North Coast Journal 05-26-2022 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, May 26, 2022 Vol. XXXIII Issue 21 northcoastjournal.com

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4 5 7 11

CONTENTS Mailbox Poem A Hazy Day

News

May 26, 2022 • Volume XXXIII Issue 21 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

Up for Judgment

News

ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2022

Arcata Strips Defiant Watson of Assignments, Limits Access to Staff

13 NCJ Daily Online 14 On The Cover

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

To Audit and Control

20 On the Table

Arcada Gets Back in the Game

22 Get Out!

Sea to Summit: A Return to Salmon Mountain

ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

23 Fishing the North Coast

Eureka Boats Back on the Salmon after Break in the Wind

24 The Setlist

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Laugh It Up

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Pony Express Days

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Special Pull-Out Section

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest

Kinetic Grand Championship 2022

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com

Special Pull-Out Section

22nd Annual North Coast Open Studios

GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston, Rory Hubbard, Renee Thompson ncjads@northcoastjournal.com

Special Insert

25 Trinidad Arts Night

Saturday, May 28, 6 to 9 p.m.

26 Home & Garden Service Directory

ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com

27 Calendar 32 Screens

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Natalie Krishna Das natalie@northcoastjournal.com

The Evolutionary

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

33 Field Notes 33 34 34 41 42

PUBLISHER

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com

A Paean to Lefties

BOOKKEEPER

Sudoku & Crossword Cartoon Workshops & Classes Free Will Astrology Classifieds

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com

Kelly at Freshwater Lagoon, the start of an uphill journey. Read more on page 22. Photo by Hollie Ernest

On the Cover North Coast Journal graphic

OFFICE MANAGER/DISTRIBUTION

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310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

MAILBOX

Terry Torgerson

Real Concerns Editor: No matter what side of the abortion issue you are on, no one has a right to dictate mastery over your own body. My response to the news that the U.S. Supreme Court is poised to take away abortion rights in this country after 50 years was physical (“Rally for Reproductive Rights in Eureka,” posted May 4). My whole body seized up, my muscles tensed, my shoulders tightened, my stomach hurt, I became nauseous. My outrage and trauma is breathtaking and heartbreaking. As I begin to process what is happening in this country and what it means for women and girls, I see that everything is connected. Donald Trump packed the court with “conservative” judges who would do his bidding and lead us to this moment in time. But these governmental changes are not conservative, they are cruel and barbaric, they are white supremacy and minority rule in action. Trump and his cronies orchestrated and nearly succeeded in pulling off a coup to bring down our democracy. Think of it. If his mob of supporters and the people in his administration had been successful, Mike Pence and Nancy Pelosi may have been killed. We may have had a civil war, a dictatorship, or both. The danger is still real. We must stand up and take positive action. Vote people out of office who want to take away women’s rights, Black and brown people’s rights, LGBTQ rights, immigrants’

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

rights, human rights. We must not let the country go back into the dark ages in 2022 and 2024. It matters for our children and grandchildren. We cannot let democracy die. April Jones, Arcata

Offshore Wind Concerns Editor: The California Coastal Commission’s decision to allow initial investigation into the feasibility of offshore wind generators (“Coastal Commission Moves Offshore Wind Forward,” April 14) will, once again, challenge our pristine coastline. The determination allows energy companies and foreign investors to establish multiple offshore wind generators, spanning 132,000 acres of our coastline. We all understand the need for cleaner electricity sources, and these wind generators seem to provide one answer. However, there are serious risks. As we are positioned on the Pacific Flyway, millions of migrating pelagic birds will make their way past these massive wind generators. The potential for numerous deaths and migration displacement, as we have seen with land wind generators, is a high risk factor. In addition, ocean mammals, including whales and dolphins, and other ocean animals, continuously use these waters, presenting an unknown safety risk. Coincidentally, the current Audubon magazine (Spring,


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY A Hazy Day

2022, Volume 124, No. 1) feaA hazy day at tures an article addressing these Humboldt Bay, moments of Zen critical issues. Watching pelicans play A major concern is these wind generators will degrade Offering thanks to our pristine and valued coastLast night’s dreams, where stories are told line, as well. Even 21 miles In impossible schemes off shore, these numerous Movement and freedom 900-feet-tall generators will Combine in a dance, loosening images always be visible from our Unfurled, entranced. shoreline. As Humboldt County — Lori Cole Supervisor and Coastal Commissioner Mike Wilson states, “These structures will be seen from virtually everywhere.” We will never again be able to appreciate our magnificent ocean view without seeing these generators. I understand the need for clean energy sources, and support the need Editor: to develop other energy sources. But I Thank you for featuring the imdon’t want to stand at Centerville Beach, portant work on Indigenous-centered Trinidad or Sue-Meg park and ask why curricula that young activists are prowe allowed such turbines in our once moting in the local public schools (‘Long pristine oceans. Overdue,’ April 28). I have spent the Richard Kandus, McKinleyville last six years researching youth identity, participation choices and resilience in local high schools. Data from interviews, Editor: focus groups, surveys and ethnography After looking over the draft developclearly show that BIPOC students have ment plans for the proposed Gateway to armor up every day in schools and project, I was immediately opposed communities to withstand the slew of to the idea of eight-story apartments microaggressions, misrepresentations looming over the Arcata Bottoms, an and silences in the curricula. Negative area of known geological hazards, as experiences in schools and towns contribute to how young people feel about well as tsunami and storm surges exacerbated by sea level rise. Bob McPherson themselves and the shape their dreams described those in stark terms in his take. thoughtful letter to the editor some Curricula connected to local Indigenous culture, such as that featured in the weeks ago (Mailbox, Feb. 10). recent NCJ cover story, alongside things Several colleagues also enlightened like Yurok language electives (which are me to the city’s poorly executed planning process, a process where much was currently offered at four high schools: done without much opportunity for Eureka High School, McKinleyville High community input. This is contrary to School, Hoopa Valley High School and how my beloved city has handled things Del Norte High School) are examples in the past and very disappointing. of providing educational access that But the clincher was the immensely promotes respectful pluriethnic coexistence. Yurok language classes affirm enlightening letter (“Audit”) by Dr. Andrea Tuttle, a much respected researchidentities of heritage-speakers and help er and supporter of our community address intergenerational trauma by and how we wend our way through validating Native cultural practices. For the inevitable growing pains of increaswhite students, these classes educate ing population. Her insights demand them about Indigenous peoples as re-evaluation and extensive revision of contemporary neighbors rather than as the awful plan put forward by city staff. past folklore. And students from other Here is a link to Dr. Tuttle’s letter: www. minority backgrounds report feeling madriverunion.com/articles/a-detailedmore motivated to investigate their own audit-of-the-draft-gateway-area-plan/. family backgrounds and to take pride in I urge all residents to read this letter for the identities they find there. In short, a comprehensive understanding of the diverse curricular offerings do many ramifications of the Gateway plan in its kinds of positive things for students present form. Randy Klein, Arcata Continued on next page »

Diversify the Curriculum

Gateway Concerns

GRAND JURY

WANTS YOU! HE L P HUM BO LDT CO UNTY IM PROVE! Apply Now for the full year term beginning in July 1st. Applications available on humboldtgov.org using the Grand Jury link or pick up an application at the Grand Jury Office on the first floor of the courthouse. For more information call 707-476-2475 and leave a message.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MAILBOX Continued from previous page

NEW LOCATION

from a range of backgrounds. I hope that school boards, superintendents, principals and teachers can all work together to find ways to expand curricular offerings that move us further away from misrepresentation and toward appreciation, and applaud those who are already doing so. Mneesha Gellman, Boston and Kneeland

Still Working Toward a Solution Editor: J.A. Savage’s article (“Geopolitics Undermine Energy Authority’s Solar Project,” posted May 1) accurately portrayed some of the challenges Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA) and other electricity suppliers currently face in meeting our renewable energy goals. As has been widely reported, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s ongoing investigation of alleged circumvention of tariffs imposed on solar panels imported from China is temporarily having a major chilling effect on development of new solar projects in the U.S. The 100-megawatt Sandrini solar project being developed in Kern County to provide clean power for RCEA’s Humboldt County customers may be delayed and/or see cost increases due to uncertainty around the tariff, along with the inflation and supply chain constraints that are playing out globally. However, contrary to the Journal’s narrative, RCEA’s contract with the developer of the solar project has not been “nullified” and the project has not been “derailed.” RCEA is in negotiations with the developer to find a solution that will allow the project to proceed with schedule and price terms that work for RCEA and our energy customers. Richard Engel, Arcata

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More Oversight Needed Editor: In Recognition of Elder Abuse Awareness Month, I would like to bring attention to this real problem in our community. There are articles about the failure of CWS to respond to reports of child abuse and this is certainly an eye-opener for our community … these little ones are our future and deserve protection. However, speaking of “the future,” we also have similar problems in the senior community, and they also

need our protection. I am speaking specifically about those living in the local nursing homes, and our assisted living facilities. Unfortunately, these facilities are for-profit and privately owned, thus no local regulatory oversight. It ultimately is the responsibility of each facility/staff to report any suspected abuse. Because such reports could result in unwanted publicity, a “fine,” other disciplinary action or loss of revenue, I am greatly concerned they are failing to report as mandated. The agencies that oversee these facilities are in Santa Rosa; you can imagine how quickly they respond. I have been involved with CASA and know the problems that exist in our community, but now I am working with the “other end of life” and I see those same problems almost daily. I wish we had an authority, such as the grand jury, to do a full investigation of the day-to-day operations of these facilities. Our program works closely with APS and HCSO, but it seems they all suffer from lack of staff, turnover, inadequate training in working with elders, etc., which makes their jobs difficult in responding to reports of abuse. As a community, we must get together to protect both our young and our old … we all will be “there” some day and I am hoping these types of reports will become obsolete. As the long-term care ombudsman program manager, I urge you to become another set of eyes for these precious individuals, whether young or old — volunteer in your community. Suzi Fregeau, Eureka

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Friday due to the Memorial Day holiday.

NCJ No Longer Accepting Election Letters! The Journal’s deadline for letters endorsing specific candidates or measures on the June ballot passed May 16. l


NEWS

Up for Judgment

Two vie to become Humboldt’s next Superior Court judge By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

F

our years after Humboldt County’s first contested judicial election in 20 years, we have another, with two candidates vying for the seat being vacated by Judge Christopher Wilson’s retirement. And seeing as an incumbent judge hasn’t faced a challenger locally in decades, whoever wins a seat on the bench in June seems likely to be there for a while. To become a superior court judge in California is to enter rarified air — after all, there are only 58 superior courts in the state, one in each county, though some have multiple courthouses. Judicial terms span six years, with vacancies filled through gubernatorial appointments, and judges wield a tremendous amount of discretion in their courtrooms, whether hearing civil or criminal cases. In civil cases — which include family law proceedings, probate cases, petitions for court orders and claims — a judge’s decision can determine whether a family stays together, how an estate is dispersed, what records are determined to be open to public view and who’s at fault in a given dispute. In criminal cases — which include felonies, misdemeanors and infractions, like traffic tickets — judges determine whether there is enough evidence to support a charge, what evidence will be admissible at trial, how a jury will be instructed on the law and, ultimately, what constitutes a just sentence for those found guilty. The two candidates looking to enter this fray are Ben McLaughlin and Steven Steward, both of whom have backgrounds in criminal law. Currently working as a deputy public defender, McLaughlin, 51, grew up in Palo Alto and has lived in Humboldt County for 15 years. After graduating from Vanderbilt University as a history major with an emphasis in Latin American history in 1994, McLaughlin received his law degree from Santa Clara University School of Law in 1999. He spent a stint in civil litigation before focusing on criminal law for much of the last 17 years, including seven years serving as a deputy district

attorney — prosecuting violent felonies — and five as a deputy public defender in Del Norte and Humboldt counties. Steward, 42, meanwhile, grew up just outside Los Angeles and moved to Humboldt County in 1998 to attend Humboldt State University and pursue a degree in political science, before leaving the area to attend graduate school at San Francisco State University. Steward then moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked for a member of Congress before attending law school at The Catholic University’s Columbus School of Law, while working to provide legal services to indigent clients at a domestic violence clinic. After getting his law degree and returning to California, Steward spent seven years representing low-income defendants in criminal courts in Los Angeles and the Bay Area, before he and his family moved back to Humboldt County to raise children. Steward has worked as a deputy district attorney since 2017, prosecuting serious and violent crimes, as well as serving as the office’s lead environmental crimes prosecutor. In the lead up to the June 7 election, the Journal caught up with both candidates and asked them to answer a handful of questions about their backgrounds, perspectives and personalities. To view their full responses, visit www.northcoastjournal.com. (Spoiler alert, asked to name their favorite fictional judge, one candidate tapped Judge Chamberlain Haller from the movie My Cousin Vinny, while the other named Judge Smails from Caddyshack.) But here’s how the candidates weighed in on the more substantive questions. Asked about judge’s role in making Humboldt County a more just community, McLaughlin said it’s essential that judges treat all parties respectfully, with dignity, noting this is especially important in civil cases with litigants representing themselves in the process because they cannot afford counsel but who “have an absolute right to access the judicial process.” On the criminal side, he said it’s Continued on page 10» northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS Continued from page 7

important judges protect the constitutionally guaranteed rights of the accused, while making sure victims and survivors are heard by the court. “Victims and survivors must feel as though their rights and safety are considered and appropriately prioritized,” McLaughlin said. When it comes to sentencing, McLaughlin said certain crimes — gun violence, sexual violence, homicides — “require a prison term,” while in other cases, justice “may require a probationer to repay a business owner, remove graffiti, serve custodial time or get his/her/their act together through mental health and addiction counseling.” Steward, meanwhile, said judges have a central role in making Humboldt County a fair community by making sure their decisions are made “fairly and free from political or other influences,” avoiding “even the appearance of impropriety.” “Whether a defendant is rich or poor, powerful or not, my record shows that I have treated everyone equally and with respect,” Steward said. “I will bring to bear this experience and my proven track record of impartiality to make Humboldt a more just community that we can all be proud of.” Asked about the cyclical nature of childhood trauma, drug and alcohol abuse and crime, Steward said he’s “committed to breaking the cycle of drug and alcohol-related offenses that make up the bulk of our local arrests.” Steward said the dual epidemic of substance

Ben McLaughlin

abuse and a lack of mental health treatment is challenging, saying he’d look at “diversionary models” that address underlying causes of criminality for nonviolent offenders “who show a sincere desire to seek rehabilitative service,” pointing to Drug Court as an example of a successful program. “I am proud to say that I am a board member of Waterfront Recovery Center in Eureka, which is a dual diagnosis facility that does transformational work in our community,” Steward said. “I am not solely spending time in the courtroom prosecuting cases, I am working, on my own time, to address these issues and would continue to do so as a judge.” McLaughlin, meanwhile, said breaking these cycles is “where the rubber meets the road,” noting that addressing the generational trauma within Indigenous communities locally, and childhood trauma more broadly, would help resolve some of Humboldt County’s chronic issues. “When offenders are addicted or ill or commit criminal acts because of generational or physical trauma, the model

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Steven Steward being developed by the Yurok Tribe is informative,” McLaughlin said. “The Yurok’s approach to overall wellness is thoughtful and considers a person’s individual and cultural histories. Applying this approach across the board would pay dividends, I think.” McLaughlin also said Drug Court eligibility needs to be expanded to include low-level offenders, and in cases where probation is not appropriate, McLaughlin said he’d like to see the expansion of re-entry programs that help felons transition back into the community with sponsorships and job training. “The dignity of a job — and hopefully health insurance — can also help break the cycle of trauma,” he said. Asked how he would find work-life balance in a job with a workload some have described as “daunting,” Steward said he doesn’t want to be a judge because it’s easy but because “it is worthwhile.” Steward described his current job as “demanding,” saying he finds balance by “getting into our beautiful forest and beaches” with his family.

“The work is demanding and at times isolating but Humboldt deserves a judge who cares more about providing justice than vacation time,” he said. McLaughlin, meanwhile, said he hopes he’ll find the job “intellectually stimulating and professionally challenging,” adding that he recognizes a healthy work-life balance is singularly important. He said he has worked to develop personal boundaries that allow him to spend time on himself and with his family and friends, noting it’s been his practice to get to work as early as needed to finish up during the day to preserve evenings with his family. “That said, I understand what the job entails,” McLaughlin said, adding that when in trial, he’ll work “as long as and whenever necessary to ensure that the business of the court is handled as efficiently as possible.” Both candidates are slated to square off in a candidate forum on KEET TV hosted by the League of Women Voters Humboldt County at 7 p.m. on June 1. Check it out and make sure to vote June 7. ● For more information on McLaughlin, visit his website at www.ben4judge.com. For more information on Steward, visit his website at www.stevensteward.com. Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


NEWS

Arcata Strips Defiant Watson of Assignments, Limits Access to Staff By Thadeus Greenson

Arcata City Councilmember Brett Watson addresses the sustained findings that he harassed a city employee while the balance of the council listens in silence. Screenshot

thad@northcoastjournal.com

A

fter hearing nearly two dozen residents plead with Councilmember Brett Watson to resign in the wake of a scathing investigative report that he abused his power and harassed a city employee, the Arcata City Council passed a series of measures May 17 aimed at protecting city staff, while limiting Watson’s access to City Hall. Watson, meanwhile, struck a defiant tone, stating there is “absolutely zero chance” he will resign from office while arguing that he is innocent of the allegations against him and himself a victim of harassment at the hands of city staff. With Watson on a figurative island, the council passed a series of motions 3-1, with Watson dissenting, to direct staff to pursue a workplace violence restraining order against him, to strip Watson of committee and other council member assignments, to take the steps necessary — including changing key codes — to restrict all council members’ access to city hall and to direct Watson cease communications with city staff outside council meetings, to refrain from any physical

contact with them and to refrain from any personal correspondences. The council briefly discussed bringing back an agenda item to censure — or formally rebuke Watson — at a future meeting, but staff explained such a process would give the council member an opportunity to defend himself, prompting Councilmember Meredith Matthews to say she didn’t want to “give this any more oxygen,” a notion Mayor Stacy Atkins-Salazar and Vice-mayor Sarah Schaefer seemed to support. The council’s actions come on the heels of a third-party investigative report compiled by Kramer Workplace Investigations, which was called in to investigate allegations that Watson had engaged in a prolonged pattern of sexual harassment and using his position of authority to make undue demands of a staff members’ time and attention. The 28-page report, which deemed the allegations “undisputed” and is corroborated by hundreds of pages of supporting text messages and emails between Watson and the employee, sustained findings that Watson engaged in “unprofessional and inappro-

priate conduct,” and “abuse of his power as a city councilmember” over the course of more than two years. (Read more about the report and its findings here.) The investigative report detailed how Watson suffered from mental health issues, including depression and anxiety, while navigating marital problems and the death of his father. The text messages in the document show he increasingly came to depend on the city employee, texting after hours, on weekends and while she was on vacation, and sharing intimate details of his life, from his feelings about his wife and the depths of his depression to changes in medication he was taking. Repeatedly, he asserted she was critical to his mental health and ability to function as a council member, according to the report, which also notes Watson made a custom of demanding long hugs from her. Those who addressed the council on the issue during public comment were unequivocal in stating Watson should resign, with some referencing a statement Watson issued last night asserting that he has never harassed anyone, that his relationship with the employee was consensual,

arguing she “enjoyed” spending time with him, “looked forward to it,” “encouraged it” and even baked him cookies. Resident Jessica Silva (who is also a Journal contributor) said she wanted to come to give Watson a piece of her mind but has come to believe he can’t hear any of us. Instead, she discussed the power dynamic at play between a city employee and one of her five bosses on the council. “Implied consent from baked cookies” is not a thing, Silva said, and “there is no one-size-fits-all response to harassment.” “Compliance within an imbalanced power dynamic is not consent,” Silva said. A group of four city department directors read the council a joint letter, pledging support for the city’s anti-harassment policy, urging the council to “send a strong message” and do what it can to protect employees from harassment. At the conclusion of their comment, Watson charged that one of the directors had faced a harassment complaint “not that long ago,” thanking him for speaking. Former Councilmember Sofia Pereira Continued on next page »

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NEWS Continued from previous page

said she read the entire report and 500plus pages of supporting materials, saying harassment is really about one person exercising power and control over another. And Pereira said the report shows Watson abused his power in more ways than one, pointing to the report detailing allegations that he threatened the employee’s job, disregarded state laws designed to protect government transparency and public trust, and bragged about his ability to manipulate the council to vote how he wanted. But Pereira said she realized the council doesn’t have any mechanism for removing Watson from office. Though she urged the council to “use whatever tools” it had to ensure a safe workplace, she also warned of “the very real possibility that he doesn’t have the humility to resign” and the city would instead have to wait until he’s up for re-election in November to purge him from office. Another former councilmember, Elizabeth Conner, called Watson’s attitude toward democracy and his role on the council “horrendous” and “terrible,” saying the investigative report is so convincing that there’s no additional evidence that could be presented to change her mind that Watson is unfit for office. The chorus of calls for Watson’s resignation continued with Aristea Saulsbury reading a letter signed by more than 50 local women. “Most of us have known a ‘Brett Watson’ in our lives — a man who took liberties while passing the blame on to the victims of his harassment,” Saulsbury read. “Most of us have experienced or witnessed the victim of harassment being left to defend themselves, only supported by whisper networks. We are done accepting men like you that treat this behavior as the norm. … You must resign.” When public comment came to a close and the discussion returned to the council dais, Watson took center stage. He aggressively questioned Tom O’Connell, a labor attorney representing the city through its insurance carrier, before repeating his claims that his relationship with the city employee was 100 percent consensual and alleging that witnesses had lied to investigators, while pointing out minor errors in the report. “Just to make it clear,” he said, “there’s absolutely zero chance I’m going to resign.” Watson alleged the investigation also violated city policy, failing to notify him of the allegations against him, while claiming the city also failed to investigate his claims that he had been the victim of harassment. He then picked select text messages from the hundreds of pages included in the investigative report that included the

employee saying something nice about him, or answering a compliment of his with one of her own, pointing to them as though they were evidence harassment could not have occurred. Some of the exchanges Watson pointed to, however, also evidence a relationship that clearly crossed the bounds of that of employer and employee. In one he pointed to, he noted he told the employee as she was leaving on a vacation that he was “miss [her] so much” and was “going to be depressed” in her absence. In another, he texted, “You mean so much to me.” He also said there were “many” examples of the employee giving him marital advice. Watson closed his remarks reiterating that he has no intention of resigning his post but said “if the staff member wants to take responsibility for her role in the relationship,” he “would consider it.” “I’ve gone through an intensive rehabilitation and I’m in a very strong place and want to serve my community,” he said, referencing a 30-day in-patient program he attended late last year. When Watson finished and the balance of the council picked up the discussion, they made clear their desire to move quickly and then get on to other city business, saying the ongoing discussion could be harmful to victims in the immediate case and victims of abuse and harassment more generally. The council then moved quickly through the series of votes to strip Watson of committee assignments, limit his access to staff and pursue a restraining order against him, with the embattled council member chiming in periodically and repeatedly casting the sole dissenting vote on the motions. After the council’s vote, City Attorney Nancy Diamond was asked to present briefly on the process the public would have to initiate to recall Watson from office. She explained proponents would have to collect signatures equaling 12 percent of voters who cast a ballot in the last general election, which would then be verified by the Humboldt County Elections Office and, if sufficient, the matter would be called for a special election. But the process spans some months, she said. “It won’t happen in time for the November ballot,” Diamond said. With that, the council moved to adjourn. “We will try to do our best to move forward,” Atkins-Salazar said. l Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Erin Gates, deputy superintendent for Redwood National and State Parks and California State Parks North Coast Redwood District, hands donor Josie Merck scissors to cut the ceremonial ribbon to celebrate the open of the Grove of the Titans in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. Photo by Carly Wipf

A host of parks officials gather for the unveiling of the Mill Creek Trail to the Grove of the Titans. Photo by Carly Wipf

Protecting the Titans: New Trail Provides Safe Access to Ancient Grove

A

once hidden trail blazed off the beaten path is now a formal North Coast attraction. Today, if you walk along the Mill Creek Trail in Del Norte County’s Grove of The Titans, you’ll tread on raised metal walkways that allow water to flow and ferns to grow beneath your feet. You’ll cross a wooden bridge, climb perfectly placed stairs and duck through nature-made tunnels of green, all the while taking in a striking view of some of the world’s tallest trees. But it wasn’t always this way. Before it reopened with ribbon-cutting ceremony May 21, the area around the Mill Creek Trail — a 3-mile path that weaves through Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park in Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP) — was largely untouched. The rise of social media over the past two decades meant more and more locals and tourists spread the word about the lauded grove. A network of informal, secret trails formed and visitors trampled over the ferns and undergrowth to marvel at the beauty of the giant trees. But this came at a significant cost to the giant trees. Redwood root systems were damaged and plants on the forest floor died. Foot traffic eroded soil and pushed litter into the streams, putting a strain on coho and steelhead spawning areas. “It is our duty to protect our resources — we needed to protect this grove, but we also wanted to allow people to access it because it is a pretty significant experience,” said Erin Gates, deputy superinten-

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dent for Redwood National and State Parks and California State Parks North Coast Redwood District. “What we were able to do is realign Mill Creek Trail, build an elevated walkway so visitors are able to experience this grove without letting their footprints do damage that is irreversible.” RNSP was dubbed a UNESCO World Heritage Site for housing some of the last surviving old-growth redwoods and for its connection to tribal nations’ history. To save what was left of the old-growth forests, California State Parks, Save the Redwoods League, Redwood Parks Conservancy and the National Park Service devised a plan in 2018 to create a formal trail in the Grove of the Titans that would limit the human impact on the surrounding nature. The Mill Creek Trail is now realigned and includes an elevated walkway with a 1,300-foot-long boardwalk through the Grove of Titans, along with stairs and bridges that allow root systems to work and vegetation to grow unfettered underneath hikers’ footsteps. ADA-accessible parking and restrooms have also been added along Howland Hill Road. Parks crews removed informal trials, planted new ferns to replace those lost to foot traffic and hand-carried 128 tons of construction materials into the site in an effort not to further damage the grove. “Balance is key when planning and building a trail in such a rare and beautiful ecosystem,” said Jessica Carter, director of parks and public engagement for Save the Redwoods League in a statement. “With the realigned trail, new boardwalk and sig-

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nage, we’re respecting the natural grandeur of this special place while also welcoming all visitors to experience and enjoy Grove of Titans for generations to come.” California State Parks North Coast Redwoods Superintendent Victor Bjelejac said he encourages visitors to be kind to one another along the trails and to take their time. “Don’t be in a hurry, stop, look around ... Don’t rush to this spot or that spot. Enjoy the environment that you’re in,” Bjelejac said, adding that only 5 percent of original redwood forest still exists today. “In this district, we have 50 percent of all those old growth redwoods. This is a place where you actually have old growth groves and it’s spectacular. So come with kindness. Don’t be in a rush and enjoy what you see.” The trail now also has signs that provide forest facts, guidance for safe trail use and translations into the Tolowa Dee-ni’ native language. The Tolowa Dee-ni nation was frequently consulted on the renovation, as the Grove of the Titans is part of Tolowa ancestral land. Amanda O’Connell, tribal councilmember for Tolowa Dee-ni’ nation, called the renovation a “wonderful project” that addressed the human impact on the grove. “The tribe obviously still has a strong connection to this place, being our ancestral lands, but it’s now managed by the park system and so it’s nice to be able to have these working relationships to be able to collaborate on the continued stewardship,” O’Connell said. “It feels really good to see a project come to completion to do that.”

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Renovations cost approximately $4 million and were funded by Save the Redwoods League supporters, California Natural Resources Agency through Proposition 68, the Parks, Environment, and Water Bond Act of 2018, more than $900,000 of in-kind contributions and $205,000 from Redwood Parks Conservancy donors. Save the Redwoods League funding also included a significant challenge grant from donor Josie Merck of Connecticut. Merck came from Connecticut to attend the ribbon-cutting, which opened with song and prayer from members of the Tolowa Dee-ni nation. “I knew already I was humbled before I got here, but nothing could speak to the true experience of being here and being sung here and prayed for and danced to as it was done,” Merck said at the ceremony. In a speech, she called those in attendance — trail crews, local parks leaders and members of the Tolowa Dee-ni nation — “humans of the highest order.” Then she spoke to the titans: “You trees are more than our elders, you are survivors.” And they will continue to survive if we tiny humans keep up our efforts and stay on the trail. Redwood National and State Parks is recruiting volunteers to monitor the trails and greet park visitors and care for the Grove of Titans. To get involved, contact JedSmithTitans@gmail.com. — Carly Wipf POSTED 05.24.22

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

13


ON THE COVER

To Audit and Control

Cher yl Dillingham

Kare z n Paz Domingue

The unprecedented battle for fiscal oversight of the county of Humboldt By Thadeus Greenson

A

s a thought exercise, take out a piece of paper and write down the names of Humboldt County’s last two auditor-controllers. It’s a safe bet that if you correctly scribbled Joseph Mellett and Michael Giacone, you either work in county government or are the most dedicated of civic enthusiasts. All that is to say, it’s beyond noteworthy that incumbent Auditor-Controller Karen Paz Dominguez has become one of the most recognizable — and polarizing — names in local government since bursting on the political scene a handful of years ago. Then the assistant auditor-controller, Paz Dominguez stepped before the Board of Supervisors during the public comment period of its Nov. 7, 2017, meeting to charge her office was grossly understaffed and mismanaged to the point it was unable to carry out its essential functions. Within months, Paz Dominguez’s predecessor had retired and, in June of 2018, voters elected Paz Dominguez to fill his shoes with 55 percent of the vote. The ensuing four years have seen Paz Dominguez become increasingly embattled, as the Board of Supervisors has voted to censure her and passed a resolution declaring no confidence in her job performance, 13 of the county’s 19 department heads signed a letter stating she “has failed to fulfill the duties and responsibilities of her position,” increasingly putting millions of dollars of

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state and federal funding at risk, and the California Attorney General’s Office has taken the extraordinary step of naming her personally in a lawsuit alleging she’s violated state law by failing to file timely financial reports with the State Controller’s Office. All of this has come to a head as the June 7 election looms, with Paz Dominguez continuing to cast herself as a reform agent facing unprecedented backlash simply for doing her job and working to transform her office from one that “rubber stamps” other departments’ fiscal documents to one that truly protects the public interest.

The Office The Humboldt County Auditor-Controller’s Office is tasked with providing financial and accounting support to the county’s departments, special districts and a host of partnering agencies that have funding streams run through county coffers. The office is responsible for accounting for property tax revenues, while apportioning and distributing them to the various entities that rely on them, including school districts. The office audits and issues county payroll checks, audits and issues claims for payment, issues receipts for all payments received by the county, documents the county’s financial transactions and prepares a host of financial reports.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

The Candidates Hired by the county in 2017 as the assistant auditor-controller, Paz Dominguez, 34, moved to Humboldt County 17 years ago after growing up in El Salvador and Los Angeles. She graduated from Humboldt State University with a degree in business administration with an emphasis in accounting, and says she spent 10 years working with two local CPA firms, where she got experience in “direct accounting, taxation and auditing,” before joining the county’s employment. Challenging Paz Dominguez in the race is Cheryl Dillingham, 60, a career public employee who spent 30 years working for the county of Humboldt — including 12 years in the Auditor-Controller’s Office, 10 years in Public Works and a stretch in the County Administrative Office — before stepping in as finance director for the city of Rio Dell three years ago. After growing up in the San Fernando Valley and Ventura County, Dillingham moved to Humboldt County 41 years ago and received a degree in mathematics and a master’s in business administration, both focused on accounting, from Humboldt State University. Announcing her campaign at a kickoff event in Eureka in April, Dillingham said she doesn’t like “public speaking or politics,” saying she’s most comfortable “doing accounting and dealing with numbers,” but said she was stepping into the race “because there is an urgent need to fix the county’s accounting and reporting” and

she is “uniquely qualified” to get things back on track. With all the discord swirling around the Auditor-Controller’s Office, it’s noteworthy that the campaign’s principals have so far refrained from the kind of trench warfare one might expect. While Dillingham has run on a platform of competence, experience and “no drama,” she’s largely refrained from being directly critical of Paz Dominguez, who she worked with for a stretch of about eight months when she was appointed interim auditor-controller after Mellett’s retirement and before Paz Dominguez assumed office. In fact, Dillingham has been complimentary numerous times — saying Paz Dominguez has done an “excellent job of addressing issues” identified in a 2018 Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury report detailing deficiencies in the county’s fiscal oversight and controls. She’s also praised Paz Dominguez’s efforts to modernize the office by automating certain functions. Dillingham has also seemed sympathetic to many of the office’s struggles. Asked about issues with county payroll at a recent forum, Dillingham said it’s a heavy lift, pointing to the fact that the county turns around payroll in the same amount of time as little Rio Dell, despite having nearly 2,000 more employees still using paper timecards. She has echoed Paz Dominguez’s claims that the department remains short staffed and struggles to recruit and


retain employees, particularly trained accountants. And she has conceded the office faced unprecedented challenges in working through a global pandemic that forced most employees to work remotely, posing unique complications with the county’s decentralized accounting systems. But asked to differentiate herself from Paz Dominguez and pinpoint exactly what she views as wrong with the office as it currently functions, and what specifically she would step in looking to change, Dillingham circled back to a question both candidates had been asked at a recent forum hosted by KMUD News: Which is more important, timeliness or accuracy? Paz Dominguez answered the question unequivocally. “Accuracy. One-hundred percent. Accuracy is the most important thing. Otherwise, what’s the point? I say this because you can be timely all day long but if the information is inaccurate, what purpose did you serve?” she said, adding that inaccurate work will lead to duplications of efforts, as it will have to be fixed. “Ultimately, it all about accuracy. That’s why you hire accountants. We need to be very clear about what this function is and it’s a function of enforcing accuracy.” Dillingham was more nuanced, countering that both are imperative, that completely accurate books filed years or months late are of little use to departments. The key, she said, is to communicate clearly and train other departments and office staff so everyone is aware of what must be provided when, and what documentation will be required. In response to a follow-up Journal inquiry, Dillingham pointed to prioritizing timeliness, in addition to accuracy, as a central differentiation between her and Paz Dominguez, deeming it “unacceptable” that the fiscal year 2019-2020 audit had yet to be completed.

The 2019-2020 Audit If you look through the county’s external year-end audits posted to the Auditor-Controller’s Office website dating back to 2010, you’ll notice external auditors repeatedly — year after year — noted the county’s failure to reconcile certain account balances in its general ledger, noting it could require significant end-of-year adjustments to county accounts and would make it more difficult for the county to identify potential acts of fraud. The 2018-2019 single audit report, the first — and to date, the last — of Paz Dominguez’s tenure, notes: “There is no disagreement with the audit finding. The auditor-controller is in the process of hiring and training staff who will be tasked with these closing procedures.”

But nearly two years after that audit report was signed by the accounting firm CliftonLarsonAllen LLP, the county’s year-end financial reporting has seemingly ground to a halt, with the county having yet to close the books on either its 2019-2020 or 2020-2021 fiscal years as it currently budgets for 2022-2023. In December, Department of Health and Human Services Director Connie Beck publicly expressed concerned the outstanding financial reports could jeopardize the more than $61 million in federal funds it depends on to run local programs. County officials have said the outstanding 2019-2020 single audit has already caused tangible problems. Planning Director John Ford has said it’s preventing his department from applying for more than $18 million in state funding. Public Works Director Tom Mattson said the outstanding audit has already resulted in the loss of $674,000 in state funding and put another $200,000 in road maintenance funds on hold, with CalTrans also having informed the county it will withhold all new funding until mandated reports are filed. This news comes as Congress’ $715 bill infrastructure package is rolling out. County Chief Financial Officer Tabitha Miller has also pointed out that discrepancies in county records from the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 fiscal years amount to $55.6 million, leaving it in a place where the county “truly (does) not know where our fund balance is” as it begins budgeting for 2022-2023. The issue of the outstanding financial reports came to a head in earnest last month, when the state Attorney General’s Office filed a lawsuit against the county and Paz Dominguez personally, alleging the auditor-controller had failed to file the county’s adopted budgets for fiscal years 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 with the State Controller’s Office, while also failing to file Financial Transaction Reports for 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 “in the time, form and manner prescribed by the State Controller.” To Paz Dominguez’s critics, the situation can serve as a case study for her tenure. According to the lawsuit, the State Controller’s Office initially reached out to Paz Dominguez about the 2019-2020 Financial Transaction Report (FTR) in November of 2020, reminding her it was her legal responsibility to file the report by Feb. 1, 2021. The office then reportedly followed up Feb. 26, 2021, advising the report was now delinquent but providing another 20 days to comply, warning that a failure to file could leave Paz Dominguez facing a fine of up to $5,000. The office followed up June 1, 2021, with an email and Paz Dominguez responded, offering to complete the report “using Continued on page 17 » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


ON THE COVER

The Child Development Lab

Continued from page 15

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is enrolling children for 2022-2023 unaudited information” and indicated it would take two weeks to get the document filed, deeming it an “urgent priority.” The State Controller’s Office agreed, but Paz Dominguez never filed the document, according to the lawsuit. The California Attorney General’s Office then sent a “final demand letter” Feb. 24, giving Paz Dominguez 20 more days to file the report under threat of a lawsuit and the aforementioned fines. Paz Dominguez responded to the letter by telling the Board of Supervisors on March 1 that she believed it was sent in error, and then delivering the “findings” of her ongoing review of the county’s finances, which included a laundry list of alleged irregularities and deficient fiscal controls that left the county vulnerable to “opportunities for fraud,” as well as a few straight allegations of impropriety. (It should be noted here that while the board urged Paz Dominguez to present evidence of her claims in a subsequent report to the board, she declined to do so, and documents released to date under a California Public Records Act request fail to substantiate the vast majority of her allegations.) After learning the letter was not, in fact, sent in error, the county and Paz Domin-

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guez mounted an all-hands-on-deck effort to file the outstanding FTR, filing it on the March 16 due date. But the state is alleging that in the section designated to document who specifically prepared the report, Paz Dominguez signed “under direction of the AG” rather than her name. The SCO returned the document, stating it required a first and last name and title of the person who input the data. According to the lawsuit, Paz Dominguez never responded and did not correct the document, prompting the lawsuit. For her part, Paz Dominguez has said a lot of things have played into problems filing the 2019-2020 financial documents. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, she says, her staff had already been outfitted with laptops and was prepared to work remotely. But that wasn’t the case across other departments, Paz Dominguez says, explaining they were ill-equipped to deal with the new reality of remote work. This, she says, caused months-long delays in other departments submitting invoices and other financial documents to the Auditor-Controller’s Office, causing a tremendous bottleneck. Currently, she Continued on page 19 »

For further information and enrollment materials, please visit our website childdev.humboldt.edu/child-development-lab/ You can also contact (707) 826-3475 or email cdl@humboldt.edu

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


ON THE COVER Continued from page 17

says, outside firms are struggling to complete reconciliations from the 2019-2020 fiscal year, which she says are a product of deficiencies in other departments’ reporting, though that’s been disputed by Miller and County Administrative Officer Elishia Hayes. Paz Dominguez’s issues with meeting deadlines have extended beyond the yearend financial reports. (It’s perhaps worth noting here that Paz Dominguez submitted the questionnaire sent out by the Journal to local candidates eight days after the paper’s initial deadline.) After Paz Dominguez aired the “findings” of her fiscal review at that March 1 meeting of the Board of Supervisors, the board asked her to return March 15 with a full report and underlying evidence, to which Paz Dominguez agreed. But she then failed to complete her report and provide the documents to the clerk of the board in time for that meeting. At the time, Paz Dominguez told the Journal that Clerk of the Board Kathy Hayes had been “very helpful” in scheduling a special March 21 meeting on the issue, adding she herself “made a commitment to the public that I would provide them the relevant information on the 15th and I will keep that promise.” Paz Dominguez said she planned to release the report publicly that day. Instead of releasing the report and underlying documentation, she took to the Humboldt County Courthouse steps to announce her re-election bid in a speech that repeated many of the allegations made two weeks earlier. Asked after the speech when she planned to release the evidence supporting her allegations, which she’d previously said she had at the ready, Paz Dominguez told the Journal it would be released in weekly response to a California Public Records act request filed by one of her campaign supporters. As the Journal went to press May 24 — 10 weeks after the promised release date — the Auditor-Controller’s Office had disclosed three batches of records responsive to the request, the last coming on April 8, and the documents released leave the vast majority of her claims unsubstantiated. Humboldt County Superintendent of Schools Michael Davies-Hughes, meanwhile, tells the Journal local school districts have not received interest apportionment payments, usually dispersed quarterly, from the Auditor-Controller’s Office for any all of the 2020-2021 fiscal year or the first three quarters of 20212022. Davies-Hughes said a “conservative estimate” would be that the outstanding payments owed local districts combine to total $2.6 million.

‘Growing Pains’ Back at the KMUD forum, Paz Dominguez characterized the tumult of her first term in office as a by-product of change. “This is a growing pain,” she said. “This is a time of growth. We are going to prioritize accuracy because we are correcting a culture, an entrenched culture of just getting things done regardless of accuracy.” In response to questions posed by the Journal, Paz Dominguez characterized the current state of the county’s fiscal controls as “evolving” and “strengthening,” noting the board’s adoption of a cash handling policy and formation of an Audit Committee as signs “the tone at the top of the organization is shifting toward one of promoting strong internal controls.” She pointed to staffing as an ongoing limiting factor for the office — it currently is budgeted for 14 employees, up from 11 before Paz Dominguez took office — but said she will look to increase automation where possible, and turn to recording video trainings for other departments to save time. Dillingham agreed staffing is a significant issue, saying she would look to bring on interns from Cal Poly Humboldt in an effort to ease the workload, while putting an emphasis on recruitment and retention efforts. But D-illingham also intoned she believes staff time can be saved by working on strengthening internal controls to prevent reporting deficiencies rather than rectifying them after the fact. She also referenced the words of a mentor, who once told her, “The difference between being a bookkeeper and an accountant is knowing when to stop looking for pennies.” In preparing its election coverage, the Journal asked both candidates to fill out a questionnaire to give readers insight into everything from their backgrounds and plans on the office to their personalities. As a part of that, we asked both candidates to sum up their candidacy in a single haiku. Here’s how they responded: Paz Dominguez: “The truth is easy When challenged, be like water And wash off mistrust”

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Arcada Gets Back in the Game By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

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he orange and black pixelated sign for Arcada (660 K St., Arcata), reminiscent of Space Invaders, hung as a question for the past two years. The retro arcade bar for grownups opened in the last week in February of 2020 only to shut down two and a half weeks later when Public Health declared a shelter-in-place order in response to COVID-19. To pass the lavender building that once housed the Other Place was to be reminded of thwarted plans and nostalgia for old times — whether the 1980s or just three years ago, when we couldn’t imagine hanging out with friends or strangers for a beer and a couple rounds of pinball could ever be fraught. Kristen “P-Nut” Thompson and her wife Amber Saba, who also co-own Slice of Humboldt Pie, reopened Arcada May 10 after a little more than two years closed. The virus that shuttered the place is still with us, making their mission of lowkey escapism more of a challenge. Still, Thompson says, “We want you to come and be a kid for a moment and not have to worry about everything. Be 12.” “They would not let this place be open for a very long time, which I totally understand,” says Thompson of the restrictions on bars and restaurants over the course of the pandemic thus far. She adds that, truth be told, she and Saba weren’t ready, either. They’d pared down to themselves and one other staffer at the pie business, which has a patio they were able to seat custom-

ers in once outdoor dining was allowed. “We really took it step by step in terms of our comfort and our employees,” says Thompson. Takeout sales, selling pies and empanadas at Eureka Natural Foods and other restaurants, along with Payroll Protection Plan loans kept Slice of Humboldt Pie running and even allowed Thompson and Saba to gradually add more staff. But Slice of Humboldt Pie, which they started in 2013, required their full attention and takeout sales from the bar menu at Arcada weren’t worth keeping it open. So they shut it down, using the kitchen for dispersed prep work, and waited. Inside, under a black tin ceiling, the walls are crowded with arcade games housed in vintage cabinets, most with drink stands beside them to hold your choice from among the eight beers on tap and a wide breadth of cans that includes 11 beers, a half dozen ciders, another half dozen wines, and an array of sodas, coffees and hard seltzers. Churning away above the bar on the right are a pair of slushie machines, one with frozen sangria and one with classic blue raspberry, “So you can get the blue tongue,” says Thompson. The filling for the Humboldt Grass-fed beef sloppy Joe empanada a few blocks away at Bittersweet shows up on the Arcada menu as a full sandwich on house baked bread with a side of fries. Fans of the pulled pork green chili empanadas will be happy to see the filling, cooked in


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20% OFF Arcada’s kitchen in great vats, can be ordered on nachos, beer-battered fries, Tater Tots or anything you think to smother in it. “Pretend you’re 12 and you have all the nacho cheese and Tater Tots and you can put on whatever you want,” suggests Thompson with a mischievous giggle. It feels equally regressive to order boneless wings, but Saba’s classic Buffalo hot wing sauce clinging to the well-crusted dark meat morsels (actual wing meat, Boneless wings with house hot sauce at Arcada. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill mind you, not chicken particle board) is sharp in tang, rounded with butter and hot enough to move your makeup come across a Crystal Castles or a real a little. Dipping sauces are from scratch, Dragons Lair.) “We have sourced those too, which makes the ranch, bleu cheese cabinets and all the games. We are up in or cumin lime dressings greater than their the games, fixing them ourselves,” says side billing. Look into the avocado sauce Thompson, noting the pinball games — and homemade cheese sauce, as well, Houdini, The Munsters and Jurassic Park — keeping Thompson’s hedonistic topping are newer models that are a little easier on advice in mind. the upkeep. Thompson’s personal favorite Arcada grew out of Saba and ThompCentipede is housed in a vintage cabison’s love of games — video and pinball net with original coin slots and a built-in — and the arcade bars and pubs they seek ashtray. Ghosts and Goblins is Saba’s jam, out when traveling. “Our days are hard featuring a knight who starts his quest in and stressful just like everyone else,” says his skivvies and must collect armor and Thompson, and “when you go to these weapons to rescue a princess. places, you can just not think about all “It’s what we like,” says Thompson. that and you can just go and be a kid.” “You want everybody else to enjoy them While Arcada is 21 and over, its ownbut you gravitate to what you like. It’s fun ers, who have two kids themselves, are being a kid.” l sympathetic to the plight of parents with joystick-happy youngsters. Eventually, they Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the may host the occasional family night. arts and features editor at the Journal. The pair is always on the hunt for new Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or acquisitions, too, as they own rather than jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow rent each piece. (Give them a shout if you her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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hile I was rushing to complete the Sea-to-Summit challenge in 2020, cycling and hiking from the ocean to mountain tops around Humboldt before weather and wildfires thwarted my plans, my friend Kelly was also pursuing all 10 peaks of the series (“Sea to Summit Part 1: Bald Mountain,” April 22, 2021). Unfortunately, she didn’t get to Salmon Mountain before the Red Cap Fire made access impossible. This uncompleted peak nagged the back of her mind through the winter of 2020. Kelly is a pharmacist, a busy lady with important responsibilities. She oversees large hospital networks that I pretend to wrap my head around but don’t completely understand. In all fairness, she is usually explaining her job to me while we are pedaling up steep hills. She loves — loves — to ride uphill on her bike. More than riding downhill, if you can believe it. Come spring of 2021, I told her I was up for driving a support vehicle with camping gear, if she still wanted to pursue the Salmon Mountain ascent. We could do it over two days. Like many of us, she’d had a rough year on several levels and really wanted to complete this challenge. Plus, I was excited to play cheerleader. On our chosen Saturday, May 1, Kelly picked me from McKinleyville in her truck, her long brown braid swept to the side of her wide grin. At the last minute, I grabbed snowshoes and ski pants from my garage, saying “I don’t think we’ll need these, but just in case!” Then we drove to Freshwater Lagoon, strategizing en route about when and where we would meet up later in the land of no cell service. She’d be taking Bald Hills Road, then follow State Route 96 to Orleans, then Red Cap Road to the Salmon Mountain trailhead and, finally, up to the peak, at 6,962 feet. Dropping her off in the misting fog and crashing waves felt like dropping a kid off at school. Even though she is an accomplished cyclist, I told her, “Be careful! Do you have enough water? And snacks?” Kelly always has enough water and snacks. I am the fool

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Kelly atop Salmon Mountain in sunshine and snow shoes. Photo by Hollie Ernest who occasionally runs out. She was grasping and fidgeting with her handlebars like a racehorse waiting for the gate to open, then she was off. While she pedaled east up and over the Bald Hills through Yurok ancestral territory, I drove back south to meet some friends at Stone Lagoon to swim. The wind picked up and we swam against roiling waves. We felt like pirates on the high seas and enjoyed the hell out of the tailwind on the return swim. After that mermaid session, I cranked the heat in the truck and set out to find my cycling friend. Bald Hills Road was still so socked in by fog I could barely see the outline of the lupines lining the road and the eerie oaks in the distance. I didn’t catch up to Kelly until State Route 96, where she was cruising through Karuk land. Riding from Orick to Orleans, what most consider a big effort, was like a warm-up to her. We stopped and chatted, but she didn’t need anything. The sun found us, and the robust winds whirled the maple leaves and blossoms until they looked like they were hula-hooping. From State Route 96, you take a right on Red Cap Road, and it’s a long and arduous climb on a bicycle to the Salmon Mountain trailhead, where we hoped to camp. I drove ahead to scout our potential camp spot but a mile or so before the trailhead, thick snow piled on the road. I have always considered myself a cautious person, though not everyone (like my mom) agrees with that assessment. I didn’t want to get my friend’s truck stuck, or worse, careen off the cliff. Well, shoot. Good thing I brought the snowshoes. I left a note on the truck that read: “Be right back.” Would we be able to summit after all? I had to find out. The hike on the road was doable enough, with some areas covered with deep snow and others with none at all. We could at least access the trail and, from what I could see, it looked passable until close to the top, which was blanketed in white. It would be a 10-mile round-trip hike the next day and the fir trees, manzanita and madrone were almost unrecognizable

in the fresh powder. We crossed paths again and Kelly cycled to where the snow started, while I sought a decent camp spot lower down. I pampered her with potato chips, water and beer, and she was so appreciative she just kept smiling. We laughed at our multisport adventure — the snowshoes crammed in between a drying wetsuit, bike helmets, tents and clothes. The truck was a mess and we were delighted. The next day, we woke up to sunshine and parked where she had left off cycling the previous day. With snowshoes secured, we went for it. The trail became harder to find the closer we got to the top. Digging the spikes into vertical white walls and using our hands, we went straight up. The views from the top brought tears to both of our eyes. We gazed at the Trinity Alps, the Marble Mountains, Etna Summit and Thompson Peak. I was proud of Kelly and her tenacity, and the hurdles she had overcome in the past year. We sang Lizzo: “I’m 100 percent that bitch, even when I’m crying crazy.” Those white peaks gave us a little bit of hope after such uncertain and tumultuous 18 months. Maybe this meant the wildfires wouldn’t be as severe or maybe the water table could actually recharge. The return trip was borderline terrifying as we slipped and slid down the mountain. The drive home felt long and short, as we discussed life, love and the pursuit of happiness. For us, happiness was on a 6,000-foot snowy peak but maybe it was elsewhere for others. Either way, we hoped more people got to see that view, with or without snow. The golden afternoon light glared through the windshield and we couldn’t believe the snowy magic, fickle wind and ocean-tomountain scenery of the past 48 hours. ● Hollie Ernest (she/her) is a botanist and forestry technician. She is writing a book about her international bike adventures, gardening and exploring the corners of Northern California. Find her on Instagram @Hollie_holly.


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Eureka Boats Back on the Salmon after Break in the Wind

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By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

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fter sitting on the sidelines for four days, the weather finally cooperated Monday and the Eureka boats were back on the water looking for kings. Salmon have been easy to come by this brief season and Monday proved no different. Quick limits were reported by the handful of boats. “The best bite was straight out front in 280 feet of water,” said Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing, who had full limits by 9:30 a.m. “The water was clear and the fish were coming shallow, right around 60 feet. There’s still some krill in the area as well as sardines. The fish are a decent size, with most around 24 inches and up with the occasional bigger one in the high teens.” Offshore conditions are looking good through Saturday for the holiday weekend but be aware of the minus tides that will begin Saturday. Sunday and Monday are the most dangerous as nearly 8 feet of water will be leaving the bay down to a minus 1-foot low when boats will be heading through the jaws.

Weekend marine forecast

After Wednesday, the north winds will begin to subside and the first part of the weekend is looking fishable. Friday, winds will be out of the northwest up to 5 knots and west waves 4 feet at eight seconds. Saturday is looking a little rougher with west winds 10 to 15 knots and waves northwest 6 feet at nine seconds. Sunday, the wind will pick up and come out of the north 10 to 20 knots with west waves 8 feet at 10 seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www.weather.gov/eureka/ or www.windy.com. To monitor the latest Humboldt bar conditions, visit www. wrh.noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the National Weather Service office at 443-7062 or the office on Woodley Island at 443-6484.

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It’s kind of been the same story on the salmon, 200 to 300 feet of water straight out front of Eureka, reports Tony Sepulveda of Shellback Sport Fishing. Darla Lewis caught this beautiful king salmon “Sardines and krill are holding the Monday aboard the Shellback. salmon in the area,” said SepulPhoto courtesy of Tony Sepulveda/Shellback Sport Fishing veda. “Most mornings they start out shallow, 40 feet on the wire and biting deep sixes. As the day goes on, they head to the bottom. If you still shallow and watermelon Apexes and still need fish at noon, 200 feet on the Cut Plugs are two of the top baits. The wire is the ticket. We’ve had limits every rockfish is still excellent, too, with both day we fished them. Some days they reefs and the Sisters producing limits come fast, others we’ve had to work at it of rockfish and lings. There hasn’t been a little. But they always seem to come.” much effort on Pacific halibut but that The Pacific halibut bite has been a little will likely change once salmon closes challenging due to the hoards of small after next Tuesday. trash fish, reports Sepulveda. “There’s Brookings definitely still some nice fish to be Lingcod and rockfish action was good caught though for those willing to put in last week and over the weekend out the time.” of Brookings, despite windy weather, Trinidad reports Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing The rockfish bite in Trinidad conCharters. “Big schools of fish are just tinues to be excellent and you don’t outside the harbor, feeding on anchoneed to travel far. Capt. Curt Wilson of vies and herring near Chetco Point and Wind Rose Charters reports a red-hot the entrance buoys,” said Martin. “Wind bite right out front of Trinidad. “We’ve chop has limited the opportunity to been staying close, right in front of Flat venture offshore for halibut, but calmer Iron and finding all the black rockfish conditions are expected later this week. we need,” said Wilson. “The crabbing is Salmon season opens June 18 for hatchreally good and they’re in great shape.” ery coho and June 25 for kings.” Ocean conditions look fishable for the Read the complete fishing roundup at week out of Trinidad, especially if you’re www.northcoastjournal.com. ● looking to fish half days. Kenny Priest operates Fishing the Crescent City North Coast, a fishing guide service The salmon bite continues to sizzle out of Humboldt specializing in out of Crescent City, reports Britt Carson salmon and steelhead. Find it on of Crescent City’s Englund Marine. He Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and said, “Just about all the boats that went www.fishingthenorthcoast.com. For out Tuesday came back with limits. Most up-to-date fishing reports and North are starting around the red can towards Coast river information, email kenny@ South Reef and the Sisters. The fish are fishingthenorthcoast.com

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SETLIST

Laugh It Up By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

I

’m happy to report I finished last week with a show that absolutely repaired my mood and gave me just enough oomph to get back to the working week. I am, of course, talking about the Eureka Symphony’s amazing season finale. I will be brief because there is new business at hand, but two things: First, if you see Jenny Scheinman’s name on the lineup, buy a ticket immediately, regardless of what you know about the show because you will never be disappointed; secondly, I can’t wait for next season. If you get a chance to go to a performance by our beloved local symphony, take it. You can thank me later. Kudos to everyone involved. Moving on, we’re back on track for the Grand Kinetic Championship. Given the ongoing pandemic, I have mixed feelings about this event but I concede that there’s literally nothing to be done. Those who choose to take precautions and those who don’t are firmly encamped, each side fully convinced of their own righteousness. My only observation is that a country stupid enough to turn a public health crisis into a culture war isn’t going to ever get better without a fundamental reconstruction. The reins have been loose for a long time, the coachman’s drunk and I can hear a horde of bandits picking up the scattered coins dropping out of the shot-up lockbox. Let those among us with reason retain their sanity by losing that reason and replacing it with absurdist humor. Rather than looking with stark horror and the slithering destruction of collective normalcy, let’s embrace the madcap and absurd and laugh at how hideous the ride has always been. In that sense, we are better equipped for the artful weirdness of this weekend’s Kinetic spectacle than ever before. And no matter how you feel about the future, you had better enjoy today. Be seeing you.

Thursday

Barbaro is a Minnesota quartet whose sound can perhaps best be described as “chamber grass.” This means it plays intricate, bluegrass-flavored songs with the complexity and sonic qualities of chamber

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music and cool-era jazz. If that description either appeals to you or leaves something to be desired, you can judge for yourself tonight at the Arcata Playhouse at 8 p.m. ($18). Perhaps there’s a better genre name for this excellent band and you might be the one to discover it.

Friday It’s always a treat to write about a venue I haven’t covered before. At least not to my recollection, which is admittedly slipping a lot these days as the “new normal” steadily grinds away the dura mater of my brain. At any rate, Forever Found is the place I am referring to and the show is a good one for all you reggae fans out there. Dezarie is a talented chanteuse from the Virgin Islands who dabbles in a soulful modern form of that great rhythmic genre. I hear her band is top notch, too. The all-ages show is at 8 p.m. and there is a byzantine pricing model: $45 general admission, $40 advance, $35 early bird, $25 super early bird, $10 kids 12 and under.

Saturday It’s the last Saturday of May and another hip hop night at the Arcata Theatre Lounge is on tonight’s program. Brother Ali is something of an unusual figure in the hip hop world: A young convert to Islam, the Wisconsin-born rapper encountered early outsider treatment because of his albinism, an experience that has informed his spiritual and creative life, fostering a love for activism and social justice. He is joined tonight by local rap collective City Hippie, as well as DJ Last Word and Rowdy. Doors at 7 p.m. ($24, $20 advance).

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Barbaro plays the Arcata Playhouse on Thursday, May 26 at 8 p.m. Photo by Jeff Mateo, courtesy of the artists

Sunday There was a time when people referred to the mix of rockabilly with modern punk as “psychobilly,” but I have seen that term thrown around less and less in the last decade. No big loss; I’m not much of a fan of kitschy genre names. Regardless, if your ears prick up at the sound of those styles mixed together, the Siren’s Song Tavern has a show for you. The Rocketz are some Los Angeles veterans of the cool cats club, while Motel Drive hails from Fresno and has a bit more country twang in the mix. Tonight’s lucky number is eight, as in “time of the show and number of dollars needed to get inside.”

Monday, Memorial Day It’s the last day of the long weekend which means that from Crab Park to downtown Ferndale the Kinetic madness will be in full swing during the sunshine hours. If you find you’ve had your fill of both sun and fun, and need to hide out somewhere and top off the tank, consider heading over to the nearby Angelina Inn, where Buddy Reed and th’ Rip It Ups will be playing the blues starting at 5 p.m. The music is free, the pizza is not.

Tuesday It’s easy to do a double-take tonight because the wide world of music has more than one guy named Mike Love. Thankfully, tonight’s visitor isn’t the more

(in)famous one, known as the Republican Beach Boy, who tours the country with the worst iteration of that foundational group and is largely hated by better musicians and discerning fans alike. No, I’m talking about Hawaiian reggae artists Mike Love & The Full Circle, a group that trades in genuine Good Vibrations and not the saccharine type. Catch the action at the Arcata Theatre Lounge tonight at 8 p.m. Acclaimed French group Dub Inc is on the marquee as well ($20).

Wednesday

Over Yonder has made a name for itself by peddling a righteous mix of intricate noodling with funky beats and heavy riffs. Sometimes known as The Primus Equation, Portland trio Sweet N’ Juicy has a similar formula, albeit with fewer musicians and the addition of three fruit-themed costumes. So, if you choose to visit the Siren’s Song Tavern tonight at 8 p.m., you won’t just be listening to funky party music, you’ll be listening to funky party music performed by a pineapple, a banana and a strawberry on keys (price unknown). Shake it up. l Collin Yeo (he/him) would like to wish the fondest of farewells to an old furry friend of his in New Orleans. Rest in peace, Pyg. You were one of the sweetest cats I ever knew. Until we meet again, dear one.


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enues throughout town will be open for art viewing and music, including Band O Loko at Saunders Plaza East and Fire Dancing at 9 p.m. Other free activities include a skate park, games and face painting. At the end of the evening, head to Trinidad Town Hall for a special jazz event from 8 to 10 p.m. with RLA and guitarist Doug Marcum ($5-$20 sliding scale). Masks strongly recommended. For info, call 834-2479. Hosted by Westhaven Center for the Arts and Community Arts Trinidad. Info at www.trinidadarts.com. Trinidad Arts Night continues every last Saturday of the month through September. Activities will vary. HEADIES PIZZA AND POUR 359 Main St. Michael Armas, photography. THE LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 355 Main St. “The Carpenter with a Camera,” Zack Stanton, photography. Susan Mayclin Stephenson and Jeff Stanley, prints, note cards and books. MOONSTONE CROSSING 529 Trinity St. Barbara Caldwell, paintings. SAUNDERS PLAZA EAST: Music by Band o Loko. Face painting by Jade Bamboo. SAUNDERS PLAZA: Fire dancing at 9 p.m. TRINIDAD ART CENTER 426 Trinity St. “Forty Years of Watercolor,” Ann Anderson, paintings, presented by Westhaven Center

for the Arts; Emerging Artists Online Showcase continues with Cal Poly Humboldt student artists; 6 to 7 p.m. “Questions and Answers” session on the history of the historic building, featuring Janine Volkmar; 7 to 9 p.m. music by Matt Brody. TRINIDAD ART GALLERY 490 Trinity St. Maureen McGarry, watercolors; Loryn White, ceramics; music by Jesse Alm and Blake Ritter w/student fiddlers joining. TRINIDAD SCHOOL PARKING LOT 300 Trinity St. Skate park and games. TRINIDAD CIVIC CLUB 409 Trinity St. Event information stand; Crucifix display/ sale (lifetime collection from around the world); jewelry, lighthouse memorabilia and more; sweets and beverages for sale by Rabia O’Loren. Benefits Doctors Without Borders. TRINIDAD EATERY 607 Parker Road. Rick Gustafson, fine art photography prints; local artisan jewelry and crafts. TRINIDAD MUSEUM 400 Janis Court. “Notable Trinidad Sculptors: Groth & Gilkerson.” Music by Howdy Emerson. TRINIDAD TOWN HALL 409 Trinity St. 6 to 8 p.m. Memorial Lighthouse Benefit Art Show featuring original art, prints and photography by Bev Doolittle, Matt Dodge, Mara Friedman, Zack Stanton and others. From 8 to 10 p.m., Westhaven Center for the Arts presents music by RLA with Doug Marcum, guitar ($5-$20 sliding scale). ●

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


Calendar May 26 – June 2, 2022 Photo by Mark McKenna

Inching back toward “normal” for Humboldt includes giant mushrooms, spaceships and mythical animals rolling through town and into the bay. At last, after a COVID hiatus, the Kinetic Grand Championship returns in-person and out of control from May 28-30. The three-day, 42-mile, human-powered kinetic sculpture race for the glory over roads, sand and sea starts on the Arcata Plaza on Saturday, May 28, where you can see the wild rides before the noon start and the push to Dead Man’s Drop on the dunes. (Bring bug repellant.) The next day, Sunday, May 29, is a splashy event on the Eureka waterfront, with the amphibious wonders hitting the waves. Finally, on Monday, May 30, head for the finish line on Ferndale’s Main Street. Visit www.kineticgrandchampionship.com for details and glorious updates.

H

eads up, Humboldt: While the county’s masking mandate has been lifted, Public Health is still strongly recommending masking indoors in public, social distancing and “avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces.” COVID-19 is still with us, so be sure to check the protocols at event venues.

26 Thursday ART

North Coast Open Studio Preview. Brenda Tuxford Gallery, 627 Third St., Eureka. Artworks by 27 of the event’s 96 participating artists will be on view at the gallery’s new location in Old Town. The exhibition will be by appointment Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. inkers@inkpeople. org. 442-8413.

BOOKS Beelzebub’s Tales To His Grandson Radio Hour. 10-11 p.m. The book will be read in its entirety on Humboldt Hot Air, every week. This week’s reading is “An Objectively Impartial Criticism Of The Life Of Man”: Episode 19: Chapter 30 (Part 3). Free. rybopp@suddenlink.net. HumboldtHotAir. org. 826-7567.

COMEDY Comedy Night. 7 p.m. Old Growth Cellars, 1945 Hilfiker Lane, Eureka. Eugene, Oregon comic Seth Milstein headlines, joined by comedians Rudy Tyburczy and Jessica Grant. Food trucks on-site. Beer and Old Growth Cellars wine available. $20. @Oldgrowthcellars.com. Oldgrowthcellars. com. 407-0479.

MUSIC Americana Music. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grind Cafe, 734

Ferndale Memorial Day parade. YouTube

It’s a long weekend for remembrance, starting with the 27th annual Trinidad Memorial Ceremony on Sunday, May 29 at 2 p.m. at Trinidad Memorial Park (free). Pay tribute to those lost or buried at sea by the Memorial Wall with bagpipe music, Samantha Day singing “Amazing Grace,” speakers, U.S. Coast Guard helicopter flyover and “Taps.” On Monday, May 30, a Memorial Day Celebration marches along Ferndale Main Street at 10 a.m., followed by a ceremony at the Ferndale Cemetery and a return parade to the Veterans Memorial Building.

Fifth St., Eureka. Bolton Basil plays songs of American folk music, including bluegrass, country and popular music of the 1950s and 1960s. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. Barbaro Live at Arcata Playhouse. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Barbaro brings original acoustic music to the Arcata Playhouse barbaroband.com $18. arcataplayhouse.org/events/barbaro/.

EVENTS Friends of the Arcata Marsh Duck Teapot Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. Bidding for 31 handcrafted ceramic wild duck teapots in nine species by Michael Harris in remembrance of his father, Stanley Harris. Benefits FOAM’s environmental education and community outreach. Pick up or ship. Opening bids $30-$40. Bidding closes at 5 p.m. on June 1. info@arcatamarshfriends.org. biddingowl.com/FriendsoftheArcataMarsh.

FOOD Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.org/ volunteering. 445-3166 ext. 310.

GARDEN Drop-In Volunteer Day. 1-4 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Get a taste of a farmer’s work growing vegetables, herbs and flowers. Come prepared for sunshine, cold, wet and working in the dirt. Bring a water bottle, snacks, closed toe shoes, long pants, sleeves and a sun hat. Free. baysideparkfarm@cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata.org/440/Bayside-Park-Farm. 822-8184.

MEETINGS Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. For BIPOC families. See the HC Black Music and Arts Association Facebook page for more information.

Shutterstock Photo by Rachel Noel

Get down to get upcycled at the Trash Fashion Show on Saturday, May 28 at 7 p.m. at the Arcata Playhouse. Apprentice Entertainment is hosting a runway show, lobby art exhibition, poetry, dancing, food and photos. Show up at 6:30 p.m. if you want to create some scrappy sculpture, then strut the catwalk in your best Oscar de la Grouch couture or golf clap from the audience with the rest of the beautiful people ($5, no one turned away).

Enrich yourself at Synapsis on Saturday, May 28 at 5:30 p.m. at Only Skin Deep: An Evening of Art, Poetry and Dance ($5-$20). Clink glasses at a cocktail hour and settle in for an immersive couple of hours of spoken word and dance celebrating voices of local artists of Indigenous, Pan African, Latinx, Asian and mixed heritage. See it in-person or livestream wherever you are.

hcblackmusicnarts@gmail.com. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from Equity Arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

a.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show with behind-the-scenes footage, movie trivia, unique short films, house-made trailers and more at 11 p.m. Movie at midnight. Rated NC-17, 18 and up. $8. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/events/1206261646577574. 613-3030.

ETC

MUSIC

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. 443- 5021. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3-$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@gmail.com. sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

27 Friday ART

North Coast Open Studio Preview. Brenda Tuxford Gallery, 627 Third St., Eureka. See May 26 listing.

COMEDY Comedy Night. 8-9:30 p.m. Bear River Casino and Resort Ballroom, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Local comedians perform in the Thirsty Bear Lounge, including Jessica Grant, Joshua Barnes, Stephanie Knowles, Evan Vest and Calista LaBolle. Ages 21 and up. Free. fb.me/e/3bqcUuems.

MOVIES Midnight Movie: The Evil Dead (1981). 11 p.m.-2

Buddy Reed and th’ Rip It Ups. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Crankin’ a real blues dance party. buddyreedblues.com. DJ Goldylocks. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino and Resort Ballroom, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. DJ Goldylocks spins hits. Ages 21 and up. Free. fb.me/e/nMUaGR2rh. Kenny Bowling. 9-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Country music. Every Friday. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of local musicians and music fans. Live streams, videos, events and local music links. facebook.com/groups/224856781967115.

THEATER The Rocky Horror Show. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. A rock musical sci-fi/horror spoof. For ages 16 and up. Through June 21. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. ferndalerep.org.

EVENTS Friends of the Arcata Marsh Duck Teapot Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing.

FOR KIDS Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop off your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17-$20. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


CALENDAR Continued from previous page

info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org/ classesprograms.html. 443-9694.

FOOD Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. EBT, Cal-Fresh and WIC accepted.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

OUTDOORS Interpreter Guided Redwood Forest Hike. 2-3 p.m. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park Visitors Center, Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway, Orick. Join park interpreters for a guided hike through the old growth redwood forest. Rain cancels. Check the California State Parks North Coast Redwoods Facebook page for updates/cancelations. Free. Interpreter Guided Visitor Center Tour (Chah-pekw O’ Ket’-toh “Stone Lagoon” Visitor Center). Humboldt Lagoons State Park, 15336 U.S. Highway 101, Trinidad. Join interpreters from California State Parks and the Yurok Tribe for a guided tour through the new Chah-pekw O’ Ket’-toh “Stone Lagoon” Visitor Center. Check California State Parks North Coast Redwoods Facebook page for updates/cancelations. parks.ca.gov/?page_id=416.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. See May 26 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail. com. sohumhealth.com.

28 Saturday ART

Trinidad Arts Night. Last Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Trinidad, Downtown. A town-wide event including venues, galleries, wine tasting, outdoor music, live art, fire dancing, kids activities and various performances throughout the night. Free.

DANCE Dancehall Choreo w/Mo Harper-Desir. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Learn traditional dancehall styles with hip hop and R&B adaptions led by West Indi queen Mo Harper-Desir. For all levels and ages. $5 suggested donation. Admin@ Mohdcreates.com. mohdcreates.com/dance-fitness. Only Skin Deep: An Evening of Art, Poetry and Dance. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Synapsis, 1675 Union St., Eureka. This immersive event celebrates voices of local artists of Indigenous, Pan African, Latinx, Asian and mixed heritage. Cocktail hour followed two hours of spoken word and dance. $5-$20. onlyskindeep@inkpeople.org. our.show/child. (661) 748- 5921.

MUSIC Brother Ali with City Hippie. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. COVID-19 rules and regulations enforced. Masks required at all times unless actively

28

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

eating or drinking at your table. arcatatheatre.com. Buddy Reed and th’ Rip It Ups. 2-4 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. The lifelong bluesman who’s played with Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, Willie Dixon and more brings gutbucket blues on a holiday Saturday afternoon. buddyreedblues.com. 668.4151. DJ Statik. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Don’t miss the hottest dance party in Humboldt County. Ages 21 and up. Free. fb.me/e/ emAQE8bC9. Happy Hour w/Anna “Banana” Hamilton. 5-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Blues, humor. Check with venue for current COVID protocols.

THEATER The Rocky Horror Show. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 27 listing.

EVENTS Friends of the Arcata Marsh Duck Teapot Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing. Kinetic Grand Championship. Countywide, Humboldt. The annual three-day, 42-mile, human-powered, all-terrain, art-vehicle race for glory. This year’s live radio coverage is on 105.1 FM KRFH and KRFH.net. kineticgrandchampionship.com. Samoa Speeder/Train Rides. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Timber Heritage Association, 930 Vance Ave., Samoa. Ride Humboldt’s historic rails with a scenic trip along the bay on Timber Heritage Association’s historic crew car rail speeder. Near the Samoa Cookhouse. timberheritage.org/ride-the-rails-on-a-historic-speeder-crew/. 443-2957. Trash Fashion Show. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Apprentice Entertainment presents a night of fashion, art, poetry, dancing, food and photos. Rock the runway or enjoy the show and trash art in the lobby. Email to show your trash art or show up early with your pieces. Doors open for building trash art at 6:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. $5, no one turned away. ae@ arcataplayhouse.org. West Side Live! Market. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Whitethorn Construction, 545 Shelter Cove Road. Meet and shop with farmers, cultivators and artisans, enjoy food, beverages and live music. Must be 21 and up to enter cannabis area. Free.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association Farmers’ Market features fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, meats, plant starts and flowers every week. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/arcataplaza.html. 441-9999. Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown onsite, fresh sourdough bread from Humboldt Baking Co. and farm fresh eggs. Art from local artists as well as goods from a variety of local artisans. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882. Spring Open House Wine Tasting. 1-5 p.m. Briceland Vineyards, 5959 Briceland Road, Redway. Taste new releases, old favorites and wines not in stores. Hor’s doeuvres, local oysters and cheeses, páte. Vegan and gluten-free options. Music by Damien Roomets. andrew@bricelandvineyards.com. fb.me/e/5zLuyPXn2. 923-2429. Continued on next page »


GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See May 27 listing.

MEETINGS Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS Audubon Guided Birding Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet leader Drew Meyer at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake). Ponds, fields and an easy-access trail. Email RSVP. Free. thebook@reninet. com. rras.org/home.aspx. FOAM Marsh Tour w/Barbara Reisman. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Reisman in the lobby for a 90-minute, rain-or-shine walk focusing on the plants and/or ecology of the marsh. Masks are optional inside the building. Free. 826-2359. Interpreter Guided Redwood Forest Hike. 2-3 p.m. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park Visitors Center, Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway, Orick. See May 27 listing. Trailhead Hosts at Black Sands Beach. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Sands Beach Trailhead, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. BLM King Range and Friends of the Lost Coast seek volunteers to answer questions, provide maps and share information about the Lost Coast, especially for busy Memorial Day weekend, May 28-30. Free. info@lostcoast.org. lostcoast.org/event/trailhead-hosts-black-sands-beach/. Wigi Wetlands Volunteer Workday. 9-11 a.m. Wigi Wetlands, Behind the Bayshore Mall, Eureka. Help create bird-friendly native habitat and restore a section of the Bay Trail by removing invasive plants and trash behind the Bayshore Mall. Meet in the parking lot behind Walmart. Tools, gloves and packaged snacks provided. Bring drinking water. Email RSVP. Free. jeremy.cashen@ yahoo.com. rras.org/home.aspx. (214) 605-7368.

SPORTS Adult Skate Night. Last Saturday of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Skating Rink, Rohner Park. 18 and older only. IDs checked at door. Alcohol and drug-free event. $5.50, includes skate rental.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. See May 26 listing.

29 Sunday MOVIES

Shaun of the Dead (2004). 5-7:45 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 5 p.m. Movie starts at 6 p.m. Posters available for purchase. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. $8. info@arcatatheatre. com. facebook.com/events/1005447787065245. 6133030.

MUSIC Bad Kitty Presents: Rocketz + Motel Drive. 8-11:59 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. The psychobilly party band tours in support of Lovesick

Sea to Plate since ’88

& Heartbroke album. Fresno’s Motel Drive opens. $8. twang4strings@yahoo.com. 798-1030. Buddy Reed and th’ Rip It Ups. 3-6 p.m. Giant Redwoods RV, 400 Myers Ave, Myers Flat. Enjoy authentic, real-deal blues in the beautiful Redwoods. Bring a picnic. buddyreedblues.com. 943-9999. Jazz Jam. 6 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Live jam at Blondies. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. blondiesfoodanddrink. com.

Tues. - Sat. 5-9pm Bar Opens at 4 PLEASE CALL AFTER 3:30PM TO PLACE YOUR ORDER FOR PICK UP OR DELIVERY

Find menu on our website Eureka Sea Grill

316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • (707)443-7187

THEATER

WWW.SEAGRILLEUREKA.COM

The Rocky Horror Show. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 27 listing.

EVENTS Trinidad Memorial Ceremony. 2 p.m. Trinidad Memorial Park, Trinity Street. Honoring those lost or buried at sea at the 27th annual event. With bagpipe music, speakers, flag ceremony, invocation, reading of the 276 memorial names from the Memorial Wall, a USCG helicopter flyover and music. Friends of the Arcata Marsh Duck Teapot Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing. Humboldt ETransport Event. Noon-4 p.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. Learn more about electric bikes and small electric transport with the Arcata Playhouse and N.E.R.D. Scooters (Newman Electric Research & Development). Bike demos and test rides, Ebikes and standard bikes for sale, information about custom builds and more with expert ebike technicians. Plus Illuminated Fools Giant Puppets and music from GALxSEE, Statement and Wilderness. Free. Kinetic Grand Championship. Countywide, Humboldt. See May 28 listing. Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

Ceramics by Loryn White

OPEN DAILY Hours: 10 am - 5 pm Every Day

Trinidad Art Night

Saturday, May 28th 6 pm - 9 pm 490 Trinity St. Trinidad 707.677.3770

trinidadartgallery.com

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Spring Open House Wine Tasting. 1-5 p.m. Briceland Vineyards, 5959 Briceland Road, Redway. See May 28 listing.

OUTDOORS Sumeg Village Tour. 11 a.m.-noon Sue-meg State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Join us for a free interpretive tour of Sumeg Village within Sue-meg State Park. Rain cancels. Please check “California State Parks North Coast Redwoods” Facebook page for updates/cancelations. Trailhead Hosts at Black Sands Beach. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Sands Beach Trailhead, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. See May 28 listing.

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets.

northcoastjournal.com/ whatsgood

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. See May 26 listing.

30 Monday ART

A Focus on Fiber. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. A fiber art exhibition featuring weaving, basketry, dyeing, quilting, wearable art, embroidery, Continued on next page »

Have a tip? Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

knitting, crocheting, book arts and woodworking. redwoodart.net.

alternative soundtrack to Katsuhiro Otomo’s iconic sci-fi anime. Tacos for purchase. Free.

MUSIC

MUSIC

Buddy Reed Solo. 5-7:30 p.m. Angelina WoodFired Kitchen, 281 Fernbridge Drive, Fortuna. An early evening solo show with lowdown acoustic blues like it is supposed to be played. buddyreedblues.com.

ELECTIONS League of Women Voters Candidate Forum. 7 p.m. KEET TV, Channel 13, Humboldt. Prepare for the June 7 Primary Election by viewing live candidate forums. Ask them questions in advance via email or call KEET during the forum. June 1: Superior Court Judge candidates Ben McLaughlin and Steven M. Steward. leaguehumboldt@ gmail.com. 444-9252.

EVENTS Friends of the Arcata Marsh Duck Teapot Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing. Kinetic Grand Championship. Countywide, Humboldt. See May 28 listing. Memorial Day Celebration. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Ferndale Main Street. Ferndale veterans and other organizations coordinate the 10 a.m. parade, followed by a memorial ceremony at the Ferndale Cemetery and a return parade to the Veterans Memorial Building.

Friends of the Arcata Marsh Duck Teapot Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing.

FOOD Shelter Cove Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers and premium plant starts and more. Live music and hot food vendors. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/sheltercove.html. 441-9999.

MEETINGS

Miranda Farmers’ Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See May 26 listing.

Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players. Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. $3-$8. 31for14@ gmail.com. 599-4605.

Sumeg Village Tour. 1:30-2:30 p.m. Sue-meg State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Join us for a free interpretive tour of Sumeg Village. Rain cancels. Please check the California State Parks North Coast Redwoods Facebook page for updates/cancelations. Free. Trailhead Hosts at Black Sands Beach. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Sands Beach Trailhead, King Range National Conservation Area, Shelter Cove. See May 28 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. See May 26 listing. Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 9:30-10 a.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email Julie at homeshare@a1aa.org for the link. Free. a1aa.org/homesharing. 442-3763. Humboldt Bounskee League. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Weekly league nights. Purchase of any wood bounskee from Humbrews or the website includes one-month family membership for future events. All ages. Free. bounskee@gmail.com. bounskee.fun. 601-9492. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 27 listing.

31 Tuesday MOVIES

Akira (remix). 7 p.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. Local DJ Pandemonium Jones’ kinetic, beat-heavy mixtape serves as an NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

EVENTS

FOOD

OUTDOORS

30

Dub Inc Performing Live at Arcata Theatre (Arcata Debut). 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The French reggae band is back in the U.S. after a decade with Hawaii’s Mike Love. arcatatheatre.com/calendar. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The French reggae band is back in the U.S. after a decade with Hawaii’s Mike Love. arcatatheatre.com/calendar. Mike Love & The Full Circle. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Check venue for current COVID protocol. arcatatheatre.com.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. See May 26 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing.

1 Wednesday

ART

Figure Drawing. 6-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. $5. blondiesfoodanddrink.com.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Night: Rubber (2010). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show with behind-the-scenes footage, movie trivia, unique short films, house-made trailers and more at 6 p.m. followed by free raffle. Movie at 7:40 p.m. Rated R. All ages, parental guidance suggested. $5 | $9 Poster Package. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/events/507611404182942. 613-3030.

MUSIC Bayside Ballads and Blues. 6-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Wednesday. Contact venue for current COVID protocols.


Sweet N’ Juicy, Over Yonder. 8 p.m.-midnight. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. Party music and dancing. $5.

Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. Community Commons, state routes 299 and 96, Willow Creek. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer.

ELECTIONS

MEETINGS

League of Women Voters Candidate Forum. 7 p.m. KEET TV, Channel 13, Humboldt. See May 30 listing.

Ujima Parent Peer Support. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing. Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing.

EVENTS Friends of the Arcata Marsh Duck Teapot Online Auction. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing. Pony Express Days. Central Avenue, McKinleyville. Events tentatively planned for 2022 include: outdoor chili cook-off, pancake breakfast, parade and festival. mckinleyvillechamber.com/pony-express-days.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See May 27 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. See May 26 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 27 listing. Trivia Night. Every other Wednesday, 6-8 p.m. The Madrone Taphouse, 421 Third St., Eureka. Reel Genius Trivia hosts. Contact venue for current COVID protocols. Free. reelgeniustrivia.com.

2 Thursday

ART

Art Night at the Sanctuary. First Thursday of every month, 4-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Create with others freely or work on a guided project. Bring your own supplies or use what’s around to collage, paint, draw, make an art book, etc. $5-$20 suggested, no one turned away for lack of funds. sanctuaryarcata.org.

COMEDY Comedy Humboldt Open Mic. First Thursday of every month, 8-10 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Thursday night. Contact venue for current COVID protocols.

MUSIC Americana Music. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grind Cafe, 734 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 26 listing. Stephen Marley -Babylon by Bus Summer Tour 2022. 7 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Reggae. With special guest Skip Marley. Doors at 6 p.m. $55, $45 advance. stephenmarleymateel. brownpapertickets.com.

EVENTS Pony Express Days. Central Avenue, McKinleyville, Central Avenue. See June 1 listing.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See May 26 listing.

NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS

ETC

HAPPY HOUR: 4pm-5:30pm Daily $2 Pints | $2 off of Cocktails

708 9th Street, Arcata • On the Plaza within Hotel Arcata (707) 822-1414 • (707) 599-2909 • info@tomoarcata.com

HOURS: 4pm-8 pm Daily

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. See May 26 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 26 listing.

Heads Up … Ink People Center for the Arts is issuing a call for artists to submit work for “RECLAIMED! Upcycled Art for Solidarity and Sustainability,” an upcoming art exhibition at the Ink People’s Brenda Tuxford Gallery. The submissions deadline is Friday, June 10, 2022. Visit inkpeople.org or call 442-8413 to learn more. Humboldt County Superior Court is now accepting applications for service on the 2022-2023 Civil Grand Jury. Call 476-2475 to request an application, or visit humboldtgov.org and follow the Civil Grand Jury link to access an application. All Humboldt County women artists are invited to submit one piece of artwork for consideration to be included in the juried exhibition Celebrating 15 Years of the Ingrid Nickelsen Trust at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Entries will be accepted in-person at the Morris Graves Museum of Art on July 27, from noon to 5 p.m. Information at the Morris Graves Museum of Art and online at humboldtarts.org. Humboldt Light Opera Company invites anyone who has ever been in one of the company’s productions to participate in “49 Years of Musical Theater, Celebrating our Past, Creating our Future.” Visit hloc.org, scroll down on the home page, and follow the link to the “Revue Interest Form.” The Humboldt Local Agency Formation Commission is accepting applications from those interested in serving on the commission as an alternate public member. To obtain an application, please visit LAFCo’s website at humboldtlafco.org. For questions, contact krystleh@ humboldtlafco.org or 445-7508. The deadline is June 17. The Blue Lake Chamber of Commerce invites craft vendors to have a booth at this year’s Annie and Mary Day celebration on July 10. Application deadline is July 7. Visit sunnybluelake.com or call 668-5567. KEET-TV seeks a diverse group of individuals to join its Community Advisory Board. Meetings are held quarterly on Zoom. Go to KEET.org to find the link at the bottom of the page. Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org.

l

@northcoastjournal northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SCREENS

The Evolutionary

George Carlin’s American Dream By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

GEORGE CARLIN’S AMERICAN DREAM. Given his insistence on examining words and everything else in context, it would be disrespectful to talk about the comedic life and legacy of George Carlin without noting the moment in which the HBO documentary about him debuts. OK, wait — there’s too much. Let’s just look at comedy. Last week, comic John Mulaney surprised his audience in Ohio by bringing out recent NIMBY convert Dave Chappelle, who reportedly leaned into his transphobic period, as his opening act. Then Ricky Gervais dropped a competitively anti-trans bit. Before they respond to the backlash by declaring themselves sacred vessels of free speech and decrying “cancel culture,” all three of these men (none of whom seem to be struggling for gigs in the wake of previous personal and professional criticism) would do well to watch the two-part documentary on Carlin directed by Judd Apatow and Michael Bonfiglio. Though it’s unlikely they’ll see how making transgender people, who are already subject to discrimination and violence, the butt of their jokes looks in comparison to punching up at church, state and corporate power. Nor is it likely seeing another comic arrested for obscenity or at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case about regulation of indecent speech will show them that the “censorship” they believe themselves to be suffering at the hands of the “woke mob” is merely dispersed booing. But Carlin offers a vital example for comedians in his willingness to challenge himself, not just his audience. George Carlin’s American Dream draws on interviews with family and comedians (W. Kamau Bell, Jon Stewart, Chris Rock, Patton Oswalt, Bette Midler and others) archival footage, performance clips, old home audio, as well as an abundance of the comedian’s notes, enlivened by animation of his scribbles and annotations. Carlin’s delightfully foul-mouthed brother Patrick helps flesh out his childhood, including their mother’s escape from their violent, alcoholic father, growing up with other Irish American Catholic kids in Morningside Heights and swimming in the filthy Hudson River. We learn how

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George came by his distrust of authority (Catholic school and the U.S. Air Force) and got into radio, teaming up with Jack Burns. We meet his first wife and greatest booster Brenda via old interviews and letters home describing touring coffeehouses flat broke before landing steady work on TV variety shows, doing ostensibly wholesome comic skits in a suit and tie. When that façade became unbearable, things get interesting and Carlin starts working as his authentic self, turning his analytical mind toward the war in Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement and the intergenerational upheaval of the times. Stephen Colbert comments that Carlin’s transformation from straight-laced jokes to counter-culture commentary is something like the Beatles going from “Love Me Do” to The White Album (dropping acid, it turns out, was involved in both). It’s not Carlin’s last evolution, either, and we see him go from a firebrand tackling birth control, war and drugs on Flip Wilson’s record label to tame observational word games before realizing he has to push himself to find his voice again. And yes, we hear a lot of the seven words you can’t say on TV. There are setbacks and comebacks and enough cocaine to make one marvel at his making it to 2008 before his fatal heart attack. Brenda, too, struggles with substance abuse as an alcoholic and cocaine user. And there are scenes of the couple talking both honestly and dishonestly about their addictions and the damage it did to their lives, the latter echoed in interview with their daughter Kelly Carlin. The family’s emergence from this grim and terrifying era is told with George and Brenda’s love story as its central thread and its happy ending, at least until Brenda’s death. That Carlin is still so steadily referenced now on social media and elsewhere is testimony both to his keen insights and our country’s continued infatuation with drugs (legal and otherwise), “bombing brown people,” capitalism, corporate

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

How it started post-Carlin. How it’s going. George Carlin’s American Dream

power over government, police brutality, guns, the hypocrisy of the founding fathers and organized religion. Carlin’s late material, having taken a disturbingly dark and misanthropic (OK, more misanthropic) turn after Brenda’s death can be hard to hear, as he pretends (?) glee at disaster and death, and tells Charlie Rose he has opted to no longer emotionally invest in how things turn out for the world and its people. Whether it was a cathartic release of rage or true surrender to hopelessness is open to speculation. But again, context: As I typed this review, news broke that an 18-year-old gunman in Uvalde, Texas, killed 18 children and three adults. Only 10 days ago, an 18-year-old racist white gunman killed 10 Black people at a market in Buffalo, New York. It feels, in the wake of this particularly American horror, repeated again and again and spurring no meaningful action from our leadership, a monumental act of willful optimism that Carlin called out while bidding his audience goodnight, “Take care of yourself. And take care of somebody else.” It’s unlikely but worth asking for. TVMA. 215M. HBO MAX. ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

NOW PLAYING

THE BAD GUYS. Sam Rockwell, Craig Robinson, Awkwafina and Marc Maron voice an animated adventure/comedy about reformed animal criminals. PG. 100M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

THE BOB’S BURGERS MOVIE. The animated feature has the Belchers battling a sinkhole. Starring Kristen Schaal, H. Jon Benjamin and Dan Mintz. PG13. 102M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. DOCTOR STRANGE IN THE MULTIVERSE OF MADNESS. Benedict Cumberbatch dons his cape for another Marvel mind bender. PG. 126M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. DOWNTON ABBEY: A NEW ERA. Big dowager energy. PG. 125M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE. Reality unravels and multiverse Michelle Yeoh comes to the rescue. With Ke Huy Quan, Jamie Lee Curtis and the legendary James Hong. R. 146M. MILL CREEK. THE LOST CITY. Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum star as a romance novelist and her cover model thrown into a jungle adventure. With Daniel Radcliffe. PG13. 112M. BROADWAY. MEN. Horror about a woman (Jessie Buckley) plagued by dudes who are kind of all the same. With Rory Kinnear. R. 100M. BROADWAY. SONIC THE HEDGEHOG 2. Animated video game sequel about a very fast hedgehog. PG. 122M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. TOP GUN: MAVERICK. Tom Cruise returns to the cockpit reprising his iconic cocky young guy role as a cocky old guy. Bring back Kelly McGillis, you cowards. PG13. 137M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456.


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They squint, they stammer, they shuffle and shamble, they flounder around like seals out of water. Awkward in the house and clumsy in their games, they are fumblers and bunglers at whatever they do. — Sir Cyril Burt, The Backward Child, 1937 ir Cyril Burt, one-time president of the British Psychological Society and notorious charlatan (for faking studies of twins), sure had it in for lefties. That’s whom he was referring to above and his harsh opinion was still current when I went to school: Left-handed kids in my British 1950s classrooms were forced to write with their right hands. Antipathy towardsleft-handers is at least as old as the Roman Empire — we get our word “sinister” from Latin for left, while Latin “dexter,” right, gives us dexterous. Other languages follow right along, as it were, with general nastiness toward left-handers: In Italian, mancino means both “left” and “maimed”; Portuguese left, canhoto, is also “weak”; and in Arabic, simal means both “left hand” and “bad omen.” I discussed this in a previous column (“The Right Stuff,” May 28, 2009). Since then, I’ve come up with a few more tidbits about left-handers: • An analysis of more than 2 million people worldwide reported that between 9 percent and 18 percent were lefties, depending on how handedness was measured. The figure of 10 percent is often cited as a rule of thumb. • In another study, males were found to be 23 percent more likely than females to be left-handed. • The Cueva de las Manos (Cave of Hands) in Patagonia has more than 2,000 handprints stenciled on its walls, created between 7300 B.C. and 700 A.D., achieved by blowing soot or ochre powder from the mouth through a bone pipe. Of the unambiguous ones, 829 are left hands and 31 right hands. Assuming they were holding the pipe with their (dominant) right hand, it seems fewer than 4 percent of these

artists were left-handed. • Left-handedness is somewhat genetic. For instance, if both parents of a child are left-handed, the kid has a 26 percent chance of also being left-handed. It was once thought that a single gene determined your handedness but now it’s thought that at least 40 genes are implicated. • Female dogs, horses and domestic cats tend to favor their right limbs; vice versa for males. • Kangaroos are mostly “left-handed.” About two-thirds of chimps favor right-handedness, as do about three-quarters of gorillas. Their orangutan cousins are mostly lefties. • U.S. presidents buck the 10 percent rule. Lefties include James Garfield (who was actually ambidextrous), Gerald Ford, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. Harry Truman and Ronald Reagan were left-handed, although they wrote with their right hands. • A popular but false myth has it that lefties die earlier than right-handed folk. A large 2019 U..K. study showed no difference in mortality. • Left-handers are over-represented in many sports. Right-handed batters facing leftie pitchers don’t have as much experience with southpaws as southpaws have had with them. Likewise in boxing, fencing and other mano a mano sports. (Regarding the term “southpaw”: Most baseball diamonds have pitchers facing west, to avoid having batters being blinded by the afternoon sun, so their pitching arms are toward the south.) • Finally, why are most of us right-handed? I’ve just spent a few hours reading the literature on your behalf (big bucks, you know) and I can report: Theories abound and no one really knows. l Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9yahoo.com) once had an unhappy experience with a left-handed corkscrew.

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67 ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

27. Org. that publishes the journal Emotion 28. Like 2021 31. Loops into a conversation, briefly 33. Uses, as a hammock 35. Soft murmur 36. “For me, a good bowl of ____ will always make me happy”: Anthony Bourdain 37. Fully equipped and ready to go ... or a hint to answering the asterisked clues 38. “Sound of da Police” rapper ____-One 39. Be down with something 40. Household skills class, for short 41. Youngest recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor (2010) 42. Scoundrel

E X E C

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A B Y S M

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43. “Blood hath been shed ____ now”: Macbeth 44. Rodin’s thinker? 46. Like a good workout 49. ____ board 53. Ejected, as froth 55. Space balls? 58. Sea-___ Airport 59. “My little” girl of ‘50s TV 60. *Thingamajig 62. Language in which “Shazbot!” is a profanity 63. Dungeons & Dragons genre, briefly 64. Nonbinary gender pronoun 65. Jennifer of “Dirty Dancing” 66. “Without a doubt!” 67. Kvetching cries

DOWN

1. Jovovich of “He Got Game”

2. Put a stop to 3. “____ Mañanitas” (traditional Mexican birthday song) 4. Grime on Santa’s suit 5. Ruffles the feathers of 6. Hunts, with “on” 7. Frenzy 8. *Record player 9. DuVall of “21 Grams” 10. Egyptian fertility goddess 11. “The Daily Show” host Trevor 13. Country that’s got Meg Ryan all mixed up? 15. Self-referential 16. Bit of stage scenery 21. Form 1099 agcy. 23. Sealing ring 25. Toothpaste additive 26. Tuskegee ____ (Second World War regiment) 29. Small rowboat

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO ORAL M O R O

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A C D C

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1. Brooks who wrote the 2021 memoir “All About Me!” 4. Test the water? 7. Year the mathematician Pierre de Fermat was born 11. Simone known as the “High Priestess of Soul” 12. Boston Garden legend Bobby 13. Writers Collins and Sheehy 14. *Snow-capped peak of song 16. Mr. Miyagi, for one 17. Drink in a tavern 18. Website with a Seller Handbook 19. Writer Jong and others 20. Ran out of patience 22. High-ranking noncom 24. “The King of Clay,” familiarly

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30. ____ Equis 31. Seeds some put in yogurt 32. *Way to kick a habit 34. Opposite of WSW 36. Lobbying grp. 37. Regarding that matter 41. Pot-au-____ (French stew) 45. Peter with the debut solo album “Legalize It” 47. Out cry? 48. Stop producing water, as a well 50. In need of calamine lotion 51. “The Two ____” (“Chinatown” sequel) 52. ____-deucey 53. Clean Air Act target 54. Henry VIII’s sixth 56. What’s pulled through a pulley 57. Weighs (down) 61. “How was ____ know?” MEDIUM #42

© Puzzles by Pappocom

I N A P O N O N G O W E S T O

H E N I E

R O A R

I T I C

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N A S T

www.sudoku.com

Cuevas de las Manos in Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. About 96 percent of the unambiguous prints are stencils of left hands, meaning the right hand was used to hold the spray pipe. Photo by Mariano, GNU Free Documentation License

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

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By Barry Evans

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A Paean to Lefties

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©2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

FIELD NOTES

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

33


CARTOONS

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BEGINNING STEEL DRUM CLASSES Mondays 6:15− 7:15. Summer sessions starting June 6th. Fridays 1:30 −3 ongoing monthly classes. 707−407−8998 panartsnetwork.com Classes held at Pan Arts: 1049 Samoa Blvd #C in Arcata

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1229)

Food & Drink

FREE GED/HISET PREP CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information. End Ad 7/7/2022 FREE GETTING STARTED IN ONLINE CLASSES W/ SPANISH LANGUAGE SUPPORT Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information. FREE MEDICAL ASSISTING PROGRAM, INFORMA− TIONAL MEETING: JUNE 14TH. Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information.

Languages

HOME INSPECTION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/6231/Home− Inspection−Certification−Program

50 and Better

INJECTIONS July 18, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500.

TAKE A CLASS WITH OLLI. Anyone can take an OLLI class. Join OLLI today and get the member discount on classes. Non−members add $25 to the class fee listed. https://extended.humboldt.edu/ olli/olli−upcoming−courses (O−1229)

MEDICAL ASSISTANT INFORMATIONAL MEETING Online June 14, 2022 at 10am Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500.

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1229) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1229)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1229) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1229) SMARTRECOVERY.ORG CALL 707−267−7868

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format. Visit https:// www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail/ ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/4916/Additional−Online− Classes NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information.

SIP IN PLACE: DOWN UNDER: AUSTRALIA & NZ. Interactive online wine tasting and education class. Zoom. Thurs., June 9. 5:30−7PM. $35. humboldt.edu/wine/sip

FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at (707) 476−4500 for more information.

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CANNABIS BUSINESS TRAINING Online July 13 − Oct. 26, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

NOTARY July 7, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. PHLEBOTOMY INFORMATIONAL MEETING Online July 7, 2022 at 5:30pm. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. SERVSAFE CERTIFICATION June 22, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. VENIPUNCTURE July 19, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500.

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDA WORKSHOPS & TRAININGS with Traci Webb and Guests @ Ayurvedic Living School. Offering Seasonal...Self−Care Retreats: June 24 & Sept 30, Group Detoxes: July 12−26, Oct. 4−18, Herbal Remedies Making Immersions: July 10 & Sept 25, Ayurveda Health & Life Coach Training starts 1/11/23, Ayurveda Herbalist Training starts 2/21/23, www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0930) MASSAGE CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS AT LOVING HANDS INSTITUTE: June− Business, Reflexology, Sports Massage, and Cupping; July− Lomi Lomi and Herbs and Oils. lovinghandsinstitute.com or 630−3407 for more information.


LEGAL NOTICES

Continued on next page »

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF POLLING PLACES FOR THE STATEWIDE PRIMARY ELECTION TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2022

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following places have been designated as polling facilities, pursuant to California Elections Code, Section 12105. Look for the “Sample Ballot & Polling Place Lookup” link on the County Election Office’s home page at https:// humboldtgov.org/elections. This site will let you check your precinct name and polling location using your address. POLLING PLACE NAME & ADDRESS Arcata Community Center 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy Arcata Arcata Community Center 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Pkwy Arcata Arcata High School 1720 M St Arcata Arcata Veterans Memorial Building 1425 J Street Arcata Manila Community Center 1611 Peninsula Drive Arcata Trinity Baptist Church 2450 Alliance Road Arcata Jacoby Creek School 1617 Old Arcata Road Bayside Prasch Hall 312 S Railroad Ave Bridgeville Community Center 38717 Kneeland Road Bridgeville Cuddeback School 300 Wilder Road Carlotta Calvary Lutheran Church 716 South Ave Eureka College Of The Redwoods 7351 Tompkins Hill Rd Eureka Cutten School 4182 Walnut Drive Cutten Eureka City Schools Marshall Annex 2100 J Street Eureka Eureka Veterans Memorial Building 1018 H St Eureka Freshwater School 75 Greenwood Hts Dr Eureka Humboldt County Office Of Education 901 Myrtle Avenue Eureka Jefferson School Community Center 1000 B St Eureka Pacific View Charter School 115 Henderson St Eureka Pacific View Charter School 115 Henderson St Eureka Pine Hill School 5230 Vance Ave Eureka South Bay School 6077 Loma Avenue Eureka Washington School, 3322 Dolbeer St Eureka Washington School 3322 Dolbeer St Eureka Zoe Barnum High School - Lincoln Site 216 W Harris St Eureka Humboldt County Fairgrounds 1250 5th Street Ferndale Humboldt County Fairgrounds 1250 5th Street Ferndale Fortuna Community Health Center - Open Door, 750 Rohnerville Rd Fortuna Fortuna Veterans Memorial Building 1426 Main St Fortuna Toddy Thomas Middle School 2800 Thomas St Fortuna Toddy Thomas Middle School 2800 Thomas St Fortuna Redwood Playhouse 286 Sprowel Creek Rd Garberville Redwood Playhouse 286 Sprowel Creek Rd Garberville

VOTING PRECINCT

CONSOLIDATED PRECINCTS

3A--1

3A--1, 3A--2, 3A--3, 3A--3A, 3A--4

3A-J1

3A-J1, 3A-J2, 3A-J3, 3A-J4, 3A-J5, 3A-JW, 3A-JWA

3A-12

3A--5, 3A--5A, 3A--6, 3A--7, 3A--8, 3A--9, 3A-12

3A-10

3A-10, 3A-11, 3A-13, 3A-14, 3A-15, 3A-16

3MA-1

3MA-1, 3MA-2, 3MA-3

3A-P2

3A-P1, 3A-P10, 3A-P2, 3A-P2A, 3A-P3, 3A-P4, 3A-P5, 3A-P6, 3A-P7, 3A-P8, 3A-P9

3JCFR

3JCF, 3JCFR, 3JCFRA, 3JCFRB, 3JCFRC, 3JCWF, 3JCWR, 3JCWRA

3B--1

3B--1

2BV-1

2BV-1, 2BV-2, 2BV-3, 2BV-4, 2BV-5, 2BV-6, 2BVF

2CU

2CU, 2CUS

4E-20

4E-20, 4E-21, 4E-22, 4E-23, 4E-24, 4E-25

POLLING PLACE NAME & ADDRESS Hoopa Neighborhood Facility 11860 Highway 96 Hoopa Azalea Hall 1620 Pickett Road McKinleyville Azalea Hall 1620 Pickett Road McKinleyville Christ The King Catholic Church 1951 McKinleyville Ave McKinleyville Fieldbrook School 4070 Fieldbrook Road McKinleyville McKinleyville Union Middle School 2285 Central Ave McKinleyville Seventh Day Adventist Church 1200 Central Ave McKinleyville Seventh Day Adventist Church 1200 Central Ave McKinleyville Monument Middle School 95 Center Street Rio Dell Trinidad Union School 300 Trinity St, Trinidad Trinidad Union School 300 Trinity St, Trinidad Willow Creek C S D 135 Willow Rd Willow Creek

VOTING PRECINCT

CONSOLIDATED PRECINCTS

5KT-4

5KT-4, 5KT-5

5MK-6

5MK-6, 5MK-6A

5MK-7

5MK-7, 5MK-8

5MK-1

5MK-1, 5MK-3

5FB

5FB, 5FBS

5MK-5

5MK-5, 5MK-5A

5MK-2

5MK-2, 5MK-4B

5MK-4

5MK-4, 5MK-4A

2R--1

2R--1, 2R--2

5T--1

5T--1

5TU-4

5TU-2, 5TU-3, 5TU-4

5KT-6

5KT-6, 5KTF6, 5KTS6

MAIL BALLOT PRECINCTS RETURN BALLOT BY 8PM ELECTION DAY VOTING PRECINCT

CONSOLIDATED PRECINCTS

VOTING PRECINCT

CONSOLIDATED PRECINCTS

1LU

1LU, 1LU-1, 1LUR, 1LUS, 1LUS-1

1E-26

1E-26, 1E-27, 1E-28, 1E-29

3E-4J

3E-4J

1CS-1

1CS-1, 1CS-2, 1CS-3, 1CS-4

1F--7

3ES-6

3ES10, 3ES11, 3ES12, 3ES-6, 3ES-9

4E-43

4E-41, 4E-43, 4E-44, 4E-45, 4E-46

1FS-1

3ES-7

3ES-7

1FS-4

1F-10, 1F--7, 1F--8, 1F--9 1FB-1, 1FS-1, 1FS-10, 1FS-11, 1FS-2, 1FS-3, 1FS-5, 1FS-6, 1FS-8 1FS-4, 1FS-7

1FS-9

1FS-9

1MU

1MU

1MUF

1MUF, 1MUVF

4E-51

4E-51, 4E-52, 4E-53, 4E-54, 4E-55, 4E-56 4E-57, 4E-58

3FW

3FW, 3FWF, 3FWF-A, 3FWS, 3FWW, 3GF, 3GF-1, 3GFF, 3GFF-A

4ES-4

4ES-3, 4ES-4, 4ES-5, 4ES-6, 4ES-8

4E-11

4E-11, 4E-12, 4E-13, 4E-14, 4E-15

1RD

1RD, 1RD-1, 1RDF, 1RDF-1, 1RDF-2, 1RDF-3

1RV-2

1SB11

1FSL2, 1RV-2, 1RV-3 1SB-1, 1SB12, 1SB13, 1SB14, 1SB15, 1SB15-1, 1SB17, 1SB-7, 1SB-7A 1SB11, 1SB11A, 1SB-8, 1SB-8A

1ES-1

1ES-1, 1ES-2, 1ES-3, 1ES-4

4E-31

4E-31, 4E-32, 4E-33, 4E-34

1SB-2

1SB-2, 1SB-3, 1SB-3A

1SCD

1SCD

1SB-4, 1SB-5, 1SB-6, 1SB-9, 1SB10

1SU

1SU, 1SUF, 1SUF-1

1SB-4 1E-48

1E-47, 1E-48

3ESS6

3ESS6

1E-30

1E-30, 1E-35, 1E-36, 1E-37, 1E-38, 1E-39

1F--1

1F--1

1FS

1FS, 1FSF, 1FSF-1, 1FSL, 1FSRF, 1FSRF-1

1SB-1

2FS-3

2FS-3

2MR

2MR

2RV-1

2RV-1

2SH-1

2SH-1

3JC

3JC, 3JCM, 3JCM-1, 3JCM-2, 3JC-R, 3JCW

3KL

3KL, 3KLF

3KL-1

3KL-1

3PA-1

3PA-1, 3PA-3, 3PA-3A, 3PA-3B, 3PAE, 3PESF

3PA-2

3PA-2, 3PA-5

3PA-6

3PA-4, 3PA-6

4E-42

4E-42, 4E-49, 4E-4F, 4E-4FW

4E-4J

4E-4J

4FW

4FW, 4FWS

4PE

4PE, 4PE-1, 4PE-2, 4PEF

5AS-4

5BU

5AS-4, 5AS-5, 5AS-5A, 5AS-6, 5AS-7, 5AS-9 5BL, 5BL-1, 5BLF, 5BLF-1, 5BLF-2, 5BLF-3, 5BLFS, 5BLFS-1, 5BLS, 5BM 5BU

5BUS

5BUS, 5BUS-1

5GP

5GP

5KT-1

5KT-1, 5KT-2

5KT-3

5KT-3

5KTS3

5KTS3

5MC

5MC, 5MCF, 5MCK

5BL

2SH-2

2SH-2, 2SHW2

2SH-3

2SH-3, 2SHF3

2SH-7

2SH-7, 2SH-9, 2SHS9

2SHF1

2SHF1

2SHR1

2SHR1

2F-R1

2F--3A, 2F-R1, 2F-R2

2F--2

2F--1, 2F--2, 2F--3, 2F--4, 2F--5, 2F--6

2SHR2

2SHR2

2F-R3

2F-R3, 2F-R4, 2F-R5

2SHS8

2SH-8, 2SHM8, 2SHS8

2HV-1

2HV-1, 2HV-2, 2HVF, 2HVW

2SHVF

2SHVF

3AS-1

3AS-1, 3AS12, 3AS-2, 3AS-3, 3AS-4, 3AS-5, 3AS-7

2SH-4

2SH-4, 2SH-5, 2SH-5A, 2SH-6, 2SH-6N, 2SHF6, 2SHS5

3AS-9

3AS10, 3AS11, 3AS-8, 3AS-9

2SH-4A

2SH-4A, 2SH-4B, 2SHF4, 2SHF7, 2SHF9, 2SHS4, 2SHS4A, 2SHS4B, 2SHS4C, 2SHS4D, 2SHS4E, 2SHS7

3BLF

3BLF, 3BLFS

5MK-9

5MK-9, 5MK-9A, 5MK-9B, 5MKS9

5MKS8

5MKS8, 5MKS8-1

5OR

5OR, 5ORS

5PA-3

5PA-3, 5PA-3A, 5PAS

5TU-1

5TU-1

DATED: MAY 20, 2022. Kelly Sanders, Registrar of Voters, prepared by Natassia Harrison, Deputy 5/12/22

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

35


LEGAL NOTICES PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2014, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2013-14:

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY AND IMPENDING DEFAULT Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3351, 3352

AMOUNT TO REDEEM ASSESSMENT NO. ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS I, Amy Christensen, Interim Humboldt County Tax Collector, State of California, certify as follows: BY JUNE 2022 That at close of business on June 30, 2022, by operation of law, any real property (unless previously tax-defaulted and Morgan, Joshua W $4,136.41 not redeemed) that have any delinquent taxes, assessments, or other charges levied for the fiscal year 2021-22, and/or any 008-032-021-000 081-021-020-000 Harden, Ruth L & Vernon L $2,165.55 delinquent supplemental taxes levied prior to the fiscal year 2021-22 shall be declared tax-defaulted. That unless the tax defaulted property is completely redeemed through payment of all unpaid amounts, together 218-171-006-000 Nyce, Beryl F & Jodrey, Nocona & Sullivan, Sierra $3,055.67 with penalties and fees prescribed by law or an installment plan is initiated and maintained; the property may be sold subsequently at a tax sale to satisfy the tax lien. 316-172-019-000 Watson, Joseph M $14,575.94 That a detailed list of all properties remaining tax-defaulted at the close of business on June 30, 2022, and not redeemed prior to being submitted for publication, shall be published on or before September 8, 2022. That information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption of tax-defaulted PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2014, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR property will be furnished, upon request, by Amy Christensen, Interim-Humboldt County Tax Collector at 825 5th Street, FISCAL TAX YEAR 2013-14: Room 125, Eureka, California 95501 (707)476-2450. AMOUNT TO REDEEM I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct. ASSESSMENT NO. ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS BY JUNE 2022 ____________________________ Amy Christensen Interim-Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 20th, 2022. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 26th, June 2nd, and June 9th, 2022.

NOTICE OF IMPENDING POWER TO SELL TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3361, 3362

105-031-002-000 109-141-004-000 203-261-063-000 300-082-023-000 520-086-007-000 520-086-009-000 525-211-013-000

Lovemen, Lorrie A Bruebaker, Daphne Meyers, Eric Reed, Judi M Green Valley Motel LLC Green Valley Motel LLC Sanderson, Jolene & Steven

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2016, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR

Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code 3691 and 3692.4, the following conditions will, by operation of law, subject FISCAL TAX YEAR 2015-16: real property to the Tax Collector’s power to sell. 1) All property for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for five or more years. Note: The power to sell schedule for nonresidential commercial property is three or more years of tax-defaulted status, unless the county adopts, by ordinance or resolution, the five-year tax default schedule. 2) All property that has a nuisance abatement lien recorded against it and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. 3) Any property that has been identified and requested for purchase by a city, county, city and county or nonprofit organization to serve the public benefit by providing housing or services directly related to low-income persons and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. The parcels listed herein meet one or more of the criteria listed above and thus, will become subject to the Tax Collector’s power to sell on July 1, 2022, at 12:01 a.m., by operation of law. The Tax Collector’s power to sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed or made subject to an installment plan of redemption initiated as provided by law prior to close of business on the last business day in June. The right to an installment plan terminates on the last business day in June, and after that date the entire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale of the property at public auction. The right of redemption survives the property becoming subject to the power to sell, but it terminates at close of business on the last business day prior to the date of the sale by the Tax Collector. All information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption will be furnished, upon request, by Amy Christensen, Interim- Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501, (707)476-2450. The amount to redeem, including all penalties and fees, as of June 2022, is shown opposite the assessment/parcel number and next to the name of the assessee.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION

The Assessor’s Parcel/Assessment Number (APN/ASMT), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the Assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The Assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s office.

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2008, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2007-2008: ASSESSMENT NO. 110-081-013-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Eger, Elmer F

$23,886.48 $4,714.51 $5,553.00 $3,518.60 $5,634.41 $1,280.12 $1,973.36

AMOUNT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2022 $14,650.82

ASSESSMENT NO. 009-281-017-000 053-212-018-000 107-123-007-000 107-144-019-000 107-236-020-000 109-091-048-000 109-231-027-000 109-241-029-000 110-071-029-000 110-131-008-000 110-131-009-000 111-052-022-000 201-254-008-000 203-251-024-000 208-113-009-000 209-321-059-000 210-142-006-000 216-382-027-000 221-171-015-000 305-251-012-000 400-031-035-000 509-132-004-000 510-281-002-000 531-074-003-000 534-152-033-000 211-391-019-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Yates, Edward J Parrish, Jay D Chesebro, Gordon Hampton, Richard A Access Equities Inc Rose, Jeff Nguyen, Luyen N Buck, Scott M Christie, Bruce A & Beth A Christie, Bruce & Beth A Christie, Bruce & Beth A, Vickers, Jock M III & Andrea M Boggs, Phillip C Burt, Ryan Barrotte, Danielle Red Oak Investments LLC Co FMB-JPB LLC Co Rodriguez, Vicente Wilson, Patrick Grandfield, Dana K Olsen, Cynthia K Pallin, Manuel A & Irene Rasella, Glenda M Sellman, Tanesia Lewis, Henrietta Spaeth, Gerald J & Young, Juliette R

AMOUNT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2022 $10,771.23 $3,620.68 $10,520.11 $13,108.82 $37,590.51 $10,412.46 $1,318.05 $2,546.59 $20,569.23 $3,348.83 $4,877.01 $3,668.30 $7,840.34 $4,408.18 $21,325.17 $11,634.33 $22,046.15 $7,609.12 $15,482.03 $6,073.18 $3,026.39 $2,165.85 $2,862.52 $9,780.04 $2,191.35 $10,231.16

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2017, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2013, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2016-17: FISCAL TAX YEAR 2012-13: AMOUNT TO REDEEM ASSESSMENT NO.

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS

AMOUNT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2022

011-183-005-000

White, Cheri

$13,012.62

053-073-004-000 110-261-029-000 314-311-019-000

Burns, Micheal W Brazil, Harold H Bones, Adam & Colleen

$1,756.38 $3,784.70 $5,689.83

36

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

ASSESSMENT NO.

004-086-007-000 006-082-034-000 006-141-016-000 008-101-029-000 011-044-002-000 011-144-005-000 013-076-001-000 015-102-001-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS

Trent, Christopher W, Trent Christopher W Living Trust Creaghe, Ronald C, Mark R & Elizabeth M Flemming, Geraldine B, Flemming, Charles L & Dorothy M Engel, Brett M Petersen, Rachelle Hahn, Diana Gantt, Elvert L & Gladys L Hiscox, James R, Brenda J & Elaine

BY JUNE 2022

$18,255.20 $17,822.98 $27,814.89 $32,904.90 $5,000.66 $13,495.61 $6,536.57 $6,412.90


Continued on next page » ASSESSMENT NO. 015-192-046-000 015-192-047-000 019-104-006-000 031-032-002-000 032-091-006-000 032-121-008-000 033-051-007-000 033-071-020-000 033-071-021-000 033-071-022-000 033-071-023-000 033-071-027-000 040-092-003-000 052-131-007-000 052-201-017-000 077-163-028-000 077-192-004-000 077-212-008-000 081-021-009-000 081-021-010-000 095-061-043-000 095-131-007-000 102-211-011-000 104-112-002-000 104-251-008-000 105-022-011-000 107-056-009-000 107-096-004-000 107-111-005-000 107-124-001-000 107-235-004-000 107-272-007-000 107-283-001-000 107-291-009-000 108-022-002-000 108-064-006-000 108-141-032-000 109-042-013-000 109-042-018-000 109-081-028-000 109-091-022-000 109-091-031-000 109-091-032-000 109-091-033-000 109-131-064-000 109-141-020-000 109-151-022-000 109-171-045-000 109-182-013-000 109-202-007-000 109-221-025-000 109-221-037-000 109-261-005-000 109-261-026-000 109-261-029-000 109-271-012-000 109-301-027-000 109-301-028-000 109-311-029-000 110-021-011-000 110-071-038-000 110-111-006-000 110-141-042-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Freitas, Daniel D & Francis J Freitas, Daniel D & Frances J Quezada, Alejandro Heckman, James R Est of Hughes, Christopher J Volpi, Donna J Lapriore, Robert M Jr Lapriore, Robert M Jr Lapriore, Robert M Jr Lapriore, Robert M Jr Lapriore, Robert Lapriore, Robert Carter, Ainsworth Perez, Tony Harmon, Gerald P & Dorothy A & Stephens, Peter J Campbell, Edna Parkinson, James C & Linda Dillon, Andrew & Marsha Leck, Dylon Schiano, Teresangela Teo, Prentice & Teo Douglas Southern Humboldt Unified School Dist. Pl Branstetter, L Phillip Fielder, Dale V & Carol J Gill, Carmen Tr Gill, Carmen Tr Couch, David Stamm, Graeme H, Fawn L, Sean G R & Alyssa L Barandica, John Dunn, Archie & Waters, Beverly M Dunn, Archie & Waters, Beverly M Xotic Flavorz LLC King, Cody Shinn, Jim Peterson, Maurice Jr Peterson, Maurice Jr Thunder Wave Investments LLC Henning, Joan C Kutina, Susan K, Nivinsky, Stanley Bank of California Meskell, Thomas R Louderback, Matthew D Louderback, Matthew D Louderback, Matthew D Clark, Lyle B Doyle, James Yambao, Felisa B Jalali, Zahra Case, Charles V Pham, Ngoc T & Vu, Daniel Petrov, Peter Driedger, Dirk J Porter, Cary B & Cheryl M Kelly, Randolph Manbeian, Taghi Thompson, Sheryl L & Caleb W Cerstelotte, Eddy Cerstelotte, Eddy, Mertens, Celestine M C Stevens, Michelle Bennett, Yvonna York, Tommy A & Pauline N Cortazar, Jim Starks, Eric & Elizabeth

AMOUNT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2022 $843.21 $8,409.58 $12,526.92 $400.00 $20,255.76 $12,349.96 $855.55 $1,197.84 $855.55 $934.12 $1,216.78 $1,216.90 $15,021.06 $4,644.04 $9,966.62 $26,495.07 $91,380.15 $2,014.07 $6,320.91 $10,486.70 $12,922.86 $44.00 $13,118.18 $522.87 $1,697.55 $20,633.78 $15,626.51 $15,273.51 $16,996.93 $1,320.35 $7,431.55 $22,297.54 $36,408.11 $23,685.57 $10,915.07 $871.96 $6,251.12 $4,684.02 $6,370.33 $1,237.95 $2,403.28 $2,543.22 $2,543.22 $2,543.22 $2,942.97 $1,881.71 $3,626.90 $3,498.78 $3,072.23 $2,289.23 $2,012.19 $3,477.39 $3,202.71 $3,705.30 $861.34 $3,716.27 $3,067.15 $3,067.15 $2,880.04 $2,909.39 $3,160.58 $10,006.87 $3,780.67

ASSESSMENT NO. 110-151-005-000 110-181-005-000 110-191-027-000 110-211-044-000 110-211-045-000 110-221-043-000 110-231-030-000 110-241-021-000 110-251-008-000 110-261-027-000 110-281-009-000 110-291-024-000 111-012-037-000 111-022-010-000 111-071-014-000 111-141-004-000 111-201-020-000 111-201-021-000 111-202-068-000 111-202-069-000 201-141-001-000 201-141-002-000 202-072-038-000 202-142-014-000 202-391-026-000 203-291-067-000 207-321-013-000 208-113-007-000 208-221-005-000 208-341-002-000 209-411-020-000 210-033-004-000 210-042-014-000 210-051-043-000 210-052-001-000 210-052-002-000 210-141-007-000 210-162-010-000 210-163-018-000 211-184-007-000 211-341-040-000 211-375-012-000 211-385-008-000 212-013-012-000 212-061-015-000 215-171-020-000 215-271-012-000 216-081-005-000 216-381-021-000 216-382-061-000 216-391-027-000 220-272-002-000 221-111-014-000 221-171-019-000 222-171-012-000 222-171-030-000 223-032-003-000 223-046-005-000 223-072-004-000 223-181-016-000 304-231-017-000

AMOUNT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2022 Rezapour, Gassem & Arellano-Raith, Jennie V $3,759.08 Moreno, Gina, Melissa K & Maxwell $2,478.78 Manbeian, Taghi $518.66 Cox, Zebulon & Rhonda $5,424.06 Cox, Zebulon & Rhonda $5,424.06 Williams, Kilkenny LLC Co $1,407.18 Inouye, Eric A & Yvonne M $1,777.67 Harrison, Sharlene M, Harrison, Russell A $3,792.33 Dillon, Lygle W & Rachel C $3,230.59 Clark, William E & Mary C $3,152.34 Parker, Ronald W & Betty $2,825.32 Rezapour, Gassem $4,076.29 Ingebretsen, Karla, Griffey, Bobbi S $3,857.06 Bare, Carl $6,249.12 Giles, Allison $14,485.50 Ip, Kam H & Angela Y $3,580.00 Simpson, Mike $5,828.71 Simpson, Michael L $6,018.33 Clearwater Real Estate Holdings LLC Co $4,014.74 Clearwater Real Estate Holdings LLC Co $5,365.77 Rundell, Rita $12,812.35 Rundell, Rita $12,812.35 Smith, Timothy T & Springer, Jessica V $3,553.96 Moseby, Thelma $38,690.66 Bailey, Jeraldyn M $18,208.36 Foster, Kevin $8,897.94 Mattson, Constance $71.00 Downs, Christopher M $10,307.68 Long, Ryan B $17,056.19 Robelen, William $11,816.01 Blake, Colin L & Kimberly D $1,782.26 Rice, Joe C & Jill R $202.92 Spears, James M & Vogelsang, David $18,568.24 Quezada, Alejandro $30,476.59 Rice, Joe C & Jill R $12,200.29 Rice, Joe C & Jill R $714.63 Owejan, Joshua J $13,802.24 Shafer Kim/ Thomas, Joseph R/ Thomas, Jade F & $366.60 Brewer Sherrie Shafer, Kim/ Thomas, Joseph R/ Thomas, Jade F & $2,172.83 Brewer Sherrie Soos, Brian J II $6,482.53 Sterngold-Lee, Margaret $22,064.93 Wheeler, James B & Lisa R $25,692.79 Loconte, Ruth $15,908.30 Burns, Jeremy D & Turner, Nicole P $26,637.73 Nord Investment LLC Co $41,348.33 Closson, Geoffrey $4,613.53 Levesque, Blaise $13,027.80 Harris Community Center $6,878.95 Canglomerate Inc $11,091.55 Lugo, Diana Y $7,716.18 Phelps Carl A $2,606.38 Doricko, Eric P $54,935.68 Reissman, Jesse & Mayim $5,805.03 Crossley, Charles & James $10,673.35 Lewis, Marsha L $7,367.73 Bikel, Fran $8,892.35 Black Jack Development LLC Co $646.51 Eighteen Meadows LLC Co $928.88 Dickman, Christina & Jackson, Liam $19,595.50 Open Door Capital LLC $44,945.69 Barnett, Carolyn & Robelen, Wesley $6,440.99 ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


ness as HUMBOLDT HOMEGIRL Humboldt 12900 Ave Of The Giants Myers Flat, CA 95554

LEGAL NOTICES ASSESSMENT NO. 306-121-045-000 306-171-002-000 310-021-005-000 310-051-007-000 310-061-003-000 310-091-001-000 312-121-007-000 312-131-005-000 314-332-007-000 315-184-001-000 316-175-011-000 316-175-019-000 400-101-015-000 401-171-039-000 401-244-007-000 404-151-071-000 500-171-021-000 500-211-006-000 501-092-041-000 503-333-011-000 507-362-030-000 508-261-014-000 510-211-082-000 510-361-025-000 511-202-007-000 512-131-078-000 515-322-005-000 515-322-026-000 515-322-027-000 516-111-007-000 520-085-013-000 520-086-004-000 520-086-008-000 520-121-006-000 522-044-006-000 522-044-043-000 522-052-006-000 522-231-011-000 522-311-059-000 522-445-006-000 524-075-024-000 524-191-007-000 525-261-014-000 525-271-002-000 526-271-010-000 527-031-006-000 529-351-008-000 529-351-009-000 529-351-010-000 529-361-001-000 531-074-017-000 531-131-017-000 532-142-017-000 534-194-008-000 509-301-014-000 204-303-019-000 216-393-013-000 216-393-028-000 216-393-012-000

38

AMOUNT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2022 Hill Near the Bay LLC Co $24,901.39 Ramirez, Lucia J $18,570.86 Rice Skylar, J/ Joe & Jill $2,568.96 Rice Skylar, J/ Joe & Jill $29,386.97 Sutherland, Catherine N $138.90 Sutherland, Catherine N $4,167.72 Allison, Ty E $2,753.07 Boyce, Jinkie L $5,175.65 Tuttle, Laura J $1,451.48 Rex Real Estate LLC Co $5,065.79 Hudson Dana C $31,551.64 Pederson, Kory J $8,828.61 Van Voltenburg, Garth D & Lorrie M $8,533.61 Zerlang, Leroy L & Dalene S $21,270.68 Dinsmore, Edith A $773.89 Konicke, William $8,393.62 Alto, Ryan & Jennifer $6,533.06 Krigel, Tova & Menachem $29,653.52 Anderson, Gail $9,652.77 Campbell, Nicholas & Goodenough, Marina $17,790.63 Born, Brett E & Walker, Teresa J $61,508.50 Riley, Ester $7,445.57 Vogelsang, David $5,595.82 Bauguess, Julianne $12,564.41 Confidence House Inc $1,230.68 Young, Brian L $12,877.30 Born, Brett & Walker, Teresa J $5,904.62 Born, Brett & Walker, Teresa J $2,913.54 Born, Brett & Walker, Teresa J $16,625.46 Hudson, Yuhan/ Hudson, Daihan/Hudson, Yurou & $10,015.84 Hudson, Jrinde & Jini, Li Simmons, James $2,387.80 Green Valley Motel LLC $1,029.51 Green Valley Motel LLC $9,377.30 Simmons, James $2,265.04 Schoenbrun, Mark $23,739.81 Bauman, Bruce C $175.55 Kline, Jasmine S $42,744.97 Hollensteiner, Charles J $12,768.79 Borden, Robert $1,248.43 Duey, Elizabeth M $805.83 Brown, Damon D & Summer, L $18,221.87 Silvers, Alex $2,240.18 Dean, Alfreda $254.59 Martin, Patsy L $1,825.12 Donahue, Doris & Donahue, Doris J Maloney, Ethel & $8,649.04 Ruthie Maloney, Ethel M & Ruthie A Martin, Patsy L $963.77 Orourke, Mark & Starelli-Orourke, Karen $1,306.42 Orourke, Mark & Starelli-Orourke, Karen $16,420.61 Orourke, Mark & Starelli-Orourke, Karen $4,206.56 Mace, Allen B & Gail L $982.82 Mclaughlin, Michael E Jr/ Mclaughlin, Michael E Sr & $8,563.34 Norene/ Mclaughlin Ulysess C Barnes, Harold M $2,080.71 Mauroni, Carmen & Tracy A/ Green, Richard Sr & Richard $900.04 Jr Green, Gerald M & Cindy L/ Bacon, Raymond E, Joseph K & Gaylon R Trent, Christopher W & Robin A & Trent Family Trust $2,322.22 Perkins, Trampas $2,602.24 Adame, Kenna L O $1,087.55 Bogdanov, Angel $14,564.82 Bogdanov, Angel $4,136.10 Tempo Plus Inc $24,785.22 ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

ASSESSMENT NO.

PO Box 9 Flat, CA 95554 ADDRESS ASSESSEE’SMyers NAME & PROPERTY

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME AMOUNT TO REDEEM STATEMENT 22−00305

BY JUNE 2022 The following person is doing Busi− Masaki, Eric H & Meagan Jeni M U Morrison $2,266.28 ness as JP HOME SOLUTIONS Zwack, Jeffrey &1575 Elk Creek Rd Humboldt Myers Flat, CA 95554 Siegert, Stephanie $412.13 156 Meadowbridge Ln 006-171-003-000 Stafford, BrentonThe business is conducted by an $1,146.07 Rio Dell, CA 95562 Individual. I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, thatregistrant the foregoing is true and PO Box 254 The date commenced to correct. Fields Landing, CA 95537 transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on June 22, 2021. Executed at Eureka,Jonathan HumboldtE Putnam County, California, on 156 Meadowbridge Ln I declare that all information in this May 20, 2022. John Bartholomew RioCoast Dell, Journal CA 95562 statement is true andPublished correct. in the North on May 26, June 2nd Humboldt County Tax Collector A registrant who declares as true and June 9th, 2022 The business is conducted by an any material matter pursuant to Individual. Section 17913 of the Business and The date registrant commenced to Professions Code that the regis− transact business under the ficti− trant knows to be false is guilty of a FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME tious business name or name listed misdemeanor punishable by a fine STATEMENT 22−00300 above on Not Applicable. not to exceed one thousand dollars I declare that all information in this ($1,000). The following person is doing Busi− statement is true and correct. /s Meagan U Morrison, Owner ness as A registrant who declares as true This April 25, 2022 BICYCLE FARM any material matter pursuant to KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt Section 17913 of the Business and by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 3318 Foster Ave Professions Code that the regis− Arcata, CA 95521 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−199) trant knows to be false is guilty of a FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME misdemeanor punishable by a fine Nicholas T Turkette STATEMENT 22−00302 not to exceed one thousand dollars 262 12th St ($1,000). The following person is doing Busi− Arcata, CA 95521 /s Jonathan Putnam, Sole Propri− ness as etor VINTAGE FLORAL FABRICS The business is conducted by an This April 27, 2022 Humboldt Individual. KELLY E. SANDERS 126 Rebecca Lane The date registrant commenced to by kt, Humboldt County Clerk Fortuna, CA 95540 transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−208) Aliza J Basa above on Not Applicable. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 126 Rebecca Lane I declare that all information in this STATEMENT 22−00308 Fortuna, CA 95540 statement is true and correct. The following person is doing Busi− A registrant who declares as true ness as The business is conducted by an any material matter pursuant to LIFE COMFORT MEDICAL SUPPLIES Individual. Section 17913 of the Business and Humboldt The date registrant commenced to Professions Code that the regis− 969 7th Street #307 transact business under the ficti− trant knows to be false is guilty of a Arcata, CA 95521 tious business name or name listed misdemeanor punishable by a fine above on Not Applicable. not to exceed one thousand dollars Mary E Palmer−Wilson I declare that all information in this ($1,000). 969 7th Street #307 statement is true and correct. /s Nicholas Turkette, Owner Arcata, CA 95521 A registrant who declares as true This April 26, 2022 any material matter pursuant to KELLY E. SANDERS The business is conducted by an Section 17913 of the Business and by sc, Humboldt County Clerk Individual. Professions Code that the regis− 5/26, 6/2, 6/9, 6/16 (22−229) The date registrant commenced to trant knows to be false is guilty of a FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME transact business under the ficti− misdemeanor punishable by a fine STATEMENT 22-00301 tious business name or name listed not to exceed one thousand dollars above on April 26, 2022. ($1,000). The following person is doing Busi− I declare that all information in this /s Aliza Basa, Owner ness as statement is true and correct. This April 27, 2022 HUMBOLDT HOMEGIRL A registrant who declares as true KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt any material matter pursuant to by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 12900 Ave Of The Giants Section 17913 of the Business and Myers Flat, CA 95554 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−206) Professions Code that the regis− FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME trant knows to be false is guilty of a PO Box 9 STATEMENT 22−00305 misdemeanor punishable by a fine Myers Flat, CA 95554 not to exceed one thousand dollars The following person is doing Busi− ($1,000). ness as Meagan U Morrison /s Mary Palmer−Wilson, Owner JP HOME SOLUTIONS 1575 Elk Creek Rd This April 28, 2022 Humboldt Myers Flat, CA 95554 KELLY E. SANDERS 156 Meadowbridge Ln by tn, Humboldt County Clerk Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by an Individual. 5/12, 5/19, 5/26, 6/2 (22−214) PO Box 254 The date registrant commenced to FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Fields Landing, CA 95537 transact business under the ficti− STATEMENT 22−00345 tious business name or name listed The following person is doing Busi− Jonathan E Putnam above on June 22, 2021. ness as 156 Meadowbridge Ln I declare that all information in this STONEHURST CONSTRUCTION Rio Dell, CA 95562 statement is true and correct. Humboldt A registrant who declares as true 6258 Lee Ann Drive The business is conducted by an any material matter pursuant to Eureka, CA 95501 Individual. Section 17913 of the Business and The date registrant commenced to Professions Code that the regis− PO Box 506 transact business under the ficti− trant knows to be false is guilty of a Cutten, CA 95534 tious business name or name listed misdemeanor punishable by a fine above on Not Applicable. not to exceed one thousand dollars Christopher R Stone I declare that all information in this ($1,000). 6258 Lee Ann Drive statement is true and correct. /s Meagan U Morrison, Owner Eureka, CA 95503 A registrant who declares as true This April 25, 2022 any material matter pursuant to KELLY E. SANDERS 516-352-002-000 040-065-002-000


STONEHURST CONSTRUCTION Humboldt 6258 Lee Ann Drive Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 506 Cutten, CA 95534 Christopher R Stone 6258 Lee Ann Drive Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on October 3, 1992. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Christopher R Stone, Owner This May 11, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/19, 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 (22−218)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00318 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SECOND MOBILE UNIT Humboldt 3696 Jacobs Ave Eureka, CA 95501 1275 8th Street Arcata, CA 95521 Open Door Community Health Centers CA 0615813 1275 8th Street Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on September 1, 2005. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stacy Watkins, Vice President of Administration This May 3, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/12, 5/19, 5/26, 6/2 (22−213)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00319 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BACKYARD BLOOMS Humboldt 4134 Morgan Pl Eureka, CA 95503 Sarah F Shakal 4134 Morgan Pl Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct.

Sarah F Shakal 4134 Morgan Pl Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sarah Shakal, Owner This May 12, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kathryn A. Luna, Vice President This April 29, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−205)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00312 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BAILEY'S E-BREAD Humboldt 504 Shaw Ave Ferndale, CA 95536 PO Box 888 Ferndale, CA 95536

5/19, 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 (22−221)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00320 The following person is doing Busi− ness as TAIT Humboldt 2083 Groth Ct Eureka, CA 95503 Ian T Salsbery 2083 Groth Ct Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ian Salsbery, Owner This May 3, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

Jennifer A Jones 504 Shaw Ave Ferndale, CA 95536 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer Jones, Owner This April 29, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/12, 5/19, 5/26, 6/2 (22−211)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00323 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CENTURY ORTHODONTICS Humboldt 707 I Street Eureka, CA 95501

5/12, 5/19, 5/26, 6/2 (22−210)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00310 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EUREKA GROCERY OUTLET Humboldt 625 Commercial St Eureka, CA 95501 Lunas Eclipse Enterprises, Inc CA C3904490 625 Commercial St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kathryn A. Luna, Vice President This April 29, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−205)

Christian J. Hagge, DDS, MS, Inc California 4789558 707 I St Eureka, CA 95501

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Christian J. Hagge, DDS, MS, Inc California 4789558 707 I St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Christian J. Hagge, President This May 4, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/26, 6/2, 6/9, 6/16 (22−227)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00334 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BLUE OX MILLWORKS/BLUE OX GENERAL STORE Humboldt 1 X Street Eureka, CA 95501 Eric P Hollenbeck 1603 I Street Apt 1 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Eric Hollenbeck, Sole Proprietor This May 9, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 5/26, 6/2, 6/9, 6/16 (22−230)

just a safebyarea The Margins business isareconducted a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF ADOPTION transact business under the ficti− BUDGET & FEE SCHEDULE tious business nameOF or PRELIMINARY name listed FISCAL YEAR 2022/2023 above on Not Applicable. I declare that ISallHEREBY information thisthe Preliminary Budget and Fee Schedule NOTICE GIVENinthat statement is true and of the Humboldt Baycorrect. Fire Joint Powers Authority of Humboldt County for A registrant whobeginning declares July as true the fiscal year 1, 2022, has been adopted by the HBF JPA Board anyofmaterial tothe following time and place for inspection Directorsmatter and is pursuant available at Section 17913 of taxpayers: the Business and by interested Professions Code that the regis− Bayfalse Fire isJPAguilty Station trant Humboldt knows to be of a1, 533 C Street, Eureka, CA 95501 Monday -punishable Friday, 9:00bya.m. to 3:00 p.m. (Closed 12pm – 1pm for lunch) misdemeanor a fine not toThat exceed one8,thousand dollars on June 2022 at 4:00 p.m., at Humboldt Bay Fire Rob Bode Training ($1,000). Classroom, 3030 L Street, Eureka, California, the Board of Directors will /s meet Christian J. Hagge, President for the purpose of fixing the final budget and fee schedule, and that This 4, 2022may appear at said time and place and be heard regarding anyMay taxpayer KELLY E. SANDERS the increase, decrease, or omission of any item of the budget and/or fee byschedule, sc, Humboldt Clerk of additional items. or forCounty the inclusion 5/26, 6/2, 6/9, 6/16 (22−227) PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF HUMBOLDT BAY FIRE JOINT POWERS AUTHORITY Jenna Harris, Board Clerk

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PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF PRELIMINARY BUDGET & FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2022/2023 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Preliminary Budget and Fee Schedule of the Humboldt No. 1 Fire Protection District of Humboldt County for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2022, has been adopted by the District Board of Directors and is available at the following time and place for inspection by interested taxpayers: Humboldt Bay Fire JPA Station 1, 533 C Street, Eureka, CA 95501 Monday - Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (Closed 12pm – 1pm for lunch That on June 8, 2022 at 3:00 p.m., at Humboldt Bay Fire Rob Bode Training Classroom, 3030 L Street, Eureka, California, the Board of Directors will meet for the purpose of fixing the final budget and fee schedule, and that any taxpayer may appear at said time and place and be heard regarding the increase, decrease, or omission of any item of the budget and/or fee schedule, or for the inclusion of additional items. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF HUMBOLDT NO. 1 FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT. Jenna Harris, Board Clerk

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS “THE VALLEY INN RESTAURANT DESIGN-BUILD PROJECT” HOOPA VALLEY TRIBE The Hoopa Valley Tribe will be accepting Design-Build Proposals from qualified Contractors for design and construction services for the renovation of one existing 3200 approximate square foot commercial restaurant building, aka “The Valley Inn Restaurant Building Project,” located at The Hoopa Shopping Center, State Highway 96 on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation, Hoopa, California. The contractor shall work with the project owner to complete both design and construction of the Project. The selected contractor shall hold single-source responsibility and contractual risk for pre-construction, design, and construction of the Project from the beginning to the end of the project. The contractor shall manage all contracts, including those with subcontractors, equipment vendors, and material providers. DEADLINE: The deadline for “The Valley Inn Restaurant Design-Build Project” shall be Thursday, June 30, 2022. A mandatory Site Visit shall be scheduled with the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Planning Department, deadline to schedule a Site Visit is Friday, June 17, 2022, 5:00 p.m. To schedule a Site Visit please contact the Planning Department at the following, Office Phone: (530) 625-4211, Cell: (707) 502-5347, or Email: hvtplanner@gmail.com. Contractors interested in submitting a Design-Build Proposal to this RFP shall submit the following prior to the scheduled Site Visit: 1. Present previous experience and information regarding completion of similar Projects in size and complexity. Qualitative and quantitative criteria shall be evaluated. 2. Demonstrate the team’s history of successful Design-Build Project delivery, innovative construction solutions, and best value through decision making. 3. Present qualifications for the Design Builders and key project team members. The Hoopa Valley Tribe reserves the right to reject any and all Proposals and to waive any informalities or irregularities in the Proposal process, the Tribe assumes no responsibility for payment of any expenses incurred by any proposing contractor as part of the RFP process. Contractors shall be aware that the Federal Executive Order 11246 (Equal Employment Opportunity), Section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450e (b)), the Hoopa Valley Tribal Title 13 Tribal Employment Rights Ordinance and Title 26 Uniform Building Code Ordinance shall be enforced. To obtain additional information, please contact the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Planning Department, P.O. Box 1348, Hoopa, CA 95546, Office Telephone: (530) 625-4211, Cell: (707)-502-5347, or Email: hvtplanner@gmail.com.

LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314

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County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


OBITUARIES

LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00316 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FRINGE BENEFITS Humboldt 1941 Daniels St Arcata, CA 95521 Lisa R Larson 1941 Daniels St Arcata, CA 95521

Samuel Aren Portillo

Julie Mae Davy

December 1, 1988

May 17,1959 - April 29,2022

Sam passed away unexpectedly on May 11 and was the beloved Son of Albert and Gina Portillo, Brother to Thomas Portillo, and Kenneth Portillo. He attended elementary school in Eureka and high school at South Fork High in Miranda, CA. Sam was a proud member of the Tolowa Tribe from Elk Valley, Crescent City, CA. He was a wonderful, beloved Son, Brother, Cousin, Grand-son, nephew, and friend. He will forever be in so many hearts for all the love and compassion he spread everywhere he went. Sam was a talented musician and held a special love for music. Sam took great pride in being the Stepfather of Robert and Allivia Clements. Preceded in death by Great Grandparents Hazel Yowell, Pansy Blazina, Grandparents Edna Brown, Richard Brown, and Ken Yowell; Great Aunts Patsy Goode, Hazel Oakley, Donna Crook, Mandy Lou Housely, Dorothy Williams, and Ada Richards; Uncles Bill Yowell, Buddy Acklin, Jimmy Acklin; Nephews Ricky and Kim Partsafas, Bobby Cooper; Cousins Amelia Partsafas, Cory, Garret and Riley Cooper, Jennika Suazo, Bonnie Japport, Heidi and Virgil Valadao, Joe Goode, Bob Lopez, and Pamela Cook. Sam leaves behind Grand Mother Shirley Tomlinson, Aunts and Uncles Patti and Jimmy Caetano, Joan Warner, Jennifer Cain, Dottie Brown, Frank Portillo and Barbara Coombe, Barbara Buerer, Dawn and Jeff Grundman; Cousins Michael Thompson, Dale Ann and Marlon Sherman, Jennie Seipp, July Seipp, Mathew Valadao, Richard and Diane Warner, Katherine Figueiredo Bobby and Melissa Cooper, Jenny and Spencer Duggan, Cody Caetano; Stepchildren Robert and Allivia Clements, and numerous other relatives and Good Friends Brian Bognuda and family, Weston Morris, Craig Eichin. John White, and all his Streaming Friends whom he loved as family. Please join us at services to be held in Crescent City at the Elk Valley Cemetery and Samuel Lopez Community Center on May 23, at 2:00 p.m. There will be a celebration of Life in Garberville, CA at a later date.

Julie Mae was born in San Diego, California, on May 17, 1959, the fifth child of Helenmae Wilhite and Ralph Lane. She grew up on a citrus ranch with her seven siblings as a spirited outdoor soul, loving all animals. Julie loved adventures, her animals on her mini farm in Blue Lake, family and friends, and Charles - her husband and the love of her life. She worked at both Humboldt State University and Eureka City Schools. In 2013, Julie was diagnosed with a rare cancer. As she battled it, she never lost her spark, laughter, or faith. She went to heaven on April 29, 2022, shortly after retiring. Her strong ethics, sense of humor, and passion for life remain forever in the hearts of those who knew her. Julie leaves behind husband, Charles; son, Michael Tyler; daughter, Sarah Beth; step-daughters, Karmen and Jennifer; grandchildren; great grandchildren; and her seven siblings. Her memorial service is on May 28th at noon at St Alban’s Episcopal Church in Arcata. We will celebrate her beautiful life at 3pm at the Wharfinger Building in Eureka.

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

classified@north coastjournal.com 40

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

We Print Obituaries Submit information via email to classified@northcoastjournal. com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

Richard P Stein 1941 Daniels St Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lisa R Larson, Owner This May 2, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 5/12, 5/19, 5/26, 6/2 (22−215)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00337 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SOUTH FORK REAL ESTATE Humboldt 4124 Bush Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Bernard C Garrigan 4124 Bush Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on April 1, 2022. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Bernard C Garrigan, Owner This May 9, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 5/19, 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 (22−217)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00354 The following person is doing Busi− ness as JOHNS USED CARS & WRECKERS Humboldt 3008 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA 95501 BJR Recycling Incorporated CA 3267506 3008 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation.

JOHNS USED CARS & WRECKERS Humboldt 3008 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA 95501 BJR Recycling Incorporated CA 3267506 3008 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Rick Fox, President/CEO This May 17, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/19, 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 (22−223)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00339 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUPER SURF SNACK Humboldt 824 L St Arcata, CA 95521 Funfactorysurf, LLC CA 202121110069 939 8th St Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Marc Tepe, Officer This May 10, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/19, 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 (22−219)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00347 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FLOUR CHILD BAKED GOODS Humboldt 189 Cook Rd Whitethorn, CA 95589 Beth A Christie 189 Cook Rd Whitethorn, CA 95589 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars


STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 18-00542 The following person has aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name CLAWSON JULIAN & WALSH CONSULTING Humboldt 1529 H Street Eureka, CA 95501

5/19, 5/26, 6/2, 6/9 (22−220)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00349 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BONES HOMES Humboldt 4185 Lentell Rd Eureka, CA 95501 Nathan M Bones 4185 Lentell Rd Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Nathan Bones, Sole Proprietor This May 13, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/26, 6/2, 6/9, 6/16 (22−224)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00351 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BUBBLES & BOURBON Humboldt 120 Cummins Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519 Bethany A Rapp 120 Cummins Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Bethany Rapp, Owner This May 13, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 5/26, 6/2, 6/9, 6/16 (22−225)

PO Box 8090 Eureka, CA 95502 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on August 30, 2018 CLAWSON JULIAN & WALSH INC CA 1529 H Street Eureka, CA 95501 This business was conducted by: A Corporation /s/ William M Clawson This statement was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date April 29, 2022 I hereby certify that this copy is a true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office Kelly E. Sanders by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−204)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: CV2200480 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 27, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m. Dept.: 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: April 8, 2022 Filed: April 8, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−198)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: CV2200511 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: ROBERT ANDERSON for a decree changing names as follows: Present name EHTAN RAY ANDERSON to Proposed Name ETHAN ROSE ANDERSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 3, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m. Dept.: 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: April 14, 2022 Filed: April 15, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court

PETITION OF: HEATHER J. SANDERS for a decree changing names as follows: Present name HEATHER JADE SANDERS to Proposed Name HEATHER JADE RAINES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 27, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m. Dept.: 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ you8,have Date:IfApril 2022a news tip, story idea or something Filed: April 8, 2022you’d like to see covered, we’d love to hear from you! /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court

5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−203)

Feeling tipsy? 5/5, 5/12, 5/19, 5/26 (22−198)

707-442-1400, ext. 321 editor@northcoastjournal.com

ASTROLOGY

Free Will Astrology Week of May 26, 2022 By Rob Brezsny

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): In defining the essential elements at play in a typical Aries person’s agenda, I’m not inclined to invoke the words “sometimes” or “maybe.” Nor do I make frequent use of the words “periodically,” “if,” or “ordinarily.” Instead, my primary identifying term for many Aries characters is “NOW!!!” with three exclamation points. In referring to your sign’s experiences, I also rely heavily on the following descriptors: pronto, presto, push, directly, why not?, engage, declare, activate, venture into, enterprising, seize, deliver, and wield. You are authorized to fully activate and deploy these qualities in the next three weeks. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I like Joan Didion’s definitions of self-respect. As you enter a favorable phase for deepening and enhancing your self-respect, they may be helpful. Didion said self-respect is a “sense of one’s intrinsic worth,” and added, “People who respect themselves are willing to accept the risk that the venture will go bankrupt, that the liaison may not turn out to be one in which every day is a holiday. They are willing to invest something of themselves.” And maybe the most essential thing about self-respect, according to Didion, is that it is “a discipline, a habit of mind that can never be faked but can be developed, trained, coaxed forth.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Reality is not simply there; it does not simply exist,” claimed author Paul Celan. “It must be sought out and won.” I think that is excellent advice for you right now. But what does it mean in practical terms? How can you seek out and win reality? My first suggestion is to put your personal stamp on every situation you encounter. Do something subtle or strong to make each event serve your specific interests and goals. My second suggestion is to discern the illusions that other people are projecting and avoid buying into those misunderstandings. My third suggestion is to act as if it’s always possible to make life richer, more vivid, and more meaningful. And then figure out how to do that. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Wilma Mankiller was the first female Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. She said, “The cow runs away from the storm, while the buffalo charges directly toward it—and gets through it quicker.” Political analyst Donna Brazile expounded on Mankiller’s strategy: “Whenever I’m confronted with a tough challenge, I do not prolong the torment. I become the buffalo.” I recommend Mankiller’s and Brazile’s approach for you and me in the coming days, my fellow Cancerian. Now please excuse me as I race in the direction of the squall I see brewing in the distance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The New Yorker is an influential Pulitzer Prize-winning magazine that features witty writing and impeccable fact-checking. In 2017, its stories exposed the extensive sexual misconduct committed by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein—and helped lead to his prosecution. How did the magazine get its start? It was co-founded in 1925 by Harold Ross, who had dropped out of school at age 13. He edited every issue for the next 26 years. I’m sensing the possibility of a comparable development in your life, Leo. In the coming months, you may get involved in a project that seems to be beyond the reach of your official capacities or formal credentials. I urge you to proceed as if you can and will succeed. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo-born Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer and author. In his book Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual, he lays down his manifesto: “Become the discipline—embrace its cold and relentless power. And it will make you better and stronger and smarter and faster and healthier than anything else. And most important: It will make you free.” While I don’t expect you to embrace Willink’s rigorous ethic with the same fanatical grip, I think you will

benefit from doing the best you can. The cosmic rhythms will support you if you make a fun and earnest effort to cultivate liberation through discipline. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Some nights you are the lighthouse, some nights the sea,” writes Libran author Ocean Vuong. According to my astrological analysis, you are better suited to be the lighthouse than the sea in the coming days. Lately, you have thoroughly embodied the sea, and that has prepared you well to provide illumination. You have learned new secrets about the tides and the waves. You are attuned to the rhythms of the undercurrents. So I hope you will now embrace your role as a beacon, Libra. I expect that people will look to your radiance to guide and inspire them. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Movie people are possessed by demons, but a very low form of demons,” observes author Edna O’Brien. She should know. She has hung out with many big film stars. Since you’re probably not in the movie business yourself, your demons may be much higher quality than those of celebrity actors and directors. And I’m guessing that in the coming weeks, your demons will become even finer and more interesting than ever before—even to the point that they could become helpers and advisors. For the best results, treat them with respect and be willing to listen to their ideas. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’m all in favor of you getting what you yearn for. I have no inhibitions or caveats as I urge you to unleash all your ingenuity and hard work in quest of your beautiful goals. And in the hope of inspiring you to upgrade your ability to fulfill these sacred prospects, I offer you a tip from Sagittarian author Martha Beck. She wrote, “To attract something that you want, become as joyful as you think that thing would make you.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): According to author Caroline Myss, “You should see everything about your life as a lesson.” Whoa! Really? Each trip to the grocery store should be a learning opportunity? Myss says yes! For example, let’s say you’re in the snack foods aisle and you’re tempted to put Doritos Nacho Cheese Tortilla Chips and Lay’s Barbecue Potato Chips in your cart. But your gut is screaming at you, “That stuff isn’t healthy for you!” And yet you decide to ignore your gut’s advice. You buy and eat both bags. Myss would say you have squandered a learning opportunity: “You’ve harmed yourself by blocking your intuitive voice,” she writes. Now, in accordance with astrological omens, Capricorn, here’s your homework assignment: Regard every upcoming event as a chance to learn how to trust your intuition better. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An Aquarian poet was disturbed when a suitor told her, “I’m really very fond of you.” She responded, “I don’t like fond. It sounds like something you would tell a dog. Give me love, or nothing. Throw your fond in a pond.” I don’t advise you to adopt a similar attitude anytime soon, Aquarius. In my oracular opinion, you should wholeheartedly welcome fondness. You should honor it and celebrate it. In itself, it is a rich, complex attitude. And it may also lead, if you welcome it, to even more complex and profound interweavings. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I need a playlist of all the songs I used to love but forgot about,” wrote Tumblr blogger Yuyuuyuyuu. I think you could use such a playlist, too, Pisces. In fact, I would love to see you receive a host of memos that remind you of all the things you love and need and are interested in—but have forgotten about or neglected. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to recover what has been lost. I hope you will re-establish connections and restore past glories that deserve to accompany you into the future. l

northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • •Thursday, Thursday,May May26, 26,2022 2022 • • NORTH NORTHCOAST COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL

Homework: Is there a postponed dream that you might be able to resume working to fulfill? What is it? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Beth Christie, Owner This May 12, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

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EMPLOYMENT

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Opportunities

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ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001 RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT & VOLUNTEER COORDI− NATOR Full−time, bene− fitted job at nonprofit cancer resource center. Fundraising, communica− tions, & volunteer coord. Email coverletter & resume to info@hcbhp.org. Applica− tion at www.bghp.org default

Hiring?

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THE CITY OF

COMMUNITY SERVICES

PRESIDENT/CEO Highly motivated business profes− sional with project manage− ment, marketing, financial management, and outstanding interpersonal skills. Full job description and application instructions: eurekachamber.com/presi− dentceo. Apply by May 31st.

 

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IN YOUR COMMUNITY

California MENTOR is seeking individuals and families with an available room in their home to help support an adult with special needs. Work from the comfort and safety of your own home while making a difference in our community and changing someone’s life for the better. Receive ongoing support and a dependable monthly payment.

CONTACT

SHARON

AT 707-442-4500 www.mentorswanted.com

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Full-time, starts at $16.71/$17.59

Program Assistant

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

Full-time, split shift, easy route, competitive pay plus benefits and 401k. Apply at www.ajjcharter.com or email admin@ajjcharter.com

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Program Analyst I/II

YUROK TRIBE

BUS DRIVER in Weott

MANAGING MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN

Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Full-time, multiple positions, starts at $16.00/hour

Child Care Specialist Full-time, starts at $16.71/hour

Human Resource Specialist Full-time, starts at $18.73/hour Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

$76,945 - $93,527 Annually (DOQ) Plus Excellent Benefits Take advantage of this opportunity to be a key partner in the City of Eureka’s newly created Alternate Response Team (ART), which will supplement calls for service received by the Eureka Police Department by responding specifically to mental/behavioral health calls. This position will oversee other Mental Health clinical and response support staff and partner with other City departments and outside organizations to ensure effective service delivery and program operations.

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Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

The City of Eureka, with a population of 27,000 (and another 14,000 just outside city limits) is located on Humboldt Bay, with the Pacific Ocean to the west and mountains and forests to the east, north and south. Eureka has all the amenities of a larger town with a small town atmosphere, including a nearby state university and a community college, short commutes, and abundant community events. The Managing Mental Health Clinician

Mental Health Support Specialist

will have an opportunity to provide direct services to targeted populations/groups within the City of Eureka and manage the designing, developing, and implementing of program services, program goals and objectives.

Bilingual Clinician I/II (Spanish)

Requirements: Equivalent to a Master’s degree in social work, marriage and family counseling, psychology or psychiatric nursing, or a closely related field; licensure to practice as a mental health therapist, clinician or counselor in the State of California, and five (5) years of post-licensure experience as a mental health therapist, clinician or counselor in an in- or out-patient setting, including two (2) years of supervisory experience. Possession of an applicable Community Mental Health Services license is required.

The City of Eureka will be accepting applications for this position until 5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 31st, 2022. For a complete job description and qualifications or to apply online please visit our website at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. EOE

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Part-time, starts at $20.30/hour.

Clinician I/II Full-time, multiple positions, starts at $ 24.54/hour, $4,875/month

Full-time, multiple positions, starts at $ 26.22/hour, $5,191.87/month Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org

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Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

HICAP Counselor Part time position (20 hours/week). $17/hour. Provide unbiased, one-on-one counseling and assistance to help Medicare beneficiaries make the best choices. Must have excellent communication skills. Knowledge of Medicare/ healthcare a plus. Training provided. Call Ben Winker at 707-442-3763, Ext. 222

Long Term Care Ombudsman Program

Coordinator/Program Manager Full time, exempt position (35 hours/week). Salary DOE. Advocate for residents in nursing and residential care facilities and investigate allegations of abuse. Supervise two staff and multiple volunteers. May not have worked in a long-term care facility during the 12 months prior to application. Call Maggie Kraft at 707-442-3763, Ext. 201

Social Services

Home Safety Specialist Full-time (35 hours/week). $18/hour. Conduct home visits to assess and help clients develop and execute a plan to improve home safety. Call Meghan Gallagher at 707-4423763, ext. 209 Job descriptions and applications on website: www.a1aa.org. Submit A1AA application and a cover letter to 333 J Street, Eureka, CA 95501. A preemployment check is required of all final candidates. Open until filled.

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TS PROJECT COORDINATOR Cal Poly Humboldt invites applicants for the position of ITS Project Coordinator, which will be primarily responsible for Project Coordination, Business Analysis & Consulting, Change Management and Operational Support for projects and other initiatives involving ITS resources and of a technical nature. Using various project management methodologies and the ADKAR Change Management model, this position will help lead the Cal Poly Humboldt Transformation across a wide variety of technical and functional areas on the campus. Position comes with a premium benefits package that includes outstanding vacation, medical, dental, and vision plans, life insurance, voluntary pre-tax health and dependent care reimbursement accounts, a fee waiver education program, membership in the California Public Employees Retirement System (PERS), and 14 paid holidays per year. To see more information about this vacancy click here: https://apptrkr.com/3053836 and see job 513982.

POLICE OFFICER Hoopa Tribal Police Department

Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Performs a wide variety of peace officer duties.  Must possess a Basic Academy Certificate from a California P.O.S.T. approved academy. Additional requirements are listed in the job description. Must have a California Driver’s license and be insurable. Must successfully pass a Title 30A Employment Background and a California Police Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) background checks. 

 For job descriptions & employment applications, contact the Human Resource Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 23 or email l.offins@hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

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RCEA is now hiring for the following positions:

Technician/Senior Technician, Demand Side Management

Oversee implementation of projects to reduce energy demand at commercial facilities. Engage and maintain customer relationships and serve as a trusted energy advisor. Candidates with experience in project or construction management, facility auditing, building operations, electrical, lighting, HVAC, refrigeration, demand response, solar and/or storage are encouraged to apply. Full-time, $67,575 to $97,355 annually, with standard benefits package. Open until filled.

Community Strategies Coordinator

Support and promote RCEA’s many programs and services. Manage front desk and customer phone inquiries, and assist with strategic marketing campaigns, workshops and community meetings. Collaborate on development of content for marketing and advertising collateral, website, social media platforms and press releases. Full-time, $39,258 to $49,151 annually, with standard benefits package. Open until filled.

Administrative Coordinator (part-time) Responsibilities include processing incoming and outgoing mail; implementing physical and digital filing and labeling systems; coordinating meetings and taking meeting notes; preparing forms and entering data; purchasing assistance including researching and gathering quotes; picking up supplies. Up to 24 hours/ week at $18.87 to $23.63 per hour. Open until filled. Full job descriptions and application instructions are available at redwoodenergy.org/employment/ RCEA is a local Joint Powers Authority that develops and implements sustainable energy initiatives for Humboldt County. We are committed to a diverse workforce and we are an equal opportunity employer.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

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Redwood Coast Regional Center Be a part of a great team!

ELDER ADVOCATE

Hoopa Human Services, Regular, F/T, Salary: $ 22.00-$27.00/hr. DOE. To provide intervention and case management services to the abused, neglected, or dependent adults and elders engaged with Tribal Court, State Court, and Adult Protection Services. Case management will include determination of need for social services; service referrals; individualized treatment and specialized application of culturally appropriate Case Plans.  Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work, Psychology, Behavioral Science, Sociology or related field (preferred), Associate’s Degree required with three years’ work experience preferably in case management. Additional requirements listed in the job description. Must possess a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Subject to Title 30A Employment Background Check.  This position is classified safety-sensitive. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200, or email . The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and T.E.R.O. Ordinance apply.

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THE CITY OF RIO DELL

Is now accepting applications for

UTILITY WORKER I/II/III ($33,257 - $49,255 + Benefits) Part-time and full-time available. This is a handson position involving the maintenance and repair of City facilities, systems and equipment.

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator) FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for indiv. w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3665/mo. Exc. bene. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs. EOE City of Arcata

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT $42,561.50 - $53,027.11 /yr. 4% Salary increases in July 2022 and 2023 Apply by midnight June 6, 2022. This position will perform a wide variety of administrative and support duties within the Wastewater Treatment Plant and Operations. Apply or review the full job description at: https:// www.governmentjobs.com/careers/arcataca or contact Arcata City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE. .

THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL IS HIRING

SALES REPS

($19/hr. + Benefits) Entry level position into the wastewater operator career field. Apply skills in science and mechanics to help protect the environment.

POLICE OFFICER ($50,606 - $71,335 + Benefits)

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Northcoast Children’s Services ACCOUNTING FISCAL SPECIALIST, Main Office (Arcata) Duties include assisting with fiscal and general ledger analysis; assist with prep for annual audits & federal/state monitoring. Assist w/payroll & accounts payable. Require 3 year’s business related experience. Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or Finance/Accounting preferred, but not required. F/T 40 hrs./wk. $20.52-$21.55/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHERS, Arcata, Fortuna Develop & implement classroom activities for toddler children. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, and have 1-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./ wk. M-F. $17.75-$18.64/hr. Open Until Filled. Perform duties required to keep site clean, sanitized & orderly. Must have experience & knowledge of basic tools & methods utilized in custodial work and have the ability to learn and follow health & safety requirements. P/T 16 hrs./ wk. $15.00/hr. Open Until Filled.

(TEMPORARY FULL-TIME POSITION)

Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue, www.cityofriodell.ca.gov or call (707) 764-3532. Rio Dell is a drug free workplace.

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HOUSEKEEPER, Eureka

OPERATOR-IN-TRAINING

Open to entry level & laterals. Candidate must have appropriate POST certification and be 21 years of age by the time of appointment.

CARE PROVIDER Are you a compassionate and caring person? Do you want to make a difference for individuals in Humboldt community? If so, we have a great opportunity for you! We are looking for support staff for people with developmental disabilities who wish to live on their own and in the community. Responsibilities include support and assistance with daily living tasks, communication skills and access to the community. Overnight sleep shifts are available as well as daytime and evenings shifts. We are looking for part− and full−time candidates. Medical, vision, dental care and paid vacation time are available to quali− fying staff. Contact us today at (707) 825−9536 or email resume with references to dawnings@sbcglobal.net Job Types: Full−time, Part−time Pay: $15.50 − $15.75 per hour *$200 Bonus for new staff after completion of 90 probationary period! Sign on Bonus!

BASE SALARY + COMMISSION + BENEFITS Seeking full-time motivated individuals eager to develop and manage sales programs across print, web and mobile platforms.

Apply by emailing your resume to kyle@northcoastjournal.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

PLEASE NOTE: Per grant requirements, All NCS staff are required to submit proof of a complete COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are granted an exemption. All staff who are eligible for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All staff must wear face coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org


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K’ima: w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions: HOUSEKEEPER – FT REGULAR ($15.00 PER HOUR) – Cleans and maintains an assigned area of

the medical center in a sanitary, orderly, and attractive condition. Looking for a solution seeking, self-starter who can easily adjust to changes. High School Diploma or GED equivalent; one to three months related experience and/or training; experience with general cleaning supplies and chemicals, infectious control practices, and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); current CPR certificate or obtain within 60 days of hire; valid CA Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MAY 31, 2022

HOUSEKEEPER – TEMPORARY O/C ($15.00 PER HOUR) – Cleans and maintains an assigned area of the medical center in a sanitary, orderly, and attractive condition. Looking for a solution seeking, self-starter who can easily adjust to changes. High School Diploma or GED equivalent; one to three months related experience and/or training; experience with general cleaning supplies and chemicals, infectious control practices, and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); current CPR certificate or obtain within 60 days of hire; valid CA Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MAY 31, 2022 SECURITY GUARD – FT REGULAR ($15.00 PER HOUR) – Protects

employees, visitors and patients from harm and guards medical center property against fire, theft, vandalism, and illegal entry by periodically performing patrols of the medical center building and grounds always ensuring safety. High School Diploma or GED equivalent or one to three months related security experience and/or training; current CPR certificate or obtain within 60 days of hire. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MAY 31, 2022

DESK TECHNICIANS (2 POSITIONS) – FT REGULAR ($16.00$18.00 PER HOUR) – Performs clerical and support functions; assisting clinical personnel with paperwork needed to facilitate patient visits in a timely manner. Functions include record keeping, telephone communications (including monitoring calls and directing calls to the appropriate person or department), and clerical cuties related to patient care. High School Diploma or GED equivalent; one to three years or related training or experience; knowledgeable of maintaining and managing files/records, operating a computer, calculator and other equipment, and common medical terminology. Ability to type at least 45 WPM. Current CPR certificate or ability to obtain within 60 days of hire. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MAY 31, 2022

PATIENT BENEFITS MANAGER – FT/REGULAR ($24.18-$32.09 PER HOUR) – Provides leadership to the PB staff while managing the

daily operations of the department and front-end revenue cycle functions. Including demographic and insurance data collections, identify patients with eligibility for alternate resources, assist with enrollment processes, act as advocates for Indian patients, assist with other social service needs, and updates existing patients and inputs new patient registrations. Minimum Requirements: High School Diploma or equivalent; 2 to 4 years of related experience and/or training, or an equivalent combination of education and experience required; 6 months experience in BPRM, RPMS, and IHS-EHR and/or other database computer systems required; 1 year experience working with health insurance companies such as Partnership Health Plan, California State Medicaid, Medicare, VA, SSI/SSD, and/or private insurance companies; and, 1 year supervisory experience. Must possess a current CPR Certificate or obtain within 60 days. Must possess a valid California Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MAY 23, 2022

PATIENT BENEFITS CLERK – FT REGULAR ($16.50-$18.68 PER HOUR) – Provide the highest level possible of customer service

standards in patient check-in process, answering calls, scheduling appointments, identifying patient’s eligibility for alternate resources and assisting with any other needs. Minimum Requirements: High School Diploma or equivalent. Six (6) months to one (1) year of related experience or training OR equivalent combination of education and experience. Knowledge of RPMS, BPMS, and IHS-HER or a data base computer system, preferred but not required. Must possess a current CPR Certificate or obtain within 60 days. Must possess a valid California Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS MAY 23, 2022 OUTREACH & PREVENTION – FT Regular ($20.40 per hour) OUTREACH MANAGER PHN OR RN – FT or PT Regular ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/BILLER – FT or PT Regular PHARMACY CLERK - Temporary PARAMEDIC – FT Regular

GRANT WRITER & PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS – FT/Regular ($29.00-36.00 per hour DOE) DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT/Regular ($39.00-43.00 DOE) PHYSICIAN – FT/Regular LAB TECHNOLOGIST – FT/Regular MEDICAL DIRECTOR – FT/Regular MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN – FT/Regular MAT RN CARE MANAGER – FT/Regular

All positions above are Open Until Filled unless otherwise stated. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: leah.offins@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw. org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Northcoast Children’s Services Do you love being with children? Do you enjoy supporting children learn and grow? Are you looking for a meaningful profession? Do you want a job that has evenings and weekends off? Would you love to find a job with a Hiring Incentive? Northcoast Children’s Services may be what you’re looking for! Northcoast Children’s Services provides early education and family support services to children and families from pregnancy to age 5. We offer home visiting services, infant toddler and preschool centers in a variety of locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. We have a variety of full and part time positions working with children and families. We offer paid vacation, sick leave and holidays to all employees and an additional health insurance/cash benefit/dependent care option to full time employees. All employees may also obtain assistance with education and child development permits. We are currently looking for people to join our team as housekeepers, cooks, teachers, assistant teachers, center directors and home visitors. **New Hire Incentives are currently available to both full and part time employees. Full time employees who work 30 or more hours will receive an incentive of $750. Part time employees, who work less than 30 hours will receive a $500 incentive. Incentives are paid after 90 days of employment. Positions include vacation, holiday and sick leave benefits. Full-time staff (30 hrs. per week or more) are eligible to participate in a Flexible Benefit Plan after 2 months of full-time employment. Please visit our website or Facebook page for more information on how to join our growing team! https://ncsheadstart. org/employment-opportunities/

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MARKETPLACE Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 866−571−1325 (AAN CAN) BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices − No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call 1−866−370−2939 (AAN CAN) BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work interna− tionally. We do the work... You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844−511 −1836. (AAN CAN) BIG GUY, LITTLE PICKUP Small cleanups and hauls. Eureka area. Reasonable rates. Call Odd Job Mike at 707−497−9990. CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN BuildCAN) to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

REAL ESTATE CHAMP Community Health Care Against Malicious Medical Prac− tices. CHAMP is seeking members volunteers, and dona− tions. Also seeking letters of patient medical testimony. 707− 223−2830

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23 1−866−566−1815 (AAN CAN)

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COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships avail− able for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1−855−978−2304 (AAN CAN)

HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−866− 544−5758 (AAN CAN)

WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

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Soules Bookkeeping Bookkeeping and payroll for small businesses. Professional Service. Competitive Pricing.

IT’S COMING TO FORTUNA. THE CITY WIDE YARD SALE JUNE 4TH Applications are at Strehl’s Family Shoes & Repair, Something Old Something Nouveau and on line at fortunadowntown.org.

Saturday June 04, 2022 10:00am - 3:00pm.

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Sales are hosted by individual homes, follow the signs once you get too Trinidad. Visit the City of Trinidad’s Website for more information https://trinidad.ca.gov/

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships avail− able for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1−855−554−4616 The Mission, Program Information and Tuition is located at CareerTechnical.edu/consumer− information.

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Computer & Internet

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

Vintage Clothing

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

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melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

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“Clothes with Soul”

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie (707) 839−1518

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WATER DAMAGE TO YOUR HOME? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833−664−1530 (AAN CAN)

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SALE4KIDS KIDS CLOTHING ALL 1/2 OFF & ALL KIDS BOOKS 3/$1 MAY 24−28 "Where your shopping dollars help youth realize their dreams!" Plus: Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629−3006.

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TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920−1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rick− enbacker, Prairie State, D’An− gelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877−589− 0747 (AAN CAN)

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(530) 266-3505

NEED IRS RELIEF? $10K − $125K+? Get Fresh Start or Forgiveness Call 1−877−707−5521 Monday through Friday 7AM− 5PM PST (AAN CAN)

www.soulesbookkeeping.com

THE CITY OF TRINIDAD IS PROMOTING A COMMUNITY YARD SALE EVENT ON

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

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CREDIT CARD DEBT RELIEF! Reduce payment by up to 50%! Get one LOW affordable payment/month. Reduce interest. Stop calls. FREE no− obligation consultation Call 1− 855−761−1456 (AAN CAN)

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Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 metaphysicsuniversity.com

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Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Barbara Davenport

Dacota Huzzen

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

BRE #02109531

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

707.499.0917

BRE # 02084041

BRE# 02070276

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

HIOUCHI – LAND/PROPERTY – $923,000

TING!

707.498.6364

Versatile ±126 acre property with residential, recreational, and commercial opportunities! Property boasts a pond stocked with trout, two l ponds, 2 rock quarries, shop, greenhouses, PG&E, several flats, Willow Creek frontage and Gregg Creek running through the parcel.

WESTHAVEN – LAND/PROPERTY - $85,000

BRIDGEVILLE – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $650,000

Own your own piece of Coastal California old growth redwood forest! Parklike ±0.27 acre lot just minutes from Trinidad and Moonstone Beach with a creek running through it. Creek setbacks make building highly unlikely.

MOTIVATED SELLER! ±40 Acre turn-key farm with county and state cannabis permits in hand for 6,750 sq. ft. permitted farm is as turn key as they come. Property features year round access, two houses, water storage, solar system, and so much more!

BRIDGEVILLE – CULTIVATION – $290,000

TRINITY LAKE – LAND/PROPERTY - $235,000 Two parcels totaling ±100 acres overlooking beautiful Trinity Lake! Great timber investment or vacation spot with well and building site in place!

460 SEQUOIA STREET, RIO DELL - $269,000

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $80,000

Versatile floor plan w/ family room and a bonus room that could easily be used for additional bedrooms, and large utility room with sink & counter. Some newer flooring, and kitchen upgrades. Several fenced patios and an attached single car garage w/ direct access to the interior.

±1.79 Acre lot in a desirable area in Willow Creek! Surrounded by trees, with sloping terraces of land, the possibilities are endless. Community water/ no septic and close to USFS land.

RIO DELL – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $1,950,000

BLOCKSBURG – LAND/PROPERTY – $225,000

±7.75 Acre turn-key cannabis farm currently permitted for 32k sq. ft. of mixed light cultivation space, explore the possibility of expansion under Rio Dell’s farmer friendly ordinance with NO CAP on permit size! Enjoy privacy and the comforts of in town living including a 4/3.5 home, PG&E, community water, and 2 story garage.

Ashlee Cook

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY - $695,000

Stunning ±113 acre property w/ views of the Siskiyou Mountains! Property features a mix of flats, slopes, saddles, and ridgetops, and has a variety of trees. With easy access from Highway 199, wide rocked roads, and water available nearby or by drilling a well, look no further for your dream property!

±40 Acres w/ STAMPED County & State permits for 9,948 sq. ft. of O.D. space utilizing light deprivation and 1,400 sq. ft. of full sun outdoor cultivation space. Parcel features developed greenhouse sites, well, and views. NEW LIS

Mike Willcutt

Realtor

±237 Acres awaiting your unique vision! Features a 3600 sqft two story, six roomed, insulated shop w/ power, several large flats, meadows and stunning views of the valley and surrounding mountains. There are multiple water sources available. This property needs some clean up, but the results will be gratifying!

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A SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

Pony Express 2022 Days Put on a cowboy hat, shine up your boots and head out for some fun with your neighbors!


Get Your Equipment Ready for the Season!

The smallest of the Kubota Grand L Series, the L 3560 HST is in a class of its own. From dirt work to rotary cutting there are few jobs around the house this tractor can’t handle!

L3560 HST

The grand L 60 series boasts L4060 HST a wide range of deluxe features and functions to reduce fatigue and maintain productivity. This 46 horsepower tractor puts your comfort first. So much so, that you might forget you’re working. With a variety of performanceB2601 matched attachments, tackling multiple jobs is what the B2601 does best. Consider any task done with the power of a 26 HP Kubota diesel engine, upgraded category I 3-point hitch, hydraulic independent PTO and telescoping stabilizers for efficient implement attachment.

The B2301 is the perfect utility tractor. With enough size to utilitze a backhoe or front end loader and still small enough to navigate a yard to mow, the B2301 is truly the right fit.

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WELCOME! The McKinleyville Chamber of Commerce welcomes you to once again enjoy the annual Pony Express Days celebration. This tradition began in 1968 as a family-friendly barbecue, parade and equestrian race and quickly became known as McKinleyville’s signature annual event. After a 2 year break due to the COVID-19 pandemic we are so pleased to bring this beloved event back. Pony Express Days has evolved through the years, with each year reflecting the interests of the town, the volunteers and others who make the celebration possible. This year, Pony Express Days will include familiar favorites like the Chili Cook-off, Pancake Breakfast, Parade, Festival and the Gymkhana, with a few changes planned. We hope you will join us as you gather with your friends and neighbors to enjoy the celebration. Put on a cowboy hat, shine up your boots and head out for some fun with your neighbors! The McKinleyville Chamber Board of Directors would like to thank you for supporting our wonderful McKinleyville community. We hope that you have fun and enjoy all of the festivities! For more information, call the McKinleyville Chamber of Commerce at (707) 839-2449 or visit our website: www.mckinleyvillechamber.com and find the page highlighting Pony Express Days! Jesse Miles, McKinleyville Chamber of Commerce 1640 Central Ave, McKinleyville 707.839.2449 McKinleyvillechamber.com

A QUICK LOOK AT WHAT’S HAPPENING Thursday, May 26th - Kick Off Mixer: 5:30-7pm BELLA VISTA PLAZA, HOSTED BY AZALEA REALTY

Thursday, June 2nd - CHILI COOK OFF: 5:30-7:30 PIERSON PARK - 1608 PICKETT ROAD, McKINLEYVILLE

Saturday, June 4th - Pancake Breakfast: 8-11am AZALEA HALL, 1620 PICKETT RD

Saturday, June 4th - PARADE: 11am

STARTS AT CENTRAL & MURRAY, DOWN TO CENTRAL & SCHOOL RD

Saturday June 4th - FESTIVAL: 12-4pm SVL65-2

TRACK LOADERS

Don’t just finish the job. Dominate it behind the controls of the Kubota SVL65-2. Whether hardscaping or landscaping, you’ll experience nimble maneuverability, power and comfort in the orange track loader. Advanced hydraulics and 68.3 horsepower ensure you won’t have to back down from a challenge and the SVL65-2 loves a good challenge.

PIERSON PARK, 1608 PICKETT RD

Sporting the Kubota’s largest cab/hydrostatic combination the MX6000 HSTC has the power to complete your biggest projects all from the comfort of a climate controlled cab!

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Saturday & Sunday - Obstacle Challenge

Judged event - Walk through: 9am

McKINLEYVILLE RODEO GROUNDS ON KJER ROAD, NORTH OF AIRPORT

KICK-OFF MIXER

Kick Off the 2022 Pony Express Days celebration by joining us at the monthly chamber mixer! Azalea Realty in collaboration with Stitches & Britches, Nail’d It, Pacific Coast Rentals, Vacasa, Nature Nurture Center, Trinity River Vineyards, Six Rivers Brewery, Jason Cimolino - State Farm Insurance, Fieldbrook Winery, and Goodnow Acupuncture presents this fun, family friendly event. There will be live music, raffle and door prizes along with refreshments for all!

2 SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

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FESTIVAL RULES • Alcohol may only be consumed in the cups provided. • All patrons are subject to search. • Alcoholic beverages may not be consumed outside the designated area during the chili cook off and the festival. • Must be 21 years of age to consume alcohol. • No alcohol may be brought in to or out of event. • No ice chests. • No weapons are allowed inside the event. • You must wear an ID wristband to consume alcohol during the chili cook off and festival.


CHILI COOK OFF

Fun and food for the whole family. Meet your neighbors for a night of tasting some of the best chili around. Participants will be doing all preparations on-site, starting at noon. Patrons are the judges. Local chefs, professional and amateur, will be preparing their favorite chili and vying for your vote in three different categories: Best Business

Chili, Best Amateur Chili and Best Team Spirit. Tickets are $10 per person. This year the Boys & Girls Club of the Redwoods will also be selling hot dogs to eat solo or top it with some of the chili being served, along with offering bake sale goodies to top off your dinner. Beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase. PARTNERS: EUREKA NATURAL FOODS, MAD RIVER RADIO.

E T M O O C L E W PRESS DAY X S! E Y N O P • auto business home • family farms • ranches

JUDY DAVIS INSURANCE

SERVICES, INC. 744 10th 1933 Central Ave. Ste D Fortuna, CA 95540 McKinleyville, CA 95519 707.725.5411 707.839.5288

www.jdinsurance.com LIC.#0F41787 SERVING NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SINCE 1977

PONY EXPRESS DAYS | northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 10, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

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PANCAKE BREAKFAST

Enjoy a pancake breakfast served by the Dow’s Prairie Grange Members to start the festival day off. Breakfast will feature 2 different kinds of scrambled eggs, all you can eat pancakes, a side of sausage, condiments, coffee, tea and juice.

community members who have a history of service and continue to serve today. With the return of the parade after a 2 year break, we are pleased to present 3 grand marshals this year to honor the Azalea Award winners in 2020, 2021 and 2022! The 2020 Azalea Award was presented to Gerry & Carol Hale.

and 1870’s Gerry was born in 1939, grew up in the living quarters of the Bella Vista Inn (now 6 Rivers Brewery), attended elementary schools in McKinleyville, then on to Arcata High and Humboldt State College. At Arcata High he was one of the eight Mckinleyville boys who propelled the 1956 football team to the league championship for the first time in decades, and he was selected to play in the North/South AllStar game after graduation. During his early days he worked on ranches in McKinleyville, Service Stations in Eureka and Trinidad, mills in Arcata and, of course, at the Bella Vista. Carol was born in 1940, grew up in Eureka, third in a family of eight children. attending Eureka elementary schools and Eureka High - then on to HSC. In high school she was active in student government and was editor of the school’s 1957 yearbook. While attending school she worked at McGaraghan’s Apparel in Henderson Center until graduation from HSC with a degree in Art Education. They met during Fall semester 1959 in Reese Bullen’s pottery class and were married in 1961. Carol’s first teaching job was at the brand new M HS. - and then there was the draft. So, Gerry enlisted in the USAF and they embarked on a thirty six year adventure in Signals Intelligence, four in the USAF and almost 32 as a civilian at the National Security Agency. He retired in 1997. In 2016 he was inducted into the Cryptologic Hall of Honor at NSA Headquarters. The Hales moved back to Humboldt, purchased a house in Eureka in 1998 and got involved in the communities that had nurtured them so well. They were both heavily involved with the College of the Redwoods Foundation League, Carol was elected vice president of Eureka Heritage where among other things completely restored the Romano Gabriel exhibit in Old Town, Eureka. Gerry joined Rotary, serving on the BOD of the Eureka Club, and when they moved back to the family property on Bella Vista Hill, transferred to the Mad River Rotary where he served as President (2008/2009). Gerry was elected to the Clarke Historical Museum’s BOD, served two terms as pres-

Large - $8, Small - $5. Tickets can be purchased in advance at Pony Express events and at the door.

GRAND MARSHALS

The Azalea Award is an annual tradition started in 2001. It is given by the McKinleyville Chamber of Commerce and chosen by the past Azalea Award recipients. The award is traditionally given to McKinleyville

Carol and Gerald Hale have Humboldt County roots that go back to the 1860’s

ident and Is now a Lifetime Trustee. Carol volunteered as an early literacy tutor at the

4 SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

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Dows Praire Elementary School. They both volunteer at the Humboldt County Library’s Humboldt Room. Carol is an active member of P.E.O. and has served as president. Big believers in giving back to the community, they continue to be supportive. They have three children, Greg. Dan and Lisa and five grandchildren. Their two sons were appointed to the United States Naval Academy in the early 1980’s, one lives in Trinidad, the other in St Helena; their daughter is a teacher in Sebastopol. The 2021 Azalea Award was presented to Kevin Jenkins & Eva Marsh.

Kevin Jenkins was born and raised in Arcata. In 1996 he moved to McKinleyville & acquired McKinleyville Ace, where giving back to the community became second nature. Eva Marsh was raised in Eureka. In 2016 she moved to McKinleyville, where she found the love of her life. Since meeting Kevin the pair have been on a whirlwind of community service. They are both members of Mad River Rotary. Kevin has served as President from 2002-2003 and 2013-2014 and was Rotarian of the Year in 1998 and 1999. Kevin and Eva are mutually and actively involved in Rotary Youth Exchange. Kevin has served on the Ace Hardware Vision 21 Board and was awarded the Ace Achievement Award for Customer Service & Community Support. An example of this support, their donation of all of the supplies for Hot Dog Sales at McKinleyville Ace for youth organizations and various non-profits to fundraise. Every month they choose a new non-profit organization to


PONY EXPRESS DAYS | northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 10, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

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“Round-Up” to at Ace. Due to their customers generosity they have raised nearly $20,000 for the youth in the community so far! Kevin and Eva have also helped out the McKinleyville Chamber & Arcata Chamber countless times behind the scenes. These events include Pony Express Days, assisting to hang Christmas trees, donating Raffle/Auction items and the list goes on! There are so many other ways they have given back to our community both through sponsorships, in kind donations and of course their own time volunteering that we could not possibly fit them all here! THE 2022 AZALEA AWARD WAS PRESENTED TO MEREDITH MAIER & TALIA NACHSCHON CLARE. Co-owners of Six Rivers Brewery, Meredith and Talia have built their business with the mind that collaboration is the key to success. They each work tirelessly to make our community a better place to live, work and play. The brewery has always focused on supporting as many locally owned businesses as possible. Their menu features dozens of local products. You can always find a well stocked Humboldt Made Marketplace within their pub. Meredith and Talia are generous supporters of dozens of local and regional non-profits. You’ll find fundraisers and pints nights happening regularly at the pub as well as finding their products at many local fundraising events for organizations such as the Sequoia Humane Society, local Chambers of Commerce, McKinleyville Family Resource Center, Humboldt Breast/Gyn Health Project, Boys & Girls Club of the Redwoods and many more. They know these community

6 SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

| PONY EXPRESS DAYS

oriented non-profits are essential. Both are active community members, donating time volunteering and serving on boards and commissions throughout Humboldt County. Talia is a member of the Mad River Rotary and also serves on the board of McKinleyville Family Resource Center. She has also served as a Board Member for the McKinleyville Chamber of Commerce. Meredith is an active board member of Humboldt Made and is the Eureka Planning Commission Chair. She has also served as a board member for Sequoia Humane Society, Humboldt County Visitors and Tourism Bureau, Eureka Visitor Center and as the local Pink Boots Chair.


Schedule PONY EXPRESS DAY S 202 2 THURSDAY, MAY 26TH - KICK OFF MIXER : 5:30-7PM @ BELLA VISTA PLAZA, HOSTED BY AZALEA REALTY THURSDAY, JUNE 2ND - CHILI COOK OFF : 5:30-7:30 @PIERSON PARK SATURDAY, JUNE 4TH: - PANCAKE BREAKFAST : 8-11AM @ AZALEA HALL

MUSIC IN THE PARK

The McKinleyville Chamber presents the Music in the Park in 2022 starting on Thursday, June 9 from 6-8pm at Pierson Park. Music in the Park has become a highly anticipated summer event for the whole family. This FREE concert series is brought to you by a partnership with the McKinleyville Chamber of Commerce and the McKinleyville Community Services District! Most Thursday evenings throughout the

summer you can bring a picnic dinner, or bring an appetite and indulge in one of the delicious food vendors that will be there. 2022 DATES : June 9 - Band O Loko June 23 - Bailee Barnett June 30 - The Tidepool High Divers July 7 - The Triple Tones July 14 - Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band July 21 - The Undercovers August 4 - Blue Rhythm Revue August 11 - Absynthe Quartet August 18 - Ghost Train August 25 - Amber Soul >>

SATURDAY, JUNE 4TH - PARADE : 11:00AM STARTS AT CENTRAL & MURRAY, DOWN CENTRAL TO ANNA SPARKS WAY SATURDAY JUNE 4TH - FESTIVAL FESTIVAL: 12-4PM @ PIERSON PARK SATURDAY & SUNDAY - OBSTACLE CHALLENGE WALK THRU @9AM @MCKINLEYVILLE RODEO GROUNDS, KJER ROAD

PONY EXPRESS DAYS | northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 10, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

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“LARGEST BRAND SELECTION IN THE COUNTY”

Most nights along with the live band you will find skate ramps set up from the Humboldt Skatepark Collective and Lawn Games set up by MCSD! Local nonprofits will be holding bake sales to fundraise for their organizations. NEW this year - we will have a few local vendors at each event. Contact the chamber if you are interested in being a vendor. Also NEW this year - BIKE SHOW on July 14th and CAR SHOW on July 21st. Thank you to all of our sponsors who make this event possible and FREE to everyone.

341 West Harris St, Eureka 707 445-3138 poletskis.com

“YOUR HOME IS WHERE OUR HEART IS”

PARK SPONSOR - GREEN DIAMOND RESOURCE COMPANY

GAZEBO SPONSORS - EXP REALTY - ROBYN BAILIE, MATSEN INSURANCE, SIX RIVERS BREWERY & LOCO FISH CO, MILLER FARMS NURSERY, GROCERY OUTLET, VACASA, THE CLUB FOR FITNESS, BLUE LAKE CASINO & HOTEL, McKINLEYVILLE ACE HOME & GARDEN CENTER, HUMBOLDT SKATEPARK COLLECTIVE

Humboldt County Real Estate experts, trusted by hundreds of your neighbors. Residential | Commercial Land | Income Serving Eureka, McKinleyville, Arcata, Trinidad, Blue Lake, Willow Creek, Ferndale and all points between.

1225 Central Ave Suite 1, McKinleyville (707) 839-4400 Jo a n i e Frederick 707.362.0144

Michelle Voyles 707.845.1609

Andy Parker 707.616.3456

S a ra h Ammon 707.601.4822

Ka t i e Cutshall 707.601.2700

DRE #0099315 2

8 SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

| PONY EXPRESS DAYS

LAWN GAME SPONSORS - MUDDY PAWS, EXP REALTY - TRACIE CREPS, STEVE’S SEPTIC, THE HEIGHTS CASINO (2 NIGHTS!), BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF THE REDWOODS, REDWOOD CAPITAL BANK, McKINLEYVILLE ACE HOME & GARDEN CENTER (2 NIGHTS!), COAST CENTRAL CREDIT UNION PARTNERS: MCSD, MAD RIVER RADIO, HUMBOLDT SKATEPARK COLLECTIVE


CORKS, FORKS & KEGS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2022, 4-8PM The annual beer and wine walk through McKinleyville with food tastings returns this year! This is a 21 and over event. MARK YOUR CALENDAR AND PLAN TO ATTEND! HOST A TASTING LOCATION BE A FOOD HOST BE A BEVERAGE HOST SPONSOR THE EVENT Contact the McKinleyville Chamber today for more details. mckinleyvillechamber@ gmail.com

PAR ADE

The Pony Express Days Parade is arguably the main event of McKinleyville’s annual festival. We have an amazing trio of Grand Marshals this year, the Azalea Award winners from the past 3 years: Gerry & Carol Hale, Kevin Jenkins & Eva Marsh and Meredith Maier & Talia Nachschol Clare. The Pony Express Days Parade will follow its usual route down Central Avenue from Murray Road to School Road. Bring the family out to enjoy the many floats and entries. The judge’s stand and announcers will be located in front of Coast Central Credit Union. Participants will be judged in six categories:

Best Overall, Best Equestrian, Best Vehicle, Best Walking Group, Best Spirit (entry with the most enthusiasm during the parade) and Best Performance (entry that is the most entertaining for the crowd). Winners will be announced at 3 p.m. from the festival stage. PARTNERS: MAD RIVER ROTARY.

!

F E ST I VA L SATURDAY, JUNE 4 noon to 4 p.m. at Pierson Park

• LIVE MUSIC BY THE TRIPLE TONES, FOOD AND CRAFT VENDORS

• SALOON, INFORMATIONAL BOOTHS, KID’S ACTIVITIES, AND MORE! • SALOON HOSTED BY SIX RIVERS BREWERY & PONY KEG MOBILE BAR, PARTNERED WITH MCKINLEYVILLE KIWANIS. • 3PM: ANNOUNCEMENT OF PARADE WINNERS

Central Avenue between Murray Road and School Road will be TEMPORARILY CLOSED during the Pony Express Days Parade on Saturday, June 4. The parade begins at 11 a.m. on Murray and slowly makes it way down Central Avenue. Roads will be reopened after the parade passes. However, motorists who have failed to plan ahead may find themselves unable to get to or from their homes. If you need to get around town during the parade, you may want to think twice about where you park your car, or better yet use your bicycle or ride your horse, and then you’ll have the right of way.

PONY EXPRESS DAYS | northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 10, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

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OBSTACLE CHALLENGE JUN 4 & 5, 2022 - WALK THRU 9:00AM CALIFORNIA STATE HORSEMEN’S ASSOCIATION REGION 13 SANCTIONED

Challenges are open the any breed of equine and any style of riding. The horse and rider will encounter a minimum of ten obstacles and sometimes challenging situations. Additional In-Hand class after the Challenge (no awards for in-hand, just praise) YOUTH 10 & UNDER • YOUTH 11 TO 17 • NOVICE • INTERMEDIATE • ADVANCED

FUN FAMILY FRIENDLY EVENT CSHA RILES APPLY CDC GUIDELINES WILL BE FOLLOWED VOLUNTEERS WELCOME FREE DRY CAMPING AVAILABLE SIGN UP BY E-MAIL OR MAIL IN APPRECIATED

Contact Lauren West for info: 707-803-9317 sixhorsewest@aol.com

McKINLEYVILLE

A picturesque community, situated on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean with a backdrop of tree covered mountains. This modern day town, surrounded by rural beauty, has kept its leisurely-paced

atmosphere, which makes McKinleyville unique. McKinleyville was once known as a place where horses have the right of way, with a hitchin’ post outside the post office to tie up your horse. Horses are no longer as common on our main roads, but they still enjoy the good life, especially in northern McKinleyville, better known as Dow’s Prairie. With easy access, horseback riders love the broad, sandy, miles-long Clam Beach, one of the most popular in the county. Take a walk or ride your bike on the scenic Hammond Trail, a paved trail that runs parallel to the coast from one end of McKinleyville to the other. Visit local beaches to spend the

We Do Paving Paving!!

• Parking Lots • Driveways • Patch Paving • Commercial • Seal Coating • Residential Call today for a quote

3445 Central Avenue • McKinleyville • (707) 839-1291 www.hoovenco.com • facebook.com/hoovenco

10 SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

| PONY EXPRESS DAYS

day kayaking, surfing, fishing or taking a leisurely stroll looking for treasures. Many outdoor adventures are just minutes away; bird watching, hiking and camping in State Parks and forests, some of the best river fishing in the world, whitewater rafting trips, horseback riding or taking photos of Roosevelt elk in their natural habitat.


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Join Us Parade Day

& Enter For a Chance To Win

this 6 PC Patio Set

Value is $1,234.99

Winner will be announced Saturday July 2nd.

Sponsors DUKE

PONY EXPRESS DAYS 2022 839-1571 • 1828 Central Ave, McKinleyville • www.millerfarmsnursery.com

BONANZA

RANCH HAND Brandon, Holly & Sara

PETTING ZOO SPONSOR

BUCKAROO • Lube Central • Captain Banjo Fishing Boat • Jackson & Eklund

• Hooven & Co • BMW • Steve’s Septic PONY EXPRESS DAYS | northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 10, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION

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Welcome to Our Mad River Community Hospital Family Dr. Bryan Freeman Dr. Rakhee Shah Dr. Andrew Kim

1972 - 2022

Celebrating Over Fifty Years of Healthcare Excellence

12 SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

| PONY EXPRESS DAYS


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 20229 • SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 26, 20229 • SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SPECIAL INSERT TO THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 26, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com