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thursday aug. 23, 2012 vol XXIII issue 34 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

From the end of your driveway to the edge of the world By Scottie Lee Meyers

8 Jobs no one wants 11 Owl dogs 13 ♥ Humboldt’s best – vote now! 20 Let ’em bolt 22 HSU parties 35 Snake in the moon


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2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 7 8 11 12

Mailbox Poem

26 Calendar 29 Filmland

News

31 In Review

Blog Jammin’ On The Cover

31 Workshops 32 Seven-o-Heaven

Gage Canal

Gory Days

The Election That Wasn’t

a cd

The Recyclable Journey

cartoon by andrew goff

13 Best of Humboldt 2012 Ballot

35 Field Notes The Monk’s Tale

36 36 37 42 43

16 Home & Garden Service Directory

20 Table Talk Going to seed

22 The Hum

Get Schooled

24 Music & More!

Welcome Students!

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

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Editor: Just an addendum to Linda Parkinson’s fine letter this week (“Pelicans Worth Saving,” Aug. 16). Apparently someone from the Bay Area is making money off fish oil, driving trucks up to collect fish remains. Why not a local person to do this? Less of a negative “footprint” environmentally all around!  If we can collect food oil for biodiesel, how about fish oil for gardens?  Just saying. Ginni Hassrick, Bayside

local pastured-meat producers such as Humboldt Grassfed Beef and the local restaurants that use their products. And we should encourage all of our local restaurants to use the local pastured meats. Not only are they better for the environment, but they’re also more nutritious than their grain-fed counterparts (I’m looking at you Omega-6s). Finally, I would also encourage Journal readers to check out the most current research regarding human evolution and protein vs. plant-based diets. (Spoiler: The plant-eaters didn’t last long.) Bodie Pfost, Redcrest

Go, Meat!

Uh-Oh

Editor: Ms. Ashley’s assumption (“Eeeeuuu, Meat,” Aug. 9) that vegetarianism is more sustainable or environmentally conscious is ridiculous considering the significant resources used in propping up today’s agriculture system. Journal readers might seek out The Vegetarian Myth by Arcata’s own Lierre Keith. In it she dispels the most commonly held beliefs about vegetarianism. Of course the modern industrial agriculture approach to animal raising is no better. But the closed-cycle system of animal farming practiced by Joel Salatin of the Polyface Farm and others, whereby animals are pastured and can contribute to the whole system, is sustainable. In fact, without the natural fertilizers from animal waste, vital nutrients for plants would have to be supplied by synthetic fertilizers (or some kind of permaculture system). Which is why we should support the

Editor: Ryan Burns’ cover story, “Occupy Broadband” (Aug. 9), somehow omits any mention of a huge downside of wireless broadband — adverse health effects from the radio-frequency microwave radiation (RF/MR) emissions. Just last year the World Health Organization classified RF/ MR as a Class 2B carcinogen, in the same category as lead and DDT. This year the American Academy of Environmental Medicine released a document calling for precaution with regard to Smart Meters and RF/MR in general, “because of the well documented studies showing adverse effects on health.” These published scientific studies were analyzed in the BioInitiative Report (2007), a 650-page document by prestigious scientists and public health experts citing more than 2,000 studies documenting health effects of electromagnetic fields from all sources. This is continued on page 6


olize It! Food Fair Sunday, Aug. 26th

11 am to 3 pm, Eureka Co-op location, 4th & B

Enioy samples from Tofu Shop, Humboldt Grassfed Beef, Natural Decadence & many more! Swing by the North Coast Co-op's Eureka location for plenty of localvore fun! Our free Localize It! Food Fair is the Co-op's kick off celebration signifying the start of our Eat Local Challenge. Stop by for free samples, music, kidfriendly activities, and of course, to sign up for the Co-op's 5 th Annual Eat Local Challenge.

Sign up at Localize It!

allenge takes Place in September

What is the Eat Local Challenge? The Eat Local Challenge encourages the community to embrace the bounty of local food that is provided by our dedicated farmers and producers . Based on the honor system, you pledge to incorporate local food into your diet at a chal lenge level that is comfortable to you for the entire month of September. You can choose to incorporate just a few local ingredients, a few local meals, or go

Challenge Levels

EASI ST Relaxed Localvore For at least one meal per week, eat only locally grown, raised, and/ or produced foods.

100% local. Choose your challenge level, then sign up at Localize It!

Lifestyle Localvore For at least one meal per day, eat only locally grown, raised, and/or produced foods with a few exceptions. Exceptions may include: non-local spices, cooking oils, vinegar, & spirits.

We Make it Easy to Shop Local We label all local products throughout our stores to make shopping local easy. The Co-op defines local as products grown or produced within a 250 mile radius but you can define it however you choose . For a more in depth look at our local farmers and producers, check out our Trust Your Source program at www.northcoastco-op .com.

Extreme Localvore Every meal and snack is locally grown, raised and/or produced foods. Some of the locally produced items include: locally roasted coffee, locally brewed beer, and locally made chocolates.

Hardcore Localvore Every meal and snack is grown or raised locally, with no exceptions! This means no non-local grains, spices, chocolate, coffee, spirits,

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

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Aug. 23, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 34

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Scottie Lee Meyers contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler

continued from page 4 the real news story. As the Board of Supervisors gets ready to vote on county telecommunications policies, it is critical that journalists provide the public with complete information. I have attended many public meetings with Connie Stewart and Sean McLaughlin in which they pushed heavily for wireless broadband in our communities, but they are not the only people involved here and they do not speak for many of us. Here’s hoping for some balanced journalism. Beverly Filip, Eureka [Editor’s note: The World Health Organization restricted its findings to personal use of wireless cell phones — it found evidence lacking for other situations, including exposures from living near transmission signals for radio, television or wireless communication. It concluded that “limited” evidence suggests radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from personal cell phones are a possible carcinogen, linked to two types of brain tumor, glioma and acoustic neuroma. It defines “limited” evidence as enough to make a cause-and-effect relationship credible, but not so much that chance or bias could be reasonably ruled out. A link to a summary of its findings is on our website, along with a link to some background on the controversial American Academy of Environmental Medicine.] Editor: The article “Occupy Broadband,” which covered the need for increased access to rural areas of Humboldt County through the expansion of fiber optics cable, was interesting but failed to mention a few things locally significant and directly related to the topic.  The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors are close to finishing up with the telecommunications section of their Gen-

eral Plan, detailing the county’s interest in facilitating cellular and broadband accessibility throughout the county. The element also details provisions for protecting the public interest in property by providing guidelines for responsible placement of cell towers, which will be implemented through an ordinance further down the road.  Of equal interest, Arcata councilmembers recently sent forward a proposal to place a Verizon cellular tower atop the Arcata Ballpark light closest to the Arcata Library. This is in direct conflict with the city’s land use code, which specifically states that telecommunications facilities be placed at least 1,000 feet from residences and 1,500 feet from schools, hospitals and historic districts. A large amount of controversy has developed over this proposal. The council has decided to revisit the issue at a Monday morning meeting on Aug. 27 at 9 a.m. at the council chambers at City Hall. Lisa A. Brown, Arcata

For Safe Reggae Editor: The Mateel Community Center would like to respond to the “Make Reggae Safe” letter in the Aug. 9 Journal. The letter refers to an alleged sexual assault at the Cooks Valley Campground, but links it directly to us and our event, Reggae on the River. We were appalled and dismayed when we learned of the possible assault. Our hearts go out the woman involved. The safety of attendees at our events is a top priority. Although we had no oversight of Cooks Valley Campground, which held its own, separate music event the same weekend as ours, we did include it in a list of local accommodations on our website. We have not received a report of sexual

mAIl/offIce:

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

• on the cover:

Photo by Drew Hyland

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assault occurring on any location under our control since Mateel resumed producing the event five years ago. Every year we do our best to keep our festivals positive, safe, fun and problem-free. We train our coordinators in non-violent communications. We do not condone sexual violence or any violence. Strict procedures are in place to deal with violent offenders, including law enforcement intervention and expulsion from our events. We have open, ongoing communication with the local sheriff’s office. Far from covering anything up, we actively seek out and address any problems within our control.  As we go forward, we are strongly considering taking the precaution of not listing any campground on our website unless that campground agrees to the Mateel’s safety standards. We need to be certain that any campground we list for our ticket holders has a level of security that people would be as comfortable with as the security we had this year at the Reggae on the River campground in Benbow Lake State Park. We sincerely appreciate feedback and welcome people to contact us at the Mateel Community Center with any concerns. Thank you, on behalf of the Mateel Community Center. Cathy Miller, Mateel sponsorship director

The Real Blackout Editor: I am dismayed at the sophism in your publisher’s latest missive concerning the rails/trails issue (“News Blackout,” Aug. 16). She presents a false dichotomy. The real “blackout” is her failure to acknowledge the arguments of her opponents. She would lead readers to believe that those who wish to preserve the Arcata-Eureka prism as a railroad are, ipso facto, op-


We walk dog slow The old man, his ancient red mutt and me, trailing behind What a pair they are The man stooped and the dog unsteady Back where I grew up This desiccated place, away from my adopted misty shore The old man talks Of the way this greenbelt was saved The orange groves protected Now oranges rot rust brown on the ground In five-acre minimum rectangles Of the cancer Both the old man and the old dog have cancer The old man’s prognosis sounds good The dog’s on borrowed time Of the community of people who walk their dogs here Of economics that let people starve while oranges rot on the ground Mallards splash on the canal Rabbits and ground squirrels bust frantic from the brush ahead A satisfied red-tailed hawk steals a look from a eucalyptus tree “Let’s go see the horsies, Jackie,” the old man says encouragingly He and the dog plod ahead I stand, rooted, staring into the canal Spanning eight feet, if that Still, it powers contemplation As water does When I was 10, I thought there should be fish or at least crayfish in there I believe it now On a drunken bet, as a younger man I waterskied once on this ribbon of green The ski rope tethered to the bumper of a ’72 Vega A Coors in one hand, the rope in the other Howling like Johnny Reb at Antietam A ball of dark moss rolls slowly along the canal’s bottom Like a tiny tumbleweed in a John Ford movie “Good dog, Jackie, see the horsies?” The old man’s voice is far away, I look up They pad along slowly, the big dog and big man meandering home Obstinately living so the other shall live — Michael Kraft

posed to the creation of a trail. Ms. Hodgson is an intelligent woman who has heard the repeated statements by the Timber Heritage Association (THA) to the effect that THA believes the prism can best be maintained as a rails and trails corridor.  I have been to several of the meetings mentioned and I have not a heard a single speaker, from any community group, advocate that no trail should be built and only the rail line should be preserved. Ms. Hodgson blithely asserts that no “viable” plan has been presented for the re-establishment of rail use in the corridor. THA speakers have frequently presented their vision that the tracks should be used to support a jobs- and revenueproducing tourist train. There is no reason why a trail could not exist alongside the rail line. I challenge Ms. Hodgson to present a reasoned and informative argument as to why this is not possible. Yes, it would cost money. This is

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one of the concerns that the NCRA committee will be addressing. Is there funding to rebuild the prism as a rails and trails corridor? Why not find the answer? Nowhere in her column does she attempt to explain why THA’s position of “rail and trails” should, or should not, be considered. She ignores THA’s position. That, dear reader, is the real “news blackout.” John Webb, Trinidad

Correction Last week’s cover article, “River Robbery,” incorrectly reported 2009 winter flows on the Eel River. The correct figure is 20,000 cubic feet per second.

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

7


The Election That Wasn’t

Local city council races attract barely enough candidates to fill positions By Ryan Burns

ryanburns@northcoastjournal.com

W

hen it comes to city council elections in Humboldt County this year, well, most don’t even qualify as “elections.” Local municipalities have a serious candidate drought on their hands: Five of the county’s seven incorporated cities won’t see any competition on their November ballots: Arcata, Blue Lake, Ferndale, Rio Dell and Trinidad each qualified just enough candidates to fill the seats up for grabs. Eureka and Fortuna, meanwhile, have just three candidates running for two council seats apiece. In all that makes 19 candidates running for 17 city council seats countywide — the fewest contenders since 1992.

What gives? Are would-be competitors satisfied with the status quo? Have they grown complacent? Cynical? Too busy? Maybe they’re waiting to see about this Mayan apocalypse. Whatever the case, the dearth of office-seekers bodes ill for democracy on the North Coast, according to Ryan Emenaker, a political science professor at College of the Redwoods. And he has a couple of big-picture theories about what might be happening. The first has to do with organization: In California and a number of other states, local offices are nonpartisan, which has its advantages. (Traditional party ideologies aren’t always relevant to local issues, for example.) But without the community-

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

building and recruiting efforts that come with the party structure, such states have had a harder time fielding candidates, Emenaker said. His other theory has to do with what drives us. Social scientists argue that people are motivated by wealth, power and status. “Obviously, in local elections you’re not getting much wealth or power, but status has usually been attached,” he said. It may be modest, but a certain amount of respect has historically been afforded to elected community leaders. In recent years, however, esteem for politicians has been eroding from the top down. Congress’ approval rating is at an all-time low; political scandals and corruption run rampant; “politician” is practically an insult. “This general feeling toward government, this malaise — I would have to assume at some point it would trickle down to people’s willingness to run [for office],” Emenaker said. Many authors and academics started worrying about America’s declining social capital during the 1990s, pointing to the steady erosion in voter turnout, membership in clubs and leagues, and the number of people willing to run for office. Smaller communities, like those in Humboldt County, have been more resistant — but not immune. Another factor is the social makeup of the cities themselves. For example, Trinidad (pop. 367) is largely made up of retirees, some of whom have already served terms on the city council. “The rest of the community is either busy or not interested,” said City Clerk Gabriel Adams. In his 10 years as clerk there’s been just one city council election — a real

nail-biter in 2004 when Chi-Wei Lin beat Jim Cuthbertson by a mere three votes, 126 to 123. (The other winner, Dean Heyenga, earned 140 votes.) The lack of competition is far more surprising in Arcata, a city famous for its outspoken progressive idealism. In the college community’s last six elections, there were at least two candidates — sometimes three — for every open council seat. Not this year, though. Three candidates tried and failed to qualify for inclusion on the ballot; they were unable to gather the required 20 valid signatures from Arcata voters. Mark Sailors, one of the rejected candidates, turned in 26 signatures 15 minutes before the deadline. Eleven of those signatures were disqualified — three came from people not registered to vote in Humboldt County; three more weren’t registered in Arcata; two were registered at different addresses than the ones they wrote down; and three other signatures looked dramatically different than the ones on file with the county, according to Arcata Deputy City Clerk Bridget Dory. Sailors initially took to his Facebook page alleging fraud, which he later downgraded to “shenanigans,” and in a phone conversation Monday evening he acknowledged that “people in Arcata sometimes have trouble following instructions.” Emenaker, the CR prof, said you have to question the seriousness of any candidate who fails at such a straightforward task. The names of all three incumbents — Michael Winkler (who’s also mayor), Shane Brinton (vice-mayor) and Susan Ornelas — will still appear on the ballot, along with two hot-button ballot initiatives: Measure H, which declares that corporations are not people, and Measure I, a tax initiative tar-


geting electricity-hogging indoor marijuana growers. Winkler offered a simple explanation for the lack of serious challengers: “By and large, people are happy with the job we’re doing,” he said last week. But former councilman and perennial council candidate Dave Meserve offered an alternate theory: Since the Green Party (his party) lost its council majority in 2006, he said, the city has been taken over by “downtown business interests,” and voters aren’t satisfied so much as complacent. Asked why he wasn’t running this time around, Meserve said he’s focusing on Measure I. Plus, he said, “I don’t like to lose.” The only contested city council races this year will be in Eureka and Fortuna. In

Eureka’s Second Ward, incumbent Linda Atkins will face a challenge from Joe Bonino, a little-known Humboldt State University payroll technician who will try to make the conservative grip on Eureka absolute. In Fortuna, where candidates are elected citywide instead of by wards, incumbent Douglas Strehl is expected to retain his council position while two new candidates vie for the seat being vacated by Kenneth Zanzi. In a phone interview last week, Zanzi said the economy could be a factor in the public’s reticence to run for office. “People are concerned about their jobs and livelihoods, and stepping into an elected position is going to take time from their

daily lives,” he said. A lot of time. Along with city council duties, Zanzi said he’s expected to serve on outside committees, such as the California League of Cities Legislative Committee, the Redwood Region Economic Development Commission and more. “When you start adding up all those other assignments, plus commitments to the city, it’s a pretty demanding job” — more than 40 hours’ worth per week, he said, with compensation of just $300 per month. “You have to have something in your gut that wants you to run for office,” Zanzi explained. He was passionate about updating the city’s general plan, and now that that’s been accomplished he’s decided not to seek a second term. He’s ready

to spend more time on his own interests, including a new Arcata business park that he and his wife are building. The two Fortuna residents hoping to replace Zanzi are Tami Gillam-Trent, a third-generation Fortunan who, at 51, owns Tangles hair salon and has served 10 years on the city’s planning commission , and Josh Brown, a 34-year-old father of three and assistant manager at Les Schwab Tire Center. Brown moved to Fortuna from Eugene, Ore., seven years ago and would like to see more retail opportunities in town, especially a Wal-Mart. Gillam-Trent wants Fortuna to keep growing slowly so it doesn’t lose its “small-town atmosphere.” Modest ambitions, perhaps, but they’re enough to keep democracy alive. ●

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

9


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Blog Jammin’

ELECTIONS, GOVERNMENT / BY SCOTTIE LEE MEYERS / AUG. 14, 5 P.M.

Reelection Made Easy

MAX THE OWL SNIFFER.

PHOTO COURTESY UW CENTER FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

ANIMALS, OWLS, SCIENCE, SURVEYS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / AUG. 16, 11:17 A.M.

Scat Dogs Spot Owls No, they’re not canine masters of jazzy nonsense, crooning in the moonlight. They’re the University of Washington’s Center for Conservation Biology detection dogs Shrek and Max, who’ve been trained to sniff out northern spotted owl pellets (the undigested stuff owls hack up after a meal) at the bases of trees (and thusly find the owls). Hey, works better than humans hooting for them, explains Lawrence LeBlond, writing on redOrbit.com about the UW research, which recently was published in the science journal PLoS ONE. The research, conducted on the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, compared the use of vocalizations to find owls to the use of the specially trained dogs. Notes LeBlond, though land managers and biologists have been hooting for spotted owls since the 1980s, “detection dogs have a much better track record at finding the species” — especially now, as barred owls increasingly encroach upon spotted owl habitat and affect their behavior: “Experts are concerned that spotted owls may be timid about responding to vocalizations for instinctual fear that they are opening themselves up to attack if they do. … The experts said the detection dogs improved the probability of finding the owls by 30 percent over the traditional vocalization methods.” The UW’s dog-detectives website profiles many of its highly trained smarty-mutts. Max, it reveals, is a 7-year-old Australian cattle dog adopted from the Everett Animal Shelter in Washington in September 2007. Besides the Northern spotted owl, Max can sniff out wolverine, barred owl, grizzly bear, black bear, American pine marten, tiger and leopard. Holy cow. ●

Arcata residents Jolian Kangas, Valerie Rose-Campbell and Mark Sailors all attempted to run for city council, but according to the city clerk’s office (and as first reported by Kevin Hoover of The Arcata Eye), none of the three challengers managed to collect 20 valid signatures from Arcata voters and have thus failed to qualify for inclusion on the November ballot. The city’s signature requirement is less rigorous than even HSU’s student government threshold. Students there must gather 50 valid signatures to run for council positions with Associated Students. To run for AS president, candidates must submit 150 signatures. Arcata city council candidates had almost a month to gather signatures and had the option to file them a week early — before the Friday 5 p.m. deadline — to make sure their signatures checked out. If errors came up, candidates would have had the opportunity to fix them. All three incumbents filed early while none of the challengers did so, according to Dory. Of the 27 signatures Kangas supplied, only 11 were valid. Rose-Campbell had 16 of 30 signatures verified. And only 15 of Sailors 26 signatures checked out. The three non-incumbents can still run as write-in candidates but must fulfill the same 20-signature requirement. The paperwork for write-in candidates must be filed between Sept. 10 and Oct. 23. ● CRABS, ENVIRONMENT / BY HEIDI WALTERS / AUG. 14, 10:28 A.M.

Crab Trap Limits A-Comin’ On your mark, get set, scuttle! It’s time to ponder the state’s new Dungeness crab trap limit program and — by Sept. 10 — submit your comments on the Department of Fish and Game’s initial study and proposed Negative Declaration. The program, the result of passage of Senate Bill 369 in 2011, goes into effect in the 2013-2014 crab season. It sets a cap of likely no more than 175,000 traps total allowed to be fished by permitted crab boats, and assigns permitholders to one of seven tiers of between 175 and 500 traps. You can read the DFG’s news release and finds links to previous coverage of crabbing on our website. ●

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The Recyclable Journey From the end of your driveway to the edge of the world By Scottie Lee Meyers

I

t’s a Sunday afternoon in late July, and Janet Smith stands in her kitchen, surrounded by oak cabinets, shiny black appliances and flying-saucer looking chandeliers. When she opens the Macy’s box on her table, white packing peanuts spill out, no longer needed to cushion a small package of Estée Lauder bronzer. Smith has wondered about those peanuts — “Is this stuff recyclable?” Uncertain, she tosses them. She knows the box can be recycled, though, so she breaks it down and stuffs it in her recycling bin. The 32-gallon bin is almost full of plastic jugs of Minute Maid juice, some jars of margarita mix, laundry detergent bottles, magazines and newspapers. She’ll roll the bin out to the end of her driveway later tonight. Tomorrow afternoon, a Recology truck driver will park outside her house on Leslie Road in Eureka, hurl the recyclables into the belly of the truck and haul them away. But to where? All over the United States, recycling facilities process our boxes and jury summons letters, our beer and water bottles, our milk jugs and take-out con-

tainers. They turn what could have been trash into cash, selling it in a marketplace that people are skittish to talk about. One of the key stops en route to that resale market is the recycling center — and in Humboldt, that has been a complex and conflicted staging ground.

Managing Humboldt’s

recycling has been a cauldron of drama for years. The Humboldt Waste Management Authority — a joint powers authority made up of representatives from the county and most of its cities — once took its recyclables to the Arcata Community Recycling Center. That $8 million dualstream processing plant in Samoa, and its smaller predecessors, had handled most of the county’s recyclables for decades. But after the center started charging a $65 a ton tipping fee in 2010, the waste authority looked into two options — buying the recycling center or finding a lower cost site once its contract expired. Amid accusations and threatened lawsuits, members of the Waste Management Agency found a new recycler. In 2011, Eureka, Ferndale, Rio Dell and Humboldt County signed a five-year contract with Solid Waste of Willits, which offered to

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

pay $8 a ton for the privilege of hauling the stuff off and sorting it. Arcata and Blue Lake stuck with the Arcata Community Recycling Center, calling it a vital community resource. But after losing its biggest customers and dealing with bond debt, the center struggled. It shut down early this year. (One of its smaller properties, a collection site on 10th Street in Arcata, may soon be sold to Eel River Disposal of Fortuna.) With the big Samoa recycling site closed and its 30 former employees out of work, the Waste Management Authority now has to figure out what comes next. The contract with Solid Waste of Willits can be canceled with six months’ notice. That contract is an “intermediate solution,” said HWMA interim president Patrick Owen, and the public and the authority’s board members will have to decide what comes next. It’s highly unlikely that could include buying the shutSTEVE FURTADO WEIGHS HIS TRAILER ON HUMBOLDT WASTE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY’S 70 FOOT SCALE AFTER UNLOADING SEVERAL TONS OF CARDBOARD FROM WILDBERRIES GROCERY STORE. PHOTO BY DREW HYLAND

tered Samoa plant, Owen said. A strategic planning public work session is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 23, at 5:30 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive in Eureka. The meeting will include input from R3, a Sacramentobased consulting firm that’s helping the board develop a waste management plan. Owen said the HWMA hopes to make a


left This mountain of trash at the Humboldt Waste Management Authority transfer station is headed to a landfill, but the station also handles recyclables from Arcata, Eureka and unincorporated areas of the county.

be heard: vote for the

decision by June. Humboldt’s recycling angst comes as county residents have joined masses of Californians who are trying to wring a little more life from what once would have been tossed. According to state department CalRecycle, California led the nation in 2010 by diverting an estimated 65 percent of its trash away from landfills. That’s a huge flip flop from the 1960s, when a Los Angeles city ordinance requiring people to separate tin cans from the rest of their garbage caused such an uproar that Sam Yorty rode into the mayor’s office on a promise to reverse it. (LA didn’t return to recycling until 1993, according to its Department of City Planning website.) 

It’s just after 2 p.m. on

Monday, and Leonard Wonnacott turns onto Leslie Road in Eureka. He’s been working for garbage companies for 30 years and is nearing retirement. Wonnacott stares at his side mirror through his tinted, transition lenses and snuggles Recology truck #13207 beside Janet Smith’s recycle bin. The $320,000 truck offers a steering wheel on both sides, and Wonnacott chooses to drive from the right. He firmly grabs the three toggle switches in the center console and begins to flick the black-knobbed levers back and forth. Compressed air hisses with each thrust. Shhhhhp, left toggle — the robotic arm extends toward the bin. Shhhhhp, center toggle — the jaws open. Shhhhhp, left toggle — the arm extends a bit more. Shhhhhp, middle toggle — the arm clasps

the bin. Shhhhhp, right toggle — the skeletal arm violently lifts the bin 30 feet in the air. The diesel engine quakes the truck. A small black and white monitor next to Wonnacott’s steering wheel displays what’s going on behind him. He sees that the bin has reached its pinnacle and tips it over. The plastic flaps slam open and the truck swallows Janet Smith’s Macy’s box and her other recyclables. Wonnacott shhhhhps the toggles, this time in reverse order, and the bin dives to the ground and sticks the landing like a gymnast. He’s already done this more than 500 times today. Wonnacott, a stout man in his 60s, has been snaking through Eureka’s neighborhoods along a route designed by a software program called RouteSmart, which displays city grids in colorful, pictorial maps. He started at 6:30 a.m. A city ordinance forbids Recology — which operates Eureka’s curbside recycling service — from collecting in residential areas before 6 a.m. Arcatans don’t get to hit the snooze button. The city hasn’t instituted any such restrictions, said Rick Fusi, owner of Arcata Garbage Co. He said some of his haulers start at 3 a.m. Maybe that’s why so many Arcatans cover their windows with thick layers of blankets? With his route now complete, Wonnacott drives toward the HWMA’s recycling facility, next to Harbor Lanes bowling alley in south Eureka. The station has drop-off areas for garbage, recycling, green waste and hazardous waste. The garbage goes to one of two landfills, either near Redding or Medford, Ore.; the green waste to Mad River Compost in Arcata; the hazardous materials mostly to the Bay Area; and the recyclables are separated out for their trip to Willits. This center is what people in the industry call a MRF (pronounced “murph”), materials recovery facility. Wonnacott arrives at the center and rolls onto the 70-foot scale. The station weighs trucks before and after they unload to calculate how much recyclables they drop off. HWMA charges commercial trucks a $120 tipping fee with each dump. The operator gives the signal and Wonnacott drives into the center’s warehouse. Inside is organized chaos. A two-storytall heap of garbage sits along the south wall, while a mound of recyclables about equal in size sits closest to the entrance on the west end. A black-and-yellow continued on pg. 15

HUMBOLDT

2012

on the Cover A forklift raises a bin of mixed paper into a trailer at the Humboldt Waste Management Authority transfer station in Eureka. Photos by Drew Hyland

Tell us what makes Humboldt the BEST place on earth! Write in your choice on this official form, then slap a stamp on it and mail it to us. OR save the stamp and bring it to our office during business hours. OR be the truly hum-tastic social networker we know you are and

fill out the form online at northcoastjournal.com. Hurry! Every time we count a ballot a kitten gets its wings.

FOOD ETC. 1. Best Local Beer ____________________ 2. Best Breakfast _____________________ 3. Best Lunch ________________________ 4. Best Dinner________________________ 5. Best Restaurant for a Vegetarian _____________________ 6. Best Asian Restaurant _________________________ 7. Best Pizza _________________________ 8. Best Bar __________________________ 9. Best Coffee Roaster _________________ 10. Best Bakery ______________________ 11. Best Food On Wheels ________________ 12. Best French Fries _________________ 13. Best Ice Cream/Yogurt ______________ 14. Best Wings ______________________

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21. Best Solo Musical Artist ___________________________________ 22. Best Club DJ _____________________ 23. Best Comedian____________________ 24. Best Local Author _________________ 25. Best Music Venue _________________ 26. Best Public Art ____________________ 27. Best Sports Event _________________

COMMUNITY 28. Best Annual Event _________________ 29. Best Nonprofit ____________________ 30. Best New Business ________________ 31. Best Playground___________________ 32. Best Restroom____________________ 33. Best River ________________________ 34. Best Trail ________________________ 35. Best Place to Send an Outsider ___________________________________ 36. Best Elected Official ________________

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

13


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Meet our neighbors

“Murphy’s is so close and convenient,” says Jessica. Her business is

in Sunny Brae. “They have a full salad bar and great assortment of fresh organic produce. The British section reminds me of Europe. I was a military brat and I often traveled to England with friends. I enjoy finding that British taste again through Murphy’s.” After acquiring her certifications in both Eastern and Western disciplines of preventive medicine, Jessica opened Jade Dragon Medical Spa which earned the Small Business of the Year Award from the Arcata Chamber of Commerce. “I opened Jade Dragon to promote preventive medicine and to offer a relaxing, clean and comfortable office where people experience quality services in a professional environment.” Her specialists offer acupuncture, reiki and ayurvedic medicine as well as therapeutic massage. Teas, tinctures and body products are available there, too. Jessica’s husband, Chip, runs his own business in Blue Lake which makes a renewable-resource potting soil, Royal Gold. Jessica and Chip each have a Murphy’s close by. Your local Murphy’s is probably close by, too!

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excavators at Humboldt Waste Management Authority’s transfer station tops off trailer #114 with about 16 tons of recyclables. It will travel 142 miles south to be processed at Solid Waste of Willits. photo by Drew Hyland

continued from pg. 13

aluminum can 2% tin 2% mrf residue non-recyclable 4% various plastics 6%

the Des Pickers, From

film Steve Fisher: The

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Federal laws restrict trailer weight, and Richardson Grove restricts length, for now anyway. This is trailer #114 and it belongs to Solid Waste of Willits. HWMA brings in about 154 tons of recyclables a week and most of that is exported 142 miles south to Willits. Whatever Willits can’t handle, which isn’t much, C&S Waste Solutions in Ukiah gets. An even smaller portion of the recyclables at HWMA is sold on the commodities market to brokers or directly to manufacturers. When HWMA does trade on the market, it generally sells a few bales of mixed paper to International Paper (check the bottom of your brown-paper grocery bags, and chances are there’s an International Paper stamp there), which is then most likely sold to a pulp mill in Springfield, Ore. Solid Waste of Willits hauls five to seven trailers every week from Eureka. Before it landed the HWMA contract in 2011, the company was already bringing

SOURCE: SOLID WASTE OF WILLITS QUARTERLY REPORT

woodchips to Scotia every week and the trucks were heading back to Willits empty. So now, after stopping in Scotia, the drivers travel a little farther north and pick up a trailer of recyclables, then head back to Willits. According to a quarterly report from Solid Waste of Willits, between April and June the company received 1,695 tons of recycled materials from HWMA and has paid the authority $85,180 for those materials and loading fees.

It’s almost 90 degrees

in Willits and Juan Gamez, site manager for Solid Waste of Willits, enjoys the comfort of his air-conditioned office. Plaques of the company’s industrial achievements

Ultimate Ride

continued on pg. 17

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The Humboldt Waste Management Authority sent more paper products than any other recyclable to Solid Waste of Willits this past spring (April 1 through June 30, 2012).

No rt h

among the trash at the recycling center. The Budweiser bottles and the bottles of Robert Goodman wine all end up here and are valued about the same. “This place is a bank,” Morais says as he scanned the hills of trash and recyclables. But it’s not making HWMA rich. Most curbside recycling programs are not financially self-sustaining. The cost of collecting, transporting and sorting materials generally exceeds the money generated by selling the recyclables. That’s why customers are charged a monthly rate, which hovers around $23 dollars a month for standard service in Eureka and Arcata. But the money earned on the market helps keep rates down. Back in the warehouse, an excavator opens its jawed bucket, bites into a heap of recycled goods — there’s an awful lot of pizza boxes in there — and spews it into a 57-foot trailer, which takes 20 minutes to fill. The trailer is loaded with four bales of aluminum too, each weighing about a ton. They sit on the bottom like silvery ice cubes. About 15 to 17 tons of loose material — cardboard, glass and plastics — is thrown on top of the cubes.

What Humboldt Recycles

Jone s

mixed glass 25%

mixed paper and cardboard 61%

©

Caterpillar 950 front-end loader zips around the facility like a mechanical bumblebee, flying from pile to pile, tidying up the throwaway loot. The operators wear neonorange vests and matching hard hats, clear protective glasses and radio headsets. They’re constantly in motion, but never in each other’s way. HWMA operations manager Helder Morais (the “H” is silent), a short and muscular man with dark eyes, commands the flow from his walkie-talkie. With a wad of chewing tobacco under his bottom lip, Morais tells the excavator driver, “All right, looks good, let her down.” Wonnacott pulls into the warehouse and rolls down his window, trading his regular wisecracks with Morais. Even jokes are recycled here. Wonnacott makes a three-point turn so that the rear of his truck faces the recyclables pile. He pushes on the gas at a formidable speed and slams on the breaks, ejecting the cardboard and mixed paper into the mound. He dumps the containers with a hydraulic lifter that tilts the load onto the floor. It’s his second dump today. This load turns out to be a little more than two tons (the trucks can hold about four). Four Recology trucks collect the county’s and Eureka’s recyclables every weekday; each truck will unload once or twice a day. Two to three Arcata Garbage trucks each drop off a load a day, too. Janet Smith’s Macy’s box isn’t visible amid the Pepsi bottles, Slim-Fast cans, lawn furniture, strawberry containers and Cheetos bags. There is no hierarchy

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home & garden

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left Humboldt Waste Management Authority interim president Patrick Owen, right, and operations manager Helder Morais pause beside a half ton bale of rigid plastic.

continued from pg. 15

hang on the wall and a framed picture of his sons’ soccer team sits on his desk. He monitors the activity in the warehouse from his flat-screen TV on the wall. It shows the loading dock, the main floor and the single-stream recycling processor — a beast of a machine, almost entirely blue except for the yellow trim on railings, steps and ladders. It stretches along the south end of the building and continues halfway along the east wall. It was installed less than four years ago. When it’s turned on, employees wear earplugs. Birds used to flock to the machine until the company hammered in nails, points up, onto the surfaces. A truck arrives and reverses into the warehouse, dropping 15 tons of recyclables from Humboldt onto the main floor. It joins the mountain of other materials in a pile about twice as long as the heap at HWMA. The materials are about to be shoved and jostled through single-stream recycling, a process that has largely edged out the dual-stream recycling that the Arcata Community Recycling Center had been so proud of. In dual stream, paper takes a different route from the remaining plastic, metals and glass. That requires more sorting at home and more expansive trucks. Once on the main floor, a front loader pushes a bathtub-sized pile of recyclables onto the conveyor belt. The belt steadily carries the materials up several stories until it plateaus. At the top, nine employees wait to sort the material; it’s a marriage of man and machine. Up here, the belt stretches flat for about 60 feet. The first line of men — yes, they’re all men in these jobs right now, although women have been on the line in the past — stand across from each other on opposite sides of the belt. Their hands rummage through the

below Aluminum is a proverbial moneymaker for recycling centers. This week, buyers will pay Solid Waste of Willits $1,285 for each half ton bale of aluminum. Photos by Drew Hyland

materials, darting, slamming, grabbing. Workers go through two pairs of gloves a week. They pluck out milk jugs and laundry hampers, otherwise known as natural plastic number two. The men toss the jugs down the chute and into a collection bay. Five feet down the line, another pair of men do the same thing, except they’re removing laundry detergent bottles, oil and antifreeze containers, the colored number two plastics. The last pair of men pull out tin. It’s a lot of soup and instant coffee cans. Like priests, therapists or film developers, recycle sorters get an intimate

look into our personal lives. They’re archeologists of the living. And what do they deduce from what we’re throwing away? “We see a lot of sex toys. A lot!” says Gamez, a short man who suddenly gains a few inches with his bright-yellow hard hat on. Dead animals, wedding rings and passports have all passed through the line too. Once a bag of bundled $20s came through. “But no bodies,” Gamez jokes, his smile exposing his bottom-bracket braces. After the materials pass the men, the belt dips down. Glass drops into a container directly below. The leftover materials then climb a motorized screen. The syncopated rattling makes them jump

up like popcorn kernels. The screen allows paper to move on while unwanted waste materials fall through the cracks. The surviving mixed paper and other residual materials make a U-turn, riding along the black-rubber conveyor belt a few dozen feet before they are met by the critiquing eye of another sorter. He lets magazines, Bibles and letters pass through and removes anything that’s not paper, which is mostly plastic bags at this point. The paper rides the belt a few feet farther before it falls down a chute. The machine operates like an occult hand, cradling the good while swiping away the bad. The plastics and tin that the men threw into collection bays will be emptied and baled. Residual materials that fell through at various spots take another ride along the belt for a second sort. Now the remaining materials are ready to be baled. According to a Solid Waste of Willits report, only 4 percent of the materials brought to Willits can’t be recycled. That’s pretty good by industry standards; Owen said some centers can’t recycle up to 30 percent of what comes in. Now that it’s all sorted, it’s time for packaging. Different recyclables, each at its own time, travel on a baler conveyer into a hopper, where they’re compressed by a giant ram and bundled by a wire machine that wraps metal at 50 feet per second. It expels the bundles in cubes about the size of a small refrigerator, and depending on the material, weighing anywhere from a half to a full ton. Sometimes the baler gets jammed when too much paper gets in. To fix the jam, a brave employee must descend into the depths of the baler and stare down that ram, which is designed to crush cars. There’s a whole protocol. The machine continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

17


Mattole Valley

continued from previous page

Charter School

Sorters at Solid Waste of Willits’ single-stream recycling system grab milk jugs and other clearcolored plastics from the line and throw them into collections pits. The machine sorts most of the glass on its own.

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must be turned off, and the keys that would restart it must be in the pocket of the employee entering the baler. No one else can be around the machine and every lock mechanism must be initiated. And you thought sticking your hand in the garbage disposal was scary. Bryan Smith has been working at Solid Waste of Willits since he was 17. Eight years later, he’s now the operations manager. He admits that he used to mindlessly throw stuff in the garbage. But that’s changed now, and he helps his wife with the recyclables at home. Smith points to a stack of baled aluminum cubes near the loading dock. “They turn out so pretty looking.” Later this week, shipping containers will pick up a lot of these pretty looking bales Smith has put together. Some of those containers will have Chinese lettering on them.

The Institute of Scrap

Recycling Industries, a trade association with more than 1,600 member companies, reports that the U.S. processed more than 134 million metric tons of recycled materials in 2011, valued at about $100 billion. That’s pretty close to Apple Inc.’s $114 billion total revenue last year. The materials were sold to manufactures in the U.S. and more than 160 other countries. China has the largest appetite for our recycled materials, especially our paper and cardboard. The country doesn’t have the infrastructure to harvest its own recycled waste yet, but it’s quickly building recycling centers to do so, according to Jerry Powell, editor at Recycling Resource. The U.S. exported $8.5 billion worth of recyclables to China in 2011. Canada is second on the list, receiving $3 billion of our recycled exports, and South Korea third with $1.7 billion. (Roughly $60 billion of the materials stayed

18 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

within U.S. borders.) At this point, the quest to track exactly where Janet Smith’s Macy’s box and the rest of Humboldt’s recyclables end up becomes murky. We can guess with some probability where it goes, but we can’t be certain. Here’s the problem: Brokers buy these materials and sell them to, well, anyone, anywhere. They might buy a container of mixed paper from Solid Waste of Willits for $100 per ton and flip it to the highest Chinese buyer for $110 per ton. Several brokers bragged about how many buyers they had in their Rolodexes. But none of them offered names. They wouldn’t even offer a ballpark number. “I’m not going there. Don’t even ask,” said Melvin Weiss, an independent broker from the wealthy Bay Area suburb of Danville, who’s been in the business for decades. His jovial tone quickly turned skeptical after he was asked which companies he brokered with. “The minute something like that gets out, my buyers could be flipped.” There are 40 other guys waiting in line for every brokered deal, he said. Weiss is probably right. I called a Los Angeles broker I thought traded with recycling centers across the North Coast. Turns out he didn’t, but he demanded I tell him the names of the centers so that he could solicit them for business. When deals are done, it’s the Jerry Maguire principle of capitalism: Show me the money. Show me the most money. “He who pays the most gets the material,” said Brian Sollum, operational manager of another North Coast garbage and recycling company, Humboldt Sanitation. According to Sollum, Humboldt Sanitation collects about a fourth of the county’s recycled goods, in McKinleyville, Trinidad and east toward Hoopa. It requires customers to do most of the separating

of their recyclables, and has onsite staff that divvies up the rest. Since the ACRC closed, Sollum said Humboldt Sanitation has seen more than a 40 percent increase in volume. The business deals Sollum secures with brokers are never long-term contracts. “I’ve never had a contract in 27 years,” he said. “If you’re smart, you play one broker off the other: ‘Pony up or I’ll ship to Joe.’” It’s the same story for all of the North Coast’s recycling centers. Contracts are for big companies capable of offering a ton of tonnage, not the smaller operations common in Humboldt. Like many industries, the recycled commodities market ebbs and flows with the global economy’s influence. Earlier this month, Solid Waste of Willits sold mixed paper at $105 a ton. The following week the price fell to $75. Prices are so low for aluminum right now, a material that is generally a money maker for recycling companies, that Harry Hardin is holding onto at least 100 tons of the stuff. He’ll sell it when the price is right. Hardin owns Eel River Disposal, a material resource facility in Fortuna with a single-stream recycling center. The company is close to wrapping up a deal to purchase the Arcata Community Recycling Center’s drop off site on 10th Street in Arcata (not to be confused with the ACRC’s dual-stream recycling center in Samoa). Amid the secrecy and swiftly made deals, here’s what we do know about some of our recycled materials: Aluminum stays domestic. Humboldt, your cans go to the Bay Area, most likely to Anheuser-Busch’s recycling center. The company’s plant manager said the aluminum bales are then sent to the Midwest or the East Coast to be melted and made into sturdy sheets. It’s then recycled into


a Budweiser beer can. Again. Your glass, that’s staying right here in California too. Glass is a proverbial loser, essentially subsidized by the state through California redemption value (or CRV) deposits, said Sollum. Humboldt, for the most part, your glass goes to Strategic Materials in San Leandro. According to the company’s website, its “specialty ground glass products are used by customers as beads for reflective high striping, frictionators for bullets and matches, grit for den-

tal products” and as ingredients in ceramic floor tiles, bricks and pots. Your mixed paper is mostly being shipped offshore. Powell said there’s an 80 percent chance of it ending up overseas, mostly in China, South Korea and Taiwan. And old corrugated containers, which are your basic cardboard, have a 50 percent chance of being exported. There are still some paper mills along the West Coast that are keeping paper domestic. Several centers in Humboldt said they’re taking

their paper to Springfield, Ore., where it’s made into a pulpy oatmeal material used for new cardboard boxes. A broker for International Paper Inc. said that the life of cardboard, from when it’s kicked to curb to when it becomes a new box again, can be about six weeks. Your plastics, there’s about a 50 percent chance that’s being shipped to China, said Powell. Although Eel River Disposal said a buyer in Sacramento takes most of its plastics, that could just be a middle-

man. Sorry, Humboldt, this one is too tough to call. And those packaging peanuts Janet Smith had wondered about. Turns out they are recyclable. In fact, according to Macy’s website, those peanuts are 100 percent biodegradable. You can dissolve them in water and pour that into your garden, yard or toilet. But they can also be dropped off at Post Haste Mail Center in Arcata. Reuse is the quickest route to recycling. l

home & garden

service directory

continued from page 16

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19


Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. bolted lettuce. photo by lynn jones.

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835 J Street, Arcata • 822-WISH Open For Dinner @ 5:30 pm Tues-Sun

Caffé Italia

Fresh is Best ...

444-2421

The Sea Grill

BreakFaSt•eSpreSSo lunCh•dinner•Catering

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316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 • LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

Open Daily

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20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

he expression “gone to seed” usually has a negative connotation, meaning disheveled, declining or otherwise post-prime. When vegetables or herbs go to seed, or “bolt,” they quit being what you planted and become gangly towers looming over the garden. In this respect they’re more like teenagers than elders, but anthropomorphisms aside, the plant’s formerly edible parts are now shriveled, bitter and woody. While this can understandably look like a bad end for your endive patch, crops that are going or have gone to seed can still play an important role in the garden. A garden plant that has run its course and produced seeds is, naturally, a source of seed. Depending on the plant’s propensity to crossbreed, the seeds it produces might be true to the parent, or a mix of parent and some similar plant. (For this reason it’s inadvisable to replant seeds from garden squash, because squash hy-

brids can be foul tasting or poisonous.) Or the seed might be sterile and not sprout at all. Seed saving is another discussion, full of complexity and art, and it’s more commitment than I care to take on personally. [See editor’s note.] Instead, when the greens bolt I simply let the seeds fall where they may. If any of them happen to sprout next month, or next spring, great — any time a yummy plant wants to grow up between my garlic or tomato plants is fine with me. I’d much rather have edible crops volunteering themselves than many of the weeds I know. The first plants to bolt are generally the leafy cold-weather plants like spinach, lettuce, escarole and cilantro, and they make their moves when spring turns to summer. The newly aged old farts crowd the garden with their blossomed stalks, providing cooler, moist shade that allows the later blooming plants to maintain their tender youth a little longer. Newly sprouted


plants are thus sheltered as well. Perhaps most importantly, the flowers attract pollinators. The nation’s bee population is currently plagued by mites, viruses and neonicotinoid-based pesticides, all of which have been implicated in die-offs, and may play roles in colony collapse disorder. This dire situation is alleviated, if only slightly, by a pesticide-free garden gone to seed, which can provide a safe, nourishing haven for imperiled bees. My bolted garden is practically a gridlock of bee traffic, which helps the garden become a place of interaction between interdependent segments of the greater ecosystem. Watching bees patronize the newly opened blossoms is hardly a buzzkill. A garden gone to seed, with young plants growing in the shade of old-growth annuals, is a diverse ecosystem, but diversity has its drawbacks. Bees aren’t the only critters that prefer dense polyculture to boring monoculture. Disease and pest problems may increase. As your plants fill out and crowd together, they won’t be able to grow as large as they would if they had more room. If your singular goal is to pull as many pounds of food from the garden as possible, then letting plants bolt might not be the game for you. Few gardens, however, are about production alone; they feed more than just your belly. A diverse garden, with different types and ages of plants, is interesting. A garden gone feral can blur the line between growing food and gathering it. A trip to the garden starts to feel like entering the forest with your basket to see what you can find. When you push the bolted radicchio aside to find a young head of hidden lettuce, it feels like a gift. I take care throughout the season to create this kind of luck, by casting handfuls of seeds every which way, in both spring and summer. Mostly I toss seeds for greens, herbs and carrots, all of which can be planted throughout the summer for a fall crop, and all of which do well in partial shade. When I happen upon an unexpected parsley patch or grove of carrots, the fact that I had scattered their seeds there,

or allowed their parents to bolt, doesn’t diminish the thrill of discovery. But as you’d expect, hurling seeds randomly at the garden won’t result in orderly rows. Those who like their garden linear and neat should avoid this tactic. There’s a fine line between letting your garden go to seed and simply abandoning it. I call the former “managed chaos.” You may need to pull some plants that are crowding or shading certain other plants. Bolted plants might block a sprinkler or attract unwanted pests or draw birds that shit on your parsley as they eat cilantro seeds. You may choose to let only a select few bolted plants stick around, like islands in an otherwise orderly garden. Managed chaos probably doesn’t fit most people’s idea of what a well cared for garden should look like. And to be honest, while it looks good to me, I often find myself slightly embarrassed when I show my garden to others, and feel compelled to blurt out why I actually intentionally chose to let the garden go to seed. In the end, gardens, like pets, often come to reflect their owners. Some value appearance above all else. Others care more for an interesting personality. Some, like me, use the garden to explore the greater ecosystem, as a source of adventure and surprise. Gardening, especially bolted vegetable and herb gardening, may not pay for itself in the cold economic calculus of input versus return. But as entertainment it’s a lot cheaper, and more enlightening, than a trip to Disneyland.

Open 7 days New Thai

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

l  Editor’s note: For those who want to learn about saving seeds locally, Jared Zysto of the Organic Seed Alliance presents an introductory workshop, Seeds For Life, walking you through the basics including harvesting, cleaning and storing your seeds, self pollinators, cross pollinators and isolation techniques. The workshop is on Sunday, Aug. 20, from 1-3 p.m. at Beneficial Living Center, 148 South G St., Arcata; cost $15. Further details at 449-9103.

Something Unique. New Menu Available Online

6th Street & K Street 707-633-6124 theotherplacearcata.com

 

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

21


Get Schooled

k.d. lang, plus HSU dance parties, Brothers Comatose, Hank 3, GoGoSnapRadio and a bunch of Portlanders By Bob Doran

k.d. lang and Siss Boom Bang

I

t’s official: College is back in session. Are all of you new students ready to party? Better get ready, because the HSU campus music machine has a full slate of shows for you (and the “community”) as the new CenterArts season gets rolling with a couple of shows next week, and Associated Students Presents throws no fewer than five dance parties Friday and Saturday. The biggest name here is k.d. lang, the androgynous alt. country star who stole the show at this summer’s Kate Wolf Festival. Lang plays the Van Duzer on Wednesday, Aug. 29. (Athens, Ga.-based alt. folk/country songwriter Lera Lynn opens.) When I showed up at Kate Wolf on a July Sunday, pretty much everyone I spoke with raved about her Saturday night set, usually mentioning Vegas and/or Elvis in the process; “Patsy Cline meets Wayne Newton” was how one friend put it. The few who did not like her show missed her old cow punk material and complained about the Vegasy aspects, that her moves and her voice seemed too studied, even slick. Lang has been working with a new band, Siss Boom Bang, led by guitarist Joe Pisapia, who she met when she played Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium, home of the Grand Ol’ Opry. She was ready for a new direction. “I love going where I’m not supposed to go,” she says in her publicity material. “I love feeling like I’m starting at square zero again. I thrive on it.” Opening the CenterArts season Tuesday night is alt. country singer-songwriter Brandi Carlile, who has been cutting one hit record after another with twin brothers Phil and Tim Hanseroth since 2004. Her latest, Bear Creek, came out earlier this summer. Opening the show: Canadian folkies The Barr Brothers with Andrew and Brad Barr of The Slip. AS Presents launches its season Friday, with a pair of shows in the University Center: First up the Missing Link All-Vinyl Revue (as in Matt ‘n’ Adam, Mantease and DJ Red) in the South Lounge with very special guests from Numero Group. As Missing Link Records owner

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

Adam explained it, ASP booker Michael Moore let them choose anyone they wanted to join them playing records. The dudes from the Chicago-based Numero reissue label were at the top of the list, heroes to soul music cratediggers. These are vinyl hunters with a mission, according to a press release, “to dig deep into the recesses of our record collections with the goal of finding the dustiest gems begging to be released from their exile on geek street. No longer would $500 singles sit in a temperaturecontrolled room dying for a chance to be played. No more would the artists, writers and entrepreneurs who made these records happen go unknown and unappreciated.” Did I mention there are door prizes? Expect retro soul heaven. Starting a little later that night in the Kate Buchanan Room, ASP goes EDM with San Francisco-based DJ Ana Sia, a Humboldt favorite, plus Frite Nite recording artists B. Bravo and Epcot. Saturday the ASP action starts at 6 p.m. with a free show on the Quad featuring S.F. neo-psychedelic soul/heavy funk band Monophonics, who play music that sounds like something discovered by a crate-digger. Opening the show is another vinyl spinning record store owner, DJ Zephyr, aka Bandon Wayne, from The Works. Then it’s a repeat of Friday’s action with variations: The Missing Link DJ crew returns to the South Lounge, this time with DJs from Secret Stash, a Minneapolis reissue label specializing in classic international soul and psyche. In the KBR it’s Portland EDM artist Doug Appling, aka Emancipator, with his trippy, organic take on electronica. He’s joined by Ninja Tune’s Yppah and another Portlander, Anomie Belle, a former classical violinist gone EDM. She’ll do her own set, then perform with Yppah.   Friday at Humboldt’s EDM central, Nocturnum, WERK productions presents dubstep/ drum ‘n’ bass artist SICKorWELL, plus Itchie Fingaz, who won last year’s Journal readers’ poll as “Best Club DJ.” (The 2012 poll is under

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

way; look for the ballot elsewhere in this issue). Opening the show is @uDioGa$m, whose moniker reminds me of a well-crafted computer password. Austin’s T Bird and The Breaks play “chunk music” Thursday at Humboldt Brews with a new local funk/rock/etc. combo River Valley Mud. By the Breaks’ definition, “chunk” is “a form of 21st century American music consisting of equal parts funk, hip-hop and rock ‘n’ roll characterized by its rough sonic quality and energetic, visceral performance. Commonly served hot with a side of girls and brass.” While the band is from Texas, there’s a touch of New Orleans involved. The Brothers Comatose are back in town for a Saturday gig at Humboldt Brews. The rollicking post-old-time band first came together in the living room of the Morrison household with brothers Ben and Alex Morrison strumming guitar and banjo respectively, and friends joining the party, among them standup bassist Gio Benedetti, fiddler Philip Brezina and mandolinist Ryan Avellone. A bona fide band jelled with the Bros landing high profile gigs at Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, High Sierra, Strawberry, and most recently, Outside Lands, which I suppose means they can add opening for Neil Young, Stevie Wonder and Metallica to their resume. Impressive. Are you ready for some hell-bent country? Sunday at Dean Creek Resort it’s “That Damn Show” featuring the rip-roarin’ grandson of country legend Hank Williams, Hank 3. The allday show also includes Angel’s Cut, Greg Ginn and The Royal We, The Dirt Floor Band, Matt Borden, Wolf Hollow Revival, local alt. country faves Gunsafe, and Butch the mechanical bull (for those with cowboy fantasies). The Portland onslaught continues: Friday at the Lil’ Red Lion it’s a PDX two-fer with Dramady, a two-piece with Amanda Wiles on bass, clarinet and saxophone, and Zac Stanley on drums and keyboards (simultaneously) playing what’s described as “highly rhythmic danceable pop with groove laden dub bass and

melodic horns,” on tour with “folktastic” Portlanders The Betwixties. The Bandage provides local support. At the Alibi Saturday, ViSes, who tell us via email, “ViSes is a post-hardcore/dance-punk band from Portland that blends heavy guitar riffs and fierce female vocals with powerful drums and groovy bass lines to create an extremely volatile Molotov cocktail capable of inciting a riot just as easily as inciting a dance party.” Sounds dangerous. Local rockers Indianola open. More punk Sunday at the Lil’ Red Lion with L.A.’s Dr. Velvet and The Social Drinkers, who have a split 7-inch out with tour mate Brian Berwind, aka Proof & Proving, a punky guitar-strummer guy from Philly. (They used Kickstarter to raise $3K to press the record and go on tour.) Humboldt comedy rock terrorists Splinter Cell and a new outfit called SFB provide local support. Drummer Alan Evans of Soulive split off to form his own piano/organ funk/jazz trio, appropriately known as the Alan Evans Trio. The combo jams at Jambalaya Saturday night after an opening set by that new local funk big band, Motherlode. Persimmons Garden Gallery in Redway has a rare Monday show on Aug. 27, with The Band Of Heathens, a top-flight Americana outfit from Austin fronted by a pair of seasoned songwriters, Ed Jurdi and Gordy Quist. The sound is Texas-style rock with shades of country and blues, good stuff. Anyone else remember Sarah-Jane Moody, lead singer for the all-girl Southwestern alt. country band The Dolly Ranchers? She’s now half of an alt. pop duo called GoGoSnapRadio with Jeremy Bleich, formerly of a band called birth. They play quirky, experimental music on junkyard instruments (a trash can lid, for example) and the occasional guitar and synth. A West Coast tour brings them to Synapsis (same building at Ink Annex/Placebo) for a show on Wednesday, Aug. 29, with local guitarist/songwriter Olin Howabauten opening. l

 


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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012

23


Nightly 6pm-3am

2 1 + O N LY

entertainment in bold includes paid listings

see The Hum pg. 22

GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com

thur 8/23

fri 8/24

sat 8/25

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Indianola (local melodic rock), Vises (Portland indie-punk) 11pm $5

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Band 8pm

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA PLAZA ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220 BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com

Find our website at www.arcatatheatre.com

The Dark Knight (2008) Doors at 8:30pm $5 Rated PG-13

Tropic Thunder (2008) Doors at 8:30pm $5 Rated R

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

Find us on Facebook

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

The McBride Brothers Band (classic rock) no cover 9pm

The McBride Brothers Band (classic rock) no cover 9pm

Yolanda Nickel Quartet (jazz) 7pm

Sam Maez Quintet (jazz) 7pm

Francis Vanek Sextet (jazz) 7pm

The Miracle Show (Dead songs) no cover 9pm

NightHawk (classic rock) 9pm no cover

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

707 (rock) no cover 9pm

707 (rock) no cover 9pm

Bradley Dean Experience 9pm

Lizzie and the Moonbeams 9pm

Garden of Readin’ Bingo 5:30pm

BAYSIDE GRANGE 2297 Jacoby Creek

ING SERV E W O N N & WI BEER

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta BENBOW INN 445 Lake Benbow Dr. BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke 8pm-1am

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

DEAN’S CREEK RESORT Redway EUREKA INN 497-6093 FIELDBROOK MARKET 839-0521 HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata

Live music 7pm Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close! T Bird & The Breaks (hip hop/funk) River Valley Mud 9pm $10

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger

Happy Hour All Day!

Grateful Dead Movie Night feat. Jerry Garcia Band Fall 1991 8pm

The Brothers Comatose, No Good Redwood Ramblers 9:30pm $10

Ana Sia, B. Bravo, Epcot (EDM) 10pm

Emancipator (EDM) 8pm $15

The Honeycutters (honky tonk) 9pm

Juce (funk) 9pm

Alan Evans Trio with Motherlode 9pm

Summer Hours: until 9pm Monday Thursday, 10pm Friday & Saturday

Brian Post (jazz) 7-10pm no cover

Jill Petricca & Company (jazz) 7-10pm no cover

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Compost Mtn Boys (bluegrass) 6pm

Dramady, The Betwixties, The Bandage (indie rock) 9pm

We got beer.

HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY INK ANNEX 47B West 3rd St Eureka JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER NOCTURNUM Eureka NORTH COAST GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKETS 441-9999

Taqueria La Barca every Friday night!

Le Abricot on tap E40 (hip hop) 7pm $35

MC Bruce @ Henderson Center Chris Parreira @ McKinleyville

SICKorWELL (EDM) 9pm $15/$10

Madonna vs. Gaga 9pm $5

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

9am-2pm on the Arcata Plaza Good Company 10am

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com www.pearlloungeeureka.com Ambush featuring Sannu (world beat) 7pm

Located in beautiful Old Town DJ music (dance music) 10pm Yolanda Nickell (jazz) 7pm

Free Wifi Itchie Fingaz (dance music) 10pm Pizza Night! Pablo Moses 9pm $20/$15

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

Check Facebook for updates about live music and other special events

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

Get your Growlers filled

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

West African Drum & Dance 5:30-7pm $10

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am, $5

Special guest folk dance workshop and party 7pm, $10

ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Irish Music Night 7:30pm

Find us on Facebook

Jeff DeMark and the LaPatinas 7pm

SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Ken Jorgenson and band (bluegrass) 8-10pm

Jim Lahman (blues) 10pm-midnight

Great Dinners & Sunset!

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

Karaoke 7-10pm MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Rude Lion (reggae DJ) 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Grampa’s Chili (rock) 9pm

Band Behind Your Hedge (rock) 9pm

Hell 69 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

SugaFoot (blues duo) 7:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 9pm

Boss Levelz 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

Throwback Thursday’s

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

SYNAPSIS STUDIO 47 A 3rd St., Eureka TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


LIBATION

WINE SHOP WINE BY THE GLASS ALWAYS AVAILABLE.

See The Brothers Comatose in a very awake state Saturday at HumBrews

BRIAN POST, JAZZ KEYBOARD

Fri., Aug. 24, 7-10pm • no cover

JILL PETRICCA & GABE LUBOWE, HUMBOLDT MIST Sat., Aug. 25, 7-10 pm • no cover

wed 8/29

www.thealibi.com

Your friend on the Arcata Plaza

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Featuring Sunday NFL Football starting in September!

Giant Monday Night Football returns in September!

Like us on Facebook!

Sci Fi Night ft. Harry and The Hendersons 6pm All ages Free

Closed Sunday www.barflypub.com

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

A Chance to win $1,000,000

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

A Chance to win $1,000,000

m Woven Roots (reggae) 2pm

NEW WINE AND BEER ARRIVALS FROM FRANCE, ITALY AND SPAIN Wine Bar & Store: Open Monday through Saturday 8th Street on the Arcata Plaza • 825-7596

T O Y O T A ◆ N I S S A N JEEP ◆

tues 8/28

Steve Smith Quartet (jazz) 7pm Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

www.bluelakecasino.com

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

$0.25 Wing Wednesday

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool & $3 Wells

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long!

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two

Call In Your Order: 822-8433

Not your average “pub grub”

UPCOMING: Beer Pong Tournament Aug. 30

UPCOMING: Va Va Voom Burlesque Vixens: Hot Topless Nights Aug. 31

www.humboldtbrews.com

Brandi Carlile 8pm $35/$17

k.d. lang and Siss Boom Bang 8pm

HONDA ◆

Quiz Night 7pm

Free Brake Inspection

FORD ◆ SUBARU ◆ DODGE

mon 8/27

sun 8/26

(For Most Vehicles)

Preventative Maintenance & Tune-ups ◆ Brakes ◆ Clutches ◆ Cooling

Systems

GM ◆

Hank 3, Gunsafe, Angel’s Cut 10am $60

513 J St., Arcata • 822-3770 Just north of Cafe Mokka

◆ QUALITY FRIENDLY SERVICE ◆

Bomb the Music Industry, 51 Cards 7p Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Thicker Than Thieves 9pm

Reggae Bubblers 9pm Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm We are a certified wine shipper

Purl and Pour come craft 6:30pm

Wallace and Phines (folk/rock) 6pm

All markets have fresh fruits and vegetables and much, much more

Online at humfarm.org

Lisa Sharry @ Old Town Eureka Colin and Cory @ Wildberries

See the NCJ’s 8 Days a Week Calendar for times and Farmers’ Market info

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Live music 7pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 9-11pm

Find us on Facebook.

Pints for Nonprofits: Surfrider Humboldt 4-11pm

Monday Swing Night 7pm class, 8pm party

West African Drum and Dance 5:30-7pm, $10

Hoop Dance w/ Nicole Beg. 5:30-6:30pm $10

Chris Parreira (Americana) 6pm

The good taste tasting room

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Swing Dance Night 7pm

End the weekend right Dine early

After work/appetizers and drinks

Make Early Reservations for the weekend 407-3550

Full cocktail bar

Whomp Whomp Wednesday 9pm

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

GLDT and ALLY Open Mic 6pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com The Band of Heathens (Americana) 7pm

www.persimmons.net or find us on Facebook Tasting Room open Mon-Wed 4-11pm Thu-Fri 4-12, Sat. 12-12, Sun 2-10 Modern Dance with Lela Free trial class! 3:30-5pm

French & Thai Fusion Restaurant

with a Wood-Fired Oven and Full Bar

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Burning Sage (acoustic) 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Secret Password Hint: South of St. Charles Avenue

SugaFoot (trumpet/guitar duo) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm GoGoSnapRadio 8pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

Mon-Fri 11:30am - 9:30pm Sat-Sun 4pm - 9:30pm 3rd and F Streets • Old Town Eureka

497-6294

Humboldt Hoodies • Tees • Hats • Beanies •

Ahhh, sunny Blue Lake

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Blue Lotus Jazz (jazz) 6pm

Repeat: We got beer.

Glass • Illadelph Glass • Roor Glass • HBG Glass

www.libation.com

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS! WE MOVED INTO A LARGER ARCATA STORE AT 10TH AND H.

HUMBOLDT’S LARGEST AND BEST SELECTION OF HUMBOLDT CLOTHING AND GLASS SMOKING ACCESSORIES

10% DISCOUNT ON ALL GLASS WITH STUDENT ID

EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

Stickers • Locally Blown

Wine Bar overlooking Happy Hour 6-8pm Monday - Thursday, the Arcata Plaza $1 off wine by the glass Dr. Velvet & the Social Drinkers, Book your band Proof & Proving, Splinter Cell 9pm 444-1344

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012

25


STRANGE/SAD/ROUGH/ QUIRKY, WITH INSTRUMENTS CONVENTIONAL AND IMPROVISED. IF YOU HAVEN’T HEARD GOGOSNAPRADIO, THEN GO! WEDNESDAY EVENING AT SYNAPSIS STUDIO IN EUREKA.

FLY, MIGHTY SAUCERS, FLY! AND IF YOU’D LIKE TO ROOT FOR THE BEST INTERGALACTIC MACHINE IN THE BUNCH, HEAD OUT HIGHWAY 36 TO BRIDGEVILLE. THE BRIDGEFEST RUNS FROM 10 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ON SATURDAY, WITH THE SAUCER FLIGHTS STARTING AT 1 P.M.

23 thursday EVENTS

Humboldt County Fair. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Only four more days of live and satellite horse racing, mule racing, carnival rides and games, death defying stunts, live entertainment, competitive exhibits, plenty of livestock events, food, special programs. Check online for complete schedules. www.humboldtcountyfair.org.

THEATER

Tripping on the Tipping Point. 8 p.m. Beginnings, 4700 Briceland Thorn Road, Redway. Petrolia’s Human Nature Theater Company presents a musical comedy production about global warming. $15/$10 students and seniors. E-mail hnmattole@gmail.com.

MUSIC

Benbow Summer Jazz Series. 6:30 p.m. Benbow Inn, 445 Lake Benbow Drive, Garberville. Featuring local music on the hotel terrace from Yolanda Nickel Quartet. benbowinn.com. 923-2124.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by MC Bruce. humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Farmfresh produce every Thursday. Music by Chris Parreira. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

MEETINGS

Stanford University Physician Assistant Program Presentation. 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. United Indian Health Services, 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata. Information session on Stanford University’s physician assistant program and and its admission requirements. E-mail chantalobue@ gmail.com. 954-1157.

ETC.

Part-Time Job Fair. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Quad, HSU. Helps returning students meet local employers about employment opportunities. 826-3341. Volunteer to Ban the Bag. 5:30 p.m. Humboldt Baykeeper, 217 E St., Eureka. Reusable bag giveaway.

humboldtbaykeeper.org. 268-8897. Mix 95.1 Radio Auction for CASA. 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, 1626 Broadway. Barbecue and radio auction to benefit Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of Humboldt. Barbecue begins at 11 a.m. www. humboldtcasa.org. 443-3197.

24 friday EVENTS

Humboldt County Fair. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds. Horse racing starts at 3 p.m. See Aug. 23 listing.

THEATER

Cabaret. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. FRT performance of the celebrated Broadway musical. $10. ferndale-rep.org. 786-5483. Tripping on the Tipping Point. 8 p.m. Beginnings. See Aug. 23 listing.

MUSIC

Ana Sia with B. Bravo and Epcot. 10 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. AS Presents an evening of EDM with Ana Sia, B. Bravo and Epcot. $10/$5 HSU students. 826-3928. Missing Link All-Vinyl Revue with Numero Group. 8:30 p.m. Humboldt State University, Arcata. AS Presents the Missing Link All-Vinyl Revue joined by founders of Chicago-based archival record label Numero Group. $5/$3 HSU students. Benbow Summer Jazz Series. 6:30 p.m. Benbow Inn, 445 Lake Benbow Drive, Garberville. Featuring local music on the hotel terrace from Sam Maez Quintet. benbowinn. com. 923-2124.

DANCE

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event features teaching and request dancing. $3. 839-3665.

SPORTS

Street Legal Drag Racing. 5:30 p.m. Samoa Drag Strip,

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

DIAMONDBACK ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS “THAT DAMN SHOW” SUNDAY AT DEAN CREEK RESORT FEATURING HANK WILLIAMS THE THIRD, AKA HANK3, WITH ANGEL’S CUT, GREG GINN AND THE ROYAL WE, THE DIRT FLOOR BAND, MATT BORDEN, WOLF HOLLOW REVIVAL, LOCAL ALT. COUNTRY FAVES GUNSAFE, AND BUTCH, THE MECHANICAL BULL.

Eureka. Cars go vroom. samoadragstrip.com.

features bingo, literary figure costume contest and swag. $20. eurekasisters.org. 676-3774.

Celebrating Life in Humboldt. 7 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Local author/historian Jerry Rohde continues his series of regional history talks. This week: Arcata/Bayside. 441-2700.

THEATER

LECTURE

25 saturday EVENTS

Hops in Humboldt. Noon-6 p.m. Rohner Park, Fortuna. Featuring over 35 of the best breweries from across the country. Also, food, local arts and crafts and music by Angel’s Cut, Loose Gravel and Joe Dominick Band. $30/$40 at the gate. 725-9261. Party for the Pelicans. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Blue Ox Millworks, 1 X St., Eureka. Benefit for pelican relief includes performances by Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy, The 51 Cards, Medicine Ball, Todd Krider, Bud Rogers, SambAmore, Josephine Johnson and Sam Whitlach, John David Young Trio, The Mighty Redwood Ambassadors. $5. www.birdallyx.net. BridgeFest 2012. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Bridgeville, Highway 36, 24 miles east of Hwy. 101. Humboldt’s favorite UFOthemed event returns with Intergalactic Flying Saucer Trials, Jr. Alien’s Zone for the kids, live local music, arts and crafts and barbecue. 777-1775. Humboldt County Fair. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds. Horse racing starts at 2 p.m. See Aug. 23 listing. Salmon, Oysters, Ales and Rails. 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Samoa Cookhouse, Samoa Road, Arcata. Timber Heritage Association and Clarke Historical Museum present a day of live music, artisan booths, kids activities and food including barbecued salmon, salad and baked beans, oysters, ales and wine. $20. 443-1947. Garden of Readin’ Bingo. 5:30 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Humboldt Literacy Project benefit hosted by the Eureka Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence

Just Dessert. 5:30 p.m. Hotel Arcata, 708 Ninth St. Interactive murder mystery by Murder By Dessert includes dessert tastings, music, an original murder mystery show, plus additional special entertainment. $25/$20 advance. murderbydessert.com. Cabaret. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Aug. 24 listing.

MUSIC

E40. 7 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Bay Area rapper returns. $35. www.mateel. org. 923-3368. Emancipator. 8 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. AS Presents EDM show with Emancipator plus Yppah and Anomie Belle. $15/$10 HSU students. Monophonics. 6 p.m. Humboldt State University, Arcata. Bay Area alt. psyche band Monophonics and Eureka’s DJ Zephyr play for free. Soprano Clara Lisle. 3 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Fouth-year voice student at London’s prestigious Trinity College of Music and a member of the London Philharmonia Symphony Choir. Accompanied by HSU music professor Daniela Mineva. Benbow Summer Jazz Series. 6:30 p.m. Benbow Inn, 445 Lake Benbow Drive, Garberville. Featuring local music on the hotel terrace from Francis Vanek Sextet. benbowinn.com. 923-2124. Bulgarian Dance. 7-11 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Dance expert Daniela Ivanova and accordionist Angel Nazlamov offer an evening of dance and music including an easy dance lesson. Additional music by Musaic and Chubritza. $10. www. humboldtfolkdancers.org. 839-3665. Missing Link DJs with Secret Stash. 8:30 p.m. Humboldt State University, Arcata. AS Presents Missing Link AllVinyl Revue plus DJs from Secret Stash Records out of Minneapolis. $5/$3 HSU students.

OUTDOORS

Western Snowy Plover Walk. 8-10 a.m. Meet at Clam


Beach north parking lot. Learn more about the Western Snowy Plover and efforts to help this threatened species recover. friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the parking lot at the end of South I Street. Led by Carol Wilson. Bring binoculars and have a great morning birding. Trip held rain or shine. 442-9353. Geology of the Lost Coast Hike. 9 a.m. Meet at Sanctuary Forest office and car pool to Sinkyone Wilderness State Park. Geologist Kathy Moley describes geologic processes while viewing their resulting formations along the rugged and scenic coast. Sponsored by Sanctuary Forest. E-mail marisa@sanctuaryforest.org. 986-1087. Manila Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Morning of invasive plant removal. Bring water, wear comfortable work clothes. tools, gloves and cookies provided. 444-1397. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet leader Leslie Anderson for a 90-minute walk focusing on the history, ecology and birds of the marsh. 826-2359.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. Music by Good Company. humfarm. org. 822-5951. Pancake Breakfast. 7:30-11:30 a.m. Humboldt Grange #501, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road. Monthly breakfast.

BOOKS

Barry Evans: Local Authors Summer Lecture Series. 1-2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. The Journal’s Field Notes columnist discusses his approach to writing on eclectic themes. humboldtlibraryfoundation.org. 269-1991.

MEETINGS

Mensa Forum. Noon-1:30 p.m. Samoa Cookhouse, Samoa Road, Arcata. No-host luncheon. “Burning the bush: a story of life and fire amongst the Maasai.” Dr. Ramona Butz discusses her research on fire and traditional burning practices while living in a remote Maasai village in northern Tanzania. 768-9701.

FOR KIDS

Bike Rodeo. 10 a.m.-noon. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett

Road, McKinleyville. Learn about bike safety, have helmets and bikes checked, have fun. North Coast Parents’ Annual Picnic. 11 a.m.-noon. Freshwater County Park, Freshwater Road, Eureka. Hot dogs and veggie burgers. RSVP. www.northcoastparents.org.

ETC.

Madaket Godwit Days Fundraiser. 3:45 p.m. Foot of C St., Eureka. Tour of Humboldt Bay with expert birder and raconteur David Fix. No-host bar. Proceeds benefit the nonprofit Godwit Days organization. $25. godwitdays. org. 826-7050. EHS Class of ‘77. 6 p.m. Elk’s Lodge, 445 Herrick Ave., Eureka. Cocktails, dinner and dance celebrating 35 years. $60. E-mail jenj4@sonic.net. 443-5729. Lap of Luxury: An Impropriety Society Social. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Location revealed to ticket purchasers. Decadent fun is forecast, and classy/posh attire suggested. $20. humboldtimps.com. 496-6167. Songwriting Workshop. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. With Joe Garceau. Bring an instrument. $10.

26 sunday EVENTS

Humboldt County Fair. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds. Horse racing starts at 2 p.m. See Aug. 23 listing.

THEATER

Cabaret. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Aug. 24 listing.

MUSIC

Hank 3. 10 a.m. Dean’s Creek Resort, Redway. Diamond Back Productions presents the third generation star along with a daylong festival that includes a mechanical bull, river access and more music by Greg Ginn and The Royal We, Angel’s Cut and Gunsafe. $60. thatdamnshow.com. Concerts on the Plaza. 2-4:30 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Arcata Main Street presents local reggae band Woven Roots. 822-4500. Kantorei Women’s Choir. 4-5 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Sixteen women, who perform

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012

27


Welcome back

students August 17-27 th

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continued from previous page

There are certain benefits to being a pelican, no Saturday, Aug. 25, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Blue Ox doubt. A big old lunchbag of a bill. Happy hours spent Millworks hosts Party for the Pelicans: Brews for the soaring, wave-like, in the peloton with one’s fellows. Birds, a benefit for Bird Ally X and Humboldt Wildlife The suspension mid-air, followed by the savage, falling Care Center. There will be puppet shows, face paintstrike into salty sea — exhilaraing, food from Bless My Soul tion! And sardines. Herring. Cafe, standup goofiness and Small, crunchy goodnesses. MCs from Ba-Dum-Chh, beer, There are disadvantages, a raffle, a silent auction and however, that come to some lots of live music: Bud Rogers, poor, hungry, often juvenile Lance Torgerson, SambAmore, pelicans — those who stray into The John David Young Trio, fisherman-land to scavenge for The Mighty Redwood Ambasfish scraps at cleaning stations. sadors, Survival Reggae Band, Hundreds have done so locally Josephine Johnson and Sam this year (and years previous), Whitlach, Medicine Ball and wallowing in the filthy, oily wamore. A $5 donation is sugter from bins or pipes at cleangested. The Millworks is at First ing stations in Crescent City and and X streets in Eureka. PELICANS ARE RELEASED ON SAMOA. Shelter Cove. The oils clog the Sunday from 4 to 5:30 p.m., PHOTO BY DREW HYLAND birds’ feathers, inhibiting their there’s a Save The Pelicans ability to keep warm and dry, which kills them. benefit cruise aboard the jolly little Madaket to raise Those particular pelicans could use some more money for the wildlife care center. The Madaket folks benefits, and this very weekend there are two (benalong with The Wine Spot, Lost Coast Brewery, Shamus efits) being thrown for them — or, rather, for the folks T Bones and Eureka Main Street are hosting the beery, who’ve been rescuing and cleaning them in hopes of winey, hors d’oeuvresy cruise. A wildlife expert will be saving their lives. As of late last week, according to Bird on hand to explain the issues as the vessel visits some Ally X, 74 birds had been washed and released and 130 pelican hangouts in Arcata Bay and at the mouth of more were still at the Humboldt Wildlife Care Center. the Elk River. Cost: $30 per person. Boarding is at 3:45 Bird Ally X said it’s been feeding the birds more than p.m. at the foot of C Street in Eureka. Info: 445-1910. 400 pounds of fish a day. The center is in constant — Heidi Walters need of volunteers. And money. mostly a capella, will sing songs from Ireland, South Africa, Bulgaria and America, along with Brahms’ 12 Songs and Romances. christchurcheureka.org. 442-1797. Benbow Summer Jazz Series. 6:30 p.m. Benbow Inn, 445 Lake Benbow Drive, Garberville. Featuring local music on the hotel terrace from Steve Smith Quartet with Joani Rose. benbowinn.com. 923-2124.

ART

HUMBOLDT UMBOLDT

GLASSBLOWERS Water Pipes • Vaporizers • Books • Jewelry • Clothing

214 E Street, Eureka 268-5511 815 9th Street, Arcata 822-7420

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

Pelicans with Benefits

Trinidad Artists’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Trinidad Art, 490 Trinity St. Next to Murphy’s Market, Trinidad. Featuring works of art and crafts from local artisans, live music and delicious barbecue. E-mail karriewallace@ymail.com. 834-8720. Peter Holbrook Art Talk. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Holbrook talks about his oil paintings based on photography of Southwestern Utah and Northwestern Arizona. /www.facebook.com/HACMGMA. 442-0278.

OUTDOORS

Ma-le’l Dunes Guided Birding Walk. 9-11 a.m. Meet at the Ma-le’l Dunes north parking lot off Young Lane. Join naturalist Carol Vander Meer for an introduction to bird watching. Some binoculars will be available, but bring your own if you have them.

FOOD

Localize It! Festival. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Eureka Co-op, Fourth and B streets. Local food samples, kid-friendly activities, great music and a grill-off with local celebrity chefs. northcoastco-op.com.

FOR KIDS

Stories on Sundays. 1 p.m. 625 Lighthouse Road, Petrolia. Family fun with Poncho Polo Puppets group. Share stories. Puppets provided. Every Sunday in August. 629-3478.

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242.

27 monday Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancers 50 and older enjoy dancing with live music from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

28 tuesday MUSIC

Bomb the Music Industry! and The 51 Cards. 7 p.m. Ink Annex, 47B West Third St., Eureka. Placebo presents New York punk band Bomb the Music Industry! with local rockers The 51 Cards. $8. Brandi Carlile. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The alt. country singer/songwriter in concert. The Barr Brothers open. $35/$17 students and seniors.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Jogging Interpretive Tour. 7 p.m. Meet at Klopp Lake parking lot at foot of South I Street. Four- to five-mile evening jog around mash led by Megan McCue. 633-6226.


Stealth Brewery Unveiled You knew this was beer country. But did you know which wants to become a “Community Supported that the newest brewery in Humboldt plans to grow all Brewery,” growing its ingredients south of Fortuna its own barley and hops? And that it will sell shares of its in Alton, and offering tastes and beer to go at its production just like some farms sign up subscribers for McKinleyville brewhouse. boxes of fruit and vegetables? And that it will be pourOh, and the mechanical bull is new this year at Hops ing at Hops in Humboldt this in Humboldt, too. weekend, even before its own The festival gets going even grand opening in McKinleyville before its gates open, with next week? music starting at 11:30 a.m. Gates If tasting some of that open at noon, taps are open doesn’t sound as tempting as from 1 to 5 p.m. and the whole riding a mechanical bull, well, thing winds down at 6 p.m. Admaybe you’re not quite the right mission is $40 for all the tastes demographic for Fortuna’s everyou have patience to wait in line growing beer fest. for, or $5 for nondrinkers. Before PHOTO BY HOLLY HARVEY Hops in Humboldt is bringing designatingly driving friends or 38 breweries to Rohner Park on relatives home, they can soak in Saturday, Aug. 25, coming from California and Colorado, the sounds like everyone else, with music by Loose Alaska and Hawaii. “That is the most ever,” says Jason Gravel, Joe Dominic, Matt Borden and Angel’s Cut. “Woody” Woodward, festival vice president and selfTwo words of caution. This isn’t a kid or pet-friendly described “beer dude.” event. Hops in Humboldt only lets in people 21 and Many brewers will offer up new beers, but it’s not as older. And really, get a driver. Local shuttles will run for common for the festival to help debut an entirely new Fortuna residents, and Humboldt Transit has scheduled brewery, Woodward said. extra buses for its regular routes to points north. The local newcomer is Humboldt Regeneration, — Carrie Peyton Dahlberg

FOOD

Old Town Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, F Street between First and Third streets. Fresh farm-grown produce. Music by Lisa Sharry. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371. Wildberries Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Fresh fruit, vegetables and plants from local growers. Music by Colin and Cory. 441-9999.

ETC.

It Takes Two: Understanding Dementia Behavior. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Alzheimer’s Resource Center Library, 1901 B California St., Eureka. Open to the public. Learn to assist loved ones while reducing the frustrations that can come with caregiving. $30. 800-834-1636. HOP Neighborhood Fair. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Quad, HSU. The students are coming! Chance for HSU students to learn about local businesses. Food samples, coupons, discounts, gifts. E-mail hop@humboldt.edu. 826-3510. North Coast Networkers. Noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St, Eureka. Group of local business people who get together once a week in order to give and receive referrals. www.bnicalneva.com. 825-4709. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Healing Rooms of Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Non-denominational prayer group. E-mail dlbitte@hotmail.com. 834-5800.

29 wednesday MUSIC

k.d. lang and Siss Boom Bang. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The alt. country lounge singer k.d. lang in concert with her latest band. Opening set by Lera Lynn. $65/$35 HSU students.

GoGoSnapRadio. 8 p.m. Synapsis Studio, 47 A West Third Street, Eureka. Santa Fe based alt pop duo GoGoSnapRadio with opener Olin Howabauten. www.gogosnapradio.com.

MOVIES

Sci-Fi Pint & Pizza Night. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The best in B science fictions movies, drive-in classics, psychotronic weirdness and more. Beer and Pizza specials all night long. $5. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

30 thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See Aug. 23 listing.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. See Aug. 23 listing. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. See Aug. 23 listing.

Heads Up…

Calling All Artists! The Humboldt Arts Council in the Morris Graves Museum of Art is seeking artisans for a future Museum Art Market which will provide a venue for artists to share their trade in the museum space. Call Sasha Lyth at 442-0278 for more info. Even More Artists Needed! The masks are gathering again for The Ink People Center for the Arts’ annual Maskibition. The entry date for this annual exhibition of masks is Saturday, Sept. 29. Contact exhibition curator Kathryne DeLorme at 442-7850 or mythicfaces@juno.com for more info. Oh, C’mon, Artists! Humboldt Arts Council will be accepting entries for the 18th Annual Junque Arte Competition and Exhibition taking place Wednesday, Sept. 26. To be eligible, artwork must be made of 100 percent recycled materials. Review detailed entry guidelines available at the museum or at humboldtarts.org. ●

Geezers with guns: Sylvester Stallone, age 66, and Chuck Norris, 72, in The Expendables 2.

Gory Days

Seniors relive their blow-em-up years, plus an earnest indie and a bland spookfest By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

THE EXPENDABLES 2. This latest installment in Stallone’s geezers-with-guns franchise is unabashedly overblown, irresponsible macho horseshit — and I kind of love it. I may be the bull’s-eye of the target audience for these movies. I cut my teeth on the crass, ultraviolent Hollywood action movies of the ’80s and ’90s, so I don’t think I can be blamed for feeling transported by the lowbrow glory of the The Expendables 2. Nostalgia aside, these movies are pitiably bad. The dialogue is riddled with painfully obvious clichés, the action scenes aren’t particularly imaginative and the acting is … well. Yet somehow, in embracing what makes them so awful, in turning a middle finger up to the critics, both Expendables movies have been satisfyingly loud and silly. For the uninitiated, the Expendables are a crack team of mostly late-middleaged mercenaries. They are, apparently, the best of the baddest. (They wantonly emblazon themselves, their motorcycles, aircraft and weapons with skulls and stuff, just so we get the message.) They’re kill-

ers, each with a different specialty, and they all believe in doing the right thing, particularly when it requires explosions and large-scale death-dealing. It’s adolescent, GI Joe fantasy nonsense. If you can’t get with that, there isn’t anything I or anyone else could say to bring you around. Nor can I blame you; enamored as I am of movie combat, I still have to silence parts of my psyche to enjoy movies like this — like the parts that celebrate film-art as personal expression, or question the ethics of entertainment based on violence for violence’s sake.  The Expendables 2 is not a good movie by any real critical standard. It’s not anywhere close to a great action movie (Die Hard) or even a pure guilty pleasure (Crank). But it is, for the right audience, enjoyable from start to finish. Stallone did well to hand off directing duty to Simon West (Con Air). His style isn’t particularly innovative, but this sequel is sure-footed and consistently paced where its precursor was talky and uneven. R. 102m. RUBY SPARKS. Director/spouse team Valerie Faris and Jonathan Dayton follow continued on next page

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northcoastjournal.com• •NORTH Thursday,AUG. Aug.23, NorthCOAST CoastJOURNAL Journal• •THURSDAY, 23,2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com


Movie Times

* = SAT./SUN. EARLY SHoWS

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 8/24 - 8/28 unless otherwise noted. PREMIUM RUSH 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30 HIT AND RUN 1:30, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20 SPARKLE 12:10, 5:35 THE EXPENDABLES 2 12:55, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 PARANoRMAN 3D 3:10, 8:05 PARANoRMAN 2D 12:35, 5:40 oDD LIFE oF TIMoTHY GREEN 12:30, 3:10, 5:50, 8:30 THE BoURNE LEGACY 11:50, 3:00, 6:05, 9:10 THE CAMPAIGN 12:00, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 HoPE SPRINGS 1:00, 3:35, 6:10, 8:45 ToTAL RECALL 2:45, 8:25 DIARY oF A WIMPY KID: DoG DAYS 11:55, 5:55 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES 12:15, 2:15, 3:55, 7:30, 8:15 ICE AGE: CoNTINENTAL DRIFT 3D 2:45, 7:50 ICE AGE: CoNTINENTAL DRIFT 2D 12:20, 5:25

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 8/24 - 8/28 unless otherwise noted. HIT AND RUN 1:45, 4:20, 6:55, 9:30 HoPE SPRINGS 1:35, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10 THE EXPENDABLES 2 12:55, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 PARANoRMAN 3D 12:40, 8:15 PARANoRMAN 2D 3:10, 5:45 oDD LIFE oF TIMoTHY GREEN 12:10, 2:50, 5:30, 8:10 THE BoURNE LEGACY 11:55, 3:00, 6:05, 9:15 THE CAMPAIGN 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES 1:20, 4:55, 8:30

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 8/24 - 8/30 unless otherwise noted.

THE BoURNE LEGACY THE CAMPAIGN RUBY SPARKS

*12:10, 3:05, 6:00, 8:55 *12:20, 2:35, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 *1:40, 4:10, 6:50, 9:20

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 8/24 - 8/30 unless otherwise noted. HIT & RUN *12:00, *2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 THE EXPENDABLES 2 *12:40, 4:00, 6:55, 9:35 PARANoRMAN 2D *2:20, 4:35, 6:50, 9:10 PARANoRMAN 3D *12:10 THE BoURNE LEGACY *12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 9:45 THE CAMPAIGN *12:20, *2:35, 4:40, 7:10, 9:25 DIARY oF A WIMPY KID: DoG DAYS *12:00, *2:15, 4:30, 7:00, 9:20

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville THE DARK KNIGHT RISES

8/24 - 8/30: 7:30 EXCEPT 8/29: 6:30

continued from previous page up Little Miss Sunshine (2006) with this, another sweetly sad meditation on the inner lives of lonely, sensitive people. I like it, but I can easily see how critics could fault its quirky earnestness and indie composure. Paul Dano plays Calvin Weir-Fields, a wunderkind struggling to produce a second novel some 10 years after the startling success of his debut. He lives with his dog in a modern, antiseptic LA house, all but a shut-in. His therapist gives him a half-baked writing assignment that somehow jolts him out of writer’s block. He pours himself into the creation of an ideal woman, writing day and night with hardly a break. Then, miraculously, that ideal woman is awake and corporeal and inside his house. This creates some consternation. The script, by Zoe Kazan, who also plays the title role, takes this tidy little premise and explores first the honeymoon period, then the restless, prickly settling-in. When Ruby turns out to be a real person, beyond the easy attributes Calvin was so desperate for, he’s forced to again wrestle with his loneliness and fear of strangers. Ruby Sparks is a self-assured, ultimately satisfying little movie. Matthew Libatique’s cinematography is spare and thoughtful without overwhelming the subject. The pacing and dialogue have a unique, natural rhythm that suits the story. Dano and Kazan deliver smart, vulnerable performances in the leads and are supported by a terrific cast, including Annette Bening, Antonio Banderas and Elliot Gould. My only real complaint is that Kazan’s script occasionally gives her scenes that feel like something she wrote for an acting workshop — as if she felt she had to demonstrate her own versatility. Let that minor indulgence slide and the movie is emotionally authentic and very watchable. R. 104m.

Aug. 24 Aug. 31 Fri Aug 24 - The Dark Knight (2008) Doors at 8:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG-13 Sat Aug 25 - Tropic Thunder (2008) Doors at 8:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Wed Aug 29 - Sci Fi Night ft. Harry and The Hendersons 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages Free Fri Aug 31 - Random Acts of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m. $6 All ages

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

northcoastjournal.com • North • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012 Journal • Thursday, Aug. Coast 23, 2012 JourNal • northcoastjournal.com 31 30 North Coast

PARANORMAN. Laika Entertainment, the animation studio behind Paranorman, made its name with 2009’s Coraline. And with good reason: That earlier effort is charming, atmospheric and inventive. This follow-up shares Coraline’s beautiful stopmotion animation and star-studded casting. But its tale of a misunderstood boy who must save his town from ghosts and zombies lacks Coraline’s imagination and story development. Granted, it’s hard to beat a Neil Gaiman story as the basis for an animated feature. He’s a dark fantasy juggernaut, and even a minor work like Coraline stands head and shoulders above the bulk of the derivative, predictable pap the major studios churn out. Paranorman lives, sadly, somewhere deep in that bulk. The movie isn’t without its merits. It boasts fluid, top-notch animation, gorgeous, minutely detailed set design and some winning performances. The first half of the movie actually makes pretty compelling viewing. But as the climax draws closer it becomes all too clear that the script doesn’t have any particularly interesting angles. About two-thirds of the way in, I was just waiting for the thing to end. I may have overburdened Paranorman with my expectations. Months ago, I was utterly captivated by the official trailer. It wordlessly evoked an atmosphere of humor and dread, thanks to some brilliant editing and the strains of Donovan’s “Season of the Witch.” Like a trailer should, it left me wanting more. I anxiously awaited the opportunity to explore the funny, creepy world Laika conjured up. That world is indeed compelling, but the story unfolding within it is completely conventional and frustratingly lackluster. PG. 93m. —John J. Bennett

Previews

PREMIUM RUSH. Joseph Gordon-Levitt stars as a Manhattan bike messenger who gets caught up in the dirty dealings of a crooked cop (the great Michael Shannon). Judging by the trailer, this movie has the goofy knob turned up to 10, with video-game editing, death-defying stunts and comically corny dialog. Might be awful, or it might be a total blast. PG13. 90m. On Friday the Arcata Theatre Lounge will screen The Dark Knight (2008), Christopher Nolan’s second and, for my money, best Batman movie, with a mesmerizing performance by the late Heath Ledger as the Joker. PG13. 152m. Saturday at 9 p.m. brings Ben Stiller’s hilarious sendup of Hollywood Vietnam movies (among other deserving targets), Tropic Thunder (2008). R. 107m. 9 p.m. Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night comes lumbering in next Wednesday with the 1987 domestic Bigfoot comedy

Harry and the Hendersons, which will be followed by Horror Express, a Spanish horror film from 1972 in which snooty British academics on a train encounter a monstrous alien.

Continuing

THE BOURNE LEGACY. Jeremy Renner replaces Matt Damon in the action franchise based on Robert Ludlum’s international thriller novels. PG13. 125m. THE CAMPAIGN. Doofus duo Will Ferrell and Zach Galafianakis star in this broad, lazy skewering of American politics. R. 85m. THE DARK KNIGHT RISES. Christopher Nolan completes his Batman trilogy with this mournful, contemplative blockbuster that still brings the exhilarating action. PG13. 164m. DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS. Slapstick kid comedy in which the titular “wimpy kid” has a mishap at a public pool, among other misadventures. PG. 94m. HIT AND RUN. Dax Shepard, Kristen Bell and Bradley Cooper star in this crude comedy about an ex-bank robber who blows his Witness Protection Plan cover. R. 100m. HOPE SPRINGS. Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones star as an aging couple trying to rekindle the fire in their 30-yearold marriage. PG13. 100m. ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT. More prehistoric hijinks from Manny the mammoth, Diego the saber-tooth and Sid, the lisping sloth. PG. 94m. THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN. A childless couple writes down their hopes for a young’un, then buries them in the backyard. Hark, a dirty kid emerges. PG. 100m. SPARKLE. “American Idol” alum Jordin Sparks stars in this drama about a 1960s Motown girl group torn apart by fame, featuring Whitney Houston in her final film role. PG13. 116m. TOTAL RECALL. Lackluster and pointless remake of the 1990 Paul Verhoeven film. PG13. 121m. —Ryan Burns l


cd Diamond Rugs By Diamond Rugs Partisan Records

  Maybe Deer Tick’s leader, John McCauley,  doesn’t like to be alone. In ’94, McCauley had  initially intended to write songs and perform as  a solo artist, but Deer Tick has evolved into a  bona fide band. Diamond Rugs, McCauley’s new  side project, was intended as another solo project but also quickly morphed into another band.  Collaborating with Deer Tick colleague Robbie  Crowell, drummer Bryan Dufresne of Six Finger  Satellite, Black Lips’ Ian Saint Pé, Hardy Morris  of Dead Confederate and Los Lobos’ reed player  Steve Berlin, McCauley has managed to create a  solid collection of songs that percolate with just  enough drunken swagger. Diamond Rugs reeks of the alcohol-fueled  rock ‘n’ roll that propelled The Faces in their  heyday. And though the record has its whiffs  of hillbilly folk and country, the reckless spirit  of Paul Westerberg and his Minneapolis-based  band The Replacements is unmistakable. It  makes sense that veteran arranger Berlin assisted in pushing Diamond Rugs into something  beyond simply throwing material against a metaphorical wall and seeing if it sticks. For “Call Girl  Blues” and “Tell Me Why,” Berlin’s arrangements  give the songs punch and structure. The rewards in The Rugs’ songs are simple.  Tales abound of girlfriends leaving (“Hightail”)  or guys getting kicked out (“Out on My Own”).  In “Gimme A Beer,” McCauley shouts over a  stinging pedal steel riff, “I want the kind of  credit where I sign and forget it. I want the kind  of hand that I could look at and admire — not a  goofy ball of flesh, … but oh, who cares, gimme  a beer.” The excellent rendition of the little  known garage-pop nugget “I Took Note,” by  Mandarin Dynasty provides one of the record’s  highlights. The album’s closer, “Christmas in a Chinese  Restaurant,” is not only the perfect response  to The Pogues’ “Fairytale in New York,” but  it also reveals McCauley at his best and most  vulnerable. With a lone piano accompaniment,  McCauley’s scratchy voice begs, “How’s the  turkey, how’s the ham? I can’t finish my moo  goo gai pan. But that’s not all; they cut me off  from alcohol. But anyway, you go on, deck the  halls.” It’s simultaneously sad and pathetic, while  wrapped in humor. Diamond Rugs, a name coined by McCauley  after the numerous rugs he slept on while on  endless tours since 2004, is an ironically apt nom  de band. Rising from the ashes, lint and beer  stains, there are true diamonds coming up like  roses from this particular rug.  — Mark Shikuma

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

PHOTO TO PAINTING. Making your memories into Art: Learn how to turn your favorite photos into either a watercolor or acrylic painting. Sat’s, Sept. 15. – Nov. 3. 9:30 a.m – noon. Fee $99. CR Eureka Downtown Site. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (AC-0823) PHOTOGRAPHY 1 & 2. Learn more about your digital camera and the techniques that will help your artistic expression in making photographs from local professional photographer, Gary Todoroff. Photo 1, Tues’s, Sept. 4 -Oct. 16, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Photo 2, Thurs’s, Sept. 6-Oct. 18, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $85 each. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www. redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (AC-0823) PLAYING WITH CLAY FOR GROWN UPS. Sept. 25–Oct. 30., Tues., 10 a.m.-Noon. Here’s your chance to have some fun and get your hands dirty! Fun and stress-relieving introduction to ceramic art in an informal, non-threatening setting. $110. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-0823) WHEEL THROWING BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE. With Bob Raymond. Tues., 7-9 p.m., Sept. 11–Nov. 13. Learn basics or perfect your wheel-throwing technique. With 40 years’ experience, Bob Raymond is an inspiration to students of all levels. Ideal for new and continuing students. $180. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-0823) WHEEL THROWING BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE. With Peggy Loudon. Thurs., 5:30-7:30 p.m., Sept. 13–Nov. 15. Complete introduction to basic wheel-throwing and glazing techniques. For beginning and returning students, this class will put you on the road to developing your own personal style. $180. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www.fireartsarcata. com (AC-0823) NATIVE AMERICAN BEADWORK, DESIGN & LEATHERWORK. Beadwork turns any simple buckskin bag or clothing into beautiful art. Intro: Develop beadwork skills using traditional and contemporary materials. Advanced: Develop your own designs/styles, and have option to work on regalia. With Winema and Lonnie Weeks. Intro or advanced course: Tues./Thurs., Sept. 11-Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m. $125 (Intro course is $50 additional for materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (AC-0830) SKIN KAYAK BUILDING WORKSHOP. with Marc Daniels, expert skin boat builder. Build your own tailor-fitted skin-on-frame sea kayak. Learn carving, lashing, pegging, steam-bending ribs, and stitching fabric skin. Three weekends, Sept. 15-30, 393 Main St., Ferndale. $1975, 50% deposit to reserve spot. No experience needed. Call (707) 834-2186 or info@mindseyemanufactory.com for details. (AC-0906) PHOTO 101, BEYOND SNAPSHOTS. Disappointed with the photos you take? Learn the basics of taking a great photograph with Lorraine Miller-Wolf. Thurs., Sept. 6-Oct. 4, 6-8 p.m. $100. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended (AC-0823)

CREATE YOUR OWN CRAFT PARTY. Every Sat., 6-9 p.m., all ages, Call for a quote $. Whether it’s a special celebration or just getting together with friends and family it’s always a fun & crafty. Rent the space or Rent the space and an instructor. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0830) CROCHETING. Thurs.s, 6-8 p.m. $30. Discover the wonderful world of crochet! Learn basic stitches. No experience needed. This class assumes you never held a crochet hook before. All ages. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0830) LEARN TO KNIT A SWEATER CLASS AT YARN. Thurs., Sept. 6-27, 5:30-7 p.m. $60, plus materials. Learn all the basics to knit a sweater. Choose an adult size or baby sweater knit from the top down with minimal seaming. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-0830) SCREEN PRINTING 2 DAY WORKSHOP. $120 + $44 Screen. Tues., Aug. 28, 6-7:30 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 2, 1-4 p.m. Basic screen-printing processes, direct and photoemulsion stencil techniques, create screen-prints from original artworks. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0823) SCREEN PRINTING LAB TIME. $40. Every Mon., 6-8 p.m. Learn basics of screen printing, brush up on your skills or come work on your own screen printing projects. Lab will be set up ready to use. Screens and inks available, bring clothing, fabric or paper to print on. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0830) VERY BEGINNING SEWING. Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. $30. Learn to use and care for your sewing machine. We will have you sewing a straight line in no time, then on to fancier stitches. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0830)

Communication

DO WE CONTROL OUR OWN DESTINIES? Or does it all come down to fate? Or maybe it’s a part of God’s plan. Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Aug. 26, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-0823)

SONGWRITING. With Joe Garceau, Sat, Aug 25, 10-1, $10, Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Dr. Call 677-0459 for more info. (DMT-0823) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin and Swing for adults & teens. Group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex in Eureka. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-1108) OBON ODORI, JAPANESE FESTIVAL DANCE. An introduction to traditional Japanese folk dance done at the mid-summer Obon Festivals throughout Japanese communities. Learn dances with fans, towels and castanets. All ages/abilities welcome. With Craig Kurumada. Thurs., Sept. 6-Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m. $60. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 8263731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (DMT-0823) FREE INTRO TO ARGENTINE TANGO. Experience the most beautiful dance of all for free! You’ll learn the basics and have lots of fun. Sat., Aug. 25, 7-8 p.m., in Arcata. info@tangodelsol.net. (858) 205-9832, www. tangodelsol.net (DMT-0823) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227) BELLY DANCING WITH SHOSHANNA. Feel fabulous in classes for all levels in Arcata at Redwood Raks. 6166876 or Shoshannaland.com. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

Computers

ZUMBA FITNESS & ZUMBA TONING! Zumba Fitness, Mon., Arcata Vets Hall. Zumba Toning (uses 1-2.5lbs. weights w/specific toning choreography), Thurs., Pan Arts Studio. Both classes 5:30-6:30 p.m., $6 drop-in. No membership required. Get moving, get grooving, get fit, get happy, you will not be disappointed! Ann has over 20 years teaching dance/fitness classes. Questions? Contact Ann, (707) 845-1055 or annyoumans. zumba.com (F-0906)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227)

INTRO TO PHOTOSHOP WITH ANNIE REID. A fastpaced hands-on exploration of the imaging application for digital camera enthusiasts, designers and other digital media artists. Tues.Thurs., Sept. 18-Oct. 2, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0906) DANCE TANGO! Milonga, Sat. Aug. 25, 8-11 p.m., $7, Arcata Vets Hall, Arcata. Free Intro Class, 7-8 p.m. Humboldtango.org (DMT-0823) DROP-IN COMMUNITY SONG CIRCLE & SAMBA DRUMMING. Join Humboldt Folklife Society for a monthly song circle on the first Tues. of each month, 7-10 p.m. at the Arcata Community Center. Or learn the fundamentals of rhythm and technique at Samba Drumming Sun.s, Noon-4 p.m. at the D St. Community Center. Just $3 drop-in fee. For more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org. (DMT-0823) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-1115)

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Fall Session Aug. 1-Dec. 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-1129) PANATUKAN, FILIPINO MARIAL ARTS. Taught by Hal Faulkner. Mon., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Wed., 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn Filipino boxing. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu. com (F-0913)

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Kids & Teens

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail. com (F-0927)

AFTERSCHOOL STUDIO FOR 6TH-12TH GRADERS. Arcata Recreation’s ARTS in the Afternoon program begins Aug. 27. Spend your afterschool hours with us in the studio. Try your hand at ceramics, video production, painting, jewelry making, drawing and so much more. Something for everyone. To sign up or for more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www. cityofarcata.org/rec. (K-0823)

AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www.aikibojitsu.com (F-1206)

CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7-12. Adventures with clay: learn various hand building and wheel throwing techniques. 4 classes offered. Mon., 4-6 p.m., Sept. 10–Oct. 8 and Oct. 15–Nov. 12, Tues. 4-6 p.m., Sept. 11–Oct. 9 and Oct. 16–Nov. 13. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445. More info at www. fireartsarcata.com (K-0823)

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (F-1227)

GYMNASTICS. Arcata Recreation’s fall gymnastics program starts Aug.27. Classes available for ages 15 months-adult offered various days/times. All skill levels welcome. Drop-in classes for children 15 months-3 years Sat.s, 10-10:45 a.m. and Fri.s, 5:30-7:30 p.m. for youth 6 and older. We also offer Cheer/Tumbling classes. To sign up or for more information call 822-7091 or visit our website www.cityofarcata.org/rec. (K-0823)

KUNG FU & TAI CHI. Taught by Sifu Joshua Cuppett. Adult Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 5-6 p.m., Sat., 1-2:30 p.m., Sun., 2-3 p.m. Kids Kungfu: Tues./Wed./Thurs., 4-5 p.m. (uniform included), Adult Tai Chi, Wed.s, 6-7 p.m., Sun. 1-2 p.m. Kungfu Movie night is first Fri. of every month, 4-8 p.m. Lau Kune Do: Temple of Martial Arts, 445 I St., Arcata. arcatakungfu.com (F-0913) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at the Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (F-0531) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www. sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

Home & Garden

FALL PLANT ID. Learn to identify a wide variety of plants suited to our local area on guided walks around the College of the Redwoods main campus and adjacent Botanical Garden. Mon’s, Sept. 10 – Oct. 29, 1:30 p.m – 4 p.m. Fee $80. CR Main Campus Greenhouse. Info. or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (HG-0823) GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE. Learn how to plant flowers and trees to attract beautiful and beneficial wildlife with an emphasis on birds. Sat., Sept. 8, 9 a.m-11:30 a.m. Fee $25. Info. or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (HG-0823)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

HUMBOLDT MUSIC ACADEMY. Music classes for ages 2-18. Classes and ensembles on Sat., Sept. 8-Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on the HSU campus. Get a registration packet online at www.humboldt.edu/hma, or call 826-3411 for more information. (K-0830) SATURDAY CRAFTY KIDS. Ages 7+. $25. Every Sat.,10 a.m.-Noon. Introduction to a varied of fun creative crafts, sewing and felting, materials included. Origin Design Lab, 621 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (K-0830) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn self-confidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense. com (K-1227) CHILDREN’S YOGA. 5-week series begins Sept. 14. Fri.s, 4:15-5 p.m. Great fun! Location: Redwood Raks, the old Creamery Building. info@littlebuddhasyoga. com (K-0913)

Skin Kayak Building Workshop

with Marc Daniels, expert skin boat builder. Build your own tailor-fitted skin-on-frame sea kayak. Learn carving, lashing, pegging, steambending ribs, and stitching fabric skin. Three weekends, Sept. 15-30, 393 Main St., Ferndale. $1975, 50% deposit to reserve spot. No experience needed. Call (707) 834-2186 or info@ mindseyemanufactory.com for details.

Language

BEGINNING ITALIAN. Introduction to Italian grammar, basic vocabulary and culture. With Giulia Marini. Tues./ Thurs., Sept. 18-Oct. 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $125. ($50 additional for optional one unit of credit.) Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 8263731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (L-0906) INTRO TO JAPANESE. Basic Japanese grammar structure, vocabulary and writing systems. Focus on useful conversational skills. With Mie Matsumoto. Tues./ Thurs., Sept. 18-Oct. 11, 5:30-7:30 p.m., $125 ($50 additional for one unit of optional credit). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 8263731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (L-0906)

Lectures

DISASTERS DON’T WAIT: HAVE YOUR SUPPLY KITS READY. Get your supplies ready for response to an earthquake, tsunami or severe weather. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. Fee: $25. Wed., Sept. 19, 6-8 p.m., Trinidad City Hall. Pre-registration required: www. humboldt.edu/rti/supplykits or call HSU Distance & Extended Education (707) 826-3731 (LE-0906) FOOD SAFETY. Preparing for any emergency includes food safety. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Tues., Sept. 11, 6-8 p.m., D Street Neighborhood Center, Arcata. Pre-registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0906) LIVING ON SHAKY GROUND. How to Survive Earthquakes & Tsunamis in Northern California. A free class. Wed., Sept. 12, 6-8 p.m. at Humboldt County Library, Eureka. Pre-registration required: Call (707) 499-0754. With Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness (www.humboldt. edu/rti). Funding provided by the Calif. Emergency Management Agency Earthquake and Tsunami Program. (L-0906) FREE SEMINAR ! INVESTMENT STRATEGIES IN TURBULENT TIMES. Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Wed., Sept.12, 5:45 p.m - 7p.m., Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP (707) 443-2741 or online at www.premieradvisor. com. (LE-0906)

COVERING GROUND WITH YVONNE COLBURN All about ground covers Sat., August 25th 10:00 a.m. Space is limited Call 839-1571x5 to reserve your spot!

Mind’s Eye Manufactory

1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville Mon.-Sat. 8:30 to 5:30, Sun 10 to 4 (Nursery Only) millerfarmsnursery.com


Over 50

GENTLE YOGA. Focus on floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Stephanie Perrett. Tues., Sept. 11-Oct. 9, 10-11 a.m., in McKinleyville. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

ADULT 50+ CERAMICS. Get your creative juices flowing by learning & practicing ceramics! Basic hand building & pinch pottery. Mon.s & Wed.s, 6:30-8 p.m., starting Aug. 27 at Ryan Center. $60 fee, includes materials. Register online at www.eurekarecreation. com or in person at Adorni Center. Call 441-4244 for more info. (O-0823)

FUNDAMENTALS OF RESISTANCE TRAINING. Explore movement for older adult exercisers, and gain basic knowledge of anatomy and principles of strength training. Then learn specific balance, mobility and stability exercises that can be done at home, office or while traveling. With Susan Lewis. Fri., Sept. 7-28, Oct. 19-26, 1-2:30 p.m. $50 or $60 (with materials)/OLLI members, $75 or $85 (with materials)/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and better. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227)

ART FOR THE YOUNG AT HEART. Intro to Watercolor and Printmaking. Mon’s 5:30 -7:30 p.m, Sept.10 - Nov. 12. Instructor Patricia Sennott. $175. Arcata Elementary School, 2400 Baldwin. More info, email Patricia, psennott@gmail.com. (O-0906) DESIGNING YOUR NEXT 50 YEARS. How do we improve the quality of life for seniors in Humboldt County? Examine several creative ways to enhance senior living on both personal and community levels, and take action to implement selected ideas after this class concludes. With JoAnne Schuch. Thurs., Sept. 13Oct. 4, 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0906) GENEALOGY & FAMILY HISTORY. Discover the tools that will help you learn more about your forebears with Michael Cooley. Sat., Sept. 15, 29 and Oct. 13, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0906) MEMOIR, WRITING YOUR LIFE STORY. Explore and write about pivotal experiences that shaped you. With Sharon Ferrett. Thurs., Sept. 13-Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-Noon, in McKinleyville. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0906) HEARING THE OTHER, FATEMA MERNISSI & M. FATHULLAH GULEN. Discuss the published ideas of two influential Muslin thinkers dedicated to fostering peace, mutual understanding and good will. With Professor Tom Gage. Tues., Sept. 18-Oct. 16 (no class Sept. 25), 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0906) DRAWING BASICS. Be introduced to various drawing media, with a brief history of drawing, and obtain a foundation in drawing techniques with Mark Soderstrom. Thurs., Sept. 6-Oct.4, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

LONGITUDE & INVENTION OF INSTRUMENTS FOR NAVIGATION. Explore history and tools of navigation from the compass and the chart to the discovery of longitude and invention of the chronometer and sextant. Includes demonstration and hands-on use of a variety of replica and modern instruments. With Harvey II and Richard A. Paselk. Wed., Sept. 5-19, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0830) MADAKET HISTORICAL TOUR OF HUMBOLDT BAY. Learn historical perspectives and insights on Humboldt Bay, then explore the bay aboard the Madaket, the last survivor of the seven original Humboldt Bay ferries. With Leroy and Dalene Zerlang. Fri., Sept. 7-28, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fee for OLLI members only: $80. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) PASS THE BLESSINGS. What are the most important blessings to pass on to the next generation? What legacy do you want to leave? How can you ease the burden for your loved ones after my death? This course will help you answer these questions. With Sharon Ferrett. Wed., Sept. 12-Oct. 3, 5-6:30 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE. Learn to photograph people with skill and confidence, and create compelling images. With Lorraine Miller-Wolf. Wed., Sept. 12-Oct. 3, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830)

REDWOOD FACTS & FICTION. A lecture-field class examining the area in and around Humboldt Redwoods State Park. Learn the differences between redwood species, explore old-growth redwoods along the Eel River and Bull Creek. With Ross Carkeet. Thurs., Sept. 6, 6-8 p.m. and Sat.,Sept. 8, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) SHINING A LIGHT, A LECTURE SERIES ON ADDICTION. Local service providers and individuals in recovery will shed light on the impacts of addiction and mental illness, facilitating a meaningful dialogue within our community. Tues., Sept. 11-Oct. 16, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) SURREALISM & REALISM IN PHOTOGRAPHY. Man Ray, Lee Miller, Salvador Dali and Cindy Sherman. Explore aberrant innovative photographers featured in two exhibitions at San Francisco MOMA and Palace of the Legion of Honor. With Ron Johnson. Tues., Sept. 4 and 11, 6-8 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) THE ART OF LIVING. Conversations on Creative Aging and Living Life Beyond 50. Monthly brown bag lunch and conversation on creative aging and the possibilities of living life to the fullest. Wed., Sept. 12: Ray Hillman; Oct. 17: Tracey Barnes-Priestley; Nov. 14: Kia Ora Zeleny. Noon-1:30 p.m., free to OLLI members. To register or join OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) WRITING FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS. Learn to write and publish fiction and non-fiction books for children and young adults. With Pam Service. Sat., Sept. 8-22, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) WRITING THE LANDSCAPE OF YOUR LIFE. Place: where we grew up, where we’ve lived and where we have traveled, helps to define who we are. In this class, we will use “place” as a catalyst for writing from memory and personal experience. With Bonnie Shand. Tues., Sept. 11-Oct. 16, 1-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0830) CREATING COMMUNITY ASSETS FORUM. Monthly presenters will narrate the creation of positive change by individuals and groups in Humboldt County. Wed., Aug. 29: The Arcata Marsh with Bob Gearheart; Wed., Sept. 26: Arcata Community Forest with Mark Andre; Wed., Oct. 31: Humboldt Baykeepers with Pete Nichols; Wed., Nov. 28: OLLI at HSU with Sheila Rocker Heppe. All presentations are from Noon-2 p.m. and are free to OLLI at HSU members. OLLI: 826-5880.(O-0823)

Preschool Openings at CDL

Back to School Student Special

5 class pass only $40 Must show proof of current registration Special offer good

Aug. 20 - Sept. 30, 2012 858 10th street • Arcata, CA 95521

707-825-YOGA (9642)

North Coast Academy

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

The Child Development Lab at Humboldt State University has openings for children 2 years 9 months up to 5 years in age in the afternoon program. We are a unique, nationally accredited preschool program offering a rich variety of learning experiences for children, supportive relationships with adults and guided development of both independence and strong social skills. For further information and enrollment materials please contact 707-826-3475.

SPEAK UP! BETTER PERSONAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS. Do you have trouble getting your point across? Do you feel awkward or nervous when speaking to strangers or groups? Learn simple and effective techniques to organize your thoughts, speak your mind and leave a lasting impression. With Phil Minor. Wed., Aug. 29 and Sept. 5, 10 a.m.-Noon. $30/OLLI members, $55/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0823) YOGA FOR OLLI. A gentle yoga class with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., Sept. 10-Oct. 8, 1:30-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0830)

Spiritual

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming.com. (S-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

Sports/Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parksrec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1227)

continued on next page

Dance Class with Trillium Erin Fernandez Dance Studios FALL Session begins Sept. 7 Formerly Dance class with erin FernanDez

Call for Expanded Schedule

Register now for

FALL SeSSion Children’s, Teen Adult Ballet

&

Children’s, Teen Adult Ballet Latin Latin Modern Dance for Kids Modern Adult Salsa Dance for Kids Private Instruction

&

&

&

& & Private Instruction

COMMON GROUND COMMUNITY CENTER Westwood Center, Alliance Road, Arcata

&

NEW SECOND STUDIO LOCATION 1925 Alliance Road, Arcata

822-8408 info@DanceWithErin.com 822-8408 • erin@DanceWithErin.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012

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continued from previous page MEN’S 30+ FALL BASKETBALL. Show off your jump shot, 3 point skills or impenetrable defense in Eureka Recreation’s Men’s 30+ Fall Basketball League! Form a dream team with your friends, family & co-workers. Find out more on Wed., Aug. 29, 6 p.m. at Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. www.eurekarecreation.com or 441-4245. (SR-0823)

Therapy/Support

DIVORCE SUPPORT GROUP. Connect with others and feel less alone. Learn effective coping skills, ways to manage strong emotions how to heal and live the life you want. Group meets Mon. evenings, 6-7:30 pm. For more info. and to register call (707) 834-3747. Facilitated by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815 (T-1115) GRIEF SUPPORT SERVICES CREATIVE ARTS GATHERING. Summer of Healing Creative Arts Gatherings: Aug. 25 & Sept. 22. We will be meeting at the beach, in the forest, and in the marshy wetlands, allowing the natural elements of each place to give voice to our own process of grief and healing. Suggested materials fee: $3-$5. Visit our website for more information at www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or contact Gretchen with questions/registration information at 445-8443. (T-0823) OVERCOMING DISCOURAGEMENT. Meeting Life’s challenges and Embracing Change. Support Group for Women of All ages. Meeting weekly for 10 weeks, Past Hurts, Relationship Changes, Workplace/Career Issues. Learn and Receive Support from Others. Focus on Some Guiding Principles. Confidentiality Required. Starting Wed., Sept. 12, 6:30-8 p.m. 905 6th St., Arcata, $25 per session/Insurance considered to register or more information call Sonja Harting, M.S., MFT LIC #MFC 40367, 826-0921 #4, slharting@gmail. com (T-0906) POSITIVE CONNECTIONS. In this world of negativity and lack of connection create and participate in a positive social network based on strengths and optimism. In a group format, learn to improve your relationships with yourself and others. Meets once a week for 6 wks. Offered by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815. For info and to register call 834-3747 (T-0913) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

GRADUATE RECORD EXAM (GRE) Prep Class at HSU: If you are applying to grad school and need a good score on the GRE, this course will prepare you. Sat.s, Sept. 22Oct. 13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $395 fee includes materials. Early registration is encouraged. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Distance & Extended Education: 707-826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended/gre (V-0906) MANAGING TIME, PEOPLE & PRIORITIES. A management workshop presenting tools to improve time management, prioritization, workload balance, delegations, and more. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., Sept. 7, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $85 (includes materials). Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 8263731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V-0823)

Wellness/Bodywork

AYURVEDA FOUNDATIONS PROGRAM. with Traci Webb. 5-MONTHLY WEEKEND IMMERSIONS, Fri-Sun, Aug. 24-Dec 2, leads to Certificate, Includes: Essential Oil Immersion, Ayurvedic Psychology, Colortherapy, Traditional Diagnostics (Pulse, Face, Tongue, Nails, etc.), and Panchakarma, $350/month. REGISTER Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0823)

HERBAL ALLIES WITH WENDY READ. Sat., Sept. 22, 2-4 p.m. $45 + $15 lab fee. Part 3 of making herbal medicine series teaches students how to combine other herbs with your cannabis salves infusions and teas to improve effectiveness. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. 707 Cannabis College, www. cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0920) INTRO TO HOLISTIC MEDICINE WITH JOHN YAMAS. Learn about the four major blockages to healing (emotional, biochemical, toxins, structure/energetic flow), and self care for health. Explore different systems of holistic medicine, history of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and emotional components and treatments including flower essence therapy, neuroemotional technique, TCM and Qigong. Wed., Sept. 19-Oct. 31, 7-8:30 p.m. $70. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-0906) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Three programs: T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis, Traditional Long Form (Wu Style), and The 42 Combined Forms (all 4 major styles). 13-week session starts the week of Sept. 17. Begin as late as the third week. At the martial arts academy in Arcata’s Sunny Brae Shopping Center. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Morning and evening classes. Fees for the 13-week term: $110 for 1 class per week, $165 for 2 or more classes per week. See www.margaretemerson.com or call 822-6508 for schedules. (W-0920) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. BEGINNING WITH HERBS. Sept. 19- Nov. 7, 2012. eight Wed. evenings plus two herb walks. Learn the basics with many hands-on activities, pre-req to 10 month course.10 MONTH HERBAL STUDIES PROGRAM Feb.-Nov. 2013. In-depth materia medica, therapeutics, flower essences, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0913) AROMATHERAPY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM & ESSENTIAL OIL DISTILLATION. With Traci Webb. Two Weekend Immersions, Fri-Sun, Oct 12-14 and Oct. 26-28. Learn to distill your own essential oils! Includes Western and Exotic Oils, Usage, Toxicity, Blending, Recipes, Take-Homes, In-Class Marma Therapy Session Demo, Oils for Women, PMS, Skin Beautification, Pregnancy, Headaches, Aches/Pains, Allergies, Sinus, Colds, Natural Cleaners, Anxiety, Depression, Ancient Perfumes, $900 (or $450/weekend) REGISTER Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: info@ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-1011) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0926) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Sept. 4, 2012 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

NORTH Coast COAST Journal JOURNAL • THURSDAY, 23, 2012 northcoastjournal.com Thursday, AUG. Aug.23, 2012 •• northcoastjournal.com 34 North

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF KING, JUVENILE DEPARTMENTNOTICE OF HEARING NO: 12-7-01532-3KNT 12-7-01531-5KNT 12-7-01530-7KNT

IN RE THE DEPENDENCY OF: Jeffrey Piercy DOB: 03-16-01 Riley Piercy DOB: 05-13-99 Anthony Piercy DOB: 05-21-95 TO: *Marina Lupe Rodriguez, mother, and/or anyone claiming parental/paternal rights or interest in the children and to All Whom It May Concern: On April 17, 2012, a petition for Dependency was filed in the above entitled Court, pursuant to RCW 13.34.080 and/or RCW 26.33.310 regarding the above named children, whose parents are * and Thomas Jay Piercy, alleged father.  [FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CALL 206-720-3293, 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.] Said Petition will be heard on September 17, 2012, at the hour of 8:15 a.m., at King County Superior Court, Juvenile Department, 401 4th Ave North, Kent, WA before a judge of the above entitled court, at which time you are directed to appear and answer the said petition or the petition will be granted and action will be taken by the court such as shall appear to be for the welfare of the said children. Dated August 3, 2012. BARBARA MINER KING COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT CLERK BY: BLB, Deputy Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23/2012 (12-227)

  NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED March 25, 2010, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. TS. NO. 141424-AH ON August 29, 2012 at 10:00 o’clock A.M. in the lobby of Humboldt Land Title Company, 1034 Sixth St., Eureka, CA County of Humboldt, State of California.HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, as Trustee under the Deed of Trust executed by Edaddywarbucks, Inc., a Nevada Corporation recorded on March 31, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-6842-3 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California by reason of default in the payment or performance of obligations secured

thereby including the breach or default, notice of which was recorded April 23, 2012 as Instrument No. 201210250-3 of said Official Records, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash in lawful money of the United States, without covenant or warranty, express or implied, as to title, possession, or encumbrances, for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, the interest conveyed to said Trustee by said Deed of Trust in property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California and described as: PARCEL ONE: That portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 11 North, Range 1 East, Humboldt Meridian, described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the West line of the State Highway at Engineer’s Station 11 plus 91.94 said point of beginning being 780.62 feet North and 538.2 feet West of the Southeast corner of said Section 33; thence South 57 degrees 10 minutes West 16.2 feet to a point on the Southwesterly line of a 50 foot right of way described as Parcel Two in the Deed to Harold A. Blankenship and wife, recorded July 30, 1959, in Book 546 of Official Records, Page 313, said point also being located on the Northeasterly line of the parcel of land described in the Deed to Rufus E. McNamara and wife, recorded April 28, 1948, in Book 44 of Official Records, Page 230, Humboldt County Records, and the true point of beginning of the land to be herein described; thence along the Southerly lines of the above mentioned 50 foot right of way North 63 degrees 03 minutes West, 11.57 feet and South 57 degrees 10 minutes West, 25.40 feet to the most Easterly corner of Parcel One described in the Deed to Blankenship above referred to; thence continuing South 57 degrees 10 minutes West, 152.79 feet along the Southeasterly line of the Blankenship parcel, to a point located thereon North 32 degrees 50 minutes West 10 feet, more or less, from the most Westerly corner of the parcel described as the exception in the Deed to Rufus E. McNamara and wife, recorded November 22, 1947, in Book 22 of Official Records, Page 278, Humboldt County Records; thence South 32 degrees 50 minutes East 10 feet, more or less, to said most Westerly corner; and thence along the Northwesterly line of the last mentioned McNamara parcel, 183.00 feet, more or less, to the true point of beginning. PARCEL TWO: BEGINNING at a point on the West line of the State Highway 101 which is 780.62 feet North and 538.20 feet West of the Southeast corner of said Section 33; thence South 26 degrees 57 minutes West, along said West fine of the State Highway, 151.05 feet; thence North 43 degrees 30 minutes West 36.75 feet; thence South 53 degrees 50 minutes West, 63.00 feet; thence North 32 degrees 50 minutes West, 43.53 feet; thence North 57 degrees 10 minutes East 200.23 feet to the point of beginning. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO. 520-051-013-000 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee

auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 707-443-0837 for information regarding the trustee’s sale and inquire as to the status of the foreclosure using the T.S. number assigned to this foreclosure shown on the first page of this notice. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The unpaid balance and estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of July 24, 2012 is $133,608.47; said amount will increase until date of sale. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described herein is purported to be: 121140 Highway 101, Orick, CA 95555 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Dated: July 30, 2012 Beneficiary: Orick Properties, LLC a California limited liability company. Telephone: (707) 234-4005 Address: 2090 Sierra Place Ukiah, CA 95482 HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, Trustee Address: 1034 Sixth Street Eureka, CA 95501 Telephone: (707) 443-0837. By: /s/ Sue E. Bosch, President 8/9, 8/16, 8/23/2012 (12-217)

SUMMONS

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: ELLEN BRYANT, INA GINOS, and DOES 1 TO 25, INCLUSIVE YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: ADELAIDE SLIGER, TRUSTEE OF SHELTON E. THUET AND MAGDALEN H. THUET REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST ESTABLISHED MAY 9, 2000; ADELAIDE SLIGER BENEFICIARY NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond


United Indian Health Services, Incorporated (UIHS) is pleased to announce the 2012 General Election Day as November 14, 2012 and UIHS is seeking interested Candidates for the 2012 Board Election of Indian Community Representatives. The General Election is Vote by Mail only.

Field notes Crater Giordano Bruno lies at the Center of pristine rays of ejeCta up to 100 miles lonG. Courtesy of nasa.

You may register to vote, at any UIHS clinic site, if you meet the following criteria: • You are an American Indian eligible for services at UIHS and are registered as an Eligible Indian Beneficiary • You are eighteen years of age or older at the time of election • You reside in the voting area from which you will vote • You have completed a Voter Registration Application/Affidavit VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE The voter registration period remains open throughout the calendar year and closes on the voter registration deadline date of October 15, 2012. However, please be advised that voters who register after the deadline date will not receive a Vote-by-Mail ballot. USES OF VOTER INFORMATION The information on the voter registration application/affidavit will be used by elections officials solely to administer the UIHS Vote by Mail Election. Personal items of information or voter signatures as shown on the registration application cannot be used for any purpose unrelated to the UIHS Election nor can it be released for commercial purposes. If a voter has any questions about the use of voter information or wish to report suspected misuse of such information, please call UIHS Compliance Officer at 707.825.5000. SEEKING INTERESTED CANDIDATES All candidates must meet the criteria for membership as an Indian Community Member. For more information about the qualifications and eligibility of a Candidate and/or to receive a Declaration of Candidacy form, please go to www.uihs.org or contact the Election Committee at PO Box 731, Arcata, CA 95521 or request the form at any UIHS clinic site. A non-refundable Candidacy filing fee of $50.00 is required when submitting the Declaration of Candidacy form. 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-239)

within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Website (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and cost on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. CASE NUMBER: CIVVS 1201703 The name and address of the court is: SAN BERNADINO SUPERIOR COURT 14455 CIVIC DRIVE, SUITE 100 VICTORVILLE, CALIFORNIA 92392

The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney is: DIANA J. CARLONI, ESQ., LAW OFFICES OF JAMES BRUCE MINTON, APC 14467 PARK AVENUE VICTORVILLE, CALIFORNIA, 92392 760-243-5678, 760-243-5688 FAX DATE: APRIL 9, 2012 NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. Filed: April 9, 2012 Superior Court of California, County of San Bernadino, Victorville District 8/2, 8/9, 8/16, 8/23/2012 (12-220)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00465

The following person is doing business REDWOOD MUSIKGARTEN at 1735 Mygina Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519 Anna Pinsky 1735 Mygina Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 6/1/2012. /s/ Anna Pinsky This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 6, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-238)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00490

The following persons are doing business as PACIFIC MOTORSPORTS at 4001 Broadway, Eureka, CA 95503.                                                                                                                 Schneider Pacific Motorsports, Inc. 4001 Broadway Eureka, CA. 95503   The business is conducted by A Corporation.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on N/A. /s/ Veronica Sargent- Vice President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-235)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00492

The following person is doing business as BAYSIDE SCHOOLHOUSE at 2051 Old Arcata Road, Bayside, CA 95524. Scarlet Ibis 2051 Old Arcata Rd. Bayside, CA. 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/14/2012. /s/ Scarlet Ibis This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-236)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00473

The following person is doing business as CENTER FOR REFLEXOLOGY & INTUITIVE HEALING ARTS at 920 Samoa Blvd., #222, Arcata, CA 95521. Alexandra L. Seymour 1860 11th St., Apt. A Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious

continued on next page

The Monk’s Tale By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

F

our centuries after being burned at the stake on an otherwise chilly February morning in 1600, the freethinking Dominican monk Giordano Bruno is still creating controversy. Actually, it’s formation of the lunar crater named for him that’s causing all the debate, although I’ll be discussing Bruno’s prescient cosmological ideas in another column. According to the English monk Fratello Gervase of Canterbury (1141-1210), an extraordinary event took place on the early evening of June 25, 1178 (our calendar), the likes of which has never been seen since: “A marvelous phenomenon witnessed by some five or more men who were sitting there facing the [2-day-old thin crescent] moon. Suddenly the upper horn split in two. From the midpoint of this division, a flaming torch sprang up, spewing out … fire, hot coals and sparks … the body of the moon which was below writhed, as if it were in anxiety, and to put it in the words of those who reported it to me and saw it with their own eyes, the moon throbbed like a wounded snake.” What did they see? According to a proposal made in 1976 by geologist Jack Hartung, it was the impact from a huge (twomiles across, perhaps) meteor or asteroid, resulting in the formation of the Giordano Bruno lunar crater. Molten dust from the impact would have obscured part of the crescent moon, that is, the “horn” would have been “split.” From Gervase’s description, the impact occurred close to the right edge of the moon, halfway between the moon’s equator and north pole. Crater Bruno, on the far side just out of sight from us, at latitude 36 degrees north, fits nicely. What’s particularly compelling about Hartung’s proposal is Bruno’s extreme youth: It’s probably the youngest

crater of its size on the moon. We know this because the rays spreading out from the crater, formed of light-colored ejecta material, are pristine, while those from older craters have been degraded by the constant rain of micro-meteorites on the lunar surface. And at 14 miles in diameter, Bruno is certainly consistent with the eruption of a vast cloud of ejecta visible from Earth. And that’s the problem, according to lunar expert Paul Withers of the University of Arizona. An impact of that magnitude would have catapulted some 10 million tons of debris into Earth’s atmosphere, causing, at the very least, a weeklong meteor storm, spectacular enough to be recorded by someone, somewhere. Yet none of the astronomical records from the time — European, Chinese, Arabic, Japanese and Korean — mention what Withers claims would have been “the best fireworks show in history.” So there’s the conundrum: If Bruno was caused by a huge impact in 1178, why didn’t anyone record the subsequent earthly meteor shower? The answer will have to wait for future astronauts to ship samples from the crater back for analysis, so its precise age can be calculated. If those samples show that Bruno was formed about 800 years ago, we can be pretty confident that Gervase recorded the birth of a lunar crater, thus solving the mystery of a moon that “writhed” and “throbbed” on that long-ago midsummer night. Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) love affair with the moon is platonic, pure and passionate. He will be giving a talk in the “local authors” series at the main Eureka Library on Saturday, Aug. 25 at 1 p.m. For reservations call 269-1991 or email hlf@humboldt.org.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug.23, 2012

35


CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-222)

business name listed above on 10/01/2002. /s Alexandra L. Seymour. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 8, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/16, 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-230)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00478

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

continued from previous page.

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

1. ____ finger 6. Labor party? 9. Munich matrons 14. City the Three Stooges visit in the 1938 short “We Want Our Mummy” 15. When most movies open: Abbr. 16. Pleated trimming 17. Willing to drink wine? 19. User of the Twitter account @SHAQ 20. Possible winning outcome after deciding 5-Down 21. It carries its newborns in a pouch known

DOWN

1. Hosp. area 2. 40 winks 3. “What’s the ____?” 4. Ending with switch 5. Tic-tac-toe choice 6. Juilliard deg. 7. Sphere 8. Soup with sushi 9. Cereal kids use to make edible necklaces 10. Totals 11. Gets 100 on a test 12. Company with EZ load ramps 13. 1965 Freedom March city 18. Make like 22. Second section

as a marsupium 23. Gerund end 26. Zadora of “Hairspray” 29. Head of the Huns 30. Iconic wine-loving actress? 34. Italian violin maker 35. Ipso ____ 36. Aromatherapy site, perhaps 38. Woodwind section members 43. Sri Lankan language 45. Wing: Prefix 46. Classic song about wine? 49. Proust’s “____ Way”

23. Mosque leader 24. Tom, Dick or Harry 25. Alum 27. Word in a 12/8/41 presidential address 28. Physician’s org. 31. “That’s ____ quit!” 32. Didn’t ignore 33. Mandatory recycling, e.g. 37. So last year 39. Suffix with original or superficial 40. Blood components 41. Rail transport 42. Trendy London district 44. “Just Another Girl on the ____” (1993 drama)

46. The Australian Way is its in-flight magazine 47. Waiting to be mailed 48. Boss on “The Dukes of Hazzard” 49. / 50. Neopagan belief 54. 552, on a cornerstone 56. Cribbage pieces 57. “A line is ____ that went for a walk”: Klee 60. Hosp. areas 61. Square dance partner 62. Madhouse 63. Terre Haute sch. 64. Capture VERY EASY #13

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

51. Duo 52. “Yo te ____” 53. Paint oil source 55. Valedictorian’s pride 58. Performed on stage 59. Recorded a new shipment of wine? 65. Barely adequate 66. One of the Gershwins 67. Mother ____ 68. Must 69. P.R., e.g. 70. Pub choice

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug.23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

The following person is doing business as CROSSFIT EUREKA at 3134 Jacobs Ave., Ste. B, Eureka, CA 95501. Meredith L. Launius P.O. Box 454 Eureka, CA 95502 3134 Jacobs Ave., Ste. B Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Meredith L. Launius. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 10, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/16, 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-232)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00440

The following person is doing business as MOUNTAINWISE FARMS at 3070 Pigeon Point Rd., Eureka, CA 95503. Sara Bleser 3070 Pigeon Point Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/25/12. /s Sara Bleser. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-228)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00442

The following persons are doing business as COAST COUNTIES PETERBILT at 2660 Jacobs Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 757, San Jose, CA 95106. Coast Counties Truck & Equipment Co. 1740 N 4th Street San Jose, CA 95112 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/12. /s Allison Dozier, Secretary-Treasurer. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 26, 2012.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00455

The following person is doing business as kemeleon ink at 2041 N Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Kay Elizabeth McCutcheon 2041 N Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/30/2012. /s Kay McCutcheon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 31, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-225)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00458

The following person is doing business as KALEIDOSCOPE VISUAL DESIGNS at 885 K St., Apt. B, Arcata, CA 95521, 2351 Sherri Ct., Arcata, CA 95521. Isaac Steel Winans 885 K St., Apt. B Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Isaac Steel Winans. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 1, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-224)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00461

The following person is doing business as HUMBOLDT GLASSBLOWERS at 214 E Street, Eureka, CA 95501. Jasmine Granat 5038 South Quarry Rd. Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 8/2/07. /s Jasmine Granat. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 2, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-226)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00464

The following person is doing business as COASTAL CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING at 1479 Terrace Ln., #3, McKinleyville, CA 95519, P.O. Box 2982, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Craig A. Brown 1479 Terrace Ln., #3 McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to

transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Craig. A Brown. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 6, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30/2012 (12-229)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120501 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: MOLLY MC HENRY BERRY TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: MOLLY MC HENRY BERRY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MOLLY MARY MC HENRY BERRY to Proposed Name MOLLY MC HENRY BERRY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 21, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: August 6, 2012 Filed: August 6, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13/2012 (12-240)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120502 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: PATRICIA LAI FOR KLAUS ARIEL LAI-LEVY (MINOR) TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: PATRICIA LAI for a decree changing names as follows: Present name KLAUS ARIEL LAI-LEVY to Proposed Name KLAUS ARIEL LAI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled


8/16, 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-231)

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF STEPHEN L. GAN CASE NO. PR120197

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: STEPHEN L. GAN, STEPHEN LEANDER GAN, STEPHEN GAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JOHN PAUL GAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JOHN PAUL GAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on September 13, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or

file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE S.B.# 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-234)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CRYSTAL C. GREENWELL, AKA CRYSTAL WATT CASE NO. PR120198

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CRYSTAL C. GREENWELL, aka CRYSTAL WATT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by KATHERINE ROSE MARTIN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that KATHERINE ROSE MARTIN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests author-

ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on September 13, 2012, at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES R. STOCKS S.B. # 67715 STOCKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 882-1771 AUGUST 13, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 8/23, 8/30, 9/6/2012 (12-237)

Is my Fictitious Business Name Statement good forever? Your fictitious business name statement

will expire five years from the date it was last filed with the County Clerk. You have 40 days from the expiration date to renew your FBNS with the County. A new statement does not need to be published unless there has been a change in the information required in the expired statement. If any changes occur then you must file a new FBNS and have published again. Within 30 days from the stamped refiling date, you must begin publishing the statement in the newspaper. If you publish it in the North Coast Journal for the required four weeks, on the last day of publication a “proof of publication” will be sent to the County Clerk to complete the filing process.

The cost for running your ficticious business name in the North Coast JourNal is a flat $50 fee.

442-1400

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF PHILLIP A. ROSE CASE NO. PR120186

the

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: PHILLIP A. ROSE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by TIMOTHY J. WYKLE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that TIMOTHY J. WYKLE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on August 23, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE S.B.# 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 8/9, 8/16, 8/23/2012 (12-223)

the Employment

CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 1, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: August 7, 2012 Filed: August 8, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court

County of Humboldt

HHS Program Services Coordinator $4,466 - $5,731 Monthly

Under direction, plans, develops and implements specialized Health and Human Services programs. Responsibilities include developing program guidelines and plans, identifying and securing funding as appropriate, developing staffing and budget proposals and planning, and assigning and reviewing the work of staff to implement the program. Filing deadline: August 31, 2012. For application come to Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs Jobline: (707) 476-2357 AA/EOE

County of Humboldt

REVENUE RECOVERY OFFICER I

$2,394– $3,072 monthly, plus excellent benefits, including 2.0 @ 55 PERS retirement plan. Under general supervision, investigate and pursue the collection of current and delinquent accounts involving revenues due to the County. Requires skill and experience in gathering information, evaluating data, drawing valid conclusions, developing collection strategies, and the ability to work effectively with a computerized tracking and record keeping system. Filing deadline: September 10, 2012. Application materials available at Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka or apply on-line at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

County of Humboldt

Senior Medical Office Assistant $2,672 - $3,429 Monthly

Under general supervision, assigns, directs and reviews the work of a small medical office support staff; provides difficult or specialized medical office support in a variety of County clinic and health program areas; performs related work as assigned. Filing deadline: August 31, 2012. For application come to Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs Jobline: (707) 476-2357 AA/EOE CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

37 37

northcoastjournal.com Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG.2012 23, 2012 • North Coast JourNal • thursday, aug.23, northcoastjournal.com • North


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

Employment Now Hiring:

Child CAre & CoMMunity speCiAlist Full-time opening. Starts at $12.15/hr.

Provides a range of office based and community services which support parents, child care providers, and community planning initiatives. Must be able to pass criminal history fingerprint clearance. Excellent benefits: paid vacation/ sick leave, holidays, and paid insurance. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address by Monday, August 27 at 5 p.m. EOE Northcoast Children’s Services

COOK Redway Head Start Prepare, organize, set-up & clean-up meals for preschool age children. Part-Time (school year): 25 hrs/wk (MonFri); $9.22-$9.68/hr

INTERPRETERS (Spanish) Head Start - various sites Assist in interpreting in class, at parent meetings, & on home visits for children & families. Part-Time (school year); Mon-Fri; $9.30-$9.77/hr

Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata CA 95521

For additional information, please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org Northcoast Children’s Services

** Arcata Main Office **

HEALTH SERVICES MANAGER

Provide leadership & oversight in the area of health and nutrition. Req. a BA in a related field + 4 yrs exp. in family & children’s services including 3 yrs exp. in supervision. FullTime (year round, exempt), Mon-Fri; $730.08-$804.92/wk Application Deadline: 8/30/12

ADMINISTRATIVE ANALYST

Carry out the development & analysis of program budgets & program data systems, prepare reports and assist with funding applications Requires a BA w/ relevant coursework. Full-Time (partial year, exempt), Mon-Fri; $695.05-$766.29/wk Application Deadline: 8/30/12

Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata CA 95521

t707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

GM – Steel Sales/Fabrication Copier Sales • Cooks Mortgage Loan Officer Insurance Agent • CPA Medical Coder ASE Mechanic • Welders

Police ServiceS officer City of EurEka $2,767 - $3,366/month

there are 5 steps in the salary range and an appointment can be made at any step depending on qualifications. this position performs a wide variety of non-sworn duties in order to provide support to patrol units and community members. a combination of education and experience equivalent to an associate's Degree in Criminal Justice or a closely related field and two years of related administrative support is desired. this position may be assigned evening and/or weekend shifts. interested? for a complete application packet, (1) contact our Personnel Department at 531 k Street, Eureka, Ca (2) call our Job Line at (707) 441-4134 to request that one be mailed to you, or (3) apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. We will be accepting applications until 5:00p.m. on friday, august 31, 2012. EoE. RESOURCE SPECIALIST - EUREKA OFFICE. Senior Information and Assistance Program. Part-time position (17.5 hours/week) located in Eureka. Duties: provide information, referral, advocacy and follow up to older persons, their caregivers and service providers by phone, walk-in and written request, enter all client information into database, and provide outreach presentations and long-term care consultation. Must have excellent written and oral communication skills. Demonstrate an ability to analyze problems and present options. Must have strong skills in office management, priority setting and time management. Knowledge of senior and caregiver support programs and services desired. Degree with major course work in social work or psychology and one year of related experience in a community planning, health or human services agency is preferred. Equivalent experience in a directservice position in a community planning, health or human service agency may be considered in lieu of a degree. For an application and job description contact: The Area 1 Agency on Aging, 434 7th St., Eureka. For information call Jeanie Ren at 442-3763 ext. 209. Position opened until filled. (E-0830) TAP & JAZZ INSTRUCTOR. 4421939. (E-0906)

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Office Technology Sales Business Solutions Consultant Exec. Director, NPO Electro-Industrial Troubleshooting Tech P/T Front Office Clerical • Collections Specialist Construction Company Bookkeeper Part Time Account Clerk AP/AR Data Entry Electrician • Legal Assistant/ Paralegal Licensed Commercial Lines Producer

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

General Manager

North Coast Co-op is seeking a General Manager responsible for the overall operation of our two large, full-service, Certified Organic Groceries. The GM will head up our management team and work collaboratively in the overall planning and management of the Co-op. Interested applicants should demonstrate an understanding and commitment to the cooperative business model and have a proven, successful management history. A background in natural foods and experience working in a union environment is preferred. BA plus five years of progressive management experience, or an equivalent combination is required. North Coast Cooperative offers a competitive wage package dependant upon experience, and an excellent benefits package.

Become a Mentor! Seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead an integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and receive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew (707) 442-4500 ext. 14 317 Third St. Eureka, CA 95501

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS. Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN) (E-0823) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-2423214. (E-0823)

Position is open until filled, first review of applications is 9/15/12. For a complete job description and to download an application: http://www.northcoastco-op.com/about.\htm#employment Please submit application, resume, salary requirements and letter of interest to Lisa Landry, HR Director at: hr@northcoastco-op.com

SERVICE COORDINATOR (CASE MGR). 1 FT position: Crescent City, CA. Advocating for Children and Adults w/dev disabilities. MA or BA + relevant exp. Good communication, organization & computer skills. Salary range $2749 to $3868/ month. + exc. bene. Go to website www.redwoodcoastrc.org for info and docs. Closes 9-4-12 at 5 p.m. EOE-M/F. (E-0830) ZUMBA FITNESS INSTRUCTORS. For the Adorni Center, the City of Eureka’s primary recreation facility. Must be self-motivated and enthusiastic. Enjoy a positive, team-oriented work environment. Flexible hours. Must provide proof of current ZUMBA certification. $14.70-$17.90/hr. Email Mo at mmerrell@ci.eureka.ca.gov or call 4414374. (E-0823)

INTERMEDIATE OFFICE CLERK. Eureka Cour t Community School. Temporary/Full-time, (M-F, 7.5 Hrs./Day) $1704.73 2,174.25/Mo. Qualifications: requires graduation from high school or demonstration of comparable basic skills competence; 2 years of progressively responsible clerical experience involving microcomputer operations. Eligible for Health Benefits and PERS retirement. For complete job description contact Personnel at (707) 445-7039 or email kschlotter@humboldt.k12. ca.us. Closing date: Aug. 29, 2012 by 4 p.m. DOE. (E-0823) MOVIE EXTRAS. Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call (866) 339-0331 (E-0823)


Employment

Rentals

Business Rentals

Rental Helpers

Offers the largest listing of homes, apartments, condos and rooms for rent in Humboldt County! 4 Seventh Street, Suite A

(707) 443-HELP TheRentalHelpers.com Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care.

Full-Time Positions MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK, Willow Creek REGISTERED NURSE, Arcata MEDICAL BILLER, Arcata REFERRAL SUPPORT, Eureka RN CLINIC COORDINATOR, Crescent City REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT, Eureka MEDICAL ASSISTANT 2 - Arcata , 1- Crescent City & 1- Willow Creek EMR SITE SPECIALIST/MEDICAL RECORDS McKinleyville BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

(Requires LCSW or Licensed Psychologist), Arcata

Part-Time Positions DRUG AND ALCOHOL COUNSELOR Crescent City Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application Call 707-826-8633 ext. 5140 for information

SENIOR ACCOUNT TECHNICIAN. Full-time, (7.5 Hrs./Day), 12 Mo./Yr., $2,338.48-$2,986.75/Mo. ($14.39-$18.38/Hr.), Starting Salary DOE. Qualifications: requires 3 years experience working in fiscal record keeping, bookkeeping and competency in spreadsheet and software applications. Eligible for Medical, Dental and Vision Benefits for successful applicant and family and PERS retirement. For complete job description contact Personnel at (707) 445-7039 or email kschlotter@humboldt.k12. ca.us. Closing date: Aug. 29, 2012 by 4 p.m. (E-0823) BILINGUAL CLIENT ADVOCATE. North Coast Rape Crisis Team has opening for a 40+ hr/wk Bilingual (Spanish/English) Client Advocate w/excellent benefits for a team oriented, self-motivated person who wants to provide in-person and phone support to survivors of sexual assault. Call 443-2737 for info. EOE (E-0830) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-0927) ADVERTISING CAREER. Secure clients over the phone, high commission possible with hourly wage, easy hours, amazing coworkers, experience not required. Arcata marketing company, 7+ years in business, (707) 822-1812. (E-0830)

BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew, (707) 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www.mentorswanted.com (E-1227) HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. theworkhub.net (E-0927) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227) OFFICE MANAGER/RECEPTION POSITION. Small Arcata office seeks Office Manager to oversee daily operations of multiple tax professionals. Position includes reception and operations duties. Experience in MS Word, Excel and QuickBooks required, in addition to excellent oral and written communication skills. Position is long-term and requires a solid, reliable person able to exercise discretion and good judgment. Pre-employment background check. Salary and benefits DOE. Mail cover letter with resume: Ms. Hall, PO Box 1094, Arcata, CA 95518 (E-0830)

Humboldt County’s only DRE Licensed Listing Service!

Corner 7 th & A of St.

PRA02054

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Busser (Sunset) 2 - Deli 2 - Valet Janitorial 2 - Security Officer Shuttle Driver Cage Cashier Bingo Admit FULL-TIME POSITIONS

Surveillance Technician Cage Cashier SEASCAPE, PART-TIME POSITIONS

Cook Host/Hostess Dish/Bus

TRINIDAD RANCHERIA

Assistant Network Admin 1 - CISCO Staff Accountant Receptionist/Admin Assistant Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

Rentals EUREKA UPSTAIRS COTTAGE. Garage, coin-op laundry, W/G paid, section 8 OK. No smoking/ grow. $585/month, $600/deposit, references and credit check. Call 725-4676. (R-0912) EUREKA 1 BEDROOM APT. Garage, onsite laundry, some utilities paid. $600. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0823)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

Call 707-488-2181 or write bobmccormick@etahoe.com for details

ARCATA 1 BEDROOM APT. Some utilities paid, fenced yard, available Mid-Aug. $625, (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-0823) ARCATA 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carpet, washer/dryer hook-ups, parking. $825, (707) 443-4357 www.TheRentalHelpers. com. (R-0823) ARCATA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Near bus, washer/dryer hook-ups, yard. $1495 (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0823) ARCATA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. New flooring. Very Clean! Shirley Blvd. Sorry, No pets/smoking/215. $1425. 826-7768. (R-0906) EUREKA 2 BEDROOM DUPLEX. Yard, washer/dryer hook-ups, small pet. $800. (707) 443-8227, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-0823) EUREKA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, yard, bonus room, washer/ dryer hookups. $1300. (707) 4434357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0823) FORTUNA 2 BEDROOM APT. Washer/dryer hookups, some utilities, $795. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com (R-0823) FORTUNA 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Garage, laundry hookups, woodstove, $1300. (707) 443-4357, www. TheRentalHelpers.com. (R-0823) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carport, onsite laundry, some utilities. $750. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0823)

FORTUNA SPACIOUS DOWNSTAIRS APARTMENT. 3BD/1.5BA, utility room, F.A. system, wood floors, wainscot, carport. $1250/ month, includes w/s/g, lawncare. Pet maybe. Call 499-7033 to see. (R-0823) MCKINLEYVILLE 2 BEDROOM TOWNHOME. Carport, onsite laundry, some utilities. $750. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers. com (R-0823) MCKINLEYVILLE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE. Yard, garage, laundry hook-ups. $1400. (707) 443-4357, www.TheRentalHelpers.com.(R0823) EUREKA 3BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1536 3rd St., #4. W/S/G paid. SEC 8 OK, Cat OK, Garage. Rent $815, MtM, Vac 9/1. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0823) FORTUNA 3+BD/3BA HOUSE. 58 Tompkins Hill Rd. Panoramic Views, Pet Considered, MtM, Rent $2200, Vac soon. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0823) ARCATA 1BD & STUDIOS. Available now. Some or all utilities paid, close to buses. Near HSU! Call for more info! 822-4557 or visit www. strombeckprop.com (R-0830) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-1213)

Business Rentals SPACIOUS DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. The Studio of Dance Arts in Eureka offers rental space for the performing, creative and visual arts. 2 huge studios, full length mirrors, maple floors and marley. Performance opportunities! Call Jane 442-1939. View the studios at studioofdancearts.com. (BR-0906)

DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227) RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE. In historic Jacoby’s Storehouse. Call 826-2426. (BR-0913)

Real Estate MOVE TO THE SUNSHINE. 2200 sf., 4 bedroom, 3 bath, Mt. Shasta view, 1.62 acres. Fruit Trees, garden area. Will consider trade in Eureka. $235K. (530) 475-3875 (RE-0830) TRINITY VILLAGE 1.3 ACRES WITH CREEK. 3BD/2BA main house. PLUS: Guest House, Art Studio/Workshop, Pool, Sauna, 2 Car Garage, Amenities Galore. $375,000. Call Gail Packard Realty, Owner/Broker, (530) 629-4181. (RE-0830) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227) RUTH LAKE LEASE LOT. Trailer, Ramada & Bathhouse, Utilities. $72k cash. (707) 574-6549. Broker ann@highway36.com (RE-0830) NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM You’ll find searchable back issues, articles, workshops & classes, the calendar, the Menu of Menus, the Wedding Guide...

on Page 43

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 23, 2012

39


Lodging/Travel VACATION RENTAL. King Range, Great for family gatherings, workshops, small events, solar powered, easy access, handicap friendly. min. 3 nights www. chemisemountainretreat.com, 986-7794. (L-1025)

the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Services

Buy/Sell/Trade

NEW

LO

in ION CAT

Old

n Tow

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

Pets

Ladies’ Hat Day

at Humboldt County Fair

Aug. 25

Large Variety of Hats in stock

under $20

Auto 1992 34 FT. AIRSTREAM EXCELLA 1000 TRAVEL TRAILER. Good condition. Lots of extras. Call for pictures. (707) 407-7312. (A-0830) 2002 HARLEY DAVIDSON HERITAGE. Lots of extras, 9,300 miles, $12,700 obo. (707) 443-0264. (A0823) CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-1004) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

Weekly specials available on Facebook

t’s New W335haE Street, Eureka

3954 Jacobs Ave. Eureka 443-7397

445-8079

BACK TO SCHOOL SALE. Kids Clothes & School Supplies 1/2 Off. Plus Pink Tagged Clothes 25¢! Aug. 21-25. Dream Quest Thrift Store, Willow Creek. Providing Opportunities for Local Youth (BST-0823) GARAGE SALE. Sat., Aug. 25, 9-2. Furniture, Tools, Clothing, Mixed Media, Chair Massage Insert, Spiral Binding Machine. 1950 Bird Ave., McKinleyville. (BST-0823)

WANTED OLD LIGHTERS. 1 lighter or collection. Any make, working or not. Collector will pay top dollar. Call (800) 379-3415. (BST-0906) REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945 (AAN CAN) (BST-0823) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr9Ste 530965, Willow 11th Creek. st. 629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1227)

Yard Sale

le garage sa › this way

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat.s, 11-3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited $66. Non-Profit. Bless the Beasts. or call (707) 444-0408 (P-1227) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at www.humboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Have an extra fixer up cars in the driveway? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

CREATIVE WRITING COACH/ EDITOR Nurturing, collaborative editing and creative coaching will make your work shine. All styles welcome. C.Baku, MFA. www. carlabaku.com. (S-0207) DIRECTV OR DISH NETWORK. LOW INTRODUCTORY RATES. Commitment and Credit/Debit required. LOCAL CALL NOW! 826-0203 (S-0830) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. Redwood Coast Helicopters, based in Humboldt County. Whatever your helicopter needs, we will accommodate you! $160/hour. redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com (S-1115) REACH 5 MILLION. hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http:// www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN) (S-0913)

Custom Pet Portraits by Sophia Dennler •

For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

SURFBOARD REPAIR 40+ years experience. George Cicero (707) 616-0738 (S-0823) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Contact (707) 8453087. (S-0906) LIFE CYCLE LANDSCAPING. Garden Maintenance, Restoration and Design. Serving All of Humboldt County, (707) 672-4398 (S-1206) HOUSE CLEANING BY JEANNIE. Residence $15/hour, Move-outs $20/hour. Call 921-9424. References Available. (S-0830) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808)


CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

Music

Services

Need some help home around the house?

home & gard

& gard

FD1963

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0830) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded #3860. Summer Cleaning Special! (707) 444-2001. (S-1011) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-0823) SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

serv

707.825.7100

Sales

home &

Service

Solutions

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson Attorney DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc. FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-1108) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0823) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

Music PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-1115) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227)

Too many tubas, overwhelmed with sTuff? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC

Community DO WE CONTROL OUR OWN DESTINIES? Or does it all come down to fate? Or maybe it’s a part of God’s plan. Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun. Aug. 26, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0823) HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR. Calling all crafters! Vendor registration for Eureka Recreation’s 36th Annual Holiday Craft Bazaar has begun! At the Adorni Center, Sat., Dec. 1, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $50/ booth space. All items must be handmade and cannot contain food. Booth space is limited, register today at the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. 4414374 or www.eurekarecreation. com. (C-0823) TO LADY IN 4-DOOR NAVY TOYOTA SEDAN. Who backed into Toyota camper at Fish Hatchery. Please call 502-1224. (C-0823) REWARD FOR STOLEN ITEMS. Taken from vehicle in the Bayview neighborhood on 8/7/12. Motorcycle gear, camping gear, men’s and women’s clothing. No questions. (707) 826-2262 or (707) 498- 5141 (C-0823) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-0823) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0124)

garden

service directory service directory see page 16

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 23, 2012

41


body, mind ▼

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 41

&Spirit Make-up classes available

TIME FOR A MASSAGE?

Award Winning Hollywood Makeup Artist

N. Kristine Chadwick introduces:

AMA approved quality.

Therapeutic Massage

Cinema Secrets professional mineral makeup line

Low prices, free makeover demo & $10 gift certificate drawing.

Call 707-768-3677 for an appointment.

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

#7 Fifth Street, Eureka frommalibutoyou@aol.com

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

with Margy Emerson Martial Arts Academy Sunny Brae Shopping Ctr., Arcata 13-Week Session Starts Week of Sept 17

3 ProgrAMS: • Traditional T’ai Chi

• T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis • 42 Combined Forms -private lessons availableFor Schedule and Fees: www.margaretemerson.com or

822-6508 Visit any class free!

PROFESSIONAL HYPNOTHERAPY: THE SAFE, RELAXING WAY. Achieve your goals, quit tobacco & other habits, become healthier, sharpen memory, increase self-confidence, excel at sports, strengthen immunities, have a joyous childbirth. Call (707) 825-0313 or 601-1261. Approved by the AMA. Experienced in Hum. Co. Physician referrals welcomed. S. Wilson, MA, CHT. (MB-0823) DIVORCE SUPPORT GROUP. Connect with others and feel less alone. Learn effective coping skills, ways to manage strong emotions how to heal and live the life you want. Group meets Mon. evenings, 6-7:30 pm. For more info. and to register call (707) 834-3747. Facilitated by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815 (MB-1115) POSITIVE CONNECTIONS. In this world of negativity and lack of connection create and participate in a positive social network based on strengths and optimism. In a group format, learn to improve your relationships with yourself and others. Meets once a week for 6 weeks. Offered by Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815. For info and to register call 834-3747 (MB-0913) STRAIGHTEN UP! Structural Integration Bodywork Series. Relieves chronic pain, eases movement, frees emotion. Good posture can be natural! 31 years experience, Cecilie Hooper, 677-3969. (MB-0823)

Parent Educator

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 23, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

We understand your personal needs and provide care for every phase of a women’s life.

825-0200 | 822-9664 | 3798 Janes Rd., Ste. #10 in front of the Mad River Emergency Room

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NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-0830) COLON HYDROTHERAPY WITH MOLLY LEUTHNER. At Jade Dragon Medical Spa. Closed System. Using an F.D.A. approved medical device, warm water is gently inserted into the colon. When the colon contracts, the water is flushed out through the device. Take an internal bath! 822-4300. (MB-1011) doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719 (MB-1115) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0124)

Coming to Arcata.

CHIROPRACTIC

www.northcoast-medical.com LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH, FROM THE INSIDE OUT. Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist and Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). (707) 845-3749. www. ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-0823)

CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE

NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Lind a N e s b i t t , M S W, LC S W (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/ anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 268-0929. (MB1025) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 4424240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (MB-1227) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0920) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0920)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Mon. Club, 610 Main St. Every Tue. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (MB-1227) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1227) YOUR NEW HEALTH PRACTITIONER may be listed here. Tell them you saw their notice in the Journal.

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup. org. (MB-1227) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227)


Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

Fall Class Starts 9/17/12, Call Now to Enroll! Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna

www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

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2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

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www.communityrealty.net

real estate

this week Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

real est

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

REDU

3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,400 sq ft single level wonderful home with views of the 7th fairway of Baywood Golf and Country Club, easy access, two living rooms, two fireplaces, decks and much more

$359,000

real estate 4 bed, 2.5 bath, 1,793 sq ft custom Trinidad home with outstanding ocean views & fabulous sunsets, 2 wood stoves, cathedral ceilings, wraparound deck, oversized lot, garden area, fruit trees, shop

this week

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace ■ MCKINLEYVILLE

this we

$399,900

$480,000

2 bed, 2.5 bath, 1,868 sq ft wonderful country property in Elk River, 9.26 acres, two wood stoves, lovely knotty pine accents, porch & decking w/views, 1800 sq ft shop, out buildings, & old barn

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

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7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435 DOW’S PRAIRIE: Have a garden and raise some chickens! on this half-acre in Dow’s Prairie. The older 3 bd/1 ba home needs some TLC and remodelling, but has a good floor plan and a separate laundry room. Includes a garden shed and greenhouse. Great location! mls#235831 $165,000

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Need help finding the home improvement experts?

home & garden

service directory

Barry Summit Land/Property Four +/-160 acre parcels located 45 minutes

from arcata near Barry Summit. properties boast timber, breathtaking views, water, deeded access and close to county road. owner will carry!

$350,000 each

Willow Creek Land/Property

+/-250 acres near Waterman Ridge, only a half an hour from Willow Creek. property boats Southern exposure, timber, two large year round springs, great access and multiple developed building sites.

$450,000

Zenia Land/Property

this beautiful, flat 40 acre parcel features 2 unfinished cabins, a yurt, small outbuildings, year round developed creek, phenomenal views and easy access. perfect year round homesteading property or summer retreat. Call today!

$269,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

23, 2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com NorthCOAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, AUG. Aug. 23, northcoastjournal.com• •NORTH

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North Coast Journal 08-23-12 Edition