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thursday oct. 4, 2012 vol XXIII issue 40 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

Two tax measures would generate billions, but which promises more for local education? By Heidi Walters

4 Jogging crash victim remembered 7 Uh ‌ this is free speech 8 Taxing those grows 20 Appetite for apples 26 Rufus! 30 Bacon, anyone?


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2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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table of 4

Publisher

23 Arts Alive!

5 5

Mailbox Poem

25 Fortuna First Friday Trinidad Arts Night

Views

26 The Hum

News

28 Music & More! 30 Calendar 34 Filmland

7 8

Senseless Tragedy

Equinox

freedom to boycott The Grow Tax

9

Home & Garden

11 12

Blog Jammin’ On The Cover

Service Directory

Propping up Schools

18 In Review a book

18 Get Out!

A Slow Trip Down the Avenue

20 Table Talk

Apples of My Eye

22 Art Beat

From Big Foot to the Bible

Eureka, Saturday, Oct. 6, 6-9 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 5, 6-9 p.m. freedom to love

Time Trials

35 Workshops 37 Field Notes

Tanoaks, Tannins and Tanning

39 Sudoku 39 Crossword 41

Marketplace

45 Body, Mind & Spirit 47

Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012

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Tasha Souza, a professor at HSU, who is a t was overcast and still quite dark fellow runner and friend of all three. that morning, Sept. 27, when the I’ve known the Seemann family for 40 three women parked their cars at years. Suzie’s late father-in-law, Howard Three Corners Market, put on reflecSeeman, was my professor in the early tive vests and checked the batteries 1970s and his wife Ann, a dear friend. Their in their headlamps. Maggie, Jessie’s dog, sons, Hank and Luke, and our daughters had her flashing collar turned on as usual. played together as todThen they headed out dlers while their parents running north toward spent hours in conversaArcata on the wide tion at the dinner table. west shoulder of Old All our children grew Arcata Road, facing trafup, went to college and fic — using best runners’ started their own wonderpractices. ful families and interesting Pretty much evcareers far from Humery Thursday, unless boldt. But Hank came someone had a temhome six years ago to take porary runner’s injury, over as environmental the women met to run services director for the — for companionship county. He brought his and joy, and to train for wife Suzie and baby son their next big run, in suzanne seemann Malcolm. Daughter Evelyn this case, the Humboldt was born here. Redwoods Marathon later this month. I met Suzie only a few times. Smart and They had a lot in common — married kind, a patient mom with a dazzling smile. with two young children each. All were I had no idea she was such an accomteachers, two preschool, one a part-time plished scientist until I read her obituary. university lecturer. Thursdays were road I don’t think it’s just because I know the days, Three Corners north for a five- or family that the grief seems so profound. I eight-mile loop before their busy days was visiting a friend at St. Joseph Hospital really began. On Tuesdays, they ran in the Monday and I stopped to talk to a veteran forest, and weekends were reserved for nurse. She had tears in her eyes when longer, leisurely runs in the Arcata Marsh she spoke of the three families and their and out on the Arcata Bottom, sometimes friends. She said she didn’t even know the Hammond Trail, wherever in nature. them. That Thursday they had gone just un“It’s so tragic. These are all very special der a mile, just south of Ole Hansen Road, people,” District Attorney Paul Gallegos when all three women were run down told me Tuesday. “Of course it’s tragic no by the driver of a 2005 Kia who fled the matter who it is, but these women are scene. (As of print deadline Tuesday, there loved by so many — people at HSU, in the was no official word regarding the “person teaching community, in county governon interest” taken into custody Friday, ment. It’s just very sad.” or any other suspects.) Suzanne “Suzie” Seemann was killed at the scene. Terri There will be a memorial for Vroman-Little and Jessica Hunt were seriSuzie Seemann Saturday at 10:30 a.m. ously injured — Terri with a broken leg, at Freshwater School. scrapes and bruises, and wrist injury; Jessie with a broken leg, foot and scapula and a lung injury. They are recovering but have no memory of the accident after leaving – Judy Hodgson the market that morning, according to hodgson@northcoastjournal.com


Green Rescue

Equinox

Editor:   There is no doubt about Hard knocks both ways, it, we are living through an the sun beating back the shade, emergency. No more time for blame and punishment; clinging to its steamy ways, we need to move into rescue the other clawing its darkling way to the fore. mode. Emergencies call upon Unimaginable forces in massy balance, us to bring forth all our courand Libra, sign of the Balance, rising age to deal with them. We can’t ignore them — lest all with the tardy dawn, the first frosts we hold dear perish. lingering just out of reach, Fortunately there are blackening pumpkins sagging in coastal rains — noble people standing by to help in emergencies — when but for now, what the hell, sun’s out, we call upon them. One of hoops and hacky sack in the plaza! them is Dr. Jill Stein, the Green — Rick Park Party candidate for president. If you were one of the 328 people crowded into HSU’s Kate Buchanan Room on Sept.24 to hear the Yellow Pages are for, right?  her speak, you know that you were in the As far as your choice of best Asian presence of a rescuer. Truth is unmistakrestaurant goes (you can look up the able when it finally reaches us. I refer to name and address in your article), the last an excellent article in the North Coast time I ate there (a month or two ago) the Journal (“Imagine All the Voters,” Sept. 27) food was swell but the service was totally for the gist of Jill Stein’s rescue plan and crappy, they only got one out of two the atmosphere her words evoke. dishes correct and refused to admit it was We are going to have to get radical their fault (much less offer to do anything now folks. We must vote Green. The othabout it), then when we gave them $30 for ers have been taking us places we don’t a $22 tab we had to ask for change. I guess really want to go. And blatantly lying to us they figured an $8 tip was totally justified — history tells us so. for their totally crappy service. Oh well, Today I learned that the Green Party go figure, right? (pun intended) is guided by 10 key values. Look them BTW the North Coast Journal is a great up; they will make your heart soar. One publication. Keep up the good work (and of them is nonviolence; another social give us some addresses and phone numjustice and equal opportunity. If all our bers next time)! laws and policies were written with these Roy Henock, Eureka values in mind — and we behaved accordingly — we wouldn’t be going through this Editor: emergency. In your “Best of” issue, you failed to Since we are and we know it, we must mention the newest food on wheels in help in any way we can. No more voting Humboldt — bet it wins next year. It is for people with so little conscience. And Nature’s Serving. It offers Mediterranean if they do get into positions of authority, foods with handmade pita — yes, baked no more obedience to that authority. right on the truck. You can get a sandwich This is an emergency.  or a full plate, a salad or something sweet Maureen Kane, Arcata — how about a mango/lime/chili popsicle with caramel center — or a blackberry/ cardamom with chocolate/nut center? Where else in Humboldt you gonna get that??? Editor: All its items are made fresh daily and use locally sourced ingredients whenever I guess it was too much trouble to possible. This is a seriously mobile food include the address and phone number truck, so you need to check its locations of every winner you reviewed for best on its web site. Whether you’re a vegan or bakery, restaurant, ice cream etc? (“Best of a carnivore, whether you wanna “travel” Humboldt,” Sept. 20.) Oh well, that’s what

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Oct. 4, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 40

North Coast Journal Inc.

continued from previous page

www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Scottie Lee Meyers contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler maIl/OffIce:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONe: 707 442-1400 faX: 707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

photo by Bob Doran

to Istanbul, Salerno or Tel Aviv, it will have something to please. Nope, I don’t own it and I don’t work for it — but such awesome food! Great prices, too. Nan Abrams, Eureka  Editor: I recently was contacted by someone doing a study of why people choose to live where they do. (She is open to hearing from other people who can contact her at whyilivehere@gmail.com.) In light of your “Best of Humboldt” issue, I would like to share my “story,” which I told her: I live in Eureka, Calif., for a number of reasons. I love and appreciate how there is a great music/arts/culture scene! There is an abundance of beautiful nature here in Humboldt County, including magnificent redwood forests and coast. There are many people who I regard as “kindred spirits” (liberal people, activists and fellow musicians in an impressive variety of styles of music). I live here because, for me, the climate is ideal: not too hot and not too cold. I also appreciate how there is lots of access to very good organic, healthy and delicious food, including chocolate and locally roasted coffee. Finally, perhaps above all, this feels like my place in the world. Seabury Gould, Eureka  

True Christians Editor: The letter about Mitt Romney, Mormons and Christians (“Missionaries, Not Troops,” Sept. 13) was on the mark in many ways. Had the writer added “Some” to the opening sentence of the third paragraph (“Christians are so hung-up with the rules that they forget that Jesus …”) I would not have felt prompted to respond.  Many Christians are not hung up on the rules. I recently read a book by one such Christian, J. Neil Alexander, an Episcopal bishop headquartered in Atlanta (This Far by Grace). He talks about how he and his friends in elementary school had a vocabulary for gays that was demeaning. The intent was to hurt and exclude. The point was to put someone or some group outside the circle and to keep them at a distance.  This is what happens when whole groups of people are judged and lumped together. Bishop Alexander went through a lot of life experiences to overcome divisive social conditioning in his early life. In so doing, he learned the priceless lesson that we are all brothers and sisters in Christ and that no individuals or groups

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Cartoon by joel mielke

are to be kept out of our hearts. He writes that, for him, the Christian life is “about active participation in a whole web of relationships — with God, with fellow believers, with nonbelievers, with folks I like and those I don’t, and with the whole of God’s creation in all its infinite diversity.” (p. 15) This is the spirit that unifies and is much needed in our world today. Bill Strider, Arcata

Lying Supervisors Editor:  I just sent the following email to the three supervisors that claim the General Plan Update (Blog Jammin’, Sept. 20)  is too difficult to understand: I’ve had a copy of the GPU for a couple of weeks now and I haven’t yet garnered the gumption to try to read it because it appears insurmountable. However, IT’S NOT MY JOB!!  I did not launch a high-dollar campaign to be in your seat, claiming to be the best man for the job. As it is part of your job and you’re whining about your difficulties comprehending it, I can only reach one of a couple conclusions. Perhaps you’re not qualified for the job. Perhaps you’re just playing a game to derail the GPU process, for reasons I can only guess.  Either way, that makes you a liar. I’m disappointed but not surprised. Thanks for nothing. Robert Jones, Kneeland

Write a letter! Please try to make it no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com l

@ncj_of_humboldt


vIews

Freedom to Boycott By Ryan Burns

ryanburns@northcoastjournal.com  

H

umboldt County loves its reggae. Check our calendar section this or any week for proof. And it makes sense. Reggae’s feel-good, pan-cultural message of “one love” jibes perfectly with our community’s streak of irie idealism, to say nothing of the ganja connection. But in recent years, the tumultuous social landscape in Jamaica has given birth to a more troublesome and controversial genre called dancehall. As the name suggests, dancehall music is infectious and beat-heavy. But where reggae’s message was largely a unity-focused rebellion against the slavery and oppression in Jamaica’s past, some dancehall reflects the country’s modern, conflicted attitudes about race, masculinity and sexuality. It’s often viewed as a backlash against the bourgeois utopian grandstanding of Jamaica’s political leaders, and many of the genre’s biggest stars, including Buju Banton, Bounty Killer and Capleton, have become notorious — in Jamaica and beyond — for performing songs that advocate violence against homosexuals. In Jamaica such violence is commonplace. We’ve written about this issue numerous times. Whenever local promoters and venue owners have booked one of these offending dancehall artists, perhaps unaware of their gay-bashing lyrics, they’ve encountered passionate objections from the local lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community and their allies. These folks have threatened to organize boycotts of any venue that hosts a show by dancehall artists who’ve been identified as hatemongers. And those threats have proved successful: Several concerts have been canceled in recent years, leaving owners and promoters feeling bullied and prompting cries of “censorship” from disgruntled music fans (“Irie vs. Irate,” March 4, 2010). The issue has erupted again in the past two weeks. Capleton, a dancehall artist with numerous songs in his catalog calling for the murder and brutalization of gays, was scheduled to play a show at Eureka’s Red Fox Tavern later this month. Under pressure from local activists that show was canceled, but promoter Beau DeVito of Bonus Entertainment soon announced that the Capleton show would be held at a different venue to be announced the day of the performance (see Blog Jammin’, page 11).

Capleton apologists, including DeVito, offer a variety of defenses. They point to his May 2007 signing of The Reggae Compassionate Act, which declared that “there’s no space in the music community for hatred and prejudice.” However, Capleton was recorded singing gay-bashing songs later that same year. They claim that Capleton’s lyrics are metaphorical or that they haven’t been accurately translated from Jamaican patois, even though the message of these songs is plain. But their most common complaint, one that attempts to twist privilege into victimization, is that people in the LGBT community are trying to censor Capleton and thus, somehow, violating the First Amendment. This argument is simply wrong. Here’s the deal: The First Amendment protects our right to expression free from government censorship. One of the consequences of this free expression, inevitably, is conflict. Short of threatening actual violence, such conflict comes with the territory of the First Amendment. Protests and boycotts are part of the deal, too. Here’s an analogy: Say you’re at Thanksgiving dinner and you start making fart noises with your mouth — you know, to entertain people. If your host tells you to shut up and stop being a dipshit, he’s not infringing on your legal rights. If you’re never invited back, that’s not censorship. It’s a predictable consequence of your behavior. The date of the Capleton show, Oct. 11, happens to be National Coming Out Day, a celebration of people who publicly identify as gay, lesbian, transgender or bisexual. Humboldt County has a proud and vibrant LGBT community, and our county government includes that community in its non-discrimination policy. To my knowledge, no one has suggested that Capleton should be legally barred from performing here. But to many in our community, his invitation feels worse than an obnoxious fart noise at Thanksgiving dinner. When you stop to consider the violent consequences of homophobia (hate crimes against LGBT people, and those perceived to be LGBT, are more likely to result in death than any other kind of reported hate crime), the invitation feels like something much more offensive — a clueless and insensitive provocation. Threats of a boycott are a predictable consequence of that provocation. ●

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ARCATA MEDICAL MARIJUANA GROW. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

The Grow Tax

Can Arcata force out big indoor pot farms with a whopping electricity levy? By James Faulk

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

I

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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n the middle of night a couple of area. MacRaith had no pot in the house. years ago, two men used a large “I’m a strong person, but that really knife to slice the screen on Bonnie shook me up,” she said. MacRaith’s kitchen window. That’s just one of the stories that The men, slight of stature Arcata Mayor Michael Winkler has and wearing dark clothes, had cut heard on his walks through the TI ON through the screen and were trycity as he visits with potential C E ing to climb through a kitchen voters before the November window when MacRaith’s dog election. With no competition Kenai, a husky cross, began for his job on the City Council, barking and growling. he’s using this time to research MacRaith, 65, who lives constituent concerns and the 201 alone off Alliance Road in campaign for passage of Measure Arcata’s Westwood area, got out I, which would tax the excessive of bed to investigate. She reacted on inelectricity use typical of large-scale stinct when she saw the men, making the grows. largest, foulest sound she could muster The more the lanky, curly-haired politi— a bellow fit for a horror movie. When cian walks, the more discussions he has the men didn’t respond she got louder. with residents, the more he’s convinced And louder. that one of Arcatans’ biggest worries is Finally, exchanging looks, the two just what the City Council wanted to adbacked away from the window and ran. dress when it voted unanimously in July to Authorities later speculated to Macput Measure I on the ballot. Raith that the crime could have been a Many in Arcata are feeling increasingly marijuana robbery gone awry, because a under siege, Winkler said, because of the nearby greenhouse had marijuana growing proliferation of big, commercial marijuana in it and the smell had permeated the grows in their neighborhoods.

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What was once a peaceable, longhaired hamlet dedicated to environmental responsibility and harmonious coexistence has become in many ways a town armed and anxious, where residents fear for their safety. “I came up here in 1972 to go to HSU and never has anything even remotely happened to me like this,” MacRaith said. “It really made me very sad about Arcata, because it’s really has been an exceptional place.” Winkler wants voters pass Measure I to drive growers out — or at very least get them to pay more taxes to offset their impacts on life in Arcata. In some neighborhoods, people feel like they are living in a war zone, he said. “There are attack dogs, all kinds of cash and guns, and they feel like they have some very hostile and dangerous neighbors,” Winkler said. “They felt like it was a safe and comfortable and friendly neighborhood, but there’s been this massive change.” Measure I would impose a 45 percent utility tax on customers who use more than six times a baseline amount established by the California Public Utilities Commission. In Arcata, the baseline works out to about 582 kilowatt hours per month in the summer for a house with electric heat, and 1,002 kwh in the winter. For a house with gas heat, the allowance works out to 360 kwh monthly in the summer and 408 in the winter, according to figures provided by the CPUC. The city points out in its election materials that the average household uses twice the baseline amount, so those taxed would have to use three times the average. “With the threshold we have, very few citizens would have this level of consumption,” Winkler said. Initially, the tax might affect 600 or so households. According to Pacific, Gas and Electric Co. spokeswoman Brittany McKannay, there are roughly 10,000 electric meters in Arcata, with slightly more than 600 rising above the Measure I threshold. That’s roughly 6 percent of metered households in the city. The measure would exempt people already getting special electric rates for medical reasons, such as needing life-support equipment, City Attorney Nancy Diamond wrote in an analysis of Measure I. No exemptions would be offered for people getting special low-income rates or for very large households. According to Diamond, the tax would generate roughly $1.2 million a year based on 2011 usage figures, although the city expects that figure to decline over time as big growers move out or change their ways.

Offsetting some of that income, Arcata would have to pay a one-time charge to PG&E, estimated at no more than $650,000, to implement the tax, which would be collected by the utility and then passed on to the city. But according to Mayor Winkler, it’s not about the money. If the measure works the way he hopes, the large tax will prove so discouraging that commercial growers will shut down or just leave. That prospect has worried some in neighboring Eureka, where Councilwoman Linda Atkins said there’s already a significant grow-house problem. Concerned that growers may relocate from Arcata to Eureka, Atkins has led efforts to get a similar tax on Eureka’s ballot in 2014. The idea has been referred to the city’s Energy Committee for analysis. By making it clear such a plan is in the works, Atkins hopes Eureka can ward off any growers who might be looking for alternative locations. In Arcata, Winkler is careful to point out that he’s not against medical marijuana. In fact, if growers stay within the legal limits for growing medical marijuana in the city, they wouldn’t break the 600 percent threshold set forth in Measure I, he said. No organized opposition has emerged to Measure I, which unlike some other proposed taxes, needs only a majority vote to pass. Instead, anonymous grumblers have posted to online forums, where they say the tax will kill the goose that lays the golden egg. Among those who have come out publicly against the measure is Mark Sailor, owner of the human-powered taxi service Kineticab, who had tried to run for City Council this year but failed to submit enough viable signatures to make the ballot. Sailor says the measure discriminates against the same growers who have helped make marijuana a massive engine for Arcata’s economy. “It’s a hey-get-the-hell-out-of-ourtown-law,” he said. “The whole thing makes me crazy.” If marijuana has brought prosperity to Arcata, Winkler expects that could still continue without huge grows that rattle peaceful neighborhoods. And for her part, MacRaith would be happy to see less of the massive flow of cash that she fears has fostered a greed-crazed culture in Arcata. “I don’t think it’s worth it,” she said. “We can find better, more creative ways to make money that can benefit a broader spectrum of people.” l

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Blog Jammin’ CRIME / BY ANDREW GOFF / OCT. 2, 4:12 P.M.

Person of Interest Named

At a Tuesday afternoon press conference, Sheriff Mike Downey named the “person of interest” who is being investigated in connection with a fatal hit-andrun as well as a homicide in Hoopa. Jason Anthony Warren, who was born in 1984 and was wanted in connection with an earlier assault, was arrested late in the afternoon on Sept. 27, the same day a crash claimed the life of HSU professor Suzanne Seemann and injured two other joggers. He is being held without the possibility of bail. Downey said no other suspects are currently being sought in the case. The Times-Standard reported that Warren had plea-bargained in an earlier assault, but then didn’t show up for his sentencing on Sept. 7. He had agreed to serve six years for assault with a deadly weapon, the newspaper said. OBITS / BY JUDY HODGSON / SEPT. 30, 2:22 P.M.

Obituary Released

The family of the late Suzanne Seemann, who was killed Thursday while jogging with two friends, has released an obituary and notice of memorial service to be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at Freshwater School. The obituary praised her as a woodworker, gardener, seamstress and camper who was passionate about her family, her students and the outdoors. Her husband, Hank Seemann, proposed to her at Yosemite, it said. The full obituary is on our website. CRIME / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / SEPT. 28, 10:22 A.M.

Jogger in fatal crash ID’d

The jogger killed yesterday in a hitand-run crash that seriously injured her two companions was Suzanne Wetzel Seemann, an HSU geography lecturer and the wife of Hank Seemann, Humboldt County’s deputy director of environmental services. Suzanne Seemann specialized in oceanic and atmospheric science, according to a press release from Humboldt State University, which described her as an “extraordinarily talented and popular instructor.” She has also lectured at the College of the Redwoods, and before coming to

cant cash due over the canceled gig, the business he stood to lose if he went on with the show would have been a greater blow. “I can’t lose 80 percent of the people that frequent my club over one show,” he said. “All I can hope is that the gay community steps up and supports our club.” UPDATE: 9/27, 8:43 a.m.: The Facebook event page for the controversial Oct. 11 Capleton show run by Bonus Entertainment was updated late last night to read “NOT CANCELLED,” has added a new poster that reads “Club T.B.A.” and added the following message: “CAPLETON is NOT CANCELED … Nah worry about those people trying to take our reggae away. … The people spreading the lies and misinformation will be held legally accountable for their actions and words. “Capleton is a reggae icon that has MUSIC / BY ANDREW GOFF / SEPT. 26, formed the roots of reggae. Every reggae 11:21 A.M. and dancehall artist has been influenced positively by the KING ! Come show your Travelin’ Capleton love !!!!” This from Red Fox Tavern owner Brian The Journal has emailed Bonus EnterSwislow’s Facebook page: tainment and we’ll let you know if a new For anyone who is interested, we at fyah zone is arranged. THE RED FOX TAVERN are cancelling a UPDATE: 9/27, 10:16 a.m.: Bonus Entershow set for October 11th. tainment’s Beau DeVito emailed us back Yes, Oct. 11 was the day Capleton was to let us know that “Capleton is performset to bring the fyah. So, ya. ing in Humboldt at a undisclosed location The Jamaican-born reggae singer had to support uncensored reggae.” We asked successfully performed without incident for clarification. to a sold-out crowd at the Red Fox in “We are not releasing the venue name November of 2010. A previous show had until the show day,” he said. Further, been canceled in 2004. In recent weeks, he was perturbed at the Journal — and a local Facebook group protesting the me personally — for “helping to hurt show gained a the show,” considerable particularly following due because he had to Capleton’s arranged for me history of antito attend the gay lyrics. 2010 Capleton UPDATE performance 2:57 p.m.: The and “to not Journal spoke review the show with Red Fox is not telling Tavern cothe truth.” OK. owner Brian Since the previSwislow this CAPLETON PERFORMS AT THE RED FOX TAVERN IN 2010. ous Capleton PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF afternoon. He show had been confirmed that mired in similar controversy, I’d wanted to the decision to scratch the Capleton show go to see if there was anything to all the was made due to pressure from the gay fuss. So, I went. Admittedly, there was no community and other artists that perform anti-gay rhetoric — that I could underregularly at the venue. stand, anyway — spouted from the stage. “I have high respect for the gay comPeople who love dancehall reggae peacemunity at large. This was never out of ably enjoyed them some dancehall reggae. disrespect,” Swislow said. No incidents. There. ● While he was sure he’d lose signifiHumboldt had worked for the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological and Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. An older resume from her days as a researcher in Madison shows that she had an undergraduate degree from Princeton, and dual masters’ degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Wood’s Hole Oceanographic Institution in environmental engineering and applied ocean physics and engineering. According to an article in today’s Times-Standard, her survivors include two children, aged 7 and 4. She was 40. Update 10:29 a.m.: The other two joggers, Terri Vroman-Little, 50, and Jessica Hunt, 41, were in stable condition this morning at St. Joseph Hospital, a hospital spokeswoman said.

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

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Propping P Up Schools

LYNN JONE S

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

2

EL

TI ON EC

2

By Heidi Walters

EL

Two tax measures would generate billions, but which promises more for local education?

Proposition 30

is Gov. erhaps some — OK, probably Brown’s baby, and he’s already written most — of you are daunted by its measures into the 2012-2013 budget. the task of studying up on the 11 It’s backed largely by the two teachers statewide ballot propositions on unions, with most cash coming from the the November ballot. You might California Teachers Association, the bigeven be considering the easy-weasel way gest campaign donor in the state, and a out: Just vote for the prez and drop it in slew of other big unions, private corporathe box. We’re certain that some of you, tions and assorted others. It would however, know exactly how you’ll TI ON raise personal income tax rates vote, at least on the measures EC for seven years on incomes that say “will increase taxes” above $250,000, and would be — open mouth gently, place retroactive to Jan. 1. Those earntongue between lips, and blow. 201 ing $250,000-$300,000 would Maybe some of you are planning pay another 1 percent in taxes, to vote “no” on everything simply $300,000-$500,000 earners would pay to reject the idea of adding more another 2 percent, and those making over laws and amendments to what is already $500,000 would pay another 3 percent. It the world’s third longest constitution. also would raise the sales tax rate for four “Where’s our constitutional convention?!” years, from 7.25 percent to 7.5 percent. Ahem. The rest of you, you’ve got 11 Proposition 38, created and mostly props to deal with, everything from funded by Molly Munger, a civil rights ending the death penalty to labeling attorney from Pasadena, is backed by the GMOs. Robert Greene, with the California Parent Teacher Association and Los Angeles Times, says Proposia small number of individuals. It would tion 31 is the prop to watch: It raise personal income tax rates for 12 years would change the state’s budget on all incomes above $7,316, on a sliding cycle from one-year to two-year, scale starting at 0.4 percent more on the give local governments tons more low end and going up to another 2.2 percontrol over how they spend cent on incomes above $2.5 million. their money and enforce state Prop. 38 raises more money than Prop. regulations — and allow the 30, and over a longer period of time governor to make emergency — about $10 billion a year the first few budget cuts. Greene suggests years and possibly more each year after, it would “force the compared to Prop. 30’s roughly $6 billion Legislature to spend a year for five years, and a little less in the more time reviewing years it’s phased in and phased out. programs and less time Prop. 30 money would be funneled into passing bills.” Some say it’s contradica new account within the general fund, tory and dangerous. where it would be used to begin replenIt’s a biggun, and you should go bone ishing another, long-standing education up on it. system-devoted account from which the But even bigger might be Propositions state has been borrowing for years to 30 and 38 — yep, the two tax-increase fund other programs. measures. They might be the most conProp. 38 money mostly would go difusing pair of propositions on the ballot. rectly to K-12 schools and early education They each propose to do the same thing programs, with specific strings attached — raise billions for the state’s education and a round of new reporting and budgetsystem — but in radically different ways. ing requirements. None of it could be Most startlingly, what happens with these used to raise salaries or pensions, and only propositions will determine whether or 1 percent of it could be used for adminnot Gov. Jerry Brown swings his mighty ax istrative costs. In addition, through the down to lop nearly $6 billion from the end of 2016-17, 30 percent of the revenue state budget, mostly from education. would be used by the state to pay down These, actually, might be the props to debt on general obligation bonds, mainly really watch.

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ones used for schools’ and universities’ infrastructure improvements. If Prop. 30 loses, Gov. Brown will cut $5.9 billion in spending from the 201213 budget, mostly from education but also from other programs, including city police departments, developmental services, parks, game wardens, flood control and fire management. That’s the governor’s “backup budget plan” — or, as Sacramento Bee Garry Eagles, county superintendent of columnist Dan Walters Humboldt’s schools, says our legislators need calls it, that’s “political exto start being problem solvers instead of just tortion.” But even Walters “passing the buck down” to the voters with initiatives. Photo by Heidi Walters allows that the governor seems to have no option. The money isn’t there. California’s deficit education system for 41 years, starting reached $16 billion this year. off as an instructional aide in Stockton. Well, heck — why not vote for both of He moved to Humboldt County in 1979, them and hope they both pass? Here’s the and worked in the Eureka City School catch: You can vote on both but you can’t District until 2003, when he became the have both. If they both pass — and they’d Humboldt County superintendent of each need 50 percent of the ballots cast schools. He oversees 31 school districts to do that — the one with the most votes (plus the office of education), 87 schools wins. That’s probably why, as of last week’s and 18,000 students. He’s watched polls, Prop. 30 was still in front of Prop. 38 enrollments decline in Humboldt and — although neither was exactly in a wincosts rise, but nothing beats the drastic ning position. And it’s largely why some reductions in funding that schools have local education administrators seem to suffered in recent years. be leaning toward the one that prevents The problem, he said — and the reason further, massive cuts. he thinks taxes should be raised, one way or the other — is that since the recession began, the state has been borrowing from desk inside the Humboldt County Office the K-12 system’s designated general fund of Education on Myrtle Avenue, a painting account — called Proposition 98 funds — of a soaring eagle hangs on the wall. Below and consistently delaying payment of the it, two eagle sculptures spread their wings monies it does send their way, in order to on either end of a long shelf — gifts, pay for other programs. Eagles said, hefting one of the sculptures “And so 2007, 2008, those were the last gently. He looked slightly self-conscious school years that were fully funded under only for a moment, then his face relaxed Proposition 98,” Eagles said. back into a kindly intensity. So, which Typically, about half the state general proposition strikes his fancy? fund is spent on education, with K-12 typi“Neither one is very good,” he said. cally getting about 40 percent and higher “The Munger initiative does not do education 10 percent. These state dollars enough to shore up the general fund of are mostly from the Prop. 98 fund, and the state of California, and the governor’s they can make up 50 to 75 percent of K-12 initiative does not raise enough money to schools budgets and about two-thirds of totally fix the problem.” community college budgets. Eagles has worked in the California continued on next page

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students linger in the breezeway between classes at McKinleyville High school. Photo by Bob Doran

Prop. 98 is the law passed in 1988 to provide a minimum threshold of education funding. There are three ways to calculate it, depending on how the economy’s doing, but most of the time it’s figured by multiplying the growth in K-12 attendance by the change in per capita personal income. Eagles said the state’s been paying schools only about 78 cents on the dollar of Prop. 98 funds owed them, and then deferring as much as 30 percent of those payments, sometimes into the next fiscal year. The borrowing helps the state meet commitments to other programs on time, but it messes up schools’ budgeting from year to year. “So, on the state’s books, they’re ‘balanced,’” Eagles said. “But what it means

for my local districts is, I have less money to work with, and I have to keep more in the bank, because I’ve got to keep enough cash in order to make payroll. So it’s a double whammy on school districts. Not only do they have to cut back because they’re not getting as much total revenue from the state, they have to spend it slower, which means further reductions in their programs.” As a result, he said, Humboldt County schools have been underfunded by the state by about $20.8 million a year — which, over five years, means a cumulative shortfall of $100 million dollars. Since 2008-2009, Eagles said, Humboldt County schools overall have lost 100 teacher and 84 support staff positions.

Maybe 12 percent of those losses could be attributed to enrollment declines. But the majority of them are because of the state funding shortfall, as well as the increasing cost of doing business: Salaries go up in stepped increments each Proposition 30 Proposition 38 year, health benefits have gone up 40 • Increases personal income tax rate • Increases personal income tax rates percent in the last five years, higher on highest incomes: over $250,000 (1 on a graduated scale, from 0.4 percent gasoline prices increase transportapercent), over $300,000 (2 percent), on incomes over $7,316 up to 2.2 tion costs. over $500,000 (3 percent). percent on incomes over $2.5 million. Six local school districts — Eureka • Sales tax increases from 7.25 percent City, Klamath-Trinity Joint Unified, Loto 7.5 percent leta Elementary, Maple Creek, Scotia About $6 billion annually first five About $10 billion annually in initial Elementary and South Bay — won’t years, then decreasing years, then increasing be able to pay their bills over the next couple of years. Sure, some of Public education and state budget Public schools, early childhood their troubles might be from severely education and state budget (debt service on bonds) declining enrollments. But even more enrollment-stable ones, like Northern Prevents $5.9 billion in cuts from the Does not prevent $5.9 billion in cuts Humboldt Union High School District, 2012-13 budget from the 2012-13 budget have suffered. Yes Not addressed Northern Humboldt oversees Arcata High, McKinleyville High, Tsurai High, Pacific Coast High (an alternative school) and Six Rivers Charter School. Kenny Richards, the district’s Seven years (Jan. 1, 2012-19) 12 years (2013-24) superintendent for the past 14 years, • Allows state to gradually restore • Does not prevent $7 million in said his district has felt the state mandated funding levels trigger cuts funding shortfall. This year, he figures •Prevents $7 million in trigger cuts • Sends per-pupil funds to each his district is getting about $1,500 per school, depending on several factors average daily attendance less than it is • Prevents $1.6 million in trigger cuts • Does not prevent $1.6 million in owed by the state. trigger cuts • Enrollment cap increases by 49 Among the changes that’s led to: • Enrollment cap reduced by 346 reducing the full-time district school • Funding for 2012-13 increases by nurse to part-time, increasing class $222,720 sizes by one to two students and • Allows state to gradually restore eliminating some courses including mandated funding levels auto, woodworking and Spanish for • Prevents $5 million in trigger cuts • Does not prevent $5 million in native speakers. The district has also • CSU will rescind 2012-13 tuition hike trigger cuts reduced equipment and supplies of 9.1 percent; refund students $249 • 5 percent undergraduate tuition spending, closed a community day hike; 7 percent for non-residents school for at-risk students that had

Side-by-Side: Propositions 30 & 38 Impact Taxes

Revenues raised

sources: California Legislative Analyst’s Office, College of the Redwoods, Humboldt STate University,

Revenue used for

Trigger cuts Guarantees funding for prison realignment and other services shifted in 2011 from the state to local governments Operative time period Humboldt County K-12

College of the Redwoods

Humboldt State University

14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

an average daily attendance of 35, and eliminated an adult education program that served about 300 people. “The first thing we cut was equipment, four years ago,” Richards said. “We decided not to buy new computers. We cut supplemental materials, too —workbooks. But we did get a bond passed [Measure Q] and that’s helped us bring back those new computers.” Dana Silvernale, who’s on the Northern Humboldt school board, credits grants and local bond measures as well as Richards’ management for keeping the district in relatively good shape. “But even so, at the rate things are going, our reserve funds will be depleted by 2014,” she said by phone last week. It’s a similar story for the community colleges, whose funds also are determined on a per-student basis. Colleges increase or reduce the number of course sections they can offer, depending on their annual per-student funding cap. The state has reduced community college funding by $809 million over the past three years, according to the California Community Colleges chancellor’s office. As a result, enrollment funding is now capped at $4,565 per full-time equivalent student for the 2012-13 school year. Back in 2010-11, it was $5,209. Lee Lindsey, vice president of administrative services at College of the Redwoods, says the state owes the college $5 million in cash deferrals of Prop. 98 funds. In just 2011-12, College of the Redwoods took a $1.2 million cut and lost funding for 276 students, he says. In 2009-10, the college offered 2,030 classes districtwide; in 2011-12, it offered 1,615. Among the classes cut were dance, aerobics, yoga, Pilates


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Kenny Richards (right), superintendent of Northern Humboldt Union High School District, says the school propositions on this year’s ballot mark “a defining moment in how we support our schools.” Photo by Bob Doran

and women’s self-defense. And there are longer wait lists to get into the remaining classes, with the longest for English and math. In addition, last year nine faculty members and 18 staff members took advantage of an early retirement program. Not all of those positions will be replaced, although Lindsey didn’t give a figure. “Each year we thin the soup,” Lindsey said over the phone last week. The California State University system also has been pinched — by state cash deferrals and rising costs. In the last two years, the statewide university system has lost $750 million to $1.1. billion from state cash deferrals, said Rollin Richmond, president of Humboldt State University, last week. Humboldt State’s share of that loss was about $5 million, he said. Among the impacts, maintenance has been deferred on some of the 99-year-old university’s buildings and, more disruptively, tuition was hiked 9.1 percent this fall. And although Humboldt State’s enrollment has risen some in the past couple of years, to a current 8,000 students (7,300 full-time-equivalent ones), budget cuts do depress the number of students who could attend. “We get a lot more qualified applicants than we’re able to admit,” said Richmond.

Local administrators

and educators don’t seem impressed with Prop. 38, even if in the case of K-12 and preschool programs it would bring in significant new cash. Some of the measure’s revenues would be used by the state to

pay down debt on education bonds — about $3 million right away specifically for community college and university infrastructure bonds; that’s about all it would do for higher education. They’re more concerned about what they’d lose if Prop. 30 loses. Which is why, without actively coming out against Prop. 38 — that could be impolitic — they seem to be focusing more of their efforts on explaining Prop. 30, the governor’s tax hike. Remaining neutral is clearly difficult. An e-mail sent to some faculty by a College of the Redwoods dean recently cautioned: “We have been advised by the Chancellor’s Office that using class time (or dismissing class early and allowing students who wish to remain) to inform students about Prop. 30 crosses the line into inappropriate political advocacy.” Even Humboldt K-12 county superintendent Garry Eagles has to restrain himself. Eagles exudes that calm, friendly, straightforward confidence one hopes for in an educator, and he seems to have endless patience when it comes to talking about the complexities of the California budget and the current education funding propositions. But he admits that, as he’s been analyzing and preparing info sheets on these measures, he petered out on his analysis of 38. No, he hasn’t typed his 87 school’s names into the Yes on 38’s site’s “benefits calculator” to see what each school supposedly would get if the measure passes. “The governor’s initiative doesn’t take

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If Prop. 30 does not pass, mid-year trigger cuts (2012-13) more local funds. Arcata Elementary totalling $5.9 Billion will be initiated. School District has two measures University of California: $250 million on the ballot. Measure E would levy California State University: $250 million a $49 per parcel tax on property owners Developmental disabilities: $50 million (except those on SSI) for five years, with City police departments: $20 million the money being used to pay for aides and music and art programs reduced by CalFire: $10 million budget cuts. Measure F would authorize Water Resources flood control: $7 million a $7 million bond to pay for updating Local water safety patrol: $5 million sewage, plumbing and other infrastrucFish and Game: $4 million ture. The Fortuna High School District Parks and Recreation: $2 million has a $10 million bond on the ballot that Law enforcement programs: $1 million would pay for making the school’s gym earthquake safe, among other upgrades.

But say Prop. 38 does

prevail. That would mean about $10 billion statewide annually, beginning in 2013-14, and possibly more in years after that until 2024. Sixty percent of that would go to K-12 schools through 2016-17 and 85 percent after K-14 education: that; 10 percent would go to $5.4 billion preschools for the first four years and then 15 percent after that; and for four years, 30 percent of it would go toward paying AT IV EA off state debt. cational NA LYS T'S Unlike current (and Prop. 30) state OFFI program CE education funding, which is largely grants, with unrestricted but also susceptible to higher amounts allotted being “borrowed” by the state for other to students in higher grades; 18 percent purposes, Prop. 38’s school-dedicated of the new-tax funds would go to lowrevenues would go directly to each income student grants, calculated on school in the state to be used for spethe number of students who qualify cific purposes. for a free meal; and 12 percent would The preschool funding would go go to training, technology and teaching toward expanding services and added materials. reporting and assessments. Every school — not just every disOf the amount that goes to K-12, 70 trict — would have to prepare budgets percent must be spent on per-pupil edudetailing every expense. School boards FOR CALI SOURCE:

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care of all of the deferrals, but it helps pay down a lot of what the state owes us,” he said. “So while school districts won’t see a lot of new money, they will get their money more on time, which means that services can begin to be restored.” It’s true there would be no “new” money from Prop. 30 — but less would be siphoned away or deferred. The revenue limit deficit — what the state owes the county school system in deferred and unpaid Prop. 98 monies — would still go up, by about $23.7 million, said Eagles. But he sees another, less direct benefit to the measure: Putting more money into the general fund — and stopping the governor’s trigger cuts — could improve a student’s life by funding social service programs. “Education does not operate in isolation,” Eagles said. “We can’t just get funded and miraculously all of a sudden these kids are going to do well. If they haven’t eaten well, if there’s alcoholism, drug issues not being addressed, a parent out of work — if all of those stressors at home aren’t dealt with, you can’t expect the child to come to school prepared to learn.” If the measure fails, the governor’s “trigger cuts” would result in a $6.95 million reduction in state funds currently budgeted for the Humboldt County K-12 system. Each district is responding to that event in different ways. The Northern Humboldt Union High School District, for example, will shorten the school year by five days, which in turn would cut teachers’ salaries by five days, said Superintendent Richards. A few districts, meanwhile, are hoping to bolster their pinched coffers with

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would have to hold public hearings twice a year on how they propose to spend the money. And they’d have numerous other reporting requirements. The Yes on 38 folks have developed a benefits calculator: Users type in a school’s name to see what it would expect to get. Not all schools are in there, and it’s unclear how the figures were derived. Nonethless, it projects that McKinleyville High would get nearly $600,000 in 2013-14, over $1 million in 2017-18 and $1.4 million in 2023-24. Eureka Senior High gets $1.45 million in 2013-14, all the way up to $3.4 million in the 12th year. Garfield Elementary: $47,000 the first year to $112,000 in the last year. However, county superintendent Eagles said the layers of new bureaucracy the measure creates — from mandated new programs to what he calls heavy reporting requirements — would be hard for his rural schools to manage, especially since the measure doesn’t allow the money to be spent on administration, salary raises or operational costs. “Our school districts have cut central bureaucracy and support systems,” Eagles said. “Very few of our libraries have librarians. We don’t have level of school nurses we used to have.” And no matter how small the school district, there’s still a minimum level of operations that must be funded — and some operational costs are higher in rural areas. Prop. 38 won’t help in those areas, he said. And, the monies might not actually go where they’re intended in some cases, at least in Humboldt. The formula for determining how the 18 percent meant for low-income students is dispersed, for instance, would be based


Ballot Recommendation Summary on the poverty rate of the community the school is in, not on the poverty rate of the students in the school, Eagles said. And in Humboldt, he said, some communities are wealthier than their students. Currently, districts get to fine-tune such earmarked funds and give them to the schools that need them. Under the Munger initiative, that wouldn’t happen. “There’s very little recognition that it costs more to tend to rural schools,” Eagles said. “A nurse here might visit 22 schools to get to 2,000 kids, whereas a nurse in an urban district might have 2,000 kids in one school. … The Munger initiative is one-size-fits-all.” Now, if the base funding was restored, then the Munger initiative would make more sense, he said. “The governor wants to fund the cake,” he said. “Munger wants to fund the frosting.” If Prop. 30 passes, College of the Redwoods’ funding would increase by $222,720, said Vice President Lindsey. In addition, the state would pay the college $1 million of the $5 million it owes in late and deferred funding. The enrollment cap would increase by 49 full-time equivalent students. If it fails, College of the Redwoods’ funding cap would decrease by 346 fulltime equivalent students and its funding would be slashed by about $1.6 million. At Humboldt State University, the main thing that would happen if Prop. 30 passes is that trigger cuts as high as $5 million would be averted ($250 million for the university system overall). The systemwide 9 percent tuition hike — $249 more a semester — instituted this fall would be rescinded, and students would get refunds, said Richmond.

If the measure fails, the trigger cuts would happen. And, tuition would go up again, by 5 percent — about $150 more a semester — for undergraduates, raising the per-semester fee to $3,135. Richmond said it’s estimated that enrollment would drop by 20,000 among the 23 CSU campuses, and about 1,500 faculty and staff jobs might be cut. Humboldt State provost Bob Snyder said the university has enough one-time money to get through this school year. But it’s hard to assess what will happen next year if the trigger cuts take place. Tuition increases likely won’t offset the trigger cut — but then what the exact cut will be and how many students the university will be able to enroll is not yet known.

Richmond said,

if he had his druthers, he’d “make education free all the way through university.” “It’s for society’s benefit,” he said. In fact, up until 1984, there was no per-unit fee to attend College of the Redwoods, said the college’s director of communications and marketing, Paul DeMark. And even now its fees are among the cheapest in the nation. But across higher education, costs have risen. Enrollments have been reduced. Tuition has soared. It’s a far cry from the state’s 1960s master plan for higher education, which guaranteed room in the two university systems for a percentage of the top high school graduates, and room for all in the community colleges. “We’re close to the point of abandoning that compact,” Richmond said. Superintendent Eagles said if someone had asked him to write a proposition to fund education, he would have made the

The HOPE Coalition (Humboldt Organized for People and the Environment) has prepared this summary of different organizations’ stands on the 11 propositions on November’s ballot. The Journal is reprinting it with permission. Detailed explanations of each proposition can be found on the Secretary of State’s website at www.sos.ca.gov. Proposition Organization (Y=Yes, N=No) American Assoc. of University Women (AAUW) Calif. School Board Association Calif. State PTA Calif. Federation of Teachers (CFT) Calif. Faculty Association Calif. Teachers Association (CTA) Calif. Democratic Party Calif. Republican Party Calif. Green Party Libertarian Party of Humboldt Peace and Freedom Party League of California Cities League of Women Voters (LWV) Calif. Labor Federation (AFL-CIO) Chamber of Commerce Consumer Federation of Calif. Common Cause Calif. Council of Churches Friends Comm. on Legislation (FCL) (Quakers) NAACP ACLU Sierra Club League of Conservation Voters Calif. Nurses Association (CNA) Calif. National Association for Women (NOW) Calif. Planned Parenthood Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association Calif. Retired Teachers My Vote: Proposition

tax increase permanent. “I wouldn’t propose a short-term tax increase,” he said. “That’s just pushing the problem down the line.” But, actually, he wouldn’t try to fix the problem with an initiative in the first place.

30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y N

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N Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y N Y Y N N Y N N Y Y N N Y Y N N N Y Y Y N N Y Y N N Y N Y N N N Y N Y Y Y N N N N Y N N N Y Y N N N Y Y Y N Y N Y N

Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y N Y N N N N Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y N Y Y Y Y N Y N N N Y

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“I think our legislative leaders ought to be fixing these issues,” he said. “The political gridlock in Sacramento is an embarrassment. These initiatives should not have to happen.” l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012

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GET OUT!

A Slow Trip Down the Avenue

book Telegraph Avenue By Michael Chabon Harper Michael Chabon’s new novel aims to be many things: A story of missing fathers and abandoned sons, a recollection of ’70s black pop culture, and the modern story of an indie record store fighting the corporate behemoth that would displace it. An ambitious mix of characters and themes, it would seem to be another example of the rich imagination that marked his previous novels, such as The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay and The Yiddish Policemen’s Union. Archy Stallings and Nat Jaffe are partners who own Brokeland Records in Oakland, a vinyl hangout threatened by a former NFL superstar’s plan to open a megastore that would most likely put them out of business. Their wives, Gwen Shanks and Aviva Roth-Jaffe, are also partners in a midwifing practice whose accreditation is threatened when a birth goes badly. Added to the mix is the reappearance of Archy’s abandoned teenage son Titus, who resents Archy in much the same way Archy resents his absent father Luther, a kung fu Blaxploitation star. Luther has fallen on hard times and is trying to revive his career through a blackmail scheme rooted in a murder that took place amid the black power politics of the ’70s. It’s potentially problematic for a white author like Chabon to attempt a novel where so many of the major characters are black, but generally he acquits himself well. His depiction of Nat and Archy’s friendship, and the way it’s occasionally circumscribed by race, is subtle and true. He’s particularly acute in showing Gwen navigating the mostly white medical and legal system that she finds herself in trouble with. He also has a real feel for the historical ghosts and resonances lingering in the neighborhood the record store occupies. A bigger problem is stylistic. The book is hobbled by strained, pumped up metaphors and purple description, especially in its overwritten first half (strangely, his description of music itself is vivid and precise). An early scene where Gwen chats with then-Sen. Barack Obama about her husband (the book takes place in 2004) is mawkish retroactive wish fulfillment, and has the unintended effect of pulling the reader out of the reality of the novel. Such missteps are frustrating, but by the last part of the book Chabon gets back in the groove and succeeds in ramping up the narrative tension. He has a real gift for creating vivid, flawed human beings — ultimately you do care about them — and the plot strands converge at the end in an old fashioned and satisfying way. At his best, Chabon’s a masterful storyteller, but here he falters because he doesn’t fully trust the story and its characters to carry the day. They do anyway. — Jay Aubrey-Herzog

By Rees Hughes

outdoors@northcoastjournal.com

S press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: thehum@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: carmen@northcoastjournal.com

18 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

ometimes there are things in our beckoned, auto cabins and camps offered lives that we pass by so often accommodation, and the redwoods rose we forget just how special they tall. Now, in many of the don’t-blink-orare. Over the years my family has you’ll-miss-them hamlets, the sense of made the long drive down to the just hanging on is palpable. You can alBay Area enough that we have reduced most hear the screech of the fingernails as the trip to a series of bathroom stops the businesses, inns, woodworks and burl with a refueling in Willits. The first portion shops fight the slow slide into history. of the trip is a blur of redwoods followed As we exited 101 to park and unload by blur of oak woodlands, vineyards, and, the bikes, Dave commented, “I feel like oh yes, the “In and Out” in Santa Rosa. We we are already in another universe.” The see the signs for the “Avenue of the Giold growth redwoods, so big that you ants” but it has been far too long since we can’t see the tops, create a perpetual dusk actually took an exit to Redcrest, Myers at the ground level. There is a deep and Flat or Miranda. pervasive quiet. Because it was early, the I recently first miles were loaded up silent and the my bicycle in air cool along our van and a roadway that cajoled my snakes through friend Dave to the forest. The sign on for a relatively level day of cycling topography along the 31.5made for easy mile Avenue riding.  of the Giants, Humboldt also less glamRedwoods orously known State Park as State dominates the Highway 254. avenue, offerWe left Arcata ing an array of early to beat sights, trails, the warmer picnic spots afternoon and camping temperatures options (Burof Southern lington and Humboldt. Hidden Springs We were campgrounds committed to would work exploring the well if staging avenue, kitsch a multi-day Rees Hughes takes in the trees along the and all. avenue experiAvenue of the Giants. Photo by David Davis Until 1960 ence). The park when the proclaims that current routing of 101 was completed, the it protects the “largest remaining stand of Avenue of the Giants was part of the main virgin redwoods in the world,” and there north-south Redwood Highway. The trip are immense old growth trees along most north from San Francisco was initially a of the length of the avenue. My personal three -and then a two-day journey as the favorite is the Founders Grove with its road was gradually improved. It was a time easy walk to the fallen Dyerville Giant, when timber was still king and salmon which — until it fell in March 1991 — was still populated the Eel. Abundant roadthe tallest tree in the park. But there houses dotted the way, tourist attractions are countless opportunities to stop and northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, oCt. 4, 2012

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absorb the magnificence of these arboreal giants. We did plenty of absorbing. However, like many before us, we succumbed to the siren call of the Shrine Drive-Thru Tree, made “world famous” by numerous postcards generated over the years. In my quarter-century-plus on the North Coast I had always resisted the temptation to visit a drive-through tree. My low expectations were confirmed. Even the small charge seemed excessive for the experience, but as Thomas Meagher, proprietor of nearby Riverbend Cellars later told us, it is still the biggest attraction of the area, pulling in far more than his tasting room. The road follows the main branch of the Eel River for roughly the northernmost dozen miles and the South Fork of the Eel for the remainder. If the afternoon is warm as it was for us, the South Fork offers tempting swimming holes or wading options. Through much of the fall, the low flow keeps the water warm and the current relatively safe. It is worth noting that the placid Eel is not always so benign. Signs along the avenue document high water marks of the 1964 flood, a catastrophe that completely wiped away many communities. Ginger Sarvinski, whose family operates an organic vegetable stand near Pepperwood, showed us pictures of that once vibrant village prior to December 1964. And at the former location of the town of Weott, we gazed at the pole showing the high water mark 33 feet above the roadway. Given the modest flow of late summer, it was difficult to imagine the raging torrent that inundated bustling Weott, destroying more than 50 buildings (Weott was later relocated to higher ground nearer the freeway). As we rode toward the south end of the avenue, the pungent aroma of the roadside growth of fennel accompanied us along sun-exposed stretches of highway. We passed through Miranda, and had it been a little later would have been sorely tempted to stop for lunch at The Avenue Café. Instead we continued on south and chose the pleasant outdoor seating at the Chimney Tree Grill, across from the namesake hollow redwood that once housed a gift shop. While the griddle heated up, we began with a cheesecake appetizer (something cyclists can justify). The owner, who grew up in the area, had re-opened the restaurant several years after the storied gift shop and previous café had closed. She hoped that there would be enough business to remain open through October. The Chimney Tree itself, an empty shell with a concrete floor, is kept open for visitors to walk inside. The calm and cool disposition of the avenue in the morning had changed on

the return trip. Traffic had increased. So had the heat. We peered into the Riverwood Inn near Phillipsville. Built in the 1930s, it is reputed to be the last remaining roadhouse on the avenue offering booze, food, limited accommodation, entertainment and vintage red velvet wallpaper. Diane Hawk, in her book Touring the Old Redwood Highway: Humboldt County, has reproduced a wonderful collection of vintage photos of the Riverwood Inn and countless similar venues.  The Humboldt Redwoods State Park Visitor’s Center just south of Weott is worth a stop too. The center’s exhibits provide a helpful overview of the natural and human history of the area, including the fascinating story of Charles Kellogg. Kellogg’s most lasting legacy, enshrined at the center, is the Travel Log. This is a hand-hewn redwood home he mounted on the back of a 1917 Nash Quad truck. From 1917-1921, Kellogg drove his eccentric mobile home across the country four times “to awaken interest in the great redwood forests of California, and to assist in their preservation.” People like Kellogg and the Save the Redwoods League are among those we have to thank for the protection of this ancient forest. We concluded our day with a stop at the Immortal Tree, as well as one of the fresh vegetable stands along the final few miles at the north end of the avenue near Pepperwood. It was a great day. Over the next week, I found myself reflecting on our ride frequently. This may have been, in part, because every time I sat down I was reminded of the ride by my sore derriere. There had been something special about the experience. The magnificent redwoods I had expected. But perhaps what I enjoyed most was that by cycling we took our time, stopped to explore and talk with some of the people along the avenue, and relished the serendipity that unfolded.  I have found myself thinking about how to incorporate a taste of the avenue the next time we are heading for San Francisco. Slow down. Look up. Maybe, like the days before 1960, allow two days for the trip.  ●

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The most thorough resource regarding the Avenue of the Giants is Jerry and Gisela Rohde’s book Humboldt Redwoods State Park: The Complete Guide Includes Avenue of the Giants Tour, Eureka: Miles and Miles, 1992.  See pages 88 through 194. If you would like to write a Get Out! Column, please email Journal editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg at carrie@northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012

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Quick-Star Savory Applesauce 1 whole star anise 1 grind fresh black pepper

This is a wonderful quick accompaniment to our local Alexander Kids’ pork chops (worth the extra pennies, seriously), or a pork roast or lamb.

Place all ingredients into a heavybottomed saucepan. Add water about 2/3 up to top of contents (about ¾ to one cup). Bring to boil, then lower heat to medium, cover and simmer, stirring often, for about 15 minutes or until apples are totally soft. Remove star anise. Break up apple pieces completely with fork and serve alongside meat, blintzes or latkes. Makes about four servings.

Ingredients and Method:

2 medium/large apples, peeled, cored, sliced into 1 cm slices (the thingee does all that) and quartered ¼ cup sugar 1 teaspoon lemon juice pinch salt ¼ t. ground cardamom ¼ t. cinnamon

Almanzo Wilder-esque Apples and Onions

APPLES AND PEELER PHOTO BY JADA CALYPSO BROTMAN

Apples of My Eye By Jada Calypso Brotman talkofthetable@northcoastjournal.com

A

h, autumn. So soft, so gray, so indistinguishable from what passes for summer here in northern Humboldt. You southern Humboldters must feel so smug all wrapped in your golden layers of summer tan. Here in Arcata autumn is primarily evidenced not by weather changes but by fresh green produce and visitors. The highway exits are awash with aspiring trimmers in dingy neckerchiefs frantically flailing scissor-embossed cardboard signs. I personally adore this season not least because my awesome brother Max makes his annual pilgrimage to New Moon Organics Farm up in the Lotus Land of Shively to join in the orgy of harvesting squash, tomatoes, beans and apples. Desperate to find some sun and strengthen the bonds of siblinghood, I took the summer bridge recently and picked alongside the New Moon residents, munching raw sweet corn and frying sausages throughout the gorgeous sunlit afternoon. I came home with bags o’ bounty, and among the succulent highlights was a peck of wonderful juicy sweet King apples, fresh off the tree. Crisp autumn apples are such a treat. I really developed an appreciation for them in my years living in the U.K., where the brief Cox’s Orange Pippin season is heralded like the Nouveau Beaujolais, with much patriotic rhapsodizing and teary

½ t. salt, more to taste 1 t. brown sugar 1 t. vinegar (apple cider or white) fresh ground pepper optional: ½ t. red pepper flakes 1 T. butter Sploosh olive oil (1, 2 teaspoons)

(Any other Little House on the Prairie fans out there? Laura Ingalls’ husband Almanzo Wilder always ate apples and onions as a kid in upstate New York. There’s no recipe in the book, but the idea inspired this totally rad breakfast dish.) Estimate one apple and half a medium-size onion per person, more if it’s a main dish. It’s particularly well suited alongside salty brekkie meats: sausage et al. A fried egg on top doesn’t go amiss either.

Heat fats over medium high heat in cast-iron frying pan. Place apples flat side down to cover bottom. Cook undisturbed until bottoms are browning, 3-4 minutes. Turn heat to medium, turn apples over, dump onions on top. Let fry undisturbed two minutes before adding seasonings and mixing all. Cook until onions are soft, another 2-3 minutes, tossing mixture occasionally. Grub hot. Serves two.

Ingredients and Method: WWII stories. Admittedly those apples are worth it; crisp, firm, sweet, with icy white flesh and a lovely snap, they have such a short season they provoke almost hysterical over-consumption. Here in the U.S. we have decent apples available most of the year but nothing beats picking ‘em fresh and free of charge. Max does an annual cider pressing that keeps us flooded in juice the rest of the year, and our friend Willoughby is an expert at dried apples. I prefer to eat my apples fresh — I consume three or four a day this time of year — and I just love cooking with crunchy, tart-sweet fresh apples. They actually make great savory dishes — fruit and meat is a killer combination — and the King holds up to cooking particularly well. Winter apples get less firm after months of storing and can cooking too quickly to mealy mush, but with fresh apples the home cook can achieve any number of consistencies while maintaining a vibrant appley flavor unmuddied by age. Before we get to some recipes I offer some advice: If you don’t have an apple peeler/corer thingee, get one. Not only are they amusingly old-timey, they are surprisingly effective. It’s important to have your apple slices of even thickness for cooking, and the thingee really does the trick. ●

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

2 apples, peeled, cored, sliced into 1 cm slices and halved 1 med. yellow onion, peeled, thinly sliced and quartered

Jada’s Too Lazy To Make Pastry Dough Pie Crust: For base, buy a graham cracker crumb crust in 9 inch pie pan or make this quick one:

Ingredients and Method:

1 ½ cups finely ground graham cracker crumbs 1/3 cup white sugar 6 tablespoons melted butter pinch salt Blend and press into pan to form crust. Chill for an hour, or prebake at 375 for 7 minutes. Crumbly Toppin’ (do last minute so butter doesn’t get melty) 1 stick cold sweet butter 1/3 cup brown sugar 1/3 cup white sugar ¼ cup walnuts ½ cup flour ½ t. salt pinch nutmeg Blend all by pulsing in food processor until mixture reaches texture of very coarse sand.

Fillin’ 5 med. large apples peeled, cored, sliced into 1 cm slices and quartered ½ cup cornstarch mixed with enough cream to make a paste — work lumps out with fork. Toss apples with paste. It will dissolve as it mixes with the juice of the fruit. Add ½ cup each brown and white sugar 1 t. vanilla ½ t. salt ½ t. cinnamon, more to taste juice of one lemon Toss all thoroughly. Sift ¼ cup flour over all. Toss again. Put evenly in crust and sprinkle, dot and press crust mixture thickly over all. It’s a crumble-style, not a flat crust. Bake 40 minutes in 375 oven (preheated). Turn up heat to 425 for another 10-15 minutes to ensure topping getting crisp. Cool at least an hour. Enjoy the appley goodness.


southeast asian cuisine

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012

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northcoastjournal.com

pull-out A RT sect i on

LEFT: “LOOK, THERE HE STANDS BEHIND OUR WALL, GAZING IN AT THE WINDOW” BY SUSANNA BLUHM. PHOTO COURTESY OF

FIRST STREET GALLERY.

CENTER: SCULPTURES BY LUSH NEWTON. PHOTO COURTESY OF FIRST STREET GALLERY.

BELOW: LUSH NEWTON WITH PINK DOUGHNUT. PHOTO BY JASON MARAK.

From Big Foot to the Bible

Lush Newton and Susanna Bluhm at First Street Gallery By Jason Marak

T

en pink flamingos? Check. Thirty-nine large pink doughnuts? Check. Space Ghost, Batman, Wonder Woman and a dancing Big Foot? Check. This might sound like a laundry list of images from that dream you had the night you ate way too much Thai curry, but it’s not. It is a partial list of the objects and images you’ll be confronted with at Lush Newton’s new exhibition, “Bread & Butter.” If you’re in the mood for some visual stimulation this month, HSU’s First Street Gallery in Eureka is the place to be. From Newton’s Pop inspired mixed media installation and sculptures to Susanna Bluhm’s large, painterly canvases, First Street is full of things that catch the eye. Newton’s background working as a character artist for Disney and Hallmark certainly makes sense when you see her work, but it isn’t responsible for her fascination with cartoon imagery and popular culture. That’s an obsession that began long before she entered the workforce. “I’ve been drawing since I was 2 years old and heavily influenced by The Mickey Mouse Club, Hanna-Barbera and Warner Brothers [cartoons], and I used to try to fight it,” Newton said. But “weird packag-

ing, cartoons, billboards, design, all of that pop culture stuff — I can’t turn away!” Many of the materials used in Newton’s mixed media sculptures and installations are salvaged. She has an abundant source of good cardboard from area merchants and she knows where to find stashes of free wood. Newton hoards materials. The Arcata studio where she works looks like you’d expect: cluttered, colorful and full of surprises. Everywhere your eye stops, there is some sort of wonderful visual contradiction: baby shoes with rollerskate wheels, a human skull next to a small statue of Bob’s Big Boy, a delicious looking crock-pot of stew (yes, real stew) next to an industrial respirator — the studio itself is a kind of shrine to the marriage of popular culture and the fine arts. Newton’s creations bring to mind the work of other contemporary Pop artists like Takashi Murakami and Yoshitomo Nara, but Newton’s work has a decidedly more rustic feel that sets it apart. Her new exhibition promises to be a floor to ceiling experience, offering moments of familiarity quickly overtaken by the rush of the unexpected. The inspiration for Seattle-based painter Susanna Bluhm’s work couldn’t be

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

further from Newton’s. Many of the canvases on display in Bluhm’s exhibition, “My Heart’s a Little Fast, but Otherwise, Everything’s Fine,” are from a group of paintings inspired by the poem “The Song of Songs of Solomon” from The Old Testament. Even the titles of many of the works are drawn from the poem’s lines. While the poem served as inspiration for the series, the paintings are by no means literal representations of the poem itself. “It’s an abstract connection, but it’s a strong one,” Bluhm explained, something she kept thinking about as she worked on the imagery. Other paintings in the exhibition are from a group of work based on photos Bluhm took of Croatian islands during her travels, but also of traffic islands around her Seattle neighborhood. Bluhm, an HSU graduate who has exhibited nationally and internationally, paints landscape environments that are certainly abstract, but they also offer glimpses of recognizable forms that help pull the viewer into the scene — locating or placing the viewer within the work. This act of combining representational and abstract elements allows viewers to create personal narratives and associations. “I like having the mix because then

the stuff that people can recognize kind of makes them think that they might also be able to recognize the abstract stuff if they looked hard enough, and then it starts to make the recognizable stuff look more abstract — so I kind of like it when they inform each other like that,” said Bluhm. But perhaps the first thing you notice when looking at her paintings is color. Her palette is saturated and inviting. “I love color and I think it’s probably the most important tool that I use as a painter,” Bluhm said. “I do want people to experience some kind of pleasure in the color… a rich, rewarding experience.” ● The Lush Newton and Susanna Bluhm exhibitions will be up at First Street Gallery (422 First St. in Eureka) from Oct. 2 until Nov. 4. There will be a reception for the artists on Saturday, Oct. 6, from 6-9 pm. in conjunction with Arts Alive! In addition, Bluhm will give a slide lecture about her work the previous day, Oct. 5, at 5 p.m. in Room 102 in the Art Building at Humboldt State University.


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15a. HUMBOLDT BEER WORKS 110 Third St. The 4 Low, bluegrass/classic rock performing. 16. BAR FLY PUB AND GRUB 91 Commercial St. Colleen Hole, mixed media; Kathleen Bryson; Marnie Schneider; St. John, of St. John and the Sinners performing. 17. CHERI BLACKERBY GALLERY and THE STUDIO 272 C St. Betty Kuhnel, The Collected Works. 17a. HALL GALLERY 208 C St. Tyson Ritter, Molly Ritter, Frank Speck, Bea Stanley, Antoinette Magyar. 17b. THE WORKS 210 C St. Phillip King, artwork. 17c. ACCIDENT GALLERY 210 C St. 18. SAILORS’ GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo related art. 18a. LIVELLA STUDIO 120 Second St. Recording Studios. Mod Brothers performing. 18b. MANTOVA’S TWO STREET MUSIC 124 Second St. Montage performing; 51 Cards performing. 18c. THE BLACK FAUN GALLERY 120 Second St. Leonard Goldstein, oil on canvas and board, paintings. 19. C STREET MARKET SQUARE First and C streets. Duane Flatmo, presents El Pulpo Mecanico, his flaming octopus; Mort Scott, solo artist for the annual C Street Market Square Public Art Sculptures; Eureka High Pep Rally; Don’s Neighbors performing. 19a. STEVE AND DAVE’S First and C streets. Marni Schneider, photography. 19b. REDWOOD CURTAIN 220 First St. Daniel C. Nyiri, scenic artist, Great Winged Grizzly, mural unveiling; Greta Turney, Day of the Dead, paintings on canvas, vintage coffee grinders, maracas, yo-yos, and other objects; Mojo Brown, blues and classic rock, performing. 20. CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. Traditional Southwest artists’ prints. 20a. ACCENT STYLING GALLERY 219 Second St. Judy Phillips, harpist, performing. 20b. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. Lara MacMillan, Humboldt Foxes, pinup photography. 21. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Carrie Wachter Martinez, nature-inspired acrylic canvasses; Ken Collins, acoustic guitar and vocals, performing. 22. RUSTIC WEST TRADING CO. 339 Second St. Louise Zuleger, pearl jewelry; Fern Valley Goatfarm, goats’ milk soap; Jeannine Brandenburg, Redneck Wineglass; Katelyn Lollich, bead jewelry.

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1. EUREKA INN 518 Seventh St. 2. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL at the Morris Graves Museum of Art 636 F St. Performance Rotunda: Mason Matteoli; Humboldt Artist Gallery: Artist Cooperative; William Thonson Gallery: 18th Annual Junque Arte Competition and Exhibition; Homer Balabanis Gallery: Junque Art with SCRAP; Knight and Anderson Gallery: Annual HAC Member Exhibition; Atrium Gallery: Morris Graves, works from HAC Permanent Collection, and CD-ROM The Life & Art of Morris Graves; Floyd Bettiga Gallery: David Zdrazil, clay artists; Peter Holbrook, Colorado Plateau, paintings in oil. 3. COTTAGE ANNEX 618 F St. Preview shabby chic, cottage chic, enamelware, floral china and linens, etc. 3a. EUREKA THEATER 618 F St. Vintage Tom and Jerry cartoons and popcorn. 3b. ANNEX 39 608 F St. Art Deco and Mid-Century modern. 4. PAUL’S LIVE FROM NEW YORK PIZZA 604 F St. 5. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. 103 pieces, From Redwoods to Rembrandt. 6. DALIANES TRAVEL 522 F St. Redwood Decorative Artists. 7. F STREET FOTO GALLERY at Swanlund’s Camera 527 F St. 7a. THE LOCAL 517 F St. Rob Gribbin, paintings. 8. SACRED PALACE BOUTIQUE 516 Fifth St. Scott Sherman, emphasis on animals, watercolors. 9. LIVING ROOM GALLERY 805 Seventh St. Client Art Show with Eve Miller, Eldin Green, Susan Anderson, Heather Cruce, Melissa Carrau and Jan Ostrom; Mon Petit Chou performing. 10. ARKLEY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 412 G St. Eureka Symphony fall program, A Night with the Bard: Music Inspired by Shakespeare. 11. SEWELL GALLERY FINE ART 423 F St. Victoria Ryan, My California Dream; Blue Lotus Jazz performing. 12. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and Engineering 401 Fifth St. Barry Cascaden. 13. AMIGAS BURRITOS 317 Fifth St. Vince Cavatio, Wave and Surfing, photography. 14. PRIMATE TATU 139 5th St. Michael Arneson. 15. INK ANNEX (Ink People Gallery formerly Empire Squared) 47 W. Third St. Maskhibition; awards ceremony, refreshments; John David Young Trio performing.

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Presented by the Humboldt Arts Council and Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are held the first Saturday of each month. Phone (707) 442-9054 or go to www. eurekamainstreet.org for more information or to have an exhibit/performance included.

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4th St

25. STUDIO 424 424 Third St. James Reid and Mark McKenna, photography. 10 25a. SHIPWRECK 430 Third St. Halloween-themed 11 13 12 with various local artists and Mexican folk art. 5th St 8 26. CAFÉ NOONER 409 Opera Alley Abby Perrott; Kara’s Lusca, acoustical group performing. 7a 26a. THE SPEAKEASY BAR6 4117 Opera Alley Showing the paintings and art of our staff. 6th St 4 5 27. HUMBOLDT BAYKEEPER 3b 211 E St. Anita Taver3a nier, Elements Part II, local scenery; Kenny Ray Morris 3 Graves and the Mighty Rovers Museum 2 performing. 500 ft

© NORTH COAST JOURNAL/Miles Eggelston

7th St

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continued1 on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012

23


continued from previous page

YOU’VE PROBABLY SEEN PICTURES OR YOUTUBE VIDEOS OF THE FIRE-SPEWING OCTOPUS EL PULPO MECANICO CREATED BY DUANE FLATMO AND FRIENDS STEVE GELLMAN AND JERRY KUNKEL FOR BURNING MAN. IT WAS FEATURED IN A RECENT SPREAD IN NO LESS THAN TIME MAGAZINE. THE GIGANTIC KINETIC SCULPTURE WAS BUILT IN A LOCAL WAREHOUSE, BUT IT’S NEVER BEEN FULLY ASSEMBLED AND OPERATED HERE IN HUMBOLDT. YOUR FIRST CHANCE TO SEE EL PULPO IN ACTION COMES SATURDAY DURING ARTS ALIVE! WHEN THE OCTOPUS COMES ALIVE IN THE SCULPTURE GARDEN AT THE FOOT OF C STREET. BE THERE. PHOTO BY JOSH KEPPEL

28. RAMONE’S 209 E St. Courtney Cross; Jan Bramlett performing. 28a. BOOKLEGGER 402 Second St. 29. TRUCHAS GALLERY/LOS BAGELS 403 Second St. Group show, Dias de Los Muertos, Day of the Dead, a thoughtful remembrance of departed loved ones, paintings, textiles, drawings, and masks. 30. BELLE STARR 405 Second St. Natlya Drew, assorted paintings. 31. NORTH SOLES 407 Second St. Sheldon Chase, acrylic paintings. 31a. SASSAFRASS 417 Second St. Haley Brick, Underwater Escapes. 32. SISTERFRIENDSJEANS 108 F St. Rosalie Thomson, oil and acrylic on canvas. 32a. HSU FIRST STREET GALLERY 422 First St. Susanna Bluhm, My Heart’s a Little Fast, new paintings, acrylic, oil on canvas; Lush Newton, Bread and Butter, mixed sculpture and installation. 33. HEALTHSPORT 411 First St. 33a. WHIPLASH CURVE 423 First St. Grand opening celebration, Alex Sepkum, designer. 34. BAYFRONT RESTAURANT F St. Plaza Huichol Indian Art from Mexico. 35. EUREKA FABRICS 414 Second St. Connie Rose, Trunk Show and Sale, textile designer, art quilts, beaded jewelry, fabric mail art, hand woven, hand dyed, hand knit. 35a. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Courtney Simone Smith, Half Embalmed, taxidermy and curiosities show.

36. YARN 418 Second St. Julie McNiel, collage. 36a. TREASURE TROVE 420 Second St. Sharon Collins, acrylic paintings. 36b. EUREKA BOOKS 426 Second St. Arcata author Heather Leigh, Hey Little Baby, picture book signing. 37. SHORELINES GALLERY 434 Second St. Going out of business sale. 38. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Lunel Haysmer, Assemblage Art, Phil Haysmer, Redwood Art. 39. TALISMAN BEADS 214 F St. 40. ALIROSE 229 F St. Justine Levy, jewelry artist. 40a. THE WINE SPOT 234 F St. Jan Hollander and Cindy Noble, oil paintings. 41. THE RITZ Third and F streets. Jennifer Mackey and Andrei Hedstrom, artwork. 42. OLD TOWN JEWELRY 311 F St. Libby George, printmaker. 43. COCO & CUVEE 531 Third St. Ian Net, local photographer. 43a. DANNILYNN’S SHOE BOUTIQUE 527 Third St. Kim Norrie, paintings. 43b. DISCOVERY MUSEUM Corner of F and Third streets. Kids Alive Program Drop off 5:30-8:00; call for reservations 443-9694. 44. AMERICAN INDIAN ART GALLERY 241 F St. Dawn Woodman, beaded jewelry, 44a. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 233 F St. Dave Van de Mark, photography. 44b. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE VISITOR CENTER 526 Opera Alley. Facility tours. 45. BON BONIERE 215 F St.

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

45a. CODY GALLERY 213 F St. 46. OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOLATES 211 F St. Barry Post, Vector art; Ge-amal, abstract acrylic and watercolor; Jim Lahman Band performing. 47. OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING Corner of Second and F streets. Mary Louise Anderson, Wild and Serene North Coast Landscapes, watercolors and pencil drawings. 48. OBERON GRILL 516 Second St. Historic photographs of Old Eureka from Historical Society. 49. LINEN CLOSET 127 F St. Wellman’s fused glass jewelry. 50. HIMALYAN RUG TRADER 529 Second St. 51. BUHNE ART STUDIOS 207 G St. (Second Floor): Parasol Arts 211 G Street Entrance; Yuma Lynch, mixed media and landscape paintings, Suite 106; Rob Hampson, recent oil paintings, Suite 206; Wit McLeod, handcrafted furniture, Suite 212; Marnie Bugs, leather handbags and moccasins, Suite 217; Robert Busch III, landscapes, and oil paintings, Suite 333; David Steinhardt, acrylics and muralist Suite 306; Anastasia Zie-

linski, paper and fabric collage, (studio at back of building, no number); and more.; Julian Lang: Master of Mid-tempo Carnage performing on the top floor in the Gallery. 52. ORANGE CUP CORAL SALON 612 Second St. Mike Stengl, portraits. 53. PIANTE 620 Second St. Leslie Kenneth Price, new works. 54. DELIGHTFUL EYE PHOTOGRAPHY 622 Second St. Tripwire performing. 55. SMUG’S PIZZA 626 Second St. Brandon Garland, pen and ink. 56. BAR AVALON Third and G streets. 57. ORIGIN DESIGN LAB 621 Third St. Rebecca Hubbard, Mari Penley and artists of Origin Design Lab, ap’ples, interpretations of the iconic fruit. 58. STUDIO S 717 Third St. Paintings of water by multiple artists. 59. BIGFOOT COMPUTERS AND PHOTOGRAPHY TOO… 905 Third St. 60. ADORNI CENTER 1011 Waterfront St. Marcus Brown, photography; Lisa Polack, photography; Charlotte Moore, watercolor. ●

INK PEOPLE PRESENTS ITS ANNUAL MASKIBITION, AN EXHIBITION AND COMPETITION CELEBRATING THE ANCIENT ART OF THE MASK IN ITS MANY FORMS. MICHAEL FIELDS, PRODUCING ARTISTIC DIRECTOR OF THE DELL’ARTE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL THEATER, WILL SERVE AS JUDGE FOR THE COMPETITION, WHICH OPENS SATURDAY DURING ARTS ALIVE! WITH A RECEPTION AND AWARDS CEREMONY AT THE BRENDA TUXFORD GALLERY IN THE INK ANNEX, 47 B WEST THIRD ST., EUREKA. LIVE MUSIC WILL BE SUPPLIED BY MASKED MUSICIANS OF THE JOHN DAVID YOUNG TRIO.

THE HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL PRESENTS THE 18TH ANNUAL JUNQUE ARTE COMPETITION AND EXHIBITION IN THE WILLIAM THONSON GALLERY AT THE MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM OF ART, WHERE “JUNK” IS RECYCLED INTO ART, AS IN THIS PIECE, “TIME MACHINE,” BY VAL SAUNDERS. DURING SATURDAY’S ARTS ALIVE! OPENING, VISITORS OF ALL AGES WILL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO CREATE THEIR OWN FREE-FORM JUNQUE ARTE CREATIONS WITH HELP FROM VOLUNTEERS FROM THE RECENTLY FORMED SCRAP HUMBOLDT, WHOSE MISSION IS “TO INSPIRE CREATIVE REUSE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOR BY PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AND AFFORDABLE MATERIALS TO THE COMMUNITY.” (DETAILS AT WWW.SCRAPHUMBOLDT.ORG.) APPROPRIATELY, THE EXHIBITION IS SPONSORED BY RECOLOGY HUMBOLDT COUNTY AND THE HUMBOLDT WASTE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY.


northcoastjournal.com

Fortuna First Friday

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

Friday, Oct. 5, 6-9 p.m.

Find art, music and fun in Fortuna. Featuring local artists and musicians, during an evening of shopping and strolling in Fortuna. www.fortunabusiness.com 725-9261 fbid@fortunabusiness.com

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET EUREKA

My California Dream Victoria Ryan

MONDAY-SATURDAY

11:30AM-9:00PM

1. BARTOW’S JEWELERS 651 12th St. Stained glass art by Steve Fregeau. 2. COLOR IMPRESSIONS 1010 Main St. Art by Paula Redtfeldt. 3. CUDDLY BEAR 571 10th St. Live music; acoustic jam night. 4. DOWNTOWN STOREFRONT ART GALLERY Between 11th and 12th streets. Art by Anita Tavernier, Emma McDowell, Ginny Dexter, Natalia Drew, Elaine Gredassoff, Abbie Parrott, Louanna Johnson, Susan Schuessler. 5. FERNDALE JEWELERS 1020 Main St. Art by Dakota’s Designs. 6. FORTUNA ART & OLD THINGS 1026 Main St. Alice Shaw, painted children’s furniture, signs, originals, framed art. 7. FORTUNA MUSIC MART 1040 Main St. Photography by Donna Queen; live music by Sarah McClimon (flute and koto) and Rahman Abdur (tablas). 8. FUNITURE DEN & DESIGN W/WINE DEN 1156 Main St. Photography by Gina Mobley, “Alphabet Soup Art” by Penny Fregeau (acrylic and oils painting), Live music light rock/crossover country. 9. HUMBOLDT HEALTHY FOOD 889 Main St. Live music by Jordan Dyar. 10. KRAFTER’S KOZY KORNER GIFT 1103 Main St. Glenda Noel, Funny Farm Tie Dye Creations and sounds from the ‘60s. 11. MAIN STREET GALLERY 1006 Main St. Chuck Bowden, “9/11 Truth Show,” “Revolutionary Realism,” “1920 Photos of the Barnum and Bailey Circus;” live music by Anna Hamilton. 12. MOORE’S SLEEP WORLD 906 Main St. (old Low’s building) John Blanc, Photography, Sanford Pyron paintings, live music by Blue Lotus (jazz). 13. PRECISION INTERMEDIA 1012 Main St. Acrylic paintings by Simon Kriger aka Stir Fry Willie, live looping performance by Stir Fry Willie. 14. RAIN ALL DAY BOOKS, 1136 Main St. Abby Perrot paintings. 15. STATE FARM INSURANCE 755 12th St. (Corner of N and 12th streets in garage under awing) Don Brown artist wood strip kayak shop and demonstration. 16. STREHL’S FAMILY SHOES & REPAIR 1155 Main St. Oil paintings by Michelle Murphy-Ferguson, 17. TACO LOCO, 955 Main St. Paintings by Richard Leamon THE SURRELL BUILDING 1100 Main St. Live music, Doug Fir and the 2x4s. KJ HANZ FITNESS AND KETTELBELL 423 N. Fortuna Blvd. (Midtown Plaza) Grand opening. ●

“AMOR A LA MEXICANA” AT TRINIDAD TRADING CO.

Trinidad Arts Night

The Finest Art for your Home, Office & Garden 423 F Street, Eureka, CA

Friday, Oct. 5, 6-9 p.m.

Tues - Sat 10-6pm • Sun Noon-5pm

(707) 269-0617

Businesses and groups host local artists and musicians in downtown Trinidad. Trinidadartnights.com. 502-5737. EAST 1. THE LIGHTHOUSE CAFE 355 Main St. Paintings by Bea Stanley and samples from Trinidad’s newest restaurant. 2. SAUNDER’S PARK AT START OF PATRICK’S POINT DRIVE. Firedancing by the Circus of the Elements starting at sundown. 3. OCEAN GROVE 480 Patrick’s Point Drive. Afterparty at 9 p.m. Admission $5. 4. OSHUN YOGA 343 Main St. Kirtan Music by Joss Jaffe. Free yoga from 5:30-6:30 p.m. 5. TRINIDAD MUSEUM 400 Janis Court at Patrick’s Point Drive. Lonnie Magellan on harp, wine 6. TRINIDAD TRADING COMPANY 460 Main St. Mexican Day of the Dead folk art. 7. WINDANSEA 410 Main St. Abalone jewelry.

sewellgallery.com

Caffé Italia BreakFaSt•eSpreSSo lunCh•dinner•Catering

444-2421

3220 Broadway, Suite 8 • eureka (Behind Big 5 Sporting goodS)

M-F 9aM-10pM • Sat. 11:30-10pM • CloSed Sun.

WEST 8. THE BEACHCOMBER. 363 Trinity St. Brett McFarlane on guitar. Art by students of Trinidad School. 9. TRINIDAD B&B. 560 Edwards St. Art by Sam Lundeen. 10. MOONSTONE CROSSING. 529 Trinity St. Mixed media drawings by Natalie Craig 11. SEASCAPE RESTAURANT. Art TBA. 12. TRINIDAD TOWN HALL. 409 Trinity St. Tango and line dancing demos and lessons. Hanlon Brothers. popcorn in front. 13. TRINIDAD ART GALLERY. 490 Trinity St. Fundraising event for opening of new Trinidad Art Gallery LLC, art cooperative. 14. THROUGHOUT TRINIDAD: the Redwood Express Horse Drawn Wagon Rides. ●

Fresh is Best ...

Open 7 days New Thai

Taste the difference at

The Sea Grill

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 • LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2 • FREE WiFi

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012

25


Rufus Wainwright.

Freedom to Love

Rufus Wainwright, Kimock, DJ Red’s 45 B-day, Shpongle, Big Gigantic, Mount Eerie and fall festivals By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

When we caught up with neo-pop songwriter Rufus Wainwright, he was staying at the Henry Miller Library in Big Sur. “They gave us this beautiful house in exchange for a concert, so my new husband and I are on our honeymoon,” he explained. (Wainwright married his longtime companion Jörn Weisbrodt in August.) At the end of this month he’s part of an all-star concert, Freedom to Love Now! in New York City, a benefit for a group working to get same-sex marriage legalized in all 50 states. “It’s an important time to state your allegiances, right before the election. In all this questioning of Obama, I have no qualms supporting him at all as a gay man. He’s really stepped up to the plate for us, both on gay marriage and ‘don’t ask, don’t tell,’ so I have confidence in him, for my needs anyway. So it’s important to keep the home fires — or the homo fires — burning,” said Wainwright with a laugh. What will it take to shift consciousness on gay freedom issues? “I have to say I’m impressed with how America is doing in that department … [but] you can’t expect a puritanical nation to just flip all of a sudden. This is a major national issue, something they’re always talking about on CNN or whatever. There seems to be some sort of ripple effect

going on. So, overall, I’m pretty positive about where America is right now.” While he says it does not relate to his recent marriage, the title track for his latest album is a song called Out of The Game. “Oftentimes I’ll write a song and think it’s about one thing, but I’m told otherwise. I tend to think of [the song] as being more about the music business. I think it’s about being in your late 30s and on the cusp of the next stage of life, shall we say. On the one hand you’re full of knowledge and perspective, and also with envy,” he said with a laugh. Your opportunity to hear Wainwright’s music comes Thursday when he plays solo at the Van Duzer Theatre. Guitar wizard Steve Kimock brings his liquid melody lines to Humboldt Brews Tuesday night, jamming with organist Bernie Worrell from Parliament/Funkadelic, percussionist Wally Ingram and bassist Andy Hess from Gov’t Mule. Yes, it will get funky. “You know the music sort of takes the shape of the container,” said Kimock cryptically. “So playing with Bernie, I make more use of the funk. It’s different. I’m a big reggae fan too, and Wally and Andy are into that, so we go there naturally, too.” Speaking of reggae, J-Boog, a Samoan singer

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

(via Long Beach) brings his Hot Rain Band to the Arcata Theatre Lounge Thursday for a funky reggae party. Meanwhile the Capleton controversy flames on, generating way too much nastiness on the Internets. IMHO everyone needs to take it down a notch or two. Hate + hate = more hate. The venerable DJ Red celebrates his birthday at Humboldt Brews Friday night with a “Strictly 45s” dance party with “fellow 45 junkies” Missing Link Adam, Gabe Pressure, Jaymorg, King Maxwell, Mantease, Spaceman Spliff and Zephyr. Red notes, “For those who are too young to know (or too old to remember), 45s (also known as the 7-inch) are those flat, round, black objects, which, through the magic of technology, produce music when played on a turntable.” The show starts late (10:30 p.m.) since HumBrews is hosting a Humboldt Beer Week “Beer and Buffet” brew ‘n’ food pairing dinner earlier that same night. Twang time Friday at the Jambalaya with Buckskin Wallets featuring Kaleb, Steve-O and Joey from the Bucky Walters playing what they call “old-timey honky-tonk club-grass.” Drifter Killer plays psychedelic grunge that night at Central Station in McKinleyville with Macktown rockers The Hudson Hound Dogs (ex-Shay’s Rebellion). Electro/folk/pop vocalist/songwriter Shana Halligan brings silky sounds to Six Rivers Thursday. Friday, classical music fans have a tough choice. That’s opening night for the Eureka Chamber Music Series at Calvary Lutheran Church with Borealis String Quartet playing an intriguing program including Taiwanese folk songs, something by Canadian composer Michael Conway Baker and Beethoven’s “Quartet in C Major, Op. 59, No. 3.” Friday is also opening night for a new season for the Eureka Symphony, with Shakespearean music by Dvorak and Shostakovich at the Arkley Center. Fortunately, the symphony also plays Saturday evening, so one could attend both shows. Fall festivals abound. Friday’s Garberville Town Square Fiesta (4-10 p.m.) has music by The Fabulous Resinaires, Twango Macallan and SoHum Girls (taking a break from recording a new album). Smokin’ Moses will have the barbecue smokin’; there’s fun for the kids and local beer and wine for grownups. Saturday’s Hoptoberfest at Perigot Park in Blue Lake has music by Big Forgive, River Valley Mud, Speakeasy Saints and The Miracle Show and plenty of beer, with proceeds going to Blue Lake Elementary’s sports and arts programs. Also on Saturday (starting at 6 p.m.) Coastal Grove Charter School presents D.C. Dance Fest at Humboldt Brews, a field-trip fundraiser with music by young rockers UFO8 (also playing at Six Rivers Friday night) plus a performance by Redwood Coast Bellydance Troupe (the Redwood Coast Bellydance Festival is at the Arcata Community Center that day). DJ Knutz

closes, spinning discs into the wee hours. There’s also the annual Fieldbrook Fall Folk Fest all weekend at Fieldbrook Market. Sierra Rose Band kicks things off Friday with some lively stringband music. Saturday (1-9 p.m.) the lineup includes Jeff Kelley, the duo Guilty Apple, Josephine Johnson, Sam Whitlatch, The Pilot Rock Ramblers, Michael Stewart and Delta T. Sunday (1-7 p.m.) it’s Turtle, Ras Tony, Joe Garceau Trio and The Moonsong Band. World Famous has a couple of big EDM things coming this week: First, on Thursday, Shpongle brings “The Masquerade” to the Arcata Community Center. British electroshaman Simon Posford is a showman who presents his music on an amazing set with swirling lasers, projections, dancers in elaborate costumes — a full-on sensory overload for raving dancers. Phutureprimitive opens the show. Then on Wednesday, Oct. 10, it’s Big Gigantic, an electro duo out of Colorado with Dominic Lalli on sax and production and Jeremy Salken on drums and an extra-large sound. B.G. is on tour with Canadian dubsteppers Christian Srigley and Leighton James, aka Adventure Club, whose Twitter page says they are “part time lumberjacks.” The Hackensaw Boys, originally from Charlottesville, Va. are another raised-on-rock string band pumping out what they call (on a couple of records) The Old Sound of Music. A seemingly endless tour brings the boys to Humboldt Brews on Monday. Tuesday CenterArts presents another in the “Acoustic Africa” series, this time with an emphasis on women. There’s vocalist/dancer Dobet Gnahore and bassist/vocalist Manou Gallo, both from Ivory Coast (Gallo was bassist for Zap Mama) plus Kareyce Fotso from Cameroon, all of them offering modern African takes on pop, blues, funk and traditional music. Same Tuesday at the Jambalaya: Mount Eerie, the alt. lo-fi drone project of Phil Elverum (formerly known as The Microphones). Based in Anacortes, Wash., Phil operates something he calls P.W. Elverum & Sun, Ltd. producing unique LPs, singles, books, CDs, etc. (Expect a cool merch table.) He’s on tour with Bouquet from L.A. described by band member Carolyn Pennypacker Riggs (from The Finches) as a “darker-leaning pop group, proggy without being wanky, gothy without being affected.” The local psyche/noise outfit Servile Sect opens. As Election Day gets closer, Spirit Vibrations takes over the Jambalaya Wednesday, Oct. 10, for a night of “musical political comical fun” with Don Husman of In Human Creation as your host. There’s a bunch of music — Silent Giants, Gunsafe, The Plumb Uglies, Eddy Arnold Jr. and Burning Sage and Josephine Johnson for starters. And there’s an open mic for political commentary in one-minute sound bites — candidates, here’s your chance. And if you haven’t done so yet, you can register to vote at the event. ●


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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012

27


Big Gigantic Wednesday at Blue Lake Casino

venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com ARCATA COMMUNITY CENTER

thur 10/4

fri 10/5

sat 10/6

Dirty Dancing Thursdays w/ Pressure Anya 10:30pm $3

Find us on Facebook

The Connies, Splinter Cell (punk rock) 11pm $5

Shpongle, Phutureprimitive 9pm $35 Bellydance Fest Afterparty 9pm $5

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220 BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com

French & Thai Fusion Restaurant

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta BLONDIE’S Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

J Boog with Hot Rain, DJ Selecta Prime (reggae) Doors 9pm 21+ Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

Mon-Fri 11:30am - 9:30pm Sat-Sun 4pm - 9:30pm

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

3rd and F Streets • Old Town Eureka

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521

EUREKA INN 497-6093 HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata

www.barflypub.com

St. John of St. John & the Sinners 9pm Photos by Marni Schneider

Dr. Squid (rock ‘n’ roll) no cover 9pm

NightHawk (rock/blues) no cover 9pm

Jimi Jeff & the Gypsy Band (rock/funk) 9pm

Mark Sexton Band 9pm (Wave) Baconfest (Sapphire) 11am-6pm

Drifter Killer, Hudson Hound Dogs 9pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

497-6294

Sci Fi Pint & Pizza Night of the Living Dead Doors 6pm

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

CENTRAL STATION 1631 Central McK

with a Wood-Fired Oven and Full Bar

Ocean Night: Beneath the Waves Film Festival Doors 6:30pm $3 all ages

Humboldt Beer Week: Beer Pong Tournament 8pm Rufus Wainwright (JVD) 8pm $45 Shpongle After Party

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Triple Junction (blues/funk/rock) no cover 9pm

Triple Junction (blues/funk/rock) no cover 9pm

Blues Etc. Jam Night 9pm

True Gospel Singers (soul) 9pm

Sierra Rose Band (country/rock) 7pm

Fieldbrook Fall Folk Festival 1-9pm

Beer Week: Beer and Buffet 6:30pm Coastal Grove D.C. Dance Fest: UFO8, DJ Red’s All 45s B-day Party 10:30pm R.C. Bellydancers, DJ Knutz 6pm-1am Eco-Poet Gary Lemons (KBR) 8pm Buckskin Wallets (ex-Bucky Walters) Z-Man, Never Die, Dot Smith (rap)

LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

Do you tweet obsessively? So do we. Follow us. @ncj_of_humboldt

LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake NOCTURNUM 206 W 6th St. Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

Open until 9pm Monday - Thursday, until 10pm Friday & Saturday myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Tim Randles/Mike LaBolle Trio (jazz) 6-8:30pm

Claire Bent (jazz vocalist) 7-10pm no cover

Weather Machine (modern jazz) 7-10pm no cover

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

Trifecta (rock) 6-8:30pm

Open noon-9pm Saturdays SkullTrane, Yheti, VJ Flood (EDM)

Squeeze Bug @ Henderson Center

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

9am-2pm Arcata Plaza Steel Standing 10am

Lyndsay Battle & Friends 9pm

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad

Jim Lahman Band (blues) 6pm

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

DJ dance music 10pm

DJ dance music 10pm

Pianist Steve Smith, Damien Roomets, Michael Curran 7pm

Stephanie Johnson Band 7pm

www.persimmons.net

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka

DJ Jay Jay 10pm

Indecisos Musical: DJ Asis y DJ Guajiro

Phish Video Night (free) 10pm

Open for growler, keg, and merchandise sales only M-F 3:30-9pm Humboldt Folk Dance Party Lessons 7pm, Dancing 8pm $5

Saturday noon-9pm Belly Dance Festival Afterparty! 8-11:30pm

Find us on Facebook

Joe, Blake and Chris (Celtic) 7pm

Eureka Brass Band (big band swing) 9:30pm

Come in for a great Dinner!

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Tasting room temporarily closed. Blues Dance Night Lesson 8pm, Dancing 9pm $5 Irish Music Night 7pm Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (country swing) 8-10pm

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Shana Halligan (electro/folk/pop) 9pm

UFO8 (local rock) 9pm

Happy 30th Jessica (private party)

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm

Boss Levelz (DJs) 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka THE WORKS 310 3rd St Eureka

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Throwback Thursdays

Elison and friends (hip hop)


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more sun 10/7

mon 10/8

tues 10/9

wed 10/10

www.thealibi.com

Infernal Stronghold (black-thrash) Cerebrate (death metal) 11pm

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Break Science & Michal Menert Doors at 9:30pm $17.50/$15 21

My Heart Is An Idiot: FOUND Magazine 10th Anniv.Tour 8pm $8

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm Quiz Night 7pm

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

A Chance to win $1,000,000

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm (Wave) Baconfest (Sapphire) 11am-4pm

Monday Night Football on the big screen + Flat Screen TV giveaways

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

World Famous presents Big Gigantic, Adventure Club, Griz 7:30pm $20

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool & $3 Wells

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

The Hackensaw Boys (old time/Americana) 9pm $15

Steve Kimock/Bernie Worrell Band (jamband) 10pm $30

www.humboldtbrews.com

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Scorpion Child (psyche/metal)

Mount Erie, Bouquet, Servile Sect 9p

Silent Giants, Gunsafe, J. Johnson

Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza

Happy Hour 6-8pm Monday - Thursday, $1 off wine by the glass

Wine Appreciation Course Tuesdays in Oct. $25 per class

Open until 9pm Monday - Thursday, until 10pm Friday & Saturday

Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

Book your band 444-1344

Repeat: We got beer.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Open noon-8pm Sundays www.madriverbrewing.com

Growler Mondays $3 off refills Purl and Pour (knitting) 6:30pm (hed) PE, Lacero, Angels Cut 9pm $9

For Folk Sake (folk) 6-8:30pm

Online at humfarm.org

The Sidekicks @ Old Town Eureka

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

NFL Football 1:15pm Free All ages Monday Night Football: Houston @ NY Jets Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 6pm $5 Doors at 5:15pm Free All ages Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com A Chance to win $1,000,000

Fieldbrook Fall Folk Festival 1-7pm

Acoustic Africa (JVD) 8pm $35 Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm

All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Open 1-9pm Monday through Friday Hoppy Hour 4-6pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM)

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

Sit and sip.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Ask us about hosting your event

Singer/guitarist Ray Bevitori, drummer Michael Curran 7pm

Sunday noon-9pm

Weekday Hours M-F 3:30pm to 9pm

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Find us on Facebook.

Breakdance with Reckless Rex Atienza 5-7pm $10 Live music 6-9pm

Monday Swing Night 7:30pm class, 8:30pm party $5

West African Drum and Dance 5:30pm Intermediate Tango 7:15pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

The Good Taste tasting room

West Coast Swing Wednesdays 7:30pm lesson, 8:30 dancing Swing Dancing 7pm

Have a signature Cocktail in the bar!

Great lunch specials! 11:30-4:00

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

JD Jeffries (acoustic) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Live Music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

Dine with us at Lunchtime Present this Form Be Eligible for our Weekly FREE Lunch Drawing

Rump Shaker: Pressure Anya 9pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

Official Entry Form NEW HUMBOLDT DESIGNS JUST ARRIVED, AND THEY WILL GO FAST SO COME IN TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SALE:

BUY ANY 2 HOODIES SAVE $10 BUY ANY 2 TSHIRTS SAVE $5 BUY ANY 2 HATS/BEANIES SAVE $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

Offer expires 10/31/12

Name: _____________ Phone: _____________ Open Daily for Lunch and Dinner, 11:30am - 10pm • Extended Bar Hours

Reservations Recommended (707) 407-3550 1911 Truesdale Street Eureka Off Broadway behind the Best Western Bayshore Inn

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012

29


OOO, PRETTY! SHPONGLE, MADE UP OF STUDIO WIZARDS SIMON POSFORD AND RAJA RAM, REVEALS ITS MOST EYE/EAR CAPTURING STAGE AND LIGHT SHOW TO DATE AS PART OF THE MASQUERADE TOUR WHICH ROLLS INTO THE ARCATA COMMUNITY CENTER ON THURSDAY, OCT. 4. WORLD FAMOUS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS THIS ROVING SPECTACLE WHICH COMBINES WORLD DANCE MUSIC WITH ELABORATE 3D IMAGERY. YOU WILL DANCE.

IF YOU NEED TO BE REMINDED OF A SIMPLER TIME WHEN APPLE PRODUCTS ALWAYS WORKED LIKE THEY WAS SUPPOSED TO, LOOK NO FURTHER THAN THE RETURN OF THE FORTUNA APPLE HARVEST FESTIVAL TAKING PLACE THIS SATURDAY, OCT. 6, WITH ADDITIONAL SUNDAY EVENTS ADDED THIS YEAR ON OCT. 7. HAY RIDES, LIVE MUSIC AND FRESH CIDER ARE JUST A FEW REASONS TO GET YOUR APPLE-LOVING BUTT DOWN TO THE FRIENDLY CITY THIS WEEKEND. (AND SEE IF YOU CAN FIGURE OUT WHO’S DRIVIN’ THE TRACTOR IN THIS ANCIENT PHOTO.)

4 thursday EVENTS

Humboldt County Restaurant Week. Participating local, independent restaurants in Arcata and Eureka offer special and discounted meal deals. Ends this weekend. See complete list online. humboldtrestaurantweek.com. Humboldt Beer Week. Celebration of the craft brew industry, focused on but not limited to local and regional craft beers. Multiple nightly sudsy events at local establisments. Ends this weekend. See full schedule online. humboldtbeerweek.com.

THEATER

The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium, 1915 J St. Theatrical performance honoring the legacy of Matthew Shepard who, in 1998, was beaten and left to die tied to a fence in the outskirts of Laramie, Wyo., for being gay. $6. E-mail emmonsn@ eurekacityschools.org. 206-276-5744.

MUSIC

Rufus Wainwright. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Pairing poignant, captivating lyrics with imaginative pop flair, the son of legendary folk singers Loudon Wainwright and Kate McGarrigle has followed his unique vision with a dizzying array of projects. $45/$22 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. Shpongle. 8 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Traditional sounds, acoustic guitars, Moroccan drums, Turkish operatic

singing, cello, double bass, backing vocals and silver flute blended together with the computer wizardry of Simon Posford’s studio production. $35/$30 adv. worldfamousproductions.net. 822-2814. Humboldt Folklife Society Group Sing Along. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Joel Sonenshein leads. 839-7063.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Squeezebug. humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farmfresh produce every Thursday. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

ETC.

Gasification Demonstration. Noon. Smart Gas and Electric, 818 Broadway, Eureka. All Power Labs demonstration producing 10 to 20 kilowatts of power (83 to 165 amps) from biomass waste. 805-259-7590. Human Rights Commission Meeting. 5 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, conference room A. Commissioners consider issues related to homelessness in Humboldt County and availability of public restrooms. Stop Smart Meters National Day of Action. 4 p.m. Eureka PG&E Office, 2555 Myrtle Ave. Protest “this assault on our privacy and our health!” Bring a sign. 268-0951. Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills for a career in maintenance. Get your OSHA certification and learn basic electrical and plumbing skills. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627.

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

BURP! IT SEEMS LIKE WE HAVE SOME BEER RELATED EVENT ROUGHLY EVERY WEEKEND IN HUMCO THESE DAYS … GOOD FOR US! HUMBOLDT BEER WEEK UNOFFICIALLY WRAPS ON SATURDAY, OCT. 6, WITH HUMBOLDT HOPTOBERFEST TAKING PLACE IN SUNNY BLUE LAKE’S PERIGOT PARK. GET A HEAD START ON YOUR WINTER COAT COURTESY OF TEMPTING REGIONAL BREWERIES AND LOCAL FOOD VENDORS. OH, AND IT’S, LIKE, FOR A GOOD CAUSE, OR SOMETHING. UH. BEER!

5 friday ELECTIONS

Candidate Forum. 7 p.m. Airs on KEET-TV Ch. 13. With California Assembly candidates Wesley Chesbro (Dincumbent) and Tom Lynch (D). keet.org. 445-0813.

THEATER

Fox On The Fairway. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. NCRT opens its 29th season with the new comedy by Ken Ludwig. $15/$12 students and seniors. ncrt.net. 442-6278. In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play). 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. Set at the turn of the last century in a prim upper class Victorian home, a gentleman doctor has innocently invented a

Bacon = Brought Home You’ve undoubtedly been horrified by the headlines. Every major news outlet knew it had a story that would provoke more American fury than a botched football call. Thus, the dreaded 2013 bacon shortage was everywhere last week, threatening to force healthier breakfasts on a populace that would probably have been OK with a few less servings. Oynk! That’s our favorite kind of dead pig! Good news, porkers! Someone actually called the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Turns out, while European pig butchers are coming up a little short on swine, there’s plenty of frozen pork for our breakfast tables. False alarm! Let’s celebrate! Conveniently, bacongate coincides with the emergence of the first ever BaconFest, taking place at Blue Lake Casino for two whole, greasy days on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 6 and 7. Baconistas will have the opportunity to sample various kinds of bacon, bacon treats, bacon appetizers, bacon desserts and bacon drinks. There will be bacon cooking classes and presentations. Or, if you’re especially

gluttonous, compete in the bacon eating contest. Yes. That. Think you’re good at makin’ bacon? Both restaurants and amateur bacon chefs can compete for “Best in Show” awards and cash prizes. And as a final insult, there will also be pig costume and impression contests. Chew on that, pigs! Do you sizzle for bacon? Baconfest runs from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $20. For more info, scootch on over to bluelakecasino.com. — Andrew Goff


most extraordinary and mysterious device for treating “hysteria” or “congestion of the genitalia.” Contains brief nudity. $16/$14 students and seniors. ferndale-rep. org. 599-7587. HSU First Fridays at Four. 4-5:30 p.m. Studio Theater, HSU. Hour-long seminar on auditioning techniques. humboldt.edu. 826-3579. The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium. See Oct. 4 listing.

MUSIC

Borealis String Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Calvary Lutheran Church, 716 South Ave., Eureka. Eureka Chamber Music Series opens with the current Quartet-in-Residence at the University of British Columbia performing pieces by Haydn and Grieg. Reception following the performance. $30/$5 students. 445-9650. Eureka Symphony. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Season opens with Antonin Dvorak’s “Othello Overture,” “Trumpet Concerto” by Armenian composer Alexander Arutiunian and Dimitri Shostakovich’s “Hamlet Suite.” Come early and join in the discussion as the hosts discuss the program. $27. www.eurekasymphony.com. 442-1956. Humboldt Talent Showcase. 6-10 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Local artists, community ears. Hosted by Jim Hubbard and featuring True Gospel Singers and the David and Jen Blues Band. $5/$10 sliding scale. 822-5693.

DANCE

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. 839-3665.

ART

Trinidad Art Nights. 6-9 p.m. Downtown Trinidad. Multiple businesses and organizations participate and host local artists and live music. trinidadartnights.com. 677-3188. Fortuna First Friday. 6-10 p.m. Downtown Fortuna. Local businesses stay open late for Fortuna’s art walk featuring local musicians and artists. 725-9261. Garberville Arts Alive. 5:30 p.m. Garberville downtown. Local businesses featuring talented local artists. 923-4789. My Heart’s a Little Fast, but Otherwise, Everything’s Fine. 5 p.m. Art Building Room 102, HSU. Alumni Susanna Bluhm presents a slide lecture about her art, currently on display at First Street Gallery in Eureka. The exhibit blends the Los Angeles native’s works in abstraction and representation to create landscapes. 443-6363. Shells, Stones, Bugs, Birds and Bones. 7-8 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Exhibition of photographs and a presentation by Diana Schoenfeld. Show runs through October.

MOVIES

Ocean Night Film Screening. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. This month features the Beneath the Waves Film Festival. Sponsored by Ocean Conservancy, Humboldt Surfrider and Humboldt Baykeeper. $3. 822-1220.

ETC.

Ships to Shore Cocktail Tour. 6 p.m. Meet at the gazebo in Old Town. Humboldt Trails Council hosts its first benefit bike ride. Six-mile loop heads south where cyclists get a sneak peek of the newly constructed Hikshari Trail, before stopping at Shamus T-Bones and The Shanty for drinks. humtrails.org. 601-5727. Gary Lemons. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Eco-poet reads selections from his new book Snake. 826-3928. Beer and Buffet. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Humboldt Beer Week events features food pairings, music and beer from five local breweries. $30. humboldtbeerweek.com. 826-2739. Kirtan Yoga Class. 5-9 p.m. Oshun Yoga, Trinidad. Donation class with Joss Jaffe.

6 saturday EVENTS

Hoptoberfest. Noon-6 p.m. Perigot Park, Blue Lake. Featuring the region’s finest breweries. Music by Big Forgive, River Valley Mud, Speakeasy Saints and the Miracle Show. Proceeds will keep sports and arts programs running at Blue Lake Elementary. $25/$20 adv. E-mail blefoundation@gmail.com. 668-1766. Arts Alive! 6-9 p.m. In and around Old Town, Eureka. Monthly celebration includes food, music and incredible art. 442-9054. Pastels on the Plaza. All-day fundraiser for Northcoast Children’s Services. Artists start drawing on the Arcata Plaza at 8 a.m. See page 33 for more info. 822-7962. Fortuna Apple Harvest Festival. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Various locations throughout Fortuna. Celebration of the fall apple harvest includes music, orchard barbecue, apple pie contest, vendors, kids’ stuff and health fair. clendenensciderworks.com. 725-9261. BaconFest. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sapphire Palace, Blue Lake Casino. Features bacon-inspired tasting and treats from around the area as well as appetizers, drinks and desserts. bluelakecasino.com. 668-9770. Redwood Coast Belly Dance Festival. Noon. Old Creamery Building, Eighth and L streets, Arcata. Features local and out of town belly dancers performing all day, live music by Musaic, an international bazaar, dance workshops, a free drumming class and food. www. redwoodcoastbellydance.com. 616-6876. 47th Annual Humboldt Sponsors Rummage Sale. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bargains on housewares, furniture, electronics, tools, books, clothing, jewelry, toys and sporting goods. Proceeds benefit the youth of Humboldt County through grants awarded to local youth-related organizations. www.humboldtsponsors.org. 445-1869. Freshwater Fall Festival. 1-5 p.m. Freshwater School, 75 Greenwood Heights Drive, Eureka. Features live music by Angel Fargas and Friends, a silent auction, carnival games for the kids, prizes, a cake walk with homemade baked goods, as well as a Mexican food lunch prepared by Pachanga Mexicana Restaurant. E-mail abronkall@yahoo.com.

THEATER

The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium. See Oct. 4 listing. Fox On The Fairway. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Oct. 5 listing. In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play). 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Oct. 5 listing.

MUSIC

Eureka Symphony. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts. See Oct. 5 listing.

Local artists

“chalk it up for kids”

Pottery & Glass

Arcata Plaza

3 Days Only!

Saturday, Oct. 6

Sale!

October 12, 13, 14 A benefit for

Northcoast Children’s Services Sponsorships & artist positions still available 822-7206 for information

Sunday October 14 1-3pm

Fri. Noon - 9pm Sat. and Sun. 9am - 4pm

Ceramic bowls, mugs, tiles, jewelry, vases, platters, fused glass... and more

520 South G Street Arcata, CA 95521

707-826-1445 fireartsarcata.com

Bayside Grange

2297 Jacoby Creek Rd.

$10

A benefit for the Humboldt Community Breast Health Project Dutch Raffle Prizes!

DANCE

Middle Eastern Dance Party. 9 p.m.-midnight. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. All-ages evening of dance and music featuring Middle-Eastern beats by DJs Anya and Pressure, belly dance, karaoke, exotic baked treats and coffee to benefit the Roshni Centre. Live belly dance by Zyphrie and the Sister Sirens, Marjhani, Origin and Megz. $5. www.megzmadrone.com. 832-8973. USA Dance. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Open dancing to Austin Alley and the Rustlers. No partner necessary. Lesson from 6:30-7:30 p.m. $10/$5 members. E-mail usadances@gmail.com. 464-3638.

ART

707-825-8345 | volunteer@hcbhp.org

Harvest of Creativity. 10:15 a.m. D Street Neighborhood Center, 13th and D streets, Arcata. Crafters material exchange. Trade your under-used clothing and creative materials with someone who can use them. scraphumboldt.org.

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012

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continued from previous page

Trouble Is My Business

Textile Trunk Show and Sale. 1-9 p.m. Eureka Fabrics, 420 Second St. North Coast textile designer Connie Rose presents her works. constancerosedesigns.com. 725-1278. Maskibition Opening. 6 p.m. Ink Annex, 47B West Third St., Eureka. Ink People once again puts a face on the creative community of mask makers with its annual fall event. Music by a masked John David Young Trio. inkpeople.org. 442-7850.

OUTDOORS

Bird Survey. 8 a.m. Shay Park, Arcata. Assist Audubon’s Rob Fowler on his ebird site survey. 839-3493. Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Gary Friedrichsen. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Trail Stewards Orientation/Work Day. 9-11 a.m. Meet at the parking area at the west end of Murray Road. Clean and treat the trail kiosks. Dress for work. E-mail sbecker@reninet.com. 826-0163. Volunteer Work Day. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Grizzly Creek State Park, Highway 36. Snacks, barbecue, drinks, s’mores, nature program and kid’s activities provided. Bring work gloves, hats and sunscreen. Camping and evening campfire program for volunteers by donation. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Jane Wilson for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. 826-2359. Arcata Marsh Jogging Interpretive Tour. 4:30 p.m. Meet at Klopp Lake parking lot at foot of South I Street. Fourto five-mile evening jog around marsh led by Megan McCue. 633-6226.

FOOD

Arcata Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Steel Standing. humfarm. org. 822-5951.

LECTURE

Humboldt County Historical Society Program. 1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. “The Development of Highway 101.” Arlene Hartin, former district personnel officer for District 1, CalTrans, gives an encore presentation of her slide show. 445-4342.

ETC.

Flea Market. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Stuff! E-mail dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100. Vendor Fair. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Humboldt Grange, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Get some early Christmas shopping in. Over 25 vendors. 442-6437.

Creating a Sense of Order. 10 a.m.-noon. MikkiMoves, 805 Seventh St., Eureka. Learn to use the OrderWithin system to declutter and organize anything. $45. orderwithin.com. 925-2875. Songwriting Workshop. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. With Lyndsey Battle. Bring an instrument. $10. D.C. Dance Party. 6 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Socialize, dance and bid on wonderful local items to help support the Coastal Grove eighth grade’s trip to Washington, D.C. Music by UFO8 and dance performance by Mudra. $5. E-mail shanalanger@gmail. com. 825-8804.

7

sunday

EVENTS

Fox Trot Run and Walk-a-thon. 10 a.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive, Arcata. Redwood Coast Montessori School fundraiser features a challenging all-sand 5k fun run through the Manila dunes. $15. redwoodcoastmontessori.org. 832-4194. Apple Harvest Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Local produce, crafts vendors, live music — like a farmers’ market, but more apple-y. 725-3959. Redwood Coast Belly Dance Festival. Noon. See Oct. 6 listing. BaconFest. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. See Oct. 6 listing.

THEATER

Fox On The Fairway Matinee. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Oct. 5 listing. In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play). 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Oct. 5 listing.

FOOD

Pancake Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Grange, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Monthly breakfast with buttermilk and whole grain pancakes, ham, sausages and scrambled eggs. $5/$3 kids. 445-2517. 4-H Lamb Barbecue. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Rohner Park, Fortuna. $10/$35 per family. 445-7351.

SPORTS

14th Annual Brewer’s Cup. 8:30 a.m. Pump Station #4 Course on the Mad River. Disc golf tournament features two 18-hole rounds. Awards held at HumBrews at 7 p.m. Call to register. $40/$35 adv. humboldtbeerweek. com. 825-0882.

The Humboldt County Library’s Eureka branch resumes its “Based on the Book” movie series in October. This time out it’s “Trouble Is My Business,” with four Tuesday night screenings of films based on Raymond Chandler’s crime novels featuring hard-boiled L.A. private eye Philip Marlowe. First up, Tuesday, Oct. 9: The Big Sleep, the classic Bogart/Bacall vehicle directed by Howard Hawks, based on Chandler’s first novel. The convoluted tale finds Marlowe working for a wealthy patriarch whose beautiful daughters are caught up in a web of blackmail, pornography and murder. Yours truly, Bob Doran serves as your host. Tuesday, Oct. 16, HumCo librarian Michael Logan introduces Murder, My Sweet, one of three adaptations of Chandler’s Farewell, My Lovely. Dick Powell takes the Marlowe role in Edward Dmytryk’s quintessential example of film noir, working for an ex-con fresh from prison who wants to find his long lost girlfriend (Claire Trevor). Next up, on Oct. 23, Logan hosts Lady in the Lake, an unusual adaptation of a Chandler novel directed by and starring Robert Montgomery, who chose to tell the story involving a publisher’s missing wife strictly from Marlowe’s perspective. Last but not least, it’s a relatively modern neo noir from 1973, The Long Goodbye, with Robert Altman directing and Elliott Gould starring as the gumshoe in present day Hollywood. While investigating the suicide of a friend, Marlowe delves into an underworld of drug dealing gangsters, detox centers and, as always, murder. I’m the host for this one, introducing the movie and leading a post-film discussion. All screenings take place at the Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka starting at 6:30 p.m. For more information go to co.humboldt.ca.us/library/branches/eureka. —Bob Doran

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Pet CPR and First Aid. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Red Cross Building, 406 11th St., Eureka. Teaches participants how to be prepared for emergencies that involve a cat or a dog and how to protect themselves and the animal from further harm. $70. redcross.org/take-a-class. 443-4521. Hey, Good Lookin. 7 p.m. Lifetree Cafe, 76 13th St., Arcata. How to improve one’s body image explored. Features a short film about artist Adam Schultz, who sculpts plus-size female figures in bronze and stone. 672-2919.

8 monday THEATER

Auditions for The Secret Garden. 4 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Missoula Children���s Theatre returns and seeks students in grades K-12 for its original adaptation. Performance on Oct. 14. www.mateel.org. 923-3368.

MUSIC

We are having a

CHILDREN’S PARTY

in honor of our newly expanded children’s section! Storybook Princess Belle will join us to celebrate the magic of reading with books, songs, and treats.

Saturday, Oct. 13th • 11 a.m. to noon Come help us celebrate our 30 birthday! th

402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

The Hackensaw Boys. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Group rooted in old-time song traditions. Everybody sings a bit of lead, everybody sings a bit of harmony. $15. humbrews.com. 826-2739.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Jogging Interpretive Tour. 4:30 p.m. See Oct. 6 listing.

ETC.

Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site, Sixth and K streets, Eureka. Learn entry-level skills used in an office setting. thejobmarket.org. 441-5627.

9 tuesday MUSIC

Acoustic Africa. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Includes Ivory Coast vocalist and dancer Dobet Gnahore, bassist and vocalist Manu Gallo and young Cameroonian singer Kareyce Fotso. $35/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/ centerarts. 826-3928. Steve Kimock. 10 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Master of guitar improvisation for nearly four decades joined onstage by Bernie Worrell, Wally Ingram and Andy Hess. $30. humbrews.com. 826-2739. (hed) PE. 9 p.m. Nocturnum, 206 West Sixth St., Eureka. Punk-rock band from Huntington Beach formed in 1994 performs with Lacero and Angels Cut. $9. diamondbackpresents.com.

MOVIES

The Big Sleep (1946). 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Screening of the Howard Hanks-directed film noir classic starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. Part of the Based on the Book film series. Hosted by NCJ A&E editor Bob Doran. humlib.org. 269-1910.

FOOD

Old Town Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, F Street between First and Third streets. Fresh farm-grown produce. Music by the Soulful Sidekicks. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371. Wildberries Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Fresh fruit, vegetables and plants from local growers. 441-9999.


LECTURE

Shining a Light Lecture Series. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Series of lectures on the effects of addiction on families, individuals and communities. $50. www.humboldt. edu/olli. 826-3731.

MEETINGS

North Group Sierra Club. 6 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. NGSC Executive Committee holds its monthly meeting. All are welcome to join us for a discussion of local conservation issues. This month: pizza! 826-3740.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Group of local business people who get together once a week to give and receive referrals. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Volunteer training meeting for those interested in gathering signatures for a proposed ordinance that would require employers with 25 or more workers in Eureka to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Nondenominational prayer group. E-mail dlbitte@hotmail. com. 834-5800.

10 wednesday MUSIC

Big Gigantic. 7 p.m. Blue Lake Casino. World Famous Productions present the instrumental livetronica, hiphop and jazz musical group based out of Boulder, Colo. Adventure Club opens. $20/$17.50 adv. bluelakecasino. com. 668-9770.

Draw, Humboldt

MEETINGS

North Coast Water Garden Club. 7 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Monthly meeting. 839-0588.

ETC.

Eel River Valley Founders BNI. 7:30-9 a.m. Victorian Inn, 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale. Meeting of local business owners. 407-6827. Office Specialist Training. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Oct. 8 listing. History Majors Career Focus Day. 4 p.m. Founders Hall 163, HSU. Professionals who were history majors speak about their background, post-graduate training, and current career/position.

WELLNESS

Eureka Mindfulness Group. 7:15 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Led by Cindee Grace. Topic: “Boosting Concentration and Brain Function.” Fragrance free, please. $3/$6 free will donation. 269-7044.

11 thursday

MUSIC

Capleton. Location released to ticket holders day of the show. Bonus Entertainment brings the controversial Jamaican dancehall reggae artist back to Humboldt County. $30. bonusman.info. Joanne Rand and Mare Wakefield. 7:30 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. North Coast songwriter/performer Rand and Nashville-based touring artist Wakefield share the stage for an intimate concert. JoanneRandMusic.com. 677-9493. Kabile. 7:30 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Humboldt Folk Dancers host a concert of traditional Bulgarian music. Featured is singer Donka Koleva, specializing in the haunting vocal style of her native Thrace. humboldtfolkdancers.org.

DANCE

Shaolin Warriors. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Over 1,000 years ago, Buddhist monks at the Shaolin Temple in China originated the martial art form known as kung fu. Today, 23 monks from that same temple travel the world as the Shaolin Warriors, offering a re-creation of a “day” at the temple. $45/$15 HSU students. humboldt. edu/centerarts. 826-3928.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See Oct. 4 listing.

EVENTS

National Coming Out Day. 5-9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Observed annually to celebrate coming out and to raise awareness of the LGBT community and civil rights movement. More details to come next week. humbrews.com. 826-2739.

THEATER

Movie Times

The Laramie Project. 7:30-10 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium. See Oct. 4 listing. Women of the Northwest Gala Opening. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Actor/writer Jacqueline Dandeneau, researcher Tammy Rae Scott and historian Edith Butler present this new historical production, a montage of women’s lives behind the redwood curtain. $15. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. See Oct. 4 listing. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. See Oct. 4 listing.

Heads Up…

Maintenance Technician Training. 9 a.m. College of the Redwoods Downtown Site. See Oct. 4 listing. Geopolitics of Overconsumption. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, BSS Room 166, Arcata. Sustainable Futures Speaker Series continues with University of North Carolina geography professor Dr. Corey Johnson on the global struggles for land, energy, food, water and minerals. humboldt.edu/envcomm/speaker_series. 826-3653. ●

Chalk one up for tradition! This Saturday, Oct. 6, marks the 25th anniversary of Pastels on the Plaza. Since 1987, artists of all levels have been gathering on behalf of local business sponsors to illustrate sections of Arcata Plaza pavement to raise funds for Northcoast Children’s Services. Businesses like, oh I dunno, the North Coast Journal! So we thought we’d dig through the photo archives and share some of our sidewalk creations: Wanna scrawl out? Reserve your $100 or $200 cement canvas by filling out a registration form found at ncsheadstart.org or by calling 822-7962. Then show up at 8 a.m. and be prepared for sore knees. —Andrew Goff

* = sAT./sUN. EARLy sHOWs

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 10/05- 10/11 unless otherwise noted. FRANKENWEENIE 3D 12:10, 4:55, 7:20 FRANKENWEENIE 2D 2:35, 9:35 TAKEN 2 12:00, 1:30, 2:20, 3:55, 4:40, 6:20, 7:05, 8:45, 9:30 PITCH PERFECT 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 8:55 LOOPER 12:15, 3:00, 5:50, 8:40 WON’T BACK DOWN 12:00, 5:30 HOTEL TRANsyLvANIA 3D 12:55, 5:45, 8:10 HOTEL TRANsyLvANIA 2D 3:20 TROUBLE WITH THE CURvE 12:30, 3:10, 5:50, 8:35 DREDD 2D 9:10 HOUsE AT THE END OF THE sTREET 2:05, 4:35, 7:05, 9:40 END OF WATCH 12:50, 3:40, 6:25, 9:05 REsIDENT EvIL: RETRIBUTION 2D 3:45, 9:20 FINDING NEMO 3D 1:20, 4:00, 6:35 LAWLEss 2:45, 8:20 THE BOURNE LEGACy 12:35, 6:10

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 10/05 - 10/11 unless otherwise noted. FRANKENWEENIE 3D FRANKENWEENIE 2D TAKEN 2 PITCH PERFECT LOOPER HOTEL TRANsyLvANIA 3D HOTEL TRANsyLvANIA 2D END OF WATCH FINDING NEMO 3D DREDD 3D TROUBLE WITH THE CURvE

*12:00, 4:50, 7:10 *2:25, 9:30 *12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 *1:05, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10 *12:10, 3:00, 5:55, 8:50 3:15, 8:05 *12:50, 5:45 *12:40, 3:20, 6:00, 8:40 * 1:30, 4:10, 6:45 9:20 *12:55, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 10/05 - 10/11 unless otherwise noted.

PITCH PERFECT THE MAsTER sLEEPWALK WITH ME

*1:25, 3:55, 6:25, 9:00 *2:10, 5:20, 8:30 *2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 10/05 - 10/11 unless otherwise noted. FRANKENWEENIE 3D *12:50, 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30 FRANKENWEENIE 2D *1:40, 4:15, 6:25, 8:40 HOTEL TRANsyLvANIA *1:50, 4:10, 6:30, 8:45 HOUsE AT THE END OF THE sTREET *1:30, 4:25, 7:00, 9:35 PITCH PERFECT *1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:25 TAKEN 2 *1:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville VOTE 2008 BY BOB DORAN

2011 BEST OF HUMBOLDT BY BOB DORAN

2004 WHAT IS ART? BY LINDA MITCHELL AND––––

BOB DORAN

TBA

33

• THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012• North Coas northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com


JoSEph gordon-levitt and bruce willis in looper.

Time Trials

Gordon-Levitt meets his future as Birbiglia sleepwalks into stuff By Dev Richards

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

LOOPER. Rian Johnson’s image of the future is a familiar one, riddled with immense poverty and constant, thoughtless violence. In Looper, Johnson, whose previous directorial efforts include Brick and The Brothers Bloom, focuses less on the details of his futuristic world and more on

the abstract possibilities it offers. Set in Kansas (presumably because the plot required a really large field) in the year 2044, Looper is a semi-cerebral story that hinges on time travel. Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is a looper, paid by the mob from the year 2072 to assassinate the men they send back to 2044. With me so

Oct. 5 Oct. 10 Fri Oct 5 - Ocean Night ft. Beneath the Waves Film Festival Doors 6:30 p.m. $3 All Ages Sat Oct 6 - Sci Fi Night ft. Night of the Living Dead (1968) 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages Free Sun Oct 7 - Giant 49ers Football Doors 1:15 p.m. Free All ages Sun Oct 7 - Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Doors 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Mon Oct 8 - Giant Screen Monday Night Football Doors at 5:15 p.m. Free All ages Wed Oct 10 - FOUND Magazine’s 10th Anniversary Tour Doors at 7:30 p.m. $8/$5 All ages

“SO GOOD.” North Coast Journal

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

835 J Street, Arcata • 822-WISH Open For Dinner @ 5:30 pm Tues-Sun

34 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

far? Good, because once you accept that premise, the rest of the plot comes easily. Loopers make a good living, with only one caveat: Eventually they will have to close their own loop by assassinating the older version of themselves. Most loopers accept this condition, pull the trigger, and start the countdown on their remaining 30 years. For Joe, it’s a bit more complicated. When Old Joe (Bruce Willis) materializes on Young Joe’s killing tarp, he takes matters into his own hands, thwarting Young Joe’s efforts and setting a general avalanche of shit into motion. While Young Joe works to track down his older self and finish his job, Old Joe is working to kill a telekinetic child who will one day take over the world. Moral dilemmas abound, and you find yourself rooting for the lesser of two evils: Young Joe. Johnson deserves points for creativity, but Looper could have been so much more. I was longing for something to keep me up all night, akin to Inception or Pi. Time travel plots can open up so many doors, but Johnson purposely sidesteps these opportunities. The moment Willis proclaims, “I don’t want to talk about time travel,” you realize the film is only going to dive to a certain depth. It takes the wind out of your nerd-sails. A great deal of effort was put forth by the effects department and by GordonLevitt to ensure that Willis can pass for Gordon-Levitt’s future self. Their cadences and mannerisms are the same, as are the bridges of their noses and the density of their brows. Despite the attention given to these sorts of minute details, Looper is still full of little holes. They have less to do with continuity than with believability. It’s impossible to go into too much depth about these flaws without slipping into dangerous spoiler territory. Looper has so much potential and is truly entertaining; but Johnson, whose previous movies were much smaller in scale, may have been out of his depth here. R. 118m. SLEEPWALK WITH ME. I’ve expounded on the dangers of adaptations before; they’re tricky and almost always end up as a severely abridged version of the original story. Sleepwalk With Me, written by Mike Birbiglia and co-directed by Birbiglia and Seth Barrish, is an adaptation of a different sort, though. Birbiglia’s usual medium is the stage, or at least the microphone. You may be familiar with his work from This American Life. Maybe you own one or more of his stand-up albums. Or maybe you have no idea who he is. Regardless, there will undoubtedly be something in Sleepwalk that appeals to you. It’s a simple story about a man with

an REM behavior disorder, the girl who loves him and the family that drives him crazy. Based on the spoken-word story of the same name, Sleepwalk is a painful and hilarious true story about Birbiglia’s experiences with somnambulance, and the steps he took toward becoming a stand-up comedian. There are no unexpected dramatic twists or turns; there’s hardly even a rise and fall. It truly is a simple story, though this simplicity is in no way limiting. Birbiglia’s forte is using his awkward charisma to give you just a glimpse of his life, those fractured, human pieces that make up the whole. Filling the dual roles of key player and narrator, Birbiglia plays a pseudonymshrouded version of himself, Matt Pandamiglio. Lauren Ambrose (Six Feet Under, Wanderlust) is Abby, the girl who loves him in spite of his many, many faults. Their eight-year relationship has no apparent direction, and Abby has grown restless waiting for Matt to take the next steps (marriage, kids, not being a bartender, etc.). The combined tension from his relationship, his career and his overbearing family becomes tangible for Matt in the form of sleepwalking. Matt’s particular brand of sleepwalking is intense, categorized as REM behavior disorder. Essentially, if he dreams it, he does it. Running from a jackal, winning the Dust Buster Olympics, eating a pillow made of pizza — you name it, he acts it out. The bouts of sleepwalking become increasingly more dangerous (and admittedly more hilarious). These sleepwalking scenes are, by far, the most entertaining aspect of the film. Sure, it’s wrong to laugh at someone else’s pain and impending danger, but there is a pizza pillow. The rest of the film may have floundered had it not been for the supporting cast, which includes Louden Wainwright III, Marc Maron and Carol Kane. As Birbiglia’s freshman work as a director, Sleepwalk With Me exceeded my expectations, which bodes well for any future film projects Birbiglia may have in the works. Not Rated. 90m. —Dev Richards

Previews

TAKEN 2. Liam Neeson returns as the retired CIA agent whose family keeps getting targeted by hostage-takers. This time, he and his wife get nabbed, prompting a succession of quick-cut action sequences and tense music. PG13. 91m. PITCH PERFECT. Yes, the trailers look like Glee Goes to College, and the catchphrase (“Get pitch slapped”) is a groaner. But the cast is led by the great Anna Kendrick, and the reviews have been solid. Your call. PG13. 112m.


FRANKENWEENIE. Tim Burton revisits one of his early short films in this stopmotion (think Corpse Bride) feature about a boy who uses zippy-zappy science to bring his beloved dog back from the dead. PG. 87m. Friday is Ocean Night at the Arcata Theatre Lounge, and this month’s edition features award-winning shorts from the Beneath the Waves Film Festival. Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night falls on a Saturday, for the first time in patchy memory, featuring George Romero’s landmark zombie classic Night of the Living Dead (1968) and a Mexican sci-fi/horror called The Robot vs. the Aztec Mummy (1958). Sounds like a fair fight. And on Sunday evening at 6, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990) will fight crime with help from their ninja master, a giant rat named Splinter.

Continuing

THE BOURNE LEGACY. Jeremy Renner replaces Matt Damon in the action franchise based on Robert Ludlum’s international thriller novels. PG13. 125m. DREDD 3D. In a dystopian future, badass cops act as judge, jury and executioner. This stylized remake has brio and action to boot. R. 95m. END OF WATCH. Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña star as hero beat cops of the LAPD who get targeted by the Mexican drug cartel. R. 109m. FINDING NEMO 3D. Pixar’s beloved fish flick returns with an extra dimension, hoping to lure new fans. Get it? Lure? G. 100m. HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA. Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler) runs a posh, monsters-only hotel, catering to the likes of Frankenstein (Kevin James) and the Mummy (CeeLo Greene). PG. 91m. LAWLESS. Prohibition-era tale of about the moonshining Bondurant brothers features a great cast (Tom Hardy, Gary Oldman, Guy Pearce) but doesn’t hold together. R. 115m. THE MASTER. Director Paul Thomas Anderson’s challenging and ambitious drama about a charismatic cult leader (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and the troubled Naval veteran he entices (Joaquin Phoenix). R. 137m. RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION. Milla Jovovich’s fifth turn in the critically reviled, commercially boffo zombie-slaughter franchise. Mmm, brains! R. 95m. TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE. Clint Eastwood stars as an elderly baseball scout bonding with his adult daughter (Amy Adams). PG13. 111m. WON’T BACK DOWN. Two moms (Viola Davis and Maggie Gyllenhaal) look to change a failing inner-city school while embracing genre clichés. PG. 121m. —Ryan Burns

 

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts CERAMIC GLAZE DESIGN & APPLICATION TECHNIQUES. With Otamay Hushing. Tues., 10 a.m.-Noon, Nov. 6-20. Explore a variety of decoration and design techniques using the Fire Arts glaze palette. Students must have bisque ware ready, including horizontal and vertical surfaces, an incised piece, and shallow bowls. $55. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata. com (AC-1004) GLASS FUSING WITH TRACE GALBRAITH.. $120 + $60 materials fee. Mon. & Wed., 10:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Class #2, Oct. 15, 17, 22, 24. Tues. & Thurs., 5-8 p.m. Class #4, Oct. 16, 18, 23, 25. Explore elements of design and principles of composition as you create exciting works of art with glass. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www. fireartsarcata.com (AC-1004) MOSAIC CRASH GLASS MEMORY BOX. With Robin Friedman at Parasol Arts, Paint Your Own Pottery and Mosaics. Oct. 17 & 18, 6-9 p.m. $70 materials and instruction. Call Parasol Arts (707) 268-8888, 211 G St., Eureka. (AC-1011) RAKU FIRING. Come to Fire Arts and experience the enjoyment of pottery firings. Bring your own bisqueware or select from a variety of unglazed pieces & glazes from Fire Arts. Call Thurs. to reserve space. Glazing at noon & Firing at 1 p.m. on Fri., $6/ piece or $25/kiln load. Fire Arts Center, 707-826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-1004)

Communication

HEY, GOOD LOOKIN’. How to improve one’s body image will be discussed it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Oct. 7, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www. campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-1004) CASCADIA LEADERSHIP PROGRAM. Cascadia Center for Leadership is accepting applications for the 2013 ten-day Leadership Program. A program of the Humboldt Area Foundation, Cascadia is led by Mary Gelinas and Roger James, who also co-direct GelinasJames, Inc., an international consulting and training firm. They offer cutting-edge leadership concepts and tools to emerging and seasoned organizational and community leaders. 2013 session dates are Jan. 1718; Jan. 31 & Feb. 1; Feb. 21-22; April 4-5; April 25-26.The $1,750 participant fee includes meals, materials, and tuition. Limited partial scholarships available. Apply on-line at www.cascadialeadership.org. Questions, email info@cascadialeadership.org or call Heather Equinoss, (707) 442-2993. Space is limited and the application deadline is Fri., Oct. 26. (CMM-1025)

CONCIOUS PARENTING. Learn the four step system to create a happier healthier home life now. Uncover the hidden treasure of negative emotions; your own and your child’s. Create and maintain age appropriate clear boundaries delivered with kindness. And so much more! Parents of all age children are welcome. Parents only please. Four classes: Mon.s Oct. 8-29, 6-7:45 p.m., in Eureka. Cost is $80 payment options available. Call or text 775-313-7332 to register. (CMM-1004)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

DANCE TANGO! Milonga Sat. Oct. 6, 8-11 p.m.,$10, Studio of Dance Arts, Eureka; Workshops Oct. 6 & 7 with Daniela and Hernan of Buenos Aires. Humboldtango.org (DMT-1004) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227)

USA DANCE. Invites you to a social dance at Humboldt Hill Grange Sat., Oct. 6. Country two-step lesson, 6:30-7:30 p.m followed by open dancing to Austin Alley and the Rustlers. No partner necessary. $10 non-members, $5 members, student discounts. Call (707) 464-3638 or email usadances@gmail.com. (DMT-1004)

Fitness

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129) ADORNI FITNESS CENTER MEMBERSHIP SPECIAL. Exclusive offer available only in the month of Oct.! Start a new fitness membership & pay no initiation fee! Membership includes Unlimited Group Fitness Classes, Free Personal Trainers & more! Hurry in to take advantage of this special by signing up Oct. 1-31, 2012. For more information please call 441-4248 or visit the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive. (F-1004) PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1025) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1227) continued on next page

SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

ONLINE

Needle Felting Applique 10/6 Ever want to add that little bit of pizzazz to a knit or felt project? In this class we’ll be learning how to needle felt appliqué onto a pre-felted notions bag/ Needle felting uses a barbed needle to interlock wool fibers together. We’ll be going over planning and transferring your design,preparing your fiber, and needle felting. Cost is $50.00 does not include materials.

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com

northcoastjournal.com

NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

northcoastjournal.com• • NORTH Thursday, OCT. Oct. 4,4, 2012 North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, 2012 northcoastjournal.com

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continued from previous page AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0927) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1227) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./ Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-1025)

Home & Garden

I WANT TO BUY A HOUSE..NOW WHAT? Join us for another workshop with Mikki Cardoza, Broker, Educator, CEO of MikkiMoves Real Estate, Inc. $5 fee includes pizza, drinks, and informational materials. Learn how to pre-qualify, find a Realtor®, shop for your “dream home”, make an offer and navigate your way through inspections and escrow. Sat., Oct. 6, 5-6 p.m. 805 7th St., Eureka. RSVP at (707) 515-MOVE or www.mikkimoves.com. Stay for Arts Alive Party! (G-1004)

Kids & Teens

KIDS’ YOGA. At OM SHALA with Crystal Soleil. Movement, breathing techniques, songs, games & guided relaxation. On-going Weds (ages 5-7) 4-4:50 pm & Thurs (ages 8-10) 4-4:50 pm, Om Shala Yoga, 858 10th St., Arcata. $7/drop-in, $55/10-class pass. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (K1004)

CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7-12. Adventures with clay: learn various hand building and wheel throwing techniques. Mon., 4-6 p.m., Oct. 15–Nov. 12; Tues. 4-6 p.m., Oct. 16–Nov. 13. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata.com (K-1004) HOOPSTERS YOUTH BASKETBALL. Youth basketball league for 3rd-12th graders. Register for 2013 season beginning Mon., Oct. 8th at the Adorni Center. Registration is on a first come, first served basis & limited based on the number of qualified coaches. $60 registration fee includes team t-shirt. 50% scholarships available for those that qualify. Forms available online at www.eurekarecreation.com. Email Steve at senes@ci.eureka.ca.gov or call 441-4245 for more info. (K-1004) THE G.U.L.C.H. TEEN PROGRAM. Teens ages 12-17 are invited to skateboard at the Eureka Skate Park, Play Disc Golf, Learn filmmaking & music production, or just chill and meet new friends! Tues & Thurs from 4 p.m-6 p.m. starting Oct. 16, at 1720 10th Street in Eureka! Teens must have a waiver on file signed by their parent/guardian. Please call 441-4240 for more information. (K-1004) YOUTH BASKETBALL LEAGUE. A fun, positive, semicompetitive atmosphere for boys & girls 1st-12th grades. Leagues based on grades and gender. Games run Jan. 5- March 2. Sign up today. For more information contact Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/rec. (K-1004) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

Lectures

FOOD SAFETY. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Wed., Oct. 17, 6-8 p.m., Trinidad City Hall. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-1004) DISASTERS DON’T WAIT. Have Your Supply Kits Ready. Get your supplies ready for response to an earthquake, tsunami or severe weather. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Wed., Oct. 24, 6-8 p.m., Azalea Hall, McKinleyville. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/supplykits or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at (707) 8263731. (L-1011) LIVING ON SHAKY GROUND. How to Survive Earthquakes & Tsunamis in Northern California. A free class. Thurs., Oct. 18, 6-8 p.m. at Pacific Union School, Multipurpose Room, Arcata. Pre-registration required: Call (707) 499-0754. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness (www.humboldt.edu/rti). Funding provided by the Calif. Emergency Management Agency Earthquake and Tsunami Program. (L-1011)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227)

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

BOTANICAL DRAWING. Learn basic fundamentals of drawing plants while focusing on line, shape, value and texture. With Tim Clewell. Thurs., Oct. 18-Nov. 15, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1011) FRIENDLY FIRE, THE HISTORY & ROLE OF FIRE IN REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK. Join ranger Jim Wheeler and prescribed fire manager John McClelland for a presentation and discussion of the role of prescribed fire in maintaining both historical landscapes and native plant communities in Redwood National Park. Includes a field trip to the Bald Hills above Redwood Creek. Thurs., Oct. 18, 1-3 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 20, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1011) HOUSING HUMBOLDT’S HISTORY. An Insider’s Look at Local Museums. Hear an introductory presentation by Jerry Rohde, and then visit the Blue Lake, Ferndale, Fortuna Depot and Trinidad museums, where directors and staff will conduct tours. Sat., Oct. 20-Nov. 17, 1-3 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1011) THE LIVES & TIMES OF FOUR FOREFATHERS OF EVOLUTIONARY THEORY. Join Dr. Robert Rasmussen, Emeritus Professor of Botany at HSU to discuss Carl Linnaeus, Alexander von Humboldt, Charles Darwin and Brother Gregor Mendel. Wed., Oct. 24-Nov. 14, 3-5 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1011) THE UNIVERSAL WORD CARD DECK. Open new worlds of possibility for prose, poetry and visual art by making your own deck of word cards, following the instructions of iconic poet Michael McClure. With Stephanie Silvia. Tues., Oct. 23-Nov. 13, 3:30-5:50 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1011) 2012 & THE END OF THE AGES. Explore the reasons behind the interest in the Mayan Calendar and 2012 End of the Age predictions with Laurent Cleenewerck. Thurs., Oct. 11-25, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1004) BOOK LOVERS UNITE, JANE AUSTEN. Join a lively conversation about Jane Austen, one of English literature’s most valued and beloved writers. Discuss her life and her books, including Price and Prejudice, with author Marie Raphael. Wed., Oct. 17, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING WINE. Join winemaker Joe Collins for an evening focused on the creation and production of champagne and sparking wine. Thurs., Oct. 11, 6-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) ELECTIONS 2012, THE MEDIA AS WATCHDOG. Discuss the role of the news media in the 2012 Presidential election with Maclyn McClary. Fri., Oct. 12 and 19, 10 a.m.-Noon. $40/OLLI members, $65/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) GENTLE YOGA FOR OLLI. Focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Stephanie Perrett. This course is held at Timber Ridge in McKinleyville. Tues., Oct. 16-Nov. 13, 10-11 a.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) WEAVING GREAT TALES, THE ART OF STORYTELLING. Captivate and inspire listeners of all ages when you discover and tell great stories. With Seabury Gould. Thurs., Oct. 11-Nov. 1, 1-3 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1004)

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS & THE ORIGINS OF THE PARTISAN DIVIDE. Partisan politics are nothing new. Discuss how mass media, the Internet, and the infusion of unlimited sums of money have affected the system the framers of the Constitution envisioned. Relive the creation of the Electoral College, and the election of 1800 with author Ray Rafael. Wed., Oct. 17, Thurs., Oct.18 and Wed., Nov. 7, 4-6 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880.(O-1004) TAI CHI FOR EVERYONE. With Glenda Hesseltine. Learn a short version of Tai Chi in these beginning sessions. Mon., Oct. 15-Nov. 19, 3-4:30 p.m. $70/ OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-1004) YOGA FOR OLLI. A gentle yoga class with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., Oct. 15-Nov. 5, 1:30-3 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-1004)

Spiritual

HOW KARMA COLORS OUR LIFE. Sat., Oct. 6, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Buddha’s teachings on karma explain the relationship between our mind, our actions, and our experiences. Karma is like gravity; it’s not personal, it’s not singling us out. If we trip and fall we don’t get angry with gravity. Understanding how karma functions puts us in control of our life. We can learn to transform, and avoid difficulty, thereby creating lasting happiness. Everyone is Welcome. $20, includes a snack break. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside, CA. www.meditateinolympia. org (S-1004) SUNDAY SCHOOL ST. BERNARD PARISH. Grades K-8. For more information call (707) 442-6466 or visit saintbernards.org (S-1011) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1227) COACHES COMMUNITY WORKSHOP HSU. Coach Steve Kinder & CR Coach Doug Oliveira share valuable coaching tips & run basketball drills! Whether you’re an experienced coach, have only thought about youth coaching or just love basketball, don’t miss this FREE Community event! Workshop attendees must be over 18 & out of high school. Sun. Oct. 7, 1-3 p.m., The Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive. Email Brian at bmillett@ci.eureka.ca.gov or call 441-4240 for more info. (SR-1004)

Therapy/Support

LIFERING ADDICTION RECOVERY. Face-to-face meetings every Wed., 7 p.m. in McKinleyville. An abstinence-based network for people seeking to reclaim life and end cycles of alcohol and drug addiction. Information at http://www.youtube.com/ user/humboldtslifering or 800-811-4142. (TS-1004)


Field notes GRIEF SUPPORT SERVICES CREATIVE ARTS GATHERING. Navigating Grief Through the Holidays, Oct. 20, Nov. 17, & Dec. 15. The holiday season is often an especially difficult time for those in grief. We will utilize the healing qualities of art and the creative process, natural elements, and community to find our way. No artistic experience is required. Suggested materials fee: $3-$5. Visit our website for more information at www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or contact Julie with questions at 445-8443. (T-1011) TYPE 1 DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP. meeting the 3rd Tue. of each month, 6-7:30 p.m, at the Foundation of Medical Care, 3100 Edgewood Rd. Eureka.Contact 443-0124. SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

CAREGIVER TRAINING. Area 1 Agency on Aging offers FREE 42-hour course in Eureka. Prepare for new career, take better care of loved ones, request employment referrals. Sessions held Tues.s and Thurs.s, 6-9 p.m., Oct. 16-Nov. 13. Homework due at first session. Call Caregiver Services at (707) 4434363 to schedule registration. (V-1011)

GET IMMERSED IN ANUSARA YOGA. With Peggy Profant at OM SHALA! Immersion (required to participate in teacher training) Oct 18-Dec 10, Teacher Training (optional) Jan 17-Mar 2013. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W-1004) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Herbal Clinic Class. Jan. 14-April 15, 2013, Refine and expand your herbal counseling skills. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.-Nov. 2013. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in-depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Bothwell & Rosemary Gladstar, Nov. 14-23, 2013. More information to come soon. Get in touch to be on the interested list. Register online at www. dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-1101) INNER FREEDOM YOGA FULL-TIME STUDENTS AND SENIORS 65+. Discounts year round: $9 each, 6 for $45 - $55. Community Yoga Center, Arcata Plaza. www.innerfreedomyoga.com (W-1011) AROMATHERAPY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM & ESSENTIAL OIL DISTILLATION. With Traci Webb. Two Weekend Immersions, Oct 12-14 & Oct. 26-28, $900 (or $475/weekend), Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ ayurvedicliving . com, (707) 601-9025. (W-1011)

SUICIDE INTERVENTION. Examine suicide statistics, attitudes, indicators and predictors to assess level of risk and kind of intervention necessary. MFT/ LCSW CEUs available. With Rebecca PorteNEW CLIENTS $10 ous, LCSW. Fri., Oct. OFF. Myrtletowne 12, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Healing Center 1480, $40 includes lunch. $25 #A Myrtle Ave. A additional for credit Hidden Gem on or MFT/LCSW/nursing Myrtle Ave., specialCEUs. Pre-registration PREPARE FOR A NEW CAREER IN CAREGIVING izing in therapeutic required. Call HSU Dis- WITH AREA 1 AGENCY ON AGING. CALL (707) massage. We will tance & Extended Edu- 443-4363 TO REGISTER. assist you on your cation to register, 826road to recovery or 3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V-1004) work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, Wellness/Bodywork uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and AYURVEDIC WELLNESS COUNSELOR PROGRAM. more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier With Traci Webb. Meets five weekends (Fri.-Sun.) are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! Oct. 12-Jan. 20, Part I of three part Practitioner You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1025) Certificate. Includes: Aromatherapy, Colors, Gems, Yoga Darshana I&II, Ayurvedic Psychology, Mental START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Constitutions, Diagnostics (Pulse, Tongue, Face, Evening classes begin Jan. 22, 2013 at Arcata School Body, Voice, Nails, Urine), and Panchakarma Seasonal of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage CertificaCleansing Theory, $1500 (in full), $350/month pay tion will prepare you for Professional Certification in plan. REGISTER: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda, California, and the National Exam. Our compreheninfo@ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601-9025. (W-1011) sive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage YOGA FOR ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS. At OM SHALA therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit with Christine Fiorentino. Eight Session Series, Oct arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ● 16-Nov 8. Tues’s & Thurs’s, 7:30-8:30 p.m. 858 10th St., Arcata. $95 if paid by 10/9, $110 after. Must pre-register. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (W-1004)

First-growth tanoak grove on Peavine ridge, on the north sloPe oF Bull Creek in humBoldt redwoods state Park.

Tanoaks, Tannins and Tanning

Photo By Barry evans

By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

W

hat makes an oak tree an oak? Acorns, right? Almost right. The tanbark oak, or simply tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflora) is the single North American exception to the rule. Its acorn is more like the spiny husk of a chestnut, plus it has different leaves, bark, flowers and wood from true oaks, genus Quercus. As the name suggests, tanoak bark secretes excellent tannin, the stuff that turns animal hide into leather — which is why, a century ago, it was harvested to near extinction on the West Coast. Southern Humboldt County was once home to dense stands of tanoak, most of which were cut down in the 20 years from 1902 to 1922. That’s when the Pacific Oak Extract Works operated in Briceland, six miles west of Redway. (Another plant operated in the Mattole Valley.) Each year, from the end of May to the middle of July, when the tanoak sap flows most vigorously, dozens of crews descended on the surrounding forests. After stripping the bark from the base of the tree, the men would fell it and immediately peel the remaining bark, because any delay would allow the sap to set, making peeling impossible. Sadly, that flowing sap made the rest of the tree useless, since sudden exposure to air causes the saturated hardwood to crack. Pack mules hauled the bark to the Briceland extraction plant, where the slabs were first aged for a year before being ground up and “percolated” in a series of large vats filled with warm water to extract the tannin. Workers then packed the resulting molasses-like liquid in 50-gallon barrels for shipment from Shelter Cove to San Francisco Bay, and thence upriver to the

Wagner Leather Co. in Stockton. In the tanning process, tannin, or tannic acid, converts animal hide into leather by binding to the skin’s natural collagen proteins, which both softens the hide and stabilizes it by making it bacteria-resistant. Because tanoak tannin also contains gallic and acetic acids, it was particularly prized for working heavy leathers such as saddles and boot soles. Nowadays, synthetic tannins have largely replaced vegetable tannins. It’s about time: archeologists believe that Sumerians were treating hides with vegetable tannins nearly 5,000 years ago. Today, a far more insidious peril threatens California’s remaining tanoaks. Phytophthora ramorum, better known as Sudden Oak Death, was first reported in Mill Valley in 1995. It is a rapidly spreading fungus-like organism whose wind-blown spores land on wet leaves, infecting the tree and usually causing its death within a year. You can see one of Humboldt’s few remaining stands of old-growth tanoak at Peavine Ridge, high up on the steep north slope of Bull Creek in Humboldt Redwoods State Park. To get there, take the Honeydew exit off 101 and drive five miles west on the Mattole Road. Park at Albee Creek campground and walk the lovely five-mile (2,000-feet elevation gain) Thornton Trail up through stands of Douglas fir and Pacific madrone to Peavine Ridge trail. You’ll find the tanoak grove about half a mile east of the junction, mercifully unharmed by humans and (touch wood!) by the fungus. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) has yet to find a convincing explanation of the phrase “Hell for leather.” Thanks to local author-historian Jerry Rhode for help with this column.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012

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NOTICE OF NEW HEARING AND ORDER ON REISSUANCE CASE NO CP120330

Name of Person Asking for Protection: PAULA KAYE STEVENS Address: 1201 Angel Heights Fortuna, CA 95540 Name of Person to Be Restrained: CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON New Hearing Date: A new hearing date is scheduled because: The person CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON was not served before the current hearing date. Order for Continuance and Notice of Hearing: The Notice of Court Hearing (Form DV-109), filed on July 25, 2012 with the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt is reset for hearing in this court on this NEW DATE: October 29, 2012, at 1:30 p.m., at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 6. Reissue Temporary Restraining Order: The request to reissue the temporary restraining order is GRANTED. The attached Temporary Restraining Order (Form DV-110) is reissued. Any orders listed on that form remain in effect until the end of the hearing on October 29, 2012. Warning and Notice to CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON If the request to reissue the Temporary Restraining Order is GRANTED, you must continue to obey the attached Temporary Restraining Order until the end of the hearing. Expiration Date: October 29, 2012 Service of Order: A copy of this Order must be served on CHRISTOPHER SCOTT THOMSON at least 5 days before the hearing, along with all other documents requesting domestic violence restraining orders. If the reissuance is denied, a copy of the Temporary Restraining Order must not be attached or served. Dated: September 10, 2012 Filed: September 11, 2012 DV-109 Filed: July 25, 2012 s/: JOYCE D. HINRICHS JUDICIAL OFFICER SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-263)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 17th of October, 2012, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has

been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Ernest Jackson, Unit # 5019 Chariti Holmes, Unit # 5241 Amanda Armstrong, Unit # 5278 George Roberson, Unit # 5515 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Lareyna Valdovinos, Unit # 2610 Jimmy Evanow, Unit # 3408 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Ramona Cooper, Unit # 1163 TB Pettyjohn, Unit # 1321 Pamela Millsap, Unit # 1350 Russell Phay, Unit # 1626 Valerie Smith, Unit # 1730 Thomas Stirling, Unit # 1782 Phillip Moore, Unit # 1790 Jose Galvez, Unit # 1812 Kenneth Laskis, Unit # 1817 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Latasha Pifferini, Unit # 169 Charles Brown, Unit # 214 Charles Brown, Unit # 336 Steve Ifenuk, Unit # 444 Cacy Parker, Unit # 476 The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Erin Cannaday, Unit # 4120 Jacob Swagert, Unit # 4309 Marcella Nasseri, Unit # 4316 Stephanie Fox, Unit # 4432 Terri Misch, Unit # 4601 Gregory Mota, Unit # 4614 Kevin Ponce, Unit # 4744 Clayton Miller, Unit # 6023 Nichole Lawrence, Unit # 6196 Jeremy Hardy, Unit # 6212 Robin Andrews, Unit # 7011 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. None The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Brian Zamora, Unit # 9234 Robin Romo, Unit # 9256 Christopher Reed, Unit # 9404 Jassen Franziez, Unit # 9524 Orrin Brown, Unit # 9569 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Mark Dodson, Unit # 3227

Luana Jackson, Unit # 4135 Sharon Smith, Unit # 6228 Jacquilyn Carter, Unit # 7213 Evan Casada, Unit # 7217 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appliances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self-Storage, 707-443-1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 4th day of October 2012 and 11th day of October 2012 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-285)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 12th of October, 2012, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at INDIANOLA STORAGE, at 673 Indianola Cutoff, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California. The following units will be sold: Daren November, Unit # 235, Misc. Household items Shelly Kershner, Unit # 134, Misc. Household items Erik Manuel, Unit # 219, Lights, fans and misc. equipment Purchases must be paid (cash only), and removed at the time of the sale, with the unit left broom clean. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Owner reserves the right to bid. Call 442-7613 Indianola Storage, Jerry Avila, bond #0327592 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-289)

 PUBLIC SALE

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien on said property pursuant to sections 21700-21716 of the Business and Professions Code, section 2328 of the UCC section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 6th day of October, 2012 at 9:30 AM on the premises where the said property has been stored and which is located at Mad River Storage Center, 1400 Glendale Drive, Arcata CA. County of Humboldt the following: # 140 Natasha Ferguson

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

# 272 Michelle Bandy # 297 Ed Lott # 304 Aaron Henderson # 310 Aaron Henderson # 331 Frank Madison Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in prior to 9:30 AM on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as-is, where is and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in event of settlement between the owner and the obligated party. Auctioneer: Don Johnson, bond # 9044453 Dated this 27th day of September and 4th day of October, 2012 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-276)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00574

The following person is doing business as STITCHES-N-BRITCHES at 1225 Central Avenue, McKinleyville, CA 95519, 360 Cedar Hill Lane, Arcata, CA 95521. Kristin Aleen Anderson 360 Cedar Hill Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/01/12. /s Kristin A. Anderson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-280)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00575

The following person is doing business as MANY HANDS GALLERY at 438 2ND St., Eureka, CA 95501. Astra N. Burke 836 3rd St., #B Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/24/2012. /s Astra N. Burke. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-282)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00576

The following persons are doing business as PINE MOUNTAIN LOGGING AND CONSTRUCTION at 25090 Alderpoint Rd., Blocksburg, CA 95514, P.O. Box 170, Blocksburg, CA 95514. Randy Hoisington 25090 Alderpoint Rd. Blocksburg, CA 95514 Dawnita Rose Hoisington 25090 Alderpoint Rd. Blocksburg, CA 95514 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a.

Request foR PRoPosals Westside Community Improvement Association is Requesting Proposals from programs interested in operating at the Jefferson Site. Proposals are sought from Charter schools – We have 6 classrooms available for primary occupancy by a charter school and 4 potentially shared classrooms. We are also seeking proposals from organizations and programs that offer recreation, art, performing arts, cultural enrichment, after school programs, nursery schools, health, nutrition, physical fitness, literacy, and other community resources. The Jefferson Campus is proposed to house a Charter School in the South Building and by fall of 2014 (if not sooner) all space in the South building will be dedicated to that purpose. We are seeking proposals from Charter Schools that will recruit students from our community and offer free quality education to the children of the Westside, elementary schools preferred. The North Building will house a Community Recreation and Cultural Enrichment Center. Programs in the North Building are expected to share space in order to maximize the benefit to the community and minimize the cost to operate programs here. We are also proposing the development or renovation of 2 more spaces outside the North Building. There will also be a public park available for outdoor recreation programs, a neighborhood events center with a stage, and a permitted kitchen. Programs are expected to offer free opportunities to children and families that live within ½ a mile of the Jefferson Project. We welcome proposals from organizations serving all ages. The proposed timeline for completion of the improvements at the facility is September 2014, but parts of the facility will be ready much sooner. Please include financials with proposals and mail by October 15th, 2012 to: Westside Community Improvement Association PO Box 5315 Eureka, CA 95502 Questions can be directed to Heidi Benzonelli lets.buy.jefferson@gmail.com (707) 498-5764 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-284)

/s Dawnita Hoisington. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-283)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00587

The following persons are doing business MOM & ME KRAFTY KREATIONS at 2446 18th St., Eureka, CA 95503, P.O Box 91, Willow Creek, CA. 95573. Zena Bushnell 2285 Friday Ridge Rd. Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Stormie Freeman-Dare 2446 18th St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s/ Zena Bushnell This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25 (12-286)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00590

The following person is doing business as NATURE’S SERVING at 3750 Harris St., Eureka, CA 95501, 138 B Rocky Creek Rd., Bayside, CA 95524. Leira V. Satlof 138 B Rocky Creek Rd. Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Leira V. Satlof. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2012 (12-288)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00531

The following persons are doing business as MYOPIA PRESS at 90 Sunny Brae Center, Arcata, CA 95521, 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A, Arcata, CA 95521. Jeff Jensen 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A Arcata, CA 95521 Ruth Jensen 810 Crescent Way, Apt. A


USES OF VOTER INFORMATION (ELECTION POLICY) Information on your voter registration application/affidavit will be used by elections officials to send you official information on the voting process and the Vote-by-Mail ballot. Items such as Driver’s license and social security numbers, or your signature as shown on your voter registration application, cannot be released for commercial purposes. If you have any questions about the use of voter information or wish to report suspected misuse of such information, please call UIHS Compliance Officer at 707.825.5000. 10/4/2012 (12-284)

Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jeff Jensen, Ruth A. Jensen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 6, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-271)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00546

The following persons are doing business as ENERGY LIFE CENTER at 616 Wood St., Eureka, CA 95501. Forty Four Financial Corp. 1102 5th St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/13/12. /s Jennifer Oliver, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-269)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00557

The following person is doing business as B.V.’S TREES at 6743 West Ave., Fields Landing, CA 95537, P.O. Box 332, Fields Landing, CA 95537. Brian Nelson Viale 6743 West Ave. Fields Landing, CA 95537 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/19/2012. /s Brian Viale. This statement was filed with the

County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 19, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-273)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00562

The following persons are doing business as MEGA MINI FARM at 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12, Eureka, CA 95501. Andrew Gill 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12 Eureka, CA 95501 Leeann Gill 1976 Myrtle Ave., #12 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Andrew Gill. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 20, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-275)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00570

The following person is doing business as JB MARYN GIFT CONCIERGE at 1685 Hideaway Ct., #A, McKinleyville, CA 95519, P.O. Box 2334, McKinelyville, CA 95519. Jodie Jean Marynowski 1685 Hideaway Ct., #A McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/24/12. /s Jodie Marynowski. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 24, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-277)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00539

The following persons are doing business as OWNS at 670 16th St., Arcata, CA 95521. Robert De Jesus Morales 670 16th St. Arcata, CA 95521 Shawn Lavelle Dean II 670 16th St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Robert Morales, Shawn Dean. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 10, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-261)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00541

The following persons are doing business as HUMFRESH at 4859 Starlund Ct., Eureka, CA 95503, P.O. Box 4662, Arcata, CA 95518. Bryan Smothers 4859 Starlund Ct. Eureka, CA 95503 Anand Tripp 2266 Redwood, Apt. B Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Bryan Smothers. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 11, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-264)

legal NOTICES continued on next page

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE The voter registration period remains open throughout the year except after the voter registration deadline date, which is a closed period of not less than two weeks prior to election day and shall remain closed until election counting day. The deadline date for registration is October 14, 2012. However, please be advised that voters who register after the deadline date will not receive a Vote-by-Mail ballot. The 2012 Election counting day is set for November 14, 2012.

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

22. The Indians, on sports tickers 23. ____ moment 26. Quit smoking, e.g. 30. Above 32. Stair posts 33. Register output 36. Antlered animal 37. Website that popularized “crowdfunding” ... or what’s lacking in 17-, 26-, 50- and 60-Across 40. “____= Politics” (TV slogan) 42. Philosopher Berlin and others 43. Order to relax

46. Gets short with 50. Check out a new car 53. La Scala, e.g. 54. I followers 55. Stephen of “Citizen X” 57. Highlands denials 58. R.E.M.’s “The ____ Love” 60. Forceful encouragement 63. Partner of raised 64. Chewed (out) 65. Ho ____ Minh City 66. Signs 67. Fall flowers 68. Solo in sci-fi

DOWN

22. Fidel’s friend 24. Venezuela and four Middle East nations formed it in 1960: Abbr. 25. More tumultuous 27. Prize seeker 28. Feverish, say 29. Bit of chiding 31. Own (up) 34. “Give ____ rest!” 35. Country: Sp. 37. Kind of reaction 38. Those, to Robert Burns 39. 35-Down, for one 40. Whiskas eater 41. To the ____ degree 44. Robert with a diet plan

45. Part of RSVP 47. Stop the flow of 48. Godmother to Whitney 49. Add 51. Maritime birds 52. Taking place in 56. Quaint “Oy vey” 58. Eastern wrap 59. Persona ____ grata 60. Levin who wrote “The Stepford Wives” 61. Always, in verse 62. Sources of APBs

1. Org. headed by Dominique StraussKahn until 2011 4. Madrid madam 10. Does in 14. Up to, in ads 15. Concise summary 16. Islamabad’s Federal ____ University of Arts, Science and Technology 17. Take things to the next level 19. Squad 20. Suffix with 19-Across 21. Liberal leader?

1. “You speak the truth” 2. What Michigan’s lower peninsula resembles 3. Articulate 4. Whirlpool 5. Directional suffix 6. Vegas gas 7. V8’s veggies, e.g. 8. Canon rival 9. Campfire remains 10. Ban 11. One on the house 12. ____ approved 13. Total 18. A ____ (kind of reasoning)

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

MEDIUM #7

www.sudoku.com

You will need to re-register to vote when: • You move • You change your name

Solution, tips and computer program at

QUALIFICATIONS TO REGISTER TO VOTE IN UIHS ELECTION You may register to vote if you meet the following criteria: You are an American Indian eligible for services at UIHS and are registered as an Eligible Indian Beneficiary, you are eighteen years of age or older at the time of election, you reside in the voting area from which you will vote and you have completed a Voter Registration Application/Affidavit.

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

United Indian Health Services, Incorporated (UIHS) is registering American Indians to vote, who are eligible for services provided by UIHS.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT 4, 2012

39


continued from previous page. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00545

The following person is doing business as AMERICAN PRIDE ROOF CLEANING at 6028 Avalon Dr., Eureka, CA 95503. Pride H. Brooks 6028 Avalon Dr. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/12/12. /s Pride H. Brooks. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-266)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00549

The following persons are doing business as EUREKA! EUROBOXERS at 3010 Cedar Lane, Eureka, CA 95503. Emily Dalton 3010 Cedar Lane Eureka, CA 95503 John Dalton 3010 Cedar Lane Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 11/15/2012. /s Emily Dalton. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-268)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00515

The following person is doing business as MADRE ILLUMINATION HEALING at 975 Shirley Blvd., Arcata, CA 95521. Jennifer Wiest 975 Shirley Blvd. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 9/5/07. /s Jennifer Wiest. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 29, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-260)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00516

The following person is doing business as BLISSFULLY BAKED at 1025 Bonnie Ct., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Chandra Murray 1025 Bonnie Ct. McKinleyville, CA 95519

The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Chandra Murray. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 29, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-257)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ARLENE M. LINDAU-POWELL, DECEASED CASE NO. PR120229

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ARLENE M. LINDAU-POWELL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by HAROLD LINDAU, SON OF DECEDENT in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that HAROLD LINDAU be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 25, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: KENNETH M. BAREILLES, NO. 44816 533 E STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-9338 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CHARLOTTE M. STERNBERG, aka CHARLOTTE MARGARET STERNBERG and CHARLOTTE STERNBERG CASE NO. PR120224

  NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF NEIL EDWARD FERGUSON, aka NEIL E. FERGUSON, aka NEIL FERGUSON CASE NO. PR120222

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CHARLOTTE M. STERNBERG, also known as CHARLOTTE MARGARET STERNBERG and CHARLOTTE STERNBERG A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ALFRED L. UPTON in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ALFRED L. UPTON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 18, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K MORRISON S.B. #30716 MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NEIL EDWARD FERGUSON, aka NEIL E. FERGUSON, aka NEIL FERGUSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JANET LEE JORDAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JANET LEE JORDAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 18, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JASON M. GARLICK SBN# 193725 1805 CENTRAL AVENUE MCKINLEYVILLE, CA 95519 (707) 840-0909 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

9/27, 10/4, 10/11/2012 (12-272)

9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-267)

10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-281)

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF NIELS CHRISTIAN LORENZEN CASE NO. PR120207

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NIELS CHRISTIAN LORENZEN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JAMES C. LORENZEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JAMES C. LORENZEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 11, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN B. PALLEY SBN# 173469 MEISSNER, JOSEPH & PALLEY 1555 RIVER PARK DRIVE, SUITE 108 SACRAMENTO, CA 95815 (916) 920-5983 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/20, 9/27, 10/4/2012 (12-262)

Curious about legal advertising?

442-1400

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOSEPHINE MURIEL FIELDER, formerly known as JOSEPHINE MURIEL STEWART CASE NO. PR120212

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSEPHINE MURIEL FIELDER, formerly known as JOSEPHINE MURIEL STEWART A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CAROL A. PEARCE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CAROL A. PEARCE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 18, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CATHERINE M. KOSHKIN CSB#149503 LAW OFFICES OF CATHERINE M. KOSHKIN 1116 ELEVENTH STREET ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-2800 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/13, 9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2012 (12-258)


Employment

CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

the Medical Records Coordinator

Social Work Care Manager

Must have at least 3 years previous medical records experience. Previous telephone experience and excellent computers skills also required. M – F, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Responsible for providing assessment and care coordination for clients in our Multipurpose Senior Services Program. Work as part of a team to provide support services to frail elderly living at home. Bachelor’s degree or higher in social work, psychology or related field and two years experience working with the elderly. Familiar with case recording and care management software programs desirable. 32 hours week with benefits which includes medical, retirement and life insurance after six months. Paid sick, vacation and holidays. Other employee paid insurance benefits available. $15.35 with BA and $16.35 with MA.

Email your letter of interest and resume to: cburton@hospiceofhumboldt.org TE ADMINISTRATOR,1 F/T HumboldtHospice of Humboldt 2010 Myrtle Avenue Eureka, CA 9550 EDICAL RECEPTIONIST, 2 F/T McKinleyville 707-441-0105 x308 EDICAL BILLER, 2 F/T Arcata

Prevailing Wage Const. Graphic Design Artist (Manager) (2)Full Time Technology Sales B2B (2) Industrial Electricians • Graphic Design Tech Reception • Part Time Outside Sales Full Charge Bookkeeper (CPA) Loan Servicing Agent IT Director • Commercial Lines Agent

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

N CLINIC COORDINATOR, 1 F/T Crescent City

Inventory Management EDICAL ASSISTANT, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 P/T Arcata Responsible for assisting the Inventory and RUG AND ALCOHOL COUNSELOR, 1 P/T Crescent City Shipping departments with scheduling, inventory transfers, cycle counts, and other day to day activities. The ideal candidate will have a proven track record successful inventory o to www.opendoorhealth.com for of online application management, preferably in a wholesale all 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information environment. Must be organized, detail-oriented, proficient in basic MS office products, e-mail, and basic computer skills. Full-time position with competitive wages and benefits. Please email resume to hr@tomasjewelry.com

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

Full-Time Positions SITE ADMINISTRATOR, 1 F/T Humboldt

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST, 2 F/T McKinleyville

PART-TIME POSITIONS

MEDICAL BILLER, 2 F/T Arcata RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, 1 F/T Crescent City MEDICAL ASSISTANT, 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 P/T Arcata DRUG AND ALCOHOL COUNSELOR, 1 P/T Crescent City

GRANTS ANd CONTRACTS ANALYST

Dynamic international organization PROGRAM ASSISTANT III seeks experienced contract manager to provide oversight of federal and private Arcata Main Office

international programs in media development. Perform datagrants entry,for program tracking, compile reports, maintain files & Seeking occasional front desk duties. Req 3 yrs to fill full-time, fully-benefitted Grants and office exp with Contracts 2 yrs computer exp & advanced Analyst position to provideclerical administrative, Spanish Preferred. Full-time (partial skills. Bilingual financial, and contractual analysis and grants management year, 2-4 wk lay-off): 40 hrs/wk (Mon–Fri, 8-4:30 pm); $9.82for a diverse international portfolio. $10.83/hr. Includes benefits. candidate has: Application Deadline:Ideal October 12, 2012

• Significant experience with federal contract, grant, andresume subgrant management Submit application, & cover letter to: • Experience in and aptitude for accounting and financial Northcoast Children’s Services analysis, including grant CA budgeting 1266 9th Street, Arcata, 95521 Experienceplease in proposal, grant, and For additional •information, call 707822-7206 and editing or visit ourcontract website atwriting www.ncsheadstart.org • Experience in procurement of goods and services, including development and evaluation of RFPs/RFQs • Experience in USG funder regulations For more details and to apply, visit www.internews.org/about/employment No Calls Please. EOE M/F/d/V

Download an application and job description from our website at: www.humsenior.org or come by 1910 California Street to pick up an application M-Thurs. 9-noon and 1-3pm. Send completed application, letter of interest, resume and three reference letters to: HR Dept. /Nancy Corral 1910 California St. Eureka, CA 95501. Deadline is 10/15/12 at 3pm. Call 443-9747 ext. 1257 with questions. EOE.

Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application Call 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information

Northcoast Children’s Services

** Arcata Main Office **

PROGRAM ASSISTANT III

Perform data entry, program tracking, compile reports, maintain files & occasional front desk duties. Req 3 yrs office exp with 2 yrs computer exp & advanced clerical skills. Bilingual Spanish Preferred. Full-time (partial year, 2-4 wk lay-off): 40 hrs/wk (Mon–Fri, 8-4:30 pm); $9.82-$10.83/hr. Includes benefits. Application Deadline: October 12, 2012

Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata CA 95521

(707) 822-7206

or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

Journal Readers are the People You want to Hire! 442-1400 • www.northcoastjournal.com

Surveillance Officer Crown Club Rep Valet Janitorial Security Officer - 4 Busser/Host Bingo Inventory Clerk Deli Worker Bingo Admit Clerk Gift Shop Clerk Gift Shop Clerk/Candy Cart Server (Sunset) Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2423214 (E-1004) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. (AAN CAN) (E-1004)

Become a Mentor! Seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead an integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and receive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew (707) 442-4500 ext. 14 317 Third St. Eureka, CA 95501

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Eel River Valley Multigenerational Center (The MGC) Board of Directors is seeking a qualified and dynamic Executive Director committed to supervising, directing and promoting the multigenerational community center to the residents of the Eel River Valley. This position will start as parttime, 15-25 hours per week. Salary range is $20-$25 an hour, commensurate with experience. For a complete job description and application, please email us at: themgcfortuna@gmail.com. Applications will be accepted until Oct. 15, 2012. (E-1004) CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

Visit our website, www.hospiceofhumboldt.org, for a complete job description.

Humboldt Senior Resource Center

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 4, 2012

41


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

Employment

Now Hiring:

CITY OF ARCATA

SENIOR PLANNER

$53,264.64 - $64,743.50/yr. Final Filing Date: 4:00 p.m., Friday October 19, 2012. Manages, oversees, performs, and supervises complex professional land use and urban planning work within the City’s Community Development Department. Application materials are available at City of Arcata, City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, CA 95521; by calling (707) 822-5953; or at www.cityofarcata.org. EOE.

POLICE RECORDS SPECIALIST I/II City of EurEka

$2,231- $2,980 per Month + Excellent Benefits this position performs a variety of general clerical and customer service duties involved in the maintenance, processing, and distribution of Police records; serves as call-taker and/or assists in dispatching units; performs directly related work as required. Must be able to type 40 words per min. Desirable qualifications include a combination of training and experience equivalent to a High School Diploma or equivalent and at least one year of related experience.

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Retail Store Mgr Insurance Agent Bookkeeper Receptionist Laborers Medical Assistant

MAINTENANCE WORKER I/II CITY OF EUREKA I - $2,439-$2,967/MO. II - $2,690-$3,272/MO. This position performs a variety of routine and limited semi-skilled labor in the construction, maintenance and repair of City infrastructures in one or more of the following Public Works Divisions: Streets, Water Distribution, or Wastewater Collection. Desirable qualifications include a combination of education and experience equivalent to a high school graduation and one to three years of construction, maintenance, or service experience in streets, wastewater and/ or water distribution. To be hired as a Maintenance Worker II, you must have six to eighteen months related experience at the Maintenance Worker I level. The current opening is in the Wastewater Collection Division. Interested? For a complete application packet, contact our Personnel Department at 531 K Street, Eureka, or call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134. Apply online at www. ci.eureka.ca.gov. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 12, 2012. EOE

for a complete application packet, (1) contact our Personnel Department 531 k St. Eureka, (2) call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request an application or (3) apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. recruitment closes until 5:00 p.m. on friday, october 5, 2012. EoE

Code enforCement Program manager City of EurEka

$4,363 - $5,306/month + excellent benefits

COMMUNICATIONS DISPATCHER CiTy Of EurEka

$2,991-$3,638/month + excellent benefits Would you like the opportunity to make a difference, save lives, and make our community a better place to live? Our dispatchers work in a positive and professional environment that provides opportunities for growth. The City’s modern dispatch center includes 6 dispatch consoles with a user-friendly computerized dispatch system. This is an entry-level position, no experience is needed, and onthe-job training will be provided. Tasks include taking 911 calls and dispatching police, fire and medical personnel following prescribed procedures, and other related duties. The ability to multi-task and work with others in a fast-paced environment is beneficial. for a complete job description and application packet: visit the Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov application packets must be received by 5:00 pm, friday, October 19, 2012. EOE

the City of Eureka is looking for an administrative professional to perform a variety of advanced journey-level work in coordinating, implementing, and maintaining community improvement projects, and programs. this individual provides budgetary, grant, training and work-flow support, acts as liaison for the City with a variety of private, public and community organizations and regulatory agencies; researches, develops recommendations for action; provides professional assistance to City management staff in the area of Code Enforcement. an associate’s Degree in Construction technology, Planning, Public administration, Criminal Justice, or a related field; four (4) to six (6) years of increasingly responsible experience in building inspection, code enforcement, public safety, or related fields; and two (2) years of supervisory experience is required. for a complete job description and application packet: visit the Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. recruitment closes at 5:00 pm, Monday, 10/15/2012. EoE

42 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN I/II City of EurEka

$2,824 - $3,976 per Month + Excellent Benefits under supervision, performs a variety of specialized paraprofessional engineering field and office duties in support of professional engineering staff. researches engineering topics and prepares basic engineering calculations; provides technical advice to the public; coordinates plan submittals; issues permits; maintains plan files and engineering records; prepares reports. for a complete application packet, (1) contact our Personnel Department at 531 k Street, Eureka, (2) call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request that one be mailed to you, or (3) apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. recruitment closes 5:00 p.m. on friday, october 5, 2012. EoE MOVIE EXTRAS. Actors, Models Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 866-339-0331 (AAN CAN) (E-1004) TRAINING COORDINATOR. Temporary & Part-time. FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT seeks training coordinator to assist with the implementation of a current professional development grant initiative serving early childhood educators in Humboldt County. Duties will include maintaining training records, including maintaining an online database of program participants. Up to 20 hours per week at an hourly rate of $20.08 per hour. Proficiency in online computer skills required. BA in Child Development or Early Childhood Education is highly desirable. To apply send a letter of interest and a resume to FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT, 1012 Second St., Eureka, CA 95501. Application deadline is Oct. 29, 2012. For further information about the position call (707) 445-7389. (E-1011) ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-(800) 560-8672 for casting times/locations. (E-1115) FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED!!! Enriching Lives is seeking committed individuals interested in opening their home and caring for children with developmental disabilities. Initial & continuing education, 24-hour professional support and a monthly stipend of $1000-4000 provided. Call 268-8891 today! (E-1025)

OFFICE MANAGER. Redwood Coast Music Festivals seeks an office manager with typing and MS office skills. Hours and wages to be determined , send resume by Monday Oct. 8, to RCMF P.O. Box 7071 Eureka 95502, EOE. (E-1004) SEASONAL UTILITY/DELIVER PERSON. 40 hrs per week. Prefer person with commercial CDL and HAZMAT endorcement, but may train right candidate. Apply at 625 K Street, Arcata. (707) 822-2188. (E-1011) BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) HELP WANTED!!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram. com (AAN CAN) (E-1004) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-1220) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

hiring? place your ad

ONLINE @www.northcoastjournal.com


Real Estate

Rentals ARCATA CLEAN 1BD. No growing, no illegal drugs, no smoking, no pets. References Required. $840/ month plus deposit. (707) 8227471. (R-1004)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1140 E St., #2. W/S/G Paid, Rent $595. Cat OK. Vacant 10/26. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2475 Redwood, #1. W/S/G Paid. Rent $595. Cat OK. Vacant 10/25. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 230 Wabash, #6. W/S/G Paid. Rent $645. Cat OK. Vacant 10/25. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) WILLOW CREEK FURNISHED 2BD HOME. With Trinity River access. Large lot fenced with locked gate. No pets/smoking. Monthly $1500. (707) 442-3732. (R-1004) ROOM FOR RENT. Redwood Terrace Condominiums. With roommate. No Pets/Drugs/Smoking. Close to Myrtletown Shopping. Access to kitchen/patio. $450/ month, $300/deposit, 1/2 utilities. Clarence 362-2443. No Calls after 9 p.m. (R-1018)

LIVE AMONG THE ELK & THE REDWOODS FOR LESS

• PRIVATE FISHING LAKE • Clean bathrooms, free hot showers • Full hookups, laundromat • Campfires allowed • 2 Well behaved pets OK • Dry Lagoon Beach & market nearby • $400/mo. plus electricity • ASK ABOUT MOVE-IN SPECIAL! • RETIREES, HSU STUDENTS, FULLTIMERS WELCOME

• Must have RV on trailer Call 707-488-2181 or write bobmccormick@etahoe.com for details

EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 3222 17th St., Unit C. W/S/G Paid, MtM, Cat OK, Spacious, Garage, Rent $775, Vacant 10/16. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2266 Redwood St.,Unit B. W/S/G Paid, Near Park, PO & Stores, W/C Cat, Rent $760, Vacant 10/1. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 1926 Mesa Ave. Ocean View! Garage, MtM, Pets Considered, Rent $1200. Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1004) EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 17 W. 14th St. 6 Month Lease, W/C Pets, Den & DR, New Paint, Garage, Rent $975, Vac 10/3. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1004) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2275 Summit Ridge Rd. Humboldt Hill, MtM, Pets Considered. Rent $1200. Vacant 10/3. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-1004) EUREKA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 3175 Cottage. MtM or 12 Month Lease, Garage, Pets Considered, Rent $1325 Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) FORTUNA 3+BD/3BA HOUSE. 54 Tompkins Hill Rd. Panoramic Views, Pet Considered, MtM, Rent $2200, Vacant Soon. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) MCKINLEYVILLE 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE . 1245 Haven Ln.,Unit B. W/S/G Paid, SEC 8 OK, MtM, Small Pet Considered, Rent $750, Vacant 10/12. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) M C K I N L E Y V I L L E 2 B D/ 1 BA APARTMENT. 1138 Gassoway, #15. W/S/G Paid, 6 Month Lease, Small Pets OK, Rent $765. Vacant Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-1004) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carport, dishwasher, some utilities. $795, (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1004) ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Onsite laundry, parking, some utilities. $650, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-1004) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Fireplace, garage, yard, laundry hookups. $1335. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R1004) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Fridge, stove, all utilities paid. $600. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1004)

EUREKA 2 BEDROOM APT. Carport, storage, onsite laundry. $775. (707) 443-8227, www.TheRentalHelpers.com.(R-1004) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Fireplace, 2 car garage, pets considered, yard. $1300. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-1004) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Dishwasher, shared laundry, some utilities, $895. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R1004) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer included, sun room, $1395. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R1004) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM APT. Laundry hookups, some utilities. $795. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-1004) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard w/care, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1300. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-1004) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates. com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

Business Rentals RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-1011) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

Real Estate

CONTINUED ON PAGE 44

Buy/Sell/Trade Back From Illness and Open During Construction HAS

N DESIG

NS ER JEA N

HALLO ITEMS

AND

20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN) (RE1004) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227) FSBO HUMBOLDT HILL 3BD/2BA 1120 SF. $160,000. Quiet Neighborhood. Tiled kitchen counters, oak cabinets, dishwasher, windows, sliding glass door upgraded, furnace 11 years old, fireplace with insert, large fenced yard, new deck, attached garage, new water heater, new laminate floor, all appliances. 442-0373. (RE-1025)

Auto CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-1004) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

hat’s New W 335 E Street Eureka 445-8079 •

Tues - Sat 10:30AM - 5PM

FLASHBACK 443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues & Sun

SELECT SALE: As is & Zombies *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL ! * Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945. (BST-1004)

Buy/Sell/Trade

on Page 47 Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www. chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-1025)

PURSES, PLATES & PLASTIC WARE 1/2 OFF! Green Tagged Clothes 25¢! Make DQ your first Halloween Stop too! Oct. 2-6. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. Providing Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-1004) 400AMP CUTLERHAMMER. Transfer switch $1200 NEVER USED! Cost new was $1800. Buyer picks up. Call: (707) 445-9691 (BST-1004)

WEE

Vintage Clothing Furniture, Housewares & more! THE

CLOTHING DOCK &

K STREET ANNEX

11th & K Streets, Arcata

822-8288

Manufactured in Humboldt County

Micronized Compost Tea & MICRO-ORGANICS line Go Green-Tranzition-Blissful Bloom

www.sensational-solutions.com

Eureka Office Building

Commercially zoned Victorian near Ingomar Club. Renovated and up to code from the perimeter foundation to the solar panel roof. $265, 000 www.eurekaoffice4sale.com

Come on in!

Swains Flat OUtpost Garden Center General Store 707-777-3385

Garden Center 707-777-3513

State Hwy 36 • Milemarker 19.5 • Carlotta • Open 9-6

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 4, 2012

43


the Buy/Sell/Trade

NEW

in ON AT I C O L

Old

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 43

Services

Pets • Grooming & Boarding by Linn •

n Tow

Gentle Professional Grooming Since 1989

CAPTURING YOUR DAY IN THE WATER.

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • groomingbyLinn.com • 826-0903

SET UP YOUR SHOOT TODAY:

artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

Sale

Pottery & Glass

Fri, Oct 12 _ Noon-9 Sat, Oct 13 _ 9-4 Sun, Oct 14 _ 9-4

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227) OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Have an extra fixer up cars in the driveway? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Weekly specials available on Facebook 3954 Jacobs Ave. Eureka 443-7397

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

      

 

by Sophia Dennler •

For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets 2 MINI MALE DACHSHUND PUPPIES. (dapple) Rare, gray, white, black with brown trim 506-5302. (P-1004) LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

drewhylandstudio.com/surf

Custom Pet Portraits

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com BE A LIFE SAVER! Your blood donation is always needed!! Call the Northern California Community Blood Bank. Call for Bloodmobile schedule. 2524 Harrison St., Eureka, 443-8004

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Services

SEA BREEZE CLEANING CO. The home service professional at Sea Breeze will prepare a cleaning service designed around the unique detail of your home,and personal cleaning requirements. Licensed/ Bonded Call 834-2898 (S-1004) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-1025)

DIRECTV SPECIAL. Offer. 2012 NFL Sun. Ticket included for FREE. $34.99/month (1yr.) Free HD/DVR. Call 888-881-3313 (S-1004) SLOW INTERNET? Exede offers download speeds 4 times faster! Call now and save $100 on set-up fee. Call (888) 797-6977 (S-1004) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use solar energy to heat your home-a proven technology-reasonably priced-Sunlight Heating-CA lic. #972834-(707) 502-1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S-1025) CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-1004) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227)

Renewable Energy Systems Consciencious Affordable Clean

Industrial Residential Agricultural Commercial # 707.822.0100 | Lic CA C10 876832 www.McKeeverEnergyandElectric.com

“Promoting the Conservation of Our Natural Resources – Commercial, Agricultural, Residential & Industrial”

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

Sales

Service

Solutions

HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded #3860. Summer Cleaning Special! (707) 444-2001. (S-1011) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-1122)


Music

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936 SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) MCKEEVER ENERGY AND ELECTRIC. McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc. Electrical Contracting, Renewable Energy, Planning & Design. Contact Nate McKeever at 707.822.0100, info@mckeeverenergy.com, or www.mckeeverenergy.com. Lic # 965286. (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 4438373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson Attorney DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc. FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

Music PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1011) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1108) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-1122)

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

Community CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

Community ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice,*Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com (AAN CAN) (C-1004) HEY, GOOD LOOKIN’. How to improve one’s body image will be discussed it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Oct. 7, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www. campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-1004) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-1004) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124) TOO MANY TUBAS, OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

&Spirit CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

Services

body, mind

LOW COST FLU CLINICS

Open to the Humboldt Community $25 cash or check

Flu Clinic Hot Line: 268-2347

Annex • 2440 23rd Street Suite C • 2280 Harrison Ave. Wednesday Oct. 3 & 10

Thursday Oct. 4

Thursday Oct. 11

9am - 1pm 2pm - 5pm Annex

9am - 5pm Annex

9am - 5pm Suite C

home & garden Eureka Internal Medicine

service directory

home & garden

Need some help home around the house?

(Brick Red Door)

Insurance billed for EIM patients.

service directory

Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

CD releaSe party for Denise payne-Ollivier’s first album, Sounds For Healing Volume I,the Opening

& garden

home & garden

service directory service directory see page 9

service directory

October 7th, 4:30 pm at Hum Spa in McKinleyville Be the first to experience these healing meditations. Denise will finish with live playing of singing bowls and other ancient instruments. CDs will be available to purchase. Space is limited, call 707-839-9540 for more info.

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012

45


body, mind ▼

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45

&Spirit

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems? Just need someone to talk to?

Energy Life Center

Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

Open house oct. 13th 10am-3pm

Come Celebrate Our

Autumn Sale

Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

October 12th, 13th & 14th

25% Off all Bulk Herbs and teas

707-822-5244

Medical Cannabis Evaluations Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years. Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Call for Walk-in Availability Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems co n

fi d e n t i a l &

co

assionate mp

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT GET TESTED FOR 7 STDS. $168. Order and test the same day. Results usually within 72 hours. FDA approved labs. ItsDiscreet. com (AAN CAN) (MB-1004)

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

10% Off off everything in the store Mon.-Sat. 10a.m.-6p.m., Sun. 11a.m.-4p.m. On the Plaza Arcata • (707) 822-5296 • www.moonriseherbs.com

Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1025) LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH, FROM THE INSIDE OUT. Dave Berman, Clinical Hypnotist. (707) 845-3749. www.ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-1004)

Sabrina Knight MA, MFT Marriage & Family Therapist Individuals & Families

443-3611  517 3rd Street, Suite 21 Eureka, CA 95501

LCS # 23232

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

839-1244

Friday-Sunday 4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW

BUY THE BLUE PILL! Cialis 20mg, Viagra 100mg. 44 pills for only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Satisfaction guaranteed. Call Now 1-888-763-6153. (MB-1004) MIDLIFE MASSAGE & BODYWORK FOR WOMEN. Danielle Jeanne, CMP (CAMTC #26673) 269-0514. (MB-1011) WHY CRANIOSACRAL BODYWORK? Migraines, deeply-held emotions, chronic pain, and more greatly benefit from this gentle reconnection of your body’s circuitry. Bodyworker since 1979. Cecilie Hooper 6773969. (MB-1018) BREATHE LOVE, CLAIRVOYANT ENERGY HEALING INTEGRATED WITH AXIS MUNDI ASTROLOGY. Gain clarity for self-empowerment. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 8451450. www.sacredenergyspace. com (MB-1122) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

COLON HYDROTHERAPY WITH MOLLY LEUTHNER. At Jade Dragon Medical Spa. Closed System. Using an F.D.A. approved medical device, warm water is gently inserted into the colon. When the colon contracts, the water is flushed out through the device. Take an internal bath! 822-4300. (MB-1011) doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra.com/19719 (MB-1115) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124) NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Lind a N e s b i t t , M S W, LC S W (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/ anxiety, depression, grief/ loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 2680929. (MB-1025)

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www. tarotofbecoming.com. (MB-1227) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-1227)

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching nonviolent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www. northcoastaikido.org, info@ northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 8261701, www.arcatazengroup.org. (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@salinarain.com, www. salinarain.com. (MB-1227)

GIT YER VALSSAGE! Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage. Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist


be a life saver! Your blood donation is always needed!! Call the Northern California Community Blood Bank. Call for Bloodmobile schedule. 2524 Harrison St., Eureka, 443-8004

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY Weekend Massage Clinic Special ½ hour $30 1 hour $45

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

Do it Legally

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$ 85

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 12-6pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI , Veterans & Students New First Tim MMJ Patie e nts

SAVE

$ 50

with men tion of this ad

Lowest Price Evaluations in HC

Medical Cannabis Consultants

(707) 407- 0527 508 I Street, Eureka

(across from HC Court House)

www.northcoastjournal.com

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227)

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

this week Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

real est

$449,500

3 bed, 2 bath, 2,150 sq ft meticulously maintained Jacoby Creek home, nearly new decking & roof, beautiful yards, spacious kitchen overlooking step-down family room with gas fireplace, turn key

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

this we

$249,900

3 bed, 1 bath, 1000 sq ft cute McKinleyville home on large lot, second unit is 600 sq ft, great investment potential or live in one & rent out the other, lots of room to garden, RV parking

$215,000

real estate 4 bed, 2 bath, 2,000 sq ft Rio Dell home located a block from the Eel River, gorgeous views of the bluffs, lots of natural light, solarium, fruit trees and plenty of room for gardening and animals

this week

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

■ Dows Prairie

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

BeautIful cuStOm hOme with dramatic entry! Soaring ceilings in this lovely 2005 home. The cook’s kitchen adjoins a large dining area, the library/office has many built-in bookcases, and the master suite is downstairs. Includes a secondary, completely separate, home for rental or extended family. mls#236296 $699,500

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

neW

Willow Creek Land/Property

LISt

InG!

+/-80 acres off of Friday Ridge Road. uSFS access, year round spring & creek, level to sloping topography, meadows, beautiful views. elevation approximately 4,300 ft.

$169,000 Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

Weitchpec Land/Property

+/-6 acres of wooded property off of HWY 169. this undeveloped property boasts timber, river frontage as well as river views and excellent year round access.

$44,000

Zenia Land/Property

this beautiful, flat 40 acre parcel features 2 unfinished cabins, a yurt, small outbuildings, year round developed creek, phenomenal views and easy access. perfect year round homesteading property or summer retreat. Call today!

$269,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

2012 northcoastjournal.com NorthCOAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, OCT. 4, 2012 northcoastjournal.com• •NORTH

47


Sunny Brae •Glendale Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Prices Effective October 3 through October 16, 2012

Meet our neighbor

King oysters, shiitake, lion’s mane and nameko

all grow at Mycality Mushrooms under the watchful eye of Mike Egan. Mike started growing mushrooms ten years ago and is currently farming in Fairhaven. There are petri dishes, seeds, autoclaves for sanitized sawdust and huge climate-controlled rooms in the world of cultivated fungus. His organic debris is composted and available to local gardeners. Mike says, “I wanted to be involved in agriculture and have found myself a niche with exotic mushrooms. I am a fortunate transplant of twenty years in Humboldt County.” All this work still leaves time for Mike and Jake to go surfing at the north jetty. Jake perpetually carries a stick to drop at your feet so that anyone can enjoy the great opportunity to play a game of fetch. Mike’s dried and fresh cultivated mushrooms are available at restaurants and, of course, Murphy’s Markets.

Mike Egan Mycality Mu shroom

s

Wholesoy

Back to Nature

Back to Nature

1 Liter

Apple, Berry, Fruit Punch 10 pak

12-13.5 oz.

Yogurt

88

Granola

100% Juice

¢ Ea.

4

Endangered Species

29 Ea.

3

99 Ea.

Natural Chocolate Bars 3 oz.

1

99 Ea.


North Coast Journal 10-04-12 Edition