North Coast Journal 08-18-2022 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 Vol. XXXIII Issue 33 northcoastjournal.com

O bon Humboldt Style By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill


MURPHY’S MARKETS SALUTES

McKinleyville Little League

Murphy’s Market would like to congratulate McKinleyville Little League on their success in this year’s section tournaments.

The 9-10 year old team made it to the championship game in Turlock. While the 11-12’s played at state as well in Watsonville. Murphy’s is very proud of both teams and wishes them both continued success.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 4 4 5 8 9

Mailbox Poem

Traveling

News

Becoming the First Native Woman in Space

NCJ Daily Online On The Cover

Obon Humboldt Style

14 On the Table 15

ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2022

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

New Faces at Frankie’s NY Bagels

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

Fishing the North Coast

ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Fall-Run Salmon Quotas Underway on the Klamath

16 Get Out!

Claiming Races and Maidens

17

Aug. 18, 2022 • Volume XXXIII Issue 33 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

Art Beat

Ingrid Nickelsen’s Legacy at Morris Graves

19 Front Row

EXIT Theatre’s Indie Development

20 Home & Garden Service Directory

20 The Setlist

Two Kinds of Tunes

Hops in Humboldt

Special Pull-Out Section

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITERS

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

23 Calendar 27 Screens

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Rory Hubbard, Renée Thompson ncjads@northcoastjournal.com

28 28 29 29

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com

The Bear Roars

Workshops & Classes Cartoon Sudoku & Crossword Washed Up

No Crabs Allowed

33 Classifieds

ADVERTISING MANAGER

SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Heather Luther heather@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Trevor Lee trevor@northcoasjtournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER/DISTRIBUTION

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

Lori Goodman’s sculpture at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Read more on page 17. Courtesy of the Morris Graves Museum of Art

On the Cover Photo by Dave Woody

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Traveling

Correction

The Best of Humboldt listings in the Aug. 4, 2022, edition of the North Coast Journal included incorrect contact information for Megan Lynch, voted best personal trainer. She can be reached at (707) 834-3877. The Journal regrets the error.

In that first moment Seeing all those stars,

Write a Letter!

And all those “trips”

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●

My journey began. Mexico, Canada, Paris, Todos Santos, Across the States Sleeping on trains, Were just distractions From my daily trek: Thanking my ego, Letting him go, And embracing The Wonder Of it all! — Kirk Gothier

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Terry Torgerson


NEWS

NASA astronaut Nicole Mann is lowered into the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory during a spacewalk training session in 2014. NASA

Becoming the First Native Woman in Space Wailacki Nicole Mann readies to make history By Jourdan Bennett-Begaye newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

N

icole Aunapu Mann will be making history as the first Native woman to fly into space this fall. Mann, enrolled in Wailacki of the Round Valley Indian Tribes in northern California, will be aboard the SpaceX Crew-5 mission to go to the International Space Station no earlier than Sept. 29. (The Wailacki’s ancestral territory lies along the Eel River east of that of the Sinkiyone people, and southeast of those of the Mattole and Wiyot.) “It’s very exciting,” she told Indian Country Today, referring to being the first Native woman in space. “I think it›s important that we communicate this to our community, so that other Native kids, if they thought maybe that this was not a possibility or to realize that some of those barriers that used to be there are really starting to get broken down.” This is NASA’s fifth crew rotation flight as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. As mission commander on the SpaceX spacecraft called Dragon, Mann is leading all phases of the flight from launch at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida

to re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere. She will also serve as the Expedition 68 flight engineer on the space station. Three other astronauts will also be on the Crew-5 mission: NASA astronaut Josh Cassada, JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata, and Roscosmos cosmonaut Anna Kikina. The crew will live on board for six months to complete their mission of conducting approximately 250 scientific experiments in the space station that is “a floating laboratory,” said Mann, a colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps. Besides the other crew members, Mann will also be accompanied by personal items in her personal preference kit. The Dragon spacecraft allows 3.3 pounds for personal items. “I have some special gifts for my family, which I can’t say because they’re a surprise. Definitely taking my wedding rings, and I have this dream catcher that my mother gave me when I was very young,” she said. “It’s kind of always stayed with me throughout my time.” This is the 45-year-old’s first spaceflight Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS Continued from previous page

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and she looks forward to the science on board that will benefit the human race. “One of the ones that I’m looking most forward to is called the biofabrication facility. And it is literally 3D printing human cells, which to me sounds so futuristic, right?” she said. The force of gravity makes printing and growing cells on Earth difficult. That is a different story in space with “a much more intact structure of the cell,” she said. The end goal: printing human organs. “We’re not there yet. However, we have successfully printed some heart cells, as well as part of the meniscus of a knee. And so this facility has flown, and then come and printed cells and then come back to Earth,” she said. “They made changes, they learned it flew again, came back to Earth, they made changes, and they’re about to fly it again. So that’ll be our chance to participate.” Of course, she hopes to do a spacewalk or two since she trained a lot for that. That was probably the most challenging but enjoyable part of her astronaut training experience. “So they put you in a spacesuit, just like you would be in space, and they blow up like a balloon,” Mann said. The pressure in the suit is filled to approximately 4.3 pounds per square inch, or psi. For comparison, the Earth’s air pressure psi is at 14.7, according to NASA. The high pressure in the suits is needed to supply adequate oxygen and air pressure to let human bodies function properly. “And that’s what it’s like when you go out the door in vacuum, then they put you in this huge pool to simulate microgravity, and use a team of divers and weights and foam,” she said. A mockup of the space station, or most components of it, lies inside this huge pool where the astronauts crawl around in “this kind of like scuba diving, kinda like a jungle gym” making modifications on the space station. “But each time you move, you’re working against the pressure of that suit, of that 4.3 psi. So it’s like a marathon. The training run is six hours long, you’re physically exhausted, you’re mentally exhausted,” Mann said. “You’re done at the end of one of these runs, but everybody says it is the most realistic training for doing a spacewalk in space. And being under the water and climbing along the space station and doing these tasks. It is incredible. It is some of the coolest training I think that we do. And hopefully I’ll have an opportunity to do that in space for real.”

Astronaut dreams

Becoming an astronaut didn’t occur to Mann as a kid. Years later, she says with a

laugh, “Why would you not want to become an astronaut?” “It was a little bit later on in life actually that I realized that being an astronaut was an opportunity and something that I could do,” she said. “To be honest, I didn’t understand when I was younger what astronauts actually did.” Mann graduated from Rancho Cotate High School in Rohnert Park, California, in 1995. She obtained a bachelor’s of science degree in mechanical engineering in 1999 from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. In 1999, she was also commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. She realized she could be a fighter pilot and a Marine simultaneously while riding in a F/A 18, a fighter and attack aircraft, in the summer before her senior year at the naval academy. After earning a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Stanford University in 2001, she went to the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School. Mann has more than 2,500 hours in 25 different aircrafts, 200 carrier arrestments and 47 combat missions in Afghanistan and Iraq under her belt. During test pilot school, she started looking at options for what to do next. Becoming an astronaut fell on the list. She applied to the 21st astronaut class. Mann was selected with seven others in the 2013 cohort out of more than 6,100 applicants. At that time, it was the second largest number of applicants NASA had received. She was 35 and a major in the Marine Corps when selected.

To the moon and beyond

Little by little NASA is working its way to deep space exploration. The SpaceX Crew-5 mission is only the beginning for Mann. “This is a huge part of our larger mission under Artemis to go to the moon and eventually to Mars,” she said at an Aug. 4 NASA press conference. “So what we are going to do in low Earth orbit is a stepping stone to achieving those goals of exploration into deep space, the technology development, the research that will do some of the operations that will learn to develop and work with the ground, understanding how we’re going to do that from a further distance where we don’t have the accessibility of the ground so often.” In December of 2020, NASA announced Mann as part of the initial 18-member Artemis Team to return to the moon. “There is so much exciting work ahead of us as we return to the moon, and it will take the entire astronaut corps to make that happen,” said Chief Astronaut Pat Forrester in a 2020 press release. “Walking on the lunar surface would be a dream come true for any one of us, and any part we can play in


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Nicole Mann, of Wailaki descent, is poised to become the first Native woman in space when she launches to the International Space Station as a part of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission next month. NASA making that happen is an honor. I am proud of this particular group of men and women and know that any of them would do an outstanding job representing NASA and the United States on a future Artemis mission.” The Artemis mission plans to send two of the 18 astronauts to land on the lunar surface, the first woman and first person of color. If Mann is selected, she would be the first woman (and Native person) to step on the moon. “It’s just this really overwhelming sense of emotion in the best of ways that I can describe,” she told Inverse, if she is the first woman. “Yes, you want to be the first person to walk on the moon, you want to fulfill that role, but really it’s not about you. … It’s about the bigger mission, so you’re just excited to support in whatever role you can.” The Artemis-III crewed mission hopes to land on the south pole of the moon’s surface in 2025. A change from the original and unfeasible 2024 moon landing that was pushed by the Trump administration. “Returning to the moon as quickly and safely as possible is an agency priority. However, with the recent lawsuit and other factors, the first human landing under Artemis is likely no earlier than 2025,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson in 2021. The Artemis-III will be the first crewed moon landing since Apollo 17 in 1972. Twelve

astronauts have walked on the moon out of the 24 American astronauts who traveled to the moon between 1968 and 1972, according to NASA. The first moon landing was the Apollo 11 on July 20, 1969, by American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, the first humans to walk on the moon. Other Natives who have been to space or sent projects to the cosmos: John Herrington and Aaron Yazzie. Herrington, Chickasaw, was the first Native astronaut to travel into space. The Navy veteran spent 14 days on the space station. Yazzie is a Diné mechanical engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. He has contributed to four Mars projects in his time with the agency. While the history books write Mann’s story, the Native astronaut will continue to train and prepare intensively for her mission in a couple of months. “We’re going to gain a ton of experience in flying low earth orbit, and any of us could be assigned to an Artemis mission in the future,” she said. “And hopefully, we’ll walk on the moon together one day.” Follow Mann’s journey on Twitter: @ AstroDuke, @SpaceX and @NASA. ● This story was first published by Indian Country Today.

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FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Six Rivers Fires: Where to Get Help and How to Help the Helpers

I

n the face of tremendous need, with hundreds of residents displaced by a series of wild fires sparked by an Aug. 5 lightning storm around Willow Creek, Humboldt County nonprofits and residents have stepped up. Donations — from donuts and dog food to livestock foster placements and meals — have come pouring into a variety of relief organizations and nonprofits that have stepped in as a part of a multi-layered disaster response. “I really want to thank the community — the individuals, the businesses — everyone who has stepped up, just again and again,” said Pay it Forward Humboldt Director Jessica Gregorio. “It’s a year thing now. But this community is amazing. I love it.” With hundreds displaced — including dozens reportedly staying in an evacuation shelter set up by the American Red Cross — and the five fires collectively known as the Six Rivers Lightning Complex still largely uncontained and blanketing the area in smoke, more help will likely be needed in what Humboldt-Del Norte CalFire Chief Kurt McCray warned will be “a long battle.” But so far, organizations have been up to the challenge. Here’s a quick look at resources available for those in need and those who want to help:

For Those Needing Assistance Food for People, in partnership with Pay it Forward Humboldt and the Red Cross, held a free food distribution Aug. 12 at Dream Quest. Evacuees or others in

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New Condors Coming: Another cohort of four California condors arrived Aug. 16 in a Yurok Tribe-led effort to bring back the endangered bird they know as prey-go-neesh to re-establish a population on the North Coast. This new group will join four others already flying in the skies above Humboldt County as a part of the Northern California Condor Restoration Program. POSTED 08.14.22

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

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need of food assistance can contact Food for People at (707) 633-8191 or emergency@foodforpeople.org. Dream Quest Teen & Youth Center in Willow Creek (100 Country Club Drive, (530) 629-3564) is stocking essentials (masks, food boxes, blankets, hygiene products, etc.) and open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, until pop-up relief stations can be organized. The Hoopa Rodeo Grounds (1767 Pine Creek Road, (707) 492-2851) has been turned into a large animal shelter, and has been helping to shelter smaller animals of those staying in the Red Cross evacuation center. The grounds cannot house goats, sheep, poultry or small animals, but “may be able to find temporary foster placements on a case-by-case basis.” Allie Hostler, who is helping coordinate the effort, said the shelter has plenty of donated dog and cat food, and a list of people volunteering to foster, noting, “No large animals are without a safe and comfortable place to stay right now.” The U.S. Post Office in Willow Creek will be holding any UPS or FedEx delivery packages sent to residences in areas under evacuation order. They can be picked up during regular business hours — Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., or 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday — and the post office can be reached at (530) 629-2185. Pay it Forward Humboldt is also working to “serve as a liaison between the community that wants to help and the community that needs,” Gregorio said. So if you’re affected by the Six Rivers Lightning Complex Fire and need something, she encourages you to reach out. (707) 616-9191.

northcoastjournal

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Ceallaigh Kelley visits with her cat Brownie at an evacuation center in Willow Creek after both were evacuated from their home Aug. 6. Allie Hostler

For Those Wanting to Help Food for People, Humboldt County’s food bank, distributes nearly 2 million pounds of food annually and is a vital part of local disaster response efforts. For information on how to make a tax-deductible donation directly to Food for People, or to look into making a food donation to the nonprofit, visit www.foodforpeople. org or call (707) 445-3166. Pay it Forward Humboldt works to fill in the gaps between other disaster response agencies and those in need of assistance. For example, when Happy Donuts recently offered to donate hundreds of donuts to evacuees and firefighters but had no way to get them to Willow Creek from Eureka, Pay it Forward coordinated pick up and distribution. (Gregorio said the treats were especially well-received by grateful firefighters: “It was wonderful to see a big smile on their faces from something as simple as a donut.”) Pay it Forward is a certified nonprofit and tax-deductible donations can be made by check (Pay it Forward Humboldt, 326 I St., Suite 102, Eureka, CA 95501), via Venmo (@

Monkeypox Vaccinations Begin: Humboldt County has begun vaccinating people considered at high risk of contracting the monkeypox virus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified those at a higher risk as people who are gay, bisexual, transgender or cisgender men who have sex with men or transgender women. People living with HIV or who are otherwise immunocompromised are also being prioritized. POSTED 08.12.22

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payit-forwardhumboldt), via PayPal (Payitforwardhumboldt@gmail.com, selecting the “Friends and Family” option to ensure the full donation is received) or through the Humboldt Area Foundation here. “We’re small,” Gregorio said. “We don’t pay anyone. Everything that comes in, goes out. The nonprofit also maintains a list of current nonmonetary needs on its Facebook page. It currently includes box fans, basic pleated air filters (8 MERV rating), gift cards for fuel or essentials, water, snacks, men’s socks, deodorant, paper towels, hair ties, gallon Ziploc bags, women’s depends (size medium), sleeping mats and sleeping bags. If you have any of these items to donate — or have other nonmonetary donations you want to get to people in need — call or text the nonprofit at (707) 616-9191. And Gregorio says, perhaps more than anything, the nonprofit needs volunteers. “The money and the goods donations are huge, but getting people there to deal with it all is also huge,” she said. — Thadeus Greenson POSTED 08.11.22 Read the full story online.

Six Rivers: The U.S. Forest Service has indefinitely closed all roads, trails and land in the Six Rivers National Forest Lower Trinity Ranger District in an effort to protect the public and firefighters responding to the Six Rivers Lightning Complex. The move is aimed at mitigating safety risks and opportunities for additional fires to spark. For a detailed map of the closure area, visit www.northcoastjournal. com. POSTED 08.11.22

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Franco Imperial, visiting from San Jose Taiko, beats the big taiko as the bon odori dancers circle the stage in front of the Arcata Playhouse on Sunday, Aug. 14.

ON THE COVER

Obon Humboldt Style HAPI brings the first Japanese Obon festival to the county By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

P

eople are still trickling into the lot in front of the Arcata Playhouse, thickening the crowd already encircling the low stage, where Marylyn Paik-Nicely, a “founding mother” of Humboldt Asians and Pacific Islanders in Solidarity (HAPI), stands in pink sneakers and a purple T-shirt commemorating this, the first Obon festival in Humboldt County, a cell phone in her back pocket. Some in the ring of attendees, both Japanese and non-Japanese, are wearing yukata (cotton summer kimono), festival hapi coats or kimono. Some of the kimono are perfectly arranged with artful contrasting bows, others are worn loosely over western clothes, some hang open like robes. But nobody seems to be fretting too much about it. HAPI member Alex Ozaki-McNeill says the group wanted to encourage people

Photos by Dave Woody to come out in whatever clothes spoke to their connection to Japanese culture. “Our general mindset is that we’re inviting people to share our culture,” she says, so they’re not worried about cultural appropriation. The event — a “Humboldt-style” Obon festival with drumming, dancing, food and children’s games — was planned as a chance for everyone to experience the annual tradition of connecting with one’s ancestors. Ozaki-McNeill finds the simplest way to explain Obon, a Japanese Buddhist celebration going back more than 500 years, in California is to draw parallels to the Mexican Dia de los Muertos. Despite their very different origins, both involve remembrance, care and feeding of departed family and loved ones. During Obon, when the spirits of the dead return, the living visit and clean their ancestors’ graves and

offer them food, placing photos, rice, fruit and favorite foods on a household altar alongside incense. Many Japanese add little wooden legs to a cucumber and an eggplant, symbolizing a fast horse to bring the spirits home and a slow cow for them to ride back to the afterworld. And out in town centers, there are festivals with bright paper lanterns and drum towers, atop which taiko drummers beat out a rhythm for circling dancers below. Growing up in Humboldt County, where the Japanese American population is fairly small and dispersed, Ozaki-McNeill says her mother would take the family to the Bay Area to expose her and her brother to cultural events like Obon. “So this is really exciting to have something like this here.” Before her grandfather died a few years ago, Ozaki-McNeill went to Japan with him. Honoring his ancestors at his family

temple and connecting with relatives was “on his bucket list,” she says. Now, with her own baby, she feels the importance of sharing the tradition with her daughter. Back on stage, Gerald Sakamoto, head minister of the San Jose Buddhist Temple, tells a story from a sutra about a student who discovers his mother’s spirit is trapped in the Realm of Hungry Ghosts, where food turns to ash and flames. When he asks his teacher how to free her, the teacher says he must help his fellow monks and the people in his community. The 2,500-year-old story, he says, demonstrates how important it is “that we recognize that relationship to those around us, that we are not isolated. … Today … [during Obon] it’s not just Buddhists we should remember, or just our families, but all people in the world.” As he prepares to Continued on next page »

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ON THE COVER

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Rinban Gerald Sakamoto, head minister of San Jose Buddhist Temple, joins HAPI’s Marylyn Paik-Nicely to open Humboldt’s inaugural Obon festival.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

chant, he looks at his feet and shrugs. “I forgot my dress shoes,” he says, drawing a laugh from the crowd. He begins the chant and the attendees fall silent under the steady thrum of his voice as red and white paper lanterns bob on the lines above the lot. A trio of children with striped water-filled balloons on elastic strings bounce them lightly. A toddler in a yukata and Hello Kitty sneakers fidgets by the bike rack. On the other side of the circle, an older man in a pale cowboy hat hooks his thumbs in his belt and listens. Sakamoto usually plays to a bigger crowd. The Obon festival in San Jose this year, the first since lockdown in 2020, drew some 900 dancers alone. But he says he’s pleased to be a part of Humboldt’s first Obon. “It’s wonderful to see all this interest, seeing people be a part of the community,” an aspect that can get a bit lost in outsized events. He says he prepared his talk with the varying backgrounds of Humboldt folks in mind, especially the Wiyot Tribe on whose land the festival would take place. “Rather than focus on a particular religion, [I focused] on a connection to people and to place.” When the Humboldt Taiko drummers start playing, it’s chest pounding, thundering down into the pavement. Some spectators hold phones aloft to record the seven drummers arcing their sticks overhead, knocking at the wooden sides and skins of their drums in sync for rolling crescendos. Teacher Gary Ronne’s solo numbers are even more physical as he leaps and dances

barefoot around his drum, veering from impishness to high drama and back again. It was at a ramen fundraiser for Taiko Swing Humboldt in 2019 that the idea for a Humboldt Obon festival first sparked. The Swingposium that the group put on in January of 2020 in partnership with San Jose Taiko was both a sober retelling of the mass imprisonment of Japanese Americans during World War II and a joyful mashup of taiko and big band music and dance. But the momentum it created was stalled by the pandemic. But as events started to return, the HAPI group that grew out of Taiko Swing Humboldt saw an opportunity to hold an outdoor festival. “In traditional HAPI fashion, we put it together in a couple months,” says Ozaki-McNeill with a chuckle. “HAPI is definitely a pan-Asian group — a lot of our coordinators identify as Japanese American but we want to incorporate more events in Humboldt that include other Asian and Pacific Islander cultures.” There’s significant overlap between the Obon organizers, the Swingposium group and the Eureka Chinatown Project, which recently worked to establish wayfinding signs for the city’s historic Chinatown and rename one of its alleys Charlie Moon Way in honor of a man who resisted the 1885 Chinese Expulsion (“Heading for Charlie Moon Way,” Nov. 7, 2021). Ozaki-McNeill notes that Paik-Nicely, a presence in all these projects, has been the driving force behind the high-speed effort for the Obon festival. “So many people came together from


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so many different [API] backgrounds, not just Japanese, some hakujin,” Paik-Nicely says, using the typically neutral Japanese word for white people. She explains how Obon varies from Japan to America and between different regions and cities, so the group shared their favorite memories to figure out what elements to incorporate. Paik-Nicely, who grew up Korean and third generation Okinawan in Japanese-influenced Hilo, Hawaii, recalls Obon as a season running from July into August. “Every Saturday there was a bon dance at a different [Buddhist] church,” as well as at Shinto shrines. “When I was younger, it was more like watching my aunties and learning the dances,” but in high school it became a social occasion. She has happy memories of driving her grandmother to the graveyard, where she’d walk from plot to plot, leaving gifts and telling stories about each friend and relative. “Each time, after, I just felt so good.” Even far away in Humboldt, Paik-Nicely says, “I always know when it is Obon … I always have an altar up anyway with pictures of my parents and grandparents just to feel in touch.” But without a Buddhist temple, sharing the season with others was difficult. Bringing Obon to Humboldt also connects to what she sees as a resurgence of Japanese American cultural practice. “After the internment and WWII ended, it was just so important for [second generation Japanese Americans’] kids to be ‘American’ and assimilate,” she says, taking American names and speaking only

English, even if they attended Japanese language class. “The third generation is like, ‘Hey, we’re gonna reclaim our heritage.’” HAPI is a Dreammaker Project of the Ink People, through which it establishes its nonprofit status and event insurance. Humboldt Area Foundation came through with a grant for event costs and HAPI got help with kitchen space at the Arcata Playhouse, tables, the stage and sound equipment through a city of Arcata event grant. The group set a budget of $8,000 on its crowdfunding page and was thrilled when a single donor put in about half that. The permit HAPI secured was for 400 people — a wild guess for the first-time event. Though there’s no formal headcount, attendance was in the hundreds. When Paik-Nicely first contacted Craig Kurumada about heading up the bon dancing, he says he “was very dubious.” “You know, I just thought, ‘OK, we don’t have a temple, or a priest and a really tiny Japanese community, but other than that,’” he trails off with a laugh. But he says HAPI had so much “energy and positive forward motion,” he got on board. Kurumada, a stalwart of the local folkdance community who specializes in Balkan dance, had taught bon dancing through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. He set an ambitious goal of eight dances for the Redwood Raks classes, all of which he learned as a kid in Salt Lake City. In the end, it yielded a core group of more than a dozen dancers who could lead others joining in

Attorney Megan Yarnall or Paralegal Karen Ellis at

JANSSEN MALLOY LLP (707) 445-2071 or e-mail: kellis@janssenlaw.com

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ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

Humboldt Taiko drummers give a thundering performance during the festival. Dancers in yukata and hapi coats joined the bon odori, traditional folk dances for Obon. at the festival. He also put tutorials online so people could practice at home. “There was a great deal of interest from non-Japanese,” and as he wondered why, Kurumada saw the irony. “Here I am as an Asian American and I’m always interested in all these other dances.” Often asked why he studies Balkan dance when he’s not Bulgarian, he replies he loves the music and the movement, and “it speaks to my heart.” Kurumada’s own family, which is Japanese and Chinese, was never particularly into Obon. But that spoke to his heart, too — he was drawn to the gatherings and the dances as an elementary student and joined the practices months ahead of the festivals. “When I moved here, of course, there was no opportunity to do it.” For 30 years, he traveled to the Bay Area if he wanted to take part. As much as he loves traditional dance,

Kurumada is not a hardcore purist, like some in the folkdance world who he says hope to “freeze things in time” instead of letting traditions evolve. “It’s a growing, organic tradition; it’s not just preservation. They’re making new dances all the time.” Paik-Nicely echoes the sentiment, noting HAPI’s festival is “Obon Humboldt style. Many things won’t be like you’ll find in other places but we’re making it the way we want it to be.” In the spirit of community participation, Kelley Garrett found inspiration in the wooden ema plaques visitors hang at Shinto shrines and the strips of paper with wishes on them that adorn bamboo trees during Tanabata, also known as the Star Festival. Garrett brought her own young cherry tree with a few redwood branches at the base and set out paper for attendees to write messages for ancestors to hang in the branches. After a Totoro mascot warms up the

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crowd, the bon dancing begins. Kurumada, fan in hand, and Ronne, drumming along to the piped in music, lean into their showmanship on stage, grinning and capering as two rings of dancers travel around them. Those who’d taken the class take the inside track, with newcomers following along, some laughing and stumbling, others mimicking with sober attention. When the music cuts out a moment, Ronne keeps the beat going a bit and the dancers continue their path to applause from the crowd. Dressed in black and pink floral yukata, Leslie Sweeney-Fern watches with a friend. “I was late because I was trying to tie my obi right.” Her son had gone to Japan for a year of study abroad “and didn’t come home,” she says, smiling. While she’s visited Japan, it’s never been during Obon. “I think it’s fantastic … it’s a real feel-good event.” Yoshiko Skelton is surprised by the

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turnout, though she’s always found Humboldt welcoming. Originally from Kyoto, she moved to Humboldt in 1973 from Tokyo, where she worked. “Almost a native,” she says from the chair someone brought her earlier. In all those years, she’s never seen a festival like this. “This is very good … a good atmosphere,” she says, eyes on the dancers, adding how much she enjoyed the taiko performance. She says she won’t dance because of a bad back but eventually she drifts into the outer circle. When the music ends, Jim Hatchimonji straightens his fedora and regroups with his wife Rachel and daughter Emi, a straw fan tucked in his belt. “We’ve gone to Obon festivals in Hawaii and Gardena,” he says, though this is his daughter’s first time dancing. Rachel Hatchimonji says the family has always had to travel if they wanted to attend something like this and she’s happy

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Teacher Gary Ronne of Humboldt Taiko pounds out the beat on the largest drum. “just getting to have one of the Japanese festivals here.” “We didn’t know there would be such an outpouring of people,” says Kurumada, who took in the crowds with disbelief. In recent years, particularly over the course of the pandemic, anti-Asian rhetoric and violence have ramped up, adding to both the surprise and meaning of such a well-attended and diverse Obon gathering. “Of course, there was this whole period of ‘Asian-free’ Humboldt; I mean it’s pretty awful,” Kurumada says, referring to the Chinese Expulsion of 1885 and its aftermath. “I had no idea not only how many Japanese and Asian people are here but also Asian-connected people ... and families.” Add to that all those with no connection, who simply wanted to learn about Obon. “I was overwhelmed,” says Paik-Nicely, who was moved by the attendance, as well as the number of people who came

out in some form of Japanese dress. (The food vendors were overwhelmed, too, with the Obento stall, Jim Hito’s curry stand and the table selling omusubi with Spam or tofu between layers of rice running out entirely.) “I think for us to have the Obon festival was a real celebration,” says Paik-Nicely, “the community coming together and honoring our ancestors and honoring tradition.” These were always the goals. But there are other joys from the day for her, like her grandson “asking all kinds of questions,” and joining the bon circle, enjoying the movement, dancing with his fan. ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/ her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 4421400, extension 320, or jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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New Faces at Frankie’s NY Bagels By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

O

n Sunday morning, Steve Band stood by the register at Frankie’s NY Bagels, a crowd of paper bags marked with customers’ names at his elbow. Beside him, Frankie Baker, owner and founder of the shop tucked in Redwood Acres, greeted a customer and introduced the new guy. Band and his wife, Rebecca, would be learning the ropes from Baker for a couple of weeks before taking over as the new owners selling the same bagels that have earned the shop a loyal following. In October of 2020, after running Frankie’s NY Bagels as a one-man shop for six months, owner Frankie Baker told the Journal he was ready to sell. But a year and a half later, he was still rising before dawn to shape, boil and bake the bagels his stalwart customer base was ordering online along with doughnuts and other sweets he’d added to the menu. The shoulder problems that made the work difficult hadn’t gotten better without the surgery he’d put off but he still hadn’t found a buyer. He’d had a few nibbles and gotten close but after having plans fall through, he says he was “not burned,” but possibly a little toasted. A couple weeks ago, after landing a job as a youth prevention specialist with the nonprofit Humboldt Independent Practice Association, Baker announced he was throwing in the oven mitt and shutting down. Like many regular patrons, Steve and Rebecca Band were disappointed. “He said, ‘This is your last bagel,’ and I said, ‘No, it’s not!’” says Steve Band with

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Frankie Baker and Steve Bands, who bought Frankie’s NY Bagels with his wife, Rebecca. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

a wide smile. Band, who hails from Albany, California, says he’d been looking for a career change after years as a political campaign consultant who’d done a lot of work with unions before coming to Humboldt two years ago. “It felt like the universe was speaking to me.” The Bands are both Jewish but Steve says visiting his wife’s hometown of Stamford, Connecticut, was his first taste of traditional bagels. “We grew up thinking Noah’s Bagels were bagels,” he says, falling into a brief silence. When they moved to Humboldt, they, like many East Coast transplants, became steady customers at Frankie’s (everything bagel with pickle cream cheese for him, sesame with vegan cream cheese for her). The shop’s vegan following pointed them to Redwood Acres, as the bagels, made without egg wash, are vegan friendly. And, as Steve Band says, “Frankie makes the greatest vegan doughnuts of all time.” Learning to make those bagels, doughnuts and other treats from Baker, who starts work before 4 a.m., means a shift in one’s circadian rhythms, but Band says he’s adjusting. “I feel like, at that point, it’s so early it’s like being a night person,” he says. An avid home baker, he’ll be doing the bulk of the production, with Rebecca working the front and their 7-year-old daughter in tow. Band says he’s not looking to change any of Frankie’s staples, vegan or otherwise,

and is determined to keep turning out bagels with the pebbly surface, chewiness and soft interior of Baker’s recipe. The limited hours and online orders will stay in place, too, for a while. “Once I can slot in and do what Frankie does, then we can look at expanding,” says Band. He and Rebecca are looking forward to adding flaky rugelach for Hannukah and jammy hamantaschen pastries for Purim, “family recipes the Jewish community hasn’t had in Humboldt.” Also, he says, “Frankie is gonna stay on as a consultant, so if he has a midnight bagel idea, he can send it over.” Baker, who’s been volunteering to work with middle school kids, says he’s ready to get started in a new direction. He’s ready to finally get his shoulder surgery and lay off the physical labor, too. Asked if he’ll start baking bagels at home as he did before opening Frankie’s, he gave an emphatic no. “I’m going to go see Steve,” he says. “I’m going to be waiting in line with everybody else.” Previously, he’d said the business would be a good one for a couple to run. “Now getting to know [the Bands], they’re like the perfect people to take over.” l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Fall-Run Salmon Quotas Underway on the Klamath

341 West Harris St., Eureka 707 445-3138

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By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

F

all regulations began Aug. 15 on the Klamath River, triggering the start of the fall salmon quota. The California Fish and Game Commission adopted bag and possession limits for the Klamath Basin based on a quota of 2,119 fall-run adult kings. On the Klamath, the fall season closes Dec. 31. The fall season on the Trinity begins Sept. 1 and closes Dec. 31. On the Lower Klamath, from the State Route 96 bridge at Weitchpec to the mouth, 1,060 adults will be allowed for sport harvest. The section above the bridge at Weitchpec to 3,500 feet downstream of the Iron Gate Dam will get 360 adults. The Spit Area (within 100 yards of the channel through the sand spit formed at the Klamath River mouth) will close when 15 percent of the total Klamath River Basin quota is taken downstream of the U.S. Highway 101 bridge. In 2022, 318 adults can be harvested below the U.S. Highway 101 bridge before the closure at the mouth is implemented. The rest of the area below U.S. Highway 101 (the estuary) will remain open to recreational fishing. Important reminder: All legally caught Chinook salmon must be retained while fishing the spit. Once the adult component of the total daily bag limit has been retained, anglers must cease fishing in the spit area. On the Trinity side, the quota is set at 699 adults. The quota will be split almost evenly: 350 adults for the main stem Trinity downstream of the Old Lewiston Bridge to the State Route 299 West bridge at Cedar Flat, and 349 adults for the main stem Trinity downstream of the Denny Road bridge at Hawkins Bar to the confluence with the Klamath. The daily bag limit will be two Chinook salmon, no more than one of which may be greater than 23 inches, and a possession limit of six, of which only three may exceed 23 inches. Once these quotas have been met, no Chinook salmon greater than 23 inches in length may be retained (anglers may still retain a limit of Chinook salmon

less than 23 inches in length). Visit www.nrm.dfg.ca.gov/ FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=202686&inline for a complete list of regulations. Anglers may monitor the quota status of open and closed sections of the Klamath and Trinity rivers by calling the Klamath information hotline at 800-564-6479. All anglers on the Trinity and Klamath rivers must have salmon harvest cards in their possession when fishing for salmon.

The Oceans: Eureka

• Servicing Humboldt County for over 40 years • Largest in stock new & used inventory • Competitive price guarantee Vic Haskett, of McKinleyville, landed a nice Chinook salmon while fishing the Klamath River estuary last Monday. The fall-run adult salmon quota for the Klamath River basin began Monday, Aug. 15. Photo courtesy of Mike Thall

According to Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing, the tuna bite turned on pretty well last Friday off of Eureka. “Boats didn’t need to go much farther than 20 miles,” said Klassen. “The tuna were in that general area for a while but they were spread out. Friday, for whatever reason, they decided to come up and the boats did well. With all the warm water, the salmon fishing hasn’t been great. Top scores have been a couple per boat. The fish being caught are on the bottom. Hopefully the wind we’re seeing this week will cool the water.”

Trinidad

The rockfish bite out of Trinidad remains excellent according to Curt Wilson of Wind Rose Charters. He said, “They come a little slower when we have minus tides, but overall, the bite is still good. Some days we’re getting a nice variety and others, it’s nothing but black rockfish. The lingcod bite is still going strong too. Fish are being caught from Flat Iron all the way to SueMeg (formerly Patrick’s Point). There are some salmon being caught, mostly out in deeper water and the fish are right on the bottom.”

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Lower Klamath

The water color is finally starting to improve after last Monday’s blowout. It’s not quite green, but it’s improving slightly each day. There’s plenty of steelhead to be had from the Glen up and some fall kings are making their way into the lower river. Fishing should really improve over the next couple weeks. Fall regulations went into effect Monday, Aug. 15. The daily bag limit will be two Chinook, no more than one adult (longer than 23 inches) and the possession limit is six, no more than three adults. Read the complete fishing roundup at www.northcoastjournal.com.

“LARGEST BRAND SELECTION IN THE COUNTY”

● Kenny Priest operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast. com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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GET OUT

Claiming Races and Maidens Demystifying horse-racing before the Humboldt County Fair kicks off By Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com

C

indy Olsen-Bugenig doesn’t count on how many horses are coming to the races at the Humboldt County Fair until she “can see the whites of their eyes crossing Fernbridge.” Olsen-Bugenig, herself a racing horse owner and breeder since 1979, is the vice-president of the Humboldt County Fair Association and chair of its Racing Committee. The total number of racehorses in the state of California has dropped precipitously since the 2008 financial crisis. To attract more owners, trainers and horses to Ferndale’s half-mile racecourse, the HCFA and the California Association of Racing Fairs is relying on a number of new strategies. “We’re here for the little guy,” says Olsen-Bugenig. “The horses that we get here are the ones that run the lower-end races at the big tracks. They might not be able to win at those tracks because the quality of horses is probably better than what they are, so they come here and sometimes they can run twice, because we have two weekends of racing so they can make their money here at this meet and survive to live another year.” The track in Ferndale runs “claiming races” with a claim of $2,500. What that means, in essence, is that anyone with a racing license can claim a horse prior to a race if they put up that sum and claim ownership after the race. (Multiple claims are settled with the roll of a die.) The conceit of a claiming race is that it equalizes the value of the horses; the owner of a horse worth $13,000 wouldn’t risk losing it at a claiming race of $2,500. “You can’t get emotionally attached, well, that’s easy to say. I cried when I lost my first one for weeks,” says Olsen-Bugenig. Spectators can place bets on their favorites at the booths in the middle of the grandstands, beginning as low as $1. The odds for each horse to win are featured on a sign on the track, and they’ll fluctuate according to how much is being bet. Olsen-Bugenig recommends watching the post parade, in which the horses walk the track for display prior to the race, to

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get a good idea of which horse might be a comer. “You can watch their movements, if they’re on their toes, or if they’re just nodding off while they’re walking,” she says. “I like the ones that have the energy.” Gamblers can also read a racing form with stats about the horses’ past performances prior to the race or “just rely on pure, blind luck.” If you wait for the post parade, however, you’ll have about eight minutes afterward in which to place your bets. The average race, measured in furlongs, lasts mere seconds, with horses covering the 4-furlong (half mile) length of the fairgrounds racetrack at an average rate of about 12 seconds per furlong. The unusually short length of the Humboldt County racetrack has been a disincentive for some jockeys, says Olsen-Bugenig, given that it means a sharp turn not far out of the gate. About six years ago, the fair association “banked” two of the turns, smoothing them out and making them safer. The track is also soil rather than a grass “turf course,” which puts off some owners worried about impact to their horses’ bodies. But the biggest issue at play, Olsen-Bugenig says, is money. Gas prices have risen, as has the price of feed. California has an increasing number of regulations for the testing and safety of horses. For these reasons, many folks in the business choose to go out of state. “It’s expensive,” says Larry Swartzlander, executive director of CARF. “It’s just an expensive sport. California doesn’t have the luxury of slot machines or a lottery to supplement purses.” Many other states allow “racinos,” casinos where a percentage money generated from slot machines pays into the purse horses can win at the track. In California, where slot gambling is restricted to Indian casinos on sovereign land, this is not an option. Swartzlander sees two new sports betting initiatives that will be on the ballot this fall as potential boons to the industry, a way to add money that might not only incentivize people to keep racing in the

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

On the track at the 2019 Humboldt County Fair. Photo by Mark Larson

state but get into the business in the first place. “Purses need to be raised, they need to be incentivized to buy that racehorse,” he says. “Here, a $5,000 claimer runs for [a] $15,000 [purse]. In New York, he runs for $44,000.” Swartzlander adds that the total impact of the initiatives is not clear, but says his group is trying to find ways to make inroads with a new generation that is increasingly online rather than on the track, including adding fantasy league betting to horseracing. CARF has estimated about 220 horses will enter the races in Ferndale this month, which will average out to about six horses per race. This is less than some previous years, which saw eight horses per race, but it’s enough to draw a crowd. “I’m a guy who thinks the glass is half full,” says Swartzlander. “We’re working on incentives.” Along with adding money to the purse, which CARF did this year, the HCFA has worked to create extra incentives for horse owners and trainers to make the trip, including giving them gas cards to compensate for increased fuel costs. The big event for the Humboldt County Fair is the Marathon, a full mile and five-eighths, a length Olsen-Bugenig says is “almost unheard of.” The purse for the marathon is $20,000. “Everyone wants to have a marathon horse,” she says. “That’s why they come up here.” In previous years, Olsen-Bugenig recalls, the jockeys would keep dried peas in their pockets and throw them out when they made a turn to remember how many laps they had left for the Marathon. Olsen-Bugenig and her cohort also see an opening for more entries into Maiden

Races, which are reserved for horses that have never had a win, also referred to as “maidens.” In the horseracing community, Ferndale has become known as a “Maiden Breaker,” a decidedly outdated term used to refer to racetracks where horses can prove themselves before moving up the ranks. “So, I’m thinking if we add more money to those maidens, maybe we can get some more from Golden Gate,” she says, referring to Golden Gate Fields. Jim Morgan, special counsel to the HCFA, recently attended a California Horse Racing Board meeting to request that board renew its policy of not allowing Golden Gate Fields to offer claiming races of $5,000 or below during the Humboldt County Fair. In 2014, CHRB threatened Golden Gate Fields with sanctions after it scheduled under $5,000 claiming races for the second week of the fair, effectively diverting horses away from Ferndale. Olsen-Bugenig says one of the biggest draws for out-of-area racers is the atmosphere and small-town feel of Ferndale. The annual event is a great social occasion for those in the industry, she says, “kind of like a one-year reunion.” “We’re smallest racing fair in the state — what you would call the way racing used to be,” she says. “We have the crowds. We have the enthusiasm. We have the community support. It’s hard for us to attract horses based on our location because people have to drive a long ways. It costs a lot of money to come up here to the racetrack. So, we’re kind of up against it on that. But we just have a wonderful community here that loves us.” l Linda Stansberry is a staff writer at The Enterprise. Reach her at linda@ northcoastjournal.com.


ART BEAT

Christy Tjaden’s painting “Nostalgia as Landscape: Wandering in a Long Forgotten Love Song, She Found Two Snakes Where Once She Believed There Was a Road.” Photo courtesy of Morris Graves Museum of Art

Ingrid Nickelsen’s Legacy at Morris Graves The late artist’s work and juried all-women show By Tamar Burris

artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

I

ngrid Nickelsen was not originally from Humboldt County but her legacy here is strong in her landscape paintings capturing the raw beauty of rivers, creeks and wilderness areas both familiar and remote. It is also alive in the estate Nickelsen bequeathed to help nurture local women artists after her death in 2005. Since 2007, the Ingrid Nickelsen Trust has gifted more than $300,000 to women artists in the Humboldt area via annual grants. To honor the 15th year of the organization this year, the group of women involved with the trust (informally known as “Liz’s Painters,” thanks to comradery built during wilderness painting retreats held by Liz Harwood Pierson and Terry Oats in 2004 and 2005) sought to do something larger for the community. Teaming up with the Morris Graves Museum of Art, they laid the groundwork for a month-long celebration of women artists and Nickelsen herself. The result is a pair of exhibitions, Ingrid Nickelsen Trust Juried Exhibition: Celebrating 15 Years of Ingrid Nickelsen’s Legacy and its companion show Use This

Map to Help You Explore: The Landscapes of Ingrid Nickelsen. They are an ode to both a remarkable woman no longer with us and remarkable women artists working in Humboldt today. The exhibit also marks the first time Nickelsen’s work has been on public display since 2006. Originally from the Boston area, the artist was a hiker and backpacking enthusiast who made her home in Eureka in the 1960s. Primarily a ceramicist, she took up landscape painting two decades later and used her treks into the wilderness to capture scenery in an extraordinarily unique fashion. She sometimes observed her chosen sites for several days at a stretch, painting the different conditions she saw with vivid hues and in translucent layers that made both water and earth seem to jump to life. A 2005 trek into the Siskiyou Wilderness proved her last when she injured herself in a fall. But even until her final moments, Nickelsen was dedicated to the local art community, writing a will on the back

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17


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

of her trail map in which she detailed the use of her estate to fund women artists. (The catalog for the show includes an essay by Journal contributor Gabrielle Gopinath that will also be available at www. humboldtarts.org with more on the artist’s life and work.) Since its beginnings, the trust has been giving discretionary grants without solicitations for things like class fees, travel budgets, medical expenses, art supplies and the like. However, this is the first time the trust has organized Annakatrin Burnham’s 2022 ceramic sculpture a juried exhibition for money. “Generations,” winner of the Juror’s Choice Award at the “Each woman we have granted Ingrid Nickelsen Trust Juried Exhibition. money to has a different need Photo courtesy of Morris Graves Museum of Art or reason for validation and financial recognition,” said trust spokesperson Carrie Grant. However, In the end, Gold selected 11 winners she said, “We have lost a few art galleries whose awards were presented during an in the past several years and women have Aug. 6 reception at the museum. The 10 fewer places to show. We thought that an Ingrid Nickelsen Trust $500 award winners exhibit was a great way to allow all women are: Trixie Galletti, Lori Goodman, Sherry artists in Humboldt County an opportuniHazelton, Cheryl Peterson Rau, Laura ty to show their work.” Corsiglia, Anna Oneglia, Christy Tjaden, The juried show is also the first Shoshana McAvoy, Naomi Ruth Olsen all-women art show at the museum. and Carol Anderson. The winning pieces There was no entry fee for artwork and are all unique and represent different organizers were shocked to receive 234 mediums — including Goodman’s hanging entries — more than double their expecsculpture “knots, sticks, and stories” and tation and the largest return on a call for Tjaden’s more abstract painting “Nostalgia entries Humboldt Arts Council Executive as Landscape: Wandering in a Long ForDirector-Curator Jemima Harr has seen gotten Love Song, She Found Two Snakes in her 18 years with the museum. “To me, Where Once She Believed There Was a this is really uniting women artists in this Road” — but each exudes a richness of community and that’s what it’s all about.” color and attention to detail reminiscent She added working with the trust on the of Nickelsen. exhibit has been an honor. “And to finally The Juror’s Choice Award for $1,000 get artists and visitors coming in again went to ceramicist Annakatrin Burnham the way we did before the pandemic is for her 2022 sculpture “Generations.” A fabulous,” said Harr. complex cubic ceramic sculpture that The exhibit’s call-for-entries drew hints of a crab pot in shape and nature, it works of art from all genres: paintings, is sublimely crafted with layers of texture textiles, ceramics, sculptures and more. and color that connect well to Nickelsen’s The job of narrowing the field fell to judge work. In expressing her gratitude, Burnand Humboldt-based abstract painter Joan ham said the show “is a testament to our Gold, herself a past grant recipient. “Joan is thriving community of women artists … I kind of the matriarch of women artists in am both humbled and inspired even just Humboldt County,” said Grant, noting the sharing this vibrant space with so many of museum staff and others working on the Humboldt’s talented women artists.” show are all women. The Morris Graves Museum of Art Gold walked slowly among the entries, hosts Ingrid Nickelsen Trust Juried Exhibiconsidering and categorizing each piece tion: Celebrating 15 Years of Ingrid Nickwith a sticky note. She knew what she elsen’s Legacy and Use This Map to Help was looking for but wanted to give each You Explore: The Landscapes of Ingrid piece the study it was due. Color and use Nickelsen through Sept. 16. ● of paint and textures were priorities, and Gold was clear the winning pieces had to Tamar Burris (she/her) is a freelance have intention and vision; they could not education writer and relationship coach. be “accidental.” Additionally, they had to Her book for children of divorce A New represent Nickelsen’s legacy in a way that Special Friend is available through her felt fitting. website www.tamarburris.com.


FRONT ROW

EXIT Theatre’s Indie Development A San Francisco satellite space settles into Arcata By Wendy Butler

frontrow@northcoastjournal.com

W

hen you approach the building on the Arcata Plaza in which EXIT Theatre is located, the first thing you’ll notice is first-floor occupant Moore’s Sleep World (“Sale, Sale, Sale” “Welcome back Students ...”). And then to the right side on the front part of the building there’s an “Aikido” sign promoting the Northcoast Aikido studio. Above these signs is the EXIT Theatre banner. How can there possibly be a performance space in there? But there is, at the top of the stairs. EXIT bills itself as “indie,” focused on independence, authenticity, courage and often the willingness to commit to projects that won’t make much money. The nonprofit has been operating in San Francisco for nearly 40 years, providing low-cost space and multi-layered production support for artists to re-imagine classics and create new work. EXIT produces festivals, too, including the annual San Francisco Fringe Festival, which this year runs Sept. 8 through 17. In San Francisco, EXIT has four small venues at 156 Eddy St., and a fifth space housing resident company Cutting Ball Theater nearby on Taylor Street. “I think art, in general, especially live performance, is really key to humanity,” said Christina Augello, EXIT Theatre founder and artistic director. But in March of 2020, live performances stopped — along with virtually all “normal” life — due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, in late 2020, in the midst of its attempting to continue theatrical productions via streaming services, Augello and EXIT’s Managing Director Richard Livingston decided, with their board’s approval, to lease the former Community Yoga Center on the second floor of 890 G St. in Arcata. After re-purposing the space for a year, EXIT Theatre began presenting a variety of live, in-person work this spring. The Arcata EXIT is a 35-seat venue. The seats and tables are on the same level as the stage, with the lighting bar hanging behind them. It’s an intimate space that’s all

about performer-audience engagement. One reason for locating the satellite theater here is Social Security, Augello said. She recently retired after 37 years from her “day job” as a bartender at The Saloon in North Beach, San Francisco. She added living in San Francisco on Social Security checks isn’t practical. Currently Augello spends half her time in San Francisco and half in Arcata. But it’s not just about what things cost, Augello said. She recalled visiting Arcata about 35 years ago, sitting in a restaurant and looking out at the plaza and thinking, “What a cool place.” Augello said when she considered where she wanted to relocate, she thought about Arcata and her “three Cs:” cost, culture and climate. She’s added “community” now, as well. “Arcata kind of feels like a neighborhood I’ve moved into,” Augello said. “I lived in San Francisco for 50 years, I’m a city girl. … In the past two years of being here ... I’m getting Arcata-fied.” The theater is not just about plays, Augello said. She acknowledged that our area offers a variety of local theaters for that purpose, though Arcata Playhouse, North Coast Repertory Theatre and Redwood Curtain Theatre also present music, dance and other performances. What she wants to grow here is comparable to how she feels EXIT has served the San Francisco arts community for several decades. She said EXIT is a “performing arts studio” rather than being specific to theater. “It is focused on individual artists,” she said. “We don’t limit ourselves just to theater and we don’t push a particular type of art.” For example, Augello said, EXIT participates monthly in Arts! Arcata and presents DIVA Burlesque Arcata, featuring local dancers who have performed with many of the local burlesque groups and Jaiden Clark, who works with a variety of local theater companies designing lights. She sees EXIT fitting in the local “cultural ecosystem” by offering workspace, too. TK Film Studios approached Augello with

an interest in using the EXIT for rehearsals and filming, and Lara Henerson is presenting Improv Taster monthly workshops there. Deadline Junkies, a collective of screenwriters led by Rale Sidebottom, has offered workshops at the theater, too. And there Christina Augello, EXIT Theatre founder and artistic director, are plays, too. at the Arcata Plaza location. Photo by Wendy Butler Upcoming theatrical productions at the Arcata EXIT include Beckett’s focusing on collaboration, audience enKrapp’s Last Tape, a one-person, one-act gagement, whatever art form you choose play with Arnold Waddell and directed by and a place to make that happen. John Heckel that runs Aug. 26 through 28. “Creativity and imagination are powerIn October, Augello will perform in a new ful tools,” Augello said. “I mean, we have work titled Waking Sam Beckett, written to have it. … I don’t know, maybe it’ll softby Arcata/Chico resident Marc Gabriel, en the world, maybe it’ll help the world, who will perform alongside Augello in this maybe it’ll do nothing, but that’s what I’ve production. been doing, and it really goes deep.” Augello grew up in Buffalo, New York, There’s room for more at the EXIT and where she said her home life was “dysAugello said she wants the Arcata space functional,” and “theater really was a refused. (Information is available at www. uge, you know.” The name “EXIT” reflects theexit.org.) “EXIT Theatre in San Francisco her love of existentialism and absurdist is built on a village,” she says, a local comtheater (the theater is legally incorporatmunity of visual, performing and literary ed as EXITheatre, which is a play on the artists. “That’s how it works. So, I need to word “existential”) for which she thanks build that village here, so this will work.” Joe Krysiak, who ran a Buffalo storefront Augello said she believes “art can performance space called Green Sleeves change the world. … And as my late and and introduced her to the works of Samgood friend Diane di Prima said, ‘The only uel Beckett and Eugène Ionesco, among war that matters is the war against the others. imagination.’” Even though the county offers a variety ● of arts incubators and theaters, Augello Wendy Butler (she/her) is an asks, why not more opportunities? This educator, writer and radio producer. She goes back to her time developing EXIT resides in Eureka. Theatre in the storefront of the Cadillac Hotel in the Tenderloin 40 years ago, northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 1, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

19


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Clementine Was Right plays the Miniplex at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 20. Photo courtesy of the artists

Two Kinds of Tunes By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

I

t has stuck with me over the years is how haunted some artists are (or were). I’m talking about folks like John Fahey, Townes Van Zandt, early-career-pre-coming-out Janis Ian (her record Between the Lines remains one of my misery favorites) and the late Jason Molina of Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co., who unceremoniously drank himself to death during the span of his 30s. Due to some weird, likely misguided summer activities during the recent full moon cycle, I was listening to a lot of his tunes, even going so far as learning and arranging one for myself, which is rare because I generally hate playing music these days. But the guy had talent, and there is a shard of broken-hearted genius

cutting through his sparse and plaintive songs like a lethal burr. One thing that has always drawn me to music like that is the central function it provides, the lineage of which stretches back to the Delta blues and beyond: It’s a sin-eater for your pain. The singer hurts and his songs are sad, and in that sadness comes validation of your own misery, sometimes even relief. Taking these sonic inoculations of vaccine-strength hardship is one way to beat the blues and likely why I didn’t drink myself to death during my 30s. Borrowing from Pope’s famous quote, to err is human and to write a good song about fucking up is pretty close to divine. Forgiveness, fear, death, sex and failure all float through these songs like spectral jellyfish,


HOME & GARDEN

Friday

Widely regarded as one of the greatest reggae artists of all time and certainly one of the greatest living female artists, Sister Carol’s hypnotic, “toasting” style of vocal delivery runs roughshod over the expectations of what feminine vocals are “supposed” to present themselves as in the boy’s club world of reggae music. A lacework of contradictions, her vocal delivery is monotone, melodious, hard, gentle, powerful and yielding, depending upon the song. That there is so much nuance in her delivery in a style that originated in the harsh and loud world of Jamaican dancehalls is a testament to her creative genius. Come see for yourself tonight at Humbrews at 9:30 p.m. ($25, $20 advance).

Saturday

Clementine Was Right is the musical vehicle of writer Mike Young, whose poetry and prose has sprouted up in many major just-off-mainstream media outlets over the past decade. The songs have thus been inflected with the cadence of stories, as the New Mexico-based group unfurls a sound that is at once dusty and sparkled, like the faded rhinestones on your mom’s favorite Saturday night jacket from yesteryear. The California Poppies are a wise local opener for this one, with that shiny pop sound evoking a time when Technicolor gave way to Kodachrome in the sunny realm of “California Dreaming.” The Miniplex is the place, the hour is 8 p.m. and the price is 10 bucks. Not a bad

The 2010s were known for quite a few trends, many ranging from odious to world-destroying. One trend that didn’t suck, however, was the soul revival that has graduated from clubs to festivals, theaters and arenas. One of the better examples from this new pack of R&B upstarts is Durand Jones & the Indications, whose spare sound is evocative of all the things that keep people spinning Motown and Stax Records vinyl delights at home and in the club. Plus I’m a sucker for a drummer who sings, which is a duty that drummer Aaron Frazer shares with frontman Jones. This Center Arts show will inhabit the remodeled Van Duzer Theatre tonight at 8 p.m., with special guest keysman Kiefer in tow ($40, $90 VIP).

Monday

It’s the back end of my column, which means it’s the front end of the new week in the post-dog days of summer, which means not too much is happening regarding live bands. However, I like to juice some of the other stuff going on regularly, and who doesn’t love a little karaoke? If your answer was, “I love a little karaoke,” come over to the Jam at 9 p.m.

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Few bands really got the formula as right as ZZ Top, the Texas power trio whose ripping licks and hot grooves entertained the world for five decades. The group’s third album Tres Hombres is a standby in my personal rotation, particularly in the truck. And while you can no longer enjoy the trio’s live antics since the unfortunate death of bassist Rusty Hill last July, there is a hot local cover band called Beer Drinkers and Hell Raisers who are carrying on the tradition. Check ’em out today at 6 p.m. at a free one on Madaket Plaza.

Sunday

ila

Thursday

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leaving tendril marks behind your eyes long after the notes have died. Van Zandt once said something like, “There are two kinds of music in this world, the Blues and ‘Zippity Doo-Dah.’” If you prefer the latter then you can disregard this intro. If we’re friends and I really like you, maybe I’ll play you my version of Molina’s “Farewell Transmission” on bass sometime, Big Muff drone, lighter slide melody and all. Have a good week.

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Tuesday

Speaking of regular local gigs, check out the Clam Beach Tavern if you’re in the mood for Hip Hop Night with DJM. That might sound vague and enigmatic but I’m reporting the basics because what more information do you need, anyway? Oh yeah, the time: 10 p.m.

Wednesday

Movie night. Tonight’s showing at the Arcata Theatre Lounge is an utter classic from the world of animated tech-noir futuresongs from Japan. I’m talking about Ghost in the Shell, the cel and CGI-created 1995 masterpiece set in the distant world of seven years from now. Whether we will indeed have human-cyborg hybrids in 2029 remains to be seen. But beyond being an action-packed visual bombardment, it’s most interesting in its examination of classic existential concerns, such as being, authenticity and free will. And the soundtrack is killer. Pre-show raffle at 6 p.m., movie at 7:40 p.m., $5 or $9 if you want a poster. ● Collin Yeo (he/him) is still working on his ideal summer bod, which includes growing a carapace, claws and many scuttlin’ legs. He lives in Arcata. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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THE 126th ANNUAL

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Racing and all fair shows included with admission!

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Join us for a lunch to Honor those that protect and serve our community and country. The Guy Fieri Foundation is treating our Heroes to a BBQ lunch to thank them for their service.

HUMBOLDT COUNTY FAIR HOMESTYLE CHILI COOK OFF Hosted by Guy Fieri A benefit for Northcoast Big Brothers and Big Sisters. Games, prizes and vendors. Music by Object Heavy.

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12 PM Poultry Judging POULTRY/RABBIT BARN

LIVE HORSE RACING: 2:15 PM B E LOT T I H A L L 12-6 Humboldt Handweavers & Spinners PM Sheep to Shawl Demonstration

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Free admission for children 12 and under.

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COMPOST MOUNTAIN BOYS

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YO U T H L I V E STO C K 10 AM Beef Show COVERED ARENA 3 PM Sheep Show COVERED ARENA MEMORIAL GARDEN & WALL

Starting on the 18th:

Visit our Memorial Wall in Memorial Garden to write appreciation notes & memories of those no longer with us who served.

POULTRY/RABBIT BARN Boer Goat Show DAIRY JUDGING PAVILION Rabbit Show POULTRY/RABBIT BARN Pygmy Goat Show DAIRY JUDGING PAVILION Swine Show COVERED ARENA

2 6 F R I DAY MIDWAY LAWN

REPTILE ADVENTURE

1:45 PM, 3:15 PM, 4:45 PM

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Come dressed to impress & compete in one of the Hatagories for local prizes, sponsored by CherAe Heights Casino & Ferndale Jockey Club. Free Forget-Me-Not photobooth. Champagne available.

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1:00 PM, 2:30 PM, 4:00 PM

E N T E RTA I N M E N T MIDWAY LAWN

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1:00 PM, 2:30 PM, 4:00 PM

HUM SOUL

THE REMEDY

5:00 PM

7:00 PM

NO ANIMALS TO VIEW ON THE SITE YOUTH CHECK-IN DAY

2 8 S U N DAY

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E N T E RTA I N M E N T

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9 AM Sheep Show (all breeds) SHEEP BARN SHOW ARENA 10 AM Rabbit Carrying Cage Show POULTRY/RABBIT BARN 12 PM Beef Cattle Show DAIRY JUDGING PAVILION

See how fleece is spun and woven, and try some spinning too. See local creations, ask questions and enjoy the arts of spinning and weaving.

2 5 T H U R S DAY

SENSORY DAY Sensory-Friendly Fair from 12-2 PM. Flashing lights & music turned off & rides offered at slower speed. Celebrate the diverse cultures that make Humboldt County the place we call home.

O P E N L I V E STO C K

O P E N L I V E STO C K 9 AM Dairy Goat Show SHEEP BARN SHOW ARENA

JR. LIVESTOCK AUCTION

Jr. Livestock Auction & BBQ. Steers, lambs, goats, pigs and rabbits will be auctioned off and available for purchase.

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MIDWAY LAWN

CARTOON POODLES

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REPTILE ADVENTURE

1:00 PM, 2:30 PM, 4:00 PM

1:45 PM, 3:15 PM, 4:45 PM

CARTOON POODLES

1:00 PM, 2:30 PM, 4:00 PM

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LIVE HORSE RACING: 2:15 PM

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YO U T H L I V E STO C K 9 AM Poultry Show SMALL ANIMAL BARN 9 AM Dairy Showmanship DAIRY JUDGING PAVILION 10:30 AM Dairy Show DAIRY JUDGING PAVILION 5 PM Youth Tractor Driving Contest 5 PM Dairy Goat Show JUDGING PAVILION 7 PM Lead Contest COVERED ARENA

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5:00 PM & 7:00 PM

YO U T H L I V E STO C K 11 AM Junior Livestock Auction BBQ

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Fair closed.

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LIVE HORSE RACING: 2:15 PM

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1:45 PM, 3:15 PM, 4:45 PM

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2 PM Dairy Cattle Show DAIRY JUDGING PAVILION

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12-5 PM IN THE GRANDSTAND

12 PM

MAD CHAD

1:00 PM, 2:30 PM, 4:00 PM

HONORING HEROES LUNCH

All card holding veterans, active service members and emergency service professionals get free admission.

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4 PM Boer Goat Show SHEEP BARN SHOW ARENA

2 4 W E D N E S DAY

HONOR THE BADGE

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2 3 T U E S DAY

M O N DAY

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2 1 S U N DAY

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Calendar Aug. 18 – 25, 2022

19 Friday ART

North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. See Aug. 18 listing.

BOOKS

Photo by Kali Cozyris

Hot jumbo corn dog! The 126th annual Humboldt County Fair’s 10-day run of old-fashioned community fun starts this week. From Thursday, Aug. 18 to Sunday, Aug. 28 (closed Monday, Aug. 22) the Humboldt County Fairgrounds will be open noon to 10 p.m. for the beloved end-of-summer ritual that has all your favorites: the carnival, horse racing, exhibits, stunts, shows, food, music and more ($15, $10 seniors, $5 kids, Free for kids under 6, $40 carnival bracelet, $5 parking per vehicle). And don’t miss the Guy Fieri Homestyle Chili Cook-Off, Wednesday, Aug. 24 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. under the grandstands. There’ll be live music, games, prizes, food and vendors. Purchase a People’s Choice Mug & Spoon Set for $10 (includes 10 voting tickets) and vote for your favorite chili.

H

eads up, Humboldt: While the county’s masking mandate has been lifted, Public Health is still strongly recommending masking indoors in public, social distancing and “avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces.” COVID-19 is still with us, so be sure to check the protocols at event venues.

18 Thursday ART

Art Night at the Sanctuary. Third Thursday of every month, 4-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Create with others freely or work on a guided project. Bring your own supplies or use what’s around to collage, paint, draw, make an art book, etc. $5-$20 suggested, no one turned away for lack of funds. sanctuaryarcata.org. North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. A judged exhibition showcasing photography and digital art. David Arnold judges.

BOOKS Beelzebub’s Tales To His Grandson Radio Hour. 10-11 p.m. The book will be read in its entirety on Humboldt Hot Air every week. This week’s reading: Episode 30: Chapter 39 (Part 2): The Holy Planet “Purgatory.” Free. rybopp@suddenlink.net. HumboldtHotAir.org. (707) 826-7567.

MUSIC Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Come get your sing on. Free. bearrivercasino.com. Music in the Park. 6-8 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Summer concert series in the park. Live music, food trucks. Aug. 18: Ghost Train; Aug. 25: Amber Soul Free.

Submitted

Trinidad Artisans Market. Submitted

Oh yes, it’s back! From outer space. The universe-renowned BridgeFest and Flying Saucer Contest returns this Saturday, Aug. 20 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. for a day of fun in the hot August sun (free). Where else can humans compete against aliens in a flying saucer throwing contest all in the name of outrageous fun? The contest is in a slightly different spot this year and we are told the landing coordinates are the school yard at Bridgeville School on Kneeland Road (just past the old bridge). Plus, all the usual, out-of-this-world festivities you know and love: live music, tasty food and drink, an alien parade, raffle, Wild Kidz zone, contests and a craft fair.

Sunday markets all over the county are in full bloom in this mid-to-end of August. Starting up this weekend is the new Blue Lake Sunday Market, which is on Sunday, Aug. 21 (and every Sunday through Sept. 25) from 1 to 5 p.m. and features a farmers market, live music, vendors and a bar. The Old Town Vintage Market in Eureka happens this Sunday, Aug. 21 (and every third Sunday of the month through October) from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Redwood Retro. There, you’ll find a summer block party with vintage, second hand and artisan vendors. Up north, the Trinidad Artisans Market happens Sundays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Saunder’s Plaza with plenty of local art and crafts, live music and barbecue until mid September.

Eureka Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Bring your chairs and please leave pets at home. No smoking or alcohol. Presented by Eureka Main Street. Aug. 18: Beer Drinkers & Hellraisers (ZZ Top tribute). Free. eurekamainstreet. org/summer-concert-series-4. (707) 441-4187.

THEATER The Children. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. A contemporary comic drama set on the seismically active, tsunami-eroded rural coast of Angelsea, England in the environs of a compromised nuclear power plant. $20. nvoss@redwoodcurtain.com. redwoodcurtain.com. (269) 355-0819.

EVENTS Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Small-town Americana at its best. Enjoy horse races, entertainment, carnival rides, fair food, handicrafts, art, livestock contests, horticulture, animals and more. humboldtcountyfair.org.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Freshest local produce, meat, fish, cheese, eggs, bread, flowers and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/hendersoncenter.html. (707) 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Farm fresh produce, music and hot food vendors. Trained, ADA certified, service animals only. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ mckinleyville.html. (707) 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation.

Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople. org/volunteering. (707) 445-3166 ext. 310. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. Produce, fish and more, plus music and hot food vendors weekly through August. No pets except trained, ADA-certified service animals. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation. org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/willowcreek. html. (707) 441-9999.

GARDEN Drop-In Volunteer Day. 1-4 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Get a taste of a farmer’s work growing vegetables, herbs and flowers. Come prepared for sunshine, cold, wet and working in the dirt. Bring a water bottle, snacks, closed toe shoes, long pants, sleeves and a sun hat. Free. baysideparkfarm@ cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata.org/440/Bayside-ParkFarm. (707) 822-8184.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. For BIPOC families. See the HC Black Music and Arts Association Facebook page for more information. hcblackmusicnarts@gmail.com. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. 12-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from Equity Arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

ETC Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@gmail.com. sohumhealth. org. (707) 923-3921.

Jon Humboldt Gates Book Signing. 6-8 p.m. Eureka Books, 426 Second St. The author signs copies of Before The Dolphins Guild - A Story of Heroic Efforts to Save Two Navy Submarine Crews Trapped Under the Sea in 1915 and 1916. info@eurekabookshop.com. eurekabookshop.com. (707) 444-9593.

MUSIC Backyard Boogie - End of Summer Party. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. DJ Statik, DJ Pressure, DJ D’vinity. With dance sets by Queen Sequoyah, Bella Rose, Efrien and All Luv. 18 and up. $10, free before 10:30pm. arcatatheatre.com. Checkered Past. 6-8 p.m. Septentrio Tasting Room, 650 Sixth St., Arcata. Ska/reggae music. Kenny Bowling. 9-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Country music. Every Friday. Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. Professional-level jazz twice a week with cool vibes and great people. Free. thespeakeasybar@ yahoo.com. facebook.com/speakeasyeureka. (707) 444-2244. Orjazzmic. 6-8 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Funky Latin, swing, ska and blues jazz quartet. Free. www.madriverbrewing. com. (707) 668-4151. Roots Revival Festival Fundraiser. 7-midnight. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Music by Ezekeal, Zion, Adam Mester and Burr. Bass music, tea and elixir bar, vendors and live art. $10-$20 sliding. redwoodraks.com. SoHum Girls Band. 7-10 p.m. Old Growth Cellars, 1945 Hilfiker Lane, Eureka. Funk, rock, blues, country, swing. Room for dancing. Free. sohumgirls@asis.com. sohumgirlsband.com. (707) 599-5537. Trinity Alps Chamber Music Festival. 7 p.m. Trinity Alps Performing Arts Center, 101 Arbuckle Ct., Weaverville. Featuring music of Johannes Brahms, Max Bruch and more. www.tapaconline.org/.

THEATER The Children. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See Aug. 18 listing.

EVENTS Eureka Friday Night Market. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Farmers market, arts and craft vendors, a bar featuring Humboldt-produced beverages, food vendors and live local music for dancing. humboldtmade.com/eureka-friday-night-market. Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See Aug. 18 listing.

FOR KIDS Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop off your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17$20. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum. org/classesprograms.html. (707) 443-9694. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

FOOD

NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS HAPPY HOUR: 4pm-5:30pm Daily $2 Pints | $2 off of Cocktails

708 9th Street, Arcata • On the Plaza within Hotel Arcata (707) 822-1414 • (707) 599-2909 • info@tomoarcata.com

HOURS: 4pm-8 pm Daily

Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, eggs, meat, baked goods, nursery plants and starts, oysters, live music on the square, crafts and more.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

SPORTS

New 2022

Street Legal Style Drags. 6 p.m. Samoa Drag Strip, Lincoln Avenue and New Navy Base Road. Details online. samoadragstrip.com.

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. sohumhealth.com.

DJ, raffle, bike games and more. All bikes welcome. BridgeFest and Flying Saucer Contest. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Bridgeville Community Center, 38717 Kneeland Road. An annual intergalactic event that pits ordinary humans against aliens in a flying saucer throwing contest. Live music, food, raffle, Wild Kidz zone, contests and a craft fair. Free. (707) 601-7983. House of PLUR. 8 p.m. Synapsis, 1675 Union St., Eureka. EDM/rave themed and inspired variety show. Browse local LGBTQIA and BIPOC vendors and enjoy drinks at the bar, dancing and photos before the show. $15. www. synapsisperformance.com. Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See Aug. 18 listing.

FOR KIDS Bee Day Party. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Celebrate Friends of the Dunes 40th anniversary with a bee dance party, face painting and birthday snacks. Learn about pollination from local naturalists through stories, demonstrations and crafts. All ages. RSVP recommended. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes. org. (707) 444-1397.

20 IN Saturday STOCK NOW!! FOOD

BOOKS

Book Signing w/Jon Humboldt Gates. 5-7 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Jon Humboldt Gates signs copies of Before The Dolphins Guild - A Story of Heroic Efforts to Save Two Navy Submarine Crews Trapped Under the Sea in 1915 and 1916. info@ northtownbooks.com. (707) 822-2834.

DANCE VaVaVoom presents Summer Sizzle. 8-11 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. A scintillating summertime burlesque show. $25, $20 advance. vavavoomburlesquevixens@gmail.com. facebook.com/ events/1220331358766985.

MUSIC

Tacomas in stock now, with more on the way. (707) 443-4871 www.mid-citytoyota.com

2 MILES NORTH OF EUREKA

Mon - Fri: 8:30am to 7:00pm Saturday: 9:00am to 6:00pm Sunday: 11:00am to 5:00pm

All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, and any emission testing charge. All new car fees include a $85 dealer doc. fee.

@ncj_of_humboldt 24

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

George Clinton’s Farewell Tour with Parliament Funkadelic. 6:30-11 p.m. Blue Lake Casino & Hotel, 777 Casino Way. At Blue Lake Casino’s outdoor venue. With opener, Object Heavy. RLA. 6:08 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Jazz/fusion featuring Tim Randles on keyboard, Mike Labolle on drums, Ken Lawrence on bass and Doug Marcum on guitar. Free. www.madriverbrewing.com. (707) 668-4151. The Trinity Alps Chamber Music Festival. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Live classical music including works by Einaudi, Schubert and Bruch. The main course of the musical menu will be Johannes Brahms’ Trio in A Minor, Op. 114. Free, $25 suggested donation. humboldtarts.org.

THEATER The Children. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See Aug. 18 listing. Youth and Teens Wizard of Oz Auditions. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. North Coast Dance, 426 F St., Eureka. Local youth and teens (grades K-12) are invited to audition. Sign up online. info@mainstagehumboldt.org. mainstagehumboldt.org/fall-2022. (707) 200-1778.

EVENTS Bikes by the Bay. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Halverson Park, First Street on Eureka Waterfront, Eureka. Join United Bikers of Northern California for a bike show, food vendors,

Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association Farmers’ Market features local produce, food vendors, meats, plant starts and flowers every week. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/arcataplaza.html. (707) 441-9999. Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown on site, local eggs and sourdough bread. Work from local artists and artisans. flowerstone333@gmail. com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN Edible Garden Tour. 12-4 p.m. Arcata and Eureka - Various Sites. Discover how your neighbors are growing food at home and how you can, too. Gardens in Eureka and Arcata open for self-guided tours. Family-friendly event. Carpooling encouraged. Advance tickets required. Purchase online. Sliding scale; pay what you can. cooperationhumboldt.com/2022-edible-garden-tour/. Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Aug. 19 listing.

MEETINGS Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS Audubon Guided Birding Tour w/Rob Fowler. 8:3011 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring binoculars and meet trip leader Fowler at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) for views of Humboldt Bay, easy-to-walk trails and a great diversity of birdlife. Free. rras.org. FOAM Marsh Tour w/Paul Johnson. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Meet leader Johnson in the lobby of the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute, rain-or-shine walk focusing on plants, ecology and/or often unnoticed Continued on next page »


things at the marsh. Masks are recommended inside the building, regardless of COVID vaccination status. Free. (707) 826-2359. Guided Tour of Fort Humboldt State Historic Park. 1-2 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. Join interpreter William on an hour-long ADA-accessible walking tour of the 19th century military outpost, focusing on its history, Euro-American colonists and Indigenous people. Rain cancels. Check North Coast Redwoods Facebook page for updates. Free. facebook.com/NorthCoastRedwoods. Historic Old Town Eureka Tours. 12-1:15 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Learn about the notable places and events that took place over the years. jthomas@ci.eureka.ca.gov. clarkemuseum.org. (707) 441-4080. Nature Writing Workshop with Jerry Martien. 1-3 p.m. Headwaters Forest Reserve, End of Elk River Road, 6 miles off U.S. Highway 101, Eureka. Join the local poet/writer for writing prompts that connect you to the nature experience and the writer in you. RSVP. Free. BLM_CA_Web_HW@blm.gov. blm.gov/ programs/national-conservation-lands/california/ headwaters-forest-reserve. (707) 825-2300.

SPORTS Drag Races. Samoa Drag Strip, Lincoln Avenue and New Navy Base Road. Details online. $10, free for 12 and under. samoadragstrip.com. Kevin Ebbert Memorial Trail Run. 9 a.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Run the 10k+ or 2-mile trail through the redwood forest to honor Ebbert, a local who became a Navy SEAL, and raise money in his name.

21 Sunday MOVIES

Apocalypse Now (1979). 5-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 5 p.m. Movie at 6 p.m. Rated R. All ages. Parental guidance strongly suggested. Retro-gaming in the lobby. $8, $12 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ events/5506446302734120. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC Always on Sunday. 12-5 p.m. Fieldbrook Winery, 4241 Fieldbrook Road. Live music starts at 1:30. Wine flights, beer, appetizer boards for purchase. Wood-fired pizzas require an online reservation. Aug. 21 features Young and Lovely. fieldbrookwinery.com. An Afternoon of Jazz with The Low Notes. 3-5 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Doug Mortenson on guitar, Rick DeVol on bass, Douglas Kamprath on drums, and Dave Ryan on vocals/keyboard. In the rotunda. humboldtarts.org. Durand Jones & The Indications w/Kiefer. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Cal Poly Humboldt, Arcata. Funk and soul. $40-$90. Jazz Jam. 5 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Live jam. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. Music in the Garden. Third Sunday of every month, 1-3 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods campus, north entrance, Eureka. Enjoy live music in the garden. hbgf.org. Summer Concert Series. 2-4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Enjoy live local bands and more. Free. arcatamainstreet@gmail.com. arcatamainstreet.com. (707) 822-4500.

EVENTS Blue Lake Sunday Market. 1-5 p.m. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. Farmers market, live music, vendors and a bar. Every Sunday through Sept. 25. The Clarke Presents: Another Very Victorian Tea. 2-4 p.m. Annie B. Ryan House and Gardens, 1000 F St., Eureka. In the gardens with tea sandwiches, scones, sweets and tasty teas by Brett Shuler Fine Catering. Guests are encouraged to dress up. $40-$225. dana.f@ clarkemuseum.org. eurekaheritage.org. (707) 443-1947. Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See Aug. 18 listing. Old Town Vintage Market. Third Sunday of every month, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Redwood Retro, 211 G St., Eureka. A summer block party with vintage, second hand, artisan vendors and more. Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

OUTDOORS Third Sunday Dune Restoration Work Days. Third Sunday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Ma-le’l Dunes South, Young Lane, Arcata. Help remove invasive plant species to make room for native plant diversity. Tools and snacks provided. Please bring water, face masks and wear work clothes. Meet at the Ma-le’l South parking lot. dante@friendsofthedunes.org. www.friendsofthedunes.org/dert-days. (707) 444-1397. Eureka Waterfront Trail Guided Birding Tour. 9-11 a.m. Eureka Waterfront, Foot of Del Norte Street. This flat, paved, relatively urban trail is wheelchair accessible and offers species abundance and diversity. Email to sign up. Free. thebook@reninet.com. rras.org. Guided Tour of Fort Humboldt State Historic Park. 1-2 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. See Aug. 20 listing.

SPORTS Drag Races. Samoa Drag Strip, Lincoln Avenue and New Navy Base Road. See Aug. 20 listing. Inaugural Moonstone Classic Surf Competition & Beach Fest. 8 a.m. Moonstone Beach, Moonstone Beach Road, Westhaven. A coastal celebration featuring a surf contest, beach volleyball tournament, yoga, cornhole, food trucks and drink booths. trinidadcoastallandtrust.org/moonstone-classic.

U O Y K T HAN

FOR VOTING US

BE S T

LOCALLY MADE FOOD

www.humboldtgrassfedbeef.com

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

FEATURED HUMBOLDT COUNTY ARTIST

West Coast Woodworking

Indoor & Outdoor fine custom woodworking.

22 Monday ART

July/August Art Show. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Watercolor paintings and ceramic tiles by Jody Bryan. Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Upstairs Gallery, 1063 G Street, Arcata. Exhibit of the late Arcata artist’s work. Curated by friend and neighbor, Shoshanna.

BOOKS Author Talk and Book Signing. 2-4 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Author Debbie Chinn talks about her book Dancing in Their Light: A Daughter’s Unfinished Memoir. Free. clarkemuseum.org.

OPEN MON-SAT 9 - 5 & SUNDAY 10 - 4 394 MAIN STREET, FERNDALE

www.humboldtshometownstore.com

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CALENDAR

+

insider HUMBOLDT FUN, RIGHT NOW

OF MENUS

Continued from previous page

LECTURE Chromebook Essentials. 10:30-11:45 a.m. Tri-County Independent Living, 139 Fifth St., Eureka. This five-week course covers the essentials. Chromebooks provided for class. Pre-registration is required, open to any 50+ fully vaccinated individuals. mgallagher@a1aa.org. (707) 442-3763 ext. 209.

EVENTS Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See Aug. 18 listing.

2022 EDITION

FOOD

OUT NOW! FIND IT ON ONLINE AND ON NEWSSTANDS ALL OVER HUMBOLDT

CA L E N DA R / M A P S / T H R I F T I N G W I T H A D I F F E R E N C E / LO G G E R BA R R E V I VA L

TK

Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. (707) 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See Aug. 18 listing.

ETC Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email for the link. Free. homeshare@a1aa. org. a1aa.org/homesharing. (707) 442-3763. Humboldt Bounskee League. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Weekly league nights. Purchase of any wood bounskee from Humbrews or the website includes one-month family membership for future events. All ages. Free. bounskee@gmail.com. bounskee.fun. (707) 601-9492. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Aug. 19 listing.

23 Tuesday MUSIC 1

LIFESTYLE OUTDOOR FUN PERFECT TRIPS FOOD & DRINK SHOPPING SOUVENIRS 90-DAY CALENDAR REGIONAL MAPS HUMBOLDTINSIDER.COM FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CALL: 442-1400 x319

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Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. See Aug. 19 listing.

EVENTS Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See Aug. 18 listing.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets, Fortuna. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts, music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation. org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/fortuna.html. (707) 441-9999. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Fresh local produce, eggs, bread, specialty sourdough donuts and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/oldtown.html. (707) 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh produce, flowers, plant starts and more. Live music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation. org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/sheltercove. html. (707) 441-9999.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. $3-$8. 31for14@ gmail.com. (707) 599-4605.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. (707) 443- 5021. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Aug. 18 listing.

24 Wednesday ART

Figure Drawing. 6-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. $5. blondiesfoodanddrink. com.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

LECTURE Chromebook Essentials. 10:30-11:45 a.m. Tri-County Independent Living, 139 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 22 listing.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Night: Ghost in the Shell (1995). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 6 p.m. Raffle at 7:35 p.m. Movie a 7:40 p.m. Rated TV-MA. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-Gaming in the lobby. $5, $9 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre. facebook.com/events/732495294694227. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC Bayside Ballads and Blues. 6-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Wednesday.

EVENTS Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See Aug. 18 listing.

FOR KIDS Storytime with Sunshine the Chicken and Ms. Sue. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. In-person stories and songs for preschool children and their caregivers. Masks are optional. Ms. Sue will be wearing one. Free. humboldtgov.org/calendar.aspx?EID=7463. (707) 822-5954.

FOOD Food for People’s Free Produce Market - Fortuna. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. *Drive-thru & walk-up. Walk-ups enter from David Way. For more information, go to www.foodforpeople.org or call (707) 445-3166. Guy Fieri Homestyle Chili Cook-Off. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Enjoy live music, games, prizes, food and vendors. Purchase a People’s Choice Mug & Spoon Set for $10 (includes ten voting tickets) and vote for your favorite chili. Under the Grandstands.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Aug. 19 listing.

MEETINGS CEDS Roadshow - Southern Humboldt. 5:30-7 p.m.

Redwood Playhouse, 286 Sprowel Creek Road, Garberville. A community discussion to hear the public’s insights on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats facing the county. drios@co.humboldt. ca.us. www.humboldtrising.com/. (707) 476-4809.

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Aug. 19 listing.

25 Thursday MUSIC

Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. See Aug. 18 listing. Music in the Park. 6-8 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. See Aug. 18 listing.

EVENTS Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See Aug. 18 listing.

FOOD Food for People’s Free Produce Market - Eureka. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Drive-thru event. For more information, go to www. foodforpeople.org or call (707) 445-3166. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Aug. 18 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Aug. 18 listing. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See Aug. 18 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. See Aug. 18 listing.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Aug. 18 listing. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. 12-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Aug. 18 listing.

ETC Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Aug. 18 listing.

Heads Up …

The Humboldt Arts Council will be accepting entries for the 26th annual Junque Arte Competition and Exhibition on Sept. 22 from noon to 5 p.m. at Morris Graves Museum of Art. Entry guidelines at the museum or at humboldtarts.org. The Humboldt County Library seeks local artists of all skill levels and ages to participate in the Tiny Art Show. Pick up a Tiny Art Kit from the Eureka Library at 1313 Third St. For more information, call (707) 269-1910, email hcl@co.humboldt.ca.us or visit humlib.org. KEET-TV seeks a diverse group of individuals to join its Community Advisory Board. Meetings are held quarterly on Zoom. Go to KEET.org to find the link at the bottom of the page. Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call (707) 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org. l


SCREENS

The Bear Roars By Grant Scott-Goforth screens@northcoastjournal.com

I

’ve never been a particularly dedicated consumer of food shows, despite my infatuation with eating. Killing a couple of minutes before bed with whichever PBS cooking show might be on is always a simple delight (unless you are hungry). All the better if the host is traveling. Polished food documentaries like Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011) have left me cold with unrelatable philosophies of eating and feeding people. Cooking competitions fall prey to unwatchable reality show tropes (the exception being the Great British Bake Off, which despite my never having made baked goods, is a delight). Rescue-style shows, which most often seem to exist to allow someone to browbeat and chastise some poor schmuck, are a huge turnoff. The Bear, then, comes as a wondrous surprise, instantly becoming one of my all-time favorite pieces of filmmaking as I breezed through its eight episodes last week. The Bear traces Carmen “Carmy” Berzatto’s (Jeremy Allen White) return to his family’s greasy spoon restaurant, a neighborhood fixture that cranks out family-style comfort food in his hometown Chicago neighborhood for its rough and tumble habitués. Carmy had recently ascended to the pinnacle of fine dining fame and success, working, as we learn in flashbacks, in sterility and abuse under an unnamed Michelin-starred chef. Carmy’s brother Michael, who was widely beloved by his extended family of siblings, cousins, coworkers and customers, has died. The circumstances aren’t initially clear, nor are the details of the arrangement regarding Original Beef of Chicagoland. Michael left Carmy half his restaurant even though he forbade him from entering it before he died. And so Carmy, fresh from French Laundry, book publishing and celebrity kitchens around the world, must ingratiate himself to the long-toiling staff of the Original Beef and bring his elevated standards to his family restaurant. Carmy’s sister Natalie (Abby Elliott) owns the other half and it’s clear she’s bending over backward — taxing her own career and family commitments — to keep the place afloat, dodging tax concerns, overdue bills and more. With the restaurant comes “Cousin”

Richie (Ebon Moss-Bachrach), a brash loudmouth who’s managed and run the front of the restaurant for years. Richie doesn’t take well to change or to taking orders from Carmy, whose cooking background couldn’t be more dissimilar. Nor does the rest of the staff, a tight-knit back-of-thehouse consisting of fewer than a dozen staff members. Neighborhood toughs, health inspectors, mounting debt and other outside forces push Carmy and the Original Beef staff to their emotional limits. The Bear plays out more like a movie than a TV series. Refreshingly free of exposition or overt explanation, viewers are left to construct the family’s and restaurant’s backgrounds from the ongoing relationships. Details emerge slowly, carefully. Glimpses of the clientele indicate how important it is to the community and, in turn, how meaningful it is to the staff, the family that makes up the core of the show. Sydney Adamu (a delightful Ayo Edibiri) a classically trained chef and Carmy fangirl joins the crew, further adding tension to the gumbo of ambitions, expectations and emotions in the kitchen. The Bear is a story of pain, grief and trauma. It confronts the wounded masculinity of Carmy and Richie, painting a portrait of despair masked by bravado and endless workdays. Its kitchen is kinetic and claustrophobia and anxiety inducing. The cast shouts dialogue over each other as deadlines and pressures mount, wills are tested and tempers flare. But the Bear has more heart and more to examine about kitchens where celebrity, abuse and unwavering exactitude are all but celebrated in food media. It accomplishes this while celebrating the devotion that cooking can induce in people and with loving attention to the details of a kitchen and the preparation of food. Carmy has exacting expectations but his method is to coax the best out of his staff, to encourage their best selves, to give them the power to expect more from themselves and each other. Still, Carmy is a flawed man, a survivor of kitchen trauma, and with mounting stresses, he finds it harder to keep it together. White, as Carmen, is remarkable in a role that seems tailored for him. He brings charisma and vulnerability to a deeply nuanced character. His talent is matched by

Me procrastinating by working on literally anything but writing. The Bear the rest of the cast, whose backgrounds largely stem from comedy. It shows — The Bear is at times uproarious, with perfect comic timing. The Bear is lovingly crafted, and even its most minor characters — an-always hungry hanger-on fix-it guy, the quiet dishwashing staff — are affectingly full of life. The camaraderie of a kitchen environment is real and, if people can temper their expectations and find something to reach for, it can be more family than family. There is stress, there is trauma in food. But perhaps, there can be healing in food. TVMA. HULU. l Grant Scott-Goforth (he/him) is a fan of beer, music, movies, art, animals, bikes and rivers, all in shuffling order.

NOW PLAYING

BEAST. Idris Elba stars as a widower who takes his kids on a family trip to the Savanna, where they meet a very agro lion. R. 93M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA. BODIES, BODIES, BODIES. Rich kids playing a murder game in a big, fancy house. What could go wrong? Starring Amandla Stenberg, Maria Bakalova, Lee Pace and Pete Davidson. R. 95M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. BULLET TRAIN. Five killers zip through Japan on the same rails. Starring Brad Pitt, Joey King, Sandra Bullock and Hiroyuki Sanada. R. 126M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. DC LEAGUE OF SUPER-PETS. Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart and Kate McKinnon voice superheroes’ best friends. PG. 106M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. DRAGON BALL SUPER: SUPER HERO. The anime saga continues (dubbed or subtitled). PG13. 100M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. FALL. I don’t know why these adven-

turous besties always end up trapped in shark cages and whatnot but these two are stuck atop a 2,000-foot radio tower. Ladies, you can actually just chill by a hotel pool. PG13. 107M. BROADWAY. MACK & RITA. Peak Coastal Grandma comedy about a woman in her 30s (Elizabeth Lail) wakes up as her 70-year-old self (Diane Keaton). PG13. 95M. MILL CREEK. MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU. Animated prequel with the chaotic little henchfolk. PG. 90M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. NOPE. Strange things are afoot at a California ranch and Keke Palmer and Daniel Kaluuya witness them in this Jordan Peele sci-fi thriller. R. 135M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. ORPHAN: FIRST KILL. The horror prequel arrives in time for the haunted Victorian doll fashion moment. Share the skincare routine, Esther. Starring Isabelle Fuhrman. R. 99M. FORTUNA. SPIRITED AWAY. A girl is put to work at a supernatural spa in Hayao Miyazaki’s animated fantasy. PG. 125M. MINOR. THOR: LOVE AND THUNDER. More Norse space-god action from the Marvel universe, with Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman doing couple-matchy capes. PG13. 119M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA. TOP GUN: MAVERICK. Tom Cruise returns to the cockpit with a note-perfect work of pure energy that sidesteps thorny politics for the pure physicality and mental plasticity required of a modern fighter pilot. PG13. 137M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING. A girl who grew up alone in the swamp in North Carolina is embroiled in a murder. PG13. 125M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema (707) 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre (707) 7252121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre (707) 822-3456.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

50 and Better

Spiritual

STAINED GLASS October 29 − November 19, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Educa− tion at (707) 476−4500.

OLLI ONLINE: SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP: LIVE AND LOCAL: CONCERTS BY THE EUREKA SYMPHONY AND THE EUREKA CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES WITH MORRISON ELIZABETH. Preview the music, share insights into the composers, and check out the musicians before concerts. First meeting is Mon., Sept. 1 from 6−7:30 p.m. Meeting dates vary, see the complete calendar on the website. OLLI members only: fall $15/full year. $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/ olli

EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1229)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BEGINNING STEEL DRUM CLASSES Mondays 6:15− 7:15. Next sessions starting Sept. 5th. Fridays 1:30−3 ongoing monthly classes. 707−407−8998 panartsnetwork.com Classes held at Pan Arts: 1049 Samoa Blvd #C in Arcata

DANCE MIX FRIDAYS: Have fun dancing to upbeat, eclectic music! 15 different routines each class. Varied styles including: Latin, hip−hop, indie, pop, jazz, country, throwbacks... Drop−ins welcome. Fridays 10−11 am Redwood Raks/ Creamery 824 L St, Arcata $0−5 Questions? ellenweiss707@gmail.com

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1229)

OLLI SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP: CITIZEN SCIENCE AND NATURE DIARIES WITH MICHELE OLSEN AND GISELA ROHDE. Participate in scien− tific data collection, finding projects, reporting observations, and creative ways to make a nature diary. This group meets quarterly. First meeting: Wed., Aug. 24 from 11 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI members only $20. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli TAKE A CLASS WITH OLLI. Anyone can take an OLLI class. Join OLLI today and get the member discount on classes. Non−members add $25 to the class fee listed. https://extended.humboldt.edu/ olli/olli−upcoming−courses (O−1229)

CARTOON

SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1229)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1229) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1229)

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format. Visit https://w ww.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/ 17724/ArticleID/4916/Additional−Online−Classes

CANNABIS BUSINESS TRAINING Online July 13 − Oct. 26, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. ELDT THEORY ONLY September 12 − October 19, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. EMT REFRESHER COURSE October 27 − November 6, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

INTERMEDIATE BOOKKEEPING October 4 − November 22, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. MEDICAL BILLING & CODING ONLINE October 4, 2022 − March 2, 2023 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. NOTARY October 11, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. PHARMACY TECH ONLINE October 4, 2022 − March 18, 2023 2023 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. REAL ESTATE PROGRAM FACE TO FACE Starts October 3, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. SERVSAFE CERTIFICATION October 20, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

TRUCK DRIVING INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS August 23 or 25, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500.

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC LIVING SCHOOL TRAININGS w/Traci Webb & Guests. Ayurveda Health & Life Coach/ Practitioner Training starts 1/11/23, Ayurveda Herbalist Training starts 2/21/23. Seasonal Self− Care Retreats: 6/24 & 9/30, Seasonal Detoxes: July 12−26 & Oct. 4−18, Herbal Remedies Making Immer− sions: 7/10 & 9/25, www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0930)

SEPTEMBER MINDFULNESS 4 WEEK SERIES Mindful Communication: Tuesdays 7−9pm Learn how to use mindfulness and nonviolent communication to foster connection. Foundation of Mindfulness: Thursdays 7−9pm Cultivate presence and clarity though vipassana meditation. Sliding scale of $200−$250 register at https://www.rememberingtruenature.c om/upcoming−classes

FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY/GED PREP: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS W/ DISABILITIES CLASSES: Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500. FREE WORK READINESS CLASSES: ONLINE Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

HOME INSPECTION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/6231/Home− Inspection−Certification−Program

28

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

YOUR CLASS HERE Arts & Crafts Computer Fitness Kids & Teens Lectures Dance & Music

Theatre & Film Spiritual Support Therapy Wellness Bodywork

442-1400 ×314

northcoastjournal.com


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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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1. It means “sulfur island” in Japanese 8. Corn throwaway 11. Virtual city dweller 14. Stands the heat 15. K.C.-to-Detroit direction 16. “____ kingdom come ...” 17. Buzzy body? 19. Maritime law drama from 1995 to 2005 20. “Huzzah!” 21. Much work ahead 23. Bottom part of an open sandwich 27. Unwakeable, say 30. “Just a heads-up...” 31. Southern region of South America 34. Counsel council, in brief 37. Biblical beacon

41. Work started by London’s Philological Soc. 42. Do away with 43. Early bird? 46. Levies, as a tax 47. Euphoria 52. Dieter’s time of indulgence 53. “Give ____ rest!” 56. Horace’s “____ Poetica” 57. Omelet’s go-with at brunch, maybe 62. Soccer star Messi, to fans 63. One of 17 in Monopoly: Abbr. 64. Actress Dietrich 65. Vigor 66. Aides for profs 67. Big tear-jerker ... or a description of this puzzle’s theme

24. A target for Target, say 25. “____ the opinion...” 26. “... all that you ____” (Army slogan) 27. ____ facto 28. Nick Mohammed’s “Ted Lasso” role 29. Slightly 32. Suffix with court or cash 33. “Garfield: ____ of Two Kitties” 34. Cries of discovery 35. ____ noire (pet peeve) 36. Home of Iowa State 38. Port on many TVs 39. Some people read them 40. Earth Friendly Products detergent

DOWN

1. ____-bitsy 2. East Coast 7-Eleven competitor 3. “Sure” 4. What Kramer often called Seinfeld 5. Ideology suffix 6. “Ay, dios ____!” 7. DOJ division 8. Green with the 2010 hit “Forget You” 9. Singular event 10. Words before a date on a package 11. Missouri city, familiarly 12. “If ____ nickel for every time ...” 13. “Unbelievable!” 18. Modern love? 22. Prefix between bi- and quad23. Sign of an old wound

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43. Landing guess: Abbr. 44. Insinuates 45. Big name in chocolate 47. Rogaine target 48. Midafternoon hour 49. “The Ant and the Grasshopper” author 50. Dims 51. “Later!” 53. Drink with a Blue Lemonade flavor 54. Oodles 55. Work without ____ (take risks) 58. Sounds in a yoga studio 59. ____ Schwarz (toy company) 60. “1 sec” 61. Title sitcom character with eight stomachs

MEDIUM #45

© Puzzles by Pappocom

A T I E D E

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L A D P R I N S M U G R O H A N S U V A G A L

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ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO ROMAN NUMERALS

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WASHED UP

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No Crabs Allowed By Mike Kelly

washedup@northcoastjournal.com

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he large sign over the archway said: “Welcome to Pillowburg Resort and Spa!” The small sign next to it said: “No Crabs Allowed.” The guard, a flabby sea slug, noticed me and said, “Oi! We don’t allow your kind. Beat it.” I was like, “Why? What did I do?” The guard said, “You are a granular claw crab (Oedignathus inermis). You are hard and bumpy. You are the opposite of a pillow. The family name of your kind of crab is Lithodidae, which literally means ‘resembling a rock.’ Besides, we just sold out.” I said, “But I can see lots of empty pillows right through there. Come on, dude. That pillow lifestyle looks sweet. My people live in rocky crevices among hard-shelled mussels or tucked between predatory anemones. We live in places so tight you’d think we were trapped. My own home is a large, empty barnacle shell under some coralline algae. We usually live near shore from Alaska to Northern California and over by Japan where the water is cold and the surf pounds. It’s a rough existence, and we wouldn’t have it any other way. But a little Pillowburg vacation sounds relaxing.” “Shove off, you filthy crab,” said the guard. “That small left claw of yours is bad enough but your big right claw looks deadly.” I said, “I use my rather impressive and bumpy right cheliped, which is what you call a claw, mainly for blocking the entrance to my lair so predators like seagulls can’t pull me out. We granular claw crabs feed on plankton, which we filter from the water using our feathered mouthparts. So, we aren’t going to chomp anyone and we present no more risk than anyone else in Pillowburg. In fact, our species name inermis means ‘unarmed.’” “But you’re a crab. You know how you people are — shifty and brutish.” “No, we aren’t. We are sophisticated

romantics. My people live in pairs and engage in precopulatory courtship rituals that involve both touching and producing lovely — to us — scents. Then we release our larvae in January and February. We are lovers, not fighters. And my wife and I would like to, you know, do it in Pillowburg.” “Whatever,” said the guard, “Frankly, that outrageous claw just makes it look like you are compensating for something.” “Well, I am compensating. I need this cheliped because I have a soft underbelly. I am a small but proud king crab. Some of us don’t have an armored abdomen like most kinds of crabs. So, once a seagull gets past my right cheliped, I’m a succulent and nutritious bite. Gulls, like owls, hock up pellets of material they can’t digest. So, our detached chelipeds, which are common on beaches where flocks of gulls rest, are probably all you Pillowburgers know of us.” “Did you just say you have a soft underbelly? Is … is it … pillow-soft?” asked the guard. “Here, look. My abdomen is like a soft, fleshy, puffed-up disk. No hard shell, no spines, just a squishy cushion full of intestines, reproductive organs and other soft abdominal bits. Some people even call us ‘the soft-bellied crab.’” “Whoa ... Let me call my pillow guy. Hold on. Boss? Yeah, I got a granular claw crab here who — get this: He has a very soft, shall we say ‘appealing’ belly.” The guard turned to me, “OK, crab, the boss says you can come in but you have to let him touch your belly. And you can’t bring your wife.” I said, “You know what? Kiss my pillowy ass. I’ll vacation in a cool place, like Humboldt County.” l Biologist Mike Kelly (he/him) is also the author of the book Tigerfish: Traditional and Sport Fishing on the Niger River, Mali, West Africa. It’s available at Amazon or everywhere e-books are sold.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Arlene Elizabeth Roberg CASE NO. PR2200240

fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Daniel E. Cooper, Esq. Morrison, Morrison & Cooper Law Office 611 I St, Suite A Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−8011 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

tions. All purchase items sold as−is, where−is, and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between the owner and the obligated party. Auctioneer: David Johnson bond #9044453

Dated this 18th day of August and To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, 25th day of August, 2022 contingent creditors and persons 08/18, 08/25 2022 who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Arlene Elizabeth Roberg STATEMENT 22−00438 A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been The following person is doing Busi− filed by Petitioner, Elizabeth Roberg ness as −Cross and Richard Roberg Jen Rice Consults In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition Humboldt for probate requests that Elizabeth 2404 17th Street Roberg−Cross and Richard Roberg 8/18, 8/25, 9/1 (22−336) Eureka, CA 95501 be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate FOUND: Currency found in the Jennifer L. Rice of the decedent. vicinity of McKinleyville Rd., 2404 17th Street THE PETITION requests the dece− McKinleyville California. Eureka, CA 95501 dent’s will and codicils, if any, be Pursuant to Sec 2080.3 of the Civil admitted to probate. The will and Code, the property, having been The business is conducted by an any codicils are available for exami− stored for over 90 Individual. nation in the file kept by court. days, has not been claimed and is The date registrant commenced to THE PETITION requests authority to hereby advertised as found. If not transact business under the ficti− administer the estate under the claimed within 7 tious business name or name listed Independent Administration of days of this published notice, title above on Not Applicable. Estates Act. (This authority will to said property will vest in the I declare that all information in this allow the personal representative finder after payment statement is true and correct. to take many actions without of publication costs. Owner may A registrant who declares as true obtaining court approval. Before produce proof of ownership and any material matter pursuant to taking certain very important claim this property at Section 17913 of the Business and actions, however, the personal the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Professions Code that the regis− representative will be required to Office, 826 Fourth Street, Eureka, trant knows to be false is guilty of a give notice to interested persons Monday through misdemeanor punishable by a fine unless they have waived notice or Friday 8:00AM − 4:00PM. not to exceed one thousand dollars consented to the proposed action.) ($1,000). The independent administration PUBLIC NOTICE /s Jennifer Rice, Owner authority will be granted unless an This July 6, 2022 Notice is hereby given that the interested person files an objection KELLY E. SANDERS undersigned intends to sell the to the petition and shows good by sc, Humboldt County Clerk personal property described below cause why the court should not to enforce a lien on said property 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−319) grant the authority. pursuant to sections 21700−21717 of A HEARING on the petition will be FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME the Business and Professions Code, held on September 8, 2022 at 1:31 STATEMENT 22−00439 section 2328 of the UCC section 535 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− The following person is doing Busi− of the Penal Code and provisions of fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 ness as the Civil Code. The undersigned will Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. The Grotto Eureka sell at public sale by the competi− For information on how to appear tive bidding on the 27th day of remotely for your hearing, please Humboldt August 2022 at 10:00 am on the visit https://www.humboldt.courts. 428 Grotto Street premises where the said property ca.gov/ Eurkea, CA 95501 has been stored and which is IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of located at the Mad River Storage the petition, you should appear at Paula A Harris Center, 1400 Glendale Drive, McKin− the hearing and state your objec− 1026 9th Street, C leyville, CA, county of Humboldt tions or file written objections with Eureka, CA 95501 the following: the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by The business is conducted by an #115 Bryan Gilmore your attorney. Individual. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a The date registrant commenced to #194 Katie Smith contingent creditor of the dece− transact business under the ficti− dent, you must file your claim with tious business name or name listed #281 Charles Kreuter the court and mail a copy to the above on Not Applicable. personal representative appointed I declare that all information in this #300 Chelsea Huntzinger Carlson by the court within the later of statement is true and correct. either (1) four months from the A registrant who declares as true #333 Chelsea Huntzinger Carlson date of first issuance of letters to a any material matter pursuant to general personal representative, as Section 17913 of the Business and #378 Jason Miller defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− Professions Code that the regis− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days trant knows to be false is guilty of a #387 Charles Kreuter from the date of mailing or misdemeanor punishable by a fine personal delivery to you of a notice not to exceed one thousand dollars under section 9052 of the California ($1,000). Purchases must be paid for at the Probate Code. Other California /s Paula Harris, Owner time of sale in cash only. Anyone statutes and legal authority may This July 6, 2022 interested in attending the auction affect your rights as a creditor. You KELLY E. SANDERS must sign in prior to 10:00 am on may want to consult with an by tn, Humboldt County Clerk the day of the auction, no excep− attorney knowledgeable in Cali− tions. All purchase items sold as−is, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−322) fornia law. where−is, and must be removed at YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME the time of sale. Sale is subject to by the court. If you are a person STATEMENT 22−00460 cancellation in the event of settle− interested in the estate, you may The following person is doing Busi− ment between the owner and the file with the court a Request for ness as obligated party. Special Notice (form DE−154) of the No Sides filing of an inventory and appraisal Auctioneer: David Johnson bond of estate assets or of any petition Humboldt #9044453 NORTH COAST or account as provided in JOURNAL Probate • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com 224 Palmer Blvd. Code section 1250. A Request for Fortuna, CA 95540 Dated this 18th day of August and Special Notice form is available 25th day of August, 2022 from the court clerk.

30

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00460 The following person is doing Busi− ness as No Sides Humboldt 224 Palmer Blvd. Fortuna, CA 95540 Luke W Vaughan 224 Palmer Blvd. Fortuna, CA 9550 Mark N Vaughan 860 14th St. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Luke Vaughan, Partner/ Owner This July 13, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−317)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00463 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Balance Body Arcata Humboldt 145 S G Street E Arcata, CA 95521 Brooke M Adams 3564 G Street Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brooke Adams, Owner Sole Proprioter This July 13, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−306)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00473 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Dick Taylor Craft Chocolate Humboldt 4 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 4 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 Dick Taylor, INC CA C3623016 4 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a

Ferndale, CA 95536

Humboldt 4 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 4 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 Dick Taylor, INC CA C3623016 4 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Adam P Dick, Incorporator−Presi− dent This July 20, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−305)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00474 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Stained Ghost Humboldt 3546 Glen St. Eureka, CA 95503 Holly M Hilgenberg 3546 Glen St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Holly Hilgenberg, Owner This July 20, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−320)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00477 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Homestead Landscapes Humboldt 679 Van Ness Ave Ferndale, CA 95536 Elbow Grease Management LLC CA 201826810818 679 Van Ness Ave Ferndale, CA 95536 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Francis A Borden, Manager This July 21, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−307)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00478 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Matt Giacomini Insurance Services Humboldt 780 Wildwood Ave. Rio Dell, CA 95562 CMG Financial Services LLC CA 20221410157 780 Wildwood Ave. Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Matthew Giacomini, Chief Exec− utive Officer This July 21, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/11, 8/18, 8/25, 9/1 (22−326)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00481 The following person is doing Busi− ness as The Humboldt Garlic Company Humboldt 1260 Hiller Rd Mckinleyville, CA 95519 PO Box 4215 Arcata, CA 95518 Six Rivers Development LLC CA 201526410170 1260 Hiller Rd Mckinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000).


tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brian Shields, Managing Member This July 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−311)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00482 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Central Sandwich Humboldt 2011 Central Ave Mckinleyville, CA 95519 Jeni M Masaki 190 Warren Creek Rd Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jeni Masaki, Owner This July 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−308)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00483 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Smart Choice Canine Academy Humboldt 1275 Fernwood Drive Mckinleyville, CA 95519 1275 Fernwood Drive Mckinleyville, CA 95519 Markus h Milligan The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Markus Milligan, Owner/Oper− ator This July 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−309)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00484 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LYNNOLEUM Humboldt 501 Third Street Eureka, CA 95501 Lynn M Jones 40 Buckley Road Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lynn M. Jones, Business Owner This July 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

ness as Arbor Landscapes

732 Hidden Creek Rd. Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 1205 Russ St Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 4252 Arcata, CA 95518

Michael Rohan 732 Hidden Creek Rd. Arcata, CA 95521

Shane U Swanson 1205 Russ St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shane Swanson, Owner This August 1, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 8/18, 8/25, 9/1, 9/8 (22−337)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00504 The following person is doing Busi− ness as 314intermedia

7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−310)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00492 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Sorrel Leaf Healing Center Inc. Humboldt 124 Indianola Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 Lost Coast Children’s Residential Treatment Center Inc. CA 4711910 3305 Renner Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Rachael Adair, Secretary This July 27, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−318)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00502 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Arbor Landscapes Humboldt 1205 Russ St Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 4252 Arcata, CA 95518 Shane U Swanson 1205 Russ St Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 732 Hidden Creek Rd. Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Michael Rohan, Owner This August 02, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/11, 8/18, 8/25, 9/1 (22−327)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00519 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Pappus Botanical Consulting Humboldt 1304 Sunset Ave. Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Robert M Anderson, Sole Propri− etor This August 10, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/18, 8/25, 9/1, 9/8 (22−334)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00521 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Kool Beanz Coffee and Ice Cream Humboldt 1338 Myrtle Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 2464 15th St. Eureka, CA 95501

ness as Kool Beanz Coffee and Ice Cream Humboldt Continued on next page » 1338 Myrtle Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 2464 15th St. Eureka, CA 95501 Joseph S. Jacobs 2464 15th St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Joseph S Jacobs, Owner This August 11, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/18, 8/25, 9/1, 9/8 (22−335)

default

Robert M Anderson 1304 Sunset Ave. Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to Michael Rohan transact business under the ficti− 732 Hidden Creek Rd. tious business name or name listed Arcata, CA 95521 above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this default The business is conducted by an statement is true and correct. PUBLIC NOTICE Individual. A registrantAUTHORITY who declares as true COUNTYcommenced OF HUMBOLDT HOUSING The date registrant to any material matter pursuant to NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN that he County of Humtransact businessISunder the ficti− Section 17913 of the and Authority developed it’sBusiness Agency tiousboldt businessHousing name or name listed has Professions that theand regis− compliance with the QualityCode Housing above Plan on NotinApplicable. trant knows to beof false is guilty Workthat Responsibility A copy the draftof a I declare all information inAct this of 1998. punishable by a fine plan isisavailable for review at misdemeanor www.eurekahumboldtha. statement true and correct. to exceed dollars org orwho by declares request. A public not hearing forone thethousand purpose A registrant as true of receiving comments on ($1,000). the Agency Plan will be any material matter pursuant to /s Robert Anderson, Sole Propri− held onofWednesday, 14,M2022 at 10:00am Section 17913 the Business andSeptember etor via Zoom. ThetheHousing will receive comProfessions Code that regis− Authority This August 10, 2022August 8, the of Agency Plan starting trantments knows toregarding be false is guilty a KELLY E. SANDERS 2022 through thebyclose on September 22, misdemeanor punishable a fine of business by Plan sc, Humboldt Countyzoom Clerk 2022. request Agency and obtain not to exceedTo one thousandthe dollars 8/18, 8/25, 9/1,ext 9/8 (22−334) meeting information, please call (707) 443-4583 ($1,000). 219. The Housing /s Michael Rohan, Owner Authority hours of operation are 9:00am – 4:30pm, Monday – Friday, This August 02, 2022 alternating every other Friday an off day. KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/11, 8/18, 8/25, 9/1 (22−327) default

PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF EUREKA HOUSING AUTHORITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that he City of Eureka Housing Authority has developed it’s Agency Plan in compliance with the Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998. A copy of the Agency Plan is available for review at www.eurekahumboldtha. org or by request. A public hearing for the purpose of receiving comments on the Agency Plan will be held on Wednesday, September 14, 2022 at 11:00am via Zoom. The Housing Authority will receive comments regarding the Agency Plan starting August 8, 2022 through the close of business on September 22, 2022. To request the Agency Plan and obtain zoom meeting information, please call (707) 443-4583 ext 219. The Housing Authority hours of operation are 9:00am – 4:30pm, Monday – Friday, alternating every other Friday an off day.

PUBLIC NOTICE Joseph S. Jacobs EBI CONSULTING 2464 15th St. Frontier Communications is proposing to modify an existing wireEureka, CA 95501 less telecommunications facility on an existing 20-foot telecommunications tower located Theself-support business islattice conducted by a approximately 400ft east of the intersection of California Married Couple.96 and Big Rock Road, Orleans, Humboldt County, California. modifi cations commenced will consist oftoa 40-foot extension of the existing 20-foot TheThe date registrant telecommunications transact business underself-support the ficti− lattice tower, increasing the height of the structure to name 64ft above ground level (measured to the top of the lightning tious business or name listed rod) on as well collocating antennas at varying heights, not to exceed 59ftabove Not as Applicable. 10in above level. Anyininterested party wishing to submit comments I declare thatground all information this regardingisthe potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic statement true and correct. property may so by sending such comments to: Project 6122007145 - KRC EBI A registrant whododeclares as true 6876 Susquehanna anyConsulting, material matter pursuant toTrail South, York, PA 17403, or at (815) 302-9118. Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Joseph S Jacobs, Owner default This August 11, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERSCITY OF FORTUNA — LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO BIDDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 8/18, 8/25, 9/1, 9/8 (22−335) Sealed bids from Licensed Timber Operators for the Vancil 2022 Tree Removal Project will be received at the office of the City Manager, will be received at the office of the City Manager, 621 11th Street Fortuna, California, until 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, August 24, 2022 at which time they will be publicly opened and read:

LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314

The successful bidder shall: A. Fall, buck, yard, load and deliver approximately 65 MBF of redwood and Douglas fir, logs. Logs manufactured from the Vancil Reservoir Parcel, APN #020-008-412, Section 32, T3N, R1W, HB&M. B. Remove and treat slash material and install designated erosion control measures and following operations. Each sealed envelope containing a quote must be plainly marked on the outside as “Vancil Tree Removal Project Bid 2022.” Specifications may be obtained from the City Manager’s Office (Buffy Gray Senior Administrative Assistant 707 725-1411), 621 11th Street, Fortuna, CA 95540. The City reserves the right to reject any and all quotes. A “field “show-me” trip is scheduled for Wednesday August 17, 2022 at 9 a.m. Interested parties can meet at the Vancil Reservoir, 1661 Vancil St in Fortuna, CA. To make an appointment for a “field show-me” contact BBW & Associates (707) 825-0475 (office), (707) 845-5804 (cell) or email jmgerstein@ bbwassociates.com or mandre@bbwassociates.com. BBW & Associates POB 702 Arcata, CA 95518

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

31


LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00491 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Eureka Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Humboldt 4320 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503−5740 4800 N US Hwy 101 Eureka, CA 95503

tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Rick Hrdina, Rick Hrdina, Secre− tary This July 26, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−323)

Eureka Motors, Inc. CA C5132876 4800 N US Hwy 101 Eureka, CA 95503

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00529 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Creekside Station B & B

Ferndale, CA 95536 PO Box 888 Ferndale, CA 95536 Jennifer A Jones 507 Shaw Ave Ferndale, CA 95536 John P Miller 507 Shaw Ave Ferndale, CA 95536 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer Jones, Owner This August 15, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to Humboldt transact business under the ficti− 504 Shaw Ave tious business name or name listed Ferndale, CA 95536 above on Not Applicable. PO Box 888 I declare that all information in this Ferndale, CA 95536 statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true Jennifer A Jones 8/18, 8/25, 9/1, 9/8 (22−341) any material matter pursuant to 507 Shaw Ave Section 17913 of the Business and Ferndale, CA 95536 Professions Code that the regis− John P Miller REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS trant knows to be false is guilty of a 507 Shaw Ave “THE HOOPA FOUR PROJECT” PROJECT MANAGER POSITION misdemeanor punishable by a fine Ferndale, CA 95536 THE CALTRANS not to exceed one thousand dollars CLEAN CALIFORNIA LOCAL GRANT PROGRAM (CCLGP) PROJECT THEThe HOOPA VALLEY TRIBALbyPLANNING DEPARTMENT ($1,000). business is conducted a /s Rick Hrdina, Rick Hrdina, Secre−Valley Married The Hoopa Tribe’s Planning DEADLINE: THIS IS A TIME SENSITIVE PROJECT, the Couple. tary Department is seeking Proposals from qualifi ed respondeadline for Proposals shall be Wednesday, September The date registrant commenced to This Julyand 26,responsible 2022 sive individuals and/or firms for the under 7, 2022, transact business the5:00 ficti−p.m. Proposals shall be accepted by email, KELLY E. SANDERS Cal-Trans Clean California Local Grant Program (CCLGP)nameinorperson, or by mail with the envelope clearly marked tious business name listed by“The tn, Humboldt County ClerkProject Manager Hoopa Four Project” Position. “Do Not Open,” to the Hoopa Valley Tribal Planning above on Not Applicable. 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−323)of improvements “The Hoopa Four8/4,Project” consists Department at the following: I declare thatand all information in this upgrades, ADA compliant, to four projectstatement sites “Pookey’ s and is true correct. Email: Park,” “Tish Tang Campground,” “Jack Jarnaghan Rodeo A registrant who declares as true planningdirector.hoopatribe@gmail.com Ground,” and the “Neighborhood Facilities,” all located any material matterhvtplanner@gmail.com pursuant to within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation, California. Section 17913 of the Business and Scope of Work: Professions Code that the regis− Mailing Address: Services to be performed shall be of trant designknows and build to be false is guilty of a Planning Director Jaclyn Robinson, coordination, project management and misdemeanor oversight of the punishable a fineTribal Planning Department HoopabyValley Cal-Trans CCLGP “Hoopa Four Project.” not to exceed one thousand dollars P.O. Box 1348, Hoopa, CA 95546 The Project Manager shall work directly ($1,000).with the Physical Address: Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Planning Department overseeJones, the Owner /stoJennifer planning, design-build, procurement, execution, and fi15,nal2022 Jaclyn Robinson, Planning Director This August delivery of the CCLGP Project grant. The KELLY ProjectE.Manager SANDERS Hoopa Valley Tribal Planning Department 11860Clerk State Highway 96, Hoopa, CA shall direct schedules and activities, ensure the work County by sc, Humboldt achieves all Project goals, conduct cost and price analysis, 8/18, 8/25, A site visit shall be scheduled with the Hoopa Valley 9/1, 9/8 (22−341) prepare monthly invoices and project reports, ensure the Tribe Planning Department, deadline to schedule a site project is running on schedule and is completed on time, visit is Wednesday, August 31, 2022, 5:00 p.m. To schedule and is within the Project budget. a site visit, please contact the Planning Department at the The Project Manager will act as the agent on behalf address information above. Additional information shall of the Hoopa Valley Tribe (Owner) working with the be obtained by contacting the Planning Department. architects, contractors, sub-contractors, consultants The Hoopa Valley Tribe reserves the right to reject and suppliers. any and all proposals and to waive any informalities or The Project Manager Skills Set: irregularities in the proposal process, the Tribe assumes Please address your range of skills, qualities, abilities no responsibility for payment of any expenses incurred and experience within your proposal: The Project Man- by any proposing contractor as part of the RFP process. ager shall have strong scheduling and time-management Contractors shall be aware that Prevailing Wage applies, skills, leadership skills, communication skills, report-writ- Federal Executive Order 11246 (Equal Employment Opporing skills, inspection services experience, organizational tunity), Section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and and multi-tasking skills, analytical and problem-solving Education Assistance Act (2 USC 450e(b)), Hoopa Valley skills, negotiation skills, financial skills, cost and price Tribal Title 21 Drug and Alcohol Policies Ordinance, the analysis skills, procurement experience, and team man- Hoopa Tribal Title 13 Tribal Employment Rights Ordinance agement skills. California State, Cal-Trans and/or Hoopa (TERO), shall be enforced. Valley Tribal grant experience is highly desired. Proposals shall be reviewed and evaluated by the Evaluation Process: Proposal Packets shall include Tribe in order to determine which Proposal best meets the following: the needs for this Project’s required services. For more Proposal Packets shall be scored and evaluated on information, please feel free to contact the Hoopa the following: Valley Tribal Planning Department at (530) 625-4211 x139, 1. Experience and work history or by email planningdirector.hoopatribe@gmail.com, or 2. Education and/or Certificates hvtplanner@gmail.com 3. Grant Administration experience 4. Finance skills/experience 5. Examples of project work 6. Desired Salary/Pay Scale 7. Three to Five References 8. Indian Preference (if applicable)

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Sally Frances Stewart Graham CASE NO. CV2201131 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Sally Frances Stewart Graham for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Sally Frances Stewart Graham to Proposed Name Sally Frances Stewart THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: Sept. 16, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 2, 2022 Filed: June 2, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court

OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 2, 2022 Filed: June 2, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 8/11, 8/18, 8/25, 9/1 (22−325)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Jennifer Clarissa Robinson CASE NO. CV2200986 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Jennifer Clarissa Robinson for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Jennifer Clarissa Robinson to Proposed Name Jennifer Clarissa Robinson Reisinger

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 2, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 20, 2022 Filed: July 20, 2022 THE HOUSING OFTimothy THE CITY OF EUREKA 8/11, 8/18,AUTHORITIES 8/25, 9/1 (22−325) /s/ A. Canning AND COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT ARE Judge of theCURRENTLY Superior Court

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR ALL PROGRAMS 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−312)

City programs are Eureka Public Housing and Eureka Family Housing, which offer 1, 2, 3, and 4-bedroom units as well as wheelchair accessible units for the mobility impaired, and Eureka Senior Housing offers 1-bedroom units only (62 or older). City programs are all located within the Eureka city limits. The County program is the Housing Choice Voucher Program, which includes a new allocation of Mainstream Vouchers and Emergency Housing Vouchers. Formerly called Section 8, this is the federal government’s major program for assisting lowincome families, the elderly and disabled to afford decent, safe, and sanitary housing in the private market. Housing assistance is provided on behalf of the family or individual, so participants can find their own housing, including single-family homes, townhouses and apartments. The participant is free to choose available rentals county-wide that meets the requirements of the program and is not limited to units located in specific subsidized housing projects. Applications are available via request from the Housing Authority. Call (707) 443-4583 or email frontdesk@eurekahumboldtha.org to request applications. Or print an application from our website, www.eurekahumboldtha.org. The Housing Authorities are Equal Housing Opportunity Organizations

ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 20, 2022 Filed: July 20, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 7/28, 8/4, 8/11, 8/18 (22−312)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Pamela Maxwell CASE NO. CV2201059 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Pamela Maxwell for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Brandon Herchell Webster Devlin to Proposed Name Prince D’Miri Maxwell Devlin THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: Sept. 9, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 2, 2022 Filed: June 2, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 8/4, 8/11, 8/18, 8/25 (22−324)

LEGALS? LEGALS? LEGALS? CountyPublic Public Notices Notices County Public Notices County Fictitious Business FictitiousBusiness Business Fictitious Petition Petition to toto Petition Administer Estate Administer Estate Estate Administer Trustee Sale Trustee Sale Sale Trustee Other Public Notices OtherPublic Public Notices Notices Other

classified@north classified@north classified@north coastjournal.com coastjournal.com coastjournal.com

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OBITUARIES

EMPLOYMENT

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Northcoast Children’s Services

Northcoast Children’s Services MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN, Arcata

Do you love being with children? Do you enjoy supporting children learn and grow?

Vaden Earl Jantz Jr.

Are you looking for a meaningful profession?

August 11,1950 - June 19, 2022 Vaden Earl Jantz Jr. was born in Arcata on August 11,1950 where he enjoyed a happy childhood with his three brothers and sister. But even as a child Vaden wanted to work! He realized his ambitions at age ten, milking cows at the Arcata Creamline Dairy across the street from his home on the corner of Zehndner and O st. In high school he helped in the kitchen of the Big 4 restaurant, a popular establishment at the time, and remembered fondly his cowboy experiences bucking hay and wrangling cattle in the hills around Humboldt county. Sitting still at college didn’t suit him so he went to work for the City of Arcata as an equipment operator, where for seventeen years he assisted in numerous water, wastewater and street projects. He was very proud of helping to create the now famous Arcata Marsh and upon his retirement from that job in 1987 was described by the members of the City Council as a “competent, loyal and dependable employee”. Vaden also served his local community for thirty three years as a volunteer and career firefighter for the Arcata Volunteer Fire Department. He was named Volunteer Fireman of the Year in 1975, where, according to an article in the Union newspaper, the selection was made on the basis of “attendance at fire calls and drills, enthusiasm and popularity”. After his retirement from the fire district in 2010, his help was eagerly sought by various civic and non-profit groups, including the town of Manila and the Friends of the Dunes. Vaden enjoyed visiting family, fishing at Lewiston lake and far-flung travels with his wife Linda, but was a worker at heart. So he once again offered his help to the City, where his expertise and congenial spirit were happily welcomed by the small Environmental Services staff with whom he spent his last working years as a heavy equipment operator, maintaining the wetlands and the community forest. Vaden was a kind and unassuming man who had no need to be in the spotlight. He was a keen observer of the world around him and had an intimate knowledge of nature, both animal and human. Vaden died peacefully at his home in Arcata on June 19. Friends are invited to an informal indoor-outdoor celebration of his life at the Blue Lake Fire Department on Saturday, August 27 from 2-5 p.m.

We Print Obituaries

Do you want a job that has evenings and weekends off? Would you love to find a job with a Hiring Incentive? Northcoast Children’s Services may be what you’re looking for! Northcoast Children’s Services provides early education and family support services to children and families from pregnancy to age 5. We offer home visiting services, infant toddler and preschool centers in a variety of locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. We have a variety of full and part time positions working with children and families. We offer paid vacation, sick leave and holidays to all employees and an additional health insurance/cash benefit/dependent care option to full time employees. All employees may also obtain assistance with education and child development permits. We are currently looking for people to join our team as housekeepers, cooks, teachers, assistant teachers, center directors and home visitors. Full-time staff (30 hrs. per week or more) are eligible to participate in a Flexible Benefit Plan after 2 months of full-time employment. Please visit our website or Facebook page for more information on how to join our growing team! https://ncsheadstart. org/employment-opportunities/

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Submit information via email to classified@ northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Performs a variety of site repairs, alterations, construction projects, and general maintenance for NCS sites. 2 years of construction exp. desirable. F/T: 40 hrs./wk. $18.09-$19.94/hr. Open Until Filled.

CENTER DIRECTOR, Eureka Responsibilities include overall management of a Head Start program. Must meet Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix, plus 3 units in Administration (BA/BS Degree in Child Development or a related field preferred). Req. a min. of 2 yrs. exp. working w/ preschool children in a group setting. F/T 40 hr./wk. $20.50-$22.61/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEACHERS, McKinleyville, Eureka Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support and supervision for a toddler program. Must meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have 1 yr. experience teaching in a toddler setting. F/T position: 40 hrs./wk. & P/T position: 25 hrs./wk. $17.94-$19.78/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHERS, Fortuna/Arcata/ Crescent City Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities for toddler age children. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, and have one-yr. experience teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $18.19$19.10/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSOCIATE TEACHER, Orleans Assists teacher in the implementation and supervision of activities for preschool children. Requires a minimum of 12 ECE units—including core classes—and at least one-year experience working with young children. F/T 32 hr./wk. $17.43$18.30/hr. Open Until Filled. Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS staff are required to submit proof of a complete COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are granted an exemption. All staff who are eligible for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All staff must wear face coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions.

Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Rita for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

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Northcoast Children’s Services ASSISTANT TEACHERS, McKinleyville, Eureka, Fortuna, Rio Dell Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a preschool program. 6-12 ECE units preferred or enrolled in ECE classes and have 6 months’ experience working with children. P/T 1725 hrs./wk. $15.00-$16.54/hr. Open Until Filled.

DAWNINGS SUPPORT SERVICES Open Positions Are you a compassionate and caring person? Do you want to make a difference for individuals in Humboldt community? If so, we have a great opportunity for you! We are looking for support staff for people with developmental disabilities who wish to live on their own and in the community. Responsibilities include support and assistance with daily living tasks, communication skills and access to the community. Overnight sleep shifts are available as well as daytime and evenings shifts. We are looking for part− and full−time candidates. Medical, vision, dental care and paid vacation time are available to qualifying staff. Contact us today at (707) 825−9536 or email resume with references to dawnings@sbcglobal.net Job Types: Full−time, Part−time Pay: $16.00 − $16.25 per hour *$200 Bonus for new staff after completion of 90 probationary period! Sign on Bonus! default

NORCAL GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

BILINGUAL HOME VISITOR, Eureka The Home Visitor provides weekly home visits and facilitates parent & child play groups. Req. AA/AS degree in Early Childhood Education, Psychology, Social Work or a related field OR 24 Head Start related units. Requires 2 yrs. experience in community service, working with children & families. Bilingual req. F/T 40 hrs./wk. $18.45-$19.37/hr. Open Until Filled.

Our company is seeking candidates interested in working full time and part-time positions. Opportunities are available in a variety of career fields including but not limited to data entry, customer service and support, clerical, and administrative Role. The Working day is Mon-fri. Wages are $29 per hr

COOK, Blue Lake Duties include preparing meals for preschool age children in a childcare center. Req. basic cooking skills, plus exp. in food service & volume meal preparation. Preferred candidate would have experience, training or education in nutrition, volume meal prep, menu planning, kitchen safety & sanitation & CACFP (CA Child Care Food Program) exp. F/T 34 hrs./wk. (Mon-Fri) $16.44/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT COOK, McKinleyville Duties include assisting in the preparation & organization of food, setting-up meals & snacks and kitchen cleanup for a preschool facility. Requires basic cooking skills. Prior experience in food handling and service desired. P/T 28 hrs./wk. M-F $15.38/hr. Open Until Filled. Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS staff are required to submit proof of a complete COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are granted an exemption. All staff who are eligible for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All staff must wear face coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions.

Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Candidates with experience in inside sales, outside sales are encouraged to apply. If you can work on your own and be selfmotivated, kindly email a copy of your resume to NorcalConstruction@currently.com default

HUMBOLDT COMMUNITY SERVICES DISTRICT (HCSD)

ACCTG CLERK/ CUSTOMER SERVICE REP I HCSD is seeking a fulltime individual to perform a full range of specialized clerical, bookkeeping, and data processing procedures related to utility billing, customer service, accounts receivable, and accounts payable. This is a 5-step position starting at $3,032/mo. + benefits. To be considered for this position, complete and submit an HCSD Job Application form with cover letter. FINAL APPLICATION DATE: Sep 16, 2022. Position remains open until filled. Visit our website http://humboldtcsd. org/employment-human-resources for required application form and additional info or obtain at our offices located at 5055 Walnut Drive in Cutten.


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YOUTH PROGRAM MANAGER Regular, F/T, Salary: $20/hr. the Program Manager is responsible for planning, coordination, and implementation of activities at the Wiyot Youth Programs. This includes addressing the developmental needs, interests, and char− acteristics of youth based upon the assessment of needs and inter− ests of youth and the community. Activities shall strive to relate to the five core areas of Youth Programming. Other duties assigned. Experience / Education Required: Bachelor’s Degree in Early Childhood Education, Child Development, Elementary Educa− tion or Special Education or related fields. Two years of experience working with youth in a leadership position. Demonstrated experi− ence in planning, developing, and implementing activities that provide social enrichment and personal development. Must be able to complete a background check, DOJ fingerprinting and Tuberculosis test before beginning work. Pre−employment drug testing required. Full−time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/ sick leave, 16 paid holidays, health, dental, life insurance and matched profit sharing. Open until filled. Please go to www.wiyot.us for complete job description. Contact Operations Manager for an application and submit to Wiyot Tribe 1000 Wiyot Dr. Loleta, CA 95551 www.wiyot.us

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Southern Trinity Health Service is taking applications for the open positions at the

Scotia Location Clinical Support Manager

We are seeking a self-motivated, quick learning, and career-minded individual seeking long-term employment. Please send resume to hr@sthsclinic.org or call (707) 764-5617 ext. 2110.

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Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Mental Health Support Specialist Part-time, starts at $20.30/hour

Mental Health Case Manager Starts at $20.30/hour

ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

Hiring?

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

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Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Bilingual Mental Health Case Manager

Program Analyst

Starts at $21.31/hour

Starts at $16.71

Clinician I/II

Program Assistant

Starts at $27.09/hr, $5,381.09/month

Full-time, starts at $16.00/hour

Bilingual Clinician I/II

Human Resource Specialist

Starts at $28.94/hr, $5,730.85/month

Full-time, starts at $18.73/hour

Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

@changingtidesfamilyservices

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Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org Hablamos español @changingtidesfamilyservices

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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K’ima: w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

WELLNESS COORDINATOR SOCIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT P/T, year round. Under the direc− tion of the Health and Human Services Director, the Social Service Assistant will assist the Health and Human Services director to provide services to Tribal families. Transporting clients to appoint− ments, assisting Elders in and out of vehicles, scheduling, delivering meals, boxes, and supplies to elders, opening the HHS office, setting up and cleaning up for Health and Human Services events, workshops, groups etc. High school diploma or GED required. Possess a valid California Driver’s License, automobile insurance and be 25 years old. Must work well with other staff and be cour− teous to Tribal members and visitors. Must be able to complete a background check, DOJ fingerprinting and TB test before beginning work. Must be food handler trained. www.wiyot.us

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FT REGULAR ($20.00-$23.00 PER HOUR)

DEADLINE TO APPLY IS AUGUST 29, 2022 BY 5PM. DIABETES COORDINATOR FT REGULAR ($30.00 PER HOUR DOE)

DEADLINE TO APPLY IS AUGUST 29, 2022 BY 5PM. A/P & FILE CLERK PT REGULAR ($15.00-$16.50 PER HOUR M-F 8AM-12PM)

DEADLINE TO APPLY IS AUGUST 29, 2022 BY 5PM. HOUSEKEEPER – FT REGULAR ($15.00 PER HOUR) HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST – FT REGULAR PATIENT BENEFITS-REGISTRATION CLERK – FT/REGULAR VAN DRIVER FT/REGULAR ($15.50 PER HR. START) DENTAL ASSISTANT IN TRAINING FT REGULAR ($15.00-$17.00 PER HOUR)

The Mattole Restoration Council, based in Petrolia, Humboldt County, California , has various job openings to join our Ecosystem Restoration Program team. For full Job announcements visit mattole.org

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THE CITY OF

PUBLIC WORKS

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR I/II WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND WATER TREATMENT

PROJECT COORDINATOR � NATIVE PLANT MATERIALS Full-time, 2-3 year position $22-$28/hr D.O.E. plus full benefits PROJECT COORDINATORS � FOREST RESTORATION Full-time, 3 year position $24-$32/hr D.O.E. plus full benefits NURSERY ASSISTANT Full-time, 3 year position $18-$22/hr D.O.E. plus full benefits

$3,490 - $4,687/MO

*Base salary will increase by 2% in 2023 with another increase of 5% in 2024. Benefits include free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more! The City of Eureka is currently accepting applications for two (2) full-time Treatment Plant Operators to join our team at the Wastewater Treatment Plant and Water Treatment Plant. Duties include monitoring plant operations equipment and processes to ensure compliance with environmental and public health standards, including monitoring and making adjustments as needed to optimize efficiency. This position requires working on weekends and holidays, and may occasionally require working evenings.

CREW LEADERS � FOREST THINNING Seasonal/Full-time, $25-$30/hr D.O.E. plus partial benefits SAWYERS, FIELD TECHNICIANS, LABORERS Seasonal/Full-time, $20-$28/hr D.O.E. plus partial benefits

OUTREACH & PREVENTION FT REGULAR ($20.40 PER HOUR)

PARAMEDIC – FT REGULAR GRANT WRITER & PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS – FT/REGULAR ($29.00-36.00 PER HOUR DOE) DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT/REGULAR ($39.00-43.00 DOE) PHYSICIAN FT/REGULAR MEDICAL DIRECTOR FT/REGULAR MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN FT/REGULAR MAT RN CARE MANAGER FT/REGULAR All positions above are Open Until Filled unless otherwise stated. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: apply@ kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

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For more information and to apply online, please visit our website at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Final filing date is at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, August 29, 2022. EOE

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DESK TECHNICIAN (2 POSITIONS) - FT/REGULAR

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

SOCIAL WORK ADVOCATE FT in Loleta, CA. Advocating, coordinating and guiding clients improving well being. Requires a BA w/ experience in SW or related fields. Salary starts at $3200/mo. excellent benefits. Visit www.wiyot.us for an application and a full job description or contact HR at (707) 733−5055 www.wiyot.us


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City of Arcata

DEPUTY DIRECTOR (STREETS/UTILITIES)

ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST I CITY OF EUREKA HOUSING AUTHORITY COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT HOUSING AUTHORITY Grade: $3,279/month + benefits package Use the link below for the job application packet or you may inquire by emailing heatherh@eurekahumboldtha.org. Use a subject line of "Accounting Specialist I". In the body, please request an application packet. You may also pick up the application packet at the Housing Authority office, 735 W. Everding Street, Eureka, California, on Tuesday − Thursday between the hours of 10:00am − 3:00pm. This position will remain open until filled. Interviews will be scheduled as soon as possible. SUMMARY Performs the duties of an accounting specialist within the finance department. ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES include the following. This list is meant to be representative, not exhaustive. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabili− ties to perform the essential functions. Processes accounts payables and payroll. Prepares payments for rents, security deposits and other tenant charges. Prepares daily bank deposits. Places inventory orders and maintains relationships with existing and new vendors. Maintains a variety of records including organizing and filing. Distributes and processes daily mail. Performs related duties as assigned. Job descriptions are written as a representative list of the ADA essential duties performed by the entire classification. They cannot include, and not intended to include, every possible activity and task performed by every specific employee. FLSA Status: Non− Exempt https://eurekahumboldtha.org/wp−content/uploads/2022/06/ Job−Posting−ASI−2022.06.29.pdf

$84,927.98 - $105,811.25/yr. 4% Salary increase in July 2023 Apply online by 11:59pm, September 5, 2022. This position manages and supervises staff, programs and activities within the Streets, Water Distribution, Wastewater Collections, Central Garage and Water/ Wastewater Treatment Plant Divisions. An ideal candidate thrives in a multipriority environment; is established as a motivating and supportive leader; and successfully collaborates across internal departments and with outside agency partners. Apply or review the full job duties at: https://www.governmentjobs.com/ careers/arcataca or contact  736 F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE

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Redwood Coast Regional Center Be a part of a great team!

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator) FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for indiv. w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3990/mo. Exc. bene. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs. EOE

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City of Arcata

PERSONNEL/ PAYROLL SPECIALIST

$56,028.11 - $69,805.06/yr. 4% Salary increase in July 2023 Apply online by 11:59pm, August 28, 2022. Performs technical and specialized Personnel and Payroll duties, including   compensation coordination, employee relations and processing and maintaining  https://www. governmentjobs.com/careers/arcataca or  736 F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE

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CITY OF FORTUNA

PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER I FULL-TIME, $15.57 – $18.95 PER HOUR. Under the direct supervision of the Lead Park Maintenance Worker, to perform semiskilled work assignments in the maintenance and upkeep of City parks, landscaped areas, public buildings and associated equipment and structures; to perform routine gardening and landscaping work at a variety of operations, and other related duties. CDL is required. Must be at least 18 years of age. Full job description and application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm on Tuesday, August 23, 2022

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


EMPLOYMENT default

MARKETPLACE TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certi− fied & ready to work in months! Call 866−243−5931. (M−F 8am− 6pm ET). Computer with internet is required.

The North Coast Journal is seeking

Distribution Drivers

Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

GAMES & PUZZLES at the Dream Quest Thrift Store− Supporting Local Youth! August 17−20. Plus: Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629−3006. default

Contact Michelle 707.442.1400 ext. 305 michelle@northcoastjournal.com

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

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CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie (707) 839−1518

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Hiring?

Lodging

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

MARKETPLACE

@northcoast journal.com

Miscellaneous BIG GUY, LITTLE PICKUP Small cleanups and hauls. Eureka area. Reasonable rates. Call Odd Job Mike at 707−497−9990.

DONATE TODAY! Donate your items of value to help House the Homeless and reduce your taxes. We are in Need of Funding for our "House the Homeless" project. Call or text 844−443 −0770 thehomelesscoalition 2022@gmail.com www.theh omelesscoalition.org

PAYING TOP CA$H FOR MEN’S SPORT WATCHES! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 888−320−1052

Computer & Internet

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. Buildwww.ZevLev.com to edge of the document

YOUR AD HERE 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Margins are just a safe area

Lawn Care Service Riding & cordless mowers, both with baggers Dump runs • Weed eating Hedge trimming ur $ 35/ho 2 hour m minimu

Call Corey 707-382-2698

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

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           



BODY MIND SPIRIT

1BR/1BA SUNYVALE $1,500 Newly built 1 bed 1 bath Duplex with bonus room/ office nook, AC and washer and dryer. Close to down− town Sunnyvale. Must see. − This beautiful 1 bed 1 bath duplex with bonus room/ office features nearly 850 square feet. Private front patio and backyard.This unit features a recently upgraded bathroom, hard− wood floors, and fresh paint throughout. Upgraded kitchen with stainless steel appliances and granite countertops. (971) 252−5885 la8833011@gmail.com

HEALING ARTS GUIDE NOW ACCEPTING SUBMIS− SIONS Attention Wholisitic Practitioners! Join us in the next issue of the Healing Arts Guide. Place your ad by 8/27/22 and receive an early bird discount. Contact Hannah (707) 683−2316 Info@wholisticheartbeat.co m. Visit the advertise page at wholisticheartbeat.com

BODY MIND SPIRIT

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

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Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

442-1400 x314 classified

Other Professionals

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 metaphysicsuniversity.com

38

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


Charlie Tripodi

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

BRE# 01066670

BRE # 02084041

BRE# 02070276

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

Owner/ Land Agent

707.834.7979

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

TRINITY LAKE – LAND/PROPERTY - $199,000

707.498.6364

Mike Willcutt

WILLOW CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,190,000

Two parcels totaling ±100 acres overlooking beautiful Trinity Lake! Great timber investment or vacation spot with well and building site in place!

Beautiful riverfront estate on over 4 acres just minutes from Willow Creek! Property boasts a 3/3 3,650 sq. ft. main residence, large in ground pool complete with outdoor kitchen and pool house featuring a full bathroom and kitchenette area, separate barn with a 1/1 apartment above and so much more!

SHOWERS PASS – LAND/PROPERTY - $300,000

MIRANDA – CULTIVATION PROPERTY – $990,000

Remote ±40 acre parcel with Mad River running through it! Stunning recreational property with swimming and fishing holes. Improvements include a developed water system and unfinished cabin awaiting your personal touches! Bonus cannabis permit for 7,620 sq. ft. of mixed light cultivation space can be included in sale.

±40 Acre Salmon Creek farm with County and State interim permits for 4,000 sq. ft. of mixed light and 16,000 sq. ft. of outdoor cultivation space! Property features two ponds, water storage, large dry room, and small guest cabin and a new home under construction.

SALYER – LAND/PROPERTY - $350,000

SALYER – HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,250,000

Beautiful ±50 acre property with easy access on a paved County road. Parcel features large open meadows, oak & scattered fir trees, plenty of flat useable space, creek, and power running through the property. Just minutes from all the recreational opportunities of the South Fork of the Trinity River.

SALMON CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $749,000

Unbelievable retreat or homestead opportunity, featuring over ¼ mile of river frontage w/campsites, private beach, and an incredible swimming hole. Cozy main house and two additional sleeping cabins. Parcel spans the South Fork of the Trinity River with suspension bridge connecting.

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $299,000

±120 Acre Salmon Creek gem featuring a gorgeous custom home, pond, guest cabin, creeks, solar & hydroelectric power, and so much more!

±177 Acre homestead, mountain recreation, or timberland property adjacent to Forest Service lands. Hardwood & fir forests, exceptional views to the south & west, several flats for development, w/ county road access and just 6 miles from downtown Willow Creek.

MYERS FLAT – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $799,000

HYDESVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $225,000

±40 Acres featuring County road access, power close by, open meandering meadows, and oak studded woodland with commercially viable fir timber. Multiple charming outbuildings, plus a cannabis permit for 34,776 sq. ft. of outdoor, 3,000 sq. ft. of mixed light and 2,000 sq. ft. of nursery space! Wonderful business and recreational opportunity!

Ashlee Cook

Come see this beautiful lot with amazing views. Endless potential! The barn is 576 square feet and can be converted into a tiny home while building your dream house. Imagine waking up to these killer views everyday. Power and water are at the street. Septic still needs to be developed. OMC!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39



ps in Humboldt features the best breweries from across the coun o H l a u n n A SPECIAL PUL L-OUT SE try 19th A CTION

Aug.27 19th Annual

2022

S P O N S O R S

Since 1931


Please Drink Responsibly

Q U I C K T I P S

W E L C O M E ! 19th Annual Hops in Humboldt features the best breweries from across the country. For one price, you can try unlimited samples of hundreds of different micro-brews, listen to live bands as they rock the stage throughout the day, cruise different arts and crafts vendors selling everything from Humboldt clothes to local hand blown glassware, and you get a cool commemorative glass to keep. 2 0 2 2 H O P S I N H U M B O L D T

B O A R D

Hops in Humboldt proudly partners with RTS to get people home safe. RTS offers bus service from McKinleyville to Fortuna. After the event several

buses will be waiting to transport folks home safely on their routes...Bus fare is $3.50 each way. Check out: https://hta.org/agencies/redwood-transit-system/

• Taps: Open from 2 to 6 p.m. • Pours: They are small for a reason. If you sample every beer, that would equate to over 34 pints. • Pace yourself. • Lines: They look long because people get their sample, then hang out, drink and bullshit. Nicely ask them if they’re in line. Most people will realize they’re in the way and move. • Lost or broken glasses: We don’t give replacements and don’t want to hear your sob story. • Water: It’s free … drink it. • No Refunds: Don’t show up 15 minutes before taps close and complain you didn’t get enough beer. • Smoking: Only do it in the smoking areas. • If you’re drunk: DON’T DRIVE!!!

O F

Y O U

• • • • • •

C A N N O T

B R I N G :

Dogs or any kind of pets. Children or babies. No one under 21 allowed. No weapons of any kind, pocket knives included. No marijuana or drugs. No illegal contraband. Drinking containers.

Bear River Casino is our water sponsor and will have plenty of bottles of water on hand. Please be advised that these rules are set to ensure that we have the safest event possible. Be prepared to have your bags checked before entering Hops. We will also have metal detectors for scanning each and every attendee. Failure to abide by these rules will result in denial or expulsion from the event. *Extra Security and NEW perimeter fencing has been added for increased safety precautions.

D I R E C T O R S

TINA TAYLOR

MELISSA SANDERSON

SUE LONG

JOHN TAYLOR

MICHELLE BISHOP

TAMI TRENT

NICHOLE STOLL

MATT EBERHARDT

SETH CROSSWHITE

President

Vice-President

Treasurer

Secretary

Board Member

Board Member

Vendors

Security

Beer Crew

D’ANNA QUEN

Volunteers

2

ALICE RYE

CRYSTAL LEWIS

BAILEY DAVY

ANGELA CONLEY

KYLE CONLEY

CARLOS DIAZ

Volunteers

Brewers Tent Hostess

Brewers Tent Hostess

Merchandise

Merchandise

Beer Crew

Special Pull-Out Section • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

KATHY MEADORSREXFORD

Awards


Serious Felonies Cultivation/Drug Possession DUI/DMV Hearings Domestic Violence Restraining Orders Pre-Arrest Counseling

FREE CONSULTATION For Defense Work Only

732 5th Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 info@humboldtjustice.com www.humboldtjustice.com

J O I N U S I N F O R T U N A ! In the heart of the redwoods, just off US 101, 18 miles South of Eureka and 253 miles North of San Francisco, rests the Friendly City of Fortuna, the home of the biggest beer fest in Humboldt. Hops in Humboldt features over 30 of the best breweries from across the country. For one price you can try unlimited samples of hundreds of different brews in your own cool, commemorative glass, listen to live bands as they rock the stage throughout the day, and cruise different arts and crafts vendors selling everything from Humboldt clothing to locally made jewelry.

N

O

RT

RN H C OAST JOU

AL

707.268.8600

Kathleen Bryson Attorney

Former Humboldt County Deputy District Attorney Member of National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) Member of California DUI Lawyers Association

TICKETS

ON

SALE

100 Ultimate VIP 12PM Admission Ticket

$

*LESS THAN 15 TICKETS REMAINING New *Ultimate VIP includes VIP cup, extra 2 hrs in early to drink-taps 12pm-6pm, 6 hours + swag bag and all the cool shit!! $

75 VIP 1 PM Admission Ticket

Join the party at the 1 PM admission time and receive an extra hour of drinking + a VIP commemorative liquid holder.

$

50 General 2 PM Admission Ticket

Join the party at the 2 PM admission time and receive the standard Hops in Humboldt 2022 commemorative liquid holder.

$

25 Non-Drinker Admission Ticket

We all have to get home right? Someone has to be that incredible person that is willing to stay well below the .08 alcohol level.

HopsinHumboldt.com/tickets tickets northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • Special Pull-Out Section • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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H I S T O R Y O F H O P S

www.humboldtequity.com

Tires • Auto • Trucks • Tractors Brakes • Alignments Wendy Hummel / Lisa Hummel OWNERS 260 S. Fortuna Blvd. • 725-4120

WWW.HUMMELTIRE.COM

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Special Pull-Out Section • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

The story started in 2003, when a small group of directors were trying to decide on a new event for Fortuna with a $1,000 grant provided by the Fortuna Business Improvement District. It took two years of planning, organizing and research. Fortuna Rotary and ESA offered to sponsor the event and Hops in Humboldt was born. The very first Hops event was held in 2004, in a small beer garden between the two playgrounds at Rohner Park. There were 10 breweries at best; all of our local breweries plus a few more from Northern California. It had a bluegrass theme with local bands and some random vendors. As the event progressed throughout the years more breweries were added. Mixed genres of music became the norm, the Hops beer games and the Hops awards were born. Local homemade food and vendors started to make the event more unique. Partnerships with transportation companies were formed to provide safe transportation alternatives for attendees. That year we saw elbow-to-elbow room only in the festival and it was evident the festival had outgrown its location. In year six Hops decided to make the move off the green grass of Rohner Park to a larger home and current location on Bartow Field. That year Hops also started the process of shedding its sponsors and

led the paperwork to become its own nonprofit organization. With a board of directors and a dedicated beer-loving committee that works year-round, Hops in Humboldt is bigger and better than ever! Hops has proudly taken in hundreds of thousands of dollars in event income. The majority of our budget is put back into the community and spent with local businesses to make the event happen. 100 percent of the profits are given back to local groups each year who fall under our grant categories.

Welcome to HOPS IN

HUMBOLDT!

Wishing Well Planters and Garden Benches

Raised Bed Planters

Raised Bed Planters Now Available


a n t u F e v a H

m u H b o n l i d t! s p o H auto • business H O P S

P R O C E E D S

Where does the money go? So, you come to Hops, shell out $30-$100 to get in and there are thousands of people there. They sell Hops gear and have games. Who gets the money? Hops in Humboldt Inc. that’s who. Most folks don’t know but Hops is a registered 501c3 nonprofit corporation. We have a board of directors, bylaws, website and everything. Through a grant process we distribute our proceeds to a variety of Humboldt County organizations that fall within five categories: schools, youth activities, senior programs, municipal programs, and drug and alcohol prevention. Anyone falling within one of these five categories is welcome to submit a grant application to Hops. To date we have distributed over $500,000 in grants. Thank you for your support and sacrificing your sobriety in the name of community service!

C RYS TA L L E W I S

WELCOME

HUMBOLDT

I NSU R A N C E PRO DUC TS Auto • Home • Business • Property • Life • Health 1336 Main Street, Fortuna

Welcome to Hops in Humboldt! •Parker Hoses & Fittings •Filtration •Hydraulics •Pneumatics •Seals •Instrumentation •AW 496 & Tractor Oil •Cylinder Repair.

L i c # 0 D7 7118

| 707.725.1135

Welcome to Hops in Humboldt! 1137 Main St, Fortuna, CA 95540

750 Riverwalk Dr

FORTUNA 707-298-1918

www.westcoasthydraulics.us

insurance services, inc.

744 10th Fortuna, CA 95540 707.725.5411

1933 Central Ave. Ste D McKinleyville, CA 95519 707.839.5288

www.jdinsurance.com Lic.#0F41787 SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SINCE 1977

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

T0

HOPS IN HUMBOLDT!

SERVING

home • family farms • ranches JUDY DAVIS

◊ Authorized UPS shipper ◊ PG&E Payment Center ◊ Copies & Faxes ◊ Notary ◊ Greeting Cards & Gifts

◊ Scans ◊ Word Processing ◊ Office Supplies ◊ Custom Forms

707-725-6542 ; Fax 707-725-6541 print@horizonbusinessproducts.com www.horizonbusinessproducts.com

Start right, Start here. HOME IMPROVEMENT MADE EASIER! Hours of Operation Mon - Sat: 7:30a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

(707) 725-5111 1784 Smith Lane Fortuna, CA. 95540

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • Special Pull-Out Section • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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2 0 2 2

210 12th St. Fortuna, CA 95540

Be sure to visit our great local breweries!

1300 Central Ave. McKinleyville

Welcome to Hops in Humboldt! • Home • Life & Health • Auto • Commercial

B R E W E R I E S

101 Taylor Way Blue Lake

BREWERY & CAFÉ 617 Fourth St, Eureka BREWERY AND TAP ROOM 1600 Sunset Dr, Eureka

CALIFORNIA

BREWERY & RESTAURANT 1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna

707-725-3316 LIC#0510019

TAP ROOM 517 F Street, Eureka CIDER GARDEN 3750 Harris St, Eureka

Brewery, Tap Room & Restaurant 1661 Upper Pacific Dr, Shelter Cove

UNITED STATES

1612 Old Arcata Rd, Bayside

Vend or s • • • • • • • • • • •

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Special Pull-Out Section • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Brindle-N-Fawn Callie Maple Collection Color Me Rad Print Co Color Street Nails Damsel In Defense Grizzly Creek Lures Hail Grace Handcrafts On The Coast Humboldt Crystals Humboldt Spice Co Island Child Threads

• • • • • • • • •

Lancuyen Larissa Robyn Design Mother Sativa Redwood Prep Charter Root To Rise Holistics Sea Dog Woodworks Seaside Weavers Toadforest Rocks Wild Oak


BEER AREA 1

S OR ND VE

ORS VEND

Humboldt’s Oldest - Family Owned-Since 1966! Looking for a new home in Humboldt County, or are you ready to sell? Visit our website and search for your dream home for free! BEER AREA 3

to the park to pick more people up

FO OD

E AG ST

Makes 4 stops around Fortuna then circles back

2 EA AR ER BE

Rohner Park from 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

E AD T SH EN T

Please Drink Responsibly Ride the FREE Fortuna Hops Shuttle

ORS VEND & GAMESNDISE A MERCH

CE FEN TER IME PER

CRAPPER

S

FOOD VENDORS

FOOD VEND ORS

TICK SALEET S

CRAPP

John Egan Realtor Associate DRE#01438132 (707) 499-5185

Wendy Medders Broker - Associate DRE#01888500 (707) 599-6407

Tami Erickson Realtor - Associate DRE#01227851 (707) 496-9376

Katy Lund Realtor - Associate DRE#02035968 (707) 672-5707

Welcome to

ERS

GL PICKASS UP

Hops in Humboldt!

T V ICK PUIP TICET HO RC KE LD HA T H ER SE OL LI TIC DE NE KET R L LIN INE E

PA R

KING

Debi August Broker/Owner DRE#00604073 (707) 498-6439

PA R K I N G

EN

TRA

910 S Fortuna Blvd., Fortuna SixRiversRealEstate.com NC

707-725-9376

• Schilling Hard Cider/ Excelsior Imperial Ciders • Seismic Brewing Co • Sierra Nevada Brewing Co • Six Rivers Brewing Co • Sudwerk Brewing Co • Tremor California • Trinity County Brewing Co

Welcome to Hops in Humboldt!

E

BRE WE RI E S • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Alesmith Brewing Co Belching Beaver Brewery Boneyard CBD Boochcraft Organic Hard Kombucha Caldera Brewing Crux Fermentation Dokkaebier Dr. Hops Real Hard Kombucha Eel River Brewing Co Fall River Brewing Co Farmers Brewing Co Firestone Walker Golden State Cider Gyppo Ale Mill Heretic Brewing Co Hop Valley Brewing Co Humboldt Cider Co June Shine Hard Kombucha Lagunitas Brewing Co Liquid Death Mountain Water Lost Coast Brewery Mad River Brewing Co Mikes Hard Lemonade / White Claw Modern Times Brewing Co North Spur Brewing Other Port O’Pints

Fo od V end ors

• ESA- Indian Tacos • Hooked Kettle Corn- Kettle Corn • Dominick’s Tacos- Mexican Plates • Pirate Dogs- Dogs & Sausages • Las Colombianas - Colombian Empanadas • Rax On Rax BBQ- Wings

Music Li neup • MELANGE • THE BEER SCOUTS • THE UNDERCOVERS

“We Sell the Best and Service the Rest” Sales & service for all major appliance brands.

1001 MAIN ST. FORTUNA

707. 725 . 6734

EelValleyAppliance.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • Special Pull-Out Section • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

7


! dt

l

Welcome to

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Ho

n H u mb ol i s p d

A historic space that’s home to

t!

• Landscape Design Build • Commercial, Residential and Estate Maintenance • Irrigation Design, Install & Repair • Artistic Pruning • Turf Management • Drainage Design and Equipment services • Brush Clearing / Fire Defensible Space clearing • Pest and weed control organic or chemical

100+ Humboldt County Makers

and The Ferndale Enterprise

394 Main St. Ferndale, CA

WWW.HUMBOLDTSHOMETOWNSTORE.COM

8

Special Pull-Out Section • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com