison between the school and community-based medical/health service providers and agency representatives. BS in Nursing with current RN license 3 letters of recommendation within last 2 years, Letter of intent, Resume, copy of license and copy of transcripts. $1,800 Signing Bonus and $1,800 Retention Bonus **$17,562.36 FOR HEALTH & WELFARE BENEFITS INCLUDED**

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$64,915.51 - $78,905.18/yr. plus 4% increases in 2022 and 2023 and a generous benefits package upon hire First review: 4:00 p.m. Friday, October 29, 2021. Responsibilities include overseeing, managing, supervising, and participating in the day-to-day functions of the Police Department Front Office and Records and Property Sections. The position is also responsible for the development, implementation, and monitoring of the Department’s annual budget, and develops, coordinates, and manages a variety of special projects in support of the Chief and Command Staff. Visit: https://www.cityofarcata.org/ Jobs for application materials or contact Arcata City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

$35,211 - $50,951 plus 4% increases scheduled for 2022 and 2023 This is the entry-level class in the Streets/ Utilities maintenance worker series with the current assignment being in Utilities performing a wide variety of semi-skilled and skilled tasks related to the construction, maintenance, repair, installation and monitoring of utilities systems and infrastructure. Visit: https://www.cityofarcata.org/Jobs for application materials or contact Arcata City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE.

ARCATA POLICE DEPARTMENT

POLICE OFFICER & POLICE OFFICER TRAINEE SPONSORSHIP

$57,919 - $70,400/yr. $19.85–$21.91/hr. Trainee Sponsorship through the Police Academy includes hourly pay, medical benefits upon sponsorship, Academy expenses and equipment paid for and provided. Upon graduation, promotion to a fulltime, fully benefitted Arcata Police Officer position. APD selects Sponsorships for students currently enrolled but not yet attending, those considering enrolling, or applicants already attending a P.O.S.T. approved Academy. Non-Sponsorship applicants should possess valid P.O.S.T. Certification verifying successful completion of a P.O.S.T. approved Police Academy or possess a valid P.O.S.T. Recertification Certificate. Arcata’s small town atmosphere, academic community, and beautiful natural resources make us a nice place to live and work. Visit: https://www.cityofarcata.org/Jobs or contact City of Arcata, 736 F Street, Arcata, CA 95521; (707) 822-5953; or email personnel@cityofarcata.org. EOE.


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The City of Rio Dell is now accepting applications for

POLICE OFFICER ($46,005–$64,849 + Benefits)



Open to entry level & laterals. Candidate must have appropriate POST certification and be 21 years of age by the time of appointment. Small but effective department.

        

The Rio Dell Police Department is a supportive environment that encourages an officer’s personal and professional growth. This is a small town with great weather, surrounded by beauty, with low levels of crime. Help us keep it this way! Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue, www.cityofriodell.ca.gov or call (707) 764-3532. default

Trees Foundation is hiring a

   Help make Southern Humboldt’s forested landscapes and communities better prepared for wildfire by helping to develop and facilitate community wildfire resiliency action plans. Work directly with the Southern Humboldt Fire Safe Council in planning, funding, and implementing community wildfire preparedness goals. Remote work possible; minimum one day/month at Trees Foundation office in Garberville.

            

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Submit cover letter, resume, and references to trees@treesfoundation.org, with the job title in subject line. View full job requirements at tinyurl.com/treesjob.

City of Trinidad Public Works/ Water System Director

The City of Trinidad is accepting applications from qualified, experienced professionals to fill the Public Works/Water System Director Position. Desired candidates must possess valid T3/D1 certifications for water treatment and distribution. Serving as Chief Water Plant Operator and Director of Public Works, responsibilities include performing diverse, specialized, and complex work in water treatment and frequent interaction with the public. This is a full-time position, with a negotiable salary depending on qualifications. Visit www.trinidad.ca.gov for a complete job profile and description. The application review period begins October 30. Please contact the Trinidad City Clerk’s office if you need additional information.

                     

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 Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

Mental Health Support Specialist Multiple positions, Part-time, $18.30/hr.

Program Supervisor II Full-time, $21.32/hr.

Program Assistant, Case Management

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Now Hiring: Dental Assistant (DA) Registered Dental Assistant (RDA)

Full-time, $14.56/hr. Open until filled

COVID-19 Vaccine Required

Position Summary: A full time, non-exempt position responsible for assisting the dentist(s) and dental hygienist(s) in the direct provision of primary care dental services to patients of the center. The Dental Assistant is also responsible for sterilization, preparation and inventory control of dental instruments and supplies.

Job description and list of qualifications available at www.changingtidesfs.org We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

K’ima: w Medical Center

Essential Functions: Assists patients in resolving minor difficulties, answering their questions and giving directions to patients as authorized by the dentist or dental hygienist. Serves as dentist’s or dental hygienist’s chair-side assistant. Prepares operatory for patient treatment as per Dental Department protocols and the dentist’s or dental hygienist’s directions. Exposes and develops dental radiographs in accordance with state regulations and law as well as Dental Department directive and protocol. Performs independent procedures as delegated and directed by the dentist in accordance with state regulation and law and Dental Department directive and protocol. Maintains Dental Department equipment in accordance with manufacturer’s directions and Dental Department policy and protocol.

Education and Training: High school diploma or GED certificate Completion of accredited course in dental assisting preferred Ability to attend to multiple tasks at the same time and to prioritize assignments and responsibilities to ensure compliance with established deadlines and protocols. Effective oral and written communication skills in English are required. Effective oral communication skills in Spanish preferred. Licensure and Credentials: Certified Dental Assistant preferred Current CPR (BLS) required Please send updated resume including references to:

www.sthsclinic.org

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2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293

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

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

SOBER LIVING CASE MANAGER ($20.40/HR) CLOSES OCTOBER 29, 2021 DENTAL HYGIENIST ($39.00-$43.00/HR DOE) CLOSES OCTOBER 29, 2021 BILLING SUPERVISOR ACCOUNTANT COMMUNITY HEALTH REPRESENTATIVE HEALTH INFORMATION DIRECTOR PATIENT BENEFITS CLERK PHYSICIAN CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT LAB TECHNOLOGIST CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CODER TECHNICIAN MEDICAL DIRECTOR MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN CARE MANAGER (RN OR LVN) PATIENT ACCOUNTS CLERK I PHARMACY TECHNICIAN ON-CALL COALITION COORDINATOR MAT RN CARE MANAGER ALL POSITIONS ABOVE ARE FT REGULAR & OPEN UNTIL FILLED UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

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Merchandise

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Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 888−519−0171 (AAN CAN) BAD PALLIATIVE CARE OR HOSPICE EXPERIENCE? Have you or a family member had a bad experience with a palliative care company or hospice in Humboldt County? Please contact badcarehumboldt@ gmail.com with your story.

2001 JAYCO DESIGNER 3610 RLT 3 slide outs, 1 awning, A/C, sleep 6, info at lanlac@hughesemail.net, asking $1,600, 408−356−8785

Your Ad Here

classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 × 314

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

Sergeant default

 Are you someone who enjoys improving processes and helping people? Are you detail oriented and take personal ownership of your work? We’re looking for someone who needs little direction but who is collaborative and wants to process the payroll for our California companies.

Hiring Minimum Requirements • High school graduate, GED, or relevant work experience • 18 years or older • Employment contingent upon successful completion of a background check

Additional Qualifications • Associate’s or Bachelor’s preferred, but not required. • 2-5 five years in payroll role required • Advanced computer and software skills/experience including proficiency in Windows, Microsoft Office, CRMs, ATS, HRMS, Payroll, etc.

https://andretti1.com/career/

The North Coast Journal is hiring

SALE REPS

BASE SALARY + COMMISSION + BENEFITS Seeking full-time motivated individuals eager to develop and manage sales programs across print, web and mobile platforms. Apply by emailing your resume to

kyle@northcoastjournal.com

Hoopa Tribal Police Department,Regular, F/T, Salary: $34.13/hr. Under general supervision of the Chief of Police or his authorized designee shall perform a wide variety of peace officer duties. Minimum Qualifications: Must have three (3) years of related experience and/or training. Must possess a valid P.O.S.T Law Enforcement Academy or Indian Police Academy Certificate. Additional requirements are listed in the job description. Valid CA Driver’s License and insurable. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

Police Officer Hoopa Tribal Police Department Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Performs a wide variety of peace officer duties. Minimum Qualifications: Must possess a Basic Academy Certificate from a California P.O.S.T. approved academy. Additional requirements are listed in the job description. Must have a California Driver’s license and be insurable. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background checks. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

Associate Attorney Office of Tribal Attorney, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Minimum Qualifications: Juris Doctorate degree; minimum 1 to 5 years practicing law, at least 2 years practicing federal Indian law or administrative/ governmental law preferred. Member in good standing of any state bar, California bar preferred. If not a California bar member, must be willing to take California State Bar Exam within a year of hire. Outstanding writing, research, and communication skills required and a writing sample must be submitted with application and resume. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. OPEN UNTIL FILLED These positions are classified safety-sensitive. Obtain position description for minimum qualifications. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 ext. 20 or 23, or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com or l.offins@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MARKETPLACE

REAL ESTATE DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1−855−380−250

ALL BOOKS HALF OFF at the Dream Quest Thrift Store Where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams. November 2−6 Plus: Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629−3006. BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices − No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 1−877−649−5043 (AAN CAN) BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work interna− tionally. We do the work... You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844−511 −1836. (AAN CAN) CABLE PRICE INCREASE AGAIN? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877 −693−0625 (AAN CAN) CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN) DINSMORE 40 ACRES Buck Mtn, 4K elevation, very nice land. $250,000, owner can carry. Please call (707) 298−5400 COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships avail− able for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1−855−554−4616 The Mission, Program Information and Tuition is located at CareerTechnical.edu/consumer− information. (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s, too! Fast Free Pickup − Running or Not − 24 Hour Response − Maximum Tax Dona− tion − Call 877−266−0681 (AAN CAN) HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−844− 416−7147 (AAN CAN)

Apartments for Rent

Lodging

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

NEVER PAY FOR COVERED HOME REPAIRS AGAIN! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1−877−673−0511. Hours Mon−Thu, Sun : 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri : 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN) SAVE MONEY ON EXPENSIVE AUTO REPAIRS! Our vehicle service program can save you up to 60% off dealer prices and provides you excellent coverage! Call for a free quote: 866−915−2263 (Mon−Fri :9am− 4pm PST) STILL PAYING TOO MUCH FOR YOUR MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order − prescription required. Call 1−855−750−1612 (AAN CAN)

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

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General Tree Work & Forestry Fire Hazard Mitigation Landscaping Wood Milling

MARKETPLACE Cleaning

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet 707.740.8247 gmforestresto@gmail.com

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

YOUR AD HERE classified@northcoastjournal.com

(707) 442-1400 ×314

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues, Private Parties, Bars. Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

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           

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BODY, MIND & SPIRIT HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

BRE #01927104

BRE #02109531

BRE # 02084041

BRE# 02070276

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

!

D PRICE

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THE MAR

2626 HILLCREST DRIVE, EUREKA - $555,000

±40 Acre Salmon Creek farm with County and State interim permits for 4,000 sq. ft. of mixed light and 16,000 sq. ft. of outdoor cultivation space! Property features two ponds, water storage, large dry room, and small guest cabin and a new home under construction.

Beautiful 4/2 home on Humboldt Hill overlooking a wooded horse pasture! Property is well-maintained and tastefully updated with stained concrete patio, new paint, and recessed LED lighting.

TING!

Stunning ±113 acre property w/ views of the Siskiyou Mountains! Property features a mix of flats, slopes, saddles, and ridgetops, and has a variety of trees. With easy access from Highway 199, wide rocked roads, and water available nearby or by drilling a well, look no further for your dream property!

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $200,000

BURNT RANCH – HOME & 2ND UNIT - $847,000

±40 Acre mountain hideaway just off Hwy 36 featuring southern exposure, end of the road privacy, two large year-round creeks, developed building site, and a rustic 3 bedroom cabin & outbuildings in need of some TLC (unpermitted buildings on site).

Ideal ±32 acre location for self-sufficiency and extended family! Commercial greenhouse for growing food, large shop, multiple springs, pond, fruit trees, good solar exposure, generator back-up, wildlife, USFS adjacency. At the end of a paved county road.

Ashlee Cook

REDUCE

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!

BRIDGEVILLE – CULTIVATION – $450,000

±3,500 sqft Commercial building with great Broadway location, has a large parking lot, and is zoned CS to offer a variety of uses! Building has fire damage and is being sold in AS-IS condition.

±40 Acres w/ stamped permit for 9,948 sq. ft. of O.D. space utilizing light deprivation and 1,400 sq. ft. of full sun outdoor cultivation space. No state permit. Parcel features developed greenhouse sites, well, and views.

CRESCENT CITY – HOMESTEAD – $695,000

SALYER – LAND/PROPERTY – $125,000

Gorgeous and historic ±38 acre homestead ranch nestled between the Siskiyou Wildness and Smith River National Recreation Area! Property is mostly flat fenced and cross-fenced grazing land, has a large barn, vegetable garden, with a 2/1 rustic home that is fully off-grid and features solar power and abundant water from a private spring.

Mike Willcutt

HIOUCHI – LAND/PROPERTY – $998,000

±10 Private acres located in the highly sought-after Greenwood Heights area! Ready for your dream home with privacy, building site, road, spring, and small creek!

EUREKA – COMMERCIAL – $874,000

NEW LIS

Dacota Huzzen

MIRANDA – CULTIVATION – $1,300,000

GREENWOOD HEIGHTS – LAND/PROPERTY - $349,000

BACK ON

707.498.6364

Bernie Garrigan

Location, location, location! This ±1.48 acre parcel is ready for you to build your dream home. Close to the Trinity River and minutes from Willow Creek, you can’t beat the shady setting for those long summer days. Permitted well in place, and power is at the street.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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