North Coast Journal 09-22-2022 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 Vol. XXXIII Issue 38 northcoastjournal.com

+ 11 Unanswered

questions 44 Condimentia

Sara Bareilles Comes Home pg 11


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 4 5 7 9 11

Mailbox Poem

Wonder of it All

News ‘Dire’

News

Supes Censure Embattled Planning Commission Chair

On The Cover

Sara Bareilles Comes Home

14 On the Table

What’s Good: Familiar Sandwiches, New Burritos

15

Front Row

NCRT’s Tiny Beautiful Things

16 Trinidad Arts Night Sept. 24, 6 to 9 p.m.

16 Home & Garden Service Directory

17 18

Sept. 22, 2022 • Volume XXXIII Issue 38 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2022

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITERS

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com

Fishing the North Coast

CALENDAR EDITOR

Tuna Water Still Sitting off Eureka

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Get Out!

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Together Again at the North Country Fair

19 The Setlist To the Fall

Burger Week

Special Pull-out Section

Apple Harvest Festival Special Insert

21 Calendar 26 Screens

Hell is Visiting Other People

27 Workshops & Classes 27 Cartoon 28 Field Notes

William Carson and his Mansion

28 Sudoku & Crossword 32 Free Will Astrology 33 Classifieds

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Rory Hubbard, Renée Thompson ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Heather Luther heather@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Trevor Lee trevor@northcoasjtournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER/DISTRIBUTION

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

The All Species Parade at the North Country Fair always brings out an eclectic mix of creativity and costumes. Read more on page 18. Photo by Mark Larson

On the Cover Illustration by Dave Brown Inset: Sarah Bareilles / Shutterstock

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMERGENCY PERMIT WORLD OIL ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES - FORTUNA 200 DINSMORE DRIVE, FORTUNA, CALIFORNIA 95540 The California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) has issued an Emergency Permit to World Oil Environmental Services - Fortuna (WOES - Fortuna) to transfer ignitable hazardous waste from a tanker truck to another tanker truck or container at the WOES Fortuna facility’s permitted truck loading/unloading area located at 200 Dinsmore Drive, Fortuna, California 95540. On August 26, 2022, World Oil Environmental Services, a transporter, arrived at the WOES - Fortuna facility to off-load approximately 1,445 gallons of used oil. The used oil was tested and found to be ignitable. WOES - Fortuna does not have a permit to manage ignitable hazardous waste and the tanker truck does not meet the specifications that would allow it to transport ignitable hazardous waste. DTSC has determined that the waste poses an imminent and substantial endangerment to human health and the environment if not properly managed. Therefore, an emergency permit was issued to allow WOES - Fortuna to pump the waste from the truck to an approved truck or container and transport the waste offsite to an authorized hazardous waste treatment facility. This Emergency Permit is effective from September 2, 2022, through October 31, 2022. The Emergency Permit includes measures to minimize any adverse impact to the community and the environment. WOES - Fortuna is required to submit a follow-up report to DTSC verifying that all hazardous waste was safely transferred. CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT (CEQA): DTSC has determined that the issuance of this permit is exempt from the requirements of CEQA and has filed a Notice of Exemption (NOE) with the State Clearinghouse. The Emergency Permit, NOE, and WOES - Fortuna’s request for this project are available for review at the file room located at: DTSC Sacramento Regional Office 8800 Cal Center Drive Sacramento, California 95826 (916) 255-3758, please call for an appointment

CONTACT INFORMATION: If you have any questions or concerns, please contact: Lung-Yin Tai Project Manager 916-255-3615 Lung-Yin.Tai@dtsc.ca.gov

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Thelmy M. Alvarez Public Participation Specialist 323-416-4138 Thelmy.Alvarez@dtsc.ca.gov

Russ Edmondson Public Information Officer 916-323-3372 Russ.Edmondson@dtsc.ca.gov

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

MAILBOX

‘To the Highest Bidder’

Editor: It is revealing that ordinary western Ukrainians know as little about the history which led to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine as we do (“Uniting for Ukraine,” Sept. 8). There is no recognition of the Reagan and GHW Bush administrations’ solemn promises not to move “one inch further east.” The Clinton administration broke this promise and promptly began installing NATO bases bristling with missiles, around Russia. Over the next years the U.S. withdrew from the ABM, the INF, the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, the Open Skies Treaty and many more. Ukrainians, as ourselves, are ignorant of the U.S.’s critical role in the 2014 coup, and the rapid arming and training of Ukraine in the ensuing years. We know nothing of Ukraine’s years of shelling Donetz and Luhansk, taking 14,000 eastern Ukrainian lives, nor NATO’s provocations, the Minsk accords or of Russia’s repeated requests to join NATO. The first duty of a country’s leader is to protect their people. Zelensky threw Ukraine to the wolves. All Ukraine had to do to prevent war was to keep Reagan’s promise. The recent spectacle of Zelensky, wearing a T-shirt proclaiming, “The Power of Freedom,” ringing a bell to open Wall Street’s stock exchange, as he offers his country to the highest bidder, defines freedom in a way we know all too well. Ellen Taylor, Petrolia

An ‘Example of Misinformation’

Editor: Miss Gustin’s letter regarding Torgensen’s cartoon about vaccines was an excellent example of misinformation (Mailbox, Sept. 15.). She started with something true: Vaccines don’t necessarily keep people from getting COVID. Then she went on to imply that we, the public, had been lied to about that. And she used emotionally charge statements like, “publicly admitted” and “it’s disturbing” (italics are mine). She purposely misconstrued the truth that Faucci, et al weren’t “admit-

Terry Torgerson

ting” anything, they were trying to educate public about realistic expectations. I listen to CNN and NPR — surely pretty mainstream media. From almost the beginning, scientists, epidemiologists and other health professions let us know the vaccines would not necessarily prevent you from getting the virus. What they said the vaccines do, and continue to do incredibly well, is decrease severe illness, hospitalization and death. The statistical decoupling of infection rates from deaths is proof of the vaccine pudding. Also the fact that the majority of COVID deaths are in unvaccinated folks. As to “...a portion of the public that is resistant to facts, science and reality,” Ms. Gustin, I am willing to put my sources next to your sources any day. I ask you, Ms. Gustin, to stop promulgating misinformation. Speak the whole truth, or nothing. For those wanting to see facts and figures about who is getting COVID and who is dying from it, I suggest the epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina’s blog. Lauri Rose, Dinsmore

‘Great Value to All’

Editor: Let’s talk about the Jacobs Junior High property. The Jacobs property is up for sale. Why? Back in the day, Eureka City Schools had 8,000 students. Now enrollment is less than half of that at 3,600 students. Loss of a lot of families. The city of Eureka puts forth a price limit of $2.8 million. The City looks at the cost of the land. Have not seen much conversation


Wonder of It All Finally, it hits me about the long-term benefits of increased housing and revitalizing a neighborhood. The citizens of Eureka just stepped up big time for the good folks at City Hall and approved Measure H, our new 1.25-percent sales tax (“Maze of Measures,” Oct. 8, 2020). Measure H was projected to bring in $9.6 million per year: the existing 0.5-percent tax bringing in $3.8 million with the 0.75-percent increase bringing in $5.8 million. With so much need for housing, and with such a huge tax and revenue increase, why isn’t Eureka City Hall rising to the occasion on this opportunity for the residents of Eureka? Where is the money from this huge tax increase going? As Eureka City Hall places a $2.8 million limit for the Jacobs property, it is adding balloon payments to its pension debt payments and will be spending ten times that amount, $28 million, over just the next four years, on pension debt. Yearly pension debt payments will then increase to $8.4 million in 2029 with payments continuing until 2040. With the loss of so many students and with the desperate need for housing, Eureka City Hall and Eureka City Schools need to work together and step up for citizens and students. The Jacobs Junior High property, put toward housing and other direct benefits for the citizens, will be of great value to all. Patrick Cloney, Eureka

‘Great Writing’

Editor: Once again, thank you for providing us with great writing. Jennifer Savage’s “The Coastal Commission is Not the Enemy” (Sept. 15) is as near perfect as an informative opinion piece can be — clear, well thought out and arranged, and wonderfully readable. She wrote no more and no less than was needed to make her point — and to completely inform anyone who might be still unclear about the issue. And Jennifer Fumiko-Cahill’s cat’s-eye view was a delightful and spot-on metaphor (“The Cat Would Like You to Stop Being So Divisive,” Sept. 15). (At least I hope it was a metaphor, otherwise it went completely under my head and I missed something.) Alan Sanborn, Arcata

Re: ‘44 Feet’

Editor: Re: “44 Feet” by J.A. Savage (Sept. 15): I wish your writer had actually quantified the risks posed by the five dry casks holding spent fuel rods at PG&E’s Buhne Point station. What was PG&E’s response to the concerns raised here? They were asked, right? And, for such an important topic, I could do without references to a celebrity cook’s hair, beer-drinking and the insomnia suffered by “a former utility employee in the nuclear

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power industry.” (Was he a materials engineer/geologist/safety officer?) According to your article, the bluff where the casks are now stored has fallen in height by 52 feet since the 1800s. Will it be underwater in 200 years, making “44 Feet” irrelevant? That “20 inches of sea level rise since 1970” — it’s actually about 7 inches. Not insignificant, but also irrelevant, given that 46 feet of water swept over the Fukushima sea wall. “The safety of the radioactive waste depends on past assumptions and scientific data that no longer apply.” I looked in vain for exactly which assumptions and data have been superseded, and how they affect the safety of the casks. The accidents at working nuclear plants (Fukushima and Chernobyl) seem out of place in a discussion on fuel rod storage. The article questions the integrity of the million-dollar Hi-Star dry casks which house spent fuel rods at the site, but I’ve yet to see any reports of a failure of any of the 2,000-plus casks now stored in the U.S. (plus thousands more in 20 other countries). Not incidentally, Fukushima’s dry casks were undamaged by the tsunami. Your writer doesn’t mention it, but personally I’d feel better knowing that the air circulation vents (which prevent the casks overheating) are checked for blockages daily at Buhne Point. Barry Evans, Eureka

Write a Letter!

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


NEWS

‘Dire’

PG&E’s lack of electric capacity puts major projects on shaky ground By Iridian Casarez and Kimberly Wear newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

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ocal and state officials are raising concern and demanding answers about PG&E’s professed inability to provide new electric hookups across the southern portions of the county, threatening major economic development from Fortuna down to the Mendocino County border and putting future projects, including a new Garberville hospital, at risk. Second District Supervisor Michelle Bushnell and city managers from Fortuna and Rio Dell, who all met with PG&E representatives in recent weeks, said they were informed it would take an estimated $900 million and up to 10 years to make the needed upgrades to increase capacity in those areas. During a Fortuna City Council discussion Monday, Bushnell described the situation as “very, very dire” and called the seven- to 10-year timeline “not acceptable.” “I have a hospital that has to go in Garberville, and it has to be powered,” she

told the council. “It’s the only hospital in 100 miles from Willits.” The lack of capacity on two main transmission lines — one coming from Cottonwood over State Route 36 and the other out of Laytonville — not only jeopardizes major development projects but also the county’s Climate Action Plan and local governments’ ability to meet state requirements for new residential housing. In an interview with the Journal, Bushnell said PG&E representatives told her there are currently only a handful of hookups available in the cities of Fortuna and Rio Dell, and “zero from Rio Dell to the Humboldt-Mendocino line.” Bushell said she also questioned the company about the nearly $1 billion price tag and how the utility planned on paying for the improvements, concerned the costs will be passed on to local ratepayers. “They didn’t have a definitive answer,” she

In a statement, the utility did not address Journal questions about how the situation got to this point but said its “multi-year grid plan is addressing needs in this area through projects already in progress, and others planned over the next few years.” “These include a line reconductoring project and upgrades to the Rio Dell substation to increase capacity in Fortuna and Rio Dell; transmission and distribution system line reconductoring, and upgrades at the Garberville substation, to increase capacity for serving the Garberville area,” it reads. “While some of this work is longer-term, in the short-term our capacity work planned through next year will support smaller energy load applications.” An earlier version of this statement specifically mentioned Jerold Phelps Community Hospital as a project that would be supported but the company then recalled it and issued an updated version that was

said. “They didn’t commit at all.” The supervisor also said she’s taken the issue to state Sen. Mike McGuire and they are going up the chain of PG&E in a search for answers and possible solutions. “It’s a top priority right now to figure this out,” she said. McGuire said in a statement he’s told the utility’s CEO “this half-baked initiative won’t stand and they must do better.” “We’ve continued to meet with utility representatives and we’ve let them know we’re expecting alternate solutions,” he said. “We’ve also been in constant communication with county officials and we’ll be bringing local elected leaders and PG&E together soon to discuss potential alternatives.” PG&E representatives are scheduled to again meet with local officials in the next week and give presentations to the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors and the Fortuna City Council in November.

Continued on next page »

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NEWS Continued from previous page

nearly identical but omitted reference to the Southern Humboldt hospital. The statement notes that building new transmission facilities requires the involvement of multiple parties, including customers, land owners, environmental regulators and the California Independent System Operator, a nonprofit that oversees the state’s bulk electric system. The utility’s statement acknowledges “past projects have experienced delays.” “We are committed to working creatively and collaboratively to develop standard and creative solutions to meet our customers’ needs,” PG&E states. Meanwhile, officials in Fortuna and Rio Dell are trying to figure out next steps, while feeling blindsided by news of the capacity limitations. Fortuna City Manager Merrit Perry said the first inkling of an issue came about six months ago when the city was installing a Tesla battery back-up at the wastewater pump station only to be informed by PG&E that it might not be able to provide service. But Perry said it took until now to get PG&E at the table with some answers, although many questions still remain. “They basically told us the Eel River Valley

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is capacity-limited, both in distribution and transmission,” Perry said, adding PG&E representatives relayed the utility won’t be able to provide new electricity for larger projects, like the proposed Mill Site development, until upgrades are done. In addition to compromising Mill Site plans and other economic development projects the city has already invested money into, Perry said he’s concerned about potential impacts to incoming housing projects. Housing is a high priority for the state, which wants 3,390 new units built in Humboldt by 2027. Additionally, Perry said the county’s Climate Action Plan, which includes transitioning new residential builds to electrical energy rather than natural gas, as well as putting more electric cars on the road, could be jeopardized. Also at risk are the city’s plans for improvements to the wastewater treatment facility and a new police station. The lack of capacity, Perry said, could “slam the brakes” on the county’s CAP, as well as derail Fortuna’s efforts to promote economic development and make needed improvements to city services. He added that PG&E representatives made it sound like the utility could “try to fit in smaller proj-

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

ects” but it was unclear where it would “draw the line” or whether PG&E might discontinue new residential hookups. Rio Dell officials also recently met with PG&E and California Public Utility Commission representatives to talk about the issue, which Mayor Debra Garnes first brought to the regulatory authority’s attention in March after a $4.5 million development was stymied by a lack of available power. City Manager Kyle Knopp called the state of PG&E’s capacity levels an “issue of paramount importance” that should be of concern to the entire county and region, not just communities around the Eel River Valley. “We did our best to communicate the urgency of the issue and we’re going to be proactive in feeding them every bit of information on development prospects here,” he said. Knopp said the timeline PG&E laid out for upgrades in the past keeps getting extended to what he now deems an unacceptable period of time. “PG&E is recognizing there are some issues with the distribution system in the region … and that there are going to have to be some pretty significant investments in the distribution system in order to realize future growth,” he said. In a letter to the CPUC back in May, Garnes said PG&E representatives told the city in 2018 that certain upgrades would be completed in three years, but now “that timeline is completely up in the air and seemingly no progress has been made at all.” She went on to describe the situation as “unacceptable” and “baffling,” noting Rio Dell “is located just 1 mile away from one of California’s largest green biomass power plants rated at 28 MW with distribution lines running through the community.” In a June response, CPUC Commissioner John Reynolds, who is overseeing a PG&E application that includes “investments in electric distribution infrastructure,” writes that he shares the mayor’s concerns about PG&E’s lack of capacity in the area and the length of the upgrade timeline. He said the schedule for PG&E’s application anticipates a CPUC decision by mid-2023. “Electric distribution grid capital improvements take time to review and approve, but PG&E should be as transparent as possible about the timeline and next steps with local governments,” he wrote. “While we cannot predetermine the outcome of any proposals … at the very least we intend for city of Rio Dell officials to have the latest information on projects affecting the city.” The Rio Dell City Council was scheduled to discuss the capacity issue at its Tuesday meeting as the Journal went to press. Knopp said the situation has been “extremely concerning, especially the way it eked out,” and noted the capacity issue

is “hugely problematic” for projects in the city and neighboring ones that community members have spent money developing. “The timeline for these upgrades is unreal and begs the question, ‘What else?’” he said, also raising concerns about future housing hookups. He said he also brought up PG&E’s previous statement to the Journal that pointed to large cannabis activity as a basis for the issue and the representatives were “apologetic for trying to affix a cause to a certain industry or customer type.” Bushnell said she had a similar conversation with PG&E representatives, noting it was “absolutely not the case” and she doesn’t want to see the utility trying to put this issue on a certain industry or bait one community against another. “We are all in this together. We have to figure this out,” Bushnell said. “The bottom line is we are happy to help in any way we can but they’ve got to be straight up with us.” Back at the Fortuna City Council meeting, council members expressed concerns about economic impacts, as well as the city’s ability to meet housing and climate mandates. Council members also supported bringing the matter to the attention of the governor and the Legislature, expressing frustration that the city had to learn of the shortage on its own. Perry, who previously described the situation as putting the Eel River Valley “on the edge of a cliff,” said this was a time to hold the governor, the state’s Public Utilities Commission and PG&E accountable. He said he wants answers on what services PG&E’s is required to provide, noting: “It’s a huge problem. A billion dollars is a huge number for this county.” “They have the privilege of being a public utility and having a captive audience, but then when they’re not adequately planning for their facilities and they’re going to leave all of their customers hanging with no ability to connect,” Perry said. “How is that an acceptable position to be in as a company that’s granted a public utility status? And what is the PUC’s role in overseeing that and ensuring we have a reliable power supply that can be provided to new development in a timely manner.” l Iridian Casarez (she/her) is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at (707) 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@northcoastjournal. com. Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez. Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the digital editor at the Journal. Reach her at (707) 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear.


NEWS

Supes Censure Embattled Planning Commission Chair Bohn supports asking appointee to step down as chair but won’t seek his resignation By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

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he Humboldt County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Sept. 20 to censure Planning Commissioner Alan Bongio and ask him to step down from the position of chair due to his repeated outbursts at the commission’s Aug. 18 meeting that many have condemned as racist and inappropriate. First District Supervisor Rex Bohn made the motion to censure Bongio and ask him to step down as chair, but said he would not support asking for his outright resignation from the commission. Bohn said Bongio’s comments “hurt” him but said he’s known the man for 55 years and lauded his almost 10 years serving on the commission. “We all have bad days; we all say things we shouldn’t say. It was beyond that — I agree — and he got caught up in the fever,” Bohn said, quickly adding that Bongio has repeatedly been voted chair by his peers, has a meeting attendance record “second-to-none” and had not received any written complaints in his time on the commission until one was filed Sept. 19 by the Wiyot Tribe stemming from his conduct at the August meeting. “Do we take all that and just throw it down the drain and give him no respect for what’s done for the last 10 years?” Bohn concluded: “I can’t fire my friend. I’m sorry.” But Bohn said if Bongio refuses to step down as the commission’s chair, he would then ask him to resign from the commission. The discussion — instigated by Fifth District Supervisor Steve Madrone’s request that a discussion and possible censure of Bongio be put on the agenda — came as the embattled commissioner faces increasing pressure on various fronts. The trouble started at the Aug. 18 Planning Commission meeting as the commission mulled approving permits needed to

allow local developer Travis Schneider to get a county stop work order lifted and resume construction of his family home off Indianola Cutoff. When learning that two local tribes — the Blue Lake Rancheria and the Wiyot Tribe — opposed the permit approvals, feeling more details needed to be added to proposed mitigation and restoration plans, Bongio repeatedly made far-reaching comments about “Indians” while accusing the tribes of negotiating in bad faith, trying to extort more concessions out of Schneider, playing a “game” with cultural resources and reneging on an agreement. Tribal officials and others found Bongio’s comments offensive, with Wiyot Tribal Chair Ted Hernandez saying they’d caused him to lose faith in the Planning Commission. During the commission’s Sept. 1 meeting, Bongio apologized to the tribes if he “in any way offended them.” On Sept. 8, heads of nine local nonprofit organizations signed a letter to Bohn asking for Bongio’s resignation or that Bohn rescind his appointment to the Planning Commission, deeming his conduct “unacceptable” and saying it “makes clear that he is not fit for this position.” Then on Sept. 13, Humboldt Community Services District Boardmember Michael Hansen asked that the elected board consider stripping Bongio, one of its members, of his status as board president at its Sept. 27 meeting. The Wiyot Tribe submitted a formal complaint to County Administrative Officer Elishia Hayes and the county’s Human Resources Department deeming Bongio’s language “racist and offensive” and saying he appeared to stop just short of using the insult “Indian giver” in reference to them. Further, the Wiyot Tribe contends Bongio showed a deep bias in favor of the developer and against local tribes and laws

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NEWS

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Continued from previous page

designed to protect their interests during the meeting. Hayes told the board Sept. 20 that she and human resources would be investigating the complaint and determining what future action to take. Madrone, for his part, told the Journal prior to the board’s meeting that he found Bongio’s conduct troubling and felt it needed to be addressed at the board level. “I feel a responsibility to the community,” he said. “It’s not OK and I’m not just going to go around and let that kind of stuff go unchecked and unchallenged. Otherwise, what are we doing here?” While Madrone had suggested the board direct steps to develop a code of conduct and diversity, equity and inclusion policy for the Planning Commission, Hayes indicated such efforts are already under way and will come before the board next month. When that happens, Hayes said staff will present various possible changes to the appointment and removal process. Currently, district commissioners are appointed by their supervisor, and only that supervisor can rescind the appointment. Hayes indicated one option to be considered would see a majority vote of the board determine commissioner appointments and removals. Meanwhile, Bongio also serves as president of the Humboldt Community Services District Board of Directors and during the body’s Sept. 13 meeting, Director Michael Hansen asked that the board consider his removal from that post at its Sept. 27 meeting. “I just think that it was indefensible what he did and someone who’s in all these powerful positions and making these decisions at the very least needs to have some common sense and respect for other people and other cultures,” Hansen told the Journal, explaining why he asked that the board consider stripping Bongio of his presidency. “It’s not the first time Director Bongio has pushed the limits with some of his speech and I felt like it was the least I could do to support others who are dealing with what he did, and basically just the type of person he is.” Bongio did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment for this story. Both Hansen and Madrone said they felt Bongio’s apology at the Sept. 1 meeting didn’t go nearly far enough to address

the damage he’d caused, with Hansen saying, “he apologized more for offending people than the act itself.” Madrone said, “Any time you begin an apology with an if and half-way through there’s a but, it’s not an apology. It just isn’t.” The supervisor’s conversation about Bongio’s conduct came as the county is rolling out a new diversity, equity and inclusion program that includes all-hands training days designed to help staff recognize their implicit or unconscious biases. Bohn said Bongio has already undergone one such training at the supervisor’s request in the wake of the Aug. 18 meeting, and that it’s important he learn “about the cultural aspects of our Native population.” The supervisor added that “part of the problem is education.” “We need to get it out there so it is less confrontational and more learning about how we accept their way of life, their past way of life, and how we move forward with that acceptance all the way through,” he said. Third District Supervisor Mike Wilson said such trainings and efforts need to go well beyond education if they’re going to be meaningful, saying participants really need to look deep inside themselves and confront the biases they carry — biases ingrained and reinforced through generations. “This is actually the real work,” Wilson said, dismissing the notion that Bongio just had a bad day that allowed bias to creep into his comments that he wasn’t already carrying. “It’s not like it just showed up one day and there it was.” Fourth District Supervisor and Board Chair Virginia Bass later struck a similar tone, saying the true work is “internalizing and understanding a way of life” that’s different than yours and working to confront biases that may be present. “I think many of us, including myself, have a lot of work to do,” she said. The Planning Commission’s next scheduled meeting is Oct. 6. It remains to be seen whether Bongio will still be serving as its chair. ●

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at (707) 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

@northcoastjournal


ON THE COVER

Sara Bareilles Comes Home By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

Sara Bareilles playing New York City’s Madison Square Garden in 2019.

I

n “Saint Honesty,” for which Sara Bareilles won a Grammy for Best American Roots Performance in 2019, she sings the praises of rain on one’s face, of it coming in through the windows: “How wild it was to find it/ to finally feel the climate/ instead of only staying dry and warm.” And when she draws out the single syllable of “rain,” spiraling up and away in her clear, steady mezzo-soprano, one wonders if a singer from anywhere but Humboldt could wring as much joy and relief from the word. Bareilles lives in New York, where she shoots the musical comedy series Girls5eva, now in its second season, but she visits her family and friends in Eureka fairly often. Over the phone from Vancouver, Canada, where she’s visiting boyfriend actor Joe Tippett on set, she talks about her return to Eureka for a free outdoor concert at Halvorsen Park on Oct. 16. It’s a gig she’s been wanting to play for years, a way to give back and celebrate the place and people she credits with inspiring and informing her music and writing, her character and the choices she’s made in her career. “I just feel really called to come home and try to … put on an event to really make the community happy,” she says, “a little bright spot, a free concert.” At the age of 42, Bareilles has garnered eight Grammy nominations, two Tony nominations for the music she composed for the Broadway adaptation of Waitress and three Emmy nominations. She’s duetted with Joni Mitchell and sang for the Obamas. But the first stages she sang,

Photo courtesy of the artist

danced and acted on were in Eureka, where her mother Bonnie Halvorsen was active in local theater. In her bestselling 2015 memoir Sounds Like Me: My Life (So Far) in Song, Bareilles describes singing with her sisters Stacey and Jennifer in front of their fireplace as an ersatz stage for her mother and father Paul Bareilles, and later in school musicals and community theater productions. There she found her people and her place, reveling in the camaraderie of choirs and casts, and connection with the audience. She writes, “I felt powerful. And strong. And important. And beautiful. I was hooked.” Writing in her journal was another creative outlet and source of solace she turned to in childhood that continues to serve her personally and artistically. “The seeds of why I became a writer at all are all embedded in my life in Eureka,” she says. She wrote about relationships, family, the overwhelming emotions of love and sorrow, adolescence and growing up — all territory she returned to in songwriting, including her formative first heartbreak that bloomed into the song “Gravity.” She says, “All the seeds of my creative output kind of all root back to my time in Humboldt County … the house I grew up in and the redwood forest around me.” As a self-described chubby kid, Bareilles says she was teased and bullied in elementary school at St. Bernard’s. Along with pushing her toward her journal, it had a profound and lingering effect on her sense of self — particularly throughout her career in the public eye — something

she’s written about in Sounds Like Me and the song “Beautiful Girl.” In that song, she sings as the voice of experience (“Baby, I’ve been there, too”) to a girl who feels ugly and in the shadow of others, offering, “Let me remind you one more time that just maybe you’re beautiful but you just can’t see.” Painful though it was, she says she’s grateful the experience taught her empathy and the value of kindness. “It takes time to learn kindness,” she says, noting she holds no grudges against her old classmates. “That period of my life really cemented the feeling in me that I do not want to be someone who makes anyone feel outcast,” an ethos that’s come to feed into her political voice since the 2016 election. As a “humanist” who says she tends toward a “bleeding heart,” Bareilles says she recognizes, “I’m in a very privileged position to have a platform. I try not to talk too much about shit I don’t know about,” but she’s not afraid to express her opinions. “There’s a lot of people who want to tell artists to ‘Stay in your lane; don’t have opinions.’ I’ve been told to fuck off many times online. It’s part of the nature of the beast right now.” Most troubling to her these days is the breakdown of communication between those with conflicting political views. “I come home to a community that is a very interesting dichotomy … we run the

spectrum of belief systems.” This, she notes with a laugh, leads to some interesting conversations with family members. “I’m not coming home to stand on soapbox,” she says, adding that she wants to focus on music, humanity and community. “But I’m not gonna apologize for the fact that there are things that really matter to me in the world. And if it comes up and I wanna talk about it, then I’m gonna talk about it.” It’s a sentiment echoed in the gentle anthem “Brave,” which she struggled with at first, afraid it was “too poppy” and a little tough to nail live (comforting news for those of us who’ve struggled to hit that high note in the car). Inspired by a friend’s difficulty coming out, the song took on a life (and a hashtag) of its own as a theme for all sorts of people struggling with life, health, secrets and who they were. It also became Hillary Clinton’s presidential camContinued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

St. Bernard’s Elementary class picture, fourth grade, 1989. Courtesy of Sara Bareilles

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

paign walk-up music, to which Bareilles, who endorsed Clinton, Tweeted an enthusiastic “YAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSSS.” Over the years, Bareilles has put her humanism where her mouth is. In 2011, in the aftermath of the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami in the Tohoku region of Japan, she and her bandmates on tour volunteered with a nonprofit organization called All Hands to help with cleanup in Ofunato, clearing gutters and taking down moldy walls. “The level of devastation was nothing I had ever seen in my life,” she says. “But it was also incredible way to sort of see after disaster … the silver lining is how humanity can show up for each other.” Eureka Mayor Susan Seaman says she’s been impressed with how Bareilles has shown up for Eureka, too, citing the performer’s donations of musical instruments to Eureka High School, scholarships for local girls to attend the nonprofit Girls with Impact Business Academy, gifting books to the Humboldt Literacy Project and funds in support of Betty Kwan Chinn Homeless Foundation and Humboldt Area Foundation. In fact, two days ahead of the Eureka concert, Bareilles will be playing the Masonic Auditorium in San Francisco in partnership with the Good Tidings Foundation, which raises money for music spaces and equipment for children. Good Tidings Founder Larry Harper says he wanted to work with Bareilles partly because she’s from Eureka, which he feels is often overlooked in terms of funding. At Bareilles’ direction, proceeds from the Oct. 14 show in San Francisco will go to the cost of refurbishing the stage at the Boys and Girls Club of the Redwoods, as well as building a jam space and full recording studio (all with a local construction company), bringing in new furniture and equipment, and a mural by local artist Mir de Silva. The concert in Halvorsen Park is no small favor, either. According to City Clerk Pam Powell, the cost estimate for the

Playing piano at home on the day of her seventh grade graduation. Courtesy of Sara Bareilles

show produced by Live Nation — with its professional stage, lighting, crew, sound and security — hovers somewhere around the $200,000 mark. But the city of Eureka only committed $25,000 to the cost of the stage, porta-potties and fencing, as well as in-kind staffing help from the Adorni Center staff, Parks and Recreation and Economic Development, while Humboldt Bay Fire’s fire marshal will do a safety check and the Eureka Police Department will assist with security outside the venue. Bareilles is covering the rest. The capacity for the park is 11,000 people, but the cap is set at 8,000 for the show, for which hopeful attendees are already on the Eventbrite waiting list for free tickets, as people swept them up within hours of the announcement Tuesday, Sept. 20. Beer and wine sales will benefit local nonprofits and there will be informational tabling as well. “The quality of it is far more than we expected,” says Seaman, who says she initially thought, “OK, we’ll put out a stage, she’ll bring a piano.” She laughs recalling the initial idea she had while on a walk with Journal contributor Linda Stansberry to honor Bareilles after her Grammy win. “I was gonna be happy with a Zoom.” Instead, she reached out to Bareilles’ mother, who carried a letter along on her next visit, starting a long conversation about what an event might look like. The result is a plan for a pro-level show, thanks to a large investment from the singer herself. “This just goes to show that her connection with our community is truly something. She must really love us.” Seaman has seen Bareilles live before


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Sarah Bareilles. Courtesy of the artist — the first time as an ensemble player in a Ferndale Repertory Theatre production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat. Even as a kid, Seaman says, “She stood out.” But, according to the mayor, her stage presence and awards aren’t the only things that make Bareilles “a great representative for our community.” She says, “For someone who has as many accolades as she does, she just feels very much like a hometown person.” Seaman sees a small-town humility and authenticity in her. “She also is resilient; she talks about her struggles and how she’s overcome them,” including the depression and anxiety Bareilles has been forthright about in her book and interviews. “And she’s strong. … She’s diversified [her career with acting, Broadway, composing and writing], she’s not just a pop singer.” To Seaman, strength and willingness to branch out, along with a little cussing now and again, are very Humboldt qualities. Bareilles would seem to agree. “Humboldt County … is part of why I’m scrappy and part of why I do it the way I wanna do it, and why I’ve been a tough cookie in my own way and forge my own path.” She says she views the people here as “sensitive, tough and powerful … We’re all like the little guy.” That Humboldt scrappiness came in handy, she says, when toting her 90-pound keyboard from gig to gig at the start of her career, playing anywhere and everywhere she could. It gave her the nerve to start her first tour with “no idea how to run it.” And, as Seaman guessed, the Humboldt “woven into” her personality helped her take “a lot of left turns [from] tours and records to theater and writing a book, then TV, then acting.” Bareilles feels her Humboldt upbringing gave her the guts to take risks, despite insecu-

rity and outside voices, and in “the pursuit of a creative life. … Being a young woman in a big industry, there’s a lot of saying no.” When she visits home, Bareilles says she spends most of her time with family, taking nostalgic strolls through Old Town, stopping at Ramone’s and Los Bagels, visiting Sequoia Park and marveling at the natural beauty she grew up with, even just along the drive from Eureka to Arcata. The Oct. 16 show will be a big production, but she hopes “we can just kick back and enjoy the beautiful place we all live in or came from and listen to music.” It’ll also be a wish fulfilled for her. “I’m coming home to share music and celebrate the community and really genuinely offer something that is out of my love for where I come from, for my family that lives there, for my friends, for the people that have impacted my life along the way, and just simply say, ‘Thank you,’ and ‘I love you,’” she says. Seaman has been looking ahead a little obsessively at the shifting weather forecast and hoping for dry weather. She’s planning to have ponchos on hand. “We’re a tough community,” she says with a light chuckle. “I hope we all get out there and get wet if that’s what it takes.” It hardly sounds like a little weather will put off the woman who sang so earnestly about the Baptism of rain on one’s face, not when she has so much to say to the folks at home. “This is my language … making music,” Bareilles says. “So that’s what we’re gonna do is come back and make some music for people.” l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE TABLE

A sweet and spicy, Chinese-inspired shrimp and mango burrito from El Fogón Costeño. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

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“The production of this document was supported, in part, by grant number CFDA 93.924 from the US Administration for Community Living (ACL), DHHS, Washington, DC. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration of Community Living policy. Its contents are solely the responsibility of A1AA/HICAP and do not necessarily represent the official views of ACL.”

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Deo’s Poor Boy makes a comeback at Grotto. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

What’s Good: Familiar Sandwiches, New Burritos By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

Sandwiches Past and Present at Grotto You’ve likely had your last dollop of blue-green Chicago relish in Humboldt for a while, as Chicago Dog House has left the building — specifically the one formerly occupied by Deo’s in Henderson Center (428 Grotto St., Eureka). But the spot didn’t remain vacant long. Paula

Harris has lately opened Grotto there, with a stacked list of sandwiches and wraps. There are specialties of the house, like the hot roast beef and cheddar Cowboy with barbecue sauce on sourdough, with onion, lettuce and tomato, as well as basics like a BLT and a turkey club. Then there are nods to the shop’s lineage, like Carrie’s Italian sub, a version of the hefty salami, pepperoni, ham, capicola,


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prosciutto and provolone sandwich with pepperoncini, lettuce, tomato and oil that won a following at Chicago Dog House. The Deo’s throwbacks, like Deo’s Poor Boy and Deo’s Italian Hogie, are sentimental favorites for Harris, who worked at the counter back when it was shuttling sandwiches through the window to the bar at Dave’s Place next door. Some things have a way of coming back.

El Fogón Costeño’s Bright Ideas, Big Flavors Slow down on Myrtle Avenue, both in the name of safety and so you don’t miss the little red El Fogón Costeño truck — decorated with a pastoral image of burrito-eating bears — tucked in the Chevron station (1679 Myrtle Ave.). Enrique Buenrostro, who originally hails from Acapulco, Mexico, has run his truck out of Fortuna for a couple of years and recently relocated to Eureka. (Not cool keeping this from the rest of the class, Fortuna.) Most of the menu falls under burrito, torta or burger, but the standouts are his maximalist specialties. The Cubana, Buenrostro’s take on the classic kitchen-sink sandwich, stacks grilled hot dog, ham and pork grilled to a browned patty with pinto beans and chorizo, as well as lettuce, tomato, pickled jalapeño, American cheese and mozzarella, all bravely held together by a soft roll. The crisped patty is a nice touch and adds some interest even in a sandwich with so much going on. The Acapulco vibe comes out in a pair of shrimp burritos of Buenrostro’s devising: the Costeño and the mango habanero. In the creamy Costeño, smoky California and árbol chile oil adds heat to grilled shrimp, green bell peppers and onions, white rice, sour cream and a little mayo. The mango habanero shrimp burrito, which has a little honey in its mango sauce, is inspired by his love of Chinese food, and reminiscent of a spicy sweet and sour with green and red peppers and thick tiles of grilled bacon. The rice and soft flour tortilla make a valiant effort to soak up the sauce but watch your shirt. Unless you’re a bear. Then do what you want, I guess. l Share your tips about What’s Good with Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her), arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

NCRT’s Tiny Beautiful Things

And how to be a successful advice columnist By Pat Bitton

frontrow@northcoastjournal.com

B

e honest. You read the advice columns. Even if it’s just to be snarky about other people’s problems. Or perhaps you’re secretly hoping the solution to a problem you’ve been sitting on will magically appear under someone else’s name? On that admittedly broad assumption, I’d be surprised if Tiny Beautiful Things, now playing at North Coast Repertory Theatre, did not touch on a situation or experience that resonates with something in everyone’s lives, past or present, admitted or secret. I know it did for me. Here’s the setup. Cheryl Strayed (yes, she of Wild book and movie fame) was asked in 2010 to take over the anonymous Dear Sugar advice column her friend Steve Almond wrote for online literary and culture magazine The Rumpus. She had no experience of professional advice-giving but she did have a whole load of life experiences stored away in her writer’s brain. So, Strayed became Dear Sugar for little material reward but, as it turns out, a good deal of self-knowledge. When we look to heal others, we are also, whether we know it or not, looking to heal something in ourselves. After her tenure ended in 2012, Strayed assembled a collection of those questions and answers that most resonated with her. That collection found its way into the hands of Nia Vardalos (My Big Fat Greek Wedding), who, along with collaborators Thomas Kail and Marshall Heyman, reinterpreted the book’s contents for the stage. That production, starring Vardalos as Sugar, premiered at New York’s Public Theater in 2016. Tiny Beautiful Things is a strange beast. There is no storyline in the traditional sense. Instead, we are invited into Strayed’s home office, where we share her experience of reading emails from advice seekers and her process for developing meaningful responses. Strayed, superbly played at NCRT by powerhouse actor Cynthia

Cynthia Martells, Alex Blouin, Jim Buschmann and Keenan Hilton in Tiny Beautiful Things. Photo by Calder Johnson, courtesy of North Coast Repertory Theatre Martells, who also directs, is at the center of this small but complex universe. The roles of the many advice seekers are shared among the talented local trio of Alex Blouin, Jim Buschmann, and Keenan Hilton, who spend 90 minutes peppering Sugar with problems of unrequited love, sexual assault, temptation, infidelity, loss, etc. — or, in one character’s frustrated outburst – “WTF, WTF, WT actual F?” The closest the piece gets to a traditional narrative arc is one advice seeker (an engaging and hyperactive Hilton) wanting to know what love is, which starts an emotional roller coaster that another (Buschmann in a tour-de-force performance) brings full circle when he asks how he can go on after the death of his beloved son. Both questions touch Strayed deeply, leading her in turn to delve into her relationship with her mother, who died young, in a way that enables her to go beyond the typical pablum to deliver relatable personal counsel to her correspondents. Blouin, too, imbues her stories of lost pregnancy and “otherness” with a powerful sense of vulnerability and alienation. This theme of powering through fears and perceived weaknesses to achieve self-love and a sense of self-worth is a constant throughout — Strayed wants us to recognize that life’s tiny, beautiful things can heal us. The anonymity of her role as Dear Sugar was important to Strayed; the notion of shame and secrecy is an ongoing motif: “I can’t tell other people these things but I can tell you because you’re anonymous.” Her concern was that if people knew anything about her, they would filter her advice through their own biases. In her own words, “I’ve always written the column as if I were a naked woman standing in a field showing you everything but her face.” Martells takes on a heavy load by both starring and directing, and she pulls it off triumphantly; a few minor verbal stumbles disappear into the emotional highs

which she vests in the role of Sugar. Calder Johnson’s scenic design nicely reflects the work-from-home ethos so many of us have been living with for the past two-plus years without the advice seekers’ manifestations of voices in Strayed’s head intruding too far into her physical world. Brian Butler’s lighting and sound design complement the setting perfectly, and stage managers Kelly Hughes and Amelia Resendez keep everything moving along smoothly. Tiny Beautiful Things is more theatrical exercise than traditional drama, but don’t let that put you off. It’s 90 minutes of powerhouse acting that will resonate and make you think about what truly matters in life. As an aside for anyone interested in exploring Strayed’s Dear Sugar world further, she revived her Sugar persona in a podcast called Dear Sugars, which she hosted alongside Dear Sugar creator Steve Almond from 2014-2018. When the pandemic arrived in 2020, she set aside advice-giving in favor of wisdom-seeking and revived the podcast as Sugar Callin, (available on Apple podcasts), in which she talked with authors over 60. NCRT’s production of Tiny Beautiful Things runs Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. through Oct. 2. Call (707) 442-6278 or visit ncrt.net. l Pat Bitton (she/her) is a freelance writer/editor based in Eureka who is theoretically retired but you know how that goes.

COMING SOON

The opening of the one-woman drama Natural Shocks at Redwood Curtain Theatre has been pushed back to Sept. 29. Ticket holders for earlier shows can email boxoffice@redwoodcurtain.com to reschedule. Call (707) 443-7688 or visit redwoodcurtain.com.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ARTS NIGHTS

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enues through town will feature a variety of art and music; activities include a skate park, games and face painting. At the end of the evening, Westhaven Center for the Arts presents a jazz night from 8 to 10 p.m. with RLA and Nicholas Dominic Talvola on trumpet. Dance floor/refreshments available (sliding scale $5-$20). Masks strongly recommended. The Eatery 5 p.m. pop-up event features complimentary wine tasting by Northstory Wines with smoked fish boards available. For info, call (707) 8342479. Presented by Forbes and Associates, and hosted by Westhaven Center for the Arts. Info at trinidadarts.com. FORBES AND ASSOCIATES - SARAH CORLISS 343 Main St. Matthew Dodge, sculpted photographs. THE LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 355 Main St. Antoinette “Toni” Magyar, acrylic on canvas. Susan Mayclin Stephenson and Jeff Stanley, prints, note cards and books. SAUNDERS PLAZA EAST (parking lot by Murphy’s Market) Music by Barking Dogma. Face painting by Jade Bamboo. HEADIES PIZZA AND POUR 359 Main St. “What did we learn from the pachyderm?” Matt Brody, acrylic paintings. TRINIDAD MUSEUM and NATIVE GARDEN 400 Janis Court Five rooms of art, culture, history and natural history; native plant garden open for strollers; music by Howdy Emerson and JD Jeffries. TRINIDAD SCHOOL PARKING LOT 300 Trinity St. Skate park/games. TRINIDAD CIVIC CLUB 409 Trinity St. (event information station). Crucifix collection display/sale; jewelry, lighthouse

HOME & GARDEN

Andrew Forsell and Annie Reid’s paired artwork at Trinidad Art Gallery. Courtesy of the artists

memorabilia and more; sweets for sale by Rabia O’Loren, benefits Doctors Without Borders; hot beverage sales benefit the Memorial Lighthouse Fund. TRINIDAD TOWN HALL 409 Trinity St. Memorial Lighthouse Benefit Art Show featuring original art, prints and photography; meet artist Sol Hoyos and enjoy her exhibit of macrame art; Westhaven Center for the Arts Jazz Night, 8 to 10 p.m., featuring The RLA Trio with Nicolas Dominic Talvola, trumpet ($5-20 sliding scale). TRINIDAD ART CENTER 426 Trinity St. Gary Bloomfield, wildlife art, birds and animals; Susan Mayclin Stephenson, paintings. TRINIDAD ART GALLERY 490 Trinity St. Reception for featured artists Andrew Forsell, jewelry, and Annie Reid, paintings. The gallery will offer snacks. EATERY 607 Parker Road. Carlene Cogliati, driftwood and acrylic artwork; wine tasting at 5 p.m. with Pat Knittle from Northstory Wines. The Eatery will be offering her wines for take-away, by the glass and bottle along with smoked fish boards. MOONSTONE CROSSING 529 Trinity St. Kenneth Fletcher, oil, charcoal, pastel and mixed media. l Continued on page 18 »

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FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Tuna Water Still Sitting off Eureka By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s been one heck of a season for albacore tuna off the North Coast, and it looks like it’s not over yet. In a typical year, you get a few shots at the warm water over the course of the summer and into early fall. But this year has seen opportunities every week since the latter part of July. The first tuna of the season was caught out of Brookings on July 21, and it’s been good fishing at selective ports from Fort Bragg north to Brookings ever since. And the good weather and ocean conditions appear they’ll stick around a little longer. The forecast looks good through Thursday of this week, with the warm water sitting straight west of Eureka 20 to 25 miles. Boats that chased tuna Saturday out of Eureka were rewarded with a wide-open bite 20 miles offshore. If you haven’t got your fill of tuna yet, and I’m willing to bet most have, there’s still time to fill the jars, freezers and smokers.

A 90-day extension on the table for emergency rockfish regulations The California Fish and Game Commission approved an emergency rulemaking amending Section 28.55 that went into effect Jan. 6, 2022. The emergency rulemaking reduced the vermilion rockfish sub-bag limit from five to four fish, added a sub-bag limit for quillback rockfish of one fish within the daily 10-fish bag and possession limit, and added a sub-bag limit for copper rockfish of one fish within the daily 10-fish bag and possession limit. The emergency regulations were readopted on June 16. With the emergency adoption set to expire Oct. 3, the Commission sent out a notice on Sept. 15 of a proposed 90-day extension. For more info on the extension, visit www.nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler. ashx?DocumentID=203540&inline.

The Oceans: Eureka According to Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing, the tuna bite fell off quite

a bit on Monday. “The ocean was a little sporty and the storm system could have had something to do with the bite,” said Klassen. “The warm water is straight out of the entrance roughly 20-25 miles. Boats that fished the same general area Greg Scoles of Petaluma landed a 38-pound albacore tuna did well on Saturday. while fishing Tuesday out of Eureka aboard the Shellback. Conditions for tuna Photo courtesy of Tony Sepulveda/Green Water Fishing Adventures look good through Thursday. The rockfish bite at the Cape is still excellent. We’re still catching a wide variety and some nice lings as well.”

The Rivers:

Shelter Cove According to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing, it was a quiet weekend at the Cove. “Rock fishing was the only real option, and the bite was good at the Old Man. We got in on some pretty good top water action. The ling cod bite remains on the slow side. We should have a shot at tuna by midweek.”

Crescent City According to Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine, it’s been pretty quiet. “The warm tuna water is still within reach but I think most guys who’ve been out a few times have all they need,” said Carson. “There are a few charters that are planning on running this week if there’s interest. The rockfish bite is still going strong. Both reefs, along with the Sisters area is producing limits of both rockfish and lings.”

Brookings Pacific halibut action remains good out of Brookings according to Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “The limit has been increased to two a day, and sixpack charter boats are getting limits,’ said Martin. “Lingcod and rockfish action also is good. Bottom fish anglers are encountering lots of adult kings, which must be released, but are an indicator a big run is headed to the Chetco and Smith rivers.”

Lower Klamath

Salmon fishing remains good for both jacks and adults on the lower Klamath. Side-drifting soft beads in the riffles and dragging roe through the deeper holes are both producing fish from the Glen to Johnson’s. Fresh fish are coming into the river daily, but the best fishing was above Blue Creek over the weekend. The water remains off color, but the fish do not seem to mind. Anglers can keep two jacks (less than or equal to 23 inches) per day with a possession limit of six.

Chetco/Lower Rogue The Chetco estuary has heated up as big numbers of kings stage at the mouth of the river, waiting for rain, reports Martin. “Up to two dozen kings a day are being caught. A 42-pounder was weighed in over the weekend. Anchovies and plugcut herring are both working. The Rogue Bay also is fishing good, with lots of jacks and adults being caught.” Read the complete fishing roundup at northcoastjournal.com. l Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-todate fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@ fishingthenorthcoast.com.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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GET OUT

A last-minute shopping trip replaced the forgotten-at-home wing supports and this owl finally soared over Saturday’s All Species Parade during the North Country Fair. Photo by Mark Larson

Danielle Villari Felsenthal (center) and other Samba da Alegria dancers made their way around the plaza in the Samba Parade. Photo by Mark Larson

Together Again at the North Country Fair By Mark Larson

getout@northcoastjournal.com

T

he Same Old People and a large number of attendees were happy to be “Together Again” at the 47th annual North Country Fair at the Arcata Plaza on Saturday and Sunday after a two-year pandemic delay. The two-day celebration of the Fall equinox, diversity and community featured the All Species Parade on Saturday and the “Together Again” theme recognized the presence of 170 art and craft vendors, local food booths, activities for children and live music and dance performances on three stages. Organizers have teamed up with Zero Waste Humboldt since 2011 to minimize the event’s environmental impact and educate attendees at the same time about

HOME & GARDEN

“zero waste.” Food vendors are required to only provide compostable plates and utensils, and Fair attendees are encouraged to bring their own refillable cups for beer. No single-use water bottles are sold, and attendees separate and dispose their waste as recyclable, compost or landfill. Given the rainy weather, Sunday’s Samba Parade at the 47th annual North Country Fair in Arcata looked like the Samba da Alegria dancers were going to be wearing raincoats, mud boots ... and feathers. The steady rain showers all morning had closed a few of the many vendors who were worried about damage to their wares and canceled morning music performances by the Humboldt Taiko drummers and other groups.

Other musicians set up and risked performing under tents in rainy conditions at the Plaza and Garden Gate stages for a few hardy dancers wearing raincoats or carrying umbrellas. As noon approached, the plaza streets had sparse crowds wandering around looking at the vendor tents that were open. And then the rain stopped. Crowds of attendees returned to the plaza and Samba da Alegría dancers and musicians emerged from all directions wearing their costumes — and feathers — to line up for the popular Samba Parade. At 1 p.m., under dry conditions, the Samba da Alegria dancers and musicians set off to circle the plaza through packed crowds of watchers and ended in a lively group dance perfor-

mance at the intersection of Eighth and G streets. By 2 p.m. and under clearing skies, the Middle Eastern dancers were out belly dancing in front of people sitting on the grass at the Lawn Stage. Attendees finished a most memorable North Country Fair “Together Again” with the rest of the afternoon’s scheduled live music performances. Visit northcoastjournal.com for the full slideshow of the weekend’s revelry. l Mark Larson (he/him) is a retired Cal Poly Humboldt journalism professor and active freelance photographer who likes to walk. Continued on next page »

Continued from page 16

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SETLIST

HOME & GARDEN

Continued from previous page

Drooler plays the Miniplex at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 24. Courtesy of the artists

To the Fall By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

H

ere we are, meeting together on the shores of the third season in the northern hemisphere, freshly appointed in our various positions, and shaking off the languorous coma of summertime to gather the power needed to squeeze every drop of warm pleasure out of the encroaching autumn. Our eyes are tuned to the angle of sun as it fires hook shots of shielded warmth and light off of the vulgar terrain to remind us of the passing zenith of heavenly summer. Gather around, my friends, and we will all sing a song of the times ahead, where mulchy forest and browning apples send poems of decay to the straggling blackberries on the vine, feeding us all with drunk and overripe sugars before the hard frost kicks in. Come home and we will all lay out, warm in our fat coats from the dead summer. Come home and we will listen to music that’s in the air everywhere. Come home.

Thursday, Autumnal Equinox

A lot of fiddling is sure going down

this week, starting with Hanneke Cassel’s show at the Arcata Playhouse this evening at 7 p.m. Cassel is a Berklee College of Music alum whose musical collage is informed heavily by the sounds of Scotland and Cape Breton. She is joined onstage by her worthy collaborators, fiddler Jenna Moynihan and guitarist Keith Murphy. ($18, $15 students, members and seniors). Elsewhere in the 95521, you can find the soulful roots rock and folk country stylings of The Coffis Brothers, a group of fresh-faced fraternal troubadours whose sound harkens back to the radio age of innocent longing when Buddy Holly was still alive. If that sounds like a thing worth visiting, head over to Humbrews at 8 p.m. If you get there on time, you can enjoy the fantastic opener, Humboldt’s own vintage treasure Canary and the Vamp ($18, $15 advance).

Friday

I haven’t caught a Los Dune Bums show since the pandemic knocked that fine act out of the clubs, so cumbia mu-

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Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SETLIST Continued from previous page

sic has not been in the mix for a while, and for many of us it is sorely missed. I have good news if you feel this way, too, because there’s a new homegrown cumbia act ready to propel your body in the right direction with the correct gyrations. Makenu is the name and the location is the Miniplex at 9 p.m. ($10). DJ Amaru Shia will also be on deck to serve up beats at your pleasure.

Saturday

The age of the supper club may be long gone and over (except for scattered portions of the Midwest) but the Arcata Veteran’s Hall has got something tonight resembling that formula of dinner and entertainment. Two Guys with Guitars is an act that covers all its bases in the name, and there will be a taco bar and booze bar to handle the rest of the foundation of your personal Maslowian pyramid of needs. The music is free, but the food and drink have a price tag, and 6 p.m. is the kick-off. I mentioned earlier that there’s a lot of fiddling going down this week, and I now stand and deliver upon that promise to you. Alasdair Fraser is not a, but

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rather the Scottish fiddler in the world today. He and California cellist Natalie Haas are monsters of the traditional string scene, and if you want to hear the old tyme rags done right, come down to the Old Steeple tonight at 7:30 p.m., pony up the dough ($25, $30 advance) and get yourself a taste. A half hour later over at the Miniplex, you can find the triumphant return of one of Ellis Wallace’s bands, formerly of Arcata, now located in Portland, Oregon, like the gangly frontman himself. I’m of course talking about Drooler, a band that deals in noisy rock confessionals and indie power chord romanticism. Local trio Sugar Boys opens, a group whose songs are a little quieter but with better lyrics, so it’s a win/win if you are a fan of dirty sneaker rock in general. It’s worth noting this is the final Drooler show before Ellis relocates to NYC, so come wish him well ($10).

Sunday

Sunny War (what a name!) is, in addition to being a fine guitarist and singer-songwriter, a Los Angeles-based community activist, organizer, and

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

person in good standing regarding any genuine leftist bona fides. A woman of action as well as words and music. You can catch her tonight at the Old Steeple at 7:30 p.m. ($30, $25 advance).

Monday and Tuesday

I have packed some of the other days with shows in this, the first Setlist of the autumn, knowing that today and tomorrow would be a ghost town. I have tried to think of musical things to say about this incoming season of gentle decay, when the lowering sun curls the leaves into beautiful, brown and florid snowflakes, but I have been coming up dry. Blame it on the libidinous downshift of my circadian rhythm, I guess. As far as music goes, I suggest you stick to the blessing of memory for these nights. Remember that Saroyan quote, about how “The person of a man may go, but the best part stays. It stays forever,” and apply it to a favorite concert from days before.

Wednesday

Three shows tonight to make up for the dead space in the preceding 48

hours. In quick succession, here’s the goods: Tré Burt, a signee on the late John Prine’s Oh Boy Records, is bringing his songs to the Old Steeple tonight at 7:30 p.m. ($30, $25 advance). Up in Arcata at 8 p.m., you have two different acts both going for the same price ($20). Le Vent du Nord, aka The North Wind, is a Quebecois quintet that brings the North American French folk sound to the rest of us heathens in the anglosphere. They will be hitting the boards at the Arcata Playhouse tonight for your listening pleasure and $2 will be deducted from the admission for members, students and seniors. Finally, over at Humbrews you can catch Making Movies, an Americana band, if one accepts the premise that the entirety of the Southern Hemisphere portion of the Americas are included prominently in the mix. In other words, expect some deep grooves and Latin melodies. l Collin Yeo (he/him) can see the skull beneath the skin but still uses a daily moisturizer. He lives in Arcata.


Calendar Sept. 22 – 29, 2022

diums will be covered. Recommended for ages 15 and up. $20 each or $150 for all classes. sanctuaryarcata.org. Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 22 listing.

MOVIES

Shutterstock Shutterstock

Submitted

Aww … Bigfoot & Paws, with a name like that, how can you pick any other event to attend this Sunday? Hightail it to the Bigfoot Taproom in McKinleyville Sunday, Sept. 25 from 1 to 6 p.m. for this fundraising event for NorCal Pet Rescue, a local nonprofit, volunteer-based animal rescue. Enjoy an afternoon of food, beer, cider, wine, live music from Papa Haole and the Fleas, raffles and (squee!) adoptable dogs. Ages 21 and up (free entry).

In the northern part of the county, the Art and Wine Festival is happening Saturday, Sept. 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Fieldbrook Winery (free entry). It, too, is a fundraiser — this time for the Fieldbrook Educational Foundation, and you can almost smell what the ’Brook is cooking from here. Park across the street at Miller Field and head into the winery grounds for mouthwatering barbecued oysters, albacore, chicken on the grill, Greek salad, garlic bread, nachos and hot dogs for the kids. Oh yeah, and there’s live music, lovely scenery and plenty of art and craft booths.

H

eads up, Humboldt: While the county’s masking mandate has been lifted, Public Health is still strongly recommending masking indoors in public, social distancing and “avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces.” COVID-19 is still with us, so be sure to check the protocols at event venues.

A Sip of Summer: Hard Cider Festival actually takes place a few days into fall, but that’s neither here nor there. The point is, it’s a festive afternoon sipping sweet and tart adult beverages in the park while listening to live music, eating great grub, playing games and browsing the wares of local artists and crafters. And it’s a fundraiser to boot — benefiting Wild Souls Ranch! So grab your designated driver and head to Rohner Park on Saturday, Sept. 24 from 1 to 5 p.m. for all the fun: Live music by Jacki & the Jollies, Wild Abandon and The Critics, art and craft vendors, food trucks, lawn games, kids zone, unlimited cider tasting and a commemorative glass. Get tickets at northcoasttickets.com.

MUSIC

Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Exhibit of the late Arcata artist’s work. Curated by friend and neighbor, Shoshanna. redwoodraks.com.

The Coffis Brothers, Canary and The Vamps. 8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Rock, blues, acoustic folk, country. $15, $18. humboldtbrews.com. Hanneke Cassel. 7-8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Boston-based fiddler Hanneke Cassell joined by guitarist Keith Murphy and fiddler Jenna Moynihan. $18, $16. david@arcataplayhouse.org. arcataplayhouse.org/ events/hanneke-cassell-2/. (707) 822-1575. Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Come get your sing on. Free. bearrivercasino.com. McKinleyville Community Choir Rehearsal. 6:308:30 p.m. Lutheran Church of Arcata, 151 E. 16th St. Join if you like to sing or play an instrument. Reading music or prior experience not necessary. Rehearsals are every Thursday evening. ccgreene46@gmail.com. (831) 419-3247.

BOOKS

FOOD

22 Thursday ART

Beelzebub’s Tales To His Grandson Radio Hour. 10-11 p.m. The book will be read in its entirety on Humboldt Hot Air. This week’s reading is Episode 35: Chapter 41 (Part 2): The Bokharaian dervish Hadji-Asvatz-Troov and Chapter 42 (Part 1): Beelzebub In America. Free. rybopp@suddenlink.net. HumboldtHotAir.org. (707) 826-7567.

COMEDY Aida Rodriguez. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Cal Poly Humboldt, Arcata. Comedian, actor and writer. $35, free for Cal Poly Humboldt students w/ID. EXTRA! EXTRA! A Headlines Comedy Show. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Hosted by Calista LaBolle and Josh Barnes, who will scour the newspapers and retort comically about their findings. $5. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. facebook. com/events/552159706662093/. (707) 845-8864.

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Freshest local produce, meat, fish, cheese, eggs, bread, flowers and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/hendersoncenter.html. (707) 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Farm fresh produce, music and hot food vendors. Trained, ADA certified, service animals only. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ mckinleyville.html. (707) 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.

org/volunteering. (707) 445-3166 ext. 310.

GARDEN Drop-In Volunteer Day. 1-4 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Get a taste of a farmer’s work growing vegetables, herbs and flowers. Come prepared for sunshine, cold, wet and working in the dirt. Bring a water bottle, snacks, closed toe shoes, long pants, sleeves and a sun hat. Free. baysideparkfarm@ cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata.org/440/Bayside-ParkFarm. (707) 822-8184.

ETC Redwood Coast Region Economic Development Virtual Summit. Virtual World, Online. Growing Forward: Shape the Change is a two-day virtual economic summit designed to foster innovative thinking throughout Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake and Mendocino Counties, as well as adjacent tribal lands. Learn more and register for the conference at bit.ly/GrowingForward2022. Mystery Loves Democracy. Virtual World, Online. An online auction to benefit Fair Fight Action. More information online, on Facebook and Twitter @mystery4voters. MysteryLovesDemocracy.com. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@gmail.com. sohumhealth. org. (707) 923-3921.

23 Friday ART

Course for Creativity. 4-5:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Automated writing, guided visualization, movement and free doodling/exploration through me-

The Big Lebowski (1998) - Movie Party. 8-11:15 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 8 p.m. Movie starts at 9 p.m. with audience participation. Rated R. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-gaming in the lobby. First 100 attendees get a custom ticket printed on 35MM film stock. Lebowski-themed White Russian menu. $8, $12 w/poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/events/617148656791837. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC Jimmie Lahman Band. 6-8 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. An end-of-summer hoorah with the Jimmie Lahman Band playing tunes to keep you on your feet. Free. madriverbrewing.com. Kenny Bowling. 9-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Country music. Every Friday. Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. Professional-level jazz twice a week with cool vibes and great people. Free. thespeakeasybar@ yahoo.com. facebook.com/speakeasyeureka. (707) 444-2244. Pretty Kitty Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Hosted by Jamie Kohl of Little Red fame. Cash only. 21 and up. Veterans welcome. Shuffleboard. PearceHansen999@outlook. com. facebook.com/profile.php?id=100082987501904. (206) 348-9335. SoHum Girls Band at Septentrio Winery. 6-8 p.m. Septentrio Tasting Room, 650 Sixth St., Arcata. An eclectic mix of funk, rock, blues, swing, New Orleans grooves and more. No cover charge. sohumgirls@ asis.com.

THEATER

Tiny Beautiful Things. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Adapted by Nia Vardalos from Cheryl Strayed’s book, the play is about reaching when you’re stuck, healing when you’re broken. Proof of COVID vaccination or a recent negative test (72 hours) is required for entrance. Masks are recommended and may be required depending on local conditions. ncrt.net.

EVENTS Eureka Friday Night Market. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Farmers market, arts and craft vendors, a bar featuring Humboldt-produced beverages, food vendors and live local music for dancing. humboldtmade.com/eureka-friday-night-market. Fridays for the Future Rally and March. 5-6 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Signs are welcome. Similar events are planned throughout the world in recognition of Greta Thunberg’s actions on behalf of the climate. 350 Humboldt is sponsoring the local event. Free. gailmail@reninet.com. (707) 443-6943. Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. -Oct. 3, 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Auction with plants, local artists, paintings, jewelry, glass, ceramics, autographed books by local authors, gift certificates from Cypress Grove and more. hbgf.org. (707) 442-5139. KMUD Membership Drive Yard Party. 3 p.m. KMUD Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

Studio, 1144 Redway Drive, Redway. Live music with King Strange, Zera Starchild, The Colour Green, Hill Honey and the Wildcats, DJs Wolfmandu, Verde and Feral Selector, MC, L Dawg. Drinks, food by Two Sinks. Treats available.

nobotany of Elk River and discusses the tribe’s recent acquisition of land at the foot of Humboldt Hill. Free. friendsofelkriver95503@gmail.com. facebook.com/ humboldt.grange. (707) 407-6466.

FOR KIDS

AJ Lee & Blue Summit, Fickle Hill. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews HumBrews, 856 10th St, Arcata. Bluegrass. $18, $15. (707) 826-2739. Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas. 7:30 p.m. The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. Performing fiddle and cello in traditional music for 20 years. Vaccination and masks are strongly encouraged. $30, $25 advance. The Beer Scouts. Lost Coast Brewery Taproom, 1600 Sunset Drive, Eureka. Rock and roll. lostcoast.com. Jennifer Trowbridge and David Powell. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, California Polytechnic University Humboldt, Arcata. “Flow My Tears,” includes music about love and loss. Guitarist Trowbridge plays Bach, Couperin, Scarlatti, Weiss, and Sagreras. Tenor Powell performs songs from English Renaissance to traditional Scottish and Irish ballads, as well as an aria by Heitor Villa-Lobos. $15. mus@humboldt.edu. (707) 826-3566. Lost Dogs. 6-8 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Blues, R&B, rock, funk and folk covers and originals. Free. madriverbrewing.com. The Sanctuary’s Fall Salebration Yard Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nowhere, 1905 Alliance Road, Arcata. Food and live music by Los Perdidos, Icarus and Suns, Y.A.W.S. Soul Fam members Bamidele, Ra, All’Love, Aeysha, James Zeller, Alex Montes De Oca and others. Browse art supplies, games, books, kitchen wares, tools, clothing and more. Benefits Arcata’s creative community center. www.sanctuaryarcata.org. WCA Jazz Night. 8-10 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Featuring Nicholas Dominic Talvola on trumpet with the RLA Trio: Tim Randles, keyboard, Mike LaBolle, drums, Kenneth Lawrence, electric bass. $5-$20 sliding. (707) 834-2479.

Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop off your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17-$20. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org/ classesprograms.html. (707) 443-9694.

FOOD Drive Thru Pulled Pork Dinner. 5-7 p.m. McKinleyville Teen Center, 1705 Gwin Road. Dinner includes pulled pork sandwich, coleslaw, fruit salad and dessert. Purchase tickets the Eureka Teen Center and the McKinleyville Teen Center. $15. Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, eggs, meat, baked goods, nursery plants and starts, oysters, live music on the square, crafts and more.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882. Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

SPORTS Stock Car Racing. Redwood Acres Raceway, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Details and ticket prices online. racintheacres.com/.

ETC Mystery Loves Democracy. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 22 listing. Public Skate. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Skating Rink, Rohner Park. $5.50 (includes skate rental), $3.50 ages 5 and under. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. sohumhealth.com.

24 Saturday ART

Artist Reception. 6-9 p.m. Trinidad Art Gallery, 490 Trinity St. Reception for featured artists Andrew Forsell and Annie Reid. Forsell creates sea-inspired jewelry, while Reid paints the beauty she finds in nature. Snacks provided. trinidadgallery@gmail.com. trinidadartgallery.com. (707) 677-3770. Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 22 listing. Trinidad Arts Night. Last Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Trinidad, Downtown. A town-wide event including venues, galleries, wine tasting, outdoor music, live art, fire dancing, kids activities and various performances throughout the night. Free.

LECTURE

Wiyot Ethnobotany of Elk River. 2-4 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Natural Resources Director Adam Canter presents Wiyot Eth-

22

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

MUSIC

SPOKEN WORD Conversations on Altruism. 12-1 p.m. Cal Poly Humboldt, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. With Lois Risling, honoring the 40th anniversary of the Altruistic Behavior Institute at Cal Poly Humboldt. Joining academics, researchers, practitioners and educators discussing possibilities for doing good. (707) 826-4553.

THEATER

Tiny Beautiful Things. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Sept. 23 listing.

EVENTS Humboldt Trails Summit. 9-11:45 a.m. Sequoia Conference Center, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Resource fair and presentations. Presentations begin at 10 a.m. with Hank Seeman from Humboldt County Public Works Department, State Sen. Mike McGuire, Karen Gear from the State Coastal Conservancy and executive director for the Great Redwood Trail Agency. Showing on Access Humboldt and HTC Facebook page. Free. info@humtrails.org. humtrails.org. Naming Ceremony. 6-7:30 p.m. Ancestor Grove, Briceland-Thorn Road, Whitethorn. Gather by candlelight in a beautiful redwood grove to acknowledge those who support Sanctuary Forest’s work. The ceremony will also feature music and poetry. RSVP online. Free. anna@sanctuaryforest.org. sanctuaryforest.org/event/ naming-ceremony-2022/. (707) 986-1087. Art and Wine Festival. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Fieldbrook Winery, 4241 Fieldbrook Road. Crafts, music, great food, wine, beer. Everyone welcome. Parking across the street


in Miller field. Free. fieldbrookwinery.com. Bands, BBQ & Brew. 4:30-10 p.m. Rio Dell Fireman’s Park, Wildwood Avenue and Center Street. Rio Dell Fire Department fundraiser featuring music by Barn Fire, Oak Top and DJ Bring It. Also, barbecued tri-tip with a side, beer, wine and kettle corn available. Free. Jbrodeur80@gmail.com. (707) 498-0355. Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing. Loleta Community Celebration. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Loleta Downtown Park, 271 Main Street. Bucket raffle, games, music, vendors, Table Bluff Farm stand and fire truck demonstrations. Proceeds benefit park maintenance. $15 pulled pork meal (sandwich, coleslaw, beans, roll, beverage and dessert). flenghiano@gmail.com. (707) 499-9040. Mad River Community Hospital Health Fair. 9 a.m.2 p.m. Mad River Hospital, 3800 Janes Road, Arcata. Featuring vendors, informational booths and exhibits, giveaways and raffles. Garden fresh produce, lowcost blood testing available. A 2-mile walk/run and Gift Shop sidewalk sale. Free. madriverhospital.com/ wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Health-Fair-2022.pdf. (707) 822-7220. Samoa Speeder/Train Rides. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Timber Heritage Association, 930 Vance Ave., Samoa. Ride Humboldt’s historic rails with a scenic trip along the bay on Timber Heritage Association’s historic crew car rail speeder. Near the Samoa Cookhouse. timberheritage. org/ride-the-rails-on-a-historic-speeder-crew/. (707) 443-2957. Sip of Summer: Hard Cider Festival. 1-5 p.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. Food trucks, lawn games, musical acts, unlimited cider tasting, commemorative glass. Presented by Wild Souls Ranch. facebook.com/ sipofsummer.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association Farmers’ Market features local produce, food vendors, meats, plant starts and flowers every week. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/arcataplaza.html. (707) 441-9999. Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown on site, local eggs and sourdough bread. Work from local artists and artisans. flowerstone333@gmail. com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN Old Town Gazebo Beautification. 10 a.m.-noon. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Improve the existing flower beds at the Old Town Gazebo. Enjoy a free barbecue and drawings for prizes after the work. jthomas@ci.eureka.ca.gov. facebook.com/ events/582802036634953. (707) 441-4080. Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Sept. 23 listing.

MEETINGS

Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet trip leader Cindy Moyer at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) for easy-to-walk trails and a diverse range of shorebirds, songbirds, raptors and waders. Free. rras.org. Crab Park Cleanup. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Crab Park, Ferndale. Join Friends of the Eel River as part of Coastal Cleanup Month coordinated by the Northcoast Environmental Center. Volunteers will be entered in a prize raffle. Supplies provided but feel free to bring your own gear. Sign up online. yournec.org/coastalcleanupmonth. FOAM Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Meet leader Sharon Levy at 2 p.m. in the lobby of the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute, rain-or-shine walk focusing on Marsh history, wastewater treatment, birds and/or ecology. Masks are recommended inside the building. Free. (707) 826-2359. National Public Lands Day Volunteer Workday. 9 a.m.-noon. Ma-le’l Dunes North, Young Lane, Arcata. Help restore coastal dune habitat by removing invasive yellow bush lupine. Wear long sleeves, long pants and closed- toe shoes. Tools, gloves and lunch provided. RSVP so we have enough food. Free. denise_seeger@ fws.gov. fws.gov/refuge/humboldt-bay. (707) 733-5406. National Public Lands Day- Lost Coast Stewardship Celebration. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Mal Coombs Park, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. Join BLM King Range and Friends of the Lost Coast to break into groups for three project sites: Mal Coombs Park, Black Sands Beach and Low Gap Trail. Lunch for volunteers at 1 p.m. Email to RSVP. Free. info@lostcoast. org. lostcoast.org/event/national-public-lands-day/. Nature Journaling Basics. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Beginning techniques of nature journaling, an overview of supplies and time to practice and experiment. Snacks and some supplies provided. Raffle. RSVP is required. info@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes.org/ naturenewbies. (707) 444-1397. Wigi Wetlands Volunteer Workday. 9-11 a.m. Wigi Wetlands, Behind the Bayshore Mall, Eureka. Help remove seed heads, pull invasive plants and pick up trash behind the Bayshore Mall. Meet in the parking lot directly behind Walmart. Tools, gloves and packaged snacks provided. Please bring your own drinking water. Free. jeremy.cashen@yahoo.com. rras.org. (214) 605-7368.

Medieval Festival of Courage 20th Annual

October 1 & 2, 2022

Horse Arena/Perigot Park - BLUE LAKE $10 Adults • $5.00 Children 3-12 2 years & under are free

A Family Weekend of Stories, Skill, Amusements, Medieval Morsels, Treasures, Knights & Royal Horses!

Knights of Valour Jousting 12:30 & 3:30 Daily

Horseback Archers 11:30 & 2:30 Daily

Tempest

Celtic Rock Headliner both days

Enchanted Story Tour Saturday 10 (for 1st 150 children)

Boffing • Axe Throwing Archery • Tavern • Petting Zoo Pony Rides • Fairyland Art Vendors • Cider Pressing Blacksmithing & Ceramic Demos Costumed Revelry • & More www.MedievalFestivalofCourage.org

Jewelry

by Drew Forsell

OPEN DAILY Hours: 10 am - 5 pm Every Day

Trinidad Art Night Saturday, Sept. 24th 6 pm - 9 pm

490 Trinity St. Trinidad 707.677.3770

trinidadartgallery.com

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

ILL T S S LE T E B K TIC VAILA A

WILD SOULS RACH PRESENTS

SPORTS Adult Skate Night. Last Saturday of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Skating Rink, Rohner Park. 18 and older only. IDs checked at door. Alcohol and drug-free event. $5.50, includes skate rental. Drop-In Pickleball. 9 a.m.-noon Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Visit website link for the full pickleball schedule for September. www.ci.eureka.ca.gov/civicax/filebank/blobdload. aspx?t=49161.01&BlobID=13395. 707-441-4248. Pickup Basketball. 12-2 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Full court pickup basketball and open gym shoot around basketball daily. Full basketball schedule online. ci.eureka.ca.gov/civicax/ filebank/blobdload.aspx?t=49161.01&BlobID=13395. (707) 441-4248. Stock Car Racing. Redwood Acres Raceway, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See Sept. 23 listing.

Tickets still available northcoasttickets.com

Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS Audubon Guided Birding Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata

ETC The Great Bingo Revival. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. With 1970s-themed live bingo Continued on next page »

INFO ON NORTHCOASTTICKETS.COM northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


CALENDAR Continued from previous page

calling, prizes, music and more. Ages 21 and up. $20. arcatatheatre.com. Mystery Loves Democracy. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 22 listing.

streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

MEETINGS

25 Sunday

Stewardship Work Day. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. Join Trinidad Coastal Land Trust in caring for the coast. Email or call to sign up. zoe@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. www. trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. (707) 677-2501.

Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 22 listing.

OUTDOORS

ART

MOVIES

The Mummy (1999). 5-8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 5 p.m. Movie at 6 p.m. Rated PG-13. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-gaming in the lobby. $8, $12 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ events/637304960933414. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC Always on Sunday. 12-5 p.m. Fieldbrook Winery, 4241 Fieldbrook Road. Beer, wine and appetizers/salads for purchase. Reservations are required for wood-fired pizza. fieldbrookwinery.com. Big Richard, Side Pony. 7 p.m. Humboldt Brews HumBrews, 856 10th St, Arcata. Folk rock. $20, $18. (707) 826-2739. SoHum Girls Band at Blue Lake Sunday Market. 2-5 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. An eclectic mix of funk, rock, blues, swing, New Orleans grooves and more. Free. sohumgirls@asis.com. (707) 599-5537. Sunday Jazz Jams. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Every Sunday. Jazz players, all ages, all levels. Bring your ax and play some Real Book tunes. Everybody who wants to play, plays. Free. blondiesfoodanddrink@gmail.com. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. (707) 822-3453. Sunny War. 7:30 p.m. The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. Singer/songwriter. $25.50.

THEATER

Tiny Beautiful Things. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Sept. 23 listing.

EVENTS Bigfoot & Paws. 1-6 p.m. The Bigfoot Taproom, 1750 Central Ave., McKinleyville. A fundraising event for NorCal Pet Rescue with raffles, food, live music from Papa Haole and the Fleas, and adoptable pets. Free. thebigfoottaproom@gmail.com. thebigfoottaproom. com. (707) 630-4057. Blue Lake Sunday Market. 1-5 p.m. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. Farmers market, live music, vendors and a bar. Every Sunday through Sept. 25. Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing.

FOR KIDS The Kinetic Classic. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. A kid-sized version of the Kinetic Grand Championship featuring three age-related race categories with judging, trophies and prizes. Register online. kineticgrandchampionship.com.

FOOD Ferndale Veterans Community Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Ferndale Veterans Memorial Building, 1100 Main St. Pancakes, biscuits and gravy, ham, sausage, eggs to order, coffee, juice and mimosas. Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G

24

Arcata Marsh Cleanup. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Join the Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship for part of Coastal Cleanup Month, coordinated by the Northcoast Environmental Center. Volunteers will be entered into a prize raffle. Supplies provided but feel free to bring your own gear. Sign up online. yournec.org/ coastalcleanupmonth. Free Birding Trip to Titlow Hill/Forest Service Route 1 area. 8 a.m.-noon. Titlow Hill Road, 31441 State Route 299, Blue Lake. Join field trip leader Ken Burton for an all-day exploration. Meet in front of Pepper’s on Valley West Boulevard in Arcata at 8 a.m. to carpool, or at the base of Titlow Hill Road at 8:45 a.m. Free. shrikethree@ gmail.com. rras.org. (707) 499-1146. Guided Birding Tour along the Eureka Waterfront Trail. 9-11 a.m. Eureka Waterfront, Foot of Del Norte Street. With leader Ralph Bucher. This flat, paved, wheelchair accessible and relatively urban trail offers the potential to observe species abundance and diversity. Email to sign up. Free. thebook@reninet. com. rras.org. Labor Temple Neighborhood Cleanup. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Join the Central Labor Council for a cleanup of the neighborhood as part of Coastal Cleanup Month, coordinated by the Northcoast Environmental Center. Volunteers will be entered in a prize raffle. Supplies provided but feel free to bring your own. Sign up online. yournec.org/ coastalcleanupmonth. Seabirding by Kayak. 9 a.m.-noon. Trinidad, Downtown. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society in partnership with local guiding company Kayak Trinidad for a morning viewing local seabirds from a kayak. Call for required reservations. $109. Andrew.RRAS@gmail. com. rras.org. (707) 329-0085.

26 Monday ART

Art + Film Dept Faculty & Staff Exhibition. Reese Bullen Gallery, Cal Poly Humboldt, Arcata. See the professional work and diverse talents of instructor and staff artists through a wide spectrum of forms, themes and styles. art.humboldt.edu/galleries. Art Show - Neil Gilchrist, Photography. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. An exhibit of images photographed over the past year during the artist’s morning walks in the Arcata Marsh. Bob Raymond and Auk. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. The ceramic pottery and sculpture of Bob Raymond and Auk exhibited through September. fireartsarcata.com. Coffee House Moments. Brenda Tuxford Gallery, 627 Third St., Eureka. A new community exhibition of artworks celebrating coffee. Artists include Yuliya Kinnunen, Cleo Carrino, Soph Kastel, Neveah Cox, Sophie Ell, Jan Ramsey, Loryn White, Claire MacKenzie, Emily Reinhart and Korinza Endsley. Painting for Children. 4-5:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

J St., Arcata. A space for children paint freely and share their work at the end of each class. $20 each or $150 for all classes. sanctuaryarcata.org. Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 22 listing. Yoga & Art. 5:30-6:45 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Four weeks of outdoor, gentle yoga practice for adults, along with art sessions for kids aged 5-12. Sign up online. donation-based. comm@huuf.org. bit.ly/huufyoga. (707) 822-3791.

EVENTS Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing.

FOOD Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. (707) 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See Sept. 22 listing.

ETC Ham Radio Technician License Class. 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Bay Fire Department, 3030 L St., Eureka. The Humboldt Amateur Radio Club is offering a class to prepare students for the Amateur Radio Technician Class license examination. This class will be a hybrid class, meeting via Zoom and in person at the Humboldt Bay Fire Training Room. Free. Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email for the link. Free. homeshare@a1aa. org. a1aa.org/homesharing. (707) 442-3763. Humboldt Bounskee League. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Weekly league nights. Purchase of any wood bounskee from Humbrews or the website includes one-month family membership for future events. All ages. Free. bounskee@gmail.com. bounskee.fun. (707) 601-9492. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing.

27 Tuesday ART

Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 22 listing.

MUSIC Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. See Sept. 23 listing.

EVENTS Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets, Fortuna. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts, music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation. org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/fortuna.html. (707) 441-9999. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town,

F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Fresh local produce, eggs, bread, specialty sourdough donuts and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/oldtown.html. (707) 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh produce, flowers, plant starts and more. Live music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation. org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/sheltercove. html. (707) 441-9999.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players. Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. $3-$8. 31for14@ gmail.com. (707) 599-4605.

SPORTS Drop-In Pickleball. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. See Sept. 24 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. (707) 443- 5021. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 22 listing.

28 Wednesday ART

Figure Drawing. 6-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. $5. blondiesfoodanddrink. com. Heart Rock Mosaic Workshop. 5-7:30 p.m. Six Rivers Brewery, Tasting Room & Restaurant, 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Includes everything you need to create a stained glass mosaic heart rock and a drink voucher. Email to reserve your spot and drop in from 5 to 7 p.m. $40. naturesmosaic@gmail.com. sixriversbrewery.com. Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 22 listing.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MOVIES

Sci-Fi Night: Aliens (1986). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 6 p.m. Raffle at 6:55 p.m. Movie at 7 p.m. Rated R. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-gaming available in the lobby. $5, $9 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/events/5907458562620167. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC Bayside Ballads and Blues. 6-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Wednesday. Le Vent du Nord. 7-8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Progressive francophone folk. $15. david@ arcataplayhouse.org. arcataplayhouse.org/events/ le-vent-du-nord/. (707) 822-1575.


Making Movies, DJ BurNt Reynolds. 8 p.m. Humboldt Brews HumBrews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Classic rock with Latin American rhythms. $20, $18. (707) 826-2739. Tré Burt. 7:30 p.m. The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. Folk singer/songwriter. $26.50.

EVENTS Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing. Humboldt Grace Presents: A Night of Laughter, Education and Inspiration. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Silent auction, live comedy, panel discussion and Q&A on science and technology, music, preview screening of The Cannabis Chronicles with director Adam Ross, who will film the event. Free. lele@humboldtgrace.org. facebook. com/events/1741742542869906?active_tab=about. (707) 672-4254.

FOR KIDS Storytime with Sunshine the Chicken and Ms. Sue. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. In-person stories and songs for preschool children and their caregivers. Masks are optional. Ms. Sue will be wearing one. Free. humboldtgov.org/calendar.aspx?EID=7463. (707) 822-5954.

McKinleyville Community Choir Rehearsal. 6:308:30 p.m. Lutheran Church of Arcata, 151 E. 16th St. See Sept. 22 listing. Protoje with Lila Ike and Jesse Royal. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. 21 and up. $45. arcatatheatre.com.

THEATER

Natural Shocks. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. Lauren Gunderson’s 60-minute, one-woman play about a woman waiting out an imminent tornado in her basement and reflecting on a lifetime of trauma. $20. nanettevoss@gmail.com. redwoodcurtain.com. (269) 355-0819.

EVENTS Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing. Redwood Coast Music Festival. -Oct. 2. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. Jazz, swing, zydeco, blues and more all weekend long, all over town. Four days of live music, multiple stages and dance floors. Tickets prices vary. rcmfest.org.

FOOD

Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Sept. 23 listing.

Food for People’s Free Produce Market - Eureka. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Drive-thru event. foodforpeople.org. (707) 445-3166. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Sept. 22 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Sept. 22 listing. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See Sept. 22 listing.

SPORTS

ETC

Pickup Basketball. 12-2 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. See Sept. 24 listing.

Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 22 listing. Wind Energy Workshop. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Discussing the next steps for California offshore wind energy development, including available data. RSVP by Friday, Sept. 23 at docs.google. com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSftgWCMEghayRA8cCCv4Ytpm16bqRqnvwh3KFsRbNQEhwj24Q/viewform. chrisl@ rcaa.org. eurekawomansclub.org.

FOOD Food for People’s Free Produce Market - Fortuna. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. Drive-thru and walk-up. Walk-ups enter from David Way. foodforpeople.org. (707) 445-3166.

GARDEN

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 23 listing.

29 Thursday ART

Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 22 listing.

COMEDY Just Joshin’. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Last Thursday of each month Josh Barnes hosts talk, games and special guests. All ages w/caution for language. 21 and up to drink. $5. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. facebook.com/ events/611411623947623. (707) 845-8864.

MUSIC The Brevet, Sequoia Rose. 8 p.m. Humboldt Brews HumBrews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Alternative rock, folk. $15. (707) 826-2739. Josephine Johnson. 6:30-9 p.m. Septentrio Tasting Room, 650 Sixth St., Arcata. Josephine Johnson, singer-songwriter and Cal Poly Humboldt graduate, returns to Arcata to perform. Drummer Jay Forbes (Strix Vega, Money) joins along with more musical guests. Free. Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. See Sept. 22 listing.

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

Heads Up …

Ink People Center for the Arts invites artists to submit work in any media for the We Are Worthy: Artwork of Survivors group exhibition at the Brenda Tuxford Gallery. Deadline for application submission is Oct. 14. Apply at www.inkpeopleinc.submittable.com. Any questions? Email gallery@inkpeople.org. Humboldt County artists and craftspeople are encouraged to submit grant applications for the Victor Thomas Jacoby Award, which includes $10,000 in funding for four recipients. Applications accepted through Nov. 1 and can be found online at hafoundation.org/Grants1. KEET-TV seeks a diverse group of individuals to join its Community Advisory Board. Meetings are held quarterly on Zoom. Go to KEET.org to find the link at the bottom of the page. Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call (707) 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org. ●

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. northcoastjournal.com/ whatsgood Have a tip? Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SCREENS Fine, thanks for asking. Speak No Evil

Hell is Visiting Other People By Grant Scott-Goforth screens@northcoastjournal.com

SALOUM. Precipitation, early dusk and fattening pumpkin spiders can only mean one thing: Fall is here and with it, Spooky Season. My brother already has Halloween decorations up in his lawn, after all. So I was excited to note the release of two buzzy genre movies this week on Shudder, the well-curated, horror-focused streaming service (it also helped justify my subscription, though at only $6 per month, Shudder is a hearty deal for anyone with scary movie predilections). Saloum is a tightly paced, focused, supernatural action-thriller that punches well above its budget (a good companion piece for this year’s unexpected Movie of the Summer, Prey). Congolese director Jean Luc Herbulot leaps right into the fray with stylish verve, channeling the visual panache of ’90s Tarantino and Guy Ritchie, while putting a colorful stamp of his own on it. We’re introduced to Bangui’s Hyenas, a trio of infamous mercenaries, in the middle of a messy operation extracting a drug lord during a coup attempt in Guinea-Bissau. Narrowly escaping in a bush plane, they’re forced down mid-flight by fuel loss and must improvise, making their way to a small resort along the Saloum river in Senegal. Trying to get fuel and repairs while staying incognito as gold miners, the mercenaries must contend with a person who’s deaf and mute and knows their true identity, and the arrival of a police investigator. Meanwhile, it becomes apparent that Chaka (Yann Gael), the Hyenas’ de facto leader, had ulterior motives for visiting the small resort and its proprietor. His actions cause a chain reaction of mounting horrors for the Hyenas, the resort’s guests and the surrounding fishing villages. Sharp, funny and pointed, Saloum leans heavily on the charm of its leads, who are impeccably stylish and badass. Their tight bond and Chaka’s motivations are surprisingly touching, exploring generational trauma and the costs of vengeance. It’s refreshing to have a non-Eurocentric spectral threat and, while the movie borrows from Westerns and other classic American genres, it’s a unique and exciting melange. Saloum left me wanting more. If we

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can’t escape the wholesale franchising of every intellectual property, we could do a lot worse than more stories of Bangui’s Hyenas. 84M. STREAMING SPEAK NO EVIL. This grim little character examination revolves around perhaps one of the most terrifying aspects of our existence: social interactions. Bjørn (Morten Burian) and Louise (Sidsel Siem Koch), a seemingly well-adjusted Danish couple with a young daughter, hit it off with a Dutch couple while they’re all on holiday in Tuscany (must be nice). Back home, and adjusting to the fall season, they receive an invitation from the couple to visit their countryside home for a weekend. While they’re hesitant to impose and not entirely comfortable with spending so much time at the home of people they don’t know well, they agree to visit, taking the eight-hour ferry and drive to Holland to the home of Patrick (Fedja van Huêt) and Karin (Karina Smulders). Through the evening and next day, all goes seemingly well but there are some hints at trouble in the Dutch home. Patrick insists that Louise, a vegetarian, eat the wild boar he’s cooked and becomes very short with Abel, their troubled son. Patrick and Karin’s behavior continues to push Louise and Bjørn past their comfort zone, and when Louise wakes up early morning to find Agnes, their daughter, asleep in Patrick’s bed, she insists they leave. This sets up a confrontation where Patrick and Karin insist their cultural differences and insensitivities were honest mistakes, and Louise and Bjørn reluctantly agree to stay for the rest of their trip. If Saloum’s mythos was supernatural and new (to me), Speak No Evil’s was otherworldly in more familiar ways. The discomfort of social interactions without boundaries, spiraling toward horror, seems remarkably apt for our time. So, too, are the themes of patriarchy on the nuclear-family level; Bjørn’s grappling with his role as a husband and father, and his ability to overlook the increasingly dire warning signs — and pleadings of his wife — to follow a charismatic leader to his own doom. Bjørn’s inaction, even in the face of

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

indisputable truths, is a reflection of our impending climate crisis, our tipping toward fascism, our global pandemic, and the nihilism and defeatism predating on our societies. Speak No Evil’s power lies heavily in frustration, and it’s the same feeling many of us are experiencing on a global scale as we scream at the people in charge, those who could help, who could do something. Anything. Some of Speak No Evil’s allegory is heavy handed, and close reexamination reveals some plot holes and inconsistencies, but that’s beside the point. It is a well-crafted, brooding vision of social terrors come to life, of toxic relationships, of the secrets our friends and neighbors hide, and the lies we are willing to convince ourselves to believe. The only thing scarier than having houseguests is being one. 97M. SHUDDER, STREAMING. l Grant Scott-Goforth (he/him) is a fan of beer, music, movies, art, animals, bikes and rivers, all in shuffling order.

NOW PLAYING

AVATAR 3D (2009). It’s like the blue cat people with boobs are right there with you. PG13. 301M. BROADWAY. BARBARIAN. AirBnB nightmare with Georgina Campbell, Bill Skarsgård and Justin Long. R 102M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. BULLET TRAIN. Five killers zip through Japan on the same rails. Starring Brad Pitt, Joey King, Sandra Bullock and Hiroyuki Sanada. R. 126M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA. CLERKS 3. As Tom Cruise returns to the cockpit, so too, writer-director Kevin Smith returns to the counter. With Ben Affleck, Justin Long and Sarah Michelle Gellar. R. 115M. DC LEAGUE OF SUPER-PETS. Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart and Kate McKinnon voice superheroes’ best friends. PG. 106M. FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. DON’T WORRY DARLING. A 1950s utopian community gets almost as weird as the off-screen drama. Starring Florence Pugh and Harry Styles. R. 123M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

DRAGON BALL SUPER: SUPER HERO. The anime saga continues (dubbed or subtitled). PG13. 100M. BROADWAY. THE INVITATION. A young woman (Nathalie Emmanuel) visits the estate of newly connected relatives only to discover they’re a bunch of bloodsuckers. PG13. 104M. MILL CREEK. JAWS 3D (1983). We’re gonna need bigger glasses. PG. 130M. BROADWAY. MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU. Animated prequel with the chaotic little henchfolk. PG. 90M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. NOPE. Strange things are afoot at a California ranch and Keke Palmer and Daniel Kaluuya witness them in this Jordan Peele sci-fi thriller. R. 135M. BROADWAY. PEARL. Ti West’s freaky horror prequel to freaky horror X, also starring Mia Goth. R. 102M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. SEE HOW THEY RUN. Murder and mystery hold up the filming of a movie in 1950s London in this comedy starring Sam Rockwell and Pearl Chanda. PG13. 98M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME (THE MORE FUN STUFF VERSION). Like the Snyder Cut but without the heartbreak. PG13. FORTUNA. THOR: LOVE AND THUNDER. More Norse space-god action from the Marvel universe, with Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman doing couple-matchy capes. PG13. 119M. BROADWAY. TOP GUN: MAVERICK. Tom Cruise returns to the cockpit with a note-perfect work of pure energy that sidesteps thorny politics for the pure physicality and mental plasticity required of a modern fighter pilot. PG13. 137M. MILL CREEK. THE WOMAN KING. Viola Davis flexes on us all as general of the 19th century all-female army of West African kingdom of Dahomey. With Thuso Mbedu, Lashana Lynch and John Boyega. PG13. 134M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema (707) 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre (707) 7252121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre (707) 822-3456.


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts DRAWING FROM IMAGINATION All skill levels, 16+ September 28, 5:30−7:30pm, 527 2nd St. Eureka. $25 suggested defiantcreative.com/workshops

Communication COMMUNITY MEDIATOR TRAINING Learn peaceful conflict management and prepare to be a mediator! humboldtmediationservices.org

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BEGINNING STEEL DRUM CLASSES Mondays 6:15− 7:15. Next sessions starting October 3rd − 24th. Fridays 1:30−3 ongoing monthly classes. 707−407− 8998 panartsnetwork.com Classes held at Pan Arts: 1049 Samoa Blvd #C in Arcata

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1229)

50 and Better OLLI IN−PERSON: ACTING UP: THE FUNDAMEN− TALS OF ACTING WITH JULIE ECCLES−BENSON. Up your confidence and your acting ability in this safe, playful environment as you use improvisa− tion, text work, and your life experience to up your acting skills. Wednesdays, Oct. 5−Nov. 9 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI members $90. Sign up today! 826− 5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli

OLLI IN−PERSON: FORM AND FUNCTION: EXPLORING TIDAL AND RIVER CHANNELS WITH MARY ANN MADEJ. Understand the similarities and differences between two important types of water channels. Examine the attributes of a fresh− water river system and observe tidal channels. Wed., Oct. 5 from 1−4 p.m. OLLI members $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: A YEAR IN THE ARTWORLD WITH JULIE ALDERSON. Get a behind−the−scenes view of the world of contemporary art. We’ll look at all the support mechanisms that help the artworld function today. Tues., Oct. 4 & 11 from 4−6 p.m. OLLI members $25. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli

OLLI ONLINE: INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN CANE FLOW WITH DOC STULL. Cane Flow can improve health and well being, focus and concen− tration, coordination and motor skills, and all sorts of other benefits. Tuesdays, Oct. 4−Nov. 1 from 4:45−5:30 p.m. OLLI members $139. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: THE EUREKA PLAN WITH KATIE BUESCH. Learn about the origins of the 1885 Chinese Expulsion in Eureka and the relatively unknown resistance of its removal. Sat., Oct. 1 from 10 a.m.−12 p.m. OLLI members $20. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli

OLLI ONLINE: INTRODUCTION TO TAI CHI CHUAN WITH DOC STULL. Learn how the slow, moving meditation of Tai Chi Chaun can become a daily practice for relaxation, centering, balance, and rhythmic self−renewal for mind and body health. Mondays, Oct. 3−31 from 4:45−5:30 p.m. OLLI members $40. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: INTRODUCTION TO TAI CHI CHUAN, PART 2 WITH DOC STULL. Learn and complete the Yang Style Short Form postures. Prerequisite: Intro to Tai Chi Chuan. Mondays, Oct. 3−31 from 5:35−6:20 p.m. OLLI members $40. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: PLANNING FOR SEA LEVEL RISE IN THE HUMBOLDT BAY REGION WITH ALDARON LAIRD AND JERRY ROHDE. Review historical alter− ations to Humboldt Bay, lower Eel and Mad Rivers, then examine sea level rise vulnerability assess− ments prepared for our area, and discuss current sea level rise adaptation planning efforts. Sat., Oct. 8 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI members $25. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: SCRIBBLING WITH A PURPOSE #2 WITH LOUISE BACON−OGDEN. Go beyond Scrib− bling #1 with a variety of shapes and additional color. Thurs., Oct. 6 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI members $25. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli

OLLI ONLINE: SPIRITUAL MEMOIR WITH SHARON FERRETT. This class will help to elicit stories and memories of the most essential and spiritual aspects of our lives. Mondays, Oct. 3−17 from 9−11 a.m. OLLI members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli TAKE A CLASS WITH OLLI. Anyone can take an OLLI class. Join OLLI today and get the member discount on classes. Non−members add $25 to the class fee listed. https://extended.humboldt.edu/ olli/olli−upcoming−courses (O−1229)

CANNABIS BUSINESS TRAINING Online Oct. 5 − 26, 2022, Call College of the Redwoods Commu− nity Education at (707) 476−4500. EMT REFRESHER COURSE October 27 − November 6, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY/GED PREP: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS W/ DISABILITIES CLASSES: Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE WORK READINESS CLASSES: ONLINE Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

HOME INSPECTION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/6231/Home− Inspection−Certification−Program

INTERMEDIATE BOOKKEEPING October 4 − November 22, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. MEDICAL BILLING & CODING ONLINE October 4, 2022 − March 2, 2023 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. NOTARY October 11, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. PHARMACY TECH ONLINE October 4, 2022 − March 18, 2023 2023 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. REAL ESTATE PROGRAM FACE TO FACE Starts October 3, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. SERVSAFE CERTIFICATION October 20, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC LIVING SCHOOL TRAININGS w/Traci Webb & Guests. Ayurveda Health & Life Coach/ Practitioner Training starts 1/11/23, Ayurveda Herbalist Training starts 2/21/23. Seasonal Self− Care Retreats: 6/24 & 9/30, Seasonal Detoxes: July 12−26 & Oct. 4−18, Herbal Remedies Making Immer− sions: 7/10 & 9/25, www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0930)

MASSAGE HACKS FOR BODYWORKERS WITH DR. SARAH GRIFFITH Saturday, November 5 9am−6pm $150 + $15 materials Lovinghandsinstitute.com 630− 3407 to register!

CARTOON

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1229) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1229) \

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1229) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1229)

SMARTRECOVERY.ORG CALL 707−267−7868

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format. Visit https://w ww.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/ 17724/ArticleID/4916/Additional−Online−Classes

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CROSSWORD

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com “[The Carson Mansion] will stand as a monument to a life of unexampled energy and honest integrity. — Humboldt Gazette, April 25, 1887.

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t’s hard to find anyone who had a bad word to say about William Carson on record, other than his usual uncomplimentary label — “lumber baron” — and the fact that he was a Republican. Other than that, in accounts from his contemporaries, he comes over as an enlightened employer who, for instance, voluntarily reduced working hours from 12 to 10, paid Christmas bonuses every year ($5 for married men, half that for singles), and who provided board for his workers where the meals “rivaled those of hotels.” When 2,000 local lumber workers went on strike for better wages and working conditions in 1907, his company was unaffected. Carson, a native of New Brunswick, Canada, arrived in Humboldt County in 1852 at age 27, having rounded Cape Horn three years earlier to join the California gold rush. For several years, his fortunes waxed and waned in the lumber industry until, in 1863, he shrewdly teamed up with John Dolbeer. The latter had just invented the donkey engine, a single-cylinder steam-powered winch that would revolutionize logging operations by towing large logs, like redwoods, out of the forests to skid rows, en route to the sawmills. The Dolbeer and Carson Lumber Co. thrived over the next several decades (keeping its name after Dolbeer’s death in 1902), so that by the early 1880s, Carson had sufficient funds to be able to commission a mansion that would become “the most photographed house in America.” By all accounts, Carson gave his architects, Newsom Brothers, a free hand with the design. Redwood — the wood that had made Carson wealthy — was the obvious choice for the exterior, due to its ability to resist weathering and decay. But Carson also arranged to have quantities of tropical hardwoods imported from all over for the internal construction and decoration. According to Benjamin Sacks in Carson Mansion & Ingomar Theatre (Valley Publishers, 1979), Carson arranged for a schooner to bring nearly 100,000

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The 1885 front elevation by architects Samuel and Joseph Cather Newsom of San Francisco. It’s close to — but not exactly — what you’ll see today at the north end of Second Street. Public domain

feet of white mahogany (primavera) from Central America. In addition, shiploads of Philippine mahogany and Indian teak complimented the exterior redwood. The house was built in 1885, a significant year for Eureka. While the nation was going through an economic depression, Carson’s pet project provided work for many otherwise unemployed workers. In the same year, construction started on the County Courthouse, while John Vance gave Eurekans a glimpse of the future: the first electric lights in our part of the world. Less happily, a stray bullet fired during a clash between rival tongs killed a city councilman, leading to the expulsion — at 24-hour’s notice under threat of hanging — of several hundred Chinese workers living in Eureka’s Chinatown. (The area, between Fourth and Fifth, and E and F, was recently memorialized by dedication of Charlie Moon Way, after a man who remained in the county, protected by his employer.) So what exactly is the style of the mansion? It’s usually described as Queen Anne, which is a nice way of saying, “a bit of everything.” You can also find architectural historians referring to it as “an example of flamboyant Victorian architecture, “the peak of the woodworkers’ art,” “eclectic,” “peculiarly American,” or, less kindly, “tortured ornamentation.” Not forgetting, “gingerbread.” The ultimate put-down though, is what must be the first thought of many tourists seeing it for the first time, “Disneyesque.” No surprise here: You’ll find a replica of the Carson Mansion on the clock tower of Disneyland’s train station. l Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) fesses up: He’s never been invited inside, so the foregoing is probably just sour grapes.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

©2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

By Barry Evans

HALF EMPTY ACROSS

1. Sugar bowl block 5. Item that holds the solution for many hospital patients? 10. “Yay, the weekend!” 14. Woodwind instrument 15. Childbirth assistant 16. Blood: Prefix 17. With allure 19. Dodgers pitching great Hershiser 20. Bad-mouth, slangily 21. Upset and then some 22. Iranian pilgrimage site 23. Police often suspect it 26. Take exception to something 29. Type of oil 30. “Let me clarify ...” 31. Bumbling 32. DEA agent, e.g. 35. Care about

36. Proverbial item that is, to a pessimist, 17- or 53-Across, or, to an optimist, 23- or 44-Across (see circled letters) 37. Chef Matsuhisa with a chain of namesake restaurants 38. Greek H 39. River spanned by the Pont de Normandie 40. Manager of the threepeat Yankees of the 1990s 41. Part of the digestive system, in brief 43. FAA overseer 44. Gas tank-to-engine connector 46. Cry at a World Cup match 47. “Blame It ____” (1984 romantic comedy) 48. Film studio with a Pegasus logo

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

52. Home to most of humanity 53. Brusque, as a reply 56. Eco-friendly building certification, for short 57. Cry after a diva’s performance 58. Strong desire 59. Therapy appt. 60. Astronomical figure? 61. Homer Simpson’s signature cries

DOWN

1. U.S. Senate majority leader between Dole and Daschle 2. Lyft competitor 3. NYC home of Frida Kahlo’s “Self-Portrait With Cropped Hair” 4. Cheerleading outfit? 5. “Hit the sack” or “hit the books” 6. Skiing great Lindsey 7. Creepy-crawly 8. The works

9. Part of LGBTQIA+ 10. First Native American to win an Olympic gold medal for the United States 11. U.S president who said “I guess it just proves that in America anyone can be president” 12. Marvin Gaye’s “____ Little Girl” 13. Dave of “The Kids in the Hall” 18. Rosebush hazard 21. “Before ____ you go ...” 23. Back, in a way 24. Quick round of tennis, maybe 25. Org. with red, white and blue trucks 26. 2.268-gram coin 27. Issue forth 28. Varied assortments 29. Mystery writer ____ Jackson Braun

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO GEN ERIC

33. Spanish river to the Mediterranean 34. Daft Punk, for one 36. Halliwell of the Spice Girls 37. Certain facial decoration 39. Battle of Normandy town 40. Spring bloom 42. Epic narratives 44. Babies that learn to walk in a few hours 45. “I can’t ____ that!” (reaction to a cringeworthy photo) 46. “The Road to Wealth” author Suze 48. Sandal brand 49. Bull, in Spanish 50. “Gah!” 51. Some kosher loaves 53. TV network with pledge drives 54. Prohibition, for one 55. Cleaning cloth

HArD #46.pDf

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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www.sudoku.com

William Carson and his Mansion

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

FIELD NOTES

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1

2

2 6 7

5 4

9 5 2

7 4

4 8 1 6

8 9

7

3 1


LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Donald Paul Koski CASE NO. PR2200259 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Donald Paul Koski A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Teresa Lynn Koski In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Teresa Lynn Koski be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 6, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.

fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Kenneth M. Bareilles Attorney at Law 533 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−9338 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−367)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Kenneth Carpenter CASE NO. PR2200270 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Kenneth Carpenter A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Leslie Matteis In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Leslie Matteis be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 13, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept

defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−373)

Toni Peters, Space # 828 The following spaces are located at 1641 Holly Drive McKinleyville, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Samantha Rigge, Space # 6223 Mikkel Burrowes, Space # 7227 The following spaces are located at 2394 Central Avenue McKinleyville CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Kathleen Brewer, Space # 9258 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown.

The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 5th of October, 2022, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage.

Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246.

The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt.

Dated this 22nd day of September, 2022 and 29th day of September, 2022

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code.

Velma Price, Space # 5321 Velma Price #5464, Space # 5464 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Melissa Boynton, Space # 2120 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Dard Tufts, Space # 1167 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Joseph Salas, Space # 202 Rosemary Hancorne, Space # 596 Vicky Nurkiewicz, Space # 746 Toni Peters, Space # 828 The following spaces are located at 1641 Holly Drive McKinleyville, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Samantha Rigge, Space # 6223 Mikkel Burrowes, Space # 7227 The following spaces are located at

Public Sale NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of UCC, Sections 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at an online auction at www.StorageAuctions.com bidding will begin on Friday the 23rd of September 2022, at 12:00 pm, and will close at or after 12:00 pm on September 30th 2022, at which time the auction will be completed and the high bidder will be deter− mined. The premises where the said property has been stored and which is located at Lock Box Storage 2031 Eich Road Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. David Vermeire − 347 Craig Yerkins − 429 Nicoya Kenney − 451 Brian Soos − 601 Jessica Combs − 646

Nicoya Kenney − 451 Brian Soos − 601 Jessica Combs − 646 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Furniture, Suitcases, Appliance, Car part, Assorted Bedding, Assorted Boxes, Assorted Bags Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between the owner and obligated party. Please refer to www.StorageAuctions.com for all other terms and conditions governing the bidding and auction process. Dated this 15th day of September 2022, and 22nd day of September 2022. (22−372)

Public Sale Notice is given that the under− signed intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 23rd of September, 2022, at 10:00 AM in Fortuna, on the premises where said property has been stored. The following spaces are located at: 1. 1799 Smith Ln #13,34− Carrie Grant 2. 1799 Smith Ln#40− Linda Star For details call 707−725−1094 Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever.

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− Continued next page » tious business on name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Holly Wilson, Manager This August 17, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/1, 9/8, 9/15, 9/22 (22−354)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00534 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Humco Cleaning Humboldt 1026 Main St. Apt. 1 Fortuna, CA 95540 1026 Main St. Apt. 1 Fortuna, CA 95540 Kylee A Guerrero 1026 Main St. Apt. 1 Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kylee Guerrero, Owner This August 17, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

Auctioneer: Kylee Guerrero Six Rivers Property Management 755 12th St Fortuna, CA 95540

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00541

Dated this 15th day of September, and 22nd day of September, 2022

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Vital Earth Living

9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−364)

(22−371)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00533 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Liberty Fitness Humboldt 1930 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 1930 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 Farm Fresh Fitness LLC CA 202112610303 1930 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− Items to be sold include, but are tious business name or name listed not limited to: above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this Furniture, Suitcases, Appliance, Car statement is true and correct. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept.as22, 2022 part, Assorted Bedding, Assorted A registrant who declares true Boxes, Assorted Bags any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Sale is subject to cancellation in the Professions Code that the regis−

Humboldt 1492 French Road Miranda, CA 95553 PO Box 762 Miranda, CA 95553 Sara E Taylor Craig 1492 French Road Miranda, CA 95553 Jarrad P Craig 1492 French Road Miranda, CA 95553 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a • NORTH COASTpunishable JOURNAL misdemeanor by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sara Taylor Craig, CFO

29


above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true NOTICES anyLEGAL material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sara Taylor Craig, CFO This August 19, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/1, 9/8, 9/15, 9/22 (22−353)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00543 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEGI Consulting Humboldt 2006 Woody Road McKinleyville, CA 95519 Craig S Christensen 2006 Woody Road McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Craig S Christensen, Owner This August 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−369)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00548 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Shaw House Inn Humboldt 703 Main Street Ferndale, CA 95536 PO Box 1369 Ferndale, CA 95536 Paula D Bigley 703 Main Street Ferndale, CA 95536 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Paula Bigley, Owner This August 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−355)

30

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NOTICE INVITING BIDS

Notice is hereby given that the Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA is soliciting bids for the Installation of H Street Eureka Electric Vehicle Charging Station (“Project”). The Project involves installation of four (4) RCEA-supplied ChargePoint CT4000 electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS), installation of electrical infrastructure associated with the EVCS, to be connected to an existing electrical service at 3rd & H Streets in Eureka, CA. The Work consists of furnishing all labor, materials, equipment, incidentals necessary to complete the project as detailed in Plan Drawing and Technical Specifications and other Bid Documents. Interested bidders should attend the mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at 3rd & H Streets in Eureka, CA. on September 27, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Project site. Failure to attend the pre-bid meeting will result in the disqualification of the bid of the non-attending bidder. Bids will be received at the office of Redwood Coast Energy Authority (“RCEA”), 633 Third Street, Eureka, California until 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 6, 2022. Each Bid shall be submitted on the forms furnished by RCEA within the Bid Documents. The Invitation for Bids package and Plan Drawing and Technical can be obtained on RCEA’s website at: https:// redwoodenergy.org/contracting/. RCEA has determined that prevailing wages apply to this Project. The selected contractor must register with the State Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 prior to award of a contract. The successful Bidder shall possess a valid Contractor’s license in good standing, with a classification of Class C-10 at the time the contract is awarded. The selected contractor will enter into a construction contract prior to commencing work. Inquiries regarding this IFB should be submitted in writing to: Redwood Coast Energy Authority Mike Avcollie 633 3rd Street, Eureka, CA mavcollie@redwoodenergy.org DATED: September 13, 2022 Publication Dates: 1) 9/22/2022 2) 9/29/2022

Humboldt County Office of Education

PUBLIC NOTICE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

STUDENT INFORMATION SYSTEM Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 20118.2, the Humboldt County Office of Education (“County Office”) requests proposals for a Student Information System (“System”). Respondents must email or hand-deliver their Proposal to: Humboldt County Office of Education Attn: Michael Davies Hughes 901 Myrtle Ave Eureka, CA 95501 superintendent@hcoe.org Proposals shall be received by the County Office no later than September 30th, 2022 at 3 pm. A copy of the Request for Proposals (“RFP”) is available on the County Office’s website: https://hcoe.org/bids/ All questions must be submitted in writing to Michael Davies-Hughes at Superintendent@HCOE.org The last day to submit all questions will be September 26th 2022. Questions submitted and answers will be available on the County Office’s website, https://hcoe.org/bids/ beginning on September 28th, 2022. The County Office reserves the right to accept or reject any and all proposals, to waive any irregularties in the proposals, and to award any, all, or none of this RFP. 1st Publication: September 22nd , 2022

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

classified@north coastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE INVITING BIDS 1. Bid Submission. City of Fortuna (“City”) will accept electronically submitted bids for its Rohner Park Basketball Court Reconstruction Project (“Project”), by or before October 6, 2022, at 2:00 (PST) P.M., in the manner set forth is section 1 of the Instructions to Bidders at which time the bids will be opened. 2. Project Information. 2.1 Location and Description. The Project is located at Rohner Park, Fortuna CA 95540, and is described as follows: The scope of this work includes: 1) Temporary construction measures as necessary for site security and safety; 2) Removal and disposal of existing AC pavement; 3) Removal and disposal of existing basketball hoop poles; 4) Earthwork, backfill, AC and CC pavements to meet the finished grade of the plans; 5) Installation of planter box areas wrapped in A1-6 curb; 6) Installation of a water line and hydration station; 7) Procurement and placement of a bike rack, and three (3) picnic tables; 8) Installation of two (2) tree wells; 9) Landscaping per the plans; 10) Procurement and installation four (4) Bison basketball hoops (or equivalent), with striping and acrylic coating per the plans; 11) Installation of 10-foot tall black vinyl coated chain link fence with three (3) man gates; 2.2 Time for Completion. In order to mobilize for this Project, up to 2 weeks will be provided from the date when the Notice to Proceed is awarded. The Project must be completed within 30 working days from the start date set forth in the Notice to Proceed. This includes weather suspension. The project must be completed by April 1, 2023. 3. License and Registration Requirements. 3.1 License. This Project requires a valid Class A California contractor’s license for the following classification(s). 3.2 DIR Registration. City may not accept a Bid Proposal from or enter into the Contract with a bidder, without proof that the bidder is registered with the California Department of Industrial Relations (“DIR”) to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5, subject to limited legal exceptions. 4. Prevailing Wage Requirements. 4.1 General. Pursuant to California Labor Code § 1720 et seq., this Project is subject to the prevailing wage requirements applicable to the locality in which the Work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to perform the Work, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. 4.2 Rates. These prevailing rates are on file with the City and are available online at http://www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR. Each Contractor and Subcontractor must pay no less than the specified rates to all workers employed to work on the Project. The Rohner Park Basketball Court Reconstruction 2022 Form NOTICE INVITING BIDS CIP 9106 Page 2 schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work must be at least time and one-half. 4.3 Compliance. The Contract will be subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the DIR, under Labor Code § 1771.4. 5. Performance and Payment Bonds. The successful bidder will be required to provide performance and payment bonds, each for 100% of the Contract Price, as further specified in the Contract Documents. 6. Substitution of Securities. Substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments is permitted under Public Contract Code § 22300. 7. Subcontractor List. Each Subcontractor must be registered with the DIR to perform work on public projects. Each bidder must submit a completed Subcontractor List form with its Bid Proposal, including the name, location of the place of business, California contractor license number, DIR registration number, and percentage of the Work to be performed (based on the base bid price) for each Subcontractor that will perform Work or service or fabricate or install Work for the prime contractor in excess of one-half of 1% of the bid price, using the Subcontractor List form included with the Contract Documents. 8. Site Visit. A site visit will be held on September 21, 2022 at 11:00 a.m., at the following location: The Basketball Courts at Rohner Park Fortuna, California 95540 to acquaint all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Worksite. The bidders’ conference is mandatory. Coordinate with Brendan Byrd (bbyrd@ci.fortuna.ca.us) prior to site visit. 9. Instructions to Bidders. All bidders should carefully review the Instructions to Bidders for more detailed information before submitting a Bid Proposal. The definitions provided in Article 1 of the General Conditions apply to all of the Contract Documents, as defined therein, including this Notice Inviting Bids. Publication Date: September 12, 2022 END OF NOTICE INVITING BIDS


ness as Fortuna Cabinets and More Humboldt 175 Ogle Ave Rio Dell, CA 95562

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00551

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00553

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FIT COAST SPA & WELLNESS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Humboldt Pack Tracks

Humboldt 625 11th Street Suite B Arcata, CA 95521 600 F St Suite 3 #511 Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 1702 West Ave. Eureka, CA 95501

FIT COAST LLC CA 202131210361 600 F St Suite 3 #511 Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Naomi Hannah Atkinson, Manager This August 24, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/1, 9/8, 9/15, 9/22 (22−351)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00554 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Moonstone Beach Trinidad Humboldt 100 Moonstone Beach Road Trinidad, CA 95570 PO Box 96 Trinidad, CA 95570 Alder Design & Development LLC CA 202250716516 719 Driver Rd. Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stacie Marshall, Manager This August 26, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−381)

L4E4 2G ALS? -1 4 0 0 × 3 1 4

Jazzmyn M Zamora 1702 West Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jazzmyn Zamora, Owner/Oper− ator This August 25, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−380)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00565 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Deni Vision Humboldt 2460 Eye St. Arcata, CA 95521 Denise Tomkinson 2460 Eye St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Denise Tomkinson, Owner This August 30, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−382)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00566 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Fortuna Cabinets and More Humboldt 175 Ogle Ave Rio Dell, CA 95562 Randy Maynard 175 Ogle Ave Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by an Individual.

Randy Maynard 175 Ogle Ave Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Randy Maynard, Owner Operator This August 30, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by wc, Humboldt County Clerk

735 4th St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Dane Valadao, COO, ReProp Investments, Inc. This September 6, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−361)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00573 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Trinity Fork Outfitters

The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Hilary J Schwartz, Owner This September 06, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−363)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00582 The following person is doing Busi− ness as The Patron Kitchen Humboldt 70 B Wildwood Rio Dell, CA 95562 3010 Kenmar Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540

9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−362)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00568 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Rustic Wood Source Humboldt 201 C St Fields Landing, CA 95537 1834 Allard Ave #34 Eureka, CA 95503 George Buck 1834 Allard Ave #34 Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s George Buck, Owner This Auhust 30, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by wc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−359)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00575 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ReProp Financial Humboldt 735 4th St Eureka, CA 95501 ReProp Investments, Inc California C0894115 735 4th St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true

Humboldt 303 Lower Camp Creek Road Orleans, CA 95556 PO Box 358 Orleans, CA 95556 Trinity Fork Outfitters LLC CA 202204110325 303 Lower Camp Creek Road Orleans, CA 95556 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shane Dante, Managing Member This September 2, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by jc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−360)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00576

Gerardo L Gonzalez-o 3010 Kenmar Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540 Leticia Gonzalez-o 3010 Kenmar Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gerardo Gonzalez−o, Owner This Sept. 12, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by jc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−368)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00596 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EA Knox Design/Build

The following person is doing Busi− ness as High Standard Accounting

Humboldt 1650 12th Street Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 788 Shively Flat Road Scotia, CA 95565 PO Box 248 Scotia, CA 95565

Ethan A Knox 1650 12th Street Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to Hilary J Schwartz transact business under the ficti− 788 Shively Flat Road tious business name or name listed Scotia, CA 95565 above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this The business is conducted by an statement is true and correct. Individual. A registrant who declares as true The date registrant commenced to any material matter pursuant to transact business under the ficti− Section 17913 of the Business and tious business name or name listed Professions Code that the regis− above on Not Applicable. trant knows to be false is guilty of a I declare that all information in this misdemeanor punishable by a fine statement is true and correct. not to exceed one thousand dollars A registrant who declares as true ($1,000). any material matter pursuant to northcoastjournal.com Thursday, 22, 2022 /s Ethan• Knox, Owner,Sept. Contracter Section 17913 of the Business and This September 16, 2022 Professions Code that the regis− KELLY E. SANDERS trant knows to be false is guilty of a by sc, Humboldt County Clerk misdemeanor punishable by a fine

A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− Continued trant knows toon be next false ispage guilty »of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ethan Knox, Owner, Contracter This September 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−376)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00597 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Touch of Love and Healing Humboldt 1890 Heartwood Drive McKinleyville, CA 95519 Brook E Madison 1890 Heartwood Drive McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brook E. Madison, Owner This September 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by jc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−377)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Adam Dean Shilts CASE NO. CV2201281 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Adam Dean Shilts for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Adam Dean Shilts to Proposed Name Adam Dean Schild THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 21, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT • NORTH 825 FIFTHCOAST STREETJOURNAL EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 1, 2022 Filed: Sept. 1, 2022

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9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−365)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Janet Renee OBrien CASE NO. CV2201343 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Janet Renee OBrien for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Janet Renee OBrien to Proposed Name Janet Renee Dudal THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 28, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 13, 2022 Filed: Sept. 13, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−375)

change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 28, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 13, 2022 Filed: Sept. 13, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−375)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Richard Conrad Shilts CASE NO. CV2201282 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Richard Conrad Shilts for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Richard Conrad Shilts to Proposed Name Richard Conrad Schild

EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Richard Conrad Shilts for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Richard Conrad Shilts to Proposed Name Richard Conrad Schild THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 21, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 1, 2022 Filed: Sept. 1, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−366)

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. IfSubmit no writteninformation objec− via email to tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petitionclassified@northcoastjournal. without a hearing. com, or by mail or in person. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 21,Please 2022 submit photos in JPG or Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information onPDF how format, to appear or original photos remotely for your can hearing, beplease scanned at our office. visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g The North Coast Journal prints ov/ SUPERIOR COURT each Thursday, 52 times a OF CALIFORNIA, year. Deadline for obituary COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET information is at 5 p.m. on the EUREKA, CA 95501 Sunday prior to publication date. Date: Sept. 1, 2022 Filed: Sept. 1, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court

We Print Obituaries

9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−366)

310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology

Week of Sept. 22, 2022 By Rob Brezsny

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): Even when your courage has a touch of foolhardiness, even when your quest for adventure makes you a bit reckless, you can be resourceful enough to avoid dicey consequences. Maybe more than any other sign of the zodiac, you periodically outfox karma. But in the coming weeks, I will nevertheless counsel you not to barge into situations where rash boldness might lead to wrong moves. Please do not flirt with escapades that could turn into chancy gambles. At least for the foreseeable future, I hope you will be prudent and cagey in your quest for interesting and educational fun. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1946, medical professionals in the UK established the Common Cold Unit. Its goal was to discover practical treatments for the familiar viral infection known as the cold. Over the next 43 years, until it was shut down, the agency produced just one useful innovation: zinc gluconate lozenges. This treatment reduces the severity and length of a cold if taken within 24 hours of onset. So the results of all that research were modest, but they were also much better than nothing. During the coming weeks, you may experience comparable phenomena, Taurus: less spectacular outcomes than you might wish, but still very worthwhile. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s a scenario that could be both an invigorating metaphor and a literal event. Put on rollerblades. Get out onto a long flat surface. Build up a comfortable speed. Fill your lungs with the elixir of life. Praise the sun and the wind. Sing your favorite songs. Swing your arms all the way forward and all the way back. Forward: power. Backward: power. Glide and coast and flow with sheer joy. Cruise along with confidence in the instinctive skill of your beautiful body. Evaporate thoughts. Free yourself of every concern and every idea. Keep rambling until you feel spacious and vast. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m getting a psychic vision of you cuddled up in your warm bed, surrounded by stuffed animals and wrapped in soft, thick blankets with images of bunnies and dolphins on them. Your headphones are on, and the songs pouring into your cozy awareness are silky smooth tonics that rouse sweet memories of all the times you felt most wanted and most at home in the world. I think I see a cup of hot chocolate on your bedstand, too, and your favorite dessert. Got all that, fellow Cancerian? In the coming days and nights, I suggest you enjoy an abundance of experiences akin to what I’ve described here. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): For 15 years, Leo cartoonist Gary Larson created The Far Side, a hilarious comic strip featuring intelligent talking animals. It was syndicated in more than 1,900 newspapers. But like all of us, he has had failures, too. In one of his books, Larson describes the most disappointing event in his life. He was eating a meal in the same dining area as a famous cartoonist he admired, Charles Addams, creator of The Addams Family. Larson felt a strong urge to go over and introduce himself to Addams. But he was too shy and tongue-tied to do so. Don’t be like Larson in the coming weeks, dear Leo. Reach out and connect with receptive people you’d love to communicate with. Make the first move in contacting someone who could be important to you in the future. Be bold in seeking new links and affiliations. Always be respectful, of course. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Love your mistakes and foibles,” Virgo astrologer William Sebrans advises his fellow Virgos. “They aren’t going away. And it’s your calling in life—some would say a superpower—to home in on them and finesse

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them. Why? Because you may be able to fix them or at least improve them with panache—for your benefit and the welfare of those you love.” While this counsel is always relevant for you, dear Virgo, it will be especially so in the coming weeks. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Tips for making the most of the next three weeks: 1. Be proud as you teeter charismatically on the fence. Relish the power that comes from being in between. 2. Act as vividly congenial and staunchly beautiful as you dare. 3. Experiment with making artful arrangements of pretty much everything you are part of. 4. Flatter others sincerely. Use praise as one of your secret powers. 5. Cultivate an open-minded skepticism that blends discernment and curiosity. 6. Plot and scheme in behalf of harmony, but never kiss ass. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Poet Mary Oliver wrote, “There is within each of us a self that is neither a child, nor a servant of the hours. It is a third self, occasional in some of us, tyrant in others. This self is out of love with the ordinary; it is out of love with time. It has a hunger for eternity.” During the coming weeks, Scorpio, I will be cheering for the ascendancy of that self in you. More than usual, you need to commune with fantastic truths and transcendent joys. To be in maximum alignment with the good fortune that life has prepared for you, you must give your loving attention to the highest and noblest visions of your personal destiny that you can imagine. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Tips to get the most out of the next three weeks: 1. Use your imagination to make everything seem fascinating and wonderful. 2. When you give advice to others, be sure to listen to it yourself. 3. Move away from having a rigid conception of yourself and move toward having a fluid fantasy about yourself. 4. Be the first to laugh at and correct your own mistakes. (It’ll give you the credibility to make even better mistakes in the future.) 5. Inspire other people to love being themselves and not want to be like you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet William Stafford wrote, “Saying things you do not have to say weakens your talk. Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” Those ideas are always true, of course, but I think it’s especially crucial that you heed them in the coming weeks. In my oracular opinion, you need to build your personal power right now. An important way to do that is by being discriminating about what you take in and put out. For best results, speak your truths as often and as clearly as possible. And do all you can to avoid exposing yourself to trivial and delusional “truths” that are really just opinions or misinformation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You are an extra authentic Aquarius if people say that you get yourself into the weirdest, most interesting trouble they’ve ever seen. You are an ultra-genuine Aquarius if people follow the twists and pivots of your life as they would a soap opera. And I suspect you will fulfill these potentials to the max in the coming weeks. The upcoming chapter of your life story might be as entertaining as any you have had in years. Luckily, imminent events are also likely to bring you soulful lessons that make you wiser and wilder. I’m excited to see what happens! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In a poem to a lover, Pablo Neruda wrote, “At night I dream that you and I are two plants that grew together, roots entwined.” I suspect you Pisceans could have similar deepening and interweaving experiences sometime soon—not only with a lover but with any treasured person or animal you long to be even closer to than you already are. Now is a time to seek more robust and resilient intimacy. l

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Homework: Fantasize about an adventure you would love to treat yourself to in the spring of 2023. Testify: Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/LEGAL NOTICES SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 1, 2022 Filed: Sept. 1, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court


EMPLOYMENT

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Northcoast Children’s Services

Northcoast Children’s Services

SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST, Arcata Experience with a multi-line telephone system;        Open Until Filled.

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SPECIALIST, Arcata      Open Until Filled.

BILINGUAL HOME VISITOR, Eureka       Open Until Filled.

HOME VISITOR, Arcata       Open Until Filled. Please note:           Northcoast Children’s Services    www.ncsheadstart.org

Do you love being with children? Do you enjoy supporting children learn and grow? Are you looking for a meaningful profession? Do you want a job that has evenings and weekends off? Would you love to find a job with a Hiring Incentive? Northcoast Children’s Services may be what you’re looking for! Northcoast Children’s Services provides early education and family support services to children and families from pregnancy to  toddler and preschool centers in a variety of locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. We have a variety of full and part time positions working with children and families.  holidays to all employees and an additional  care option to full time employees. All employees may also obtain assistance with education and child development permits. We are currently looking for people   center directors and home visitors.   after 2 months of full-time employment.  for more information on how to join our growing team! https://ncsheadstart. org/employment-opportunities/

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

DISHGAMU PROJECT MANAGER FT in Loleta, the Dishgamu Project Manager is responsible for plan− ning, coordination, and implementation of activities. Plan and organize Dishgamu programs, Promote and market programs to the community, Provide administrative support to the Director. Knowledge of building trades, job development, construction and land acquisition is required. Two years of experience working in a leadership position. Eligible for benefits. Three−month proba− tionary period. Contact HR at 707−733−5055 to request full job description and application. www.wiyot.us default

Northcoast Children’s TEACHERS, McKinleyville, Eureka

Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler program. Must meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have 1 yr. experience teaching in a toddler setting. F/T position: 40 hrs./wk. & P/T position: 25-28 hrs./wk. $17.94-$19.78/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, Eureka, McKinleyville, Fortuna

 of the classroom for a preschool program. 6-12 ECE units preferred or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T 17-27 hrs./wk. $15.38-$16.96/hr. Open until Filled.

ASSISTANT COOK, McKinleyville

Duties include assisting in the prep & organization of food, setting-up meals & snacks and kitchen cleanup for a preschool facility. Req. basic cooking skills. Prior exp. in food handling & service desired. P/T 28 hrs./wk. M-F $15.38/hr. Open Until Filled. Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS  COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are  for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for  coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT

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SOCIAL WORK ADVOCATE FT in Loleta, CA. Advocating, coordinating and guiding clients improving well being. Requires a BA w/ experience in SW or related fields. Salary starts at $3200/mo. excellent benefits. Visit www.wiyot.us for an application and a full job description or contact HR at (707) 733−5055 www.wiyot.us default

Mak� A Differenc�

ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

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CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200-$4000+ a month.

Contact Rita at 707-442-4500 www.mentorswanted.com

Hiring?

Now Hiring

Executive Assistant Wage $20. For more info, contact us at 707-442-3763 Ext. 227 or visit our website a1aa.org.

442-1400 ×314

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THE CITY OF

PUBLIC WORKS

UTILITY WORKER I/II WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

SOCIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT P/T, year round. Under the direc− tion of the Health and Human Services Director, the Social Service Assistant will assist the Health and Human Services director to provide services to Tribal families. Transporting clients to appoint− ments, assisting Elders in and out of vehicles, scheduling, delivering meals, boxes, and supplies to elders, opening the HHS office, setting up and cleaning up for Health and Human Services events, workshops, groups etc. High school diploma or GED required. Possess a valid California Driver’s License, automobile insurance and be 25 years old. Must work well with other staff and be cour− teous to Tribal members and visitors. Must be able to complete a background check, DOJ fingerprinting and TB test before beginning work. Must be food handler trained. www.wiyot.us

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$2,858-$3,801 Monthly *Salary will increase by 2% in 2023 with another 5% increase in 2024. Plus excellent benefits including free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more! Performs a variety of skilled utility maintenance and repair work on the City’s wastewater treatment facilities and systems; provides general maintenance support to the Utilities Division; and performs related work as required. A valid California Class B driver’s license is highly desirable. For more information and to apply go to www. eureka.ca.gov. Application deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Friday, September 30. EOE.

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

THE CITY OF

ROADS DIRECTOR F I N A N C E D E PA R T M E N T

Roads Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Responsible for planning and maintaining transportation systems on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation; and, oversees all operations including Road Construction, Aggregate and Ready-mix enterprises, New Construction, and Road maintenance program. Minimum Qualifications: Must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering, Planning, or a related field; AND a Minimum of 5 years of public road maintenance, facilities, and construction experience at a management level; OR an equivalent combination of education, training and/or experience. Knowledgeable about federal and state laws pertaining to road construction (BIA, FHA, NEPA, and highway and bridge engineering); Class A General Engineering Contractor’s license preferred, but not required; and, knowledgeable in the basic operation of heavy machinery. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: September 9, 2022. For job descriptions & employment applications, contact the Human Resource Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 23 or email dori.marshall@ hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

ACCOUNTANT I/II

$4,260 – $5,721/MO *Salary will increase by 2% in 2023 with another 5% increase in 2024. Plus Excellent Benefits including free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more! This position is responsible for professional accounting, administrative and technical support of activities in the Finance Division. A Bachelor’s Degree in accounting or equivalent plus one (1) year of responsible professional public accounting experience is required. Candidates will be considered for appointment at either the entry or journey level depending on qualifications. For more information and to apply online, please visit our website at www.ci.eureka. ca.gov. Application deadline: 5:00pm on Friday, September 30th, 2022. EOE

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Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Program Assistant, Case Management

Clinician I/II

Full-time, starts at $16.00/hour

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Full-time, Clinician I starts at $27.09/hr,

Program Assistant

We’re Hiring! Are you motivated by meaningful experiences? Do you have a heart for service? Our current openings include:

Registered Nurses Licensed Vocational Nurse Transportation Manager Quality Assurance Manager PT/OT Assistant CarePartners (Care Aides) Driver Care Coordinator Nutrition & Activities Supervisor Behavioral Health Clinician To apply, visit www.humsenior.org. Questions? Call 707-443-9747.

Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Full-time, starts at $16.00/hour

Clinician II starts $5,381/month

Bilingual Child Care Initiative Project and Resource & Referral Specialist

Bilingual Clinician I/II (Spanish)

Starts at $17.59/hour

Full-time, Clinician I starts at $28.94/hr,

Human Resource Specialist

Clinician II starts $5,730/month

Full-time, starts at $18.73/hour Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org Hablamos español @changingtidesfamilyservices

Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

@changingtidesfamilyservices

HSRC is an equal opportunity employer.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

35


EMPLOYMENT

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CITY OF FORTUNA

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BUS DRIVER I Part-Time, $16.20 to $19.70 per hour.

HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT Employment Opportunity

Under the general supervision of the Recreation & Transit Administrative Supervisor, to operate a vehicle for the transportation of senior citizens and persons with disabilities within the Fortuna City limits, and occasionally in surrounding areas and related work as required. Must be at least 18 and maintain possession of a valid Class B California Driver’s License, with passenger endorsement, issued by DMV throughout employment. Full job description and required application available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600 or www.friendlyfortuna.com.

Deputy Clerk IV/V

Salary range: $20.01-$27.00/hr. DC IV/V attends court sessions and takes minutes during court proceedings: at the direction of a judge, impanels juries, sets future court dates, etc. Legal experience required. Please apply at www. humboldt.courts.ca.gov/ gi/employment.htm and submit application to: Jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov.

Application Packets must be received by 4:00 pm on Friday, September 30, 2022

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HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT

SUPPORT local, in-depth journalism CA L E N DA R / M A P S / T H R I F T I N G W I T H A D I F F E R E N C E / LO G G E R BA R R E V I VA L

Research Attorney $85,403-$119,564 FT – 40 HRS. (SALARY EXEMPT)/FULL BENEFITS This professional level position performs legal research, gathers information regarding legal motions, pleadings, and writs presented to the Court; reviews and summarizes evidence, procedural history and legal contentions and submits recommendations for resolving matters before the Court. Please apply at: https://www.humboldt. courts.ca.gov/general-information/human-

1

resources-and-employment and submit application to: jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov.

Sponsorships • Subscriptions • Swag

SHOP.COM

36

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

PLACE YOUR JOB LISTINGS CLASSIFIEDS.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM Place Ad


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Hiring?

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Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

The City of Rio Dell Is now accepting applications for

Fiscal Assistant I/II/Senior

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K’ima: w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

WELLNESS COORDINATOR – FT REGULAR ($20.00-$23.00 PER HOUR) – Coordinated and implements activities and action steps as listed in the goals and objectives of the CDC Tribal Wellness Grant. Responsible for helping create opportunities for community members to improve their physical, mental, and emotional health through cultural activities. High School Diploma or GED equivalent and two years clerical and/or administrative experience; must actively participate in tribal cultural activities; must be able to assist with grant reporting and with grant compliance; current CPR certificate or obtain within 60 days of hire; valid CA Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS SEPTEMBER 26, 2022 BY 5PM. MEDICAL BILLING SPECIALIST – FT Regular ($17.90 - $24.25 hr.) CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT – FT REGULAR ($20.44-$27.55 PER HOUR) OR MEDICAL ASSISTANT – FT Regular ($18.62-$25.09 per hour) 2 COMMUNITY HEALTH REPRESENTATIVES (CHR) – FT Regular ($18.62-$25.09 per hour) HOUSEKEEPER – FT Regular ($15.00 per hour) PARAMEDIC – FT Regular EMT – FT Regular GRANT WRITER & PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS – FT/Regular ($29.00-36.00 per hour DOE) DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT/ Regular ($39.00-43.00 DOE) PHYSICIAN – FT/Regular MEDICAL DIRECTOR – FT/Regular MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN – FT/Regular MAT RN CARE MANAGER – FT/Regular All positions above are Open Until Filled unless otherwise stated. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: apply@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

($34,942 - $51,747 + Benefits) Provides customer service to the public, customers and complex support to the Finance Department. This is a great way to get experience and earn a reference. Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue in Rio Dell, or call (707)764-3532. Position is open until filled.

YOUTH PROGRAM MANAGER Regular, F/T, Salary: $20/hr. the Program Manager is responsible for planning, coordination, and implementation of activities at the Wiyot Youth Programs. This includes addressing the developmental needs, interests, and char− acteristics of youth based upon the assessment of needs and inter− ests of youth and the community. Activities shall strive to relate to the five core areas of Youth Programming. Other duties assigned. Experience / Education Required: Bachelor’s Degree in Early Childhood Education, Child Development, Elementary Educa− tion or Special Education or related fields. Two years of experience working with youth in a leadership position. Demonstrated experi− ence in planning, developing, and implementing activities that provide social enrichment and personal development. Must be able to complete a background check, DOJ fingerprinting and Tuberculosis test before beginning work. Pre−employment drug testing required. Full−time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/ sick leave, 16 paid holidays, health, dental, life insurance and matched profit sharing. Open until filled. Please go to www.wiyot.us for complete job description. Contact Operations Manager for an application and submit to Wiyot Tribe 1000 Wiyot Dr. Loleta, CA 95551 www.wiyot.us

The North Coast Journal is seeking

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS

Are you personable and have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance? Call us! News box repair skills a plus! Contact Michelle 707.442.1400 ext. 305 michelle@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


MARKETPLACE Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 866−571−1325 (AAN CAN)

ALL SPORTING GOODS HALF OFF SALE @ THE DREAM QUEST THRIFT STORE! Where your shop− ping dollars support local youth. Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629− 3006. September 20−24.

ARE YOU BEHIND $10K OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 877−414−2089 (Hours: Mon−Fri 7am−5pm PST) BATH & SHOWER UPDATES IN AS LITTLE AS ONE DAY! Afford− able prices − No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call 1−866−370−2939 (AAN CAN) BIG GUY, LITTLE PICKUP Small cleanups and hauls. Eureka area. Reasonable rates. Call Odd Job Mike at 707−497−9990.

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN) CREDIT CARD DEBT RELIEF! Reduce payment by up to 50%! Get one LOW affordable payment/month. Reduce interest. Stop calls. FREE no− obligation consultation Call 1− 855−761−1456 (AAN CAN)document Build to edge of the

REAL ESTATE / FOR SALE DIRECTV SATELLITE TV SERVICE Starting at $74.99/month! Free Installation! 160+ channels avail− able. Call Now to Get the Most Sports & Entertainment on TV! 877−310−2472 DISH TV $64.99 FOR 190 CHAN− NELS + $14.95 HIGH SPEED INTERNET. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23 1− 866−566−1815 (AAN CAN) NEVER CLEAN YOUR GUTTERS AGAIN! Affordable, profession− ally installed gutter guards protect your gutters and home from debris and leaves forever! For a FREE Quote call: 844−499− 0277 PAYING TOP CA$H FOR MEN’S SPORT WATCHES! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 888−320−1052

SPECTRUM INTERNET AS LOW AS $29.99, CALL TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FOR ACP AND FREE INTERNET. No Credit Check. Call Now! 833−955−0905 TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920−1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rick− enbacker, Prairie State, D’An− gelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877−589− 0747 (AAN CAN)

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Riding & cordless mowers, both with baggers Dump runs • Weed eating Hedge trimming ur $ 35/ho Call Corey 707-382-2698

FEATURED LISTING $409,000

2184 Rohnerville, Fortuna Fortuna Victorian - Stain glass front doors, remodeled kitchen, formal dining room, 3 bed, 2 bath, approx. 1600 sq. ft. laundry room, covered back porch, storage shed, near downtown. MLS# 262774 LIC# 01339550

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie (707) 839−1518

WATER DAMAGE TO YOUR HOME? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833−664−1530 (AAN CAN)

YOUR AD HERE

649,900

$

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

New Price

EASTERN McKINLEYVILLE HOME ON OVER ¼ ACRE, WITH AN OVERSIZED GARAGE AND ROOM FOR RV OR BOAT PARKING ALONG BOTH SIDES OF THE HOME. 3br, 2bth and the kitchen has been beautifully remodeled with a large island and breakfast bar, stainless steel appliances and granite slab counters. Open floor plan with cathedral ceilings in the living room, a cozy wood stove and French doors leading to the spacious south facing back deck, great for sunny summer BBQ’s! Hickory wood floors, redwood lap siding, separate laundry room, cathedral ceilings, french doors off the primary bedroom, and more. Centrally located, just up the street from shopping, Pierson Park, restaurants, and gym. Call for the details or your private showing today! MLS#262600

Auto Service

Computer & Internet

Lawn Care Service

38

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certi− fied & ready to work in months! Call 866−243−5931. (M−F 8am− 6pm ET). Computer with internet is required.

Margins are just a safe area

2 hour m minimu

■ McKinleyville

Call Broker Owner Jeremy Stanfield at Landmark Real Estate (707) 725-2852

MARKETPLACE Lodging

BODY MIND SPIRIT default



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Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

YOUR AD

HERE

classified@north coastjournal.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

     

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 metaphysicsuniversity.com default

    



Home & garden improvement experts starting on page 16.

442-1400 ×315 kyle@ northcoastjournal.com


Charlie Tripodi

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

BRE # 02084041

BRE# 02070276

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

Owner/ Land Agent BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

ARCATA – 2 UNITS - $849,000

TING!

NEW LIS

±7.75 Acre turn-key cannabis farm currently permitted for 32k sq. ft. of mixed light cultivation space, explore the possibility of expansion under Rio Dell’s farmer friendly ordinance with NO CAP on permit size! Enjoy privacy and the comforts of in town living including a 4/3.5 home, PG&E, community water, and 2 story garage.

TRINITY LAKE – LAND/PROPERTY - $249,000

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $75,000

BLOCKSBURG – HOME ON ACREAGE - $349,000

!

D PRICE

±1.79 Acre lot in a desirable area in Willow Creek! Surrounded bytrees, with sloping terraces of land, the possibilities are endless. Community water/ no septic and close to USFS land.

SALYER – HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,250,000

Premium hunting property perched high on a ridgetop with expansive views of the local mountains! Property boasts a newly drilled well & water system, end of the road privacy, beautiful rolling meadows and a 1,000 sq. ft. open concept cabin. Sustainable living at its finest with plenty of space for gardening, animals, and great solar energy potential!

Unbelievable retreat or homestead opportunity, featuring over ¼ mile of river frontage w/campsites, private beach, and an incredible swimming hole. Cozy main house and two additional sleeping cabins. Parcel spans the South Fork of the Trinity River with suspension bridge connecting.

WILLOW CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,050,000

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $237,000

Beautiful river view estate on over 4 acres just minutes from Willow Creek! Property boasts a 3/3 3,650 sq. ft. main residence, large in ground pool complete with outdoor kitchen and pool house featuring a full bathroom and kitchenette area, separate barn with a 1/1 apartment above and so much more!

WEAVERVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $94,000 Undeveloped, mostly steep ±40 acre parcel with top the of the world mountain views! Property is conveniently located just off Highway 299, only 10 minutes west of Weaverville.

Ashlee Cook

RIO DELL – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $1,300,000

Modern, completely remodeled 2 units in the Jacoby Creek School District situated on ±0.86 flat acres! 3 Bedroom, 3 Bathroom main house with 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom second unit, massive backyard, large shop, stunning deck, patio, and so much more! 3 Parcels totaling ±90 acres with easy Trinity Lake access! Perfect vacation getaway with privacy and seclusion surrounded by Forest Service and a large timber holding. Take advantage of the existing NTMP with a 20 year old growth projection of 1,500,000 board feet of timber! Parcel also features a spring and deeded right of way. Owner may carry!

REDUCE

707.498.6364

Mike Willcutt

±177 Acre homestead, mountain recreation, or timberland property adjacent to Forest Service lands. Hardwood & fir forests, exceptional views to the south & west, several flats for development, w/ county road access and just 6 miles from downtown Willow Creek.

REDUCE

D PRICE

!

HYDESVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $199,000 Come see this beautiful lot with amazing views. Endless potential! The barn is 576 square feet and can be converted into a tiny home while building your dream house. Imagine waking up to these killer views everyday. Power and water are at the street. Septic still needs to be developed. OMC!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


BACK TO SCHOOL

@ THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COLLECTIVE

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS FOR THE WHOLE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER STUDENTS GET

10% OFF with a purchase MUST HAVE STUDENT ID NO EXCEPTIONS

UP THE ALLEY

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT

ATION AND TO THE LEFT OF OUR OLD LOC

M

YR

TL

E

A

. VE

1662 Myrtle Ave. SUITE A Eureka 707.442.2420

NEW HOURS

M-F 10am-7pm Sat 11am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm

License No. C10-0000997-LIC

21+ only


AL SPECI UT O PULL- ON SECTI

2022

BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

24

BURGER

SPECIALS

SEPTEMBER 23 - OCTOBER 2 AT

24 LOCAL RESTAURANTS SEE THEM ALL INSIDE OR AT

N CJ B U R G E RW E E K .C O M

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

1


2022

! T S E T N O C E I SELF This year we challenge you eaters to show us what you’ve got! Literally, show us! Snap a photo of yourself with your burgers (preferably before you ingest them!) and upload them to the contest page at ncjburgerweek.com You’ll be entered to win one of two prizes! Either a Foggy Bottoms Boys Farm Tour or $500 cash. You are allowed to enter one selfie from each participating burger week location. Winners will be chosen at random from submitted photos. The more burgers you eat, the more chances you have to win. Visit ncjburgerweek.com to see all the participating restaurants and burgers and enter to win!

Contest Ends Noon Monday, Oct. 3rd WINNERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED IN THE OCTOBER 6TH ISSUE OF THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL

2

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


Welcome to NCJ Burger Week!

2022

Join us as we revel in our annual celebration of the hamburger. This year, 24 restaurants are participating in the revelry — using everything from locally-forged chanterelle gravy to chili garlic pinapple chutney to donut buns — to offer up mind-boggling creations. And the bacon. So much beloved bacon. So many burgers, so little time. Is it humanly possible to try them all? We super believe in you.

NCJ Burger Week Pro Tips Sometimes restaurants run out of burgers. Good news: #NCJBurgerWeek will be even meatier than last year’s event! That also means more fellow diners showing up and, because kitchens aren’t staffed with genies and supplies are not infinite, a given restaurant could run out of its #NCJBurgerWeek burger toward the end of a shift. If that happens, know that we feel your pain and it’s going to be OK. There’s always a tomorrow when you can come back and order the burger we all want you to have. Don’t let your hangry self get the better of you and remember that making and serving burgers is a noble calling. Be kind to those doing this important work.

the frenzy that is #NCJBurgerWeek. Tip at least 20% and walk out with your head held high, making your parents and the NCJ team proud. Your patty purveyors will remember it when you come back.

Yes, you may have to wait. As mentioned above, folks are excited for #NCJBurgerWeek. Word about last year has spread and your favorite participating spot may go from sleepy to packed. Don’t be surprised if you have to wait a little. Treat yourself to a beverage. Revel in the anticipation. And when your burger shows up in all its juicy glory, post about it on social media using #NCJBurgerWeek and you could win a prize.

You can keep up with the madness on Facebook and Instagram. #NCJBurgerWeek is on Facebook and Instagram. Follow us and get up-to-date info on everything #NCJBurgerWeek while you peruse the foodporn. And don’t be shy — join the fun and share your own burger photos using #NCJBurgerWeek.

You should get some fries and a drink, too. You’re not required to buy anything else but can you really say you’ve had the full experience without some kind of fried side and a beverage? This is the perfect time to try out the fries, onion rings and other goodies our restaurant pals are dishing out while showing a little love to local businesses. Is there craft beer on the menu? Milkshakes? Go big or go home, burger fans.

Not tipping makes you that customer. Don’t be that customer. We all get caught up in the excitement of a deal. But don’t lose your manners and remember the folks cooking and serving are handling more orders and delivering a gourmet burger during

#NCJBurger

Week

#NCJBURGERWEEK

NCJBURGERWEEK.COM northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

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NCJBURGERWEEK.COM AA ISLAND BURGER Teriyaki bacon jam, Swiss cheese and grilled pineapple ring on a bed of sweet slaw.

AA Bar & Grill

929 Fourth St., Eureka (707) 443-1632 aabarandgrill.net

Available Mon.-Fri., 11am-2pm during Burger Week

SOUTHWESTERN VEGGIE BURGER

Choice of black bean, Gardenburger or beef patty with spicy roasted red pepper ranch, lettuce, tomato, pepper jack cheese and guacamole on a grilled burger bun. Dine in only, side not included.

$ 50 $

812

$

with

SIDE

ELVIS’ HEARTBREAK BURGER

6-ounce Humboldt grass-fed burger, peanut butter and crispy bacon.

The Alibi

744 Ninth St., Arcata (707) 822-3731 thealibi.com Open for Burger Week Fri.-Mon., 9am - 10pm Wed. and Thurs., 11:30am 10pm

FEAST BURGER SPECIAL

Marinated, roasted tri-tip crowned with crispy onions, organic greens topped with a drizzle of sweet and spicy honey. Served with kettle chips.

4

10

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

$

1777 Norton Road, McKineyville (707) 839-2342 Open for Burger Week 11:30am - 2:30pm Closed Fri.-Sun, Sept. 23-25, and Sat-Sun. Oct. 1-2

13

Dine-in only.

$

Beau Pre Golf Club

75

14

Cafe Feast Humboldt 1211 Evergreen Road, Redway (707) 314-0410 cafefeasthumboldt

Open for Burger Week Mon.-Thur. 10am-2pm, closed Fri., Sat. & Sun. Call in, take-out welcome. Large take-out Burger Week orders can be placed in advance and are available all days.


#NCJBURGERWEEK

2022

NCJ BURGER WEEK IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: SEPT. – OCT. 2022

#NCJBurger

Week 25

19

20

21

22

23

24

26

27

28

29

30

1

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

5


NCJBURGERWEEK.COM THE SPICY ISLAND BURGER A perfect hand pattied burger topped with sweet and spicy teriyaki sauce, pepper jack cheese, grilled jalapeños and pineapple, served with French fries.

Cafe Marina & Woodley’s Bar

601 Startare Drive, Eureka (707) 443-2233, cafemarina.net Open for Burger Week Daily, noon-9pm Dine-in, call in orders and take-out welcome.

$

THE POPPER RANCH BURGER

This burger is a delicious ¼-pound patty topped with lettuce, pepper jack cheese, jalapeño poppers filled with cream cheese, and our super tasty ranch sauce, served with French fries and a drink

95

A smashed certified organic ground beef patty, topped with house made chili garlic pineapple chutney, bacon, Swiss cheese, shredded green lettuce and sliced tomatoes served on an oil-topped bun. Served with choice of side. It’s Maui-licious!

6

Open for Burger Week 11am-9pm

11

Eel River Brewing Company 1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna (707) 725-2739 eelriverbrewing.com

FRY BURGER

Deep-fried burger patty, NOT your ordinary hamburger. Come try it out yourself!

99

17

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Fry Burger

2021 Fifth St., Eureka (707) 601-3913 trevyn.07 Available Sun.-Thur., 11am-10pm Call-in orders and take-out welcome.

Open for Burger Week Daily, 11am-11pm Dine-in, take-out welcome.

$

3023 F St., Eureka (707) 442-6967 freshfreezeeureka.com

$ 95

17

THE MAUI WAUI BURGER

Fresh Freeze Drive-In

$

16-18


#NCJBURGERWEEK DA BOMB

⅓-pound chargrilled Angus burger, topped with bacon, grilled onions, grilled mushrooms and brie cheese with a touch of horserasdish aoli and Dijon mustard on the buns. Lettuce, tomato, onion and pickled pepper on the side. Hand cut fries included. You still need to consider dessert!

Gallagher’s Irish Pub

101

1604 Fourth St., Eureka (707) 442-1177 gallaghersirishpub.com Open for Burger Week Tues.-Fri. 11am-8pm, Sat. noon-8pm Call in and take-out welcome.

2022

Index by City

TRINIDAD Sunset Restaurant at The Heights Casino pg. 11

TRINIDAD

MCKINLEYVILLE

99

15

Papa Wheelies pg. 9

Humboldt Brews pg. 7

MCKINLEYVILLE

The Jam pg. 8

Six Rivers Brewery pg. 11

3

Plaza Grill pg. 9 The Pub at the Creamery pg. 10

299 6

Roman's Kitchen pg. 10 Wildberries Marketplace & Cafe pg. 11

ARCATA

BLUE LAKE

8

Low & Slow BBQ pg. 8

EUREKA

LOLETA River's Edge Restaurant at Bear River Casino pg. 10 FORTUNA

LOLETA

DRAGON BURGER 100% Humboldt Grassfed Beef, sweet Thai chili slaw, habanero aioli, grilled roasted peppers and tomatoes, pepper jack cheese. Served with fries.

$

Humboldt Brews

856 10th St., Arcata (707) 826-2739 humbrews.com

Open for Burger Week Mon.-Fri. 4-9pm Sat. and Sun. noon-9pm Dine-in, call in orders and take-out welcome.

211 FERNDALE FERNDALE No Brand Burger Stand pg. 9

BLUE LAKE

Eel River Brewing Company pg. 6

FORTUNA RIO DELL

RIO Wildwood DELL Waffles pg. 11

EUREKA AA Bar & Grill pg. 4 Alibi Lounge & Restaurant pg. 4 Café Marina & Woodley's Bar pg. 6 Fresh Freeze pg. 6 Fry Burger pg. 6 Gallagher's Irish Pub pg. 7 Opera Alley Bistro pg. 9 Ramone’s Bakery and Cafe pg. 10

101

18 REDWAY Cafe Feast Humboldt REDWAY pg. 4

GARBERVILLE

© NORTH COAST JOURNAL

$

Beau Pre Golf Course pg. 4

ARCATA

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

7


#NCJBURGERWEEK

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FOR VOTING US

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Come get your Jam on during Burger Week. Big, juicy, 10-ounce grass-fed, all beef burger, cooked to order, topped with house made remoulade, crispy bacon, your choice of cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion and pickles, served on a 5-inch sesame seed bun. Be sure to wash it down with something cold. Extra napkins provided.

$

Open for Burger Week Thurs. and Fri., 4-9pm, Sat., 11am-9pm, Sun., 10am-9pm. The bar is open seven days a week, past 9pm daily.

Mention this ad and receive a 10% discount on your Jambo Burger

18

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SUPPORT local, in-depth journalism CA L E N DA R / M A P S / T H R I F T I N G W I T H A D I F F E R E N C E / LO G G E R BA R R E V I VA L

PARADISE BURGER

Our burger patties consist of house ground brisket, chuck and bacon. It comes topped with a grilled, fresh cut pineapple ring, house smoked pork belly burnt ends, house pickled jalapeños, tomato, lettuce, red onion and pickles. We add pepper jack cheese and sweet barbecue sauce. Oh, and crispy bacon to round it out, because, well, bacon. Cheers, enjoy!

1

$

Sponsorships • Subscriptions • Swag

SHOP.COM

8

The Jam

915 H St., Arcata (707) 822-5266, thejamarcata.com

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

20

Low & Slow BBQ 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake (707) 496-4379

Open for Burger Week Mon.-Fri. 2-8pm Sat. and Sun. noon-8pm Closed Tues. and Wed. Dine-in, take-out welcome.


NCJBURGERWEEK.COM JALAPEÑO BACON BLUE CHEESEBURGER

Toasted bun with mayo/mustard spread, ¼-inch local beef patty, salt, pepper and garlic, sliced jalapeños, bacon, blue cheese, lettuce, tomato, sweet relish and onions.

$

1400 Main St., Ferndale (707) 786-9474

Open for Burger Week Mon.-Sat. 11am-4pm, Sun. 11am-3pm Call in orders welcome, take-out welcome.

14

SOUTHERN COMFORT

Pacific Pastures grass-fed beef, peppered bacon, house made pimento cheese and pickles. Served à la carte, sides ordered separately.

$

No Brand Burger Stand

13

POUTINE YOUR MOUTH

Artisan hamburger bun with local fresh ground grass-fed beef, our world-renowned French fries topped with cheese curds and homemade locally foraged chanterelle gravy poured over the top with fresh arugula.

$

Opera Alley Bistro

409 Opera Alley, Eureka (707) 442-0121 operaalleybistro.com

Open for Burger Week Wednesday - Saturday, 11am-4pm Closed Monday & Tuesday Call in orders welcome, take-out welcome.

Papa Wheelies Pub

1584 Reasor Road, McKinleyville (707) 630-5084 papawheeliespub.com Open for Burger Week Tues.-Sat. 4-10pm

14

AMERICAN RETRO Two 5-ounce Angus beef patties, American cheese, bacon, lettuce, tomato, onion and dill pickle on a brioche bun.

Plaza Grill

780 Seventh St., Third Floor, Arcata, (707) 826-0860 plazagrillarcata.com Open for Burger Week Tues.-Sat., 5-7pm Closed Sun. and Mon. In-house only, carry-out not available.

$

16

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

9


NCJBURGERWEEK.COM LUTHER

Two ¼-pound smash-burger patties made with Humboldt Grassfed Beef, topped with onion bacon jam and then American cheese on each patty, in between two halves of a grilled glazed donut. Served á la carte.

$

A 7-ounce beef patty, bacon, blackberry bourbon sauce, red onion, arugula and brie on a rustic ciabatta bun, grilled to order served with chips or greens.

10

824 L St., Suite A, Arcata, (707) 630-5178

Open for Burger Week Wed.-Fri. 11am-10pm, Sat. & Sun. 3-10 pm Closed Mon. and Tues. Burgers are for dine-in only.

25

14

THE BIG BEAR BURGER

1/2-pound Angus beef, one egg, lettuce, tomato, and smoked Gruyere cheese on a brioche bun.

Rivers Edge Grill & Bar

Bear River Casino 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta (707) 733-9644 ext 2137 bearrivercasino.com Open for Burger Week 11am-2pm and 5-9pm

Dine-in and take-out welcome.

$

15

BLACKBERRY BOURBON BURGER

$

The Pub at the Creamery

9

129 $ 1599

er's car with play

d

withOUTard c player's

Ramone’s Bakery & Cafe

2297 Harrison Ave., Eureka (707) 442-1336 ramonesbakery.com Open for Burger Week Mon.-Sat., 12-8pm Closed Sun.

SWEET AND SPICY BACON BURGER

A Humboldt Grassfeed burger patty, hardwood crispy bacon, pepper jack cheese, barbecue sauce, homemade spicy mayo, tomatoes, onions and pickles with a side of small fries.

$

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

89

15

Roman’s Kitchen

1301 D St., Arcata (707) 407-9750 romanskitchen.com

Open for Burger Week Daily, 11am-6pm Dine-in, call in and take-out welcome


#NCJBURGERWEEK 2022

MUM DINNER BURGER

6-ounce Eel River grass-fed meatloaf burger cooked to order, topped with caramelized onions, mashed potatoes, bacon, cheddar cheese and a rich brown gravy on a buttery bun. Served with a side of fries.

$

1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville (707) 683-2233 sixriversbrewery.com Open for Burger Week Tues.-Sat., noon-7pm Dine-in only. No substitutions.

Not gluten free and no gluten-free option available.

16

PRIME BEEF TRI-TIP BURGER

Prime beef tri-tip burger on an oil-topped bun with crispy onion, romaine lettuce, sharp white cheese and roasted garlic aioli. Served with JoJo potatoes.

$

Six Rivers Brewery

16

WILDPLATTER GYRO BURGER

Our take on a classic Greek gyro. A generously seasoned flame grilled patty of 75% local Bear River Valley grassfed beef and 25% local Ferndale Farms lamb, stationed on a pita bread bun, topped with tzatziki, lettuce, red onion, tomatoes and a mild harissa sauce.

Wildplatter Cafe at Wildberries Marketplace

747 13th St., Arcata (707) 822-0095 wildberries.com

Wildplatter Grill Open for Burger Week Mon.-Sat. 11am-7pm Dine-in, call in and take-out welcome .

$ 99

9

The Heights Casino Sunset Restaurant 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad (707) 825-2770 funattheheights.com Open for Burger Week Wed.-Sun., 5-9pm

THE MANIC BURGER

A juicy, house made all beef patty stuffed with fragrant garlic and melty havarti cheese, topped with leafy spring mix, fresh organic tomato and grilled onions. Smothered with a sweet and savory jalapeño jam on our famous waffle bun!

$

Wildwood Waffles

770 Wildwood Ave., inside Root 101 Nursery, Rio Dell, (707) 506-3073 wildwoodwaffles Open for Burger Week Daily, 7am-2pm Call in orders welcome, take-out welcome.

10

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

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Burger Bliss. Before you bite into all those Burger Week burgers, visit Humboldt County Collective for quality cannabis products that will make the best burgers even better.

CAFE MARINA'S SPICY ISLAND BURGER

ALLEY UP THELEF T OF OUR

AND TO THE OLD LOCATION

1662 Myrtle Ave. SUITE A Eureka

M

T YR

LE

A

NEW HOURS

. VE

M-F 10am-7pm Sat 11am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm

707.442.2420

License No. C10-0000997-LIC

12

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

21+ only

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT