North Coast Journal 07-21-2022 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, July 21, 2022 Vol. XXXIII Issue 29 northcoastjournal.com

By Iridian Casarez

6 Seven missing bullets 16 Paddling Humboldt Bay


EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT

Arte Whyte

Meet Murphy’s new Health and Wellness Manager, Arte Whyte. Originally from New England, Arte moved to California in the late 90’s via the Air Force. After moving around a bit, Arte moved up to Humboldt in 2021 and has been working for Murphy’s Market since March. When Arte is not at work, he enjoys working on his latest book and researching new health and wellness breakthroughs and remedies. “My ultimate goal is to create a competitive wellness department here at Murphy’s and make sure that I have all the knowledge possible to give the best customer service possible,” explains Arte. “Murphy’s customers are like an extended family and it has been great interacting with so many of them. I encourage anyone that has questions about health and wellness to swing by and check out our ever expanding selection.”

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SUNNY BRAE | CUTTEN | GLENDALE | TRINIDAD | WESTWOOD 2

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 4 5 6

Mailbox Poem

Mourning Light

News

‘Responsibility’

9 NCJ Daily Online 10 On The Cover ‘All Hands On Deck’

14 On the Table

Ale in the Castle

16 Get Out!

Wet and Wild on Woodley

17 18

Fishing the North Coast

Pacific Halibut Quota Nearly Met

The Setlist

Come On Feel The Noise

19 Calendar 20 Home & Garden Service Directory

24 Screens

Crimes Fails to Captivate

July 21, 2022 • Volume XXXIII Issue 29 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2022

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

25 Workshops & Classes 25 Free Will Astrology 26 Field Notes

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest

26 Sudoku & Crossword 30 Classifieds

GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Island Universes, Part 1

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Rory Hubbard, Renée Thompson ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Trevor Lee trevor@northcoasjtournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER/DISTRIBUTION

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

Kenny Bowling is slated to take the stage at the 17th Songwriters Circle of Death at 2 p.m. Sunday at The Shanty. Read more on page 18. Submitted

On the Cover Illustration by Dave Brown

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MAILBOX

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

In Appreciation

Editor: Blue Lake’s 54th annual Annie & Mary Day celebration was a rousing success (Calendar, July 7). The sun was out all day, the food was tasty, the car show was the largest ever and vendors offered all kinds of crafts. This event would not have happened if it was not for the hard work put in by Mariel Morison, Rick Levin, Blue Lake’s city workers, Adelene and Ted Jones, Jo Patterson, Kathy Nelson and many others. Special thanks to the Friends of the Annie & Mary Trail, Murphy’s Markets, the Logger Bar, the Blue Lake Museum, Mad River Brewery, Jewell Distillery, Cal Plumbing and Fire Suppression, Redwood Capital Bank, Coast Central Credit Union, Dell’Arte, Elaine Benjamin, Marlene Smith, Paradise Cay, Green Diamond, Vaughn Hutchins, Frank Onstine, Just My Type, the Booklegger, Erv Clark, Susan Lewis, Karen Miller, Cheerful Designs, BLT Designs, Jonsteen Company and Englund Marine for their generous donations to our amazing raffle. There was stellar music by the Spindrifters, The Lost Dogs, Papa Haole and the Fleas and Barn Fire. Our deepest gratitude to Lost Coast Communications, North Coast Journal and the Mad River Union for getting the word out on our fun event. See you next year! Marvin Samuels, Blue Lake

‘Decorum’

Editor: Cheers to Alan Sanborn (Mailbox, June 16) and David Ross (Mailbox, July 14) for objecting to Jennifer Fumiko Cahill’s use of offensive language in her article. Two voices in favor of decency and decorum. Thank you. Patricia Lazaravich, Trinidad

Seriously?

Editor: I’ve noticed some things recently. A dictator has started dropping bombs on civilians in a neighboring country. Women in America have no right to control their bodies. Our President is fist-bumping with a mob boss who has people dismembered. And we are destroying the web of

Mourning Light Deep Blues settle into Yellows and Reds Lifting my horizons, While I sip coffee Wandering again Beneath it all… I once complained About the lack of Clear directions From whomever, Until a dear friend Returning from war Enlightened me: “She did the best, She could.” — Kirk Gothier

life on Earth. But you know what really makes me angry? That gosh-darned cussin you folks subject us to. Mitch Trachtenberg, Trinidad

‘Fascinating Tales’

Editor: Just a quick note to let you know how much we enjoyed reading the two articles by Barry Evans (Field Notes, June 9 and July 7). Both were fascinating tales, and to think this has all happened in roughly the last 200 years! This area has a very cool, albeit sad history. ... Also very interesting is to go to Fort Humboldt and walk that circle and read the placards detailing the life of the fort, and Ulysses Grant’s role in local history. No one we’ve talked to has ever even bothered to go to Fort Humboldt, actually very peaceful in the early morning. Mr. Evans’ story-telling is wonderful, and a great big thanks from us older folks “up-on-the-mountain” here in Westhaven. Russ Wheatley, Westhaven


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Correction

A story in the July 14, 2022, edition of the North Coast Journal headlined “Quantifying Impact” contained an error, as Nordic did respond to Journal inquiries about the departures of executives Erik Heim and Marianne Naess from the company. The Journal regrets the error. Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Write a Letter!

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS

‘Responsibility’

EPD shooting investigation leaves seven shots unaccounted for amid chaotic chase By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

T

he day after his officers combined to fire more than 40 shots on the streets of downtown Eureka shortly before 5 p.m. on a Tuesday amid a chaotic pursuit in 2016, then Eureka Police Chief Andrew Mills held a press conference and pledged a thorough investigation. “Each officer is personally accountable for every round that they discharge and where that round ends up,” Mills said, adding that he would report back to the community when the investigation was complete and the department had determined where each round was discharged, as well as where they ended up. Five and a half years later, Mills is gone, working as the police chief in Palm Springs, following several years in Santa Cruz after he left EPD in 2017. Mills’ successor as chief, Steve Watson, who was on scene that day as the suspect, 26-year-old Clayton Lee Lasinski, collapsed on Fifth Street, retired last year. And Stephen Linfoot — the first officer to open fire during that Dec. 6, 2016, chase — is also gone, working for the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office, while another of the four officers who shot that day has retired. Last month, some three and a half years after the Journal submitted a California Public Records Act request for documents related to the shooting pursuant to a law that took effect in 2019, the city released its internal affairs investigation into the incident. The delay, according to the department, was due first to the need to wait for Lasinski’s criminal case to resolve, which it did in May of 2020 when he was sentenced to serve 11 years in prison after pleading guilty to assault with a firearm, exhibiting a weapon at a peace officer and other charges, and chronic short staffing in the department’s records unit. The recently released records — which span more than 900 pages — shed new light on the shooting, illustrating how a series of decisions and assumptions repeatedly escalated an already tense situation, leading to officers firing 42 rounds

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

at Lasinski over the course of just three minutes and 19 seconds as he fled through three and a half blocks of downtown Eureka without returning fire. The records also indicate an investigating officer, Sgt. Mike Guy, determined one of the officers who opened fire on Lasinski that day violated policy, though they include no indication of whether the department made any effort to pursue disciplinary or corrective action against him. EPD Records Manager Amanda O’Neill initially indicated disciplinary records were purged by the chief’s office at some point prior to Senate Bill 1421, the police records transparency bill, taking effect in 2019. After multiple follow-up inquiries, City Attorney Autumn Luna said “the city has no further documents or information to disclose related to this case.” Interim EPD Chief Todd Jarvis, who stepped into the role in December, said he doesn’t know whether any disciplinary action was taken as a result of the investigation. But Jarvis said he’s reviewed all the documents released to the Journal in the case, and debriefed with Capt. Brian Stephens, and feels that the incident was reviewed “thoroughly,” resulting in some changes to training and protocols. “I honestly believe that if a similar situation happened today, it would be handled differently,” Jarvis said, before being asked why. “The whole nature of policing has changed [since December of 2016],” Jarvis continued. “There’s probably a lot more thought behind pressing that trigger in the minds of every officer. I think that, in and of itself, might have created a different outcome.” Asked if he found anything concerning in his review of the incident, Jarvis didn’t pause: “The sheer amount of rounds that were fired. I think everyone was fortunate there was no collateral damage.” The incident began after a California Highway Patrol officer attempted to pull Lasinski’s Dodge pickup truck over after he allegedly rolled through a stop sign


when turning westbound on Fourth Street in Eureka shortly before 5 p.m. on Dec. 6, 2016. Lasinski then pulled the truck into the parking lot of the Best Western, where he bailed on foot, leaving two female passengers in the car. Lasinski was wanted on a warrant at the time, which Mills said he believed was why he fled, but the suspect would later tell investigators he feared pursuing officers weren’t really cops but people in disguise after him for an outstanding debt. No matter the reason, Lasinski was fleeing on foot and CHP asked EPD to assist in canvassing the area for Lasinski, who was in possession of a handgun and had allegedly brandished it at a Best Western employee who tried to detain him while he fled the property. Linfoot was then the first officer to spot Lasinski, telling dispatch he saw him running southbound in the alley between Sixth and Seventh streets. Shortly after spotting him, Linfoot decided to pursue the armed suspect on foot. EPD policy on foot pursuits recognizes they are inherently dangerous to officers and the public, so much so the policy explicitly states “no officer or supervisor shall be criticized or disciplined for deciding not to engage” in one and that “surveillance and containment are generally the safest tactics for apprehending fleeing persons,” where circumstances permit. EPD’s internal investigation, however, did not seem to question Linfoot’s decision in this case. Linfoot pursued Lasinski as the suspect ran across A Street and onto the Sole Savers car lot on Seventh Street, chasing him as Lasinski ran into a covered driveway portion of the business and climbed into the passenger side door of a running red Mazda, which had been recently detailed and was left running for its upholstery to dry. As Linfoot approached the car, coming within 6 feet of its front bumper, he said he saw Lasinski raise a handgun over the dashboard, though investigators were unable to determine if the suspect intentionally pointed the weapon at him or simply had it in his right hand as he slid from the vehicle’s passenger seat to its driver’s side. “I see a black handgun … pointing directly at me … as he continues to get into the driver’s seat,” Linfoot told investigators. “So, I get my gun out and I start to try to put some distance between myself and him … and I fire into the car.” The exact sequence of events here is a bit jumbled, but Linfoot told investiga-

tors that he tripped while trying to create space and ended up on his back on the driver’s side of the Mazda. He said two things led him to believe Lasinski continued to pose a lethal threat: He could see Lasinski continuing to move inside the vehicle and he saw a bullet hole in the vehicle’s driver’s side window, which he thought Lasinski had put there by firing at him from inside the vehicle. Investigators later determined the bullet hole was Linfoot’s, created in his initial volley of shots fired into the vehicle. But Linfoot said he believed he was being fired upon. “My thinking was,’ I’m in a gun battle with this guy,’” Linfoot said, adding that he then fired until his clip was empty, fearing that Lasinski would either flee in the Mazda or shoot him. It’s unclear exactly when, but investigators determined one of these initial shots fired by Linfoot was the only bullet to hit Lasinski in the pursuit, piercing his upper left chest. Nonetheless, after Linfoot fired a total of 15 rounds at or into the Mazda, Lasinski put the car in gear and fled, turning right out of the parking lot toward Sixth Street, as officers Dustin Nantz and Abraham Jansen approached, with Nantz about 100 feet ahead of his fellow officer. Nantz told investigators that he heard gunshots as he ran onto the Sole Savers lot and then saw a red Mazda come around the building at “an extremely high rate of speed.” Nantz said he and the driver made eye contact as the vehicle accelerated straight at him. “I didn’t believe I was going to be able to actually get out of the way of the car … fast enough,” Nantz said, adding that as the vehicle approached, he drew his handgun and fired five times at the vehicle, stopping when it passed him. “Luckily, I was able to. I don’t know if he swerved when I raised my gun or not … but I did believe I was going to be ran over.” EPD policy at the time prohibited officers from firing at moving vehicles unless they “reasonably believe there are no other means available to avert the threat of the vehicle,” an exception Guy deemed applicable in this case, finding Nantz acted within policy when he opened fire. Jansen saw all this unfold as he approached and told investigators he’d heard so many shots fired in the initial exchange — which happened outside his line of sight — he assumed the suspect “just fired at officer Linfoot or they got into Continued on next page »

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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some kind of gunfight … ugh, considering the number of shots, especially.” Jansen said that when Nantz opened fire at the oncoming Mazda, he did as well, though he did not tell investigators he felt either officer was in the vehicle’s path. “I open fire as well, considering that this was the subject that we’re looking for and I thought he just [got into] a gun battle with officer Linfoot,” Jansen told investigators. “I opened fire on the subject. He traveled past me … I continue shooting at him while he traveled past me until he got to Sixth Street, and at that point I ran out of ammo in the magazine.” Jansen then re-loaded and followed onto Sixth Street, which Lasinski had driven against one-way traffic up to the intersection of Sixth and B streets, where he abandoned the car. From about 30 yards away, Jansen then took aim and fired two more rounds at Lasinski up Sixth Street but missed. In his report, Guy wrote that he believed the first three to five rounds Jansen fired as Lasinski approached him and Nantz in the Mazda were within departmental policy. “However, considering officer Jansen’s sustained rate of fire, lack of control and inaccuracy, the next 10 to 12 rounds he fired, as the vehicle was passed him, were not in compliance with this policy,” Guy wrote, explaining his conclusion was based on Jansen’s firing 15 rounds in approximately four seconds, with three stray rounds hitting a building on Sixth Street and a parked car. After ditching the Mazda, Lasinski walked down B Street toward Fifth, as scores of EPD officers poured out of the department’s headquarters nearby and continued to respond to Linfoot’s call of shots fired and a “carjacking” at Soul Savers. Senior Detective Ron Harpham was among them, telling investigators he heard the shots fired call and walked out EPD’s back door to hear two different types of gunshots followed by officers yelling, “Drop the gun! Drop the gun!” Harpham said he believed officers had been in a “full-on gun battle” with the suspect, who he saw walking northbound on B Street with ª pistol visible in his hand. Harpham said he then raised his pistol and put Lasinski in his sights, stopping to quickly inventory what he knew about the situation. As he did so, Harpham said he saw a string of officers head down A street toward Fifth. “And I kind of see that … and then I notice headlight traffic on Fifth and I’m going, ‘Ah, fuck. Gunfight? Gunfight. Citizens everywhere. And I go, ‘Shit, I got to

stop this guy.’” Harpham said he fired a single round from about 40 yards away but missed Lasinski. “So I was setting up to go on him again and I … remember thinking, ‘Yeah, that’s right, just keep throwing rounds down range. … You missed him the first time, stupid.’ I mean, I didn’t have all that internal dialogue but I had that perception — ‘Don’t do it again, right.’” Harpham then pursued Lasinski on foot. As he did, and as the suspect moved past Hertz Car Rental and onto Fifth Street, Jansen fired three more times at Lasinski as he walked away from a distance of about 35 yards, with all bullets missing the suspect. Those were the last of the 42 gunshots EPD fired during the pursuit, as Lasinski walked a ways down Fifth Street before stopping next to a parked car, where he ultimately collapsed due to blood loss and was taken into custody. While Lasinski never fired a round in the exchange, police found his gun’s hammer was cocked back. Mills said at the time that he believed Lasinski had tried to fire on pursuing officers but did not know how to properly work the handgun. A Department of Justice forensic report identified 34 bullet strikes on the Mazda, the Soul Savers building, a building on Sixth Street and a wall near Hertz. Another bullet hit Lasinski, which, according to the report, left the whereabouts of seven bullets fired by EPD officers unaccounted for. Looking back on the incident as it was outlined in various reports and witness interviews contained in EPD’s internal affairs investigation, Jarvis was reminded of his initial comment that he believed things would have played out differently today and asked if that’s a good thing or a bad thing. “Both,” he said, adding that while police ultimately have to be responsible for their actions, he believes hesitancy to pull the trigger has probably cost some officers their lives because they’re thinking about “being second guessed or being prosecuted” before doing what they were trained to do. But ultimately, Jarvis said, the public expects its officers to be perfect. “We have the responsibility,” he said. “We have to be right every time, and that’s a tough responsibility for everyone.” ●

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. He can be reached at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


DAILY ONLINE

FROM

988 Goes Live

A

The national 988 hotline launched July 16, giving those experiencing or witnessing a mental health crisis just three numbers to dial to be connected with intervention services without being routed through a police dispatcher. The new number, which takes the place of the suicide prevention hotline, is part of a national effort to overhaul the delivery of mental healthcare and, as much as possible, keep police out of mental health crisis response. But it’s a baby step. For now, calls and texts that come into the 988 number will be routed to state suicide prevention call centers, including about a dozen in California. Calls placed in Humboldt County will be routed to a state call center in Yolo County and, from there, redirected to the county’s 24-hour crisis line: 445-7715, or toll free at (888) 849-5728. (For the time being, these numbers remain the most direct line to the local experts waiting to help, but 988 provides an easy-to-remember alternative.) Humboldt County Behavioral Health Deputy Director Paul Bugnacki said only about 2 percent of hotline calls statewide are transferred for an emergency response, and state officials have expressed hope 988 could reduce the number of mental health crisis calls coming into emergency dispatch centers. The new hotline won’t change much on the ground in Humboldt

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Fourth Condor Takes Flight County, Bugnacki said, though he said he may look to add a position to the county’s crisis stabilization unit, depending on call volume. Meanwhile, local agencies and the county continue to work toward the larger vision of having trained mental health clinician teams ready to respond directly to emergencies without police, where possible. County Behavioral Health is currently working with the Eureka Police Department, the Arcata Police Department and the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, to have mental health teams co-respond to certain calls — or work certain beats — along with sworn officers. Bugnacki said teams are also in place to dispatch to local hospitals when police bring someone in on a mental health hold to evaluate whether the person meets legal criteria for the hold or could possibly be treated or monitored in a less restrictive setting. Eureka, meanwhile, seems to be the local entity closest to implementing 988’s architects’ full vision of providing an emergency mental health response that does not involve police at all. Eureka City Manager Miles Slattery said the program has been more than a year in the making but the city has hired a mental health clinician who is slated to start Aug. 1. The clinician will lead a small team operating out of a city-owned van that will respond

Warrants Issued: The Eureka Police Department announced July 14 that arrest warrants had been issued for two suspects in a Fourth of July assault of a Black man on Eureka’s waterfront in which he reported being called a racial slur. The warrants list Joseph Bradley Boxell, 20, and Dylan Cody Olivas, 21, as suspects in the case. POSTED 07.14.22

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A fourth California condor is now flying free in the skies over the North Coast after A1, a young male, left the enclosure just before dawn July 14, according to the Northern California Condor Restoration Program, a Yurok-led effort to return the bird they know as prey-go-nesh to the northern reaches of the endangered species’ former territory. POSTED 07.14.22 Photo by Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

directly to mental health related calls for service, though a lot of the details remain to be worked out. Bugnacki, meanwhile, said while Humboldt County is ahead of many jurisdictions as far as forming partnerships between mental health professionals and law enforcement, he’s constantly looking for ways to expand those services. The biggest challenge is finding trained profes-

Arcata Considers Land Acknowledgement: As the Journal went to press July 19, the Arcata City Council was slated to consider a statement of unity against anti-Semitic messages and hate speech in the wake of someone having distributed flyers with such propaganda in recent weeks, as well as adding a land acknowledgement to its meetings. POSTED 07.18.22

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

sionals to send out in the field, he said. “The money is there, the partners are there — we just don’t have the workforce,” he said. If you are or witness someone experiencing a mental health emergency, call the county’s local line at 445-7715, or toll free at (888) 849-5728, or call or text the national line at 988. ­ —Thadeus Greenson POSTED 07.18.22

Colleges to Provide Abortion Pills: As California’s efforts to enshrine abortion access continue, the University of California and California State University systems are working to provide medication abortions on all campuses by Jan. 1. Currently, none of the CSU campuses offer medication abortions and access within the UC system varies campus to campus. POSTED 07.14.22

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newsletters

Digitally Speaking

They Said It

Comment of the Week

2

“This sucks. It’s arranged so that the poorest, neediest people don’t get it.”

“No decent person should be a bystander in a situation like this. No one deserves to be treated like that.”

The number of local residents who died of COVID-19 between July 6 and July 13, representing Humboldt County’s 150th and 151st COVID-19 deaths over the course of the pandemic. As the Journal went to press July 19, 14 people were hospitalized with the virus locally, with four under intensive care..POSTED 07.13.22

Brooke Hamlin, an 81 year old who lives off of Social Security benefits, on the state’s plans to give inflation payments of $200 to $1,050 to 23 million Californians, including households making up to $500,000 annually, but not the 3 million residents who earned so little they weren’t required to file tax returns for 2021. POSTED 07.15.22

­— Julia Minton on the Journal’s Facebook page commenting on a post about the Fortuna Police Department launching a hate crime investigation after a trans man was accosted and threatened at a local store. POSTED 07.13.22

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

‘All Hands On Deck’ Humboldt prepares for waste overhaul that will cut climate emissions and feed the hungry By Iridian Casarez

iridian@northcoastjournal.com

A

new state law mandating organic waste recycling and the creation of food recovery programs will overhaul the state’s garbage system — changing everything from how residents throw out their trash to how organic waste is recycled and where cities source their mulch — all while reducing emissions of methane, one of the worst climate pollutants. “This is the most encompassing law ever in California — not only is it a recycling law but a climate change law as well,” said Evan Edgar, principal engineer and president of Edgar and Associates, a Sacramento-based environmental engineering company and lobbying firm working with local municipalities on the issue. “This is all hands on deck.” Senate Bill 1383, the biggest overhaul in the California waste management system since 1990 and possibly the state’s biggest climate change legislation, will create a new system for how households, businesses, municipalities and trash haulers handle organic waste, like food scraps, yard waste and all other trash coming from plant or animal products. The new system will require a unique collaborative effort between waste hauling companies, local governments, businesses, food pantries and shelters like no other waste management legislation has ever before. The bill’s scope is so massive that last year Humboldt Waste Management Authority, a joint powers authority of member agencies including the cities of Arcata, Blue Lake, Eureka, Fortuna, Fern-

10

dale, Rio Dell and the county of Humboldt, hired Edgar and Associates, which specializes in solid waste management, recycling, composting and renewable energy issues, to help with its implementation process. The consulting firm has created a roadmap report for the county, detailing what needs to be done to offer organic waste services and meet state mandates. Signed into law in 2016 by then-Gov. Jerry Brown, S.B. 1383 sets the goal of reducing the amount of organic waste entering landfills by 75 percent statewide by 2025. After the bill was signed, the California Department of Resources, Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) created the rules and regulations for implementation, finalizing them in 2020. It is now beginning to enforce them. Cities and counties must adopt enforceable ordinances mandating curbside collection services for organic waste through hauling companies or self-hauling services, while also creating edible food recovery programs and establishing compost or organic fuel procurement plans to ensure the organic waste has a beneficial final destination, creating a circular economy for what had previously been treated as trash. In Humboldt County, various cities have begun updating their ordinances to include organic waste collection. In residential areas, it will be collected in curbside bins and hauled to an organic waste processing facility. HWMA is also starting to build out the infrastructure to support organic waste recycling services. The HWMA board recent-

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Senate Bill 1383, California’s biggest waste management overhaul and climate change legislation, will create a circular economy for sustainable organic waste byproducts like compost, mulch and bioenergy. Illustration by Dave Brown

ly authorized the temporary closure and relocation of its Eureka Recycling Center, with plans to convert the current location on Hawthorne Street into a processing facility where the organic waste will be sorted, baled and readied for transport. The Solid Waste Local Task Force and Humboldt County’s Department of Environmental Services, meanwhile, are creating a countywide edible food recovery program that will work with local businesses to donate leftover food to area homeless shelters and food banks. “The beautiful thing about S.B. 1383 is it’s bringing everyone to the table,” said Linda Wise, general manager for Eel River Recology and Recology Humboldt. “We’re coming together, finding issues and addressing them to get it done.” The statewide effort is aimed at reducing what’s called “short-lived climate pollutants” and methane emissions, which are generated by decomposing food scraps and other organic matter in landfills and are 86 times more potent than carbon dioxide. A 2021 report published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimated that organic waste generates

170 million metric tons of carbon dioxide nationally each year, equal to the annual emissions of 42 coal-fired power plants. The EPA also found municipal solid waste landfills are the third-largest source of human-related methane emissions in the U.S., accounting for approximately 14.5 percent of these emissions in 2020. According to CalRecycle, organic waste causes up to 20 percent of the state’s methane emissions. Compostable items, defined as “organic materials typically accepted for use in commercial compost or digestion systems” in the 2020-2021 HWMA waste characterizations study, made up about one-quarter of Humboldt County’s overall waste stream, with food waste making up 14 percent, recycled paper making up 6.7 percent and compostable paper comprising 5.4 percent. CalRecycle initially gave cities until Jan. 1 to begin organic waste collection and food recovery services before it would start fining them, but the COVID-19 pandemic brought delays. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an addendum last year giving cities and counties an extension if they send CalRecycle a “notice of intent to comply,” which


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all Humboldt County cities did in April. Since then, cities, including Fortuna and Ferndale, have begun amending waste collection ordinances to include organic waste recycling. Fortuna’s ordinance states it will begin offering organic waste services next year. However, the start date is contingent on whether Eel River Recology, which handles Fortuna waste collection services, has the appropriate bins, trucks and a tipping floor needed to haul the new materials. “The main driver for that (date) is Recology doesn’t have the trucks, they don’t have the bins, there’s no possible way we could have that service implemented any faster than Jan. 1, 2023,” Fortuna City Manager Merritt Perry said. “So, my thought is

to put the effective date of Jan. 1, 2023, and adopt an ordinance that has the general provisions, which is the best we can do in the short-term. If we need to make any changes to the municipal code, we can make them in the six or eight months before its effective date — or push the date back if we’re unable to meet the original date.” Wise said industry demand for the trucks, which are made to order, and the price of metal have pushed deliveries back 18 to 24 months from the original date. But even with the trucks, Humboldt County is still missing an essential element to offering organic waste recycling: the tipping floor, or the facility where garbage trucks dump waste onto a conveyor belt to be sorted and baled for transportation to its

next destination. In the roadmap report, Edgar and Associates suggested that HWMA create an organic waste tipping floor by repurposing and relocating its Eureka Recycling Center. It’s the easiest and fastest way to start an organic waste collection service because the site is already built out and operating as a recycling processing center, which should make the permitting and zoning process swift. HWMA will close the Eureka Recycling Center on Aug. 1 to begin retrofitting the site for organic waste, according to a staff report from HWMA Executive Director Peter Fuller. HWMA is also expected to open a new recycling center for source-separated drop-off by November. “We’re all in this together,” Fuller said. Continued on next page »

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

“It is fluid, it’s dynamic. It’s challenging for all of us. The engineers that I speak with have seen different permutations of how this has to go down. We’re all scrambling — productively — but scrambling to work together to make this happen.” HWMA is in the early negotiations to buy a property on West End Road in Arcata for the new recycling center. During a June 9 HWMA board meeting, HWMA Director of Operations Eric Keller-Heckman said the Arcata property has the potential for expansion and is ideal for all of the services offered at the Eureka Recycling Center. To date, the waste management company is on schedule to meet its November deadline for opening the new recycling center and its January deadline for opening an organic waste tipping floor and processing center. “HWMA staff and Edgar and Associates staff will be meeting with the local Humboldt County [CalRecycle Local Enforcement Agency] next week to discuss the permitting process and the amendments needed for the Hawthorne Street Transfer station,” Keller-Heckman said. “HWMA staff has begun to assess the infrastructure needs of the Eureka Recycling Center and what it’s gonna take to transform that into the organics processing facility and, right now, everything is currently on track.” Until then, HWMA will be purchasing necessary equipment, retrofitting the site, recruiting staff for the organic waste processing facility, recruiting a site supervisor for the new location and developing a request for proposals for the transportation and disposal of organic waste. HWMA is expected to open the organics processing facility to commercial and public drop-off by Jan. 1. The projected costs for relocating the Eureka Recycling Center and transforming it into an organics-processing facility range from $3.7 million to $4.7 million, with the largest expenditure being the purchase of a new property. (The company may also have to buy a new baling machine if the current one at the recycling center can’t be modified to fit the new location, according to a staff report.) But organic waste collection is only a small piece of the new system. Under the law, after organic waste is separated and baled, it must be sent to a facility to be turned into traditional organic waste byproducts, like compost and mulch. S.B. 1383 recognizes that methane emissions, as the EPA has reported, represent a lost opportunity to create energy by converting the emissions found in landfills into bioenergy, and requires organic materials to be converted into bioenergy (electricity derived from organic waste) and renewable natural gas (a liquid

form of bioenergy that can be used to fuel vehicles, electricity and thermal appliances like stoves, ovens and water heaters). And to close the organic waste economic loop, S.B. 1383 will also require municipalities to “procure” these organic waste recycling byproducts, from compost to biofuel, based on their population. Humboldt County currently doesn’t have a facility that is able to break organic waste down into compost, mulch or bioenergy. Edgar and Associates estimates a local composting facility should be permitted and operational in five years but, until then, the sorted and baled organic waste from the HWMA facility will be transported out of the county for processing. Municipalities will then need to backhaul compost and mulch from an out-ofcounty facility to meet S.B. 1383’s “procurement” requirement. But the methane emissions saved by organic waste recycling versus the carbon dioxide emitted from transporting materials is 20 to one (due to methane emissions being 86 times more potent than carbon dioxide), so the new system will result in an overall emissions reduction despite the additional vehicle trips. Based on Edgar and Associates’ initial calculations, Humboldt County as a whole will have to acquire approximately 5,990 tons of compost, 10,325 tons of mulch, 0.76 megawatts of bioenergy and 216,835 DGE (diesel gas equivalent) of renewable natural gas to be compliant with S.B. 1383. Each city will have its own required procurement amount based on its population. For example, Arcata must procure up to 839 tons of the 5,990 tons of compost and 1,446 tons of the 10,325 tons of mulch, 0.107 megawatts of bioenergy of the 0.76 megawatts of bioenergy and 30,371 tons of renewable natural gas of the 216,835 DGE. Arcata Environmental Services Director Emily Sinkhorn said the city is exploring different ideas for how it will use its required 839 tons of compost and 1,446 tons of mulch. “We know there are different types of arrangements and contracts in other cities, like partnering with agriculture companies or property managements, we just haven’t explored those in-depth,” Sinkhorn said. “We have a lot of open space and park spaces, so we’re analyzing how we can best utilize compost and mulch in those areas. It’s still to-be-determined but we’re working on it.” Compost and mulch can be used in community gardens and parks, and school gardens, while bioenergy and renewable natural gas (RNG) can be used for everything from powering wastewater treatment plants to power grids and trucks, but bioenergy and RNG don’t yet have the in-


frastructure necessary to support demand in Humboldt County. However, through an application process, CalRecycle allows procurement exemptions for rural, low-population jurisdictions due to their smaller organic waste footprints and significant challenges to collecting and repurposing organic waste. This could potentially exempt Humboldt County cities from having to purchase bioenergy and RNG, at least until they are in greater demand locally. To ensure California is meeting its goal of reducing methane emissions, CalRecycle is mandating robust record keeping with annual reports from cities and waste hauling companies, including copies of passed ordinances, route reviews and evaluations, collection service records, education and outreach records, edible food recovery program records, enforcement action records and complaints. Cities and jurisdictions will also be required to provide organic waste procurement records. The state will also require regular audits of garbage, organic and recycling bins, a responsibility that will fall to Recology because it has the proper equipment and knows all of the collection routes. Essentially, Recology will have to look into garbage bins to check that all waste is separated correctly. If Recology finds residents or businesses with contaminated bins — for example, if an organic waste bin has plastic bottles or wrappers — the company would report it to the city or county, which would then issue a fine according to the applicable local ordinance. For example, Fortuna’s ordinance states, “If the city determines that an organic waste generator, self-hauler, commercial edible food generator, food recovery organization, food recovery service or other entity is not in compliance with this chapter, it shall document the noncompliance or violation, issue an administrative citation and take enforcement action, as needed.” The administrative citation in Fortuna is $100 for the first violation, $200 for the second and $500 for the third offense within a year. Not only will S.B. 1383 divert methane

emissions through organic waste recycling, but it will also eliminate methane emissions released by salvageable food rotting in landfills through a food recovery program — a program desperately needed in Humboldt County, which has a food insecurity rate of 18 percent, higher than the national average of 12 percent. With a goal of recovering 20 percent of edible food from the waste stream, S.B. 1383 requires cities to create a program in which businesses like restaurants, hospitals and grocery stores, as well as organizations like schools, must donate leftover food to local shelters and food pantries instead of throwing them away. “Tier 1 food generators,” which include larger grocery stores and supermarkets, must begin the food recovery process by Jan. 1. “Tier 2 food generators,” which include restaurants with more than 250 seats, hotels with more than 200 rooms, health facilities like hospitals with more than 100 beds, large venues and state and educational facilities with large cafeterias, must begin by 2024. The food recovery program will be a collaborative effort between businesses and organizations, food pantries and local shelters, cities and the Humboldt County Environmental Health Department, which manages food safety inspections. Edgar and Associates has finished the first draft of the county’s food recovery strategic plan, which gives clear recommendations and next steps to build out the program. It also assesses the county’s capacity to save edible food, outlines possible funding streams to support the program and identifies which businesses in the county must participate based on their size and waste accumulation. The draft has yet to be made public but is in the hands of the Solid Waste Local Task Force for review and comment. It will be discussed further during the next meeting on July 25. Last year, Zero Waste Humboldt created a similar assessment looking at the potential capacity for an edible food recovery program in Arcata and Eureka. It found that all food recovery organizations in Arcata and Eureka could accept more non-perishable donations based on the current level of demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic and inflation. However, there are limitations to the amount of perishable food organizations can receive. “Food recovery organizations’ expansion is limited by lack of basic infrastructure:

sufficient cold and dry storage space, a lack of refrigerated trucks, and need for the paid staff to manage coordination, collection and record-keeping,” the report states. All food recovery organizations interviewed for the Zero Waste Humboldt Assessment expressed an interest in expanding food recovery efforts but said they would need the proper trucks and equipment to do so. Food for People, Humboldt County’s principal food bank, for example, is currently in the process of rebuilding its main site after sewer inundation in 2020 rendered the building unusable, forcing the organization to lease different buildings and leaving it unable to support an increase in perishable food at the moment. The organization is slated to open a new, expanded facility later this year. The Salvation Army and the Betty Kwan Chinn Foundation both would need to purchase walk-in freezers to safely store more perishable food but grant funding for nonprofits almost always comes as reimbursements, creating cash flow problems. Although there is still a long way to go in expanding food recovery in the county, some of it is happening now. The assessment found every grocery store in Eureka and Arcata is already participating in a food donation process, either donating to a food pantry or a local pig farm, but some challenges exist, including a need for regular, consistent donation collection services, the staff time required for scheduling donations, navigating regulations pertaining to perishable food donations and concern over litigation associated with donating perishable food, among others. In order to create a sustainable food recovery program in the county, local governments, businesses and nonprofits will need to create new partnerships. The Solid Waste Local Task Force, along with HWMA, Recology and other waste haulers in the area, will continue to meet regularly to discuss next steps toward fully implementing the robust organic waste recycling law. The collective effort has begun and will continue for the next five years, at least. “This stuff isn’t going to happen overnight,” Wise said. “We’re still years away from a fully phased organic waste recycling program but some jurisdictions may come to see it more quickly than others.” ● Iridian Casarez (she/her) is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @Iridian_Casarez.

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The Humboldt Waste Management Authority’s Eureka Recycling Center will be permanently closing on August 1, 2022. HWMA staff will be identifying suitable sites for relocation, and it is anticipated that these services will return in early 2023. We understand this closure may cause complications and hardships to our customers and only exacerbates the difficulty with disposing of certain hard to recycle items, but we encourage customers to utilize the below alternate disposal locations during this time. This closure will allow HWMA and Humboldt County Jurisdictions to work toward SB 1383 compliance by utilizing this vacated space to conduct organics collection and processing activities. For questions or concerns please email operations@hwma.net or call 707-268-8680. For more info about SB1383 and its requirements visit https://calrecycle.ca.gov/organics/slcp/education/ DROP-OFF LOCATIONS SCRAP METAL Arcata Scrap and Salvage 192 G St Arcata Ca

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14

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

The prosciutto and brie panini with apple served on a baguette. Photos by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Ale in the Castle

Arcata’s brew scene has a new addition By Erin Young

onthetable@northcoastjournal.com

B

uilt on Arcata’s H Street in 1885 as the former clubhouse for the Knights of Pythian, Pythian Castle has lived many lives and is currently inhabited by multiple clothing shops including a grand-papi of local thrift shops, the Vintage Avenger. But there has been a small restaurant space nestled in among the retail shops that had yet to find its forever match — like a shell without its hermit crab. Because the space has turned over a few times in recent history, it is easy to overlook that a new business has moved in. But let me assure you, Oak Brewery and Deli is not to be overlooked. After a career of working in events in Southern Humboldt came to an abrupt halt during the infamous pandemic, Bryce Cherpelis needed to make a hard pivot. Cherpelis’ parents had been home brewing since 1993 and when they moved to Florida, Cherpelis called a quick “dibs” on the brewing equipment as well as the family recipe book. Paired with his 10 years of experience working in a deli, Cherpelis saw the perfect new venture, which just launched in January. The interior of Oak Brewery and Deli is clean and simple and shows that it has room to grow and continue to make its mark. Though the simplicity of the space

is misleading, as Cherpelis renovated the whole interior — including a reclaimed teak floor and new, special electrical wiring for brewing — all in a successful transformation from the salon that it had been most recently. The true focal points of the shop are the impressive deli case and the even more impressive fermentation tanks behind the counter. But let’s not bury the lead here — the beer is delicious. At the moment, Cherpelis is only producing a few beers at a time and rotating them regularly, so there is always something new to try. When I went to taste with Cherpelis, the two he had on tap after a very busy weekend with Oyster Festival, were the Redwood Creek Sessions IPA, which was a more “daytime” IPA as Cherpelis described, with a lower, 4-percent alcohol content and a soft stone fruit flavor (would absolutely recommend), and the Berliner Weiss Sour, which was beautifully complex with a 5-percent alcohol content, notes of bananas foster, brioche, pineapple and a slight touch of hops (my personal favorite and I went back for a full pint). I also got the opportunity to taste some new, unfinished beers that were still wrapping up the fermentation process. And even without bubbles and final


HUMBOLDT touches, they were delicious and I could tell that they were going to be fantastic. The Vienna Pilsner, which is brewed from an Austrian grain, had slightly more hops than the other two, with unique notes of Meyer lemon, tangerine and orange blossom; the Mexican Lager was lighter, with notes of white nectarine, apple, lemon and spice; and the Pale Red Ale had a bigger body, more hops and a scrumptious red delicious apple flavor. All of these may be on tap by the time this article publishes but, honestly, I hope that they were popular enough that they’re already on to the next round. The boutique nature of the small brewery is what really makes each product special. The hands-on techniques that Cherpelis takes ensure quality, as well as fewer chemical cleaners, as he takes the time to “care about every corner of the kettle.” And the full grain he uses rather than malt (which is a dehydrated, concentrated product) means a longer extraction process, but also some incredibly nuanced flavor. Though the beer certainly is the star of the show, one of the things that I was very impressed by was the quality of

the food Oak Brewery and Deli offers. Ingredients are sourced locally (including the ever-delicious Brio Breadworks). The food is simple, but excellent because as Cherpelis says, “We use really good product and put it together.” When I was there, the soup of the day was a chicken wild rice, which I all but completely inhaled, and I also had a chance to try the brie and prosciutto sandwich and the Oak Reuben, which was spectacular. Though the business is still new, it’s just getting started. For now, Oak Brewery and Deli is open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. with entertainment and events on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Beers rotate regularly, sticking around for two to three weeks at a time and plans are in the works to expand to filling growlers, as well as selling in local shops soon. But it doesn’t stop there. Cherpelis says the next goal is to expand into an offsite brewing space to increase from a 100 gallon production to about 1,000 gallons, as well as expanding the packaging and distribution of the product. And from what it sounds like, that’s just the next step and there is so much more to come. ●

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h, how I love paddling on Humboldt Bay. When the tide is right, I might visit Indian Slough, where the narrow wandering passageways remind me of tiny lanes I’ve cycled in Wales, my husband Barry’s homeland. In spring, I spot nesting egrets clustered high in the cypresses and schools of sandpipers resting on the mud flats in low tide. Sometimes I weave in and out of pilings, like a slaloming skier, or see if I can squeeze through the opening of a channel marker without touching it. As long as it’s not too windy, I love the bay and never tire of its docks, moorings, jetties, marinas, faded fishing boats and decommissioned pulp mill. Unlike many paddlers we know, I’ll take the bay over Stone Lagoon any day. They avoid the bay because you have to pay attention to the tides. But Barry and I have a handy tide app, so we know when it’s possible to, say, circle Woodley Island, which you can only do when the tide is 5 feet or higher. The only downside of the app is that it can be off by an hour or more, and a few weeks ago I misjudged it, thinking the tide was at slack when it had already turned. Along with the gusts of wind, it was heavy going. I’m not a warrior paddler; no chop, wind, or rain for me. Unlike kayakers, I don’t even like wakes. Easy for them, all snug in their nests. “Try loving wakes when you’re standing on a paddleboard,” I tell Barry. I decided to cut my losses and get off at the Adorni Center. My paddleboard is so light, I was ready to whisk it home, but Barry turned out to be only a block away and carried it for me. Such a gentleman. Meanwhile I’ve recently started a new form of cross-training: Whenever I need a change of venue from strolling around Eureka’s streets, I hop on my paddleboard and head over to Woodley. Such was the case a few days ago. I took off from Old Town’s C Street dock,

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

carefully avoiding the docked Madaket, and headThe author paddling near Tuluwat. Photo by Barry Evans ed north at a seriously low tide. Gliding, I’d aim at the mainland, sight, and cleaned up as best I could. then at the island, back and forth in a On the dock, now presentable, if a herringbone pattern, passing the F Street little muddy, I introduced myself to the dock, the U.S. Coast Guard boat Barraguy, who was only protecting his home cuda, the Aquatic Center. Before long, turf. Fair enough. Just glad I don’t live in a I was approaching the north end of the “stand your ground” state. Woodley Island Marina. As I neared it, I Then I went on a walk, checking out realized I hadn’t had a dip for a while. I the boats, the fisherman statue and the used to go open-water swimming in the rock-mounted marker for “Indian/Gunbay and sometimes I miss the therapeutic ther Island, Site 67 (Tolowat),” a National cold. No one’s around, I thought. I could Historic Landmark, which, to my dismay, just scooch in from the dock, have a dip, says only, “This site possesses nationget my cold-water fix, then climb back al significance in commemorating the onto the dock, get dressed and walk on history of the United States of AmeriWoodley. I’m the fastest clothing-changca.” Of course, as we know, what really er I know. Easy. happened — far from the airbrushed OK, it’s settled. name — was that in 1860, white settlers I landed, turned my SUP over, snuck massacred Wiyot women and children my paddle and life vest under it, unliving on the island. In 2019, the island, to dressed, and slipped off the dock. I the northeast and larger than Woodley, hadn’t realized how muddy it was. “Well, was returned to the Wiyot Tribe and you did say you wanted to get down and renamed Tuluwat (“The Island’s Return,” dirty with nature more, Rogers,” I told Oct. 24, 2019). myself. A while back, I wrote the Humboldt Suddenly I heard a voice. A man with Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation long black hair on the ramp was shouting District saying that while we can’t change at me. “What are you doing swimming what our ancestors did, we can at least naked in the water?” tell the truth about the wording. I was “I’m getting wet and having a dip,” I happy to hear that a convoluted process shouted back. “I didn’t want to get my involving a range of stakeholders — most clothes wet.” importantly, the tribe — is in process. “Are you homeless?” After the marker, I brought my mind “No, I’m not homeless,” I said. back to the 21st century. Turning around, “Where do you live?” I strolled back to the end of the marina, “In Old Town. Look, please don’t climbed back on my paddleboard, and report me. I don’t want my picture headed home for lunch. What’s not to splashed all over. I’ll get out soon.” like? ● None too soon, in fact. I didn’t have the usual restorative feeling since I was Louisa Rogers (she/her) is a leadership covered in mud from my knees down. I coach and writer who lives in Eureka and waddled back to the dock, clambered Guanajuato, Mexico. up and snuck behind some boats, out of


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Pacific Halibut Quota Nearly Met

TAPPIN ROOTS

ALL STAGES FERTILIZER GALLON

By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

NOW

F

avorable ocean conditions for a good part of July, along with the closure of ocean salmon, has led to anglers putting a very large dent in the Pacific halibut sport quota. So much so that it could be met prior to Aug. 1, when the ocean salmon season opens back up. The hope was the halibut quota would carry into August giving anglers three options — rockfish, salmon and halibut — to target. The one thing we know is once Aug. 1 rolls around, salmon will become the species of choice. But if that fishery doesn’t pan out, it’s nice to have a couple other options in your back pocket. We’ll know where we stand once the quota is updated by California Department of Fish and Wildlife later this week. As of Tuesday, California’s share of Area 2A’s quota, which includes Washington and Oregon, is at 70 percent, with 26,706 net pounds harvested against the 38,740 quota. The daily bag and possession limit for Pacific halibut is one fish with no minimum size limit. For more information on Pacific halibut, visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/ Conservation/Marine/Pacific-Halibut.

The Oceans: Eureka

Less than ideal ocean conditions along with big King tides made for a tough halibut bite over the weekend. But the fish are still there, according to Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing. “The fish seem like they’re moving around a lot,” he said. “I’m not sure if the tides and currents have something to do with that, but we’re having to move around quite a bit. When the conditions are right, the fishing is still really good. The black cod have thinned out a little, which makes things much easier. Rock fishing is still excellent at the Cape, but we haven’t had a whole lot of opportunity to get down there with the ocean conditions.”

Trinidad

“The ocean has been a little lumpy, especially at low tide, but the rockfish are

4499

$

still biting, “said Curt Wilson, of Wind Rose Charters. “We’re still spending most of our time near Patrick’s Point towards the Turtles catching some nice black rockfish and a few lings. The Pacific halibut bite is still good, I’d say it’s a steady pick. The fish are all over the place from the Head to the Point in 250 to 260 feet of water. The crabbing has slowed way down and it’s likely done for the season, but we’re setting our rings out before each trip.”

Shelter Cove

CENTURY WIRE STRING LIGHT 12/3 100' 10 LIGHT

Was

Fortuna resident Johnny Johnson landed a 90-pound Pacific halibut while fishing out of Eureka on July 7. Halibut fishing remains excellent out of Eureka and Trinidad. Photo courtesy of

Crescent City

A few California halibut are being caught along South Beach, according to Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine. “Small boats and kayaks trolling bait have had some decent success,” said Carson. “The clamming during last week’s minus tides was excellent. The people who knew what they were doing scored easy limits. The rockfish and lingcod bite is still really good when the boats can get out. The redtail perch bite has really turned on at Kellogg Beach. Sand crabs and the Berkeley Gulp Worms have been the top bait.”

The Rivers: The salmon bite has been up and down

in the estuary to date. There are oceanfresh kings pouring in on every tide, but they aren’t always in the biting mood. Water temperatures over the weekend at the mouth reached 71 degrees. Anchovies rigged with or without a spinner blade have been the top producers so far, but Kastmasters are catching quite a few. The best fishing has been on the incoming and a couple hours after the high tide.

Lower Rogue

Water temperature near Agness have ranged from 72 to 75 degrees, forcing salmon to hold up in the bay, reports Martin. “Fishing in the Rogue Bay has been the best so far this season, with most boats catching multiple fish. Plain anchovies are working well. Tides this week switched to a morning bite near the jetties and in front of Jot’s.” l Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www. fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com

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The story hasn’t changed much out of Shelter Cove, according to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing. “Rock fishing has been steady with the ling cod still being pretty difficult to locate,” said Mitchell. “There’s been a few Thresher sharks around and some more bait starting to show up. Hopefully there will be some salmon around when it opens back up on Friday.”

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17


SETLIST

Come On Feel The Noise By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

W

e’ve got a lot of great local gigs this week, which is about as good as it gets regarding midsummer Setlists. And many of them are free, which certainly doesn’t hurt with the way things are at present. Despite my own hectic schedule, I was able to catch a few good ones last week and was rewarded each time. Even if you don’t have the time for a complete show, a partial still counts toward full credit regarding the feeling afterward. Think of it like spending an hour or two at the river rather than camping overnight, or daytripping in lieu of a multi-day hike. It’s still a good time. And these days, lord knows, good times are a precious commodity. Go get at it.

Thursday

Hip hop Thursday is a thing at The Jam, where starting at 10 p.m. you can catch some of Humboldt’s best rhyme-sayers and beat makers doing their thing near the iconic mural of the late, great Muddy Waters. This week has Chuck Angeles, Flo J Simpson and others rocking the beat. I don’t know the exact door charge so bring some dough just in case.

Friday

Humboldt’s beloved traveling musical couple, Nola and Dieter, have returned from their sonic wanderings to hole up in the county for a spell and drop some tunes. Most famous locally for their group Opossum Sun Trail (as well as their countless collaborations), the pair plays the Siren’s Song Tavern tonight under the moniker Landers Drifters, which I am told by Nola is a “cosmic Americana act with some covers, in the vein of The Flying Burrito Brothers.” That’s good enough for me. Dieter and local badass Nicholas Dominic Talvola open the night with their project iichiko Brain. This one’s gonna be good, folks. 8 p.m. (Free).

18

The retro-punk sounds of Courtney Jackson fill The Shanty during the Songwriters Circle of Death beginning at 2 p.m. Sunday. Submitted

Saturday

You have the option of an all-day and into the night event in the form of a block party put on by Arcane Artists in front of the Kinetic Sculpture Lab over at 820 N St. in Arcata, where a $20 general pass will grant you access to many hours of quality music and good times, starting at 4 p.m. However, if you want something more intimate with ties to the good old days of the HumCo music scene, you might want to head over to Lost Coast Brewery, where Sonoma County’s trio of Humboldt music veterans The Beer Scouts will be playing a lot of blues and rock, in the form of covers and originals. This is a free matinee show at 3 p.m., so you have the option of enjoying some portions from each feast.

Sunday

The Songwriter Circle of Death is a fantastic tradition, where a handful of local tunesmiths take turns on the mic with their finest compositions, flogging their feelings in front of a barful of cheering onlookers. This marks the 17th edition of this hallowed event, and the talent on the roster is about as top notch as it gets in our neck of the woods. Come enjoy the country stylings of Kenny Bowling, the perfectly bratty retro-punk sounds of Courtney Jackson and the drunken bass pummel of our dear Dave O, aka TheBoredAgain. I just caught Dave’s set with The Smashed Glass opening for the Pine Hill Haints and, let me tell you, the last two years of crap have been great for the man’s chops. Ditto Ms. Jackson, whose latest release with Clean Girl and the Dirty Dishes gave me goose bumps in my rave review in these pages. Mr. Bowling I have seen the least, but I plan to remedy that,

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

and you should, too. Come over to The Shanty at 2 p.m. to see what it’s all about, all you need to get in the door is a pulse and a shadow.

Monday

It’s another quiet summer Monday, sadly. However, I’m going to toss out some entertainment suggestions that you can pursue. In terms of cinema, one of my favorite films, Meet Me in St. Louis, begins in the summer of 1903, so it might be considered a summertime flick. A young Judy Garland is perhaps a more earnest figure than nearly anyone alive now or then, so the plot still kicks. As far as music goes, one of my all-time favorite lazy dog day records is Nilsson Sings Newman. If you know, you know.

plex tonight at 8 p.m. ($20/ $15 advance). This is a fantastic show for those in the know and of a sympathetic aesthetic background, as evidenced by our local heroes Clean Girl and the Dirty Dishes rounding out the bill. Dirty dishes and puff pastries galore! l Collin Yeo (he/him) is just some dude who lives in Arcata.

Tuesday

I’ve been saying this, but I have to do it again, as I recently got a re-up and enjoyed the gig immensely. Word Humboldt’s free open mic at Northtown Coffee at 6 p.m. is very real. You can experience everything from the sublime to the cringey, with nothing held back. It is a special experience, and I fully endorse it. And if you get there early enough, you can sign up for the mic, thus changing the room’s landscape with the geography of your mind.

Wednesday

I’ve lauded Fresno’s Fatty Cakes and the Puff Pastries here before, when they came and rocked the town with a chamber pop cast fused to a riot grrl ethos. Well, the band is back at it again, and can be found at the Mini-

Catch TheBoredAgain and others at the 17th Songwriters Circle of Death at 2 p.m. Sunday at The Shanty. Submitted


Calendar July 21 – 28, 2022

MOVIES Fight Club (1999). 8-11:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 8 p.m. Movie at 9 p.m. Rated R. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-gaming in the lobby. $8, $12 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre. com. facebook.com/events/707389840487156. 613-3030.

MUSIC

Submitted

File

If you haven’t checked out Fort Humboldt State Park, do yourself a favor and do it. There’s no better way than to take the Guided Tour of Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, offered this Saturday and Sunday, July 23 and 24, starting at 1 p.m. (free). Join an interpreter on the hour-long ADA-accessible walking tour and learn about the outpost’s history, Euro-American colonists and Indigenous people. It’s a fascinating look into the 19th century military outpost in Eureka, overlooking Broadway and the bay, with original buildings and equipment still standing today. Rain cancels. Check the North Coast Redwoods Facebook page for updates.

It seems like the dust’s barely settled from the rodeo and Fortuna’s already gearing up for the city’s next big thing. For those who’ve taken a shine to classic and vintage cars, the Fortuna Redwood AutoXpo is nothing short of Heaven. For three days — July 22-24 — the city of Fortuna will be crammed with car aficionados and hundreds of four-wheel and two-wheel beauts lining the streets, hoods up, chrome polished and selfie-ready. In addition to a huge car show, attendees will enjoy a Friday night cruise, deep-pit barbecue, artisans faire, show & shine, car-themed movie night and plenty more. Get detailed info at www.redwoodautoXpo.com.

H

eads up, Humboldt: While the county’s masking mandate has been lifted, Public Health is still strongly recommending masking indoors in public, social distancing and “avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces.” COVID-19 is still with us, so be sure to check the protocols at event venues.

21 Thursday ART

Art Night at the Sanctuary. Third Thursday of every month, 4-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Create with others freely or work on a guided project. Bring your own supplies or use what’s around to collage, paint, draw, make an art book, etc. $5-$20 suggested, no one turned away for lack of funds. sanctuaryarcata.org. North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. A judged exhibition showcasing photography and digital art. David Arnold judges.

BOOKS Beelzebub’s Tales To His Grandson Radio Hour. 10-11 p.m. The book will be read in its entirety on Humboldt Hot Air, every Thursday night at 10 p.m. This week’s reading: Episode 26: Chapter 37 (Part 2): France. Free. rybopp@suddenlink. net. HumboldtHotAir.org. 826-7567.

MUSIC Americana Music. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grind Cafe, 734 Fifth St., Eureka. Bolton Basil plays songs of American folk music, including bluegrass, country and popular music of the 1950s and 1960s. Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Come Get Your Sing On!!! Free. bearrivercasino.com. Music in the Park. 6-8 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Summer concert series in the park. Live music, food trucks. Free.

Photo by Kali Cozyris

When the sun dips down behind the buildings outside the Arcata Ball Park during Humboldt Crabs Games, things can get downright chilly. Add fly balls raining down like oversized (albeit much heavier) snowflakes and a jubilant crowd sipping adult beverages and, no matter the month, it’s a bit like Christmas, isn’t it? Grab your ugliest Christmas sweater and Santa cap and join the party during Christmas in July Night, Saturday, July 23, at 6:30 p.m. ($10, $4 child 3-12). On Sunday, July 24, wear your swirliest and rainbowiest to the park for Humboldt Crabs Tie-dye Sunday with first pitch at 12:30 p.m. ($10, $4 child 3-12). Are you at a Day on the Green concert or a ballgame, man? Both. The World Famous Crab Grass Band will be honking out some of its hits at this one. Should be a groovy, sunny afternoon, Crabs fans. Bring sunscreen.

Outside Minds Concert Series. 7 p.m. Arcata Marsh Amphitheater, Butcher’s Slough, South G Street. Sitebased and feature collective breathing, poetry and music. Donations accepted. Eureka Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Bring your chairs and please leave pets at home. No smoking or alcohol. Presented by Eureka Main Street. July 21: Dr. Squid (dance hits), July 28: Los Cautivos (Latin) Free. eurekamainstreet.org/summer-concert-series-4. 441-4187.

FOR KIDS Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Get a passport at participating businesses and hunt for Waldo in 26 locations. Collect stamps or signatures, then turn your passports in to Northtown Books to enter a July 30 drawing. Free. info@northtownbooks.com. northtownbooks.com/event/wheres-waldo-arcata-2. 822-2834.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Freshest local produce, meat, fish, cheese, eggs, bread, flowers and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ hendersoncenter.html. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Farm fresh produce, music and hot food vendors. Trained, ADA certified, service animals only. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/mckinleyville.html. 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.org/ volunteering. 445-3166 ext. 310. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. Produce, fish and more, plus music and hot food vendors weekly through August. No pets except trained, ADA-certified service animals. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoast-

growersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ willowcreek.html. 441-9999.

GARDEN Drop-In Volunteer Day. 1-4 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Get a taste of a farmer’s work growing vegetables, herbs and flowers. Come prepared for sunshine, cold, wet and working in the dirt. Bring a water bottle, snacks, closed toe shoes, long pants, sleeves and a sun hat. Free. baysideparkfarm@cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata. org/440/Bayside-Park-Farm. 822-8184.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. For BIPOC families. See the HC Black Music and Arts Association Facebook page for more information. hcblackmusicnarts@gmail.com. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from Equity Arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

ETC Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3-$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@gmail. com. sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

22 Friday ART

North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. See July 21 listing.

DANCE Obon Odori Class. 7 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Traditional Japanese dance with Sensei Craig Kurumada. redwoodraks.com.

The Beer Scouts. 6-8:30 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Rock and roll. Free. madriverbrewing.com. DJ Run Dat. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Club hits. Free. bearrivercasino.com. Grupo Nueva Ilusion. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino and Resort Ballroom, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Latin hits. $10. Kenny Bowling. 9-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Country music. Every Friday. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. Professional-level jazz twice a week at The SpeakEasy (Tuesdays and Fridays). Come out for some cool vibes and great people. Free. thespeakeasybar@yahoo.com. facebook.com/speakeasyeureka. 444-2244. Pretty Kitty Karaoke. Every other Friday, 8:30-11:30 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Pretty Kitty Karaoke at the Eureka Veteran’s Hall. Hosted by Jamie Kohl late of Monday nights at the Little Red. Under the auspices of Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872. 21 and over. Veterans and guests of veterans welcome. Free. PearceHansen999@outlook.com. facebook.com/profile. php?id=100082987501904. (206) 348-9335.

EVENTS Eureka Friday Night Market. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Farmers market, arts and craft vendors, a bar featuring Humboldt-produced beverages, food vendors and live local music for dancing. humboldtmade.com/eureka-friday-night-market. Fortuna Redwood AutoXpo. City of Fortuna, Various city locations. Huge car show, show and shine, burn out, artisans faire, tractor pull, movie nights and more. redwoodautoXpo.com. Lost Coast Kennel Club Agility Trials. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Lost Coast Kennel Club presents four days of AKC-sanctioned agility trials, plus FCATs and a Barn Hunt.

FOR KIDS Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. See July 21 listing. Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop off your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17-$20. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org/ classesprograms.html. 443-9694.

FOOD Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, eggs, meat, baked goods, nursery plants and starts, oysters, live music on the square, crafts and more.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882. Continued on page 21 »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SPORTS Humboldt Crabs vs. Fairfield. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs the Fairfield baseball team, featuring the World Famous Crab Grass Band. Gates at 6 p.m. Tickets available online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 child (3-12). humboldtcrabs@gmail. com. humboldtcrabs.com. 840-5665.

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. sohumhealth.com.

23 Saturday ART

Craft for the Coast Trash Art Show. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. View pieces that bring awareness to marine debris issues and give litter new life during the Arcata Farmer’s Market. Free. nec@yournec.org. yournec. org/craft4coast. 822-6918.

MUSIC The Beer Scouts. 3-6 p.m. Lost Coast Brewery Taproom, 1600 Sunset Drive, Eureka. Rock and roll. lostcoast.com. Happy Hour w/Anna “Banana” Hamilton. 5-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Blues, humor. Island Night. 1-10 p.m. The Bigfoot Taproom, 1750 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Live music by Papa Haole & The Fleas. Music from 6 to 9 p.m. Dress in your best tropical attire! Free. thebigfoottaproom@gmail.com. thebigfoottaproom. com. 630-4057. Steve’s Big Rock Show. 3-11 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Featuring rock and blues from Intergalactic Trash, King Range, Mark Goo, John Hardin, Dreams on Fire and The Funnicators. Beer and wine bar serving those 21 and over. Food by Christy, light show by Cosmic Goo Improv Visuals. $10 at the door. mateel.org. The Travelin McCourys, Never Come Down. 8 p.m. Humboldt Brews HumBrews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Bluegrass greats. $35, $30 advance. humbrews@gmail.com. holdmyticket.com/event/394779. 826-2739. Under the Influence. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Dance hits. Free. bearrivercasino.com.

EVENTS Arcane on the Block. 4-10 p.m. Kinetic Sculpture Lab,

Eighth and N streets, Arcata. Live bands, DJs, singers, dancers, fire performers, aerialists, art installations, live artists, bar, food vendors, art and merchant vendors, VIP lounge and more. All ages. $35-$15. Disability Pride Fest. 2-5 p.m. Synapsis, 1675 Union St., Eureka. Disability pride props/photo booth, crafts, art show, film screenings, speakers, open mic. Free. EHassler@ redwoodcoastrc.org. fb.me/e/1Izfjm5U7. 445-0893 ext. 321. Fortuna Redwood AutoXpo. City of Fortuna, Various city locations. See July 22 listing. Lost Coast Kennel Club Agility Trials. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See July 22 listing. Samoa Speeder/Train Rides. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Timber Heritage Association, 930 Vance Ave., Samoa. Ride Humboldt’s historic rails with a scenic trip along the bay on Timber Heritage Association’s historic crew car rail speeder. Near the Samoa Cookhouse. timberheritage.org/ride-the-railson-a-historic-speeder-crew/. 443-2957.

FOR KIDS Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. See July 21 listing.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association Farmers’ Market features local produce, food vendors, meats, plant starts and flowers every week. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ arcataplaza.html. 441-9999. Kiwanis Club of Fortuna Pancake Breakfast. 7-11 a.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. Bring the kids and enjoy pancakes, sausage, coffee, milk and orange juice. Benefits local scholarships and youth activities. friendlyfortuna.com. Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown on site, local eggs and sourdough bread. Work from local artists and artisans. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See July 22 listing. Tansy Pull. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sinkyone Wilderness State Park, Briceland Road, Whitethorn. Help remove tansy ragwort. Tools and gloves provided. Bring water and a snack, and wear sturdy shoes and layers. Meet at the Jones Beach trailhead. Carpooling is recommended. Free. Michelle.Forys@ parks.ca.gov. sanctuaryforest.org/event/tansy-pull-in-sinkyone-wilderness/.

MEETINGS Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS Audubon Guided Birding Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet leader Kathryn Wendel at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) for incredible views of Humboldt Bay, easy to walk trails and a great diversity of birdlife. Let them know you plan to attend. Contact Ralph Bucher at thebook@reninet.com. Free. thebook@reninet.com. rras.org. FOAM Marsh Tour w/Paul Johnson. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Meet leader Johnson in the lobby of the Interpretive Center for a 90-minute, rain-or-shine walk focusing on plants, ecology and/or overlooked aspects of the marsh. Masks are recommended inside the building. Free. 826-2359. Guided Tour of Fort Humboldt State Historic Park. 1-2 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. Join interpreter William on an hour-long ADA-accessible walking tour of the 19th century military outpost, focusing on its history, Euro-American colonists and Indigenous people. Rain cancels. Check North Coast Redwoods Facebook page for updates. Free. facebook. com/NorthCoastRedwoods. Historic Old Town Eureka Tours. Noon-1:15 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Learn about the notable places and events that took place over the years. jthomas@ci.eureka.ca.gov. clarkemuseum.org. 441-4080. Seabirding Adventure by Kayak. 9 a.m.-noon. Trinidad, Downtown. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society and Kayak Trinidad in seeking out Marbled Murrelets, Pigeon Guillemots, Common Murres, Black Oystercatchers and more. All kayaks and gear provided. Reservations required. Email Andrew.RRAS@gmail.com. $109. Andrew.RRAS@gmail. com. rras.org. Wigi Wetlands Volunteer Workday. 9-11 a.m. Wigi Wetlands, Behind the Bayshore Mall, Eureka. Help create bird-friendly native habitat and restore a section of the bay trail by removing invasive plants and trash. Meet in the parking lot directly behind Walmart. Tools, gloves and snacks provided. Bring your own drinking water. Free. jeremy.cashen@yahoo.com. rras.org. 214-605-7368.

Tickets available online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 child (3-12). humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs. com. 840-5665. July Skate Night. 6:30-9 p.m. Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St. First-come, first-served. Limited to 75 participants. Open to all ages. $6 adult, $5 for ages 17 and under.

24 Sunday ART

Art Talk and Slideshow with Erin Lee Gafill. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Erin Gaffil shares stories and pictures from five generations of California family history, as well as tales of growing up in Big Sur at Nepenthe in the 1960s and ’70s. Gaffil’s exhibition “California Atmosphere” is on view at the MGMA through Sunday July 24. $5, $2 seniors/students/military, Free for members, children under 17, and families with EBT card. humboldtarts.org.

MOVIES Lilo & Stitch(2002). 5-7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 5 p.m. Movie at 6 p.m. Rated G. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-gaming in the lobby. $8, $12 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre. com. facebook.com/events/773192210715545. 613-3030.

MUSIC Always on Sunday. 12-5 p.m. Fieldbrook Winery, 4241 Fieldbrook Road. Enjoy live music starting at 1:30 p.m., woodfired pizzas, appetizers and salads, beer and wine available for purchase. Music by Canary and the Vamp. $5 entry, refundable toward any food item. fieldbrookwinery.com. Jazz Jam. 5 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Live jam. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. Summer Concert Series. 2-4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Enjoy live local bands and more. Free. arcatamainstreet@gmail.com. arcatamainstreet.com. 822-4500.

EVENTS Fortuna Redwood AutoXpo. City of Fortuna, Various city locations. See July 22 listing. Lost Coast Kennel Club Agility Trials. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See July 22 listing. Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

FOR KIDS

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Christmas in July Night. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs the Fairfield baseball team. Christmas in July night. Gates at 6 p.m.

Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


CALENDAR

Good food needs good leadership

Continued from previous page

H St., Arcata. See July 21 listing.

FOOD

Run for our

BOARD OF DIRECTORS!  Represent our thousands of members  Support our local food system  Provide direction by setting policies

Applications are available at Customer Service and our website www.northcoast.coop/elections

MEMBERS: Applications available NOW. Deadline to apply is August 3. r-owned grocery store ic, membe since n a g r o 1973 r u o Y

22

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Kiwanis Club of Fortuna Pancake Breakfast. 7-11 a.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. See July 23 listing.

Ave. See July 21 listing.

26 Tuesday ART

North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. See July 21 listing.

OUTDOORS

COMEDY

Guided Tour of Fort Humboldt State Historic Park. 1-2 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. See July 23 listing. Riparian Restoration at Freshwater Farms Reserve. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Help remove invasive plants along Freshwater Slough. Bring a water bottle, long pants/shirt, sunscreen, hat, closed-toed shoes and a jacket. Tools and lunch provided. Free. shannon.filbey@wildlife.ca.gov. 4062197186.

Escape From Eureka. 8 p.m.-midnight Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Open mic comedy. Signups at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Free. PearceHansen999@ outlook.com. (206) 348-9335.

SPORTS

Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. See July 21 listing.

Humboldt Crabs Tie-dye Sunday. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs the Fairfield baseball team, featuring the World Famous Crab Grass Band. Wear your tie-dye. Gates at 11:30 a.m. Tickets online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 child (3-12). humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs.com. 840-5665.

25 Monday ART

July/August Art Show. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Watercolor paintings and ceramic tiles by Jody Bryan are on display at the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. See July 21 listing. “RECLAIMED! Upcycled Art for Solidarity and Sustainability”. Brenda Tuxford Gallery, 627 Third St., Eureka. A new group exhibition of sustainably created artworks open now through July 31.

DANCE Obon Odori Class. 5 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See July 22 listing.

FOR KIDS Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. See July 21 listing.

FOOD Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See July 21 listing.

ETC Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email Julie at homeshare@a1aa.org for the link. Free. a1aa.org/ homesharing. 442-3763. Humboldt Bounskee League. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Weekly league nights. Purchase of any wood bounskee from Humbrews or the website includes one-month family membership for future events. All ages. Free. bounskee@gmail.com. bounskee.fun. 601-9492. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 22 listing.

MUSIC Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. See July 22 listing.

FOR KIDS FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets, Fortuna. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts, music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/fortuna.html. 441-9999. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Fresh local produce, eggs, bread, specialty sourdough donuts and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/oldtown. html. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh produce, flowers, plant starts and more. Live music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/sheltercove.html. 441-9999.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players. Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. $3-$8. 31for14@gmail.com. 599-4605.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs TKB Baseball, featuring the World Famous Crab Grass Band. Gates at 6 p.m. Tickets online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 child (3-12). humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs. com. 840-5665.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. 443- 5021. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 21 listing.

27 Wednesday ART

Figure Drawing. 6-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420


Once in a lifetime experiences, seven days a week E. California Ave., Arcata. $5. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. See July 21 listing.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Night: Tank Girl (1995). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 6 p.m. Free raffle at 7:15 p.m. Movie at 7:20 p.m. Rated R. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-gaming in the lobby. $5, $9 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ events/334700245501047. 613-3030.

MUSIC Bayside Ballads and Blues. 6-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Wednesday.

FOR KIDS Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. See July 21 listing. Storytime with Sunshine the Chicken and Ms. Sue. 1111:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. In-person stories and songs for preschool children and their caregivers. Masks are optional. Ms. Sue will be wearing one. Free. humboldtgov.org/calendar.aspx?EID=7463. 822-5954.

FOOD Food for People’s Free Produce Market - Fortuna. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. *Drive-thru & walk-up. Walk-ups enter from David Way. For more information, go to foodforpeople. org or call 445-3166.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See July 22 listing.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs TKB Baseball. Wine Wednesday! $1 off wine! Gates at 6pm. Tickets available online at humboldtcrabs.com or in person at Wildberries Marketplace. $10 Adult/$4 Child (3-12). humboldtcrabs@ gmail.com. humboldtcrabs.com. 840-5665.

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 22 listing. Trivia Night. Every other Wednesday, 6-8 p.m. The Madrone Taphouse, 421 Third St., Eureka. Reel Genius Trivia hosts. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. Free. reelgeniustrivia.com.

28 Thursday ART

North Coast Lens. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. See July 21 listing.

MUSIC Americana Music. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grind Cafe, 734 Fifth St., Eureka. See July 21 listing. Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. See July 21 listing. Outside Minds Concert Series. 7 p.m. Arcata Marsh Amphitheater, Butcher’s Slough, South G Street. See July

21 listing. Subhumans. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. World famous punk band Subhumans and Generacion Suicida. All ages. $20. PearceHansen999@ outlook.com. (206) 348-9335. Eureka Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See July 21 listing.

FOR KIDS Find Waldo in Arcata. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. See July 21 listing.

FOOD

Guided Whale & Wildlife Tours of Trinidad Bay On Site Rentals at Big Lagoon County Park Kayak Instruction & Rolling 707-329-0085 www.kayaktrinidad.com reservations@kayaktrinidad.com

Food for People’s Free Produce Market - Eureka. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Drive-thru event. For more information, go to foodforpeople.org or call 445-3166. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See July 21 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See July 21 listing. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See July 21 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. See July 21 listing.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 21 listing. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 21 listing.

NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS HAPPY HOUR: 4pm-5:30pm Daily $2 Pints | $2 off of Cocktails

708 9th Street, Arcata • On the Plaza within Hotel Arcata (707) 822-1414 • (707) 599-2909 • info@tomoarcata.com

HOURS: 4pm-8 pm Daily

ETC Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 21 listing.

Heads Up …

Ink People Center for the Arts calls for artists to submit work for the “Coffee House Moments,” exhibition at the Brenda Tuxford Gallery. Submit up to three artworks inspired by the ritual of coffee at inkpeopleinc.submittable. com/submit by Friday, July 22. Humboldt County Superior Court is accepting applications for service on the 2022-2023 Civil Grand Jury. Call 476-2475 to request an application, or visit humboldtgov.org and follow the Civil Grand Jury link to access an application. All Humboldt County women artists are invited to submit one piece of artwork for consideration to be included in the juried exhibition Celebrating 15 Years of the Ingrid Nickelsen Trust at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Entries will be accepted in-person at the Morris Graves Museum of Art on July 27 from noon to 5 p.m. Information at the Morris Graves Museum of Art and online at humboldtarts.org. Humboldt Light Opera Company invites anyone who has been in one of the company’s productions to participate in “49 Years of Musical Theater, Celebrating our Past, Creating our Future.” Visit hloc.org, scroll down on the home page, and follow the link to the “Revue Interest Form.” KEET-TV seeks a diverse group of individuals to join its Community Advisory Board. Meetings are held quarterly on Zoom. Go to KEET.org to find the link at the bottom of the page. Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org. l

STOP

Medicare Fraud

Empowering Seniors To Prevent Healthcare Fraud

Protect, Detect, Report! Call 1-855-613-7080 to report fraud. Thank you Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) counselors for helping people understand Medicare, the choices they have and the help that may be available. The Area 1 Agency on Aging’s HICAP group has estimated saving the communities of Humboldt and Del Norte nearly 1.5 million dollars in 2021.

Call your local Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) for help 1-800-434-0222 707-444-3000 333 J St. Eureka, CA 95501 www.a1aa.org northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


SCREENS

Crimes Fails to Captivate By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com

CRIMES OF THE FUTURE. I suspect the only people ambivalent about the work of David Cronenberg are those who have not seen it. For all the rest, he is a polarizing figure: either a loathsome degenerate or one of the most noteworthy creators working in the medium; OK, maybe both. Matters of taste aside, he remains one of the most significant voices in modern cinema and one of the — increasingly — rare few who, after making significant contributions to the color and shape of movies over the decades, continues to generate lively, distinctive work. As one of the originators of what would become known as “body horror,” Cronenberg has spent the better part of six decades exploring (perhaps more aptly dissecting) the human form, particularly as it relates to and is governed by some of the cruder, less-understood impulses of the brain and technology created thereby. He has simultaneously, through mastery of the form, elevated these explorations to high art, wherein lies the challenge (for some). He has cultivated a complete aesthetic, a finely controlled assemblage of casting, lighting, sound, camera placement/movement and editing, that is uniquely his own. So much so that his work, among only a handful of contemporaries, is recognizable within seconds, if not mere frames. Granted, those frames may well contain a bony, alien protuberance affixed to or at work on a human body; no fair cheating. Point being, Cronenberg is, was and will be an artist with something to say, even if the audience to which he says it diminishes with time. And so, to me, Crimes of the Future, his first feature since Maps to the Stars (2014), was required viewing and something I looked forward to. To backtrack, I probably first became aware of his work through references to Scanners (1981), most memorably in Wayne’s World (1992), which I’ll freely admit was a more significant influence on me at the time. But in fairly short order I be-

24

Does this light make my ears look big?

Crimes of the Future

came acquainted with his ingenious, deliriously disgusting version of The Fly (1986), a showcase for leads Geena Davis and Jeff Goldblum, as well as the goo and prostheses that partially define the Cronenberg canon. Meanwhile, I would catch fragments of his Naked Lunch (1993) adaptation on the Independent Film Channel and its perverse puppetry began to color my dreams. And then, of course, there was Crash (1996), which I watched at a particularly formative, probably problematic moment in my development. Since overshadowed by Paul Haggis’ misguided, tone-deaf, denigrated-in-hindsight Oscar winner of the same title, the first and only true Crash is an adaptation of JG Ballard as only Cronenberg could do it, exposing a visceral connection between machinery, injury and sexuality that must — or must not, depending on one’s sensitivities — be seen to be reckoned with. The following decade brought A History of Violence (2005) and Eastern Promises (2007), both bloody, bruising departures from the themes of Cronenberg’s earlier work but also appropriate, troubling, unsettlingly satisfying additions to his resume. Crimes of the Future marks something of a return to those earlier themes, harkening back especially to the medical grotesquerie and anachronistic futurism of Dead Ringers (1988). In a near future — parallel present, maybe, it’s hard to say — unknown influences have altered the course of human evolution. Pain is experienced only by a rare few, apparently only in sleep. Surgery has become a popular underground pastime occasionally elevated to performance. Oh, lest I forget, people tend to grow previously unseen organs

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

which, by rule of law, are removed and then cataloged by a government agency. Saul Tenser (Viggo Mortensen) and Caprice (Léa Seydoux) have become prominent figures in the scene, with her public removal of his tattooed innards an event breathlessly awaited by the faithful. Meanwhile, a fringe group prepares to make their particular brand of guided mutation known to the world, even as the powers that be encircle them. It would be unfair to call Crimes of the Future disappointing. It is exceptionally well-acted, with Kristen Steward doing especially amazing work as a weird, mousy sycophant. Howard Shore’s music is appropriately haunting and the Cronenberg trademarks are firmly in place. But the story — and perhaps it is a mistake to attach too much importance to it — seems underdeveloped. The central idea, the germ in the movie’s tissue, is fascinating but insufficiently explored to be captivating. R. 107M. AMAZON PRIME. ● John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

NOW PLAYING

THE BLACK PHONE. Blumhouse horror about an abducted boy (Mason Thames) aided by the spirits of his captor’s past victims. Starring Ethan Hawke in creepy late-period Johnny Depp drag. R. 102M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. ELVIS. Austin Butler and Tom Hanks in Baz Luhrmann’s musical biopic. PG13. 159M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

JURASSIC WORLD: DOMINION. Dinosaurs everywhere, I guess. Which is fine. Take the planet and good luck, Barney. PG13. 106M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. MARCEL THE SHELL WITH SHOES ON. A stop-motion animated shell wearing shoes goes on an adventure to find his family. PG. 90M. MINOR. MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU. Animated prequel with the chaotic little henchfolk. PG. 90M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. PAWS OF FURY. Animated samurai cats teach a dog new tricks. With Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Cera, Mel Brooks and Michelle Yeoh. PG 103M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. THOR: LOVE AND THUNDER. More Norse space-god action from the Marvel universe, with Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman doing couple-matchy capes. PG13. 119M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. TOP GUN: MAVERICK. Tom Cruise returns to the cockpit with a note-perfect work of pure energy that sidesteps thorny politics for the pure physicality and mental plasticity required of a modern fighter pilot. PG13. 137M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING. A girl who grew up alone in the swamp in North Carolina is embroiled in a murder. PG13. 125M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456.


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Week of July 21, 2022 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: To heal yourself, bestow two blessings, one on a human and one on an animal. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): You are entering the Season of Love’s Renewal. To celebrate, I offer you a poem by eighth-century Tamil poet Andal. Whatever gender you may be, I invite you to visualize yourself as the “Snakewaist woman” she addresses. Here’s Andal, bringing a fiery splash of exclamation points: “Arouse, Snakewaist woman! Strut your enchantment! Swoop your mirth and leap your spiral reverence! As wild peacocks shimmer and ramble and entice the lightning-nerved air! Summon thunderheads of your love! Command the sentient wind! Resurrect the flavor of eternal birth!” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Tips to get the most out of the next three weeks: 1. Work harder, last longer, and finish with more grace than everyone else. 2. Be in love with beauty. Crave it, surround yourself with it, and create it. Be especially enamored of beautiful things that are also useful. 3. Taste the mist, smell the clouds, kiss the music, praise the earth, and listen to the moon in the daytime sky. 4. Never stop building! Keep building and building and building: your joy, your security, your love, your beauty, your stamina, your sense of wonder. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini astrologer Astrolocherry says that while Geminis “can appear naive and air-headed to onlookers, their minds usually operate at light speed. They naturally absorb every surrounding particle of intellectual stimuli. They constantly observe their interactions for opportunities to grow their knowledge.” I believe these qualities will function at peak intensity during the next four weeks, Gemini—maybe even beyond peak intensity. Please try to enjoy the hell out of this phase without becoming manic or overwrought. If all goes well, you could learn more in the next four weeks than most people learn in four months. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Naeem Callaway founded Get Out The Box, an organization that mentors at-risk youth in low-income and rural communities. Here’s one of his central teachings: “Sometimes the smallest step in the right direction ends up being the biggest step of your life. Tiptoe if you must, but take the step.” Even if you don’t fit the profile of the people Callaway serves, his advice is perfect for you right now. For the time being, I urge you to shelve any plans you might have for grandiose actions. Focus on just one of the many possible tasks you could pursue and carry it out with determined focus. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A Leo astrologer I’ve known for years told me, “Here’s a secret about us Lions. No matter what happens, despite any pitfalls and pratfalls, my ego will stay intact. It ain’t gonna crack. You can hurl five lightning bolts’ worth of insults at my skull, and I will walk away without even a hint of a concussion. I believe in myself and worship myself, but even more importantly: I trust my own self-coherence like I trust the sun to shine.” Wow! That’s quite a testimony. I’m not sure I fully buy it, though. I have known a few Leos whose confidence wavered in the wake of a minor misstep. But here’s the point of my horoscope: I encourage you to allow a slight ego deflation in the coming days. If you do, I believe it will generate a major blossoming of your ego by August. And that would be a very good thing. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo poet Claude de Burine described how one night when she was three years old, she sneaked out of the house with her parents’ champagne bucket so she could fill it up with moonlight. I think activities like this will be a worthy pursuit for you in the coming days. You’re entering a favorable phase to go in quest of lyrical, fanciful experiences. I hope you will make yourself available for marvels and curiosities and fun surprises.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): There is a distinction between being nice and being kind. Being nice is often motivated by mechanical politeness, by a habit-bound drive to appear pleasant. It may be rooted more in a desire to be liked than in an authentic urge to bestow blessings. On the other hand, being kind is a sincere expression of care and concern for another. It fosters genuine intimacy. I bring these thoughts to your attention because I think that one of Libra’s life-long tasks is to master the art of being kind rather than merely nice. And right now is an especially favorable phase for you to refine your practice. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You sometimes feel you have to tone down your smoldering intensity, avert your dark-star gazes, conceal your sultry charisma, dumb down your persuasive speech, pretend you don’t have so much stamina, disguise your awareness of supernatural connections, act less like a saint and martyr in your zealous devotions, and refrain from revealing your skill at reading between the lines. But none of that avoidance stuff usually works very well. The Real You leaks out into view. In the coming weeks, I hope you won’t engage in any of the hiding behavior I described. It’s a favorable time to freely pour forth your Scorpionic blessings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There could be interesting and important events happening while you sleep in the coming nights. If a butterfly lands on you in a dream, it may mean you’re prepping for a spiritual transformation in waking life. It could be a sign you’re receptive to a breakthrough insight you weren’t previously open to. If you dream of a baby animal, it might signify you’re ready to welcome a rebirth of a part of you that has been dormant or sluggish or unavailable. Dreams in which you’re flying suggest you may soon escape a sense of heaviness or inertia. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): How to be the best Capricorn you can be in the coming weeks and months: 1. Develop a disciplined, well-planned strategy to achieve more freedom. 2. Keep clambering upwards even if you have no competitors and there’s no one else at the top. 3. Loosen your firm grasp and steely resolve just enough so you can allow the world to enjoy you. 4. Don’t let the people you love ever think you take them for granted. 5. Be younger today than you were yesterday. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the next seven to eight weeks, I’d love for you to embody an attitude about intimacy articulated by author Hélène Cixous. Here’s her aspiration: “I want to love a person freely, including all her secrets. I want to love in this person someone she doesn’t know. I want to love without judgment, without fault. Without false, without true. I want to meet her between the words, beneath language.” And yes, dear Aquarius, I know this is a monumental undertaking. If it appeals to you at all, just do the best you can to incorporate it. Perfection isn’t required. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I periodically consult a doctor of Chinese Medicine who tells me that one of the best things I can do for my health is to walk barefoot—EVERYWHERE! On the sidewalk, through buildings, and especially in the woods and natural areas. He says that being in direct contact with our beloved earth can provide me with energetic nourishment not possible any other way. I have resisted the doc’s advice so far. It would take the soles of my feet a while to get accustomed to the wear and tear of barefoot walking. I bring this up, Pisces, because the coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to try what I haven’t yet. In fact, anything you do to deepen your connection with the earth will be extra healing. I invite you to lie in the sand, hug trees, converse with birds, shout prayers to mountains, and bathe in rivers or lakes. l

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BEGINNING STEEL DRUM CLASSES Mondays 6:15− 7:15. Next sessions starting Sept. 5th. Fridays 1:30−3 ongoing monthly classes. 707−407−8998 panartsnetwork.com Classes held at Pan Arts: 1049 Samoa Blvd #C in Arcata DANCE MIX FRIDAYS: 15 routines per class to upbeat eclectic music. Latin, hip−hop, indie, pop, jazz, country, throwbacks... Drop−ins welcome. Fridays 10−11 am Redwood Raks/Creamery 824 L St, Arcata $0−5 Questions? eweiss707@gmail.com

SAMBA DA ALEGRIA PARADE DANCE CLASSES Thurs 5:30−7PM. Jul/14−Sep/15. Redwood Raks. Everyone welcome! alegriaparade@gmail.com.

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1229)

Kids & Teens 22ND ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP Water enthusiasts of ALL levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skills necessary for all types of wave riding & SURFING while being immersed in JUNIOR LIFEGUARD water safety, surf etiquette, beach & ocean awareness. Lead by former Cali− fornia State Lifeguard & school teacher along w/ male & female instructors. Where: Moonstone Beach Ages: 8 and up When: 5 sessions: June 20−24, July 5−8, July 18−22, Aug 1−5 & Aug 8−12 It’s Barrels of Fun! Cost: $200 Contact: (707) 822−5099 Website: www.moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com SUMMER ROWING WITH HUMBOLDT BAY ROWING ASSOCIATION New Junior Rowers (ages 12−18) are welcome at our 2−week sessions begin− ning July 11 and August 1. Meet 4−6 pm Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. For more information: 707 267−7976 HumboldtBayRowingAssoc@gmail.com www.hbra.org

50 and Better BACK TO CAMP: LIFELONG LEARNING IN THE REDWOODS WITH OLLI AT HUMBOLDT, AUG. 1− 5: Come back to camp at the Wolf Creek Educa− tion Center for a five−day personalized education and camping experience designed for OLLI members. Between a variety of classes, activities may include walking in Fern Canyon, visiting waterfalls, viewing rock formations, and possible elk sightings. OLLI members can go "back to camp" overnight, or choose a day or half−day to spend at camp. See details, register, and renew/join OLLI at humboldt.edu/olli/camp

TAKE A CLASS WITH OLLI. Anyone can take an OLLI class. Join OLLI today and get the member discount on classes. Non−members add $25 to the class fee listed. https://extended.humboldt.edu/ olli/olli−upcoming−courses (O−1229)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1229) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1229)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1229) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1229)

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format. Visit https://w ww.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/ 17724/ArticleID/4916/Additional−Online−Classes BEGINNING BOOKKEEPING August 16− September 27, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. CANNABIS BUSINESS TRAINING Online July 13 − Oct. 26, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

HOME INSPECTION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/6231/Home− Inspection−Certification−Program INTERMEDIATE BOOKKEEPING October 4 − November 22, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. REAL ESTATE PROGRAM FACE TO FACE Starts October 3, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC LIVING SCHOOL TRAININGS w/Traci Webb & Guests. Ayurveda Health & Life Coach/ Practitioner Training starts 1/11/23, Ayurveda Herbalist Training starts 2/21/23. Seasonal Self− Care Retreats: 6/24 & 9/30, Seasonal Detoxes: July 12−26 & Oct. 4−18, Herbal Remedies Making Immer− sions: 7/10 & 9/25, www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0930)

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CROSSWORD 1

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By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

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Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) would have enjoyed the young (astronomical) Kant more than the old (philosophical) Kant.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

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1. Insult, informally 4. Suffix with north or south 7. Doomed to fail, for short 10. Pay with a chipbased credit card, perhaps 13. Price hike: Abbr. 15. Grp. that might hold a raffle 16. “There you have it!” 18. Texas ballplayer, for short 19. [Circled letters] 1983 hit for Quiet Riot 21. [Circled letters] 1972 hit for Elton John 23. Female warrior in a Disney movie 24. ____ Lanka 25. %: Abbr. 28. Org. founded in 1913 by B’nai B’rith 29. Part of an Insta Story, perhaps

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32. Worth something 36. CNN announcement 40. Change what a file is called, say 41. [Circled letters] 1992 hit for Naughty by Nature 43. Component of an Arnold Palmer 45. Trunks 48. He partnered with Bear in 1923 50. RR stop 51. “Yabba dabba ____!” 52. Communication syst. in “CODA” 53. Sch. whose yearbook is the “Gumbo” 56. Word before “Puffs” or “Krispies” 58. [Circled letters] 1976 hit for Parliament 63. [Circled letters] 1994 hit for Alan Jackson 66. “Love & Basketball” actor Omar 67. Poet/playwright

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

Brecht 68. Ref. that added “essential worker” in 2021: Abbr. 69. 1003, in old Rome 70. Spanish Mrs. 71. To the ____ degree 72. Baseball Hall of Famer ____ Wee Reese 73. Hibernation spot

11. Cockpit abbr. 12. Tuba sound 14. Almond ____ (toffee brand) 17. Wine barrel material 20. ____ Lingus (carrier to Dublin) 22. Theoretically 25. Served as matchmaker 26. Summa ____ laude 27. Simple top 30. Congresswoman Omar DOWN 1. Sony audio product 31. Boardroom VIP 33. Phony persona unveiled in 1984 2. Ruin a private moment 34. Luxury Italian fashion label 3. Mouse feature 35. Med school subj. 4. Rap duo with the 1992 hit “Crossover” 37. ____ spell (rest) 38. Dashboard reading, 5. East Coast hwy. for short 6. Wash. baseballers 39. “____ Carter V” 7. Texas border city (2018 Lil Wayne 8. Roman emperor after album) Galba 42. Sue Grafton’s “____ 9. Opposite of sans for Outlaw” 10. “____ death do us 43. “Patience ____ part”

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO FETCH O G E E M I N E V E R T S

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1750 book An Original Theory, or New Hypothesis of the Universe by Thomas Wright, an English sailor and surveyor who’d turned his attention to the heavens. Wright was actually more interested in the religious overtones of his various models of the universe — where God’s throne was located and where Hell is — than in serious cosmology. Serendipitously, the review distorted his ideas, so what Kant saw wasn’t quite what Wright proposed, but was closer to what we now know to be true: The reason we see the Milky Way as a ghostly band across the night sky is that our galaxy is a flattened disc of stars, of which our sun is one of many. When we look into the plane of the disc, we see many stars, i.e. the Milky Way. When we look perpendicularly to the disc, we see comparatively few. Kant reasoned that if such a body were seen from afar, it would appear either “as a patch of space whose figure will be circular if its plane is presented directly to the eye, and elliptical if it is seen from the side or obliquely.” The latter, he theorized, was the case with the Andromeda nebula (our closest large neighboring galaxy, just visible with the naked eye), which was “nothing else than a mass of many fixed stars.” It was faint because of its distance, he correctly surmised. That is, Andromeda is a distant replica of our own Milky Way, an island universe in its own right and perhaps one of many. The quotes are taken from Kant’s book Universal Natural History and Theory of the Heavens, published in 1755. Nearly 100 years later, William Parsons’ sketch of the Whirlpool Galaxy would be the first direct confirmation of Kant’s speculations, as we’ll see next week. l

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Located west of Dublin, Ireland, the Birr Leviathan was the world’s largest telescope from 1845 to 1917. Its designer, William Parsons (standing by the eyepiece) made the first observation of “spirality” in a nebula in April 1848, thus giving birth to cosmology as an empirical science. Image via the National Library of Ireland

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f historians ever assign a date to our species coming of age, cosmologically speaking, my vote would be April 26, 1848. On that night, Parsons wrote in his notebook: “6-feet instrument. Saw the spirality of the principal nucleus very plainly; saw also spiral arrangement in the smaller nucleus.” He was referring to M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, a favorite target of amateur astronomers. It lies just below the end of the Big Dipper’s handle. This was the first time that a so-called nebula — one of hundreds of fuzzy “clouds” that share the night sky with pinpoints of stars — was resolved into a spiral structure. As he later wrote, per the lead quote, this was “unlike anything … in our system.” Our system being the Milky Way, with the implication that what he saw (and drew) must be outside and separate from our home galaxy. Astronomers of his age had barely come to terms with the fact that our sun was one of uncountable other stars that together make up the Milky Way, so the idea that our galaxy was but one of many was almost impossible to conceive. Almost. A couple of far-sighted thinkers had speculated on this idea nearly a century before Parsons’ breakthrough observation of another “island universe.” That catchy phrase originated with German philosopher Immanuel Kant nearly 100 years earlier, long before he turned his attention to the weighty matters of rationalism and empiricism. The youthful Kant read, in a Hamburg journal, a review of the

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“We thus observe, that with each successive increase of optical power, the structure has become more complicated and more unlike anything which we could picture to ourselves as the result of any form of dynamical law, of which we find a counterpart in our [Milky Way] system.” — William Parsons, Third Earl of Rosse, on the Whirlpool Galaxy

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virtue” 44. Pennies: Abbr. 46. Chocolate-coated marshmallow sandwich 47. Penetrates fully 49. Nancy Drew, for one 54. Early riser? 55. “Gimme a high five!” 57. “Is it just me or are there other anagrams ____” (groan-worthy quip) 58. Understand 59. App symbol 60. V, in physics 61. Branch headquarters? 62. Jekyll’s counterpart 63. “Pygmalion” author’s monogram 64. “____ the ramparts ... “ 65. Grp. opposed by Everytown for Gun Safety

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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Island Universes, Part 1

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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©2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Jeanne Laverne Perkins CASE NO. PR2200207 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Jeanne Laverne Perkins A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Douglas L. Wilson In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Douglas L. Wilson be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on August 11, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.

fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Thomas B. Hjerpe, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Deolinda Marie Watson CASE NO. PR2200199 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Deolinda Marie Watson A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Linda Marie Meng In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Linda Marie Meng be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on August 4, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California

the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 7/14, 7/21, 7/28 (22−292)

TSG No.: 8774585 TS No.: CA2200287316 APN: 522-432012-000 Property Address: 57 TREE TOP LANE WILLOW CREEK, CA 95573 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/07/2016. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 07/27/2022 at 11:00 A.M., First American Title Insurance Company, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 11/10/2016, as Instrument No. 2016−021378, in book , page , , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of HUMBOLDT County, State of California. Executed by: ALYSSA K. COOKE A SINGLE WOMAN, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) At the front entrance to the County Courthouse at 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST APN# 522−432−012− 000 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 57 TREE TOP LANE, WILLOW CREEK, CA 95573 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of

http://search.nationwideposting.co WILLOW CREEK, CA 95573 The m/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using undersigned Trustee disclaims any the file number assigned to this liability for any incorrectness of the case CA2200287316 Information street address and other common about postponements that are very designation, if any, shown herein. short in duration or that occur Said sale will be made, but without close in time to the scheduled sale covenant or warranty, expressed or may not immediately be reflected implied, regarding title, possession, in the telephone information or on or encumbrances, to pay the the Internet Website. The best way remaining principal sum of the to verify postponement informa− note(s) secured by said Deed of tion is to attend the scheduled sale. Trust, with interest thereon, as NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have provided in said note(s), advances, a right to purchase this property under the terms of said Deed of after the trustee auction if Trust, fees, charges and expenses of conducted after January 1, 2021, the Trustee and of the trusts pursuant to Section 2924m of the created by said Deed of Trust. The California Civil Code. If you are an total amount of the unpaid balance "eligible tenant buyer," you can of the obligation secured by the purchase the property if you property to be sold and reasonable match the last and highest bid estimated costs, expenses and placed at the trustee auction. If you advances at the time of the initial are an "eligible bidder," you may be publication of the Notice of Sale is able to purchase the property if $ 268,025.53. The beneficiary you exceed the last and highest bid under said Deed of Trust has placed at the trustee auction. There deposited all documents are three steps to exercising this evidencing the obligations secured right of purchase. First, 48 hours by the Deed of Trust and has after the date of the trustee sale, declared all sums secured thereby you can call (916)939−0772, or visit immediately due and payable, and this internet website http://search has caused a written Notice of .nationwideposting.com/propertyS Default and Election to Sell to be earchTerms.aspx, using the file executed. The undersigned caused number assigned to this case said Notice of Default and Election CA2200287316 to find the date on to Sell to be recorded in the which the trustee’s sale was held, County where the real property is the amount of the last and highest located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL bid, and the address of the trustee. BIDDERS: If you are considering Second, you must send a written bidding on this property lien, you notice of intent to place a bid so should understand that there are that the trustee receives it no more risks involved in bidding at a trustee than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. auction. You will be bidding on a Third, you must submit a bid, by lien, not on the property itself. remitting the funds and affidavit Placing the highest bid at a trustee described in Section 2924m(c) of auction does not automatically the Civil Code, so that the trustee entitle you to free and clear owner− receives it no more than 45 days ship of the property. You should after the trustee’s sale. If you think also be aware that the lien being you may qualify as an "eligible auctioned off may be a junior lien. tenant buyer" or "eligible bidder," If you are the highest bidder at the you should consider contacting an auction, you are or may be respon− attorney or appropriate real estate sible for paying off all liens senior professional immediately for advice to the lien being auctioned off, regarding this potential right to before you can receive clear title to purchase. If the sale is set aside for the property. You are encouraged any reason, the Purchaser at the to investigate the existence, sale shall be entitled only to a priority, and size of outstanding return of the deposit paid. The liens that may exist on this prop− Purchaser shall have no further erty by contacting the county recourse against the Mortgagor, the recorder’s office or a title insur− Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s ance company, either of which may attorney. Date: First American Title charge you a fee for this informa− Insurance Company 4795 Regent tion. If you consult either of these Blvd, Mail Code 1011−F Irving, TX resources, you should be aware 75063 First American Title Insurance that the same lender may hold Company MAY BE ACTING AS A more than one mortgage or deed DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO of trust on the property. NOTICE COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMA− TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale TION OBTAINED MAY BE USED date shown on this notice of sale FOR THAT PURPOSE FOR TRUSTEES may be postponed one or more SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL times by the mortgagee, benefi− (916)939−0772NPP0413094 To: ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant NORTH COAST JOURNAL 07/07/ to Section 2924g of the California 2022, 07/14/2022, 07/21/2022 Civil Code. The law requires that (22−286) information about trustee sale postponements be made available City of Ferndale to you and to the public, as a cour− The City of Ferndale is accepting tesy to those not present at the bids for their California Street sale. If you wish to learn whether Sewer Replacement Project. The your sale date has been postponed, scope of work includes replacing an and if applicable, the rescheduled existing sewer with 1,210−feet of 12− time and date for the sale of this inch sewer line. Sewer laterals are property, you may call (916)939− to be reconnected to the sewer, 0772 or visit this internet website the manhole at California and Van http://search.nationwideposting.co Ness is to be replaced with a m/propertySearchTerms.aspx, using manhole 1.8−feet deeper Two the file number assigned to this culverts may impede construction. case CA2200287316 Information The engineer’s estimate for the about postponements that are very project is $295,000. Bids are to be short in duration or that occur submitted by August 5th at 3:00 PM close in time to the scheduled sale where a public sealed bid opening may not immediately be reflected northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, will be held. Bid documents are2022 • in the telephone information or on available form the Humboldt the Internet Website. The best way Builder’s exchange or from the to verify postponement informa− engineer at tion is to attend the scheduled sale.

the manhole at California and Van Ness is to be replaced with a manhole 1.8−feet deeper Two culverts may impede construction. on next TheContinued engineer’s estimate forpage the » project is $295,000. Bids are to be submitted by August 5th at 3:00 PM where a public sealed bid opening will be held. Bid documents are available form the Humboldt Builder’s exchange or from the engineer at lostcoastengineering@gmail.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00391 The following person is doing Busi− ness as The Thrifty Boutique Humboldt 979 Myrtle Ave Eureka, CA 95501 4298 Pimlico Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 Filomena M Jarvis 4298 Pimlico Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 07, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−281)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00395 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BioMechanique Humboldt 735 12th St. Arcata, CA 95521 3300 Broadway St. Ste 502 #2006 Eureka, CA 95501 Desiree E. Plaisance 1403 E Street #4 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Desiree E. Plaisance, Sole Propri− etor This June 07, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/7, 7/14, 7/21, 7/28 (22−284)

NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


Hounds of Humboldt

LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00398

Humboldt 337 Shamrock Lane Unit C Blue Lake, CA 95525 1326 Lynnea Court Mckinleyville, CA 95519

The following person is doing Busi− ness as C I F R A Associates

Gloria K Baker 337 Shamrock Lane Unit C Blue Lake, CA 95525

Humboldt 1625 15th St. Euerka, CA 95501 PO Box 5960 Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gloria Baker, Owner This June 14, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

Stephen W Lunt 1625 15th St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stephen W Lunt, Principal This June 10, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 7/7, 7/14, 7/21, 7/28 (22−285)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00403 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Eureka Spice Humboldt 1005 E St, Unit D Eureka, CA 95501 Shay Konradsdottir 1005 E St., Unit D Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 14, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00415

28

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00428 The following person is doing Busi− ness as JLM Freedom Electric Humboldt 1005 Tim Mullen Rd. Kneeland, CA 95549 Jason Lee Mayhorn 1005 Tim Mullen Rd. Kneeland, CA 95549

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Bandera USA

Humboldt 1400 Table Bluff Rd Loleta, CA 95551 1177 Table Bluff Rd Loleta, CA 95551

Humboldt 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540

Jamie L. Christensen 1177 Table Bluff Rd Loleta, CA 95551

Lloyd F Julien 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540 Donna R Julien 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jason Mayhorn, Owner This June 028, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

7/14, 7/21, 7/28, 8/4 (22−293)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00410

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 21, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−279)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00414 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Lost Coast Maintenance Humboldt 3253 Trinity St. Fortuna, CA 95540

6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−276)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00416

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00442 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Problem Solving Applications/ PSA Computer Services/PSA Humboldt 94 Painter St. Rio Dell, CA 95562 PO Box 2 Rio Dell, CA 95562

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Lively Up!

Billy J Long 94 Painter St. Rio Dell, CA 95562

Humboldt 100 Ericson Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 P.O. Box 5 Hydesville, CA 95547

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Billy Joe Long, Owner/Operator This July 07, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

Kelly M Mallet 199 Chuck Hole Rd. Hydesville, CA 95547

The business is conducted by an Individual. Smithie J Richardson Jr The date registrant commenced to 3253 Trinity St transact business under the ficti− Fortuna, CA 95540 tious business name or name listed Humboldt Regina L Richardson above on Not Applicable. 337 Shamrock Lane Unit C 3253 Trinity St I declare that all information in this Blue Lake, CA 95525 Fortuna, CA 95540 statement is true and correct. 1326 Lynnea Court A registrant who declares as true Mckinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by a any material matter pursuant to Married Couple. Section 17913 of the Business and NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com Gloria K Baker The date registrant commenced to Professions Code that the regis− 337 Shamrock Lane Unit C transact business under the ficti− trant knows to be false is guilty of a Blue Lake, CA 95525 tious business name or name listed misdemeanor punishable by a fine The following person is doing Busi− ness as Hounds of Humboldt

The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kelly M Mallet, Owner This June 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Get Nailed

6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−277)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00405

Smithie J Richardson Jr 3253 Trinity St Fortuna, CA 95540 Regina L Richardson 3253 Trinity St Fortuna, CA 95540

7/14, 7/21, 7/28, 8/4 (22−291)

Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Billy Joe Long, Owner/Operator This July 07, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 7/14, 7/21, 7/28, 8/4 (22−291)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00450 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Peony Landscaping Humboldt 81 Church St. Loleta, CA 95551 PO Box 530 Loleta, CA 95551 Pamela K Berti 81 Church St. Loleta, CA 95551 Emily R Fisher 81 Church St. Loleta, CA 95551 The business is conducted by Copartners. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Emily Fisher, Copartner This July 08, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00459 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Carlotta Custom Saddles & Tack Humboldt 312 Vance Mansion Road Carlotta, CA 95528 PO Box 275 Carlotta, CA 95528 Jeremy A Lozensky 312 Vance Mansion Road Carlotta, CA 95528 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME ($1,000). STATEMENT 22−00468 /s Jeremy A Lozensky, Owner The following person is doing Busi− This July 13, 2022 ness asE. SANDERS KELLY Riverbend Sciences by tn, Humboldt County Clerk Humboldt 1614 West Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 1614 West Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 Joshua Eli Asarian 1614 West Ave. Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed 7/21, 7/28, 8/4, 8/11 (22−295) above on Not Applicable. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME I declare that all information in this STATEMENT 22−00459 statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true The following person is doing Busi− any material matter pursuant to ness as Section 17913 of the Business and Carlotta Custom Saddles & Tack Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a Humboldt misdemeanor punishable by a fine 312 Vance Mansion Road not to exceed one thousand dollars Carlotta, CA 95528 ($1,000). PO Box 275 NOTICE /sLEGAL Joshua Eli Asarian, Owner Carlotta, CA 95528CITY OF FORTUNA — NOTICE TO BIDDERS This July 18, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS Jeremy A Lozensky Sealed quotes for purchase of approximately 55 (fifty five) MBF of tn, Humboldt Clerk 312redwood Vance Mansion Roadand 10 (ten) MBFbyDoug timber MBF fir, will beCounty received at the Carlotta, CA 95528 office of the City Manager, 621 11th Street Fortuna, California, 95540 until p.m. on WednesdaybyJuly The4:30 business is conducted an 27, 2022 at which time they will be publicly opened and read: Individual. The date to The registrant successfulcommenced purchaser shall: transact business under the ficti− Purchasename 55 MBF of redwood tious •business or name listed timber; and or 10 MBF of Douglas above on Applicable. fir; Not harvested from a 75 year old stand of timber from the Vancil I declare that all Parcel, information in this Reservoir APN #200-084-12 statement is true and correct. • Each sealed envelope a quote must be plainly marked A registrant who declares ascontaining true on thematter outsidepursuant as “VANCIL any material to TIMBER SALE BID 2022.” Specifications beofobtained from the Sectionmay 17913 the Business andCity Manager’s Office (Buffy Gray Senior Professions Code thatAssistant the regis−707 725-1411), 621 11th Street, Fortuna, CA. Administrative trant knows be City falsereserves is guiltythe of aright to reject any and all quotes. 95540.toThe misdemeanor punishable by a fine make one an appointment for a “field show-me” contact BBW & Asnot toToexceed thousand dollars sociates (707) 825-0475 (office), (707) 845-5804 (cell) or email jmgerstein@ ($1,000). /s bbwassociates.com Jeremy A Lozensky,and Owner mandre@bbwassociates.com This July 13, 2022 & Associates KELLYBBW E. SANDERS 702, Arcata, CAClerk 95518 by tn,POB Humboldt County


statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Joshua Eli Asarian, Owner This July 18, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Alyssa Leigh Brown CASE NO. CV2200974 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Alyssa Leigh Brown for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Alyssa Leigh Brown to Proposed Name Zayleigh Zamure

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 2, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 13, 2022 Filed: July 13, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to UTILITIES COMMISSION CALIFORNIA PUBLIC show cause why the petition should TO ADOPT AN INITIAL notNOTICE be granted. If no written objec−STUDY/MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLAINDIAN tionRATION/BUREAU is timely filed, theOF court may AFFAIRS NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ANthe ENVIRONMENTAL FOR THE KLAMATH RIVER RURAL grant petition withoutASSESSMENT a BROADBAND INITIATIVE PROJECT hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Notice is hereby given that the California Public Utilities Commission Date: September 2, 2022 (CPUC) and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) have prepared a joint Initial Study/ Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. Declaration/Environmental 4 Mitigated Negative Assessment (IS/MND/EA) Forfor information on how appear the Klamath River to Rural Broadband Project (Project) that meets the remotely for your hearing, please California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and National Environmental visit Policy Act (NEPA) requirements. The CPUC has released a Notice of Intent https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/(NOI) to adopt an Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration for the Project, located SUPERIOR COURT in rural Humboldt County. The BIA is serving as the federal agency for the purposes of NEPA environmental review. The proposed OFlead CALIFORNIA, Project OF would comprise installation of a “middle-mile” fiber optic network COUNTY HUMBOLDT well asSTREET “last- mile” wireless broadband networks to provide high-speed 825asFIFTH internetCAaccess EUREKA, 95501to first responder agencies, anchor institutions, households Date: 13, 2022in the towns of Orick, Orleans, Johnsons, Wautec, Weitchpec andJuly businesses Filed: 2022 unserved or underserved with internet access. The Project thatJuly are 13, currently /s/would Timothy A. Canning extend 104 miles and consists of above-ground and underground Judge of the Superior installation of fiber Court optic cables, a wireless tower in the town of Orick, a signal connection in Orleans, and placement of “last-mile” fiber cable and associated structures. The IS/MND/EA evaluates potential direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of the construction, operation, and maintenance of the proposed Project. The public review and comment period begins on June 24, 2022 and ends July 25, 2022 The Final IS/MND/EA will incorporate written input received during the 30-day public comment period. The Draft IS/MND/EA is available for public review by request at the McKinleyville Library: 1606 Pickett Rd. in McKinleyville. The Draft IS/MND/EA may also be viewed online on the CPUC’s website for the Project at: https://ia.cpuc. ca.gov/environment/info/esa/klamath/index.html. The Project’s website provides access to public documents and information pertaining to the environmental review process for the proposed Project. Comments may be submitted in writing by mail to: CPUC, c/o ESA, attn. Maria Hensel/ Klamath 1425 North McDowell Blvd., Suite 200, Petaluma, CA 94954; or by email to KlamathBroadbandCEQA@esassoc.com

LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314

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NOTICE TO BIDDERS CONTRACTOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR: COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS RE-ENTRY RESOURCE CENTER PROJECT PROJECT #170223 Notice is hereby given that the County of Humboldt (COUNTY) has determined that all bidders on the Community Corrections Re-Entry Resource Project (Project #170223) to be undertaken by the COUNTY must be pre-qualified prior to submitting a bid on that project. The current estimate for the Project is approximately $22,750,000. No bid will be accepted from a Contractor that has failed to comply with the requirements of this NOTICE TO BIDDERS. Please note: Due to an extended review period for the construction documents, the list of prequalified contractors for this project from September of 2021 will expire prior to approval for bidding. Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 20101(c), prequalification shall be valid for one calendar year following the date of initial prequalification. As a result, the County is releasing this revised prequalification packet to refresh the list of prequalified contractors. All interested contractors, including those on the expiring prequalification list, are required to resubmit a prequalification packet for scoring and evaluation if they are interested in bidding on the project. Copies of the Contractor Prequalification Packet for the Community Corrections Re-Entry Resource Project, #170223 are available for download from the County’s website at: https://humboldtgov.org/Bids.aspx. Contractors are responsible for monitoring this website for addendums to the Prequalification Package and answers to timely submitted questions. The Prequalification Package may also be seen at Humboldt County Department of Public Works, 1106 Second Street, Eureka, California. The COUNTY makes no guarantees and assumes no responsibility for information obtained from and errors that may exist in copies of the Prequalification Package retrieved from any other source. Contractors shall possess a California Class B license to bid as the Prime Contractor on this project. It is mandatory that all Contractors who intend to submit a bid, fully complete the Application for Prequalification (included in this Prequalification Packet), provide all materials requested therein, and be approved by the County of Humboldt to be on the final pre-qualified bidders list. No bid will be accepted from a Contractor that has failed to comply with these requirements. If two or more business entities submit a bid as part of a Joint Venture or expect to submit a bid as part of a Joint Venture, each entity within the Joint Venture must be separately qualified to bid. The last date to submit a fully completed questionnaire is 5:00 p.m. on August 11th, 2022 (8/11/22). Contractors are encouraged to submit their completed Application for Prequalification as soon as possible to allow the COUNTY, at their sole discretion, to notify Contractors of omissions of information to be remedied, and notify Contractors of their pre-qualification status in advance of the bid advertisement for this project. Answers to questions contained in the attached questionnaire, information about current bonding capacity, notarized statement from surety, and the most recent reviewed or audited financial statements, with accompanying notes and supplemental information, are required. The COUNTY will use these documents as the basis of rating Contractors in respect to the size and scope of contracts upon which each Contractor is qualified to bid. The COUNTY reserves the right to check other sources available. The County of Humboldt’s decision will be based on objective evaluation criteria. The COUNTY reserves the right to adjust, increase, limit, suspend or rescind the pre-qualification rating based on subsequently learned information. Contractors whose rating changes sufficient to disqualify them will be notified and given an opportunity for a hearing consistent with the hearing procedures described below for appealing a pre-qualification rating. While it is the intent of the pre-qualification questionnaire and documents required therewith to assist the County of Humboldt in determining bidder responsibility prior to bid and to aid the COUNTY in selecting the lowest responsible bidder, neither the fact of pre-qualification, nor any prequalification rating, will preclude the COUNTY from a post-bid consideration and determination of whether a bidder has the quality, fitness, capacity and experience to satisfactorily perform the proposed work, and has demonstrated the requisite trustworthiness. One original and 3 copies of the Application for Prequalification shall be submitted to the address below. Digital copies and electronic submissions via email will not be accepted. The pre-qualification applications should be submitted under seal and marked “CONFIDENTIAL: PREQUALIFICATION SUBMITTAL PACKAGE FOR PROJECT #170223 – TIME SENSITIVE” to: Humboldt County Department of Public Works Attn: Thomas K. Mattson, Director 1106 Second Street Eureka, CA 95501

The pre-qualification applications (questionnaire answers and financial statements) submitted by Contractors are not public records and are not open to public inspection or public review. All information provided will be kept confidential to the extent permitted by law. However, the contents may be disclosed to third parties for purpose of verification, or investigation of substantial allegations, or in the appeal hearing. State law requires that the names of contractors applying for pre-qualification status shall be public records subject to disclosure, and the first page of the questionnaire will be used for that purpose. Each questionnaire must be signed under penalty of perjury in the manner designated at the end of the form, by an individual who has the legal authority to bind the Contractor on whose behalf that person is signing. If any information provided by a Contractor becomes inaccurate, it is the Contractor’s responsibility to immediately notify the COUNTY and provide updated accurate information in writing, under penalty of perjury. Any information that is determined to be incorrect will lead to disqualification of Contractor before or after bidding. The COUNTY reserves the right to waive minor irregularities and incidental omissions in the information contained in the pre-qualification application submitted. The COUNTY also reserves the right to make all final determinations, and to determine at any time that the pre-qualification procedures will not necessarily be applied to future public works projects. Contractors may submit completed Applications for Prequalification via mail or delivery service during regular working hours on any day that the offices of the Humboldt County Department of Public Works is open, to the address above. Contractors who submit a complete Application for Prequalification will be notified of their qualification status no later than ten (10) calendar days after receipt by the COUNTY. The COUNTY may refuse to grant pre-qualification where the requested information and materials are not provided, or not provided by 5:00 p.m. on August 11th, 2022 (8/11/22). There is no appeal from a refusal for an incomplete or late application, but re-application for a later project will be permitted. The closing time for bids or the acceptance of bids will not be changed in order to accommodate supplementation of incomplete submissions, or late submissions. Where a timely and completed application results in a rating below that necessary to pre-qualify, an appeal can be made. An appeal is begun by the Contractor delivering notice to the County of Humboldt of its appeal of the decision with respect to its pre-qualification rating, no later than 5:00 pm on the fifth calendar day following the day on which the notice of prequalification determination. Without a timely appeal, the Contractor waives any and all rights to challenge the decision of the County of Humboldt, whether by administrative process, judicial process or any other legal process or proceeding. Upon notice of disqualification, the Contractor will be notified of the basis for the prospective bidder’s disqualification and provided with any supporting evidence that has been received from others or adduced as a result of an investigation by the COUNTY. If the Contractor gives the required notice of appeal and requests a hearing, the hearing shall be conducted so that it is concluded no later than ten (10) calendar days after the COUNTY’s receipt of the notice of appeal, and no later than five (5) business days prior to the last date for the receipt of bids on the project. The hearing shall be an informal process conducted by a panel to whom the County has delegated responsibility to hear such appeals (the “Appeals Panel”). The Director of Public Works shall appoint, prior to commencing the prequalification process, three or more public employees, who have expertise regarding projects similar to this project, to serve as the Appeals Panel. The Contractor will be given the opportunity to present information and present reasons in opposition to the rating. Within two (2) business days after the conclusion of the hearing, and barring any external unforeseen conditions, the Appeals Panel will render its decision. It is the intention of the COUNTY that the date for the submission and opening of bids will not be delayed or postponed to allow for completion of an appeal process. Note: A contractor may be found not pre-qualified for bidding on a specific public works contract to be let by the COUNTY, or on all contracts to be let by the COUNTY until the contractor meets the COUNTY’s requirements. In addition, a contractor may be found not pre-qualified for either: (1) Omission of requested information or (2) Falsification of information * * * ** NOTICE: To contractors who are using subcontractors for this job, please be advised that the COUNTY may require, as to subcontractors, one of the following: ⦾ The qualification of subcontractors in the following crafts or trades, following acceptance of your bid, but before the award is made: ⦾ Pre-qualification of all subcontractors. ⦿ Pre-qualification of subcontractors in certain crafts. ⦾ Post-bid qualification review.

County Public Notices • Fictitious Business • Petition to Administer Estate • Trustee Sale • Other Public Notices

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LEGAL NOTICES

EMPLOYMENT

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NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNFICANT IMPACT AND NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS July 21, 2022 California Department of Housing and Community Development 2020 W. El Camino Avenue, Suite 200 Sacramento, CA 95833 NEPAcomments@hcd.ca.gov These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by the Yurok Indian Housing Authority (YIHA). REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or about August 9, 2022, the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) will submit a request to HUD for the release of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act funds, signed into law March 27, 2020, to undertake a project known as Yurok at Risk Homeless Non-Congregate Public Facilities. The proposed project site is a 49-acre undeveloped rectangular parcel located at Ross Property, Weitchpec, CA 95546 (Parcel No. 530-061-015) (LAT/LONG: 41.1919/123.7036) on the north side of the Klamath River in Humboldt County, California, and is part of the Yurok Reservation. The YIHA proposes to acquire five prefabricated cabins (approximately 300 to 440 square feet in size) to be placed on the project site. Each of the five units will house one to two individuals with health indicators putting them at risk of serious complications from Covid-19. In total, the five cabins will add 2,200 square feet of impervious surface to the project site, for a project site total of .1% impervious surface coverage. Water service will be provided by the Tribe’s Weitchpec water system, and connections to water/ wastewater will be completed during the pre-fabricated cabin installation on site. The total development cost is projected to be $430,202, which would be funded through HUD’s CDBG-CV program. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The California HCD has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ERR) on file at the California HCD headquarters at 2020 W. El Camino Avenue, Suite 200, Sacramento, CA 95833 and may be examined or copied weekdays 9 A.M to 5 P.M. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ERR to the California HCD headquarters or NEPAcomments@hcd.ca.gov. All comments received by August 8, 2022, will be considered by the California HCD prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. Comments should specify which Notice they are addressing. ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION The California HCD certifies to HUD that Janice L. Waddell in her capacity as Community Development Branch Chief consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. HUD’s approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and allows the Yurok Indian Housing Authority to use Program funds. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and the California HCD’s certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the California HCD; (b) the California HCD has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants in the development process have committed funds, incurred costs or undertaken activities not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to Ms. Kimberly Nash, Director, Community Planning and Development at_COVID-19OEE-SFO@ hud.gov and SFCPDMail@hud.gov. Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day of the objection period. Janice L. Waddell California Department of Housing and Community Development Community Development Branch Chief

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

classified@north coastjournal.com

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County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

442-1400 ×314 northcoast journal.com

Redwood Coast Regional Center Be a part of a great team!

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator) FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for indiv. w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3990/mo. Exc. bene. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs. EOE

ADRC PROGRAM COORDINATOR You can be instrumental in bringing a “no wrong door” approach to care and support of the aging and disabled members of our communities.

THE NORTH COAST THE JOURNAL NORTH

Aging and Disability Resources Connection of Humboldt County (ADRC) will enhance the community by providing a visible, reliable, nowrong-door access point for information, referral assistance, options counseling and transitions from long-term nursing home residence to community living arrangements

IS HIRING

You will work in partnership with Area 1Agency on Aging and Tri-County Independent Living to support the achievement of the following goals:

COAST JOURNAL IS HIRING

SALES REPS SALES REPS

• Establish enhanced information, referral and awareness systems • Establish ADRC Options Counseling and Assistance Programs • Develop streamlined eligibility determination for public programs • Establish person-centered transition support • Secure involvement of partnerships, stakeholders and consumer population in the local ADRC-NWD system • Implement quality assurance and continuous quality improvement practices

BASE SALARY + COMMISSION + BENEFITS Seeking full-time motivated individuals eager to develop and manage sales programs across BASE SALARY + COMMISSION + BENEFITS print, web and mobile platforms. Seeking full-time motivated individuals eager Applyand by emailing yourprograms resume to to develop manage sales across kyle@northcoastjournal.com print, web and mobile platforms.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in social services related field or 5+ years of related work, experience working with people with disabilities and/or older adults preferably in an Independent Living Center or Aging and Adult services organization, experience working and leading teams in collaborative environments Generally 40 hours/week. $22-$25/hour DOE, Competitive Benefits Package For information on how to apply, application and position descriptions go to: www.tilinet.org

OPEN UNTIL FILLED People with disabilities strongly encouraged to apply. Alternative format will be provided upon request. EOE.

Apply by emailing your resume to kyle@northcoastjournal.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Tri-County Independent Living (TCIL) is a community-based, non-residential, non-profit, multicultural organization providing services to persons with disabilities to enhance independence.


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Northcoast Children’s Services Do you love being with children? Do you enjoy supporting children learn and grow? RCEA is now hiring for the following positions:

Infrastructure Programs Manager

RCEA seeks an individual with a diverse set of skills to work on both the planning and implementation of transportation electrification and resiliency projects for Humboldt County. The Infrastructure Programs Manager will assist the department Director in managing the overall budget, schedule, and resources to achieve project deliverables within a dynamic program environment. Candidates with knowledge of transportation electrification and resiliency technologies, local & state policy and goals, and who possess intermediate to advanced project management skills are encouraged to apply. Full-time, $77,971 to $112,333 annually, with competitive benefits package. First review of applications, August 5, 2022

Finance Manager

As a key member of the Business Planning & Finance team, the Finance Manager is responsible for a wide range of RCEA’s accounting and financial functions. This position requires knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles and practices, experience in financial statement preparation, and the management and coordination of payroll, AR, AP, and audit cycles. Candidates with a high level of integrity, who have experience in government agency accounting, are familiar with public sector budgeting and procurement, and work well in a fast-paced dynamic environment, are encouraged to apply. Full-time, $77,971 to $112,333 annually, with competitive benefits package. Open until filled.

Technician/Senior Technician, Demand Side Management

Manage implementation of projects to reduce energy demand for commercial, public, and residential customers. Engage and maintain customer relationships and serve as a trusted energy advisor. Candidates with experience in project or construction management, facility auditing, building operations, electrical, lighting, HVAC, refrigeration, demand response, solar and/or storage are encouraged to apply. Full-time, $67,575 to $97,355 annually, with competitive benefits package. Open until filled. Full job descriptions and application instructions are available at redwoodenergy.org/employment/ RCEA is a local Joint Powers Authority that develops and implements sustainable energy initiatives for Humboldt County. We are committed to a diverse workforce and we are an equal opportunity employer.

Post your job opportunities here. Hiring? 442-1400 • northcoastjournal.com

Are you looking for a meaningful profession?

Northcoast Children’s Services ASSOCIATE TEACHER, Orleans Assists teacher in the implementation and supervision of activities for preschool children. Requires a minimum of 12 ECE units—including core classes—and at least one-year experience working with young children. F/T 32 hr./wk. $17.00$17.85/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, Eureka

Do you want a job that has evenings and weekends off? Would you love to find a job with a Hiring Incentive? Northcoast Children’s Services may be what you’re looking for! Northcoast Children’s Services provides early education and family support services to children and families from pregnancy to age 5. We offer home visiting services, infant toddler and preschool centers in a variety of locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. We have a variety of full and part time positions working with children and families. We offer paid vacation, sick leave and holidays to all employees and an additional health insurance/cash benefit/dependent care option to full time employees. All employees may also obtain assistance with education and child development permits.

Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a preschool program. 6-12 ECE units preferred or enrolled in ECE classes and have 6 months’ experience working with children. P/T 1725 hrs./wk. $15.00-$16.54/hr. Open until Filled.

HOUSEKEEPER, Eureka Perform duties required to keep site clean, sanitized & orderly. Must have experience & knowledge of basic tools & methods utilized in custodial work and have the ability to learn and follow health & safety requirements. P/T 16 hrs./wk. $15.00/hr. Open Until Filled. Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS staff are required to submit proof of a complete COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are granted an exemption. All staff who are eligible for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All staff must wear face coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions.

Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

We are currently looking for people to join our team as housekeepers, cooks, teachers, assistant teachers, center directors and home visitors. **New Hire Incentives are currently available to both full and part time employees. Full time employees who work 30 or more hours will receive an incentive of $750. Part time employees, who work less than 30 hours will receive a $500 incentive. Incentives are paid after 90 days of employment. Positions include vacation, holiday and sick leave benefits. Full-time staff (30 hrs. per week or more) are eligible to participate in a Flexible Benefit Plan after 2 months of full-time employment. Please visit our website or Facebook page for more information on how to join our growing team! https://ncsheadstart. org/employment-opportunities/

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City of Arcata

MAINTENANCE WORKER/SENIOR (FACILITIES) $36,257.64 - $52,464.08/yr. 4% Salary increases in July 2023 Apply by August 4, 2022 midnight. Performs a variety of semi-skilled and skilled tasks related to the construction, maintenance, repair, installation and monitoring of City Facilities and Buildings. See the full job description and application process at: https://www. governmentjobs.com/careers/arcataca or  F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE.

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CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Rita for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com default

Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program

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HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT

HICAP Counselor Part time position (20 hours/week). $17/hour. Provide unbiased, one-on-one counseling and assistance to help Medicare beneficiaries make the best choices. Must have excellent communication skills. Knowledge of Medicare/ healthcare a plus. Training provided. Call Ben Winker at 707-442-3763, Ext. 222

Child Custody Recommending Counselor (CCRC) $72,946-88,760 FT – 32-40 HRS. (NON-EXEMPT)/FULL BENEFITS

Long Term Care Ombudsman Program

Coordinator/Program Manager Full time, exempt position (35 hours/week). Salary DOE. Advocate for residents in nursing and residential care facilities and investigate allegations of abuse. Supervise two staff and multiple volunteers. May not have worked in a long-term care facility during the 12 months prior to application. Call Maggie Kraft at 707-442-3763, Ext. 201

Social Services

Home Safety Specialist Full-time (35 hours/week). $18/hour. Conduct home visits to assess and help clients develop and execute a plan to improve home safety. Call Meghan Gallagher at 707-4423763, ext. 209

Provides professional child custody recommending counseling services related to family law and juvenile court matters, including child custody/ visitation assessments to individuals/families referred by the Court. Writes detailed reports and makes recommendations regarding custody/parenting plans and interventions when needed, mediates agreements, performs related duties as assigned. Please apply at: https://www.humboldt. courts.ca.gov/general-information/humanresources-and-employment and submit application to: jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov. default

For additional information please visit: https://www.a1aa.org/about-us/job opportunities/ for complete job description, application and how to apply.

HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT Research Attorney $85,403-$119,564 FT – 40 HRS. (SALARY EXEMPT)/FULL BENEFITS This professional level position performs legal

DAWNINGS SUPPORT SERVICES Open Positions Are you a compassionate and caring person? Do you want to make a difference for individuals in Humboldt community? If so, we have a great opportunity for you! We are looking for support staff for people with developmental disabilities who wish to live on their own and in the community. Responsibilities include support and assistance with daily living tasks, communication skills and access to the community. Overnight sleep shifts are available as well as daytime and evenings shifts. We are looking for part− and full−time candidates. Medical, vision, dental care and paid vacation time are available to qualifying staff. Contact us today at (707) 825−9536 or email resume with references to dawnings@sbcglobal.net Job Types: Full−time, Part−time Pay: $15.50 − $15.75 per hour *$200 Bonus for new staff after completion of 90 probationary period! Sign on Bonus!

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

research, gathers information regarding legal motions, pleadings, and writs presented to the Court; reviews and summarizes evidence, procedural history and legal contentions and submits recommendations for resolving matters before the Court. Please apply at: https://www.humboldt. courts.ca.gov/general-information/humanresources-and-employment and submit application to: jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov.


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CITY OF ARCATA

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27TH FREE OF CHARGE DISPATCHER TESTING Arcata Police Department California (P.O.S.T.) Test Session in Arcata 6:00 p.m. (no late entries) Take this interactive, no study test for new career options. If hired and you pass training and probation you will qualify to receive a $3,000 hiring bonus! The test helps determine if you have a natural ability to become a Dispatcher. Individuals from a broad spectrum of employment backgrounds or those just entering the workforce often learn they have what it takes to be of great service to their community. Secure a test slot by submitting an employment application at: https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/arcataca  707-822-5953 or personnel@cityofarcata.org

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The North Coast Journal is seeking

Distribution Drivers

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Northcoast Children’s Services ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SPECIALIST, Arcata Duties include a variety of specialized tasks involving the preparation and processing of ongoing accounts payable. High school graduate or equivalent, plus 3 yrs. of bookkeeping exp. F/T, 40 hrs./wk. $20.52-$21.55/hr. First Review Date: 08/05/2022

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN, Arcata Performs a variety of site repairs, alterations, construction projects, and general maintenance for NCS sites. 2 years of construction exp. desirable. F/T: 40 hrs./wk. $17.65-$19.46/hr. Open Until Filled.

CENTER DIRECTOR, Eureka Responsibilities include overall management of a Head Start program. Must meet Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix, plus 3 units in Administration (BA/BS Degree in Child Development or a related field preferred). Req. a min. of 2 yrs. exp. working w/ preschool children in a group setting. F/T 40 hr./wk. $20.00-$22.05/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEACHERS, Eureka

Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

Contact Michelle 707.442.1400 ext. 305 michelle@northcoastjournal.com default

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

POLICE OFFICER Hoopa Tribal Police Department

Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Performs a wide variety of peace officer duties.  Must possess a Basic Academy Certificate from a California P.O.S.T. approved academy. Additional requirements are listed in the job description. Must have a California Driver’s license and be insurable. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background checks. 

 For job descriptions & employment applications, contact the Human Resource Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 23 or email l.offins@hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support and supervision for a toddler program. Must meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have 1 yr. experience teaching in a toddler setting. F/T position: 40 hrs./wk. & P/T position: 25 hrs./wk. $17.50-$19.30/hr. Open Until Filled.

K’ima: w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

HOUSEKEEPER – FT REGULAR ($15.00 PER HOUR) – Cleans and maintains an assigned area of KMC in a sanitary, orderly, and attractive condition. Looking for a solution seeking, self-starter who can easily adjust to changes. High School Diploma or GED equivalent; one to three months related experience and/ or training; experience with general cleaning supplies and chemicals, infectious control practices, and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); current CPR certificate or obtain within 60 days of hire; valid CA Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS JULY 25, 2022 CLINICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANT/ PHLEBOTOMIST – FT REGULAR ($19.05$24.77 DOE) – Responsible for performing a variety of technical and clerical as defined by and in direct support of the Clinical Laboratory Scientist. Examples of duties include collection, preparation, and centrifuge of laboratory specimens; maintain proper infection control procedures. High School Diploma or GED equivalent; California Phlebotomist Licensure or equivalent. Current CPR certificate or ability to obtain within 30 days of hire. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS JULY 19, 2022 DENTAL ASSISTANT IN TRAINING – FT Regular ($15.00-$17.00 per hour) OUTREACH & PREVENTION – FT Regular ($20.40 per hour)

TEAM TEACHERS, Fortuna/Arcata/Crescent City

DESK TECHNICIAN (2 POSITIONS) – FT/Regular

Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities for toddler age children. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, and have one-yr. experience teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $17.75$18.64/hr. Open Until Filled.

GRANT WRITER & PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS – FT/Regular ($29.00-36.00 per hour DOE)

Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS staff are required to submit proof of a complete COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are granted an exemption. All staff who are eligible for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All staff must wear face coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions.

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN – FT/Regular

Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

PARAMEDIC – FT Regular

DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT/Regular ($39.00-43.00 DOE) PHYSICIAN – FT/Regular MEDICAL DIRECTOR – FT/Regular MAT RN CARE MANAGER – FT/Regular All positions above are Open Until Filled unless otherwise stated. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: leah.offins@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MARKETPLACE

Merchandise FIR OR CEDAR ROUNDS FOR BACKYARD BONFIRES $275 cord. (707)497−6618

Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 866−571−1325 (AAN CAN) ARE YOU BEHIND $10K OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 877−414−2089 (Hours: Mon−Fri 7am−5pm PST)

BATH & SHOWER UPDATES IN AS LITTLE AS ONE DAY! Afford− able prices − No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call 1−866−370−2939 (AAN CAN) BIG GUY, LITTLE PICKUP Small cleanups and hauls. Eureka area. Reasonable rates. Call Odd Job Mike at 707−497−9990.

DISH TV $64.99 FOR 190 CHAN− NELS + $14.95 HIGH SPEED INTERNET. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23 1− 866−566−1815 (AAN CAN)

HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−866− 544−5758 (AAN CAN) NEVER CLEAN YOUR GUTTERS AGAIN! Affordable, profession− ally installed gutter guards protect your gutters and home from debris and leaves forever! For a FREE Quote call: 844−499− 0277 WILL PAY CASH FOR INDI− VIDUAL TO POST 1400 QUALITY GOLF BALLS ON CRAIGSLIST. (707)497−6618 Margins are just a safe area

REAL / FOR SALE Build toESTATE edge of the document

Soules Bookkeeping

707-273-1212

405 A Street, Ferndale 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1,300 sq foot Craftsman house, big lot, gardener included. Garage not included. $2,000 a month.

www.soulesbookkeeping.com

Phone: 415-307-3947

Professional Service. WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

PERSONAL CARE ITEMS HALF OFF ALREADY LOW PRICES! Save MONEY− Support YOUTH. Shop at the Dream Quest Thrift Store Senior Discount Tues− days & Spin’n’Win Wednes− days! (530) 629−3006. July 19 −23.

Competitive Pricing. Dominique@Soulesbookkeeping.com

DONATE TODAY! Donate your items of value to help House the Homeless and reduce your taxes. We are in Need of Funding for our "House the Homeless" project. Call or text 844−443 −0770 thehomelesscoalition 2022@gmail.com www.theh omelesscoalition.org

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FLASHBACK

116 W. Wabash • 798-1443 Hours 2-6 Closed Sun & Mon

“Clothes with Soul”

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN)

Call Corey 707-382-2698

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie (707) 839−1518

Vintage Clothing & Gently Used

Riding & cordless mowers, both with baggers Dump runs • Weed eating Hedge trimming ur $ 35/ho

Computer & Internet

Clear Lake Lots 5,000 square feet, from $500 down, $286/Month • Utilities Available • 1 Mile From Lake • Owner will Finance • No Credit Check • Cash is King

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

THE BEER SCOUTS

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

A Sonoma County Rock and Roll trio with Humboldt roots. In the late 70s & early 80s they played in local and long-gone hot spots such as Walt’s Friendly Tavern, Vance Log Cabin and The Red Pepper. Catch them this Friday, July 22 at Mad River Brewing in Blue Lake at 6 pm. Also rocking the Lost Coast Brewing Company in Eureka, Saturday, July 23 from 3-6 pm.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

BODY MIND SPIRIT HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 metaphysicsuniversity.com

Amazing Views of Campbell Ridge

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  Sunny 1.3 private acres, 1.3 miles east of Willow Creek on the river side. Water, electricity, custom home plan, completely ely fenced, private dead end road. About 500 trees. Subdivdable.  suburban. Excellent internet speeds. 1 block to Thai restaurant. $124k

707-998-1785 or 707-523-5239

BECAUSE OF THE ECONOMY TODAY, THE SAFEST INVESTMENT IS REAL ESTATE default

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

WATER DAMAGE TO YOUR HOME? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833−664−1530 (AAN CAN)

Text or call Dave

707-498-9833

Lodging Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

MARKETPLACE

Home Repair

BOTH SHOWS ARE FREE & OUTDOORS

34

FOR RENT

Bookkeeping and payroll for small businesses.

Lawn Care Service

2 hour m minimu

Margins are just a safe area

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TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920−1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rick− enbacker, Prairie State, D’An− gelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877−589− 0747 (AAN CAN)

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

YOUR AD HERE 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

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  

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

        




Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Barbara Davenport

Dacota Huzzen

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

BRE #02109531

Realtor

Realtor

707.499.0917

BRE # 02084041

BRE# 02070276

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

707.834.7979

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

HIOUCHI – LAND/PROPERTY – $923,000 Stunning ±113 acre property w/ views of the Siskiyou Mountains! Property features a mix of flats, slopes, saddles, and ridgetops, and has a variety of trees. With easy access from Highway 199, wide rocked roads, and water available nearby or by drilling a well, look no further for your dream property!

BRIDGEVILLE – CULTIVATION – $180,000

BRE# 01066670

707.498.6364

Mike Willcutt

Realtor

KNEELAND – HOME ON ACREAGE - $749,000 ±55 Acre homestead featuring a cozy, well constructed 3/1 home, open meadows, well, mixed timber, fruit trees, and plenty of useable space for gardening, animals, and hobbies!

HONEYDEW – LAND/PROPERTY – $239,000

±40 Acres w/ STAMPED County & State permits for 9,948 sq. ft. of O.D. space utilizing light deprivation and 1,400 sq. ft. of full sun outdoor cultivation space. Parcel features developed greenhouse sites, well, and views.

±27 Acre Southern Humboldt gem! Conveniently located just 15 minutes from Honeydew with easy access on a County road, this property features meadows, spring water, power at the street, and building site with beautiful views awaiting your dream home!

SALYER – LAND/PROPERTY - $550,000

BLOCKSBURG – HOME ON ACREAGE - $349,000

One of a kind ±160 acre property conveniently located off South Fork Road. Enjoy beautiful views, lush meadows, a mixture of fir and oak timber, and two creeks running though the parcel. Property is surrounded by Forest Service offering privacy and seclusion.

Premium hunting property perched high on a ridgetop with expansive views of the local mountains! Property boasts a newly drilled well & water system, end of the road privacy, beautiful rolling meadows and a 1,000 sq. ft. open concept cabin. Sustainable living at its finest with plenty of space for gardening, animals, and great solar energy potential!

BURNT RANCH – HOME & 2ND UNIT - $725,000

SALYER – LAND/PROPERTY – $125,000

Ideal ±32 acre location for self-sufficiency and extended family! Commercial greenhouse for growing food, large shop, multiple springs, pond, fruit trees, good solar exposure, generator back-up, wildlife, USFS adjacency. At the end of a paved county road.

Location, location, location! This ±1.48 acre parcel is ready for you to build your dream home. Close to the Trinity River and minutes from Willow Creek, you can’t beat the shady setting for those long summer days. Permitted well in place, and power is at the street.

SALMON CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $749,000 ±120 Acre Salmon Creek gem featuring a gorgeous custom home, pond, guest cabin, creeks, solar & hydroelectric power, and so much more!

Ashlee Cook

BRIDGEVILLE – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $650,000 MOTIVATED SELLER! ±40 Acre turn-key farm with county and state cannabis permits in hand for 6,750 sq. ft. permitted farm is as turn key as they come. Property features year round access, two houses, water storage, solar system, and so much more!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 21, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Specials from

****** *FEAT* *URED* DEALS*

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$

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Prerolls

$

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Disposables

45

$

EY UP THELEAFTLL OF OUR

NEW HOURS

AND TO THE OLD LOCATION

707.442.2420

an 1/88th

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1662 Myrtle Ave. SUITE A Eureka

Flower

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M-F 10am-7pm Sat 11am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm License No. C10-0000997-LIC

21+ only

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT