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north coast

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7 Now what for HSU athletics? 13 Oh noes … almost too late …

thursday aug. 30, 2012 vol XXIII issue 35 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

Vote for Best of Humboldt 20 Mushroom secrets revealed 26 Big bad blues


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2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 6 7 9 12

Mailbox Poem

Light in August

News

Penalty Kicks: Off the Field

Blog Jammin’ On The Cover Bad Water

13 Best of Humboldt 2012 Ballot 18 Home & Garden Service Directory

20 Table Talk

An Early Thanksgiving

22 Art Beat

Illuminating HSU’s Permanent Collection

23 Arts Alive!

Saturday, Sept. 1, 6-9 p.m.

CASA of Humboldt

Special Insert

26 The Hum

we’ve got blues again

28 Music & More! 30 Calendar 31 Seven-o-Heaven

cartoon by andrew goff

32 In Review a book

32 Filmland

Road Runners

34 Workshops 37 Field Notes

To Mars and/or Bust

40 40 42 45 46

Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

An open letter to the community: In light of recent events, I feel the need to submit a statement of my own. As the owner of Redwood Curtain Brewing Company, I, Drake Mollberg, do not condone Eli LaRue’s actions in any way, shape, or form. I feel his actions in the early hours of Saturday, Aug. 18, 2012, were unacceptable. I hope this is not construed as a reflection of Redwood Curtain Brewing Company’s role in the community. My family, wife, and two children treasure this community and intend to support it for years to come. I would like it to be known that effective immediately, Eli LaRue is no longer a partner in Redwood Curtain Brewing Company. I truly hope he takes this event as an impetus to take some time to look at his behavior and its impacts on others and to improve upon himself. I have encouraged him to seek professional help.

“Think before you speak. Read before you think.” -- Fran Lebowitz

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On a personal note, I would like to also apologize to the two women this event has affected, Ms. Jen Ables and Ms. Maral Attallah. I am very sorry for Eli’s actions and again, feel they were out of line and completely unacceptable. I wish to sympathize with your situation and wish you peace in the future. Again, my deepest apologies to everyone involved in the incident, to our community and our loyal supporters. Nobody deserves to go through such an ordeal! My deepest sympathies, Drake

Owner, Redwood Curtain Brewing Company

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

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Recycling? Tell us More Editor: It was good to find out more about what actually happens to recycled materials (“The Recyclable Journey,” Aug. 23). It would also be good to find out more about what can currently be recycled, since that seems to be changing. Apparently things like six-pack, milk and egg cartons that were not acceptable before are now. But pizza boxes are not. Some updated information on this, perhaps printed in the Journal or sent out with the garbage bill, would be useful. Charles Minton, Bayside  Editor: We live outside city limits and have trash/recycle service through Humboldt Recology. The recycle stuff is single stream into blue plastic bags. Then a trash truck (same as garbage) picks up everything and compacts it all. They sort the smashed bags back in Eureka and ship to Willits via the outsourced third party. How much smashed glass con-

taminates the cardboard, and how much cross-contamination takes place when it’s all smashed together? This makes a large volume of recyclables that get tossed into landfill as they are unfit to sort. I’m guessing this untold story would blow the lid off as folks around here will not stand for say 20 to 35 percent trash from their recyclables. Has anyone followed up on what’s going on with this one bag mess we ship out as recyclables? Mark Cortright, McKinleyville [Editor’s note: Recology Humboldt County is experimenting with same-truck collections in Garberville and in the Fieldbrook/Blue Lake area to keep rates down, according to the company’s general manager, Mike Leggins. Some of the blue bags do break and some recyclables are lost, possibly around 10 percent, Leggins said. The company is trying out some heavier bags and plans to reassess at the end of January, after a full year of sametruck collection, he said.]

Brewery Turmoil Editor: In the light of recent events (Blog Jammin, Aug. 30), I feel the need to submit

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In Praise of Squires Editor: I have rented from Floyd Squires for over six years, and I disagree with “Limbo Land” (Aug. 16). I’ve been here to witness him fixing the front and back door almost weekly. People will rent from him and then pay one month’s rent. When they don’t have the next month’s rent and have already damaged the apartment beyond their ability to recover their deposits, they destroy as much as they can, then leave. Sometimes their damage is in the thousands of dollars. Every time he replaces the extinguishers somebody breaks or steals them. I’ve never had any trouble getting any repairs that I ask for. Vagrants break in the building. They leave feces everywhere, garbage, needles, etc. So for those who are mad, pay your rent and keep your place clean. Get repairs as needed. Floyd and Betty Squires are most people’s last resort because nobody will take a chance with them. Everybody pointing fingers either wants free living or they are room jumpers. Floyd and Betty Squires have been excellent owners. I also pay my rent.

Cartoon by joel mielke

a statement of my own. As the owner of Redwood Curtain Brewing Company, I, Drake Mollberg, do not condone Eli LaRue’s actions in any way, shape, or form. I feel his actions in the early hours of Saturday, Aug. 18, were unacceptable. I hope this is not construed as a reflection of Redwood Curtain Brewing Company’s role in the community. My family, wife and two children treasure this community and intend to support it for years to come. I would like it to be known that effective immediately, Eli LaRue is no longer a partner in Redwood Curtain Brewing Company. I truly hope he takes this event as an impetus to take some time to look at his behavior and its impacts on others and to improve upon himself. I have encouraged him to seek professional help.  On a personal note, I would like to also apologize to the two woman this event has affected, Ms. Jen Ables and Ms. Maral Attallah.  I am very sorry for Eli’s actions and again, feel they were out of line and completely unacceptable.  I wish to sympathize with your situation and wish you peace in the future. Again, my deepest apologies to everyone involved in the incident, to our community and our loyal supporters. Nobody deserves to go through such an ordeal! Drake Mollberg, Arcata

One man trying to keep his building safe can’t stop people from breaking in; it’s only a misdemeanor, trespassing. My shower broke, and within 24 hours I had a working one again. So before you judge and point fingers, he provides living space for the poorer people and gets screwed in the long run. Jacky Lee Brown, Eureka

‘Best Of’ Gripe Editor: Hey, no fair! After casting my ballot in

the annual NCJ Best of Humboldt readers poll, I included a link to the survey ballot on my blog, “Like You’ve Got Something Better To Do” (www.lygsbtd.wordpress. com), encouraging my readers to participate in the survey. The NCJ website denied everyone who clicked that link access to the ballot, telling them that they had already voted. “Like you’ve got Something Better To Do” readers should be allowed to vote in this survey, and deserve to have their votes counted. By now, most regular continued on next page

22nd Annual Natural Fiber Fair FREE Hourly Demos

Arcata Community Center • 10am to 5pm • Admission $5 Saturday , September 8, 2012

Sunday, September 9, 2012

All Day Demonstrations at Booths:

All day Demonstrations at Booths:

Lois Schaer will share a variety of spinning techniques. Leg Roll cordage and netmaking with Tamara Wilder. Wet Felting with Carin Engen.

Lois Schaer will share a variety of spinning techniques. Leg Roll cordage and netmaking with Tamara Wilder. Wet Felting with Carin Engen. Weave on a loom with Amy Pollock.

12pm - Learn how to use a drop spindle with Lois Schaer 1pm - Make felt over soap with Hope Rose of Hope Springs 1pm - Learn to spin fancy yarns with Janet Heppler 2pm - Learn to needle felt with Sheri McKelvy 2pm - Make a no sew bag from a scarf with Linda Gabriel 2pm - Discuss plant fibers and uses with Tamara Wilder 3pm - April Sproule demonstrates textile design stenciling. 3pm - Weave on a loom, bring home a coaster! Amy Pollock 4pm - Learn about raw wool and sheep breeds with Ace Vanderneck 4pm - Crochet a granny square with Carl Chatfield

12pm - Crochet a granny square with Carl Chatfield. 12pm - Learn to spin on a spindle with Lois Scher 1pm - Spinning contest! See the best spinners spin! 2pm - Indigo dye pot! Dye indigo blue with John Marshall. 2pm - Handweaving with Hazel Spencer 3pm - Felt on soap with Hope Rose! Great kid class. 3pm - Learn to knit! Bring needles and yarn if you have them 4pm - Discuss plant fibers and uses with Tamara Wilder

Half and Full Day Workshops are also available. Sign up now at naturalfiberfair.com 599-2729. northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

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Aug. 30, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 35

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

Welcome Students!

continued from previous page

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

&

K STREET ANNEX

CLOTHING DOCK

Samples of tap water collected by residents at Arbor Glen Mobile Home Park. Photo by Heidi Walters.

Early Letter Deadline

Because of the upcoming holiday, letters for the Sept. 6 Journal are due by 11:30 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 31, and they must include a phone number where you can be reached before noon on Friday.

Correction

Last week’s cover article, “The Recyclable Journey,” incorrectly reported that commercial franchisers pay Humboldt Waste Management Authority a tipping fee for recyclables, when in actuality, the tipping fee is for commercial garbage drop-off only. Also, Ferndale and Rio Dell are not currently sending their curbside recyclables to Solid Waste of Willits. ●

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press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

shouldn’t dis my readers because they found a link to the ballot at the blog. John Hardin, Redway

| 11th & K Streets, Arcata | 822-8288

NEW & USED

www.wildwood.ws

mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

THE

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Scottie Lee Meyers contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler

readers who felt inclined to respond to your survey have already had their votes unfairly, unceremoniously and wrongly rejected. This constitutes a travesty of justice, an assault against “Like You’ve Got Something Better To Do” readers, and a corruption of the democratic process. As a result, your survey is tainted, distorted and skewed, even. My blog has been unfairly victimized, disadvantaged and injured by the NCJ‘s flawed and intentionally discriminatory voter ID protocol. I am outraged that the NCJ would stoop to the kind electoral shenanigans that I expect from Florida republicans, just to keep their readers from discovering what many in Humboldt County already know, that “Like You’ve Got Something Better To Do” is the funniest blog in Humboldt County. I know that’s not really saying a lot, but still, you don’t reject votes for Stars Hamburgers or the North Coast Co-Op, even though you leave stacks of paper ballots in those establishments, and you

Light in August

Inland, the polished-gem lyricism of birdsong sounds in the distance, barely audible within the airless womb of heat-stroked August. The mood of the somnolent afternoon is as elusive as sex and death: Conjugal rigors and rigor mortis are soaked in the sweat of ebbing summer’s languor; not the slightest breeze tugs at the window curtains of the bedroom. The sizzling trill of cicadas rises from the weed-infested culverts of the black metaled road, where the tar bubbles languidly with pungent, breath-taking fumes. The motionless, suffocating ambience is as hot as a kiln. Visibly invisible waves of heat swelter in the feverish light, one of nature’s sensory paradoxes. Light in August exposes the mysterious essences of things, ripeness about to burst and poised to shrivel, phenomena seen but not heard, heard but not seen, felt but not touched, experienced but not grasped. — Paul Mann

Folk Instruments Books & Accessories

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


Penalty Kicks: Off the Field The soccer season’s over but not the controversy By Scottie Lee Meyers scottie@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s been just over a week since Humboldt State University President Rollin Richmond canceled the upcoming men’s soccer season, and players and their parents are still grumbling about the decision, wishing they had a referee to officiate what they’re calling campus politics. Rumors are swirling and athletes are unwilling to talk on the record, frightened of further discipline. “Not without my lawyer,” or “I don’t want to comment” was what current soccer players consistently said when pressed for details about an Aug. 4 offcampus party attended by all but one player. A campus-led investigation, which began when someone called university administrators two days later, concluded the party involved underage drinking and hazing. Anxiety still reverberates from the locker rooms and into the classrooms as members of the women’s soccer team, facing similar accusations, await the fate of their upcoming season. A decision is expected soon. Parents of players have been exchanging emails among themselves and with the administration, saying a stern probation would have sufficed, instead of the president’s “draconian” decision to cancel the season. But the administration, well aware of hazing tragedies across campuses nationwide, says it wants to send a clear message that hazing won’t be tolerated at HSU. As a practicing attorney in Sacramento, Mark Swartz believes everyone is entitled

to due process. He feels his 21-year-old son Austin Swartz, a junior midfielder, was robbed of a fair hearing, the victim of an administration that did not justify its decision and was all too willing to play judge, jury and executioner. “Why is your punishment so harsh?” Swartz asks rhetorically, as if he were speaking to the president instead of on the phone to the Journal. “He’s never answered that question. Period.” Swartz is primarily a civil attorney now, but when he was a deputy district attorney, prosecuting first-time offenders who didn’t inflict bodily harm, they typically got probation and a second chance, he said. He wishes the school would act more like a court of law. “Everybody screws up, and you get a warning that if it happens again there will be serious consequences. This was a knee-jerk reaction.” But Richmond worries that there might not be a second chance. “How would I have liked to call a father or mother and say, ‘Sorry, we didn’t do a good enough job to stop hazing, your son is dead?’” Still in the president’s mind is a 2005 incident at nearby Chico State University, where a man died after drinking too much water as part of a fraternity initiation which also required dancing in raw sewage. As of February 2010, hazing has killed 96 people, with 82 percent of the deaths involving alcohol, according to the National Collaborative for Hazing Research and Prevention. HSU administrators say the Aug. 4 northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

7


Welcome back

students

Water Pipes • Vaporizers • Books • Jewelry • Clothing

HUMBOLDT

GLASSBLOWERS 214 E Street, Eureka 268-5511 815 9th Street, Arcata 822-7420

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

party put the lives of two students at risk from alcohol poisoning. But since the investigation didn’t begin until two days after the party, and since neither student received any medical treatment according to campus authorities, it was unclear what information the college relied on to determine lives had been at risk. HSU athletic director Dan Collen, who helped lead the investigations along with the student affairs department, said canceling the season was a painful decision for the president. “He certainly agonized over it. There were a lot of conversations. I do support it though. [Hazing] can’t be tolerated.” Richmond said that there were some differences of opinion on what the appropriate level of disciplinary action should be. “But I made the ultimate decision, primarily based on the fact that people’s lives were put in danger.” What makes the university’s decision particularly frustrating, said Swartz, is that parents can’t see the investigative report or details of the interviews on which it was based. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act requires that schools have a student’s consent before disclosing of educational records. Swartz said several athletes have asked to view the reports but haven’t seen them yet. With the athletes’ refusals to talk and the investigative report still under wraps, it’s impossible to say what exactly happened at the Aug. 4 party. But it seems clear that there is, and has been, what Collen described at a press conference as a “tradition” of hazing. Swartz has heard about rowdy, embarrassing initiation parties — but he says it’s not hazing because attendance is not required in order to win a spot on the team. “What I’ve heard is that this has been going on for years. It’s a tradition. My son went through it, and he said it was silly and kind of funny, but not a big deal to him. My son said you don’t have to sit there and pound alcohol. You can stop or take a break. Or not show up,” Swartz said. What about the rumors swirling about past year’s parties, the diaper-wearing and penis pacifiers for new team members, the penalties for those who didn’t drink enough, including forced streaking or dildos taped to a hand? Swartz hadn’t heard anything about dildos or pacifiers. The diapers, he said, that has happened. It’s just not hazing, as he’d define it. But that was a past party, and details of the most recent one are hard to come by. Michael Streck-Woodward, a member of the football team, said he briefly stopped by the infamous Aug. 4 party. “It was a typical college party, loud music,

dancing, alcohol. But nothing in gratuitous amounts that would cause harm.” Student athletes in other sports are standing by the soccer players, he said. “It’s mostly a sad situation. I wish they had their season so we could all support them.” The soccer players haven’t lost any scholarship support because their season was canceled, but for most, soccer was a vital part of campus life. Parents are steaming because they haven’t been able to schedule a meeting with the president, Swartz said. And he’s lashing out at Peg Blake, who largely conducted the investigation, saying her own record of drinking and driving makes her a hypocrite. Blake, vice president of student affairs, did not return multiple phone calls from the Journal, and university president Richmond tried to deflect the attack on her, saying HSU knew about her past when it hired her, and that she has contributed to student life. In 2005, when Blake was the vice president of student affairs at Boise State University, she was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol with her 8-year-old child in the front seat, according to the school’s student newspaper. Police stopped her for driving the wrong direction down a one-way street, and her blood alcohol content registered three times over the legal .08 limit, the paper said. The university suspended Blake and she later resigned. Blake pleaded guilty to driving under the influence, Idaho state records show, and was given probation and six months in jail, with at least 165 days of the jail time suspended. The charges were later dismissed after she completed court-imposed requirements. Blake has “engaged in far worse behaviors than these kids,” Swartz said. And yet, “She got a second chance in the court system. The criminal court system gave her probation and didn’t take her kid away,” he said. Richmond sees Blake’s past as an asset to HSU. “she has been punished and she sees the importance that making sure people understand that it’s not tolerated and to send a strong message when it is violated.” With soccer on hold for this academic year, administrators say they’re trying to ensure that athletics at HSU will change fundamentally. As a result of the hazing allegations, the athletic department plans to start random drug and alcohol testing for student athletes. The new test, to be administered by the university, will be in addition to testing already conducted by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The athletic department will also require student athletes to sign a nonhazing agreement each year. ●


Blog Jammin’ ANIMALS, ENTERTAINMENT, FAIR, HORSE RACES / BY HEIDI WALTERS / AUG. 22, 12:23 P.M.

A Fair Day The young man watched the horses parade around the corral near the race track just before the race. His gaze lingering on Western Roses (No. 3), a curious, rollyeyed steed with tongue perpetually stuck far out and to the right like a manic comic pushing to squeeze every last laugh out of his audience. Lookiloos, wandering up to stare a few seconds, noticed the tongue and laughed. Was it funny? Was it sad or bad? The trainer leading W.R. seemed to think it embarrassing, at least, as he kept trying to stuff the horse’s tongue back inside his mouth. W.R. wasn’t having it, and back out came the tongue. The young man looked down at his racing form and made a note. “You’re betting on No. 3?” a stranger asked him. “I think I might,” he said. “You’re not bothered by the tongue?” “No, I always look for a horse that shows me something different.” And soon the horses were shooting from the gate and trampling down the groomed, wetted track. The crowd in the stands and on the grass roared in betfueled excitement. Western Roses came in third. Maybe that mattered to the “something different” fellow. But the race grounds were filled with happy devil-may-careness. Lots of people with a stake on a pony or a jockey. Lots more with a simple stake in having a good time. After the last race, some of them planned to saunter back out into the main fairgrounds to get a funnel cake drenched in strawberry and chocolate, then a beer, then a corn dog, eye the healthful vegetarian stall ruefully, go inside to pet the goats and talk to the cows and scratch a hog’s belly then check out the collections and quilts and bizarro dollhouses, then wander back out into the

foggy light for some of those beerbattered fries and, after a decent minute or two, an espresso. ● FACEBOOK / BY ANDREW GOFF / AUG. 27, 9:44 A.M.

Hops On Zee Bull If you missed the sudsy action at Hops in Humboldt this weekend, you missed the presence of a bucking, gyrating mechanical bull. Many an event attendee embarked on a futile attempt to tame the restless beast. We took pictures. Join in these amateur cowboys’ brief moments of fame by following the link to our website or checking out our Facebook page. Yee to the haw.

ALICIA HASLER. PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF.

● BUSINESS, BEER / BY RYAN BURNS / AUG. 27, 12:44 P.M.

LaRue Out at Redwood Curtain Brewing Co. In the aftermath of his alcohol-fueled confrontation and arrest on Aug. 18, Eli LaRue has relinquished his half-ownership of Redwood Curtain Brewing Co., the business he co-founded with Drake Mollberg in 2010. In a phone interview this morning, Mollberg said LaRue’s behavior is unacceptable. “Eli has a drinking problem. He needs to focus on himself and his family and really work on becoming a better person.” The two men met as Oregon State University students in the 1990s, according to the HSU Lumberjack. Mollberg said LaRue’s behavior on Aug. 18 does not reflect the values of the company or its 12 employees. “We want to be a part of this community. We want to grow this community. And we want to offer our deepest apologies to the women who were affected by this.”

LaRue confirmed via email that he relinquished his share of the company to Mollberg, who will now be the sole owner. LaRue also resigned from the Arcata Planning Commission, to which he’d been appointed on Aug. 15. ● BUSINESS, CRIME, GOVERNMENT / BY RYAN BURNS / AUG. 24, 9:59 A.M.

Planning Commish Goes Drunken Door-Kicking Eli LaRue, the 32-year-old co-owner of Redwood Curtain Brewing Company and a recent appointee to the Arcata Planning Commission, has been charged with public drunkenness and violating his probation after reportedly trying to break into a house in downtown Arcata last weekend, terrifying the two women who’d been sleeping inside. Arcata residents Jen Ables and Maral Attallah say LaRue repeatedly and violently tried to break into their home in the wee hours of last Saturday morning, damaging a window screen and nearly kicking in a side door, even as they yelled at him to leave. [Disclosure: I’ve met both women in passing at social gatherings, but neither is a close friend.]

LaRue was appointed to the city’s planning commission last Wednesday. Via email, he initially declined to comment on the incident, but later sent a statement to the Journal, saying in part: I wish to offer my sincerest apologies to the two women. … I would like to assure them that I meant them no harm, and am truly sorry that I put them through an experience that made them feel unsafe in their own home and community. … My actions in the morning hours of Aug. 18 are indefensible, and embarrassing. All I can do is ask these two women, and the community, for forgiveness. See his full statement on our website, in the comments section below this item. In another update, LaRue has submitted a letter of resignation from the planning commission to city staff. The city council is expected to accept his resignation at its Sept. 5 meeting. In a phone interview, Ables said she was awakened shortly after 4 a.m. by her dogs’ frantic barking. Suspecting cats or raccoons, she peered out the window but saw nothing. She went back to bed, but 20 minutes later there were more thuds, more barking. She got up to investigate, just as a loud boom snapped her roommate awake. “I knew immediately someone was trying to break into the side door,” Attallah said. “The windows off of the kitchen shook. The whole house shook.” Ables was terrified, but Attallah remained level-headed, telling Ables firmly but calmly to go back to her room — someone was trying to break in. “I just screamed ’cause I got really, really scared,” Ables said. Attallah told her to call 911, which she did, begging the dispatcher to hurry. Attallah then approached the side door and peered through its glass panes, catching a glimpse of a man, she said. Two more kicks. The door shook with each impact but didn’t give. A few years earlier, after some disoriented drunks had also tried to enter continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012

9


“The Last Days” A film by Steven Spielberg

September 6

Ferndale Repertory Theatre At 7pm, no charge

October 3

Presentation by

Renee Firestone Ferndale Community Center At 7pm, no charge Reserve tickets: Ferndale Museum, Rings, Green’s Pharmacy & The Works

Blog Jammin’

continued from previous page

their home, the women had installed new deadbolts. Now, that thumb-sized stub of metal held their door firmly to the jamb. Attallah called out to Ables, loud enough for the man outside to hear: “Get the shotgun! Get the handgun! Anyone comes to the door you shoot.” On the other side of the door, the man responded by muttering, “Hey,” Attallah recalled. She declined to say whether she actually owns a shotgun and a handgun. “I believe in my Second Amendment rights. That’s what I feel comfortable saying.” Nearly hysterical with fear, Ables returned to her room and grabbed a small baseball bat. The man, she said, continued kicking the door. Attallah recalled what happened next: I yelled, ‘I have a shotgun! You need to leave!’ He said, ‘Hey, I’m comin’ in.’ That’s when I said, ‘I will blow your fucking head off.’ At that point he stopped. The man climbed nimbly over the chain-link fence that surrounds the side yard and then fled, Attallah said. Arcata police officers arrived almost immediately thereafter and apprehended LaRue. Both women feel that LaRue should

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have been charged with more than just public drunkenness, which is a misdemeanor and, for LaRue, a probation violation. (Last year he pleaded “no contest” to misdemeanor driving under the influence.) Ables in particular says she was traumatized by the experience. “I’m still scared. That sucks. I still can’t sleep. He took away that sense of security at home. That’s not fair.” Arcata officials would not release any details about the incident to the Journal, but the women said they were told by Arcata police officer Bob Martinez that LaRue had a blood alcohol level of 0.214, nearly three times the legal limit for driving. Officer Martinez also told them that LaRue thought he was at his own house, and that he was too drunk to be charged with a more serious crime, such as vandalism or attempted burglary, according to Attallah and Ables. Both women are frustrated. “It feels like we were really terrorized,” Ables said. But according to UC Davis Law Professor Gabriel “Jack” Chin, it is difficult to convict a person who was that drunk of a “specific intent” crime — “that is, one where you have to have some particular purpose, motive or resolve, like burglary,” Chin said. California Penal Code Section 22 states

that voluntary intoxication won’t get you off the hook for any criminal liability, but it can be used as a defense to argue that you were too hammered to commit a “specific intent” crime. “Now, does that mean a jury would necessarily accept [that defense]?” Chin asked. “No. Those sorts of mental state defenses are often rejected, and some states have abolished them by statute.” But California is not one of those states, and Chin said other factors are often considered, such as whether or not the suspect has committed violent crimes. Ables said the Arcata police department tried to put her at ease by telling her that LaRue has no history of violent crimes. After hearing the details listed above, Chin said he understood why LaRue wasn’t charged with anything more serious. “Drunk in public does sort of cover the situation you’re describing to me,” he said. Attallah and Ables disagree. “Let’s be honest here: Giving someone a drunk in public? That’s a slap on the wrist,” Attallah said. ● READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

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A

little pumphouse, cloud-colored with dark gray trim, stands in a corner of the dandelion-stuffed former horse pasture next to the Arbor Glen Mobile Home Park in Del Norte County. Behind the pumphouse and a wooden electrical pole shivers a patch of the dark forest — alders, redwoods — that defines this sun-and-fog land. And beyond the trees, U.S. Highway 101: From this point, for northbound travelers, await the touristy goofballs Paul Bunyon and Babe the Blue Ox at Trees of Mystery, the wavesplashed beauty of False Klamath Cove, trailheads to grand tree- and fern-choked places with names like Damnation Creek, and, 17 miles away, the practical next pitstop and home of Pelican Bay Penitentiary, Crescent City. For southbound travelers, just a mile and a half lands them in the little townsite of Klamath, a blip of houses, gas station convenience, smoked salmon shops and Yurok tribal offices. Then the Klamath River, floating dreamily under the bridge guarded by golden bears, and yet more forested, oceanfringed beauty before reaching Arcata, 57 miles from the pumphouse. Last Wednesday, around about 5 p.m., Fred Stockett — owner of the pumphouse, the well inside it, the mobile home park nearby and the rest of this 125-acre parcel encased in wild, northwest wonderland — was standing next to his truck parked by the pumphouse when the law arrived to arrest him. Del Norte County District Attorney Jon Alexander,

AFTER LANDLORD FRED STOCKETT SWITCHED THE WATER SUPPLY TO HIS MOBILE HOME PARK TO AN AGRICULTURAL WELL, RESIDENTS STARTED GETTING SICK. STATE INSPECTIONS FOUND THE WATER CONTAMINATED WITH BACTERIA. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

dressed in his official black DA’s jacket — and with a holstered personal gun on his right hip, a brace on his right leg (which he’d injured in a July 4 dunk tank incident at a school-sports fundraiser), and a crutch under his left arm — showed Stockett the warrant. Yurok Tribe Police Sgt. Thorin McCovey, faintly goateed just like the DA but younger, showed him the handcuffs. Stockett submitted without incident. In a photo capturing the moment, the big, blocky man looks bewildered — a worried crinkle in his forehead, a pulled tension to his mouth. His red Tshirt, bulging over a 60-year-old chest and belly, and baggy dark sweatpants suggest he’d spent the day doing grubby work, or intending to. As the landlord was driven away in custody, reported the DA with satisfaction the next day over the phone, the 20 or so Arbor Glen residents who had gathered outside their mobile homes were cheering. Fred Stockett’s troubles had just deepened. But the residents’ troubles — at least the ones they say he was the cause of — might be easing. Maybe they’d be able to flush their toilets again. Maybe they’d have potable, running water someday. Maybe there’d be official trash pickup once more, instead of that open-aired trailer Stockett had put out that the bears kept getting into, scattering garbage and crapping big, steaming fly-cakes and scaring the bejeesus out of everyone. Maybe some other stuff would get fixed. Maybe.

For years, some Arbor Glen residents claim — in interviews, in small-claims lawsuits filed in Del Norte County Superior Court and in a class-action suit filed in Yurok Tribal Court — they had battled

ARBOR GLEN RESIDENTS VIVIAN EACRET WITH HER BABY, LIAM; VERONICA DOWNS; JASMINE PACHECO WITH VERONICA’S CHILD PEC-TU-SON; AND ASHLEY TURNER HOLDING VERONICA’S CHILD TEK-WES. THEY HAVEN’T HAD CLEAN, RUNNING WATER AT ARBOR GLEN SINCE LATE JUNE. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS


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DEL NORTE COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY JON ALEXANDER AND YUROK TRIBE SGT. THORIN MCCOVEY ARRESTED ARBOR GLEN OWNER FRED STOCKETT LAST WEEK ON SUSPICION OF DEFRAUDING HIS TENANTS, ELDER ABUSE AND COMMITTING A FELONY WHILE OUT ON BAIL FOR ANOTHER FELONY. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL

with their landlords, Fred Stockett and his wife, Lorna Livingtree, to fix this and that. But since late June — and some say even earlier — all of the residents had been hostage to the weird water machinations of the financially troubled, ornery Stockett and, toward the end, the tangled bureaucracy of the state. Their rent went up — to cover higher water and other bills, they said the landlord told them. Then their water was turned off. Then it was turned back on — and came out stinky, different and murky. They got sick, they claimed, from that new water, which they learned came from the well in the field pumphouse, not the local municipal system the park had long been hooked up to. They complained to the landlords, to

the county, to the state regulators. They filed lawsuits. The state stepped in — and eventually the tribal cop and the DA, who arrested Stockett on suspicion of defrauding his tenants and allowing conditions to get so bad they constituted elder abuse. What happened? The story begins at the Redwood Park Community Services District, a public utility that serves a 35-home subdivision a half mile north of Arbor Glen. Since the early 1980s, it also has provided water service to Arbor Glen — based on a handshake agreement between the district and the park’s owners at the time, says the district’s chairperson, Robert Nulph (who also is the superintendent of the Yurok Tribe’s public utility district). When Stockett bought Arbor Glen about nine years ago, Nulph says, the district decided to formalized the park’s connection and asked Stockett to sign a water user agreement that would be renewed every five years. He refused. “We let him stay hooked up,” Nulph said. “We didn’t want to cut him off, because he was paying the bill.” In 2009, the district raised its rates and introduced a new structure that Stockett said was unfair. He sued, and lost. Meanwhile, Nulph said, the half-mile water line between the district’s ARBOR GLEN RESIDENT SONNYMAN DOWNS HAS well and Arbor Glen appeared BEEN SAVING WATER SAMPLES SINCE THE DAY THE STUFF STARTED COMING OUT OF HIS FAUCET SMELLY AND LOOKING LIKE TEA. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

continued on next page

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to be leaking, putting usage at Stockett’s 40-unit park at more than double the nearby 35-home subdivision. Stockett owns that water line and is responsible for maintaining it, Nulph says. In May, Stockett stopped paying his water bill, which was averaging $2,800 a month. On June 28, when Stockett was behind $9,032, the district shut off Arbor Glen’s connection. Stockett, meanwhile, had had workers digging trenches, disconnecting pipes and laying new pipes in anticipation of the cutoff. The park was dry two days — residents we interviewed said they sort of went with the flow, because this had happened in years past on occasion. On June 30, Stockett turned on the new water system, connected to the well in the field next to his park. When dirty, stinky water came out of the taps and some residents started getting sick, someone complained to the Del Norte County Health Department and the state department of public health. Stockett was ordered to send water samples to a lab in Arcata, and the results came back positive for coliform bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, vomiting,

stomach pains and urinary tract infections. On July 4 notices went up telling residents to boil their water. Then another state department stepped in: the department of housing and community development, the building and codes enforcer for mobile home parks in many municipalities, including all of them in Del Norte and Humboldt counties. That department notified Stockett on July 6 that he was violating state health and safety code by providing nonpotable water through an unpermitted water system. He was ordered to provide five gallons of water per person per day until he had brought the system up to state standards — tested, inspected and permitted. He would be charged double fees for this work. Stockett wrote his own letter to residents on July 6. He apologized for the water problems, said that tests had found coliforms and he was working on a remedy. “We just had to get away from Redwood Park Water District,” he wrote, adding

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Left Arbor Glen residents say bears have been raiding their trash ever since their landlord replaced municipal trash pickup with his self-haul trailer. And, sometimes, there’s no trailer. Bottom The Yurok Tribe has been supplying drinking water to Arbor Glen since their water went bad. right After their landlord shut the water off altogether, under state orders, residents had to haul in water to flush their toilets and wash up. Photos by Heidi Walters

that the water bill under the new set up was only going to cost him $300 a month. In the meantime, he said he would pass out six gallons of drinking water to each household. People could call him if they needed more. On July 26, the department of housing and community development issued an ultimatum: Fix the system and permit it by Sept. 1, or Stockett’s license to operate the park would be suspended. The department of public health sent him a notice on Aug. 6 ordering him to turn off the unpermitted, unsafe water system. It hinted at the possibility of a daily $25,000 fine for continued violation. Later, the target shutoff order was eased over concerns that residents shouldn’t be left without any water for fire protection or toilet flushing, but Stockett said he hadn’t heard about that change. On Aug. 16 he shut

off the water and sent everyone in the park a 60-day eviction notice. On Aug. 21, the state ordered Stockett to turn the water back on within 24 hours. When he did not, the state suspended his permit to operate the park, and the DA and the tribal cop swooped in.

Sonnyman Downs

thunked another bottle of scummy water onto the edge of his fishing boat, drydocked in the dirt beside the mobile he’s shared with his wife, Linda Wilson, and their two kids, ages 10 and 8, since 2002. He scowled at the lineup of mismatched bottles, all shapes and sizes. He had more like that stowed away. “Every day since the water changed, I take a sample of the water out of my tap,” he said, taking a sip from a can of Pepsi. It was midday on Monday, Aug. 20 — the day before the state would order Stockett to turn the well back on, two days before he would be arrested, four days since he’d turned the well off, and 54 days since the Redwood Park Community Services District shut Arbor Glen’s water

off and Stockett switched the park over to the well in the field. Though they’d noticed a change back then — the water was dark, and low pressure — and people were getting sick, nobody knew just what had happened, Downs said, until days later when the landlord issued a notice urging them to boil their water and apologizing for the inconvenience. “I got sick,” Downs said. “I was pretty messed up for about five days — diarrhea and vomiting. I’m only 49, though, and I’m one of those nutheads who wait it out.” There were elders in the park who’d been really sick, he said, and babies. Some went to the doctor, although nobody has medical documents identifying water contamination as the cause of their discomforts. By August, with the water problem still not fixed, Downs and some others had quit paying rent altogether. About 15 people, including kids and babies, and an assortment of frolicking dogs had gathered in the dirt clearing by the boat now. Everyone started talking. Downs’ sister, Veronica Downs, walked up and set another big bottle on the boat. A billowy yellow substance jiggled in the bottom of it. “A bunch of pillow-top,” she said. Dusty Davidson, a fidgety, anxious 38-year-old, said he and his mom, Sharon, who’s disabled, can’t move out — they don’t have a security deposit to reclaim. They

moved into their two-bedroom mobile three years ago rent free because Davidson took care of Stockett’s livestock in a field behind the park. That deal ended, though, and Stockett got rid of the livestock. Now they’re paying $700 a month. “We don’t know what’s going to happen,” Dusty said, starting to cry. “I asked welfare. I asked Del Norte human services — no help. Because I’m not a woman with kids. It’s just me and my mom.” Two girls, Ashley Turner and Jasmine Pacheco, listened seriously. They’re best friends. “We’ve both lived here two years,” said Pacheco. “This is where our friendship started.” Turner said her family — her mom and dad, she and her two siblings, and her uncle — have resorted to using paper plates and cups. Her dad bought a five-gallon solar camping shower from Wal-Mart which they fill from a white water tank donated by the Yurok Tribe for temporary use. They park the camping shower in the sun for several hours and then use it in their mobile’s bathroom, plugging the tub to catch the water which they then use to fill the toilet tanks. “I think he just wants us to ditch this place,” Pacheco said about the landlord. Nearby, Charlotte Bernier’s front door was open, a huge Christmas cactus guarding it. She was sitting on the couch inside, next to a chair draped in a colorful wool blanket with the words “Honored Yurok Elder” embroidered on it. Bernier, who’s lived here 14 years and owns her mobile, said she’s been filling water bottles at the tank provided by the tribe. continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

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continued from previous page

“I’m 73 years old and going and getting water is just ridiculous,” she said. “I have arthritis. It’s putting me out. Washing clothes — I don’t know. I’m going to have to take them someplace. Maybe to my daughter’s in Crescent City.” Bernier is the lead plaintiff in a complaint by 18 residents against Stockett and Livingtree, filed July 19 in Yurok Tribal Court. Bernier and her sister, and about half the other tenants at Arbor Glen, she said, are Yurok Tribal members. The park isn’t on Yurok land, and the landlords aren’t Yurok. But, the complaint notes, the landlords live in a “large yellow house” on the reservation. Besides detailed allegations, the suit notes some of Stockett’s Charlotte Bernier, 73, owns her mobile home and personal affairs: his arrest in has lived in Arbor Glen 14 years. She and other January on suspicion of “lewd residents filed a class-action suit in Yurok Tribal and lascivious acts with a child Court against their landlord, Fred Stockett. Photo by Heidi Walters under the age of 14” (that case is pending); the suspension of bushes line the walkway between their place his teaching license after that (he taught at and Bernier’s. Mature, pretty potted plants Folsom High School for 11 years); and his trip cluster on the wood deck. to Hawaii this year. The plaintiffs claim that, Juan Romero, who had just pulled up because of the water problems, the defenin his pickup truck with several huge, blue dants have defied the Yurok Constitution containers in the back, said he’d been down by denying adequate housing, violating their to Requa, six miles away at the mouth of human dignity, and insulting them. the Klamath River. He had showered at the “In Yurok culture,” reads the complaint, Yurok Tribe’s facility for fishermen there and “if one person insulted another person, the filled the containers at his brother-in-law’s. first person had to pay the second person to Romero, 59, has been a cheese maker at cure the injury of being insulted, and put the Rumiano Cheese, in Crescent City, for 34 incident behind them both.” years. Normally he’d be at work on a MonThey’re asking for $1 million for the alday — he works full-time, six days a week, leged insult, and $500,000 for the alleged and on Sundays he and Darrelen go into injury to human dignity. Crescent City to the All Tribes Foursquare Several other tenants have filed at least Church, where Darrelen is the pastor. He’d two small-claims suits against Stockett, Livtaken today off, however, to get the water, ingtree and their company, Star Properties, shower and take his wife to a doctor’s apin Del Norte County. And a bunch of them pointment in Klamath. sent a proposal to Redwood Park CommuInside the mobile — a crowded but clean nity Services District: If they put their withspace with family photos and memorabilia held rents toward paying off the parks’ water packing the walls and houseplants catching bill, would the district hook them back up? light in the busy kitchen — Darrelen sat in a Arbor Glen is a stark, but tidy, park, with chair with a large green blanket draped over grass that’s heat-beaten and a lot of empty her lap. She’s nearing 70 and has needed rentals. Some homes have decorations a wheelchair ever since a car crossed the outside. A few are flanked by junk, trash or center line on 101 one day, eight years ago, wood piles. Others have ranks of kids’ bikes and smashed into her car. stacked against them. Darrelen and Juan The Romeros moved their mobile home Romero’s place stands out: Large, flowering

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


Several residents began withholding their rent as the water problem persisted, including Bernier and her sister and brother-in-law, Darrelen and Juan Romero (right). Juan, who works full time in Crescent City, showers and fills water jugs in Requa. Darrelen, who’s disabled, is stuck at home most of the week. Photo by Heidi Walters

to Arbor Glen from Crescent City 20 years ago. They paid $150 for the space rent. A couple years after Stockett bought the park, said Juan, he raised their rent to $350, which includes water. Recently he raised it again, supposedly to cover higher water, electricity and garbage bills. “We’ve never, never, never not paid our rent,” said Darrelen. “And we pay our own electricity!” The law-enforcement scanner crackled from the shelf behind her chair. “I don’t even know how to put into words

had the blues. “I don’t have the feeling to do nothing,” he said. “Why does the state take so long to take care of business? How can a man do this to people? The elders and the infants and everybody in between — he screwed them all over.”

When Fred Stockett

how stressful it is,” Darrelen said. “Juan has to work all day. I’m here alone. We’re down to paper plates. I’m incontinent — my clothes get wet and have to be washed. … I’ve got to keep my spirit sweet. I can’t be angry and mean and not love. But this man is really stretching it.” Outside, Sonnyman Downs was tinkering on a friend’s busted boat engine now and drinking a Rockstar. He said he could be fishing — the commercial salmon season had opened the day before. He could be working in his scrap metal business. But he

answered his cell phone last Wednesday he sounded out of breath. It was a few minutes before 4 p.m., and he said he was at the pumphouse in the field next to Arbor Glen, getting ready to turn the well back on. He was wary about talking to a reporter, but he wanted to tell his side of the story. Because, it isn’t easy being a landlord. Stockett and his wife own about 10 pieces of property in Del Norte County, consisting of 57 parcels — most of them mobile home spaces. There are 40 spaces at Arbor Glen — seven occupied by tenant-owned homes, and the rest by mobile home rentals and at least one RV. More than 60 people have lived there in the past. Now only about 20 or 25 people live there, he said — oc-

cupancy’s been dropping, anyway, and since this water fiasco began, he’s moved some families over to another of his properties, Village Mobile Home Park in Klamath. But long before he fell in arrears on his water bill — whether through orneriness about paying the new rates, or lack of money, or both — Stockett’s money troubles were mounting. “We were losing $10,000 a month at the mobile home parks,” he said. “We were bringing in rents, but we were about 25 percent vacant. We had more bills than income — $800 and something for a yearly permit to operate. Taxes on every mobile home you own. We owe a lot of money. Between $250,000 and $300,000 needs to be paid today. Mortgages, trash people, water people, taxes — it’s all past due. And at most of our other properties, we’re at least two payments behind. We’ve been losing money for two years, and it just became overwhelming lately.” When Recology’s rates went up, Stockett said, he fell behind in payments by about $6,000. That service ended, and he started bringing a rail-sided truck-pulled trailer out to the site where the Recology bins used to go and directing tenants to dump their trash there. (By Aug. 20, the trailer was gone and trash was piled on the ground and scattered into the weeds.) And then there are bad tenants. “Since we’ve been here,” he said, “the amount renters have cheated us out of is over three quarters of a million dollars,” he said. That was at his two mobile home parks continued on page 19

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— Arbor Glen and Village — and six ner. He’s set to be arraigned at 1:30 houses, also in Klamath. “It’s mostly p.m. Oct. 2 on charges of grand theft the renters in the mobile home parks fraud (for charging rent but not pro— they don’t pay their rent, they tear viding the water or garbage removal the place up. I could tell you stories included in it), elder abuse and comthat curl your toes.” mitting a felony while out on bail on Here’s one: The last renter that another felony (the January lewdness moved out of the Village park, her son charge). That last one could garner broke out 19 panes of glass in one unit, him two extra years in state prison, if he said. And Stockett doesn’t have the he’s convicted and sentenced on the money to replace them. other charges, said DA Alexander. Last year alone, he said, about 60Though he can no longer collect some renters moved out, and another rent, Stockett is still obligated to 37 were evicted. Stockett even started bring his water system into comcharging an eviction deposit, it got so pliance by Sept. 1. But, by his own bad, he said. account, he doesn’t have the money “I have two or three people and to do that. Last week, he couldn’t all they do is maintenance,” he said. say what his intentions were toward “Do we always do everything in a Arbor Glen, except that he had “lots After the state ordered Fred nice, punctual manner? No. It’s overof different plans.” Stockett to provide his tenants with bottled potable drinking whelming.” The residents’ fates remain in water, he made some sporadic Now Arbor Glen is down to a 50 limbo. The Yurok Tribe is still filling deliveries — not nearly as much as percent occupancy rate — and many their drinking water tank. They can he was supposed to. Photo by Heidi Walters of those folks are withholding their flush their toilets without hauling rent. Stockett faces fines from the water. But if they have to move out, state over the water situation. Because his permit to operate many don’t have the means to — although, the state’s susthe park is suspended, he can’t collect rent. He’s still expected pension notice to Stockett said he might have to help them to fix the water problem, though. To bring the current system with relocation costs. up to grade — from an agricultural well to a municipal well — Colin Parent, director of external affairs for the state and get it permitted, he’d have to drill a new well and put in a department of Housing and Community Development, said 100,000-gallon tank at about a $100,000 cost, he said. To hook residents of mobile home parks “oftentimes are people with back up to Redwood would, of course, require paying the limited means, and they have limited alternatives.” $9,000-some past due and reinstalling the pipe connections That’s why the Mobile Home Parks Act lays out a number he ripped out when he switched to the well in the pasture. of special protections for such folks, Parent said. Most of the Stockett has more troubles than landlord-tenant messes. time, park owners comply with the rules. Typically, they fix In January, he was arrested and slapped with lewdness their violations. charges. He’s out on bail and it’s still just an accusation. But “Arbor Glen is not typical,” Parent said. “The complete gutStockett said the charges have tainted his and his wife’s lives ting of the water system in a park, that’s an unusual thing.” in their rural Del Norte community, which they moved to But with Stockett’s permit suspended, Arbor Glen is no from the Sacramento area about nine years ago. longer officially an operating mobile home park, and so the “I’m totally shocked at what one accusation will do,” he state housing department no longer has jurisdiction over it. said. “In Klamath, everyone thinks me guilty, and so they conIt’s in the county’s hands now. sider me fair game. In the last 45 days, they broke a window Nobody in Del Norte County can yet say what is going to out of my truck and stole $500 worth of supplies. They broke happen with Arbor Glen. “We’ll take whatever actions we can into my wife’s car. They stole $10,000 worth of stuff out of a do legally to deal with the situation,” said county administracabinet at my shop and … somebody stole my wife’s laptop. tive officer Jay Sarina last week. And they say to my face, ‘We’re going to drive you off the The outcome of the residents’ lawsuits also is uncertain. reservation.’ Three people have said that to me, to my face. Stockett, over the phone last week as he stood by his truck Lorna, she’s a very sweet person, and it’s difficult for her to in the field by the pumphouse, said he didn’t think the tribal deal with all the mean people around her.” court suit was valid because the incident took place off the At about 4:35 p.m., Stockett said he had to get off the reservation. phone. “I have to go. I have to turn on the water at Arbor Glen.” Even DA Alexander’s future is uncertain — he’s facing possible disbarment, over several professional conduct-related after Stockett’s arrest allegations unrelated to this water case, at a trial in front of last Wednesday, a park handyman got the well in the field the state bar in San Francisco on Oct. 15. switched back on. At 10:30 p.m., Stockett posted his $25,000 One thing is certain: It could be some time before happy bail, according to Del Norte County Sheriff’s Sgt. Fred Wagdays return again to the little mobile home park in the woods. •

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Michael Egan holding a Lion’s Mane mushroom. Photo by Simona Carini

An Early Thanksgiving

In praise of Humboldt’s local bounty By Simona Carini

talkofthetable@northcoastjournal.com

A

change in the quality of the sunlight tells me it’s nearly September, back-to-school month for many students, and Local Food Month for all of us. Sponsored by the Community Alliance with Family Farmers, the North Coast Growers’ Association, the North Coast Co-op and KHSU-FM, this month-long string of delicious events celebrates local foods and the people who bring them to our markets, stores and tables. Throughout September and into October, more than two dozen events provide special opportunities for getting to know and appreciate our foodscape. The range of events this weekend alone shows what a bountiful foodscape it is. Are you interested in grains? If so, you can help with the grain harvesting at

Hindley Ranch in Honeydew this Saturday, Sept. 1, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Do you wish you knew more about how to save and savor the best of the season? That same Saturday, Bayside Park Farm at 930 Old Arcata Road will give a food preservation workshop from 10 to 11:30 a.m., with an emphasis on herb storage, herb tinctures and butters, and drying techniques. (That workshop will only touch briefly on canning, but don’t worry — a nearly daylong canning workshop is coming up Sept. 15 at the Humboldt County Agriculture Center in Eureka.) Or have you ever wondered how mushrooms are grown? Michael Egan of Mycality Mushrooms will tell you all about it during the open house at his farm in Samoa this Sunday, Sept. 2, from noon to 3 p.m. I recently visited Mycality Mushrooms,

which is registered organic pending certification, at 1900 Bendixsen St. in Samoa. While Egan showed me his farm, he described the fascinating process of growing mushrooms, which includes four stages, starting from the preparation of the bags containing the medium where the mushrooms will grow. The medium — straw for oyster mushrooms and a mixture of hardwood sawdust, wheat bran and gypsum for the other varieties — is sterilized to make sure nothing else will grow on it, Then it is inoculated with mushroom spores. Here’s an appetizing morsel of preview: Visitors on the Mycality tour will experience this part of the process firsthand, then bring home a special souvenir — a fruiting bag that, in time, will provide them with pretty and tasty oyster mushrooms. After inoculation, the bags are placed in the incubating room, where the mushrooms spread through the transparent bag as Egan watches them move toward the fruiting stage. Anywhere from four to 16 weeks later, depending on the species, the mushrooms are ready to sprout. The final stage occurs in the fruiting room, where mushrooms finally come out, mature and are harvested for our palates’ enjoyment. (I realize I am moving fast forward here, but I’m hoping to whet your appetite.) In the fruiting room, I saw Black Poplar mushrooms (called pioppini in my native Italy), then Lion’s Mane mushrooms. Looking like mini frozen waterfalls, with their icicle-like white spines cascading down on the side of the growing substrate, Lion’s Mane mushrooms bear no resemblance to the common mushroom with its cap and stem. I then admired elegant oyster mushrooms growing in clumps or clusters along the side of long bags as if on the trunk of trees. Egan also grows shiitake, Nameko, the traditional miso soup mushroom, Enokitake and Maitake, raising some on his property on Fickle Hill Road. A dehydrator allows him to dry some of the Shitake crop for longer term storage and consumption (this product is available in

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the bulk section of the Arcata Co-op). My nose certainly enjoyed being in the dehydrator room. When holding in my hand a mushroom with which I am not familiar, my first question is: How do I cook it? That’s what I asked when I held the Lion’s Mane mushroom. Egan instructed me to cut it lengthwise into quarter-inch slices and simply sauté it. This mushroom is prized for its delicate flavor and texture — its texture reminded me of scallops, and many compare its flavor to crab, lobster or other seafood. During the event, visitors will be able to ask questions about appropriate care and cooking options for the different varieties of Mycality mushrooms and to sample some dishes prepared with them. The open house at Mycality Mushrooms is one example of the many events that organizers of Local Food Month have put together for the public. You can find the full schedule at www.caff.org/ humboldt, so make sure you go through it and then mark your calendar with the ones that appeal to you. This weekend also includes the annual harvest festival at the Mattole Grange in Petrolia. Later this month and early next, look for a pesto party, farm tours, interpretive walks, potlucks, and much more, including a Taste of Willow Creek and an apple harvest festival in Fortuna. Take this opportunity to learn more about local food producers and how to make the best use of the bounty they work hard to bring to us. Think of it as Thanksgiving in September. l While more details are available on the website of the Humboldt Chapter of Community Alliance with Family Farmers, the group offers this contact information for the four events coming up this weekend: Hindley Ranch grain harvest, Laurence (629-3292) or Lisa (599-9088); food preservation workshop 805-459-4122 or baysideparkfarm@ gmail.com; Mycality mustrooms, 8346396, mycality77@yahoo.com; Mattole Grange, www.mattolegrange.com.


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Illuminating HSU’s Permanent Collection

‘Light of Day’ at First Street Gallery By Jason Marak

I

f you read the headline of this article and your first thought was, “I didn’t even know HSU had a permanent art collection,” you are not alone. The university has largely kept its works on campus, so outsiders haven’t had the chance to learn that HSU not only has a collection, but it’s a significant one. The collection, established in 1970, contains more than 1,000 works by artists ranging from Rembrandt to acclaimed Pop artist Mel Ramos. “Light of Day,” an exhibition of selected works from the collection at the First Street Gallery in Eureka, represents the first time the university’s treasures have been shown off the main campus, and it’s a rare opportunity for the public to view many important pieces. For the last 40 years, Humboldt State has been growing its permanent collection through art department acquisitions, including the President’s Purchase Award, selected from the annual student exhibi-

tion. Private individuals and the artists themselves have also donated pieces. Work from the collection is typically shown around campus, including ongoing displays in the library, university office spaces and the Reese Bullen Gallery. For the general public, the collection has not been as accessible. Michele McCallWallace, director of the Reese Bullen Gallery and the university’s permanent collection, looks forward to changing that. “It’s an adventure to take it off campus — more exposure to the community,” McCall-Wallace said. “It’s just really exciting … to bring [the work] together in one place.” McCall-Wallace noted that most of the artwork on display is spread out around campus, making it difficult to see how the collection relates to itself — how each piece functions in context of the others. Since many of the works in “Light of Day” have won the President’s Purchase Award, the exhibition also highlights the

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

strength of the university’s art department. “For people to be able to see the history of HSU, the history of art coming out of our department, I think that’s an important thing too,” McCall-Wallace said. A confluence of different factors led to the “Light of Day” exhibition, which will run through Sept. 16. It fit into the gallery’s schedule, and “for the first time I found a group of students who were interested in producing it here,” said First Street Gallery Director Jack Bentley. “That’s really important. Everything that we do here is produced by our HSU students,” he said. The university founded the gallery in 1998 partly to give students firsthand experience managing, preparing and curating exhibitions. The exhibition’s three co-curators, HSU students Erin Grady, Shawn O’Connor and Natalie Schoch, selected which works to display from the vast collection. For primarily logistical reasons, Bentley gave the curators a couple of parameters. The pieces had to be from the fine arts area of the collection and had to be twodimensional, so they would be easier to move and to display. Beyond that, Bentley encouraged the students to select works that they responded to intuitively. Despite occasional debates about the merits of individual pieces, the curators all agreed on the exhibition’s overall direction. “We wanted to showcase artwork that was under-shown around campus for one reason or another,” said Schoch. “We chose a lot of artworks that were underexposed,” O’Connor added. As a result, the exhibition features many works that, for reasons ranging from content to controversy, have rarely been displayed on campus. But the curators were also careful to address a broader purpose as well. “This show is not all about shock — it’s more

about just making people A RTS more aware about the ALIVE! NEXT PAGE permanent collection,” Grady said. One of the toughest parts of picking the art, the curators agreed, was creating a cohesive exhibit that still provided a broad sampling of the collection’s range and depth. Beyond raising public awareness of the collection, the curators hope the exhibit will have an impact on campus. “I hope that more offices or buildings will want some of the artwork from the collection, and we can get it out more around campus,” Grady said. Schoch and O’Connor agreed. “I hate to see a piece just stay in a storage facility and never see the light of day,” O’Connor said, wryly. Bentley is also excited about the secondary impacts exhibit could have.”This is a show that’s meant to be pedagogical in nature and to really support the acquisition program of the permanent collection — but it also highlights the fact that [First Street Gallery] is a learning laboratory. We’re not a sales gallery. … Our primary goal is to educate and provide a resource for the community,” Bentley said. In coming years, McCall-Wallace and Bentley hope to bring different elements from the HSU permanent collection to First Street. “We are already talking about doing a selection of three-dimensional pieces,” said Bentley. “We hope that it will continue as a series.” ● “Light of Day” includes work by Martin Wong, Mel Ramos, Tim Rollins, Leslie Kenneth Price and many others. A reception will be held Saturday, Sept. 1, in conjunction with Arts Alive. The First Street Gallery, at 442 First St. in Eureka, is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.


First Saturday Night Arts Alive! Saturday, Sept. 1, 6-9 p.m. Presented by the Humboldt Arts Council and Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are held the first Saturday of each month. Phone (707) 442-9054 or go to www.eurekamainstreet.org for more information or to have an exhibit/performance included.

10a. ART FOR HEART’S SAKE Fifth and F streets. Benefit for Hospice House. Works of wellknown local, national and international artists will be featured in a silent auction. Included will be works of Richard Duning, Deborah Burke, Iris Schenke, Nina Groth, John Wesa, Peggy Loudon, Duane Flatmo and many others; Rick Copeland and friends performing.

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A. ST. INNOCENT ORTHODOX CHURCH 939 F St. Jeff and Ruth Jensen, woodcuts. 1. EUREKA INN 518 Seventh St. 2. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL at the Morris Graves Museum of Art 636 F St. Performance Rotunda: Gamelan Sekar Sequoia; Humboldt Artist Gallery: Artist Cooperative; William Thonson Gallery: Palettes and Paws, partnership with HAC and Sequoia Humane Society. Knight Gallery: Alan Dismuke, The Gender Series, 1990-Present, photography; Atrium Gallery: Morris Graves, works from HAC Permanent Collection and CD-ROM The Life & Art of Morris Graves; Youth Gallery: Artwork created in the 2011-2012 sessions MGMA Museum Art School; Floyd Bettiga Gallery: David Zdrazil, clay artists; Anderson Gallery: Peter Holbrook, Colorado Plateau, paintings in oil. 3. COTTAGE ANNEX 618 F St. Preview shabby chic, cottage chic, enamelware, floral china and linens, etc. 3a. EUREKA THEATER 618 F St. Vintage Tom and Jerry cartoons and popcorn. 3b. ANNEX 39 608 F St. Art Deco and Mid-Century modern. 3c. PAUL’S LIVE FROM NEW YORK PIZZA 604 F St. 4. THE TREASURE TROVE 609 E St. 5. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. Annual fall exhibition. 6. F STREET FOTO GALLERY at Swanlund’s Camera 527 F St. Ellen Land-Weber and Lorraine Miller-Wolf, Face to Face: Portraits from Two Continents, photography featuring people from Central Asia and Central America. 7. THE LOCAL 517 F St. Christine Ciarcia, photography. 8. SACRED PALACE BOUTIQUE - BIKRAM YOGA – HUMBOLDT BRANCH 516 Fifth St. Scott Sherman, emphasis on animals, watercolors. 9. LIVING ROOM GALLERY at MikkiMoves Real Estate, Inc. 805 Seventh St. Susan Cooper, Joy Dellas, Joyce Jonté and friends; Jim Lahman Band, blues. 10. SEWELL GALLERY FINE ART 423 F St. Ralphie Hendrix, Southern Exposure, pastel views of Southern Humboldt; music by Squeeze Bug.

18a. LIVELLA STUDIO 120 Second St. Recording Studios. Mod Brothers performing. 18b. MANTOVA’S TWO STREET MUSIC 124 Second St. Road Tricks Entertainment performing. 18c. THE BLACK FAUN GALLERY 120 Second St. Ras Terms, Sage Wildseed and Safetyfirst, multi media installation. 19. STEVE AND DAVE’S First and C streets. Marni Schneider, photography. 19a. REDWOOD CURTAIN 220 First St. Matt Durham, paintings. 20. CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. 20a. ACCENT STYLING GALLERY 219 Second St. The Man in White performing. 20b. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. Michael Cowen, pencil and pen. 21. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Carrie

11. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and Engineering 401 Fifth St. Christopher Hansen, An Inspirational Journey, landscape oil paintings. 12. AMIGAS BURRITOS 317 Fifth St. Vince Cavataio, Beautiful Wave, photography. 13. PRIMATE TATU 139 Fifth St. Michael Arneson. 14. INK ANNEX 47 W. Third St. Local artists, The Spirit of Ganesh; live music. 15. BAR FLY PUB AND GRUB 91 Commercial St. Kathleen Bryson and Colleen Hole, mixed media; St. John performing. 16. CHERI BLACKERBY GALLERY and THE STUDIO 272 C St. Betty Kuhnel, The Collected Works. 17. HALL GALLERY 208 C St. John Motian, Retrospective of Paintings. 17a. THE WORKS 210 C St. Phillip King, artwork. 17b. ACCIDENT GALLERY 210 C St. 18. SAILORS’ GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St.

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WORKING IN OILS, CHARCOAL, CHALK AND OTHER MIXED MEDIA, NCJ STAFFER SOPHIA DENNLER CREATES PORTRAITS FROM ANTIQUE PHOTOGRAPHS. “SISTERS,” IN COLORED PENCIL ON PAPER, WILL BE AMONG DENNLER’S PIECES ON DISPLAY AT OLD TOWN ART GALLERY, 233 F ST.

Wachter Martinez, nature-inspired acrylic canvasses; Jerry Cottrell, acoustic guitar and vocals performing. 22. RUSTIC WEST TRADING CO. 339 Second St. Loreta Flemingaite Bright, Baltic amber; Cara Rider, stained glass mosaics; Karen Nelson, Day of the Dead art; Katya Newman, sea glass figures and rings.

23. CIARA’S IRISH SHOP 334 Second St. Gary Todoroff, photography. 23a. HUMBOLDT GLASS BLOWERS 214 E St. Monica Haff, paintings; Pinball tournament. 23b. CLARKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM Third and E streets. Timber and train history in Humboldt County exhibit.

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

JOHN MOTIAN, WHO PAINTS ON PAPER AND CANVAS, IS “UNIMPRESSED BY PHOTOGRAPHIC REALITY,” HE WRITES IN A PRESS RELEASE. “I WANT POETRY, MYSTERY.” MOTIAN’S TRIPPING THROUGH TIME PAINTINGS ARE BEING SHOWN AT THE C STREET HALL GALLERY, 208 C ST.

24. BELLA BASKETS 311 E St. Holly Vetter, photographs; Ron Vetter, frames from old growth and repurposed redwood. 25. STUDIO 424 424 Third St. James Reid and Mark McKenna, photography. 25a. SHIPWRECK 430 Third St. Jake Mondragon, paintings. 26. CLARKE PLAZA Third and E streets. Hand 5, live drumming, hula hoping and improv flow dance performing. 26a. CAFÉ NOONER 409 Opera Alley. Doug Hunt, mixed media; The Living Rooms performing. 26b.. THE SPEAKEASY BAR 411 Opera Alley. Showing the paintings and art of our staff. 27. HUMBOLDT BAYKEEPER 211 E St. Redwood Camera Club; Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers performing. 28. RAMONE’S 209 E St. Jan Hollander, oil landscapes; The Soulful Sidekicks performing. 28a. BOOKLEGGER 402 Second St. 29. TRUCHAS GALLERY/LOS BAGELS 403 Second St. Patricia Sennott, handmade prints. 30. BELLE STARR 405 Second St. Martha Johnson, watercolors. 31. NORTH SOLES 407 Second St. Patricia McGee, photography. 31a. SASSAFRASS 417 Second St. Haley Brick, Underwater Escapes. 32. OLD TOWN SQUARE Second and F streets. Pan Dulce Steel Drums performing. 32a. SISTERFRIENDSJEANS 108 F St.

32b. HSU FIRST STREET GALLERY 422 First St. Light of Day: Selections from Humboldt State University’s Permanent Collection,curated by current HSU students Erin Grady, Shawn O’Connor and Natalie Schoch. 33. HEALTHSPORT 411 First St. 33a. WHIPLASH CURVE 423 First St. Lauren Cogan Jones, drawings. 33b. BAYFRONT RESTAURANT F St. Plaza. Huichol Indian art from Mexico. 34. STRICTLY FOR THE BIRDS 123 F St. Leslie Anderson, photography. 35. EUREKA FABRICS 414 Second St. 35a. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Kaylee and Isabell Paredes; kid’s art. 36. YARN 418 Second St. Julie MacNiel, mixed media paintings. 36a. EUREKA BOOKS 426 Second St. 37. SHORELINES GALLERY 434 Second St. 38. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Lunel Haysmer, assemblage art, Phil Haysmer, redwood art. 39. TALISMAN BEADS 214 F St. 40. ALIROSE 229 F St. Justine Levy, jewelry artist. 40a. THE WINE SPOT 234 F St. Arny King, photography. 41. THE RITZ Third and F streets. Jennifer Mackey and Andrei Hedstrom, artwork. 42. COCO & CUVEE 531 Third St. Ian Net, photographs.


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A DARK SKY AND ETHEREAL LIGHT ARE CAPTURED IN DRY PASTELS IN RALPHIE HENDRIX’S “ON ALDERPOINT ROAD.” HENDRIX’S SOUTHERN HUMBOLDT LANDSCAPES ARE AMONG THE WORKS BEING FEATURED DURING AN ARTS ALIVE RECEPTION AT SEWELL GALLERY, 423 F ST.

43. DANNILYNN’S SHOE BOUTIQUE 527 Third St. Kim Norrie, paintings; refreshments. 43a. DISCOVERY MUSEUM Corner of F and Third streets. Kids Alive Program Drop off 5:30-8 p.m.; call for reservations 443-9694. 44. AMERICAN INDIAN ART GALLERY 241 F St. Abby Perrott, mixed media paintings. 44a. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 233 F St. Sophia Dennler, portraits and paintings. 44b. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE VISITOR CENTER 526 Opera Alley. John David Young Trio performing; roasting facility tours. 45. BON BONIERE 215 F St. Genevieve Minahan (Gebhardt), paint with thread; Dale Winget, guitarist/vocalist performing. 45a. CODY GALLERY 213 F St. 46. OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOLATES 211 F St. Sheldon Chase, contemporary abstracts; Buddy Reed, gut bucket blues performing. 47. OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING Corner of Second and F streets. Linda Parkinson, Wildlife Watercolors; Wynsome Winds, flute duets with Joyce Carter and Mary Harper performing. 48. HOLLYGOLIGHTLY 514 Second St. Floral paintings. 48a. OBERON GRILL 516 Second St. Historic photographs of Old Eureka from Historical Society. 49. LINEN CLOSET 127 F St. New hand blown jewelry by the local artisans at Mirador Glass.

50. HIMALYAN RUG TRADER 529 Second St. 51. BUHNE ART STUDIOS 207 G St. Suite 106 Yuma Lynch, mixed media and landscape paintings; Suite 206 Rob Hampson, recent oil paintings; Suite 212 Wit McLeod Furniture; Suite 217 Marnie Bugs; Suite 333 Robert Busch III, landscapes and oil paintings; Suite 306 David Steinhardt, acrylics; Queen Serene, soulful sounds and other musical guests on the top floor in the gallery performing. 52. PARASOL ARTS 211 G St. 53. ORANGE CUP CORAL SALON 612 Second St. Mike Stengl, portraits. 54. PIANTE 620 Second St. Leslie Kenneth Price, new works. 55. DELIGHTFUL EYE PHOTOGRAPHY 622 Second St. Tripwire performing. 56. SMUG’S PIZZA 626 Second St. Brandon Garland, pen and ink. 57. BAR AVALON Third and G streets. Frances Boettcher, Lily, painting over the new Tapas bar. 58. ORIGINS DESIGN LAB 621 Third St. Renee Thompson, fine art, original paintings; Eureka Button Club, buttons; Kathy Lee, doll collection. 59.. STUDIO S 717 Third St. Paintings of water by multiple artists. 60. BIGFOOT COMPUTERS AND PHOTOGRAPHY TOO… 905 Third St. ●

sewellgallery.com

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street Eureka, CA  443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm

BayfrontRestaurant.net

Fresh Good Food Dine-In or Take-Out

Open Daily 11 am - 4 pm

On Arts Alive! nights open until 9pm

~Mediterranean & Creole Specialities~ ~Local Wine & Beer~ ~Offering dining choices for ALL appetites~

On E St. between 2nd and 3rd Eureka • 443-4663 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012

25


james cotton headlines blues by the bay on Sunday.

This week’s guide to things that are better than Humboldt coastal summer weather

her German citizenship allows her free, socialized education. Sounds nice. (In case you’re wondering, she’s trading in her corset to pursue a degree in alternative technology.) For her final performance, she has promised a special duet performance with a live singer. No iPods, folks. Hold her to it. In addition to boobs, expect danceable beats supplied by DJs Gabe Pressure and Anya and yuks from stand-up funny dude John McClurg, a newer voice to Humboldt’s comedy scene who’s been pickin’ up a few votes in the highly contentious “Best Comedian” category of the Journal’s annual Best Of Humboldt poll (non-subtle nudge, have you voted? One week left, suckas!)

By Andrew Goff

The Other Soul Night

Dana Fuchs headlines blues by the bay on Saturday. Courtesy of Dana Fuchs.

We’ve Got Blues Again calendar@northcoastjournal.com

D

uh nuh … duh nuh … I glanced at my calendar… Duh nuh … duh nuh … It said August was done… Duh nuh … duh nuh … But I live here in Eureka… Duh nuh … duh nuh … So I still ain’t seen no sun… No, baby! Nooooo! I’d argue that, in this instance, that’s correct usage of a double negative in that last line. Feel free to disagree and debate. My point is, the blues is easy. Another time-tested American musical style that leans more on guttural passion and truth than complexity. You got a grievance? Do you know your I-IV-V chords? Then let ‘er rip, brother. But while the tools of the trade are wielded sufficiently by many, it’s nice to appreciate a master craftsman from time to time. Or how ‘bout a bunch of ‘em? Back to back? Over two days? Sittin’ on a blanket by the bay in the (potentially) warm sunshine? You see where I’m goin’ here? Blues by the Bay returns to Eureka’s Halverson Park for its sweet 16th year on Saturday and Sunday for two pentatonic-scale-drenched days. So who’s workin’? Saturday — heavy on female-fronted acts — is headlined by husky-

voiced, sassy and captivating Dana Fuchs. Why might you already know her? She played an aspiring singer named (sexy!) Sadie in the often-loved, Beatles song-filled Across the Universe. Remember? She’s the one who belts out “Helter Skelter” through Janis-ish pipes and Robert Plant locks — in fact, you can see her and her band do a less visually psychedelic version of the White Album classic on the Blues by the Bay website (bluesbythebay.org). Girl’s got force. Also on day one, flashy, jazzy pianist, soulful singer and saxophonist Deanna Bogart and band transition from high-energy blues swing to more restrained singer/songwriter territory. Singer Janiva Magness brings a more straightahead blues sensibility. Blues guitar shredder Chris Cain brings exaggerated licks/facial expressions. Kicking off the fest, guitarist Laurie Morvan brings fast licks that seem more than able to wake people up. Sunday’s main event? Mississippi-born, 77-year-old harmonica virtuoso James Cotton. Over the years, Cotton has toured with giants such as Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters and even briefly with Janis Joplin before forming his own band in the late ‘60s. Also on the day two bill, acoustic bluesman Eric Bibb, slide guitar

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

one-man-rock band David Jacobs-Strain and “rasta blues” from … wait, really? Huh, yup … Corey Harris (it’s actually pretty interesting to listen to some of the ways Harris fuses the two styles. Check him out). If you haven’t already secured your BBTB ticket you can get ‘em presale for both days for a whopping $85 (it goes up to $95 the day of the event). But, man, Redwood Coast Music Festivals is really making an appeal to that young crowd: tickets for blues lovers 13 all the way to 23 are only $35 for both days. Maybe some of the rest of you should look into a reverse fake ID.

HumBrews Hotness

Not into blues? How ‘bout skin? Humboldt’s ambitious, overachieving burlesque peddlers continue to make sure that y’all rarely have to endure a pasty-less week. This week’s temptation? The Va Va Voom Burlesque Vixens are rolling out Hot Topless Nights, a 1950s automobile culture-themed soiree Friday night at Humbrews in Arcata. It’s sure to (uh oh, unavoidable cliche imminent) get your motor runnin’! (Sigh.) The night will be bittersweet in that it marks the final performance of Va Va Voomer “Nina Betina,” who’ll be moving abroad since

Speakin’ of “hot” and “HumBrews,” is there any hotter recurring event in Humboldt right now than Missing Link’s monthly all-vinyl Soul Night? I will answer for you, in case you thought I just wanted you to keep reading: no, there is not. Due to high levels of awesomeness, thing sells out every damn time. But, man, it gets hot and crowded in that room, amirite? Solution: Soul Night fans can find a similar, less crowded scene this Saturday at the less regular, lunar-dependant Funky Full Moon III at Ocean Grove in Trinidad with DJs Jaymorg, Mantease, Rickshaw, King Maxwell and Knutz bringing you classic soul, R&B and disco records. Too hot inside? Too crowded? Take a breather on OG’s spacious back deck. Just make sure to carpool. Trinidad is a trek. Gas is expensive.

In Your Vest Interest

And finally, school sucks! But since a lot of you are in the slog again, the fine folks at Blondies noticed that “vest” rhymed with “fest” and as such are staging their first ever free Back to School VESTival on Saturday. That means you wear a vest to it, if that wasn’t apparent. And there will be prizes! “Best Overall!” “Most Cringe Worthy!” “Flashiest!” Plus, beer, tug-of-war, beer, music and beer. But most importantly, rock that vest, kids. Just because your nose is back in the books doesn’t mean your arms have to go back in the sleeves. ●


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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

27


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

see The Hum pg. 26

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com

thur 8/30

fri 8/31

sat 9/1

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Vektor, Author & Punisher (metal) 11pm $5

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220 BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Featuring Sunday NFL Football starting in September! Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm Karaoke 8pm-1am

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

EUREKA INN 497-6093

District 9 (2009) Doors at 8:30pm $5 Rated R

Find us on Facebook

Arts Alive! w/ St. John (blues) 9pm

Lost Dog Sound (neo-swing) no cover 9pm

The Hot Rods (oldies rock) no cover 9pm Back To School VESTival 2pm

Cold & Dark Band (rock) no cover 9pm

Kaye Bohler (blues) no cover 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Speakeasy Saints (r&b/soul) no cover 9pm

Speakeasy Saints (r&b/soul) no cover 9pm

Blues Jam 9pm

Lizzie and the Moonbeams 9pm

The Spindrifters 7pm

FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521

St. John & the Sinners 9pm

THE FORKS Willow Creek

HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata

Flea 8pm $10

Random Acts of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m. $6 All Ages

Open Mic 7pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

HALVERSON PARK Eureka HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata

WHY? (indie psych) 7:30pm $20/$17

Blues by the Bay 2012 10am Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close! Beer Pong Tournament 8pm

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger Va Va Voom Burlesque Vixens: Hot Topless Nights 9pm $10

Happy Hour All Day! Not your average “pub grub”

INK ANNEX 3rd St., Eureka DJ Stepwise (dance) 9pm

JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER NOCTURNUM Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

Summer Hours: until 9pm Monday Thursday, 10pm Friday & Saturday

Blue Lotus Jazz (jazz) 7-10pm no cover

Weather Machine (jazz) 7-10pm no cover

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif The Trouble (Americana) 6pm

Jarrod West (folk rock) 9pm

We got beer.

Chli Madness on tap! Taco Truck!

Water Tower (psych folk) 6pm Redwood Metal Fest 2pm $30/$25

SqueezeBug @ Henderson Center Colin & Cory @ McKinleyville

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

9am-2pm on the Arcata Plaza Old Dog 10am

Buddy Reed and The Rip It Ups (blues) 7pm Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy Night 8pm

Located in beautiful Old Town DJ music (dance music) 10pm

Buddy Reed and The Rip It Ups (blues) 7-9pm

Terry Rodriguez (jazz) 7pm

Joani Rose (jazz) 7pm

Pizza Night!

Check Facebook for updates about live music and other special events

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Get your Growlers filled

Blues Dance Night Lesson 8pm, Dancing 9pm $5

Congolese Dance with Makaya 5:30-7pm, $12-$15

New Kids Program! www.RedwoodRaks.com

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

The good taste tasting room

Ken Jorgenson and Falling Rocks (bluegrass) 8-10pm

Great Dinners & Sunset!

Uptown Kings (blues) 8-10pm

FUnKy FULL Moon III 9pm $5

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748 RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

Karaoke 7-10pm MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Rude Lion (reggae DJ) 10pm Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK Jim Lahman Band (blues) 9pm

Top of the Hill, McKinleyville DJs Pressure and Anya 9pm

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

SugaFoot (blues duo) 7:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 9:30 - 12:30pm

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza

Boss Levelz 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

Throwback Thursday’s

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580 SOPAI’S CAFE 535 5th St Eureka THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

DJ music (dance music) 10pm

www.sixriversbrewery.com Salsa Night 9pm $5


WINE SHOP

BLUE LOTUS JAZZ

Fri., Aug. 31, 7-10 pm • no cover

WEATHER MACHINE

Death Angel leads an army of bands into the Mateel on Saturday for Redwod Metal Fest

tues 9/4

wed 9/5

www.thealibi.com

Your friend on the Arcata Plaza

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Harry Potter & the Chamber of Secrets Doors at 5:30pm $5 Rated PG

Giant Monday Night Football returns September 10!

Find our website at www.arcatatheatre.com

Giant NFL Football Opening Game 5:15 p.m. All ages Free

Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm Quiz Night 7pm

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

A Chance to win $1,000,000

Wine Bar & Store: Open Monday through Saturday 8th Street on the Arcata Plaza • 825-7596

Flea 8pm $10

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

$0.25 Wing Wednesday

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool & $3 Wells

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long!

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two

UPCOMING: Yogoman Burning Band Sept. 8

UPCOMING: Delhi 2 Dublin Oct. 3

UPCOMING: Chris Robinson Brotherhood 11/29 Projections (alt rock) 7pm

JEEP ◆

www.bluelakecasino.com

HONDA ◆

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

GM ◆

A Chance to win $1,000,000

T O Y O T A ◆ N I S S A N

Blues by the Bay 2012 10am Call In Your Order: 822-8433 Future Islands (synthpop) Lyndsey Battle 9pm $10

Free

Brake Inspection (For Most Vehicles)

Preventative Maintenance & Tune-ups ◆ Brakes ◆ Clutches ◆ Cooling

Systems

513 J St., Arcata • 822-3770 Just north of Cafe Mokka

FORD ◆ SUBARU ◆ DODGE

mon 9/3

EXPANDED EVENING HOURS! NEW SMALL PLATES MENU!

sun 9/2

Sat., Sept. 1, 7-10 pm • no cover

*ENJOY OUR BOTTLED BEERS, TOO!*

LIBATION

◆ QUALITY FRIENDLY SERVICE ◆

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza

Happy Hour 6-8pm Monday - Thursday, $1 off wine by the glass

www.libation.com

Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

Book your band 444-1344

Repeat: We got beer.

Ahhh, sunny Blue Lake

Purl and Pour come craft 6:30pm

Jeff DeMark & LaPatinas (sonic delights) 6pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Pints for Nonprofits Humboldt Sponsors 6pm

Online at humfarm.org

Rick Park @ Old Town Eureka

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

We are a certified wine shipper

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

www.persimmons.net or find us on Facebook

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Tasting Room open Mon-Wed 4-11pm Thu-Fri 4-12, Sat. 12-12, Sun 2-10 Shimmyfit Bellydance Fitness 11-12:30pm, $15 with a friend!

Buddy Reed (blues) 9-11pm

Find us on Facebook.

Monday Swing Night 7pm class, 8pm party

West African Drum and Dance 5:30-7pm, $10

Robert Meade (acoustic) 6pm

Spoken Word Night 8pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

End the weekend right Dine early

After work/appetizers and drinks

Make Early Reservations for the weekend 407-3550

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades Wold Hollow Revival (Man and woman with wings) 7pm

www.pearlloungeeureka.com SoHum Girls 7pm Pints for Nonprofits: Surfrider Humboldt 4-11pm Hoop Dance w/ Nicole Beg. 5:30-6:30pm $10 Salsa Dance Night 7pm Full cocktail bar

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Joe Griffin (acoustic) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Secret Password Hint: South of St. Charles Avenue

SugaFoot (trumpet/guitar duo) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS! WE MOVED INTO A LARGER ARCATA STORE AT 10TH AND H.

HUMBOLDT’S LARGEST AND BEST SELECTION OF HUMBOLDT CLOTHING AND GLASS SMOKING ACCESSORIES

10% DISCOUNT ON ALL GLASS WITH STUDENT ID

EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

Stickers • Locally Blown

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm GLDT and ALLY Open Mic 6pm

Humboldt Hoodies • Tees • Hats • Beanies •

Now serving beer and wine

Glass • Illadelph Glass • Roor Glass • HBG Glass

Whomp Whomp Wednesday 9pm All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Dine with us at Lunchtime Present this Form Be Eligible for our Weekly FREE Lunch Drawing

Official Entry Form Offer expires 10/31/12

Name: _____________ Phone: _____________ Open Daily for Lunch and Dinner, 11:30am - 10pm • Extended Bar Hours

Reservations Recommended (707) 407-3550 1911 Truesdale Street Eureka Off Broadway behind the Best Western Bayshore Inn

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012

29


WELL, YOU’VE BEEN WANTING THE KIDS TO QUIT PLAYING VIDEO GAMES AND GET OUT OF THE HOUSE ALL SUMMER, RIGHT? ACCOMPLISH HALF YOUR GOALS BY DROPPING THE KIDS OFF AT THE SEQUOIA PARK ZOO’S BOWLING FOR RHINOS EVENT ON SATURDAY FEATURING WII BOWLING FOR A GOOD CAUSE: RHINO CONSERVATION PROGRAMS. NO BOWLING SHOES REQUIRED!

30 thursday FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by SqueezeBug. humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farmfresh produce every Thursday. Music by Colin and Cory. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

31 friday EVENTS

Hot Topless Nights. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Va Va Voom Burlesque Vixens present a ’50s themed celebration of all things auto featuring burlesque, standup by John McClurg and DJs Gabe Pressure and Anya. $10/$7 in ’50s costume. humboldtbrews. com. 826-2739.

COMEDY

Random Acts of Comedy. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Humboldt’s funniest freaks this side of the asylum, local loons and possible pole dancers perform. $6/$10 adv. 822-1220.

MUSIC

WHY? 7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Three Cincinnati-bred gentlemen who’ve shared a whole lotta past together share some psychedelic indie music with Humboldt. Serengeti and DJ Soda Pop open. $20/$17 adv. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

DANCE

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. 839-3665.

1

VA VA VOOM GOES VA-VA-VROOM! WITH ’50S AUTOMOBILE CULTURETHEMED HOT TOPLESS NIGHTS EVENT HAPPENING FRIDAY NIGHT AT HUMBREWS. LOCAL STANDUP STANDOUT JOHN MCCLURG AND DJS GABE PRESSURE AND ANYA FILL OUT A NIGHT THAT WILL HAVE YOU SWEATIN’!

BLOCK OFF SOME TIME ON YOUR LABOR DAY, ARCATANS, FOR THE ANNUAL I BLOCK PARTY IN FRONT OF LOS BAGELS — A FUNDRAISER FOR ARCATA’S SISTER CITY CAMOAPA, NICARAGUA. EXPECT PLENTY O’ RHYTHM COURTESY OF THE LOST COAST MARIMBAS, KULICA AND NO GOOD REDWOOD RAMBLERS. BEER! BARBECUE! BAGELS! PHOTO COURTESY OF LOSBAGELS.COM

saturday

EVENTS

Blues by the Bay 2012. 9:30 a.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Sixteenth annual event. Saturday’s performers include Dana Fuchs, Deanna Bogart, Janiva Magness, Chris Cain and Laurie Morvan. $95/$55 one day pass. bluesbythebay.org. Bigfoot Days. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Willow Creek Veterans Park. Parade, live music, retail and food booths, logging competition, lawnmower races, mechanical bull, kids bike races, water slides. E-mail BigfootDays@yahoo. com. 445-8801. 10th Annual Taste of the Cove. 1-6 p.m. Mal Coombs Park, Shelter Cove. Benefit for Heart of the Redwoods Community Hospice features BBQ fish by the Flaming Chefs, fun stuff for kids, live music. $30, Kids 18 and under the price of their age, kids 5 years old and under free. $30. E-mail hospice@asis.com. 923-7276. Arts Alive. 6-9 p.m. In and around Old Town, Eureka. Monthly celebration includes food, music and incredible art. 442-9054.

MUSIC

What The Folk 2: Back the Folk Up! 9 p.m. Jambalaya, 915 H St., Arcata. Local folk artists rally featuring Acey Aseltine, Lyndsey Battle, Caitlin Jemma, Daniel Garner, Josephine Johnson and August and the Moonshine Vines. Appearance by Paul Doffing on his “Freedom From Fuel” tour. $8. jambalayaarcata.com. 822-4766.

ART

Art for Heart’s Sake. 6 p.m. Gross Building, Fifth and F streets, Eureka. Local and international art auction benefitting Hospice House. Music provided by Rick Copeland and friends. 845-1125.

MOVIES

Flea. 8-10 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Story of a young mute boy on the run from an abusive home and taken in by the mysterious Shadow Clan. Written, directed and produced in Humboldt County by Suza

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

Lambert Bowser. $10. suzalambertbowser.com. 822-1575.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Jude Power. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Trail Stewards Orientation/Work Day. 9-11 a.m. Meet at Hiller Park. Sweep the trail, trim brush, and other activities. Dress for work. E-mail sbecker@reninet.com. 826-0163. Lanphere Dunes Guided Walk. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet at Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata. Tour of the Lanphere Dunes with trained naturalist Jenny Hanson. 444-1397. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Leslie Anderson for a 90-minute walk focusing on the birds and plants of the marsh. 826-2359.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Old Dog. humfarm. org. 822-5951. Food Preservation Workshop. 10-11:30 a.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road. Highlights include herb storage, making herb tinctures and butters, drying techniques, and a brief canning and fermentation overview. Part of Local Food Month. Mattole Grain Harvest. 11 a.m. Honeydew. Harvest grain on a fourth generation family ranch. Call for directions. Part of Local Food Month. hindleyranch.com.

ETC.

Bowling for Rhinos. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Nintendo Wii bowling competition hosted by the Redwood Coast Chapter of the American

Association of Zookeepers. Proceeds support rhino conservation programs. $3. 441-4263. Back to School VESTival. 2-8 p.m. Blondies, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Vest competitions include “Best Overall,” “Most Cringe Worthy,” “Baby/Kid/Mini Pony” and “Flashiest.” Plus frohawk, tug-of-war contests and live music. KEET’s Kids Club. Noon-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Free monthly workshops for children, families and childcare providers comprised of viewing a segment of PBS Kid’s programming, reading short stories and doing art activities. Each family receives the book Harold and the Purple Crayon. 442-0278.

2 sunday MUSIC

Blues by the Bay 2012. 9:30 a.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Sunday’s performers include James Cotton Superharp, Eric Bibb String Band featuring Dirk Powell and Cedric Watson, David Jacobs-Strain and Corey Harris. $95/$55 one day pass. bluesbythebay.org. Outreach at the Beach. 1-8 p.m. Merrymans Beach House, Moonstone Beach, Westhaven. Bring your singer/songwriting talent to share and enjoy with other performers and music lovers. Donation $5/$10.

DANCE

ShimmyFit Reggae/Bellydance Fusion. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. With special guest Jaya Krupp. $25/$15 with a friend.


Stashed under the dash is a ragged map. Preset three is the secret frequency. The dot-dash code tells what back road. Come forthright at dawn in one month with white scarf on. … Six-oh-three, the city is asleep and these streets will grieve a million Mardi Gras beads when dawn comes, each one glistening like a Super Bowl ring in the sun. Is it you? Is it you?” — from “For Someone” by Why? The lyrics offer elaborate instructions leading to who knows where, leaving you with questions unanswered. This is Why? You might wonder, what, or who, is Why? In the beginning, at the end of the ‘90s, Why? was the nom de rap for young Jonathan “Yoni” Wolf, who recorded DIY mixtapes on a four-track in the basement of a Cincinnati synagogue. Why? ultimately became the name of a band with Yoni’s older brother Josiah Wolf and their friend from high school Doug McDiarmid at the core. The music evolved, shifting from rap into indie rock territory, but always revolving around Yoni’s poetic, enigmatic lyrics. The Wolfs headed west, settling in the East Bay for a time, and became founders of the alt. hip hop collective Anticon. The band produced a series of albums and EPs, Oaklandazulasylum in 2003, Alopecia in ‘08, the cool, shining Eskimo Snow in ‘09. At this point Yoni

ART

Trinidad Artists’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Trinidad Art, 490 Trinity St. Next to Murphy’s Market, Trinidad. Featuring wonderful works of art and crafts from local artisans, live music and delicious barbecue. E-mail karriewallace@ ymail.com. 834-8720. Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed and Something Blue. 1-4 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Opening reception for show featuring the watercolors of Nina Groth and kilnformed glass pieces of art by Rozz Aucella. Runs through Oct. 677-9493.

MOVIES

Flea. 8-10 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See Sept. 1 listing.

OUTDOORS

Sierra Club Prairie Creek State Park Hike. 9:30 a.m. Meet at Arcata Safeway. Nine-mile loop along West Ridge, Zig Zag #2 and Prairie Creek Trails highlights the vegetation differences between old growth redwoods on a ridge and along the pleasant stream below. Bring water, lunch and sturdy shoes. 839-5971.

is once again living in Cincinnati. His album Mumps, Etc. is due out later this year, with the overflow going into a recently released EP, Sod in the Seed. He says the writing process was different for every song. “Sometimes it comes in quiet moments — something that makes me laugh, an idea, or the way something might rhyme. I’ll write that down save it for later.” Following his brother’s advice he assembled one song at a time, starting by printing out his word strings. “I cut it all up, cut out each line, then laid everything out on a table trying to figure out what goes where. … It’s a real puzzle-making process, putting things together into stanzas and then verses then into songs,” he explained. “It’s much like weaving a rug or something like that, a tapestry that’s more ornate that might have a couple of gold threads in it.” He figures the trick is not letting the glints of gold dominate. They don’t. See for yourself as Why? takes the show on the road for a West Coast run. Thelittlestillnotbigenough presents Why? in concert at the Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. on Friday, Aug. 31, starting at 7:30 p.m. Fellow Anticon artists Serengeti and DJ Soda Pop open. Tickets for the all-ages show are $20 or $17 in advance, available at Missing Link Records or online via www.arcataplayhouse.org. — Bob Doran

3 monday EVENTS

I Block Party. Noon-6 p.m. Los Bagels Arcata, 1061 I St. Music, beer, barbecue, kids’ activities! Performances by Lost Coast Marimbas, Kulica and the No Good Redwood Ramblers. All for the annual fundraiser for the ArcataCamoapa Sister City Project. /www.facebook.com/ events/184196658380039. 267-5411.

4 tuesday FOOD

Old Town Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, F Street between First and Third streets. Fresh farm-grown produce. Music by Rick Park. humfarm. org. 441-9999.

Lyrical Tapestries The alt. hip hop of Why?

WHY?

Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371. Wildberries Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Fresh fruit, vegetables and plants from local growers. 441-9999.

ETC.

North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St, Eureka. Group of local business people who get together once a week in order to give and receive referrals. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Nondenominational prayer group. E-mail dlbitte@hotmail. com. 834-5800.

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FOOD

Annual Harvest Festival. Noon. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Annual beef and beans BBQ put on by Mattole Grange members. Fresh pies for sale and a raffle that benefits local scholarships for Mattole Valley youth. Part of Local Food Month. $10. Mycality Mushrooms Farm Tour. Noon. 1900 Bendixsen St., Samoa. Visit the lab and fruiting facilities. Sample mushrooms and take home a fruiting bag. Part of Local Food Month.

ETC.

Flea Market. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Lots o’ stuff! $0.50. 822-5292. Freshwater Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Grange, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Monthly pancake breakfast. $5/$3 kids. 445-2517. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012

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book

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The Social Conquest of Earth Edward O. Wilson Liveright In examining the relationship of humans to the  rest of nature as well as human nature itself, Edward  O. Wilson has been a defining presence for some  40 years. He created the field of sociobiology in  the 1970s. He won the Pulitzer Prize for On Human Nature in 1979, and with later titles (Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge and Biofilia) he added concepts  (and buzzwords) to scientific and popular discussion. His work has always been controversial, and  assertions in this new book similarly attracted  criticism from major figures. His rejection of “kin  selection” in human evolution (a concept used to  explain altruism that he previously championed) and  his adoption of a form of “group selection” have received lengthy rejoinders from psychologist Steven  Pinker and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins.  (Dawkins also cites strong disagreement from scores  of other scientists.)   It’s not possible to even summarize these arguments in my allotted space. But I can instead discuss  what contending scientists largely do not: This book  as a reading experience.   Whatever the results of scientific debate, the  central theme of this book is a bracing corrective to  the run of evolutionary theory since Dawkins’ selfish  gene thesis began to dominate. Wilson looks at human evolution not as isolated every-individual-foritself battles of one against all (let alone every gene  for itself), but by recognizing the reality of humans  as social beings. He has a word for natural selection  that responds to the social context as well as the  rest of the environment: eusociality.   In under 300 pages, Wilson discusses the latest  of what’s known about biological and cultural human evolution, and focuses his theories on the origins of morality, religion and the creative arts. Lynn  Margulis noted that previous evolutionary theorists  failed to account for the role of symbiosis because  they studied big animals, not the bacteria and tiny  organisms she studied. Wilson uses his knowledge  of social insects (his first area of expertise was ants)  to challenge prevailing assumptions that might be  equally blinkered. Recent science in animal intelligence as well as a more modest view of genes  themselves argue for greater complexity than the  previously dominant mechanistic theories allowed.  So a different approach like Wilson’s fills a need. Some of his scientific arguments get technical.  Some chapters seem more cogent that others (I  found “What is Human Nature?” disappointing). But  mainly Wilson’s prose is clear, informative and at  times provocative. However controversial, he presents a refreshing and even hopeful synthesis, arguing  that knowing our biological history is essential to  saving our magnificently unlikely species at “the  growing point of an unfinished epic,” as well as to  saving the rest of present life we have imperiled.  — William Kowinski

5 wednesday OUTDOORS

Friends of the Dunes Work Day. 5-6:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help develop the native landscaping. Bring gloves. 444-1397.

ETC.

Foot Worship It’s been a pretty good year for Mr. Foot. With the recent success of Animal Planet’s Finding Bigfoot, several feature films reported to be in production and another sighting video going viral — this one from Bigfoot-drenched Ohio — your favorite cryptids profile has arguably never been higher. And where is this guy so we can congratulate him? Even with Bigfoot business bustling, the elusive beast remains just out of reach. But that’s the game, right? The day Christ returns, the Jesus fish coffee mug industry is toast. Same with our (more) hairy friend. And we’ll note that there is no show named Found Bigfoot, so business appears to be safe. To celebrate another year of not being real found, why not head on up to Willow Creek — the Roswell of Bigfoot culture — for its annual Bigfoot Days event on Saturday, Sept. 1. Bigfoot worship begins bright and early at 9 a.m. with Bloody Marys at The Forks bar, which will get you in the mood for the annual parade through downtown. The party moves to Veteran’s Park for an entire day of festivities: logging competitions, petting zoo, horseshoe tourney, lawn mower race, watersides and various Bigfoot-themed retail and food booths. Roar. Saturday night at the VFW hall, humans can utilize their puny little feet to boogie down to the sounds of Taxi starting at 7 p.m. Will Bigfoot show up? Cross your toes. — Andrew Goff

Aug. 31 Sept. 5 Fri Aug 31 - Random Acts of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m. $6 All Ages Sat Sept 1 - District 9 (2009) Doors at 8:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Sun Sept 2 - Harry Potter & the Chamber of Secrets (2002) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Wed Sept 5 -Giant NFL Football Opening Game 5:15 p.m. All ages Free

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, AUG. Aug. 30, 30, 2012 2012 • northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 32 NORTH

Meditation. 5:55-7 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. “Just sitting” meditation for all, in soto zen tradition. E-mail barryevans9@yahoo.com. 476-8317.

6 thursday

Road Runners

Late-summer action flicks pursue the thrill of the chase By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

MUSIC

Ziggy Marley. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Iconic, five-time Grammy-winning reggae royalty performs. $55/$25 HSU students. humboldt.edu/centerarts. 826-3928. Humboldt Folklife Society Group Sing Along. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Joel Sonenshein leads. 839-7063.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See Aug. 30 listing.

MOVIES

The Last Days. 7-9 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main Street. Steven Spielberg’s Academy Award-winning documentary chronicles the stories of five Hungarian survivors of the Holocaust as they return to their hometowns and the places where they were imprisoned by the Nazis. www.ferndalemuseum.com. 786-9196.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. See Aug. 30 listing. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. See Aug. 30 listing.

Heads Up…

Calling All Artists! The Humboldt Arts Council in the Morris Graves Museum of Art is seeking artisans for a future Museum Art Market which will provide a venue for artists to share their trade in the museum space. Call Sasha Lyth at 442-0278 for more info. Even More Artists Needed! The masks are gathering again for The Ink People Center for the Arts’ annual Maskibition. The entry date for this annual exhibition of masks is Saturday, Sept. 29. Contact exhibition curator Kathryne DeLorme at 442-7850 or mythicfaces@juno. com for more info. Oh, C’mon, Artists! Humboldt Arts Council will be accepting entries for the 18th Annual Junque Arte Competition and Exhibition taking place Wednesday, Sept. 26. To be eligible, artwork must be made of 100 percent recycled materials. Review detailed entry guidelines available at the museum or at humboldtarts.org. ●

Reviews

HIT AND RUN. If I had to pick a favorite sub-genre, it would probably be car chase movies. I’ll acknowledge that most of them are guilty pleasures, but I can live with that. You like what you like, and I really like Hit and Run. It has plenty of what I like to see in a summer movie: comedy, action, lightheartedness and the overarching sense that it was a lot of fun to make. Of course it’s also implausible, silly and formulaic, but like I said, I’m OK with that. Dax Shepard plays a getaway driver who testified against his murderous former associates. During his stint in witness protection, he falls for Annie Bean (Kristen Bell). When she’s offered a university teaching job in L.A, he decides their relationship is more important than his continued anonymity/safety. They set out for the southland, pursued by his bloodthirsty ex-robbery crew and a U.S Marshal minder (Tom Arnold). Annie’s ridiculous ex-boyfriend (Michael Rosenbaum) is also in bumbling hot pursuit. The story is a thin excuse to get everybody into cars for prolonged chase sequences and some relationship-examination type conversations, but somehow it all works. Shepard is credited as writer, co-editor and co-director; he also appears to have done a fair amount of his own driving in the movie. This passion-project aspect of the thing may have been what really won me over. Most summer releases would take this basic blueprint and churn it through the studio machinery until it was lifeless, laugh-less and homogenized. Somehow, Hit and Run avoids that trap. It’s a little raggedy and rough in places, but it’s got a good heart and it’s a lot of fun.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, aug. 30, 2012

21


Movie Times into the girl’s body. Scary stuff ensues. PG13. 92m. THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALLOON ADVENTURE. Described as the Teletubbies meets The Rocky Horror Picture Show meets a Tyler Perry movie, this kid flick encourages children to sing and dance in the theater. Let’s hope the walls are thick. G. 88m. THE INTOUCHABLES. After a paragliding accident leaves him a quadriplegic, a French aristocrat hires a black man (!) from the projects (!!!) to be his caretaker. In French with English subtitles. R. 112m. HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS (2002), the second in the boy-wizard series, will show at the Arcata Theatre Lounge Sunday at 6 p.m. PG. 161m.

Continuing

Bradley cooper with Humtasty dreads in Hit and Run.

Shepard and Bell bait and snipe at each other like a real couple (which they are), and their conversations are mundane and silly enough to ring true. Bradley Cooper makes a welcome return to comedy playing the fearsome, ridiculously dreadlocked antagonist. Above all else, Hit and Run is a refreshing change of pace. It proves — as if it needed proving — that inconsequential comedies can still be director-driven, individual works of art. Sure, it’s broad and goofy, but there’s nothing wrong with that. I’m excited to like this movie as much as I do, and I celebrate the fact that it got made at all. R. 100m. PREMIUM RUSH has a lot going for it: Joseph Gordon Levitt and Michael Shannon are two of the more charismatic, likeable actors working in Hollywood; writer-director David Koepp is a seasoned pro with an impressive track record. And everybody loves a bike messenger/immigrants in trouble mash-up, right? OK, strike that last one. While Koepp’s fascination with the sweaty, low-rent world of New York City’s courier culture serves up plenty of opportunities for exciting chase sequences, it isn’t enough to carry the movie. That fact, and a distractingly cartoonish execution, mean Premium Rush never quite lives up to its potential. Levitt plays Wilee, arguably the best and most brazen rider in the Big Apple. His relationship is on the skids, and he pretty much lives to ride. He picks up an envelope that needs to go to Chinatown. The contents of the envelope are extremely valuable, a fact not lost on inveterate gambler/maniac cop Bobby Monday (Shannon). In a series of shifting timelines

and occasionally exhilarating chases, Wilee and Monday play an ever-escalating game of cat and mouse through the city. The two stars turn in admirably committed performances, particularly Shannon’s twisted take on Bobby Monday. He manages a delirious balance of menace and humor that never lets up. Somehow, it’s both hilarious and convincingly scary. Levitt attacks his role with the usual aplomb, even apparently taking on some of the bike stunts himself. The rest of the cast is merely background for these two. The same could be said of the movie as a whole. While polished and self-assured, it lacks the energy and gravitas of the performances that anchor it. Even the stunt sequences, while impressive, fail to be as fun and risky as they could have been. PG13. 91m. —John J. Bennett

Previews

LAWLESS. Three bootlegging brothers in Depression-era Virginia encounter trouble with the law. Sounds like the wild hills of Humboldt, circa now! Starring Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf, Guy Pearce and Gary Oldman. R. 115m. 2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA. Described by one critic as a “right-wing horror flick,” this agit-prop documentary paints Obama as a radical who’s waiting for his second term before acting on the anti-colonialist ideals he inherited from his father. PG. 89m. THE POSSESSION. Finally, a horror movie about a haunted Jewish wine cabinet. A young girl buys an antique box at a yard sale, unaware that it contains a dybbuk, a malevolent spirit from Hebrew mythology. Predictably, the dybbuk hops

THE AVENGERS. Marvel’s superhero super-team returns to the Broadway. PG13. 143m. BRAVE. Pixar’s Scottish princess returns to the Broadway. PG. 100m. THE BOURNE LEGACY. Jeremy Renner replaces Matt Damon in the action franchise based on Robert Ludlum’s international thriller novels. PG13. 125m. THE CAMPAIGN. Doofus duo Will Ferrell and Zach Galafianakis star in this broad, lazy skewering of American politics. R. 85m. THE DARK KNIGHT RISES. If you need a synopsis to tell you that this is the third Christopher Nolan Batman movie, we’re guessing you don’t plan to see it. PG13. 164m. THE EXPENDABLES 2.  Stallone, Schwarzenegger, Norris and more geriatric action stars pay homage to their ’80s action roots, with all the fun and stupidity intact. R. 102m. HOPE SPRINGS. Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones star as an aging couple trying to rekindle the fire in their 30-yearold marriage. PG13. 100m. THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN. A childless couple writes down their hopes for a young’un, buries them in the backyard, and hark, a dirty kid emerges. PG. 100m. PARANORMAN. A misunderstood boy tries to save his town from zombies in this pretty if bland stop-motion film from the makers of Coraline. PG. 93m. RUBY SPARKS. A wunderkind author overcomes writer’s block by conjuring his dream woman — first on the page, then in the flesh. R. 104m. THE WATCH. Sci-fi comedy wastes a fine cast (Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn) on crass, formulaic material. R. 101m. —Ryan Burns

* = SAT./SUN. EARLY SHOWS

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 8/31 - 9/6 unless otherwise noted. THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALOON ADVENTURE 11:55, 2:15, 4:35 2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA 1:30, 3:55, 6:20, 8:45 THE POSSESSION 12:00, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 LAWLESS 12:25, 3:15, 6:00, 8:50 PREMIUM RUSH 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30 HIT AND RUN 6:50, 9:20 THE EXPENDABLES 2 12:55, 3:40, 6:25, 9:00 PARANORMAN 3D 3:05, 8:05 PARANORMAN 2D 12:35, 5:40 ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN 12:40, 3:10, 5:50, 8:30 THE BOURNE LEGACY 3:00, 8:35 THE CAMPAIGN 12:00, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 HOPE SPRINGS 12:30, 6:05 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES 7:50 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3D 5:25 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 2D 12:20, 2:45 THE AVENGERS 2:40, 8:20 BRAVE 12:15, 5:55

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 8/31 - 9/6 unless otherwise noted. THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALOON ADVENTURE *11:55, *2:15, 4:35 2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA *1:55, *4:20, 6:45, 9:10 THE POSSESSION *12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20 LAWLESS *12:25, 3:15, 6:05, 8:55 HIT AND RUN 6:55, 9:30 HOPE SPRINGS 8:50 THE EXPENDABLES 2 1:10, 3:45, 6:20, 9:00 PARANORMAN 3D 2:25, 8:15 PARANORMAN 2D 12:00, 4:50 ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN 1:00, 3:35, 6:15 THE BOURNE LEGACY 1:50, 8:30 THE CAMPAIGN 7:15, 9:40 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES 4:55

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 8/31 - 9/6 unless otherwise noted.

INTOUCHABLES THE CAMPAIGN RUBY SPARKS

*1:20, 3:55, 6:30, 9:10 *2:35, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 *1:40, 4:10, 6:50, 9:20

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 8/31 - 9/6 unless otherwise noted. THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALOON ADVENTURE *12:25, *2:40, 4:45, 7:00, 9:05 LAWLESS *1:00, 4:05, 7:05, 9:45 HIT & RUN *12:00, *2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 THE EXPENDABLES 2 *12:40, 4:00, 6:55, 9:35 PARANORMAN 2D *12:10, 2:20, 4:35, 6:50, 9:10 THE BOURNE LEGACY 6:40, 9:40 THE CAMPAIGN *12:20, *2:35, 4:40, 7:10, 9:25 BRAVE *12:50, 4:15

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville

THE WATCH 8/31- 9/3: 7:30 MOONRISE KINGDOM 9/4- 9/6: 7:30 EXCEPT 9/5: 6:30

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal •northcoastjournal.com Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012• North Coas


POTTERY GLAZING CLINIC. With Elaine Shore. Sat., 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Oct. 13 and Oct. 20, plus one hour Oct. 27. Introduces glazing techniques, which can bring your pieces to the next level. For beginning and ongoing students who are ready to take advantage of Fire Arts large selection of glazes. $65. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www. fireartsarcata.com (AC-0830) WHEEL THROWING BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE. With Peggy Loudon. Wed., Sept. 12–Nov. 14. 3 classes offered: 9-11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., 2-4 p.m. Complete introduction to basic wheel-throwing and glazing techniques. For beginning and returning students, class will put you on the road to developing your own personal style. $180. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata. com (AC-0830)

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

EXPRESSIVE ARTS. For the joy of creating. Mon’s, 6-8 p.m. beginning Sept. 17, ongoing. Painting, mixed-media, mask making and more. $75/mo. Fortuna United Methodist Church.More information call Susan Cooper, 726-9048 (AC-0906) GLASS FUSING WITH TRACE GALBRAITH. $120 + $60 materials fee. Mon. & Wed., 10:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Class #1, Sept. 24, 26, Oct. 1, 3. Class #2, Oct. 15, 17, 22, 24. Tues. & Thurs., 5-8 p.m. Class #3, Sept. 25, 27, Oct. 2, 4. Class #4, Oct. 16, 18, 23, 25. Explore elements of design and principles of composition as you create exciting works of art with glass. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0830) PHOTO TO PAINTING. Making your memories into Art: Learn how to turn your favorite photos into either a watercolor or acrylic painting. Sat.’s, Sept. 15 – Nov. 3. 9:30 a.m – noon. Fee $99. CR Eureka Downtown Site. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (AC-0830) PHOTOGRAPHY 1 & 2. Learn more about your digital camera and the techniques that will help your artistic expression in making photographs from local professional photographer, Gary Todoroff. Photo 1, Tues.s, Sept. 4- Oct. 16, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Photo 2, Thurs.s, Sept. 6- Oct. 18, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $85 each. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (AC-0830) PLAYING WITH CLAY FOR GROWN UPS. Sept. 25–Oct. 30. Tues., 10 a.m.-Noon. Here’s your chance to have some fun and get your hands dirty! Fun and stress-relieving introduction to ceramic art in an informal, non-threatening setting. $110. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-0830)

WHEEL THROWING BEGINNING & UTILITARIAN FORMS. With Bob Raymond. Wed., 7-9 p.m., Sept. 12– Nov. 14. Learn the basics or perfect your wheel-throwing technique. With 40 years experience, Bob Raymond is an inspiration to students of all levels. For intermediate students, he will assist in mastering Utilitarian forms. $180. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 8261445. More info at www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-0830) NATIVE AMERICAN BEADWORK, DESIGN & LEATHERWORK. Beadwork turns any simple buckskin bag or clothing into beautiful art. Intro: Develop beadwork skills using traditional and contemporary materials. Advanced: Develop your own designs/styles, and have option to work on regalia. With Winema and Lonnie Weeks. Intro or advanced course: Tues./Thurs., Sept. 11-Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m. $125 (Intro course is $50 additional for materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt. edu/extended (AC-0830) SKIN KAYAK BUILDING WORKSHOP. with Marc Daniels, expert skin boat builder. Build your own tailorfitted skin-on-frame sea kayak. Learn carving, lashing, pegging, steam-bending ribs, and stitching fabric skin. Three weekends, Sept. 15-30, 393 Main St., Ferndale. $1975, 50% deposit to reserve spot. No experience needed. Call (707) 834-2186 or info@mindseyemanufactory.com for details. (AC-0906) CREATE YOUR OWN CRAFT PARTY. Every Sat., 6-9 p.m., all ages, Call for a quote $. Whether it’s a special celebration or just getting together with friends and family it’s always a fun & crafty. Rent the space or Rent the space and an instructor. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0830) CROCHETING. Thurs.s, 6-8 p.m. $30. Discover the wonderful world of crochet! Learn basic stitches. No experience needed. This class assumes you never held a crochet hook before. All ages. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0830) LEARN TO KNIT A SWEATER CLASS AT YARN. Thurs., Sept. 6-27, 5:30-7 p.m. $60, plus materials. Learn all the basics to knit a sweater. Choose an adult size or baby sweater knit from the top down with minimal seaming. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-0830) SCREEN PRINTING LAB TIME. $40. Every Mon., 6-8 p.m. Learn basics of screen printing, brush up on your skills or come work on your own screen printing projects. Lab will be set up ready to use. Screens and inks available, bring clothing, fabric or paper to print on. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0830)

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

VERY BEGINNING SEWING. Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. $30. Learn to use and care for your sewing machine. We will have you sewing a straight line in no time, then on to fancier stitches. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0830)

Communication

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH YOU? Examine a simple technique that greatly enhances self-worth. Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Sept. 2, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0830)

Computers

INTRO TO PHOTOSHOP WITH ANNIE REID. A fastpaced hands-on exploration of the imaging application for digital camera enthusiasts, designers and other digital media artists. Tues.Thurs., Sept. 18-Oct. 2, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0906)

ZUMBA FITNESS & ZUMBA TONING! Zumba Fitness, Mon., Arcata Vets Hall. Zumba Toning (uses 1-2.5lbs. weights w/specific toning choreography), Thurs., Pan Arts Studio. Both classes 5:30-6:30 p.m., $6 drop-in. No membership required. Get moving, get grooving, get fit, get happy, you will not be disappointed! Ann has over 20 years teaching dance/fitness classes. Questions? Contact Ann, (707) 845-1055 or annyoumans.zumba.com (F-0906) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-0913)

DROP-IN COMMUNITY SONG CIRCLE AND SAMBA DRUMMING. Join Humboldt Folklife Society for monthly song circle, first Tues. each month, 7-10 p.m., at Arcata Community Center, or learn the fundamentals of rhythm and technique at Samba Drumming Sun’s, 12-4 p.m at D St. Community Center. Just $3 drop-in fee. For more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org. (DMT-0830)

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1227)

DANCE TANGO! Practica Fri. Sept. 28, 7-9 p.m., $6, Studio of Dance Arts, Eueka. Humboldttango.org. NO SUMMER CLASSES (DMT-0830)

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT1227) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129)

KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./ Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-0913) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0927) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1227) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227)


SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227)

HUMBOLDT MUSIC ACADEMY. Music classes for ages 2-18. Classes and ensembles on Sat., Sept. 8-Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on the HSU campus. Get a registration packet online at www.humboldt.edu/hma, or call 826-3411 for more information. (K-0830)

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

SATURDAY CRAFTY KIDS. Ages 7+. $25. Every Sat.,10 a.m.-Noon. Introduction to a varied of fun creative crafts, sewing and felting, materials included. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 4976237, www.origindesignlab.com. (K-0830)

Home & Garden

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

FALL PLANT ID. Learn to identify a wide variety of plants suited to our local area on guided walks around the College of the Redwoods main campus and adjacent Botanical Garden. Mon’s, Sept. 10 – Oct. 29, 1:30 p.m –4 p.m. Fee $80. CR Main Campus Greenhouse. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (G-0830) GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE. Learn how to plant flowers and trees to attract beautiful and beneficial wildlife with an emphasis on birds. Sat., Sept. 8,. 9 a.m –11:30 a.m. Fee $25. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (G-0830)

Kids & Teens

AFTERSCHOOL ART STUDIO 6TH-12TH GRADERS. Arcata Recreation’s ARTS in the Afternoon runs Mon.Thurs. Spend your afterschool hours with us in the studio. Try your hand at ceramics, video production, painting, jewelry making, drawing and so much more. There is something for everyone. Sign up or for more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org/rec. (K-0830) BEGINNING SKATE FOR 3-7 YEARS. Skate without the risk or intimidation of older, more experienced skaters. Sat’s starting Sept. 8, 4:30-5:15 p.m., Eureka Muni. $20 includes skate rental. This is a parent participation class. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or in person at the Adorni Center 1011 Waterfront Dr. 441-4244. (K-0830) CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 4-7. Sat., 9:30-11 a.m., Sept. 15–Oct. 6. Children will have a great time creating with clay. Make 1-2 pieces per week. Each project designed to bring out their creativity. With Amanda Steinebach. $60. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www. fireartsarcata.com (AC-0830) FRIDAY NIGHT FLIPS. Want a space for your kids to play while you getaway. Bring them to the Arcata Community Center gymnastics room for two hours of fun. Ages 6-12, Fri’s, 5:30 p.m-7:30 p.m. Bring a snack! Drop-in $10/$11 non-residents or purchase 6 class pass at recreation office $50/$55 non-residents. Call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata. org/rec. (K-0830) IMAGINE THAT! Beginning Sept. 12. Ongoing weekly youth art. Drawing, painting, printmaking, maskmaking and more. Ages 5-18 grouped by age. $60 each month. Fortuna Methodist Church, 9th & N St. Call to register 726-9048. An Ink People Center for the Arts DreamMaker program. (K-0906) CHILDREN’S YOGA. 5-week series begins Sept. 14. Fri.s, 4:15-5 p.m. Great fun! Location: Redwood Raks, the old Creamery Building. info@littlebuddhasyoga. com (K-0913)

DISASTERS DON’T WAIT: HAVE YOUR SUPPLY KITS READY. Get your supplies ready for response to an earthquake, tsunami or severe weather. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute — Community Disaster Preparedness. Fee: $25. Wed., Sept. 19, 6-8 p.m., Trinidad City Hall. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/supplykits or call HSU Distance & Extended Education (707) 826-3731 (LE-0906) FREE SEMINAR ! INVESTMENT STRATEGIES IN TURBULENT TIMES. Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Wed., Sept.12, 5:45 p.m - 7p.m., Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP (707) 443-2741 or online at www.premieradvisor.com. (LE-0906)

Language

LIVING ON SHAKY GROUND. How to Survive Earthquakes & Tsunamis in Northern California. A free class. Wed., Sept. 12, 6-8 p.m. at Humboldt County Library, Eureka. Pre-registration required: Call (707) 499-0754. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness (www. humboldt.edu/rti). Funding provided by the Calif. Emergency Management Agency Earthquake and Tsunami Program. (L-0906)

INTRO TO JAPANESE. Basic Japanese grammar structure, vocabulary and writing systems. Focus on useful conversational skills. With Mie Matsumoto. Tues./Thurs., Sept. 18-Oct. 11, 5:30-7:30 p.m., $125 ($50 additional for one unit of optional credit). Preregistration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (L-0906)

Over 50

BEGINNING ITALIAN. Introduction to Italian grammar, basic vocabulary and culture. With Giulia Marini. Tues./Thurs., Sept. 18-Oct. 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $125. ($50 additional for optional one unit of credit.) Preregistration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (L-0906)

Lectures

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS IS EVERYONE’S BUSINESS. Our region relies on its local businesses to remain open after a disaster to help the community quickly recover. This course provides a simple but effective plan to identify and mitigate hazards, create a sensible business disaster plan, prepare disaster supplies kits, identify and strengthen building weaknesses, plan to reduce injuries and save lives. Instructor: Judy Warren. Wed., Sept. 26, Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, Eureka (next to Adorni Center), 6-9 p.m. $50. For more details, fees and to register: www. humboldt.edu/rti or call HSU Distance & Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0913) LIVING ON SHAKY GROUND. How to Survive Earthquakes & Tsunamis in Northern California. A free class. Mon., Sept. 24, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Presbyterian Church, Garberville. Pre-registration required: Call (707) 499-0754. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness (www.humboldt.edu/rti). Funding provided by the Calif. Emergency Management Agency Earthquake and Tsunami Program. (L-0913) FOOD SAFETY. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Tues., Sept. 11, 6-8 p.m., D Street Neighborhood Center, Arcata. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/ foodsafety or call HSU Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0906)

Skin Kayak Building Workshop

with Marc Daniels, expert skin boat builder. Build your own tailor-fitted skin-on-frame sea kayak. Learn carving, lashing, pegging, steambending ribs, and stitching fabric skin. Three weekends, Sept. 15-30, 393 Main St., Ferndale. $1975, 50% deposit to reserve spot. No experience needed. Call (707) 834-2186 or info@ mindseyemanufactory.com for details.

Mind’s Eye Manufactory

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY & THE MODERN WORLD. Join Professor Tom Gage to explore quirky, shocking but entertaining stories from classical mythology that linger beneath the surface of modernity. Thurs., Sept. 20-Oct. 18 (no class Sept. 27), 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880. (O-0913) SETH KINMAN, LIVE & KICKING. A one-man show of the life and times of Seth Kinman (1815-1888), a famous pioneer, bear hunter, and storyteller from the early history of Humboldt County. With Charlie Beck. Sun., Sept. 23, 1 p.m. Natural Resources Bldg., room 101, Humboldt State University (free parking). Cost for OLLI members only: $10. (O-0913) ART FOR THE YOUNG AT HEART. Intro to Watercolor and Printmaking. Mon’s 5:30 -7:30 p.m, Sept.10 - Nov. 12. Instructor Patricia Sennott. $175. Arcata Elementary School, 2400 Baldwin. More info, email Patricia, psennott@gmail.com. (O-0906) DESIGNING YOUR NEXT 50 YEARS. How do we improve the quality of life for seniors in Humboldt County? Examine several creative ways to enhance senior living on both personal and community levels, and take action to implement selected ideas after this class concludes. With JoAnne Schuch. Thurs., Sept. 13-Oct. 4, 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0906) GENEALOGY & FAMILY HISTORY. Discover the tools that will help you learn more about your forebears with Michael Cooley. Sat., Sept. 15, 29 and Oct. 13, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0906) DRAWING BASICS. Be introduced to various drawing media, with a brief history of drawing, and obtain a foundation in drawing techniques with Mark Soderstrom. Thurs., Sept. 6-Oct.4, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $60/ OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

Preschool Openings at CDL

The Child Development Lab at Humboldt State University has openings for children 2 years 9 months up to 5 years in age in the afternoon program. We are a unique, nationally accredited preschool program offering a rich variety of learning experiences for children, supportive relationships with adults and guided development of both independence and strong social skills. For further information and enrollment materials please contact 707-826-3475.

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continued from previous page HEARING THE OTHER, FATEMA MERNISSI & M. FATHULLAH GULEN. Discuss the published ideas of two influential Muslin thinkers dedicated to fostering peace, mutual understanding and good will. With Professor Tom Gage. Tues., Sept. 18-Oct. 16 (no class Sept. 25), 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0906)

SURREALISM & REALISM IN PHOTOGRAPHY. Man Ray, Lee Miller, Salvador Dali and Cindy Sherman. Explore aberrant innovative photographers featured in two exhibitions at San Francisco MOMA and Palace of the Legion of Honor. With Ron Johnson. Tues., Sept. 4 and 11, 6-8 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

MEMOIR, WRITING YOUR LIFE STORY. Explore and write about pivotal experiences that shaped you. With Sharon Ferrett. Thurs., Sept. 13-Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-Noon, in McKinleyville. $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0906)

THE ART OF LIVING. Conversations on Creative Aging and Living Life Beyond 50. Monthly brown bag lunch and conversation on creative aging and the possibilities of living life to the fullest. Wed., Sept. 12: Ray Hillman; Oct. 17: Tracey Barnes-Priestley; Nov. 14: Kia Ora Zeleny. Noon-1:30 p.m., free to OLLI members. To register or join OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

GENTLE YOGA. Focus on floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Stephanie Perrett. Tues., Sept. 11-Oct. 9, 10-11 a.m., in McKinleyville. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

WRITING FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS. Learn to write and publish fiction and non-fiction books for children and young adults. With Pam Service. Sat., Sept. 8-22, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

FUNDAMENTALS OF RESISTANCE TRAINING. Explore movement for older adult exercisers, and gain basic knowledge of anatomy and principles of strength training. Then learn specific balance, mobility and stability exercises that can be done at home, office or while traveling. With Susan Lewis. Fri., Sept. 7-28, Oct. 19-26, 1-2:30 p.m. $50 or $60 (with materials)/OLLI members, $75 or $85 (with materials)/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

WRITING THE LANDSCAPE OF YOUR LIFE. Place: where we grew up, where we’ve lived and where we have traveled, helps to define who we are. In this class, we will use “place” as a catalyst for writing from memory and personal experience. With Bonnie Shand. Tues., Sept. 11-Oct. 16, 1-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

LONGITUDE & INVENTION OF INSTRUMENTS FOR NAVIGATION. Explore history and tools of navigation from the compass and the chart to the discovery of longitude and invention of the chronometer and sextant. Includes demonstration and hands-on use of a variety of replica and modern instruments. With Harvey II and Richard A. Paselk. Wed., Sept. 5-19, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0830) MADAKET HISTORICAL TOUR OF HUMBOLDT BAY. Learn historical perspectives and insights on Humboldt Bay, then explore the bay aboard the Madaket, the last survivor of the seven original Humboldt Bay ferries. With Leroy and Dalene Zerlang. Fri., Sept. 7-28, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fee for OLLI members only: $80. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) PASS THE BLESSINGS. What are the most important blessings to pass on to the next generation? What legacy do you want to leave? How can you ease the burden for your loved ones after my death? This course will help you answer these questions. With Sharon Ferrett. Wed., Sept. 12-Oct. 3, 5-6:30 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE. Learn to photograph people with skill and confidence, and create compelling images. With Lorraine Miller-Wolf. Wed., Sept. 12-Oct. 3, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) REDWOOD FACTS & FICTION. A lecture-field class examining the area in and around Humboldt Redwoods State Park. Learn the differences between redwood species, explore old-growth redwoods along the Eel River and Bull Creek. With Ross Carkeet. Thurs., Sept. 6, 6-8 p.m. and Sat.,Sept. 8, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) SHINING A LIGHT, A LECTURE SERIES ON ADDICTION. Local service providers and individuals in recovery will shed light on the impacts of addiction and mental illness, facilitating a meaningful dialogue within our community. Tues., Sept. 11-Oct. 16, 3:305:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

YOGA FOR OLLI. A gentle yoga class with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., Sept. 10-Oct. 8, 1:30-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0830)

Spiritual

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation

PICKLEBALL. Combines elements of badminton, tennis and table tennis into a fun new sport that is enjoyed by players of all ages. Drop-in Indoor Pickleball; Thurs.s, 10 a.m.-Noon, Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. $2/Adult, $1.50/Senior. Call 441-4374. (SR-0830) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1227)

Therapy/Support

OVERCOMING DISCOURAGEMENT. Meeting Life’s challenges and Embracing Change. Support Group for Women of All ages. Meeting weekly for 10 weeks, Past Hurts, Relationship Changes, Workplace/Career Issues. Learn and Receive Support from Others. Focus on Some Guiding Principles. Confidentiality Required. Starting Wed., Sept. 12, 6:30-8 p.m. 905 6th St., Arcata, $25 per session/Insurance considered to register or more information call Sonja Harting, M.S., MFT LIC #MFC 40367, 826-0921 #4, slharting@ gmail.com (T-0906)

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

DIVORCE SUPPORT GROUP. Connect with others and feel less alone. Learn effective coping skills, ways to manage strong emotions how to heal and live the life you want. Group meets Mon. evenings, 6-7:30 pm. For more info. and to register call (707) 834-3747. Facilitated by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815 (T-1115) POSITIVE CONNECTIONS. In this world of negativity and lack of connection create and participate in a positive social network based on strengths and optimism. In a group format, learn to improve your relationships with yourself and others. Meets once a week for 6 wks. Offered by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815. For info and to register call 834-3747 (T-0913) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

GRADUATE RECORD EXAM (GRE) Prep Class at HSU: If you are applying to grad school and need a good score on the GRE, this course will prepare you. Sat.s, Sept. 22-Oct. 13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $395 fee includes materials. Early registration is encouraged. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education: 707-826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended/ gre (V-0906)

Wellness/Bodywork

AYURVEDIC WELLNESS COUNSELOR PROGRAM. with Traci Webb. Meets five weekends (Fri.-Sun.) Oct. 12-Jan. 20, Part I of three part Practitioner Certificate. Includes: Aromatherapy, Colors, Gems, Yoga Darshana I&II, Ayurvedic Psychology, Mental Constitutions, Diagnostics (Pulse, Tongue, Face, Body, Voice, Nails, Urine), and Panchakarma Seasonal Cleansing Theory, $1500 (in full), $350/month pay plan. SAVE $100-REGISTER by Sept. 30: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda, info@ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601-9025. (W-0927) MEDICAL & THERAPEUTIC QIGONG. Ancient knowledge for todays well being. Suitable for all ages. Designed to empower and master your inner world. Reclaim health and joy in your life. 8-week class, Mons.s, 5:30-7 p.m., Sept. 10-Oct. 29, $80. Open Class, Thurs.s, 9-10:30 a.m., $12/session. At Garden Bliss, corner of 3rd and E St., Arcata. Information, Saki, (707) 822-8760 or sakitou2@gmail.com. (W-0906) YOGA FOR PAIN MANAGEMENT. Tues’s, Sept. 4–25, 6:30–8:30 p.m, Om Shala Yoga, Arcata. $40-$80 sliding scale. 825-YOGA.(9642) www.omshalayoga. com (W-0830) INTRO TO HOLISTIC MEDICINE WITH JOHN YAMAS. Learn about the four major blockages to healing (emotional, biochemical, toxins, structure/ energetic flow), and self care for health. Explore different systems of holistic medicine, history of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and emotional components and treatments including flower essence therapy, neuro-emotional technique, TCM and Qigong. Wed., Sept. 19-Oct. 31, 7-8:30 p.m. $70. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (W-0906) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. BEGINNING WITH HERBS. Sept. 19- Nov. 7, 2012. eight Wed. evenings plus two herb walks. Learn the basics with many hands-on activities, prereq to 10 month course.10 MONTH HERBAL STUDIES PROGRAM Feb.-Nov. 2013. In-depth materia medica, therapeutics, flower essences, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0913)

T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Three programs: T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis, Traditional Long Form (Wu Style), and The 42 Combined Forms (all 4 major styles). 13-week session starts the week of Sept. 17. Begin as late as the third week. At the martial arts academy in Arcata’s Sunny Brae Shopping Center. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Morning and evening classes. Fees for the 13-week term: $110 for 1 class per week, $165 for 2 or more classes per week. See www.margaretemerson.com or call 822-6508 for schedules. (W-0920) AROMATHERAPY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM & ESSENTIAL OIL DISTILLATION. With Traci Webb. Two Weekend Immersions, Fri-Sun, Oct 12-14 and Oct. 2628. Learn to distill your own essential oils! Includes Western and Exotic Oils, Usage, Toxicity, Blending, Recipes, Take-Homes, In-Class Marma Therapy Session Demo, Oils for Women, PMS, Skin Beautification, Pregnancy, Headaches, Aches/Pains, Allergies, Sinus, Colds, Natural Cleaners, Anxiety, Depression, Ancient Perfumes, $900 (or $450/weekend) REGISTER Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ayurvedicliving. com, (707) 601-9025. (W-1011) HERBAL ALLIES WITH WENDY READ. Sat., Sept. 22, 2-4 p.m. $45 + $15 lab fee. Part 3 of making herbal medicine series teaches students how to combine other herbs with your cannabis salves infusions and teas to improve effectiveness. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www.cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0920) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-0926) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Sept. 4, 2012 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

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AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE This Notice Amends the NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE recorded on August 3, 2012 as Document No: 2012-020191-2, Official Records of Humboldt County. This Amendment is done to correct the sale date.

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED AUGUST 8, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that on September 21, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. on the front steps of the Humboldt County Superior Court, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, James E. Reed, Trustee, whose street address is 43130 Highway 299E, Fall River Mills, California 96028, and whose telephone number is (530) 336-5050, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, the real property described below. The real property is located in the town of McKinleyville, California, County of Humboldt, State of California. It is commonly described as 1525 School Road, McKinleyville, CA 95519. The county assessor’s parcel number for the property is 511-443-013. The following is the legal description of the property: Lot 5 as shown on Tract No. 571, Larsen Subdivision, as shown on the Map thereof filed in Book 23 of Maps, Pages 119, 120, 121, and 122, Humboldt County Records. The sale will be made without covenant or warranty regarding title, possession, or encumbrances to satisfy the obligations secured by and pursuant to the power of sale conferred in that certain deed of trust dated August 8, 2005, executed by GERHARD LARSEN and CHRISTINE LARSEN, as Trustors, in which James Kenneth McKinney, an unmarried man as to an undivided 40% interest; Grant A. Brown and Carol A. Brown, husband and wife, as Joint Tenants as to an undivided 35% interest and Mark A. Rasmussen, a single man, as to an undivided 25% interest, are named as Beneficiaries and Alliance Title Company, a California corporation is named as Trustee, and recorded on August 17, 2005, as Instrument Number 200527682-3, Official Records of Humboldt County, California. A Notice of Default, containing an election to sell the described real property under the above Deed of Trust was recorded on January 30, 2012 as Instrument No. 2012-2287-7, Official Records of

Humboldt County, California. The following amounts represent the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above-described property to be sold and the estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of the time and of the initial publication of this notice of sale: Unpaid balance of obligation:     $275,000.00 Unpaid Interest                          38,500.00 Current Taxes Due                     1,103.94 Defaulted Taxes                         8,310.91 Costs:                                       736.00 Attorney’s Fees:                         1535.00                                                                           ============= TOTAL AMOUNT: $ 325,185.85 The undersigned was appointed and substituted as Trustee under the above Deed of Trust by a substitution dated December 15, 2011 and recorded on January 30, 2012 as Instrument No. 2012-2286-4, Official Records of Humboldt, California. This notice is given in compliance with a written request made to the Trustee by the Beneficiary. Dated: August 7, 2012 /s JAMES E. REED, Trustee  STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SHASTA On this 7th day of August 2012, before me, JOANN LOUISE MOORE, Notary Public, personally appeared JAMES E. REED, who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same in his authorized capacity, and that by his signature on the instrument the person executed the instrument.  I certify under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct.   WITNESS my hand and official seal. s/Joann Louise Moore, Comm. #1832590 NOTARY PUBLICCalifornia Shasta County Filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 27, 2012. 2012-021690-3 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-246)

AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE This Notice Amends the NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE recorded on August 3, 2012 as Document No: 2012-020192-3, Official Records of Humboldt County. This Amendment is done to correct the sale date.

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED AUGUST 17, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO

PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that on September 21, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. on the front steps of the Humboldt County Superior Court, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, James E. Reed, Trustee, whose street address is 43130 Highway 299E, Fall River Mills, California 96028, and whose telephone number is (530) 336-5050, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, the real property described below. The real property is located in the town of McKinleyville, California, County of Humboldt, State of California. It is commonly described as Allie Court Subdivision. The county assessor’s parcel numbers for the property are 511-431-064-000; 511-431-065-000; 511-431-066-000; 511-431-067-000; 511-431-068-000; 511-431-069-000; 511-431-071-000; 511-431-072-000; 511431-073-000. The following is the legal description of the property: LEGAL DESCRIPTION ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT “A” DESCRIPTION That real property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California, described as follows: Those portions of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 30, Township 7 North, Range 1 East, Humboldt Meridian, described as follows: PARCEL ONE: BEGINNING at the Southeast corner of said Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter; thence North along the quarter section line 419.77 feet to the true point of the beginning; thence North along the quarter section line 272.25 feet; thence West parallel with the South line of said Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter 320 feet; thence South parallel with the quarter section line 272.25 feet; thence East parallel with the South line of said Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter 320 feet to the true point of beginning. PARCEL TWO: A non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress and public utility purposes over a strip of land 20 feet in width, the East line of which is described as follows: BEGINNING at the Southeast corner of Parcel One; thence South along the quarter section line 419.77 feet. PARCEL THREE: The easements reserved in the  Partial Reconveyances recorded March 22, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-5928-3, Humboldt County Records, and recorded March 22, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-5931-3, Humboldt County Records, and the easement granted to Pacific Sunset Development, LLC, a California Limited Liability Company, by Deed recorded September 30, 2009 as instrument No. 2009-21917-7, Humboldt

continued on page 39

Field notes My favorite iMage froM Curiosity’s landing, taken froM over 200 Miles away by nasa’s Mars reConnaissanCe orbiter, shows Curiosity a Minute before landing, dangling beneath its 51-foot-diaMeter paraChute about two Miles above gale Crater. nasa/Jpl-CalteCh/ university of arizona

To Mars and/or Bust By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

T

he odds were stacked against the Mars Science Laboratory, aka Curiosity, which represented the 17th attempt by Earthlings to land a spacecraft on the surface of the Red Planet. Only seven of the previous 16 had succeeded, so when it did touch down safely last Aug. 5, at 10:32 p.m. PDT, after by far the most complicated landing system ever (“Seven Minutes of Terror”), you could hear the collective sigh of relief from space-watchers around the world. Three of the successful landing craft that preceded Curiosity were stationary machines, not rovers. Best known of these were the twin Viking landers that arrived on Mars during the bicentennial month of July 1976. They sent back several albums-worth of photographs, many of which made it seem as if they were taken on some remote mesa in Arizona or New Mexico, devoid of vegetation but with similar geology. The most controversial data from the Vikings (then and now) were subtle indications of microbial life. Each craft carried a biology experiment consisting of three sub-systems. While two of these showed zero evidence for life, the third, the “Labeled Release” experiment, suggested the presence of organic compounds in the Martian soil. (Because Mars lacks an ozone layer, the sun’s ultraviolet rays sterilize the surface, so any putative life would be underground.) Curiosity is the fourth successful rover on Mars, preceded by tiny Sojourner, which hitched a ride to the Martian surface on the Pathfinder lander, and by the twin Mars Exploration Rovers A and B, dubbed Spirit and Opportunity.

Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, and — incredibly, given the mission’s nominal three-month duration — is still operational. Pathfinder, Spirit and Opportunity all landed using airbags to cushion their arrival on Mars, after decelerating through the thin Martian atmosphere using supersonic parachutes and retro-rockets. In contrast with these earlier rovers, Curiosity presented much more of a landing challenge, mainly because of its one-ton weight, compared with Sojourner’s 23 pounds and Spirit and Opportunity’s 400 pounds. That’s why the landing sequence was so complicated. It was too heavy for airbags and too vulnerable for a retrorocket landing, since if it had landed using rockets all the way to the surface, the resulting dust might have damaged the complicated machine. Curiosity isn’t designed to search for life, but to look for suitable conditions for life as it might have evolved some 3 billion years ago, when Mars had oceans and was something of a sister planet to Earth. Mars later froze (unlike Earth, it’s too small to maintain an internal heat source), but some of us still dream of discovering some hardy little buggers nestled for warmth deep within the flanks of a stillwarm volcano. Curiosity isn’t going to find all the answers about possible Martian life, but it will at least lead us in the right direction. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) didn’t realize he could hold his breath for seven minutes until the evening of Aug. 5.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

37


PROPERTY TAX DEFAULT (DELINQUENT) LIST

Made pursuant to Section 3371, Revenue and Taxation Code

I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, State of California, certify that: The real properties listed below were declared to be in tax default at 12:01 a.m. on July 1, 2009, by operation of law pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3436. The declaration of default was due to non-payment of the total amount due for the taxes, assessments and other charges levied in the fiscal year 2008-2009 that were a lien on the listed real property. Tax-defaulted real property may be redeemed by payment of all unpaid taxes and assessments, together with the additional penalties and fees, as prescribed by law, or it may be redeemed under an installment plan of redemption. The amount to redeem, including all penalties and fees, as of September, 2012, is shown opposite the assessment number and next to the name of the assessee. All information concerning redemption of tax-defaulted property will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 Fifth Street, Room 125, Eureka, California 95501 (707) 476-2450.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Parcel/Assessment Number (APN/ASMT), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map (if applicable), and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the assessor’s office. Property tax defaulted on June 30, 2009 for the taxes, assessments and other charges for the fiscal year 2008-2009: Assessor’s Assessment No 525-281-012-000 405-271-014-000 110-071-008-000 305-271-051-000 216-382-060-000 109-101-025-000 111-031-014-000 110-071-019-000 400-153-004-000 507-091-021-000 109-121-018-000 111-071-055-000 520-084-013-000 077-232-010-000 201-252-001-000 108-133-019-000 109-281-020-000 053-153-008-000 053-162-006-000 053-103-021-000 220-082-007-501 109-362-036-000 109-362-037-000 032-171-015-000 109-183-017-000 109-183-018-000 111-012-002-000 004-015-004-000 201-031-013-000 109-281-037-000 109-321-004-000 109-331-038-000 203-383-019-000 031-181-006-000 005-074-005-000 216-081-004-000

Amount to redeem Achamire Eva M C/Achamire Homer D/Cotton An$ 3,341.43 thony W/Cotton Russell E Ackles Richard $3,413.95 Acojedo Rogelio P $1,821.40 Andersen David R & Cheryl $326.18 Anderson Mark A $2,564.70 Antonelli Mattie F C $1,810.43 Applegate Paul A $2,991.80 Arthur Christopher H $1,301.05 Arzner Judy M $2,541.07 Backman Mark W & Susan L $3,044.01 Bailey Thomas A $1,927.45 Baker Dena H $1,655.15 Baker Rodney A $1,170.60 Banning Matthew/Downie Sarah $23,301.28 Barcelos Tracie M $2,304.28 Barker Hans $6,796.45 Barnes Claire $2,581.10 Barnett Michael L $6,620.04 Barnett Michael L $1,088.01 Barnett Michael L $10,193.03 Beecham Larry $3,117.53 50% undivided interest share of 220-082-007-000 Berger Annemarie Estate Of $7,986.22 Berger Annemarie Estate Of $8,597.89 Best Buy Containers LLC Cr $1,643.32 Birchfield Bill & Billie Jo/Birchfield Julie A $1,834.09 Birchfield Bill & Billie Jo/Birchfield Julie A $1,834.09 Bleuler Barbara G Tr $2,157.57 Bonnet Joyce M $20,894.93 Borges Michael & Kelly $4,036.25 Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona $1,766.54 Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona $1,674.80 Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona $1,773.10 Boyd Perry & Jewel $1,712.47 Branstetter Dennis & Steve & Terri $5,596.89 Briggs Janice L & Michelle M $1,719.15 Buck Mountain Ranch Limited Partnership Lp $139.80 Assessee’s Name

Assessor’s Assessment No 216-134-001-000 216-135-005-000 223-072-006-000 223-073-004-000 223-073-005-000 223-074-001-000 109-341-035-000 109-341-034-000 109-311-002-000 109-362-007-000 510-231-035-000 040-263-017-000 109-301-028-000 404-031-005-000 111-061-020-000 522-301-005-000 220-312-032-000 300-052-002-000 110-021-058-000 111-061-019-000 526-062-050-000 531-074-011-000 303-063-010-000 110-261-039-000 519-301-015-000 009-071-004-000 525-291-008-000 110-051-009-000 110-201-022-000 109-041-023-000 109-211-036-000 110-281-017-000 002-082-001-000 002-231-004-000 506-051-003-000 506-061-026-000 506-061-027-000 506-112-006-000 506-121-001-000 100-284-011-000 210-141-013-000 004-023-005-000 110-021-002-000 203-092-053-000 210-192-017-000 031-171-046-000 515-331-033-000 025-083-016-000 510-231-029-000 510-081-024-000 021-072-010-000 503-143-016-000 052-091-002-000 200-411-059-000 211-622-005-000 214-021-005-000 220-291-002-000 104-112-002-000 109-211-033-000 529-361-010-000 002-061-003-000 507-092-021-000 111-112-007-000 110-231-038-000 109-362-004-000 053-141-037-000 013-044-008-000 306-012-001-000 001-047-008-000 110-071-002-000 111-051-019-000 529-361-029-000 529-361-030-000

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Assessee’s Name Buck Mountain Ranch Limited Partnership Lp Buck Mountain Ranch Limited Partnership Lp Buck Mountain Ranch Limited Partnership Lp Buck Mountain Ranch Limited Partnership Lp Buck Mountain Ranch Limited Partnership Lp Buck Mountain Ranch Limited Partnership Lp Bukovsky Martin EJ & Mellie A Bukovsky Martin E J & Mellie/Morgan Melinda Bukovsky Martin E J Pt/Bukovsky Mellie A Pt Morgan Melinda Pt Busters Ventures III LLC Co Byrd Michael L C G Metzger Development Co Inc Cr Cerstelotte Eddy Mertens Celestine M C Chapman Dallas G Chissie Michael & Elizabeth A Christie Kevin L Cleaves Cameron L/ McMonigal Mark/Streichsbier Cathy Jo/Millard Esteban S & Nellie Cloninger Heidi L Coastal Covers II Inc Coastal Covers II Inc Colegrove Everett Const Colegrove Everett H & Marjorie H Conlee May B Cook Cassandra M Cook David L Suc Tr Cordero Richard K/Cordero Steven R Cordova Gilbert & Genevieve Cortazar James/Bejarano Basty/ Cortazar Vincent/ Cruz Brenda Crews Calvin F/Crews Robert L/ Crews John T/ Crews William C CS Paradiso Holdings LLC Co CS Paradiso Holdings LLC Co CS Paradiso Holdings LLC Co Cue E V LLC Cue E V LLC Cue IV LLC Cue IV LLC Cue IV LLC Cue IV LLC Cue IV LLC Curran Elizabeth D’Adami Caitlin Day Lindsay & Rebecca Dean Paul Dick Eugene F & Bonnie S Dillard Jeffrey Dixon Shannon & Ashley Dodd Jesse Dorvall Rocky L & Judy A Eanni Jo E Eanni Joemma Eckart Robert K Eckart Robert K Egan Athena L Ehrhardt Brent & Kelly Eib Gerald R Enzenbacher Dennis J Fair Anthony Fielder Dale V & Carol J Fink Maureen Floria-Gale Beth E Flower Robert A Floyd Randall C & Pamela A Forsberg Ruby C Foster Nicholas S Tr Foxy Avenue Clips Inc Foyster Barry F Um Rem/ Foyster Brian F LE Fredlund Cissie G Freitas Michael & Lynnette/ Gill Denise Fulton Ronald & Lilly Carolyn F Funesto Lamberto & Georgia Gabinay Elmer H & Angelynne S Gale Beth Gale Beth

Amount to redeem $20,179.04 $1,815.47 $437.29 $271.67 $341.70 $248.97 $1,832.03 $1,907.50 $1,913.36

Assessor’s Assessment No 006-311-009-000 110-211-036-000 110-211-037-000 215-172-005-000 006-073-028-000

$10,058.07 $3,225.85 $3,010.83 $287.39

214-041-006-000 109-241-018-000 109-311-047-000 110-151-014-000 110-181-017-000 110-211-032-000 204-291-011-000 109-171-017-000 534-193-007-000 021-117-009-000 111-112-006-000 002-231-003-000 109-261-031-000 514-021-008-000 109-362-028-000 025-074-002-000 401-011-020-000 401-021-028-000 033-011-018-000 033-011-019-000 033-311-005-000 214-253-002-000 214-254-002-000 300-041-014-000 095-081-022-000 302-071-090-000 111-241-051-000 011-183-012-000 081-021-001-000 110-121-007-000 216-133-010-000 014-252-004-000 109-292-050-000 109-292-051-000 215-202-015-000 315-262-003-000 315-271-008-000 016-222-011-000 203-382-012-000 316-191-017-000 109-331-029-000 016-172-003-000 515-121-045-000 215-241-044-000 212-162-015-000 040-174-027-000 013-152-041-000 021-281-005-000 534-182-017-000

$576.03 $4,287.98 $3,616.73 $12,700.20 $6,384.97 $3,589.62 $20,558.42 $246.33 $1,518.35 $2,074.23 $1,897.24 $724.27 $1,471.70 $4,334.58 $4,272.86 $1,861.42 $2,253.24 $1,786.05 $2,188.31 $8,286.32 $4,034.39 $1,146.20 $711.81 $391.73 $4,273.64 $5,687.58 $2,404.40 $1,900.98 $4,588.00 $1,399.59 $3,067.29 $7,186.11 $17,122.86 $3,639.10 $2,851.57 $4,461.93 $2,966.50 $6,890.25 $4,860.77 $3,378.15 $13,121.01 $3,734.55 $4,712.00 $24,671.78 $406.45 $1,816.13 $8,209.02 $143.25 $6,047.23 $1,768.46 $1,570.93 $6,277.75 $380.35 $2,882.03 $880.42 $1,910.13 $963.00 $3,711.69 $359.95 $9,261.26

108-133-014-000 003-131-017-000 205-011-001-000

004-105-015-000 053-212-003-000 503-381-005-000 100-141-003-000 110-291-007-000 111-241-033-000 525-261-007-000 221-221-014-000 221-221-019-000 221-211-027-000 307-121-054-000 208-321-003-000 208-321-004-000 208-321-006-000 204-381-029-000 109-192-041-000 077-163-015-000 529-032-030-000

Assessee’s Name Gauvaln Gwendolyn D Gibbs Benjamin E S & Carpenter Seth O Gibbs Benjamin E S & Carpenter Seth O Glover David Gomez Ana M & Lyda Kathee/ FDR Family Living TR FBO/ L&M Family Living TR FBO Gray Terry L Gregg Kenneth W & Trudy L Haberstock Craig R & Haberstock Raymond G & Annette A Hagler Arlo/Hagler Angela M/ Hagler George S Haifa Iyad A Hakimzadeh Debora Hakimzadeh Debora Hakimzadeh Debora Hakimzadeh Debora Hall Roger D & Peggy L Hargrove Wade Hart Lani A & Kelley Richard N Heath Cheryl Hirst William L Jr Hollenbeck Shelley M Holmes Leslie J Hopkins Kathryn & Lyall Pamela J Hudson Carolyn K Tr Hudson Diana L Humboldt Sunshine Inc Cr Humboldt Sunshine Inc Cr Hurd Pearl Hurd Pearl Hurd Pearl Ingram Debrielle J Ingram Debrielle J Jacobsen Michael R & Darlene H Jenkins Danielle Johnson Betty L Tr Joseph Laurie A Joyce Sandra Keener Jill Kelly Monica Kercher Sterling & Sandra / Caballero Kevin R Kessler Richard Tr/Parent Andrew FBO King Donald J & Sandra J King Donald J & Sandra J Kinser Jess Sr & Marjorie B/Kinser Jess B Jr Living Trust Klein Richard M Klein Richard M Kneaper Mark A & Linnea M Tr Knight Barry W Suc Tr Koehler Drew T Koehler Richard D III Kroemer Andreas Lacourt Anne G Lander Mark Layman John E Leonardo Tony & Janice Leslie Paul & Heidi Levine Zachary Lincoln Charlene A/Abbott Clyde W/Abbott Aaron L/ Abbott Charles W Jr Lopez Roberto Lu Tian Y Lund-Valdez Lisa Tr Machado Ron A Malinowski William W Manares Antonio C & Medelita O Marshall Jacquelyne J McCrady Susan O McCrady Susan O McCrady Susan O McGuiness Robert & Chomicki-McGuiness Jewel McGuiness Robert G McGuiness Robert G McGuiness Robert G McKay Peter H & Sandra L McLean John Meacham Steven L & Nancy J Tr Meade Dennis

Amount to redeem $2,000.43 $1,838.64 $1,838.64 $6,896.92 $14,454.12 $10,481.85 $13,254.27 $10,433.86 $2,887.75 $2,201.68 $2,057.18 $1,928.75 $2,108.56 $1,706.59 $2,504.35 $2,225.82 $9,273.10 $2,970.67 $1,774.73 $6,602.91 $2,103.65 $253.95 $1,499.82 $23,621.20 $2,952.08 $5,289.28 $1,113.72 $1,804.95 $1,794.41 $3,166.04 $1,640.79 $2,766.87 $1,563.06 $516.70 $3,013.20 $612.21 $1,652.52 $2,671.46 $2,968.62 $6,162.74 $1,981.46 $2,525.62 $1,809.92 $887.94 $375.56 $30,954.19 $7,330.59 $14,348.43 $1,401.01 $4,053.74 $7,301.59 $3,780.35 $2,079.64 $6,380.37 $6,728.37 $10,277.96 $1,557.18 $7,122.05 $77.15 $6,279.82 $14,483.42 $14,468.88 $3,820.22 $1,258.74 $1,083.56 $2,375.10 $5,716.69 $29,035.74 $3,414.92 $4,830.90 $4,622.16 $12,395.25 $1,369.41 $4,553.99 $3,051.10


Assessor’s Assessment No 109-101-021-000 217-381-014-000 511-342-004-000 505-322-001-000 109-071-002-000 209-152-002-000 109-211-013-000 306-111-007-000 105-162-003-000 306-292-004-000 009-133-008-000 109-341-022-000 005-022-007-000 310-082-001-000 310-083-003-000 310-083-006-000 310-084-001-000 310-084-002-000 309-161-002-000 310-051-009-000 109-241-041-000 208-231-003-000 217-251-003-000 522-511-013-000 509-132-004-000 306-102-011-000 109-281-006-000 301-082-055-000 508-331-010-000 108-132-020-000 223-231-004-000 031-151-006-000 108-022-002-000 108-064-006-000 509-162-023-000 109-341-027-000 109-141-022-000 201-112-005-000 203-051-039-000 203-051-044-000 110-291-024-000 110-151-005-000 309-221-003-000 309-221-005-000 211-363-007-000 211-371-009-000 309-151-002-000 309-161-001-000 310-011-003-000 508-242-011-000 109-182-041-000 522-121-015-000 111-052-050-000 109-061-012-000 109-061-014-000 110-281-023-000 221-061-032-000 104-191-005-000 516-131-018-000 109-051-002-000 033-140-005-000 530-081-012-000 223-072-002-000 010-281-024-000 017-012-017-000 001-102-005-000 031-192-013-000 008-144-017-000 215-181-015-000 215-181-019-000 106-111-012-000 108-221-004-000 306-026-011-000 204-312-003-000

Assessee’s Name Miers Robert E Milligan William J Montgomery Roger Moreno Pixie W R Morrison Peter Mosolf Terence & Dalton Elizabeth J Munro Raymond Nasca Phillip R Neikirk Jonathan O Nelson Donald O Nelson Raymond S & Holly L Nguyen Anh & Dinh Niekrasz-Laurent Virginia L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Oblena Leolin D Oliver David III Oliver Jessi ONeill William J Tr Pallin Manuel A & Irene Parker Mildred A Parrish Bishop P 3rd Parsons Thomas & Machado Ashley Pergens Andre L F & Karen B Pergens Karen B Pergens Karen B Perkins Kim Peterson Maurice Jr Peterson Maurice Jr Phillips Melissa E Pirzadeh Dara Porreca Paul V Premo Francine Etal/Premo Diana/Premo Cheryl J/ Premo Cyndi L/Premo Marchelle/ Premo Marlena A R & T Black Development Pt R & T Black Development Pt/ Gess Cathy L & Jerry J/ Poletski Richard A & Dama Rezapour Gassem Rezapour Gassem & Arellano-Raith Jennie V Rice Joe & Jill Rice Joe & Jill Rice Joe C & Jill R Rice Joe C & Jill R Rice Joe C & Jill R Rice Joe C & Jill R Rice Joe C & Jill R Riley Patricia/Ohanen Patricia J Rillamas Carl D & Brenda A Rinesmith Myrna S/Snyder Gladys M Roberts Lynn E Roberts Lynn E & Sylvia A Roberts Lynn E & Sylvia A Roberts Mike Roediger Tim R Rose Coreen K Roth Padre & Carrie Sakata Michael D Tr/ Sakata Mildred M Tr Sanders Joshua W Sanderson Roger/Frye-Free Vina Adkins Patricia/ Knight Rachel/ Henderson Lauretta/Frye Muriel Carlson Margaret/Martin Donna Frye(Hunsucker) Patricia Santaella Sherri L Schrack Heidi A Scott John Security National Offices LLC Shaha Gregory Shelley Tim E & Connie J Shiningstar Tara Shiningstar Tara Shultz Calvin C & Smith Lori A Co Tr Smalley Gene H/Smalley Steven P/Doyle Sandra C Smith Shawlyn E/Flannery Richard A Spears Therese L

Amount to redeem $1,719.13 $2,421.27 $1,907.42 $1,552.40 $1,196.21 $4,039.54 $2,005.36 $2,095.95 $1,572.99 $2,411.41 $6,447.10 $2,011.00 $1,667.82 $278.92 $185.34 $332.60 $303.13 $303.13 $5,235.58 $2,115.60 $3,503.01 $5,282.99 $4,946.35 $19,346.60 $2,451.06 $765.45 $1,708.38 $1,758.44 $4,721.96 $15,658.19 $11,092.80 $5,254.54 $5,853.14 $377.37 $4,410.07 $2,244.32 $2,635.11 $2,414.87 $4,814.81 $4,486.66 $2,429.05 $2,246.46 $781.07 $108.66 $381.94 $11,455.96 $354.48 $237.18 $2,551.88 $3,993.10 $2,389.69 $3,955.64 $6,039.51 $2,013.20 $2,013.20 $2,562.97 $2,984.97 $12,256.83 $12,661.29 $1,810.43 $9,872.72 $584.89 $12,017.14 $21,323.88 $6,256.87 $9,987.74 $84.70 $239.42 $3,071.07 $11,562.90 $10,536.97 $21,698.65 $11,273.22 $2,918.57

Assessor’s Assessment No 002-063-005-000 001-066-002-000 001-066-003-000 005-053-006-000 305-271-007-000 111-112-013-000 111-161-014-000 111-161-049-000 004-233-010-000 004-233-011-000 006-312-008-000 221-091-021-000 025-091-020-000 008-143-015-000 200-083-010-000 006-073-007-000 010-281-027-000 010-281-029-000 033-170-026-000 002-132-008-000 221-181-028-000 205-031-061-000 205-071-039-000 109-193-011-000 210-191-011-000 021-263-002-000 004-144-011-000 511-182-006-000 109-131-048-000 510-101-065-000 216-252-003-000 216-261-058-000 216-252-001-000 216-252-004-000 216-271-020-000 109-211-017-000 305-101-020-000

Assessee’s Name Squires Floyd E III & Betty J Squires Floyd E III & Betty J Squires Floyd E III & Betty J Squires Floyd E III & Betty J St John Lisa D Stack Paul W & Elenita Stanley Carwin T Stanley Carwin T Stevens James & Margaret Stevens James & Margaret Stevens Lois A Stone Alishia & Leach Joseph W B Supko Eugene N Thomas Corinne E Tr Tillinghast Michael A & Jill A/ Tillinghast Eric T Tomlinson Glennda F Tornroth Genevieve M & Cedeno Betty A Tornroth Genevieve M & Cedeno Betty A Trabue Trevor United Property Holdings LLC United States Of America United States Of America Pl United States Of America Pl Valerio Kevin Vance Robert Webster Terry L & Brenda S White Jennefer L A & Horridge Jarod W Williams Greg & Rust Garry Williamson Peter Woodard Karon Wyatt Dale & Venus Wyatt Dale L & Venus Wyatt Dale Wyatt Dale Wyatt Echo K Zandi Abrahim Zeck Kristen M

Amount to redeem $6,908.23 $9,241.04 $2,235.58 $11,625.00 $11,034.40 $3,810.43 $1,297.45 $1,681.92 $13,524.02 $9,448.44 $2,554.03 $7,107.39 $5,491.48 $3,111.62 $4,964.10 $968.08 $3,047.95 $2,867.44 $15,067.76 $184,406.22 $7,050.84 $16,859.07 $26,708.23 $3,122.62 $3,352.43 $1,276.49 $2,110.47 $4,862.28 $2,052.61 $21,604.23 $1,038.81 $3,253.93 $1,878.66 $1,473.41 $11,439.43 $1,870.38 $868.25

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on August 24, 2012. Published in the North Coast Journal on August 30th, September 6th, and September 13th, 2012. 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-244)

continued from page 37. County Records. EXCEPTING therefrom Lot 1 of Tract No. 617, Silver Creek Estates Subdivision as per Map recorded in Book 24 of Maps, Pages 102, 103, and 104 Humboldt County Records, as released by partial Reconveyance recorded March 22, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-5928-3, Humboldt County Records. ALSO EXCEPTING therefrom Lot 8 of Tract No. 617, Silver Creek Estates Subdivision as per Map recorded in Book 24 of Maps, Pages 102, 103, and 104, Humboldt County Records, as released by Partial Reconveyance recorded March 22, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-5931-3, Humboldt County Records.

The sale will be made without covenant or warranty regarding title, possession, or encumbrances to satisfy the obligations secured by and pursuant to the power of sale conferred in that certain deed of trust dated August 17, 2007, executed by PACIFIC SUNSET DEVELOPMENT, LLC, A California Limited Liability Company, as Trustor, in which Russell C. Hawkins and Helen K. Hawkins, husband and wife, as Joint Tenants as to an undivided 50% interest; Terry Ronald Lindblad and Deborah Annette Lindblad, husband and wife, as Joint Tenants as to an undivided 20% interest, Joaquin Cruz, a married man as his sole and separate property as to an undivided 10% interest Peter Brousseau, Surviving Trustee of the Peter Brousseau Family Trust dated May 14, 1993 as to an undivided 10% interest and Lorale Tollett, an unmarried woman as to an undivided 10% interest,

are named as Beneficiaries and Alliance Title Company, a California Corporation is named as Trustee, and recorded on August 27, 2007, as Instrument Number 2007-25452-4, Offical Records of Humboldt County, California. A Notice of Default, containing an election to sell the described real property under the above Deed of Trust was recorded on March 19, 2012 as Instrument No. 2012-6869-13, Official Records of Humboldt County, California. The following amounts represent the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above-described property to be sold and the estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of the time and of the initial publication of this notice of sale: Unpaid balance of obligation:     $747,940.00 Unpaid Interest                          94,500.00 Unpaid and Defaulted Taxes       17,517.80 Costs:                                      1370.66 Attorney’s Fees:                        1934.93                                                                      ============= TOTAL AMOUNT:                     $863,263.39 The undersigned was appointed and substituted as Trustee under the above Deed of Trust by a substitution dated 12/8/2011 and recorded on March 19, 2012 as Instrument No. 2012-6868-10, Official Records of Humboldt County, California. This notice is given in compliance with a written request made to the Trustee by the Beneficiary. Dated: August 7, 2012 /s JAMES E. REED, Trustee  STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SHASTA On this 7th day of August 2012, before me, JOANN LOUISE MOORE, Notary Public, personally appeared JAMES E. REED, who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same in his authorized capacity, and that by his signature on the instrument the person executed the instrument.  I certify under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct.   WITNESS my hand and official seal. s/Joann Louise Moore, Comm. #1832590 NOTARY PUBLICCalifornia Shasta County Filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 27, 2012. 2012-021691-4 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-248)

AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE This Notice Amends the NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE recorded on August 3, 2012 as Document No: 2012-020193-3, Official Records of Humboldt County. This Amendment is done to correct the sale date.

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED APRIL 4, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that on September 21, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. on the front steps of the Humboldt County Superior Court, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, James E. Reed, Trustee, whose street address is 43130 Highway 299E, Fall River Mills, California 96028, and whose telephone number is (530) 336-5050, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, the real property described below. The real property is located in the town of McKinleyville, California, County of Humboldt, State of California. It is commonly described as 1640 Rosebud Lane, McKinleyville, California 95519. The county assessor’s parcel number for the property is: 509-240-043-000. The following is the legal description of the property: LEGAL DESCRIPTION ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT “A” DESCRIPTION That real property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California, described as follows: PARCEL ONE: Parcel 2 of Parcel Map No. 3366 as per Map recorded in Book 32, Pages 70 and 71 of Parcel Maps, Humboldt County Records. PARCEL TWO: A non-exclusive easement for ingress, egress and public utility purposes over, under and across those portions of Parcels 1 and 3 of said Parcel Map No. 3366 which lie within Parcel “F”, (Rosebud Lane). PARCEL THREE: A non-exclusive easement for storm drainage purposes over, under and across those portions of Parcels 1 and 3 of said Parcel Map No. 3366 lying within Parcel “E” as shown on said Parcel Map No. 3366. PARCEL FOUR: A non-exclusive easement for pedestrian access purposes over and across that portion of Parcel 1 of said Parcel Map No. 3366 lying within Parcel “G” as shown on said Parcel Map No. 3366. The sale will be made without covenant or warranty regarding title, possession, or encumbrances to satisfy the obligations secured by and pursuant to the power of sale conferred in that certain deed of trust dated April 4, 2006, executed by PACIFIC SUNSET DEVELOPMENT, LLC, A California Limited Liability Company, as Trustor, in which JESSIE J. SMITH, an unmarried man as to an undivided 30% interest; JAMES L. REAMS and JUDITH REAMS, husband and wife, as Joint Tenants, as to an undivided 30% interest; FRANK BROWN and ANN BROWN, as Trustees of The Brown Family Trust, Dated 5/28/2004 as to an undivided 15% interest and MYRLE

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

39


continued from previous page.

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00475

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

1. 17th century Spanish playwright Pedro Calderon de la ____ 6. Gossip 10. Christmas verse starter 14. Not ____ in the world 15. Kitchen drawer? 16. Tirade 17. Island near Java 18. Question after “Hello” 20. Emphatic denial 22. It holds water 23. Stimulus response 25. Org. making grants to museums

DOWN

1. Hand-dyed fabric 2. Like grapefruit juice 3. Quimby in Beverly Cleary books 4. Witchy women 5. Dirigible, e.g. 6. “I am an idiot!” 7. Fan club focus 8. Ravenclaw who cofounded Hogwarts School 9. Journey 10. Hammock support 11. Method 12. Diciembre ends it 13. “Rugrats” dad 19. Down-to-earth 21. NYU’s ____ School for the Arts

26. Sch. founded “in the fires of evangelism” 29. Spoils 32. Trouble spots? 33. It gets hammered 34. “Dover Beach” poet 40. “Eso ____” (Paul Anka hit) 41. Creepy-sounding lake name? 42. Famous ‘60s phrase that endorses solving 29- and 56-Across but frowns upon solving 18- and 34-Across 49. OED entries 50. Suffix with suburban

51. Moves gradually closer 53. Childish giggle 55. Absorbs the loss 56. Tree native to the U.S. southwest 60. Ammonia compound 61. Swear 62. Philosopher Descartes 63. Brown-____ 64. It may be manicured 65. Its state sport is rodeo: Abbr. 66. Veep Agnew

24. Not mad 26. Ellipsoidal 27. Harry of the Senate 28. WWW address 30. Bird also called a flycatcher 31. Yoko from Tokyo 34. Honey drink 35. Makes inquiries 36. Sock part 37. Obama education secretary Duncan 38. ____ Janeiro 39. Profits 40. Mercedes rival 43. Actor Schreiber 44. “Do unto ____ ...” 45. Didn’t go straight

46. Swabber 47. Birthplace of St. Francis 48. Spoiler 52. Wing: Prefix 53. Word with ghost or boom 54. Bart’s teacher 56. Friend 57. Actress Gardner 58. Dispirited 59. Cry of surprise

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

MEDIUM #6

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

LEMA and PEGGY LEMA, Trustees of the Lema Family Trust, Dated July 28, 1992 as to an undivided 25% interest, are named as Beneficiaries and Alliance Title Company, a California corporation is named as Trustee, and recorded on April 27, 2006, as instrument Number 2006-12354-4, Official Records of Humboldt County, California. A Notice of Default, containing an election to sell the described real property under the above Deed of Trust was recorded on January 30, 2012 as Instrument No. 2012-2289-7, Official Records of Humboldt County, California. The following amounts represent the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the above-described property to be sold and the estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of the time and of the initial publication of this notice of sale: Unpaid balance of obligation:     $385,000.00 Unpaid Interest                          53,900.00 Unpaid and Defaulted Taxes        29,567.89 Costs:                                       1028.66 Attorney’s Fees:                         1340.00                                                                            ============= TOTAL AMOUNT:       $470,836-55 The undersigned was appointed and substituted as Trustee under the above Deed of Trust by a substitution recorded on January 30, 2012 as Instrument No. 2012-2288-6, Official Records of Humboldt County, California. This notice is given in compliance with a written request made to the Trustee by the Beneficiary. Dated: August 7, 2012 /s JAMES E. REED, Trustee  STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SHASTA On this 7th day of August 2012, before me, JOANN LOUISE MOORE, Notary Public, personally appeared JAMES E. REED, who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he executed the same in his authorized capacity, and that by his signature on the instrument the person executed the instrument.  I certify under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct.   WITNESS my hand and official seal. s/Joann Louise Moore, Comm. #1832590 NOTARY PUBLIC-California Shasta County Filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 27, 2012. 2012-021692-4 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-247)

SUMMONS

CASE NUMBER: DR120197 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ROLAND BRAY YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: DALILA MORALES-JACOBS, AND ERIC JACOBS Notice! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and cost on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. SUPERIOR COURT OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 825 5TH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF JAMES A. ZITO, ESQ., SB 96272 LAW OFFICE OF JAMES A. ZITO 611 L STREET, SUITE A EUREKA, CA 95501 707-269-0743 Dated: March 28, 2012 Clerk, by Jodie W., Deputy NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant Filed: March 28, 2012, Superior Court of Humboldt County, California 8/30, 9/6, 9/13, 9/20/2012 (12-242)

The following person is doing business BUCK MOUNTAIN EXPERIMENTAL STATION at 5136 Burr Valley Rd., Bridgeville, CA 95526 Melinda Stone 5136 Burr Valley Rd Bridgeville, CA. 95526 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s/ Melinda Stone This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 9, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/30, 9/6, 9/13, 9/20/2012 (12-243)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00487

The following persons are doing business as THROWTEC at 1715 Stromberg Ave., Arcata, CA 95521. Edward Harvey 3455 Zelia Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 David Sinclair 1715 Stromberg Ave. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/14/2012. /s Edward Harvey. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/30, 9/6, 9/13, 9/20/2012 (12-241)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00497

The following person is doing business as I-DETAIL 101 at 448 Wildwood Ave., Rio Dell, CA 95562. Daniel J. Cardarelli 448 Wildwood Ave. Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/17/12. /s Daniel J. Cardarelli. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 17, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/30, 9/6, 9/13, 9/20/2012 (12-245)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00465

The following person is doing business REDWOOD MUSIKGARTEN at 1735 Mygina Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519 Anna Pinsky 1735 Mygina Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 6/1/2012. /s/ Anna Pinsky This statement was filed with the


County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 6, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-238)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00490

The following persons are doing business as PACIFIC MOTORSPORTS at 4001Broadway, Eureka, CA 95503                                                                                                                 Schneider Pacific Motorsports, Inc. 4001 Broadway Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Veronica Sargent- Vice President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-235)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00492

The following person is doing business as BAYSIDE SCHOOLHOUSE at 2051 Old Arcata Road, Bayside, CA 95524                                                                                                   Scarlet Ibis 2051 Old Arcata Rd Bayside, CA. 95524                                                                                                                The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/14/2012. /s/ Scarlet Ibis This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-236)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00473

The following person is doing business as CENTER FOR REFLEXOLOGY & INTUITIVE HEALING ARTS at 920 Samoa Blvd., #222, Arcata, CA 95521. Alexandra L. Seymour 1860 11th St., Apt. A Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 10/01/2002. /s Alexandra L. Seymour. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 8, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/16, 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-230)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00478

The following person is doing business as CROSSFIT EUREKA at 3134 Jacobs Ave., Ste. B, Eureka, CA 95501. Meredith L. Launius P.O. Box 454 Eureka, CA 95502                                                                                                                   3134 Jacobs Ave., Ste. B                             Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Meredith L. Launius. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 10, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/16, 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-232)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00440

The following person is doing business as MOUNTAINWISE FARMS at 3070 Pigeon Point Rd., Eureka, CA 95503. Sara Bleser 3070 Pigeon Point Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/25/12. /s Sara Bleser. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-228)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00442

The following persons are doing business as COAST COUNTIES PETERBILT at 2660 Jacobs Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 757, San Jose, CA 95106. Coast Counties Truck & Equipment Co. 1740 N 4th Street San Jose, CA 95112 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/12. /s Allison Dozier, Secretary-Treasurer. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 26, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-222)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00455

The following person is doing business as kemeleon ink at 2041 N Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Kay Elizabeth McCutcheon 2041 N Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/30/2012. /s Kay McCutcheon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 31, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-225)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00458

The following person is doing

business as KALEIDOSCOPE VISUAL DESIGNS at 885 K St., Apt. B, Arcata, CA 95521, 2351 Sherri Ct., Arcata, CA 95521. Isaac Steel Winans 885 K St., Apt. B Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Isaac Steel Winans. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 1, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-224)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00461

The following person is doing business as HUMBOLDT GLASSBLOWERS at 214 E Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Jasmine Granat 5038 South Quarry Rd. Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/2/07. /s Jasmine Granat. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 2, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-226)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00464

The following person is doing business as COASTAL CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING at 1479 Terrace Ln., #3, McKinleyville, CA 95519, P.O. Box 2982, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Craig A. Brown 1479 Terrace Ln., #3 McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Craig. A Brown. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 6, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-229)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120501 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: MOLLY MC HENRY BERRY TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: MOLLY MC HENRY BERRY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MOLLY MARY MC HENRY BERRY to Proposed Name MOLLY MC HENRY BERRY

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 21, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: August 6, 2012 Filed: August 6, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-240)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120502 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: PATRICIA LAI FOR KLAUS ARIEL LAI-LEVY (MINOR) TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: PATRICIA LAI for a decree changing names as follows: Present name KLAUS ARIEL LAI-LEVY to Proposed Name KLAUS ARIEL LAI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 1, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: August 7, 2012 Filed: August 8, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 8/16, 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-231)

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF STEPHEN L. GAN CASE NO. PR120197

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEPHEN L. GAN, STEPHEN LEANDER GAN, STEPHEN GAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JOHN PAUL GAN in the Superior Court of California, County

of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JOHN PAUL GAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on September 13, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE S.B.# 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-234)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CRYSTAL C. GREENWELL, AKA CRYSTAL WATT CASE NO. PR120198

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CRYSTAL C. GREENWELL, aka CRYSTAL WATT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by KATHERINE ROSE MARTIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that KATHERINE ROSE MARTIN be appointed as personal representa-

tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on September 13, 2012, at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES R. STOCKS S.B. # 67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 882-1771 AUGUST 13, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-237)

Curious about legal advertising? 442-1400

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012

41


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

Employment

Store Pricer

County of Humboldt

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER I

$2,632– $3,378 mo. plus excellent benefits EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY TRAINING PROVIDED

The County of Humboldt is now accepting applications for Correctional Officers I with the Humboldt County Correctional Facility. On the job and classroom training will be provided. We are seeking career minded men and women willing to commit to our agency. Must pass a detailed background investigation and be available to work all shifts. Apply by September 13, 2012. Apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs or contact Humboldt County Human Resources Department (707) 476-2349 Humboldt County Courthouse 825 Fifth St., Eureka AA/EOE

County of Humboldt

REVENUE RECOVERY OFFICER I

$2,394– $3,072 monthly, plus excellent benefits, including 2.0 @ 55 PERS retirement plan. Under general supervision, investigate and pursue the collection of current and delinquent accounts involving revenues due to the County. Requires skill and experience in gathering information, evaluating data, drawing valid conclusions, developing collection strategies, and the ability to work effectively with a computerized tracking and record keeping system. Filing deadline: September 10, 2012. Application materials available at Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka or apply on-line at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

Police ServiceS officer City of EurEka

Medical Assistant • Housekeeping Manager Office Technology Sales • Warehouse/Class B Driver Exec. Director, NPO • Collections Specialist Electrician • Legal Assistant/ Paralegal Licensed Commercial Lines Producer

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

RESOURCE SPECIALIST - EUREKA OFFICE. Senior Information and Assistance Program. Part-time position (17.5 hours/week) located in Eureka. Duties: provide information, referral, advocacy and follow up to older persons, their caregivers and service providers by phone, walk-in and written request, enter all client information into database, and provide outreach presentations and long-term care consultation. Must have excellent written and oral communication skills. Demonstrate an ability to analyze problems and present options. Must have strong skills in office management, priority setting and time management. Knowledge of senior and caregiver support programs and services desired. Degree with major course work in social work or psychology and one year of related experience in a community planning, health or human services agency is preferred. Equivalent experience in a directservice position in a community planning, health or human service agency may be considered in lieu of a degree. For an application and job description contact: The Area 1 Agency on Aging, 434 7th St., Eureka. For information call Jeanie Ren at 442-3763 ext. 209. Position opened until filled. (E-0830)

$2,767 - $3,366/month

PART-TIME POSITIONS

for a complete application packet, (1) contact our Personnel Department at 531 k Street, Eureka, Ca (2) call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request that one be mailed to you, or (3) apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. We will be accepting applications until 5:00p.m. on friday, august 31, 2012. EoE.

Become a Mentor! Seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead an integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and receive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew (707) 442-4500 ext. 14 317 Third St. Eureka, CA 95501

42 North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Maintain pricing and inventory hardware, software, and structure. Focus on cost and accurate retail prices. Maintain ordering and receiving records. This job is 20 hours a week and weekend availability is a must. Please turn in applications at either store location. $10-$15.50 per hr depending on experience. Applications available at www.northcoastco-op.com

ZUMBA ON THE WATERFRONT! Adorni Center, the City of Eureka’s primary recreation facility, is looking for self-motivated, enthusiastic Zumba Fitness Instructors. Enjoy a positive, team-oriented work environment. Flexible hours. Must provide proof of current ZUMBA certification. $14.70-$17.90/hr. Email: Mo at mmerrell@ci.eureka. ca.gov or call 441-4374. (E-0830) ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN) (E-1115) EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists. For: Ads TV Film Fashion. Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool. com (E-0830)

SERVICE COORDINATOR (CASE MGR). 1 FT position: Crescent City, CA. Advocating for Children and Adults w/dev disabilities. MA or BA + relevant exp. Good communication, organization & computer skills. Salary range $2749 to $3868/ month. + exc. bene. Go to website www.redwoodcoastrc.org for info and docs. Closes 9-4-12 at 5 p.m. EOE-M/F. (E-0830) DRAFTING TECHNICIAN II/GIS SPECIALIST (JOB #12-59). F/T position at Humboldt State University. Review: 8/30/12. For more info visit: www.humboldt.edu/jobs or call (707) 826-3626. HSU is an ADA/ Title IX/EOE (E-0830) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (E-0920)

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO

there are 5 steps in the salary range and an appointment can be made at any step depending on qualifications. this position performs a wide variety of non-sworn duties in order to provide support to patrol units and community members. a combination of education and experience equivalent to an associate's Degree in Criminal Justice or a closely related field and two years of related administrative support is desired. this position may be assigned evening and/or weekend shifts. interested?

AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2423214. (E-0830) GET PAID TO GO ON FIELD TRIPS WITH HUMBOLDT STATE! Humboldt State University is looking for experienced bus drivers with least a class B license with passenger and air brake endorsements, and 2 years of bus driving experience with a clean driving record. Is an on-call, intermittent position with flexible hours and excellent pay ($18.37/hr). Drive times and locations vary depending on academic and extra-curricular field trip schedules. Drivers are subject to pre-employment and random drug screenings. For more information, go to www.humboldt. edu/jobs or call (707) 826-3626 and reference Job #11-12 (E-0830) TAP & JAZZ INSTRUCTOR. 4421939. (E-0906)

- Eureka Location -

2 - Deli Valet Janitorial Security Officer Shuttle Driver

FULL-TIME POSITIONS

Surveillance Technician SEASCAPE, PART-TIME POSITIONS

Cook Host/Hostess Dish/Bus

Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

Full-Time Positions MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK 1 - Willow Creek, 1- McKinleyville MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST, McKinleyville MEDICAL BILLER, Arcata RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, Crescent City REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT, Eureka MEDICAL ASSISTANT 2 - Arcata , 1- McKinleyville & 1- Willow Creek REGISTERED NURSE, Arcata BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

(Requires LCSW or Licensed Psychologist), Arcata

Part-Time Positions DRUG AND ALCOHOL COUNSELOR, Crescent City Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application Call 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information


Rentals

Employment

Real Estate HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Admin Assistant F/C Bookkeeper Welder • Receptionist Loan Collections • Laborers Cooks • Insurance Agent

Executive Director

Humboldt Redwoods Interpretive Association 36 Hrs. per wk, $12.75 hr. Operation and interpretation of redwoods at Humboldt Redwoods Interpretive Association’s Visitor’s Center. (VC) near Burlington Campground. Responsibilities include: financial operations, payroll, daily intake, daily visitors count, volunteer schedule and hours. Also yearly budget, annual reports, preparing monthly reports and agendas for HRIA Board Meetings and Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) Staff. Position responsible for Interpretation at VC and training VC volunteers. Works closely with HRIA Board, DPR and volunteers, leads Nature Walks for tour groups. Also develops and maintains center exhibits, gathering both natural history and historical information. Successful candidates demonstrate knowledge of computers, budgeting, interpretation, and excellent communication skills working with a diverse group. Knowledge of redwood ecology and willingness to learn are desired qualities. Candidates interested in position please submit letter of interest, resume, and three reference letters to: HRIA P.O. Box 263, Weott, CA 95540 ATTN: Susan O’Hara, HRIA Board President Deadline September 14. Electronically submitted applications to vc@humboldtredwoods Interviews on September 22.

BILINGUAL CLIENT ADVOCATE. North Coast Rape Crisis Team has opening for a 40+ hr/wk Bilingual (Spanish/English) Client Advocate w/excellent benefits for a team oriented, self-motivated person who wants to provide in-person and phone support to survivors of sexual assault. Call 443-2737 for info. EOE (E-0830) ADVERTISING CAREER. Secure clients over the phone, high commission possible with hourly wage, easy hours, amazing coworkers, experience not required. Arcata marketing company, 7+ years in business, (707) 822-1812. (E-0830) BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. theworkhub.net (E-0927)

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

Rentals ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Some utilities paid, parking, available Mid-Sept. $615, (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R0830) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carpet, washer/dryer hook-ups, parking. $950, (707) 443-4357 www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-0830) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, washer/dryer hookups, yard. $1375 (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0830)

LIVE AMONG THE ELK & THE REDWOODS FOR LESS • PRIVATE FISHING LAKE • Clean bathrooms, free hot showers • Full hookups, laundromat • Campfires allowed • 2 Well behaved pets OK • Dry Lagoon Beach & market nearby • $400/mo. plus electricity • RETIREES, HSU STUDENTS, FULLTIMERS WELCOME

• Must have RV on trailer Call 707-488-2181 or write bobmccormick@etahoe.com for details

EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. All utilities paid. $600. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0830) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM DUPLEX. Yard, onsite laundry, parking. $750. (707) 443-8227, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-0830) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, yard, washer/dryer hookups. $1300. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0830) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Laundry facilities, some utilities, $750. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0830) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, laundry hookups, woodstove, $1300. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0830) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carport, onsite laundry, some utilities. $750. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0830) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1400. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com. (R0830) EUREKA UPSTAIRS COTTAGE. Garage, coin-op laundry, W/G paid, section 8 OK. No smoking/ grow. $585/month, $600/deposit, references and credit check. Call 725-4676. (R-0912) ARCATA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. New flooring. Very Clean! Shirley Blvd. Sorry, No pets/smoking/215. $1425. 826-7768. (R-0906)

Rental Helpers

Offers the largest listing of homes, apartments, condos and rooms for rent in Humboldt County! 4 Seventh Street, Suite A

(707) 443-HELP TheRentalHelpers.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 44

Humboldt County’s only DRE Licensed Listing Service!

Corner 7 th & A of St.

PRA02054

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA 3BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1536 3rd St., #4. W/S/G paid. SEC 8 OK, Cat OK, Garage. Rent $815, MtM, Vac 9/1. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-0830) FORTUNA 3+BD/3BA HOUSE. 58 Tompkins Hill Rd. Panoramic Views, Pet Considered, MtM, Rent $2200, Vac soon. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0830) ARCATA 1BD & STUDIOS. Available now. Some or all utilities paid, close to buses. Near HSU! Call for more info! 822-4557 or visit www.strombeckprop.com (R-0830) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

Business Rentals RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-0913) SPACIOUS DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. The Studio of Dance Arts in Eureka offers rental space for the performing, creative and visual arts. 2 huge studios, full length mirrors, maple floors and marley. Performance opportunities! Call Jane 442-1939. View the studios at studioofdancearts. com. (BR-0906) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@ hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

RUTH LAKE LEASE LOT. Trailer, Ramada & Bathhouse, Utilities. $72k cash. (707) 574-6549. Broker ann@highway36.com (RE-0830) MOVE TO THE SUNSHINE. 2200 sf., 4 bedroom, 3 bath, Mt. Shasta view, 1.62 acres. Fruit Trees, garden area. Will consider trade in Eureka. $235K. (530) 475-3875 (RE-0830) TRINITY VILLAGE 1.3 ACRES WITH CREEK. 3BD/2BA main house. PLUS: Guest House, Art Studio/Workshop, Pool, Sauna, 2 Car Garage, Amenities Galore. $375,000. Call Gail Packard Realty, Owner/Broker, (530) 629-4181. (RE-0830) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

Buy/Sell/Trade

Weekly specials available on Facebook 3954 Jacobs Ave. Eureka 443-7397

Vintage Clothing Furniture, Housewares & more!

Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www. chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-1025)

Auto 1992 34 FT. AIRSTREAM EXCELLA 1000 TRAVEL TRAILER. Good condition. Lots of extras. Call for pictures. (707) 407-7312. (A-0830) CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (A-1004)

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

THE

CLOTHING DOCK &

K STREET ANNEX

11th & K Streets, Arcata

822-8288

BOOKS & MUSIC 1/2 PRICE. Blue Tagged Clothing 25¢! Aug. 28-Sept. 1. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. Providing Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-0830) GARAGE SALE SAT. & SUN., SEPT. 1-2. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Rockpit Rd., Fieldbrook. Follow the signs. 30 years of accumulated great stuff. (BST-0930) WANTED OLD LIGHTERS. 1 lighter or collection. Any make, working or not. Collector will pay top dollar. Call (800) 379-3415. (BST-0906)

on Page 46

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 30, 2012

43


the Buy/Sell/Trade

Services

Pets

Custom Pet Portraits

Manufactured in Humboldt County

Micronized Compost Tea & MICRO-ORGANICS line Go Green-Tranzition-Blissful Bloom

www.sensational-solutions.com Come on in!

Swains Flat OUtpost Garden Center General Store 707-777-3385

Garden Center 707-777-3513

State Hwy 36 • Milemarker 19.5 • Carlotta • Open 9-6

in ON AT I OC L NEW

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 43

own ld T

O

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017

CAPTURING YOUR DAY

by Sophia Dennler •

IN THE WATER.

For more information and to order

SET UP YOUR SHOOT TODAY:

drewhylandstudio.com/surf

www.sophiadennler.com/pets LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227)

Services

New In Old Town

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

alterations & custom sewing 407-3527 | M-F 11-6 ✂ Sat 11-2 | 621 3rd Street, Eureka 95501

artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945 (AAN CAN) (BST-0830)

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Services

Yard Sale

CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207)

996 1 1th s t.

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

DIRECTV OR DISH NETWORK. LOW INTRODUCTORY RATES. Commitment and Credit/Debit required. LOCAL CALL NOW! 826-0203 (S-0830) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) REACH 5 MILLION. hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http:// www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN) (S-0913)

OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Have an extra fixer up cars in the driveway? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Pets PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

FD1963

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-0906) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) HOUSE CLEANING BY JEANNIE. Residence $15/hour, Move-outs $20/hour. Call 921-9424. References Available. (S-0830) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0830)

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded #3860. Summer Cleaning Special! (707) 444-2001. (S-1011) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-1122) SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227)


body, mind

Music

Community

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1115) ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1108) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-1122) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227)

BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124)

Legal Services Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976 1026 Third Street Eureka

(707) 445-9666

Music

Community CALLING ALL CRAFTERS ! Holiday Craft Bazaar Vendor registration for Eureka Recreation’s 36th Annual Holiday Craft Bazaar has begun! This year’s event will be at the Adorni Center on Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m – 4 p.m. $50/booth space. All items must be handmade and cannot contain food. Booth space is limited, register today at the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. 441-4374 or www. eurekarecreation.com. (C-0830) WHAT’S RIGHT WITH YOU? Examine a simple technique that greatly enhances self-worth. Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Sept. 2, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0830) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227)

&Spirit CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

Coming to Arcata.

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

We understand your personal needs and provide care for every phase of a woman’s life.

Fall Class Starts 9/17/12, Call Now to Enroll!

825-0200 | 822-9664 | 3798 Janes Rd., Ste. #10 in front of the Mad River Emergency Room

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

home national Crisis& garden 445-2881

www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

www.northcoast-medical.com

service directory Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

BREATHE LOVE, AXIS MUNDI ASTROLOGY INTEGRATED WITH YOUR SUBTLE ENERGY. Gain clarity for self-empowerment. Rev. Elisabeth Zenker, MSW; (707) 845-1450. www. sacredenergyspace.com (MB1122) KICK BUTTS! Become nicotine free with Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist and Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). (707) 8453749. www.ManifestPositivity. com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB0830) DIVORCE SUPPORT GROUP. Connect with others and feel less alone. Learn effective coping skills, ways to manage strong emotions how to heal and live the life you want. Group meets Mon. evenings, 6-7:30 pm. For more info. and to register call (707) 834-3747. Facilitated by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815 (MB-1115) POSITIVE CONNECTIONS. In this world of negativity and lack of connection create and participate in a positive social network based on strengths and optimism. In a group format, learn to improve your relationships with yourself and others. Meets once a week for 6 weeks. Offered by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815. For info and to register call 834-3747 (MB-0913)

home & garden

YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

Need some help home around the house?

Services

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

service directory Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

& garden

home & garden

service directory service directory see page 18

service directory

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 30, 2012

45


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45

&Spirit

Make-up classes available

Award Winning Hollywood Makeup Artist

TIME FOR A MASSAGE?

N. Kristine Chadwick introduces:

AMA approved quality.

Cinema Secrets professional mineral makeup line

Low prices, free makeover demo & $10 gift certificate drawing.

Call 707-768-3677 for an appointment. #7 Fifth Street, Eureka frommalibutoyou@aol.com

Therapeutic Massage Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

with Margy Emerson Martial Arts Academy Sunny Brae Shopping Ctr., Arcata 13-Week Session Starts Week of Sept 17

3 ProgrAMS: • Traditional T’ai Chi

• T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis • 42 Combined Forms -private lessons availableFor Schedule and Fees: www.margaretemerson.com or

822-6508 Visit any class free!

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0830) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124)

46

COLON HYDROTHERAPY WITH MOLLY LEUTHNER. At Jade Dragon Medical Spa. Closed System. Using an F.D.A. approved medical device, warm water is gently inserted into the colon. When the colon contracts, the water is flushed out through the device. Take an internal bath! 822-4300. (MB-1011) doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719 (MB-1115) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124) NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 268-0929. (MB-1025) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 4424240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (MB-1227)

COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0920) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0920) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@salinarain. com, www.salinarain.com. (MB-1227)

It’s here! The 2012 Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt.

View it online on our Special Publications page. NORTH • THURSDAY, AUG. 30,30, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com NORTHCOAST COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching nonviolent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 8261701, www.arcatazengroup.org. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)

INSID E

Venues Jewelry Gowns and Tuxedoes Flowers Bakeries

www.northcoastjournal.com

body, mind

real estate

this week Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace ■ ARCATA

NEW

LISTI

NG!

VERY, VERY PRIVATE! This 3 bedroom, 1 bath older home with approximately 1520 sqft, is located on over 2 acres off West End Rd. It feels far-out but is really close-in to town and all conveniences. Needs some fixing! mls #236216 $249,000

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

And More

home & garden

service directory


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

“WE WORK FOR YOU.”

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

Our Real Estate Loan Rates Funded through C.U. Members Mortgages 30 Year Fixed Rate

15 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 3.500%  APR - 3.681%

Rate - 2.875%  APR - 3.196%

10 Year Fixed Rate

5 Year Adjustable Rate

Rate - 2.750%  APR - 3.217%

Rate - 2.625%  APR - 5.093%

F.H.A

V.A.

FHA 30 Year Rate

$319,000

$449,900

4 bed, 3 bath, 2,650 sq ft custom Fortuna home, amazing property, dreamlike setting in lush landscaping encircled by forest, koi pond, waterfall, gleaming wood floors, spacious gourmet kitchen

Federal VA 30 Year Fixed Rate

Eureka four-plex that has been well maintained and landscaped, on site coin operated carpeted laundry room, enclosed carport off alley, off street parking, great investment

$155,000

3 bed, 1 bath, 975 sq ft cheery bright and clean Eureka home, newer windows, newer roof, and newer forced air unit, remodeled bath & kitchen, hardwood and laminate flooring

Rate - 3.500%  APR - 3.883% Rate - 3.375%  APR - 4.408% *These rates are subject to change daily. Subject to C.U. Members Mortgage Disclaimers. Up to $417,000.00

1270 GIUNTOLI LANE, ARCATA or 707-822-5902 northernredwoodfcu.org

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

South Fork of the Trinity Land/Property Breathtaking +/-55 acres of trinity river

frontage. Sloping to flat topography, oak woodlands, and year round creek. no deeded access.

Looking for a prime space in Downtown Eureka? The landmark Gross Building at 5th and F Streets has commercial space and office suites available. This iconic building has been carefully and meticulously restored to its historical splendor. Modern updates include seismic rehabilitation, a sprinkler system and complete handicap access {including restrooms and elevator}. Contact us for a private tour and view the Melvin Schuler Court Gallery in the upstairs outdoor mezzanine.

Gross Building 427 F St. Eureka (707)444-9056

$325,000

Rio Dell Land/Property

Eureka Land/Property

$250,000

$339,000

±34-acre parcel is only 1 mile west of Rio dell. property features an attractive view of the eel River, paved road frontage, easy access to HWY 101, conifer trees, inspiring views, multiple building sites, plus Slater Creek runs through the parcel.

Located near Indianola Cutoff, this flat 1 acre parcel is an organic farmer’s paradise. property features a 1,600 square foot newly remodeled home, 2 power meters, unfinished fruit/vegetable stand, excellent exposure, new 2,500 gallon water tank and more!

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, aug. 30, 2012

47


AND N U T S

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SCHOOL’S OPEN...DRIVERS BE ALERT!

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TOP OF THE HILL G STREET. • ARCATA

! s s e d c t i i r o K a h r o m C f S

V ISIT US AT www.wildberries.com ATM, VISA, MC, DISCOVER, AMEX

• LOW SUGAR SNACKS • WHOLE GRAIN BREADS

FRUIT • DRIED FRUIT •

PBJ • CRACKERS • BULK RAISINS

Se

s to

UR

KIDS...PLEASE USE THE CROSSWALKS!

B S NT ET E UD & G T S S) L T( L N A PARE

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• TRAIL MIXES • STRING CHEESE

• HEALTHFUL JUICES • FRESH

s g iv n a ! s S y a t n r d FF e u d O t u % a t 0 S S 1 • BAGELS

North Coast Journal 08-30-12  

The North Coast Journal of Politics, People & Art is a guide to what’s really happening on the far North Coast of California.

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