North Coast Journal 06-30-2022 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, June 30, 2022 Vol. XXXI Issue 26 northcoastjournal.com

6 Rainbow cyclone 15 Oyster F&$#!

AFTER ROE In California, Humboldt and beyond


THE 101ST FORTUNA

RODE O J U LY 10

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS

6 8 9

Mailbox Poem

Haying on Saturday

News

Clear Skies for Second Annual Ferndale Pride March

Views

The Overturning of Roe and What to Do Now

Views

‘Step into Your Power’

10 NCJ Daily Online 11 On The Cover After Roe

15

On the Table

17

Get Out!

18

Oyster Fest’s Rocky Return Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Saving the Humboldt Marten

Fishing the North Coast

Pacific Halibut Continue to Chew Up Baits

19 Arts Nights

First Saturday Night Arts Alive

20 Home & Garden Service Directory

Eureka Main Stree 4th of July

Special Pull-Out Section

29 The Setlist Boom Times

30 Calendar 34 Screens

The Lives of Women

35 Field Notes

Midsummer Puzzle Answers

35 36 36 41

Workshops & Classes Cartoon Sudoku & Crossword Classifieds

June 30, 2022 • Volume XXXIII Issue 26 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2022

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Entertainment Calendar

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com

JULY

5 5

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Another shot of the elusive Humboldt marten. Read more on page 17. Photo courtesy of the Institute of Natural Resources at Oregon State University and the Wildlife Program of the Yurok Tribe.

On the Cover Protestors on the Arcata Plaza. Photo by Mark Larson

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

MAILBOX

HWMA’s EUREKA RECYCLING CENTER IS PERMANENTLY CLOSING

The Humboldt Waste Management Authority’s Eureka Recycling Center will be permanently closing on August 1, 2022. HWMA staff will be identifying suitable sites for relocation, and it is anticipated that these services will return in early 2023. We understand this closure may cause complications and hardships to our customers and only exacerbates the difficulty with disposing of certain hard to recycle items, but we encourage customers to utilize the below alternate disposal locations during this time. Terry Torgerson

RE: RE: RE: Unhinged

Haying on Saturday

Editor: First, I have to acknowledge A tribute to KMUD and local radio Gordon Inkles as the fine writer that he is (Mailbox, June 23). But he says As BBC expounds on nukes, low-yield he missed my alternative to foul Our hay truck lurches as we leave the field. language in political debate. My letA disc can launch them from the NATO ring ter listed five good examples of the Encircling our competitor. It’s spring. alternative. Google Hakeem Jeffries or Chris Murphy on gun control, or Ill-omened, like the dread two-headed calf Taiara Tamminga on biased policing, Are infants suckled by Globemaster jets. or Katie Porter on political corrupAnd Service suicides are up by half! tion, or Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on The more we hear, the more macabre it gets. just about anything. We switch to KMUD on the hill. Here’s Ed Only two hours ago, we got the And Rattlesnake. A flash, and gloom has fled devastating news that the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. Yes, For Sgt. Pepper’s coming through the rye: there has already been some cursing Their constellation towers in the sky. here at home about that — but we — Ellen Taylor are a two-person choir. Maybe the language used in public discourse has changed and I’m too old now to appreciate it. However, Humboldt County own their own homes. profanity doesn’t help at all in changing othFew of these homes are adapted for reduced er people’s minds — and more often has the mobility, putting us seniors at risk for opposite effect. That’s why most of us have falls. As we get older it is more difficult to given up reading online comments. If we maintain our homes, which can also result express our opinion publicly, we most likely in unsafe conditions. The nonprofit Life Plan hope our opinion will sway at least a few Humboldt is a grassroots effort that will give others — I just don’t believe crude language these homeowners an opportunity to downis an effective way to do that. size, trading our homes to become members Alan Sanborn, Arcata of a community designed to promote safety, independence and social connections. This Editor: would free up housing for working families, As board members of Life Plan Humboldt, addressing another problem facing Humwe applaud the Grand Jury for recommendboldt County. It will take a multi-pronged ing steps to accommodate the growing approach to ensure the expanding senior number of older adults in our community population is cared for and help older adults (“The Grand Jury Weighs In,” June 23). It is a remain connected and contributors to the great time to leverage state funds for affordwell-being of the whole community. able housing and the need is critical. And Ann Lindsay and JoAnn Schuch, Life Plan yes, unhoused seniors need emergency beds Humboldt, McKinleyville and services designed exclusively for them. We agree with the Grand Jury on the need Please make your letter no more than 300 for the Elder and Vulnerable Adult Services words and include your full name, place of Team to continue to grow. All older people, residence and phone number (we won’t print particularly once they cannot drive, are at your number). Send it to letters@northrisk for social isolation. Without strong social coastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to supports, they may be vulnerable to physibe considered for the upcoming edition is 10 cal, sexual, emotional and financial abuse. a.m. Monday. ● Eighty percent of people 75 or older in

This closure will allow HWMA and Humboldt County Jurisdictions to work toward SB 1383 compliance by utilizing this vacated space to conduct organics collection and processing activities. For questions or concerns please email operations@hwma.net or call 707-268-8680. For more info about SB1383 and its requirements visit https://calrecycle.ca.gov/organics/slcp/education/ DROP-OFF LOCATIONS SCRAP METAL Arcata Scrap and Salvage 192 G St Arcata Ca

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Ferndale Pride marchers make their way through town bedecked with rainbows on Sunday, June 26. Photo by Jose Quezada

Clear Skies for Second Annual Ferndale Pride March By Linda Stansberry

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Editor’s Note: Portions of this story originally appeared in The Enterprise’s June 16, 2022 edition. The Enterprise is owned by the North Coast Journal, Inc.

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F

erndale on a Sunday morning is quiet but not sleepy. Middle-aged couples put in their daily miles walking loops down Main Street, turning on Van Ness to pass the fairgrounds. Gaggles of young moms window shop while clutching coffee cups. Farmers done with their morning chores catch up at the counter of Poppa Joe’s under the watchful eye of taxidermied bucks. The Veteran’s Hall marquee is advertising its monthly pancake breakfast, scheduled for next week. Across the street, the Friends of the Ferndale Library are hosting a book sale. The bells of St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church call the faithful inside for The Divine Service at 10:30 a.m. On the lawn of the church, its sign this Sunday, June 26, says “The LGBTQ Are Being Deceived.” A similar declaration last year, asking people if they had been hurt by LGBTQ culture, inspired the small town’s first-ever Pride March on June 27, 2021. Plans for a second march, almost exactly a year later, were also galvanized by inflammatory statements from the church’s pastor Rever-

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

end Tyrel Bramwell. “Ferndale’s first pride march was a protest and the turnout was more than I expected that year,” says Kaelan Rivera, who organized this year’s march. “The turnout was more awe-inspiring because of that sign.” Rivera, who came out as transgender in 1998 while living in Redding, is a military veteran who has lived in Ferndale for two years. Rivera says he has always been very open about his identity and displays rainbow flags on his vehicle and home. Things have not always been this way. As recently as 2007, community members attempted to prevent openly gay therapist Stuart Altschuler from conducting sessions at his home office, citing concerns that it might not be appropriate for a “family setting.” The planning commission’s vote to deny Altschuler’s permit was eventually overturned. Altschuler, who still lives and works in Ferndale, says things have changed over the past 15 years. “My experience, since arriving in Ferndale in 2007, is that the support of LGBTQ people has been stronger and more evident,” he says. “The vast majority of Ferndale residents make me feel safe and loved and supported. Unfortunately, there will always be those who prefer ignorance

and hateful belief systems to drive their hatred and attacks on minorities of any kind. I prefer to see the good in Ferndale and deal with the bigots only when I must.” In recent years there has been an increase in visibility for the queer community. A home at the north end of Main Street proudly displays a rainbow flag. Two local businesses — Foggy Bottoms Boys and Patches’ Pastries — put their identities front and center with their marketing efforts. Recently, the Cream City played host to numerous folks in drag and saucy costumes as they attended the Rocky Horror Show at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre. Bramwell, who appears to have leaned into the controversy, chose Pride Month this year to conduct a series of sermons titled “Rescued from Sin’s Rainbow.” On June 23, he added a blog entry to St. Mark’s website titled “Moral and Immoral Cyclones.” In it he references Lynette Mullen’s April 21, 2022 article in The Enterprise describing an incident from 1892 in which several citizens destroyed the home of a local woman accused of prostitution. The Enterprise’s editor at the time, Denis Edeline, referred to the reaction as a “moral cyclone” striking Ferndale. Bramwell perceives the marches as an “immoral cyclone” centered not “on a house of


immorality,” but the church. “On June 26, 2022, another rainbow-striped cyclone of immorality is scheduled to touch down in town,” wrote Bramwell. “What will be Ferndale’s response? … Sexual immorality was once struck by a cyclone in Cream City. Is there enough morality left among us for those winds to swirl yet again? We shall see what the weather will bring. I, for one, believe we will see the gale-force winds of a moral people once again.” When the June 26 march was initially announced, The Enterprise reached out to Bramwell for comment, and he offered to respond via email. We asked about his interpretation of the Bible’s views on homosexuality, why he felt compelled to comment on the subject and how he felt about his views seeming to have encouraged the local LGBTQ community to be more vocal and present in Ferndale. “The Bible says homosexuality is a sin against God’s Law for which Jesus Christ died so that repentant believers in Him would be justified,” Bramwell wrote. “I want my hearers to know the depth of God’s love for them and how far He goes to save them from their sins. I have a vocational duty to address the sinful temptations of our day when they are presented. The LGBTQ presence was in and around Ferndale before I arrived in our community in 2017. I saw it steadily increasing for years before my message revealed its presence in no uncertain terms.” In 2021, Bramwell stood on the church’s steps to address the crowd and was met with chants and kazoos. He alleges on the St. Mark’s website that he and his family have been threatened. This Sunday he is speaking to his congregation about “the simple and the senseless,” quoting from the Book of Proverbs and Corinthians, encouraging this flock to be “daring and direct and unashamed of the Gospel.” Outside, the remaining scrim of the coast-

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al fog burns off to reveal the full promise of the day. Around 11:45 a.m., the quiet of the Cream City is broken as more than 100 people, many waving rainbow flags, descend on the lawn in front of City Hall. Some arrive on foot from their homes in Ferndale, others from further away. Pat McCutcheon and Cheryl Rau of Bayside, holding a banner that said, “Celebrating 37 Years Together,” pull up in their bright yellow convertible. “This is our service for the day,” said McCutcheon, waving to her friends from the Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. Behind her, a young family with a mother, father and two young girls apply sunscreen. The mother wears a shirt that says, “Protect Trans Youth.” Over by the gazebo, Pete Bansen, in a striped shirt and suspenders, shakes hands with a friend. “I’m here to represent the straight, retired farmers in suspenders contingent,” says Bansen, chuckling. He adds that he had an uncle who was gay and that he “suffered.” “Ferndale’s changed quite a bit,” Bansen says. On the sidewalk, Ferndale Police Department officer Cesar Cervantes stands with his thumbs on his belt, gamely answering questions. His vehicle is pulled to the side, its lights flashing silently to give drivers coming into town a reason to pause as march attendees stream across the street. Many have questions about where they’ll be marching. McCutcheon asks if they can drive. Yes, Cervantes says, they can drive slowly, but as the organizers don’t have a permit, the march will have to take place on the sidewalks, not the street. A samba band gathers, members rolling their drumsticks experimentally. The siren atop the Ferndale Volunteer Fire Department sounds at noon and Rivera climbs the steps of the gazebo, shouting for people to gather closer so they can

hear him. He lays down some guidelines, saying, “this is a march, this is a protest.” Rivera asks participants in wheelchairs or with mobility problems to go to the front and lead the procession. “Queer people with disabilities do not get seen hardly ever in a parade and they’re going in front,” he says, prompting a round of applause. Rivera also calls for the crowd to “not engage” with detractors. “There will be people who say things, do things, all sorts of foul stuff if you’ve never been to a parade,” he says. “We send them peace and love and we keep marching.” Rivera’s warning turns out to be unnecessary. At 12:15 p.m., the march begins, with Renee Crandall and her family, with one member using a wheelchair, at the front. “I am supporting myself, and I am supporting my people, and I am supporting my moms,” says Crandall, “All women, all genders all around the world, who want to be here but can’t be here. They have to be hidden or they can’t express themselves because of their family … my father disowned me because I’m a lesbian. There’s nothing I can do about it but love him from afar.” Crandall added that she thinks Ferndale is a great place to have a pride parade and “spread kindness.” “It’s a beautiful place, it has history,” she says. “I think it’s a great place to teach old dogs new tricks.” The marchers snake their way down Main Street, past the Cat Shack, then across the intersection at Shaw as the samba beat throbs. Cheryl Etter stands on the corner in front of Ferndale Pizza, clapping her hands as she watches. “I don’t believe you judge other people,” says Etter softly when asked why she came out to support the march. “You let people be who they are.” In front of Tuyas restaurant, brunching

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tourists look up from their sopes and enchiladas as the colorful crowd streams past. Two employees stand in the doorway, also taking it in. Rau and McCutcheon are still inching their way up Main in their bright yellow car. Another Ferndale Police officer is waiting at the intersection of Main and Bluff, lights flashing to alert northbound traffic. “Happy Pride!” shouts a woman from the sidewalk, receiving a cheer. The marchers turn again to cross at Brown Street and a pickup hauling a horse trailer brakes to let them pass. The driver flashes a peace sign out the window. The beat of the samba band goes on and on. Just a few blocks away, at Firemen’s Park, the blanket of afternoon quiet drops once again. Tables are set up behind the bocce ball court with a handful of vendors waiting to sell tie-dye rainbow T-shirts and jewelry. A radio plays Sting’s greatest hits at a serene volume. The entire Petersen family is gathered beneath the shade of pop-up awning on folding chairs, waiting to hand out ice cream. No, they say, they don’t have anyone in the march. “We’re just here to be of service,” one says. Back down Main Street, the march has returned to City Hall and dissolved. Several people are headed north to the park, others are starting their cars. A Suburban pulls up next to a truck to give it a jumpstart. The steps of the church are empty, but two teenagers pose in front of the sign. One wears a short plaid skirt and fishnets, a rainbow flag draped over their shoulders. Their friends snap pictures. The sky above is clear and blue, not a cloud to be seen. l Linda Stansberry (she/her) is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at linda@ northcoastjournal.com and follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.

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The Overturning of Roe and What to Do Now

W

e knew it was coming and still the news launched a million expressions of fury across the media landscape and onto the streets. We’ve known this was coming for years, decades. The steady march of the Republican party as it took over school boards, rallied candidates for local offices, blocked judicial appointments at all levels until it could appoint those who would do its bidding. The agenda has always been the same. The GOP has created a brilliant blueprint for minority rule and on Friday, June 24 won a major victory against women and those with uteruses, whose autonomy its members have demonstrated they hate. Against the people they do not believe deserve healthcare. Against the people who bear the burden of forced parenting, racism and poverty. Against the people who’ve been raped. Having failed to stop them, what are we going to do now? Grab your placard and yell in the street if that calls to you, yes. Let our anger be seen but don’t, for the love of all things good, stop there. Listen, here is the difference between those who believe in individual freedom and those who would reserve all rights only for those who are cis male, white, rich: The latter have lawmakers on their side. Senate Republicans operate without shame and in full commitment to their party’s goals, which include, explicitly, taking away the rights of women, of non-straight men and of everyone not-white. On the other side, the Democrats, despite representing more people and winning the popular vote every year since 1996, continuously fail to exhibit such strength and commitment. What that means is, if all you care about is forcing people to have babies, you barely have to work at it at all — your boys are all over it. But if you think we should have self-determination

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over our own bodies, holding on to that right is on you. One of the most effective ways to help with any cause is to give money to organizations successfully supporting it. As of this typing, five states have outlawed abortion with eight more expected to follow suit momentarily. Whatever California’s problems — and we have a lot of them — the criminalizing of abortion is not among them. That frees me up to donate to funds and places specifically aimed at helping people less lucky. In Kentucky, for example, where I set up a recurring donation directly to Planned Parenthood’s Lexington branch. www.thecut. com has the best list I’ve found to directly assist those most in need. Let’s talk about recurring donations, a useful way to support the work of organizations looking out for us. Even small monthly donations add up and enable groups to budget further into the future. Let’s also talk about amounts. No one who is truly struggling to pay their bills should feel shamed into donating beyond their means. But, as Australian philosopher Peter Singer would say, a lot of us have more than we need to live a comfortable life. We could be, and should be, saving lives with the excess. Between Netflix, HBO and Amazon Prime, I spent about $50 per month on streaming services. Is a person’s right to make their own health care decisions more or less important? Is protecting victims of rape from having to bear unwanted children more or less valuable? We’re not going to win if we’re unwilling to sacrifice. Not until we overcome gerrymandering and an otherwise rigged system, which doesn’t seem poised to happen any time soon. The other part of this equation is showing up. But again, if you live in a blue part of California, where do you show up to? What’s the ask? Well, here’s something to think


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about: As the CalMatters story on page 11 notes, “40 percent of California counties do not have any abortion clinics.” The state legislature has put forth a package of 13 bills to help advance access within the state. Check it out, then call your state senator and assembly person and tell them to vote yes on each of those bills. Call every single person who represents you at every level and ask them their position on abortion. Make it clear you will not vote for anyone who is not 100 percent prochoice. Report out on social media, tagging the politician, give kudos for being on the right side, announce your commitment to voting them out if they’re on the wrong. Can’t find a pro-choice candidate to vote for? Run. Show up at the demonstrations. Follow what the activist organizations are

doing and find out where you can plug in. Need more? Google “how to help women get abortions.” A long list of possibilities will appear. Look, this is a lot. I know. And when you want to burn it to the fucking ground, “donate and call your representatives and do a Google search” is a few million miles short of cathartic. Why bother taking part in a broken, corrupt system? Fair question. The only answer I can give right now is we have to fight on all fronts. So, speak out, donate, call your reps, do your research, show up where you’re needed and, importantly, hold on to hope and each other. ● Jennifer Savage (she/her) is a political strategist and mother of three.

‘Step into Your Power’ By Sharonne Blanck and Lorna Bryant newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

L

ast week’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling striking down Roe v. Wade was a massive blow to reproductive rights and a direct attack on the health and safety of women, people with uteruses and basic human rights. This ruling will affect all people, however, Black people stand to be disproportionately impacted by the court’s ruling. According to the Guttmayer Institute, most abortions in the United States are obtained by people of color (37 percent Black, 22 percent Hispanic and 8 percent “Other,” meaning Asians, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans and those of mixed race). This is coupled with the number of people who die during childbirth. A 2020 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report states the maternal mortality rate for non-Hispanic Black people was more than 55 deaths per 100,000 live births — almost three times the rate for non-Hispanic white people. The rate for Black people increases with age (13.8 deaths per 100,000 for people under age 25; 22.8 for those aged 25-39; and 107.9 for those aged 40 and over). Separately, these statistics are alarming; together, these rates amplify the crisis of reproductive health of Black people. The future of our inalienable rights hangs in the balance. The overturning of Roe v. Wade appears to be an ominous foreshadowing of other attacks that may lie ahead. The conservative-leaning U.S. Supreme Court appears to have its sights on reversing other laws our country has fought hard to set in place. In his concurring opinion of the Roe v. Wade overturning, Justice Clarence

Thomas hinted at the need to revisit samesex marriage and birth control rulings. We must take action. Step into your power. Identify your areas of influence and step into them. It is all right to be nervous and even scared. Lean into it. Run for office. Step into a leadership role. Support current leaders and organizations doing the work and celebrating our culture, beauty and strength. Donate your time and/ or your money to organizations that align with your values. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel — seek out groups and organizations already doing the work. Connect with Eureka NAACP, Centro de Pueblo, HAPI (Humboldt Asians & Pacific Islanders in Solidarity), Planned Parenthood and Cooperation Humboldt. The fight can sometimes be daunting. This is a marathon, not a sprint. It is essential to focus on joy and well-being — we are here to be glorious, not solely to fight. Tap into the resources from Black Humboldt and HC Black Music and Arts Association to cultivate your emotional health while doing this work. Complacency is a convenience we can no longer lean on. Change rarely occurs overnight. It takes work and time, but the reward makes the effort worth it. Time to work! Time to fight! We can do it — together. ● Sharonne Blanck (she/her) is the Eureka NAACP president. Lorna Bryant (she/her) is the Eureka NAACP media coordinator.

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DAILY ONLINE

Supreme Court Ruling Puts Target on California Concealed Carry Law

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he U.S. Supreme Court issued one of its most significant gun law rulings in more than a decade on June 23, tossing out New York state’s tight restrictions on who can carry a concealed gun in public. Gun rights activists are celebrating the 6-3 decision, while advocates for stricter gun laws decry it. Both agree that California’s similar law may be next to be challenged. The ruling likely marks the most dramatic expansion of gun rights in the United States since 2008, when the Supreme Court clarified for the first time that the Second Amendment’s right “to keep and bear” firearms applies to individual citizens, not just state militia members. But that ruling only affirmed the right for “self-defense within the home,” leaving states with wide discretion over whether and how to restrict guns elsewhere. This ruling brings that constitutional right outside the home. Most states either issue concealed carry licenses upon request or do not require licenses at all. But in eight states, applicants are required to show a compelling need before being granted permission to tote around a concealed firearm. Until today’s ruling, New York was one of those states. California is another. How easily a Californian is able to obtain a concealed weapon permit depends on where they live. That’s because in California these licenses are issued by local law enforcement — either city police chiefs or county sheriffs. And while state law requires applicants to demonstrate “good cause,” local law enforcement officials have wide latitude to define what

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that means. In counties with Republican sheriffs — Sacramento and Tehama, for example — permits are issued to all qualified applicants so long as they pay the necessary fees, take a firearms safety class as required by state law and don’t have a criminal record. San Francisco sits on the opposite end of the spectrum. According to county sheriff guidelines, an applicant living in the city must “supply convincing evidence” that they are at “significant risk of danger” that local law enforcement “cannot adequately address” and “cannot reasonably be avoided by alternative measures.” The court’s ruling doesn’t immediately invalidate restrictive concealed carry policies like those in San Francisco. But it does make legal challenges against California’s entire discretionary system much more likely to succeed. Chuck Michel, president of the California Rifle & Pistol Association (the state’s National Rifle Association chapter), said he plans to file a supplemental brief in an existing challenge against Los Angeles County’s concealed carry licensing system. At the same time the nation’s highest court expands the scope of the Second Amendment, Congress is on the verge of adding a few modest extra guardrails. In response to the mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, in which a gunman killed 19 children and two teachers with a semi-automatic rifle, the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives passed a bipartisan gun bill over the objections of the National Rifle Association. Signed by President Joe Biden on June 25, the law ratchets up some background

Covid Death: Another Humboldt County resident has died of COVID-19, according to Public Health’s last update on the virus’ status. The death marked the 149th for Humboldt County since the beginning of the pandemic. As the Journal was going to press June 28, a state database showed 12 people were hospitalized locally, with two in intensive care. POSTED 6.22.22

Crabs designated hitter Lane Oliphant celebrates after scoring against the Seattle Studs on June 17. The Crabs are back from their road trip, so check www.northcoastjournal. com for a wrap-up of the week’s home games. POSTED 06.22.22 Photo by Thomas Lal

checks for younger would-be gun buyers. It also provides funding to states interested in introducing “red-flag laws,” which make it easier for authorities to temporarily remove firearms from those deemed to be a threat to themselves or others. Democratic lawmakers in California are also considering their own raft of new gun bills. That includes legislation that

Election Update: Eureka City Councilmember Natalie Arroyo is heading to the Fourth District seat on the board of supervisors without a November runoff, according to the latest election results. Arroyo now holds 53.9 percent of the vote. She is trailed by Mike Newman, who has 32.39 percent of the vote, with Arroyo’s fellow Councilmember Kim Bergel at 13.65 percent.

would open gun vendors and manufacturers to an array of lawsuits for violating state gun rules or marketing guns and ammunition to minors or others who aren’t allowed to own them. Ben Christopher/CalMatters POSTED 06.23.22 Read the full story online.

Newborn Namings: Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed into law a bill by North Coast Assemblyman Jim Wood that expands the time period in which parents must register the birth of their child from 10 days to 21 days to recognize cultural traditions followed by many Native American families in naming newborns. POSTED 06.22.22

POSTED 06.24.22

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After Roe

What Happens to Abortion in California? By Alexei Koseff and Kristen Hwang, CalMatters newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

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he constitutional right to abortion in the United States is no more. June 24 the U.S. Supreme Court struck down its landmark Roe v. Wade precedent in a 5-4 decision, ending nearly 50 years of guaranteed abortion access for American women. The historic ruling has been expected since early May, when a draft of the opinion was leaked, and was widely anticipated long before that as conservative justices tilted the court. The fight over abortion rights now returns to the states, where it played out five decades ago, with the procedure immediately set to become nearly or entirely illegal in almost half of them and several more bans likely to follow. California is moving in the opposite direction, ramping up legal protections for abortion providers and pouring resources into expanding access as clinics prepare for a possible surge of patients traveling from other states to terminate their pregnancies. Here is how the Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization will play out in California:

Abortion will be a major focus of November election

Expect to hear a lot about abortion rights in the months ahead, as candidates tout their endorsements from Planned Parenthood and flood the airwaves with advertisements warning of the bleak future for access if their opponents win. Since the draft ruling leaked last month, Democrats in California and across the country have latched onto protecting abortion rights as a key issue for the 2022 midterm elections. With decades of public polling showing that a majority of Americans believe abortion should be legal in all or most cases, it has put the party back on the offensive as it faces mounting voter dissatisfaction with President Joe Biden and withering Republican attacks over inflation and crime.

“I hope that people are enraged,” said state Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins, a San Diego Democrat who ran a women’s health clinic before entering politics. “While we feel like we have better protections here and California is different, I hope they’re enraged and they understand what’s at stake,” she told CalMatters. A poll conducted last month by Monmouth University found that abortion was nearly tied with economic policy as the top concern for voters nationwide, a considerable increase from four years ago driven by its rising importance among Democrats. Another recent survey from UC San Diego asked Californians whether they planned to vote in November, before and after reading an article about the possibility of a national abortion ban if the Roe decision is overturned; researchers determined it had a significant mobilizing effect on independent voters. The potential for Republicans to pursue a national abortion ban should they win back control of Congress is likely to feature prominently in a number of battleground House races across the state. Gov. Gavin Newsom and Attorney General Rob Bonta have already made abortion rights central to their re-election campaigns, and even some candidates with less of a direct connection to ensuring abortion access, including Democratic state controller hopeful Malia Cohen, have tried to raise alarms about the beliefs of their GOP opponents. Abortion rights will also literally be on the ballot in California in November with a measure that, if approved by voters, would enshrine “reproductive freedom” in the state Constitution. Though California already protects abortion access through a constitutional right to privacy, Atkins, who is shepherding the amendment through the Legis-

Anti-abortion protesters gathered at the state Capitol against abortion measures before the Legislature on June 22, 2022. Photo by Miguel Gutierrez Jr., CalMatters

lature, said a more explicit guarantee is important as legal battles over the future of reproductive rights continue. “That is my biggest fear. You find one judge somewhere in California who rules and our whole right to privacy as it currently exists in California is in question,” Atkins said, though she acknowledged there were additional political benefits: “I sure as hell hope that it’s going to drive turnout.”

More legal support for abortion providers

As dozens of conservative states laid the groundwork for the end of Roe, passing abortion bans triggered by the Supreme Court ruling, California has been scrambling to build a bulwark for reproductive rights and accommodate a potential influx of patients from beyond its borders. Last fall, Newsom convened the Future of Abortion Council, a coalition of reproductive rights, health and justice groups, to explore how to make the state a “sanctuary” for abortion. Its recommendations, released in December, formed the basis for a sweeping package of more than a dozen bills currently moving through the Legislature. They include Atkins’ Senate Bill 1375, which would increase the number of providers by allowing some nurse practitioners to independently perform first-trimester abortions without a doctor’s supervision, and Assembly Bill 1918 by Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris, a Costa Mesa Democrat, which would create

a “reproductive health service corps” for underserved parts of the state. Several measures would protect doctors from legal and financial penalties if they travel to other states to perform abortions or treat out-of-state patients: AB 1666 by Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan, an Orinda Democrat, won final legislative passage June 23 and would nullify civil judgments from other states. AB 2091 by Assemblymember Mia Bonta, an Alameda Democrat, would prohibit medical providers and health insurers from sharing information in cases that seek to penalize abortion. AB 2626 by Assemblymember Lisa Calderon, a Whittier Democrat, would prevent the state medical board from suspending or revoking the license of a physician who is punished in another state for performing an abortion in accordance with California law. Abortion opponents have showed up at the state Capitol in force to protest AB 2223 by Assemblymember Buffy Wicks, an Oakland Democrat. Seeking to protect Californians from overzealous law enforcement and district attorneys who may be hostile to abortion rights, it would end a requirement that coroners investigate the cause of fetal deaths resulting from suspected self-induced abortions, clarify that women cannot be held criminally or civilly liable for pregnancy loss or abortion, and create an ability to sue prosecutors and others who violate that protection. “We’re covering a lot of ground,” Atkins said. “As disheartening as this reality is that we have to prepare for…given all that we’re Continued on next page »

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doing to shore up our protections and access to services, we will be ready.” Newsom has expressed support for many of the proposals — and already signed legislation earlier this year to eliminate out-of-pocket costs for abortions in health insurance plans. Though some would take effect immediately if approved, including the three bills expanding legal protections for doctors, others would not become law until January.

Out-of-state influx, but how big?

With Roe toppled, California has become the nearest state with abortion access for approximately 1.3 million out-of-state women of reproductive age, according to the Guttmacher Institute, an abortion rights think tank. That’s a nearly 3,000 percent increase triggered by Arizona’s historical abortion ban that criminalizes the procedure and went into effect when the Supreme Court announced its decision. Using women of reproductive age as a proxy for abortion demand is imprecise at best, and Guttmacher’s projection is based solely on driving distance. But without statewide data on abortions, it’s nearly impossible to estimate how many people may now rely on California clinics. Even before the June 24 Supreme Court decision, California providers and advocates reported serving women from states farther than Arizona. “One of the things we’ve seen is a cascading effect. The wait times for appointment availabilities increase in border states, and they travel to other states to get the care,” said Lisa Matsubara, general counsel for Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California. In the first four months following Texas’ controversial six-week ban last year, Planned Parenthood clinics in California performed abortions for approximately 6,000 out-of-state patients, Matsubara said. Patients from out of state were three times more likely than California patients to be seeking abortions rather than other health care during the same time period. In 2021, ACCESS Reproductive Justice, which gives grants to women to offset the cost of the procedure and remove barriers such as travel and lodging, helped people from 18 states, said Jessica Pinckney, the group’s executive director. Pinckney, who is among the coalition of abortion advocates supporting the 13-bill package in the Legislature, said advocates have been clear with lawmakers that planning for the unknown is difficult, but providers have done their best to collectively estimate what access gaps remain in California and what they expect to see in

the near future. “There’s so much you can’t anticipate,” Pinckney said. “In a world where half of the states have banned abortion outright or nearly outright, the barriers are only going to be greater.”

Increase the number of providers?

Despite California’s reputation as a reproductive health safe haven, 40 percent of California counties do not have any abortion clinics. Lawmakers are pushing to increase the number of abortion providers by offering financial incentives and streamlining regulations that govern who can perform abortions. Newsom’s proposed budget includes $20 million to give scholarships and loan repayment options to clinicians who commit to providing reproductive health care services. The Legislature’s spending plan invests an additional $21 million in existing reproductive health workforce programs and commits a one-time $20 million investment for recruiting and training clinicians that work at reproductive health centers. Another measure aimed at allowing nurse practitioners to perform first trimester abortions without physician supervision has been billed as a way to increase the number of abortion providers, but even advocates say the impact may be limited. In 2013, California adopted a measure allowing nurse practitioners, physician assistants and certified nurse midwives to perform first trimester abortions after receiving special training. Since then, however, training opportunities have remained limited. “Very few nurse practitioners have been trained since the law went into effect,” said Debbie Bamberger. Bamberger was the first nurse practitioner in the state to be trained to perform abortions and has been a nurse practioner for 28 years and works for Planned Parenthood in Oakland. Her training was conducted as part of a research study that assessed whether clinicians other than doctors could safely perform aspiration abortions — a procedure that uses suction during the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. Forty clinicians were trained during the course of that study, and Bamberger said not many more have been trained since. Part of the problem is nursing schools and physicians assistant programs do not have abortion curriculum or training opportunities for students who want to learn the procedure. Most training is limited to medical residency programs for physicians, who don’t want to give up their limited


spots to other kinds of clinicians. Bamberger said her clinic has trained five nurse practitioners to perform abortions in the past two years and Planned Parenthood of Northern California does not offer widespread training. “It’s mostly trying to remove barriers but it’s not necessarily going to hugely increase access if there’s still no training available,” she said.

The state is investing in abortion access

Both the Legislature’s Democratic leadership and Newsom administration have made it clear they’re willing to commit a significant amount of the state’s record surplus to abortion rights. In his latest budget proposal, Newsom pledged $125 million to reproductive health care, including $60 million to directly subsidize the cost of providing abortions to low-income or uninsured patients. Roughly a third of that money is reserved for low- and middle-income Californians enrolled in the state’s insurance exchange, Covered California, but $40 million can be used to reimburse abortion providers for procedures conducted on anyone who can’t pay — even those from out of state. His proposal, which is supported by the Legislature, also includes $20 million to improve physical and digital security at abortion clinics and $15 million for community-based organizations to provide sexual and reproductive health education. The Legislature’s spending plan goes even further, earmarking an additional $156 million in reproductive health spending to train more providers, increase funding for clinics that serve Medi-Cal patients, and open an abortion “Safe Haven” pilot program in Los Angeles. One headline-grabbing investment the Legislature and governor haven’t agreed on yet, is the creation of the California Abortion Support Fund. The fund would give grants to organizations that help defray travel, lodging, child care and other costs that advocates say prevent women from getting to an abortion clinic. While the money would go to California-based nonprofits, women seeking abortions from any state could apply for grants. “Some of the hesitation I’ve heard from legislators and the administration is it’s not common for us to provide practical support,” said Pinckney, with ACCESS Reproductive Justice. “But there’s no other health care that is banned and is time sensitive. They can’t wait six months to save the money.” l This story was originally published by CalMatters.

Pro-choice protesters assembled at the Humboldt County Courthouse on Friday, June 24. Photo by Ryan Hutson

‘We Are Not Going Back’

Humboldt County reacts to End of Roe v. Wade By Kimberly Wear and Ryan Hutson

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undreds gathered in Humboldt County to protest the U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade, joining hundreds of thousands across the nation in decrying the ruling that abruptly ended nearly five decades of constitutional protection. Until June 24, the 1973 landmark case was widely considered settled legal precedent grounded in the fundamental right to privacy afforded by the U.S. Constitution. While safe and legal access to abortion remains secure in California, the decision now places control over one of the nation’s most divisive issues back in the hands of state lawmakers, who can now determine a woman’s ability to terminate a pregnancy. That, according to Planned Parenthood Northern California, threatens “the right to safe and accessible abortion for millions of people nationwide” and will result “in over half our country’s states moving to wipe out abortion access.” Carol Sher, one of the hundreds who attended a June 24 community protest at the Humboldt County Courthouse with

Clergy for Choice, said she found the court’s decision “outrageous.” “I can’t believe they will give an 18-yearold an AR-15 and they will take away women’s rights over their own bodies,” she said. “It’s not about life, it’s about power over women.” Also protesting was Cynthia Packar, a retired registered nurse who’s lived in the area since the 1970s, said she expects a lot of “gray-haired women” will be out demonstrating “because we remember what it was like before abortion was available — the women dying, the women bleeding.” “Stopping legalized abortion doesn’t stop abortion, it just stops safe abortion,” she said. “And it was a sad day for women when this decision came down.” A sole counter protester wearing a “Make America Pro-Life Again” stood across the street. “I think it’s a wonderful day. It’s progress for America to take that step towards protecting innocent human life, and this is, it’s kinda a big deal,” said Roger Rees, a deputy district attorney who said he was there in his capacity as a community member.

North Coast representatives also weighed in on the decision, which had been widely anticipated following a leak of the draft opinion in May, with Congressman Jared Huffman describing the court majority as “extreme” and “out of touch.” “A cascade of dire consequences and restrictions will now sweep across the country, falling hardest on those who already face the most barriers to care: Black and Brown women, folks who can’t afford care, young people and LGBTQ people, and women suffering domestic violence are now all at the highest risk,” Huffman said, vowing to keep fighting in Congress to restore reproductive healthcare rights. California voters will also decide in November whether to codify the right to access abortion and contraception in the state Constitution with an amendment that will be on the upcoming election’s ballot. State Sen. Mike McGuire said he was “livid” and state Assemblymember Jim Wood described June 24 as “a very dark day in America.” Continued on next page »

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Above and left: On Sunday, June 26, protesters in Arcata carried signs against the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. PHOTO BY MARK LARSON

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Two days after the opinion came out, a second protest took place at the Arcata Plaza, with a few speakers, including Councilmember Meredith Matthews, one of the organizers, describing the impact the decision had on them, as well as calling for people to make sure they know where candidates stand on this issue and other fundamental rights. Matthews took a moment to encourage young people, especially, to get involved in their communities, to vote and to run for office, pledging her help to anyone who was interested. “You have a voice,” she said. “Please use it.”

The crowd of about 150 then moved to the eastern corners of the square, holding signs with messages including, “I’m Not Ovary-Acting,” “No Forced Birth” and “Women’s Liberation Now,” receiving mostly positive responses from passing drivers, many of whom honked and fist pumped their approval, a few blowing kisses. Eureka residents Amber Pawloski and Michelle Huckaby stood next to each other, at times finishing each other’s sentences as they explained their need to stand up against the stripping away of women’s reproductive rights and to stand up in solidarity with women in other parts of the country who no longer have the same protections available in places like California. “We are doing this for others,” Pawloski said. “Government should not be regulating our bodies,” Huckaby said. “It’s our choice. We have more regulations on our bodies than guns. It’s ridiculous. We are mad. … We are not going back.” “This is just the beginning,” Huckaby added. “What we want to know is, what’s next?”l Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the digital editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear. Ryan Hutson (she/her) is a freelance journalist based in Humboldt County.


ON THE TABLE

Good food needs good leadership

Run for our

BOARD OF DIRECTORS!  Represent our thousands of members  Support our local food system  Provide direction by setting policies The new off-plaza venue for the Oyster Fest attracted thousands, many of whom ended up in long food and drink lines snaking around the grounds and even into the welcome shade of this large vendor tent. Photo by Mark Larson

Oyster Fest’s Rocky Return By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

A

n hour into the Arcata Bay Oyster Festival, the lines for oysters at the Obento stall stretched across the battered grass and under the red and blue striped tent where local food businesses were tabling. The shade was a relief on a sunny day that promised traditional Oyster Fest sunburns, but those in the queue were in for a test of patience and the charm of their company, since those at the front of the line reported waiting 45 minutes or more to place orders. It was the same story in the next line and the next, where attendees, nearly all unmasked, with commemorative steel cups stood packed together in clumping lines that one had to cut through to reach the music stage. Scanning the offerings from the back of the stalls, where oysters popped on the grills and cooks shucked frantically, I wondered idly what kind of bribe it would take to buy a Kumamoto under the table. Finally, I gave up and headed to Brio to enjoy the smoked and

fried oyster special on the shaded patio. After two years of virtual and dispersed iterations meant to keep up community spirit and promote local food producers amid the pandemic, the festival welcomed an estimated capacity crowd of 5,000 revelers to the field in the Creamery District for a $15 entry fee, halting ticket sales at 3 p.m. When the grills cooled, the stage cleared and the tents came down, however, the reviews were harsh. Hour-long waits for food and drink, not enough shade, a scant four oyster booths, the admission fee and missing the broad and accessible plaza location were the top complaints in Arcata Main Street’s Facebook page, as well as the Journal’s, issues echoed in conversations over the following days. Music from the stage, it seems, can only soothe the hot, hungry and thirsty so much. It’s hardly the first time Arcata Main Street has taken a flogging for its main fundraising event, which fills the coffers for the rest of the year’s events. Previous

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years have seen tumult over an exclusive deal with out-of-town SeaQuake beer, parking, intoxicated attendees, crowds and fencing off the plaza. This year a pair of beer booths tapped out more than 40 kegs from Lost Coast Brewery, Six Rivers Brewery, Mad River Brewing Co., Eel River Brewing Co. and Humboldt Cider Co. But, points out Shoshanna, one of the main organizers of the event, filling steel cups is slower than passing out pre-filled plastic ones destined for landfill, which is what the five beer booths serving the typical festival crowd of 15,000 usually do. Shoshanna admits more food vendors would have shortened lines but says it was tough getting them on board. Two oyster stalls dropped out, leaving Nori, Obento, North Bay Shellfish and Sammy’s Barbecue, as well as non-oyster eateries Oak Deli & Brewery and Rax on Rax wings. Some of the 45 vendors from the 2019 oyster festival have shut down or stopped doing events. Others are fighting to stay afloat in an industry hit hard by COVID. Aside from the $500 booth fee, the requirements of a mobile setup and the marathon of feeding the masses, it was a big ask for restaurants already facing staffing problems and shrinking margins. For many, it was a safer bet to participate by serving specials in their usual locations. “They were trying to figure out whether to stretch and go or just stay where they are,” she says, adding it’s not easy “believing in an event that hasn’t happened in two years.” She’s hopeful the strong attendance this year will give vendors more confidence they can turn a profit at next year’s event. Festival coordinator Matthew Cook, a 20-year veteran of the North Country Fair and Reggae on the River, echoes her tone of resignation. “Every food vendor that wanted to come came and we just couldn’t get anymore,” he says. “People just aren’t geared up to do this kind of thing anymore.” The annual Best Oyster competition, no longer requiring a booth at the event, drew seven entrants, some representing restaurants, others independent. Gaby Long of Taste of Bim won Best Hot Oyster with her Caribbean curry with mango topping. Best Cold went to the Nosh’s Ryan Clair who served an oyster with nasturtium leaf, green apple, horseradish cream sauce, dill and watercress oil, wasabi and almond oil. Norberto Angon from

Nori took Best Presentation with an oyster boat garnished with carved fruit. Named for the local chef who died this year, the Dave Griswald Best Overall went to home cook David Orluck for his Umami Tsunami raw shooter with mirin, ponzu, Sriracha, scallion and quail egg, and his Surf and Turf hot oyster with wagyu beef, chimichurri and a home-raised and cured duck egg yolk. Walter Rubke from Mazzotti’s took the Unleashed Award with a raw oyster served with honey, homemade threemonth champagne vinaigrette, apple, mango, cilantro, shallot, lemon and sugar. It’s hard to imagine composing some of these entries with speed in a hot tent on the plaza. As for the hustle at the Creamery field, Shoshanna says, “I think people were doing as much as they could as fast as they could,” noting a few key organizers had been out with COVID in the past months. “People were frustrated with long lines at the event but there were so many people also running around and having a good time.” She’s not wrong. I was especially struck by younger attendees walking around smiling in high festival fashion. Perhaps as the world crumbles, Gen Z has necessarily evolved to enjoy a party amid high temperatures and limited access to food and drink. “I know what we accomplished and I know how difficult it was to accomplish anything this year,” says Cook, particularly since details weren’t solidified until February. He says some of the criticism is “valid,” but, “A lot of people are talking about things they know nothing about … . I’ve done this so long, I just kind of let this stuff roll off.” He won’t be back for 2023 and has this advice for future organizers: “I think things will be a little bit easier next year. More people will be able to help and participate. Get an early start. Like now.” Shoshanna, who’s moved on to a new post as youth services outreach coordinator for the Humboldt County Library, won’t be returning either. But she’ll be rooting for the event and is characteristically optimistic. “It’s a comeback event … and it is a bumpy ride.” ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip to jennifer@northcoastjournal.com.


GET OUT

Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Saving the Humboldt Marten By Katherine Larson getout@northcoastjournal.com

T

he Humboldt marten is about the size of a 4-month-old human baby and adorable, with small, round ears, a fluffy tail and a button nose. Don’t let these looks fool you. This member of the weasel family is a voracious predator that fights hard for a spot in the animal kingdom, taking down large rodents such as squirrels and woodrats. The elusive, nocturnal critters are hard to spot, even for those researching them. “Don’t expect to see one,” warns Micaela Gunther, a behavioral ecologist researching martens at Cal Poly Humboldt, to her master’s students. Its dwindling population — it’s listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act — doesn’t help, as it has been extirpated from 95 percent of its historic range. Unfortunately, we’re not just at risk of losing the Humboldt marten but also the very thing that could save them: traditional ecological knowledge or TEK. TEK is the body of expertise accumulated by Indigenous people concerning their environment and relates to both a spiritual and ecological understanding of nature. According to Tiana Clausen-Williams, a Yurok tribal member and director of the Yurok Tribe Wildlife Department, the loss of ancient knowledge is the reality for many Indigenous tribes in the U.S. With colonization came relocation, and the Yurok were removed from their homes, no longer allowed to speak their language, wear traditional clothes or sing traditional songs. “My own uncle was sent to Riverside. … The graveyards full of children are astounding,” remarks Clausen-Williams. “Many folks didn’t pass down traditional knowledge because they were so scarred by these experiences. They didn’t want their children to have to go through that.

Sometimes I feel A Humboldt marten caught by a trail camera at Blue Creek like I’m missing Salmon Sanctuary. Photo courtesy of the Institute of Natural Resources at parts of who I am Oregon State University and the Wildlife Program of the Yurok Tribe. as a Yurok person because the knowledge wasn’t passed on can’t manage the land the way they once to me… Humboldt marten are used in our did is a major contributing factor to the ceremonies and regalia, and it’s impactful disastrous wildfire season we have right when a major contributing spirit is no now,” remarks Clausen-Williams. longer there,” she says. “I personally don’t According to Kent Barnes, a wildlife know the story of the marten to Yurok … I biologist for the Yurok Tribe who helped wish I did, and I know there has got to be to establish the tribe’s threatened and ena reason.” dangered species program, our forests are Efforts to restore TEK are ongoing for very dense. “The forest has ladder fuels,” the Yurok Tribe in the form of language he says, “which happens when very dry revitalization, ceremonial dances and conlower branches enable a forest fire on the sultation with tribal elders. According to ground to climb right up into the canopy. Clausen-Williams, how to live in relationWe’re performing variable density thinning ship with the world around you is central to allow trees to reach old-growth potento the Yurok tradition. Unlike settler ideals tial at a much quicker rate. This will reduce of independence and self-sufficiency, “We fuel loading so that catastrophic wildfires believe you can’t exist in isolation. It’s are less likely to occur and a major threat impossible to be independent. You exist in to the Humboldt marten can be reduced.” reciprocity.” Ultimately, improved collaborations beTEK demonstrates the impossibility tween western scientists and Indigenous of saving the Humboldt marten without tribes is critical for wildlife conservation first saving its environment. The marten in general and protecting the Humboldt relies on old growth forests that house a marten specifically. “If you have a convariety of habitat features benefiting all servation objective, it’s essential to get sorts of species. In particular, increasing out on the ground. A strong relationship woody debris from the trees contributes with the tribe can be a good surrogate for to sustaining Humboldt marten prey and this because we are an integrated part of the marten’s denning sites. “Rather than the system,” remarks Clausen-Williams. seeing the forest solely as an economic “One of the keys is being able to practice opportunity, we consider it our responsireally listening … as you continue to have bility to restore the forest for the health conversations, it’s clear that TEK is the anof the community,” says Clausen-Williams. swer. But you have to invest the time into “We are here for the long haul. We want it.” Even if you never see the fierce little a forest that we can engage in relationcritter hiding in the forest. l ship with, both for our and the forest’s benefit.” Katherine Larson (she/her) is an The tribe’s wildfire management pracundergraduate student studying wildlife tices are another crucial example of TEK conservation and management at Cal and conservation. “The fact that tribes Poly Humboldt. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Pacific Halibut Continue to Chew Up Baits By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

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he halibut bite over the weekend picked up right where it left off, with anglers pulling em’ over the rails at breakneck speeds. Boats were back on the water Saturday following last week’s windy conditions. And the Pacific halibut were ready and willing to take any bait sent their way. It’s been a while since we’ve seen fishing this good, and there’s a good chance it may come to an early end. With an entire month left before salmon season opens, which will command much of the attention, there’s a good chance the 38,740 net pound quota will be gobbled sometime in July. So, if you haven’t yet to get in on the action, you better make it quick. This fishery won’t last long. Through June 19, CDFW projected 8,771 pounds had been caught. But those numbers will be sure to skyrocket after the wide-open bite the last few days. To view the latest catch projection information, visit www.wildlife. ca.gov/Conservation/Marine/Pacific-Halibut#31670772-in-season-tracking.

July 2 is statewide free fishing day On Saturday July 2, people may fish California’s waters without a sport fishing license. All regulations, such as bag and size limits, gear restrictions, report card requirements, fishing hours and stream closures remain in effect. On Free Fishing Days, every angler must have the appropriate report card if they are fishing for steelhead, sturgeon, spiny lobster, or salmon in the Smith and Klamath-Trinity river systems. For more information visit, www.wildlife.ca.gov/Licensing/Fishing/ Free-Fishing-Days.

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18

The Oceans: Eureka

Halibut is still the focus out of Eureka, and the fishing is really good reports Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing. “Not everyone is getting limits every day, it’s about being in the right place at the right time,” said Klassen. “If those line up, you’ll do well. The bite has moved slightly north,

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

with most of the fish coming between the 48 and 54 lines. The fish are a little bigger now, with most falling in the 20-to-50-pound range. The good news is the black cod seemed to have vanished, which allows you to get the bait to the bottom. It looks like we’re in for windy conditions Wednesday through Friday.”

Trinidad

According to Curt Wilson of Wind Rose Charters, the Pacific halibut bite out of Trinidad is about as good as it gets. “I think roughly 30 boats launched Sunday and I heard just about all the boats caught halibut,” said Wilson. “Most of the action is happening straight out and 265 feet seems to be the magic number. The rockfish bite remains wideopen, with the area between Cone and Turtle Rock being one of the better spots at the moment. The lingcod bite has been excellent, as well, with limits coming quickly most days. The crab bite seems to be dependent on the weather, but the customers are still going home with a few each trip.”

Shelter Cove

“Salmon fishing remains very slow at the Cove with only a few being caught each day,” said Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing. “The rockfish bite is consistently good and we’re getting easy limits. The ling cod have been a little tougher to come by. The Hat, Ranch House and Rogers Break are all producing solid action.”

Crescent City

“The ocean has been nice the last few days and the rockfish bite has been excellent,” said Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine. “California halibut have finally shown up with a few being caught daily off of South Beach by kayaks trolling anchovies and guys fishing off the rocks. The minus tides are producing excellent clamming conditions for the just reopened razor clam fishery. There’s lot of limits being reported, and good tides will stick around through the fourth. A few Pacific halibut are being caught at the South Reef along with plenty of Petrale Sole.”

Red Bluff resident Juan Nava landed a giant Pacific halibut while fishing out of Trinidad Monday aboard the Wind Rose. The big fish taped out at 58-inches and was estimated to weigh in the 90-pound range. Photo courtesy of Curt Wilson/Wind Rose Charters

Salmon season opens July 1 on parts of Klamath and Trinity Rivers The spring Chinook salmon fishery on the lower Klamath River (downstream of the Highway 96 bridge at Weitchpec) and Trinity River (upstream of the confluence of the South Fork Trinity River) opens Friday, July 1, and will run through Aug. 14 on the Klamath River and through Aug. 31 on the Trinity River. The daily bag limit has been set to one Chinook salmon (no size restrictions), and the possession limit set at two Chinook salmon. Read the complete fishing roundup at www.northcoastjournal.com. ● Kenny Priest operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast. com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com


ARTS NIGHTS

First Saturday Night Arts Alive July 2, 6 to 9 p.m.

E

ureka Main Street presents First Saturday Night Arts Alive on July 2 from 6-9 p.m. Our galleries, museums, theaters, bars, and restaurants are open. Some businesses continue to require everyone to wear masks and follow other COVID safety precautions to keep patrons and staff safe. Please respect the standards set by individual businesses, be kind and enjoy the evening! ART CENTER SPACE 620 Second St. Local art. BELLE STARR CLOTHING 405 Second St. “Bombachas,” Fernanda Delgado, handmade women’s panties. THE BODEGA 426 Third St. Chelsea Reardon, 3D collages, acrylic paintings on glass and watercolors. C STREET STUDIOS 208 C St. Various artists. CANVAS + CLAY 233 F St. “MEOW,” annual group show for the artists of Canvas and Clay Studio and Gallery. Cat paintings, sculpture, fiber arts, hand-painted tote bags and cat planters will all be on display and available for purchase. CLARKE PLAZA Corner of Third & E St. Skateboard art fundraiser 4-9 p.m. THE EPITOME GALLERY 420 Second St. “Tales of the Devil’s Playground,” Bob Doran, photography; “The Can Show,” art by many local artists, all art on empty spray cans; skateboards, as part of the skateboard fundraiser in conjunction with The Madrone and Humboldt Skate Lab. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. Rhianna Williams, photography. Live models in the windows. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL 636 F St. Music

by Piet Dalmolen. William Thonson Gallery: “California Experience,” Erin Lee Gafill, abstract landscape works. Anderson Gallery: “Cloud Vessel,” Kit Davenport, new sculpture and drawing. Knight Gallery: “Recent Humboldt County Landscape Paintings in Gouache,” Jim McVicker. Rotunda Gallery & Floyd Bettiga Gallery: from the Permanent Collection. Museum Store/Permanent Collection Gallery: a selection of gifts and merchandise inspired by the artwork on view by Morris Graves, Glenn Berry, Melvin Schuler and Romano Gabriel. Homer Balabanis Gallery/Humboldt Artist Gallery: unique, original gifts. HUMBOLDT BEER WORKS 110 Third St., Suites D & E. Humboldt Homebrewers will be pouring samples of home-fermented beverages like beer and hard cider while staff from Humboldt Beer Works will lead a brewing demonstration on the HBW 10-gallon shop demonstration system. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Reuben Mayes, acrylic paintings. Music by Blake Ritter. JUST MY TYPE LETTERPRESS PAPERIE 235 F St. “12 Eureka Victorians,” Lynn M. Jones, hand-colored linoleum block prints. Music by Steel Pan Ensemble. LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Seana Burden, acrylic painting, pen and ink, glitter. THE MADRONE TAPHOUSE & BRICK FIRE PIZZA 421 Third St. Sixth annual Skateboard Art Fundraiser, oil painting, acrylic painting, watercolors, pen and ink and

Caption Credit

Erin Lee Gafill paintings at Morris Graves Museum of Art. Courtesy of the artist

drawings. Music by Dead Drift and DJ Goldylocks. All proceeds help provide skateboards and helmets for local youth involved in CASA, Big Brothers/Big Sisters and Eureka Teen Center/Boys & Girls Club. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Featuring the work of more than 40 local artists and handcrafted treasures from around the globe. MENDENHALL STUDIOS 215 C St. Various artists. NORTHERN CALIFORNIA INDIAN ART AND GIFT SHOP 240 F St. Music by Goodshield Aguilar.

NEST 330 Second St. Hand-painted home and garden décor. NORTH COAST REPERTORY THEATRE 300 Fifth St. Music by Thundercloud at 8 p.m. $10 cover charge at the door. All ages. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 417 Second St. Jennifer Liu, plein air landscapes, pet portraits and city scenes. Featured artists: Peter Zappel, oil paintings; Giselle Cox, paintings; Carolyn Laumann, paintings; and Yvonne Jarrett, jewelry. OLD TOWN INK LAB 212 G St., Suite 103. Wanderstay vending machine full of art and fun. Continued on next page »

Sea to Plate since ’88

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

19


STOP

Medicare Fraud

Empowering Seniors To Prevent Healthcare Fraud

ARTS NIGHTS Continued from previous page

Protect, Detect, Report! Call 1-855-613-7080 to report fraud. Thank you Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) counselors for helping people understand Medicare, the choices they have and the help that may be available. The Area 1 Agency on Aging’s HICAP group has estimated saving the communities of Humboldt and Del Norte nearly 1.5 million dollars.

Call your local Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) for help 1-800-434-0222

707-444-3000

333 J St. Eureka, CA 95501

www.a1aa.org

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Jim McVicker paintings at Morris Graves Museum of Art. Courtesy of the artist OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOCOLATES 211 F St. Linda Perganda, acrylic flow art. Music by Bradley Dean Band. PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St. Anna Amezcua and Nancy Ayers, oil painting, acrylic painting and mixed media. PROPER WELLNESS CENTER 517 Fifth St. Collection of local artists and glass blowers from Humboldt and around the world. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. 64th Annual Summer Exhibition; music by Stan Fleming; complimentary wine pours with suggested donation. REDWOOD CURTAIN THEATRE 220 First St. “Night of the Hanging Pants,” Kaelan Docherty, mixed media. Open early for Arts Alive and then welcoming patrons into the theater for the performance of The Miscast Cabaret at 8 p.m. REDWOOD DISCOVERY MUSEUM 612 G St. Kids Alive! 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Drop-off program for children aged 3.5 to 12 years. Kids can enjoy crafts, science activities, pizza and uninhibited museum fun. Enjoy Arts Alive while the kiddos have the time of their lives. $20/child or $17 for members. REDWOOD RETRO 211 G St. Mondo Chaga, performance.

RESTAURANT FIVE ELEVEN 511 Second St. Anna Amezcua and Nancy Ayers, oil painting, acrylic painting and mixed media. ROSEBUD HOME GOODS 213 F St. “Dreamscapes,” Ami Campbell, mixed media. Music by Julia Sheppard. Pop-up shop by Moon & Root. SAGE 203 F St. Sean Griggs, acrylic paintings. SAILOR’S GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo art. SEKOYA BOTANICALS 215 F St. Fringe and Clay, local macramé artist. Live macramé demo. SHIPWRECK 430 Third St. “Animals Teach,” Laura Phelan-Shahin, watercolors. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art & Engineering 401 Fifth St. “Celebration,” Rex White, paintings. THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley. Music by RLA with Dough Marcum, 7 to 10 p.m. TIMBER BOUTIQUE 514 Second St. Sidewalk sale. VIXEN 622 Second St. Teresa Stanley, mixed media. ZEN HUMBOLDT 437 F St. Tamar Atik, mixed media. ZUMBIDO GIFTS 410 Second St. Snail Studios, watercolors and stickers. Build to edge ●of the document

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


SETLIST

Hometown

Boom Times

Photo Days

By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

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his week’s headline might be a little sarcastic and only half-referencing what will undoubtedly be a spectacular fireworks display on Monday evening. Many people are really hurting and upset right now. It’s hard to look at the disorder in our world and find much hope. As someone who could be referred to as a “geriatric millennial,” (although I prefer “Oregon Trail millennial”), I am perhaps a little more used to the bad times than some of my fellow citizens, having known mostly bad times since the first election I could vote in was obviated by a partisan Supreme Court. My adult life has been set against a series of crises and calamities, and if you don’t believe me, perhaps I’ll tell you the story about seeing my home on the news during Hurricane Katrina sometime. Things increasingly breaking down and not working for us is my generation’s normal, and the cold comfort from that is a kind of resilience that is a little deeper than the static blur of ironic detachment we wall ourselves behind. While I do enjoy pissing some people off for what I believe are the right reasons, I also believe in community — perhaps the only thing that has ever and will ever save us. I’ll be thinking about that on this long Independence weekend, and, rather than celebrating freedom in the abstract, I’ll be thinking of the freedoms of expression, solidarity, community and that great ultimate one: Peace. Look after each other.

Thursday

Seattle’s Hell Baby has a punk adjacent, post-Riot Grrl sound that will doubtless appeal to many in our local alternative and punk community. Other applicable nouns to consider would be “garage,” and “pop rock.” Tonight, the group brings itself down the coast a wee bit to land at the Siren’s Song Tavern at 8:30 p.m., where it will be sharing the stage with local heroes Clean Girl and the Dirty Dishes and Think Tank ($5). This should be a good one and a nice pre-game set for the long weekend.

Friday

Canary and the Vamp is sure getting out there a lot these days. Which is good, for as I have mentioned in this space before, Humboldt’s finest Tin Pan Alley troubadours have never sounded better than with

Canary and the Vamp play North Coast Repertory Theatre on Friday, July 1 at 8 p.m Photo by Dave Woody

the current lineup, thanks in part to the expanded instrument array of front lady Beverly Twist (who among other accouterments has been playing a mean trumpet), as well as the addition of pedal steel dynamo Aleister Paige. If you want to see the band play in a setting most befitting of its charming, golden torch song-era style, then tonight’s 8 p.m. show is the one. North Coast Repertory Theatre is the perfect venue for this act, with its intimate, mini-amphitheater seating and nice acoustics ($15).

Saturday

The long, patriotic weekend is upon us and no matter how you feel about the notion of celebrating America’s current iteration, a long summer weekend is still a welcome thing. I’m going to pad today’s events out a bit, as there are some empty spots later in the holiday that will doubtless be filled with some mixture of explosions, fun in the water and the sun, and some form of epicurean excess. Let’s start in Sohum, shall we? If your daytripping has taken you out to beautiful Briceland Road and beyond, consider a stop at the Gyppo Ale Mill, where Oryan Peterson-Jones will be peddling his solo folk-Americana act for free starting at 5 p.m. Up north, there are some goodies, too. During Arts Alive starting at 6 p.m., you can find the return of Radio Clash, that post punk and gothic dance party helmed by DJs Anya, Ratrace and Zero One over at 215 C St. in Old Town. This used to be a regular institution at the Alibi and was usually a banger. Over at the Arcata Veterans Hall, there’s a noisy one happening at 7:30 p.m. ($10). Bellingham, Washington’s The Sheen are a trio of polyrhythmic tone weirdos who play some genuinely unsettling grooves. Joining these fellas is local power trio par excellence The Sturgeons, whose last show at the Vet’s Hall was nothing short of a triumph. This one should be packed. Finally, if you still have it in you to look for more aural stimulation, Humbrews is hosting a show with two of Arcata’s more

accomplished smooth soundmakers. Conman Bolo is teaming up with The California Poppies at 9 p.m. for the kind of line-up that will make you think you are driving a custom shaggin’ wagon through Ventura in the mid 1970s with the FM radio turned all the way up ($15, $10 advance). Mids scooped and bass and treble blaring right as the saxophone hits. Bliss.

Sunday

Honestly? Go to the river. Get some water time in before the algae blooms.

Monday, Independence Day Well it’s the big barbecue, explosionsin-the-sky-day. I’d suggest enjoying the fireworks over the bay and keeping an eye out on your neighborhood fur friends. This can often be their own little private D-Day. I know I’ll be keeping an eye on my kitties and grabbing the hose if I see the unsanctioned mortars getting too close to the roofline.

Tuesday

Word Humboldt continues its excellent open mic at Northtown Coffee, where many of the featured poets of late have been of an unusually good quality. The whole thing is free, all ages, friendly to all and starts at 6 p.m.

Wednesday

The Jam has a newish dance night that it’s been pushing pretty hard to fill the void left by a certain EDM-celebrating, “whomp” night of yesteryear. The Wednesday Ting is curated by DJ Pressure and DJ D’Vinity, and built to pump out sounds from the world of reggae, dancehall and Afrobeat. The music starts at 9:30 p.m. and I believe that there is no cover to get in the door. l Collin Yeo (he/him) would like to ask the same question that Ray Davies of The Kinks did in 1965: “Where have all the good times gone?” He lives in Arcata.

FOR THE

4th of July By Hometown Photographer Katie McKay Photography No appointment needed. Three digital photos will be emailed to the ticket purchaser.

Saturday July 2, 2022 10AM-2PM Humboldt’s Hometown Store At The Enterprise 394 Main Street, Ferndale

Presale photoshoot tickets available online at northcoasttickets.com Proceeds from all holiday photo shoots will be donated to help care for and light Ferndale’s Living Christmas tree.

394 Main Street, Ferndale

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Calendar June 30 – July 7, 2022 30

Thursday

BOOKS

Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson Radio Hour. 10-11 p.m. The book will be read in its entirety on Humboldt Hot Air. This week’s reading is Episode 23: Chapter 34 (Part 1): Russia. Free. rybopp@suddenlink.net. HumboldHotAir. org. 826-7567.

MUSIC Submitted

In the market for a good time this summer? Nothing beats a street fair with oodles of arts and crafts, live music and great food. Eureka’s Friday Night Market kicks off this Friday, July 1 and runs weekly through Sept. 30 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Old Town (free). Browse the North Coast Growers Association’s farmers market and local vendors’ arts and crafts. This year there’s also a bar featuring Humboldt-produced beverages, a variety of food vendors and two stages of live music. This Friday, groove to music by Blue Rhythm Revue on the Gazebo Stage and The Bayou Swamis at Clarke Plaza.

KMUD website

Rock the block! The KMUD Block Party is back. After three years, the all-day sunshine fest with music, food and fun is rolling again. Head down to the KMUD Studio in Redway this Saturday, July 2 for live music from a host of local bands, loads of craft vendors, kid’s activities, cocktails, mocktails, beer, wine, food and on and on. Bring your camp chair and sunhat. The good times start at noon and go until 9 p.m. (free).

Americana Music. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grind Cafe, 734 Fifth St., Eureka. Bolton Basil plays songs of American folk music, including bluegrass, country and popular music of the 1950s and 1960s. Music in the Park. 6-8 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Summer concert series in the park. Live music, food trucks. Free. Eureka Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Bring your chairs and please leave pets at home. No smoking or alcohol. Presented by Eureka Main Street. June 30, Beatz Werkin (classic rock); July 7, Rising Signs (reggae) Free. eurekamainstreet.org/ summer-concert-series-4. 441-4187.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Freshest local produce, meat, fish, cheese, eggs, bread, flowers and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/hendersoncenter.html. 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.org/ volunteering. 445-3166 ext. 310. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. Produce, fish and more, plus music and hot food vendors weekly through August. No pets except trained, ADA-certified service animals. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation. org/willowcreek.html. 441-9999.

Shutterstock

This Fourth of July, celebrate the land that you love with your friends and family at these area festivals: Starting things off a day early on Sunday, July 3, the Mattole Grange is holding its Fourth of July Old Time Beef & Beans BBQ from noon to 3 p.m. with traditional deep pit roasted meat (BYO plates, cutlery and side dishes), a raffle, games and prizes ($15, $10 kids 6-12, free for kids under 6). Sunday evening, head to Fortuna for its annual Fortuna Fireworks Festival from 5:30 to 10:30 p.m. in Newburg Park with kids’ activities, DJ music, firemen’s games, food and fireworks at dark ($5 parking, $10 kids’ wristband). The Arcata Fourth of July Celebration is downsizing this year (those who are still recuperating from Oyster Fest are cool with that) and it’s geared a little more toward the kiddos with games, crafts, hula hoops, bubbles with HumBubbles, sidewalk chalk and DJ Shoshanna spinning kid-friendly tunes. This all goes down on Monday, July 4 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Arcata Plaza (free). Independence-loving folks of all ages can get their stars and stripes on at Eureka Main Street’s Fourth of July Festival on Monday, July 4 from 11 a.m.to 5 p.m. in Old Town with two music stages, food and craft vendors, fire trucks, horse and carriage rides, speeder card rides (at First and E streets), Madaket bay cruises and fireworks over the bay at 10 p.m. (free). Ferndale’s Fourth of July Parade happens earlier in the day at noon, followed by a barbecue at the Veterans Building until 2 p.m. with hamburgers and hot dogs, sides and watermelon for dine-in and take-out ($10/plate).

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. For BIPOC families. See the HC Black Music and Arts Association Facebook page for more information. hcblackmusicnarts@gmail.com. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. 12-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from Equity Arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

ETC Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3-$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@ gmail.com. sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

1 Friday MOVIES

Midnight Movie: Battle Royale (2000). 11 p.m.-2 a.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show with behind-the-scenes footage, trivia, short films, housemade trailers and more 11 p.m., movie at midnight. NR, 114 minutes, ages 18 and up. Retro-gaming in the lobby. $8, $12 with poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ events/395787945929214. 613-3030.

MUSIC Canary and the Vamp at NCRT. 8-11 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Local songbird Beverly Twist’s 1920s-swing quartet bringing obscurities and favorites from spaghetti western to show tunes and originals. $15. northcoastrepertory@gmail.com. ncrt. net/. 442-6278. Kenny Bowling. 9-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Country music. Every Friday. Contact venue for current COVID protocols.

THEATER A Miscast Cabaret. 8-10 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See actors perform songs they would never sing because they would never be cast in that role for a variety of reasons, be it gender, age or type. $10 at door or online. redwoodcurtain.com.

EVENTS Access Humboldt Relocation Party. 5-8 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Celebrating “graduation” from the Eureka High School location and moving on to CR. Food, music, movie screenings, interactive stations and silent auction. Free. Monique@ Accesshumboldt.net. Accesshumboldt.net. (413) 658-5696. Eureka Friday Night Market. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Farmers market, arts and craft vendors, a bar featuring Humboldt-produced beverages, food vendors and live local music for dancing. humboldtmade.com/eureka-friday-night-market.

FOR KIDS Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop off your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17-$20. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org/ classesprograms.html. 443-9694.

FOOD Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, eggs, meat, baked goods, nursery plants and starts, oysters, live music on the square, crafts and more.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

OUTDOORS Summer Nights - Dune Restoration. First Friday of every month, 5-7 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Unwind from your busy work week with a few hours of pulling invasive plants while chatting with like-minded nature lovers. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397.


Trailhead Hosts at Black Sands Beach. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Sands Beach Trailhead, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. BLM King Range and Friends of the Lost Coast seek volunteers to answer questions, provide maps and share information on busy summer weekends. Email RSVP. justin@lostcoast.org. lostcoast.org/event/ trailhead-hosts-black-sands-beach-2/.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs vs Sacramento Saints. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs Sacramento Saints, featuring the World Famous Crab Grass Band. Gates at 6 p.m. Tickets available online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 kids 3-12. humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs.com/. 840-5665.

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. sohumhealth.com.

2 Saturday

ART

Arts Alive. First Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Art, and a heap of it, plus live music. All around Old Town and Downtown, Eureka. Free. eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054. Mariachi with Chachi. 6-9 p.m. Zeno’s Curious Goods, 320 Second St., Suite 1B, Eureka. Chachi presents recent works amid recorded Mexican music of all varieties. THEY LIVE merchandise sale. Free. 798-1480.

MOVIES Northwest X Southwest Indigenous Film Festival. 8-10 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Dell’Arte hosts a night of independent Indigenous films from Northwestern California and the Peruvian Andes. Get tickets online. $15. albert@ dellarte.com. dellarte.com/product/nwxsw/. 668-5663.

MUSIC Happy Hour w/Anna “Banana” Hamilton. 5-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Blues, humor.

THEATER A Miscast Cabaret. 8-10 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See July 1 listing.

EVENTS Summer Nights Art Market. First Saturday of every month, 3-7 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Local art, music, food and fun every first Saturday from through September. Leashed dogs welcome. Free. abbeyoftheredwoods@gmail.com. 839-3726. KMUD Block Party. 12-9 p.m. KMUD Studio, 1144 Redway Drive, Redway. All-day live music, craft vendors, kid’s activities, craft cocktails, mocktails, local brews and local wines, food and more. Free. gm@kmud.org. kmud.org. 232513. Lost Coast Live Market. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Whitethorn Construction, 545 Shelter Cove Road. Over 30 farmers, local makers, live music, BBQ oysters, wine tasting, wood fired pizza and more. Trinidad Flea-Art. First Saturday of every month, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Fine local art, food and more. Benefits the Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse Project. The Health Department recommends masks indoors, especially if unvaccinated. Please practice social distancing and use sanitizer. 834-8720.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association Farmers’ Market features local produce, food vendors, meats, plant starts and flowers every week. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ arcataplaza.html. 441-9999. Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown on site, local eggs and sourdough bread. Work from local artists and artisans. flowerstone333@gmail. com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See July 1 listing.

MEETINGS Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS Audubon Guided Birding Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring binoculars and meet leader Chet Ogan at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) for views of Humboldt Bay, easy trails and a diversity of birdlife. RSVP by email. Free. thebook@ reninet.com. rras.org. FOAM Marsh Tour w/Barbara Reisman. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Meet leader Reisman in the lobby of the Interpretive Center for a 90-minute, rain-or-shine walk focusing on plants and/or marsh ecology. Masks are recommended inside the building, regardless of COVID vaccination status. Free. 826-2359. Guided Tour of Fort Humboldt State Historic Park. 1-2 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. Join interpreter William on an hour-long ADA-accessible walking tour of the 19th century military outpost, focusing on its history, Euro-American colonists and Indigenous people. Rain cancels. Check North Coast Redwoods Facebook page for updates. Free. facebook. com/NorthCoastRedwoods. Trailhead Hosts at Black Sands Beach. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Sands Beach Trailhead, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. See July 1 listing.

ST 31 July 22,

23, & 24

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs - Cowboy Night. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs Sacramento Saints. It’s Cowboy Night, y’all, so don’t forget those hats and bandanas. Gates at 5:30 p.m. Tickets available online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10 Adult/$4 Child (3-12). humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs.com/. 840-5665.

ETC Abbey of the Redwoods Flea Market. First Saturday of every month, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Local arts, products, goods. Free entry.

3 Sunday

MOVIES

The Sandlot (1993). 5-7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, Continued on next page »

JUDGED SHOW • SHOW & SHINE • ARTISANS FAIRE PIT BBQ DINNER • SWAP MEET & CAR CORRAL ANTIQUE TRACTOR & FARM EQUIPMENT • CRUISE DRIVE-IN MOVIE • POKER RUN • BURNOUT CONTEST For more information go to www.redwoodautoxpo.org or call 707-572-7855 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

31


CALENDAR Continued from previous page

1036 G St. Pre-show with behind-the-scenes footage, trivia, short films, house-made trailers and more at 5 p.m. Movie at 6 p.m. Rated G, 101 minutes. All ages, parental guidance suggested. Retro-Gaming in the lobby. $8, $12 w/poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ events/1471726009925023. 613-3030.

MUSIC Jazz Jam. 5 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Live jam. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. Music in the Garden. First Sunday of every month, 1-3 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods campus, north entrance, Eureka. Enjoy live music in the garden. July 3: Music by the SoHum Girls Band hbgf.org.

New 2022

EVENTS Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

FOOD

anyone under the age of 13.

4 Monday

BOOKS

Equity Arcata’s Community Book Club. First Monday of every month, 4-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Alia Dunphy and Meridith Oram discuss Adrienne Marie Brown’s book Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds. On Zoom. Register online. equityarcata.com.

EVENTS 125 Years of Service Celebration. 1-3 p.m. Ferndale Fire Department, 436 Brown St. Help Ferndale Volunteer Fire Department celebrate 125 years of service to the local area. Equipment viewing, tour of the facility, fun hospitality. Come by and grab a plate to eat. Artisan Craft Fair. Avenue of the Giants (Rio Dell), Dyerville Bridge. The Southern Humboldt Chamber of Commerce presents as part of the Fourth of July celebrations. 923-2613.

Fourth of July Old Time Beef & Beans BBQ. 12-3 p.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Traditional deep pit roasted meat the day before the holiday. BYO plates, cutlery and side dishes. Pie and drink sales benefit the building fund. Women’s Club raffle, games and prizes for all ages. $15, $10 kids 6-12, free for kids under 6. pmfromhoneydew47@gmail.com. 629-3421. Brunch at Arcata Veterans Hall. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J St. Eggs, pancakes, sausage (vegan options included), bacon and home fries. Complimentary coffee. facebook.com/events/5166730910055514/?ref=newsfeed. Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

FOOD

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Arcata Fourth of July Celebration. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. This year’s event is mini festival for kids and families with games, crafts, hula hoops, bubbles with HumBubbles, sidewalk chalk and DJ Shoshanna spinning kid-friendly tunes. Free. arcatamainstreet@gmail. com. arcatamainstreet.com/4th-of-july. 822-4500. Ferndale’s Fourth of July Parade. noon. Ferndale Main Street, Ferndale. Fire trucks and patriotic floats and vehicles parade at noon. Then the Ferndale VFW and VFW auxiliary host a barbecue from at the Veterans Building until 2 p.m. with hamburger or hot dog, sides and watermelon for dine-in and take-out. Fourth of July Festival. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Two music stages, food and craft vendors and so much more. Free. eurekamainstreet.org. 441-4187.

Fourth of July BBQ. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Ferndale Veterans Memorial Building, 1100 Main St. Fundraiser for Wreaths Across America. Sponsored by the Ferndale VFW Axillary. Hamburger or hotdog, potato salad or macaroni salad, baked beans, watermelon, iced tea or lemonade. $10/plate. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation. org. 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See June 30 listing.

IN STOCK NOW!!

Fortuna Fireworks Festival. 5:30-10:30 p.m. Newburg Park, 2700 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Celebrate Independence Day early in Fortuna with family fun, kids’ activities, DJ music, Firemen’s Games, food and more. Fireworks start at dark. $5 parking, $10 kids’ wristband.

OUTDOORS

Tacomas in stock now, with more on the way. (707) 443-4871 www.mid-citytoyota.com

2 MILES NORTH OF EUREKA

Mon - Fri: 8:30am to 7:00pm Saturday: 9:00am to 6:00pm Sunday: 11:00am to 5:00pm

All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes, any finance charges, and any emission testing charge. All new car fees include a $85 dealer doc. fee.

@northcoastjournal 32

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Guided Tour of Fort Humboldt State Historic Park. 1-2 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. See July 2 listing. Trailhead Hosts at Black Sands Beach. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Sands Beach Trailhead, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. See July 1 listing.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs - Camouflage Sunday. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs Sacramento Saints, featuring the World Famous Crab Grass Band. Camouflage Sunday. Kids run the bases. Gates at 11:30 a.m. Tickets available online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 kids 3-12. humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs.com/. 840-5665.

ETC Clean the Sidewalk Day. First Sunday of every month, 9-11 a.m. Valley West Park, Hallen Drive, Arcata. Help pick up non-hazardous items left behind. Meet at the park entrance on Hallen Drive. Instructions and supplies at the check-in table. gmartin@cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata.org. Humboldt Flea Market. First Sunday of every month, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. New location. Masks and safe social distancing required. Browse antiques, collectibles, tools, records, clothes, crafts, pies, jams and more. $2, free for

HOLIDAY EVENTS

OUTDOORS Trailhead Hosts at Black Sands Beach. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Sands Beach Trailhead, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. See July 1 listing.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs vs Solano Mudcats. 2:30 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs Solano Mudcats, featuring the World Famous Crab Grass Band. Wear your red, white and blue. Gates at 1:30 p.m. Admission not guaranteed with ticket purchase. First come, first served. Tickets online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 kids 3-12. humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs. com/. 840-5665.

ETC Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and


safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email Julie at homeshare@a1aa.org for the link. Free. a1aa.org/ homesharing. 442-3763. Humboldt Bounskee League. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Weekly league nights. Purchase of any wood bounskee from Humbrews or the website includes one-month family membership for future events. All ages. Free. bounskee@gmail.com. bounskee.fun. 601-9492. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 1 listing.

5 Tuesday

ketplace. $10, $4 kids 3-12. humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs.com/. 840-5665.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. 443- 5021. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See June 30 listing.

6 Wednesday

ART

FOOD

Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets, 10th and Main streets, Fortuna. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts, music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/fortuna.html. 441-9999. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Fresh local produce, eggs, bread, specialty sourdough donuts and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ oldtown.html. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh produce, flowers, plant starts and more. Live music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/sheltercove.html. 441-9999.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players. Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. $3-$8. 31for14@ gmail.com. 599-4605. Monthly Meeting VFW Post 1872. First Tuesday of every month, 6-7 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Calling all combat veterans and all veterans eligible for membership in Veterans of Foreign Wars to meet comrades and learn about events in the renovated Memorial Building. Free. PearceHansen999@outlook.com. 443-5331.

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs vs. Mudcats. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs Solano Mudcats. Gates at 6 p.m. Tickets online or at Wildberries Mar-

Figure Drawing. 6-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. $5. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. Matt Dodge Exhibit. 12-5 p.m. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. The Northern Humboldt artist’s exhibit “Summary,” on display through July 10. MattDodgeImages.com. 268-0755.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Night: Planet of the Apes (1968). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show with behind-the-scenes footage, trivia, short films, house-made trailers and more at 6 p.m., movie at 7 p.m. Rated G, 112 minutes, all ages, parental guidance suggested. Retro gaming in the lobby, free raffle for sci-fi prizes. $5, $9 w/poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ events/1471304429998995. 613-3030.

MUSIC Bayside Ballads and Blues. 6-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Wednesday.

FOR KIDS Storytime with Sunshine the Chicken and Ms. Sue. 1111:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. In-person stories and songs for preschool children and their caregivers. Masks are optional. Ms. Sue will be wearing one. Free. humboldtgov.org/calendar.aspx?EID=7463. 822-5954.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See July 1 listing.

SPORTS

GARDEN

Humboldt Crabs - Solano Mudcats. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. Humboldt Crabs vs Solano Mudcats, featuring the World Famous Crab Grass Band. Wine Wednesday featuring Fieldbrook Winery. Gates at 6 p.m. Tickets online or at Wildberries Marketplace. $10, $4 kids 3-12. humboldtcrabs@gmail.com. humboldtcrabs. com/. 840-5665.

Drop-In Volunteer Day. 1-4 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Get a taste of a farmer’s work growing vegetables, herbs and flowers. Come prepared for sunshine, cold, wet and working in the dirt. Bring a water bottle, snacks, closed toe shoes, long pants, sleeves and a sun hat. Free. baysideparkfarm@cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata.org/440/Bayside-Park-Farm. 822-8184.

ETC

MEETINGS

Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See July 1 listing.

Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See June 30 listing. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. 12-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See June 30 listing.

7 Thursday

ETC

ART

Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See June 30 listing.

Art Night at the Sanctuary. First Thursday of every month, 4-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Create with others freely or work on a guided project. Bring your own supplies or use what’s around to collage, paint, draw, make an art book, etc. $5-$20 suggested, no one turned away for lack of funds. sanctuaryarcata.org.

Heads Up …

The Blue Lake Chamber of Commerce invites craft vendors to have a booth at this year’s Annie and Mary Day celebration on July 10. Application deadline is July 7. Visit sunnybluelake.com or call 668-5567. Humboldt County Superior Court is accepting applications for service on the 2022-2023 Civil Grand Jury. Call 4762475 to request an application, or visit humboldtgov.org and follow the Civil Grand Jury link to access an application. All Humboldt County women artists are invited to submit one piece of artwork for consideration to be included in the juried exhibition Celebrating 15 Years of the Ingrid Nickelsen Trust at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Entries will be accepted in-person at the Morris Graves Museum of Art on July 27 from noon to 5 p.m. Information at the Morris Graves Museum of Art and online at humboldtarts.org. Humboldt Light Opera Company invites anyone who has ever been in one of the company’s productions to participate in “49 Years of Musical Theater, Celebrating our Past, Creating our Future.” Visit hloc.org, scroll down on the home page, and follow the link to the “Revue Interest Form.” KEET-TV seeks a diverse group of individuals to join its Community Advisory Board. Meetings are held quarterly on Zoom. Go to KEET.org to find the link at the bottom of the page. Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org. l

COMEDY Comedy Humboldt Open Mic. First Thursday of every month, 8-10 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Thursday night. Contact venue for current COVID protocols.

MUSIC Americana Music. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grind Cafe, 734 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 30 listing. Music in the Park. 6-8 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. See June 30 listing. Eureka Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 30 listing.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See June 30 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Farm fresh produce, music and hot food vendors. Trained, ADA certified, service animals only. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/mckinleyville.html. 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See June 30 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. See June 30 listing.

Humboldt Crabs Baseball

2022 Season • July

SUN

“A useful anti-racist memoir about how anti-racism can make the world safer for all children.” KIRKUS 402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E, Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

3 River Park Eagles 12:30 pm 10 Menlo Park 12:30 pm

17 West Coast Kings 12:30 pm

24 Fairfield Indians 12:30 pm 31 Seals Baseball 12:30 pm

MON

TUE

WED

6 Solano Solano Mudcats 7:00 pm Mudcats 7:00 pm

THU

4 Solano Mudcats 2:30 pm

5

11

12 Redding Tigers

18

19 Medford Rogues 20Medford Rogues 21

25

26 TKB Baseball

7:00 pm 7:00 pm

7:00 pm

13 Redding Tigers 7:00 pm 7:00 pm

27 TKB Baseball 7:00 pm

1

FRI

River Park Eagles 7:00 pm

7

8

14

15 West Coast Kings 7:00 pm 22 Fairfield Indians 7:00 pm

28

Menlo Park 7:00 pm

29 Seals Baseball 7:00 pm

2 9

SAT

River Park Eagles 6:30 pm Menlo Park 6:30 pm

16 West Coast Kings 6:30 pm 23 Fairfield Indians 6:30 pm 30 Seals Baseball 6:30 pm

Tickets available at humboldtcrabs.com Check the website for promotions and special events

= Appearance by the World Famous Crab Grass Band

= Road Game

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

33


SCREENS

The Lives of Women And the men who kill them By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com Mood. Assassination Nation

I

t would seem I’ve chosen the wrong decade to quit drinking. With apologies to Samuel Clemens, it’s easy: I’ve done it dozens of times. For whatever reason, though, I selected the summer of 2022 to take a longer, less-defined hiatus from one of my longest-standing hobbies. These weren’t conscious factors in the decision, but it is possible that regime change and the possible ebbing of the plague suggested a time of greater peace and tranquility, with less necessity for Bourbon-based self-medication. Concurrently, the looming possibility of a third world war would seem to encourage clarity and light-footedness. But my decision was, ultimately, a more hopeful one; looks like I predictively shit the bed on that one. I was raised in a fairly stereotypical, West Coast product of the American Dream kind of household: two working parents, one sibling, emphasis on the twinned pillars of hard work and education. Also a somewhat hard-to-parse hybrid of kindness, service and the tenacious holding of grudges (and the specter of lapsed Catholicism); it’s a cocktail that leads organically to cocktails. More to the point, it was an early and often repeated lesson in our household that Roe v. Wade and the struggle for the Equal Rights Amendment were vital and emblematic of the vicious, often ignored but ongoing war for the rights of women in this country. When I met the girl I would eventually marry, I was wearing Education Now and Babies Later shoelaces; needless to say, she dug them. But then and now, I didn’t really think of fairness and balance as issues of gender politics, much less as politics at large. It seemed a foregone conclusion, to my naive teenaged self, that women, by

34

virtue of living (especially in a democracy in the modern world), would naturally be afforded self-determinism and control of their bodies. But I had forgotten that we still live in the Dark Ages of stupid fucking white men. That puts too fine a point on it, I know, as there are women and people of color who support the dictums of the panel of ghouls in gowns currently fomenting regression and murder; it’s still all white exclusionist bullshit. So, being the progressive beta cuck that I am — albeit one now reconsidering surrendering his weapons and in fact actively readying them — Friday didn’t exactly put me in a mood to watch Elvis — not that that mood would or will ever strike — or Jerry and Marge Go Large or Beavis and Butthead Do the Universe. Fortunately, I was able to keep busy, or I probably would have crawled into a hole with Apocalypse Now, Miami Vice, John Wick and a case of Maker’s Mark, from which I would have been unlikely to emerge. But I stayed the course, even as my thoughts shuttled frequently to my friends with daughters and the terrifying impossibility of having to explain the world’s obvious antipathy to them. I also looked back on what we have watched and have been watching lately, current events notwithstanding, and much of it, by and about women, could be cause for a strain of cautious optimism, if not hope. Hacks, the HBO series created by Lucia Aniello, Paul W. Downs and Jen Statsky and starring Jean Smart (legend, boss) and Hannah Einbinder, recently concluded its second season. Pairing Smart’s battle-hardened, Vegas casino resident standup with Einbinder’s recently disgraced comedy writer, the show poignantly but

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

hilariously dissects the business/boy’s club of comedy and show business while also exploring the surrogate parent dynamic of professional mentorship. Candy, a darkly comic true-crime adaptation from Robin Veith and Nick Antosca on Hulu, is at once an artfully executed examination of late-20th century domestic malaise, a murder mystery and an acting clinic anchored by a transformed Jessica Biel and the always revelatory Melanie Lynskey. Loot, starring Maya Rudolph on AppleTV+, and I Love That for You, a semi-autobiographical comedy cringe-fest from Vanessa Bayer on Hulu, are both in the early stages, but have already shown tremendous individual promise. Casting back into the shadows of the recent past, I’ve been put in mind of Mrs. America, the FX limited series about which there is much more to be said (there’s a multi-thousand-word document gathering dust on this very hard-drive). While the subject matter (Phyllis Schlafly’s torpedoing of the E.R.A.) remains abhorrent, the show is beautifully done and beyond exceptionally acted and, to me, suggests the importance of civilized discourse, mutual understanding and compromise are ephemera. More pointedly, Obvious Child (2014), Plan B (2021) and Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) are all, with apologies to Tim O’Brien, true war stories about women’s reproductive rights (or lack thereof) in contemporary America, with the first two tending more toward broad comedy and the last toward desolate honesty. I recommend all three unreservedly. As a corollary, Assassination Nation (2018), largely overlooked on its release, becomes increasingly topical: a self-de-

fense primer for girls in a world out to get them. l John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

NOW PLAYING

THE BLACK PHONE. Blumhouse horror about an abducted boy (Mason Thames) aided by the spirits of his captor’s past victims. Starring Ethan Hawke in creepy late-period Johnny Depp drag. R. 102M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. ELVIS. Austin Butler and Tom Hanks in Baz Luhrmann’s musical biopic. PG13. 159M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. JURASSIC WORLD: DOMINION. Dinosaurs everywhere, I guess. Which is fine. Take the planet and good luck, Barney. PG13. 106M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. LIGHTYEAR. The Toy Story hero prequel with an army of robots and the terrible Zurg. Starring Chris Evans, Taika Waititi and Keke Palmer. PG. 105M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU. Animated prequel with the chaotic little henchfolk. PG. 90M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. TOP GUN: MAVERICK. Tom Cruise returns to the cockpit with a note-perfect work of pure energy that sidesteps thorny politics for the pure physicality and mental plasticity required of a modern fighter pilot. PG13. 137M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456.


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

FIELD NOTES

Midsummer Puzzle Answers

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

H

ere are the solutions to last week’s challenge. If you haven’t tried it yet, don’t peek — go to www.northcoastjournal.com to find the questions online.

The Mistake It’s the extra “the.”

Pedal to the Metal

Infinitely fast. The car needs two minutes to drive two miles at 60 mph. But those two minutes have already been used up in the first mile driving at 30 mph. So, it’s impossible.

Four Fours

All have multiple answers but I believe these are the shortest. 0 = 44 − 44 1 = 44 / 44 2 = 4/4 + 4/4 3 = (4 + 4 + 4) / 4 4 = 4 × (4 − 4) + 4 5 = (4 × 4 + 4) / 4 6 = 4 × .4 + 4.4 7 = 44 / 4 − 4 8 = 4 + 4.4 − .4 9 = 4/4 + 4 + 4 10 = 44 / 4.4 11 = 4/.4 + 4/4 12 = (44 + 4) / 4 13 = 4! − 44/4

Special Words

They’re pronounced differently when the first letter is capitalized.

Continued on next page »

Arc-square

0.4. Let s be the length of a side of the square. Fill in the remaining three quadrants as shown and connect the top left corner of the original square with the bottom right of the opposite square, which (by symmetry) passes through the center of this circle, i.e. it’s a diameter, length 2. By Pythagoras, s^2 + (3s)^2 = s 2^2, that is, 10s^2 = 4, so s^2, 2 the area of 3s the blue square, is 4/10.

Matches

Square root of 1; and using Roman numerals for 11. l

Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) welcomes any puzzle ideas for future use in Field Notes.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

Therapy & Support

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM CLASSES Mondays 6:15− 7:15. Summer sessions starting June 6th. Fridays 1:30 −3 ongoing monthly classes. 707−407−8998 panartsnetwork.com Classes held at Pan Arts: 1049 Samoa Blvd #C in Arcata

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1229)

DANCE MIX FRIDAYS: 15 choreographed routines per class to upbeat eclectic music. Latin,hip− hop,indie,pop,jazz,country,throwbacks...Drop−ins welcome. Fridays 10−11 am Redwood Raks/ Creamery 824 L St, Arcata $0−5 SS Questions? eweiss707@gmail.com

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1229)

Kids & Teens 22ND ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP Water enthusiasts of ALL levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skills necessary for all types of wave riding & SURFING while being immersed in JUNIOR LIFEGUARD water safety, surf etiquette, beach & ocean awareness. Lead by former Cali− fornia State Lifeguard & school teacher along w/ male & female instructors. Where: Moonstone Beach Ages: 8 and up When: 5 sessions: June 20−24, July 5−8, July 18−22, Aug 1−5 & Aug 8−12 It’s Barrels of Fun! Cost: $200 Contact: (707) 822−5099 Website: www.moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format. Visit https://w ww.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/ 17724/ArticleID/4916/Additional−Online−Classes BEGINNING BOOKKEEPING August 16− September 27, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

SUBMIT your

Calendar Events

FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information.

50 and Better

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email us your tip and we’ll check it out!

Spiritual

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

SMARTRECOVERY.ORG CALL 707−267−7868

Languages

TAKE A CLASS WITH OLLI. Anyone can take an OLLI class. Join OLLI today and get the member discount on classes. Non−members add $25 to the class fee listed. https://extended.humboldt.edu/ olli/olli−upcoming−courses (O−1229)

Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1229)

EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1229) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1229)

ONLINE or by

E-MAIL northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Print Deadline: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CANNABIS BUSINESS TRAINING Online July 13 − Oct. 26, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information. FREE GED/HISET PREP CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information. End Ad 7/7/2022 HOME INSPECTION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/6231/Home− Inspection−Certification−Program INJECTIONS July 18, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. INTERMEDIATE BOOKKEEPING October 4 − November 22, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. NOTARY July 12, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500.

PHLEBOTOMY INFORMATIONAL MEETING Online July 7, 2022 at 5:30pm. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. REAL ESTATE PROGRAM FACE TO FACE Starts October 3, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. VENIPUNCTURE July 19, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500.

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC LIVING SCHOOL TRAININGS w/Traci Webb & Guests. Ayurveda Health & Life Coach/ Practitioner Training starts 1/11/23, Ayurveda Herbalist Training starts 2/21/23. Seasonal Self− Care Retreats: 6/24 & 9/30, Seasonal Detoxes: July 12−26 & Oct. 4−18, Herbal Remedies Making Immer− sions: 7/10 & 9/25, www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0930) MASSAGE CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS AND LOVING HANDS INSTITUTE. Lomi Lomi July 9−10, 9am−6pm $335. Herbs and Oils July 18−20, Aug 3−5. 5:30−9:30 24 contact hours Lovinghandsinstitute.com or 707− 630−3407

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ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO W-2 S B O E E R W K E T W I E A D F D Y W L I E G Y W O O E W A L E L S E L D

U Y I T Z O N E O M A N W O M W E N I O N O E L I L L I V M A A S R N K A E A R T W H I I E S E R D

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Spain 41. Specialties 44. Clean, as with a paper towel 45. Has a passion for 46. Hire 50. Offer one’s two cents 51. Alms provider 52. Crystal ball gazers, e.g. 53. Letter-shaped girder 54. “I’m just like that,” in modern lingo 55. Hold (up) 56. “If thou ____ marry, I’ll give thee this plague for thy dowry”: Hamlet 57. USCG rank 58. What might make a ewe turn 59. Parseghian in the College Football Hall of Fame

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62. One taking the high 11. Stick ____ in the road? water 63. “Love & Basketball” 12. Guarantee co-star, 2000 13. Diminutive Italian 64. Flirty types suffix 14. 1%-er in D.C.?: Abbr. 20. Boat trailers? DOWN 23. “No surprise to me” 1. Bits of trash often 24. Community of flora swept up with and fauna popcorn 25. Sounded kittenish 2. Actress Sevigny 27. Jeweler’s magnifying 3. “What the Butler glass Saw” playwright 28. Cause of sticker 4. Type of poker shock at the based on a Chinese florist? gambling game 5. New York city where 29. They’re used in a crunch Mark Twain was married and buried 30. “Skip to My ____” 31. Relative of Christian 6. Fruit with an Mingle astringent flavor 32. Sore ____ 7. NHL great Jagr 33. Half of O.H.M.S. 8. “Their exact words 37. McKellen who were ...” played Gandalf 9. Kind of bean 10. “The Hallucinogenic 38. CT scan relative 39. Evening hour in Toreador” painter

34. Opposite of ‘neath ACROSS 1. Checks (out), slangily 35. Premium TV streaming service 7. “Garfield” creator until 2020 15. Bondage 36. Longtime Howard 16. Lithographic Stern rival process 39. “You don’t like 17. Occurring last what I did? I don’t month care” 18. Need to do a trip to 40. B flat’s equivalent the supermarket, 41. Space station that say landed in the 19. Up-tempo jazz Pacific Ocean in piano style 2001 21. Mister of La 42. Join with rings Mancha 43. Really skimpy, like 22. Tsp. or tbsp. the polka-dot 23. Company with the bikini of song most U.S. patents per year since 1993 47. Do wrong 26. Hand-held two-way 48. “The Addams Family” cousin communications 49. Urban woes device 31. Star who performed 53. Like some ‘60s tiedye wearers, say at the 2020 Super 57. Wild apple source Bowl wearing a 60. Not taped Puerto Rican flag, 61. Tryst figure for short

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Gayle E. Forster, also known as Gayle Elizabeth Forster CASE NO. PR2200168 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Gayle E. Forster, also known as Gayle Elizabeth Forster A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Shane Dennis Forster In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Shane Dennis Forster be appointed as personal representa− tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 21, 2022 at 1:30 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Yvonne A. Ascher 444 Pearl Street, Suite A1 Monterey, CA 93940

file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Yvonne A. Ascher 444 Pearl Street, Suite A1 Monterey, CA 93940 831−641−9019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/16, 6/23, 6/30 (22−256)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Nancy Marie Portalupi CASE NO. PR2200190 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Nancy Marie Portalupi A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Manny Daskal In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Manny Daskal be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 28, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept

defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Thomas B. Hjerpe, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−275)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Rosallyne Ann Brewster aka Rose Brewster CASE NO. PR2200181 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Rosallyne Ann Brewster aka Rose Brewster A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Allyson Plaza In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Allyson Plaza be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 14, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as

the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. 350 E Street First Floor Eureka, CA 95501 707−442−7262 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/23, 6/30, 7/7 (22−268)

T.S. No.: 22-13904-01 Notice of Trustee's Sale You are in default under a deed of trust dated 7/2/2018.

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CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION NOTICE TO ADOPT AN INITIAL STUDY/MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION/ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE KLAMATH RIVER RURAL BROADBAND INITIATIVE PROJECT Notice is hereby given that the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has released a Notice of Intent (NOI) to adopt an Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration for the Kamath River Rural Broadband Project (Project), located in rural Humboldt County. The CPUC has prepared a joint Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration/Environmental Assessment (IS/MND/EA) that meets the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is serving as the federal lead agency for the purposes of NEPA. The proposed Project would comprise installation of a “middle-mile” fiber optic network as well as “last- mile” wireless broadband networks to provide high-speed internet access to first responder agencies, anchor institutions, households and businesses in the towns of Orick, Orleans, Johnsons, Wautec, Weitchpec that are currently unserved or underserved with internet access. The proposed Project would extend 104 miles and consists of above-ground and underground installation of fiber optic cables, a wireless tower in the town of Orick, a signal connection in Orleans, and placement of “last-mile” fiber cable and associated structures. The IS/MND/EA evaluates potential direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of the construction, operation, and maintenance of the proposed Project. The public review and comment period begins on June 24, 2022 and ends July 25, 2022 The Final IS/MND/EA will incorporate written input received during the 30-day public comment period. The Draft IS/MND/EA is available for public review by request at the McKinleyville Library: 1606 Pickett Rd. in McKinleyville. The Draft IS/MND/ EA may also be viewed online on the CPUC’s website for the Project at: https://ia.cpuc.ca.gov/environment/info/esa/klamath/index.html. The Project’s website provides access to public documents and information pertaining to the environmental review process for the proposed Project. Comments may be submitted in writing by mail to: CPUC, c/o ESA, attn. Maria Hensel/Klamath 1425 North McDowell Blvd., Suite 200, Petaluma, CA 94954; or by email to KlamathBroadbandCEQA@esassoc.com

Unless you take action to protect your property, it may be sold at a public sale. If you need an explana− tion of the nature of the proceeding against you, you should contact a lawyer. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held Submit information via email to by the trustee in the hereinafter classified@northcoastjournal. described property under and com, or by mail or in person. pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be Please submit photos in JPG or made, but without covenant or PDF format, or original photos warranty, expressed or implied, can be scanned at our office. regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the The North Coast Journal prints each remaining principal sum of the Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on thereon, as provided in the note(s), the Sunday prior to publication date. advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably esti− mated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day 310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 of sale. Original Trustor(s): Don A (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401 Scoville, a single man Duly Appointed Trustee: WT Capital Lender Services, a California Corpo− ration Recorded 7/9/2018, as northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL Instrument No. 2018−012632 of Offi− cial Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California Date of Sale: 7/6/2022 at

We Print Obituaries

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Notice of Sale) reasonably esti− seconds West, 118.14 feet; thence of said Section 19. A.P.N.: 107−145− mated to be set forth below. The North 09 degrees 23 minutes East, 014−000 The undersigned Trustee amount may be greater on the day 182.86 feet; thence North 78 disclaims any liability for any incor− of sale. Original Trustor(s): Don A degrees 46 minutes 15 seconds rectness of the street address or LEGAL NOTICES Scoville, a single man Duly West, 48.63 feet; thence South 34 other common designation, if any, Appointed Trustee: WT Capital degrees 01 minute 45 seconds West, shown above. If no street address Lender Services, a California Corpo− 223.84 feet; thence North 60 or other common designation is ration Recorded 7/9/2018, as degrees 32 minutes West, 55.52 shown, directions to the location of Instrument No. 2018−012632 of Offi− feet; thence North 14 degrees 35 the property may be obtained by cial Records in the office of the minutes 30 seconds East, 192.14 feet; sending a written request to the Recorder of Humboldt County, thence North 21 degrees 11 minutes beneficiary within 10 days of the California Date of Sale: 7/6/2022 at 30 seconds West, 79.34 feet; thence date of first publication of this 10:00 AM Place of Sale: At the front North 68 degrees 21 minutes 30 Notice of Sale. Notice to potential entrance to the County Courthouse seconds West, 42.66 feet; thence bidders: If you are considering located at 825 5th Street, Eureka, South 29 degrees 24 minutes West, bidding on this property lien, you California Amount of unpaid 120.89 feet, more or less to the East should understand that there are balance and other charges: line of the Southwest Quarter of risks involved in bidding at a trustee $288,087.93 Estimated Street the Southeast Quarter of Section auction. You will be bidding on a Address or other common designa− 18, Township 3 South, Range 1 East, lien, not on the property itself. tion of real property: 480 Chakahn Humboldt Meridian. Together with Placing the highest bid at a trustee Rd Honeydew, CA Legal Descrip− a maintenance easement to extend auction does not automatically tion: Parcel one: The Northwest 10 feet beyond catch points of all entitle you to free and clear owner− Quarter of the Northeast Quarter cuts and fills. Being the same ease− ship of the property. You should of Section 19, Township 3 South, ment granted to Stewart R. Gable, also be aware that the lien being Range 1 East, Humboldt Meridian. et al, recorded December 5, 1980, auctioned off may be a junior lien. Said lands being shown as Parcel 2 Book 1629, Official Records, page If you are the highest bidder at the on Parcel Map No. 1675 filed in 633. Parcel three: A non−exclusive auction, you are or may be respon− Book 14 of Parcel Maps, Page 118. easement for ingress, egress and sible for paying off all liens senior Excepting therefrom all the above− public utilities, and for all purposes to the lien being auctioned off, described lands, all oil, gas and including the hauling of timber and before you can receive clear title to other hydrocarbons and minerals timber products over a strip of land the property. You are encouraged now or at any time hereafter situ− 70 feet in width, the centerline of to investigate the existence, ated therein and thereunder, which is described as follows: priority, and size of outstanding together with all easements and Beginning on the East line of the liens that may exist on this prop− rights necessary or convenient for Southwest Quarter of the South− erty by contacting the county the production, storage and trans− east Quarter of said Section 18, recorder’s office or a title insurance portation thereof and the explo− Township 3 South, Range 1 East, company, either of which may ration and testing of the said real Humboldt Meridian, at the most charge you a fee for this informa− property and also the right to drill Westerly terminus of the centerline tion. If you consult either of these for, produce and use water from of the easement described in Parcel resources, you should be aware said real properly in connection Two herein; thence South 29 that the same lender may hold with its drilling or mining opera− degrees 24 minutes 00 seconds more than one mortgage or deed tions thereon, all as excepted in the West, 80.05 feet; thence South 11 of trust on the property. Notice to Deed from Mabel M. Swartley to degrees 52 minutes 30 seconds property owner: The sale date Sound Lumber Company, recorded West, 87.78 feet; thence South 1 shown on this notice of sale may be July 25, 1951, as Recorder’s File No. degree 50 minutes, 00 seconds East, postponed one or more times by 8254 of Parcel Maps, Pages 117 and 250.81 feet to the South line of the the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, 118, Humboldt County Records. Southwest Quarter of the South− or a court, pursuant to Section Parcel two: That portion of Parcel 3 east Quarter of said Section 18. 2924g of the California Civil Code. as shown on Parcel Map No. 1675 Parcel four: A non−exclusive case− The law requires that information filed in the Office of the County ment for ingress, egress and public about trustee sale postponements Recorder of Humboldt County, utilities, and for all purposes be made available to you and to California, on November 28, 1979, in including the hauling of timber and the public, as a courtesy to those Book 14 of Parcel Maps, pages 117 timber products over a strip of land not present at the sale. If you wish and 118, described as follows: A non 70 feet in width, the center line of to learn whether your sale date has −exclusive easement for ingress, which is described as follows: been postponed, and, if applicable, egress, public utilities and for all Beginning on the East line of the the rescheduled time and date for purposes including the hauling of Northeast Quarter of the North− the sale of this property, you may timber and timber products, within west Quarter of said Section 19 at visit the Internet Web site address a strip of land 50 feet wide, the the most Westerly terminus of the listed below for information center line of which is described as center line of the easement regarding the sale of this property, follows: Beginning at a point in the described as Parcel Three herein; using the file number assigned to center line of the County Road thence South 20 degrees 36 this case file number. Information known as Wilder Ridge Road, minutes 30 seconds West, 81.91 about postponements that are very located North 21 degrees 20 feet; thence South 72 degrees 58 short in duration or that occur minutes West, 692,00 feet from the minutes 00 seconds West, 192.01 close in time to the scheduled sale Southeast corner of said Parcel 3; feet; thence North 78 degrees 59 may not immediately be reflected thence South 78 degrees 15 minutes minutes 30 seconds West, 104.30 in the telephone information or on West, 50.62 feet; thence South 36 feet; thence North 58 degrees 14 the Internet Web site. The best way degrees 28 minutes 30 seconds minutes 30 seconds West, 370.27 to verify postponement informa− West, 137.81 feet; thence North 59 feet; thence South 75 degrees 09 tion is to attend the scheduled sale. degrees 26 minutes 30 seconds minutes 30 seconds West, 43.69 Date: June 9, 2022 WT Capital West, 114.24 feet; thence South 39 feet; thence South 23 degrees 27 Lender Services, a California corpo− degrees 11 minutes West, 199.77 minutes 45 seconds East, 65.10 feet; ration 7522 North Colonial Avenue, feet; thence South 00 degrees 09 thence South 46 degrees 32 Suite 111 Fresno, California 93711 minutes West, 116.90 feet; thence minutes 45 seconds East, 291.18 feet; (559) 222−4644 WTCap.com By Nate South 34 degrees 32 minutes 30 thence South 40 degrees 27 Kucera, Vice President (IFS# 26252 seconds West, 68.58 feet; thence minutes 15 seconds East, 174.72 feet; 06/16/22, 06/23/22, 06/30/22) South 56 degrees 06 minutes 30 thence South 55 degrees 38 22−258 seconds West, 277.44 feet; thence minutes 00 seconds East, 88.40 Title Order No.: 2107838CAD South 20 degrees 14 minutes West, feet; thence North 86 degrees 59 Trustee Sale No.: 85828 Loan 96.16 feet; thence South 88 degrees minutes 30 seconds East, 255.18 feet No.: 399121497 APN: 220-27255 minutes West, 48.46 feet; thence to the East line of the Northeast 002-000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S North 22 degrees 01 minute 30 Quarter of the Northwest Quarter SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT seconds West, 118.14 feet; thence of said Section 19. A.P.N.: 107−145− UNDER A DEED OF TRUST North 09 degrees 23 minutes East, 014−000 The undersigned Trustee DATED 9/21/2015. UNLESS 182.86 feet; thence North 78 disclaims any liability for any incor− YOU TAKE ACTION TO degrees 46 minutes 15 seconds rectness of the street address or PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT West, 48.63 feet; thence South 34 other common designation, if any, MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC degrees 01 minute 45 seconds West, shown above. If no street address SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA223.84 feet; thence North 60 or other common designation is NATION OF THE NATURE OF degrees 32 minutes West, 55.52 shown, directions to the location of NORTH JOURNAL • Thursday, June • northcoastjournal.com THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST feet; thence NorthCOAST 14 degrees 35 the property may30, be 2022 obtained by YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT minutes 30 seconds East, 192.14 feet; sending a written request to the A LAWYER. thence North 21 degrees 11 minutes beneficiary within 10 days of the On 7/19/2022 at 11:00 AM, CALI− 30 seconds West, 79.34 feet; thence date of first publication of this

38

SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/21/2015. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 7/19/2022 at 11:00 AM, CALI− FORNIA TD SPECIALISTS, AS TRUSTEE as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 1/11/ 2016 as Instrument No. 2016−000634 −7 in book N/A, page N/A of offi− cial records in the Office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, executed by: ERIC P. DORICKO, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY , as Trustor SUSAN PERKINS DEMOSS, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE DECLARA− TION OF TRUST KNOWN AS "SUSAN PERKINS DEMOSS TRUST" DATED JULY 25, 1984 , as Beneficiary WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan associa− tion, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). At: Outside the front entrance to the County Courthouse located at 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501, NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE − continued all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California describing the land therein: As more fully described on said Deed of trust. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common desig− nation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1630 PERRY MEADOW ROAD REDWAY, CA 95560 "VACANT LAND. DIRECTIONS MAY BE OBTAINED BY WRITTEN REQUEST SUBMITTED TO THE BENEFICIARY WITHIN 10 DAYS AFTER THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE AT THE FOLLOWING ADDRESS: BENE− FICIARY, C/O CALIFORNIA TD SPECIALISTS, ATTN: PATRICIO S. INCE’, 8190 EAST KAISER BLVD., ANAHEIM HILLS, CA 92808." The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to−wit: $ 311,849.79 (Esti− mated). Accrued interest and addi− tional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The bene− ficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Decla− ration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of

trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to−wit: $ 311,849.79 (Esti− mated). Accrued interest and addi− tional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The bene− ficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Decla− ration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election of Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: 6/ 15/2022 CALIFORNIA TD SPECIAL− ISTS, AS TRUSTEE, as Trustee 8190 EAST KAISER BLVD., ANAHEIM HILLS, CA 92808 PHONE: 714−283− 2180 FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMA− TION LOG ON TO: www.stoxposting.com CALL: 844− 477−7869 PATRICIO S. INCE’, VICE PRESIDENT CALIFORNIA TD SPECIALIST IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. "NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid on a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear owner− ship of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be respon− sible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of the outstanding lien that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be post− poned one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 844−477−7869, or visit this internet Web site www.stoxposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case T.S.# 85828. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale." For sales conducted after January 1, 2021: NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this prop− erty after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of the California Civil Code. If you are an "eligible tenant buyer," you can

immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale." For sales conducted after January 1, 2021: NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this prop− erty after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of the California Civil Code. If you are an "eligible tenant buyer," you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an "eligible bidder," you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (844) 477−7869, or visit this internet website www.STOXPOSTING.com, using the file number assigned to this case 85828 to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid; by remitting the funds and affidavit described in Section 2924m(c) of the Civil Code; so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an "eligible tenant buyer" or "eligible bidder," you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase. 6/23, 6/30, 7/7 (22−269)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00338 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Card Family Farms Humboldt 490 Bar W Ranch Rd. Carlotta, CA 95528 Concetta C Card 490 Bar W Ranch Rd. Carlotta, CA 95528 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Nancy Morelli, Owner This May 10, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30 (22−241)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00373 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Right on Thyme Personal Chef Service Humboldt 2580 Central Ave. #54 McKinleyville, CA 95519 PO Box 2771 McKinleyville, CA 95519


STATEMENT 22−00373 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Right on Thyme Personal Chef Service Humboldt 2580 Central Ave. #54 McKinleyville, CA 95519 PO Box 2771 McKinleyville, CA 95519 Nancy G Morelli 2580 Central Ave. #54 McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Nancy Morelli, Owner This May 23, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30 (22−240)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00382

McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc CA C3392952 5000 West End Road #4 Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Nathan McKeever, Founder & President/CEO This June 3, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00384 The following person is doing Busi− ness as 1963 Photography Humboldt 6810 Lanphere Rd Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 4745 Arcata, CA 95518 Jesse A. Boomer 6810 Lanphere Rd Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 1459 Broadway Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jesse Boomer, Owner This June 3, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by st, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Craig Lord, Owner This June 2, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30 (22−254)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00387 The following person is doing Busi− ness as McKeever Humboldt 5000 West End Road #4 Arcata, CA 95521 McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc CA C3392952 5000 West End Road #4 Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this

6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−281)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00397 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Humboldt Endodontics, Dental Practice

6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−267)

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Eureka Car Stereo

Craig A Lord 605 Humboldt St Eureka, CA 95501

The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 07, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−264)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00391 The following person is doing Busi− ness as The Thrifty Boutique Humboldt 979 Myrtle Ave Eureka, CA 95501 4298 Pimlico Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 Filomena M Jarvis 4298 Pimlico Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine

Humboldt 2320 23rd Street Eureka, CA 95501 R. Joseph Weibert, DMD, A California Dental Corporation CA C4223685 2320 23rd Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Richard Joseph Weibert, Owner/ President This June 8, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−266)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00392 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Many Hands Gallery Humboldt 438 2nd St. Eureka, CA 95501 Astra N. Burke 1301 M St. Eureka, Ca 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Astra N. Burke, Owner This June 7, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/7 (22−257)

Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Astra N. Burke, Owner This June 7, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

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NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Humboldt County Office of Education will receive bids for 5 vehicles. Bid packages listing specifications may be obtained from Hana Hanawalt at the Humboldt County Office of Education located at 901 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501. Bid forms and pictures can also be found at https://hcoe.org/bids/. Bids shall be sealed and delivered via email, mail or hand delivery to purchasing@hcoe.org, or the Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, CA, on or before 3:00 p.m. Friday, July 15, 2022. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at that time. It is anticipated that the bid will be awarded at the August 10, 2022 Board of Education meeting. The Humboldt County Office of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to waive any irregularities or informalities in the bids or in the bidding process, and to be the sole judge of the merit and suitability of merchandise offered. All bidders may not withdraw their bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set for the opening of bids. Michael Davies-Hughes Humboldt County Superintendent of Schools

6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/7 (22−257)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00406 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Central Office / Copy Center Humboldt 326 I Street Eureka, CA 95501 Terry A Davis 4179 Walnut Dr Eureka, CA 95503 Lynette H Worthington 3478 Summer Street Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−272)

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NOTICE OF RIGHT TO CLAIM EXCESS PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Made pursuant to Section 4676, Revenue and Taxation Code Excess proceeds have resulted from the sale of tax defaulted property listed on this notice on May 20, 2022. Parties of interest, as defined by California Revenue and Taxation Code section 4675, are entitled to claim the excess proceeds. All claims must be in writing and must contain sufficient information and proof to establish a claimant’s right to all or any part of the excess proceeds. Claims filed with the county more than one year after recordation of the Tax Collector’s deed to the purchaser cannot be considered. ASSESSMENT NO. 019-121-025-000

ADDRESS/LOCATION 1306 Howard St, Eureka

EXCESS PROCEEDS $21,633.53

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00400

033-031-030-000

69 Jump-up Ct, Garberville

$1,141.45

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Bayside Farmstead Cafe

108-023-011-000

9225 Wilder Ridge Rd, Ettersburg

$305.24

108-132-004-000

No Situs

$261.69

Humboldt 1602 Old Arcata Rd Bayside, CA 95524

110-021-057-000

374 Parsons Rd, Shelter Cove $466.23

207-101-008-000

19619 St Hwy 36, Carlotta

$14,375.39

Tryphena Lewis 1461 Anvick Road Arcata, CA 95521 Rhiannon M. Lewis-Stephenson 1666 Charles Ave. Arcata, CA 95521

220-261-064-000

1800 Shop Rd, Redway

$20,208.92

220-281-007-000

No Situs

$22,278.29

317-051-004-000

No Situs

$7,727.45

317-056-002-000

No Situs

$8,004.24

402-081-011-000

7228 Myrtle Ave, Eureka

$45,269.52

533-062-002-000

No Situs

$4,196.74

533-063-021-000

No Situs

$5,044.59

534-096-013-000

No Situs

$267.19

The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Tryphena Lewis, Owner/Partner This June 13, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−260)

Claim forms and information regarding filing procedures may be obtained at the Humboldt County Tax Collector’s Office, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501 or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free (877) 448-6829 between 8:30 am-Noon and 1:00pm-5:00pm, Monday through Friday. I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct. _________________________________ Amy Christensen, Interim- Humboldt County Tax Collector State of California Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on June 22, 2022 Published in North Coast Journal on June 30, July 7 & July 14, 2022.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00393 The following person is doing Busi− ness as The Honey Man Humboldt 275 Sunset Pl Willow Creek, CA 95573 PO Box 787 Willow Creek, CA 95573 Michael E Christie 275 Sunset Pl Willow Creek, CA 95573 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Michael E Christie This June 8, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−265)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00410 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Bandera USA Humboldt 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540 Lloyd F Julien 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540 Donna R Julien 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 21, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−279)

40

Lloyd F Julien 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540 Donna R Julien 1315 Fernbridge Dr Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 21, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−279)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00403 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Eureka Spice Humboldt 1005 E St, Unit D Eureka, CA 95501 Shay Konradsdottir 1005 E St., Unit D Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 14, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−277)

any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 14, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00408 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Redwood Roots Salon

6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−277)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00379 The following person is doing Busi− ness as First Choice Care Home Humboldt 456 10th Street Fortuna, CA 95540 PO Box 620 Fortuna, Ca 95540 Ladies Choice, Inc. CA C2282983 458 10th Street Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Linda M. Taylor, President This June 1, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−262) `

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00414

Humboldt 1969 Central Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Shelby L Beck 521 Chartin Rd Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shelby Beck, Owner This June 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−271)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00415 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Get Nailed Humboldt 1400 Table Bluff Rd Loleta, CA 95551 1177 Table Bluff Rd Loleta, CA 95551

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Lost Coast Maintenance

Jamie L. Christensen 1177 Table Bluff Rd Loleta, CA 95551

Humboldt 3253 Trinity St. Fortuna, CA 95540

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

Smithie J Richardson Jr 3253 Trinity St Fortuna, CA 95540 Regina L Richardson 3253 Trinity St Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Terry Davis, Co Partner This June 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

6/30, 7/7, 7/14, 7/21 (22−276)

STATEMENT OF ABANDON− MENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 21−00301 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name Nonna Lena’s Humboldt 5425 Ericson Way, Suite 2 Arcata, Ca 95521 PO Box 357 Arcata, CA 95518 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on April 26, 2021

The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name Nonna Lena’s Humboldt 5425 Ericson Way, Suite 2 Arcata, Ca 95521 PO Box 357 Arcata, CA 95518 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on April 26, 2021 Cynthia Timek 3523 Coombs Drive Arcata, CA 95521 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ Cynthia Timek, Owner This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the June 1, 2022 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office s/ sc, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−261)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 18-00546 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name Redwood Roots Salon Humboldt 1969 Central Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Whitney M Owsley PO Box 524 Blue Lake, CA 95525 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on July 1, 2011 Cynthia Timek 3523 Coombs Drive Arcata, CA 95521 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ Whitney Owsley, Owner This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the June 16, 2022 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office s/ tn, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−273)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Esmeralda Viviana Ortega CASE NO. CV2200756 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Esmeralda Viviana Ortega for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Esmeralda Viviana Ortega to Proposed Name Esmeralda Viviana Castaneda− Mariscal THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may

cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 22, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 2, 2022 Filed: June 2, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 6/23, 6/30, 7/7, 7/14 (22−270)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Loren Lynn Cannon CASE NO. CV2200426 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Loren Lynn Cannon for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Loren Lynn Cannon to Proposed Name Loren Turlough Cannon THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 15, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: March 30, 2022 Filed: March 30, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30 (22−253)


EMPLOYMENT Opportunities ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

Continued on next page »

CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Rita for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more. default

CITY OF FORTUNA

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT Employment Opportunity

Deputy Clerk I/II

Salary range: $16.74-$20.75/hr. FT – 37.5 hrs. per wk/ Full Benefits

Deputy Clerk I is the entry level position and performs a variety of office and court support duties.

Please apply at www. humboldt.courts.ca.gov/gi/ employment.htm

and submit application to: Jobs@humboldtcourt. ca.gov.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

442-1400 ×314 northcoast journal.com

FULL TIME TPO OIT/I: $41,561 - $50,565 PER YEAR TPO II: $43,833 - $53,330 PER YEAR. Under the general supervision of a senior operator, to perform a variety of operations, control, and maintenance functions in the City’s water and wastewater treatment systems; to perform laboratory testing and sample collection; to perform a variety of semiskilled, and skilled work in the maintenance, repair, and construction of wastewater treatment facility; and to do related work as required. Applicants must possess valid CDL, and be at least 18 years of age. Complete job description and application available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street or friendlyfortuna.com. Applications must be received by 4 p.m. on Friday, July 15, 2022.

THE CITY OF RIO DELL

is now accepting applications for

FINANCE DIRECTOR $82,924 – $100,794 + Benefits The City of Rio Dell is hiring a Finance Director with the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities to help a small local government be transparent, accurate and timely in its financial affairs. With a lot of projects in the works this is a great opportunity to use your financial and grant management skills to help transform the community into Humboldt County’s best small town.

POLICE OFFICER

Executive Director The Arcata Chamber of Commerce is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Executive Director. The Executive Director is a key representative and advocate for business owners and employers in a community. The Executive Director promotes and strengthens communities by building prosperity through a healthy economy and a strong business sector. The Executive Director is responsible to the Board of Directors to provide executive leadership to the Arcata Chamber of Commerce. The Arcata Chamber is committed to fostering and celebrating diversity, equity and inclusion. We believe that diversity is the presence and celebration of differences that enrich our community. We believe that equity is the presence of and commitment to fair treatment, access and opportunity for all, where individuals are not disadvantaged because of their identities. We believe that inclusion is how we demonstrate our commitment to diversity and equity and ensures that individuals with different identities are valued, leveraged and welcomed within our community and that is demonstrated on our website and through our branding. • Develop, plan, organize and oversee services and events for members. • Be a liaison for the Chamber to businesses in the community promoting the benefits of Chamber membership. • Oversee the Chambers social media and website featuring local business news and Chamber membership directory that is available to the

Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue, www.cityofriodell.ca.gov or call (707)764-3532. Position is open until filled.

public, potential new customers, and clients. • Hold regular social events that offer members a chance to network and share information and ideas. • Identify common needs among local business owners and arrange topical lectures, workshops and training seminars of benefit to the members. • Oversee annual award programs that

showcase businesses and business leaders. • Assist existing businesses with growth opportunities, education and mentoring programs, including workforce development and mentorship with area educational institutions.

Community Outreach & Visitor Center • Lead the business community’s efforts to support and enhance our community. • Public relations; meet with local area leaders regularly to collaborate with the business and public institutional communities, establish and maintain contacts with local media, represent the Chamber at community meetings and activities, develop community outreach strategy for Chamber

events and activities. Welcome new businesses in the community. • Oversee Chamber sponsorship of community events which may include holiday parades, heritage festivals, job and health fairs. • Assist in development of partnerships between government and employers to help shape the success of the area workforce and economic

development. • Responsible for effective operations of the Visitor Center including, but not limited to; hiring, training, and supervising staff, internships, and volunteers. • Focus on the business community’s role in conserving local energy and water resources.

Financial Management & Personnel • Responsible for management of Master), budgets, reports, insurance Chamber of Commerce finances documents. and preparation of monthly financial • Work cooperatively with the Board of reports, in collaboration with Chamber Directors to develop, and implement, of Commerce Assistant. Responsibilities the Chamber’s fundraising strategies include, but are not limited to, filing and campaigns. tax forms, management of accounting • Supervise Chamber staff, including software (Quickbooks, Chamber

hiring, coaching, performance reviews, supervision, terminations, and organizational development. • Promote an excellent working environment through collaboration, continuous improvement and innovation.

Board of Directors • The Executive Director, in cooperation with the Board of Directors, is responsible for managing a long-term strategic plan of the Chamber and

responsible for defining annual goals for the upcoming year. • Coordinate all Chamber Board meetings in collaboration with the

Chair, and Executive Committee. • Provide regular activity reports and updates to Board meetings.

Job Requirements and Salary • More than 2 years of business and/ or community leadership experience. • Experience with budgets, finance, public relations, and/or strategic planning.

($50,606 - $71,335 + Benefits) Open to entry level & laterals. Candidate must have appropriate POST certification and be 21 years of age by the time of appointment.

Membership Services

• Leadership and supervisory skills • Local area knowledge and strong community connections are preferred. • Full time, schedule Monday - Friday

8am - 5pm. • Qualification based pay; minimum exempt salary $31/hour or $64,480/year, and 80 hours / year vacation accrued.

Preferred Experiences • Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience • Spanish speaking (bilingual) • Public speaking

• Event organizing • Strategic Planning • Fundraising and/or grant writing experience

• Organizational leadership skills and/ or working with Board of Directors • Financials/Budgeting, QuickBooks experience.

The Arcata Chamber has served as a catalyst to support business entrepreneurship, collaboration and innovation while promoting a strong sense of community for 70 years. Please submit a cover letter and resume/CV to SearchCommittee.ArcataChamber@gmail.com Reviews have been extended and will begin June 30, 2022. The position is open until filled. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

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Redwood Coast Regional Center Be a part of a great team!

RN Case Manager

ResolutionCare | a Vynca company, is a fast-paced, fun entrepreneurial environment incredibly passionate about transforming end-of-life care. This individual works as part of an interdisciplinary team and is responsible for managing and coordinating patient care, including oversight of the care plan and provision of direct patient care. Care is provided in collaboration with other Care Team members as described in the patient’s care plan.

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator) FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for indiv. w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3990/mo. Exc. bene.

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HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT



Research Attorney $85,403-$119,564 FT – 40 HRS.



(SALARY EXEMPT)/FULL BENEFITS

To apply, please review our website www.resolutioncare.  competitive and commensurate with experience.

This professional level position performs legal research, gathers information regarding legal motions, pleadings, and writs presented to the Court; reviews and summarizes evidence, procedural history and legal contentions and submits recommendations for resolving matters before the Court. Please apply at: https://www.humboldt.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The Sequoia Park Zoo Foundation is seeking an experienced leader and fundraiser to be part of a dynamic team dedicated to supporting the mission and vision of the City of Eureka’s Sequoia Park Zoo.

General Summary of Position: To implement the strategic goals of the organization, providing oversight to all the Foundation’s operations. The Executive Director plans, develops, implements and oversees all fundraising and membership for the organization. Prepares and manages annual budget. Creates an annual fund development/membership program and supporting strategy to provide funding for Founda− tion operations, services, programs and special/capital projects. Promotes the organization within the community to ensure a broad base of funding resources and general public support. Manages all Foundation staff. Builds and maintains good relation− ships and communication with Zoo Management and other City of Eureka personnel. Compensation: Commensurate with experience. This is 40 hours+ per week, full time/non−exempt position including paid holidays and vacation benefits. How To Apply: Please submit Resume, Cover Letter indicating why you are inter− ested in the position and 3 Professional References via email to: spzfedsearch@sequoiaparkzoo.net Deadline to apply: July 10th 2022 by 5:00 PM https://sequoiaparkzoo.net/

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CITY OF FORTUNA

PUBLIC WORKS PROJECT MANAGER

Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs. EOE

• Experience in hospice, palliative care, oncology or home health

Organizational Information: Founded in 2004, the Sequoia Park Zoo Foundation is a 501c3, inde− pendent organization whose mission is to promote and stimulate interest in the Sequoia Park Zoo and support the Zoo’s develop− ment and programs through fundraising, promotion and other initiatives designed to enhance the Zoo experience. The Founda− tion’s vision is for the Sequoia Park Zoo to be seen as a premier Redwood Coast destination.

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courts.ca.gov/general-information/human-

$67,816 - $82,509/YR, FULL-TIME.

Under the general direction of the Public Works Director, assists in planning, organizing, directing, and executing the activities of the Public Works Department including capital improvement project management activities; provides expert professional assistance to Director and other Departments in areas of expertise, including but not limited to engineering, municipal water, sewer collection, and street and facility maintenance; and performs related duties as required. Bachelor’s Degree or significant completion of coursework for Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university is desired. Any combination of training and experience that would likely provide the required knowledge and abilities is qualifying. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4 pm Friday, July 15, 2022.

resources-and-employment and submit application to: jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov.

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HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT Child Custody Recommending Counselor (CCRC) $72,946-88,760 FT – 32-40 HRS. (NON-EXEMPT)/FULL BENEFITS Provides professional child custody recommending counseling services related to family law and juvenile court matters, including child custody/ visitation assessments to individuals/families referred by the Court. Writes detailed reports and makes recommendations regarding custody/parenting plans and interventions when needed, mediates agreements, performs related duties as assigned. Please apply at: https://www.humboldt. courts.ca.gov/general-information/humanresources-and-employment and submit application to: jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

MARKETING & MEDIA COORDINATOR Eureka Store This is a very rare opportunity to merge your passion with your profession while working for one of the largest, fastest growing local business in Humboldt County.

Our Marketing & Media Coordinator is responsible for inspiring not only sales and customers, but our community. Prospective hires should have a history of working with digital, print and radio media, retail, marketing and sales management experience, exceedingly strong customer service skills and the ability to inspire and lead others. This is a career opportunity that offers as much as it demands, including: medical, dental and vision plans, retirement plans, vacation accrual, sick pay, competitive wages, consistent scheduling and most importantly, an amazing work place environment! To apply come into either location 1450 Broadway Eureka, CA, 2165 Central Ave. McKinleyville, CA, or download our application at eurekanaturalfoods.com.


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Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Program Analyst I/II Full-time, starts at $16.71/$17.59

Program Assistant Full-time, multiple positions, starts at $16.00/hour

Child Care Specialist Full-time, starts at $16.71/hour

Human Resource Specialist Full-time, starts at $18.73/hour Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

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Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Mental Health Support Specialist Part-time, starts at $20.30/hour.

Clinician I/II Full-time, multiple positions, starts at $ 24.54/hour, $4,875/month

Bilingual Clinician I/II (Spanish) Full-time, multiple positions, starts at $ 26.22/hour, $5,191.87/month Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

H UMBOLDT A REA F OUNDATION

Redwood Region Climate and Community Resilience Hub (CORE) Coordinator JOB DESCRIPTION Location: Bayside, CA Team: Strategy, Program, & Community Solutions Reports To: Executive in Residence CORE Time Base: 40 hours per week Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm, including occasional evening and weekend work as needed Status: Regular Non-exempt Wage Range: $17.00-$19.00/hour upon hire depending on experience, plus health benefits, retirement benefits, paid holidays and sick time; $21.25/hour expected at 1 year of tenure Job Description Redwood Region Climate and Community Resilience Hub (CORE) is a new cross-cultural, communityengaged organization dedicated to solving the climate emergency by working urgently to decarbonize and build resiliency in both natural and human-made systems throughout the Redwood Region. The CORE Coordinator is responsible for prioritizing dynamic workloads, providing excellent customer service, proposing solutions, communicating effectively, and working collaboratively across the organization. The ideal candidate will carry out job duties with an emphasis on attention to detail, cultural humility, respect for sensitive information and confidentiality, and have an ability to complete tasks with minimal oversight and a high level of independence. This position is a full participant in working with the CORE Team to fulfill HAF’s mission to “promote and encourage generosity, leadership, and inclusion to strengthen our communities,” and to practice organizational values of community, empathy, and equity. Essential Functions include • Work closely with and across the CORE team to coordinate meetings, including scheduling and logistics, preparing materials and resources, setting up appropriate technology, and providing follow up with documentation of activities, notes, and agreements. Follow through on deadlines and deliverables. • Coordinate calendars of project staff and schedules of several regularly scheduled project meetings. Support the strategy and engagement planning and coordinate internal and external meetings. • Work closely with the others within the organization to organize and capture strategy materials. • Coordinate with Marketing Team to identify, develop and implement website updates; independently maintaining technical and media guides. • Outreach for community events in coordination with the Marketing and Philanthropic Advancement Teams: manage the contacts database, coordinate mailing lists and distribute invitations through multiple communication channels including social media and email campaigns. Application procedures can be found at www.hafoundation.org/jobs along with a detailed job description with minimum and preferred qualifications. For questions, contact Haley Clark at jobs@ hafoundation.org or call (707) 442-2993, ext. 376. Application deadline: This position will remain open until filled, however, priority consideration will be given to those who apply by 8 a.m. on Monday, July 18th. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

CITY OF FORTUNA

$84,204 - $102,447 PER YEAR, FULL-TIME. Under the administrative direction of the Public Works Director, to plan, organize, schedule, direct, and review the functions and activities of the City’s Engineering Division; to perform a wide variety of the most complex engineering assignments; to be responsible for the design and inspection of Public Works projects; to review and approve subdivision development plans; and to do related work as required. Education equivalent to graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering is required. Any combination of training and experience that would likely provide the required knowledge and abilities is qualifying. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm Friday, July 15, 2022.

Finance Manager

As a key member of the Business Planning & Finance team, the Finance Manager is responsible for a wide range of RCEA’s accounting and financial functions. This position requires knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles and practices, experience in financial statement preparation, and the management and coordination of payroll, AR, AP, and audit cycles. Candidates with a high level of integrity, who have experience in government agency accounting, are familiar with public sector budgeting and procurement, and work well in a fast-paced dynamic environment, are encouraged to apply. Full-time, $77,971 to $112,333 annually, with competitive benefits package. Open until filled.

Technician/Senior Technician, Demand Side Management

Manage implementation of projects to reduce energy demand for commercial, public, and residential customers. Engage and maintain customer relationships and serve as a trusted energy advisor. Candidates with experience in project or construction management, facility auditing, building operations, electrical, lighting, HVAC, refrigeration, demand response, solar and/or storage are encouraged to apply. Full-time, $67,575 to $97,355 annually, with competitive benefits package. Open until filled. Full job descriptions and application instructions are available at redwoodenergy.org/employment/ RCEA is a local Joint Powers Authority that develops and implements sustainable energy initiatives for Humboldt County. We are committed to a diverse workforce and we are an equal opportunity employer.

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For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

Do you love being with children? Do you enjoy supporting children learn and grow? Are you looking for a meaningful profession? Do you want a job that has evenings and weekends off? Would you love to find a job with a Hiring Incentive? Northcoast Children’s Services may be what you’re looking for! Northcoast Children’s Services provides early education and family support services to children and families from pregnancy to age 5. We offer home visiting services, infant toddler and preschool centers in a variety of locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties.

RCEA is now hiring for the following positions:

YUROK TRIBE

Northcoast Children’s Services

CITY ENGINEER

We have a variety of full and part time positions working with children and families. We offer paid vacation, sick leave and holidays to all employees and an additional health insurance/cash benefit/dependent care option to full time employees. All employees may also obtain assistance with education and child development permits. We are currently looking for people to join our team as housekeepers, cooks, teachers, assistant teachers, center directors and home visitors. **New Hire Incentives are currently available to both full and part time employees. Full time employees who work 30 or more hours will receive an incentive of $750. Part time employees, who work less than 30 hours will receive a $500 incentive. Incentives are paid after 90 days of employment. Positions include vacation, holiday and sick leave benefits. Full-time staff (30 hrs. per week or more) are eligible to participate in a Flexible Benefit Plan after 2 months of full-time employment. Please visit our website or Facebook page for more information on how to join our growing team! https://ncsheadstart. org/employment-opportunities/

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

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Northcoast Children’s Services

ACCOUNTING FISCAL SPECIALIST, Main Office (Arcata) Duties include assisting with fiscal and general ledger analysis; assist with prep for annual audits & federal/state monitoring. Assist w/payroll & accounts payable. Require 3 year’s business related experience. Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or Finance/Accounting preferred, but not required. F/T 40 hrs./wk. $20.52-$21.55/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHERS, Arcata, Fortuna Develop & implement classroom activities for toddler children. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, and have 1-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $17.75-$18.64/hr. Open Until Filled.

HOUSEKEEPER, Eureka Perform duties required to keep site clean, sanitized & orderly. Must have experience & knowledge of basic tools & methods utilized in custodial work and have the ability to learn and follow health & safety requirements. P/T 16 hrs./wk. $15.00/hr. Open Until Filled. Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS staff are required to submit proof of a complete COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are granted an exemption. All staff who are eligible for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for SARSCoV-2 infection. All staff must wear face coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

@northcoastjournal


Continued on next page »

Miscellaneous

K’ima: w Medical Center

BIG GUY, LITTLE PICKUP Small cleanups and hauls. Eureka area. Reasonable rates. Call Odd Job Mike at 707−497−9990.

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

CARE MANAGER (RN OR LVN) – FT/ REGULAR – Primary role is that of patient care coordinator for outpatient clinical service. Primary responsibilities are to assist in the overall management of K’ima:w Medical Center’s high-risk patients, particularly those with chronic diseases. This is done through chart review and health/ behavioral assessments to identify prevention, treatment, and intervention opportunities. Participates in patient and family education, provides leadership when working with medical staff, ancillary services, nursing staff, other provider, and other IPC team members to ensure comprehensive care is provided. Minimum Requirements: Nursing degree from an accredited school of nursing; Bachelor’s degree preferred and one (1) to two (2) years related experience. Valid California RN or LVN Licensure, current BLS, current ACLS Certification (must obtain within 6 months of hire), current PALS Certification (must obtain within 6 months of hire). DEADLINE TO APPLY IS JULY 11, 2022

WELLNESS RECEPTIONIST – FT REGULAR –

Greets members of the public. Contacts departments located in the Wellness Building to advise them of visitors. Operates telephone switchboard to relay incoming, outgoing, and interoffice calls. Incumbent will perform clerical and dispatching duties as assigned. Will complete satisfactory training regimen with current KMC operator. High School Diploma or GED equivalent; minimum of six months using a multi-line telephone system; must be comfortable using a computer; CA driver’s license and be insurable; current CPR certificate or ability to obtain within 60 days of hire. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS JULY 11, 2022

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER – FT Regular

($120,000.00-$140,000.00 annually DOE) Provides leadership, direction, and management of the Fiscal department; key member of the executive team providing leadership and direction for the organization. Minimum requirements: Must meet one of the three following criteria: (1) Master’s degree in Business Administration, 1 year experience in managing a finance office, supervision of personnel and working in the general ledger; OR, (2) Bachelor degree in business, accounting, or related field that includes managing accounting controls, finance or strategy, and/or auditing, 5 years accounting work in the general ledger, and 3 years documented supervisory experience; OR, (3) Associate degree in business, accounting, or related field, and 8 years of experience in accounting work in the general ledger, and 5 years documented supervisory work. In addition, a valid driver license and CPR certification are required. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS JULY 5, 2022

DENTAL ASSISTANT IN TRAINING – FT Regular ($15.00-$17.00 per hour) OUTREACH & PREVENTION – FT Regular ($20.40 per hour) DESK TECHNICIAN (2 POSITIONS) – FT/Regular PARAMEDIC – FT Regular GRANT WRITER & PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS – FT/Regular ($29.00-36.00 per hour DOE) DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT/ Regular ($39.00-43.00 DOE) PHYSICIAN – FT/Regular LAB TECHNOLOGIST – FT/Regular MEDICAL DIRECTOR – FT/Regular MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN – FT/Regular MAT RN CARE MANAGER – FT/Regular All positions above are Open Until Filled unless otherwise stated. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: leah. offins@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

DAWNINGS SUPPORT SERVICES Open Positions Are you a compassionate and caring person? Do you want to make a difference for individuals in Humboldt community? If so, we have a great opportunity for you! We are looking for support staff for people with developmental disabilities who wish to live on their own and in the community. Responsibilities include support and assistance with daily living tasks, communication skills and access to the community. Overnight sleep shifts are available as well as daytime and evenings shifts. We are looking for part− and full−time candidates. Medical, vision, dental care and paid vacation time are available to qualifying staff. Contact us today at (707) 825−9536 or email resume with references to dawnings@sbcglobal.net Job Types: Full−time, Part−time Pay: $15.50 − $15.75 per hour *$200 Bonus for new staff after completion of 90 probationary period! Sign on Bonus! default

DONATE TODAY! Donate your items of value to help House the Homeless and reduce your taxes. We are in Need of Funding for our "House the Homeless" project. Call or text 844−443 −0770 thehomelesscoalition 2022@gmail.com www.theh omelesscoalition.org

RELAX AND SAVE MONEY AT THE SAME TIME! BOOKS & PUZZLES All HALF PRICE @ the Dream Quest Thrift Store. "Dream Quest helps youth realize their dreams!" Plus: Senior Discount Tues− days & Spin’n’Win Wednes− days! (530) 629−3006.

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MAIL HAUL, INC / TS TRANSPORTING, INC COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVERS

PAYROLL ACCOUNTANT Join a reputable firm committed to a rewarding work environment. Manage a bi-weekly payroll for 100+ employees working in seven offices and two states. Ideal applicant is trustworthy, has a customer service mind set, excellent interpersonal skills, and a high numerical aptitude. SHN has a strong compensation package including health insurance, a matching retirement plan and shareholder opportunities. See the full ad and how to apply: www.shn-engr.com/careers/currently-open-positions

SHN is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer!

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

FULL OR PART-TIME A California CDL (Class A) is required, along with a DMV report and a current medical. We have dedicated runs from Eureka to the Bay Area and back. There is a layover while down south, but the runs are consistent and year-round. Pay is good, trips are generally easy, and this is an excellent team that is GREAT to work with! We prefer 2 or more years of tractor / trailer experience, but can help with training. Backing skills are a plus. Up to $31.07/hr. There are retirement account or health insurance options. Vacation and holiday pay begin after probation period. Please call, email, or text Charles (707-834-8350), clindquist00@gmail.com with questions or if you would like to schedule an application interview.

POLICE OFFICER Hoopa Tribal Police Department

Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Performs a wide variety of peace officer duties.  Must possess a Basic Academy Certificate from a California P.O.S.T. approved academy. Additional requirements are listed in the job description. Must have a California Driver’s license and be insurable. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background checks. 

 For job descriptions & employment applications, contact the Human Resource Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 23 or email l.offins@hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MARKETPLACE

REAL ESTATE default

    

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

Dave’s Computer Services

Water, electricity, custom home plan, completely fenced, private dead end road. PERSONAL PROPERTY INCLUDED:

26’ Trailer, 2containers, motorcycle, spa & more.

145K

Schedule A Service Call!

(707) 955-5124

FLASHBACK

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

MARKETPLACE

Macintosh, Windows, Linux & printer services.

35 YEARS EXPERIENCE

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Auto Service EMAIL TO

raneyrealestate @gmail.com default

Soules Bookkeeping

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

FEATURED LISTING 579,000

$

1026 Main Fortuna Commercial Opportunity - Rare Main Street location, approx. 4100 total sq. ft., retail space, 3 upstairs apartments, separately metered, covered off street parking, alley access, downtown Fortuna. MSL# 261949

LIC# 02080831

Call Sales Associate Devon Bollan at Landmark Real Estate (707) 725-2852 ■ Fieldbrook

989,000

$

BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME IN A TRANQUIL FIELDBROOK SETTING. 4.5+/- acres and over 2400 Sqft. Solid oak wood floors and a Livingroom full of south facing windows, with soaring ceilings open to the 2nd floor walkway above. Full shared bathroom upstairs, half down, and an additional shower in the laundry room. Perfect mix of open lawns, meandering brick walkways, garden’s, beautiful Redwoods, even plum trees and a small apple orchard. Several outbuildings and a separate carport. There’s a great porch which wraps across two sides of the home and a large 2 story outbuilding constructed to look like a matching cottage; it even has its own woodstove. Way too much to list. Call for more info today! MLS #261880

Cleaning Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Bookkeeping and payroll for small businesses.

Vintage Clothing & Gently Used 116 W. Wabash • 798-1443 Hours 2-6 Closed Sun & Mon

Professional Service.

“Clothes with Soul”

Competitive Pricing.

707-273-1212

MARKETPLACE CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie (707) 839−1518

Computer & Internet

Dominique@Soulesbookkeeping.com

@ncj_of_humboldt

www.soulesbookkeeping.com

YOUR AD HERE classified@northcoastjournal.com

(707) 442-1400 ×314

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Other Professionals Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Let’s Be Friends

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT default

  

CONFUSED, ANGRY, AFRAID? The bigger world or your own might be in chaos, but you can focus on yourself & get strong. Consider talking to a coun− selor at www.ncamhp.org

        



HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 metaphysicsuniversity.com

YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Submit your Calendar Events ONLINE or by E-MAIL @ northcoastjournal.com / calendar@northcoastjournal.com PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Barbara Davenport

Dacota Huzzen

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

BRE #02109531

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

707.499.0917

BRE # 02084041

BRE# 02070276

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

TING!

NEW LIS

WILLOW CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,350,000 Beautiful riverfront estate on over 4 acres just minutes from Willow Creek! Property boasts a 3/3 3,650 sq. ft. main residence, large in ground pool complete with outdoor kitchen and pool house featuring a full bathroom and kitchenette area, separate barn with a 1/1 apartment above and so much more!

MYERS FLAT – COMMERCIAL LOT - $160,000 Opportunity awaits! Flat useable commercially zoned property bordered by the Myers Flat offramp and Highway 101 located in the beautiful, historic Avenue of The Giants. With high visibility and ease of access from the 101, this property is perfect for any magnitude of commercial endeavors.

HIOUCHI – LAND/PROPERTY - $150,000 ±10 Acres with close proximity to natural splendors like Jedediah Smith State Park and the wild and scenic Smith River! This highly usable property that is ready for you to construct your dream home!

SALYER – LAND/PROPERTY - $350,000

707.498.6364

Realtor

Mike Willcutt

Ashlee Cook

BURNT RANCH – HOME & 2ND UNIT - $725,000 Ideal ±32 acre location for self-sufficiency and extended family! Commercial greenhouse for growing food, large shop, multiple springs, pond, fruit trees, good solar exposure, generator back-up, wildlife, USFS adjacency. At the end of a paved county road.

KNEELAND – HOME ON ACREAGE - $749,000

NEW LIS

TING!

±55 Acre homestead featuring a cozy, well constructed 3/1 home, open meadows, well, mixed timber, fruit trees, and plenty of useable space for gardening, animals, and hobbies!

BLOCKSBURG – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $999,000 ±160 Acres with STAMPED County and provisional State permits for 30,300 sq. ft. of outdoor, 9,320 sq. ft. of mixed light, and 1,920 sq. ft. of nursery canopy space! This turn-key farm is complete with tons of water storage including tanks, bladders, and a 400,000 gallon pond, solar & generator power, 4 greenhouses, and much more!

Beautiful ±50 acre property with easy access on a paved County road. Parcel features large open meadows, oak & scattered fir trees, plenty of flat useable space, creek, and power running through the property. Just minutes from all the recreational opportunities of the South Fork of the Trinity River.

SALMON CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $749,000

HONEYDEW – LAND/PROPERTY – $239,000

BRIDGEVILLE – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $650,000

±27 Acre Southern Humboldt gem! Conveniently located just 15 minutes from Honeydew with easy access on a County road, this property features meadows, spring water, power at the street, and building site with beautiful views awaiting your dream home!

MOTIVATED SELLER! ±40 Acre turn-key farm with county and state cannabis permits in hand for 6,750 sq. ft. permitted farm is as turn key as they come. Property features year round access, two houses, water storage, solar system, and so much more!

±120 Acre Salmon Creek gem featuring a gorgeous custom home, pond, guest cabin, creeks, solar & hydroelectric power, and so much more!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 30, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

47


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FIREWORKS  2 STAGES OF LIVE MUSIC  FOOD VENDORS  ACTIVITIES & MORE!


OVER 40 YEARS

of 4th of July Celebrations in Old Town Eureka The first 4th of July Street Fair would have started sometime in the 1970s. At one-point former council woman Bonnie Gool, was involved in the event. Former Mayor Nancy Flemming reflects on why she originally became involved. It was 1982, and she was the president of the North of Fourth Association. The Festival had degraded and lacked organization. Vendors were setting up in the doorways of shops, interrupting business for any of the shop owners who wanted to be open on the holiday. Working with the city manager she was able to file the permit to take over the responsibility of managing the Festival Brooke Exley, and Flemming, working together transformed the festival into what we see today. Exeley oversaw booths, and began adding food vendors, and crafts booths. She also booked all the bands. Flemming took on the job of permitting, and the non-musical entertainment. There were Coast Guard demonstrations, parachute jumpers, a children’s teddy bear parade, kids’ activities, and more. Copies of the Constitution and American flags were handed out to all the children attending. For several years Bon Boniere sponsored an ice-cream carving contest, using their homemade ice-cream. Sculptors like Hobart Brown demonstrated their artistic ability. Flemming was also a catalyst for why we have fireworks over Humboldt Bay. In 1984 the first fireworks were launched from the end of Woodley Island. She says it was such a popular place to view the

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fireworks, that the next year they began staging on a barge in the Bay. 34 years later they are still shot over the Bay from a barge. In 1987 Flemming and former councilman Mike Jones, who was General Manager of KEKA Radio in Downtown, partnered to fund raise and include patriotic music with the fireworks. Sound Advice provided giant speakers for music, and Flemming and Jones broadcast from her dock on the Bay. She also hosted a BBQ and Madaket ride for the top fireworks donors. Fireworks continue today because Rob and former councilwoman Cherie Arkley generously underwrote them for several years, through 2006. In 2007, Jones, with his patriotic spirit stepped up and was the City’s key fundraiser through 2018. This year he still grew his beard out, and will don his red, white and blue tux, complete with hat and tails, and serves as Eureka Main Street’s official mascot at the Festival. After Flemming was elected Mayor in 1990. While she still stayed involved with Exeley, her duties kept her too busy. Exeley continued to manage the 4th of July Street Festival, until 2001. She handed the reins to Eureka Main Street, and the festival has been under their care ever since. It is now referred to as Eureka Main Street 4th of July Festival, however, most still call it Old Town 4th of July Festival. It will always be a labor of love, celebrating the birth of our Nation with a family friendly festival, culminating with the fireworks over the Bay.


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

• Celebrating Local Schools • Local Creations & Gifts • Visitor Information

In The Ritz Building We’re back with a bang, for the 4th of July weekend! Downtown and Old Town Eureka will be bustling with activity all weekend long! Kick off the fun on Thursday, June 30th is the Eureka Summer Concert Series brought to you by Coast Central Credit Union, Bicoastal Media, Eureka Main Street and the City of Eureka. This week’s concert features classic rock music by Beatz Werkin at Madaket Plaza from 6-8 pm. The concerts are free and fun for all ages! Friday Night Markets, hosted by Humboldt Made, returns for the first time in two years on Friday, July 1st from 5:30-8:30pm on 2nd and E streets in Old Town Eureka, including: artists, makers, farmers, food, and drinks. Dance the night away to music by Blue Rhythm review and the Bayou Swamis. The festive atmosphere continues on Saturday, July 2nd with the 6th Annual Skateboard Art Fundraiser at Clarke Plaza from 4-9pm . This event is co-hosted by Humboldt Skate Lab, The Epitome gallery and The Madrone Taphouse. Come out to skate, eat, drink, and listen to music by DJ Goldylocks. You can also view some amazing art, including live art by DMISE, buy a board, or just hang out and support!

218 F St. EUREKA (707) 798-1806

After attending the skateboard art fundraiser, you can check out more incredible art at First Saturday Night Arts Alive from 6-9 pm. Stroll around downtown and old town to experience great art, music, shopping and dining at your favorite local businesses! Rest up on Sunday because Monday, July 4th will be fun from sun up until well after the sun goes down! Bring the family down to old town to celebrate at the 4th of July Festival from 10-5pm where there will be two stages featuring a variety of local bands, including: Band O Loko, The Jimmie Lahman Band, Canary and the Vamp, The Moondots, Widdershins, John David Young Conspiracy, Lizzy and the Moonbeams, Main Stage Youth Performers, Humboldt Highlanders Pipe Band and The Scotia Band. There will also be food, craft and information booths, Speeder Car Rides, Madaket Bay Cruises and don’t forget the fabulous shops and restaurants too! Then settle in along the waterfront to watch the spectacular fireworks show over Humboldt Bay at 10 pm! We can’t wait to see you again! For more information follow eureka main street on facebook and instagram or visit eurekamainstreet.org.

SPECIAL INSERT • 2022 • 4TH OF JULY FESTIVAL GUIDE

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July 4

IN THE HEART OF OLD TOWN EUREKA

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10am-5pm Many Hands

Gallery

★ Gifts with meaning & history ★ Over 45 local artisans ★ Ethnic fair trade imports ★ Suitcase friendly souvenirs & curiosities

2nd & F St. | Open 7 Days a Week | manyhandsgallery.net

#ncjboh22 Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

LIVE MUSIC

4th of July Festival The 4th of July Festival features two stages with live music. The Eureka Main Street stage is located at the Gazebo (2nd & F Streets) and the Mantova’s Two Street Music Stage is located at 2nd & C Street). The Scotia Band will also perform at Clarke Plaza (3rd & E Streets). We take pride in showcasing local bands for the event and encourage you to come enjoy the music! BAND O LOKO Take and musical journey with Band O Loko. Songwriter Kevin Held combines stories of life with his words, and melodies from his fingers on the keyboard. Sharing the stage with songwriter Tim Bonow on guitar and Josh Patterson on the drums, they create music of their own and share favorites from others. Check out www.bandoloko.net for free downloads, videos and more.

MAIN STAGE YOUNG PERFORMERS COMPANY

O P EN ✯ ✯✯

BAND O LOKO

MAIN STAGE YOUNG PERFORMERS COMPANY Developed in 2014, Main Stage Young Performers Company is a dynamic performing arts company composed of local youth artists ages 7-17. The company takes on a variety of projects from appearing at community events, to piloting new musical works. The Young Performers Company also serves as the youth musical

theatre training company for Main Stage Humboldt. These dedicated young artists study and perform alongside professional theatre artists in the Arkley Center season annually. HUMBOLDT HIGHLANDERS PIPE BAND Humboldt Highlanders Pipe Band performs regularly in the community at festivals, fairs, public ceremonies, weddings and memorials.

Good Through July 10th

Closed on the 4th

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THE MOONDOTS

CANARY AND THE VAMP Photo by Dave Woody THE JIMMIE LAHMAN BAND The Jimmie Lahman Band plays a mixture of Blues, Swing, Funk and Rock. We add original songs that fit the genre. Great for dancing. The Jimmie Lahman Band members are from Eureka, Arcata, and Westhaven. Jim Lahman, the founder of the band, plays guitar and sings, Justin Hoopes is the drummer, Alex Kantner is the bassist and Ron Perry plays harmonica. We have a female vocalist, Nan Voss. CANARY AND THE VAMP Channeling the voices of the Tin Pan Alley Song book, Beverly Twist from Belles of the Levee joins forces with Absynth Quartet’s guitarist Ryan Roberts and bassist/vocalist John Ludington. “With the addition of Aleister Paige on pedal steel, the sound has never been better.”-Collin Yeo, North Coast Journal. Twist periodically switches from rhythm guitarist to banjolele, trumpet and melodica. Roberts plays a self made o-hole guitar traditionally played in jazz manouche fashion, a style made popular by early jazz guitarist, Django Reinhardt. Ludington holds down the upright bass whilst singing close harmonies with Twist. With a mix of ‘20s and ‘30s vaudevillian style, Brazilian jazz and country swing, Canary’s sound is bound to excite if not intrigue it’s listeners. You can check us out on canaryandthevamp.com THE MOONDOTS From Arcata, California, The Moondots started playing together amid lockdown, blending covers and original compositions into an innovative fusion of funk, folk, and hip-hop. They have been playing at dif-

ferent venues around Humboldt Country since 2021. WIDDERSHINS Widdersins music style is uniquely poetic, transportive originals with rock influences. The band showcases the talents of Christine Walden, vocals, lyricist; Frank Mancinelli, guitar; Spencer Kennedy, drums; and Lisa C Sharry, bass and backup vocals.

JOHN DAVID YOUNG CONSPIRACY JOHN DAVID YOUNG CONSPIRACY The John David Young Conspiracy is a four-piece jazz/rock band that has been known to wander into country or blues. Lead guitar/vocalist John David Young, rhythm guitar/flute/vocalist Les Craig, and bass player Ray Ritter have been together since 2008, and drummer Ernie Continued on next page »

SKATEBOARD ART Fundraiser

4TH OF JULY FESTIVAL

LIVE MUSIC SCHEDULE EUREKA MAIN STREET STAGE/GAZEBO 10:00 am BAND-O-LOKO 12:00 pm MAIN STAGE YOUTH PERFORMERS 12:15pm HUMBOLDT HIGHLANDERS PIPE BAND 1:00 pm THE JIMMIE LAHMAN BAND 3:00 pm CANARY AND THE VAMP

MANTOVA’S TWO STREET MUSIC STAGE / 2nd & “C” 10:00 am THE MOONDOTS 12:00 pm WIDDERSHINS 1:00 pm JOHN DAVID YOUNG CONSPIRACY 3:00 pm AND LIZZY THE MOONBEAMS

Humboldt Skate Lab raising funds to provide skateboards for local youths.

CLARKE PLAZA / 3nd & “E” 12:00 pm SCOTIA BAND SPECIAL INSERT • 2022 • 4TH OF JULY FESTIVAL GUIDE

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Live Music Continued from previous page

Earnshaw joined us in 2011. We have four CDs out so far, and this photo is from one of our favorite gigs, the Union Labor Day Picnic in Sequoia Park. We play mostly originals written by John or Les, but we also love our oldies, especially Beatles! LIZZY AND THE MOONBEAMS Original and cover tunes that will get you up and on the dance flor and keep you there all night long. Covering a large array of styles, including R & B, Blues, jazz, 50’s-60’s rock to country. Lizzy and the Moonbeams has something for everybody. SCOTIA BAND The Scotia Band, Humboldt County’s

Community Band, was born in 1935 when a group of Pacific Lumber Company employees began getting together regularly to play music. For many years this all-volunteer group was sponsored by Pacific Lumber, their hallmark maroon and khaki uniforms with a redwood tree patch on the sleeve seen around the County enhancing community events with a broad repertoire of marches, show tunes, popular, folk, and classical music selections. They became a 501c3 nonprofit group in 2006 and nowadays anyone of any age who plays a wind or percussion instrument is invited to join. For more information, see their website at www.scotiaband2.org.

THE MADAKET

SCOTIA BAND PERFORMING AT A PAST FOURTH OF JULY FESTIVAL IN CLARKE PLAZA

CARRIAGE RIDES

SPEEDER CAR RIDES

ACTIVITIES Something for Everyone! On top of all of these amazing vendors the 4th of July Festival offers some unique activities that can only be found in Eureka.

Old Town Carriage Rides Eureka is fortunate to have their very own horse drawn carriage. Old Town Carriage offers special rides during the 4th of July Festival. The carriage parks near Smug’s Pizza at 2nd & H Street. The carriage will arrive at 10:30am and run throughout the event. The route goes up 2nd Street toward the Carson Mansion and last 10 minutes. Prices are $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Take a little break from the crowd with a short ride that brings the history of our beautiful city to life. For information about regular hours

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and rides contact Old Town Carriage Co. at (646)591-2058 or visit www.oldtowncarriageco.com

Madaket Harbor Cruise

Take in the sights and sounds during this leisurely cruise along Eureka’s scenic waterfront and get an up-close look at the preparations taking place on the fireworks barge. Enjoy a beverage from Madaket’s tiny bar, the smallest licensed bar in the State of California. 4th of July 20 minute narrated cruises depart every hour and half hour from 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. at Madaket Plaza (foot of C Street). Adults $6, Kids (12 and under) $4. Book your cruise during the festival at the Madaket Booth near 2nd & E Street.

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Learn the history of the Madaket or book a regularly scheduled cruise visit www.humboldtbaymaritimemuseum.com or call (707) 445-1910.

Timber Heritage Association Speeder Car Rides Take a ride on Humboldt’s history with a scenic trip along the bay on Timber Heritage’s speeder crew car! The Arcata and Mad River Railroad crew/speeder car is a restored maintenance of way vehicle that traveled along the railways in Korbel. Originally used for getting the logging crews out into the woods, crew

speeder cars were a quick and efficient way to travel. Timber Heritage volunteers restored the A&MRR in 2009 and THA began offering rides in the summer of 2009. The winter of 2016-2017 the speeder was overhauled, and the rides are even smoother! Rides run about every half hour from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Rides begin at 1st and E Streets, Eureka and travel North along 1st Street. Rides cost $5 for Adults, $2 for kids (ages 3-10), and free for kids ages 2 and under. If you would like more information on the Timber Heritage Association, contact (707) 443-2957, P.O. Box 6399, Eureka, California 95502, or visit www.timberheritage.org


VENDORS Food, Crafts & More Over 100 vendors and businesses participate in the 4th of July Festival. Many Old Town businesses come out of their shops with sidewalk sales or booths for this special event. Food vendors offer a wide range of culinary delights, including BBQ, oysters, gyros, tacos, fresh tropical fruits, shaved ice, cotton candy and root beer floats, to name just a few. Crafters Eureka Main Street | 525 Second Street, Ste. 105 | Eureka, CA 95501 |707-441-4187 | www.eurekamainstreet.org

present their best jewelry, décor, candles, clothing and so much more. Nonprofit organizations offer information about public services, social groups, upcoming events and ways to become active in our community. On top of all of these amazing vendors, the 4th of July Festival offers some unique activities that can only be found in Eureka. 

Eureka Main Street reserves the right to move vendors into different spaces as needed.

Booth Locations Map - 4th of July Festival 2022

X = Barricades A = ADA toilet R = Regular toilet

= Food Booth = Craft/Info Booth = Tables for Dining = Music Stage

H = Handwash Station W= Wastwater Disposal

1st Street XXX Public Restrooms WW

XXX

R R HSnug Alley

Snug Alley

Snug Alley

Snug Alley

Snug Alley

X

RRH

AR R R R H

X

XXX

THA - Speeder Car Rides

City Garbage - Dumpster

XXX

WW

XXX AH

Music Stage

27 28 29 30 31 38 37 36 35 34 33

Tables for Dining

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F E

B

Music Stage

Median

N Opera Alley

Opera Alley

Opera Alley

X

Opera Alley

X

X

P Q

XXX Opera Alley

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Location: Snug Alley between 1st & 2nd by public restrooms 2 Regular

H 45 46 47 48

Location: 1st & E streets 2 Regular 1 Handwash Station

Median

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WW B & B Toilets Location: between 1st & D streets 1 ADA 4 Regular 1 Handwash Station

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10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 60 59 58 57 56 55 54 53 52 51 50

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 D

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2nd Street

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Location: G St. by alley between 1st & 2nd 1 ADA 1 Handwash Station

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UNBC Butterfly Bath Klaylife Studios Coastal Haze Designs Africa Unite LLC Mindys Kreations and More Kristin Burckard Eureka Police Department Humboldt Bay Fire Truck Keiber Glass Leelo Rose Larissa Robyn Design Melissa Bee Sewing SEIU, Local #2015 Humboldt County Democratic Central Committee

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Joyful Designs Salmonberry Prints Elect Tiffany Nielsen Madaket Bay Cruise Gloria G’s Facepainting & Bodyart Our Finds Online Job’s Daughters Baltic Amber and Creations Ambrz Art Painted Forest Art The Wine Spot North Coast Scottish Society Alzheimer’s Association Clay on Herbs RCEA

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

BACA Old Town Carriage Lost Coast Jewelry Arts Roland Damsel in Defense DJ’s All Bugged Out Soylee Unique Candles Quinn Sharp Jewelry Designs American Indian Art & Gift Shop Eureka Fabrics Human Canvas Body Art EA Family Services Nlavida Michelle’s Choice Boutique Making a Scene

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Cub Scout Pack 4028 Redwood Discovery Museum Buy PGZ Bounce House La Croix Creations /Pawsitively Comfy 51 Color Street 52 Nest 53 Sisters Clothing Collective 54 Stonesthrow 55 Redwood Clay Pots 56 Saraba African Art 57 Wise Dyes 58 Humboldt House Plants 59 Feel the Love Balloon Décor 60 All Dogs Biscuit Bakery

H Street

G Street

F Street

E Street

D Street

C Street

3rd Street

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Made with Love By Madelis Amazingly Beautiful Boutique Upcycled Treasures Root to Rise Holistics The Bismuth Wizard Mary Kay Cosmic Cat Art Doris Delights

A Phatsy Klines B Chapala C Redwood Adult & Teen Challenge D Indian Tacos- Amanda E Amigas Burritos F F.O Eagles

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U

La Patria Mariscos and Grill Mermaid’s Treasure Shaved Ice LoveMiniDonuts Hooked Kettle Corn Cheerful Shaved Ice St Innocent Orthodox Church El Pueblo Market HC Kiwanis Old Town Coffee & Chocolates Indian Tacos - Margaret Reyna’s A Taste of Bim Tacos El Pueblo Pizza Gago Big Island Kine

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4 JULY TH OF

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EY UP THELEAFTLL OF OUR

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1662 Myrtle Ave. SUITE A Eureka 707.442.2420

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