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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday July 4, 2019 Vol XXX Issue 27 northcoastjournal.com

The Administrator Before Tom Jackson Jr. officially took the reins at HSU, he sat down with the Journal By Thadeus Greenson

11 That’s a lot of sacrament 17 Big finds in Little Japan


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2  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 4 4

Mailbox Poem New Shades of Summer

4

Home & Garden Service Directory

8

News A Change of Position

10

Views

11

Week in Weed

12

NCJ Daily

13

On The Cover

17

Table Talk

18

Arts Alive!

21

Trinidad Art Nights

22

Art Beat

‘Hook, Line and Turbine’ A Sack of Sacrament

The Administrator Ten Items or Fewer Saturday, July 6 Friday, July 5

Summer Stories and Floating Worlds

23

The Setlist

24

Music & More!

An Eye to the Sky Live Entertainment Grid

28 34

Calendar Filmland

35 36

Workshops & Classes Field Notes

Yesterday is Sweet and Corny

Seven Puzzles for the Seventh Month

40 Sudoku & Crossword 41 Cartoons 41 Classifieds

July 4, 2019 • Volume XXX Issue 27 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2019 Publisher Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Special Publications Publisher Creative Services Director Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Art Director Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Heidi Beltran, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Senior Advertising Representative Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Marna Batsell marna@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Multimedia Content Producer Zach Lathouris zach@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Administrative Assistant Sam Leishman sam@northcoastjournal.com Chief Executive Officer Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com

Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

New Humboldt State University President Tom Jackson Jr. (right) with Humboldt Crabs Vice President Matt Filar. Read more on page 13. Photo by León Villagómez.

On the Cover Photo courtesy of Humboldt State University

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

3


Home & Garden

Mailbox

The Case for and Against Huffman

New Shades of Summer – A Retrospective on the Life of June

How we were drawn into this light, Editor: Released from bedtime curfews, In response to Denver NelAnd freed from morning’s grasp: son’s letter (Mailbox, June 27), I Those signatories of winter heartily support and approve of With their dark ink now all blurred and faded. Congressman Huffman’s efforts on holding the travesty of the In this light, Trump administration accountWe might hear the rhythm of seasons, able for its obviously illegal and Or trace the day’s soft edge. heinous actions, on so many Maybe rediscover the contours of our soul, fronts (“The Case for ImpeachOr we might just sit in trees, ment,” June 13). I dare say most of With the afternoon wind still sliding through Mr. Huffman’s constituents agree The once barren branches. with me. — Sam A. Flanagan There are honest and reasoned differences of opinion about how best to do that. Given the White House and DOJ’s stonewalling of constitutionally mandated of evidence. The result: no Collusion and a oversight, one approach is to begin formal twisted answer to obstruction. If Mueller hearings under the auspices of impeachhad found obstruction, he would say so; ment, whether or not this results in actual he didn’t. Mueller was to come to a binary articles. This would help to cut the legs decision. Were crimes committed or not? out from under the Trump team’s legal That’s a special counsel’s job. A political arguments as there is no reasonable doubt hack writes 258 pages of character assasthat impeachment inquiries fall under the sination and then basically says, “I couldn’t oversight of Congress. Hearings would be find a thing. You take over House.” on very public display and would surely Huffman and his acolytes waste time sway public and congressional opinion. and our money on these investigations Mr. Nelson points out Mr. Huffman’s that go nowhere (“The Case for Impeach“obvious talent” and the fact that he’s ment,” June 13). A humanitarian/national a “smart lawyer.” He’s also extremely security crisis at the border, homelessness dedicated, energetic and has proven his (California has a fifth of the entire counability to work on multiple complex issues. try’s homeless, 70,000 living on streets One of the mandates of the 116th U.S. in Los Angeles County), our schools rate Congress after the 2018 blue wave is to act in the bottom 10 percent; opiate addicas a check on the Trump administration. tion, health/disease issues (Los Angeles is Jared is taking a principled and courageous talking bubonic plague!), infrastructure isstand to do just that. sues, the country’s worst poverty rate, high taxes, housing unaffordability, our cities The disaster of the Trump presidency have become literal toilets, needles all over affects us all, regardless of where you the place and Huffman is essentially saying, might live in the U.S. or, indeed, the world. “We have to impeach. We don’t know what In the first Democratic debate, Jay Inslee we’re looking for but we have to investigate said it well: The biggest threat to America’s because that’s all we have.” I mean, what national security is Donald Trump. has the Democratic House done legislativeSteven Kossow, Arcata ly for the good of our country? Huffman’s ilk are destroying California Editor: with their “progressive” agenda. No matter After two-plus years, one bombshell your party affiliation, it’s obvious a change story after another which turn into of leadership from the likes of Huffman nothing burgers by our politicized media, and our reps in Washington, D.C., and $30 million to $40 million of taxpayer Sacramento is in order. money, 19 hate Trump lawyers (even one Rick Brennan, Eureka of Hillary’s personal lawyers) employed/ assisted by approximately 40 FBI agents, Editor: intelligence forensic accountants and Congressman Huffman, if I had spent other professional staff, more than 2,800 the last two years lobbing for my boss subpoenas, nearly 500 search warrants, to be fired, I would be out on the street more than 230 orders for communication looking for a new job (“The Case for Imrecords, almost 50 orders authorizing use peachment,” June 13). of pen registers, 13 requests to foreign With all the taxes I pay, I have not governments for evidence, and intergotten one dime’s worth out of you. Go viewed approximately 500 witnesses, to work, please! Do something that really compiled millions of documents/pieces

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Joan Woodcock Insurance Services matters. Trump is going to be president no matter what during the next 18 months. See if you can give your constituents something for their tax dollar for these next 18 months. Please! Get to work! Charlie Giannini, Fortuna Editor: Congressman Jared Huffman, representing the North Coast, deserves heaps of praise for successfully co-leading an amendment to a major spending bill on the U.S. House floor to block imports of sport-hunted trophies of African elephants and lions from several African nations. These are threatened and endangered species and it’s outrageous that the federal government has promoted the killing of these rare animals by granting American trophy hunters permits they requested. It is a terrible contradiction for the U.S. and other nations throughout the world to ask local Africans not to kill elephants for the ivory trade but to give the green light to wealthy American hunters to kill animals for their tusks or lions for their manes. We’re grateful to Congressman Huffman for leading the push for mainstream animal welfare and conservation initiatives. Penny L. Eastman, Washington, D.C.

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Everything Matters Editor: I believe the North Coast Journal of the past few years has had the best journalism in Humboldt. That’s why I was stunned to see Clay Jones’ cartoon in the last issue (Cartoons, June 27), trying to find humor in the Trump administration’s detention of children without providing such basics as soap and toothpaste (let alone access to their parents). I went to Clay Jones’ website, where it’s clear he’s horrified by the treatment of these children. Humor is a difficult thing; what some people find funny others find awful and still others won’t get at all. For me, at least, this cartoon completely failed. It seemed to trivialize the atrocities that our government is committing in our collective name, the opposite of what I believe was the cartoonist’s intent. We watch the occupant of the Oval Office shake hands with murderous dictators and ignore human rights at home and abroad. In this environment, I believe, even cartoons matter. Mitch Trachtenberg, Trinidad

Continued on next page »

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5


Mailbox

Terry Torgerson

‘Speak Up Now’ Editor: I am appalled to find myself writing letters to my legislators and to the president of our country to remind them that it is inhumane to separate children from family members and cage them in windowless warehouses without beds, blankets, soap, bathing facilities or toothbrushes (“How We Let This Happen,” June 27). It is fundamentally un-American to treat any people this way. That children are being so abused by our government, supposedly on our behalf, breaks my heart. If you are a person who is appalled by these actions, I urge you to speak up now. Nancy Short, Eureka

‘Protect our Natural Treasures’ Editor: In a world that rushes to develop everything, we have spectacular natural beauty, a place people come to restore their connection to nature. We are a travel destination for those seeking solace. If we care about the world that our grandchildren will have, we must choose to protect our natural treasures. Terra-Gen created this list of impacts in the draft impact statement: environmental aesthetics and visual resources, air quality, biological resources, cultural resources, hazards and hazardous materials, hydrology and water quality, noise and vibration, transportation and circulation, tribal cultural resources and wildfire (“Why I Support Terra-Gen’s Wind Project,” June 27). The turbines will have lasting negative impacts for our environment, beyond visual ones. Changed wind patterns will further dry out the land, making wildfire

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

more likely with flammable petroleum products delivered regularly. Significant research and controversy exist on the ill-effects of the sub-audible sound waves on human health. More nighttime light will disrupt sleep cycles. The condors are at risk; the endangered species marbled murrelets are immediately threatened by this project. Our tribe’s appeals for respect of their ancestral ceremonial lands are ignored. Energy Capital Partners, the petroleum and nuclear materials transportation company that bought Terra-Gen, is a $2.25 billion venture capitalist company. They are here to make big money; The company they formed, Humboldt Wind LLC, will do that. The winds near Humboldt Bay are among the best. RCEA already applied for a commercial offshore wind lease able to be developed within five to seven years. It would provide 100 to 150 megawatts, the same as Terra-Gen’s potential, with more following. Within 15 years, we could fulfill our power needs and export surplus energy without devastating our ridges. Do we have the foresight to craft a solution that feeds our future? Protect the beauty of our natural resources; Be a voice to craft a sustainable future. Please, speak up. Claire Robbins, Eureka

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. ●


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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

7


News

A Change of Position THE NORTH COAST’S COMPLETE R E STA U R A N T D I R E CTO RY

450+ Restaurants, Breweries, Wineries and Delicatessens Food Event Calendar New Establishments

Business owner’s change of heart pushes Betty Chinn’s project forward amid housing crisis By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

L 2019-2020 EDITION

out now

ocal philanthropist Betty Chinn plans to erect a small transitional housing village out of modular trailers donated by PG&E that have been lying dormant for months on the city-owned Crowley property on the south end of town. PG&E donated the 11 trailers — which it had been using as administrative offices at the Humboldt Bay Power Plant — to Chinn back in September of 2017 and she planned to convert them into small apartments that people could use to build up rental histories for two years before finding permanent housing. But the plan had been waylaid in May of 2018 by threats of litigation from the owners of Pierson Building Center, which expressed concerns about impacts of the project and warned that the city wasn’t following proper process. “We applaud the city for trying to help those truly in need that are looking to make a better life for themselves,” the letter said. “With that said, the businesses on South Broadway are at the breaking point due to the large populations of homeless, transient individuals, many of whom have mental issues and or drug abuse problems in our area. Increasingly, they frequent and prey upon the open door policy of retail businesses, attempting to steal merchandise on a regular basis and frequently becoming belligerent and or threatening in their behavior when confronted.” The city abruptly pulled an item from

8  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Betty Chinn at the Betty Kwan Chinn Day Center. Photo by Mark McKenna.

the city council’s agenda that would have amended the property’s zoning to make way for the project and then began researching other potential sites, seemingly to little success. Chinn said she started to think it wasn’t going to work out and seriously considered an offer to sell the trailers for money she could use to fund her foundation’s other endeavors, which include a day center, a family shelter and a children’s after-care program. Then, in April, the hardware store’s owner Bill Pierson sent the city a letter indicating he’d had a change of heart, thanks in a large part to a conversation he’d had with Police Chief Steve Watson, during which the chief detailed Chinn’s good work with Betty’s Blue Angel Village, a makeshift shelter village crafted out of converted shipping containers that houses about 40 people. “Chief Watson assured me that Betty Chinn runs a tight ship and that any facility that she is in charge of will be operated in the best way possible,” Pierson wrote, adding that Watson was sympathetic that the store already faces a “deterioration in the local

business environment.” “He said that the presence of Betty’s facility could actually improve the situation we are currently faced with by focusing additional services into our area.” As a result, Pierson said that not only was he “changing (his) position of opposing the project,” but he was also pledging to personally donate $10,000 to Chinn “to help ensure the success of the project.” Because the proposed project is slated to sit in the coastal zone, it will need a local coastal plan amendment and a coastal development permit, both of which fall under the purview of the California Coastal Commission, meaning a lengthy process awaits. Public Works Director Brian Gerving said staff is currently working to finish environmental documentation for the project, including an archeological survey, and will then look to develop a site plan by mid-August. Following that, the city will host a meeting to gather neighborhood input, followed by local coastal amendment and coastal development permit processes with the coastal commission. All told, Gerving said

“Chief Watson assured me that Betty Chinn runs a tight ship and that any facility that she is in charge of will be operated in the best way possible.”


the city hopes construction can begin next spring. By some indications, it can’t open soon enough. As if to underscore the need for creative housing solutions like Chinn’s PG&E village, the Humboldt County Grand Jury issued a report July 2 titled “Like Home? There’s No Place …” that assessed housing issues in Humboldt County. Unsurprsingly, the report found that Humboldt County has a disproportionately high homeless population that far exceeds available shelter space, that there are a lack of transitional housing options and an entrenched lack of affordable housing. Further, the report states, new construction of affordable housing units is moving at a snail’s pace, as we’ve previously reported (“Draft Housing Element Calls for Drastic Solutions to Humboldt’s Housing ‘Crisis,’” May 23). “The production rate of affordable housing units is insufficient to meet the needs of the county’s residents and homeless,” reads one of the report’s findings. The report makes a wide variety of recommendations, including that the city and county direct staff to look at providing financial incentives for people who build accessory dwelling units to help meet housing demand (something that has been done successfully in other areas of California) and that the county move forward with some of the bold recommendations contained in the draft housing element update. This included the creation of a tiny house village and a sanctioned area for people to sleep in their cars. Plans for Chinn’s transitional housing project have each of the 11 trailers being converted into a duplex and they could combine to house 24 individuals and six families. While that number pales in comparison to the almost 1,500 people estimated to be living without shelter in Humboldt County, the grand jury report and the county’s housing element update have made clear there is no silver-bullet project that will alleviate the area’s housing crisis. Rather, experts agree, it will take a multi-faceted approach. Meanwhile, Chinn continues to see results with her Blue Angel Village, which launched in partnership with the Humboldt Coalition for Property Rights as the city of Eureka was clearing the PalCo Marsh of the city’s largest and most entrenched homeless encampments. While the project, initially located at Third and Commercial streets in Eureka, met fierce backlash from neighboring business owners, it quickly earned their overall buy-in. In addition to operating without major incident, the project served more than

500 clients in its first two years, helping 442 of them find jobs and moving 229 into permanent housing. The project has since moved to a city-owned lot on Koster Street, where it similarly met some initial neighborhood skepticism but seems to have run smoothly. Chinn said she’s excited that plans for the village on the Crowley property seem to be moving forward. She said she

already has the funding she needs to get started, thanks to contributions from the county, the city and St. Joseph Hospital. Because the goal is to help people build up rental histories before moving into permanent housing, Chinn said the project will only charge minimal rent — essentially enough to cover PG&E bills and insurance — allowing people to save money for future deposits. New residents will be set up with case management and

whatever services they need, she said, with the goal of reducing those as their stays progress before they ultimately move out on their own. “I think it’ll be good for the people,” she said. l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgresson.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

9


Guest Views

‘Hook, Line and Turbine’ Why I oppose Terra-Gen’s wind project By Greg King

views@northcoastjournal.com

H

ow dispiriting to read that officials at Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA) have fallen hook, line and turbine for a deeply flawed energy proposal. Like many outside colonizers since 1850, a Manhattan energy company, Terra-Gen, is relying on local officials to support its plan to place up to 60 wind turbines, each standing 600 feet tall, on Monument and Bear River ridges. The RCEA’s Michael Winkler, in a June 27 op-ed in the Journal (“Why I Support Terra-Gen’s Wind Project”), epitomized this colonial mindset. Let’s start with Winkler’s belief that Terra-Gen’s wind farm “can potentially provide substantial environmental and economic benefits to the citizens of Humboldt County. … Large-scale onshore wind at the proposed location is the best choice for Humboldt County.” The Monument-Bear River Ridge ecological corridor is among the worst sites for an industrial anything. The large natural meadow ecosystem is nearly pristine, with rare expanses of native grasses maintained for centuries by the Wiyot Tribe. The “bird-shredding” turbines would cause widespread destruction of several state and federally protected species, including but not limited to hawks, golden and bald eagles, and peregrine falcons; an important colony of hoary bats; and the North Coast’s celebrated but much diminished population of marbled murrelets. Terra-Gen resorted to its own brand of “tobacco science” to hide these impacts. The company’s Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) uses just one year of surveys for endangered marbled murrelets (protocols demand a minimum of two years), whose primary flyway to Headwaters Forest (for which taxpayers paid $480 million to protect) is over these ridges. Stantec, the corporation that conducted Terra-Gen’s wildlife surveys, tells us that the windmills will kill 10.43 to 20.86 marbled murrelets over the project’s estimated 30-year lifespan. (Santec, a Canadian firm, specializes in oil and gas development, coal mining, fracking, shale and tar sands mining, thousand-mile oil pipelines and transmission lines.) However, by raising

the model’s turbine-collision input by just 1 percent the murrelet mortality rate doubles. According to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), Bear River and Monument ridges are “inappropriate for wind development” due to large populations of rare and protected species that would be destroyed, including murrelets, bats and raptors, as well as the “loss and possibly extirpation of a disjunct population of horned larks.” In May, the Wiyot Tribe said the wind farm would present “un-mitigatable impacts to Tsakiyuwit,” the Wiyot name for the Bear River Ridge area, which is in Wiyot territory. At risk are “culturally important sites, flora, fauna and the remainder of Wiyot territory that is within its viewshed. The Wiyot have experienced mass genocide and been robbed of most of their sacred lands around Humboldt Bay and the lower Eel River. Much of their ancestral land has been developed, or the native vegetation types they helped to shape and tend, converted to alien pasture grasses and weeds. In the spectrum of impacted landscapes, Tsakiyuwit has persisted to the present as an iconic gem of native coastal prairie that still holds the signs of the Wiyot’s caretaking and stewardship.” The wind turbines will be visible from just about anywhere in western Humboldt County (that’s why, in 1853, surveyors placed a monument there), especially from Scotia, Rio Dell and the Eel River Valley. Residents could suffer from turbine noise, including low-frequency “infrasound” that can cause sleep problems, headaches, tinnitus, dizziness, nausea and memory problems. Terra-Gen makes no mention of these noise problems, despite protests by virtually every community that has had windmills crop up in their neighborhoods. Officials in Rio Dell and Scotia oppose the project. Wind turbines are infamous for spontaneous combustion, a problem far more common than most realize. The flames are exacerbated by 400 gallons of oil contained in each windmill and, of course, by high winds. On Monument-Bear River

10  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Ridge a turbine fire could race across dry grasslands, through the surrounding forest and right into town. Rural fire departments often do not have the capacity to reach the turbines with retardants, so they simply let them burn. Residents will also cringe while the turbines are built, which will require the following: • Construction of 17 miles of new road, some 200 feet wide and rising through the Jordan Creek watershed, which is just beginning to recover from slides caused by Maxxam’s forest liquidation; • Delivery of 11,000 yards of concrete to build 60 massive slabs, each 65 feet in diameter and placed 10 feet into the ground on 3 acres of scraped ground, that will never be removed; • Six new 400-foot-tall meteorological towers; • Ten thousand truck trips, with trucks up to 90 feet long and weighing 110 tons; • Two temporary freeway bypasses at Hookton Road and 12th Street in Fortuna; • Twenty-five miles of 100-foot-wide, 90-acre, clear-cut corridors; • Nine hundred acres of surrounding forest permanently clear-cut; • A new grid tie-in at Bridgeville, requiring a new line-transmission easement 100 feet wide and running through 25 miles of forestland kept clear with herbicides (another fire danger). In order to give its project a green patina, Terra-Gen has amortized, over 25 years, the immense carbon front-loading required to build, place and maintain the windmills, which therefore won’t begin reducing local greenhouse gas emissions for several years. Terra-Gen and its parent company, the giant Energy Capital Partners, have little interest in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. If they did, they would get out of the fossil fuel business altogether, yet this portfolio is growing. Certainly Terra-Gen wants to sell wind power, and why not? It’s money. Terra-Gen has accelerated the Humboldt County

project to take advantage of tax breaks that expire in 2020. Less well known is that Terra-Gen is desperate for cash. In February, the S&P Global Ratings service downgraded Terra-Gen’s rating from B to B-minus, indicating “weak cash flow and debt paydown. … The negative outlook reflects our expectations that Terra-Gen’s cash flow generation profile could worsen further. … The company may have difficulty refinancing in 2021.” This should serve as a warning, especially in combination with Winkler’s blithe reminder that “Humboldt has some of the strongest and most consistent winds in North America. …” If Terra-Gen can mine wind at one of our region’s most biologically and culturally important sites, then why not Trinidad Head, Patrick’s Point State Park, the King Range, Big Lagoon, the Bald Hills? The only thing renewable and green about this project is the money. Like the nuclear power industry, Winkler dismisses solar power with worn-out tropes. One thing he got right, though, is that solar power “has played and still can play an important role in giving individuals more direct control of their energy.” In this way he unintentionally highlights two points that corporations like Terra-Gen and Energy Capital Partners want you to forget: Installation of rooftop solar panels, combined with even modest levels of conservation, does more to reduce local greenhouse gas emissions than wind farms ever could while posing no harm to our wildlands. And this power would be held by the people, not by a faceless Manhattan conglomerate. l Greg King is executive director of Siskiyou Land Conservancy, a non-profit land trust dedicated to protecting and restoring wildlife habitat on California’s North Coast. www.SiskiyouLand.org Have something you want to get off your chest? Think you can help guide and inform public discourse? Then the North Coast Journal wants to hear from you. Contact us at editor@northcoastjournal. com to pitch your column ideas.


Week in Weed

A Sack of Sacrament By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

A

Southern California lawyer and church leader has filed a lawsuit against the county of Humboldt and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, alleging they violated his client’s rights to religious freedom when they raided a cannabis grow and eradicated five greenhouse’s worth of weed last month. In the lawsuit filed June 27, Matthew Pappas alleges that his client, the Redwood Spiritual Healing Ministry, described as a “nonprofit religious entity,” was using its property to “grow cannabis in a manner that meets exacting religious requirements for spiritual cannabis of church and its related association,” the Association of Sacramental Ministries, a nonprofit made up of member churches. “The primary and central belief of (the church) centers around the sacramental use of cannabis, its properties as an entheogen and the healing powers of cannabis,” the lawsuit states. “(The church) uses church property in part to cultivate, in accordance with strict requirements for spiritual cannabis used by its members in branches in California, cannabis sacrament that is used by thousands of church members that are part of the church association.” The trouble — in the eyes of the county and the state — is that while the church may have been operating in accordance with strict spiritual requirements, it was not operating within state law, which would have required state and county permits and adherence to the state’s maze of regulations. So on June 11, officers with the county and DFW raided the property and eradicated all the sacrament. (Also worth noting: the Redwood Spiritual Healing Ministry is not registered as a nonprofit in California and has apparently not filed required disclosure forms with the IRS, and the Association of Sacramental Ministries is listed as having dissolved in 2018 by the California Secretary of State’s Office, just seven months after it registered.) Pappas alleges this violated his clients’ rights to free exercise of religion and due process, essentially saying that the church should be free to grow and distribute its sacrament — or practice its religion — as it sees fit without state regulation, and that cutting down all those plants amounted to a punishment without proper judicial process. In an interview with a reporter for www. kymkemp.com, which was first to report on the lawsuit, Pappas said he had been in communication with the county about the church’s property and cannabis cultivation activities since last year, when code enforcement served the property with an abatement notice. While novel, the case is certainly not without precedent. In fact, Pappas has filed a series

of similar suits throughout California in recent years, seemingly with little success. Case law has long carved out limited protections against drug law prosecutions for certain religious practices. In 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Navajo members of the Native American Church had the right to use peyote in religious ceremonies and, more recently, the same court ruled in 2006 that a New Mexico church congregation could continue using a hallucenagenic tea in its services. The litmus test laid out by the court when considering whether illegal drug activity can be considered religious, is whether a judge believes there is a sincerity of belief — ie., that a congregation isn’t just saying some stuff they don’t believe to get high legally — and whether the religious exception would “substantially undermine” the government’s ability to otherwise enforce the law. It would seem Pappas has some heavy-duty lawyering to do in order to convince a judge that his clients weren’t simply looking to grow and distribute a bunch of black market weed. And it should be noted that Pappas, who himself seems to hold a central role in the church, comes to the case with a bit of a checkered legal past. He currently has a disciplinary action pending against him with the California State Bar, whose staff is recommending he be suspended from practicing law in California’s Central District for at least six months because he “does not currently posses the mental and emotional health to competently practice law.” The bar’s action stems from allegations that in five separate cases he failed to show up for hearings, meet filing deadlines or keep his clients informed. While not mentioned in the bar proceedings, Pappas seems to have had similar issues with a cannabis sacrament case in Sonoma County that was dismissed in 2016 after he failed to show up for a mandated conference. (Courthouse News Service reported the story under the headline: “Lawyer No-Show Tanks Sacramental Pot Case.”) The Humboldt County case notes that in addition to the cannabis sacrament and the Bible, the church holds The Nine Epiphanies as its central scripture. According to an article in the San Diego Union-Tribune, Pappas wrote the epiphanies based on a series of dreams his daughter had after suffering a traumatic injury. County counsel has declined to comment on the case filed last week, which seeks unlimited damages in excess of $25,000. ● Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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From NCJ Daily

Husband Killed, Wife Injured After Truck Plows Through Their Bedroom

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is due back in court Aug. 7 for an arraignment. One of the family’s neighbors described a frantic scene in the moments following the crash as emergency responders tried desperately to save a badly injured Beland before transporting him to the hospital. “I grabbed the woman’s robe off of the wall in that demolished room because she was asking for it,” the woman told Redheaded Blackbelt. “The robe was the only thing I could access that wasn’t ruined.” “The first responders were working really hard to keep his heart beating,” the neighbor said. “It was heartbreaking to see his wife with blood all over her face and wanting to know how her husband was, and watch them trying to keep him alive just feet away and she couldn’t see him.” There was an outpouring of support for the family on the GoFundMe page, which had nearly $10,000 of its $25,000 goal before noon on Tuesday. Many who left messages talked about the couple’s generosity and remembered Beland as a man who always had a “smile and a kind word for everyone.” “Our hearts go out to Liz and the family. You are amazing people,” one post reads. “Your family has help so many people in this town and never asked for anything. It’s time we all step up and help this family in need.” — Kimberly Wear

he lives of one Eureka family changed in an instant June 28 when an out-of-control truck came barreling off the street and through a bedroom, killing a man who was lying in bed, injuring his wife and destroying their home. The couple, longtime business owners and active community members Robert Beland and Elizabeth Martin, own Humboldt Lock and Safe, according to a GoFundMe account set up to help with expenses. Beland, 64, died at the hospital after being found amid the debris by responding firefighters. Martin was described as suffering minor injuries, while two others in the home and the driver of the truck, Ryder Stapp, were uninjured. According to the California Highway Patrol, the 25-year-old was driving “at a high rate of speed” just before 10:30 p.m. when he allowed his pickup to drift off the road and through a parking lot before plowing completely into the home’s bedroom. Stapp reportedly tried to flee the scene but was held back by residents. He was arrested on suspicion of DUI, hit and run and vehicular manslaughter but was released from jail 12 hours later after posting $175,000 bail, according to Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Samantha Karges. The Times-Standard reports that Stapp

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Sand Sculptures

Northcoast Environmental Center team members took to the air when they finished their “Lend a Hand, or Eight” sand sculpture at the Sand Sculpture Festival sponsored by Friends of the Dunes. It later won the People’s Choice award. See more photos as www. northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 07.01.19

POSTED 06.29.19 READ THE FULL STORY ONLINE.

McKinleyville Assault: Jonathan Albert Boone, 38, was arrested June 26 after allegedly fatally stabbing a dog, injuring an 85-year-old man in a fight and assaulting a woman at a residence on the 2300 block of Grace Avenue. According to the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, Boone also became combative when contacted by deputies and had to be tasered before being taken into custody on suspicion of a variety of crimes. POSTED 06.27.19

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Professor’s Book Honored: Humboldt State University professor and Journal contributor Cutcha Risling Baldy’s first book was recently honored at the Native American Indigenous Studies Conference in New Zealand. We are Dancing for You: Native Feminisms and the Revitalization of Women’s Comingof-age ceremonies was named the Best First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies at the conference, which draws more than 1,000 scholars from around the world. POSTED 06.30.19

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Digitally Speaking

Comment of the Week

The Humboldt Crabs record on the season after a torrid stretch, which has made up for a slow 6-10 start to the year and left the Crabs with a winning record. POSTED 07.01.19

Congratulations on the misleading cover art. Some McKinleyville residents are now literally decrying the idea that cityhood means big city skyscrapers coming to town instead of creating local control. The board of supervisors has more incentive to develop McKinleyville than a McKinleyville city council would. It’s a sad day when I link to your news article in a community

12  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Photo by Mark Larson

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Human Remains Found: Human remains found June 27 in Redwood National and State Parks have been identified as those of 49-year-old Jeff Pierce, of Oswego, Illinois, who had been reported missing. No foul play is suspected at this time, according to the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. Pierce’s remains were found after state parks rangers reported an abandoned car possibly linked to Pierce had been found in the Dolason Prairie area. POSTED 06.28.19

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forum and then have to spend my energy correcting misconceptions created by your graphic design. If a picture is worth a thousand words, be more responsible with your image choices. ­ Andrew Jones comment on a Journal Facebook post about — the June 27 cover story, “McKinleyopolis,” which explored the idea of whether McKinleyville — Humboldt County’s third largest population center — should incorporate as a city. POSTED 06.28.19


On the Cover

The Administrator

New Humboldt State University President Tom Jackson Jr. strolls across campus on June 28, his first day on the job.

Before Tom Jackson Jr. officially took the reins at HSU, he sat down with the Journal

Photo by Grant Scott-Goforth

By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

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hen Tom Jackson Jr. strode into the Corbett Conference Room in Humboldt State University’s Siemens Hall one morning in June, he hadn’t even officially taken over as the eighth president in the university’s more than 100-year history. That day came last week, when Jackson was given a university identification card and control over what is arguably Humboldt County’s most important institution. But Jackson, who earned the distinction of being the first president in the California State University system to be on campus the day he was voted into office, was already dressing for the role. Punctuating his black suit and crisp white dress shirt was a vibrant green and gold striped tie. Working on a tight schedule as he familiarized himself with the university he would soon be running, Jackson gave the

Journal 15 minutes of his time on June 7. Campus spokespeople warned he wasn’t yet up to speed on the details of the university’s budget, complexities of HSU administrators’ past decisions or the intricacies of Humboldt County life, but said he wanted to begin to introduce himself to the community. Jackson, 59, comes to HSU from a four-year tenure as president of Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota, and steps into the position vacated by Lisa Rossbacher, who retired last month after a tumultuous and generally unpopular five-year presidency defined by budget cuts, growing discord between the campus and the community, and allegations that she didn’t do enough to protect and support students of color. Jackson — who said he is the fourth member of his family to carry the name Tom Jackson Jr., the first being a freed slave in the South — is HSU’s

first black president and the campus’ first leader to come from a strictly administrative background without classroom teaching experience in at least 35 years. In his brief conversation with the Journal — which touched on HSU’s strengths and challenges, why he got into university administration and what he can do to help heal inherited wounds — the military veteran was soft-spoken, thoughtful and almost unflinchingly positive. Here’s a transcript of the conversation, lightly edited for clarity. North Coast Journal: Reading your resume, it is apparent that you are a career administrator. What caused you to pursue a career in university administration and how would you describe your administrative philosophy? Tom Jackson: Interesting. I went to Southwest Minnesota State University

— Southwest State — for my baccalaureate degree and I was very, very involved in student organizations. I ran track, was active in student government, wrote for the newspaper, became a [resident advisor], a center manager of student life … along with being a business major at one point in time. You know, you get to that moment of, ‘What am I going to do after I graduate,’ and it hit me: I’m doing it right now. I’m working with students and I’m leading in higher ed. So I mentioned it to one of the professionals — two of them, the center director and the director of residence life, two different individuals — and they said very quickly, ‘If this is what you want to do, working in a university setting helping students, then go off and get your master’s degree.’ And they promptly guided me and Continued on next page »

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On the Cover Continued from previous page

HSU President Tom Jackson Jr. capped his first day on the job with a trip to the Arcata Ball Park, where he watched the Humboldt Crabs beat the California Expos. Photos by León Villagómez

mentored me on how to package myself to get a good grad assistantship at a university and that launched my career. So it was really about working with students and being a trainer’s trainer, a mentor’s mentor, and one thing led to the next, which led me to here. But it really started simply as just wanting to help students be successful in a university setting. And over time, opportunities presented themselves and each one gives you a stronger tool box that gets you to really try to improve the environment of students who come through the door. Now there’s noble reasons for doing this: helping students become part of the educated citizenry, giving them a better quality of life, helping them maneuver through the maze of a university system, helping them be sources of pride for their families. All of those things are certainly

part of the equation but at the root, it really was and still is about helping the students. NCJ: In both studying HSU from afar and your brief time so far on campus, what would you identify as the university’s biggest challenges and its greatest strengths? Jackson: I’ll start with the biggest strengths. I would say that’s the pride of the community. There’s an enormous sense of pride, not only in Humboldt State but also in this community. And I’m referring primarily to Arcata, but there’s pride throughout Eureka and McKinleyville, as well. That pride shows itself in the passion of the words that people speak but it also shows itself in the alumni and the desire for this to be the absolute best university it can be. Where I think the strength lies is actually in the community and the relationships with the community.

“Now there’s noble reasons for doing this: helping students become part of the educated citizenry, giving them a better quality of life, helping them maneuver through the maze of a university system, helping them be sources of pride for their families.”

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We tend to focus right now on what isn’t working but there are a thousand things that are working, and those thousand things are all the volunteer hours this university provides the people that live in the community that help drive the economic engine, or providing service time to agencies, the connectedness between the community and the campus — those are really, truly the strength. Now, we could refer to that as the amazing people who live in this area but I’m just referring to it simply as the connectedness between the university and the community is its strength. It also, in its own way, is its challenge because the two talk and the two are essentially the same. And because we communicate so freely and openly, it gives us that blueprint for how we each need to evolve and become better and those are soft spots for both the community and the university. So, in essence, the community and the university are working through their relationship to be the ideal place that we want to be. I refer to that as modeling the global community because Humboldt, Arcata — this North Coast region — is a place that could be anything it wants for a lot of different reasons. But it also is a place that already is modeling the global community, working through those dynamics of what it means to be a

modern-day society dealing with these types of issues that not only impact the university setting but also impact the community. But by working together, going back to the strength, it will. NCJ: You touched on this a bit in your last answer — that connectedness between the community and the university at times creating challenges. When you spoke to one of our reporters on your first day here at the university library, you mentioned there were a lot of conversations taking place in the president’s office at that point about “healing.” There have been a number of decisions made recently by HSU administration that have been hurtful to segments of the community, not just the outcomes of those decisions but how they were made — and I’m speaking specifically about the elimination of HSU football, major reductions at KHSU and the closing of the Third Street Gallery — so I’m curious to hear from you how you plan to heal those wounds and prevent similar ones from occurring in the future. Jackson: I think honestly that the institution as a whole never intends to annoy people through its decisions. It makes the best decision it can given the information it happens to have at that time. And you know as well as I that the institution is going through a correction. When enroll-


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ment dips, resources have to be discovered in different ways and the university has to react, just like the community as a whole has to react when tax revenues are down. And so in essence, just like stocks and other investments, this university is going through a correction. During that correction, one would say, it would help if we were just a little more transparent. And so when I talk about healing, it’s about trying to share more information so that individuals can understand the dynamics of the university, maybe the sausage making of running a university, so there’s at least some understanding of why certain decisions may be made or had to be made. I think that would go a long way to helping individuals understand why the university is doing what it’s doing and why it doesn’t intend to harm anyone. But the question I want to ask the community in that same breath is how do we move forward from that, because my message is about positivity, looking outward and looking upward. And recognizing our strengths and abilities, targeting those and playing off of those, so we can celebrate the amazing things we are as a community, as a whole. So it’s, what do we need to do not only as a community but as a university to move past those things that are behind us and really celebrate what

we want to celebrate as what we would call ‘the North Coast.’ And once we get to that point and answer those questions, I think we’ll be past that. NCJ: As I’m sure you’re aware, last year the local branch of the NAACP called on HSU to stop recruiting students of color until it can effectively support and protect them on campus and in the local community. How would you respond to prospective parents who are concerned about this statement and what do you plan to do, on campus and off, to make sure students of color who come to receive their education at HSU are supported? Jackson: I would say that students of color are not just one set of ‘students of color’ and to cluster individuals into one category is unfair to the many individuals who enter a university setting. Going to college is a special privilege. It’s a very, very special privilege. … We also expect things of college graduates that aren’t necessarily expected of other individuals, sometimes. So to cluster individuals into one category is really unfair to the families who, for their whole life, wanted their sons or daughters to experience a university setting. That’s not to say that each university in California or across the United States

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On the Cover Continued from previous page

shouldn’t try to provide the best, positive, meaningful experience for every student who comes through the door. More simply put, if the student is good enough to enter a university, then that university has to be good enough to keep them. That’s the challenge. No university is perfect at that. Some are better at it but it takes into account not only the university’s ability to do it but also the individual’s ability to do it. You and I both know it’s not intended to be an easy success story. It’s intended to be challenging. And those challenges are often (faced) in a controlled setting at the university. So dealing with injustices, whatever they may be, is very important to the growing process of an individual because a university life compares nothing to the life we have to live after the university life. College was a long time ago for me. A lot more has happened that has challenged me after college than in college. And so that’s what we’re preparing our students to really do. So I want every student of color not to just react to that one moment or those singular statements, recognizing that it is a process and that’s what separates those who finish from those who don’t start. I want every student of color to come to this university and help this university be the absolute best it can be. NCJ: I wanted to end on a personal note. Obviously, accepting a position like this, uprooting your family and moving them across the country, there’s a professional element to a decision like that but there’s also a very personal element. Personally speaking, why did you feel Humboldt County was a good place to move your family to, a good place for you guys to live that next chapter together? Jackson: Let me go back a couple of segments just before then. I was at a university, coming up through the ranks. I already told the story about the first professional position I had and one leading to the next. Somewhere in there, I became a vice president, twice. And colleagues around me, including myself, would say, ‘Why aren’t there more women of color and men of color in positions of presidents?’ And the easy answer was none of

us were aspiring to them. It wasn’t that we were trying, it was that we liked the jobs we had. I really enjoyed being a vice president for student affairs. One could say it’s one of the best jobs on the planet, working with students and doing all the things we get to do on a regular basis. But if we’re going to try to get more people in the ranks of the presidency, someone has to say, ‘I’m going to give up a really good job to take a presidency,’ not knowing it’s also a really good job with different challenges. So I heard that call and I said, ‘Well, I’ve got to at least adhere to some of the same challenges that others are challenging me to do,’ so I took it. I went after a presidency and fortunately it was Black Hills State University that provided me the perfect opportunity to lead, I believe, a fantastic university, one that my daughter, I hope, will graduate from one day. I can’t say anything bad about Black Hills State University. I led it and it’s a beautiful, wonderful university. But we also knew that we had the skillsets and Humboldt was looking for a leader to follow the leadership of President Rossbacher — and there’s some similarities, not only the natural beauty and the ocean, but a regional, remote area that played, I think, fairly nicely with things that we thought were very important to us as a family and so we put our name into the hat. And you never know. It’s not something that is given by any measure. We just hope we’re given the chance and we do the absolute best we can and maybe by the end of a dozen years, or however long they let us stay here, people will look back and say, ‘They did the best they could and the place is better as a result of it.’ But it leads me back to the very first point I made, which is, I do what I do to provide the best positive, meaningful experience for our students. And I can start every day with that and I know at the end of every day I’ve done something to at least make it more meaningful. l

“We just hope we’re given the chance and we do the absolute best we can and maybe by the end of a dozen years, or however long they let us stay here, people will look back and say, ‘They did the best they could and the place is better as a result of it.’”

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16  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


Table Talk

Ten Items or Fewer: Little Japan edition By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

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aybe you’re already swinging by Little Japan (2848 F St., Eureka) for the sushi-grade fish in the freezer (where else are you going to get a single curled octopus tentacle?), mochi sweets or pillow-sized bags of short-grain fancy rice. But the little Henderson Center shop is packed with Japanese goodies and cult faves. Here’s a quick list to fill your tiny double-decker cart. Miso. For those of us for whom miso soup is a staple, the relief of not having to haul a trunk full of this stuff back from San Francisco is very real. For those wondering why their miso soup at home isn’t turning out like their auntie’s or the bowls at restaurants: It’s your miso. For $5.99, you can pick up a little tub of organic soybean paste or the kind with the dashi already added — no judgement. For the latter, simply boil your vegetables, tofu and whatnot, turn down the heat and dissolve the paste completely. Done. Soy sauce. Calling it now: Fancy soy sauce is the new fancy olive oil. At least it should be. The Shoda Marudaizu Shoyu is rich and intense ($9.99). Use it to finish dishes, to dip, to pour at the table and for host gifts. Keep it in the fridge because it kind of tastes better and if you don’t, my mother will know and you don’t want that. Candy. Small as the store is, the snack aisle still overwhelms. You can’t lose with creamy, hard-then-taffy-like White Rabbit candy wrapped in an inner layer of edible rice paper, a Chinese classic since the 1940s. Grab some gummies, too — softer, springier and mind-blowingly flavored. Team muscat grape and peach, here. And are those bags of Kit Kats in strawberry cheesecake and miso flavor? Yes. Because in Japan, Kit Kat bars change seasonally

A bevy of cold sakes for summer. Photo by Zach Lathouris

and bank on novelty. Expect to see a constantly changing roster of at least half dozen flavors here. Soft drinks. Let’s have more sugar in the form of these drinks for around $2 each. Sure, there’s strong green tea and ginseng elixir, but dig the neon green of this melon soda (make a vanilla float — 127 million people can’t be wrong). The classic ramune (pronounced ra-mu-nay) soda requires forcing a glass ball into the bottle neck to open — safer than it sounds! — so ask the staff for help if you’re new or rusty. Creamy milk tea, yogurty fruit-flavored Calpico and a maneki neko (lucky cat) soda that tastes like honey or brown sugar, or … you know, whatever. Look at that adorable cat! Kitchen gadgets. For the serious chef, there’s a glass case of very good knives. For the rest of us, there’s a whole wall of squee-worthy things to mold rice into pandas, sweet bento boxes, egg slicers, itty-bitty sieves and, best of all, crab scissors and pickers. These skinny tools that crack, snip and empty out a shell are the only way to get every last morsel out of a crab without looking like an otter in a messy shirt. Sake. The hardcore enthusiast will surely find something special on the shelves and the novice need only ask for a recommendation. A smooth, lightly sweet and

fragrant option to enjoy cold is the junmai ginjo sake from Yoshi No Gawa on special for $19.99. During summer picnic season, consider a pop top ($4-$7). Yup. Single servings to put in the cooler and pop open, no tiny cups or decanter required. Is that a samurai fox and a little cartoon dog with an upended bowl of ramen on his head? Yes. Kampai. Noodles. We’ve covered some of the legion instant ramen offerings here (“Ramen Rumble,” Aug. 25, 2016) and we still stand by our favorite Myojo Chukazanmai ($2.19). But there’s more to explore, like dry green tea soba ($6.49) and the fresh udon and ramen in the freezer. The spicy sesame tan tan ramen with fresh noodles is the best way to up your home ramen game without spending 24 hours roasting and boiling pork bones. Kewpie mayonnaise. If you have already tasted the contents of the iconic red-capped squeeze bottle with the little baby on the front, you already know it’s good on everything ($5.99). If not, don’t resist. Fries, sandwiches, potato salad, leftover spaghetti, pizza. (Spins in chair, cackling.) Soon you’ll see. Then you’ll be ready for its cousin, the Kewpie Deep Roasted Sesame Dressing ($3.59), which will make you flip a table the next time you’re served the orange stuff in a Japanese restaurant.

Dishes. Browse the blue and white traditional bowls, ceramic soup spoons, dipping dishes, rice bowls and tea cups — something will speak to you. This trio, with their respective crab ($4.50), origami ($3.49) and cherry blossom ($8) motifs are exactly the sort of things you buy as a gift and then keep. Don’t sleep on the sets of chopsticks near the counter, either. Chips. Take a break from the Extreme Doritos and Hot Cheetos that blew out your taste receptors for a minute and try the relatively mild Calbee baked wasabi shrimp chips ($2.19) and nori potato chips ($4.69). They’re wonderful and as addictive as their hardcore western counterparts, which will absolutely still be there when you’ve finished these.

Bonus

Socks. In this hard and cynical world, allow yourself to be charmed by whimsical split-toed tabi socks adorned with pandas, cats and majestic Hokusai waves ($5). There are socks with individual toes, too, for those with more patience. l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com.

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Arts Nights

Arts Alive!

Saturday, July 6, 6-9 p.m.

P

resented by Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and performances are held the first Saturday of each month. For more information, call 442-9054 or go to www.eurekamainstreet.org

707 BAR (formerly Steve and Dave’s) First and C streets. Barry Evans photography. Music by Dr. Squid. A TASTE OF BIM 613 Third St. Maggie Draper, artwork. ADORNI CENTER 1011 Waterfront Drive Paul Rickard and Barbara Saul, artwork. AMERICAN INDIAN ART AND GIFT SHOP 245 F St. Trinidad Goodshield, artwork. ARTS AND DRAFTS 422 First St. “Alter Ego,” Lauren Miller. Music by CuppaJo. BACK ROOM GALLERY 525 Second St. “Abstracts in the Back Room,” Reuben T. Mayes, acrylic paintings. Live painting with Reuben. BANDIT SAVORY & SWEET 525 Second St. Patricia Rose, painting; Piano music; Drink specials. BECAUSE COFFEE 300 F St. “Memes for Gen Xers,” Benny White, limited run framed prints. BOOKLEGGER 402F St. Jeff DeMark and Jason Marak will be sharing short stories. 7-8:30 p.m. BRENDA TUXFORD GALLERY at Ink People 525 Seventh St. “Floating Worlds,” Grethe Von Frausing-Broch. BUZZARDS NEST ANTIQUES & UNIQUES 420 Second St. Ellen Engels, upcycled vintage glassware. C STREET STUDIOS & HALL GALLERY 208 C St. C Street studio artists.

CALIFORNIA SCIENCE SOLUTIONS 328 Second St. TBD. CANVAS + CLAY GALLERY 233 F St. “OFF THE GRID,” a two-person exhibition featuring Eric Lee, C+C artist, colorful puzzle-pieced abstract landscapes and animals and Sam Whitlach, C+C teacher, geometric gray scale and line work. CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. Kylan Luken, photography. CHERI BLACKERBY MUSEUM 272 C St. Featured artist Mark Williams, retrospective of his prominent pieces over the last 20 years, including ceramic and paper maché vehicles and embroidered pillows. Also on exhibit are works from all our artists. CLARKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM 240 E St. New exhibits: Main Hall: “Sewing Circles: Stitching Together Community,” local communities created by the act of quilting, with visual representation, and quilts from the Clarke collection. Nealis Hall: “When Designs Escaped Baskets,” visual language of basket designs of Hupa, Karuk, Wiyot and Yurok tribes, and how designs became car decals, tattoos and pottery; “Women’s Ceremonial Dresses: Then and Now,” 150 years of dressmaking for ceremony, including regalia items (necklaces, basket caps, and hair ties) from Clarke and community collections, along with discussion on the difference between

Kat Wallace, “Ecstasy of Self” at Good Relations. regalia and costume, and a contemporary dress from the Wiyot. Opera Alley: “Designs on the Wall,” a pairing of photos related to the new basketry and quilt exhibits. Closing exhibits: Victorian Room: Victorian photography. Under construction: The Gun Vault: Opening late 2019. CLARKE PLAZA Third and E streets. Music by DJ Goldylocks as part of the Madrone/Humboldt Skate Lab special event.

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

THE

“The library is inhabited by spirits that come out of the pages at night.” — Isabel Allende

Used Books

New Books

Special orders welcome for new books!

402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

18  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

I SION VCENTER Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years. DR. KENNETH KAISER OPTOMETRIST Previously with Eye of the Phoenix

616 H STREET • EUREKA

THE CONNECTION at HPRC 334 F St. “Inquire and Inspire Through Acrylic Painting,” Chaz Arrington and Linda Joanne, acrylics; Music by Original Anna Banana; Light refreshments served. COAST GUARD PLAZA Foot of F St. Rueda by the Bay, free-for-fun salsa jam, dance in or out of the wheel as you like, or just hang out and watch. DISCOVERY MUSEUM 612 G St. Kids Alive Drop-off Program 5:30 to 8 p.m. Kids


3-12 $15 members/$20 nonmembers. EUREKA VISITOR’S CENTER (inside the Clarke) 240 E St. Music by Die Geister Beschworen. FOREVER FOUND 105 Fifth St. Carmel Reyes, Matthew Obrian (SkullFace Project), Madeliene Fouchaux, visual art. Dan McCauley, metal sculptures. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. “Ecstasy of Self,” M.K. Wallace, oil on canvas, oil on wood panel and watercolor on paper. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL at the Morris Graves Museum of Art 636 F St. Performance Rotunda: Music by The Latin Peppers. William Thonson Gallery: “Spirit of the Day,” Nishiki Sugawara-Beda, paintings. Anderson Gallery: “Layered Stories,” Miya Hannan, installations, sculpture and drawings. Knight Gallery: “The Odyssey of These Days,” Wesley Hurd, paintings. Melvin Schuler Garden: Dan McCauley, sculptures using materials from scrap yards. Homer Balabanis Gallery/ Humboldt Artist Gallery: Unique, original gifts. Museum Store/Permanent Collection: Artwork on view by Morris Graves, Glenn Berry, Melvin Schuler and Romano Gabriel. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE Opera Alley Gallery Reuben T. Mayes, artwork. Music by Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers. HUMBOLDT BEER WORKS Corner of Third and B streets (across from North Coast Co-op) Demos of HBW’s main house system and brewing demos. Music by Former Chimps (formerly the Get-Aways). HUMBOLDT CIDER CO. TAP ROOM 517 F St. Alder Gustafson, ceramics. Music by Luke Tygar McCarthy and John Swanson. HUMBOLDT COUNTY DEMOCRATIC HEADQUARTERS 527 Fourth St.

Sheri Jewett, alcohol ink landscape paintings; “The Art of Dialog,” Kathryn Donahue, RN leading discussion, “Why Improved Medicare for All?”; Q&A and several mini-clips from Dr. Weisbart’s presentation earlier this year at HSU. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Jeff Stanley, acrylic and open acrylic paintings. Music by Squeeze. HUMBOLDT HONEYWINE 723 Third St. TBA. INN AT 2nd AND C (Historic Eagle House) Historic Ballroom TSUMNU, mixed media. JACK’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 4 C St., Suite B. Rachel K. Schlueter, abstract paintings. JUST MY TYPE LETTERPRESS PAPERIE 501 Third St. “Found Faces in Driftwood,” David Arthur. KENNY’S CHOCOLATE 425 Snug Alley Rob Hampson, artwork. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. “Ugly Buddies,” Dorian Daneau. LIVELLA STUDIO 120 Second St. Now open. Please stop in. LIVING THE DREAM ICE CREAM 1 F St. “Art with Heart,” Jenifer Sherman Ruppe and Karan Collenberg. LOTUS STUDIO 630 Second St. Pat Kanzler, acrylic paintings. Music by Arcata Threshold Choir. THE MADRONE BRICK FIRE PIZZA & TAPHOUSE 421 Third St. Fundraising event for youth groups including Boys and Girls Club and Raven Project with Humboldt Skate Lab (617 Third St.) Skateboard art for sale, halfpipe skateboard demonstrations and more. MANTOVA’S TWO STREET MUSIC 124 Second St. Music by Adamas. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Over 40 local artists. MENDENHALL STUDIOS 215 C St. (Cor-

Continued on next page »

Old Town’s Premiere Tattoo Studio

Full Custom Tattooing Stop by and Check out our Tattoo-Related Art, Antiques & History

Walk-Ins Welcome

Appointments Preferred

TUES-SAT 11AM - 7 PM 138 2ND ST. Eureka, CA (707) 443-0666

• Featuring • Henry KrÜger John Lopez Rob Gribbin Brian Mead

@sailors-grave-tattoo @sailors_grave_tattoo_humboldt

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

19


Arts Nights Continued from previous page

Gallery Art Opening on

Trinidad Art Night Friday, July 5, 6:00-9:00 p.m. Now Featuring Artists Elaine Y Shore, ceramics Patricia Sundgren Smith, print maker.

OPEN DAILY 10-5

490 Trinity St, Trinidad • 707-677-3770

Fresh from our roaster to your mug

Between 2nd & 3rd on “F” St. OLD TOWN, EUREKA 502 Henderson Street IN FRIENDLY HENDERSON CENTER

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Melanie Matteoli and Michal Mugrage, acrylic on canvas and watercolors; Music by “Jamo” James Khougaz. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. Sixty-first Summer Exhibition honoring artist Julia Bednar. Music TBA. REDWOOD CURTAIN THEATRE 220 First St. Lobby Gallery: Kathrin Burleson, watercolor paintings. SAILOR’S GRAVE Ian Carey at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo related art, antiques and memorabilia, new works. ner of Second and C Streets) Scott SEAMOOR’S 212 F St. DaveO!, paint, and Hemphill Studio: “Seduca,” hand pen and ink drawings. carved Madrone burl with copper. SHIPWRECK! Vintage and Handmade Topher Reynolds: Soon to be open 430 Third St. Jon Bout, oil on panel, “Glass Garage,” live glass blowing colored pencil and graphite. demonstrations, and vending. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and NORTH OF FOURTH Third and C Engineering 401 Fifth St. “Irreconcilable streets. Music by Shinbone à Deux. Differences,” Ben Vaughn Zeitlin. NOTHING OBVIOUS 426 Third St. SOULSHINE ARTS & FLAMEWORKING Artist TBA. STUDIO 411 Fifth St. Live glass blowing OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING demonstrations. 203 F St. John Palmer, landscape STUDIO 424 424 Third St. paintings. Elaina Erola, watercolors. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY (on the GaSYNAPSIS NOVA 212 G St. zebo) 417 Second St. Featured artist 6-8 p.m. LGTBQ Art Show, 8 p.m. “At Julie Sessa. Sea” Cabaret, Synapsis performers OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOexplore themes of ocean, surf and sea LATES 211 F St. Zack Rouse, photogin their monthly cabaret. raphy. Music by Jim Lahman Band. TREASURES BY THE BAY 213 F S. Michael OLD TOWN SQUARE Second and F Cowan, hand knife-cut inlaid wood streets. Music by Pure Mongrel. paintings; Ryan Johnson, photography; OTTO +OLIVE 330 Second St. Megan McAtee, paintings; Live music. Angela Tellez, boudoir photography. TRUCHAS GALLERY at Los Bagels 403 PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St. “Counting on Humboldt,” Second St. (inside Inn at 2nd and C local youth artists, mixed media colSts.) TSUMNU, mixed media. lage illustrations. PIANTE 620 Second St. TWO STREET ART LAB 527 Second St. Philomena Franca Barba and Jeff “Rust in Peace,” Community art show Hunter, paintings. exploring rust as an element. A benefit PROPER WELLNESS CENTER 517 Fifth for the Kinetic Museum Eureka. St. Collection of local artists. RAMONE’S BAKERY 209 E St. l


Arts Nights

Patricia Sundgren Smith’s print at Trinidad Art Gallery.

Trinidad Art Nights July 5, 6-9 p.m. FORBES AND ASSOCIATES 343 Main St. “Rhythm’s In Time,” Chris Knopp, watercolors. HEADIES PIZZA AND POUR 359 Main St. Susan Mayclin Stephenson, oil on canvas, prints and notecards. MOONSTONE CROSSING 529 Trinity St. Rick Tolley, oil paintings. NED SIMMONS GALLERY 380 Janis Court (Trinidad Coastal Land Trust). Plein Air Artists Show, multiple artists including but not limited to: Jody Bryan, Stock Schulueter, Andrew Daniel, Richard Stockwell, Rick Tolley and Paul Rickard, various mediums. REDWOOD COAST VACATION RENTALS 361 Main St. Colleen Clifford, stained glass. SAUNDERS PARK (start of Patricks Point Drive) Fire dancing by Circus of the Elements. Show start time is 8:45 p.m. SAUNDERS PLAZA (parking lot area near Murphy’s Market) Music by Absynth Quartet; Face painting by G’s Face Painting; A game of cornhole. SEASCAPE RESTAURANT AND PIER 1 Bay St. “Trees to Sea,” Zack Stanton, photography. THE LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 355 Main St. Genise L. Smith, digitally crafted art. TRINIDAD ART GALLERY 490 Trinity St. Featuring ceramicist Elaine Y Shore and linocut artist and printmaker Patricia Sundgren Smith. Music by Penny Gunn

and Son. A wine pour will benefit Trinidad Coastal Land Trust. TRINIDAD EATERY AND GALLERY 607 Parker Road. “Miniatures,” Nancy Pippin, Fimo clay. Music by Dessert First. TRINIDAD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 300 Trinity St. “Boffer Ring,” Styrofoam swordplay and role play. Skate ramps provided by Humboldt Skatepark Collective. TRINIDAD MUSEUM 400 Janis Court (next to library). Featuring the newly refreshed mycology exhibit in the Natural History Room; 50th Year Commemoration of Lady Bird Johnson Grove; “Schools and Scholars” exhibit; Music by Nancy and the Do Rites. TRINIDAD TOWN HALL CIVIC CLUB ROOM 409 Trinity St. Showcase of Westhaven Center for the Arts featuring Writer in Residence Bryan Radzin; Artist in Residence Crystal Ange; and music by prior Musician in Residence Seabury Gould; Art display of WCA’s upcoming featured artist, Debbi Kallish. Learn about upcoming workshops and sign on as a WCA member. TRINIDAD TRADING COMPANY 460 Main St. Leslie, Francesca and Cheyenne, bead hangings. WINDANSEA 410 Main St. Danielle Hurley, Trinidad-themed bottle cap magnets and wire wrapped Trinidad agate necklaces. l northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

21


Art Beat

Summer Stories and Floating Worlds Group shows at Redwood Arts Association and Brenda Tuxford Gallery By Gabrielle Gopinath artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

S

ummer is the season for group exhibitions. The 61st annual open-call summer exhibition at Redwood Arts Association, held in honor of longtime member Julia Bednar, opens this month with an un-themed show of mostly painting and photography on both floors. A couple blocks away at the Ink People’s Brenda Tuxford Gallery, a themed group exhibition titled Floating Worlds puts together a roster of artists who are, in the words of curator Grethe von Frausing-Borch, “looking back at looking forward to the glamor of adulthood.” “This show ... explores the theme of what we thought being an adult would be like as a kid. Think of it as sort of a personal retro-futurism,” Von Frausing-Borch writes. Several of her own watercolor paintings are in the show; they “explore a fantasy of adulthood created from the television, movies, books and magazines (I) absorbed as a child.” Small, impressionistic renderings in loose curving brushstrokes illustrate scenes from this small girl’s touchingly anachronistic maturity-idyll: Delicate, doll-like figures promenade in couture, recline glamorously on beaches and dance the tango with faceless tuxedoed males. “King of Diamonds,” by Arupa, delivers differently on the exhibition brief by centering an abstracted face on a diamond-shaped field, presenting adult cognizance as an inward turn. Smiling lips, sleepy-lidded eyes and pendulous gauged earlobes make shorthand for the life contemplative; rays streaming from a diamond-shaped third eye suggest the astral plane.

A couple of blocks away, the RAA group show is strong on landscape and nature scenes. Representations of local places, birds and animals range from pen and ink contour drawing (Karen Merry’s “Dragon, Jellies and Frogfish”) and plein-air watercolor (John P. Jameton’s “Arcata Marsh”) to expressionistic gouache (Elsie Mendes’ attentively observed “Mother Goose with Goslings”). As ever, an open-call exhibition format makes for an unfocused, yet predictable viewing experience. But there are artworks here with the capacity to surprise and charm. The imagery in Katie Pasquini Masopust’s quilt “Spring Equinox” looks from a distance like a black and white screen being splashed with golden light. Up close you can see that the effect is being generated by dozens or perhaps hundreds of individually stitched fabric pieces shaped like circles, spirals and lozenges. The bubbled texture of many fabrics adds a dimension of volumetric relief. Yael Burkes’ untitled fiber piece, mounted horizontally on the wall, presents an undulating surface of interlocking fibers in melting sunset colors that could describe forms at either macro or micro scale. Taken in conjunction with the strong fiber-arts exhibition RAA mounted this spring, these pieces speak to the quality of the work being produced locally in this medium. The same is true of photography. In Jon Exley’s panoramic “Garment Party,” colorful T-shirts printed with radiating hippie emblems twist in the wind, alligator-clipped by wire hangers against a blue and gold California landscape. It’s disorienting — one part kite festival, one

22  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Watercolor and gouache paintings by Grethe von Frausing-Borch Courtesy of the artist.

part cipher for an embodied human gathering. A very different photograph, Diane Schoenfeld’s silver gelatin print “Woman with Her Beloved Dogs” frames a woman and two shaggy-jawed wolfhounds as shifting apex points of an isosceles triangle. While it’s interesting to see how making a classic triad portrait composition multi-species can enliven it — what lingers in the memory is the intensity of the subject’s look and the state of rapt absorption the photographer captured. Schoenfeld’s formally elegant, psychologically incisive photographs have made solo appearances in several RAA group shows now; hopefully soon we’ll have a chance to see them in one another’s company. Amidst competent renderings of marshes around Humboldt Bay and snow-capped Trinity Alps, Irina Abolasik’s abstract painting “Universe Impressions from Humboldt” is an outlier: It says more

about the human dimension of the place. It’s a murky expanse of green-blue paint shot through with jagged streaks of light and populated with wiggly protoplasmic forms, looking exactly as if someone had been blowing an epic series of smoke rings in Eureka on a sunny day and then those concentric rings kept on floating until they hit the atmosphere’s outer reaches and drifted off into intergalactic space, infusing the cosmos with a homeopathic tincture of Humboldt. l The Redwood Art Association’s 2019 Summer Exhibition will be on view through July 19 at 603 F St. in Eureka. “Floating Worlds” will be on view at the Brenda Tuxford Gallery at 525 Seventh St. in Eureka through July 27. Gabrielle Gopinath is an art writer, critic and curator based in Arcata.


Setlist

An Eye to the Sky

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s the Fourth of July on Thursday and I’ll be skipping that day here this week. After all, what could I really suggest for you that would outshine this evening’s celebration of bellicosity and fireworks? Nothing. Which is exactly how I feel about this holiday in the age of Mitch McConnell. No push toward a central patriotism or a great love of the national narrative. Just a blank dullness. As long as we remain a nation of bigots and reactionary dipshits at permanent war to preserve the power of a ruling class more evil and bloodthirsty than any monarchy in history, this native son has no love to give on the fourth. I am happy to celebrate the eternal spirit of revolution, however, as well as justice, liberty, humanity and the better angels of our nature, which are all things worth pursuing any day of the year. As I write this there are tanks massing in Washington, D.C., for a parade that will in all likelihood serve less as a paean to our country and fellow citizens and more as a low tribute to the insane Freudian death drive of our worst politicians and the absolutely ugliest form of human expression we know: war. And who are the pundits and leaders who casually mention bombings and invasions like they’re talking to the caterers? To a person they are cowards, all of them. From John Bolton to Donald Trump, these people look like they would have to be hospitalized with a nervous breakdown if you popped a balloon behind them. If there is anything worth celebrating, it is the resilience and inventiveness of humanity, with a prayer to the future that we can eventually create a government that won’t just hand the reins over to the wealthiest and morally void minority to cull profit out of our mass destruction. That if we work and organize enough, we will eventually get to “of the people, by the people, for the people.” Keep on rockin’ in the free world.

Friday

The Siren’s Song is hosting an evening of freaky, improvisational folk music tonight at 7 p.m. Andrew Weathers is a solo composer who specializes in developing wild sounds out of acoustic properties, while Blaine Todd deconstructs the nature of a singer/songwriter until the resulting distillation steams in Americana abstraction. Both artists are highly active in the world of production and label running. The local scene will be represented by the transubstantial supergroup Medicine Baul as well

as an exercise in American acoustic primitivism provided by Die Geister Beschwören ($5).

Saturday

It’s Arts Alive! in Eureka, which means there will be a great many musicians playing their hearts out for free within walking distance of one another on this beautiful summer evening. May I recommend a couple of sets? Fiddler Rosalind Parducci from local neo-folk trio No Pardon will be playing at Arts and Drafts at 7 p.m., while the Jim Lahman Mary Wander plays the Outer Space on Tuesday, July 9 Band will be rocking it at 7 p.m. Photo by Evyenia Karapolous, Courtesy of the artist over at Phatsy Kline’s an hour later. If Eureka’s not your scene, have Tuesday no fear. There are a couple of dance parties Lancaster, Pennsylvania’s Mary Wander is happening in other burgs. The Jam is hosting a singer/songwriter whose folk-punk songs a reoccurring house, dubstep, and drum and wander through the streets of love, gender bass event called dConstructive tonight at and contemporary politics. Tonight they will 9:30 p.m. Just $5 will let you inside where be at the Outer Space where they will be you can dance to the sounds generated by joined by the similarly-minded local heroes Monsieur, Badam and Sudakra. If you like in Blood Hunny, as well as the truly magical your sounds a little more canned and with a starlight darlings of Wild Abandon at 7 p.m. world-beat flavor, the Logger Bar is hosting ($5-$20 sliding scale). Culture Clash around the same time. It’s a DJ-curated dance-stravaganza with an emWednesday phasis on reggae and Afro-beat tunes from Whomp Whomp Wednesday rolls out the ’80s and beyond. And it’s freeeeeee. at the Jam again. Tonight’s show is titled “A Sunday Path to Northern Nights” and will feature Our local PBS affiliate station KEET TV is artists who are sympatico with the cyberhosting a free songwriting workshop at the netic forest adventure that is coming up Arcata Playhouse today at 10 a.m. Join local fast in a couple of weeks. The doors open at 9:30 p.m., and this evening’s curators pros Jeff DeMark and Jan Bramlett as they are Trevor Kelly, Dov1, G.I.R. and Hypha. walk you through the process of unlocking Admission is $15, $12 if you score advance your own inner musical storyteller, with tips tickets, which might not be a bad idea on how to stylishly shape your sentiments because this one can get packed. l into a finished song worthy of an audience.

Monday

The Savage Henry Comedy Club is hosting a free recording of its comedy podcast tonight at 7 p.m. If you have ever felt like you wanted to be a part of the exciting world of podcasting but didn’t have much to offer content-wise, never fear: You can be immortalized among the stars as a part of that most venerable of institutions, the live studio audience.

live jazz, small bites & craft cocktails

THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS in the basement of the jacoby storehouse

780 7th st. ARCATA

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo is an American who will never let anyone else define the qualities or value of patriotism for him. He lives in Arcata. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

23


Live Entertainment Grid PA IR UP FO R T H I S SUM M E RS FE S T IVAL S E A S O N

HERE’S TO THE GOOD TIMES

Music & More VENUE

THUR 7/4

(707) 822-3090 987 H ST, Arcata

(707) 476-0400 Bayshore Mall

www.humboldtclothing.com

C I T N E H AUTALIAN IT ENU M Organic Products

CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-2013

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611

Eyes Anonymous (’80s hits) 9pm Free

mazzottis.com www.facebook.com/Mazzottis

M-T-W 7/8-10

Jazz Jam 6pm Free

[W] Latin Dance Night 9pm $5

Karaoke 8pm Free [W] Karaoke w/Rockstar Lone Star Junction (outlaw country)

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

The Lost Dogs (blues, R&B) 7:30pm Free

[T] Trivia Tuesday 6-8pm Free All agesc

THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

First Fridays - Sign Of The Times w/DJ EastOne 10pm Free

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

Phish - Live Webcast from Fenway Park, Boston 4pm

FIELDBROOK MARKET 4636 Fieldbrook Road 633-6097

Phish - Live Webcast from Fenway Park, Boston 4pm

Humboldt Crabs Baseball 2019 Season • July/August SUN

Open Daily 8am -2am

BEST Fried Pickles

773 8th St. Arcata 822-1900

Floral Patterns (emo post rock)

CLAM BEACH TAVERN 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-0545

Bloody Mary

Free WiFi Spot

Mother Vines (surf psych punk) 8pm The Boys of Summer (Eagles music) 9pm Free

Fresh Seafood & Steaks Student & Senior Discounts

SUN 7/7

Front Ear 9pm Free

BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Excellent Wine & Spirits Drink Specials & Full Bar

SAT 7/6

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-1220

BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 822-3453

MIX + MATCH FOR A GREAT COMBO DEAL

FRI 7/5

FIFA Women’s FIFA Women’s [W] Sci-Fi Night: Attack From Space World Cup 2019 7:30am World Cup 2019 7:30am (1965) 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev Free w/$5 food/bev purchase Free w/$5 food/bev purchase purchase

THE BASEMENT 780 Seventh St. 826-2345

ALL TSHIRTS, TANKS + HATS SAVE 20% WHEN YOU BUY 2

ARCATA & NORTH

1

MON

TUE

WED

THU

2 3 4 5 JUNE SCHEDULE Solano Mudcats 7pm Solano Mudcats 2:30pm

FRI

SAT

6 Puf Caps 7pm 12 13 Ukiah Hawks 7pm 19 20 West Coast Kings 7pm 26 27 Lincoln Potters/Healdsburg 7pm 2August 3August Pacific Union Financial Capitalists

Crabs Ballpark, www.humboldtcrabs.com 8 99th & F Arcata 10 11

7 Puf Caps 12:30pm

14 Ukiah Hawks 15 12:30pm

16

21 West Coast Kings 12:30pm

23

22

San Leandro Ports 7pm

17 Redding Ringtails 7pm 24 Redding Colt 45s 7pm 31 @Humboldt B52’s 7pm

18 25

28 Lincoln Potters/ 29 30 1August Healdsburg Pacific Union Financial Capitalists Puf Caps 7pm 12:30pm 4August Puf Tickets available at Sport & Cycle in Eureka & Fortuna, and Wildberries Marketplace in Arcata Caps 12:30pm Check the website for promotions and special events

= Appearance by the World Famous Crab Grass Band

= Road Game

Hangover Breakfast

What’s your food crush? 744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

24  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email us your tip and we’ll check it out!

NCJ HUM PLATE

jennifer@northcoastjournal.com


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 7/4

FRI 7/5

THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766 LARRUPIN CAFE 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad

SAT 7/6

SUN 7/7

M-T-W 7/8-10

DConstructive Round 3 w/Monsieur, Badam, Sudakra 9:30pm $5

Deep Groove Society 10pm $5

[T] Top Grade Tuesdays Dancehall Reggae w/DJ RealYouth, Cassidy Blaze 10pm $5 [W] Trivia Night 6pm, Whomp Whomp Wednesdays 10pm TBA

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151

Undercovers (covers) 9pm Free

Culture Clash with DJ Chill and Pozitive iDiaz 9pm Free

[T] Old Time Music Jam 8pm Free

The Tidepool High Divers (counbtry rockabilly) 6pm Free

Stellar Jays 6pm Free

[T] The Low Notes (jazz) 6pm Free [W] Piet Dalmolen (solo guitar) 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000 NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

Open Mic 7pm Free

Goat Karaoke 9pm Free

[T] Sonido Pachanguero 9pm

Two Mic Sundays (comedy) 5pm Free

[T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6-8pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad 677-3543 PIERSON PARK 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville

INTRODUCING

Eureka and South on next page

[M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5 No Concert This Week

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7224

The Lost Dogs (blues, R&B) 8pm Free

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-7580

[M] Shuffleboard Tournament 7pm

Trivia Night 8pm Free

SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919

DJ Dance Party 10pm

DJ Dance Party 10pm

Dance Party w/DJ Pressure 10pm

TOBY AND JACKS 822-4198 764 Ninth St., Arcata

DJ Dance Party TBA

Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

[M] Karaoke with DJ Marv 8pm

northcoasttickets.com

Local tickets. One place. Sophisticated. Intuitive. Easy-to-use.

[W] Old School Hip Hop w/DJ Hal TBA

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Our platform is free to event creators. Work with the team you trust, who cares about your business or organization and the success of the Humboldt county area. Contact Melissa Sanderson at 707-498-8370 or melissa@northcoastjournal.com

Dinner ser ved Wednesday-Sunday 5 pm - 8:30 pm Reser vations Recommended northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

25


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE ARTS & DRAFTS 422 First St., Eureka 798-6329

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613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

EUREKA & SOUTH

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway

THUR 7/4

FRI 7/5

SAT 7/6

4th of July: Brew with a View (drink specials/fireworks watching)

Pre-game Game Night Music TBA 5-10pm

Rosalind Parducci (fiddle) 7pm

[W] LGBT’riviaQ 6-9pm

Lightning Boom Productions (DJ music) 9pm Free

[W] Trivia Night with Jeff & Kyle 7pm Free [T, W] Summer Music Series w/ Chris & Tony 6-9pm [T] Karaoke 9pm [W] Open Mic/Jam session 7pm Free

Dr. Squid (dance hits) BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 9pm Free Summer Music Series w/Chris Summer Music Series w/Jim BENBOW HISTORIC INN 445 Lake Benbow Drive 923-2124 & Tony 6-9pm & Francis 6-9pm BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Dr., Redway 923-3188 DOUBLE D STEAK & SEAFOOD 320 Main St., Fortuna 725-3700

our TEPPANYAKI menu

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

Check out our Spring menu

4th of July Live Music Series GYPPO ALE MILL 986-7700 1661 Upper Pacific Dr., Shelter Cove w/On Safari, Jared Smith and ACE 2-10pm Free HUMBOLDT CIDER CO. - GARDEN 3750 Harris St., Eureka 798-6023 Summer Concert Series MADAKET PLAZA w/ Clean Sweep (R&B/funk) Foot of C St., Eureka 6-8pm Free MADRONE BRICK FIRE PIZZA AND TAPHOUSE 421 Third St., Eureka 273-5129 NORTH OF FOURTH 207 Third St., Eureka 798-6303 OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 PALM LOUNGE - EUREKA INN, The Color of Jazz 518 Seventh St., Eureka 497-6093 7-11pm Free PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

HUMBOLDT

M-T-W 7/8-10

Anna Hamilton (blues, humor) 6-9pm Free Chuck Mayville (classics) 6-9pm Free

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

20% OFF

SUN 7/7

Live Music Friday: George Mooney7-9pm Free

[W] Pints 4 Non-Profits: Garberville Town Square 2-6pm MeadowMaker (forest bathing rock) 4-7pm Free

Michael Dayvid (acoustic guitar) 7pm

Arts Alive w/The Humboldt Skate Lab Fundraiser 6-9pm

[W] Trivia Night 6-8pm

Shinbone à Deux for Arts Alive (blues, R&B) 9pm Free

[W] Brian Post and Friends Jazz Trio 7pm Free [M] Improv Show 6pm Free [T, W] Cocktail Piano 6-8pm Free

Friday Night Improv Show 7pm Free DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, dance remixes, trap) 10pm Free

DJ Statik (Hip-hop, trap) 10pm Free

HEY, BANDS

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NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS GOOD THROUGH 7/31/2019 LIMIT ONE OFFER PER TABLE

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26  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

MIDDLE OF G ST. ARCATA PLAZA 707.826.7578

Sun - Thurs 8am-3pm Fri. & Sat. 7am-3pm

and/or email with high-res photo to music@northcoast journal.com


Lone Star Junction plays Cher-Ae Heights Casino on Saturday, July 6 at 9 p.m. (free).

Park

Side

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VENUE PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka 444-3344

THUR 7/4

FRI 7/5

SAT 7/6

4th Of July Celebration at Friday Night Market Afterparty Phatsy’s & the Historic Eagle Ft. The Jim Lahman Band (rock, jazz, blues) 8pm Free House 11am-11pm Free FC Sierra 9pm $10 Die Geister Beschwören, Andrew Weathers, Blaine Todd 7pm $5

SAVAGE HENRY COMEDY CLUB 415 Fifth St., Eureka 845-8864 THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778 THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 744 Redway Dr., Garberville VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950

Live Music TBA 4-11pm Chris Riggins 9pm $10 Project Piano w/Katie McGourty 6-8pm

Live Jazz 8:30pm Free

SUN 7/7

M-T-W 7/8-10

[M] Relax & Unwind at Phatsy FIFA Women’s World Cup Kline’s 4-7pm [T] Happy Hour with 9am Free MeadowMaker 4-11pm [W] Jazz with Bill Allison & Friends 7pm Free [M] Monday Night Pod 7-11pm Free [T] Trivia Tuesdays 9pm $5 [T] Jessica Gerhardt w/ Brianna Ibarra 8pm [T] Opera Alley Cats 7:30pm Free [W] Buddy Reed and the Rip it Ups (blues) 7:30pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in

[T] Blues Tuesdays 7pm Free [W] Karaoke 9pm Free

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Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free

VISTA DEL MAR 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka

The

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G R I L L

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Buy Any Adult Buffet get a Child Buffet (12 & under) For FREE! Mon-Fri 11am-2pm. Limit 4 per visit. Can’t be combined with any other offer. GOOD THRU 7/31/19

Angelo’s Pizza Parlor 215 W. 7th St. Eureka 444-9644

Find our speciality salsas at Eureka Natural Foods in Eureka & McKinleyville • Eureka & Arcata Coop • Murphy’s Market in Trinidad

Come have some nacho tots and the new, red, white & blue mimosa to wash it down!

508 Henderson St Eureka 707.445.9702 M-Sat 11am-8pm

M-F 8am-3pm | Sat & Sun 9am-3pm 307 2nd St. Eureka | 707.798.6083 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

27


Calendar July 4 – 11, 2019

4 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

BOOKS Fourth of July Book Sale. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, 1034 H St., Arcata. Features books of all genres. Sale benefits Edilith Eckart Peace Scholarship. WILPF@humboldt1. com. 822-5711.

DANCE Jason Marak. Submitted Art is alive and well-represented in the form of Jeff DeMark and Jason Marak, two writers appearing Saturday, July 6 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Booklegger (free). DeMark will read new poems and short fiction, as well as perform original songs. Marak will read from a group of 100-word flash fiction stories that are part of a hybrid visual/literary project.

Submitted

Who’s a good dog? They ALL are! See our fourlegged friends strut their stuff at The Lost Coast Kennel Club Dog Shows July 5-7 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Humboldt County Fairgrounds (free, parking fee). The AKC dog shows are three days of conformation, obedience, rally and Fast CAT (sounds fun, right?). There will be a puppy class and a Pee Wee class for handlers aged 5-9.

Photo by Patrick Rutherford

Is it us or is it hot in here? Red Light in Blue Lake: An Adult Cabaret Mad River Festival’s tantalizing late-night-adults-only cabaret gets things swinging Friday and Saturday July 5 and 6 starting at 10 p.m., and Sunday, July 7 at 8 p.m. at Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre ($20). It’s a sizzling summer evening of burlesque, comedy, music and cocktails for the 18 and up set.

Boom, Crack, Sizzle Oh, summer, you sunny season of hot dogs, baseball, swimming at the lake. Sure, Memorial Day kicks it off, but the Fourth of July kicks it in. So, where are things crack-a-lackin’? There are celebrations across the county where you can wave the red, white and blue and wish America a happy birthday. From hometown parades to fireworks over the bay, here’s what’s hot this Independence Day. The Arcata Chamber of Commerce puts on a heck of a party at the Arcata Plaza each year during its Fourth of July Jubilee & Bubbles Promenade (free). The fun starts with a bubbles parade starting at (one guess) the Bubbles store at 10 a.m. (the first 100 families receive free bubbles), then parading to the plaza. The fun flows all day (until 5 p.m.) with music from The Undercovers, Lyndsey Battle, Stevie Culture & the Irie Rockers, Conman Bolo and Community African Dance & Drum Arcata. Kids’ activities include a premiere skateboarding experience for all ages, kids zone, face painting, bean bag toss, wax hands, performances by the Humboldt Aerial Collective, breakdancing with the Humboldt Rockers, craft booths and Humboldt Crabs Baseball players signing autographs. Save room for all the food and beer/wine booths. Across the bay in Eureka’s historic Old Town, Eureka Main Street’s Fourth of July Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. offers family fun with blocks and blocks of activities, including four stages of live music, food stalls, arts and crafts vendors, kids’ activities, boat rides on the Madaket, Old Town carriage rides and Timber Heritage Association speeder crew car rides. Keep an eye out for a photo op with Uncle Sam, who’ll be strolling about from 11 a.m to 2 p.m. Over at the Historic Eagle House from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., enjoy more live music, barbecue, a cake walk, an evening DJ dance party and more. It’s small-town Americana at its finest in Ferndale, when the Fourth of July Parade meanders down Main Street on July 4, starting at 10 a.m. and Ferndale volunteer firefighters celebrate Independence Day with engine rides for kids from 10 a.m. to noon. Shelter Cove offers up a slew of fun for folks heading over the hill and to the shore. Gyppo Ale Mill is having a Fourth of July Extravaganza from noon to 10 p.m. with live music, contests, vendors and other patriotic events. Over at the Shelter Cove Commu-

nity Clubhouse, it’s the Shelter Cove July Fourth Art and Craft Show from noon to 6 p.m., where local artisans will be selling their wares. Declare your independence from hunger at the Firefighters BBQ and Pioneer Bake Sale, and enjoy a hometown parade in this exquisite beach town. When you’re ready for things that go boom in the night, head to Eureka or Southern Humboldt for the area’s two professional fireworks Photo by Mark Larson displays (Fortuna does the deal in Newburg Park on July 3). In Eureka, fireworks start over the bay at 10 p.m. Line up along the boardwalk or along First Street from the Adorni Center to Madaket Plaza for the best views (free). In SoHum, watch the skies light up in Benbow at the Fourth of July Fireworks Show at Benbow Lake State Recreation Area (free to view from Benbow Lake, $8 per car day-use fee). Finally, Arcata pet owners, don’t put away those ThunderShirts just yet. On Saturday, July 6 there will be a fireworks show after the Humboldt Crabs game (usually beginning around 9:30 or 10 p.m.). The booms should only last about 5 to 10 minutes, but don’t let the fur fly. Keep ’em inside, safe and secure.

28  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

— Kali Cozyris

Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www.redwoodraks.com.

MUSIC Humboldt Folklife Society Sing-along. First Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Sing your favorite folk, rock and pop songs of the 1960s with Joel Sonenshein. Songbooks are provided. Free. joel@asis.com. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Presented by Eureka Main Street. Every Thursday through Aug. 15. Live music with Clean Sweep (R&B/funk) on July 4 and Britnee Kellog (hot country) on July 11. Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. The 29th annual festival includes a concert celebrating a lifetime of work by Dell’Arte’s award-winning composer/sound designer Timmy Gray, Dell’Arte’s first ever drag show, an experimental theatrical laboratory, a storytelling night, a late night cabaret, a week of local music with the Humboldt Folklife Festival and more. Prices vary. www.dellarte.com.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer.

GARDEN Fortuna Community Wellness Garden Drop-In Volunteer Time. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Health Center, 3750 Rohnerville Road. Learn about growing a variety of produce. Volunteers are welcome to harvest and take away fresh nutritious foods. Kid-friendly. Tools provided. Please bring a reusable water bottle to stay hydrated. Hablamos Español. Free. garden@ opendoorhealth.com.

HOLIDAY EVENTS 20-Minute Fourth of July Cruises. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Madaket, 1 C St., Eureka. During Old Town Eureka’s Fourth of July Festival, 20-minute narrated cruises will depart on the hour and the half hour from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. $6, $4 child-12 years and under (includes infants). humboldt-


baymaritimemuseum@yahoo.com. www.bookeo.com/ madaketcruises. 445-1910. Fourth of July Parade and Fire Truck Rides. 10 a.m. Ferndale Main Street, Ferndale. Ferndale volunteer firefighters celebrate Independence Day with engine rides for kids from 10 a.m. to noon, and a parade down Main Street. info@visitferndale.com. Fourth Of July Extravaganza in Shelter Cove. Noon-10 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. Gyppo Ale Mill presents a full week of events. Enjoy live music, vendors and more at this family fun, dog-friendly event. Free. family@gyppo.com. 986-7700. Fourth of July Festival. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Five city blocks packed with over 100 vendors, live music, food, kids’ activities and Uncle Sam. Fireworks start over the bay at 10 p.m. Free. www. eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054. Fourth of July Fireworks Show in Benbow. Benbow Lake State Recreation Area, 1600 U.S. Highway 101. Picnic tables and barbecues on site, so bring your family and food to join in the celebration. Fireworks approximately at 9:30 p.m. Free to view from Benbow Lake, $8 per car day-use fee. www.parks.ca.gov. Fourth of July Jubilee & Bubbles Promenade. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. A bubbles parade (meet at the store, Bubbles) at 10 a.m., then a full day of food, music, skateboarding, a kids’ zone, performances by the Humboldt Aerial Collective, breakdancing and more. Shelter Cove July Fourth Art and Craft Show. Noon-6 p.m. Community Clubhouse, 1555 Upper Pacific Drive, Whitethorn. Artisan booths, pioneer bake sale, firefighters barbecue, hometown parade. Free admission. 986-7447.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 2:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. The 75th anniversary season is underway. Crabs vs. Solano Mudcats July 4, vs. PUF Capitalists July 5-7, vs. San Leandro Ports July 9-10 $9, $6 seniors/students, $4 children 12 and under.

ETC Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. New members welcome. Anyone with sewing or quilting experience or who wants to learn. Free. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

5 Friday ART

Art Therapy. First Friday of every month, 7-8 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Express yourself through projects in a safe and supportive environment. All ages. Supplies are provided. Free. ahennessy@ ervmgc.com. www.ervmgc.com. 725-3300. Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Drop-in volunteering every Friday to help the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@scraphumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt. org. 822-2452. Trinidad Art Nights. 6-9 p.m. Trinidad, Downtown. A town-wide event including many venues, galleries, wine tasting, outdoor music, live art, fire dancing, kids activities and performances throughout the night. Free. trinidadart95570@gmail.com. www.trinidadartnights. com. 502-5737.

BOOKS Junior Book Club: Operation Redwoods. Every other Friday, 2-3 p.m. Tin Can Mailman, 1000 H St., Arcata. Readers, ages 10-13, are invited to share light refreshments and a good summer read, Operation Redwoods, by S. Terrence French, every Friday at 2 p.m. from June 28 through July 26. Copies of the book are available for pickup at Arcata Library. Free. 822-5954.

COMEDY FC Sierra. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. FC Sierra has been featured at the Savage Henry Comedy Festival and the Santa Cruz Comedy Festival. Ryan Goodcase features. David Eubanks and Paula. Hosted by Nando Molina. $10. editor@savbagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864. Friday Night Improv Show. 7-9:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games with audience suggestions. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www. oldtowncoffeeeureka.com. 497-9039.

THEATER MRF Offsite: Forgive Us, Gustavito! 8-9:15 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Winner Best of Fringe at the Charm City Fringe Festival 2018, Forgive Us, Gustavito! is set in the backdrop of a horrific crime. Inspired by bizarre true events, it is a story that is equal parts classic noir and outrageous animal madness. $15, $12 student. info@dellarte.com. www.dellarte.com/shows-andevents/2018-2019-season. 668-5663. Red Light in Blue Lake: An Adult Cabaret. 10-11:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Mad River Festival’s late-night-adults-only cabaret. Burlesque, comedy and music, plus cocktails served at your seat. 18 and older. $20. info@dellarte.com. www.dellarte. com. 668-5663.

sunday, july 7 8am-3pm

SUBMIT your

Redwood Acres Redwood Acres Calendar Fairground Fairground Events 3750 Harris St. 3750 Harris St. Eureka

44@44 707.616.9920 44@44

Eureka

admission $2.oo kids 12 & under FREE

admission $2.oo kids 12 & under FREE

thehumboldtfleamarket@gmail.com

thehumboldtfleamarket@gmail.com

707.616.9920 ONLINE or by E-MAIL

northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See July 4 listing. Friday Night Market. 5-8 p.m. Clarke Plaza, Old Town, Eureka. A night farmers market with live music, farmers, local artists, beer/wine/distillery features and more. Market portion will be on E Street between Second Street. and Opera Alley. Lost Coast Kennel Club Dog Shows. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Three days of conformation, obedience, rally and Fast CAT. Only dogs entered may be on the fairgrounds. Free admission, parking fee. lostcoastkc@gmail.com. www. lostcoastkc.org.

FOR KIDS Baby Read & Grow. First Friday of every month, 11-11:45 a.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Babies and their families are invited to share songs, finger plays and short stories at this early literacy event. Free. jlancaster@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.humlib.org. 269-1910. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@gmail.com. 845-0094. Zumba Kids and Kids Jr. 6-7 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Every Friday night, instructor Vanessa Maloney. Open to kids ages 5 and up. $8, $5 prepay. ecooper@ervmgc.com. www.ervmgc.com. 725-3300. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

29


Calendar Continued from previous page

FOOD Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local produce, pasture-raised meats, baked goods, plant starts, crafts and more. Live music and food vendors.

GARDEN Arcata Community Wellness Garden Drop-In Volunteer Time. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden, Corner of F and Eleventh streets. Learn about growing a variety of produce. Volunteers are welcome to harvest and take away fresh nutritious foods. Kid friendly. Tools provided. Please bring a reusable water bottle to stay hydrated. Free. garden@ opendoorhealth.com.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Fourth Of July Extravaganza in Shelter Cove. Noon-10 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. See July 4 listing.

OUTDOORS Friday Night at the Refuge. 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. The Shorebird Loop Trail and Visitor Center will be open during the evening hours. A guided evening walk begins at 7 p.m. Bring a flashlight. Free. denise_seeger@fws.gov. www.fws.gov/refuge/humboldt_bay. 733-5406. Pinniped Talk and Tour. 9-11 a.m. Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. Join Trinidad Coastal Land Trust and BLM Biologist Claire Nasr for a brief talk on pinnipeds (seals and sealions) followed by a field trip to view these marine mammals off the coast. Meet at the TCLT office behind the Trinidad Library. Registration required. Free. info@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. www. trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. 677-2501.

SPORTS Humboldt B52s Baseball. 7:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. The semi-professional, wood-bat summer ball team swings away. Through first weekend in August. B52s vs. Sonoma County Tigers July 5-7 $5, $3 seniors/kids 5-12, free for kids 4 and under. www. humboldtb52sbaseball.com. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See July 4 listing.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

6 Saturday

ART

Arts Alive. First Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Art, and a heap of it. All around Old Town, Eureka. Free. www. eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054.

BOOKS Book and Media Sale. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. The Friends of the Arcata Library is holding its donated book and media sale fundraiser on all topics for all ages to benefit the many programs offered by the Library. www.facebook.com/ArcataBranchLibrary. 822-5954. Book Sale. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Children’s books and movies are free, and all other sales

benefit the Arcata Library. 822-5954. Jeff DeMark and Jason Marak. 7-8:30 p.m. Booklegger, 402 Second St., Eureka. Jeff DeMark reads new poems, short fiction and performs original songs. Jason Marak reads from a group of 100-word stories that are part of a hybrid visual/literary project. Read to K9 Reading Buddies Rufus and Bridge. Every other Saturday, 2-3 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Call to reserve a 10-minute session for kids with labradoodle Rufus or Anatolian shepherd Bridge July 6, 13 and 20. Free. 822-5954.

COMEDY Chris Riggins. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Riggins produced the Outdoor Comedy Club, opened for Dave Chappelle and headlined major clubs and colleges throughout the U.S. Ivy Vasquez features. $10. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www. savagehenrymagazine.com.

LECTURE Fort Humboldt Historic Tour. 11 a.m.-noon. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. On this easy, 45-minute stroll, visitors will uncover a story of conflict, hope, struggle and future presidents. Explore the historic buildings and enjoy views of the Humboldt Bay. Meet at the small flag pole at the north end of the parking lot. Free. ryan.spencer@parks.ca.gov. 445-6568.

MUSIC Sawyer Brown Live In Concert. Sunset Restaurant, CherAe Heights Casino, 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad. Country hits include “The Race is On,” “Some Girls Do” and “Six Days on the Road.” $49 premium, $39 standard seats. www. cheraeheightscasino.com/restaurants/sunsetrestaurant.

THEATER MRF Offsite: Forgive Us, Gustavito! 8-9:15 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. See July 5 listing. Red Light in Blue Lake: An Adult Cabaret. 10-11:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See July 5 listing.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See July 4 listing. Lost Coast Kennel Club Dog Shows. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See July 5 listing.

FOR KIDS Kids Alive. First Saturday of every month, 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop-off program for ages 3-12 during Arts Alive. $20 per child, $15 per child for members. www.discovery-museum.org. Mini Masters Reading Program. First Saturday of every month, noon-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Monthly workshop includes story time, tours of current exhibitions, literacy games and art activities. For children ages 2-8, but all ages welcome. Learn about mixing paint colors in a read aloud of Mouse Paint by Ellen Stoll Walsh. Free. alex@humboldtarts.org. humboldtarts.org/pbsnc-kids-club. 442-0278. Quack and Wabbit Puppet Theater. 1-2 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Quack and Wabbit perform Mr. Gumpy’s Outing. Program directors and performers Tanya Crowley and Yumi Ozaki seek to cultivate important life skills in children through the art of puppetry. Free. 822-5954. Story Time. First Saturday of every month, noon. Willow Creek Library, State routes 299 and 96. Introduce your preschooler to the fun of books. Free. Storytime. 11:30 a.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Stories for children and their parents. Free. Storytime and Crafts. 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111

30  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Greenwood Ave. Followed by crafts at noon. Now with a Spanish and English story every first and third Saturday. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. 668-4207.

Lounge, 1036 G St. Check www.arcatatheater.com for more details. Free w/$5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

FOOD

ETC

Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Live music from 10:30 a.m to 1:30 p.m. Music by the Latin Peppers. Microbatch Release Party. 5-7 p.m. Dick Taylor Chocolate Factory, 4 West Fourth St., Eureka. Dick Taylor Chocolate celebrates the release of its latest microbatch chocolate bar. Enjoy paired bites, drinks and drinking chocolate on tap before Arts Alive.

Women’s Peace Vigil. Noon-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

ART

Fourth Of July Extravaganza in Shelter Cove. Noon-10 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. See July 4 listing.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Elliott Dabill at the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute walk focusing on the plants, history and/ or ecology of the Marsh. Loaner binoculars available with photo ID. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. 826-7031. Walk leader is Tracy Walker. Free. www. rras.org/calendar. Blue Lake Cottonwoods Bird Walk. 9-11 a.m. Mad River Bridge, Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society walk leader Amaya Bechler for a bird walk at the Blue Lake Cottonwoods and Mad River Fish Hatchery. Meet by the Mad River Bridge. amayabechler0@gmail.com. www.rras.org. 826-7031. Hammond Trail Work Day. First Saturday of every month, 9-11 a.m. Hammond Trail, McKinleyville, McKinleyville. Work, clean and paint. Dress for work. New volunteers welcome. Changing locations each month. Contact for meeting place. sbecker@reninet.com. www. humtrails.org. 826-0163. Lanphere Dunes Guided Walk. First Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Bay NWR Lanphere Dunes Unit, 6800 Lanphere Road, Arcata. Join a Friends of the Dunes naturalist for a guided tour. Meet at Pacific Union School to carpool to the protected site. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. www.friendsofthedunes. org. 444-1397. Low Tide Walk. 9-11 a.m. Simmons Gallery/Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. Join Trinidad Coastal Land Trust naturalists Carol Vander Meer and Danny O’Shea for a walk along the Parker Creek Trail to Old Home Beach. The walk to the beach is approximately half a mile and includes lots of steps. Meet at the Trinidad Coastal Land Trust office. Reservations required. Free. info@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. 677-2501. Tracking Workshop. 9 a.m. HSU Natural History Museum, 1242 G St., Arcata. All-day wildlife tracking workshop with Phil Johnston. This is an active time for observing wildlife signs. Call 826-4479 to register. $25, $50 family, $20 members, $15 seniors and HSU students. www. humboldt.edu/natmus.

SPORTS Humboldt B52s Baseball. 5:30 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See July 5 listing. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See July 4 listing. Women’s World Cup 2019. 7:30 a.m. Arcata Theatre

7 Sunday

Art Talk. First Sunday of every month, 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Visiting and local artists share their inspiration, techniques and the meaning behind their work. Miya Hannan discusses her exhibition “Layered Stories.” $5, $2 seniors/military/ students, children/members free. alex@humboldtarts. org. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278. Opening Reception. 1-4 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. “Figures and Flowers” features the drawings of Deborah Kallish and drawings and ceramics by her student, Lotus Monahan, a junior at Arcata High Arts Institute. Free. annintrin13@gmail. com. 797-677-0128. Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

BOOKS Obi Kaufmann. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. The author and illustrator presents his new book, The State of Water: Understanding California’s Most Precious Resource, the follow up to his bestselling California Field Atlas. info@northtownbooks.com. www. northtownbooks.com/event/obi-kaufmann-state-water.

COMEDY Two Mic Sundays. 5 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. At Northtown Coffee at 5 p.m. and Savage Henry Comedy Club at 9 p.m. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. At Northtown Coffee at 5 p.m. and Savage Henry Comedy Club at 9 p.m. Free. editor@ savagahenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine. com. 845-8864.

MUSIC Bayside Community Hall Music Project. 6-8 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Bandemonium, community activist street band, from 6-8 p.m. Bring wind instruments and drums. Free. gregg@ relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 499-8516. Songwriting Workshop. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Workshop with Jam Bramlett and Jeff DeMark. Sign up at KEET.org or call 445-0813. Free. Summer Music Series. 1 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, north entrance, Eureka. This “All-American Summer” themed concert features the Scotia Band, conducted by Dr. Kenneth Ayoob, performing the music of John Philip Sousa, George M. Cohan, Karl King and George Gershwin tunes featuring vocalist Elizabeth West Souza. Bring your family, a picnic lunch and lounge on the lawn before touring the garden or the Butterfly House. Garden is open at 10 a.m. Concert is at 1 p.m. Free to HBG members, general admission for non-members, free for children under 6. www.hbgf.org.


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MRF Offsite: Forgive Us, Gustavito! 4-5:15 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. See July 5 listing. Red Light in Blue Lake: An Adult Cabaret. 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See July 5 listing.

recordings 7 and 9 p.m. Free. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Paso a Paso host dance therapy. Free. jorge.matias@stjoe.org. 441-4477.

EVENTS

MUSIC

Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See July 4 listing. Lost Coast Kennel Club Dog Shows. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See July 5 listing. Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Trinidad, Downtown. Local arts and crafts, live music and barbecue every Sunday starting May 26 through mid September. Next to Murphy’s Market (Exit 728 off CA-101).

Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. In the EHS band room located in the rear with parking at Del Norte and J streets. Free. SrJoePapa@ gmail.com. 834-0909. Join the Scotia Band. 7:30-9 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Woodwind, brass and percussion musicians (intermediate level and above) of all ages are invited. The band rehearses Monday evenings in the Fortuna High Band Room and performs publicly throughout the year. Free. thescotiaband@yahoo.com. www.scotiaband2. org. 599-4872.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. For ages 4 and up. Free w/museum admission. www.discovery-museum.org. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See July 5 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Fourth Of July Extravaganza in Shelter Cove. Noon-10 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. See July 4 listing.

OUTDOORS Dune Restoration. First Sunday of every month, 1-4 p.m. Lake Earl Wildlife Area, 2591 Old Mill Road, Crescent City. Ensure that diverse native dune plants can survive and spread, providing homes and food for native animals. Free. 954-5253.

SPORTS Humboldt B52s Baseball. 12:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. See July 5 listing. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See July 4 listing. Women’s World Cup 2019. 7:30 a.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See July 6 listing.

ETC Humboldt Flea Market. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Come explore the largest collection of treasures in Humboldt County. $2, free for kids 12 and under. thehumboldtfleamarket@ gmail.com. www.redwoodacres.com. 616-9920. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

8 Monday COMEDY

Improv Show. 6-7:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games. Audience suggestions taken for scenes, plays, films, songs and more. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www.oldtowncoffeeeureka.com. 497-9039. Monday Night Pod. 7-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Live recordings of podcasts on the Savage Henry Podcast Network. Usually two

Always Authentic, 7 days a week! Big Shrimp Appetizer 47.99 (feeds

THEATER

Big Shrimp Appetizer 47.99 (feeds

1718 4th St. Eureka •Mon-Fri 10am-9pm •Sat & Sun 9am-9pm

SPOKEN WORD Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/perform your original poetry or hear others. $1.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See July 4 listing.

GARDEN Garden Drop-In Hours. 1-4:30 p.m. The RAVEN Project, 523 T St., Eureka. Come helps us garden and grow healthy veggies! Learn various planting techniques, how to utilize fresh fruits and veggies, cooking skills and much more. Open to youth ages 10-21. Free. bdematto@rcaa. org. 443-7099.

MEETINGS VFW Post 2207 Monthly Meeting. Second Monday of every month, 7-8:30 p.m. Fortuna Veterans Hall/Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Fostering camaraderie among U.S. veterans of overseas conflicts and advocating for veterans, the military and communities. Free. 725-4480. Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

9 Tuesday COMEDY

Trivia Tuesdays. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Teams of three. Three rounds. Real prizes. $5 team entry fee. editor@savagehenrymagazine. com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Live music. All ages. $6. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

MOVIES Revenge in Film Noir: Act of Violence (1949). 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. The Humboldt County Library - Based on the Book Film Series is back this summer with Best Served Cold: Revenge in Film Noir. This 1949 movie follows a war veteran and former POW whose past comes back to haunt him. Hosted by Barry Evans. Free. www.humlib.org.

Please join us in the shade of the China Creek Amphitheatre from 2-10pm. Amazing local bands, great food and a collective vision. Tickets $20 in advance, $25 at the door; 5-12 years old $5! As a thank you for your heroic service to keep our community safe, all active firefighters will be admitted for free! Check out Mountain Community and Culture on Facebook or contact

Nick Wilde at 530.629.3769. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

31


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Calendar Continued from previous page

Humboldt County Guidance, Support and Crisis Resources Call 211 anytime to connect with local resources 24-Hour Crisis Lines California Youth Crisis 1-800-843-5200 Youth Services Hotline, 444-CARE Domestic Violence, 443-6042 North Coast Rape Crisis, 445-2881 Alcoholics Anonymous, (844) 442-0711 LGBTQ National Help Center, 1-888-843-4564 Raven Project, 444-2273 Faith-Based Drug & Alcohol Residential Programs Teen Challenge, Men (2680614) and women (4424233), 1 year program Men’s New Life Discipleship Program, 445-3787, Men only Mountain of Mercy (Honeydew), 601-3403, Men and women, children considered Groups and Meetings Alcoholics Anonymous, aahumboldtdelnorte. net, 844-442-0711 Narcotics Anonymous, www.humboldtna.org/, (707) 444-8645 AlAnon (for family members of addicts and alcoholics), 443-1419 Celebrate Recovery (faith-based), 442-1784 Housing North Coast Veteran’s Resource Center, Eureka, 442-4322, Accepts: Veterans (men and women) Serenity Inn, Eureka, 4424815, Accepts: Men and women, children Arcata House Partnership, 822-4528 North Coast Vets Resource Center, 442-5852 Crestwood Bridge House, 442-5721

Harm Reduction North Coast Aids Project (Eureka), 599-6318 Humboldt Area Center for Harm Reduction, hachr707@gmail.com Open Door Suboxone Program (Eureka), 498-9288 Open Door North Country Clinic (Arcata), 822-2481 Redwood Rural Health Center (Redway), 923-4313 United Indian Health Services (Weitchpec), (530) 625-4300 Inpatient Residential Drug & Alcohol Treatment Programs

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816. Mary Wander. 7 p.m. Outer Space, 1100 M St., Arcata. Folk punk from Pennsylvania. With local support by Blood Hunny, Post-Teen Bedroom Blues, Wild Abandon. All ages. Safer and sober space. $5-$20 sliding scale.

SPOKEN WORD

10 Wednesday

Word Humboldt and Dion “SH8KES” Williamson. 6-9 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. Dion “Sh8kes” Williamson is a motivational speaker and poet out of Durham, North Carolina. “His words are a call to action” and his work has been featured by JET magazine, XXL and The Source. Free. wordhumboldt@gmail.com. (919) 909-7109.

My First Book Group. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Spark a love of reading and sharing in your 8-10 year old. Led by librarian, Terri Bonow, on four Wednesdays in July, (July 10-31). Pick up a copy of the two featured titles at Arcata Library’s Help Desk - Rabbit and Robot by Cece Bell and Fergus & Zeke by Kate Messner. Free. 822-5954.

THEATER Stories in the Tent. 7-8:30 p.m. Dell’Arte Big Top Tent, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Storytelling performances featuring stories from the Humboldt community brought to life by the Dell’Arte Company in association with The Mad River Union. Free. info@dellarte.com. dellarte.com. 668-5663.

Humboldt Recovery Center, Men (444-6262) and women (443-0514) accepted

EVENTS

Waterfront Recovery Services, 269-9590, Men and women accepted

FOR KIDS

Singing Trees singingtreesrecovery.com, 247-3495 Outpatient Drug & Alcohol Programs Humboldt County Programs for Recovery & Mental Health DHHS, 476-4054 Healthy Moms, 441-5220 (For pregnant and parenting women) Kimaw Behavioral Health and Human Services (Hoopa), (530) 625-4261 ext. 450, Free with Tribal ID United Indian Health Services: Arcata (825-5000), Fortuna (725-7988), Weitchpec (530625-4300), for tribal members Under 18 Raven Project, rcaa.org/division/ youth-service-bureau/program/ raven-project-street-outreachprogram, 24 hour: 443-7099 Boys and Girls Club Teen Court, 444-0153 Children’s Mental Health Services, 268-2800 En Español Paso a Paso, (707) 441-4477

32  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See July 4 listing. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See July 7 listing.

Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See July 4 listing. Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www.humlib. org. 725-3460.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Farmers’ Market, 10th and Main streets. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. WIC and Cal Fresh accepted with $10 bonus match when using EBT card. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. sohumfm@yahoo.com. 943-3025. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. GMO-free produce, humanely raised meats, pastured eggs, plant starts and more. Live music weekly and CalFresh EBT cards accepted. Free. www.humfarm.org. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers and premium plant starts.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbers. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Humboldt Cribbage Club plays weekly. Seven games in summer and nine games during the season. $8. grasshopper60@aol.com. 444-3161. Learn How to Work from Home Caring for Others. 3:304:30 p.m. Enriching Lives, 325 2nd St., Suite 202, Eureka. Become a family home provider to care for individuals with developmental disabilities. Learn about the four- to eight-week process of becoming certified. Free.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See July 4 listing.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a variety of games or bring your

BOOKS

MOVIES Sci-Fi Night: Attack From Space (1965). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Another feature length tale from the legendary Japanese superhero Starman. When the evil empire of a race of beings set out to invade Earth, a benevolent race of aliens send Starman to Earth to aide and assist them in their time of need. Free w/$5 food/ bev purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Sweet Harmony Women’s Chorus. 6-8 p.m. Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St. All-female barbershop-style chorus that sings a variety of music in four-part, a cappella harmonies. Accepting new members. Ability to read music not required. barbershophumboldt@gmail.com. (802) 490-9455, 601-8219.

THEATER Through the Waves. 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Through the Waves is the tale of a woman who is lost between the uncharted waters of her grief and the shores of her joyful memories following the disappearance of her soul-mate. $17, $15 student/senior/veteran, $10 kids under 12. info@dellarte. com. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See July 4 listing.

FOR KIDS Board Game Nights. 5-6:45 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Join your friends to play a variety of games such as Monopoly, Uno, Apples to Apples and more. Or bring new games to share. Ages 5 and up. Snacks provided. Free. 725-3460. Lego Club. 3-4:30 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A weekly Lego Club for ages 5 and up meets at the library. We have many Lego sets, bring your friends to build and create! 725-3460.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See July 4 listing.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Family Night. 4-7 p.m. Blood Bank, 2524 Harrison Ave, Eureka. The Blood Bank will make dinner and watch the kids while you donate. Free. recruit@nccbb.org. www. nccbb.org. 443-8004.


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11 Thursday

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See July 4 listing.

BOOKS Trinidad Library Book Buddies Club. Second Thursday of every month, 11 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. No mandatory reading, just a love of books. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

COMEDY Double Trouble. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Comics are paired at random to create a tandem set on the spot. $5. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Peaceful Yoga for Adults. 6-7 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Stretch your body, calm your mind with certified yoga instructor Jessalyn Delucchi. Free. Sponsored by Friends of Arcata Library. 822-5954. Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See July 4 listing.

MUSIC Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See July 4 listing.

THEATER Through the Waves. 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See July 10 listing.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See July 4 listing.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Lego Club. Every other Thursday, 3-4:30 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Calling all masterbuilders 5 years and older for the Trinidad Lego Club now meeting at the Trinidad Civic Club Room on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. Free. 496-6455. Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See July 4 listing.

FOOD Chocolate Bark Workshop. 7-9 p.m. Dick Taylor Chocolate Factory, 4 West Fourth St., Eureka. A variety of carefully selected ingredients will be provided for participants to create their own chocolate bark. Wear closed-toe shoes and hats or hair nets. Please do not wear jewelry of any kind. Ages 12 and older. $25. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See July 4 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. See July 4 listing.

GARDEN Fortuna Community Wellness Garden Drop-In Volunteer Time. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Health Center, 3750 Rohnerville Road. See July 4 listing.

MEETINGS Conservation Meeting. Second Thursday of every month, noon-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill, 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Discuss conservation issues of interest to the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www.rras.org/ calendar.html. 445-8311. Humboldt Grange 501. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Regular monthly meeting. nanettespearschade@ gmail.com. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 443-0045.

Toastmasters. Second Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

ETC Community Board Game Night. Second Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@northcoast. com. www.baysidecommunityhall.org. 444-2288. Heads Up This Week. See July 4 listing. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See July 4 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See July 4 listing.

Now Accepting: NCJ SMARTCARD

Heads Up … Redwood Art Association in conjunction with the Redwood Camera Club and the Eureka Photoshop Users Group is hosting the Humboldt Photography Exhibition, July 24 -Aug. 16. This is a judged exhibition with prizes, open to all Humboldt County residents. Entry date is July 20 from noon to 3 p.m. at Redwood Art Association. SCRAP Humboldt and the Ink People invite the public to collect plastic during summer strolls on the beach and reclaim bits from the recycle bin to create two and three dimensional art pieces for their joint exhibition “Out of the Sea.” Drop off artwork at the Brenda Tuxford Gallery, 525 Seventh St., Eureka, on Aug. 1, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wildwood Days parade seeks participants. Download an application at riodellscotiachamberofcommerce.org from the “Join the parade” link on the front page, email rdschamber@gmail.com, or call 707-506-5081 to request to have one mailed. Friends of the Arcata Marsh and the city of Arcata seek welcome desk volunteers for weekends at Marsh Interpretive Center. Shifts are four hours, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Call 826-2359 or email amic@cityofarcata.org. Arcata and Mad River Transit System (A&MRTS) offers free bus rides for the month of July. Free bus rides in Arcata will be in effect beginning Monday, July 1-31. A&MRTS offers transit routes that run Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in summer months. For more information, visit cityofarcata.org or call 822-3775. Applications are still being accepted for Humboldt County grand jury service for 2019/2020. For more information and to print or complete an online application, visit www.humboldt. courts.ca.gov or call 269-1245 and request an application be mailed to you. The Gyppo Ale Mill is booking Pints 4 Nonprofits through the summer. Contact julie@gyppo.com or visit 1661 Upper Pacific Drive in Shelter Cove. The Blue Lake Chamber of Commerce invites businesses, organizations and individuals to participate in this year’s Annie & Mary Day Parade on July 14. Also, craft and food vendors are invited to have a booth at the celebration. For information and an online application visit sunnybluelake.com. The Eureka Street Art Festival is seeking host families for visiting artists during this year’s event. Hosts will provide a private room and access to a bathroom and kitchen facilities for a visiting artist from July 25-Aug. 4. If interested, email eurekastreetartfestival@gmail.com. Faben Artist Fund now accepting applications. Grant guidelines are posted at www.humboldtarts.org. Email Jemima@ humboldtarts.org or 442-0278, ext. 205. The Redwood Art Association is looking for artists to compete in the first Humboldt Open Paint Out. This event is open to all artists and mediums and will be held Oct. 7-11. Find more information and register at www.redwoodart.us. Email any inquiries to humboldtopenpaintout@gmail.com. l

Open Every Day For Lunch & Dinner 773 8th St. Arcata northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

33


Filmland

Yesterday is Sweet and Corny And why the hell not? By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

YESTERDAY. I wouldn’t call Danny Boyle one of my favorite directors. He can tend toward narrative overreach, treacly sentimentality and visual excess. Still, he’s been showing up and doing the work for oh, 25 years now — at least in the world of features, since he was directing television for a while before the debut of Shallow Grave in 1994. I missed that early work but like so many of my generation was quickly swept up in the bipolar hysteria of Trainspotting (1996), an endlessly inventive demonstration of new ways to place and move a camera within a scene, to use popular music and editing just as forcefully as the images on screen. That movie served to both expand our worldview and announce the arrival of a number of significant talents, Boyle first among them for me, though Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller and Kelly Macdonald are no slouches. Trainspotting left such an impression (admittedly a perhaps hormonally charged one), that Boyle’s subsequent work made me feel as if he had wandered off the path. At the time I wanted more sordid drug movies with dazzling dolly work; lovers on the run scrutinized by angels (A Life Less Ordinary, 1997) didn’t really fit the frame into which I had forced him. And so, over the years, I checked in with his work but relatively infrequently. His 28 Days Later ... (2002) did fun new things with the zombie genre (walkers, brain-eaters, whichever. Don’t @ me). Slumdog Millionaire (2008) was perhaps over-praised, particularly by the Academy, but I was just as entranced by it on first viewing as everybody else. Ditto 127 Hours (2010). Steve Jobs (2015), I thought, represented some of Boyle’s most mature, sophisticated work but seemed to be met with a general shrugging of the shoulders. Point being, although I admire much of Boyle’s work, his sense of adventure, re-invention and willingness to try (and fail), I’m anything but a completist. I’ve skipped over some of his kids’ movies, for example, and T2 Trainspotting (2017) looked too strained to bother with. And therein lies the balance because with daring and comfort with risk comes inevitable failure. And when you’re making movies for the global market, those shortcomings play out on a pretty big stage.

And so I approached Yesterday with enthusiasm tempered with trepidation: Not only would this seem to represent Boyle’s most anti-Trainspotting impulses, it is also scripted by Richard Curtis, a writer likewise given to sometimes ill-conceived grand gestures and maudlin pap. It’s become cool, in recent years, to hate on Curtis’ Love Actually. (I get it but I still like it.) And therein lies the tension. Bring together these two inarguably dynamic creative people and let them loose on perhaps their most deceptively high-concept story to date, one that could slide very easily over the precipice into the chasm of pat cuteness, and what happens? Well, Yesterday happens and I have to admit to enjoying it more than my cynical Trainspotting fan-boy self of those decades past would care to admit. Is it corny and sentimental and generally too much? OF COURSE, IT IS. But it is also well-executed and warm, and I’m getting soft in my old age. Jack Malik (Himesh Patel), a rather unsuccessful singer-songwriter/glorified busker, decides to give up on the dream of music stardom and return to his day job as a schoolteacher. This much to the chagrin of his “manager” Ellie (Lily James) who happens to be secretly in love with him. For better or worse, on his bicycle ride home on the very night of his fateful decision, Jack gets hit by a bus during a global electrical blackout. He wakes up in the hospital, abraded and missing two teeth; also he is the only one in the world who remembers The Beatles because ... well, just because. Curtis doesn’t really specialize in explaining coincidence or newly introduced universal phenomena in his writing. (Coca-Cola and cigarettes also blink out of existence, but those are incidental.) And so, with little to no hesitation, Jack sets about remembering, playing and recording the songs of the Beatles. He buddies up to Ed Sheeran (playing himself), is brought under the wing of his manager Debra Hammer (Kate McKinnon, devouring the scenery as only she can), leaves Ellie behind and sets out to make himself the biggest pop-star in the history of the known universe. Spoiler alert: There might be a crisis of conscience on the way. For the most part, Yesterday manages to

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

So The Beatles are erased and yet Ed Sheeran’s tattoos remain. Yesterday

sidestep most of the innumerable potential pitfalls it creates for itself. Boyle brings his celebration of the medium into play, framing even conventional walk-and-talks with moving Dutch angles, for example. His exuberance behind the camera — and the control of someone who has been exercising that exuberance for decades — enlivens the material even beyond the childlike wonder with which Curtis infuses the writing. But, of course, this movie is still going to be too sweet for some, too intentionally clever and cute; I’m at least part way in that camp. Also, placing all of the power of The Beatles in the songwriting Yesterday, ignores some of the intangibles about that band, the alchemy of their collaboration, and the warmth and fullness of the sound they created in their recordings. Even though the songwriting is undeniable, I question whether anyone else could really turn the songs in to classics. How many covers of “Blackbird” have you heard? How many of them are actually any good? PG13. 116M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. — John J. Bennett See showtimes at www.northcoastjournal. com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards› Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Opening

MIDSOMMAR. A young American couple’s (Florence Pugh and Jack Reynor) trip to Sweden goes from folksy festival to trippy murder cult and honestly this is why I don’t shop at Ikea. R. 140M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MINOR. SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME. Peter Parker heads on vacation to inevitably save the world, this time with new superhero Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhall). Hold up — they’re introducing the multiverse?! Starring Tom Holland and Samuel L. Jackson. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

JAWS (1975). Look into a rubber shark’s dead eyes instead of Stephen Miller’s for a sec. PG. 124M. BROADWAY.

Continuing

ALADDIN. Live-action Disney remake with (hopefully) less racism and a hotter Jafar than the original. Starring blue Will Smith, Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott and Marwan Kenzari. PG. 128M. BROADWAY. ANNABELLE COMES HOME. More scary doll stuff for folks who find Chucky too playful. R. 106M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA MILL CREEK. AVENGERS: ENDGAME. Back with additional scenes that won’t make the time travel any easier to figure out. PG13. 188M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. CHILD’S PLAY. Aubrey Plaza and Mark Hamill take a stab at rebooting the killer doll horror. R. 90M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. MEN IN BLACK: INTERNATIONAL. Tessa Thompson and Chris Hemsworth dip out of Asgard to revive the alien-friendly franchise and suit tailoring with Emma Thompson. PG13. 104M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. THE RIVER AND THE WALL. Documentary about traveling the U.S.-Mexico border and the environmental and human impact of a border wall. NR. 97M. MINIPLEX. SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2. This sequel lacks the charm, inventiveness and sweetness of the original, despite a strong cast that includes Patton Oswalt, Jenny Slate, Kevin Hart and Harrison Ford. PG. 86M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. THE SOUVENIR. Tilda Swinton, Honor Swinton Byrne and Tom Burke star in a drama about a young filmmaker’s relationship with a sketchy older man. R. 120M. MINIPLEX. TOY STORY 4. Go ahead, little toys (lights cigarette), see if I have any soul left to crush. Starring Tom Hanks. G. 100M. FORTUNA, MINOR. l — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill


Workshops & Classes

Continued on next page »

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts CREATING EMOTIONAL IMPACT FOR YOUR STORIES, NOVELS & FILM Jul 11 − Jul 25. Call Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (A−0704)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0725) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (D−0725) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m. −8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0725)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0725)

Kids & Teens 19TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP Water enthusiasts of ALL levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skills necess. for all types of wave riding & SURFING while being immersed in JUNIOR LIFEGUARD water safety, surf etiquette, beach & ocean awareness. Lead by former Cali− fornia State Lifeguard & school teacher along w/ male & female instructors. Where: Moonstone Beach Ages: 8 and up When: 4 sessions: June 24−28, July 8−12, July 22−26, Aug 5−9. It’s Barrels of Fun! Cost: $195 Contact: (707) 822−5099 Website: www.moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com (K−0801)

BILINGUAL CONVERSATIONS & CULTURAL EXPERIENCES WITH ELLIE GALVEZ−HARD. Virtu− ally visit Spanish−speaking countries and examine cultural and linguistic similarities and differences. Wed., July 17 from 2−4:30 p.m. OLLI Members: $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−0704)

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

SEMIT E IVOM JCN

MOVIE TIMES.

TRAILERS. REVIEWS.

!semitwohS dniF

COMMERCIAL FISHING OFF CALIFORNIA: WILL THE OCEAN SUSTAIN US? WITH VIVIAN HELLI− WELL. Examine California’s fishing adventure since European arrival: harvest management, policy, equipment, and the changing ocean we are adapting to now. Fri., July 19 from 2−4:30 p.m. OLLI Members: $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0704) HISTORY OF REDWOOD TRAILS IN ARCATA COMMUNITY FOREST WITH SAM PENNISI. Walk the trails and learn more about how the first formal trails in the Arcata community forest were designed and built by the HSU forestry club. Fri., July 19 from 10:30 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI Members: $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−0704) OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0704) THE ARMCHAIR TRAVELER: CRUISING THE NORTH COAST WITH JERRY & GISELA ROHDE. Join us on a virtual jaunt as we explore the history hotspots found at and near Humboldt County’s north coast −all from the comfort of our OLLI armchairs! Sat., July 20 from 2−4:30 p.m. OLLI Members: $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0704) VICTORIANS IN ARCATA WITH SHARON FERRETT. Take a walking tour of several Victorians in Arcata including the Chapman House, the Bair House and the Stone House. Thurs., July 18 from 10:30 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI Members: $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0704)

50 and Better

WILLIAM CARSON: ANCHOR OF OLD TOWN WITH JERRY ROHDE. Join us for an illustrated lecture and a brief walking tour as we recall the sights and stories of late−19th century Eureka with a focus on Lumberman William Carsonand the world−famous mansion. Wed., July 17 from 10:30 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI Members: $35. Sign up today! 826− 5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0704)

A HISTORY OF THE SPIRIT OF HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY FROM THE BEGINNING TO HOPES FOR THE FUTURE WITH ROLLIN RICHMOND. Explore the history of HSU from the dispute over its location to the current situation and the possi− bilities for the new President. Sat., July 20 from 10:30 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI Members: $35. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0704)

WITNESSING AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH OUR COLLECTIVE FAMILY STORIES WITH RAY RAPHAEL. When and why did our families first arrive in this country and where did they come from? Learn techniques for discovering personal and societal roots. Thurs., July 18 from 2−4:30 p.m. OLLI Members: $35.Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0704)

Browse by title, times and theater.

northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

35


Workshops

Continued from previous page

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442− 4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0704) HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP. We are here to change lives with our love. Services at 10am on Sunday. Child care is provided. 24 Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0718) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−0704)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0725) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−0725) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0725)

Vocational BEGINNING BOOKKEEPING Aug 13 − Sep 24. Call CR Workforce and Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH Aug 2 − Sep 6. Call CR Workforce and Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) COUPLES YOGA: Develop a sacred way to prac− tice yoga together. Sat., July 13 & 20 on HSU campus. $100/couple. Register at www.humboldt.edu/extended or call 707−826− 3731. (V−0704) GED TESTING Earn your GED. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information or to schedule your appointment at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) INJECTIONS JULY 20. One day certification! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) INTRODUCTION TO PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Sep 30 − Nov 30. Call CR Workforce and Commu− nity Education for more information at (707) 476− 4500. (V−0704)

Email us Here:

MEDICAL ASSISTING Jul 10 OR Jul 31. FREE Informa− tion Meeting at 3 p.m. 525 D Street Eureka, CA 95501. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING Aug 6 − Nov 11. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) PHLEBOTOMY Jul 11. FREE Information Meeting at 5 p.m. CR Main Campus, Room HU 129. Call Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) REAL ESTATE LIVE LECTURE CLASSES Series starts Oct 1. A reduced fee and a payment plan is avail− able. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704) VENIPUNCTURE JULY 21. One day certification! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0704)

Wellness & Bodywork ARE YOU INTERESTED IN STARTING A CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY? Loving Hands Institute’s introductory Swedish class runs September 16 − November 19. Mon−Thurs 10am−2pm. Cost is $2700 and 152 contact hours. This course allows you to practice throughout Humboldt County as a Holistic Massage Practitioner in Swedish style massage. Call Hilary at 725−9627 with any ques− tions or to register. (W−0912) AROMATHERAPY TRAINING & AROMATIC PRODUCT MAKING with Traci Webb. Start your aromatic career & lifestyle, learn to distill your own essential oils, heal yourself & others, Topics Vary: Sept. 7−8, 14−15 & 21−22. www.ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601−9025 (W−0919) AYURVEDA PULSE IMMERSION WITH TRACI WEBB. Aug. 16−18. Healers & Therapists learn ancient pulse system for self−healing & to support your client’s physical and emotional well being. Early Save$! www.ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601− 9025 (W−0815) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 18 − Nov 6, 2019, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2020. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0829)

Field Notes

Seven Puzzles for the Seventh Month (Answers on page 39) By Barry Evans

T

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

he Old Bridge

Four people with one flashlight between them have to cross a rickety two-person capacity bridge in the next 17 minutes before a hurricane destroys it: Alice (who takes one minute to cross), Bill (two minutes), Cassie (five minutes) and Dave (10 minutes). It’s pitch black, so anyone crossing needs the flashlight. How do they do it?

Four Cards

Each of four cards has a letter on one side and a number on the other. Which cards must be turned over in order to check if the statement “Every card with a D on one side has a 3 on the other” is true?

Gender Gap

In Ruritania, each couple stops having children if, and only if, they have a female baby. After many generations, what will the sex ratio in this country be? (a) Significantly more males than females; (b) Significantly more females than males; (c) Approximately 1:1 Assume: no multiple births; equal probability of a birth being male or female; life expectancy is the same for males and females.

Yin and Yang

Harry S. Truman

What does the “S” stand for?

Percentages

One hundred percent divided by 10 percent = (a) 0.1 percent; (b) 1 percent; (c) 10 percent; (d) 100 percent; (e) 1,000 percent.

Circles

The sum of the yellow areas is (a) less than; (b) equal to; (c) more than the sum of the blue areas.

Bisect (into equal areas) both the yin and the yang with one straight line.

press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: music@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: classified@northcoastjournal.com

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Bonus Question!

What do Ellis Bell, Ann Landers, Robert Galbraith, Anne Rice and George Orwell have in common, literary-wise? Answers on page 39 »


Legal Notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF HOWARD ANTHONY LEMING CASE NO. PR190137 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of HOWARD ANTHONY LEMING A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner KRISTI LYN ELLIOTT In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that KRISTI LYN ELLIOTT be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 11, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Leon A. Karjola 732 Fith Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 707−445−0804 Filed: June 11, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−192)

Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Leon A. Karjola 732 Fith Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 707−445−0804 Filed: June 11, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−192)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE COMPLIANCE WITH CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE SECTION 2923.3 WAS NOT REQUIRED BECAUSE THE LOAN IS SECURED BY VACANT LAND. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED: May 13, 2016. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: Tara L. Johnson DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Harland Law Firm LLP DEED OF TRUST RECORDED: May 23, 2016 INSTRUMENT NUMBER: 2016− 009472 of the Official Records of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California DATE OF SALE: July 30, 2019 at 11:00 A.M. PLACE OF SALE: Front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 THE COMMON DESIGNATION OF THE PROPERTY IS PURPORTED TO BE: 37430 Alderpoint Rd., Blocks− burg, CA 95514−9207. Directions to the property may be obtained by pursuant to a written request submitted to Harland Law Firm LLP, 212 G Street, Suite 201, Eureka, CA 95501, within 10 days from the first publication of this notice.

See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof for the Legal Description. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $278,620.56. Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount. The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated above, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee at (707) 444−9281. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immedi− ately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: This 18 day of June, 2019 in the city of Eureka, and the county of Humboldt, California. Harland Law Firm LLP

See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof for the Legal Description. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $278,620.56. Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount. The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated

________________________ John S. Lopez, Trustee 6/27, 7/11, 7/4 (19−197)

T.S. No. 078407-CA APN: 015152-021-000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 1/6/2010. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER

Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned or its prede− cessor caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this prop− erty lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280−2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 078407−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP 4375 Jutland Drive San Diego, California 92117

property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Continued on next Code and provisions of thepage Civil » Code. The undersigned will sell the following tenants’ units at a public auction by competitive bidding on July 19, 2019 at noon, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini−Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as follows. Household and miscella− neous items to be sold include but are not limited to the following: Unit#879 Samantha Cook − Subwoofer, coffee table, misc items Unit#230 Shawn Devore −− Rocking horse, vanity, strollers, car seats Unit#739 Elizabeth Liufau − TV, dresser, desk, corner hutch Unit#155 Brian Lakios − Children’s items, toys, car seats Unit#430 David Moen − Men’s clothes, portable grill, tackle box Unit#762 Fred Jewett − Shelves, books, chairs, bicycle, boxes Unit#305 Derek Buchkoski −books, men’s clothes, box spring, DVDs and player Unit#351 Edward Poehner − Lamps, radiator heater, shelves/cupboards, boxes Unit#634 Gene Hunter − Tools, sporting goods, piano, misc containers Unit#826 James Rose −Movies, books, surfboard, telescope, boxes Unit#727 Randy Wagemann −Yard tools, weights, chainsaw/hand tools Unit#814 Roger Chapman −glass ta− ble, 4 chairs

On 7/26/2019 at 10:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 2/22/2010, as Instrument No. 2010−3634−19, , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: ROBERT L ORNELAS, AND DOROTHY ORNELAS, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIERS CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINAN− CIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURT− Purchases must be paid for at the HOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, time of purchase in cash only. All CA 95501 all right, title and interest purchased items are sold "as is" and conveyed to and now held by it must be removed from the under said Deed of Trust in the premises within 24 hours. Sale is property situated in said County subject to cancellation in the event and State described as: MORE of a settlement between owner FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED and obligated party. Deposit of OF TRUST The street address and $100.00 is required on each unit other common designation, if any, purchased. Bring a flashlight and of the real property described padlock(s). above is purported to be: 1928 Dated this 4th and 11th day of July QUAKER ST EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 2019. 95501 The undersigned Trustee CA BOND NO. 0336118 disclaims any liability for any incor− (19−199) rectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be PUBLIC SALE held, but without covenant or NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the warranty, express or implied, undersigned intends to sell the regarding title, possession, condi− personal property described below tion, or encumbrances, including to enforce a lien imposed on said fees, charges and expenses of the property pursuant to Sections Trustee and of the trusts created 21700−21716 of the Business & by said Deed of Trust, to pay the Professions Code, Section 2328 of remaining principal sums of the the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal note(s) secured by said Deed of Code and provisions of the civil Trust. The total amount of the Code. unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold The undersigned will sell at auction and reasonable estimated costs, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−198) by competitive bidding on the 17th expenses and advances at the time of July, 2019, at 9:00 AM, on the of the initial publication of the NOTICE OF SALE premises where said property has Notice of Sale is: $155,441.73 If the PUBLIC AUCTION been stored and which are located Trustee is unable to convey title for Notice is hereby given that the at Rainbow Self Storage. any reason, the successful bidder’s undersigned intends to sell the sole and exclusive remedy shall be personal property described below The following spaces are located at the return of monies paid to the to enforce a lien imposed on said 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County Trustee, and the successful bidder property pursuant to Sections of Humboldt. shall have no further recourse. The 21700−21716 of the Business & beneficiary under said Deed of Professions Code, Section 2328 of Carol Ashley, Space # 5045 Trust heretofore executed and the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Anthony Bognuda, Space # 5101 delivered to the undersigned a Code and provisions of the Civil Michael King, Space # 5217 written Declaration of Default and Code. The undersigned will sell the Demand for Sale, and a written following tenants’ units at a public The following spaces are located at Notice of Default and Election to auction by competitive bidding on 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com Sell. The undersigned or its prede− July 19, 2019• Thursday, at noon, onJuly the 4, 2019 • NORTH County COAST of Humboldt and will be cessor caused said Notice of premises where said property has sold immediately following the sale Default and Election to Sell to be been stored and which are located of the above units. recorded in the county where the at South Bay Mini−Storage, 2031

37


of Humboldt. Carol Ashley, Space # 5045 Anthony Bognuda, Space # 5101 Michael King, Space # 5217

Legal Notices

The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Desirae Keyes, Space # 2606 Kurtis Spliethof, Space # 2808 Dixie Rogers, Space # 3114 Brandy Navarro, Space # 3115 Leshaun Araneo, Space # 2906 Thomas Sickafoose, Space # 3303 Michael King, Space # 3630 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Cathleen Cramer, Space # 1173 Staranna Hogue, Space # 1195 Iva Linder, Space # 1196 Paul Woodard, Space # 1227 Philip Sullivan, Space # 1230 Iva Linder, Space # 1724 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Jason Valencia, Space # 158 Tami Gruetzmacher, Space # 168 Julie Saravia, Space # 231 Gary Upshaw, Space # 268 Toni Peters, Space # 433 Stuart Sutherland, Space # 506 Steven McCall, Space # 756 The following spaces are located at 1641 Holly Drive McKinleyville, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Bradly Killingsworth, Space # 2119 Troy Stark, Space # 2216 Robert Gwinn, Space # 6230 Percy Carey, Space # 8118 Guy Hodges, Space # 9105 Joseph Vogelpohl, Space # 9115 Abigail Thomas, Space # 9128 The following spaces are located at 2394 Central Avenue McKinleyville CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Robert Willard, Space # 9262 Breanna Siegrist, Space # 9267 Nicole Johnson, Space # 9290 Carol Ashley, Space # 9608 The following spaces are located at 180 F Street Arcata CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Amber Masten, Space # 4004 Richard Boone Jr., Space # 4113 Michael Lee Cox, Space # 6018 Francis Verges Jr., Space # 6112 Rosena Plath, Space # 6179 Annijke Wade, Space # 6215 The following spaces are located at 940 G Street Arcata CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units.

Rosena Plath, Space # 6179 Annijke Wade, Space # 6215 The following spaces are located at

Continued from previous pageof 940 G Street Arcata CA, County

Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Monique Derr, Space # 6317 Jessica Astorga, Space # 6323 Robin Gold, Space # 6339 John Stewart, Space # 6403 Jessica Astorga, Space # 6433 Matthew Bushell, Space # 6455 (Held in Co. Unit) Joanne Fast, Space # 6470 Allen Burgess, Space # 6473 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown.

misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 3rd day of July, 2019 and 11th day of July, 2019

Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 default NOTICE: −1451. APPLICATIONS Purchases must be paid for at the BEING ACCEPTED FOR OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE time of the saleBOND in cashCITIZENS’ only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at SCHOOL DISTRICT FRESHWATER 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to NOTICE is hereby given that the Freshwater School District has es9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, a Citizens’ Oversight notablished exceptions. All purchased itemsCommittee to oversee expenditures of C bond areMeasure sold as is, wherefunds, is andwhich mustwas be the bond measure approved by District voters on June of 5, sale. 2018.Sale TheisDistrict is continuing to accept applications removed at time from to interested citizens to serve on the Committee in an effort to seat subject cancellation for any all 7 positions. The Committee will consist of seven members which meet, reason whatsoever. review andKim report on expenditures of bond funds to ensure money is used Auctioneer: Santsche, only forfor voter-approved Employee Rainbow Self−purposes. Maintaining a committee to review expenditures is required Storage, 707−443−1451, Bondby#law and was promised to District voters as part of the accountability provisions in the bond measure. Interested persons 40083246. may obtain an application from the Superintendent’s Office, located at 75 Greenwood Drive, Eureka, Dated this 3rd Heights day of July, 2019 and CA, or download the application from District’ s website 11ththe day of July, 2019 at http://www.freshwatersd.org. Applications should be submitted at the office of(19−195) the Superintendent.

default

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY OF FORTUNA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Fortuna City Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, July 15, 2019, at 6:00 P.M. at City Hall, 621 - 11th Street in Fortuna, California to consider the approval of the subdivision application described below. The proposed project is a planned development and subdivision of a 12.85-acre parcel on the south side of Redwood Way located between Maxwell Street and St. Joseph Drive, in Fortuna, CA. The project consists of 56 detached cottage style residences, a community center, common open space, a pedestrian pathway, private roads and public utility services. Applicant: Dennis Fitze. Assessor’s Parcel Numbers: 202-082-005 & 202121-002. Zoning: Residential Single Family (R-1-10); General P lan land use: Residential Low (RL). You are invited to come to the Public Hearing to ask questions or comment on the proposed project. Information on the project is available at City Hall for review at the Community Development Department. Written comments may be submitted to the City Planner on or before the day of the meeting. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Building Department at (707) 725-7600. Notification 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting (28 CFR 35.102 - 35.104 ADA Title II). Buffy Gray, Deputy City Clerk Dated: June 26, 2019

COAST Monique Derr, Space # 6317JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com 38 NORTH

Jessica Astorga, Space # 6323 Robin Gold, Space # 6339 John Stewart, Space # 6403

(19−195)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00312

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00354

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00362

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MATTOLE RIVER ORGANIC FARMS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CUSTOM CRAB POTS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT COMPUTER TECH− NOLOGY

Humboldt 42354 Mattole Rd Petrolia, CA 95558

Humboldt 601 Bay St Eureka, CA 95501

Ian C Sigman 42354 Mattole Rd Petrolia, CA 95558 Melissa M Sigman 42354 Mattole Rd Petrolia, CA 95588

Griggs & Associates, Inc. CA C2104004 601 Bay St Eureka, CA 95501

Chuck W Chen 1380 Clipper L Bayside, CA 95524

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elena Griggs, Secretary This June 5, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by bs, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Chuck Chen, Owner This June 10, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−183)

6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−187)

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ian Sigman, Owner This May 16, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

Humboldt 1380 Clipper Ln Bayside, CA 95524

6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−186)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00355

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00363

The following person is doing Busi− ness as REDHEADED BLACKBELT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as EL CHIPOTLE MEXICAN & AMER− ICAN FOOD

The following person is doing Busi− ness as COMPACT HOUSES

Humboldt 3849 Thomas Rd Miranda, CA 95553 PO Box 182 Phillipsville, CA 95559

Humboldt 850 Crescent Way Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 140 Raven Ridge Rd Trinidad, CA 95570 PO Box 599 Trinidad, CA 95570

Kym M Kemp 3849 Thomas Rd Miranda, CA 95553

Oscar Santiago Anguiano Zamudio 1769 Chanterelle Dr #A McKinleyville, CA 95519

Clay C Johnson 140 Raven Ridge Rd Trinidad, CA 95570

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kym Kemp, Publisher This May 28, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Oscar Santiago Anguiano, Owner This June 5, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Clay Charles Johnson, Owner This June 10, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−181)

6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−189)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00331

6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−180)

@ncj_of_humboldt


Continued on next page » Continued on next page »

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00372

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00381

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00400

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ETMG, INC.

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUMMIT SUNGROWN

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HARDESTY CELLARS

Humboldt 5550 West End Road, Ste. 9 Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 2530 Fickle Hill Rd Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 222 Bayside, CA 95524

Humboldt 655 Peach Tree Lane Willow Creek, CA 95573 1667 H Street Arcata, CA 95521

4 Ponds LLC CA 201620410537 2530 Fickle hill Rd Arcata, CA 95521

Peach Tree Lane, LLC CA 201630010112 1667 H Street Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stacia Eliason, Chief Executive Officer This June 14, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Drew Cowan, Owner/Operator This June 20, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Miles Garrett, Sole Owner This June 26, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−190)

6/27, 7/4, 7/11, 7/18 (19−196)

7/4, 7/11, 7/18, 7/25 (19−203)

Emerald Triangle Management Group, Inc. CA C3944836 5550 West End Road, Ste. 9 Arcata, CA 95521

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00377 The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE FIREPLACE Humboldt 1041 F Street Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 12 Arcata, CA 95518 Fireplace Management Incorpo− rated CA C4241267 1041 F Street Arcata, CA 95521

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00398

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HIGHLINE NURSERY

Humboldt 1660 Central Ave. #C McKinleyville, CA 95519 1425 K St. Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 1271 Evergreen Road, #600 Redway, CA 95560

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Devin Walker, Owner This June 18, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Janie Johnson, Owner This June 26, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

7/4, 7/11, 7/18, 7/25 (19−200)

7/4, 7/11, 7/18, 7/25 (19−204)

Continued from page 36

Answers The Old Bridge

Alice and Bill cross (two minutes elapsed); Alice returns with the flashlight (three minutes); Cassie and Dave cross (13 minutes); Bill returns with the flashlight (15 minutes); Alice and Dave cross (17 minutes total).

Gender Gap

(c), since every birth has a 50/50 chance of being male. (Past results have no effect on the probability of the next child’s gender.)

Yin and Yang

7/4, 7/11, 7/18, 7/25 (19−202)

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

Cards 1 and 4. Obviously, you have to check card 1 to see if there’s a 3 on the back. Card 2 is irrelevant. So is card 3, since whether there’s a D or not doesn’t affect the validity of the statement. But if there’s a D on the back of card 4, the statement is false. (In a test of this logic puzzle, devised by psychologist Peter Wason in 1966, only 10 percent of the general public and 43 percent of mathematicians got it right!)

Harry S. Truman Percentages

(e) (1 divided by 1/10 = 10)

Circles

(b) Each small circle has 1/4 the area of the big circle, so their total area is equal to that of the big circle. Thus, the total area of the overlaps (yellow) must be equal to the total area not covered by the small circles (blue).

Bonus

All are pseudonyms: Ellis Bell was Emily Bronte, Ann Landers was Ruth Crowley (later, “Eppie” Lederer), Robert Galbraith is J.K. Rowling, Anne Rice is Howard Allen O’Brien, George Orwell was Eric Arthur Blair. ●

Kamino, LLC CA 201535010140 1271 Evergreen Road, #600 Redway, CA 95560 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Joshua, Monschke, Member This June 27, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

Four Cards

S.

The small white and black semicircles above and below the horizontal line each have 1/8 of the area of the whole (since the area of a circle is proportional to its diameter squared), as do the two triangles (45 degrees being 1/8 of a full circle). Hence the white area above the 45 degree line has ¼ the area of the whole circle. By symmetry, so does the black area below the 45 degree line. Therefore the 45 degree line bisects both the white and black shapes.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00401

The following person is doing Busi− ness as VIBE HAIR STUDIO

Janie L Johnson 1425 K St. Eureka, CA 95501

Field Notes

INTRODUCING

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Contact Melissa Sanderson at 707-498-8370 or melissa@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00403

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HW FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY Humboldt 210 Belleview Ave, Unit A Rio Dell, CA 95562

©2019 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Heather R Watkins 210 Belleview Ave, Unit A Rio Dell, CA 95562

TWITTER ACROSS

1. *Complement for a tango 4. *Kid 8. *”For what matters most” sloganeer 15. “Kung Fu” actor Philip 16. Gal. or oz. 17. Dormitories and apartments 18. Open like a kid on Christmas morning 20. Go over 21. Feel awful about 22. *Fever caused by salmonella bacteria 24. Classic Jaguar model 26. ____ Dunham, mother of Barack Obama 27. “The only time ____ the bar low is for limbo”: Michael Scott of “The Office” 31. Like some screws and translations 32. TV character with

the catchphrase “Booyakasha!” 34. Cartoon style 35. Duchamp contemporary 36. Bob with the Silver Bullet Band 38. Jumper cable connection points 39. Social media-savvy celebrities often have a lot of these ... or what the answers to this puzzle’s starred clues are in the dictionary 42. Excited pointer’s comment 43. Hedren of Hitchcock’s “The Birds” 44. Cry of shear terror? 45. Cries of pain 46. Oven for pottery 47. Christmas carols 49. Army in the field? 50. Get-____ (starts) 51. Custer’s “last” thing 52. *Weather event

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Heather Watkins, Owner This June 27, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kl, Humboldt County Clerk 7/4, 7/11, 7/18, 7/25 (19−201)

that’s Pacific-specific 55. Sleuth, in old crime fiction 56. Swiffer WetJet, e.g. 60. Popular strengthtraining program 63. Confused 64. 1957 Stravinsky ballet 65. “Keep ____ secret” 66. *Representative 67. *An aye for an eye, say? 68. *Mars : Roman :: ____ : Norse

DOWN

1. Skin pic? 2. 1960 hit for Dion and the Belmonts 3. Cruising 4. “You’re oversharing!” 5. “Fiddler on the Roof” matchmaker 6. “Teenage Dream” singer Perry 7. Benefit program giving workers a chance to buy co.

shares 8. Crowd 9. Dealer’s query 10. Ilsa ____ (“Casablanca” character) 11. Class for U.S. newcomers 12. “Boyz n the Hood” actress Long 13. Toronto’s province: Abbr. 14. Part of XL: Abbr. 19. Curious George creators Margret and H.A. 23. Pomade 25. Basil-based sauces 27. “____ pronounce you ...” 28. Secondary advantage 29. Oz capital 30. “Creed” actress Thompson and others 31. Janet Jackson’s sister 32. The “A” of USDA: Abbr.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO STARTLING

33. Having liberal political tendencies 34. Bless, in a way 37. Apt rhyme of “squeak” 38. Tour de France high point 40. Triple-A jobs 41. Worker at a hosp. 46. Longtime “Nightline” host 48. Honey Bunches of ____ 50. Dumplings at a Japanese restaurant 51. Busybody 52. Nickname for a seven-time NBA All-Star 53. One-____ (old ball game) 54. Anything-goes party 56. Morse “E” 57. Even a little 58. Plan, with “out” 59. ____ Beta Kappa 61. Commercial start for Balls or Caps 62. Gravel alternative VERY EASY #5

www.sudoku.com

© Puzzles by Pappocom

8 2 7 3 6 5 2 4 3 6 5 9 1

4 3 9

9 6 2

9 5

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

6 7

1

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00367 The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRIBE OF WILD Humboldt 3984 Redwood Dr Redway, CA 95560 PO Box 563 Redway, CA 95560

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: BRENT OPAROWSKI for a decree changing names as follows: Present name BRENT OPAROWSKI to Proposed Name BRENT CLOTHIER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 26, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 10, 2019 Filed: June 10, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−191)

Shana Henry 3984 Redwood Dr Redway, CA 95560 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Drew Cowan, Owner/Operator This June 12, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 6/27, 7/4, 7/11, 7/18 (19−194)

8

8 3 4 7 4 9 2

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME BRENT OPAROWSKI CASE NO. CV190501

Let’s Be Friends

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JASON KINCAID LeBLANC CASE NO. CV190514 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JASON KINCAID LeBLANC for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JASON KINCAID LeBLANC to Proposed Name JASON EARENDIL AVON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 13, 2019 Filed: June 13, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−193)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME NATHAN WYTHE SKRZYPCZAK CASE NO. CV190477 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: NATHAN WYTHE SKRZYPCZAK for a decree changing names as follows: Present name NATHAN WYTHE SKRZYPCZAK to Proposed Name NATHAN WYTHE SKY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 26, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 4, 2019 Filed: June 4, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−184)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

classified@north coastjournal.com

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Employment

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                   

              

WATER QUALITY TECHNICIAN CITY OF EUREKA

 



$3,336 - $4,055 PER MONTH PLUS EXCELLENT BENEFITS The principal function of an employee in this class is to perform a variety of chemical, physical, biological, and bacteriological analysis involved in the testing of City water and wastewater quality. Assists in performing routine to complex laboratory tests to ensure that City water and wastewater treatment plants are in compliance with all Federal and State requirements. Equivalent to an Associates degree in Chemistry, Biology, Natural Sciences or a related field, and 2 years of experience performing lab analysis of water, wastewater, or industrial products is qualifying. For a complete job description and to apply, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Final filing date: 5 pm on Monday, July 8th, 2019. EOE

                   

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@northcoastjournal northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment

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   “Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.”

New opportunities at United Indian Health Services! Help us continue toward our vision- A healthy mind, body, and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community. One way we work toward this goal is by being an integrated health organization. Our divisions include: Medical, Dental, Behavioral Health, Vision and Community Health and Wellness. We strive to bring members of the community together so they can not only be unified in ensuring the best care is provided to their families, but also help in preserving Native culture through education, community outreach, and medicine. UIHS offers an excellent work life balance. Our clinic is open Monday through Friday, from 8 am-5 pm. Fulltime employees enjoy 3 weeks of paid time off per year, as well as 11 paid Holidays. Other benefits include: comprehensive health care plans for individuals and families, 4% matched retirement plans, and loan repayment programs.

Current employment opportunities:

Substance Abuse Counselor (FT) Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Prevention (FT) Clinical Nurse- RN (FT) Health Promotion & Education Specialist (FT) Our job application and all of our open opportunities with full job descriptions are on our website unitedindianhealthservices.org/jobs Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

 

      

 

      

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DIRECTOR OF RECREATION Our mental health residential facility is in search of a licensed recreation / art / music / dance / occupa− tional therapist to bring their expertise, enthusiasm, and creativity as our Director of Recreation. The role of the Director of Recre− ation is to create and lead the recreational program with recre− ational activities, hobby & interest building, physical activities and other events & holidays throughout the year. In our holistic approach, recreation is just one facet to the wellness of our clients along with behavioral skill building, medication support, dietary teaching, and prevocational training. Our overall goal is to support our clients (adults, ages 18+) to create their life worth living and be successful as independents in their community. This is a full−time position where available benefits include medical & dental insurance, vision plan, additional AD&D, 401K, and lots of company training in our key initiatives of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Wellness Recovery Action Plans, trauma−informed care, and more. Please inquire Robert Pitts, Campus Administrator, at rpitts@cbhi.net or at 707−442−5721 x11060. Applications are completed onsite at our facility − 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka, CA 95501

@ncj_of_humboldt

     



     

 

         

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip to jennifer@northcoastjournal.com.

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

FULL TIME REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT This position performs a variety of back office duties, including chair side assisting, sterilization, x-rays and child sealants. Applicants must be able to work in a fastpaced environment that requires managing multiple tasks simultaneously. TEMPORARY PART-TIME FRONT DESK RECEPTION Qualified applicants must be customerservice oriented and possess excellent phone, computer and general office skills. Spanishspeaking and knowledge of public substance programs preferred. Could become F/T position.


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CITY OF FORTUNA

STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER I

SENIOR TRIBAL ATTORNEY

$12.00 – 14.59 per hour.

Part-Time.

Entry-level position to perform a wide variety of maintenance, repair, and construction of City streets and storm drains; to learn basic equipment operation assignments; and to do related work as required. Work assignments may include heavy physical and manual labor. Must be 18 and have valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm Friday, July 12, 2019.

CITY OF FORTUNA

LEAD PARK MAINTENANCE WORKER

$38,424 - $46,749 per year, Full-Time. Under general direction of the Parks & Recreation Director perform all levels of work in the maintenance and upkeep of City parks, landscaped areas, public buildings, and associated equipment and structures; to perform gardening and landscaping work in the planting, maintenance and repair of trees, plants, shrubbery in landscaped areas throughout the City; to operate, maintain and repair parks and grounds maintenance equipment; to provide lead supervision of other workers and volunteers; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna. com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm Friday, July 19, 2019.

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

The Hoopa Valley Tribe, a federally recognized Indian Tribe located in Hoopa, CA, seeks an Attorney to fill the position of Senior Tribal Attorney. The successful candidate will serve in the Office of Tribal Attorney under the supervision of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council and Tribal Chairman. Provides a wide range of legal services to the Hoopa Valley Tribe, including without limitation advice, negotiation, drafting, research, lobbying, representation in litigation and administrative proceedings and other duties as assigned by the Council. Senior Tribal Attorney does not provide legal services or advice to individual Tribal members, except upon resolution of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council. Contractual, Salary: DOE. Minimum Qualifications: Juris Doctorate (J.D.) Degree. Minimum of five to ten years practicing Federal Indian Law and/or training; or equivalent combination of education or experience. Member in good standing of any state bar; California Bar Membership (highly desired) or willing to obtain California Bar membership within one year of hire. Outstanding writing, research and communication skills required.Experience in employment law, civil litigation, contracts and business law, and tax law. Must possess a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Preference will be given to qualified Native American Indian applicants. This position classified safety-sensitive. POSITION IS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. Submit application, cover letter, resume and writing sample to: Human Resources Department : To Apply Hoopa Valley Tribe P.O. Box 218 Hoopa, CA 95546Or call (530) 625-9200 ext. 20, Email submission: liz@hoopainsurance.com The Tribe’s Alcohol and Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

Director, Academic Resources (Job #19-38)

Student Engagement Specialist (Job #19-41)

F/T position in Academic Affairs. Closes: 7/24/19.

F/T position in Enrollment Management. Closes: 7/8/19.

HSU is an ADA/Title IX/EOE Start Date 6/24/2019

    

    

              

    

             

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For more info visit: www.humboldt.edu/jobs or call 707-826-3626.

 

For more info visit: https://apptrkr.com/1510270 or call 707-826-3626. HSU is an ADA/Title IX/EOE

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 www.northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

43


Employment AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

deffault

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Hiring? First 5 Humboldt is looking for an

Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

Continued on page 46 »

Continued from previous page

442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoast journal.com

Administrative Analyst I/II $20.38 - $26.16 hr. plus benefits Under general supervision, performs responsible administrative, organizational, systems, budgetary, statistical, public information and community liaison work and other analyses and staff support related to department, division, or County-wide activities and functions. Application deadline is Friday, July 11, 2019.AA/EOE

Apply online at: http://www.humboldtgov.org/hr

(707) 445.9641 default

K’ima:w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions: 062819 North Coast Journal listing:

For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350 0991 Survey Specialist RG/FT WEAVERVILLE$30.19-39.39 OUF

1041 JOM Tutors RG/PT ALL AREAS $15.22-22.06 OUF

MEDICAL ASSISTANT (DENTAL EDUCATOR), FT/Regular ($20.93-22.12 per hr DOE). This is a grant funded position. Deadline to apply is 5 PM, July 10, 2019. Pharmacy Clerk, FT/Regular ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, July 5, 2019.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN-1, PT/Temporary and On-Call available, ($10.15-12.00 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, July 11, 2019.

RG/FT KLAMATH $25.12/27.56 7/5/19

DIABETES CLERK/DATA COORDINATOR,

64 Home Base Visitor

FT/Regular ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE; Associate or Bachelor degree $15.38-$20.00 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, July 3, 2019.

81 Conservation Warden TEMP KLAMATH $18.91-23.87 7/5/19

83 Planner IV

DIRECTOR OF NURSES - DON, FT/Regular ($83,688-108,678 per yr DOE) Physician FT, Contract ($190,000-240,000 per yr DOE)

RG/FT KLAMATH $52,250-68,174 7/5/19

CERTIFIED ALCOHOL AND DRUG COUNSELOR,

84 Guidance Technician

FT/Regular ($39,600-51,500 per yr DOE)

TEMP EUREKA $20.72 7/5/19

ALL POSITIONS ARE OPEN UNTIL FILLED, UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED

86 Associate General Counsel RG/FT KLAMATH $74,838-97,647 7/5/19

87 Records Specialsit Admin III RG/FT KLAMATH $19.87-25.09 7/12/19

 default

HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISOR,

RG/FT KLAMATH $57,325-74,796 7/5/19

RG/FT KLAMATH $15.6017.34 7/5/19

General Labor • Driver Parts Clerk • Watershed Technician Controller • CMA• Bookkeeper Membership Sales Rep • Class B Driver •Investment Administrator • Route Driver

FT/Regular ($15.38-20.00 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, July 3, 2019. Housekeeper, FT/Regular ($12.25-15.92 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, July 5, 2019.

1072 Title IV E Manager 58 Social Worker

sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E St., Eureka, CA 95501

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YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS

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For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

 

               


5,995

9,995

$

$

$

9,995

2009 Ford Fusion

2016 Chevrolet Spark EV 1LT

2015 Dodge Dart SE

107,834 miles #216644

40,643 miles #582664

74,485 miles #345358

$12,995

13,995

$

14,295

$

2015 Ford C-Max Energi SEL

2017 Nissan Sentra

2017 Hyundai Elantra

31,332 miles #107400

37,520 miles #312063

35,581 miles #112938

14,995

$

14,995

$

15,995

$

2017 Chevrolet Cruze LT

2017 Chevrolet Trax LS

2014 Dodge Ram 1500 4x4

18,892 miles #609792

19,385 miles #247251

128,841 miles #264429

15,995

$

2014 Toyota Prius HB Plug-In

15,995

$

2016 Toyota Corolla

2016 Toyota Camry LE

38,946 miles #477277

15,995 miles #533877

83,102 miles #061494

18,249

$

16,995

$

18,495

$

$

18,995

2017 Nissan Rogue

2017 Mazda Mazda 6

2017 Chevrolet Volt HB LT

46,245 miles #149298

37,797 miles #105251

37,401 miles #102133

18,995

$

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT

22,795

$

32,599

2015 Ram 1500 4x4 Laramie

2018 Toyota 4Runner SR5

43,602 miles #753130

49,239 miles #515368

33,995

$

34,995

2016 Chevrolet Tahoe LT 76,070 miles #474568

$

34,995

2015 Ford F-150 4x4

2016 Toyota Tundra 4x4

27,661 miles #E06917

Only 9,000 miles! #582453

43,708 miles #597075

$

31,595

2016 Nissan Frontier 4x4

36,647 miles #695986

$

$

40,995

$

2016 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD Duramax Diesel 93,659 miles #302699

$

46,995

2018 Chevrolet Suburban 37,683 miles #185096

Sale price does not include tax, license or $80 document fee. Subject to prior sale. Loans subject to credit lenders approval. Ad expires 7/31/19 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

45


Marketplace Art & Collectibles default

Real Estate

Continued from page 44

Miscellaneous

Cleaning

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CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

$324,500

■ Arcata

CUTE AND COZY ARCATA HOME! Close to Coastal Grove Charter School in Bloomfield subdivision. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, built in 1948. The home features solar-electric panels with a heat pump for heating and cooling. The kitchen is remodeled and there are French Doors off the dining area leading out to a nice fenced yard with a garden shed. Call soon for a private showing! MLS#254221

New Listing!

Convenient

Merchandise NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

Miscellaneous CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1−866−535− 9689 (AAN CAN) TOYS, GAMES & PUZZLES HALF PRICE Sale Plus: Monday Munchies, Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednesdays, New Sale Thursdays, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Satur− days. Where your shopping dollars support local youth! Dream Quest Thrift Store July 6−12. (530) 629−3006.

Computer & Internet 50 GLORIOUS YEARS 

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Musicians & Instructors

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

Other Professionals

Other Professionals

(707) 445-3027

2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

 

CalBRE: #01144618, NMLS: #323296

HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING Summertime cleaning special 20% off 2 hours or more 707−502−1600

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

Lin Bauer

  

707-826-1806





  

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice macsmist@gmail.com



Home Repair

Owner

    







WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Housing default

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $22,700, 2 pers. $25,950; 3 pers. $29,200; 4 pers. $32,400; 5 pers. $35,000; 6 pers. $37,600; 7 pers. $40,200; 8 pers. $42,800 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Other Professionals

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

 

Body, Mind & Spirit

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         

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

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



 

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Est. 1979 



YOUR AD

HERE

LEARN TO ROW THIS SUMMER Juniors ages 12−18 meet Tues., Wed. & Thurs. afternoons. Adults meet Tues. & Thurs. at 5:30 pm and Sundays at 10am. (707) 267−7976. www.hbra.org

  

  

Done Making Babies?

Consider Vasectomy… Twenty-minute, in-office procedure In on Friday, back to work on Monday Friendly office with soothing music to calm you

  



 

442-1400 ×319 melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400


Kyla Tripodi

Katherine Fergus

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

Charlie Tripodi

707.476.0435

691 GREENHORN DRIVE, TRINITY CENTER - $249,900

1293 MARSHALL LANE, HOOPA - $199,000

Flat, usable ±.65 parcel, fully fenced, w/ Mill Creek frontage, fruit trees, 2 cabins w/ bath & electric.

±1.2 Ac w/ creek frontage, 2/1 home, guest cabin, pool & deck, garage/shop, tool shed, orchard.

±5 Acres in gated community w/ 2 small building sites, year-round creek, small spring. OMC!

HAWKINS BAR – LAND/PROPERTY - $119,000

DOUGLAS CITY – LAND/PROPERTY - $385,000

±1.45 Acres in Trinity Village. Stunning views w/flat building sites. OWC with 50% down.

±124 Acres overlooking Reading Creek! Easy access, year round creek (with fish), and an unfinished 3/2 house!

PETROLIA – LAND/PROPERTY - $325,000

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY - $120,000

±80 Private acres with beautiful views of the Mattole River Valley. Property features a creek, terraced gardens, and multiple building flats.

NEW LIS

TING!

±20 Acres on an old remote homestead featuring a spring, building areas, and power on site.

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY - $149,000

±80 Remote acres on the Reservation in Weitchpec. Wooded parcel w/ year round stream, spring, and large flat. NEW LIS

TING!

±160 Remote acres featuring meadows, building sites, developed well, and Grass Creek frontage! TING!

916.798.2107

REDWOOD VALLEY – HOME ON ACREAGE - $399,000

PHILLIPSVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $155,000

NEW LIS

BRE # 02084041

±160 Acres on 3 parcels w/ permitted cultivation space, RRR space, multiple homes, outbuildings, wells, water tanks, and much more!

±60 Acres w/ large flats and mature timber! Beautiful views, great water, and easy access.

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY - $445,000

Realtor/ Commercial Specialist

±155 Acres w/ panoramic views of the Trinity Alps, custom high end cabin w/ wood floors & wood vaulted ceilings.

SOMES BAR – LAND/PROPERTY - $130,000

TING!

Mike Willcutt

HARRIS – LAND/PROPERTY - $2,590,000

3/2 Home on one acre of park like setting! Features ponds, garden, fruit trees, pool, hot tub, and more!

NEW LIS

Hailey Rohan

HORSE MOUNTAIN – HOME ON ACREAGE - $625,000

Meticulously maintained 3/1 cabin and large shop on over half an acre. Just a few minutes drive from Trinity Lake!

172 MARIE LANE, CARLOTTA - $399,000

Tyla Miller

ORICK – LAND/PROPERTY - $125,000

±40 Acres w/ Klamath River frontage! Features building sites, timber, and potential for hydro-electric system.

NEW LIS

TING!

HYDESVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $1,290,000

Stunning ±7.25 acre parcel with an STAMPED Permit for 10,000 sq. ft. of mixed light cultivation space!

MYERS FLAT – ELK PRAIRIE VINEYARD - $1,450,000 Established ±15 acre vineyard w/ 3 homes, winery, cellar, tasting room, mature grapes & olive trees.

5925 WILDER RIDGE ROAD, HONEYDEW - $225,000 22 Acre Honeydew treasure! Interim cultivation permit exp 12/31/19. RRR app for 20K sf, initiated in 2016.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, July 4, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

47


ONE DAY SALE FOR

@ H UMBOLDT COUNT Y COLLECTIVE $

5

ABSOLUTEXTRACTS CART WITH FULL PRICE ABX CART PURCHASE

$

5

SELECT CARTS WITH FULL PRICE PU RCHASE O F LIVE CART

15% OFF ALL LIVE RESINS

EVERYONE recieves a preroll for $1 with a concentrate purchase. One per customer

"

1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka CA | 707.442.2420 | M-F 10am-6pm, Sat + Sun 11am-5pm License No. C10-0000011-LIC

E VERYONE

Profile for North Coast Journal

North Coast Journal 07-04-19 Edition  

The Administrator -- Before Tom Jackson Jr. officially took the reins at HSU, he sat down with the Journal, by Thadeus Greenson

North Coast Journal 07-04-19 Edition  

The Administrator -- Before Tom Jackson Jr. officially took the reins at HSU, he sat down with the Journal, by Thadeus Greenson

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