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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 Vol. XXXI Issue 40 northcoastjournal.com

A staffing ‘crisis’ has law enforcement triaging while grasping for answers BY THADEUS GREENSON

In Eureka, officers are working an emergency schedule built on 12.5hour shifts and mandatory overtime, as the police department’s once touted Problem Oriented Policing and Community Safety Engagement teams operate with skeletal staffing. In Arcata, two detectives have been pulled back to patrol and all calls for service that don’t involve someone in danger have been deprioritized, while proactive policing continued on page 10 >>

6 Welcome, Sue-meg

State Park 16 Candy Fight


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 4 News

Sue-meg Restored

6 News

Toward a Sustainable Blue Economy

9 NCJ Daily Online 10 On The Cover Help Wanted

Oct. 7, 2021 • Volume XXXII Issue 40 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2021

PUBLISHER

12 Home & Garden

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com

16 On the Table

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

Service Directory

Candy Corn Doesn’t Care if You Hate It

18 Trophy Case

The Best of Fans

19 Fishing the North Coast

Chetco Estuary Kicking Out Quality Kings

NEWS EDITOR

ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

20 The Setlist

STAFF WRITER

21 Arts! Arcata

CALENDAR EDITOR

As It Was, So Shall It Be Friday, Oct. 8, 4-7 p.m.

22 Calendar 26 Screens

Back to the Source

27 Field Notes

One Second a Year

27 Workshops & Classes 31 Sudoku & Crossword 32 Free Will Astrology 32 Classifieds

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Rod Kausen, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com ART DIRECTOR

Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston, Jacqui Langeland ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Natalie Passen natalie@northcoastjournal.com

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

Artwork at Infuzions in Arcata. Read more on page 21. Submitted

On the Cover Illustration by Jonathan Webster

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 17,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

Well, that went by fast. It’s already time again for the annual North Coast Journal  Flash Fiction Contest, so get typing. Make your original stories 99 words or fewer (like this announcement), not including the title, for a chance to see your work of genius and brevity in the  Journal.  Email up to three entries as attachments or in the body of your email (no PDFs, please) to fiction@northcoastjournal.com with your full name and contact information (sorry, we don’t do pen names) by 5 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 8.  The judges’ favorites will be published in December. Don’t procrastinate.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS

Sue-meg Restored

2 0 21

An iconic state park ditches its murderous namesake By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

S

ince time immemorial, the Yurok people have called the coastal area north of Trinidad — located in the heart of their ancestral lands — Sue-meg. Now, some 170 years after the name was usurped, the 1-square-mile property with meadows, forest lands and long beaches stretched out below soaring cliffs will officially be known as Sue-meg State Park. The State Parks and Recreation Commission voted unanimously Sept. 30 to — as one commissioner said — “restore the name” to the unit originally designated as Patrick’s Point State Park. “Reclaiming a name is really the core to this,” Commissioner Sara Barth said, noting she did not consider the decision a “renaming.” “It’s restoring a name that was inappropriately taken.” The change is the first for a State Park under California’s “Reexamining Our Past Initiative,” which was launched by the state last year to address what California Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot described as “historic names that stem from a dark legacy that includes discrimination, violence and inequity.” California State Parks Director Armando Quintero, who appeared emotional as the final vote was cast, his hands clasped together in front of his face, called the decision “a momentous step to heal relationships with Native Americans and working together in recognition and honor of indigenous cultural and linguistic relationships.” Several members of the Yurok Tribe talked to the commission about the importance of giving the land back its rightful name and removing the moniker that referred to Patrick Beegan, an Irish immigrant who briefly laid claim to the jutting peninsula in the 1850s as whites infiltrated the area amid the gold rush. Historians believe Beegan to be responsible for numerous atrocities, including the murders of Native Americans, among them a young Yurok boy.

He lost the property after fleeing law enforcement in connection with the killing. Yurok Tribal Chair Joseph L. James said the historic Sept. 30 decision was a move toward healing. “Indigenous people across the world … are either watching or listening and looking at the opportunity we have here today,” he said. “By renaming Sue-meg back … that’s bringing balance back to us as Yurok people.” Yurok Tribal Heritage Preservation Officer Rosie Clayborn spoke of the attempted genocide and destruction of Indigenous communities that occurred after contact, with Native people subjected to institutionalized violence and driven from their ancestral lands, their families ripped apart as children were forcibly sent to boarding schools in an attempted to strip them of their culture. Not all of them came home. “My ancestors and Yurok ancestors fought hard to stay connected to this place that we call Sue-meg and surrounding places. They fought with their lives,” she said, noting the name of the boy killed by Beegan was never documented in the official records of the time, and that he will never receive full justice for what was done to him. “But what we can do,” she said, “is honor their legacy by using our language.” Clayborn began choking up as she related how such intergenerational traumas are not long in the past, sayings she’s had the opportunity to talk with Yurok elders who were among those taken from their homes and sent to boarding schools. The scars of what they endured — including the beatings they received for speaking their language — are still evident, she said. Restoring the name Sue-meg, Clayborn said, carries a great meaning to the Yurok people and is an act that bridges both the past and the future. “It gives a more balanced and just


Construction crew members Senior Park Aide Jake Reed (left) and Yurok Trail Crew members Napooi Shorty and Michael Wolf (partially hidden) lift the first of the new roof planks onto the framework of the new women’s Dressing House in Sue-meg Village. Photo by Mark Larson

world for not only Yurok children but to all children.” The “Reexamining Our Past Initiative” that led to the designation of Sue-meg State Park builds on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s formal apology in 2019 for the state’s systemic role in the attempted genocide of Native communities and efforts to annihilate their cultures. Newsom’s initiative also set up the tribally-led Truth and Healing Council to “correct the historical record and acknowledge wrongdoings.” Terry Supahan, director of the faithbased True North Organizing Network, which has formed an intertribal committee on name changes, applauded the decision in a news release. “This is about a healing journey and a pathway forward,” he said. “It is so important to our communities throughout Northern California that we recognize the genocide that Indigenous people have experienced here, and move toward ‘settling up’ and making things right, so that we can work together to care for special land and to be responsible for climate change.” Along with his apology and formation of Truth and Healing Council, last year the governor also launched California’s “30 by 30” initiative, which aims to conserve 30 percent of state land and

coastal waters by 2030 through voluntary efforts with Native American tribes and private landowners, as well as federal and local governments. “The renaming of Sue-meg State Park is a major first step toward respecting Indigenous traditional knowledge of how to steward these lands appropriately,” Skip Lowry, a local father of Yurok, Mountain Maidu and Pit River descent, said in a release. “We hope that this is the beginning of true consultation and collaboration between California government agencies and native Tribes on ancestral territories now known as state parks, national parks and public lands.” When Sue-meg State Park — a 600acre property that stretches from north of Trinidad up past Agate Beach — was brought into California State Park’s fold nearly 100 years ago, the area was already well known as Patrick’s Point in reference to Beegan and so the name remained, until now. Long before, however, Sue-meg was an integral cultural and trading center for the Yurok people. In the 1970s, the place was chosen as the reburial site for the remains of tribal ancestors returned by the State Parks Department in a landmark case. Walt Lara Sr., who served for seven years on the Native American Heritage

Commission of California — which was a key litigate in the case and instrumental in securing protections for Native graves and burial sites — spoke at the Sept. 30 hearing about the ceremony, saying there were no Yurok prayers to address the moment, so a tribal elder created one. “It more or less was, ‘We’re putting our people back to rest again and leave them be and don’t bother them anymore,’” Lara told the commissioners. Now 86, Lara also participated in the original construction of the Sue-meg Village at the park in the 1980s, an effort led by tribal members Dewey George, Jimmy James and others using traditional skills, and he is now overseeing restoration of the Yurok ceremonial site. Lara told the commissioners he feels very good about seeing the name Suemeg restored to the land. “The governor gave an apology to our people and this will seal it as far as I’m concerned,” he said. l Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the Journal’s digital editor. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear.

Feeling tipsy? If you have a news tip, story idea or something you’d like to see covered, we’d love to hear from you! 707-442-1400, ext. 321 editor@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS

The Eureka Slough during a 2019 king tide event gives a glimpse of what sea-level rise will look like around Humboldt Bay. File

Toward a Sustainable Blue Economy Symposium focuses on harnessing the promise of the coast By Elaine Weinreb

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

T

he perennial conflict between environmental conservation and economic development may now be in remission, the crisis of climate change increasingly pushing industries into cooperation with environmental goals. One such path of co-existence, at least along the California coast, is the “Sustainable Blue Economy,” defined by the World Bank as the “the sustainable use of ocean resources for economic growth, improved livelihoods and jobs while preserving the health of ocean ecosystems.” A three-day symposium on the “Sustainable Blue Economy” was held virtually last week, sponsored by California Sea Grant, the Humboldt Bay Initiative and several local consulting firms. The symposium featured scientists, community activists and an economist, as well as government officials of all denominations, ranging from county planners to the head of a state agency. The keynote speaker was Wade Crowfoot, secretary of California’s Natural Resources Agency, an umbrella agency that supervises the Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Ocean Protection Council, the Coastal Commission, the Coastal Conservancy and numerous other environmental agencies. People identify climate action with electric vehicles or solar panels on roofs, Crowfoot said, but we also need to elevate the role of nature in helping us

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

combat the climate crisis. “Humboldt Bay is one of the most beautiful places in the world,” Crowfoot said. “However, it faces different challenges than any other area in the state. Coastal communities face a daunting set of threats, and need resources … so that these communities can continue to thrive decades into the future, even as climate effects intensify.” Crowfoot noted that the budget signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom last week includes $15 billion for climate action. “We have the leadership, we have the resources and we have some very clear targets to achieve,” he said, praising the proposed offshore wind farm, which he said would be located 17 miles off the coast, with no impacts on the viewshed, and minimal impacts to fishermen. Humboldt Bay is also becoming a hub of ocean-related products. Already producing 70 percent of the state’s oysters, the harbor has also started developing seaweed farms. “Last year, Humboldt State University established the first commercial seaweed farm in Humboldt Bay,” said Rafael Cuevas Uribe, associate professor of the Fisheries Biology Department at HSU, adding that the university is the only place in California where a student can prepare for a career in fisheries biology with a concentration on aquaculture. He noted that this was a good opportunity for local farmers, instead of

mega-corporations, to take charge. “In Arcata we know that local businesses are the key,” he said. “That’s what I want to create in Humboldt Bay.” Marine scientist Karin Gray, a consultant with GreenWave, discussed seaweed farming as a nature-based solution that can help regenerate the ocean ecosystem, while creating jobs and providing food. Gray noted that the farm has already had two successful harvests of dulse, a commercially valuable seaweed. Next year, HSU hopes to start a bull kelp farm. “Bull kelp was an obvious choice, not only because it was growing naturally in the Bay, but also because of the unprecedented decline of California’s kelp forests,” said Uribe. According to an HSU publication, kelp can be used for human consumption, animal feed, agricultural fertilizer and as a sustainable alternative to single-use plastic. The loss of the kelp forests was described during the next day of the conference by Sarah Gravem, an ecologist at Oregon State University. Starfish, or sea stars, to use their proper name, have almost disappeared along the Pacific Coast over the past several years, resulting in drastic changes to the underwater coastal ecosystem (“The Plight of the Abalone,” March 8, 2018). Victims of a gruesome viral disease, the sea stars once visible in every tide pool have died off, allowing their chief prey, the sea urchin, to grow and multiply without restraint. Sea ur-


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chins feed on kelp and without predation from sea stars, the urchins have devastated the kelp forests that provide food and habitat to numerous sea creatures. The results are analogous to clear-cutting a land-based forest: Nothing is left. More than 5.75 billion sea stars have died, Gravem said, putting the creatures on the “critically endangered species” list. The exact cause of the epidemic is unknown, although sea warming resulting from climate change is suspected to be a critical factor. Scientists and citizen naturalists have joined forces to try to save the kelp forests, with a group called the Oregon Kelp Alliance diving into the water and removing sea urchins by hand. Scientists are also trying to raise baby sea stars in captivity, where they can be kept safe from the epidemic. Graven asked audience members to report viewings of sea stars to the phone app iNaturalist, or to the website www.seastarwasting.org. The other half of the sustainability equation is allowing the coastline to do its natural job of separating the ocean from the land. When white settlers moved into the Humboldt Bay area, they made massive changes in the shoreline in an attempt to dry out saltmarshes and create more agricultural land. In an age of rising sea levels caused by climate change, this landscape is no longer tenable. Now, government planners are turning more and more to “nature-based solutions” to sea-level rise. Several ongoing projects hope to combine public safety with improved opportunities for recreation. Katie Marsolan, a planner with the city of Eureka, discussed the rehabilitation of the Elk River Estuary. This forlorn section of the Elk River near the mouth of Humboldt Bay, occupies 114 acres of city property purchased in the 1980s for the development of the wastewater treatment plant. A large section of the property, formerly used as a dumping site for biosolids from the treatment plant, has been converted to pastureland. Another part consists of mudflats covered with invasive Spartina grass. The city plans to remove the tide gates from the mouth of the Elk River, allowing for more natural tidal action in the area, eliminate the Spartina, and re-configure the topography to allow public access. The enhanced floodplain will help protect the nearby highway from coastal flooding. When completed, there will be 2.8 miles of navigable channels, areas for coastal native plants and a 1-mile extension of the Eureka Waterfront Trail, as well as a new non-motorized boat launch

providing access to both the river and the bay. The Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge recently completed another project, restoring the historic flow of Salmon Creek into Hookton Slough. Previous man-made changes to the area had converted acres of saltmarsh into poor quality pastureland. With the aid of $693,000 is grants, the saltmarshes have been restored, creating more natural resilience to storms and sea level rise. Other restorative projects are being planned for the Jacoby Creek wetland area. There are many obstacles to community-based efforts to fend off sea-level rise. One thorny problem is the simple fact that low-income people, at least in Humboldt, tend to live in the areas most vulnerable to inundation, such as King Salmon and Fairhaven. Many of these residents are older people, whose lifetime wealth consists of the investment in their houses. Farmworkers also live in low-cost housing that is scattered across the bottomlands. Where would these people move and how could they afford to move in today’s hyper-inflated real estate market? One planner said a key will be building a lot of affordable housing, a laudable goal, but one which has proven challenging. Adam Canter, the natural resources specialist of the Wiyot Tribe, warned that the area’s tribes, with their centuries of Indigenous knowledge, must be included in all regional planning. Another problem could be the California Coastal Act, itself. Written 40 years ago to make sure the coastline remained accessible to Californians of all income levels, planners say some aspects of the law are impeding needed adaptations. John Driscoll, the district representative for Congressmember Jared Huffman, also warned that future-oriented planning could be threatened by technologies from the past, such as a proposed coal train, which he compared to an effort defeated decades ago to bring a liquefied natural gas plant to Humboldt. “We have some areas on Humboldt Bay that can be developed, but we don’t have infinite room,” he said. “We have this opportunity and we can’t squander it on the old ways of doing things.” ● Elaine Weinreb (she/her) is a freelance journalist. She tries to re-pay the state of California for giving her a degree in environmental studies and planning (Sonoma State University) at a time when tuition was still affordable.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com



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FROM

DAILY ONLINE

COVID Surge Could Stretch into 2022

W

hile Humboldt County’s latest — and most deadly — COIVD-19 surge appears to be on the downward slope, the descent is likely to be a slow one that could extend “well into next year,” with occasional mini-surges, according to county Health Officer Ian Hoffman. “Today’s COVID-19 case rates have dropped to the lowest rate they’ve been in the past two months. However, case rates remain very high, higher than they were during the peak of the previous surges in winter and spring of this past year,” he said in a written report to the board of supervisors. If the state’s “Blueprint for a Safer Economy” were still being used, Humboldt would fall into the highest risk level — the purple tier — and under the U.S. Centers for Disease Control data tracker, the county continues to be in the “Red, High Transmission” tier, his report states. “The worst is not over yet and we need to remain vigilant,” Hoffman said at a Sept. 29 news conference. In the latest round of genomic sequencing, the Delta variant accounted for 98 percent of Humboldt County cases, Hoffman said. It is, he said, “the vastly, predominantly overwhelming variant that is out there now and it has taken over them all.”

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A state database shows 17 people hospitalized with COVID-19 locally as of Oct. 5, with five under intensive care. The local hospital census peaked Sept. 3 with 42 COVID-19 patients. Hoffman and other county health officials continue to emphasize the importance of vaccination, with Public Health Director Sofia Pereira saying, “That continues to be our best shot to get through this pandemic together.” With each successive surge of COVID cases, younger and younger nonvaccinated people are being hospitalized — including many in their 20s and 30s — with some dying, including residents in their 40s and 50s, Hoffman said. That is not the case with the fully vaccinated, with hospitalizations and deaths due to the virus in that group being tied to older age and underlying health conditions, Hoffman said at the news conference. “We will likely continue to see more hospitalizations and deaths over the coming weeks, as those are the most lagging indicators for COVID-19 during a surge in cases,” the health officer wrote in his report for the supervisors. “Based on current COVID-19 national modeling, we could see cases, hospitalizations and deaths continue throughout the remainder of 2021, and into the spring of 2022.” Hoffman said vaccination rates have

Photo by Kris Nagel

Hundreds of Humboldt County residents descended on the courthouse lawn Oct. 2 in solidarity with marches and demonstrations taking place in all 50 states to rally for reproductive rights. See a slideshow of photos from the rally at www.northcoastjournal. com. POSTED 10.03.21 shown a “slow but steady rise” in recent weeks with an about 1 percent increase each week in the number of county residents who are fully vaccinated. He emphasized that those who are in priority groups for the Pfizer booster — including residents 65 and older, those who live in high-risk, long-term care facilities, those with certain underlying medical conditions or who are at increased risk of exposure at work — should get their shot six months after their second dose, if they

received Pfizer as their original vaccine. So far this school year, the county has found only one COVID-19 outbreak associated with a classroom. Hoffman and Pereira said Public Health is working with districts and campuses to keep schools safe and they are not seeing widespread transmission in classrooms. Read more at www.northcoastjournal. com. — Kimberly Wear POSTED 10.04.21 Read the full story online.

Tahoe Bound: Local travel options are poised to expand next month after ExpressJet announced it will launch nonstop flights from Humboldt County to the Reno-Tahoe airport. The flights are slated to operate Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday, adding to a flurry of recent additions that includes flights to Denver, Colorado, and Las Vegas, Nevada.

Another Walkout: For the third consecutive day, hundreds of students walked off a local high school campus on Sept. 29 to stand in solidarity with survivors of sexual assault and protest what they feel are inadequate administrative and societal responses. The Sept. 29 walkout saw several hundred students leave Arcata High School to rally downtown.

Mulling Mandates, Oversight: As the Journal went to press Oct. 5, the Eureka City Council was slated to decide whether to mandate COVID-19 vaccinations for all city employees and discuss how to implement more robust oversight of the Eureka Police Department. Check www.northcoastjournal.com for a full report on the Oct. 5 meeting.

POSTED 09.29.21

POSTED 09.30.21

POSTED 10.04.21

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking

189

Rally for Reproductive Rights

The number of new COVID-19 cases confirmed in Humboldt County through the first five days in October, during which the county had a test-positivity rate of 16.2 percent and reported eight new hospitalizations. POSTED 10.05.21

northcoastjournal

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

They Said It “They know this operator is running the facility and they’re not doing anything about it. In a sense, the state could be codefendants in this case.”

northcoastjournal

newsletters

Comment of the Week “Wait… they want to require vaccinations in school? Get out!”

­— California Advocates for Nursing Home reform Tony Chicotel on how a lack of state oversight enabled conditions in a Redding skilled nursing facility that led to a deadly COVID-19 outbreak and a lawsuit against its owner Schlomo Rechnitz, who also owns four Humboldt County facilities.

­— Jason Crews responding to an uproar on the Journal Facebook page on a story about the state of California announcing it will require COVID-19 vaccines for eligible students beginning in 2022, as it already does for Polio, Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Hepatitis B and Chickenpox.

POSTED 10.04.21

POSTED 10.01.21

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

Humboldt County Sheriff William Honsal (foreground) and Arcata Police Chief Brian Ahearn are both thinking outside the box as they try to hold the line on service levels with depleted staffing. Photo by Mark McKenna

Help Wanted

A staffing ‘crisis’ has law enforcement triaging while grasping for answers By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

I

n Eureka, officers are working an emergency schedule built on 12.5-hour shifts and mandatory overtime, as the police department’s once touted Problem Oriented Policing and Community Safety Engagement teams operate with skeletal staffing. In Arcata, two detectives have been pulled back to patrol and all calls for service that don’t involve someone in danger have been deprioritized, while proactive policing measures — like traffic enforcement in front of local schools or a detail to address the problematic group of homeless people doing drugs and relieving themselves in public near the Arcata Community Center — have been shelved. For the Humboldt County Sheriff’s

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Office, 12-hour schedules and mandatory overtime — with deputies working holidays and weekends and days off — have become the norm. Resident deputy posts sit vacant while regular rural patrols and around-the-clock coverage of outlying areas have been abandoned for the time being. Amid a pandemic, deputies are afraid to call in sick for fear of leaving their co-workers stretched even thinner while the county looks to renegotiate police services contracts with the cities of Blue Lake and Trinidad because it can’t deliver the promised regular patrols. Some nights, just eight deputies are left to cover the county’s almost 4,000 square miles of unincorporated territory. “That’s a lot of ground to cover,” says

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt County Sheriff William Honsal over the phone, frustration evident in his voice. Humboldt County’s largest law enforcement agencies are all struggling to recruit and retain officers, mirroring state and national trends that see higher rates of officers retiring or otherwise leaving the profession, with a shallowing pool of applicants signing up to replace them. The issue isn’t new — we wrote about it in these pages in January of 2020 (“Recruitment and Retention”) — but it seems to be getting worse, not better. The reasons are myriad — what some describe as a “perfect storm” of challenges facing the profession — but the result is that agencies are vying for any and all

recruitment and retention advantages. Officials are also increasingly looking for outside-the-box solutions to maximize officers’ time and have non-sworn personnel respond to calls that don’t necessarily demand the presence of a badge and a gun.

The Storm

College of the Redwoods’ Police Academy once turned away scores of applicants, with its program capped at 40 students a semester. But, currently, it has just a dozen cadets enrolled. And that’s not a problem unique to CR. Academies across the country are reporting fewer applicants. Nationwide, a Police Executive Research Firm survey earlier this year found departments were seeing an overall decrease of 5


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HERE’S WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ON ZILLOW: percent in their hiring rates in the 20202021 fiscal year, with smaller departments reporting an average vacancy rate of near 9 percent. Perhaps most alarming, the survey found resignations increased 18 percent, while retirements were up 45 percent. Ask local law enforcement leaders why fewer people seem to be going into policing and you’ll find there’s not shortage of answers. First, it’s a grueling job — one that generally necessitates nontraditional hours and witnessing high rates of trauma, all with the knowledge that returning home at the end of a shift isn’t a given. But those factors aren’t new and have always been inherent in policing. But there’s no denying the climate around policing has changed. What started as the so-called “Ferguson effect” in reference to the 2014 police shooting of unarmed Black teenager Michael Brown, spawning protests across the nation, rose to unprecedented levels in 2020 following the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer. Floyd’s killing set off waves of protests across the nation and sparked intense dialogues about policing in America, with calls to “defund the police,” renewed scrutiny of the impacts of racial bias and increased demands for accountability in the profession, including the criminal prosecutions of officers who use excessive or unwarranted force. “There’s an environment right now where they’re looking to make examples of cops,” EPD Chief Steve Watson says. “Throw this on top of what is already a really challenging job with often unrealistic expectations, and it’s a lot.” APD Chief Brian Ahearn says he’d like to see an academic institution do some real research on the subject to find more definitive answers but agreed that technology and the push for police accountability have markedly changed the expectations of the job. “The expectations now are almost unattainable in terms of having to be perfect every time and out on every call and in every situation,” he says. “We recruit and retain from the human race and humans are imperfect.” And that extends way beyond critical incidents, Ahearn says, explaining that bodyworn cameras have become the industry standard, meaning an officer’s interactions will be dissected by their supervisors, juries and defense attorneys and the public,

with near perfection as the standard. That feeling of always being under a microscope, coupled with the push for police accountability — from prosecutions to civil lawsuits — could cause someone looking to make a positive difference in their community to choose a different career path, Ahearn says. “We have to be held to a higher standard — we have to,” he says. “We need to be judged about the service we provide and the manner in which we provide it, and that needs to happen not only inside the organization but outside as well. But does that require some soul searching, much more than when I decided to enter the profession 35 years ago? It probably does because you’re exposing yourself and your family to that degree of evaluation and scrutiny. It really can multiply the pressure and stress on officers and their families.” Ahearn pauses for moment before concluding: “I think some people are choosing other occupations when perhaps they would have chosen law enforcement before.” The nature of policing has also changed markedly in recent decades, as officers spend an increasing percentage of their time tasked with mitigating the quality of life impacts of homeless populations, those suffering from mental illness and grappling with addiction. Watson calls it the “tragic triad.” “The cops are there to fill the gaps in an under-resourced system,” he says. “You call and they’re going to respond. When I came into law enforcement, I had a picture in my head: I was going to be chasing bank robbers and arresting murderers and rapists. Well, the job today is so much more complex and wide, and we are being asked to do things that don’t meet the traditional mold.” Ahearn points out that the burden of these societal problems also continues to fall disproportionately to officers even as courts and lawmakers have repeatedly weighed in to say they should not be law enforcement issues. “Community police departments are left trying to strike an impossible balance,” he says. Over the past 18 months, officers have also been on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic, which officials say has added layers of stress, both from increased risk of exposure to just seeing more

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ON THE COVER Continued from page 11

desperation in calls for service involving people increasingly living on the economic margins or with deteriorating mental health. Watson says the local housing market — which has seen median home prices jump 20 percent over the past year to $405,000, according to Zillow — also poses challenges, saying he recently had an officer leave after they spent nine months looking to buy a house. “It wasn’t their first choice to move but they just didn’t feel like they could find a house for their growing family here,” he says.

Just Compensation

Back in 2014, when years of budget cuts had taken a toll on Humboldt County’s coffers and the ranks of its sheriff’s office, voters passed Measure Z, approving a half-cent sales tax hike that was projected to raise millions of dollars annually to fund public safety services. The county billed it as a means to “maintain/improve essential services, such as 24-hour sheriff’s patrols, 911 emergency response, crime investigation … .” But six years — and one extension approved by voters in 2018 — later, the measure is again becoming a talking point in county government. Through a certain lens, Measure Z delivered on its promise, bringing in the revenue needed to fund dozens of deputy sheriff positions and fill those resident posts and staff those rural patrols. But the vast majority of those positions now sit vacant — funded but unfilled — as the same frustrations of slow response times and no police presence in outlying areas that led to Measure Z’s passing grow anew. In a Sept. 10 letter to the county’s Measure Z committee and the Board of Supervisors, Humboldt County Deputy Sheriff’s Association President Jamie Barney blasted the county for having “absolutely wasted $70 million on a wrong-headed and counterproductive ‘hire rookies and hope for the best’ strategy that is actually making public safety worse.” The association, which is in the midst of negotiating a new contract with the county, charges that the county’s pay scale for deputies makes it hard to recruit and retain lateral hires. Meanwhile, the association argues that the county’s efforts to bring on entry-level deputies have been slow and costly, wasting resources to train prospective deputies who fail to make it through the process, leading to staffing shortages that cause undesirable working conditions that push experienced deputies to look for often more lucrative positions elsewhere. “Even some of our most dedicated HDSO members are actively applying for better paying jobs in other communities

where their families can be protected with adequate public safety patrols,” Barney wrote. In a Sept. 24 email to the board of supervisors, Honsal backed the association, saying he’s revamped the department’s entire recruiting strategy to focus on lateral hires, even hiring a marketing firm to sell the department to potential candidates throughout the state and offering a $12,000 signing bonus to lateral hires. In a phone call with the Journal, Honsal explains those are the tools he has in his tool box right now, saying it’s the board of supervisors that sets salary schedules — not him. So while he can dip into his budget for signing bonuses, he can’t raise salary schedules. And Honsal says he absolutely sees compensation as a major factor in his department’s staffing woes, pointing out that peace officer salaries have simply not kept pace with the changing realities of the job or the regional job market. The starting wage for a deputy in Humboldt County is about $48,000 a year, and Honsal points out plenty of other local employers offer wages competitive with that for jobs that come with a lot less stress and danger. In a letter to the board of supervisors last month, lobbying for a pay increase for deputy sheriffs, Honsal wrote that he recently had eight deputies apply for a single security guard position with PG&E that paid about $10 more an hour than his deputies make. Honsal says local departments often lose officers to the Redding Police Department, where the pay scale starts at $55,500, pointing out that Redding doesn’t seem to have an issue retaining officers. But one need only look around the county to see that there’s more to the equation than pay scales. Arcata and Eureka both start officers at more than $55,000, and their staffing struggles remain, with EPD reporting that 25 percent of its officer positions sit vacant while APD has three of its 22 sworn positions unfilled with two more officers planning to leave the department. Fortuna ($48,000), Rio Dell ($46,000) and Ferndale ($38,000) all pay significantly less, yet are at or near full staffing levels. (Read more about the Eel River Valley departments’ staffing situations in this week’s Enterprise.) In Ferndale, Chief Ron Sligh, who stepped into the job in November after a career in Arcata, says he feels the culture of the Victorian Village community is supportive of law enforcement, which aids recruitment and retention efforts. And in addition to having a full roster of officers, Sigh says he has four reserve officers —

Feeling tipsy? If you have a news tip, story idea or something you’d like to see covered, we’d love to hear from you!

707-442-1400, ext. 321 editor@northcoastjournal.com

Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

“seasoned officers that still have a desire to serve” — ready to call in when there’s a vacancy or a vacation. “One thing that I have noticed, and one of the reasons I applied here, is that the city of Ferndale has a reputation of being very supportive of their police department and officers,” he says. “The applicants that I have interviewed have all said this to me and with the current negative climate around law enforcement, the officers are looking for jobs where they feel appreciated and supported.” Fortuna Police Chief Casey Day agrees, saying he’s focused much of his city’s recent recruitment efforts on bringing in lateral transfers from other departments, who he says are drawn by Fortuna’s culture and that of the department, which Day says has put a premium on officer wellness and work-life balance. “I think regionally here in Humboldt, word gets out,” he says. “You have some law enforcement officers working in different areas of the county where I’m just going to go out on a limb and say maybe there is not as much support for law enforcement as there is here in Fortuna. Officers feel like they want to work in a jurisdiction where they’re going to get a little bit more community backing.”

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

What’s clear in talking to law enforcement executives throughout the region is that none expect the landscape to seismically shift any time soon, and none predict a record class of recruits will flood CR’s academy in the coming months. And that means officers will continue to be in incredibly high demand, regionally and statewide, making hiring and retaining a competitive endeavor. Local departments are — and have been — retooling accordingly. As Honsal lobbies for pay raises for his deputies, Arcata and Eureka both also recently approved pay hikes. And in addition to compensation, departments are looking at other ways to support their officers and create a climate recruits want to be a part of. “A lot of millennials are motivated by more than just money — it has to do with quality of life and job satisfaction,” Watson says, adding that EPD has revamped its recruiting pitches to showcase the sense of service inherent in the job, as well as opportunities for specialized training and assignments, as well as career advancement. In Fortuna, Day has implemented twice annual all-staff meetings for which he has an outside agency come police the city so his entire staff can gather and talk, with a focus on family, work-life balance and holistic support, while also implementing

programs to tighten the bonds between officers and the community. In Arcata, Ahearn says he’s hopeful a culture of support — one that says “you don’t have to be perfect just follow the law and department policy and act in good faith in everything you do” — coupled with progressive, forward looking citywide conversations about the future of policing will help bring on good people looking to make a difference. Departments are also increasingly looking for efficiencies to make sure they’re maximizing the impact of their limited ranks of sworn officers. The county, Arcata and Eureka have all implemented online reporting systems for low-level property crimes, in which there isn’t evidence or a suspect, in an effort to minimize the time officers spend taking those reports. Honsal says he’s exploring the possibility of hiring legal office assistants to help deputies with report writing and exploring whether purchasing a dictation system might increase efficiency. He says he’s also looking to expand the ranks of community service officers to handle calls like burglaries, vandalism, abandoned vehicles and cold case follow-ups, the kind of stuff that “doesn’t take a badge and a gun, just a smart person to go out and get information.” Ahearn, Watson and Honsal also say they are working with city, county and state officials to find ways to get more mental health clinicians and social workers to respond to certain quality-of-life calls involving people in emotional distress or the chronically homeless. “I feel like county mental health and state mental health have to step up to this. The sheriff’s office and law enforcement in general, we can’t be the answer to all of society’s issues,” Honsal says, relating the story of a deputy who was recently dispatched to a call from a parent whose 12-year-old kid had locked themselves in their room, refusing to go to school. “We get that call and we have to respond.” If there was another system in place to respond to those types of calls, Honsal says he and the deputy sheriff’s association would happily sacrifice some positions to help fund it. “By all means, take the money,” Honsal says. But the reality is those systems aren’t currently in place and, as Watson says, “You’re going to have a hard time getting a social worker to come out at 2 a.m.” For his part, Ahearn says that while the challenges are daunting, it’s an incredibly exciting time to be in police leadership, on the front lines as departments try to adapt simultaneously to staffing challenges and changing societal expectations. That might


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“Special APR Financing available on new 2021 models now through November 1st, 2021” Sheriff William Honsal, who’s department has been hardest hit locally by the staffing crisis, is lobbying the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors to increase the salary schedule for his deputies, saying he thinks it’s key to attracting and retaining quality officers. Photo by Mark Larson mean bringing on more non-sworn specialists to address certain community issues, or taking some traditional police department functions — like school resource officers and crime prevention programs — and putting them under civilian management. “We’re going to have to evolve,” he says. “Fifty years from now, policing will look so much different than it does now. … In the here and now, I do think we’re in the midst of a change. The staffing challenge is serving as one of many catalysts that are going to effect change.” Like nearly all the law enforcement executives the Journal spoke to for this story, Ahearn ends the interview with a recruiting pitch: “We’re hiring and we’re looking for good people to join our organization. Give us a chance. Come take a look at the

Arcata PD and the other fine law enforcement agencies throughout the county. We need good people, diverse community members, BIPOC community members. We need good people from all walks to life to not only come in as entry-level staff but to take on promotions and leadership positions and move our organization on into the future.” He offers his cell phone number: (707) 601-6943. “Call me,” he says. “We’ll have coffee.” l Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE TABLE

Shutterstock

Candy Corn Doesn’t Care if You Hate It By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

C

andy corn is trash. Say it all you want; post it on every platform. Candy corn doesn’t give a giant gummy rat’s ass. For one thing, it’s been around and isn’t going anywhere. Candy corn was first manufactured in the 1880s, the same decade that brought us its wax-wrapped cousin from Atlantic City, saltwater taffy. Wild times. Go ahead and hate these vintage sugar bombs — they’ve survived wartime sugar rationing and two separate decades of low-carb diet trends. They cannot be killed by conventional means. Oh, you think it’s too sweet? Suck it up, Milk Dud. So are cotton candy, jellybeans and s’mores, the core team of seasonal American sweets. Too much is the point. To our contemporary obsession with thinness and LED-bright teeth, candy corn extends its blunt, triangular middle finger. The tri-colored fusion of fondant and marshmallow does not need an actual flavor, only the binding magic of carnuba wax and, like, six different dyes. With the exception of a regrettable foray into

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Thanksgiving dinner flavors, candy corn has always had the popcorn balls not to pretend and to be only itself: frosting you can eat while driving or typing. Is it my favorite candy? Not by a longshot. But I have had a lot of sugar and I would like to fight. Unlike, say, a Look Bar or Good & Plentys, candy corn refuses to be shamed into the shelves of misfit candy only your uncle asks you to pick up. Instead, it waits. Candy corn bides its time until the school supply shelves have been laid to waste. Then, overnight, it crowds the shelves of supermarkets and drugstores, a wave of neon candy announcing the season since long before pumpkin spice was a twinkle in that Starbuck’s barista’s eye. Do you want some? Doesn’t matter. Look, there’s a bag in your cart now. Seasonal though it may be, candy corn isn’t out here trying to blend into a Martha Stewart arrangement of cream-colored pumpkins and reclaimed barn wood. No, candy corn is taking down the fall industrial complex from the inside, reminding


us that somewhere behind the façade of carefully arranged leaf piles, a sticky toddler is pawing the bins at WinCo or tearing at a bag of Brach’s that will inevitably explode and scatter the little orange, yellow and white tablets way behind the fridge. Candy corn shows up to your tasteful Thanksgiving in over-the-top harvest vegetable drag, its garish stripes mocking the earnest, whitewashed ceramic pilgrims on your table. Go ahead and try to gentrify this cheap-ass confection, Martha. Because you can take the candy out of the drugstore but you can’t take the drugstore out of the candy. And some of us remember you’re from Jersey. Oh, you’ve always hated candy corn because it’s so artificial? Cool story, fun size. Enjoy your fruit-sweetened gummies and know that candy corn is blowing bubblegum cigarette powder in your direction. Because unlike Frankenstein’s monster, candy corn neither craves the love and acceptance of humanity nor rages at its rejection. In fact, as the annual dragging of candy corn has become it’s own tradition, the iconic sweet you love to hate has only grown stronger, morphing into pumpkin shapes and Easter pastels. Candy corn does not retreat. There are, incidentally, only three acceptable ways to eat candy corn: one by one, biting off one color layer at a time, imagining an ultimately imperceptible difference between them and with full mental focus and attention to the candy’s transformation into an almost buttery slurry; mindlessly and by the handful as you pass an uncovered candy dish, only realizing how many you’ve consumed when your fingers graze the bottom and your stomach roils with regret; and by jamming one on each canine tooth, transforming yourself into a candy vampire. Still, I tip my Halloween witch hat to the Pinterest nihilists making candy-corn fudge, cakes, layered puddings and party snack mixes. In that lawless confectionary dark web, candy corn finds strange new forms, including the alarmingly realistic formation of an ear of corn, made by jamming the pieces into a cookie dough cob. If you can work up the sugar tolerance and accept candy corn on its own terms, you’ll know the smug joy of loving a candy everyone hates. (I see you, black jellybean gang.) Do it or don’t. Candy corn does not care. ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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TROPHY CASE

The Best of Fans Bill and Emily Langenbach By Rod Kausen

trophycase@northcoastjournal.com

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ill and Emily Langenbach had a grandson that ran cross country and track a few years before I became the track and field coach at Fortuna High School in 1982. He tried hard and he found some athletic success, and they became fans of the sports. Every season from then on, they would come out for each local track and field and cross country meet, they even made plenty of road trips. The little old couple, hand in hand, sitting next to each other in the pickup, growing older and smaller with each passing year. They donated to the high school programs with money and lent their support. They donated to many local agencies as well, such as the police and fire departments. I became good friends with them, especially Bill. Many times I stopped by to chat at their house on Rohnerville Road, not far from where I lived, and I learned a lot from them. I painted their house twice and Bill taught me a couple lifelong tricks about painting, a skill I had practiced every summer since my teen years. He had the coolest shop with every type of tool, including many of his own inventions. Each year, everyone on the team knew the Langenbachs and would thank them for coming to the meets rain or shine, cheering each athlete enthusiastically until dark. Their encouragement showed they believed in trying hard and that each person who competed needed to be cheered on. They brought treats for the troops and we named a post-season award for them: the Inspirational Award. Our teams would cheer more than any others and they were the lead cheerleaders. It created a special bond, having this kind couple cheer so hard for everyone. The team loved them. The Langenbachs became particularly fond of one of the all-time star athletes I have coached, Mike Katri. But they always let him know it wasn’t because he won, but how hard he tried and the improvement that he made that they appreciated. Still, as he got better and better, they treated him like a grandson who was a star. Katri would wait for them at each meet and walk in with them and keep them company during the races. Those who knew Katri might not have expected that.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Mike Katri with Bill and Emily Langenbach at a Fortuna High School meet. Courtesy of Rod Kausen

He won the state meet in Los Angeles in 1992, becoming the fastest half-miler in the U.S. The Langenbachs were the second people I called from L.A. They whooped and screamed. Bill had been a bridge engineer earlier in his life and had done very well. Emily was from Fortuna but they had met and lived their life in Sacramento, though Bill did a lot of work up here, as well. They raised two brilliant kids and when they retired, they bought a house near family where Emily was raised. Each day, they would walk the same route up in the hills across the road together, hand in hand, slowing down through the years but always holding hands. They were avid bird watchers and flower growers. They got up in the middle of the night and danced, they went to Burger King every day, where the staff knew their order and would cut their Whopper in perfect halves for sharing. The Langenbachs were the greatest of fans but also role models of sharing and support for many student athletes who had never seen such a bond. The couple told me one time that they had had a couple disagreements in their 60 years of marriage but never had a fight or gotten angry with each other. They were totally connected as one. Emily started to slip into cognitive and physical problems as they aged into their 80s, though Bill was still lucid and healthy. They grew unable to attend meets, walk in the hills together or dance in the front window at 3 a.m. She was hospitalized for various ailments, none of it seeming to help her mind. Bill spent a lot of time milling around the yard out front, tending to the flowers. He told me they had a deal to be each other’s caregivers exclusively and made a pact to go together. I would stop to talk with him as I could see he was getting more and more lonely and depressed. Bill said that Emily often didn’t know who he was, that she refused

to take her medications and was showing signs of anger. She was slipping away and the only thing he wanted to do was help her. The last time I stopped by, Bill was slouching on a stump in the front yard, crying. He said he couldn’t stand to watch Emily suffer all day, moaning. I saw signs of confusion and anger in Bill, as well; he was getting stories and people mixed up. He was as miserable as Emily. We went to the shop and he showed me his deer and elk mantles. He had quite a collection of hunting trophies and guns. His stories were confusing and desperate. He said, “I’ve been dancing alone at night and pretending that Emily is dancing with me, but it’s not the same. I think tonight I’ll get up at 3 and dance alone and pretend harder that Emily is dancing, too.” Just a couple of days later I got a phone call from his son-in-law. When I saw the number pop up, I said to my wife “Emily must have died.” But when I answered the phone, he said, “It’s worse than that — they are both gone.” When I drove by their house, it was taped off and the window blinds were closed. Thinking back to the Times-Standard headline the next day, I want to pretend it said, “Lovebirds now dancing together again,” but it didn’t. ● Rod Kausen (he/him) is a retired teacher and coach. If you or someone you know is struggling, resources are available, including the following: the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255, press 1 for veterans, ayuda en Español (888) 628-9454; the Crisis Text Line- Text HOME to 741741; the Department of Health and Human Service’s 24-hour Behavioral Health Crisis Line (707) 445-7715 or tollfree (888) 849-5728; and the Behavioral Health Warm Line at (707) 268-2999 Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Chetco Estuary Kicking Out Quality Kings

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fishing@northcoastjournal.com

I

f you’re looking for an opportunity to catch big, ocean-fresh kings, the Chetco estuary is the place to be. Salmon have been staging in the tidewater since the beginning of September. They’ll be there until rain allows them to make their way upriver. Following last Monday’s rain, which bumped the flows from under 100 cubic feet per second to nearly 1,000 cfs, some salmon were able to navigate out of the tidewater. But there should be plenty more heading in from the salt to take their place. “Salmon fishing has kicked into high gear on the Chetco estuary,” said Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. “Upward of 50 kings were landed on Saturday and several dozen more on Monday. There is a good mix of jacks and wild and hatchery kings. The good fishing has attracted a crowd of boats. Anchovies and plug-cut herring are producing fish the second half of the incoming tide and beginning of the outgoing.” On the Chetco, the daily bag limit for salmon is two adult fish per day and no more than one adult wild Chinook. Anglers may harvest adult hatchery Chinook until the daily bag limit has been met. Once the adult daily limit is harvested, anglers cannot continue to fish for jack salmon. The river remains closed above mile 2.2 because of low flows. Over on the Smith River, the tidewater fishing hasn’t been as good. But that may not be for a lack of fish. The rain that fell last week pushed the flows over 900 cfs, and schools of jacks and darker adults moved through. According to Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine, there aren’t many fish staging in the estuary right now. “There’s been a few boats trolling sardines and anchovies, as well as bank anglers tossing Kastmasters and Cleos,” he said. The Smith River is currently closed above the mouth of Rowdy Creek due to low flows.

Doug and Nick Ebert hold limits of salmon caught Oct. 2 while fishing the Chetco River estuary with guide Mick Thomas of Brookings Fishing Charters. Photo courtesy of Brookings Fishing Charters

Weekend marine forecast

Winds will begin to decrease Friday and the ocean looks to be plenty fishable over the weekend. As of Tuesday afternoon, Friday’s forecast is calling for winds out of the southwest up to 5 knots with northwest waves 4 feet at eight seconds and west 3 feet at 16 seconds. Saturday, winds will be out of the north 5 to 10 knots with northwest waves 5 feet at nine seconds. Sunday looks similar with winds coming from the north 5 to 15 knots with northwest waves 5 feet at nine seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka or www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh. noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service at 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at 443-6484.

The Oceans: Eureka

Prior to Monday, there hadn’t been much offshore activity out of Eureka due to rough seas. Gary Blasi of Full Throttle Sport Fishing ventured to the halibut grounds in less than ideal conditions Monday and put in quick limits. The weather was better Tuesday but the bite was slower. Very few boats were on the water.

Shelter Cove

According to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing, the rockfish bite has been excellent this week. “It’s been a little slow at times but still getting good limits every day,” he said. “Most of the effort was at the Old Man this week. The salmon bite picked up the last couple days and most boats have been getting limits over the weekend right at the Coast Guard buoy.

• Servicing Humboldt County for over 40 years • Largest in stock new & used inventory • Competitive price guarantee • Delivery and Service after the sale

The Rivers: Lower Klamath

The salmon effort and harvest has slowed considerably on the lower Klamath. Reportedly, the mouth is still sanded over, making it difficult for fish to enter the river. If and when it blows open, we should see more fresh kings along with coho move in. The daily bag limit is two jack Chinook at 23-inches or smaller and two hatchery steelhead. Read the complete fishing roundup at www.northcoastjournal.com. ●

“LARGEST BRAND SELECTION IN THE COUNTY”

Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast. com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SETLIST

As It Was, So Shall It Be Eureka Symphony opens again By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

O

n Oct. 1 and 2, the Eureka Symphony opened its 30th anniversary season at the Arkley Center for the Performing Arts with a program that was aptly titled ”Re-Emergence.” I was there, at my first large indoor concert after the longest break in indoor concerts I have experienced since I can remember. It wasn’t an easy decision. I have, like a lot of you, I am sure, watched and experienced the pandemic desolation that has come in the wake of large public events. However, the draw that clinched it for me was the very necessary and correct measures the organizers took to assure the safety of the public: Vaccination cards and masks were required. Talking to some of the friendly staff in the lobby before the show, I was told there were no issues among the patrons with these rules and the only thing even approaching drama was when one concert-goer had to return to their vehicle to retrieve their vax card, which they did without complaint. My first glimmer of hope that evening was the revelation that, despite what the media, online comment sections, and a deeply stupid protest outside of a local hospital with an at-capacity ICU were all telling me, there are still quite a lot of reasonable adults in our community. As reckless as I can be with my own private life and celebratory habits, I am still pulling for the social contract, public safety and an appreciation of consensus reality. Seeing how polite and normal everyone — both staff and the public — was behaving in the face of such abnormal conditions did a lot to raise my spirits and make me feel comfortable about doing something from the maskless old days. The opening piece of the night was Elgar’s “Serenade for Strings,” an early work by the outsider English composer that has a light and almost pastoral feeling in its gentle first movement before opening up to the sort of melodic splendor that would become one of the composer’s distinguishing qualities later in his career. The serenade’s three movements always uplift and present the listener with an unambiguous sense of muted joy, despite the sometimes complex time signatures and returning main theme. This work gave its often morose and despairing author an

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early glimpse of future prestige to come, and provided — for me at least — an auspicious and even optimistic beginning to the evening and season. The musicians did an excellent job with this one and I settled in easily. Introductions now out of the way, the assembled players wasted no time presenting the star of the evening, violinist Otis Harriel, a confident, highly skilled and accomplished talent whose life and career began in Arcata. The next composition of the evening brought the audience back in time and southward to the continent of Europe from Elgar’s Albion home, to land in the early 19th century territory of the evening’s most prolific and famous composer, the Austrian titan of the tones, Franz Schubert. His Rondo in A Major, which was written when the composer was still a teenager and remained unpublished in his lifetime, is an excellent way to showcase a violinist’s talent without overwhelming the audience. Because a rondo is at its core an instrumental round, the melodies are never swamped by the sort of soloist virtuosity often found in more complex pieces of music. That is not to say the music doesn’t require technical brilliance — it certainly does — it’s just that the melody is never fully subservient to the technical showcasing of the central player. Harriel performed brilliantly on this piece and the symphony rose to the occasion in its playing. After such a long dry period away from this kind of thing, I found myself moved and the return of a long, nearly forgotten, genuine elation came creeping home through my ears and into my head. The final performance of the night brought the audience even further south geographically and back in time to the late baroque world of Italian composer Tomaso Vitali and his exquisite and mysterious Chaconne in G Minor. I say mysterious not simply because of the quality of the piece but for the enigma of its composition, whose enharmonic modulations carry the work into new key signatures in a fashion that wouldn’t become chic until a century later in the Romantic period. This was a wonderful and inspired choice to end the evening with, as the music does an excellent job dividing the players into the

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

The marquee lit once again for the Eureka Symphony. Photo by Katherine Nunes-Siciliani

concrete support pillars of the chaconne’s dominant four-note descending basso ostinato that serves as a buttress for a truly, well, baroque display of technical ecstasy from the violinist. The task laid before Harriel was no small feat and to say that he met it is putting it lightly. By the end of the work, with that ever-present and heavy bassline carrying an otherworldly violin, you have certainly gone somewhere. I came on the second night of the symphony’s opening and this ultimate performance concluded with a quick solo excursion by Harriel, the Capriccio No. 23, aka “The Labyrinth,” by Italian baroque violinist Pietro Locatelli. I don’t want to sound ungrateful here, but after the excellent conclusion of the previous work, this seemed a little excessive and showy, like the solo violinist equivalent of blasting Van Halen’s “Eruption” as an encore. I appreciate the player’s great skill but to my ears it wrecked the feeling of the evening’s conclusion. However, I am a notoriously grumpy asshole, with a pickiness that tends to live only in my own head, and an informal vote among my friends in attendance afterward registered a split very much in favor of the performance. So I admit defeat and my only objection was one of mood; the piece was played very, very well. It’s a hard thing to consider, returning

to a large indoor concert after so many months away and under the shroud of an ongoing plague. I’m glad I did and I am particularly happy this was the show I broke cover for. The staff and musicians all handled the evening with a grace and professionalism that seems superhuman considering the circumstances. Longtime fixture, guiding beacon and star of the Humboldt orchestral music scene, Conductor and Musical Director Carol Jacobson was a delight to see at work again, bringing her megawatt passion to power the program in the concert hall. There is something magical about live music of the instrumental variety played in a place like the Arkley Center, a liminal space is created as if a vast and eternal wormhole is being tapped into. And Jacobson is certainly a magician within that space. For the first time in a long time I felt a sense of hope for a future unlike the dreary decline of our present. Here’s hoping the Eureka Symphony lives long and far into that unseen land. l Collin Yeo (he/him) is begging the ghost of LBJ to rise from Hades and beat the everloving shit out of the moribund Democrats whose recalcitrance toward progressive legislation threatens us all with a coming GOP imperium. He lives in Arcata.


ARTS NIGHTS

Works from Uska Ayar school of painting in Pucallpa, Peru, at Global Village Gallery. Submitted

Arts! Arcata

NCJ HUM PLATE

Friday, Oct. 8, 4-7 p.m.

A

rts Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at locations in Arcata. Visit www.arcatamainstreet. com, Arts! Arcata on Facebook, or call 707-822-4500 for more information. ARCATA ARTISANS GALLERY 883 H St. Zachary Shea and Betsy Roberts, artwork. ARCATA GALLERY 1063 H St. New gallery grand opening featuring a diverse collection of artists in various media. CAFE BRIO 791 G St. Serge Scherbatosky, photography. GLOBAL VILLAGE GALLERY 973 H St. Amazonian visionary art from the Uska Ayar school of painting in

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email us your tip and we’ll check it out!

Pucallpa, Peru. INFUZIONS 863 H St. Being Beaming, artwork. Merry Gnosis, block prints. MOONRISE HERBS 826 G St. Peggy Ho, photography. THE GARDEN GATE 905 H St. “A Wondrous World of Colorful Explosion,” Augustus Clark, paintings. THE GRIFFIN 937 Tenth St. Joyce Jonte, paintings. THE JAM 915 H St. Savage Henry Comedy Festival and DJ Show with Electric Jungle.

PLAZA GRILL Third Floor, Jacoby’s Storehouse Jay Brown, paintings. PLAZA SHOE SHOP 699 G St. Stephanie Thomas, artwork. ●

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Calendar Oct 7 – 14, 2021

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. For BIPOC families. See www. facebook.com/HC-Black-Music-Arts-Association-104727504645663 for more information. hcblackmusicnarts@gmail.com. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from Equity Arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

OUTDOORS

Submitted

Looking to get a jumpstart on your holiday shopping or find that special gift for a friend or yourself? It’s a lovely time of year for an outdoor craft fair, especially one in picturesque Bayside. The Bayside Fall Makers Fair is here, happening Saturday, Oct. 9 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at two locations: Jacoby Creek Land Trust Kokte Ranch and Redwood Roots Farm, next to the Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. The multi-site fair offers a COVID-safe experience with plenty of room to move about and lots of fresh air. Masks, however, are still required while browsing the more than 80 artisan booths offering an array of jewelry, fiber work, woodwork, metalwork, painting, printmaking, ceramics, glass, illustration, food products, and body and wellness products.

H

eads up, folks: Due to the increase in COVID-19 cases in the area, many events are in flux. Please check our online calendar for event changes and contact information before heading out. We’ll do our best to update the rapidly changing info. At press time, these events are still on. Please remember the county mandatory masking ordinance is in place and mask up for yourself and your neighbors.

7 Thursday

COMEDY

Savage Henry Comedy Festival. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. Comedians from all over the country perform at multiple venues in Eureka for the 10th annual festival. www.facebook.com/savagehenrymagazine.

Hunter Ranch, NRLT

For the second year in a row, Northcoast Regional Land Trust’s annual celebration Boots and Birkenstocks will be held online, offering attendees the chance to view a new mini-documentary about its largest conservation easement, the Hunter Ranch, and participate in an online auction to support the organization’s good work. The documentary takes a look at the people who work the land on Hunter Ranch and those who are working on the oak woodland restoration there. Auction items include local meats and veggies, trips, art and more. The event is up and running now until Oct. 9. Find it online at www.ncrlt.org/AC2021.

EVENTS Fire Prevention Week 2021. Virtual World, Online. Humboldt Bay Fire has a week full of activities scheduled Oct. 4-8. Visit the Fire Prevention Week tab at www.hbfire.org/fire-prevention-week-2021. Fire Relief Donation Drive. 2-5 p.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J St. Updated list of needs and a monetary donation site online. legionprograms@gmail.com. www.battlenhomefronts.org/localaction/?fbclid=IwAR3Rl-5mRv64ntGRryc2q3ZuscCzQfSq3fbu-bH356WdI0DU4u8Sbgxf6Wc. 610-6619. NRLT Boots and Birkenstocks. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online.Northcoast Regional Land Trust’s annual celebration with a week-long online auction and a new mini-documentary about its largest conservation easement, the Hunter Ranch. www.ncrlt.org/AC2021. 822-2242.

FOR KIDS

Bill McKibben of 350.org: What can we still do?. 4-5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online.The New Yorker contributor and 350.org founder discusses what can we do to slow temperature rise and find resilience in our divided societies. Part of HSU’s Sustainable Futures speaker series. Free. schatzenergy@humboldt. edu. schatzcenter.org/2021/09/sfss-billmckibben/. 826-4345.

MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Humboldt and Del Norte county youth ages 12 to 26 learn to express themselves creatively in visual art, audio and video production. All MARZ students have free access to equipment, software and training. Meets via Zoom by appointment. Free. marzproject@ inkpeople.org. 442-8413. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online.North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

SPOKEN WORD

FOOD

LECTURE

The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online.A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom. us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

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Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org/. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Submitted

Marvelous Mycoheterotrophs, not a new action movie on Netflix, but the subject of a California Native Plant Society, North Coast Chapter-hosted lecture. It’s happening Wednesday, Oct. 13 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. (free). Actually, the full title is even more exciting: Marvelous Mycoheterotrophs: The Beauty and Science of Floral-Fungal Freeloaders. And so is the subject. Learn more about this mysterious, waxy, alien-looking plant from mycologist Leah Bendlin of the Oregon Mycological Society. The free Zoom webinar can be accessed at www. northcoastcnps.org. Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Local, GMO-free produce. Live music. Free. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org/. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free/. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. www.foodforpeople.org/volunteering. 445-3166 ext. 310.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Earthly Edibles Pumpkin Patch. 1-6 p.m. Earthly Edibles Farm, Riverside Road, Korbel, Blue Lake. Organic pumpkins and farm stand. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. Pumpkin patch, corn maze, farm stand. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Open weekdays Noon-6 p.m. and weekends 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. Voting for the contest runs from Oct. 15 to Oct. 30. Winners will be chosen by the number of “likes” their image receives on Clarke Museum Facebook page. Winners will be announced on Oct. 31. $5-$15 per entry suggested donation. dana.f@clarkemuseum.org. www. clarkemuseum.org/events.html. 443-1947. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 1-6 p.m. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road, 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. Six acres of pumpkins and some corn at the Pifferini Ranch — a community tradition for more than 30 years. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. Celebrate Halloween with Food for People by donating and sending friends spooky lawn decorations like Franken-carrot, Mummy Pear and more. Kids can enter a Count Brocc-ula coloring competition for a chance at prizes from Wildberries Marketplace. Proceeds help rebuild Food for People. Sign up online. $25-$200. crobbins@foodforpeople.org. www. foodforpeople.org. 599-0855.

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www.facebook.com/ NorthCoastRedwoods.

SPORTS Run in the Redwoods (Virtual) 5k. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, 127011 Newton B Drury Scenic Parkway, Orick. Register online for this benefit 5k For Redwood Parks Conservancy. Runners and walkers can complete their 5K at Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park during “run week” or anywhere they choose. Registered runners receive a custom T-shirt, bib and finisher ribbon. www.redwoodparksconservancy. org/RITR.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www. englishexpressempowered.com. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3-$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@gmail.com. www. sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

8 Friday

ART

Art Hike Adventure Tour: Victorian Village. 9 a.m. Ferndale Main Street, Ferndale. Join Margaret Kellermann on a walking art workshop through Ferndale with some history and architecture. All levels of artists, ages 10-17 must be accompanied by adult. Tickets online. $40. www.ferndalemusiccompany.com/ classes-and-workshops/art-hike-adventure-tour-victorian-village. 786-7030.

COMEDY Savage Henry Comedy Festival. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. See Oct. 7 listing.

LECTURE Powerful Parenting in Practice w/Kat Kabick. 4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A discussion of parenting’s impact on future generations. Part of Humboldt County Transition-Age Youth Collaboration Youth Advisory Board’s first virtual wellness series. RSVP by email or phone at least two days prior to attend and get a care package and supplies delivered. Free. staff@hctayc.org. 298-5190 or 298-5184.


MUSIC Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www. facebook.com/groups/224856781967115.

EVENTS Fire Prevention Week 2021. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. NRLT Boots and Birkenstocks. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

FOR KIDS MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

FOOD Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farmers, prepared food vendors and crafters bring their bounty to Southern Humboldt. Non-GMO produce. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Earthly Edibles Pumpkin Patch. 1-6 p.m. Earthly Edibles Farm, Riverside Road, Korbel, Blue Lake. See Oct. 7 listing. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 1-6 p.m. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road, 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Uncovering the Hidden World of a Secretive Seabird. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join Jennifer Guerrero, the program manager for the Oregon Marbled Murrelet Project with Oregon State University, for a presentation about the endangered seabird and challenges for addressing conservation and land management for this species. Zoom presentation link online. Free. www.rras.org/home.aspx.

SPORTS Run in the Redwoods (Virtual) 5k. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, 127011 Newton B Drury Scenic Parkway, Orick. See Oct. 7 listing.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email invitation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/ CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@ gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com.

9 Saturday

ART

Arts! Arcata. Second Saturday of every month, 4-7 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art in downtown Arcata, surrounding area and online. Due to COVID-19, there is no gathering. Keep safe distances, wear facial coverings and observe guidelines in each location. Free. arcatamainstreet@ gmail.com. www.arcatamainstreet.com. 822-4500.

BOOKS Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms.gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

COMEDY Savage Henry Comedy Festival. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. See Oct. 7 listing.

MOVIES Robo-Cat Productions Presents: Oracle Of The Stones. 5-7:45 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Enjoy this telepathic tale featuring cosmic mystery and danger. The link for the show goes live Oct. 9. www. youtube.com/watch?v=cHfcgEUVWqo. Free. robocatproductions@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/ events/2331862966949745. 267-4771.

Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown onsite, fresh sourdough bread from Humboldt Baking Company and farm fresh eggs. Art from local artists as well as goods from a variety of local artisans. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Oct. 8 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Earthly Edibles Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Earthly Edibles Farm, Riverside Road, Korbel, Blue Lake. See Oct. 7 listing. Fortuna Pumpkin Patch. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Table Bluff Farm’s Pumpkin Patch, 1813 Eel River Drive, Fortuna. Jack-o-Lantern pumpkins, specialty pumpkins for baking, soups and pies. Pumpkin the kunekune pig will be there for pets and photos. Family photos in patch available. Masks required. Free admission, pumpkins by the pound. info@tableblufffarm.com. www.fb.me/e/4DHddnp1P. 890-6699. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Luna Farm Pumpkin Patch. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Luna Farm, 3345 Dyerville Loop Road, Redcrest. Festivities also include a farm stand with Luna Farm organic fruits and vegetables, seasonal food and sweet treats for sale, and a photo booth. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing.

Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road, 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

MEETINGS Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Paul Johnson in front of the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute walk focusing on plants, Marsh ecology and “tiny creatures that are often overlooked.” Bring a mask to comply with current COVID rules. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Guided Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Meet leader Jude Power at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata. Bring your binoculars. COVID-19 participation guidelines online. RSVP by text or email with the walk date and name, email and phone number for each participant. Free. thebook@reninet.com. www.rras. org/home.aspx. 499-1247. Dune Restoration Work Days. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Continued on next page »

CARTOON

EVENTS Bayside Fall Makers Fair. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Kokte Ranch & Nature Preserve, 2182 Old Arcata Road, Bayside. More than 60 local artisans selling jewelry, art, crafts, food products, body and wellness products, and more at both Kokte Ranch & Nature Preserve and Redwood Roots Farm (45 Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Road). Masks required. baysidecommunityhall@gmail.com. www.baysidecommunityhall.org. 599-3192. Humboldt Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County, Humboldt. There will not be a single walk this year. Instead, teams are asked to walk their favorite paths and visit one of the county’s 11 Alzheimer’s Promise Gardens. Locations on website. kcoelho@alz.org. www.act.alz. org/humboldt2021. 407-8826. NRLT Boots and Birkenstocks. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

FOR KIDS HCBMAA Reading and Book Discussion. Noon-1 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Presented by the HC Black Music and Arts Association every Saturday during farmers market. For youth and families. info@ hcblackmusicnarts.org. www.hcblackmusicnarts.org.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday Humboldt County farmers bring their non-GMO bounty, rain or shine. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Information and COVID rules online. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

SUPPORT Sponsorships • Subscriptions • Swag

CALENDAR Continued from previous page

Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help restore the dune ecosystem of the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center by removing invasive plants. Training in plant identification and removal provided. COVID-19 safety practices in place. Wear masks while gathered and practice social distancing. Free. dante@friendsofthedunes.org. www. friendsofthedunes.org/dert-days. 444-1397. Habitat Improvement Team Volunteer Workday. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Help restore habitat by removing invasive, non-native plants and maintaining native plant areas. Bring drinking water, a facial mask and gloves. Wear long pants, long sleeves and closedtoe shoes. We will provide tools and snacks and a beautiful place to work. Free. www.fws.gov/refuge/ humboldt_bay/. 733-5406. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

SPORTS Run in the Redwoods (Virtual) 5k. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, 127011 Newton B Drury Scenic Parkway, Orick. See Oct. 7 listing.

ETC Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www. facebook.com/clubtriangl English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

10 Sunday MUSIC

Rage with Magic Miles, a Benefit Concert. 1-6 p.m. Perigot Park, 312 South Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Join Magic Miles as he fights ECS on disability discrimination. Featuring food, drink and live music. A negative COVID test or proof of vaccination will be required to enter. Tickets available on Eventbrite. $20, free for kids under 5. brandeyherring@hotmail.com. www. facebook.com/MagicMilesMysteryTour.

EVENTS Bayside Fall Makers Fair. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Kokte Ranch & Nature Preserve, 2182 Old Arcata Road, Bayside. See Oct. 9 listing. Our Lady of Fatima Celebration. 10:30 a.m. Ferndale Portuguese Hall, Fifth Street and Ocean Avenue. Mass begins at 10:30 a.m at Ferndale Assumption Church. Sopas and alcatra lunch at noon followed by auction of donated items.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

SHOP.COM 24

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Earthly Edibles Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Earthly Edibles Farm, Riverside Road, Korbel, Blue Lake. See Oct. 7 listing. Fortuna Pumpkin Patch. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Table Bluff Farm’s Pumpkin Patch, 1813 Eel River Drive, Fortuna. See Oct. 9 listing. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Luna Farm Pumpkin Patch. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Luna Farm,

3345 Dyerville Loop Road, Redcrest. See Oct. 9 listing. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road, 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

OUTDOORS Audubon Guided Bird Walk. 9-11 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Guided, leisurely two- to three-hour birding tour with leader Ralph Bucher. Beginners welcome. COVID-19 participation guidelines online. Text or email with the walk date and name, email and phone for each participant. Free. thebook@reninet.com. www.rras. org/home.aspx. 499-1247. Eel River Guided Walk for Indigenous Peoples’ Day. 10 a.m. Riverwalk Trail, Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna. Celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day with a guided walk along the Eel River on the Riverwalk Trail. Meet at the pergola with the big fish outside of the Fortuna River Lodge. Please park on the road-side of the parking lot. All ages. Please bring masks and social distance where possible. Free. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Rohner Park Guided Walk for Indigenous Peoples’ Day. 1 p.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. Celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day with a guided walk among the redwoods on the forest trails in Rohner Park. Meet at the gate at the start of the trail system. Parking available at the trailhead. All ages. Please bring masks and social distance where possible. Free. www. friendlyfortuna.com. Seabirding Adventure by Kayak. 9 a.m.-noon. Trinidad, Downtown. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society in partnership with Kayak Trinidad and pro guides to view marbled murrelets, pigeon guillemots, common murres, black oystercatchers and more. Kayaks and gear provided. Email reservations required. $99. andrew.rras@gmail.com. www.rras.org/home.aspx.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

11 Monday FOR KIDS

Earth Science Week at HSU Natural History Museum. . Virtual World, Online. Celebrate Earth Science Week with a live virtual after-school program featuring 75-minute sessions about the sun and stars, water, rocks and fossils geared toward children 8-12. $25 for week, $20 for members, includes materials. www. natmus.humboldt.edu.

FOOD Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Featuring local farmers and crafters. Non-GMO produce. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation. org. 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See Oct. 7 listing.


HOLIDAY EVENTS

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

Earthly Edibles Pumpkin Patch. 1-6 p.m. Earthly Edibles Farm, Riverside Road, Korbel, Blue Lake. See Oct. 7 listing. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 1-6 p.m. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road, 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Ham Radio Technician License Class. Virtual World, Online. The Humboldt Amateur Radio Club prepares students for the Amateur Radio Technician Class license examination. Via Zoom and in-person at the Humboldt Bay Fire Training room at 3030 L St. in Eureka. Call or email to reserve a seat. Free. ke6hec@arrl.net. www.humboldt-arc.org. 834-0042. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 8 listing.

12 Tuesday FOR KIDS

Earth Science Week at HSU Natural History Museum. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 11 listing. MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. Free. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org/. 441-9999. Free Produce Market. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Garberville Presbyterian Church, 437 Maple Lane. Fresh fruits and vegetables for income-eligible people. Bring your own reusable bags. Please wear a mask and observe 6-foot social distancing. Information on qualifying online. Free. www.foodforpeople.org. 11:30-12:30 a.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. Fresh fruits and vegetables for income-eligible people. A drive-thru and walk-up event. Walk-ups enter from David Way. Bring your own reusable bags, wear a mask and observe 6-foot social distancing. Eligibility information online. www.foodforpeople.org. 12:30-1:30 p.m. Redway Baptist Church, 553 Redway Drive. Food for People’s food distribution for those in need. This is a drive-thru and walk-up event. Cars enter from Empire Drive. Participants must wear face masks and maintain 6-foot social distancing. Free. www.foodforpeople.org. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. GMOfree produce, humanely raised meats, pastured eggs, plant starts and more. Live music weekly and CalFresh EBT cards accepted. Free. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. This sea town’s farmers market provides fresh, non-GMO produce and locally made crafts. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

MEETINGS Community Housing Sessions. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Participate in an open dialogue on housing needs, issues and vision for the future of housing in Humboldt County, perspectives about housing opportunities, challenges, solutions and more. Via Zoom. Join at www.us02web.zoom.us/j/82323649248.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

ETC Disability Peer Advocate Group. Second Tuesday of every month, 3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Peer advocates supporting each other and furthering the disability cause. Email for the Zoom link. alissa@ tilinet.org. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

13 Wednesday BOOKS

On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

LECTURE Marvelous Mycoheterotrophs: The Beauty and Science of Floral-Fungal Freeloaders. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Mycologist and teacher Leah Bendlin of Oregon Mycological Society discusses how these alien looking plants depend upon fungi, introduces local species and how they might help mushroom hunting. Via Zoom. Free. www. northcoastcnps.org/index.php/44-topmenucontent/254-evening-program-event-page.

FOR KIDS Earth Science Week at HSU Natural History Museum. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 11 listing. MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Oct. 8 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Earthly Edibles Pumpkin Patch. 1-6 p.m. Earthly Edibles Farm, Riverside Road, Korbel, Blue Lake. See Oct. 7 listing.

Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 1-6 p.m. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road, 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

MEETINGS FUSD School Board Meeting. 7-8 p.m. Ferndale High School, 1231 Main St. Girls Basketball Parent Meeting. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ferndale Elementary School, 164 Shaw Ave.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 8 listing.

14 Thursday SPOKEN WORD

The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

EVENTS Fire Relief Donation Drive. 2-5 p.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J St. See Oct. 7 listing. Women-Owned Business Certifications Webinar. 10-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Learn about the main certifications available to women-owned small businesses. Free. info@norcalptac.org. www. eventbrite.com/e/certifications-overview-for-women-owned-businesses-registration-173040608117. 267-7561.

FOR KIDS Earth Science Week at HSU Natural History Museum. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 11 listing. MARZ Project. Noon-5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Oct. 7 listing. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See Oct. 7 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Earthly Edibles Pumpkin Patch. 1-6 p.m. Earthly Edibles Farm, Riverside Road, Korbel, Blue Lake. See Oct. 7 listing. Huddie’s Harvest Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing.

Organic Matters Pumpkin Patch. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 7 listing. Pumpkin Carving Contest. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road. 1-6 p.m. The Pumpkin Patch at Mad River Road, 1171 Mad River Road, Arcata. See Oct. 7 listing. Trick or Eat: Veggify Your Friends. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 7 listing.

Heads Up … Ink People Center for the Arts, Humboldt County Library and Word Humboldt, in partnership with KEET-TV, seek submissions of works of visual art and poetry from youth ages 13-18 and adults for “Stand Up and Be Counted: Art and Poetry Inspired by Muhammad Ali.” Entries will be accepted online through Nov. 19, 2021. The exhibition will go live at the Brenda Tuxford Gallery in early 2022. See www. inkpeople.org for details. The city of Arcata seeks applicants for the Public Safety Committee. Applicants must live within Arcata city limits or live or work within the Arcata Planning Area. Committee applications may be emailed to bdory@cityofarcata.org, faxed to 822-8018 or dropped off in the city manager’s office at Arcata City Hall between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, visit www.cityofarcata. org or call 822-5953. Redwood Art Association Humboldt Open Paint Out is still accepting participants for the event running through Oct. 2. Artists are invited to compete for prizes for their vision and interpretation of the landscape painted anywhere in Humboldt County in any medium. This judged event will have the art displayed at Redwood Art Association until Oct. 15. For more info and to register go to www.redwoodart. us or info@redwoodart.us. The city of Arcata seeks applicants for the Economic Development Committee. Email applications to citymgr@cityofarcata.org, fax to 822-8081 or drop off in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office” at the City Hall drop boxes. For more information visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. The Humboldt-Del Norte County Medical Society’s Humboldt-Del Norte PreMedical Education Task Force offers two $1,000 Future Physician scholarships to students planning on attending medical school. Application at www.hafoundation.org/Grants-Scholarships/Scholarships-Apply-Now. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SCREENS

Back to the Source

The Guilty and The Many Saints of Newark By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com THE GUILTY. I’ve long bridled at Hollywood remakes (I suppose we’re calling them reboots now) of recent international movies. For one, the practice speaks to the corporatized murder of imagination that has taken hold in the American cinema industry, whereby original screenplays are, by are large, passed over in favor of pre-existing properties. Secondly, it reinforces the false exceptionalism of said industry, separating art from other continents and, heaven forfend, other languages into a sub-category, a pool of “less-than” art that then becomes a well from which the vultures might drink. I acknowledge that’s a little cantankerous and anachronistic. To frame it a little less angrily: What would it hurt for American studios or distributors to license or acquire these international properties and re-release them for domestic audiences, particularly now, in the age of streaming? This presumes those domestic audiences would watch something with subtitles at all, and that dog likely will not hunt. Further, attaching a bankable American star/director/writer goes a great distance toward marketability and commercial success. And so, once again, my frustration has met my cynicism and retired into resignation. The Guilty is adapted from a Danish picture of the same title (Den Skyldige) from 2018 — incidentally, it is currently available on Hulu — with a screenplay by True Detective creator Nic Pizzolatto. To be fair, though, a screenplay credit might be generous: This is a beat-for-beat, sometimes word-for-word translation of the source material with a little texture and a few grace notes overlaid. Directed by Antoine Fuqua, who has been proficiently making very successful, large-scale, middle-of-the-road action movies for half my lifetime, it stars Jake Gyllenhaal as a 911 dispatcher caught in a caller’s domestic nightmare, set against his own ambiguous professional and personal crises. Perhaps I should have led with this:

26

Jake Gyllenhaal would like to talk to the owner of the vehicle. The Guilty

I like The Guilty (this version and the original) quite a lot. Despite my disinclination toward this school of cinema, I won’t argue with work that is competently and compellingly presented. Pizzolatto (whose work I have enjoyed but who I think may be a bit of a charlatan) and Fuqua move the action from wintry Copenhagen to Los Angeles in the midst of late-summer wildfires. Joe Baylor (Gyllenhaal), whom we will learn has been temporarily demoted from street duty to the call center, slogs through a shift of minor accidental overdoses, robbery by prostitute, bicycle injuries and the like. But then he fields a call from a woman who seems to have been abducted by her ex-husband. Joe scrambles to investigate the crime and apprehend the suspect from his headset, sometimes by extra-legal means, all while wrestling with his own anxiety, angst, asthma and impending dissolution. Maybe because this was a COVID production, Fuqua turns down the theatrics, simplifying and focusing his attention on Gyllenhaal’s performance. Which, because he has become our preeminent avatar of onscreen anguish, is of course immediately compelling. Compared to the civility and composure of the Danish original, it might seem a little over the top, but set against a standard thriller, it plays quiet and reserved, though equally intense and involving. R. 90M. NETFLIX. MANY SAINTS OF NEWARK. I haven’t read any criticism of this but a little bird tells me it isn’t being entirely well-received, which I don’t understand. There seems to be some sort of backlash against prestige television (which The Sopranos basically created), even as it overtakes

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

movies as the preeminent informer of contemporary popular culture. Maybe I’m misinformed. I like The Sopranos; everybody does. I appreciate the sophistication and care with which it was imagined and constructed. I also appreciate it for its irony and cynicism, attributes that seem to be lost on some of the audience, even if I don’t see it as the ur-text of modern crime drama. To me, The Many Saints is an ideal coda to the series, even all these years on, because it eschews the formal structure and familiar faces (for the most part), offering a prequel as final chapter. Written by creator David Chase and Lawrence Konner, and directed by Alan Taylor (who directed a great number of TV episodes we have all seen), the movie opens in Newark, 1967, after a pastiche of voices from the Bardo. Anthony Soprano is just a kid and afraid of the life lived by his father Johnny (Jon Bernthal) and his associates. But he also worships his “uncle” Dickie Moltisanti (Alessandro Nivola), who becomes the center of the narrative. Dickie, founded on contradictions, is an attentive, sensitive man capable of unspeakable violence and treachery; an appropriate role model for the Tony we come to know in the series. As Newark is consumed by the flames of racial tension, a now teenaged Tony (played by Michael Gandolfini) struggles with ways to help his family and avoid the lifetime of dangerous secrecy laid out before him. Simultaneously, Dickie tries to temper his inner monster with intentional acts of kindness. Both find limited success. Lavishly stylized, funny and horrible, and grittily true to the minutiae of life that transcend movies and gangster-ism

and culture, The Many Saints of Newark serves both as a standalone contribution to American organized crime cinema and as an entirely suitable introduction and farewell to characters we came to know over the course of six immersive seasons of television. R. 120M. BROADWAY, HBO MAX, MILL CREEK. ● John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

NOW PLAYING

THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Animated movie about your favorite Goth role models. Voiced by Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron and Chloë Grace Moretz. PG. 93M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. FREE GUY. Ryan Reynolds plays a man who realizes he’s an extra in somebody else’s chaotic, violent video game. Lol, same. PG13. 115M. BROADWAY. NO TIME TO DIE. Daniel Craig dusts off the tux one last time to do spy stuff with Lashana Lynch, Ana de Armas and Rami Malek. PG13. 203M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. SHANG-CHI AND THE LEGEND OF THE 10 RINGS. Marvel’s eponymous kungfu superhero (Simu Liu) spin kicks onto the big screen with Awkwafina, Tony Leung and Michelle Yeoh. PG13. 132M. BROADWAY, MINOR. VENOM: LET THERE BE CARNAGE. Tom Hardy returns in the sequel to the dark Marvel movie about a man and his symbiotic frenemy. PG13. 90M. BROADWAY, MINOR, MILL CREEK. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456.


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

FIELD NOTES The Citizen Eco-Drive Caliber 0100, the world’s most accurate autonomous watch, incorporates a quartz crystal vibrating more than 8 million times a second. The fine-wire coil seen through the clear back operates its once-a-second stepper motor.

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Fitness

Courtesy Citizen Watch Co.

One Second a Year By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

I

imagine Socrates and Plato running into each other in the market. Socrates says, “Hey, wanna join me and the boys tomorrow after lunch in the forum? I feel a dialogue coming on.” Plato says, “Love to! When did you say?” Socrates gives him a look. “I just told you. After lunch.” Which was good enough for the ancient Greeks. Rather than running around trying to keep up, they were relaxed about time. Don’t sweat it. When we’re all there, we can start. But at some point — probably about 500 years ago, with the invention of the first pocket watches — folks started worrying about time. Now, as the saying goes, time is money. It’s often considered unprofessional if you arrived two minutes late for a meeting. Rather than controlling time, it controls us. Having said that, I’m gobsmacked by a wristwatch that keeps time, without reference to a radio or GPS time signal, to within a second a year. Consider that any watch prior to the “quartz revolution” (discussed in the last Field Notes) was hard pressed to maintain accuracy of 10 seconds a day, that is, an hour a year. Today, a $20 quartz watch is good to plus-or-minus three minutes a year. A second a year — one part in 31,556,952 — is a couple of orders of magnitude more accurate. That’s quartz. There are, of course, many mechanical “chronometers” (ad-speak for accurate watches — certified chronometers are something else) available. They come with serious price tags, anywhere from a few hundred dollars to hundreds of thousands for handmade ones. But when it comes to accuracy, mechanical watches, beautiful as they are, just aren’t in the same league as quartz ones. For instance, the popular Rolex models (10,000 sold every week) are only accurate to a couple of seconds per day, which translates to

around 10 minutes a year. In fact, most high-end manufacturers don’t advertise the accuracy of their watches. You don’t wear a $300,000 Patek Philippe “Grand Complications in Rose Gold” beauty to know what time it is. (You have an iPhone for that.) You wear it for its craftsmanship, its aesthetic appeal and, of course, to impress. One “watch blogger” was assured by a contact in Switzerland, “You aren’t taken seriously in business in Europe if you don’t have a good mechanical watch.” The one-second-a-year instrument is the Caliber 0100 (“zero-one-hundred”), which, when it was announced by the Japanese Citizen group two years ago, caused the jaws of watch-lovers the world over to drop. It achieves this incredible accuracy not by any revolutionary techniques, but by pushing existing technology to the limit. For instance, its quartz crystal vibrates over eight million times a second, or 256 times faster than regular quartz-regulated watches: The higher the frequency, the greater the precision. In addition, it samples the ambient temperature every minute, adjusting the watch accordingly, since the vibration speed of quartz is (very slightly) affected by temperature changes. You change your time zones or set daylight savings by adjusting the hour hand (in one hour increments) without affecting the underlying timekeeping. Oh, and it goes forever (unless you keep it in the dark for more than six months) since solar cells beneath the translucent dial keep its tiny battery charged. Want one? It’s available in three models, with the rose gold one selling for $16,500. Too spendy? Don’t worry. You can pick up a titanium model for less than half that — a bargain! l Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) wants the world to know that he has a birthday coming up. Just saying.

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1230)

50 and Better OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1230) OLLI ONLINE: AUTUMNAL YOGA: A JOURNEY THROUGH THE ELEMENTS WITH LENA SCHMIDT. Enjoy a well−rounded, all−level, mellow movement class with gentle stretching and physical strength− ening, guided relaxation, and an Autumnal theme woven throughout. Join for one, any, or all sessions! Tues., Oct. 19−Nov. 9 from 12:30−1:30 p.m. OLLI members $15 each class or $45. for the series. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−1007) OLLI ONLINE: BIGFOOT STUDIES: THE PATTERSON−GIMLIN FILM WITH STEVEN SAINT THOMAS. Apply journalistic methods to probe the pros and cons of this legendary film. Survey various analyses of the film over the past 50−plus years, review first hand sources and put hoax theories to the test. Wed., Oct. 20 from 1−3:30 p.m. OLLI members $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1007)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1230) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1230)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1230) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1230) SMARTRECOVERY.ORG CALL 267 7868

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format. Visit https://w ww.ed2go.com/crwce/SearchResults.aspx?Sort=R elevance&MaxResultCount=10 (V−1007)

EMT REFRESHER 11/4/21 − 11/14/21. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. (V−1007) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA HISET PREPARA− TION visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/ adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707− 476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) FREE WORK RELATED SKILLS CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1125) LOAN DOCUMENT SIGNING 10/14/21. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−1007) NOTARY 10/13/21. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−1007) SERVSAFE MANAGER CERTIFICATE 10/20/21. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−1007)

Wellness & Bodywork 2022 AYURVEDA HEALTH & LIFE COACH & HERBALIST TRAININGS NOW ENROLLING. Do you ever feel your childhood upbringing or educa− tion was lacking in the life−skills needed to be the healthiest most successful version of yourself? Ready to learn the health & life skills & get the ongoing support you need to truly thrive in all areas of your life? Join the Ayurvedic Living School w/Traci Webb & Guests for our 100% online Ayurveda Health & Life Coach Training Starting: January 12. Ayurveda Herbalist Training Starts: March 22. Spaces fill fast. Early registration advised. Visit: www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−1/13) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Herbal & Traditional Healing in Greece with Thea Parikos. May 21 − 31, 2022. Discover the beauty, aromas, traditional and modern uses of many medicinal plants on this amazing journey of learning to the Aegean island of Ikaria. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0428)

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


OBITUARIES

LEGAL NOTICES AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOHN DAVID OLSON CASE NO. PR2100253

Michael Devlin May 26, 1959 - August 4, 2021 Michael “Mikie” Devlin was born to Joan Warde and Harry Devlin on May 26, 1959 in San Diego, California. He joined his two older siblings, Patrick and Kelley. Michael spent his early years in the Southern California area where his entire family spent the majority of their time swimming, surfing and enjoying the local beaches. Michael’s early surfing experiences occurred at San Onofre Surf Club Beach mixed with occasional camping trips to Baja & mainland Mexico. Michael was a member of the Hobie “Mini” surf team (14 & under) and he, along with his brother & sister, competed in many local surf contests. In 1972, Michael & his family moved from San Juan Capistrano, CA to Trinidad, CA, a small, picturesque fishing town in Northern CA. He attended Trinidad Elementary School and McKinleyville High School. Here he continued his passion for surfing, enjoying unlimited surf breaks and uncrowded conditions. Michael discovered that the commercial fishing community offered an economic opportunity and a chance to be on the ocean as well as a camaraderie that lasted his entire adult life. Michael fished for Dungeness crab, Salmon, Albacore tuna, black cod and shrimp. He also had a 19-year career working with geologists performing salmon stream restoration. Michael later moved to the Ft. Bragg/Mendocino area to fish salmon & black cod for the remainder of his life. Michael began woodworking in High School and built his own home near Dry Lagoon. He enjoyed gardening, searching for agates, hunting, camping, hiking and cooking. Michael is survived by his brother Patrick Devlin, sister Kelley Devlin-Lake, step-sister Fedessa Thomas Boyd, and nephew Todd Lake & family, along with many cousins. He also had many friends and associates too numerous to mention. Our deepest gratitude and appreciation go out to all of the wonderful people in the Ft. Bragg community who have been so helpful during this time. This includes the fishing community of Ft. Bragg, the U.S. Coast Guard, Mendocino County Sheriff’s Department, Noyo Fish Company, Chapel by the Sea, Noyo Harbor District, Coast Self-Storage and the Glass Beach Inn. Arrangements for memorial “Celebrations of Life” are in process for both Ft. Bragg and Trinidad, in between fishing seasons, when his ashes will be sprinkled at sea. For those who would like to make a donation in Mikie’s name, feel free to contribute to a favorite charity. His memory would also be honored greatly by supporting local fishermen and women.

28

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOHN DAVID OLSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner JANE ELISABETH OLSON In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that JOHN JANE ELISABETH OLSON be appointed as personal representa− tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 14, 2021 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6, Room: 6.

For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate

affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 Filed: September 17, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/23, 9/30, 10/7 (21−360)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BARBARA ANN TOMASCHESKI CASE NO. 2100251 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of BARBARA ANN TOMASCHESKI A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner DANIEL J. TOMASCHESKI In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that DANIEL J. TOMASCHESKI be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 14, 2021 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6, Room: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice

contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: Jocelyn M Godhino, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 Filed: September 14, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/23, 9/30, 10/7 (21−353)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARITA LOUISE MOORE aka RITA L. MOORE CASE NO. PR2100276 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MARITA LOUISE MOORE aka RITA L. MOORE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner MATTHEW WHEELER In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that MATTHEW WHEELER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the dece− dent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 28, 2021 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec−

held on October 28, 2021 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 Filed: October 1, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−378)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 13th of October, 2021, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage. The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Heather Petersen, Space # 5526 Jacki Gormley, Space # 5530 Cha−Gun Marshall, Space # 5552 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Jeffrey Johnson, Space # 2605 (Held in Co. Unit) Tyler Walchock, Space # 3016 (Held in Co. Unit)


Cha−Gun Marshall, Space # 5552 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Jeffrey Johnson, Space # 2605 (Held in Co. Unit) Tyler Walchock, Space # 3016 (Held in Co. Unit) The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. James Lee, Space # 1119 Christina Donnell, Space # 1321 Arika Juniper Burnett−Thompson, Space # 1406 Jeffrey Carver, Space # 1728 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Christine Cataldo, Space # 161 Karen Powell, Space # 265 Ross Alexander, Space # 278 Dan Conant, Space # 286 Dan Conant, Space # 289 Laura Kinyon, Space # 389 Terre Leveton, Space # 420 Alisa Zarattini, Space # 711 Kayla Adams, Space # 856 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. 9/30, 10/7 (21−368)

Public Notice I, Margaret Christina Belli, have sold the property commonly known as 3029 Eel River Drive, Loleta, Cali− fornia, near [Zip Code 95551] [309−051−075−000, 309−061−005− 000, 309−041−016−000] In a private sale in Lawful Money. Dated: September 13th, 2021 By Seller: Margaret Christina Belli By Buyer: Undisclosed Witness: Jason Penrod 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 1028, 11/4, 11/11 (21−354)

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LUCID SOCIETY DESIGNS & DYES

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00598 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT SWAG Humboldt 1433 11th Street, Suite I Arcata, CA 95521 Humphrey’s Enterprises, Inc CA C3557630 1433 11th Street, Suite I Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on April 1, 2016 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Andrea Humphreys, CFO This September 8, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7 (21−351)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00512 The following person is doing Busi− ness as RADIATE METTA WELLNESS Humboldt 735 12th Street Arcata, CA 95521 2750 Pacific Avenue Arcata, CA 95521 Destiny M Preston 2750 Pacific Avenue Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Destiny Preston, Owner This September 13, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14 (21−352)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00583 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LUCID SOCIETY DESIGNS & DYES Humboldt 42119 Hwy 299 Willow Creek, CA 95573 PO Box 431 Willow Creek, CA 95573 Gretchen Hammer

Humboldt 42119 Hwy 299 Willow Creek, CA 95573 PO Box 431 Willow Creek, CA 95573 Gretchen Hammer 42119 Hwy 299 Willow Creek, CA 95573 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gretchen M Hammer, Owner This June 11, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−370)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00589 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EUREKA THE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH Humboldt 1060 Hoover St Eureka, CA 95501 Full Gospel Tabernacle of Eureka, CA CA C 0399655 1060 Hoover St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on November 19, 2014 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jonathan McDonald, Pastor/ President This September 1, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7 (21−589)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00593 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ALYSIA HAYS, LCSW Humboldt 510 3rd Street, Suite 8 Eureka, CA 95501 1641 Kellner Avenue McKinleyville, CA 95519 Alysia M Hays 1641 Kellner Avenue McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual.

510 3rd Street, Suite 8 Eureka, CA 95501 1641 Kellner Avenue McKinleyville, CA 95519 Alysia M Hays 1641 Kellner Avenue McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on August 9, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Alysia Hays, Owner This September 3, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7 (21−350)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00608 The following person is doing Busi− ness as STARTLINE AGILITY TRAINING Humboldt 3750 Harris Street Eureka, CA 95501 3615 Old Arcata Road Bayside, CA 95524 Marlene E. Jurkovich 3615 Old Arcata Road Bayside, CA 95524

Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Marlene E. Jurkovich, Owner This September 9, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14 (21−365)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00609 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SWEET PEA GARDENS Humboldt 1433 Freshwater Rd Eureka, CA 95503 Shelley A Ruhlen Ponce 1433 Freshwater Rd Eureka, CA 95503

Shelley A Ruhlen Ponce 1433 Freshwater Rd Eureka, CA 95503 Continued on next page » The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 1, 2007. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shelley A Ruhlen Ponce, Owner This September 13, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−371)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− CURRENT tious businessNOTICE name orOF name listed PROPERTY TAXES DUE aboveI, on January 1, 2007. Humboldt County Tax Collector, hereby announce John Bartholomew, I declare that all information thisbe mailed on or before October 4th, 2021, that regular secured tax billsinwill statement is trueowners, and correct. to all property at the addresses shown on the tax roll. If you own A registrant declaresCounty, as true and do not receive a tax bill by October property inwho Humboldt any18th material matter pursuant to 2021, contact the tax collector’ s office, at 825 5th Street, Room 125 Section theor Business and Eureka,17913 CA of 95501 call 707-441-3020. Professions that athe FailureCode to receive taxregis− bill does not relieve the taxpayer of the respontrant knows to be timely false ispayments. guilty of a sibility to make misdemeanor punishable by a fine FIRSTone INSTALLMENT is due and payable on November 1, 2021, and not toThe exceed thousand dollars will become delinquent if not paid by 5:00 p.m., or the close of business, ($1,000). is later,Ponce, on December /s whichever Shelley A Ruhlen Owner 10, 2021; thereafter a 10% penalty will beSeptember added. 13, 2021 This SECOND INSTALLMENT is due on February 1, 2022, and will become KELLYThe E. SANDERS if not paid by 5:00 p.m., or the close of business, whichever is bydelinquent kt, Humboldt County Clerk later, on April 11, 2022; thereafter a 10% penalty will be added plus the cost 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−371) to prepare the delinquent tax records and to give notice of delinquency. Both installments may be paid when the first installment is due. Payments may be made by electronic funds transfer at www.humboldtgov.org/tax or by mail to Humboldt County Tax Collector (or HCTC) 825 5th Street Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501. Mailed payments must be POSTMARKED BY THE DELINQUENT DATE to avoid late penalties. Payments also may be made in person at the County Tax Collector’s office 825 5th Street Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501 between the hours of 8:30am -noon and 1pm- 5pm, Monday through Friday, holidays excepted. I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct. Humboldt County Tax Collector State of California Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on September 24th, 2021, Published in North Coast Journal on September 30th & October 7th, 2021

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Marlene E. Jurkovich, Owner This September 9, 2021 UNMET TRANSIT NEEDS — PUBLIC HEARINGS KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The Humboldt County Association of Governments (HCAOG) and its member entities will conduct 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14 (21−365) Public Hearings to solicit transit needs input for Humboldt County. Meeting dates listed below will be held remotely. Please visit the websites for meeting information. City of Fortuna

Mon, Oct 18 at 6 p.m.

friendlyfortuna.gov

City of Arcata

Wed, Oct 20 at 6 p.m. cityofarcata.org

City of Ferndale

Wed, Oct 20 at 7 p.m

City of Blue Lake

Tues, Oct. 26 at 6 p.m https://bluelake.ca.gov/

City of Eureka

Tues, Nov 2 at 6 p.m

County of Humboldt

Tues, Oct 26 at 9:30am humboldtgov.org/167/Board-of-Supervisors

Humboldt Transit Authority Wed, Nov. 3 at 9 a.m.

trinidad.ca.gov https://www.ci.eureka.ca.gov hta.org/board-meetings/

HCAOG Thurs Nov 18 at 4 p.m. hcaog.net You may also send email comments to stephen.luther@hcaog.net or call (707) 444-8208. For more information about the Unmet Transit Needs process, please visit www.hcaog.net/documents/unmettransit-needs northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

29


LEGAL NOTICES INVITATION TO BID

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids are invited by the Department of Public Works of Humboldt County, a public body, corporate and politic, for the performance of all the work and the furnishing of all the labor, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment for the following project: CONSTRUCTION OF: HUMBOLDT COUNTY PLANNING DIVISION BASEMENT UPGRADES PROJECT COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT PROJECT NUMBER: 162737 Pursuant to the Contract Documents on file with the Department of Public Works of Humboldt County. A pre-bid meeting is scheduled for 2:00 p.m. Pacific Time, October 14, 2021 at the Humboldt County Clark Complex, 3015 H St. (at the Harris Street basement entrance), Eureka, California. Contract Documents, Plans and Specifications will be available on October 5, 2021. Each Bid must be contained in a sealed envelope addressed as set forth in said Bid Documents, and filed at the office of the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, 825 5th Street, Room 111, Eureka, California at or before 2:00 P.M., Pacific Daylight Time, on October 26, 2021. All Bids will be publicly opened and summary amounts read aloud. The officer whose duty it is to open the Bids will decide when the specified time for the opening of Bids has arrived. Plans and Specifications and other Contract Document forms will be available for examination upon prior arrangement at the Department of Public Works, 1106 Second Street, Eureka, CA, 95501, Phone: (707) 445-7493. Plans will also be available at the Humboldt County Bid Opportunities website: https://humboldtgov.org/bids.aspx and for viewing at area plan centers. Complete sets may be obtained via prior arrangement from Humboldt County Public Works. Complete sets may be obtained upon advanced payment of $50.00 each, 100 % of which shall be refunded upon the return of such sets unmarked and in good condition within ten (10) days after the bids are opened. Checks should be made payable to County of Humboldt. Each Bid shall be submitted on the forms furnished by the County within the Bid Documents. All forms must be completed. Each Bid shall be accompanied by one of the following forms of Bidder’s Security to with a certified check or a cashier’s check payable to the County, U.S. Government Bonds, or a Bid Bond executed by an admitted insurer authorized to issue surety bonds in the State of California (in the form set forth in said Contract Documents). The Bidder’s security shall be in the amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the Bid. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for a satisfactory faithful performance bond and a satisfactory payment bond in the forms set forth in said Bid Documents. The County reserves the right to reject any or all Bids or to waive any informalities in any Bid. No Bid shall be withdrawn for a period of ninety (90) calendar days subsequent to the opening of Bids without the consent of the County. All Bidders will be required to certify that they are eligible to submit a Bid on this project and that they are not listed either (1) on the Controller General’s List of Ineligible Bidders/Contractors, or (2) on the debarred list of the Labor Commissioner of the State of California. The successful Bidder shall possess a valid Contractor’s license in good standing, with a classification of “B” (General Building Contractor) at the time the contract is awarded. The successful Bidder will be required to comply with all equal employment opportunity laws and regulations both at the time of award and throughout the duration of the Project. This project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. Pursuant to Section 1771.1(a) of the California Labor Code, a contractor or subcontractor shall not be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of Section 4104 of the Public Contract Code, or engage in the performance of any contract for public work, as defined in Sections 1770 et seq. of the Labor Code, unless currently registered and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Section 1725.5 of the Labor Code. It is not a violation of Section 1771.1(a) for an unregistered contractor to submit a bid that is authorized by Section 7029.1 of the Business and Professions Code or by Section 10164 or 20103.5 of the Public Contract Code, provided the contractor is registered to perform public work pursuant to Section 1725.5 at the time the contract is awarded. The Contractor, and each subcontractor participating in the Project, shall be required to pay the prevailing wages as established by the Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Labor Statistics and Research, P.O. Box 420603, San Francisco, CA, Phone: (415) 703-4780. The attention of Bidders is directed to the fact that the work proposed herein to be done will be financed in whole or in part with State and County funds, and therefore all of the applicable State and County statutes, rulings and regulations will apply to such work. In the performance of this contract, the Contractor will not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment in accordance with the provisions of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act. (Government Code section 12900et seq.) In accordance with the provisions of Section 22300 of the Public contractors’ code, the Contractor may elect to receive 100% of payments due under the contract from time to time, without retention of any portion of the payment, by entering into an Escrow Agreement for Security Deposits In Lieu of Retention. DATED: ATTEST: By: Kathy Hayes Clerk of the Board of Supervisors, County of Humboldt, State of California

We Print Obituaries Submit information via email to classified@northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date. 310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00619

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00625

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00653

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LEELO ROSE LLC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT HYDROPONICS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as DOC DASH LEGAL SERVICES

Humboldt 1849 Montecito Way Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 1302 Union St Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 2036 Irving Dr Eureka, CA 95503

Leelo Rose LLC CA 202114010542 1849 Montecito Way Eureka, CA 95501

Growth Chart Solutions LLC Ca 202109110566 996 Hayes Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519

PO Box 724 Eureka, CA 95502

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 1, 2021. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Leah Vaughn, Chief Executive Officer This September 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Natalie Parchman, Managing Partner This September 17, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−369)

9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14 (21−363)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00624

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00639

The following person is doing Busi− ness as REAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT/ REAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT HUMBOLDT/PROFESSIONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MAREHILL PRODUCTIONS

Humboldt 710 E St. Suite 205 Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 3205 Glen St Eureka, CA 95503

Elizabeth E Stephens 2036 Irving Dr Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on September 30, 2021. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elizabeth Stephens, Owner This September 30, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 (21−376)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00655 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CALLIE MAPLE COLLECTION Humboldt 4169 Cedar St Eureka, CA 95503

Paul Hilson Parker 3205 Glen St Eureka, CA 95503

PO Box 481 Cutten, CA 95534

PPM Investments, Inc. CA C1644677 710 E St. Suite 205 Eureka, CA 95501

Marian R Baker 3526 Nevada St Eureka, CA 95503

Jamie A Andresen 4169 Cedar St Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Darus K. Trutna, President This September 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on September 21, 2021. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Paul Hilson Parker, Partner This Septermber 21, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 13, 2021. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jamie Andresen, CEO This October 1, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14 (21−358)

9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−367)

10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 (21−377)

@northcoastjournal


Humboldt 2257 Crown Drive Fortuna, CA 95540 Darrell J Jackson 2257 Crown Drive Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 31, 2021. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Darrell J Jackson, Owner This September 13, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−372)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00618 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SAFE HORTICULTURE COMPANY Humboldt 589 Spring Road Whitethorn, CA 95589−8927 Safe Horticulture Company LLC California 202012110234 589 Spring Road Whitethorn, CA 95589−8927 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Joshua Johnston, President This September 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/14 (21−357)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00649 The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE FERNDALE ENTERPRISE Humboldt 310 F Street Eureka, CA 95501 North Coast Journal, Inc. CA C1997928 310 F Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation.

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Melissa Sanderson, President This September 28, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21 (21−375)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2101262 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: COTY SCHNEIDER, NATHANIEL SCHNEIDER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JAMESON CRUZ SCHNEIDER to Proposed Name JAMESON MAREK CRUZ SCHNEIDER

9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7 (21−348)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2101297 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: AMY RENAE CONLIN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name AMY RENAE CONLIN to Proposed Name AMY RENAE SEGUI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 29, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: September 14, 2021 Filed: September 14, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 18, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. CR04 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Get listed Date: September 3, 2021today for Filed: September 7, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

FREE

9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 10/7 (21−348) ad Place a free classified in the North Coast Trader

You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com

9/23, 9/30, 10/7, 10/7 (21−362)

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Wales 68. Prenatal test, for short 69. Primatologist Fossey 70. Courtroom cry 71. Oozes 72. “By the power vested ____ ...”

41. Item for 65-Across 42. Text-displaying technology for Kindles and Nooks 43. Match up, as devices 44. Utah mountain range 46. Conk out 47. What a PR blitz generates 49. Items for 65-Across 51. Longtime SeaWorld attraction 54. “Love Jones” actress Long 55. Items for 65-Across 60. Mild Dutch cheeses 64. Seedy area? 65. Event that often occurs on [see circled letters] 67. One may hail from

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1. Disney queen voiced by Idina Menzel 2. Acknowledges applause 3. “American Psycho” author ____ Easton Ellis 4. Google, say 5. “The Marvelous ____ Maisel” 6. Most populous Hawaiian island 7. The ravens Huginn and Muninn bring him information 8. One of 10 leapers in

a carol 9. Player’s buy-in 10. Destroy 11. Some native Nebraskans 12. Coverings on ancient Roman statuary 13. Agnew who resigned in 1973 18. Tugboat sounds 22. Diamond stat 24. Busy 26. Torments with reminders 27. “Just giving it my best” 28. FBI agent, in old slang 29. Like the movie “Get Out” 30. ____ Rica 31. “Valley of the Dolls” author Jacqueline 34. Urge 36. Lyft offering

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©2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JACKSON ENTERPRISES

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37. One may be named for a physicist 38. Barely squeezes (out) 40. Excessive sentimentality 45. Athlete in goggles 48. “I reckon” 50. Bride of 1981 51. Food service giant 52. Malarkey 53. Spry 56. “Unfortunately ...” 57. “____ That 58-Across” (classic game show) 58. “57-Across That ____” (classic game show) 59. Scissors sound 61. Tennis score after deuce 62. Polite address with an apostrophe 63. Last word of a seasonal song 66. Hairstyles EASY #34

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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www.sudoku.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00610

North Coast Journal, Inc. CA C1997928 310 F Street Eureka, CA 95501

hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 18, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. CR04 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: September 3, 2021 Filed: September 7, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

Humboldt 310 F Street Eureka, CA 95501

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ASTROLOGY

EMPLOYMENT

Free Will Astrology Week of Oct. 7, 2021 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: Hold your own hand and tell yourself what you will do to end a nagging discomfort in your life. https://Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com.

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries poet Anna Kamieńska said her soul didn’t emanate light. It was filled with “bright darkness.” I suspect that description may apply to you in the coming weeks. Bright darkness will be one of your primary qualities. And that’s a good thing! You may not be a beacon of shiny cheer, but you will illuminate the shadows and secrets. You will bring deeper awareness to hidden agendas and sins of omission. You will see, and help others to see, what has been missing in situations that lack transparency. Congratulations in advance! TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “There is something truly restorative, finally comforting, in coming to the end of an illusion—a false hope.” So declared author Sue Miller, and now I’m sharing it with you, Taurus—just in time for the end of at least one of your illusions. (Could be two, even three.) I hope your misconceptions or misaligned fantasies will serve you well as they decay and dissolve. I trust they will be excellent fertilizer, helping you grow inspired visions that guide your future success. My prediction: You will soon know more about what isn’t real, which will boost your ability to evaluate what is real. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Afghan-American novelist Khaled Hosseini writes, “People mostly have it backward. They think they live by what they want. But really what guides them is what they’re afraid of—what they don’t want.” Is that true for you, Gemini? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to meditate on that question. And if you find you’re motivated to live your life more out of fear than out of love, I urge you to take strenuous action to change that situation! Make sure love is at least 51 percent and fear no more than 49 percent. I believe you can do much better than that, though. Aim for 75 percent love! CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Sometimes dreams are wiser than waking.” Oglala Lakota medicine man Black Elk said that, and now I’m passing it on to you. It’s not always the case that dreams are wiser than waking, of course, but I suspect they will be for you in the coming weeks. The adventures you experience while you’re sleeping could provide crucial clues to inform your waking-life decisions. They should help you tune into resources and influences that will guide you during the coming months. And now I will make a bold prediction: that your dreams will change your brain chemistry in ways that enable you to see truths that until now have been invisible or unavailable. (PS: I encourage you to also be alert for intriguing insights and fantasies that well up when you’re tired or lounging around.) LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Don’t hope more than you’re willing to work,” advises author Rita Mae Brown. So let me ask you, Leo: How hard are you willing to work to make your dreams come true, create your ideal life, and become the person you’d love to be? When you answer that question honestly, you’ll know exactly how much hope you have earned the right to foster. I’m pleased to inform you that the coming weeks will be a favorable time to upgrade your commitment to the work and therefore deepen your right to hope. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “To be truly visionary, we have to root our imagination in our concrete reality while simultaneously imagining possibilities beyond that reality.” This shrewd advice comes from author bell hooks (who doesn’t capitalize her name). I think it should be at the heart of your process in the coming days. Why? Because you now have an extraordinary potential to dream up creative innovations that acknowledge your limitations but also transcend those limitations. You have extra power available to harness your fantasies and instigate practical changes. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Some people are crazy drunk on rotgut sobriety,” wrote aphorist Daniel Liebert. I trust you’re

not one of them. But if you are, I beg you to change your habits during the next three weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have a heavenly mandate to seek more than the usual amounts of whimsical ebullience, sweet diversions, uplifting obsessions, and holy amusements. Your health and success in the coming months require you to enjoy a period of concentrated joy and fun now. Be imaginative and innovative in your quest for zest. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scottish Poet Laureate Jackie Kay, born under the sign of Scorpio, writes, “It used to be that privacy came naturally to everybody and that we understood implicitly what kind of things a person might like to keep private. Now somebody has torn up the rule book on privacy and there’s a kind of free fall and free for all and few people naturally know how to guard this precious thing, privacy.” The coming weeks will be a good time for you to investigate this subject, Scorpio—to take it more seriously than you have before. In the process, I hope you will identify what’s truly important for you to keep confidential and protected, and then initiate the necessary adjustments. (PS: Please feel no guilt or embarrassment about your desire to have secrets!) SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “All our Western thought is founded on this repulsive pretense that pain is the proper price of any good thing,” wrote feisty author Rebecca West (1892–1983). I am very happy to report that your current torrent of good things will NOT require you to pay the price of pain. On the contrary, I expect that your phase of grace and luck will teach you how to cultivate even more grace and luck; it will inspire you to be generous in ways that bring generosity coming back your way. As articulated by ancient Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu, here’s the operative principle: “Opportunities multiply as they are seized.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “If you don’t ask, the answer is always no,” declares author Nora Roberts. In that spirit and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you to be bold and lucid about asking for what you want in the coming weeks. In addition, I encourage you to ask many probing questions so as to ferret out the best ways to get what you want. If you are skilled in carrying out this strategy, you will be a winsome blend of receptivity and aggressiveness, innocent humility and understated confidence. And that will be crucial in your campaign to get exactly what you want. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Few persons enjoy real liberty,” wrote poet Alfred de Musset. “We are all slaves to ideas or habits.” That’s the bad news. The good news is that October is Supercharge Your Freedom Month for you Aquarians. I invite you to use all your ingenuity to deepen, augment, and refine your drive for liberation. What could you do to escape the numbness of the routine? How might you diminish the hold of limiting beliefs and inhibiting patterns? What shrunken expectations are impinging on your motivational verve? Life is blessing you with the opportunity to celebrate and cultivate what novelist Tim Tharp calls “the spectacular now.” Be a cheerful, magnanimous freedom fighter. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The brilliant Piscean composer Frédéric Chopin (1810–1849) wrote, “I wish I could throw off the thoughts that poison my happiness, but I take a kind of pleasure in indulging them.” What?! That’s crazy! If he had been brave enough and willful enough to stop taking pleasure in indulging his toxic thoughts, they might have lost their power to demoralize him. With this in mind, I’m asking you to investigate whether you, like Chopin, ever get a bit of secret excitement from undermining your own joy and success. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to dissolve that bad habit. l

NORTHCOAST COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL• Thursday, • Thursday, Oct. Oct. 7, 2021 7, 2021• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 32 2 NORTH

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SALES REPS

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                        

THE CITY OF

P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T

POLICE CADET

(POLICE ACADEMY STUDENT) $2,990- $3,634 Monthly

**Salary will increase to $3,080 - $3,745 per month in 2022 with another 5% increase in 2023.

BASE SALARY + COMMISSION + BENEFITS Seeking full-time motivated individuals eager to develop and manage sales programs across print, web and mobile platforms. Apply by emailing your resume to kyle@ northcoastjournal.com

Upon successful completion of the Basic Police Academy, salary will increase to the range of $4,660 to $6,457 per month. Are you interested in pursuing a career in law enforcement? The City of Eureka is seeking motivated and disciplined individuals to assume the role of Police Cadet and undergo training to become a Police Officer with the Eureka Police Department. If selected for this position, candidates will be sponsored to attend and complete the local POST approved Basic Police Academy. Cadets who successfully complete the academy will be promoted to Police Officer with EPD, provided that all necessary requirements are met at that time. For a complete job description and to apply, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Final filing date: Friday, November 26th, 2021. EOE


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Tolowa Dee-ni ’ Nation is Hiring! Social Worker I or II

CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

Full Time $20.88-$32.01 The Social Worker II assists Social Worker I with unusual situations that do not have clear precedents or when clarification or interpretations of established policies/regulations are needed.

The City of Rio Dell is now accepting applications for

POLICE OFFICER

($46,005–$64,849 + Benefits)

Staff Accountant II Full Time $16.88-$23.00 This position works under the general supervision of the Fiscal Manager. Incumbent supports the fiscal department in the specialized area of general ledger, accounts payable and receivable. www.tolowa-nsn.gov/jobs

Open to entry level & laterals. Candidate must have appropriate POST certification and be 21 years of age by the time of appointment. Small but effective department. The Rio Dell Police Department is a supportive environment that encourages an officer’s personal and professional growth. This is a small town with great weather, surrounded by beauty, with low levels of crime. Help us keep it this way! Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue, www.cityofriodell.ca.gov or call (707) 764-3532.

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  The Assistant Director of Finance works under the direction of the Director of Finance in maintenance of the Agency’s financial records to include revenue, receipts, disbursements, payroll, journal vouchers and general ledger.

POSITION RESPONSIBILITIES: Will audit the work from indirect reports, track expenditures, and maintain cost allocations within the nonprofit’s programs. Assist in the preparation and submission of reimbursement requests for multiple federal and state grants, communicating with grantors to ensure adequate support is submitted and maintained for all programs and grants. Follows and understands procedures to remain in compliance with all regulatory, grantor agency, and policy requirements. Supports the completion of monthly fiscal reports and verifies that all transactions have been appropriately recorded. Join our exciting team and support services to older adults.

COMPENSATION: 35 hours week, starting at $54,090, exempt position, dental, eye, benefits, paid vacation and sick leave.

TO APPLY: Submit A1AA application (found on website), two letters of recommendation and a cover letter to DOF 434 7th Street, Eureka, CA 95501. A pre-employment background check is required of the final candidate.



 Are you someone who enjoys improving processes and helping people? Are you detail oriented and take personal ownership of your work? We’re looking for someone who needs little direction but who is collaborative and wants to process the payroll for our California companies.

Hiring Minimum Requirements • High school graduate, GED, or relevant work experience • 18 years or older • Employment contingent upon successful completion of a background check

Additional Qualifications • Associate’s or Bachelor’s preferred, but not required. • 2-5 five years in payroll role required • Advanced computer and software skills/experience including proficiency in Windows, Microsoft Office, CRMs, ATS, HRMS, Payroll, etc.

https://andretti1.com/career/

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   **Annual JOB POOL** NCS anticipates a number of Head Start, Early Head Start & State Program job openings for our 2021 program yr. Potential positions are throughout Humboldt County & may be yr. round or school-yr. Anticipated start date: October

CENTER DIRECTOR • HOME VISITOR TEAM TEACHER • TEACHER ASSOCIATE TEACHER CLASSROOM ASSISTANT COOK • ASSISTANT COOK NUTRITION AIDE • SPECIAL AIDE SPECIAL AIDE/INTERPRETER (Spanish) ASSISTANT TEACHER COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER HOUSEKEEPER • SUBSTITUTES Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

  

           

  

        

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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 Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

Mental Health Support Specialist

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Multiple positions, Part-time, $18.30/hr.

Program Supervisor II

Wellness Sales Associate

Full-time, $21.32/hr.

Responsibilities: Keep displays, coolers, and shelves fully stocked, clean, and tidy while providing prompt, friendly, and helpful customer service. Foster a team environment while meeting wellness objectives. Learn about wellness trends and issues and impart knowledge with customers.

Program Assistant, Case Management Full-time, $14.56/hr. Open until filled

Qualifications:  Willingness and ability to learn to meet the changing requirements of the job. -Ability to handle multiple demands.  Experience serving the public. Ability to project a friendly, outgoing personality.  Regular, predictable attendance.  Demonstrates independent working skills and taking initiative. Pick up an application packet at the customer service counter at any Eureka Natural Foods location or print one out from our website; www.eurekanaturalfoods.com/ employment Submit the completed application packet to customer service desk in Eureka.

COVID-19 Vaccine Required Job description and list of qualifications available at www.changingtidesfs.org We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293 



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HOME VISITORS, Various (HS/EHS)

Provide weekly home visits & facilitate parent & child play groups twice a month. Req. AA/AS degree in Early Childhood Education, Psychology, Social Work or a related field OR 12 Head Start related units. Req. 2 years’ exp. in community service, working w/ children & families. Bilingual preferred. F/T & P/T position. $18.00-$19.16/hr. Open Until Filled.

CENTER DIRECTOR, Arcata

Responsibilities include overall management of Head Start and Partnership programs. AA/BA in Child Development or related field preferred. Meet req. for Site Supervisor permit. 3 Infant Toddler units req. F/T 40 hrs./wk. M-Fri. $20.00$ 22.05/hr. Open Until Filled.

CENTER DIRECTOR, Eureka, McKinleyville Responsibilities include the overall management of a Head Start center base program. Meet Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix, plus 3 units in Administration (AA req. BA/ BS Degree in Child Development or a related field preferred). Req. a minimum of 2 years’ exp. working w/ preschool children in a group setting. F/T 40 hrs./wk. Mon-Fri (8am-4:30pm); $20.00$ 22.05/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSOCIATE TEACHERS, Redway, Orleans default

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Northcoast Children’s Services

                   

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req. a minimum of 12 ECE units—including core classes—& at least 1-year exp. working w/ children. Redway: F/T 32 hrs./wk. Orleans: F/T 32 hrs./wk. $17.00-$17.85/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEACHERS, Eureka (Temporary), Arcata

Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for toddler program. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, & have 1-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. P/T positions, 28 hrs./wk. M-F $17.50-$19.30/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEACHER, McKinleyville

Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a preschool program. Must have AA or working towards AA & 12 core in ECE/ CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, & have 1-yr. exp. teaching in a preschool setting. F/T, 40 hrs./ wk. M-F (8am-4:30pm) $17.50-$19.30/hr. Open Until Filled. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org


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Redwood Coast Regional Center

Tolowa Dee-ni ’ Nation is Hiring!

Be a part of a great team!

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator)

ELC Assistant Cook

FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for Adults w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3665/mo. Exc. bene. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs. EOE

THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COLLECTIVE

IS NOW HIRING!

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Come join our friendly, knowledgable staff that was voted

 

Best Dispensary for the second year in a row!

Serve as the Executive Assistant to the Area 1 Agency on Aging (A1AA) Executive Director and provide general support to A1AA administrative and program staff.

COMPENSATION Full time (35 hours a week), hourly position. Starting at $18/hour plus health, dental, eye, benefits, paid vacation and sick leave.

TO APPLY: Submit A1AA application (found on website), two letters of recommendation and a cover letter to Executive Director 434 7th Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Email tmartin@a1aa.org for a copy of the job description. A pre-employment background check is required of the final candidate.



Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@northcoastjournal.com

Family Services Project Coordinator Full Time $18.85-$28.68 This position will coordinate grant projects and programs pursuant to approved program and grant objectives. Other functions performed will be grant compliance and coordination of joint activities with program and other designated tribal staff or departments.

Head Start Teacher Assistant

POSITION RESPONSIBILITIES: Perform a variety of moderately complex clerical duties, including preparation of correspondence, agendas, minutes, and periodic reports. Serve as clerical support to the A1AA Board of Directors and A1AA Advisory Council. As the Social Media Coordinator, design and produce materials for print, website, Mailchimp or social media, and manage content. Works with a dynamic team to provide important services to older adults in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. Position requires an extremely organized, thoughtful, and kind person to provide support to a diverse group of clients, staff and other service professionals.

Part Time $14.08-$19.00 Under the direct supervision of the Nutrition Specialist, the Assistant Cook will provide support in preparing, purchasing, storing, and serving food in accordance with USDA/California Department of Education Nutrition Guidelines.

1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka CA | 707.442.2420 M-F 10am-6pm | Sat + Sun 11am-5pm License No. C10-0000011-LIC

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Full Time $15.00-$20.30 Under the general supervision of the Teacher, the Teacher Assistant will provide support through classroom and playground supervision of children, preparation of materials for learning activities, participation and guidance in children’s learning activities. Assist in providing a safe and sanitary environment for children, regularly communicate with parents/guardians and maintenance of children and family records.

Human Resources Generalist

Health Information Technician Electronic Health Records and Clinician Support (Eureka) Vynca is a fast-paced, fun entrepreneurial environment incredibly passionate about transforming end-of-life care. With the integration of ResolutionCare services, we are actively looking for an individual to support maintenance and upgrades to the Electronic Health Records / Electronic Medical Records (EHR/EMR) systems, offer support and guidance to clinical staff, assist with new employee device needs assessment and procurement, and realtime technical desktop support for systems that support telehealth visits. The individual in this role is responsible for assisting in increasing the use of tele-palliative care through videoconference enablement, company adherence to regulatory requirements for technological use in a health care setting, co-managing and maintaining company electronic assets, tier 1 level troubleshooting common issues experienced by the clinical, and operational team, initial technological assessment of new staff, and user training of devices and systems with staff and patients. To apply, please review our website www.resolutioncare.com and then send a cover letter and resume by e-mail to info@resolutioncare.com or fax it to (707) 440-8100. Open until filled. Salary competitive and commensurate with experience.

Full Time $20.88-$32.01 The Human Resources Generalist position must provide a wide range of support, including possessing the ability to interact with staff and be able to work in a fast paced and sometimes pressured environment, while remaining flexible, proactive, resourceful, and efficient.

Language Teacher I Full Time $20.88-$32.01 The language teacher position will meet and/or exceed Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation Teacher Standards and Learner Standards, that promote language stabilization, fluency and usage. The position leads and participates in linguistically diverse settings, meetings, trainings and community-based gatherings.

Self Sufficiency Program Manager Full Time $53,705-$83,824 The Self-Sufficiency Program Manager is a professional position responsible for providing a full range of supervision and coordination of personnel and programs within the Self-Sufficiency Division. This position will ensure programs maintain and operate in compliance with Tribal and funder codes, regulations, policies and protocols. www.tolowa-nsn.gov/jobs

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT

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Pets & Livestock

Miscellaneous

MATURE, PLAYFUL female spayed cat (gray tuxedo) needs loving home soon. Owner entering care facility. (707) 572− 6070

4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 888−519−0171 (AAN CAN)

TEAM TEACHER, Arcata Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities for toddler age children. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, & have 1-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./ wk. M-F. $17.75-$18.64/hr. Open Until Filled.

YUROK TRIBE

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

TEMPORARY TEACHER, McKinleyville Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler program. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have 1-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. P/T 28 hrs./wk. M-F $17.50-$19.30/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, Arcata, McKinleyville & Trinidad default

K’ima: w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN BILLING SUPERVISOR DENTAL BILLER RECEPTIONIST/DATA ENTRY CLERK ACCOUNTANT COMMUNITY HEALTH REPRESENTATIVE HEALTH INFORMATION DIRECTOR PATIENT BENEFITS CLERK PHYSICIAN CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT LAB TECHNOLOGIST CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CODER TECHNICIAN MEDICAL DIRECTOR MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN RN CARE MANAGER PATIENT ACCOUNTS CLERK I COALITION COORDINATOR MAT RN CARE MANAGER PHARMACY TECHNICIAN – ON-CALL ALL POSITIONS ABOVE ARE FT/REGULAR AND OPEN UNTIL FILLED UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: apply@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

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Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Minimum of 6-12 ECE units preferred, not req. & 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T 25 hrs./wk. M-Fri $15.00-$16.54/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Eureka Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a toddler program. 6-12 ECE units preferred, not req. & have 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T 28 hrs./wk. M-Thu (8:15am3:45pm) $15.00-$16.54/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT COOK, Eureka Duties include assisting in the prep & organization of food, setting-up meals & snacks and kitchen cleanup for a preschool facility. Req. basic cooking skills. Prior exp. in food handling & service desired. P/T 25.5 hrs./wk. M-Thu (9am-2pm, Fri 8:30am-2pm) $15.00/hr. Open Until Filled.

HOUSEKEEPER, Eureka, Arcata, Fortuna Perform duties to keep site clean, sanitized & orderly. Must have exp. & knowledge of basic tools & methods utilized in custodial work & have the ability to learn & follow health & safety req. Eureka: P/T 16 hrs./wk. Arcata & Fta: P/T 5 hrs./ wk. $15.00/hr. Late afternoon/evening hours, flexible. Open Until Filled. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

@northcoastjournal

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THE CITY OF

PUBLIC WORKS

DEPUTY CITY ENGINEER $6,223 – $7,564 Monthly Plus Excellent Benefits 1/1/22 – Max. salary $7,794 Monthly 1/1/23 – Max. salary $8,193 Monthly Join a passionate team of Public Works professionals! The City of Eureka is accepting applications for the position of Deputy City Engineer. The City of Eureka, with a population of 27,000 (and another 14,000 just outside city limits) is located on Humboldt Bay, with the Pacific Ocean to the west and mountains and forests to the east, north and south. Eureka has all the amenities of a larger town with a small town atmosphere, including a nearby state university and a community college, short commutes, and abundant community events. The Deputy City Engineer will have an opportunity to design, manage, and implement a wide range of projects, including transportation, facilities, and water and wastewater systems. REQUIREMENTS: Equivalent to graduation from an accredited four-year college or university with major coursework in civil engineering or a related field and five (5) years of civil engineering and/or public works experience, including two (2) years of high-level project management or supervisory experience. Possession of a Master’s Degree is highly desirable and may be substituted for one year of the required experience. Possession of a Valid Professional Engineer’s license from the State of California is required. The City of Eureka will be accepting applications for this position until 5 p.m. on Tuesday, October 12th, 2021. For a complete job description and qualifications or to apply online please visit our website at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. EOE.


7th & D St Eureka

707-443-4861 7,995

9,595

$

$

2012 Nissan Versa

2014 Nissan Sentra S

108,695 miles #888873

15,595

$

2016 Hyundai Elantra Limited 59,108 miles #593054

20,995

$

2019 Chevrolet Cruze LT 22,753 miles #606632

23,595

135,150 miles #270536

17,995

$

2018 Hyundai IONIQ EV Electric 31,951 miles #027390

21,595

36,280 miles #320764

29,995

$

2018 Nissan Rogue SL 4,687 miles #487412

35,995

$

2020 Subaru Forester Limited 8,895 miles #525712

42,995

$

2019 Toyota 4Runner SR5 59,642 miles #687933

2019 Nissan Sentra S 9,698 miles #235379

21,595

2018 Hyundai Elantra GT

24,995

$

31,631 miles #170121

2019 Subaru Impreza

2018 Chevrolet Colorado

20,995

$

2019 Toyota Corolla L

2017 Honda Civic EX 2.0i

26,995

66,520 miles #410358

$

$

$

2013 Volkswagen Jetta

$

$

47,454 miles #419823

13,995

$

19,837 miles #619115

27,995

$

2018 Honda CR-V LX 21,563 miles #212172

29,995

$

2018 Subaru Outback Limited 48,679 miles #275752

37,595

$

2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4x4

2,662 miles #036170

26,595

2021 Chevrolet Trax LT 6,758 miles #330283

28,995

$

2018 Hyundai Tucson Limited AWD 14,665 miles #720667

30,995

$

2918 Audi A6 2.0 Premium 45,040 miles #063346

38,995

$

2017 Ford F-150 XL

29,442 miles #129668

45,995

$

2018 Chevrolet Colorado 4WD ZR2 Diesel 50,244 miles #303251

62,980 miles #D19906

47,995

$

2018 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 4WD LT Z71 29,868 miles #597544

WWW.NORTHWOODHYUNDAI.COM Sale price does not include tax, license or $80 document fee. Subject to prior sale. Loans subject to credit lenders approval. Ad expires 10/31/21

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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REAL ESTATE CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN) DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1−855−380−250 HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−844− 416−7147 (AAN CAN) default

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

KITCHEN FLATWARE, UTENSILS & CUTLERY 1/2 OFF at the Dream Quest Thrift Store Where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams. October 11−16 Plus: Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629−3006.

         

 

General Tree Work & Forestry Fire Hazard Mitigation Landscaping Wood Milling

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

MARKETPLACE Cleaning

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet

$

GREAT STARTER HOME IN FIELDBROOK! Spacious 3 bed, 2 bath manufactured home on an oversized lot. Centrally located for enjoying the Fieldbrook Market, Fieldbrook Community Center and the Winery. Home has a 433A recorded permit in place. Come enjoy life in the country but close to the city! Call Deborah at 707-498-2646 now for a private showing. MLS# 260190

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

MARKETPLACE

707.740.8247

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT

gmforestresto@gmail.com default

SAVE MONEY ON EXPENSIVE AUTO REPAIRS! Our vehicle service program can save you up to 60% off dealer prices and provides you excellent coverage! Call for a free quote: 866−915−2263 (Mon−Fri :9am− 4pm PST)

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com



Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals



Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

   

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues, Private Parties, Bars. Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419

 

YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com default



Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

Let’s Be Friends NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111



707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Musicians & Instructors

38

300,000

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 

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Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

BRE #01927104

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BRE# 02070276

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

TING!

NEW LIS

BRIDGEVILLE – CULTIVATION – $450,000

±3,500 sq ft Commercial building with great Broadway location, has a large parking lot, and is zoned CS to offer a variety of uses! Building has fire damage and is being sold in AS-IS condition.

±40 Acres w/ interim permit for 9,948 sq. ft. of O.D. splace utilizing light deprivation and 1,400 sq. ft. of full sun outdoor cultivation space. Parcel features developed greenhouse sites, well, and views.

BLUE LAKE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,150,000

HORSE MOUNTAIN – LAND/PROPERTY – $1,800,000

HIOUCHI – LAND/PROPERTY – $998,000 Stunning ±113 acre property w/ views of the Siskiyou Mountains! Property features a mix of flats, slopes, saddles, and ridgetops, and has a variety of trees. With easy access from Highway 199, wide rocked roads, and water available nearby or by drilling a well, look no further for your dream property! !

D PRICE

Dacota Huzzen

EUREKA – COMMERCIAL – $874,000

±46 Acres conveniently located just 15 minutes from Blue Lake! Property features a gorgeous 3/2 home, grid-tied power with solar panels, two car garage and inground pool. Large 25’x60’ fully insulated AG building with separate 200amp power drop is ready for all your hobbies!

REDUCE

707.498.6364

Bernie Garrigan

Ashlee Cook

NEW LIS

TING!

Fantastic timber investment opportunity! 8 remote patent parcels totaling ±1,279 acres with over 8,000,000 board feet of timber. Located off USFS 1, approximately 18 miles from Berry Summit, parcels feature easy access off paved roads, views and lots of water!

HAWKINS BAR – LAND/PROPERTY - $124,500

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

±1.45 Acres along the Trinity River featuring river views, a flat building site, PG&E lines through the property, community water hookups, and a community river access point.

GREENWOOD HEIGHTS – LAND/PROPERTY - $329,000

SALMON CREEK – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $1,350,000

±10 Private acres located in the highly sought-after Greenwood Heights area! Ready for your dream home with privacy, building site, road, spring, and small creek!

±42 Acres in the Salmon Creek area with cannabis permit for 10,000 sq. ft. of outdoor cultivation space! Property features a 3/1 2,840 sq. ft. home w/ 2 car garage, outbuildings, greenhouses, 2 ponds, and ample water storage!

BURNT RANCH – HOMESTEAD - $885,000

2104 OLD ARCATA ROAD, BAYSIDE – $729,000

±32 Acres with excellent access, multiple springs, pond, stunning mountain and canyon views. 3+bed/2ba main house, 1+bed/1ba separate apartment, shop building/complex with versatile studio workspace/gallery rooms. Screened porches, decks, greenhouse, fenced garden beds. USFS adjacency. OMC.

Mike Willcutt

Private ±1.8 acres in Jacoby Creek School district! Main house is 4/1 w/ large windows, hardwood floors, and upgraded kitchen appliances. An adorable 1/1 airbnb unit is in the southeast corner of the yard, and a secondary tiny home is on the northern boarder of the property.

REDUCE

D PRICE

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 7, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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IS MAKING ROOM FOR IT 'S

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YR

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1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka CA 707.442.242 M-F 10am-6pm, Sat + Sun 11am-5pm License No. C10-0000011-LIC

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT

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