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thursday may 17, 2012 vol XXIII issue 20 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

O F R F E U N M ! M U S

northcoastjournal.com

north coast

4 So you’re thinking about voting? 8 The Internet sucks 35 Car singing your way to stardom 41 Johnny BerryPicker, for the win! 42 Depp/Burton, please stop!


1. 1COLLEGE OF THE REDWOODS

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Information? www.redwoods.edu Look under Hot Topics for Open Summer Courses. Or call: CR Counseling and Advising (707) 476-4150.

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4

Publisher

33 Stage Matters

5 6

Mailbox Poem

35 The Hum

8

My Bully Pulpit

After the News, Walking

Media Maven

If You Tweet in a Forest

9

News

11 12

Blog Jammin’ On The Cover

27

Ring of Fire

Summer of Fun!

Home & Garden

Legend of the Falls Going Viral

36 Music & More! 38 Gotta Dance Recital Season

39 Calendar 42 Filmland

Paging Mr. Scissorhands

43 Workshops 44 Seven-o-Heaven

cartoon by andrew goff

FURNITURE THE PLAZA Service Directory

29 In Review

a book and a live performance

30 Table Talk New in Town

32 McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, May 18, 6-8 P.M.

47

49 49 50 54 55

ONNotes Field

Eclipse Lore

Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

ON FURNITURE THE PLAZA

Hours: Mon-Sat 10-6, Sun 813 H Street, Hours: Mon-Sat 10-6, Sun12-5 12-5 • •813 H Street, Arcata Arcata • 822-0312• 822-0312

will be closed Memorial Day, May 28th

Please submit your copy by 5pm THURSDAY, MAY 24th for the May 31st issue.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012

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May 17, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 20

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Zach St. George zach@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production interns Kimberly Hodges sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Cut paper and design by Lynn Jones. Photo by Drew Hyland.

PublisheR

My Bully Pulpit

F

rom the time the Journal was founded in 1990 up until a few election cycles ago, we endorsed candidates and made recommendations on ballot measures. They were ultimately my endorsements as editor/publisher — and later as publisher when the two positions were split — with substantial input from the reporting staff. It’s not that I think those of us in the news-gathering business are smarter than our readers. It’s just that we pay close attention and often have better recall than most. We have to, in order to do our job. Since we have a new editor this election cycle, Carrie Peyton Dahlberg, I brought up the should-we-endorse question at a recent staff meeting. It was met with groans and sighs. Why piss off half our readers when their minds are made up? Nobody pays attention to newspaper endorsements! Isn’t it just a vanity thing for the publisher? (Ouch.) OK, then. I’m not telling you how to vote. But since this is my column, I will tell you how I would vote if I lived in your district. Then you can tell me why I’m either pretty smart or very wrongheaded in an email or letter to Carrie (letters@northcoastjournal.com) for next week’s paper. We’ll budget extra room. Please use your real name and provide a daytime contact number. We must be able to contact and speak with you directly before noon on Monday, May 21. Let’s go from the easiest race to hardest: District 3. When you have an incumbent who is intelligent, honest, hardworking and in tune with the priorities of his district, he deserves to be re-elected. Mark Lovelace. The District 2 representative certainly has a less homogenous constituency. After all, there’s city folk and all those back-tothe-landers in the hills. What a mess of a district to represent. Incumbent Clif Clendenen, of the Fortuna apple-growing family fame, came into office as a businessman and pro-conservationist. (Yeah to both.) He became a moderate voice on the board and currently serves as chair of the North Coast Railroad Authority, among other appointments. That’s all well and good, but if you read the Journal cover story last week, “District Soup,” you will know that this election is all about the General Plan update — which after 13 years, 300-plus meetings and 70-plus public hearings — has moved at a glacial pace to the Board of Supervisors for approval. Clif under-

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

stands the plan and, more importantly, is on guard against those who are trying to undo these years of process. He, too, deserves another term. His opponent, Estelle Fennell, until recently held a paid position for HumCPR, an advocacy group that spends all its efforts trying to water down the General Plan update. I’m very leery of this kind of lobbyist being elected to the board. Don’t mess this up, District 2. By the way, if you have forgotten just how important the General Plan update is, spend a little time on-line. The Journal has been reporting on this since our cover story of Sept. 7, 2000, called “What’s the Plan, Humboldt?” If you search site:northcoastjournal.com and “general plan update” you will have 163 Journal entries — 10 Google pages — of reporting and commentary. No, you don’t have to go back 13 years, start with some more recent coverage. How about “Why Do People Hate Kirk Girard?” a cover story Nov. 3, 2011? Or “General Babel,” an editorial written by Ryan Burns, April 14, 2011? I also recommend, “Town Holler,” June 18, 2009, a story that asks and answers the question, “The general plan update: important opportunity or colossal bore?” Or “Deliberate,” July 15, 2010 — one of my personal favorites. (Be careful. If you just search the Journal website and “general plan,” you will get a mind-blowing 4,500-plus entries.) Some of the commentary pieces were written by former Editor Hank Sims, who now blogs for Lost Coast Communications, in his Town Dandy column for the Journal. Now let’s talk about District 1. Jimmy Smith is retiring and he leaves behind some big shoes to fill. This new supervisor will need to get up to speed quickly and have the courage, strength, independence and intelligence not to be misled. District 1 is a three-way race and might even go to a run-off. I hope it does because it needs more scrutiny. I sat in to hear the candidates Monday at the Eureka Rotary luncheon at the Wharfinger. Annette De Modena is a fairly recent arrival in Humboldt County. She said she was excited about the “new” Prosperity 2012 effort but seems unaware of Prosperity’s history: three years of very hard work and preparation before it was adopted by the county in 1999. She wants “harbor revitalization” linked with an east-west railroad line. From the forum I attended, I’ll give her one point: She was the only one who would directly answer the question,

“If not you, who would you vote for?” (She said, although Rex Bohn has “name recognition,” Cheryl Seidner has “a deep, dear, abiding soul” and was a friend of hers. She’d vote for Cheryl.) This is a two-way race. Bohn, with his ubiquitous round baseball signs even outside the district he is running in, is the equivalent of apple pie. He is an Energizer bunny who says yes to any good cause. I personally have attended perhaps a half dozen fund-raisers where he has served without pay as a very able and entertaining auctioneer. One was for the elementary school, Fieldbrook, down the street from my house here in the rural 5th District. He gave up a night of his life for my local school. I admire him. I thank him every chance I get for his civic involvement and service. I am concerned, however. As reported in our Journal blog and in the newspaper, there have already been campaign shenanigans — phony telephone polls that would so obviously benefit Bohn. Who’s running them and why? If I were a candidate, I’d want to know and perhaps put a stop to it. It’s not enough to shrug your shoulders and say, “It’s not me.” Voters want to know where this phantom support is coming from and why. Voters want to know if he will be beholden to people other than those listed on his campaign contribution reports. Cheryl Seidner, former Wiyot tribal chair and retired administrator for Humboldt State University, is a late entry into this race. She was asked to run by several people concerned about the balance on the board, including Assemblyman Wes Chesbro and former Assemblywoman Patty Berg, among others. She is certainly qualified. If I had one adjective to describe her after hearing her speak, it would be “thoughtful.” It’s kind of refreshing.   You can read the Journal’s coverage of these three races on-line at http://www.northcoastjournal.com/ news/2012/05/10/district-soup/ if you missed last week’s paper. And for U.S. Congress? It’s a robust field vying to replace Mike Thompson. The top two — Jared Huffman and someone otherthan-Jared who will come in second — will face off in November. I might bring out my bully pulpit again in the fall for the congressional run-off. l

 

– Judy Hodgson

hodgson@northcoastjournal.com


Unfair to Lovelace Editor: I believe I am qualified to set the record straight regarding an accusation made by Karen Brooks against Mark Lovelace in Zach St. George’s cover story “District Soup” (May 10). For several years, I have been the point person in Humboldt County educating and organizing around the dangerously unhealthy levels of microwave radiation emitted by PG&E’s Smart Meters. Ms. Brooks claims that “when PG&E installed Smart Meters he [Mark] didn’t do anything about it, even though people in the district didn’t want them.” In reality, Mark was one of the few local officials who seriously considered this issue and took action on it. He took the time to meet in person with me and others to listen and discuss our concerns. Mark sought out information on the issue and spoke to supervisors in other counties to learn what other communities were doing. Mark spearheaded the drafting of letters expressing customers’ concerns. These letters were later approved by the board and sent to PG&E and the CPUC on behalf of our community. The Smart Meter issue is not yet completely resolved. However, thanks to Mark and other responsive officials and activists, PG&E

customers can now help protect their health and privacy by opting out of a Smart Meter. Mark Lovelace deserves our thanks and our votes for 3rd District Supervisor for the work he has done on this and many other important issues. Beverly Filip, Eureka Editor: Last week’s Journal contains an ad (May 10, page 5) by Karen Brooks that is an extreme and exaggerated hit piece against Mark Lovelace. The first thing I noticed was a picture of the Plaza Point affordable senior housing project in Arcata. Karen prominently features this project as a very Cartoon by joel mielke negative example of what she terms “social engineerApparently Karen prefers that the site of Plaza ing,” which Mark would supposedly impose on Point be left as a gravel parking lot rather than all of us if he is re-elected as county supervibe high-quality, solar-powered affordable sor. In addition to being mayor of Arcata, I housing for seniors in easy walking distance of have donated hundreds of unpaid hours of my downtown Arcata with close to zero PG&E bills time as the energy analyst on this fine project.

for residents. Karen’s target is even stranger because Plaza Point is a Danco project in Arcata, a project in which Mark and Humboldt County have no involvement. I support Mark for supervisor because he works for policies that offer a wide variety of housing for people of all incomes. Mark supports more compact development, which protects our farms and forests and reduces costs for Humboldt County to provide services. Before he became supervisor, Mark led the successful effort to both save the Sunny Brae Forest and keep it as a working forest. I reject the myths and fantasies offered by Karen Brooks and support real, affordable and sustainable choices that Mark Lovelace works for every day. Michael Winkler, Arcata continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012

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After the News, Walking

continued from previous page

Go, Seidner! Editor: The NCJ provided an essential service to our community in its recent in-depth report on the supervisor’s race. We have a unique and exciting opportunity June 5 to elect a supervisor with proven leadership skills. Cheryl Seidner was twice voted woman of the year by the state of California; she earned an honorary doctorate in humane sciences, and has served 12 years as chairwoman of the Wiyot Tribe, bringing together a wide range of individuals and agencies to provide her community with fundamental services. Despite her successes as a talented and determined negotiator, her distinguished achievements, credentials, awards, and her lifelong dedication to public service, Cheryl Seidner is one of the most humble and gracious individuals I have known; qualities that Cheryl radiates at public appearances. I first met Cheryl Seidner at Humboldt State University where, for 28 years, Cheryl counseled tens of thousands of young adults, like me, through the overwhelming financial burdens in obtaining a public university degree without any family support. My university experience was essential in acquiring the skills and confidence needed to create and operate a successful business that provided dozens of local youths with their first employment at a living wage. Cheryl Seidner understands that the economic prosperity of every class of citizen in every community ultimately depends upon the prosperity of all its residents, especially our most vulnerable and capable youths, eager to begin building self-reliant, sustainable communities. Unfortunately, half the eligible voters aged 18-25 are unregistered (2010, U.S. Census), while half of the registered voters of all ages typically abstain from voting. Many are discouraged after three decades of unprecedented divestment in the American people by the largest U.S. corporations, financial institutions and by our own government. The result is America’s New Gilded Age and the growing human toll within every meaningful indicator of the economy, environment and society that continues to collapse. Humboldt County‘s “other majority” has until May 25 to register to vote and ensure that individuals like Cheryl Seidner are leading Humboldt County government to represent all the people. Cheryl Seidner is that caliber of person. George Clark, Eureka Editor: Being a resident of the newly reconstituted 1st District, I read your May 10 cover story, entertainingly titled “District Soup,” with considerable interest.

I met Rex Bohn when I chaired the Humboldt County Democratic Central Committee, and I like him just fine for his work with youth sports and as a public auctioneer. These are quick, fast-paced activities that match his skills. I am even OK with him strutting down the fashion runway in high-heeled drag, although, honestly, I wouldn’t do that myself. But when I consider that he seeks to represent our interests in the most intense, intellectually demanding job at the highest level of county government as 1st District Supervisor, I have to say “Sorry, Rex, but you can’t touch the skills and qualifications Cheryl Seidner has for this position.” Cheryl has held numerous leadership positions in the political world, including serving 12 years as the Wiyot Tribal Chair, work that has taught her invaluable skills in achieving solutions to problems while considering, as she herself puts it, “people first.” She is a published historian, adding depth to her governing knowledge and skills, and she worked for 28 years at Humboldt State University in the Educational Opportunity Program, helping students succeed in school. Small wonder the California State University System awarded her an honorary doctoral degree. In the university’s words, she “is a visionary, a leader, and a community builder” who received her doctorate “in recognition of her life of extraordinary service.” Please join me in voting for the person who is best qualified and most capable of representing the interests of all of us in the 1st District, Cheryl Seidner. Patrick Riggs, Stafford

Go, Solomon! Editor: As Judy Hodgson noted in her Blog Jammin’ item (May 10), “the race (for the new 2nd Congressional District seat) is heating up with just 30 days to election time.” Since time is truly short, I would like to encourage everyone to support Norman Solomon in this race. There is a Democrat in the White House, but sometimes you wouldn’t know it. Instead of wholly supporting the 99 percent, we have an administration that often displays a more Republican-like behavior. It maintains the defense budget at lofty levels and allows the Bush tax cuts for upper-income earners to continue on. The resulting reduced and misallocated revenues put a substantial squeeze on programs that would benefit the majority of Americans, such as funding for needed infrastructure which would promote job creation, education which would underpin America’s future, and health-care reform which could help free us from being pawns of the medical

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Full moon: from the trees, shadows spill as if blood, that red honey. Venison is sweet if the kill is calm, I recall. Also, more than one woman has died with a baby’s mouth at her breast. My skin tenses. It is a border, my private country safe, contained. Among a thousand redwoods, a dewy luster of moss, tunneled, under the feathered waiting of barred owl. So much wanting, though no one wants to be other. There are arcs of darkness, where a deer or mouse could step away into light, where someone surely watched, allowed, the quick collapse of body into death. All those babies, what did they taste? Everywhere the ground is layered in little bones.

is sending to the general public that bothers me. It shows that as much as we think we’re in this hippie dippy community that has enlightened ways of thinking, where men and women are equal, in actuality we’re not. The ad’s message is that women are objects, or “dirty girls” that need to be cleaned up from top to bottom. This is not always the best way to reach the male demographic, either, because some men may find this narrow, old-school view offensive. Women who see this ad might not shop at a place that demeans women by depicting them as “dirty girls.” This ad is gross. I certainly won’t shop at Bayside Garden Supply, and I will tell all my friends the same. Please pull this ad. Sharon Hammond, Eureka

Editor: I’m an avid North Coast Journal — Kimberley Pittman-Schulz reader. I enjoy the quality of writing and the breadth of topics. The Journal is a fabulous publication, whether in print or online. insurance industry. Having said that, I was reading “A Place in If you want to change this, Norman Solothe Woods” (May 3) online recently, when my mon deserves your vote. He would support a son walked up behind me and started staring Democratic administration, but he would also … not at the article, but at the advertisement let them know when he disagrees with them. next to it. Honestly, I don’t even recall what As a long-time progressive, he fully underthe ad was for, but it was a huge scantily clad stands and supports the cause of the 99 perseductress. cent. He would be an advocate for reductions Now, I’m not modest nor prude. I have in the defense budget and a transformation nothing against pornography (for and of of the current private health care system to a adults). But this reaction by my son got me more efficient universal single payer one. He thinking: First, the ad obviously does what it’s would also oppose any privatization of Social intended to do, which is get people’s attention. Security. Some people are supporting other Second, and more important, it exposes my candidates because they say their candidate is son to images that are totally age inappropribetter able to hit the road running. I would say, ate. At this point, he’s quite young, and sexual first look and see what direction the candiimplications are lost on him. Frankly, he’s so date is actually going. In my opinion, Norman young that he might be more likely to think of Solomon is going in the right direction. His breasts as a source of food rather than titillagoal is to make America a better place for all tion. But soon enough, these images will start of us, and I would hope that that’s in the same to be more meaningful, and not in a good way. direction you too would like us to go. I could write at length about how the media Sherman Schapiro, Blue Lake objectifies women or a slew of other related issues, but that’s not the point. My point is this: The Journal is a publication for all ages, and that sort of advertising Editor: isn’t appropriate for children or adolescents. I noticed the ad for Bayside Garden Supply One could argue that I should stick to kid on page 34 of your May 10 issue. A woman is friendly publications. However, I’d argue that standing on a log, grasping her back side. In the our local “guide to what’s happening” should forefront, a man is blowing air up her skirt with be kid friendly. Specifically, NC Journal ads an atomizer. The slogan reads “Clean up those should be as family oriented as the rest of its dirty girls from top to bottom.” It’s a given that content. female marijuana plants need to be debugged. Finally, I understand that not all news is apSex may be an easy way to get people’s atpropriate for children; but by the time my son tention, but this particular way of advertising has the capacity to read the Journal, he may narrows your market by the 50 percent of the be more prepared to comprehend the compopulation who are women. plex social issues reported therein. Until then, It’s not the product or the woman in the I’d like to be able to read the Journal without ad, but rather the message about women this having to worry about what he’s seeing over

Dirty Ad


my shoulder. So, let’s leave the sexually explicit advertisements to less reputable publications or websites, shall we? Thanks. Carol Ingram, Arcata

Dig Deeper on Parks Editor: The feature article coverage of the state parks closure issue (“A Place in the Woods,” May 10) was appreciated. The time is certainly ripe for elected officials, Gov. Brown, and big money funding sources to pull a rabbit out of the hat to avoid these disastrous closures. We hope that your weekly continues to dig into this topic, because there are many relevant facts that your reading public would appreciate having brought to light. The history of Grizzly Creek Redwoods State Park, as recounted in the article, missed an important element for understanding the dark politics of state park closures. The feature article failed to explore how the $500 million dollar Headwaters deal included upwards of $30 million for purchase of PALCO lands adjacent to Grizzly Creek in order to expand the park from its tiny 360 acres to a total of approximately 3,500 acres. Apparently, this major lands acquisition initiative has now been relegated to permanent limbo, with the purchased lands in state possession, but no hint whatsoever as to their conservation destiny. Certainly, the issues of timber theft, vandalism, inappropriate off-road vehicle use, and other conservation threats apply to those lands as much as they do to the globally important park. It is tremendous that Humboldt County may be able to steward Grizzly Creek past this closure challenge. Nevertheless, as executive director of the Environmental Protection Information Center, I certainly hope that the promise and investment of the Headwaters deal is not ignored, and that the North Coast Journal will dig under the surface on these critical issues. Gary Graham Hughes, Arcata

Free Flowing Editor: I am a big fan of “Field Notes” by Barry Evans. In fact, as a retired person, I consider his column a part of my continuing education. His recent column (“Six Rivers (By Any Other Name),” May 3) reminded me that Six Rivers Bank used to (maybe still does) give out these beautiful calendars with photographs of each of the six rivers. I carried one around for years until it finally went where old calendars go. We are lucky, we who live in this temperate rain forest, where some of our rivers are dam free and where most of our citizens are damn free. Barbara Dilworth, Eureka

Dem Dilemma Editor: Thanks for Ryan Burns’ reporting on the “The Dem Schism Gets Real,” (Blog Jammin, May 17). The motives being alleged against Virginia and others are projection. These hit and run tactics by certain local disgruntled members of the Humboldt County Democratic Central Committee are par for the course. These self-appointed Democrats by their own flawed litmus test are the only true Democrats. They ambushed and tried to pass a resolution that some of their own members had no prior knowledge of, and questions about procedures were legitimate. Some writers timed letters deliberately so they conveniently appeared in local media a day after their attack was unveiled at the May 9 HCDCC meeting. Considering that this resolution and these letters are by opponents running for HDCC seats against Virginia, Marian and others, their intent is not selfless. I consider myself independent and I chose not to pick one party because I want to make my choices based on the individual, the best person for the job. This allows me to support candidates such as Susan Adams for U.S. Congress. The rigid two party system has long failed to serve the people. To call someone “DINO” and other derogatory comments only shows the character of the person hurling such insults. I have only attended a few HCDCC meetings to support individual Democratic candidates. I am disgusted at the way these meetings are conducted. Visitors are required to register and introduce themselves but not allowed to speak. Since the November 2010 election, a radical minority has had a case of sour grapes. Milt tried to influence questions and discussions on the special resolution. Another HCDCC member was yelled at and called traitor after the meeting, outside, away from media scrutiny, by another member because she did not support the resolution at that meeting. Sounds like freedom of speech and respect is well and alive at the HCDCC. The Brown act and bylaws are selectively applied by these self-appointed “true Democrats.” I find the local Republican party more welcoming. While I am not a Democrat, those who belittle moderate Democrats and all other parties exhibit hubris at its best. John Chiv, Eureka

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Write a letter! Please try to make it no more than 350 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012

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y thoughts don’t go much deeper than the length of this column. Once I think an idea through I’m on to my next thought. But two letters that my March column generated bothered me so much that my brain refuses to move on. In “Take the Money and Run With It” (March 1), I said that my daughter wants a gong she could bang to interrupt conversation and get a word in. I contrasted that to the power of corporations and wealthy individuals to mass distribute their voices through television advertisements. The point? Speech you buy is more powerful than speech that costs nothing. Reader Eric Black of Eureka said that if my daughter wants to spread her ideas to the masses all she needs is a Twitter account. And Cyndy Phillips of McKinleyville added that through e-mail, YouTube and other online communication tools she can reach millions. Well, my daughter has beautiful ideas in her 7-year-old head of cleaning up the earth and feeding poor people. How wonderful the world would be if it only took a Twitter account to spread those messages. Pick up #litter on the beach, bring #bag to store, walk don’t drive, give money to #foodforpeople, and let’s all get along.@ AnaFernanda. Here’s the problem. An estimated 300 million registered Twitter users send about 175 million tweets every day. On YouTube people view 4 billion videos every day. YouTube boasts that people upload more videos each month than ABC, NBC and CBS combined created in 60 years. In 1977, 150 million people watched the 12-part miniseries “Roots,” about a multigenerational family of black slaves and their descendants. They watched it because it was a riveting show. But they tuned into it in the first place because there wasn’t much else on. You didn’t have a DVR back then to record and store shows. These days, “Roots” would compete against “The Voice,” “NCIS,” “Jersey Shore,” “Judge Judy” (she still pulls them

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

in!) and anything people have recorded or ordered up from Netflix. None of those top rated shows pulled in more than 20 million viewers. I won’t argue that important messages can’t travel the world via Twitter or YouTube. Both media helped lead to the toppling of Hosni Mubarak and Moammar Gadhafi. Kony 2012 is everywhere. But what’s the chance that your revolutionmaking tweet will penetrate that dense forest of 175 million daily tweets? It would be like winning the Lotto. I think winning the Lotto would be more likely to happen. Just consider what people view and comment on these days. When I checked earlier this month, the most discussed YouTube video was Justin Bieber performing the song “Baby” with Ludicris. It had 732 million views and 7.8 million comments. Also on the top list was “Questions Every Intelligent Christian Wants to Know,” “Super Junior,” Lady Gaga and Eminem. The sixth most viewed video was “Charlie Bit My Finger Again” — about a baby that bit his brother’s finger (450 million views and counting!) Revolution making? The second most discussed video was a seconds-long one about Sub4Sub, which is a service that will help you generate viewers for your videos and subscribers for your video channel. To do this you toss your name into a big digital hat. You agree to subscribe to just about anyone’s video channel if they will subscribe to yours. It’s like a grown up version of playing doctor. I’ll look at yours if you look at mine. But you can generate more subscribers much faster if you pay Sub4sub. For $60 I could buy 2,000 subscribers in about 24 hours. Or for $440 I could buy 2,000 people who will view it, “like” it and comment on it. Imagine how many VLCs, as they call them, I could get with $4.4 million. Or let’s get back to television. These days, none of the top TV shows get even a sixth of the viewership “Roots” did. But with enough money you could now buy a 30-second ad on seven shows and get that

kind of viewership. And you can post it on YouTube and Twitter it for free. In the presidential election, super PACs have raised more than $200 million so far, according to Opensecrets.org, which compiles election fundraising and spending data. President Obama has raised $191 million. Mitt Romney has raised $87 million. Here in California we won’t feel the force that paid speech will have in the presidential election, because our state isn’t one of nine swing states. In the nine states that the Washington Post says could go either to Obama or Romney — Ohio, Nevada, Florida, Iowa, Colorado, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Virginia and Wisconsin — people are going to be blasted with TV, magazine and newspaper ads, robo-calls and billboards, Facebook and Google ads, Twitter posts and YouTube videos and ads on YouTube videos, email spam, ads tacked on to the end of emails, radio ads, door fliers and junk snail mail. Some political hounds estimate that total spending could hit $1 billion. Much of that will be spent in just those nine states. My daughter’s Twitter posts don’t have much of a chance against that flood. There is a dangerous myth that Twitter and Facebook and YouTube foster. That’s the idea that because the Internet gives everyone access to a press, we each have the power to communicate our ideas worldwide. We don’t have that power. We only have that potential. It isn’t the same thing. Corporations and people with money can pay to turn that potential into reality. Then again, all that money that PACs will spend in the upcoming election might be a waste of time. Ohio residents might be too busy watching Charlie bite fingers to pay much attention to the commercials that air during “Jersey Shore.”

– Marcy Burstiner

mib3@humboldt.edu

Marcy Burstiner is an associate professor of journalism and mass communication at Humboldt State University.


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PARTIAL ANNULAR ECLIPSE SEEN ECLIPSE SEEN UMBRA

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Ring of Fire

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Sun and moon will perform a rare pas de deux in Humboldt skies on Sunday By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

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This Sunday, sorry: no flares, no corona. Just a ring of bright sun that’s dangerous to look at directly without special eye protection. It’ll feel more like a bright overcast than heavy twilight. Even so, plenty of people are getting hyped up about the phenomenon. Locally, the centerline passes over Requa on the north bank of the Klamath, and the Requa Inn has been fully booked for nearly a year, with visitors coming from as far away as Europe. “We got our first booking for May 20 three years ago,” said Jan Wortman, one of the Inn’s owners, “and we’ve had to turn many people away. For us, this is unheard of to be booked up so far in advance.” Closer to home, Arcata’s creamery district will celebrate with a free Solar Eclipse Festival, complete with stilt walkers, kinetic test drives and entertainment from the Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir, Samba da Alegria, the Lonesome Roses and many more. Sponsors, including the Arcata Playhouse, Holly Yashi Jewelry, KHUM and the Creamery District Neighborhood Coalition, will close off a stretch of Ninth Street near L for the party, which runs from 3 to 7 p.m. Viewing should be great at eclipse time, when the sun will seem to hover right at the end of the street, said David Ferney, the playhouse’s co-artistic director. Be sure to wear the “cool eclipse viewing glasses” on sale during the festival, or bring your own. And if Arcata is foggy, you can still continued on next page

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verything you need to know about solar eclipses can be summed up in one number: 400. During an eclipse of the sun, when the moon comes between our star and the Earth, it’s a near-perfect fit: they look just about the same size. That’s because, while the diameter of the sun is some 400 times greater than that of the moon, the sun is about 400 times farther away. Pure fluke. When the moon is close to us in its elliptical orbit, the lunar disk appears slightly larger than that of the sun, so when they’re in line, we experience a total eclipse of the sun. This Sunday, however, the moon is nearly at “apogee”— when it’s farthest from us — so its disk is smaller than that of the sun, giving us an annular, or ring, eclipse. In any given spot, an annular eclipse — with a full ring of light visible around the moon — is a rare thing, about as common as a total eclipse of the sun. Humboldt won’t see another for decades. From 2001 on through 2020, just 15 annular eclipses will be visible from anywhere on the planet, along with 13 total eclipses and a couple of hybrids (total or annular, depending on your location). Visually, an annular eclipse is a starkly different experience from totality, when no sunlight gets past the moon, giving the weird impression of a black hole in the sky. At that time, naked eye viewing is fantastic, letting us see the corona of hot gases which surround the sun and, sometimes, pink solar flares or prominences.

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head for the hills, where specially filtered binoculars and telescopes will be set up for public viewing by the nonprofit Astronomers of Humboldt. The group also plans to have some low tech pinhole boxes and possibly safety glasses available. The astronomers will take over the south parking lot of the Kneeland Airport starting around 4:30 p.m., and they are encouraging people to bring picnic dinners. If the sky is clear, people can stay on for dark sky observations well into the evening, said club president Russ Owsley. Whatever you do to mark this celestial event, be careful out there! If you’re in the “path of annularity” (seeing the complete ring), about 88 percent of the sun’s area will be covered. That still lets 12 percent of the sun’s light through, making the ring about 50,000 times brighter than a full moon. That represents an awful lot of photons, including high-energy ultraviolet ones, plenty enough to fry a whole bunch of an unprotected retina’s 100 million optical receptors in a few seconds. As with any partial eclipse of the sun, naked-eye viewing, even during the full extent of “annularity” is dangerous. (See box for safe viewing tips.) In addition to the ring of sunlight, a couple of other visuals are worth looking for during the annular eclipse. One is the planet Venus, which might be visible if you look about 23 degrees east of the sun (about the span between your extended thumb and little finger held at arm’s length). The other is the “pinhole camera” effect, where you’ll see images of the sun’s ring on the ground through small holes formed by your fingers or a straw

hat, say. Humboldtians are well placed to see the full extent of the annularity anywhere from Garberville on to the north. The sun will be low in the sky, around one-quarter of the way between the horizon and directly overhead. That’s assuming the western sky will be clear, of course; historically, we have about a 50 percent chance of clear skies THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE’S JACKIE DANDENEAU WEARING on the coast for the afternoon SPECIAL ECLIPSE VIEWING GLASSES PHOTO BY BOB DORAN of May 20. In Eureka, the partial eclipse begins at about 5:10 p.m., with full annularity lasting four minutes from 6:26 to 6:30 p.m. igh-energy ultraviolet light can damage unprotected The midpoint is at 6:27:50 p.m., eyes. Since our retinas are insensitive to pain, people when the sun will be about 21 looking directly at the sun wouldn’t feel the destrucdegrees above the horizon. tion, and might not even notice it until hours later. Even The longest annularity for this worse is looking at the eclipse through unfiltered binoculars eclipse is 5 minutes 46 seconds, or a telescope, when retinal damage can take just a fraction nearly two minutes longer than of a second. we experience in Humboldt, There are two basic ways of safely observing the eclipsed sun, occurring almost on the Interindirectly or through filters. national Dateline in the middle The easiest indirect method is pinhole projection, in which of the Pacific Ocean. you project the image of the sun through a small hole in a Due to the International piece of card onto another sheet of white card. You can use Dateline, our May 20 eclipse binoculars mounted on a tripod (don’t even think of looking actually starts on May 21, in the through them!) to do the same thing, briefly — prolonged exGulf of Tonkin, off the south posure can damage the optics because of the heat build-up. China coast. It takes about two For filtered direct viewing, sun-certified mylar glasses are hours for the moon’s shadow cheap and do the job well, as does welder’s glass #14. Silverto swing across the Pacific, based black-and white film (fully exposed to light, developed passing south of the Aleutian to maximum density) also works. The Discovery Museum in Islands, making landfall close to Eureka and the gift shop at Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park the mouth of the Klamath, and are among those selling eclipse glasses. Do not look at the ending at sunset near Lubbock, sun through: sunglasses, color film (which lacks silver), “space Texas. In all, the moon’s shadow blanket” material or aluminized polyester gardening film. travels about 8,500 miles in 3½ — Barry Evans hours, at an average velocity of

Safe Solar Watching

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2,400 mph. The path of annularity will be between 147 and 201 miles wide. Babylonian astronomers, 2,500 years ago, knew that the sun, Earth and moon return to about the same relative positions in the sky roughly once every 18 years, resulting in a similar eclipse. But there is a catch. This 18-year cycle — which has become known as the “saros” cycle — is made up of 223 synodic (full moon to full moon) months. That works out at about 18 years 11 days and eight hours. The eight hours has the effect of shifting each eclipse one-third of an Earth-revolution west from the previous one. We’re next due partial solar eclipses in Humboldt County on Oct. 23, 2014; Aug. 21, 2017; and Oct. 14, 2023. We have to wait until Aug. 12, 2045 to experience a total eclipse of the sun here, which is actually pretty cool: Any one place on Earth only experiences totality about once every 360 years, on average. A year later, Feb. 5, 2046, Humboldt gets another annular eclipse. If Sunday’s annular eclipse doesn’t quite do it for you (and truth is, the difference between a partial and a total solar eclipse is, well, day and night), be patient. The United States is due a total eclipse in five years. On Aug. 21, 2017, the centerline passes right across Salem, Ore. Trust me, it’ll be worth the drive. ● Journal editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg contributed to this report. For more eclipse lore, see Barry Evans’ Field Notes on page 47.


Blog Jammin’ POLITICS / BY RYAN BURNS / MAY 10, 12:29 P.M.

Dem Schism Gets Real Now it’s on: The struggle for control of the Democratic Party in Humboldt County has officially gone ballistic. Two weeks ago we reported on an ideological rift in the Humboldt County Democratic Central Committee — a schism between liberal Democrats such as Eureka City Councilwoman Linda Atkins and her more conservative nemeses. We assumed the showdown would take place at the ballot box on June 5, when eight candidates — four from each camp — vie for just four available seats in the committee’s fourth district. Turns out Atkins couldn’t wait that long. At last night’s central committee meeting, Atkins introduced a resolution to remove her opponents, most of whom have just recently become associate members. Namely she sought to oust fellow Eureka Councilmembers Marian Brady and Melinda Ciarabellini, Humboldt County Supervisor Virginia Bass, Harbor District Commissioner Richard Marks and his wife, Robin. [Update, 2:15 p.m.: Marks just called to say that his wife has not endorsed Bohn. He’s not sure why her name is listed on Bohn’s website, but he’s working to get it removed.] On what grounds? All five [four, says Marks] have publicly endorsed Rex Bohn for First District Supervisor. The committee, meanwhile, has officially endorsed Cheryl Seidner, the lone Democrat in the race. (Bohn is now registered independent, though he was a Republican as recently as June of last year.) In a ballsy move, Brady even turned up at the meeting wearing a “Rex Bohn for Supervisor” hoodie. Turns out this is a violation of committee bylaws, which allow for the removal of any committee member “publicly advocating that voters should not vote for the Democratic endorsee for any office.” Atkins stood at the front of the room, reading her resolution while the committee, including Brady and Bass (along with her husband, Matthew Owen), followed along on print-outs provided by Atkins. It was a bold and aggressive move, and it appeared to throw her intended targets off guard — along with most everyone else. The resolution sent the meeting into procedural chaos. Committee Chair Milt Boyd explained that in order to consider a special resolution introduced at the same meeting, the committee first had to bypass standard voting procedures, and to do that it needed approval from two-thirds of the commit-

tee. In other words, 12 of the 18 voting members present had to agree to consider the resolution before they could even talk about ousting Brady, Bass, Ciarabellini and the Markses. It didn’t get that far. After several minutes of cross-talk, head-scratching and points of order, only 10 members voted to consider the resolution — two shy of the number needed. Confusion was largely to blame. After the meeting, several members admitted that they weren’t sure exactly what they were voting on. Another said she would have voted yes but had “nodded off.” This doesn’t mean that Atkins’ resolution has failed; it’s merely been delayed. It will be put on the agenda for the next scheduled committee meeting, which won’t take place until June 13, eight days after the election. (If the committee had agreed last night to consider the resolution, the vote on removal would have taken place at a special meeting on May 30.) This could potentially set up an even stranger scenario: There’s a good chance that at least one of the four more conservative candidates will win a voting position on the committee on Election Day. If that happens, Atkins said, the next committee vote will determine whether or not the insurgent victor(s) can be seated. This is political hardball at its fiercest. After the meeting, Bass said she agreed to endorse Bohn a year and a half ago, “long before” she decided to run for a seat on the committee. She won’t take back that endorsement now. Bass alleged that the committee has not been consistent with its application of the bylaws, and she said Atkins’ resolution “seems contrived.” She also questioned whether the committee’s bylaws are consistent with others in the state. Brady left the meeting before we could ask for her response. Atkins said she’d written up the resolution the previous night after she learned that a TV commercial for the Bohn campaign was touting the endorsements of Democratic committee members. This issue, she said, goes to the heart of the committee’s mission. ●

Eureka 443-3507 | Fortuna 725-1169 | McKinleyville 839-8986

OCEAN, RECREATION / BY BARRY EVANS / MAY 11, 2:51 P.M.

Madaket Rides Again Humboldt Bay Maritime Museum’s MV Madaket, launched in 1910, took her first cruise of the season today, with the full cruise season starting on May 19. 75-minute narrated cruises will run from the C Street Dock. ●

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

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PAPER CUTS BY LYNN JONES, PHOTOGRAPHY BY DREW HYLAND

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12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

hh, the sounds of the season … “Maaaaa! Make me a sandwich!” Or who can forget … “Daaaaad, I’m bored. Take me to Tilt.” Or the timeless … “Can we PLEEEZE change the channel to SpongeBob?” (or whatever they’re watching now). Yes, having the kids around the house can be pure joy. But with the annual summer surrender of local schools staring parents in the face, it might be a good idea to strategize so as not to incur more mirth than you can handle. Absence, after all … it does good stuff fer your ticker. Thus, every year, the North Coast Journal steps it up to list your local options for “sharing”

your offspring. We call it our “Summer of Fun” issue! Hopefully, for two reasons: The following programs are meant to simultaneously entertain, educate and occupy your kids, while perhaps giving you time for a little Summer Fun of your own! So! Sit your kid(s) down at the kitchen table. Give ’em a magic marker. Place the following pages before them. Tell ’em, “Circle what you’d just love to do.” Then, when they’re done, go back through and cross out the listings with the prices they clearly weren’t paying attention to. Now, Humboldt parents, rest easy. Enjoy knowing that summer is almost here … and you have some peace and quiet scheduled! You’re welcome. — Andrew Goff


General and Multiple activity programs ARCATA RECREATION DIVISION. Numerous classes and camps including gymnastics, exercise classes, drop-in sports, art and cooking. Ages: Toddlers to teens, depending on program. When, Where, Cost: Varies according to program. Contact: 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. BLUE LAKE DROP-IN RECREATION Drop-in recreation for youth and teens. Basketball, climbing wall, pool table, foosball, video games, Xbox, more. Ages: All ages. When: Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m. Where: Blue Lake Roller Rink, 312 S. Railroad Ave. Cost: Free to youth and teens. Sponsored by Blue Lake Teens for Change. Contact: Blue Lake Parks and Recreation, 668-5932. Website: bluelake.ca.gov. BLUE SLIDE CAMP. Faith-building outdoor overnight summer camp. Relaxation, celebration, singing, swimming and prayer. Ages: Entering grades 4-12. When: Family Camp July 6-8; Youth Camp (entering grades 4-12) July 8-13. Where: On the banks of the Mad River in Maple Creek. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: 445-3453. E-mail: ncsrfmom@yahoo.com. Website: blueslidecamp.org.

Bring the Kids to the

BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF THE REDWOODS. Club house drop-in program with arts and crafts, recreation, cooking, field trips. Supervised by staff. Ages: 6-12. When: Noon-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Where: 3117 Prospect Ave., Eureka. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: 442-9142. Website: bgcredwoods.org. CAMP CARSON. Free summer recreation camp includes games, sports, arts and crafts, performing arts, scientific discovery, special guest speakers and more. Ages: 5-12. When: June 18-Aug. 10, M-F, 11 a.m.-4.p.m. Where: Corner of Carson and I streets, Eureka. Cost: Free, first-come, first served basis. Contact: Mo Merrell, 268-1844. ARCATA CAMP COMBO. Morning camp (9 a.m.-1 p.m.) then for the remainder of the day (1-5 p.m.) choose a specialty camp. Cost: $125 weekly, $135 non-resident. Contact: Arcata Parks and Rec. 822-7091. CAMP LIVING WATERS. Crafts, swimming, outdoor games. Ages: Various. When: July 15-20. Where: Cookson Ranch, 22 miles east of the Highway 10half99 interchange. Cost: $175. Contact: 822-4102. Website: camplivingwatershumboldt.org. CAMP PERIGOT Games, water day, skating, art, fieldtrips, sports, theatre, cooking and more. Hot

breakfast and lunch provided. Ages: 5-13. When: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Fri., June 18-Aug. 24. Extended care available from 8-9 a.m. and 4-5:30 p.m. Where: Perigot Park, Blue Lake. Cost: Camperships available! Resident Discount: $86/full-day/week, $45/half-day/week, $22/daily full day, $12 daily half-day. Non-Resident: $103/ full-day/week, $63/half-day/week, $26/daily full day, $15 daily half-day. Contact: Blue Lake Parks and Recreation, 668-5932. Website: bluelake.ca.gov. CAMP RYAN. Educational recreation program includes games, sports, arts and crafts, performing arts, scientific discovery, special guest speakers and field trips. Ages: Youth ages 5-12. When: June 18-Aug. 10, M-F, 7:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. All sessions are one week, can register for half day or full day sessions. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Cost: $95 half day, $115 full day. Contact: Mo Merrell, 268-1844. DREAM QUEST TEEN AND YOUTH CENTER Includes Monday art lab, youth media projects, computer/ internet lab, music lessons, ensembles and programs, Tae Kwon Do, Friday night recreation, swim lessons, performing arts camp, Karla’s cooking camp and more. Ages: All ages. When: Ongoing, Mon.-Thur., 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri., 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Where: 100 Country Club Drive, Willow Creek (next to Post Office). Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: (530) 629-3564.

EUREKA RECREATION. Refer to Camp Ryan, Carson and Leader-In-Training Camps. Numerous classes and camps available at Adorni Center. Ages: Depends on program. When: Depends on program. Where: Adorni Center, Eureka. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: Adorni Recreation Center 441-4224. Website: adornicenter.com. FORTUNA LIBRARY SUMMER READING PROGRAM. Prizes, movie night, crafts and a reading group. Ages: Children ages 0-11, Teens ages 12-19. When: June 14-Aug. 31. Where: Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Cost: Free. Contact: 725-3460. HSU BASKETBALL CAMPS Boys’ and girls’ day or overnight camps emphasizing fundamentals and sportsmanship. Competitions and game play. Ages: Grades 2-12 (boys) and grades 4-12 (girls). When: Boys: June 25-28. Girls: June 22-24. Where: HSU. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: HSU Athletics, 826-3666. ARCATA CHILDREN’S CENTER STATE PRESCHOOL. Offers play-based curriculum in home-like center. Helps young children with the basic skills they will need for entry into school. Ages: 3-5. When: Year round, M-F, 7:45 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Where: 1695 10th St., Arcata. Cost: Full time $35/day, three-fourths time $26/day, half time $19.20/day. Financial assistance available. Contact: 822-1423. continued on next page

June 21-24 10am-10pm

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Camp begins with lunch at noon

Cost per week: $35.00 (includes supplies and lunch)

J Street Gym First Covenant Church 2500 J St., Eureka For information and scholarship inquiries, call 443-2957 or 442-6774 Enrollment is limited! First sign-ups will have preference.

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F.U.N. PLAY CENTER. Safe place for families to meet while offering kids their first play experience. Ages: 0-5. When: 9 a.m.-noon, Mon.-Wed., After July 1, Mondays and Wednesdays, 9-11:30 a.m. (ongoing). Where: Adorni Center, Eureka. Cost: Free with donations accepted. Contact: 268-1844. Website: adornicenter.com. INDIAN VALLEY SUMMER CAMP. Natural resource education through community collaborations. Free day camp. Daily meals/transportation/activities included. Ages: Session 1: 8-11; Session 2: 12-16. When: Session 1: June 18-29; Session 2: July 9-13. Where: Hayfork, Trinity County. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: 407-5036. Website: thewatershedcenter.com. KEET-TV KIDS CLUB. Clips of PBS Kids, stories, art projects. Each family gets a free book. Ages: 2-8 with parents. When: First Saturday of every month. Noon-2 p.m. June 2, July 7 and Aug. 4. Where: Morris Graves Museum, 636 F St., Eureka. Cost: Free. Contact: 442-0278. E-mail: programassistant@humboldtarts.org. KID’S CAMP. Outdoor play time, arts and crafts, field trips, skating, exciting clubs and much more. When: Sessions run from June 18-Aug. 17. Where: McKinleyville Activity Center, Gwin Road. Cost: Full day fees: $105/week, Half day fees: $65/ week. Single days full: $23/day, Single days half: $15/day. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003. KIDZTOWN INTERNATIONAL EXTRAVAGANZA. Puppets, unicycles, fast-paced children’s activities and lessons. Ages: All ages. When: May 20, 10:30 a.m. Where: Campbell Creek Connexion, 76 13th St., Arcata. Cost: Free. Contact: Campbell Creek Connexion, 826-1000, myrnadipert@gmail.com. L.I.T. PROGRAM. Held in conjunction with City of Eureka Summer Day Camps. Offers teens opportunity for leadership and personal growth that will enhance college and job applications, teach valuable life skills and strengthen work ethic. Ages: Teens 13-17. When: June 18-Aug. 10, M-F. Sessions are one week and schedules are flexible. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St. and Camp Carson, Corner of Carson and I streets. Cost: $45/week, includes training, T-shirt, sweatshirt and field trip fees. Application deadline May 18. Contact: Mo Merrell, 268-1844. LOST COAST CAMP. Ropes challenge course, cooperative games, swimming, backpacking, arts and crafts time. Costume party. Ages: 5-15 depending on the session. When: Ranch and Wild Camp (ages 8-11) June 26-July 3; River and Adventure Camp (ages 8-11) July 5-12; Jr. Day Camp (ages 5-7) July 16-20; Performing Arts Camp (ages 11-13) July 14-22; Family Camp July 27-29; Teen Back Pack Trip (ages 13-15) July 25-Aug. 1. Where: Petrolia. Pickups available in northern and southern Humboldt. Cost: Varies per session. Many scholarships

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

are available. Contact: 629-3547. Website: lostcoastcamp.org. MOUNT HERMON KIDDER CREEK CAMP. High-adventure program features rafting, horseback riding and high mountain adventures. Ages: Grades 2-12. When: Various sessions from June-August. Where: Kidder Creek, in Scott Valley near Yreka. Cost: Call for details. Contact: (888) 642-2677. Website: mounthermon.org. NORTH COAST PARENTS. Support group for parents of babies, toddlers and preschool aged children. Reduced fee gymnastics, craft times, cooking with kids, park days, Madaket boat cruise and pony rides. Ages: 0-5 yrs. When: Activities vary. Check online. Where: Locations vary. Cost: $20 to join for summer. Website: northcoastparents.org. NORTH STAR QUEST CAMP. Adolescent girl campers sing songs, swim in the river and enjoy fun and enlightening workshops like clowning, belly dancing and women’s health. Scholarships available. Ages: Grades 6-8. When: Session 1: July 29-Aug. 2; Session 2: Aug. 5-9. Where: Mattole Camp and Retreat Center, 36841 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Cost: $550 (no one turned away for lack of funds). Contact: 633-4522. Website: northstarquest.org. PLAY GROUP Ages: 0-5. When: Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m.12:30 p.m. Where: Call for location. Cost: Free Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003. REDWOOD PARK DAY CAMP. Games, art, field trips, swimming and more. Ages: 5-12. When: Full day 9 a.m.-5 p.m. or half day 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. M-F., June 18-Aug. 24. Where: Redwood Park Lodge. Cost: $125 per week/$90 per week for half day. (Add $10 for non-resident.). Contact: Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. REDWOOD PARK FAMILY DAYS. Arcata Ropes Course activities including the Nitro Crossing, Flying Squirrel, games, team building and more!. Ages: 4 years and older (accompanied by an adult). When: May 12 and July 14, 9 a.m.-noon or 1-4 p.m. Where: Meet at the Redwood Lodge in Redwood Park. Cost: $10 per participant / $11 per non-resident. Contact: 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. REDWOODS AND RIVERS KIDS CAMP. River activities supervised by trained, certified instructors. Four days of rafting and structured activities focusing on teamwork, leadership, outdoor skills and wilderness safety. Ages: 11-17. When: July 23-26. Where: Call for more information. Cost: $400 includes all meals, equipment, camping and river fees. Contact: 1-800-429-0090.

ROONEY-MCKINLEYVILLE CHILDREN’S CENTER STATE PRESCHOOL. Offers play-based curriculum in home-like center. Warm and nuturing envirmont helps young children with the basic skills they will need for entry into school. Ages: 3-5. When: Year round, M-F, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Now accepting new enrollment for summer. Where: 1621 Gwin Road, McKinleyville. Cost: Full time $35/day, three-fourths time $26/ day, half time $19.20/day. Financial assistance available. Contact: 822-1423. SUMMER FUN AND KIDDIE KAMP. Skating, movies, water day, field trips, games, arts and crafts. Ages: Graduating 1st through graduating 8th graders and Kiddie Kamp for ages 4-graduating kindergartners. When: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri., June 18-July 24. Where: Rohner Park, Fortuna. Cost: $90/week, $20/day, $15/half day (7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. or 12:30-5:30 p.m.). Discounts for multiple sessions, siblings. Contact: Fortuna Parks and Recreation 725-7620. SUMMER LEAP PROGRAM. Helps youth discover the outdoors via rock climbing, whitewater rafting, challenge course and backpacking activities. Leadership, environmental education, personal growth. Ages: K-12. When: Varies depending on type of trip requested. Where: 3015 J St., Eureka. Contact: 441-1030. E-mail: summerleap@yahoo.com. SUMMER READING CLUB “DREAM BIG.” Based on the theme “Dream Big.” Series of programs with stories, activities and crafts. When: Wednesdays, 1:30 p.m., June 20-Aug. 8. Where: Main Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Cost: Free. Contact: JoAnn Bauer, 269-1927. Website: humlib.org. SUMMER READING CLUB. Participants can sign up and play the game by reading library books. Preschoolers can also participate by listening to books read aloud. When: As soon as school gets out. Game begins Friday, June 15. Where: SRC at all library branches and book mobile, game at Main Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Cost: Free. Contact: JoAnn Bauer, 269-1927, humlib.org. TRIUMPHANT LIFE CAMP. Faith-themed activities include paintball, arts and crafts, climbing wall, team building challenge course, zip line, swimming pool activities, disc golf, river swimming, nature hikes, basketball, baseball, volleyball and campfires. Ages: Grades 4-12 depending on camp. When: 4 p.m. Sun. to 4 p.m. Fri. Grades 4-5, July 8July 13; Grades 6-7, July 15- July 20; Grades 8-9, July 22-July 27, Grades 10-12, July 29-Aug. 3. Where: Triumphant Life Camp on Highway 36, 10 miles beyond Bridgeville. Cost: $235/$265 after June 3. Contact: 445-2267. Website: tlc-camp.org. VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL. Rocky Point Lighthouse. Ages: 5-12. When: Aug. 24-26. Where: Campbell Creek Connexion, 76 13th St., Arcata. Cost: Free. Contact: To register, Campbell Creek Connexion, 826-1000, myrnadipert@gmail.com.


Coffee Connexion open for parents to enjoy while your kids have fun!

YMCA CAMP RAVENCLIFF. Beautiful, natural setting for summer and family camp. Ages: 7-13, 13-15 (Teen Camp). When: July 1-Aug. 5. Various camps. Where: Camp Ravencliff, Redway. Cost: Varies. See website. Contact: ymcaeastbay.org/register/ravencliff. YOUTH DRIVEN SATURDAY NIGHTS. Open recreation program for youth. Various activity options, board games, gym games, Wii, music. Ages: Grades 6-12. When: Saturdays, 7-9:30 p.m. Where: McKinleyville Activity Center, 1705 Gwin Road. Cost: Free. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003.

Visual and Performing Arts “HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME” DANCE CAMP. Halfday camp. Learn dance styles made famous by Hollywood royalty: tap, jazz, hip hop, more. Each day’s dance style and activities based on a famous dance icon. Ages: 7-10. When: July 9-13, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Where: Arcata Studio, 1093 10th St. Cost: $120. Contact: 825-0922, info@nolimitstapandjazz.com. Website: nolimitstapandjazz.com. “ON BROADWAY” DANCE CAMP. Explore the world of dance and musical theater in this Broadway themed half-day camp. Each day’s activities include dancing, art and fun all based on famous Broadway musicals. Ages: 7-10. When: July 16-20, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Where: McKinleyville Studio, 1547 Pickett Road. Cost: $120. Contact: 825-0922, info@nolimitstapandjazz.com. Website: nolimitstapandjazz.com. “BOYS ONLY!” DANCE CLASS. Week of hip hop, tap and jazz … guy style. Learn the fundamentals of dance as well as performance routines. Ages: 6-10. When: July 9-13, 10 a.m.-noon. Where: McKinleyville Studio, 1547 Pickett Road. Cost: $75. Contact: 825-0922, info@nolimitstapandjazz.com. Website: nolimitstapandjazz.com. NEW WORLD BALLET. Offering a variety of dance classes for all ages and skill levels, including: ballet, hip hop, contemporary ballet and Kinder ballet. Ages: 4 and up. When: Visit website for schedule. Where: 824 L St., Arcata. Cost: See website. Contact: 822-4947, info@humboldtdance.org. Website: humboldtdance.org. ART CAMP. Artists explore the visual arts, while discovering their own style. Ages: 7-14. When: 1-5 p.m. daily, June 25-29, July 9-13, July 23-27, July 30-Aug 3, Aug 13-17. Where: Arcata Community Center’s Teen Room, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Cost: $90 weekly, $100 non-resident. Contact: Arcata Parks and Rec. 822-7091.

BEGINNING CERAMICS FOR YOUTH. Play with clay! Basic information about clay and commonly used tools. Each week students will delve into a different construction process such as pinch pots, coils and slabs. Ages: 7-12. When: Thursdays, July 12-Aug. 16, 6-7:30 p.m. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Cost: $40 includes materials. Contact: 441-4244. BLUE LAKE YOUTH DANCE CLASSES Ballet fun for everyone! Mommy, daddy and me. Beginners ballet and intermediate/advanced ballet classes. Ages: All ages. When: Ongoing, call for times. Where: Blue Lake. Cost: $5/class. Contact: Blue Lake Parks and Recreation, 668-5932. Website: bluelake.ca.gov. CAMPS FOR KIDS: COOKING CAMP. For aspiring young chefs. Ages: Kids entering grades 4-6. When: Noon-3:30 p.m. June 18-22. Where: J St. Gym, First Covenant Church, 2526 J St., Eureka. Cost: $35. Includes lunch and supplies. Contact: 442-6774 or 443-2957. CAMPS FOR KIDS: SEWING CAMP. Sewing fun for kids. Ages: Kids entering grades 4-6. When: Noon-3:30 p.m. June 18-22. Where: J St. Gym, First Covenant Church, 2526 J St., Eureka. Cost: $35. Includes lunch and supplies. Contact: 442-6774 or 443-2957. CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS. Adventures with clay! Learn various hand building and wheel-throwing techniques. Sign up begins May 21. Ages: 7-12. When: Mondays, 3-5 p.m., June 18-July 16 and July 23-Aug 20; Tuesdays, 3-5 p.m., June 19-July 17 and July 24-Aug 21. Where: Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. Cost: $80. Contact: 826-1445. Website: fireartsarcata.com. CREATIVE DANCE ARTS CAMP. Integrate dance, art, poetry and theater arts toward a show at the end of each week! With Shoshanna and Stephanie Silvia. Ages: 5-12. When: July 23-27 and July 30-Aug. 3, half and full day options. Where: Redwood Raks, 824 L St., Arcata. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: 616-6876, shoshannaland.com. DANCE ALL SUMMER LONG. Intermediate Modern dance class for teens with previous ballet, jazz or modern dance background. Ages: 12-18. When: Ongoing, Mondays, 4-5:30 p.m. Where: Pan Arts Studio, 1049 C Samoa Blvd., Arcata. Cost: $10/class. Contact: 707 601-1151. E-mail: panartstudiodance@gmail.com. DANCE CAMP. Learn the latest dance moves and experiment with dance styles while working on core competencies. Each week culminates with a Friday all-camp performance. Ages: 4-9. When: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. daily, June 18-22 for ballet, July

9-13 for jazz, July 30-Aug. 3 for hip hop, Aug. 6-10 for world dance. Where: Redwood Lounge in Redwood Park. Cost: $90 weekly, $100 non-resident. Extended Care hours are offered with drop-off as early as 8 a.m. for no additional charge. Contact: Arcata Parks and Rec. 822-7091. FERNDALE REPERTORY THEATRE. Theater classes and improv games culminate in a live performance. Ages: 7-18. When: June-July. Call for dates. Cost: $95 for four-week course. Scholarships available. Contact: 786-5483. Website: ferndale-rep.org. FORTUNA YOUTH ARTS. Drawing, painting, maskmaking and mixed media, sculpting and more. Ages: Various programs, 4-18. When: July 2-Aug. 17 weekly and ongoing. Where: Fortuna United Methodist Church, 1922 N St. Cost: $60 per month. Contact: Susan Cooper, 726-9048. HIP HOP DANCE CREW. Learn the art of hip hop dance in a fun and friendly environment. Breaks down advanced dance moves to easy step-by-step lessons. Ages: 5-9. When: Mondays, July 9-30 and Aug. 20-Sept. 17, 6-6:45 p.m. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Cost: $25. Contact: 441-4244. HLO KIDCO MUSIC THEATER CAMPS! Sing, act and dance! Musical theater classes will help young performers to grow in skill and confidence. Vocal, acting and dance technique taught, plus the exploration of set and costume design through puppetry, mask making and more. Ages: 5-7 and 8-17. When: Arcata, July 9-20, M-F and Eureka, July 23-Aug. 3, M-F (Ages 5-7) 9-10:30 a.m., (Ages 8-17) 9 a.m.-noon. Where: Eureka, Calvary Lutheran Church, 716 South Ave. Arcata, Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St. Cost: (Ages 5-7) $110, (Ages 8-17) $220. Contact: kidco@hloc.org, 497-6666. Website: hlokidco.org. KIDS CLAY CLASSES. There is no limit to what the imagination can create in clay! Designed to enhance a child’s knowledge about creative thinking and expand designing skills. Ages: 5-7. When: Saturdays, 9:30-11 a.m., June 30-July 21 and Aug. 4-25. Where: Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. Cost: $60. Contact: 826-1445. Website: fireartsarcata.com. MARZ YOUTH PROGRAM. Summer youth project with recording, design and music studio space. Ages: 13-21. When: Tuesday-Friday, June 1-Sept. 1, Noon-5 p.m. Where: 517 Third St., Suite 38, Eureka. Cost: Free. Contact: 442-8413. MUSIC AND MOVEMENT. Fun and movement abound for the tiniest of dancers. Watch your children use their imaginations as they develop

Free Cappucinos and Lattes!

Saturday, May 19 • 2-4pm

Short Performances by Canadian Kidstown Team unicycles, juggling, puppets and magic! campbellcreekconnexion.com

76 13th Street, Arcata (707) 672-2919

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Kids Camps Mon-Fri 9am-1pm Starts June 11th $135/week 8 weeks

continued from previous page

motor skills, body awareness, concentration and creativity. Ages: 2-4. When: Saturdays, June 9-30, July 7-28, and Aug. 4-25, 9:30-10:15 a.m. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Cost: $25. Contact: 441-4244. NO LIMITS ADVANCED BEGINNING, INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED DANCE CLASSES. Tap, jazz, ballet and hip hop classes for dancers with previous experience. Ages: 10 and up. When: Varies depending on level (see our website for details). Where: Arcata Studio, 1093 10th St. Cost: Call for cost. Contact: 825-0922. Website: nolimitstapandjazz.com. NO LIMITS DANCE ACADEMY’S BEGINNING DANCE CLASSES Tap, jazz, ballet and hip hop classes. Learn the fundamentals of dance as well as a performance routine. Ages: 6-10. When: July 16-20, 10-11 a.m. “Beautiful Ballerina Basics,” July 16-20, 11 a.m.-noon “Got Rhythm Tap Dance,” July 30-Aug. 3, 10-11 a.m. “Jamin’ Jazz Dance,” July 30-Aug. 3, 11-noon “Shake it up Hip Hop..” Where: Arcata Studio, 1093 10th St. Cost: $45 per style (discounts given for dancers taking multiple styles). Contact: 825-0922. Website: nolimitstapandjazz.com. NO LIMITS DANCE ACADEMY’S “DANCING DISNEY PRINCESSES (AND PRINCES TOO!)” DANCE CAMPS. Come be Disney Royalty for a week! Explore the world of tap, jazz and ballet as a princess (or prince). Each day’s music, dance, activities and fun will be based on a different Disney princess. Ages: 4-6. When: July 23-27, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. (Arcata Studio). July 30-Aug. 3, 9 a.m.-noon (McKinleyville Studio). Where: Arcata Studio, corner of 10th and K streets.

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

McKinleyville Studio, 1547 Pickett Road. Cost: $95 per camp. Contact: 825-0922. Website: nolimitstapandjazz.com. NORTH COAST DANCE SUMMER DANCE CAMPS. Featuring zumba, hip hop, jazz, hula, samba, ballroom/swing, modern, line dancing, creative movement and belly dance. Ages: Ages 5-7 (session 1), 8-12 (session 2), 13 and up (session 3). When: July 16-20 (session 1) July 23-27 (session 2), July 30-Aug. 3 (session 3). Where: North Coast Dance, 426 F St., Eureka. Cost: $99 to $150/week. Contact: 442-7779. Website: northcoastdance.org. PIANO LESSONS. Learn rock, blues, improvisation and traditional. Ages: All ages. When: Ongoing. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: Colleen, 444-2756. PRESCHOOL VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS SUMMER CAMP! Strongbridge Montessori School offering two three-week summer camps. Session 1 includes music, singing, dancing and performance. Session 2 includes ceramics, painting, collage and crafts. Ages: 3-5. When: 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Session 1 (performing arts) July 9-27; Session 2 (visual arts) Aug. 6-24. Where: Strongbridge Montessori School, 4700 Valley East Blvd., Arcata. Cost: $600 per session, all inclusive. Class size limited to 10. Contact: 845-5173. Website: strongbridgemontessori.org. REDWOOD COAST INSTITUTE BAND CAMP. Woodwind, brass and percussion players. Ends with community concert. Ages: Entering grades 6-11. When: Aug. 13-17. Where: Location varies. Contact: 677-0446.

E-mail: mcfamily@suddenlink.net. Website: redwoodcoast.org. RURAL BURL MURAL BUREAU. Paint big! Design and paint murals around the county. Ages: Teens 13-18. When: Saturdays and Sundays ongoing, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: 517 Third St., Eureka. Third Floor Theater. Cost: Free. Contact: Kati Texas, 498-8696. SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS AND BEGINNING PIANO. Private lessons, beginning to advanced jazz improvisation and technique. Ages: All ages. When: Ongoing. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: Susie Laraine at 441-1343. GUITAR AND PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Ages: All ages. When: Ongoing, call for times. Where: Call for location. Contact: Seabury Gould, 444-8507. PIANO LESSONS. Experience teacher Judith Louise teaches piano to children of all ages, from beginners onward. Ages: All ages. When: Ongoing, call for times. Where: Call for location. Contact: Judith Louise, 476-8919. SECOND SATURDAY FAMILY ARTS DAY. Offers activities for youth and families including performances, hands-on arts projects and interactive storytelling. Ages: Children and families. When: Second Saturday of every month. 2-4 p.m. June 9, July 14, Aug. 11. Where: Morris Graves Museum, 636 F St., Eureka. Cost: Free. Contact: Humboldt Arts Council, 442-0278 x201. SEQUOIA CHAMBER MUSIC WORKSHOP. Study and perform at least four different works with four different chamber groups. Ages: 12-20. When: Session 1: June 17-23, Session 2: June 24-30. Where: HSU Campus.


Cost: 1 week $400, 2 weeks $770. Scholarships and financial aid available. Housing available for additional cost. Contact: Ethan Filner, director, 415-938-7839. Website: sequoiachambermusic.org. SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE? Participants will spend six weeks learning and practicing simple dance routines, with the goal of performing them for family and friends. Ages: 9-14. When: Saturdays, July 7-Aug.11, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Cost: $25. Contact: 441-4244. SUMMER THEATRE WORKSHOPS. Kids sharpen their onstage presence during various themed workshops. Clowning for Kids; Crazy Creatures; Creating Characters; Improv in Action. Ages: 7-9, 10-14. When: July 9-13. 9 a.m.-12 p.m., 1-4 p.m. Where: Arcata Playhouse. Cost: $100 one class/$75 second class. Contact: 822-1575 Website: arcataplayhouse.com. THE G.U.L.C.H.: FRESH VOICES TEEN MUSIC PROGRAM. Teens learn the basics of music production, write their own lyrics, produce original beats and record their own original songs on professional equipment. Ages: 12-17. When: Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St. Cost: $3 drop-in. Contact: Brian Millett, 441-4240. THE UPPER STUDIO SUMMER DANCE CAMPS. Explore the history of classical ballets through choreography, art, costume and performance. Culminates with an in-studio performance. Ages: 5-10. When: M-F, 2-4:30 p.m. June 18-22 Cinderella, June 25-29 Sleeping Beauty, July 9-13 Nutcracker, July 16-20 Swan Lake. Where: The Upper Studio, 22123 Jacoby Creek Road. Contact: 360-791-4817 or visit our Facebook page.

TINY TUTUS-BEGINNING BALLET I. Ages: 4-7. Your little ballerina will learn ballet’s basic steps and beginning dance positions. When: Thursdays, July 19-Aug. 9, 6-6:45 p.m. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Cost: $25. Contact: 441-4244. TINY TUTUS-BEGINNING BALLET II. Fine tune their dance skills, flexibility and knowledge of dance. (Must take Ballet I or have previous ballet experience.). Ages: 4-7. When: Thursdays, June 7-July 12 and Aug. 23-Sept. 27, 6-6:45 p.m. Where: John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Cost: $30. Contact: 441-4244. TRILLIUM DANCE STUDIOS SUMMER DANCE CAMP 2012. Dance class with Erin McKeever, Julie Ryman and guest instructors. All levels of ballet, modern, jazz, Latin dance and more!. Ages: 4-Adult. When: July 23-Aug. 4. Where: Trillium Dance Studios, 1925 Alliance and Common Ground Studio, 180 Westwood Center. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: info@DanceWithErin.com, 822-8408. TRINITY BALLET ACADEMY SUMMER SESSIONS. Full schedule of ballet classes from “tutu” toddlers for very young children to partnering and choreography workshops for more advanced students. Ages: 3 and up. When: Summer sessions begin July 5, register by June 20. Where: 1981 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: 839-1816. VOCAL INSTRUCTION. Expand vocal range, vocal agility/inflection, improve intonation/time, mic technique. When: Ongoing. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: Lin McPhillips 822-5235. YOUNG CREATORS ART CAMP. Young aspiring artists play games and activities with focus on art projects. Ages: 4-6.

When: 1-5 p.m. daily, July 2-6, July 16-20, Aug 6-10. Where: Arcata Community Center’s Teen Room, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Cost: $90 weekly, $100 non-resident. Contact: Arcata Parks and Rec. 822-7091. YOUNG CREATORS CAMP. Games and activities with focus on art projects and an intro to theater. Ages: 4-6. When: 1-5 p.m. M-F July 2-6, July 16-20, Aug. 6-10. Where: Teen Room, Arcata Community Center. Cost: $90 per week/$100 nonresident. Contact: Arcata Recreation Division, 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. YOUNG WRITERS’ ACADEMY 2012. Week one: Digital storytelling. Week two: Poetry writing. Week three: Plays and scripts. Ages: Kids entering grades 4-9. When: 9 a.m.-noon M-F July 9-13, Plays and scripts; July 16-20, Poetry; July 23-27, Story writing. Where: HSU campus, Forestry 105 and 107. Cost: $125 first week, $115 for additional weeks. Contact: Redwood Writing Project, 826-5109. Website: redwoodwp.org. YOUTH ART CAMP AT MORRIS GRAVES. Youth engage with the museum’s exhibits through handson instruction. Ages: 5-7 and 8-12. When: Session 1: “Orchid Dreams, Wild Places,” June 25-29; Session 2: “Images of Water” July 16-20; Session 3: “Subliminal Realms.” Where: Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F. St., Eureka. Cost: $90/session, $85/Current HAC Members. Contact: 442-0278 x208. Website: humboldtarts.org. YOUTH ARTS AND CRAFTS ENRICHMENT WORKSHOPS. Needle felting, wet felting, beginning knitting, crocheting, embroidery, sewing and more. Ages: All ages. When: Starting June 18, each session four days a week, Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-noon or 1-4 p.m. Where: Origin Design Lab, 426 Third St., Eureka. Cost: $110 per session, all supplies and snack included. Contact: 497-6237. Website: origindesignlab.com. continued on next page

Interested in Rowing?

FREE CLINIC June 2nd

& 2 week summer clinics for Adults and Juniors Visit hbra.org Call 845-0686

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

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YOUTH BALLROOM DANCE CAMP Learn salsa, East Coast swing and nightclub while gaining confidence and social skills. Ages: 11-15. When: M-F, 1-5 p.m., Aug. 6-10. Where: North Coast Dance, 426 F St., Eureka. Cost: $99, some scholarships available. Contact: Dance with Debbie, 464-3638, dancewithdebbie.biz.

Nature and Science BIRDS, BEAKS AND BEYOND Observe specimens in the museum, meet educational birds and go bird watching. Ages: Ages: 4-5 and 6-9. When: June 25-29. Where: HSU Natural History Museum and field trips. Cost: $65 members/$75 non-members and $85 members/$95 non-members. Contact: 826-4479 or humboldt.edu/natmus. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS. Daily Junior Ranger programs on natural and cultural history topics. Ages: 7-12 for Junior Rangers. When: Varies according to park. Where: Call for times and locations, special events. Cost: Free. Contact: Visit website for the phone number at the park you wish to visit. Website: nps.gov/redw. COASTAL CONNECTIONS Get sandy and muddy! Explore dunes, wetlands and mudflats while learning about the animals and plants that live there through games, crafts and hands-on exploration. In partnership with Friends of the Dunes. Ages: 8-12. When: Aug. 6-10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: Coastal Nature Center. Cost: $150 members/$170 non-members. Contact: 826-4479 or humboldt.edu/natmus. GEOLOGY ROCKS Learn about crystals, minerals, rocks. Participants will create a model of Earth identifying the layers and the connection of earthquakes and volcanoes. Ages: 4-5 and 6-9. When: August (dates TBA). Where: HSU Natural History Museum and field trip.

Cost: $65 members/$75 non-members and $85 members/$95 non-members. Contact: 826-4479 or humboldt.edu/natmus. HERBAL SUMMER CAMP Five fun-filled days of botanically creative activities. Immerse yourself in the joys of the green and learn to make herbal candy, teas, crafts and wild food treats. Ages: 8-12. When: July 16-20, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Where: 1778 Blakeslee Ave., Arcata. Cost: $75. Contact: Gabrielle Visco, 616-2614, gvisco@yahoo. com. MARSH EXPLORERS CAMP. Investigate the natural world with weekly experiments, individual projects and engaging science learning. Ages: 7-9. When: 1-5 p.m., June 18-22, July 2-6, July 16-20, and Aug. 6-10. Where: Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Cost: $90 per week/$100 non-resident. Contact: Arcata Parks and Rec. 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. NATURAL RESOURCES SCIENCE CAMP. Science experiments, exploration, projects, team building activities, games, field trips, unique access to HSU faculty and labs and more. Ages: 9-12. When: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. daily, June 25-29, July 9-13, July 16-20, July 30-Aug 3, Aug. 6-10. Where: HSU. Cost: $125 per week/$135 non-resident. Contact: Arcata Parks and Rec. 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. NATURE DETECTIVES Learn how to uncover some of the mystery of nature as a Nature Detective. By the end of the week you will have the knowledge to help you observe and discover the wild nature all around. Ages: 4-5 and 6-9. When: July (dates TBA). Where: HSU Natural History Museum and field trips. Cost: $65 members/$75 non-members and $85 members/$95 non-members. Contact: 826-4479 or humboldt.edu/natmus.

ADVENTURE WEEK Trips Going Out July Thru August

Scholars hip Available s

Rock Climbing, Whitewater Rafting, Backpacking and Camping At Pristine Wilderness Lakes Redwood Coast Institute • 707-496-9415 • redwoodcoast.org

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

PAL CAMP. Seven week-long day camps featuring a new theme each week and hands-on exploration of the natural world. Themes include Mad Scientist, Let’s See What’s Cooking, Global Explorations and more. Optional sleepover Thursday night for kids grades 4 and up. Ages: 5-12. When: 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. (extended care available for additional cost) Monday-Wednesday and Friday, 1-8:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 18-Aug. 10. Where: 1 Pacific Lumber Camp Road, Freshwater. Cost: $150 per week. Contact: 443-9694. Website: discovery-museum.org. REDWOOD RANGERS Learn about the birds, plants, trees and mammals of the coast redwood forest through games, art projects and exciting hands-on activities. Ages: 4-5 and 6-9. When: July (dates TBA). Where: HSU Natural History Museum and field trips to Arcata Community Forest. Cost: $65 members/$75 non-members and $85 members/$95 non-members. Contact: 826-4479 or humboldt.edu/natmus. SCIENCE EXPLORERS Science is cool! How cool is it? Come find out in this class by exploring the diverse fields of science each day. Ages: 4-5 and 6-9. When: July (dates TBA). Where: HSU Natural History Museum and field trips. Cost: $65 members/$75 non-members and $85 members/$95 non-members. Contact: 826-4479 or humboldt.edu/natmus. CUB CLUB CUNNING CARNIVORES. Spend the week at the zoo exploring cunning carnivores and many others. Ages: 5-7. When: Aug. 13-17, 9 a.m.-noon. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. CUB CLUB REDWOOD RASCALS. Meet some animals that live in the redwood forest, explore Sequoia Park and discover the wonders of the forest in our backyard. Ages: 5-7.

When: July 30- Aug. 3, 9 a.m.-noon. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. CUB CLUB WATERSHED HEROES. Spend the week at the zoo and explore animals that depend on water and have amazing super powers. Ages: 5-7. When: July 16-20, 9 a.m.-noon. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. FAMILY ZOOSNOOZE. Experience the zoo at night. Activities include a special animal encounter, nocturnal night hike and storytelling around a fire. Sleep in your tent on the zoo lawn and awake to a bagel breakfast with the other primates. Ages: 5 and up. Must be accompanied by an adult with a maximum of two children per adult. When: 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25–9 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 26. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St, Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. JR. ZOOKEEPERERS FROM DINOSAURS TO DODOS. Spend the week cracking open the mysteries of dinosaurs, reptiles and birds from the past, present and future. Ages: 8-11. When: Aug. 6-10, 1-4 p.m. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. JR. ZOOKEEPERS ANIMAL CSI. Mysteries abound at Sequoia Park Zoo this week. Explore animal evidence and help solve some very perplexing animal mysteries, puzzles and riddles. Participate in the first ever “whodunit?” mystery game at the zoo. Ages: 8-11. When: Aug. 6-10, 9 a.m.-noon. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St, Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. JR. ZOOKEEPERS FOREST EXPLORERS. Explore Sequoia Park and the animals that live within the redwood forest. We will be meeting and making special treats for our forest friends that live at the


zoo, as well as searching for hidden treasures in the famous Forest Explorers treasure hunt. Ages: 8-11. When: July 23-27, 1-4 p.m. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. JR. ZOOKEEPERS PAMPERING THE PRIMATES. Explore the world of primates and make enrichment treats for our primate ambassadors. Ages: 8-11. When: July 23-27, 9 a.m.-noon. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. JR. ZOOKEEPERS WATERSHED HEROES. Explore animals that have super powers that help them survive in the water. Design a new Watershed Heroes exhibit with river otter, bald eagle and salmon. Ages: 8-11. When: July 9-13, 9 a.m.-noon. Where: Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Contact: 441-4217. E-mail: education@sequoiaparkzoo.net. WILD IN THE CITY. Learn about the plants and animals in and around our neighborhood while playing games, making crafts and singing songs. Ages: 6-9. When: July 16-20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: HSU Natural History Museum and daily field trips. Cost: $150 members/$170 non-members. Contact: 826-4479 or humboldt.edu/natmus. YOUNG EXPLORERS CAMP. Investigate the natural world with weekly fun experiments, individual projects and engaging science learning. Ages: 4-6. When: 1-5 p.m., June 25-29, July 30-Aug. 3, and Aug. 13-17. Where: Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Cost: $90 per week/$100 non-resident. Contact: Arcata Parks and Rec. 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec.

Sports, Athletics and Adventure 12TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP Learn the aquatic skill necessary for all types of surfing while being immersed in lifeguard water safety, surf etiquette and beach and ocean awareness. Ages: 8 and up. When: Five sessions: June 25-29, July 9-13, July 23-27, July 29-Aug. 3. Where: Moonstone Beach. Cost: $195 for a full four-day session. Contact: 822-5099. Website: moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com. ADVENTURE CAMP. Discover how to work as a team to design and build a raft and sail away, traverse low ropes course elements testing balance and problem solving, boulder at Far North Climbing Gym, climb a redwood tree. Ages: 10-14. When: 1-5 p.m. June 18-22, July 2-6, July 16-20, Aug. 6-10. Where: Redwood Park. Cost: $90/$100 nonresident. Contact: Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec.

ADVENTURE WEEK. Week of activities: Rock climbing, whitewater rafting, canopy tour, hiking, standup paddleboard. Ages: Varies. When: July 10-14, July 31-Aug. 4, Aug. 14-18. Where: Various locations. Cost: $449. Contact: 496-9415. Web site: redwoodcoast.com. AQUATICS CAMP. Camp includes kayaking, canoeing, surfing, sailing and camping. Ages: 10-17. When: M-F, July 23-27 (12-17), July 30–Aug. 3 (10-17). Where: Center Activities at HSU, Stone Lagoon, Moonstone Beach and Big Lagoon. Cost: $299 to $329/week. Contact: 826-3357. Website: humboldt.edu/centeractivities. ARCATA COMMUNITY POOL. Swim, kayak lessons, recreation, lap swimming, group lessons, junior lifeguarding. Ages: 6 months and up. When: Summer schedule June 18-Aug. 24. Where: Arcata Community Pool, 1150 16th St. Cost: General admission $7 adult, $4.50 youth (under 18), 3 and under free. Contact: 822-6801. Website: arcatapool.com. BASKETBALL JONES HOOP CAMPS. Basketball day camp. Ages: 7-15. When: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Session 1: July 16-20; Session 2: July 30-Aug. 3. Where: Session 1: St. Bernards High School; Session 2: Freshwater Elementary. Cost: $230 per week. Contact: Basketball Jones Camp, 800-348-3803. Website: basketballjonescamps.com. BAYWOOD GOLF CLINIC AND COUNTRY CLUB JUNIOR GOLD MEMBERSHIP. For all playing abilities. Members and non-members are encouraged to participate. Ages: All ages. When: Call for times. Where: Baywood Country Club, Arcata. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: 822-3686 ext. 108. Website: baywoodgcc.com. BITTY BASKETBALL. Great opportunity for your youngsters to start learning the basic skills of basketball and sharpen their gross motor skills. Ages: 2-4. When: Saturdays, June 3-30, July 7-28, 10-10:45 a.m. Where: Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Cost: $25. Contact: 441-4244. BLAKE’S HOUSE OF BOXING. Develop self-defense skills, cardiovascular health and personal character. Non-contact fitness. Ages: 10 and up. When: Tuesdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Where: McKinleyville Activity Center. Cost: $5/drop-in or five classes/$20. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003. BLUE LAKE ROLLER SKATING RINK. Drop-in roller skating and public and private birthday parties. Ages: All ages welcome. When: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1-3 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sundays 2-5 p.m.,

Redwood Raks for Birthday Parties • If you’d like to have a really special,

magical themed party with Shoshanna

• Fairy, princess, pirate, under-water,

mermaid, belly dance....... super fun!

www.ShoshannaParty.com

P.O. Box 1086 • Arcata, CA 95518 (707) 616-6876 • dance@shoshannaland.com

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

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Adult skate second Sunday of every month 6:309:30 p.m. Where: Blue Lake Roller Rink, 312 S. Railroad Ave. Cost: $3.25 children 8 and under, $4 children 9-17, $5 for adults 18 and over; private birthday parties$125 for two hours; public birthday parties $20 per table, $15 each additional table. Contact: Blue Lake Parks and Recreation, 668-5932. Website: bluelake.ca.gov. BLUE LAKE YOUTH BASKETBALL CAMP Camp focuses on skills of the game needed to be successful. Ages: Grades 2-5 and Grades 6-12. When: Call for dates. Where: Prasch Hall, Blue Lake. Cost: Call for fees. Contact: Blue Lake Parks and Recreation, 668-5932. Website: bluelake.ca.gov. CAMPS FOR KIDS: BASKETBALL CAMP. Basketball skills including defense, dribbling, shooting, passing and rebounding. Ages: Kids entering grades 4-6. When: Noon-3:30 p.m. June 18-22. Where: J St. Gym, First Covenant Church, 2526 J St., Eureka. Cost: $35. Includes lunch and supplies. Contact: 442-6774 or 443-2957. COBRA AND BUTTERFLY KARATE SCHOOL Learn traditional martial arts and kubudo weapons. Gain strength, agility and balance. Ages: All ages. When: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4-4:45 p.m. (Ages 4-6); 5-5:50 p.m. (Ages 7-9); 6-6:50 p.n. (Ages 10-13); 7-7:50 p.m. (14 and up). Where: 1711 Main St., Fortuna. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: 725-4849. FAST BREAK FRIDAYS. Come and shoot hoops with your friends. Ages: Youth 13-17. When: Fridays, 7-9 p.m. Where: McKinleyville Activity Center. Cost: $1 per player. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003. FC SAMOA SOCCER ACADEMY: SUMMER CAMPS Day camps, all levels. Contact for more details.

When: Call for times. Where: Crescent City (6/18). Eureka (Alice Birney) (7/9). Arcata (French pro only) (7/23). Varsity Prep (Samoa) (7/30). Cutten K-6 (8/6). Redway (8/13). Cost: Day Camps $95 for 15 hours 9 a.m.-noon. French pro $225 (24-30 hours). Low income (partial) scholarships available upon application (up to $60 for a $95 camp). Contact: mufc06@yahoo.com. Website: fcsamoa.com. FC SAMOA SOCCER ACADEMY: SUMMER MINIACADEMIES Base camps: Contact for more details. Ages: 8-12, 11-15. When: June 18-Aug. 10. Various programs M-F. See online. Where: Crescent City. Redway. Cutten. Eureka (Alice Birney). Arcata (French pro only). Cost: Base Camps $95 for 15 hours 9-noon. French pro: $220 (24-30 hours). E-mail for more info. Contact: mufc06@yahoo.com. Website: fcsamoa.com. FLIPS FOR KIDS. Offering gymnastic programs for all ages; gym tots, shining stars, gym stars, beginning and and intermediate gymnastics. Ages: Toddlers to teens. When: Ongoing, schedule available online. Where: 1489 Hoover St., Eureka. Contact: 445-0450. Website: flipsforkids.net. HEADWATERS TO THE OCEAN CAMP. Camp includes hiking, camping, surfing, kayaking and a trip to the hatchery. Ages: 10-17. When: M-F, June 25-29. Where: Center Activities at HSU, Headwaters Forest Reserve, Blue Lake Hatchery, Smith River, Crescent City. Cost: $299/week. Contact: 826-3357. Website: humboldt.edu/centeractivities. HEALTHSPORT SWIM SCHOOL. Offering “Tiny Swimmers,” “Learn to Swim,” and “Stroke Development.” Ensure your child is safe and confident in the water. Ages: All ages. When: Twice a week (two-month session). Call for times.

Where: Two Locations, HealthSPORT Arcata and HealthSPORT Eureka. Cost: (two-month session) $110/Members, $150/ Community. Contact: HealthSPORT Arcata, 822-3488, HealthSPORT Eureka, 443-3488. HSU GIRLS BASKETBALL INDIVIDUAL CAMP Features instruction from college players and coaches for skills development. Ages: Grades 2-12. When: June 18-21. Call for specific times. Where: HSU. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: HSU Athletics, 826-3666. HSU GIRLS VOLLEYBALL CAMPS. Skill development will be enhanced through competition and gamesimulation drills as well as video analysis. Ages: Grades 7-12. When: July 25-28, day and overnight options available. Where: HSU. Cost: $325 or $425 for overnight campers. Contact: 826-6017. HSU RUNNING CAMP Taught by Jim Hunt. Inspiring week of running amidst majestic redwoods, beside ocean vistas and along winding rivers and an opportunity to learn from prominent coaches and interact with athletes. Ages: All ages. When: July 22-27. Where: HSU. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: 209-748-1918, runninawaycoach@yahoo. com. Website: runninaway.com. HSU SOCCER CAMPS Soccer camps for a variety of ages. Ages: Kids Camp (5-8); Youth Camp (9-14), Teen Camp (teens). When: July 31-Aug 3. Call for specific times. Where: Redwood Bowl, HSU. Contact: 826-3666. HSU SOCCER ID CAMP Train and be seen by HSU coaching staff. Ages: 14 and up. When: Aug. 3-4.

Where: Redwood Bowl, HSU. Cost: $100. Contact: 826-3666. HSU STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING SUMMER PROGRAM. Train under coach Drew Petersen. Ages: 13-18. When: Two sessions: June 11-July 13 and July 16-Aug. 17. Where: HSU Student Rec Center. Cost: $80 per session. Contact: 826-4519. HSU YOUTH FOOTBALL CAMPS Gives youth individual attention from college coaches. Emphasis on fundamental football skills, offensive and defensive sessions, conditioning and more. Ages: Grades 7-12. When: June 22, Individual Prospect Camp (Grades 9-12); June 23 and 24, Linemen Camp (Grades 7-12); June 23 and 24, 7 on 7 Passing Tournament, JV and Varsity Teams Camp. Where: Redwood Bowl, HSU. Cost: Call for details. Contact: 826-5950. HUMBOLDT BAY BICYCLE COMMUTERS ASSOCIATION. “Bike Smart” safety training program. Upon completion of two-hour program, participants will be familiar with bike laws and how to ride defensively and responsively on public streets. Includes on-street training. Ages: 7-14. When: Several Saturdays and Sundays throughout the summer. Call for times. Cost: Free. Helmets offered for those who need one. Contact: Rick Knapp at 445-1097. Website: humbike.org. HUMBOLDT CRABS BASEBALL CAMP. Four-day sessions include coaching and instruction from players on the Crabs roster and Coach Wilson. Ages: Boys and girls ages 8-14. Adv. Camp 12-15. When: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Session 1: June 18-22 Arcata; session 2: June 25-29 Eureka, Fortuna, Scotia; session 3: July 9-12 Arcata. Adv. July 16-26. Where: Locations in Arcata, Eureka, Fortuna, Scotia. Cost: $85 per session. Includes T-shirt, season pass to Crabs home games and 10 adult tickets. Applications available at Crabs website. Contact: 826-2333. Website: humboldtcrabs.com.

Trillium Dance Studios Integrate dance, art, poetry and theater arts with Shoshanna and Stephanie Silvia.

Work toward a show at the end of each week!

July 23 - July 27 July 30 - August 3

Half & full d ay optio n

Summer Dance Camp

2012

July 23 - Aug. 4

Ages 5-12

Redwood Raks, 824 L Street, Arcata (707) 616-6876, www.shoshannaland.com

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

• Ballet • Jazz • Modern • • Latin Dance • Samba & More! PERFORMANCE on Aug. 4th

Erin McKeever, Artistic Director & Guest Instructors

All levels, ages 4 & up • $8 registration fee plus camp tuition • Drop-ins welcome • Alliance Studio, 1925 Alliance Rd., Arcata & • Common Ground Community Ctr, Westwood Shpg Ctr, Alliance Rd., Arcata

Call 822-8408 or email info@DanceWithErin.com


HUSKY’S GIRLS VOLLEYBALL CAMP Camp focuses on skills of the game needed to be successful. Ages: Grades 2-5 and Grades 6-12. When: TBA, please call for informaiton. Where: Fortuna Union High School. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: Fortuna Parks and Recreation 725-7620. I CAN SKATE TOO! Beginning skaters can skate without the risk and intimidation of older, more experienced skaters. Parent participation class. Ages: 3-7. When: Saturdays, June 6-23, July 7-28, Aug. 4-25 and Sept. 8-29, 4:30-5:15 p.m. Where: Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St., Eureka. Cost: $20, includes skate rentals and skate pass. Contact: 441-4244. JUNIOR SAILING PROGRAM. Develop sailing skills and self-confidence in a safe and encouraging environment. Ages: 8-14. When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Session 1: July 9-13. Session 2: Aug. 13-17. Cost: $160/one week, $280/both weeks. Contact: 839-1930. Website: humboldtyachtclub.org. KIDS ON THE MOVE. This Latin inspired dance fitness class is a fun, creative and crazy-cool way to get your kids exercising. Ages: 5-11. When: Mondays, June 4-25, July 9-30 and Aug. 6-27, 4-4:45 p.m. Where: Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Cost: $20. Contact: 441-4244. KIDS YOGA AT OM SHALA YOGA WITH ARTEMISIA SHINE. Please have your child wear comfortable, flexible clothing and bring a bottle of water. Mats are available at no extra charge. Ages: 6-8. When: Wednesdays, 3:45-4:45, Ongoing. Where: Om Shala Yoga, 858 10th St., Arcata. Cost: $7/drop-in, $55/10 class kids pass. Contact: 825-YOGA, omshalayoga.com. KINDERSPORTS Introductory program to the sport of the season. Develop motor skills while having fun learning the rules and skills of an organized

sport (soccer, t-ball, basketball and olympics) in a team setting. Ages: 3-5 years. When: Ongoing, Saturdays, (six week sessions). T-ball June 9-July 14, 9:30-10:30 a.m. or 11 a.m.-noon. Olympics Aug. 8-Sept. 15, 9:30-10:30 a.m. or 11 a.m.-noon. Where: Call for locations. Cost: $45/Resident, $50/Non-resident. Supply Fee $10. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 8399003. KINDERSPORTS JR. Introductory program to the sport of the season. Develop motor skills while having fun learning the rules and skills of an organized sport (soccer, t-ball, basketball and olympics) in a team setting. Ages: 2-3. When: Ongoing Saturdays, (six week sessions). T-ball June 9-July 14, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Olympics Aug. 4-Sept. 15, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Where: Call for locations. Cost: $45/Residents, $50/Non-Residents. Supply Fee $10. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 8399003. KINDERSPORTS KAMP Learn the importance of exercise, nutrition, creativity, basic sports skills and team work. Develop large motor skills while participating in physical activities. Ages: 4-6. When: 12:30-3:00 p.m., Wednesday-Friday, Session 1: June 20, 21, 22. Session 2: June 27, 28, 29. Session 3: July 11, 12, 13. Session 4: Aug. 8, 9, 10. Where: Azalea Hall, McKinleyville. Cost: $75/wk (residents) $80/wk (non-residents). $275 (all sessions) $280 (all sessions). Supply Fee: $12/ session. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 8399003. KOOL KICKS SOCCER League for youth to enhance their skills and apply them to the game of soccer. Learn fundamental soccer skills. Includes skills clinics, sportsmanship drills and games. Ages: 6-14. When: Mondays, June 11, 18, 25 and July 9, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Location: Hiller Sports Site, McKinleyville.

Summer Band Camp

Summer Dance Extravaganza

August 13-17 • on the Arcata HS campus All woodwind, brass and percussion players entering 7-10 grades are invited to this new band camp. Instructors include Fred Tempas, Joshua Kieselhorst, Jeremy Cotton and Gary Ross. Entering Juniors and Seniors — please sign up to be counselors! Questions? 677-0446 E-mail mcfamily@suddenlink.net for brochure. Sign up forms on the website www.redwoodcoast.org Tuition is $170 payable to Redwood Coast Institute, Summer Band Camp (some camperships)

Cost: $30/Residents, $35/Non-Residents. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003. LITTLE DRIBBLERS. Focus on fundamentals; ball control, dribbling and passing. Ages: 5-7. When: Saturdays, June 2-30, July 7-28, 11-11:45 a.m. Where: Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Cost: $25. Contact: 441-4244. LITTLE KICKERS SOCCER. Ball control, dribbling and passing skills are emphasized through engaging games and activities. This beginner class is for kids looking to learn new skills and have fun. Ages: 5-7. When: Fridays, June 29-July 20 and July 27-Aug. 17, 11-11:45 a.m. Where: Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Cost: $30. Contact: 441-4244. MCKINLEYVILLE SUMMER YOUTH BASKETBALL LEAGUE Co-ed basketball league. Ages: Entering grades 3-4, 5-6, 7-8. When: June 27-Aug. 8. Where: Activity Center, 1705 Gwin Road, McKinleyville. Cost: $25/$30 non-resident. Add $10 after June 15. Contact: McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003. NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Physical conditioning, better health, self-confidence and self-defense. Ages: 6-18. When: Ongoing, Mondays, 4-5 p.m. (ages 6-9); Wednesdays, 4-5 p.m. (ages 10-12); weekdays except Thursday, 6-7:30 p.m. (teens). Where: 890 G St., Arcata. Cost: 12 and under, $40 per month, Teens $99 first six weeks. Contact: 826-9395, info@northcoastaikido.org. Website: northcoastaikido.org. PEE WEE SPORTS CAMP. Young athletes are invited to learn the basic hand-eye coordination and

Young Writers Academy 2012 Who? Grades 4-9 in Fall 2012 Where? On the HSU campus: Forestry 105 & 107. When? Mondays-Fridays, 9am-12pm July 9-13: Plays & Scripts July 16-20: Poetry July 23-27: Story Writing $125 for the first week $115 for each additional week To register, go to:

www.redwoodwp.org

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North Coast Fencing Academy

No Limits

Tap, Jazz, Hip Hop and Ballet Dance Camps Beginning Intermediate & Advanced Dance Classes Arcata & McKinleyville 825-0922

www.nolimitstapandjazz.com

Summer Classes

July 9-13 and July 16-20 2:00 - 4:00PM • Ages 8 and up 1459 M Street, Arcata, CA 95521 (707) 601-1657 northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

21


NEW! $60 off when signing up for two camps!

• High-Quality Basketball Instruction • Day Camps for Boys & Girls Ages 7-15 • Cutting Edge Basketball Techniques for 7-8 yr olds • Over 10,000 Campers Coached! • All Experience Levels Welcome • 100 basketball drills, 12 5-on-5 games, 6 shooting contests, video game tourney, DJ for music entertainment and many extras like “Get yo’ money” and “Name that Tune.” • Don’t miss out on this super fun basketball camp experience! EUREKA CAMPS July 16-20 at St. Bernards High School Directed by Basketball Jones Owner Gene Cotter July 30-August 3 at Freshwater Elementary Directed by Local Legend Isaac Gildea

Call 1-800-348-3803 for more information or visit our website and register online at: www.basketballjonescamps.com

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

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prerequisite skills for a myriad of active sports. Ages: 4-6. When: 1-5 p.m. June 18-22, July 9-13, 23-27, Aug 20-24. Where: Arcata Community Center. Cost: $90/$100 nonresident. Contact: Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. REDWOOD SOCCER CAMPS. Soccer basics and skill improvement. Week long sessions. Ages: 4-14. When: 9 a.m.-noon. Mon.-Fri. Session 1: June 18-22, Session 2:July 9-13, Session 3: July 16-20. Where: Arcata (sessions 1 and 3), McKinleyville (session 2). Cost: $100 (includes new soccer ball), $85 (bring your own ball). Contact: 822-3333. Website: mrysl.com. ROLLER SKATING. Many locations offer summer roller skating, including Fortuna, McKinleyville, Eureka and Blue Lake. Ages: Depends on location. When: All summer. Where: In Fortuna, Fireman’s Pavilion; in McKinleyville, Activities Center; in Eureka, Municipal Auditorium; Blue Lake Roller Rink. Cost: Depends on location. Contact: Blue Lake Parks and Recreation, 668-5932; Eureka Parks and Recreation, 441-4223; Fortuna Parks and Recreation, 725-7620; McKinleyville Parks and Recreation, 839-9003. SIX RIVERS YOUTH FOOTBALL CONFERENCE, INC. A youth football and cheer program for kids. Season starts July 30 and registration has started for all of the associations. Visit website for further information. Ages: 5-14 (with restrictions). Where: All over Humboldt, Del Norte and in Brookings, Ore. Cost: Varies. Contact Information: General information hotline 440-8058, sryfootball@yahoo.com. Website: quickscores.com. SKATE CAMP. Youth of all skill levels can learn how to be safe and have fun at our local skate park. Ages: 6-14. When: 9 a.m.-1 p.m., June 18-22, June 25-29, July 9-13, July 23-27, Aug. 13-17. Where: Arcata Skate Park, Sunset Ave. Cost: $90 per week/$100 for non-residents. Contact: 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. SRC CLIMBING CAMP. Camp includes indoor climbing. Ages: 6-9 and 10-13. When: Session I, July 16-19, Session II, July 23-26. Session I: 9 a.m.-noon (6-9), 1-4 p.m. (10-13) Session II: 9 a.m.-noon (10-13), 1–4 p.m. (6-9) M-Th. Where: Student Recreation Center, HSU. Cost: $130/session. Contact: 826-4197. Website: humboldt.edu/centeractivities. SRC TEEN STRENGTH AND FITNESS CAMP Camp includes weight lifting, ultimate football, kickball and a circuit challenge. Ages: 13-19. When: M-F, Noon–2 p.m. or 5-7 p.m. Session I: June 11-July 13, Session II: July 16-Aug 17. Where: Student Recreation Center, HSU. Cost: $80/session. Contact: 826-4197. Website: humboldt.edu/centeractivities.

SUMMER CLIMBING CAMP. Learn climbing techniques, safety and build confidence. Ages: 6-14. When: M-F, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., beginning June 11 and running through summer. Where: Far North Climbing Gym, 10th and K streets, Arcata. Cost: $135/week. Contact: 826-9558. Website: farnorthclimbinggym.com. SUMMER GYMNASTICS. Arcata Recreation offers two gymnastics programs to meet the needs of a wide variety of age and skill levels. Ages: 15 mos.-4 yrs., 6-12. When: June 4-July 6, July 9-Aug 10. Where: Judo Hut and Arcata Community Center. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. HUMBOLDT BAY ROWING ASSOCIATION. Instruction in the basics of rowing an Olympic-style racing shell. All athletes must be able to swim. No previous experience necessary. Ages: 12-18. When: July 9-20, MWF, 6-8 p.m. Where: Call for location. Cost: $175/person. Contact: Scott, 845-4752, sagrows@hotmail.com. Website: hbra.org. LEARN TO ROW DAY. Two-hour rowing lesson in conjunction with U.S. Rowing and clubs across the country. Limited slots available. Ages: 12-18. When: June 2, starting 8 a.m. Where: Call for location. Cost: Free. Contact: 443-0170. Website: hbra.org. HUMBOLDT SWIM CLUB. All levels from beginner to elite! Year-round program includes individualized and team training, recreational and competitive opportunities. Ages: 6-18. When: Tryouts second Tuesday of each month, 6 p.m. Where: Arcata Community Pool. Contact: Coach Cameron, 227-4055. Website: hscswim.org. SUMMER SWIM LESSONS. Learn to swim in an outdoor pool. When: Call for times. Where: Baywood Country Club, Arcata. Contact: 822-3686 ext. 108. Website: baywoodgcc.com. SUMMER TENNIS LESSONS All skill levels welcome. Ages: 7 and up. When: Times vary according to age group. Four sessions: June 18-28, June 27-July 7, July 2-12, July 16-26, July 30-Aug. 9. Where: Larson Park, Arcata. Cost: $40 per session/$50 non-resident. Contact: Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. SURF LESSONS 2012 Learn to surf. Wetsuit, board and instruction provided. Develop swimming and ocean safety skills. All levels welcome. Ages: 6 and up. When: Contact and book the time and dates that will work for you. Where: Moonstone Beach. Cost: To be determined.


Cost: Call for costs. Contact: Justin, 601-1657, northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com. SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Sun Yi’s Academy Arcata offers a well-rounded and diverse array of classes. An effective and exciting martial art, for self-defense, competition, physical fitness and mental well-being. Ages: 4 and up. When: See website for schedule. Where: 1215 Giuntoli Lane, Arcata. Cost: See website for costs. Contact: 825-0182. Website: sunyisarcata.com. WAE YU NAE GONG ACADEMY CLASSES Ultimate kick boxing, self defense, grappling and weapons. Ages: 4-6, 7-12, juniors-adults. When: 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday (ages 7-12); 3:15 p.m. Monday and Wednesday (ages 4-6); 10 a.m. Saturday (juniors and adults). Where: Wae Yu Nae Gong Academy, Sunny Brae Shopping Center, Arcata. Cost: Call for pricing. Contact: Master Instructor Daniel Perez, 822-4958, info@waeyunaegong.com. Website: waeyunaegong.com. YOUTH JUJITSU. Traditional self defense martial arts consisting of escapes, locks, striking, throwing and grappling. Ages: 9-16. When: Mondays and Thursdays from 6:15-7:30 p.m. Where: Judo Hut, Arcata. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. YOUTH SAMURAI. Beginning martial arts training taught in a high energy class using games with martial concepts, focus on strength, balance and coordination. Ages: 5-9. When: Mondays and Thursdays from 5:15-6:15 p.m. Where: Judo Hut, Arcata. Cost: Call for prices. Contact: Arcata Recreation Division 822-7091. Website: cityofarcata.org/rec. YOUTH SURF CAMP. Camp includes surfing all week on Moonstone Beach and in Crescent City. Ages: 10-17. When: Monday-Thursday, July 9-12. Where: Center Activities at HSU, Moonstone Beach, Jedediah Smith State Park, Crescent City. Cost: $254/week. Contact: 826-3357. Website: humboldt.edu/centeractivities. ZUMBA FOR TWEENS AND TEENS. Fun, fast-paced dance environment, gives teens a chance to move, get their heart rates up and have a good time all while getting fit. Ages: 12-17. When: Wednesdays, June 6-27, July 11-25, Aug. 8-29, Sept. 5-26, 4-4:45 p.m. Where: Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Cost: $20. Contact: 441-4244. ●

RECREATION SUMMER CAMP ACTIVITIES 10 different camps to make memories that will last a lifetime.

HUMBOLDT SWIM CLUB

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Contact: 834-2827. E-mail: youth2surf@yahoo.com. Website: humboldtsurfschool.com. TEEN SURF CAMP Camp includes surfing all week on Moonstone Beach and in Crescent City. Ages: 12 and up. When: M-TH, Aug. 6-9. Where: Center Activities at HSU, Moonstone Beach, Smith River, Crescent City. Cost: $274/week. Contact: 826-3357. Website: humboldt.edu/centeractivities. TODDLER SOCCER. Children will develop motor skills while having fun running and kicking just like the big kids. Uses a variety of fun games to engage toddlers in early learning experiences of athletic development. Ages: 2-4. When: Fridays, June 29-July 20 and July 27-Aug. 17, 10-10:45 a.m. Where: Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Cost: $30. Contact: 441-4244. TREKKING AND TRACKING CAMP. Camp includes learning to read and make maps, how to track birds, hiking, camping and a barbeque. Ages: 10-17. When: M-F, July 16-20. Where: Center Activities at HSU, Arcata Community Forest, the Arcata Marsh, Mad River Slough and Big Lagoon. Cost: $299/week. Contact: 826-3357. Website: humboldt.edu/centeractivities. TRIATHLON FOR KIDS. 22nd Annual. Individuals and three-person relay teams in the swim, bike and run events. Ages: Ages 7-18. When: June 3, 8:45 a.m. Where: Arcata Community Pool. Cost: Pre-register before May 31: $25/individual, $42/team. Scholarships available. Contact: Jennifer, 496-0257. Website: trikids.com. NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn self-confidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through marital arts. Ages: 7 and up. When: See website for times. Where: 820 N St., Building #1, Suite C, Arcata. Contact: 822-6278. Website: northcoastselfdefense.com. CAPOEIRA KIDS SUMMER INTERSESSION. Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian martial art developed by slaves over 400 years ago. It combines self defense, movement, acrobatics and music. Capoeira helps build: self-esteem, coordination, rhythm, strength and flexibility, and promotes the importance of community. Ages: 3 and up. When: Summer Intersession June 15-July 31, visit website for times. Where: 865 8th St., Arcata. Cost: $10 drop-in, member options also available. Contact: 498-6155. Website: humboldtcapoeira.com. NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout and a very chill environment. Ages: 8 and up. When: Call for times. Where: 1459 M St., Arcata.

2012 ARCATA

For team tryout information call Coach Cameron at 707-227-4055 or www.hscswim.org

Arcata Recreation has summer fun for everyone with sports, arts, science, adventure camps and more. For registration materials, stop by the Recreation Division Office in Arcata City Hall or visit our website, www.cityofarcata.org/rec

(707) 822-7091 See our Summer Camp listing in this issue of the Journal

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

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CONCERTGOERS AT REGGAE ON THE RIVER PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

Summer Music Festival Guide 2012 By Bob Doran

S

ummer’s just around the corner, which makes it time for another round of music festivals, big, small and in between. Some are tailored to your specific music taste, some more eclectic. Among the options here in Humboldt or not-too-far away: The 36th Annual Summer Arts and Music Festival. Despite troubles with the state park system, Benbow Lake Recreation Area will once again see festival action for a couple of weekends, starting with the Mateel’s first big festival of the season. Among the five dozen acts on four stages (along with art, craft and food booths, a kid’s zone, dancers, etc.), headliners include Fishbone, Thomas Mapfumo, Diego’s Umbrella, French klezmer band Kabbalah, The Shook Twins, Monkey, and locals Joanne Rand and Absynth Quintet. June 2 and 3, Benbow Lake Recreation Area south of Garberville. www.mateel.org. The 35th Annual Redwood Run. After a year at Cooks Valley, the Kiwanis folks are moving the biker bash back to its longtime home at Riverview Ranch. Expect the usual biker games along with rock and blues by Lukas Nelson, Charlie Brechtel, The Fryed Brothers, II Big with Billy Idol, Kaye Bohler, The Unauthorized Rolling Stones, and a tribute to the late Ronnie Montrose with special guest Michael Lee Firkins. June 8-10, Riverview Ranch, Piercy. www.kiwanisrwr.com. The Third Annual Jefferson State Old Time

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Revue. Missing Link is back with another alt. old time/roots fest, this year moved up a bit so it’s not competing with the Folklife Festival. Among the acts confirmed so far: Frank Fairfield, Petrovick Blasting Company, The New Five Cents, Clampitt Family and The No Good Redwood Ramblers. Saturday, July 7, Arcata Playhouse. The 35th Annual Humboldt Folklife Festival. As usual, the Folklife folks conclude Dell’Arte’s Mad River Festival with over a week full of music, all local, mostly folk with some variations. It starts Friday, July 13, with a Kickoff Party at Mad River Brewery featuring The Pilot Rock Ramblers and The Spindrifters and a Barn Dance at the Manila Community Center with Sue Moon and friends, continues Sunday with Blue Lake’s Annie and Mary Day in Perigot Park, and then moves to Dell’Arte for a kick-off performance by The Scotia Band in the Rooney Amphitheater followed by Songwriters Night in the Carlo. Tuesday’s Jazz Night is in the Carlo too, with the Redwood Jazz Association helping to curate. Wednesday the fest moves back to the amphitheater for another Country Night (with Huckleberry Flint once again headlining). Thursday it’s Bluegrass and Beyond (out back). Friday it’s an Old Time Barn Dance at the Arcata Veteran’s Hall. Wrapping it all up with a big red bow: The All Day Folklife Free Festival Saturday, July 21, with dozens of bands, songwriters, pickers, workshops and more, in and around


the Dell’Arte building. July 15-21, Blue Lake and Arcata. www.humboldtfolklife.org. The 28th Annual Reggae on the River. The Mateel would like to move to another more versatile location, preferably French’s Camp, but for now, Reggae is back at Benbow. The 30 plus reggae and world music artists are split between two stages; among them Toots and The Maytals, Junior Toots, Midnite, Oliver Mtukudzi and Black Spirits, Fully Fullwood’s Tosh Meets Marley, Romain Virgo, Fantan Mojah, Pato Banton and locals Synrgy and JUCE. July 21 and 22, at Benbow Lake State Recreation Area. www.mateel.org. The 19th Annual Trinity Tribal Stomp. This classic hippie music fest out Highway 299 falls on the same busy July weekend as Reggae and the end of Folklife. The Stomp lineup leans toward the jamband/neo-stringband side with Victor Wooten Band, Poor Man’s Whiskey, Peter Rowan’s Big Twang Theory, Clan Dyken, The Shook Twins and Absynth Quintet all on Saturday; David Nelson Band, Moonalice, LoCura and the all-star Tribal Stomp Orchestra featuring Mark Karan headlining Sunday. July 21 and 22 at Junction City Park on Highway 299 in Junction City. Trinitytribalstomp.org. The 12th Annual Buddy Brown Blues Festival. Expect most of the usual suspects when all-local blues bash returns on Saturday, Aug. 4, in Blue Lake’s Perigot Park. www.humboldtfolklife.org. The Fourth Annual Mad River Summerfest. Parking problems at last year’s fest almost ended this free summer treat along the Mad, but it’s returning with the same local focus on the music, just on a new date: Saturday, Aug. 18, and a new location, Christie’s Ranch, the pumpkin patch on Glendale Drive, west of Blue Lake. The 15th Annual Blues by the Bay. Redwood Coast Music Festivals’ Labor Day weekend blueso-rama is back full force. Saturday is ladies day with Laurie Morvan, Janeva Magness, Deanna Bogart, Dana Fuchs and the token male, Chris Cain. Sunday it’s roots blues with David Jacob-Strain, Eric Bibb String Band featuring Dirk Powell and Cedric Watson and James Cotton: Superharp. Sept. 1 and 2, Halverson Park, by the Adorni Center, Eureka. www.bluesbythebay.org.   The Not Quite Annual Bummerfest. When new organizers announced that the local alt. music fest founded in 2001 was back for another round, they were swamped with bands wanting to play. Among those tentatively confirmed: The Monster Women, Eureka Garbage Company, Gunsafe, Radios in Caves and Speed of Darkness. Sept. 1 and 2, Eureka Veterans Hall. The 39th Annual North Country Fair. The Same Old People are currently booking musicians and vendors for another very Arcatan weekend of crafts, food and music. Sept. 15 and 16 on the

Arcata Plaza. www.sameoldpeople.org. Two big festivals we’ve listed in this guide for years are officially on hiatus: After 33 years, the venerable Harmony Festival is “reorganizing” and looking at “the possibility of creating Harmony Festivals in the coming years.” And, after losing its home in Laytonville to the Gaia Festival, Earthdance moved to Vallejo, then founder Chris Dekker returned home to Australia. Now the NorCal Earthdance is “taking a sabbatical for 2012.” Among the many other surviving music fests elsewhere in Northern California: The 18th Annual Sierra Nevada World Music Festival. This year’s SNWMF is heavy on reggae, especially roots-style, with some of the top acts in the field including Jimmy Cliff, Third World, Luciano, Linton Kwesi Johnson and Israel Vibration, plus Jah Sun and Lion Camp and AfroMassive representing Humboldt. June 22-24, Mendocino County Fairgrounds, Boonville. www. snwmf.com. The 17th Annual Kate Wolf Memorial Music Festival. This fest always presents stellar folk and roots musicians, and this year is no exception. Headliners include k.d. lang, Lucinda Williams, Richard Thompson, Ruthie Foster, Loudon Wainwright III, Leftover Salmon, Texas Tornados, Marcia Ball and Poor Man’s Whiskey, and that’s just the top of the bill. June 29-July 1, at Black Oak Ranch, north of Laytonville. www. katewolfmusic.com. The 22nd Annual High Sierra Music Festival. Still a jamband fan paradise, this fest keeps stretching out with Ben Harper, Built to Spill, STS9 and Toot and the Maytals among the headliners along with Galactic, ALO, Railroad Earth, and the twangy High Sierra-conceived Brokedown in Bakersfield with Tim and Nicki Bluhm joined by members from ALO. July 5-8, Plumas Sierra County Fairgrounds, Quincy. www.highsierramusic.com. The Second Annual Gaia Festival. Launched last year by the Hog Farm as a slightly-downsized Earthdance-style fest, this time they have Michael Franti and Spearhead, Yonder Mountain, Hot Buttered Rum, Kinky, Dumpstaphunk, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars, Bomba Estereo, Baka Beyond and David Lindley, just for starters. Aug. 3-5, Black Oak Ranch, Laytonville. www. thegaiafestival.com. The Fifth Annual Outside Lands. This eclectic multi-stage mega-fest in Golden Gate Park is supremely high-powered with Stevie Wonder, Neil Young, Jack White, Metallica, The Foo Fighters, Beck, Norah Jones, Santigold and Skrillex among the 60-or-so acts. Wow. Aug. 10-12, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. www. sfoutsidelands.com. l more Summer of Fun continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012

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Doggy Days By Ryan Burns No

Wutchood oi n

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y wife and I have a misshapen dog named Delroy. A boisterous mutt born into a dirt patch in the Fieldbrook hills (and a product of sibling inbreeding, we suspect), Delroy looks sort of like Pete the Pup, that floppy-eared pit bull from The Little Rascals, with some unfortunate exceptions. He’s proportioned like a dwarf — short, awkward limbs, the front ones curved like little bananas — and he has a pronounced under-bite, so his upper lip often gets lodged behind a bottom row of haphazard tombstone teeth, lending him the air of a hillbilly moonshiner. When we walk Delroy on a leash he has trouble coordinating his dwarfy, malformed legs. Each one hops and stumbles independently; his chaotic gait brings to mind a Radio Flyer wagon on square wheels. Not that it bothers him much; Delroy’s fairly amiable by nature (unless you ask a mailman or our vacuum cleaner). But lemme tell ya, set him loose in an open field or unleash him on the beach and Delroy can fly. Those

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

DELROY PHOTO BY RYAN BURNS

stubby limbs become a blur, his droopy lips flap in the breeze and his eyes light up. Nothing makes him happier. All dog lovers share the joy of such moments. But unless you live somewhere like the Fieldbrook hills, these opportunities can be hard to come by — assuming you follow the rules, which you totally should. Here are some basics: If your dog’s not trained to come every single time you call her, sorry — no off-leash privileges. If your dog gets aggressive with other critters (humans included), better keep him tethered. Does your dog poop? Yeah, I thought so. Pick that $#!t up, people. And here’s an important one: Only let your dog off leash in places where it’s allowed. Liberated dogs can wreak havoc on sensitive wildlife in areas like the Arcata Marsh, and it’s against the law to set ’em loose in all but a handful of Humboldt County locales. A few such glorious places are listed below,

but remember the rules and check signage for specifics. Cuz I don’t know about your dog, but Delroy can’t read. Eureka: Samoa Dunes Recreation Area; Headwaters Forest Reserve. Arcata: Mad River County Park. McKinleyville: Clam Beach County Park, Hiller Dog Park (beyond the split-rail fence) and adjoining Mad River Bluffs. Ferndale: Centerville Beach County Park, Lost Coast Headlands. Trinidad: Big Lagoon County Park; Luffenholtz Beach County Park; Moonstone Beach County Park. Manila: Mal-e’l Dunes (South), the waterline trail at Humboldt Coastal Nature Center. Loleta: Mike Thompson Wildlife Area, South Spit Humboldt Bay. Six Rivers National Forest: Except in swimming areas. Shelter Cove: King Range National Conservation Area. ●


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There’s an illustration I recall from an old schoolbook that still defines the popular conception of  human evolution (at least for those who believe in it at  all). It depictes a progression of primates, hairy apes becoming slightly less hairy and more two-legged until the  crouching Neanderthals become the modern human,  upright and standing tall, poised to invent subprime  mortgages. It’s a tale of destiny and inevitable progress,  and it’s pretty much wrong. Chris Stringer is a prominent paleoanthropologist  affiliated with the Natural History Museum in London.  In this book he attempts a comprehensive survey of the  still-changing picture of human species development.  He begins with the state of knowledge in the 1970s,  when he started his professional work, and he describes  in some detail the factors involved in how that picture  has changed. He explores fast-moving advances in contributing fields: not only in new techniques for locating  and unearthing fossils, but in dating them with exotic  new technologies (like the synchrotron, of which a very  big example is the Large Hadron Collider). Genetics now contributes in various ways, advancing  with stunning speed. The human genome was essentially sequenced less than 20 years ago. Now there’s a  sequenced Neanderthal genome. Stringer also considers cultural questions based on artifacts such as tools,  paints and musical instruments. Stringer writes a lot about how information was  developed, so the big picture emerges in fragments. While all the new data answers some questions,  basically it seems to have complicated the story. It’s  now considered likely that several of the many human  species (an earlier book counted 22) coexisted at the  same time, maybe in the same place. Modern humans  carry some Neanderthal DNA (and before the caveman  jokes start, Neanderthal males and females may have  been more equal physically and culturally than are  modern humans). So how did we become the only humans on Earth? Did modern humans develop traits that gave them  competitive advantage through natural selection? In  some ways probably, but traits that survived for no discernable reason (genetic drift) also helped. I’ve noticed  that in recent years, historians are taking the role of  climate more seriously as a causal factor in the rise and  fall of civilizations. Similarly, this book describes climate  changes as crucial elements in the prehistoric story of  human species. There are still plenty of puzzles, but Stringer  concludes that we’re here at least partly by accident,  by luck. “Sometimes the difference between success  and failure in evolution is a narrow one,” he concludes,  and notes that we’ve now got “an overpopulated planet  and the prospect of global climate change on a scale  that humans have never faced before.” Let’s hope our  species is up to the challenge.   — William Kowinski

Patti Smith Van Duzer Theatre May 10

  This is the girl who changed it for all of us  girls in the ’70s. Patti Smith. She was beyond  cool. Counter culture and cultured. She was a  bona fide poet. She was an artist. A balls-out  skinny wisp of a woman with an electric guitar  hanging from her shoulder. Her voice, in modulating harmonies, belted out our raw desire, our  hunt for beauty. Through Patti Smith we sought  who we were in the world, as she exclaimed it  for us. The Van Duzer felt like a small room last  Thursday when Smith took the stage with  her longtime guitar player Lenny Kaye. She  acted like we knew each other as she sang to  us, recited poetry, told stories (in her Jersey  accent), made us laugh. Ever in blue jeans, a  loose-fitting black suit jacket and long brown  hair haloed with strands of white, she could  have stepped right out of one of one of Robert  Mapplethorpe’s iconic black and white photos  from decades ago. Smith read from Just Kids, her love song of  a book chronicling her relationship with Mapplethorpe, their prelude to fame and tenure  at the infamous Chelsea Hotel, arriving at the  maelstrom of all things ’60s, when it seemed  the world would explode. While singing a lovely and plaintive Helpless,  by Neil Young, Smith lost her place for a moment  and later intimately explained, “I know the  song. Sometimes I start thinking about my late  husband (guitarist) Fred ‘Sonic’ Smith.” Her naked  sadness made the theater feel smaller yet. Her voice is in great shape, moving from rich  and evocative to gravelly and raucous. After  relating the backstory of writing verses for Because the Night at the Chelsea one night while  waiting endlessly for Fred to call from tour with  his own band, Smith and Kaye played a rousing  version of her only No. 1 hit, emphasizing the  famed lines, “Have I doubt when I’m alone/ Love is a ring the telephone.“ Asked by an audience member about two  of her art forms she said, “Poems and songs are  different things. Songs I’m writing to you, to  the people … a poem, I‘m not conscious of the  listener. I’m very involved in the language of the  poem. A poem may be more beautiful, but a  song more generous.” And a magnificently generous evening it was.  So many of us were shaped by the same forces  that drive her work. Patti Smith onstage singing  and reading, that is life of the artist and it is  happening right now. She is Patti Smith. Twenty  or 30 or 40 or 65 years old, she is true to herself,  and that is the reason her work continues to  inspire. — Stephanie Silvia

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here’s one thing constant in the restaurant world: change. Menus change; restaurants come and go. It can be hard to keep track. That’s why we put out a new Menu of Menus every year. There’s a new one out, which you can find on select newsstands and other locations throughout Humboldt County. So, what’s new? For those who love barbecue, Shamus T Bones in Carlotta has been a destination restaurant. Now former-building-contractor-turned-BBQ-chef Chris Barry has opened his dream restaurant in a brand spanking new rustic-meets-Craftsman building on the waterfront (behind the Best Western Plus Bayshore Inn) with an expansive view of Humboldt Bay. Expect the same Texas-style barbecue menu, heaven for carnivores, but with more seafood, including a full oyster bar, as well as new options for vegetarians. And yes, the awesome collection of mounted trophy heads made the move.   When our last Menu of Menus came out we were still waiting for Luke Patterson of Luke’s Joint to open his dinnerhouse, The Other Place, on K Street in Arcata. It was worth the wait for what is arguably the most innovative menu in the county. Luke calls the food “FrenchAmerican,” but that’s too limiting for the range of influences in play. Those curious about how he does it, and what goes on in a cutting-edge kitchen, are invited to re-

serve “The Kitchen Table,” a counter with seating for three right in the restaurant’s kitchen. It’s been a couple of years since Avalon expanded to Arcata with Bizou, a second location offering what was basically the Avalon menu. After spending part of 2011 on hiatus, the space in the Safeway shopping center has reopened as a casual burger joint, Bizou Burger. The new menu includes variations on the classic burger using local grass-fed beef, plus BBQ ribs, pulled pork, Buffalo wings and Caesar salad, all with that Avalon twist. Vegetarian and gluten-free options? Of course. Before Ramone’s established itself as one of Humboldt’s premier bakeries, it was an Old Town restaurant known first as Ramone’s Café, then as Ramone’s at Night. Berit Meyer was among the staff (she’s also a founding owner). She now oversees bakeries in five locations with her husband, Brian Ferguson. About a year ago their production bakery near St. Joseph Hospital took over the neighborhood grocery next door, Duck’s Market, to become Ramone’s Harrison Bakery & Café. The well-appointed space offers the usual bakery fare along with a breakfast menu with egg dishes, French toast and the like. At lunch there’s pizza, panini, soups and salads along with daily specials. There’s also a carefully selected wine list, beer on tap and a rotating dinner menu served until 7 p.m. most weekdays, until 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays — which means it’s


once again Ramone’s at night — if not by name, by schedule. Despite its off-the-beaten-path Eureka location, there’s often a wait for a table at hot spot Brick and Fire Bistro. Not to worry, simply head a couple of doors down F Street to its satellite, Two Doors Down. The cozy wine bar took over the space that once housed World Café. Wait for your table at Brick and Fire and have an appetizer, fondue or a cheese board while you sip a glass of wine. Or have a light meal there. Choose from soups and salads and finish with dessert. You may not notice much of a change, but longtime Northtown Arcata favorite Folie Douce has a new owner, Chris Hollen, who has been a server there for years. One new addition: something she calls “Sweet Sunday Madness” the second Sunday of each month, with appetizers based around ingredients from local famers paired with appropriate regional wines. As 2011 came to an end, longtime Old Town fave Hurricane Kate’s called it quits and baked its last wood-fired pizza. Now Alex Moore from The Pearl (right next door) is taking over. A new name was in order (the original Hurricane Kate blew out of town years ago). He’s going with the address: Five Eleven. Moore has big plans: He’s already enlisted Dave Griswold from the original Kate’s crew as head chef — he’s working on a menu along locavore Northern Pacific cuisine lines. Interior changes include moving the bar to the other side of the room and building a stage in back for live music. The industrious Moore projects a July opening. He will definitely have a very busy 2012: He also recently took over The Yellow Rose, a bar and grill in Petrolia (the only one in the Mattole Valley) and is rebuilding that from the ground up with plans to reopen in June. Also due for resurrection: The Ritz. The Old Town bar and restaurant has been empty since Zhuo Zhao Ellis merged her Italian restaurant, Cin Cin, and her sushi/ teppanyaki operation as the Bayfront Restaurant on the waterfront. Now her Bayfront partner, Jack Wu, is moving into the space she left behind, turning it into a Thai/French restaurant, presumably named The Ritz. (Why change that classic neon signage?)  When the Journal asked readers to choose their favorite pizza last year, Paul’s Live From New York took home the award. At the time the pizza place was working on a new location on the corner of Seventh and F streets near the Eureka Theater. The big, roomy space

is now up and running, turning out the same high quality New York-style pizzas you’ll find in McKinleyville. Z & J Asian Subs opened a couple of years ago in the steel-clad building near Target that once offered drive-through coffee. Z & J’s limited menu — mainly tasty sub sandwiches and a generous Asian chicken salad — won enough followers to warrant expansion. Now Z & J has taken over the almost-new Quiznos on Fifth in Eureka, offering the original menu plus: Dinner specials rotate night to night (hickory-smoked prime rib on Fridays). There’s also an array of exotic snacks, soft drinks and juices — and tables so you can sit and eat. The space on the corner of Fifth and G streets in Eureka has been home to a series of restaurants offering everything from Philly cheese steak sandwiches to Indian food. Next up: Sopai’s Place, a Southeast Asian sandwich/pizza joint operated by Sopai Chum, who comes from the same family that runs Don’s Donuts in Arcata. The old Waterwheel Restaurant in Garberville has been reborn as Sequoia Steak and Pub, serving lunch and dinner six days a week. As you can guess from the name, it’s primarily a steak house, although plans are afoot for seasonal seafood, and it already has the requisite vegetarian options and salad bar, which, says owner Pat Bilandzijah, will always be organic and as GMO-free as possible.  Kurt Kramer and company are almost done refurbishing the earthquakedamaged Healy Brothers Building, former home of the Old Town Bar and Grill. That restaurant/bar/nightclub is not returning; instead plans are under way for a pub called The Siren’s Song Tavern, with an emphasis on microbrews and small production craft beers. The tavern keepers Phyllis Barba from the Accident Gallery and her partner Nathan Swenson, a lecturer at HSU, figure they’ll have around a hundred different beers — that’s right, 100 bottles of beer on the wall.  Also offering 100 bottles of beer and a wide array of microbrews on tap, exotic and otherwise, is The Local, which recently opened downstairs in the Professional Building on F in Eureka, where Obento Sushi used to be. It follows close on the heels of The Speakeasy, a new, intimate full-service bar on Opera Alley in Old Town. Does that sound like a lot of new places to explore? There will be more before you know it. l

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northcoastjournal.com

MckinleyvilL MckinleyvilLee aRts Night Third Friday McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, May 18, 6-8 p.m.

is presented by members of the McKinleyville business community and is open for all McKinleyville businesses to display the work of local artists. Receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are from 6-8 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Call 834-6460 or visit www.mckinleyvilleartsnight. com for more information. CERAMICS BY ANN SHACKLETON AT CURVES

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG SMITH AT NORTH COAST GALLERY AND PICTURE FRAMING

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SUSAN TREPANIER AT CURVES

1. Eureka-Arcata Airport. Redwood Art Association coordinated show. 2. Silver Lining, 3561 Boeing Ave., #D. The Good and Evil Twins, ambigram art; Music by Dale Winget. 3. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road in the Multipurpose Room. MHS Drama and Improv Troupe, 5 ATW Spring Showcase variety show; Free Green Show on quad from 6-7 p.m. $5/$3 seniors and students charged from 7-10 p.m. 4. North Coast Gallery and Picture Framing, McKinleyville Shopping Center. Greg Smith, photography. 5. McKinleyville Family Resource Center, 1450 Hiller Road. Family Art Night. 6. Blake’s Books, 2005 Central Ave. John Wesa, serigraphs. 7. Eco Threadz, Miller Business Park. Mike Adams, mixed media; Ryan Souther: mixed media. 8. Curves, Miller Business Park. Susan Trepanier, photography; Ann Shackleton, ceramics. 9. Knitter’s Lane, 1225 Central Ave., #14. Knit Night, knitter’s circle. ●

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Zita Nyarady, Eric Hoffman and Brandon J. Wilson in The Most Remarkable Man of the Age. photo by Joan Schirle

Legend of the Falls

Two entertaining takes on immortality at Dell’Arte By William S. Kowinski williamkowinski@northcoastjournal.com

I

remember my mother standing at an ironing board in the motel room where our family was staying on a vacation trip in the summer of 1960, as we heard the radio report of what came to be called “the miracle at Niagara”: a 7-year-old boy had been swept over the titanic Horseshoe Falls and survived. He was picked up at the bottom by the tourist boat, “Maid of the Mist.” We had visited the Falls just hours before it happened. It was a wonder just hearing about it.   The first person to intentionally go over those falls and survive was Annie Edson Taylor, a down-on-her-luck teacher who said she was 43, but was actually 63. She did it in a specially built barrel in 1901. Her story is the basis of one of the two original pieces on the Carlo Theatre stage at Dell’Arte for its second and final weekend, under the umbrella title of Beyond Belief. They are the thesis projects of third-year students in the MFA program at the Dell’Arte International School.   The story of this remarkable woman is preceded by The Most Remarkable Man of the Age, although he’s fictional. MFA candidate Myque Franz adapted an Edgar

Allen Poe story (“The Man That Was Used Up”) and poem (“The Conqueror Worm”), and created this piece with three former Dell’Arte students: Eric Hoffman, Zita Nyarady and Brandon J. Wilson.   It has the satiric mood of the Poe story but owes as least as much to his macabre side, as well as perhaps to melodrama, morality tales, German Expressionism and those beloved (by some) cheap horror flicks. An Everyman named Thompson seeks the secret of the rumored immortality of the elusive figure, Gen. Dr. John A.B.C. Smith, PhD. Thompson meets various bizarre characters (Pompeygirl, Dr. Guru Stretchmout, the Cognoscenti Twins, Sinivate the Worm etc.) before learning the secret the hard way, in a kind of Alfred Hitchcock Presents twist.   At least that’s what happened when I saw it. The nature of these projects is that they change, especially from one weekend to the next. It was an entertaining and skillfully presented piece, with all the expected physical flourishes on, behind and even under the stage. It managed to incorporate a variation on the Actor’s Nightmare: finding yourself onstage — maybe in your underwear — with no

idea of what the play is, or the words of your next line. This helped give this entire piece the quality of a nightmare.   Heroine of Horseshoe Falls is the work of the three third-year participants: Rachel Brown, Meghan Frank and Pratik Motwani. It follows the general biography of Annie Edson Taylor, though it shapes it for affecting and artful effect. But it also adds much texture and detail. It begins with a striking theatrical image, which I won’t spoil except to say that it, like some other images, postures and dance movements, reminded me of photos and films of Agnes de Mille’s early work. When Taylor’s husband is killed in the Civil War she is left to her own devices. After her wanderings and struggles as a teacher, she gets the idea of plunging down the Horseshoe Falls to make her fortune. The real Annie Taylor’s desperation seems softened by a delusion well-known in our time, of self-affirmation and immortality through a famous accomplishment.   Pratik Motwani (who rocketed to local stardom in last year’s Mary Jane: The Musical — and yes, he’s back this summer!) plays her carney-eyed manager who siphons off what little money she makes. He sees Annie as a freak attraction, while she sees herself as an inspiring story. Meghan Frank, who is excellent as Annie throughout, is especially riveting as her elder self: the former “Queen of the Mist” selling penny postcards memorializing her exploits. Her rueful sweetness in defeat feels true. Meghan Frank is an actor with range. Rachel Brown plays the “inner Annie” and a half-dozen other parts with efficiency and charm. Spoken exposition got confusing at times, but some of the writing was especially evocative: the remembered scene of Annie getting the news of her husband’s death, for instance. There were bursts of comedy, as in the old “Niagara Falls! Slowly I turn …” bit I first saw in a Three Stooges film — barely integrated but fun. Michael Foster designed lighting and Lydia Foreman the costumes. Daniel Spencer is technical director and Kristin Shumaker the production stage manager — all for both shows. The lighting for each was especially effective in setting the mood from the start. Beyond Belief continues this weekend at Dell’Arte in Blue Lake, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. Coming Up: North Coast Repertory Theatre opens the 2003 Broadway musical Avenue Q on May 24. It runs through June 23. l

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nicki bluhm. photo by john chapman.

Going Viral

Nicki Bluhm and The Gramblers, plus Ryan MacEvoy, Broken Water and music for a black sun By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

W

hat makes something “go viral” and bounce exponentially around the Net garnering countless tweet pointers, Facebook shares and millions of hits? It’s hard to say. One thing’s for certain, that word, “hit,” has taken on a new meaning. Marketing departments everywhere are trying to figure out the formula, since going viral has become a mark of success and can serve as an instant career boost. Take for example something that happened on the Journal website earlier this year. Our Google Analytics watcher Andrew Goff noticed an unexpected traffic spike in connection with a Bad Kitty show at the Red Fox featuring Sarah Blackwood from the Canadian psychobilly band The Creepshow — oddly, a show that never happened. It was cancelled because of a little video Ms. Blackwood made with her side project, Walk Off the Earth. The vid shows her

and her four bandmates playing a song by the Belgian-Australian songwriter Gotye, “Somebody That I Used to Know” — all on the same guitar. At some point after she’d booked her solo tour the vid became an overnight sensation: At this point, it has been viewed over 107 million times. With Blackwood’s instant career bump, overnight Eureka became too small a pond. But the lingering show announcement, with a pic that somehow ranked high in Google Image searches, brought a measurable bump in our web traffic. The song itself is the epitome of viralness: Gotye’s video for it is approaching 210 million hits on YouTube. The song has been performed on The Voice, American Idol and Glee, and Gotye did it on Saturday Night Live — all within the last couple of months. While it’s not quite at the same stratospheric level, a YouTube vid titled “Hall and Oates — I Can’t Go For That — Cover by

Nicki Bluhm and The Gramblers — Van Session 17” seems to be going viral. Uploaded in March, it was at 1,205,500 views last time I checked. It’s a casual, lo-fi recording, shot with an iPhone in a moving tour van with Ms. Bluhm on vocals and kazoo, a guitarist next to her, a keyboard player in the way back sitting next to Nicki’s husband, Tim, who sings sweet harmony and strums percussion on a Martin Backpacker guitar adapted with a sheet of paper threaded through the strings. The song is used as a marketing tool: In exchange for your email address you can get a free download, an offer made via YouTube, where you’ll also find links to the band’s website, Facebook and iTunes pages. Fans of the “California soul” band The Mother Hips will recognize Tim Bluhm as that band’s lead singer/songwriter. He’s still with The Hips, but has been focusing attention on The Gramblers, who have been working on their second album at Mission Bells Studio in San Francisco. Nicki and Tim have become something of a power couple on the festival circuit: They’re playing a bunch of fests this summer including Kate Wolf and High Sierra, in both cases doing sets with an alt. Cali-country band called Brokedown in Bakersfield with members of ALO, a project born at last summer’s High Sierra. Nicki Bluhm and The Gramblers will be spending a lot of time in that tour van in the coming months. It brings them to Arcata this weekend for a Sunday show at Humboldt Brews, where I’m sure you’ll hear “I Can’t Go For That” live and in person along with a bunch of Tim and Nicki’s songs. Aoife Hearty has a sound that’s hard to pinpoint. She Irish, from County Laois, but she now lives in Leeds and is part of the Brit neo-soul-jazz/electro scene a la Morcheeba and Goldfrapp. Her band, Rodina, assembled in jamband-central Colorado, features Joe Tatton, keyboardist from New Mastersounds, along with members from Colorado jam/funkband Fox Street All Stars. The guys drop jazzy soul with hints of reggae behind Aoife’s delicate vocals. What is it? Decide for yourself when Rodina plays at the Red Fox Thursday. DJ Red writes to say,  “As you probably already know, the next Missing Links Soul Night at HumBrews is this Saturday. The guest DJs this week are Rickshaw and myself (King Maxwell will be out of town so I’m happily filling his shoes). Missing Link just got pre-sale tickets in, and they’re already selling like johnnycakes. Get ’em while you still can. And we all really hope that people will come out early to support the opener, as there’s nothing more disheartening to a DJ than playing to an empty room. First record drops at 9.” Red’s 45-only set will focus on “Northern soul.” Ask him what that means.  You’ll also find the Missing Link DJ Crew spinning at the Arcata Playhouse Sunday afternoon as part of the big Solar Eclipse Street Festival in the newly proclaimed Creamery District (you’ll find more about

the eclipse and the street fair elsewhere in this paper.) The festival is an ambitious (free) event with two stages featuring all sorts of dancers: Ya Habibi Dance Company, Chakra Nation Hoopers and Samba Da Alegria, and music: teen rockers 51 Cards, Lonesome Roses, Colin and Cory, The Interfaith Choir, The Big Forgive, and Jan Bramlett just before the sun disappears. Post-eclipse the action moves indoors to the Arcata Playhouse where Absynth Quintet plays to bring back the sun (that part costs money). Pianist Ryan MacEvoy grew up in Humboldt; local classical music lovers traced his progress as the child prodigy entered the HSU music program as a teen, worked with the late Deborah Clasquin, graduated at the age of 18, and went on to earn a masters degree from USC, with stops along the way to play a concert at Carnegie Hall and record a CD of music by French composer Milosz Magin. He’s back in town this weekend for the Eureka Symphony spring concert Friday and Saturday nights at Arkley Center, where he’ll take on Sergei Rachmaninoff’s technically challenging “Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor Opus 30.” The program also has the symphony performing Mozart’s “Great G minor Symphony” No. 40, K.550. If you show up early (7 p.m.) you’ll find John Chernoff and Daniela Mineva at the piano explaining the musical structure, historical context and current significance of the pieces.  Self-described “hacker space rock” trio CMKT 4 is on a national tour of “hackerspaces, makerspaces, co-working spaces and fab labs.” The trio is teaching workshops on DIY electronics and circuit bending, which involves repurposing electronic gadgets (for example a “Speak and Spell”) by messing with the innards to create new music/noise instruments. The hackers are in Humboldt next week schooling DIYers in workshops where you can make your own “Creme DeMentia Contact Microphone” from a bottlecap, a few wires and some basic electronics. Monday they’re at John Haynes Memorial Veterans’ Hall in Garberville, where the 6 p.m. workshop is preceded by a potluck dinner (at 5 p.m.). Tuesday afternoon (3-6) they’re at the MARZ Project upstairs in the Carson Block Building (517 Third St.) in Old Town Eureka. Both workshops will conclude with some sort of space rock concert. Later on Tuesday at the Shanty, The Monster Women share a bill with Broken Water, a band from Olympia, Wash. The trio, Jon Hanna on guitar, Kanako Pooknyw and Dillan Norton on drums and bass, is about to release an album called Tempest for Sub-pop sister label Hardly Art. The collection of nowave/grunge/shoegaze songs, influenced by “Russian punk-rock poets, the ocean, drowning, the Occupy Movement, nightmares, dreams, substances and others,” is not out officially until May 29, but the band might have some on the road. If so, buy one. That’s how bands put gas in those vans.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012

35


WINE SHOP

BON SWING!, Gypsy Jazz

Fri., May 18, 7-10pm • no cover

JIM SILVA, Guitar

Sat., May 19, 7-10pm • no cover

SUMMER HOURS!

Open until 9pm Mon. - Thurs. • 10pm Fri. & Sat. Happy Hour 6pm - 8pm Mon. - Thurs. • $1 off glass of wine

Wine Bar & Store: Open Monday through Saturday 8th Street on the Arcata Plaza • 825-7596

1.75 Liter

venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 9th St. ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

thur 5/17

fri 5/18

sat 5/19

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Miasmic, Lord Dying (metal) 11pm $5

Like us on Facebook!

Future Shorts Film Festival Doors at 7:30pm $5 All ages

Reservoir Dogs Doors at 7:30pm $5 Rated R

Eureka Symphony 8pm

Eureka Symphony 8pm

Happy Hour: $1 off wells The Roadmasters (country) no cover 9pm

Happy Hour: $1 off pints Midnight Special (country/rock) no cover 9pm

Nighthawk (dance rock) no cover 9pm

Berel Alexander Ensemble (r&b/soul) no cover 9pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Dr. Squid (dance rock) no cover 9pm

Dr. Squid (dance rock) no cover 9pm

Anti-Prom 2012 8pm $12

THE BRIDGE Fernbridge 725-2190

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm Open Mic 7pm Karaoke 8pm-1am Blues Jam w/ Anna Banana 6pm

Rich & Blake (bluegrass) 8pm

CAFE MOKKA Arcata 822-2228

Drink of the Week:

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

786 9th Street Arcata

2 parts Sailor Jerry Fill with timg/ grapefruit soda 2 lime wedges

*Must be 21 to purchase alcohol.

bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

750 Liter

Glass: highball Method: Build in glass over cubed ice & squeeze in lime wedges

includes paid listings

BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com

16

Ironside

entertainment in bold

ARKLEY CENTER Eureka 442-1956

Humboldt County’s best price on Sailor Jerry’s $ 99 $ 99

18

Broken Water Tuesday at The Shanty with The Monster Women ENJOY OUR BOTTLED BEERS, TOO!

LIBATION

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

BossLevelz w/Masta Shredda & Itchie Fingaz no cover 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm Eureka Brass Band 8:30pm

EUREKA INN 518 7th St.

1644 G Street, Arcata

FIELDBROOK MARKET Fieldbrook HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata

Angel Fargas (Flamenco) 8pm $3 Monte Carlo Speakeasy Night 8pm

EUREKA THEATER 612 F St. The Living Rooms (folk) 7pm Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close!

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger Silver Hammer (Beatles tribute) 10pm $7

Happy Hour All Day! Missing Link Records Soul Night 9pm $5

DJ Knutz 9pm free

The Bump Foundation (funk) 9pm

Accurate Productions (dance) 9pm

Summer Hours: until 9pm Monday Thursday, 10pm Friday & Saturday

Suprise Guest! 7-10 pm, no cover

Jim Silva (guitar) 6-9pm no cover

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif River Valley Mud (soul/funk) 6pm

Enceledus (Humboldt metal) The Last Match 9pm

Don’t think of it as work, think of it as fun!

www.humboldtbrews.com

INK ANNEX 47B West 3rd St Eureka JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LARRUPIN CAFE Trinidad LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake MANILA COMMUNITY CENTER

Taqueria la Barca 4-7pm HFS Barn Dance 7:30pm $7

Six packs on sale!

NOCTURNUM Eureka OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GARDEN GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive 923-2748

DJ Jsun & friends (dance music) 9pm-midnight

Located in beautiful Old Town DJ Jsun (dance music) 10pm

Tony Nestor (singer/guitarist) 7pm

Yolanda Nickell (jazz) 7pm

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

PORTUGUESE HALL Arcata Rodina (Brit funk pop) 9pm

DJ Ray 9pm

Get your growlers filled

Tasting Room open Fridays 4-midnight

Tasting Room Open 12-12

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

West African Drum/Dance 5:30-7pm

Congolese Dance with Makaya 5:30-7pm $8-$15

www.RedwoodRaks.com

SAVE $ WHEN YOU BUY 2 AT HUMBOLDT CLOTHING!

ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Buy any 2 Hoodies SAVE $10 and get 2 pairs of Humboldt Shoelaces

SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Buy any 2 T-Shirts SAVE $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 1642 G ST.

(Next to Hey Juan Burritos)

707-822-3090

Karen Lovely 9pm $15

36

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 7-10pm

Irish Music Night 7:30-10:30pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Kenny Ray & The Mighty Rovers (country swing) 9pm

St. John and the Sinners (blues/rock) 9pm

Find us on Facebook

Dale Winget (folk) 7pm

Randles-Labolle-Wu (jazz) 7pm

Brew at the Zoo: Ishi Dube 6pm

SEQUOIA PARK ZOO Eureka

THE SHANTY Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville SIDELINES Arcata Plaza

Karaoke 7-10pm MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

Rude Lion 10pm

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Silent Giants (rock) 9pm

The Trouble (Americana) 8pm

Jim Lahman Band (blues) 9pm

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka

Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30

SugaFoot (blues duo) 7:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Find us on Facebook

Boss Levelz 10pm

MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS WINEMA THEATER Scotia

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

www.persimmons.net or find us on Facebook Rutabaga Ball 7pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville

Buy any 2 Hats/Beanies SAVE $5

Sit and sip. Benji Onewise (dance music) 10pm

Randles-LaBolle-Wu Trio (jazz) 7pm Doug Fir and the 2x4s (rock) 9pm $8


clubs • concerts • cafés sun 5/20

mon 5/21

tues 5/22

wed 5/23

DJ Anya 11pm $3

Full menu online!

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells

Indian in the Cupboard Doors at 5:30pm $5 Rated R

Find our website at www.arcatatheatre.com

UPCOMING: AAI Presents Flow 2012 Fashion Show Saturday, May 26!

Sci Fi Night ft. Radical Dystopian Documentaries 6pm-10pm All ages

www.barflypub.com

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Free Pool & $3 Wells

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm-1am

No Limit Texas Hold’em 6:30pm

Bear River Casino Hotel For reservations call 733-9644 Wild Wing Wednesday w/ 25¢ wings

Open Mic Night 6pm

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints Open Jam 6pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Ba-Dum-Chh Comedy 9pm

Solar Eclipse Festival 3-7pm

$100,000 Strike It Rich Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

Receive one free swipe on the Strike It Rich kiosk Quiz Night 7pm www.bluelakecasino.com

Looking for a caterer or baker for your next big event?

Gin & Guitar Stan (country) 5-7pm

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1 Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers (rock/soul/country) 9pm $10

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long!

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two

Weensday: all Ween from 4:30-10pm AND 10% off your order!

UPCOMING: Moksha Masquerade Dance Party, May 27

Cribagge Tournament 6:30pm

www.humboldtbrews.com

Sundaze: Deep Groove Society 9pm

Jamestown Revival 8pm

Yarn 9pm

Dancehall Reggae Night 9pm

Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza

Happy Hour 6-8pm Monday - Thursday, $1 off wine by the glass

www.libation.com

We are a certified wine shipper

Come for the beer, stay for the clowns!

The other Red Lion

Repeat: We got beer.

Solar Eclipse party

Purl and Pour come craft 6:30pm

The Spindrifters (bluegrass) 6-8:30pm

Aber Miller (piano) 6-9pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif 4 For Jazz (jazz) 6pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday 9pm

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Now serving beer and wine

GLDT and ALLY Open Mic 6-8pm

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Now reopen for spring!

Open 2-10pm Wed-Fri

Handcrafted items for children and adults.

Live music 7-10pm Jam Session 9pm

Happy Day! Happy hour all day!

Tapping IGA from the Oak

Break Dancing with Rex 5-7pm $10

Tasting Room open Mon-Wed 4-11pm Thu 4-12 Swing Dance Night 7:30-10:30pm $5

Argentine Tango Int: 7:15pm/Beg 8:15pm

Hoop Dance w/ Nicole beginning session 5:30-7:30pm

Chris Parreira (Americana) 6-9pm

Spoken Word Night! 2 piece/5 min limit

Happy hour M-F 4-6pm

Salsa Night! $5 Lesson 7pm, dancing 8-11pm

Oysters, clams, mussels

Dinner reservations 407-3550

Full cocktail bar

Expanded seafood menu

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

southeast asian cuisine

Thai • Lao • Vietnamese corner of 4th & L Eureka • 443-2690 ••• OPEN Mon.-Sat Lunch & Dinner

Pick up a copy of the Journal’s 2012 Wedding Guide. Available on newsstands throughout Humboldt County, at wedding vendors and online at www.northcoastjournal.com, under the Special Publications tab.

• We cater, too! •

IN SID E

Venues Jewelry Gowns and Tuxedoes Flowers Bakeries And More

Broken Water, Monster Women 9pm

Karaoke 8pm Wallace and Phines noon-3pm Jimi Jeff’s Jam 9pm

Karaoke 9pm w/ sushi

Arcata Pizza Council (jazz) 9pm w/ fried chicken

Greg Camphis Duo: unplugged 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Open Sun-Thu 4-11pm Fri-Sat 4pm-2am

SugaFoot (trumpet/guitar duo) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

37


From the Dancers Studio (l-r) Erin Knight, Alia San Giovanni, Dana Fergusen, Rachael Green, Ceylon Baginski, Carrie Maschmeier, Julia Hjerpe and Jazzmin Martinez. courtesy of Dancers Studio

Recital Season

Spring is in the air, and so are dancers! By Stephanie Silvia dance@northcoastjournal.com

S

pringtime! Baseball for some. Dance recitals for others. (With no chance of being rained out.) In local studios all over the county a host of teachers are diligently rehearsing, readying their students to be on stage. Producing shows takes a tremendous amount of planning and labor. Add kids to the mix and whoa — there’s an undertaking of epic proportions, the anticipation shooting through the roof. Many dance schools have a range of students from pre-K through high school, with a pre-professional program of advanced teenagers, along with young adults and faculty forming small dance companies. This is always a boon for the youngsters, who get to see where the training may lead, and for the adults in the audience, who just ardently watched 15 dances in a row of emergent ballerinas disguised as prancing teddy bears, whirling bumblebees and leaping fairies. The focus of most of these concerts is on the kids, who are at all stages of technical development. Some of the shows tend to be long, reflecting the popularity of these studio-schools, since students from all the classes perform in different dances, often in more than one. Grandparents, friends and relatives come from far and wide to see the kids hoofing away. These fetes are always great outings for the children in the audience, who enjoy watching other kids perform. Many

directors work to make the recital into a cohesive dance event with concepts that tie the works together, along with company level pieces. The first concert of the season, Brava! Dances, May 18 at the Van Duzer, directed by Virginia Niekrasz-Laurent of the Dancers Studio, will no doubt culminate in a piece she premiered at Dance Ink Day last month, Allegro Molto. It is performed to the first movement of Felix Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto in E. Like a baseball team whose seniors all graduated, many Brava! company members have gone on to college, leaving Laurent working with many ballerinas in the acolyte stages. Three of her four principal dancers are accomplished teens, led by the experienced, enigmatic Carrie Maschmeier. When asked about her process of making dances, Laurent says she’s “basically inspired by the desire to combine different technique levels in a cohesive, contemporary work.” She succeeded in this abstract, elegant dance, giving her nascent corps work that is doable, while pushing against the limits of their training — a wonder to behold. The program also includes classical and contemporary pieces, and collaboration with the Redwood Chorus under director Kathe Lythe, and guests from the Dance Art Studio from Crescent City. (Brava! guests in that studio’s show June 2 and 3.) Brava! Dances, Friday, May 18, at 7:30 p.m. HSU’s Van Duzer Theatre. Tickets $12, available at the door or at The Danc-

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

ers Studio in Eureka, 442-7770. North Coast Dance’s spring school performance, Once Upon A Time, is designed to highlight all levels of the studio’ s program, from pre-ballet students to fullon ballerinas like Iris Van Atta and Beth Posten. Who doesn’t love fairy tales? NCD brings the classic characters to life. Artistic director Danny Furlong choreographed a series of mini-ballets to be accompanied by the live music: Snow White for the kids in the school and company members, and a teenagers’ Madhatter’s Tea Party, sure to be filled with the characteristic speed and wit of Furlong’s phrasing, along with Unicorns, a pointe piece for company apprentices that promises fantastical costumes. The faculty has composed more fairy tale dances for the littlest Red Riding Hoods and Miss Muppet’s, on up to Nancy Call’s Ballet 4 students who will dance variations from Sleeping Beauty. Once Upon A Time, at the North Coast Dance Studio, 426 F St., Eureka, Friday, May 18, at 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at 2 and 5 p.m., and Sunday, May 20 at 1 and 4 p.m. One night only at the Arkley Center for the Performing Arts in Eureka, Wednesday, May 23, at 7 p.m. Tickets $12, 12 and under, $10. 442-7779 www.northcoastdance.org. New World Ballet, directed by Victor Temple with Nadine Cole, is leaving for Santa Rosa. Cole, who studied with the iconic New York City ballet director, George Balanchine, opened the studio in 1994, handing over artistic directorship to Temple in 2005. Dance Theater of Harlem and Oakland Ballet alum Temple brought much to the local landscape, not only with the guest artists he invited from the professional ballet worlds of the Bay Area, New York City and Richmond, Va., but with his deep connections to the international African dance and drumming community. Temple will be remembered for giving us our own Humboldt Cinderella, replete with Uggs, tie-dye and a stoner Prince Charming, along with coming out of retirement at 40 to dance a stunning grand pas de duex with a prima from Oakland ballet as the Sugar Plum fairy. Historic. See NWB’s swan song to Arcata, a concert in its studio in the old Creamery Building, 824 L St., Arcata, Saturday, May 19, at 7 p.m., Arcata, 822-4947, info@ humboldtdance.org. You may want to get there early; the performance is a parting gift, free admission. Always a treat, Trillium Dance Studios (formerly Dance Class with Erin Fernandez) has its springtime show June 9 and 10 at the Van Duzer. The kids adore Erin McKeever and love to be onstage in this yearly extravaganza. With a cast of over 200, “Dances of the Redwood Forest” is a

mix of ballet, modern and Latin dance in front of a redwoods scene painted by Rachel Robinson. McKeever has developed a knack for working with a theme, which is not only meaningful to the kids, who proudly bubble over about their parts, but for the audience, who have a sense of coherence while experiencing a barrage of dances. The redwood forest theme is ripe with possibilities. Look for skunks, raccoons, otters, red tailed hawks, egrets, trillium flowers, berries, a salmon run dance with a mountain lion, and deer on pointe. The studio boasts a cadre of strong on technique, 20-something teachers who perform as Trillium Dance Ensemble. And any day you get to see McKeever dance is a good day; long-limbed and lithe-footed, she performs a barefoot solo as a great blue heron. Ahh … Trillium Studios presents Dances of the Redwood Forest, Saturday June 9 at 2 and 6 p.m. and Sunday, June 10, at 2 p.m. at Van Duzer Theatre. Tickets at the door. The Studio of Dance Arts, directed by Jane Morgan, presents A Night on Broadway and Spring Dance Recital, a dance production in two acts. Act one showcases jazz, modern and tap dances choreographed to popular Broadway musical numbers, like Stephanie Carter’s re-staging of the gutsy “Cellblock Tango” from Chicago. The second act covers an array of styles including contemporary ballet, modern, Middle Eastern and the troupe’s award-winning Irish step dancing. Tuesday, June 19, 7 p.m. at the Arkley Center for Performing Arts. Tickets are $15, at the door and at the box office, 412 G St., Eureka. 442-1956, www.arkleycenter. com. The Ferndale Dance Academy’s original production, Cinderella Liberty, written by Michael and Laura East and narrated by Kevin Sharkey, follows three Navy gals on a 12-hour shore leave in New York City. As the girls romp around the Big Apple seeing the sights, Times Square, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Fifth Avenue, Lincoln Center, Coney Island, they encounter a mix of styles from ballet and jazz to hip-hop and tap, danced to Mozart, Gershwin and classic American standards. Choreographed by FDA director Laura East with Kelly Wortman, this is an all-school affair with performers aged 3 through adult. Gershwin and tap — what could be finer? The Ferndale Dance Academy in Cinderella Liberty runs June 22 and 23 at 7 p.m. at the Arkley Center. Admission $15, 12 and under $12, kids 3 and under $8. Tickets through the Arkley box office or at the door. Information at 496-0805 or www.ferndaledance.com. l


SATURDAY’S SEQUOIA PARK ZOO BENEFIT, BREW AT THE ZOO, FEATURES BEER, PUB-STYLE GRUB AND REGGAE MUSIC BY ISHI DUBE, ALL IN THE COMPANY OF BELOVED ZOO ANIMALS LIKE THE SUPER-CUTE RED PANDA.

THE EUREKA SYMPHONY CONCERT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS AT ARKLEY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS FEATURES PIANO SOLOIST RYAN MACEVOY ON SERGEI RACHMANINOFF’S TECHNICALLY CHALLENGING “PIANO CONCERTO NO. 3 IN D MINOR OPUS 30” WITH THE SYMPHONY PERFORMING MOZART’S “GREAT G MINOR SYMPHONY” NO. 40, K.550.

PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF

BASSIST RICH MACEY, DRUMMER ADAM SUMMERS AND LEAD GUITARIST JR PEREZ OF THE LOCAL ROCK BAND 51 CARDS PLAY FOR ANTI-PROM 2012 ON SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE. THE ALTERNATIVE TO THE TRADITIONAL TEEN PROM IS SPONSORED BY INK PEOPLE CENTER FOR THE ARTS. PHOTO BY

BOB DORAN

CASA. $25. www.humboldtcasa.org. 443-3197.

THEATER

17 thursday

FILM

EVENTS

Bike to Work Day: Eureka. Noon. Old Town Gazebo, second and F streets, Eureka. Rally for National Bike Month. Meet fellow cyclists, learn bike safety skills, show support for the bicycle. Cyclists wearing helmets get free hot drinks at the Eureka Co-op energizer station 7-9 a.m. 269-2061.

THEATER

Beyond Belief. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Culminating thesis projects for third-year MFA students representing their training in ensemble based physical theatre. Pay what you can. dellarte. com. 668-5663. For Better. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. Romantic comedy for the digital age pokes fun at our over-dependence on the gadgets in our lives. $10/$15 Fri. and Sat. 443-7688.

Local Filmmakers Night: Kinetic Edition. 6:30-9 p.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School. Video chronicles of Kinetic madness by the Kinetic Street Team: Steve Spain and Joe and Winston Lowe. Sponsored by Access Humboldt and filmHUMBOLDT. $5. www.accesshumboldt.net. 476-1798.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

FOOD

People’s Produce Market. Noon-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Income eligible folks pick out fresh fruits and vegetables, sample recipes using available produce and enjoy live music. www.foodforpeople. org. 445-3166.

BOOKS

Falling in Love with a Buddha. 7-9 p.m. Humboldt

40

Play Baywood for

EVENTS

Trinidad Bay Watershed Night. 6-9 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Slideshow and displays celebrating local groups and agencies within the Trinidad watersheds that maintain and improve our coastal waters and communities. 499-6454. Tastes of the World. 7-11 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Local chefs create a series of small plates featuring regional cuisine from around the world. Music by UKEsperience and Djalopy. Proceeds benefit

Third Friday Jazz. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Featuring music by the RandlesLaBolle-Wu Trio. Sliding scale. 677-9493. Manila Barn Dance. 7:30-11 p.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive, Arcata. Sue Moon and Mathew Marshall call dances to fine music by Blake Ritter, Rich Kearns and Sam McNeill. No partner or experience needed. $7. 269-2061. Eureka Symphony. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Piano soloist Ryan MacEvoy performs Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto #3 ; the symphony performs Mozart’s Symphony No. 40, K.550 G Minor. $19/$9 students. eurekasymphony.com. 442-1956.

continued on next page

Join Baywood Golf & Country Club before May 31st and pay $0 initiation fee and only $200 per month for a full golfing membership. Social, Pool and Junior Memberships available. Call 822-3686 x108 for more information.

Through May 31, 2012. Tuesday-Sunday. Tee times required.

822-3688

18 friday

MUSIC

MeMBershiP, LiMiteD OFFer!

BAYWOOD GOLF COUPON

$

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Author Frank Berliner reads from his book about Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s life and teachings. $10. ddeford@sonic.net. 822-4737.

Radio Gals. 8 p.m. Redbud Theatre, Camp Kimtu, Willow Creek. A retired music teacher receives a Western Electric 500 watt radio transmitter and begins broadcasting as radio station “WGAL.” 530-514-8746. Beyond Belief. 8 p.m. Carlo Theatre. See May 17 listing. For Better. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See May 17 listing.

One 18-hole round of golf. Act quickly! Must present coupon before play, unlimited coupon use, carts extra, dress code enforced, club etiquette to be followed. Expires 5/31/2012. Baywood reserves the right to refuse service for any reason.

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3600 Buttermilk Lane | Call the Clubhouse: 822-3686 Visit Our Web Site: baywoodgcc.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

39


continued from previous page

DANCE

Once Upon A Time. 7 p.m. North Coast Dance, 426 F St., Eureka. North Coast Dance children’s recital inspired by fairy tales. $12/$10 kids 12 and under. northcoastdance. org. 442-7779. Brava! Spring Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Annual concert of classical and contemporary dance by members of the Ink People Center for the Arts Dreammaker project program directed by Virginia Niekrasz-Laurent. $12. danceeureka.com. 442-7770.

ETC.

Spring Auction and Carnival. 6 p.m. Hydesville School, Humboldt County. Raising funds for the eighth grade class trip. 768-3610. Roller Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Fire Hall. Every Friday and Saturday. friendlyfortuna.com.

19 saturday EVENTS

2012 Rutabaga Ball. 7 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. Three-round pageant to decide who will reign supreme in kookiness and glory over the 2012 Kinetic Grand Championship. Music to Eyes Anonymous. $10. rutabagaqueen2007@yahoo.com. 616-5703. Brew at the Zoo. 6-10 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Beer, pub-style grub and music by Ishi Dube … at the zoo! Proceeds benefit Sequoia Park Zoo. www. sequoiaparkzoo.net. 442-5649. Rededication of the Cornerstone for Eureka City Hall. 11 a.m. Eureka City Hall, Third and G streets. Rededication of a Madera County granite stone first laid at City Hall on Nov. 26, 1904. 442-9054. Celebration of the Arts 2012 Gala. 6-9 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Humboldt Arts Council honors Gary and Pam Barker with the Outstanding Contributions to the Arts Award. Live music, hors d’oeuvres, dinner, wine, art auctions. www. humboldtarts.org. 442-0278. Anti-Prom 2012. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Event for teens who are or are not attending traditional proms and for those who don’t have a traditional school prom to attend. Sponsored by Ink People Center for the Arts. $12. antiprom2012@gmail.com. 822-1575. Monte Carlo Speakeasy Night. 8-11:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Dress in ’20s/’30s attire, play a few hands of blackjack, enjoy a period cocktail and dance to music by Donna Landry and Swingset. $35. theeurekatheater. org. 845-8795.

THEATER

Beyond Belief. 8 p.m. Carlo Theatre. See May 17 listing. For Better. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain. See May 17 listing. Radio Gals. 8 p.m. Redbud Theatre. See May 18 listing.

MUSIC

Eureka Symphony. 8 p.m. Arkley Center. See May 18 listing. Doug Fir and the 2x4s. 9 p.m. Winema Theater, Main St., Scotia. Guitar-driven hard rock ‘n’ roll band brings energy to classics from 1940s-70s. $8. 834-6777.

DANCE

Once Upon A Time. 2 and 5 p.m. North Coast Dance. See May 18 listing.

OUTDOORS

Lanphere Dunes Hike. 9 a.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Five-mile hike. Dress in layers, bring sack lunch, water, sunscreen and hat.

friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Manila Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Morning of invasive plant removal. Bring water, wear work clothes. Tools, gloves and cookies provided. 444-1397. Open Gardens. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Gardens, College of the Redwoods, Eureka. Roam the 44acre fully fenced property. $5. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Friends of the Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Milt Boyd leads a 90-minute marsh ecology walk. 826-2359.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables, fruits, seedlings, plants and local food. humfarm.org. 822-5951.

SPORTS

North Coast Tsunami vs. San Diego Flash. 1 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. NPSL soccer match. fcmischief@earthlink.net. 499-3703. Team in Training Kick-Off Event. 2-3:30 p.m. Hiller Park, 795 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Want to run or walk a half or full marathon? Train with a professional coach and join a team running to cure blood cancer. 498-3813. Bicycle Gear Swap. 10 a.m.-noon. Pacific Outfitters, 737 G Street, Arcata. Part of Humboldt Bike Month. 668-1716.

ETC.

BDSM 101: An Impropriety Society Salon. 11:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Presentations and demonstrations by community members on BDSM topics such as bondage, sensation play, negotiation, safety considerations, aftercare, etc. with opportunity for questions and discussion. $10. www.humboldtimps. com. 496-6167. Impropriety Society Social. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Theme: May I Have Another? BDSM-oriented event with a large dungeon space and dungeon monitors. Location given with ticket purchase. $20. www.humboldtimps. com. 496-6167. Senior Get Together. 8 p.m. Palm Lounge, Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Single seniors meet. Wear a rose in hair or lapel for easy ID. Non-alcohol drinkers welcome. 442-2990.

20 sunday EVENTS

Solar Eclipse Festival. 3-7 p.m., Ninth and L streets, Arcata. Watch the moon devour the sun! Music, food, stilt walkers and more. Free. 822-1575. Eclipse Observations. 5-7:30 p.m., Kneeland Airport. View through specially shielded binoculars and telescopes provided by Astronomers of Humboldt. Free. www.astrohum.org Eureka Waterfront Run. 10 a.m. Eureka Natural Foods, 1626 Broadway. Two- and five-mile walk and run. Proceeds provide running shoes for area children. kbrooks@humboldt1.com. 826-7736. Backpack Buddy Night. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cher-Ae-Heights Casino, 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad. Silent and live auctions with Rex Bohn, live music and prime rib dinner. Benefits Backpacks for Kids, Food for People’s weekend hunger relief program for children. $30. www.foodforpeople. org. 269-4335.

DANCE

Once Upon A Time. 1 and 4 p.m. North Coast Dance. See May 18 listing.

FOOD

Dow’s Prairie Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Have a delicious pancake breakfast while meeting your neighbors. dowsprairiegrange.org. $6. dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100.

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 •

northcoastjournal.com

Celebrating Life in Humboldt. 7 p.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Local author/historian Jerry Rohde continues his series of regional history talks. This week: Mattole Valley. 441-2700.

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242.

The Cornerstone It was a grand occasion commemorating the start of a grand project. On Saturday, Nov. 26, 1904, a cornerstone was laid near the southwest corner of Third and G streets for a new Eureka City Hall. The twostory Italian Renaissance-style building, to be built on the site of the old Pioneer School after a vote to levy a tax to pay for construction, was designed by San Francisco architect Joseph W. Rowell. It would house all the city offices along with the police and fire departments, with a jail in the basement. It would be “a building which will stand for years to come as a monument of the awakening of civic pride in Eureka,” noted The Daily Humboldt Standard. The newspaper reported that the ceremonial placement of the cornerstone was done as a rite of the Masonic order, with Grand Master G. W. Hunter, up from San Francisco for the occasion, assisted by the Grand officers pro tem of the Grand Lodge of California and Humboldt Chapter of Masons. As the ceremony began, the block of Madera County granite — 30 inches square and 9½ inches thick, inscribed “A.D., 1904” — was suspended in mid-air with block and tackle decorated with small American flags. After a prayer and a song by a choir, Eureka’s mayor turned things over to the Masons. Dressed in full regalia adorned with gold, Grand Master Hunter gave a stirring speech praising the choice of location for the building on an old school site. He went on to say, “The government of cities is one of the great problems of the age. In many places there is graft and corruption, but here in Eureka, I’m glad to say the city’s affairs have been honestly administered and the officials have used their best judgment on all occasions. For this beautiful edifice we must thank the Council and the newspapers and commend the wisdom of the people in voting

MUSIC

McKinleyville Community Choir. 2 p.m. Azalea Hall, 1620 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Free concert. naofau@ yahoo.com. 839-2276.

LECTURE

EUREKA CITY HALL

POSTCARD FROM THE HUMBOLDT PROJECT COLLECTION OF STEVEN LAZAR

money for it.” After heaping on further praise for the city’s lack of crime (thanks to the many fraternal organizations) and noting that “San Francisco papers no longer locate Eureka somewhere in Oregon,” he placed the stone and anointed it with wheat, oil and wine poured from silver ceremonial vases. Finished about a year later, the city hall was used from 1906 until 1954, when an earthquake rendered much of it unsafe. In 1960 the building was demolished. A parking lot took its place. However, at the insistence of the Masons, the cornerstone was saved, housed in the collection of the Clarke Historical Museum. Now, through a partnership among the City of Eureka, Eureka Main Street and the Eureka Heritage Society, with assistance from the Clarke, Humboldt Masonic Lodge No. 79, and contractor Bill Lenhoff of Cornerstone Construction, the cornerstone will be placed once again, not far from where it stood for 56 years. It will serve as the base for a monument carrying a plaque commemorating the old Eureka City Hall building. The public is invited to attend the ceremonial rededication at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 19, at the corner of Third and G. Once again, ceremonies will be conducted by the Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons of California. This time Most Worshipful Frank Loui, Grand Master, will preside. — Bob Doran Note: Postcard collector Steven Lazar and local historian Bob Libershal have posted an online slide show history of Eureka City Hall at www.thehumboldtproject.org/cityhall.


To Be Queen

RCATA PHO TO

JOHNNY B ERRYPICKER AS RUTABAGA PRINCESS, TERRENCE 2011 MCNALLY/A

21

is cool — what the hell a Rutabaga Queen is/does. Since 1978, the Rutabaga Queen has been the public face of the Kinetic Grand Championship, attending Kinetic-themed events, dealing with pesky media and ensuring high levels of mirth among race spectators by being really, really extroverted. Who gets to be royalty? The Rutabaga Queen for any given year is crowned at the

monday

MUSIC

Circuit-Bending Workshop/Concert. 6 p.m. John Haynes Memorial Veterans’ Hall, 483 Conger St., Garberville. Led by the Dekalb, Illinois-based circuitbending band, CMKT4. Potluck at 5 p.m. 923-3700.

DANCE

Swing Dance Night. 7:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Swing what your mama gave you! $5. 616-6876.

22 tuesday MUSIC

Circuit-Bending Workshop/Concert. 3-6 p.m. MARZ Project, 517 Third St., Eureka. See May 21 listing. RSVP 442-8413.

FOOD

Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh and tasty local produce, plants, breads and jams. 726-9371.

ETC.

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Healing Rooms of the Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Nondenominational prayer group. healingrooms.com. 834-5800.

23 wednesday DANCE

Once Upon A Time. 7 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts. See May 18 listing.

FOR KIDS

annual Rutabaga Ball being held this year on Saturday, May 19, at 7 p.m. at the Portuguese Hall on 11th Street in Arcata. Following pageant-format, the Queen crowning process consists of three rounds of competition: a formal wear round, a talent round and, of course, a swimsuit competition. Which brings us back to our endorsement. Not only is Johnny BerryPicker a kindhearted, sweetheart of a man — he was the Jacoby Storehouse Santa last year, for crissakes — he’s got the experience to effectively lead the Kinetic Nation. Last year, Johnny BerryPicker was crowned the Rutabaga Princess — in other words, the runner-up who will pick up the slack if the official Rutabaga Queen, I dunno, dies

or joins the Merchant Marines or something. Now, BerryPicker is, oh, let’s say a full-figured gentleman. And we think that maybe — with all due respect to Queen G-Ma — had he been a tad more daring with his choice of “bay crossing” attire, he could have brought home that crown. This is not to say there are not other worthy Queen candidates, but that said, 2012 has “Year of the Picker” written all over it. We’re picking Johnny (and maybe a speedo) to win it. For more info, check out rutabagaqueen.com. For the glory. — Andrew Goff

STUDIO

Elsewhere in this week’s Journal, voters can delve into the thoughtful nuances of our publisher’s positions on the upcoming California June primary election. But here’s where we really relish the longstanding Mass Media tradition of throwing weight behind public figures dreaming of power and inaugurations. The North Coast Journal totally thinks that Johnny BerryPicker should be named the 2012 Rutabaga Queen! Like, big time! Before we get into the logic behind our mega-important ’baga bump, we should tell you — in case you don’t know, which

Fratello Marionettes. 3:30 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. 6:30 p.m. Eureka Library, 1313 Third St. Kevin Menegus and Fred C. Riley III present “The Vaudeville

Heads Up…

Want a Pitbull? Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office Animal Shelter will discount pitbull adoptions by 50 percent during the month of May, in an effort to reduce our population and find caring homes for more dogs. Visit the shelter at 980 Lycoming Ave., McKinleyville, or online at petharbor.com. Teen Summer Jobs! The Youth Conservation Corps is a summer employment program for young men and women, ages 15 through 18, doing important conservation work on public lands. The eight-week program begins on June 25 and concludes on Aug. 17. Apply by

May 30. Call 733-1946 or visit fws.gov/humboldtbay for more info. Is Your Baby Cute? The Stork’s Nest in the McKinleyville Shopping Center is now accepting photographs for the Fourth Annual Humboldt’s Cutest Baby Contest. Babies newborn to 48 months are eligible. Personal snapshots. No professional photos. Deadline is May 18. Call 8400300 with any questions. ●

northcoastjournal.com

Follies,” a marionette variety show presented in the spirit of the old time music hall. humlib.org. 269-1910.

ETC.

Mad River Softball Association. 7 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Organizational meeting for 2012 adult Wood Bat Softball League starting first week of June. Samoafog@aol.com. 445-3432. Eureka Mindfulness Group. 7:15 p.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Led by Cindee Grace. Topic: “Enlightenment On Your Own Terms.” Fragrance free, please. $3/$6 free will donation. 269-7044.

24 thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See May 17 listing.

COMEDY

Random Acts of Comedy. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Humboldt’s funniest freaks this side of the asylum, local loons and possible pole dancers perform. $6/$10 adv. 822-1220.

SPORTS

Humboldt Tri-Kids Triathlon. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Arcata Community Pool, 1150 16th St. Kids ages 7 to 18 swim, bike and run their way to the finish line. Register day of the race. www.trikids.com. 496-0257.

ETC.

Ice Cream Social. 6:30 p.m. Woodside Preschool, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. For those interested in enrollment. www.woodsidepreschool.com. 445-9132.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

41


Paging Mr. Scissorhands In their eighth collaboration, Burton and Depp have lost their magic By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Johnny depp in dark shadows

Reviews

DARK SHADOWS. I walked into this movie with my guard down and my hopes up. Bad move. Whether it was due to my recent good fortune at the theater or my nostalgia for Tim Burton’s early movies — which I love dearly — I ignored the fact that his more recent work has consistently let us all down. Dark Shadows is no exception. Drawn from a late ’60s daytime soap about which I know nothing, Shadows tells the story of Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp in pancake makeup, phoning it in). He’s the scion of an extremely wealthy 18th century Maine fishing family. As a youth, he makes the mistake of spurning the advances of a witch (Eva Green), who turns him into a vampire, then locks him in a buried coffin for around 200 years. In 1972 he is accidentally unearthed, kills some workmen and hippies, then tries to rebuild the fortune of his now threadbare empire. But the aforementioned witch is still around to complicate matters, so things don’t go especially well.

May 18 May 23 Fri May 18 - Future Shorts Film Festival Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 All ages Sat May 19 - Reservoir Dogs Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Sun May 20 - Indian in the Cupboard Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Wed May 23 - Sci Fi Night ft. Radical Dystopian Documentaries 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. All ages Free

As with any Burton production, the costuming and design are dramatic and imaginative. The atmosphere of an early ’70s Maine fishing village is gloriously detailed, and the soundtrack includes some classic jams. But Burton has lost the visual magic and big-hearted storytelling that were once his trademarks. He assembles an excellent cast, as usual, but doesn’t give them much to work with. Great actors like Jackie Earle Haley, Helena Bonham Carter and Chloe Grace Moretz are forced to do what they can with thin, uninspired characters. The trouble lies with the script, which takes potentially delicious guilty pleasures — vampires and witches and crumbling empires — and manages to make them really boring. The first two-thirds of the movie drag on seemingly interminably; then the ending is a rushed cacophony of ridiculous twists haphazardly thrown together. Dark Shadows might have been great fun, if somebody with less money and more inspiration (like, say, Tim Burton 20 years ago) had scaled it down and focused on telling the story. Instead it is lifeless, a little mean-spirited, and unnecessary. Fortunately, I was able to salvage the weekend with The Cabin in the Woods, which you should make every effort to see (if you haven’t already) — assuming you like movies that are smart, scary, hilarious, gory and entertaining throughout. If not, well, see Dark Shadows. PG13. 113m. —John J. Bennett

Previews

THE DICTATOR. The latest from subversive comedy genius Sacha Baron Cohen. This time out, the creator of Borat and Ali G stars as a Middle Eastern dicta-

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

42 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

tor. R. 105m. BATTLESHIP. Yes, it has really come to this: a would-be blockbuster “inspired by” that old Milton Bradley guessing game with the little plastic ships. Director Peter Berg invites big, loud aliens into the naval warfare. (Let’s hope they don’t guess “B7.”) PG13. 131m. WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING. Five interconnected couples have a bunch of babies, violate parental taboos to comedic effect and ultimately discover universal truths. Or something. With Cameron Diaz, Jennifer Lopez, Chris Rock and some real-life infants. PG13. 110m. If you’re not feeling the frothy summer escapism vibe, check out Future Shorts, a showcase of short films with large ambitions. The traveling festival aims to create “another way of experiencing film” and to “change the way we look at the world.” That’s asking a lot, which is pretty damned refreshing these days. The six shorts include such eclectic fare as a claymation erotic comedy, a documentary on 1970s wife-swapping and a tragicomic Spike Jonze film animated with hand-cut pieces of felt. The festival plays Friday at 8 p.m. at the Arcata Theatre Lounge and is your Journal pick o’ the week. Quentin Tarantino’s gut-punch debut, Reservoir Dogs (1992), plays the following night at 8 at the ATL. Sunday’s family feature is The Indian in the Cupboard (1995). And next Wednesday, Pint and Pizza Night abandons its usual Sci-Fi theme to feature a pair of “radical, dystopian documentaries.” B.I.K.E. (2005) depicts the Brooklyn chapter of the Black Label Bike Club, a fringe network of tall-bike jousters who espouse environmental and anti-consumerist rhetoric. END: CIV sounds the alarm

bells of economic chaos, peak oil, climate change and political turmoil. A raffle will benefit Food Not Bombs. 6-10 p.m.

Continuing

THE AVENGERS. Director Joss Whedon infuses this superhero all-star team with wit and humor without skimping on the thrills. PG13. 142m. THE CABIN IN THE WOODS. When five young friends head into a creepy, remote wilderness you may think you’ve got the story pegged. Think again, sucka. R. 95m. CHIMPANZEE. Hackneyed Disney doc narrated by Tim Allen. G. 78m. THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT. An engaging romantic comedy from co-writer and star Jason Segel about the thick and thin that can follow a marriage proposal. R. 124m. THE HUNGER GAMES. In a dystopian future state, teenagers get conscripted into a televised death match. PG. 142m. THE LUCKY ONE. Based on a Nicholas Sparks novel, this maudlin romance starring Zac Efron isn’t offensively bad, just painfully bland and drawn out. PG13. 101m. THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS. Stop-motion comedy from Aardman Studios is fun but doesn’t quite live up to the magic of Wallace & Gromit. PG. 88m. THE RAVEN. John Cusack stars as Gothic author Edgar Allen Poe, who must help stop a serial killer imitating Poe’s own stories. R. 111m. THINK LIKE A MAN. Adapted from a self-help book, this amiable-if-trite romcom at least offers a charming cast. PG13. 122m. —Ryan Burns

 


5 - 17 pm)

Movie Times

* = EARLY SHOWS

PHOTOGRAPHING HUMBOLDT COUNTY AT TWILIGHT. Twilight can be a magical time to photograph, but can often yield disappointing results. In this class with Colleen Longo, learn to overcome underexposed images and new ways to interact with light as it turns from day into night. Mon., June 4-July 12, 6-8 p.m. $200. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended. (AC-0524)

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema 707-443-3456

HAND EMBROIDERY & EMBELLISHMENT. Every Fri., 2-4 p.m. $30. Learn how to add stunning designs to clothes and home accessories. New projects every week. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0531)

1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 5/18 - 5/24 unless otherwise noted.

THE AVENGERS 2D THE AVENGERS 3D BATTLESHIP

1:45, 5:20, 8:45 2:20, 5:50, 9:10 12;05, 2:00, 3:10, 5:10, 6:15, 8:20, 9:20 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING *12:15, 3:00, 5:45, 8:30 PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 3D 1:35 PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 2D 4:00 THE LUCKY ONE 6:20, 8:50 DARK SHADOWS 1:00, 2:35, 3:50, 5:25, 6:40, 8:15, 9:30 THE DICTATOR 12:20, 2:40, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35 CHIMPANzEE 12:30, 2:45, 7:25 CABIN IN THE WOODS 4:50, 9:40 HUNGER GAMES 2:30, 5:45, 8:55 THINK LIKE A MAN 12:25, 6:10 FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT 3:15, 9:00

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 5/18 - 5/24 unless otherwise noted. THE AVENGERS 2D THE AVENGERS 3D BATTLESHIP DARK SHADOWS THE DICTATOR

2:45, 6:00, 9:15 1:40, 5:10, 8:30 12:05, 3:10, 6:10, 9:10 1:00, 2:35, 3:05, 5:25, 6:40, 8:15, 9:30 2:00, 4:15, 6:30, 8:50 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING *12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:00 PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 3D 1:05 PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 2D 3:25 CHIMPANzEE 5:50 HUNGER GAMES 8:00

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 5/16 - 5/24 unless otherwise noted.

THE AVENGERS 2D DARK SHADOWS THE DICTATOR

*2:00, 5:15, 8:30 *1:25, 4:00, 6:35, 9:10 2:40, 4:55, 7:10, 9:25

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 5/18 -5/24 unless otherwise noted. BATTLESHIP

*12:50, 3:40, 6:40, 9:45

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING *1:30, 4:00, 6:50, 9:20

THE AVENGERS 3D THE AVENGERS 2D THE DICTATOR DARK SHADOWS

*11:45, 3:00, 6:15, 9:30 *1:45, 5:00, 8:15 *12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 7:10, 9:15 *1:15, 4:15, 7:00, 9:40

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville May 18 - 21 The Raven

7:30pm

List your class – just 50 cents/ word per issue! • Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts CREATING TUMBLERS & MUGS. Ongoing, weekly the first and third Mon., 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Create whimsical ceramic mugs for our fundraising events. All ages welcome. Attend 3 workshops and receive a final product free. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. 707-8261445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-0517) LACE FINGERLESS GLOVES CLASS AT YARN! Learn how to knit lace while making a pair of lovely fingerless gloves. You get to choose one of 3 different charts with varying degrees of difficulty. Thurs.s, June 14 & 21, 5:30-7 p.m.. Cost is $35, plus materials. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-0607) PLAYING WITH CLAY FOR GROWN UPS. June 19-July 24. Here’s your chance to have some fun and get your hands dirty! A fun and stress-relieving introduction to ceramic art in an informal, non-threatening setting. $110 Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, more info at fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0517) WHEEL THROWING BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE. Session 1: Tues.s, 7-9 p.m., June 19-Aug. 21. Session 2: Wed.s, 7-9 p.m., June 20-Aug. 22. Learn the basics or perfect your wheel-throwing technique. With more than 30 years’ experience, Bob Raymond is an inspiration to students of all levels. Ideal for both new and continuing students. $180. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, info@Fireartsarcata.com (AC-0517) WHEEL THROWING BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE. Thurs.s, 5:30-7:30 p.m., June 21-Aug. 23. Join Peggy Loudon for this complete introduction to basic wheelthrowing and glazing techniques. Perfect for beginning and returning students, this class will put you on the road to developing your own personal style. $180. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, more info at fireartsarcata.com (AC-0517) GARDEN GREMLIN MOSAICS. Fri., May 18, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., CR Eureka Downtown Site. $25 plus $10 materials fee. Bring an old plate, cooking pot, tea kettle or use instructors 4” tiles to create a bright, colorful gremlin to “plant” in your garden. College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000, www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (AC-0517)

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DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Ballroom, Latin, & Swing. Group & Private lessons. Weddings & special events. Learn to dance and have fun doing it! Call (707) 4643638, or visit www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT-0628) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-0531) MODERN DANCE. With Bonnie Hossack. Int/Adv., Sun.s, 10:30 a.m.-noon and Wed.s, 6:15-7:45 p.m.; Int. for teens, Mon.s, 4-5:30 p.m., Pan Arts Studio at 1049 C Samoa (Samoa @ K St.), Arcata. $10/class; $5/ students with valid ID. Info: 601-1151 or panartstudiodance.gmail.com. (DMT-0531)

INTRO TO WET FELTING. Thurs.s, 6-8 p.m. $35 +$10 material fee. Learn basic wet felting techniques using warm soapy water and wool roving. Create felted balls, felted beads, pin cushions, coasters and flat felt. Fun to be felted by all! Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (AC-0531)

TRILLIUM DANCE STUDIO PRESENTS: Salsa Lessons with Ozzy Ricardez and Miss Julie. All levels Welcome. Ongoing, drop-in Fri. nights, 7-8:15 p.m. 1925 Alliance Rd., in Arcata (x st. Foster) $7 single $10 couple. (DMT-0531)

NEEDLE FELTING. Fri.s, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $30. All the basics to get you started in this great art form. No experience necessary. All materials provided. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 4976237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0531)

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227)

NORTH COAST ARTS. July 9-20. One or two-week intensive classes taught by HSU art faculty within the well-equipped HSU art studios. Courses include ceramics, painting, photography, jewelry, sculpture, K-12 education. Designed for beginners and advanced professionals. Register by June 21 to reserve your space. Optional academic credit is also available. For more details, fees and to register: www.humboldt. edu/northcoastarts or call HSU Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (AC-0614) OIL PAINTING. Old masters techniques to the styles of popular contemporaries. Tues.s and/or Wed.s, $100/month. Plein-air weekends by appointment. Contact Robert at The Busch Gallery, (216) 315-2646, Rebusch333@gmail.com. (AC-0524) VERY BEGINNING SEWING. Wed., 6-8 p.m. $30. Learn to use and care for your sewing machine. We will have you sewing a straight line in no time, then on to fancier stitches. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0531)

Communication

COMMUNICATION & CONFLICT MEDIATION. Sat., June 2, 8:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at St Joseph’s Hospital, Eureka. Advance registration required. Discounts available. Details and registration at www.humboldtmediationservices.org or call (707) 445-2505. (CMM-0531) LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. Why is the cycle of sexual abuse in families so difficult to break? And how can those who’ve suffered childhood sexual abuse find healing? Discussion Sun., May 20, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@ hotmail.com. (CMM-0517)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

DISCOVER ARGENTINE TANGO! Beginning lessons Sun., 5-5:45 p.m. Practica 6-7p.m., $6 Studio of Dance Arts, Eureka. 445-2655, 822-6170. (DMT-0524) LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Foundational Hoop Dance series starts every few weeks in Arcata. Ongoing int/ adv. workshops. Private lessons. Hoops/collapsible hoops for sale. www.chakranation.com (DMT-1227)

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227)

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) BELLY DANCING WITH SHOSHANNA. Feel fabulous in classes for all levels in Arcata at Redwood Raks. 616-6876 or Shoshannaland.com. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

KUNDALINI YOGA & MEDITATION. Learn the ancient practice that uses posture, mantras, mudras, breathing techniques and relaxation to create a specific physical and mental state. Leave feeling centered and reconnected to the true beauty of your being. With Anne Marie Tse. Mon., June 11-July 2, 7-8:30 p.m. $40. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended. (F-0531) VINYASA YOGA. Hatha Yoga combined with aerobic movement and an energizing soundtrack. Liven up your morning exercise routine with a fresh and inspiring approach to yoga! Tues.s & Thurs.s, 7-8:30 a.m. $6.50/class or free with Adorni Center Fitness Membership. Call 441-4248, adornicenter.com. (F-0517) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at the Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (F-0531) YOGA FOR NEW & SEASONED ATHLETES. 6-week series will augment your training program while complementing it with increased balance & flexibility. No prior yoga experience required. Tue. 5:30 p.m. beginning May 29 at CrossFit Eureka. $60 paid in full at first class. HSU/CR students $50. Call Cathy for information or to register. (707) 601-7299. (F-0524) AIKIDO. An innovative, dynamic, and noncompetitive self-defense martial art. Four-week class, starting May 22, Tues.s & Thurs.s, 5:30-6:30 p.m. At CR main campus on Tompkins Hill Road. $49. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education at 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (F-0517) continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

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continued from previous page NEW AT CROSSFIT EUREKA! Offering Core Strength, Kettlebell, FitMom Prenatal Movement, Vinyasa Fow Yoga, Clinics for Endurance Runners, Foundations with Dr. Phil Pritting D.C. www.crossfiteureka.com, crossfiteureka@gmail.com. (F-0719) ZUMBA FITNESS. Sat.s, 10-11 a.m. Lose weight, get fit, have fun. Sun Yi’s Academy, 1215 Guintoli Ln., Arcata. $5 class. Michele, 445-2355. (F-0517) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session: Feb. 1-June 15. Classes: Beginner Basics, Tues.s & Thurs.s, 6-7:30 p.m. Advanced Adults, Mon.s & Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. All Ages All Levels Community Class, Sat.s, Noon-2 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. HSU Students First Class Free. (F-0531) NIA. Nia has arrived in Humboldt County! Dance fusion fitness program blending healing arts, dance arts, and martial arts. Weds at the Bayside Grange, 6:30-7:30pm., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. Your first class is always FREE! Regular fees $6/$4 Grange Members. Pauline Ivens 707-441-9102, waterpolly@gmail.com (F-0531) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-1206) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Lau Kune Do Kung Fu, Muay Thai, Stand-up/Kickboxing & MMA. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www. northcoastaikido.org. (F-1227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227)

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Kids & Teens

SEQUOIA PARK ZOO SUMMER CAMPS. For 5-11 year olds. Join us for a wild adventure. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo.net for info. (K-0517) 12TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP. Have fun while Safely Learning to Surf. Includes Jr. Lifesaving. Licensed & Insured, male/female instructors. Ages 8+. $195/week. Sessions: June 25-29, July 9-13, July 23-27, July 29-Aug. 3. MoonstoneBeachSurfCamp.com or (707) 822-5099. (K-0621) CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7-12. Adventures with clay: learn various hand building and wheel throwing techniques. 4 classes offered. Mon.s, 3-5 p.m., June 18-July 16, July 23-Aug. 20. Tues.s, 3-5 p.m., June 19-July 17, July 24-Aug. 21. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826-1445, more info at fireartsarcata.com. (K-0517) TINY TUTUS BEGINNING BALLET II. Designed for your ballerina who is ready for the next step. Must take Ballet I or have previous ballet experience. John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Thurs.s, 6-6:45 p.m., beginning May 31, $30. Call 441-4244 or visit Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. (K-0517) SUMMER CAMP. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for roller skating, arts and crafts, sports and more at Camp Perigot for Ages 5-13, Mon.-Fri., June 18-Aug. 24, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Perigot Park. Very affordable and every camper receives a free breakfast and lunch! Full-day or half-day options. Extended care hours available. Register today! Find registration materials at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 6685932, for more information. (K-0816) CRAFTY KIDS AGES 7 & UP. Every Wed., 4-6 p.m. $25. Introduction to a variety of fun creative crafts, sewing and felting. Snack and materials included. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (K-0531) WEEKEND CRAFTY KIDS AGES 7 & UP. Every Sat. Morning 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $25. Introduction to a varied of fun creative crafts, sewing and felting, Snack and materials included. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www. origindesignlab.com. (K-0531)

DO YOU HAVE A DISASTER SUPPLY KIT READY? LEARN HOW TO CONSTRUCT A WELL-STOCKED KIT.

IMAGINE THAT ART FOR YOUTH IN FORTUNA. Drawing, painting, mixed-media, printmaking, sculpting and more.Weekly and ongoing. $60/month, Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Information, call Susan (707) 726-9048, An Ink People Center for the Arts Dreammaker Project. (K-0517) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227) CAPOEIRA KIDS. Spring Session 2012: Feb. 1-June 15. Classes: Beginner Kids (Age 5-7), Tues.s & Thurs.s, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Beginner kids (Age 8 & up), Tues.s & Thurs.s, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Toddler Tumblers (Ages 3 & 4), Tues.s, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Advanced Kids (Ages 5-7), Mon.s & Wed.s, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Advanced Kids (Ages 8 & up), Mon.s & Wed.s, 4:30-6 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (K-0531) FC SAMOA SOCCER ACADEMY. SUMMER MINIACADEMIES. Base Camps: Guaranteed learning “packaged” in fun and age-appropriate games Ages: 8-12yrs. Elite and/or Varsity Prep: age 11-15yrs Intensive week-long program for serious soccer athletes. July 30- Aug. 9, (8 sessions) 1-3p.m, Samoa, $65. Various programs M-Fri. See online. Crescent City. Redway, Cutten. Eureka (Alice Birney). Arcata (French pro only). Base Camps $95 for 15 hours 9 am.-noon, French pro $220 (24-30 hours). E-mail for more info. mufc06@yahoo.com,Website: www.fcsamoa.com, Low income (partial)scholarships ALWAYS available upon application. (K-0614)

Lectures

DISASTERS DON’T WAIT. Have Your Supply Kits Ready. Preparing a supply kit can make a substantial difference in disaster recovery after an earthquake, tsunami, winter weather and flooding. Learn to construct well-stocked, sensible kits based on extensive checklists. These include individual kits for each member of the family, including pets, as well as general kits for the household, office and vehicle. Presented by Judy Warren of HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. $25. Mon., June 11, 6-8 p.m. For more details, fees and to register: www.humboldt.edu/rti or call HSU Extended Education at 707-826-3731. (L-0531)


GENETICS & BREEDING. Sat., June 16, 2-6 p.m. $65. Learn basic principles of breeding and propagation of cannabis, what you need to know about storing pollen and seeds and pollination techniques. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege. com, (707) 672-9860. (G-0614)

MADE FOR THE TRADE. The Trinidad Museum “Made for the Trade” exhibition and presentation explores local Native American baskets and the changes that occurred through making them for sale and trade outside of the Indian community. With Ron Johnson. Sun., June 10, 2-4 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0531)

CHOCOLATE MEDICINE WITH POWER FOODS. Fri., June 8, 2-5 p.m. $65 + $10 lab fee. Learn to make powerful, vital, aphrodisiac treats to use as medicine for body and spirit. You will be able to prepare the treats as demonstrated and also learn how to add cannabis medicine to recipes. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0607)

RAMBLING AMONG THE REDWOODS. An all-day van trip and light hiking excursion to some of the most scenic and historic sports in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park and Redwood National Park with Jerry and Gisela Rohde. Thurs., June 6, 6-8 p.m. and Sat., June 8, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0531)

PLANT SPIRIT COMMUNICATION. Sat., June 9, 1-4 p.m. $45. With Wendy Read. Drum journey to explore and form a much deeper partnership with the plant allies all around you. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Rd., #4, in Meadows Business Park. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (S-0607) PLANNING YOUR RETIREMENT. Premier Financial Group, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor, invites you to a free seminar on Tues., June 6, 5:15 p.m-6:30 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr. Room 212, Eureka. Let us help you gain clarity and confidence around your retirement. RSVP at (707) 443-2741 or online at www.premieradvisor. com. (LE-0531) HUMBOLDT HISTORY 1. Lively lecture with topics including Native Cultures & Exploration, Gold Rush Settlements, The Redwood Lumber Industry, and Architectural Heritage. June 2-July 7 (no class 6/30), Sat.s, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $59. CR Eureka Downtown. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education, 269-4000 or www.redwoods. edu, visit Community Education link. (L-0517) CANNABIS IN THE HISTORY OF HUMAN SPIRITUALITY. With Wendy Read part 1 of a 2 part series Fri., May 18, 6-9 p.m. $45. Look at how religion has evolved and the role that Cannabis has played in the “great leaps forward” of human evolution and enlightenment up to the time of Christ. Introduction to Plant Spirit Communication class. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (LE-0517)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227) CREATIVE IMAGERY. An introduction to creative visualization and conscious power of imagery to create what you want in all areas of life. With Sharon K. Ferrett, Ph.D. Wed., June 6, 6-8 p.m. and Sat., June 9, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0531) FALK, FROM COMPANY TOWN TO FOREST GROUND. Take an easy ranger-led walk along the paved Headwaters trail, where you will explore the past location of the historic mill town of Falk. With Julie Clark. Mon., June 11, 10 a.m.-Noon. $30/ OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0531)

GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE. Create a wildlife sanctuary in your yard, even if you have a brown thumb. With Louise Bacon Ogden. Thurs., June 7, 6-8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880. (O-0524) PACIFIC COAST NATURE WRITING EXCURSION. Enjoy and explore the Pacific Ocean at Trinidad and then write about your experience, and create book art to display your writing. With Emily Gibson. Thurs., June 7, 8:30-10:30 a.m. and Fri., June 8, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880. (O-0524) PATAGONIA & EASTER ISLAND. A Tour Without the Airfare. Explore these unique places with retired HSU professors Rollie Lamberson and Rick Vrem, who have traveled extensively in the regions. Thurs., June 7, 4-6 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0524) SENIORS STRETCH CLASS. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Gentle stretch, designed to increase flexibility and strength while improving balance and circulation. Mon, Wed, Fri. 10-11 a.m. at Prasch Hall, Blue Lake. Drop-In fee $4. Visit www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Amanda Arthington at 668-5932. (O-0517)

Spiritual

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-0517) FALLING IN LOVE WITH A BUDDHA. A reading, book signing & public talk with Frank Berliner, Professor of Contemplative Psychology at Naropa University, psychotherapist, and long time student of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. In his book Falling in Love with a Buddha, Berliner recalls the world of Trungpa Rinpoche’s life and teachings while evoking the powerful presence of this unique teacher in the era of 1960’s America. Thurs., May 17, 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Fellowship, Bayside. $10-$15 donation. Hosted by Arcata Shambhala Meditation Group, 822-4737 (S-0517) COSMIC VISIONS. Transform your Nature trips into profoundly ecstatic experiences. HSU Center Activities workshop taught by Dr. Stone Brusca begins June 3. Visit www.CosmicVisionsWorkshop.com (S-0531) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

THE SACRED MOVEMENTS OF THE FOURTH WAY. Dances for Self-Development and Awareness. April 28, May 12, 26. Sat 9:45-11:30 am, 854 10th St. Arcata. (S-0524)

Sports/Recreation

MASQUERADE ROLLER SKATING BALL. Join Eureka Recreation Division May 19 for a Masquerade Roller Skating Ball! Come in costume and skate the night away with this fun games & music party! Eureka Municipal Auditorium. 6-8:30 p.m., $4 Youth/$4.75 adults. Skate rental included. Call 441-4223. (SR-0517) PICKLEBALL. Combines elements of badminton, tennis and table tennis into a fun new sport that is enjoyed by players of all ages. Drop-in Indoor Pickleball; Thurs.s, 10 a.m.-Noon, Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. $2/Adult, $1.50/Senior. Call 441-4374. (SR-0517) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-0524) SKATING AT EUREKA MUNI ! Fun for all ages! Fri. & Sat. 6-8:30 p.m. Roll with your friends and family as you enjoy great music and funky strobe lights at the Eureka Muni (1120 F St.). Youth 17 & under $4, Adults $4.75. Skate rental (inline or quad) included in admission, first-come first served. Call 441-4223 or visit adornicenter.com (SR-0628)

Therapy/Support

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227)

Vocational

CERTIFICATE IN FACULTY PREPARATION. Teaching in Higher Education. Do you want to teach in higher education? This series of online courses introduces prospective and current faculty to the roles and responsibilities of teaching in higher education and specifically addresses teaching, learning and technology issues in the college classroom. The capstone course is an apprentice teaching experience arranged by the candidate, during which the candidate is mentored by a senior faculty member. This is a three-semester, 12-unit certificate program that starts June 25. For full course descriptions, deadlines, fees and more information, visit www. humboldt.edu/facultyprep or contact Humboldt State University Office of Extended Education at 707-826-3731 or extended@humboldt.edu. (V-0621)

Wellness/Bodywork

NEW QIGONG CLASSES & WORKSHOPS ! Visit MistyMountainHealingArts.com for current schedules/class information, or contact Zena Bardelás 707-498-1009 (W-0531) SOAP MAKING. With Jan Neal Sat., May 19, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $40 + $20 lab fee. Learn to make luscious, soothing soaps, choosing from the finest herbs, spices and oils, make it your own. It is also an option to use healing cannabis if you have valid 215 recommendation. All materials with exception of cannabis provided. Leave with your very own bar(s) of soap. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0517)

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. PETROLIA SEAWEEDING WEEKEND, with Allison Poklemba. June 23-24, 2012. Learn how to identify, ethically harvest, and prepare local sea vegetables. HIGH COUNTRY HERB WEEKEND, July 27-29,2012. Join us on the top of the world at this special botanical preserve. Register online www. dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0621) GREEN JUICING FRESH CANNABIS. Fri., June 15, 6-9 p.m. $40 (FREE to Elders!). Demonstrates how to use many different types of juicers to extract juice from cannabis leaves for raw consumption. Method does not activate the psychoactive properties of cannabis and so is user friendly for people who do not desire the psychoactive effect, while still getting benefits of cannabinoid consumption. Bring whatever kind of juicer/blender you have to class. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online, www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (W-0614) LEARN TRADITIONAL MAORI BODYWORK. With a team of gifted healers from New Zealand sharing their ancient system of healing that blends deep tissue work with a potent understanding of energy and spirit. $395 (partial scholarships available). Please email/call Jen, (707) 499-4441, jenmadrone@gmail. com. (WB-0517) TAOIST WATER QIGONG. Sudden School Presents Taoist Water Qigong. An energy art form for all ages and fitness levels. Increase energy, attain vibrant health and increase internal awareness of vital force in the body. 8-week sessions: $80.00 or $12.00 a session. Mon., June 4 -July 23. 5:30-7 p.m. On going Thurs. morning classes starting June 7, 9-10:30. At Garden Bliss, 3rd & E St. Arcata. For information call Saki @ 707-8228760 or sakitou2@gmail.com (W-0524) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Sept. 4, 2012 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227) ●

SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

ONLINE northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

45


Polling Place ame & Address

3FW

3FW, 3FWF, 3FWF-A

Freshwater School, 75 Greenwood Hts Dr, Eureka

3FWS

3FWS, 3FWW, 3GF, 3GF-1, 3GFF, 3GFF-A

Grace Baptist Church Lobby, 220 Buhne St, Eureka

4E-51

4E-51, 4E-55A

Grant School Cafeteria, 3901 G Street, Eureka

1E-45

1E-45, 1E-46

Grant School Cafeteria, 3901 G Street, Eureka

1ES-1

1ES-1, 1ES-2, 1ES-3

Humboldt CSD Board Rm, 5055 Walnut Dr, Eureka

1CS-3

1CS-3

Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka

4E-21

4E-21, 4E-2F, 4E-2J

Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka

4E-22

4E-22

Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka

4E-32

4E-32

Jefferson School, 1000 B Street, Eureka

4E-11

4E-11

Pine Hill School Library, 5230 Vance Ave, Eureka

1SB-2

1SB-1, 1SB-2, 1SB-3

Redwood Acres Home Ec Bldg, 3750 Harris St, Eureka

3ES-6

3ES-6, 3ESS6, 3ES-7

Redwood Acres Home Ec Bldg, 3750 Harris St, Eureka

4ES-6

4ES-6

Ridgewood School The Commons, 2060 Ridgewood Dr, Eureka

1CS-4

1CS-4

3A-1

Sacred Heart Church Parish Cntr, 3100 Edgewood Dr, Eureka

4ES-3

4ES-3

4ES-4

4ES-4

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following places have been designated as polling facilities, pursuant to Section 12105 of the California Elections Code.

Look for the “Sample Ballot & Polling Place Lookup” link on the County Election Office’s home page at http://www. co.humboldt.ca.us/election/. This site will let you check your precinct name and polling location using your address.

Arcata City Hall, Council Chambers, 736 F Street, Arcata

Consol. Name 3A-1

Home Precinct Names

Freshwater School, 75 Greenwood Hts Dr, Eureka

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF POLLING PLACES FOR THE PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ELECTION TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 2012

Polling Place ame & Address

Consol. Name

Home Precinct Names

Arcata City Hall, Council Chambers, 736 F Street, Arcata

3A-4

3A-4

Sacred Heart Church Parish Cntr, 3100 Edgewood Dr, Eureka

Arcata Lutheran Church Parish Hall, 151 E 16th Street, Arcata

3A-3

3A-3, 3A-3A

Sacred Heart Church Parish Cntr, 3100 Edgewood Dr, Eureka

4ES-5

4ES-5, 4ES-8

1SB-4

1SB-4, 1SB-5, 1SB-7, 1SB-7A, 1SB-8, 1SB-9

Arcata Methodist Church Social Hall, 1761 11th Street, Arcata

3A-7

3A-7, 3A-8

South Bay School Library, 6077 Loma Ave, Eureka

Arcata Methodist Church Social Hall, 1761 11th Street, Arcata

3A-9

3A-9

South Bay School Library, 6077 Loma Ave, Eureka

1SB-6

1SB-6

Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J Street, Arcata

3A-5

3A-5, 3A-5A, 3A-6

South Bay School Rm 18, 6077 Loma Ave, Eureka

1SB10

1SB10, 1SB11

Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J Street, Arcata

3A-11

3A-11, 3A-12

Zane Middle School Multipurpose Rm, 2155 S Street, Eureka

4E-23

4E-23

Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J Street, Arcata

3A-13

3A-13

Zane Middle School Multipurpose Rm, 2155 S Street, Eureka

4E-24

4E-24

1F-1

1F-1

Trinity Baptist Church Foyer, 2450 Alliance Road, Arcata

3A-10

3A-10, 3A-14

Humboldt County Fairgrounds Red Barn, 1250 5th Street, Ferndale

Pacific Union School Multipurpose Rm, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata

3A-P2

3A-P1, 3A-P2

Humboldt County Fairgrounds Red Barn, 1250 5th Street, Ferndale

1FS

1FS, 1FSF, 1FSF-1, 1FSL

2F-R1

2F-R1, 2F-R5

Pacific Union School Multipurpose Rm, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata

3A-P2A

3A-P2A

Ambrosini School Multipurpose Rm, 3850 Rohnerville Rd, Fortuna

Pacific Union School Multipurpose Rm, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata

3A-P3

3A-P3, 3A-P4, 3A-P5, 3A-P6, 3A-P7, 3A-P8, 3A-P9

Ambrosini School Multipurpose Rm, 3850 Rohnerville Rd, Fortuna

2F-R2

2F-R2

California Conservation Corp (CCC), 1500 Alamar Way, Fortuna

2F-R3

2F-R3

Pacific Union School Multipurpose Rm, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata

3PA-1

3PA-1, 3PA-2, 3PA-3, 3PA-3A, 3PA-4

California Conservation Corp (CCC), 1500 Alamar Way, Fortuna

2F-R4

2F-54

Sunny Brae School Multipurpose Rm, 1430 Buttermilk Ln, Arcata

3A-2

3A-2

Fortuna City Hall Conference Rm, 621 11th Street, Fortuna

2F-1

2F-1, 2F-2

Sunny Brae School Multipurpose Rm, 1430 Buttermilk Ln, Arcata

3A-J1

3A-J1, 3A-JW, 3A-JWA

Fortuna City Hall Conference Rm, 621 11th Street, Fortuna

2F-4

2F-4, 2F-5, 2F-6

Jacoby Creek School Gym, 1617 Old Arcata Rd, Bayside

3JCFR

3JC, 3JC-R, 3JCFR, 3JCFRA, 3JCM, 3JCM-1, 3JCW

Fortuna Volunteer Fire Dept, 320 S Fortuna Blvd, Fortuna

2F-3

2F-3, 2F-3A

2RV-1

2FS-3, 2RV-1

Jacoby Creek School Gym, 1617 Old Arcata Rd, Bayside

3JCWR

3JCF, 3JCWF, 3JCWR, 3JCWRA

Fortuna Volunteer Fire Dept, 320 S Fortuna Blvd, Fortuna

Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Dr, Arcata

3MA-1

3MA-1, 3MA-2, 3MA-3, 3PA-5, 3PAE, 3PESF

New Wine Fellowship, 1180 Evergreen Rd, Garberville

2SH-4

2SH-4, 2SHPV-4

New Wine Fellowship, 1180 Evergreen Rd, Garberville

2SHS4

Skinner Store, 111 Greenwood Ave, Blue Lake

3B-1

3B-1

2SH-4A, 2SH-4AN, 2SH-4B, 2SHF4, 2SHS4

Blue Lake Elementary School Library, 631 Greenwood Ave, Blue Lake

5BL

5BL, 5BL-1, 5BLF, 5BLFS-1

Hoopa Neighborhood Facility, Hwy 96, Hoopa

5KT-4

5KT-4, 5KT-5

Bridgeville Community Center, 38717 Kneeland Rd, Bridgeville

2BV

2BV, 2BVN

Hydesville Fire Station, 3495 Hwy 36, Hydesville

2HV

2HV, 2HVF, 2HVW

1LU

1LU, 1LU-1, 1LUR, 1LUS, 1LUS-1

Cuddeback School, Health Start Bldg, 300 Wilder Rd, Carlotta

2CU

2CU, 2CUS

Loleta Fire Station Meeting Rm, 567 Park Ave, Loleta

Apostolic Faith Church Basement, 272 Harris St, Eureka

4E-14

4E-14, 4E-15

Azalea Hall Hewitt Rm, 1620 Pickett Rd, McKinleyville

5MK-7

5MK-7

5MK-1

5MK-1

Apostolic Faith Church Basement, 272 Harris St, Eureka

4E-52

4E-52

Christ the King Catholic Church, 1951 McKinleyville Ave, McKinleyville

Apostolic Faith Church Basement, 272 Harris St, Eureka

4E-53

4E-53

Christ the King Catholic Church, 1951 McKinleyville Ave, McKinleyville

5MK-3

5MK-3

Apostolic Faith Church Basement, 272 Harris St, Eureka

4E-54

4E-54, 4E-54HB

Dows Prairie School Multipurpose Rm, 3940 Dows Prairie Rd, McKinleyville

5MK-8

5MK-8, 5MK-9, 5MKS8, 5MKS8-1, 5MKS9

Apostolic Faith Church Lobby, 272 Harris St, Eureka

1E-55

1E-55, 1E-56, 1E-57, 1E-58, 1E-59

Fieldbrook School Multipurpose Rm, 4070 Fieldbrook Rd, McKinleyville

5FB

5FB, 5FBS

Cutten School Multipurpose Rm, 4182 Walnut Dr, Eureka

1CS-1

1CS-1

Morris School Multipurpose Rm, 2395 McKinleyville Ave, Mckinleyville

5MK-5

5MK-5

Cutten School Multipurpose Rm, 4182 Walnut Dr, Eureka

1CS-2

1CS-2

Morris School Multipurpose Rm, 2395 McKinleyville Ave, Mckinleyville

5MK-5A

5MK-5A

Eureka City Schools Marshall Annex, 2100 J St, Eureka

4E-25

4E-25, 4E-47, 4E-48

Morris School Multipurpose Rm, 2395 McKinleyville Ave, Mckinleyville

5MK-6

5MK-6

Eureka City Schools Marshall Annex, 2100 J St, Eureka

4E-34

4E-34, 4E-35

Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F Street, Eureka

4E-12

4E-12

Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F Street, Eureka

4E-13

4E-13

Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F Street, Eureka

4E-31

4E-31

Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F Street, Eureka

4E-33

4E-33

First Covenant Church Fellowship Hall, 2500 J Street, Eureka

1E-36

1E-36, 1E-41, 1E-42

First Covenant Church Fellowship Hall, 2500 J Street, Eureka

1E-43

1E-43, 1E-44

46 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Morris School Multipurpose Rm, 2395 McKinleyville Ave, Mckinleyville

5MK-6A

5MK-6A

Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1200 Central Ave, McKinleyville

5MK-2

5MK-2

Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1200 Central Ave, McKinleyville

5MK-4

5MK-4

Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1200 Central Ave, McKinleyville

5MK-4A

5MK-4A

Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1200 Central Ave, McKinleyville

5MK-4B

5MK-4B


Polling Place ame & Address

Consol. Name

Home Precinct Names

South Fork High School Library, 6831 Avenue of the Giants, Miranda

2SH-5

2SH-5, 2SH-5A, 2SH-6, 2SH-6N, 2SHF6, 2SHS5

Healy Senior Center, 456 Briceland Rd, Redway

2SH-7

2SH-7, 2SH-7A, 2SH-7N, 2SHF7

Healy Senior Center, 456 Briceland Rd, Redway

2SHS7

2SHS7

Monument Middle School, 95 Center St, Rio Dell

2R-1

2R-1

Monument Middle School, 95 Center St, Rio Dell

2R-2

2R-2

Scotia Fire Hall, 145 Main St, Scotia

1SU

1RD, 1RDF, 1SCD, 1SU

Trinidad City Hall, 409 Trinity St, Trinidad

5T-1

5T-1

Trinidad City Hall, 409 Trinity St, Trinidad

5TU-1

5TU-1, 5TU-2

Westhaven Fire Hall, 446 6th Ave, Trinidad

5TU-4

5TU-3, 5TU-4

Trinity Valley School, Hwy 96, Willow Creek

5KT-6

5KT-6, 5KTF6, 5KTS6

“L’écLipse de Lune de christophe coLomb.” coLumbus impressing LocaL Jamaicans by foreteLLing the June 30, 1503 Lunar ecLipse.

VOTE BY MAIL — Return ballot by 8PM Election Day Consol. Name

Home Precinct Names

Consol. Name

Home Precinct Names

1FS-1

1FB-1, 1FS-1, 1FS-2, 1FS-3, 1FSL2

3AS-9

3AS-9, 3AS10, 3AS11, 3AS12

1FS-4

1FS-4, 1FS-5, 1FS-6, 1FS-7, 1FS-8

3E-2J

3E-2J

1FS-9

1FS-9

3KL

3KL

1MU

1MU

3KL-1

3KL-1

1MUF

1MUF, 1MUHB

4PEF

4FW, 4FWS, 4PE, 4PEF

1RV-2

1FSLHB, 1RV-2, 1RV-3

5AS-4

5AS-4, 5AS-5, 5AS-6, 5AS-7, 5AS-9

1SB12

1SB-8A, 1SB12, 1SB13, 1SB14, 1SB15, 1SB15-1, 1SB17

5BM

5BLF-1, 5BLFS, 5BLS, 5BM

5BU

5BU

5BUS

5BUS, 5BUS-1

5GP

5GP

5KT-1

5KT-1, 5KT-2

5KT-3

5KT-3

5KTS3

5KTS3

5MC

5MC, 5MCK

5OR

5OR, 5ORS

5PA-3

5PA-3, 5PA-3A, 5PAS

2MR

2MR

2SH-1

2SH-1, 2SHB-1

2SH-2

2SH-2, 2SHW2

2SH-3

2SH-3, 2SHF-3

2SH-8

2SH-8, 2SHMB, 2SHS8

2SHF1

2SHF1

2SHR1

2SHR1

2SHR2

2SHR2

2SHVF

2SHVF

3AS-1

3AS-1, 3AS-2, 3AS-3, 3AS-4, 3AS-5, 3AS-7, 3AS-8

Eclipse Lore By Barry Evans

A

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

DATED: May 17, 2012. Carolyn Crnich, Registrar of Voters, by Judith Hedgpeth, Deputy 5/17 (12-143)

legal NOTICES continued on next page ➤

will be closed Memorial Day, May 28th

from astronomie popuLaire 1879, pubLic domain

Please submit your copy by 5pm THURSDAY, MAY 24th for the May 31st issue.

s we count down to Sunday’s annular eclipse — coming to a clear sky near you, we trust — herewith some eclipse bits and pieces: • The word “eclipse” comes from the Greek ekleipsis, meaning “omission” or “failure,” that is, something gone wrong. It’s cognate with “ellipse” and with “ellipsis,” those quaint periods … found in novels where something (usually racy) is omitted. • The moon’s orbit is tilted about five degrees with respect to the ecliptic, the plane of Earth’s orbit around the sun. If it were in the same plane, we’d experience a lunar eclipse every full moon and either a total or annular solar eclipse every new moon. • In a lifetime of “three score years and ten,” a person living in the same location could expect to see about 50 lunar eclipses — half being total — and 30 partial solar eclipses. However, that person would only have a 20 percent chance of seeing a total solar eclipse. • The longest possible duration of a total solar eclipse is 7 minutes 40 seconds, while the maximum total lunar eclipse lasts 1 hour 44 minutes. • People have been noting eclipses for a long time. Writing in the second century CE, the Greek astronomer Ptolemy discusses Babylonian eclipse records going back to 747 B.C. • According to Herodotus, Thales of Miletus predicted the eclipse of May 28, 585 BCE. He probably did so using the “saros” cycle discovered by the Babylonians, a mathematical coincidence that results in approximately the same configuration of

sun, moon and Earth every 18 years 11 days 8 hours (ignoring leap years). • That 585 BCE eclipse gives us the first definitive date for a historical event, in this case, the end of a war. The Lydians and Medes were in the middle of a battle when (again according to Herodotus) “… the day was suddenly turned to night … so they ceased from fighting, and both parties were the more zealous to make peace.” • The ancient Chinese attributed the fortunes of the emperor and his family to eclipses. The Han Dynasty record for the total solar eclipse of Jan. 18, 120 CE includes the commentary, “Teng, the Empress Dowager, showed aversion to it. Two years and three months later, she died.” • The length of the day is increasing by nearly two milliseconds per century, mainly due to the braking effect of tides (Field Notes, Jan. 6, 2011). Ancient eclipse records help astronomers calculate how fast Earth is slowing, because if the length of the day were constant, you would have had to be 2,500 miles west of Babylon to see the total solar eclipse of April 15, 136 BCE. But according to a clay tablet from Babylon, now in the British Museum, “24 us (96 minutes) after sunrise, a solar eclipse obscured the sun on the southwest side … Venus and Mercury were visible.” That 2,500 miles “lost” over 21 centuries gives the average rate of slowing. l As Barry Evans’ (barryevans9@yahoo. com) emerged many years ago from the Imam Reza mosque in Mashad, Iran (one of the three holiest Shia shrines), the moon had magically turned to copper: a total lunar eclipse.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012

47


DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 707-445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: April 26, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Names of the Applicants are: PHYLLIS FRANCA BARBA, NATHAN ANDREW SWENSON The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 325 2ND ST EUREKA, CA 95501-0425 Type of License Applied for: 40 - On-Sale Beer 5/17, 5/24, 5/31/2012 (12-151)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED April 22, 2005, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER TS. NO. 140620-AH ON June 1, 2012 at 10:00 o’clock A.M. in the lobby of Humboldt Land Title Company, 1034 Sixth St., Eureka, CA County of Humboldt, State of California HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, as Trustee under the Deed of Trust executed by STEVE M. FRENCH AND TAMARA J. FRENCH, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP recorded on April 29, 2005 as Instrument No. 2005-13794-20 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California by reason of default in the payment or performance of obligations secured thereby including the breach or default, notice of which was recorded February 1, 2012 as Instrument No. 2012-2554-3 of said Official Records, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash in lawful money of the United States, without covenant or warranty, express or implied, as to title, possession, or encumbrances, for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, the interest conveyed to said Trustee by said Deed of Trust in property situated in the County of Humboldt, State of California and described as: That real property situate in the County of Humboldt, State of California, described as follows: PARCEL ONE: BEGINNING on the Southerly line of Glenwood Avenue at a point distant thereon 300 feet West of its intersection with the West line of

Frank Avenue, as said Avenues are shown on the Map of Eden filed in the Recorder’s Office of Humboldt County, California, on October 27, 1906 in Book 10 of Maps at Page 3; and running thence West along the South line of Glenwood Avenue, 83 feet; thence at right angles South 72 feet 1 inch; thence at right angles West, 2 ½ feet; thence at right angles South, 47 feet 11 inches; thence at right angles East, 85 ½ feet; thence at right angles North 120 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL TWO: That portion of the Eden Tract, according to the Map thereof on file in the Office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, California, in Book 10 of Maps, Page 3, described as follows: BEGINNING on the Southerly line of Glenwood Avenue at a point distant thereon 383 feet West from the West line of Frank Avenue; and running thence at right angles South 72 feet 1 inch; thence at right angles West, 2.5 feet; thence at right angles South 12 feet to the true point of beginning of the parcel of land to be herein described; thence from said true point of beginning continuing South 35 feet 11 inches; thence at right angles West, 0.8 feet; thence at right angles North 35 feet 11 inches; and thence at right angles East 0.8 feet to the true point of beginning. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NO. 016-081-028 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that informa-

tion about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 707-443-0837 for information regarding the trustee’s sale and inquire as to the status of the foreclosure using the T.S. number assigned to this foreclosure shown on the first page of this notice. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The unpaid balance and estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of May 2, 2012 is $222,942.37; said amount will increase until date of sale. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described herein is purported to be: 3842 Glenwood St., Eureka, CA. Directions may be obtained pursuant to a written request submitted to the Beneficiary. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Dated: May 2, 2012 Beneficiary: Coast Central Credit Union Telephone: (707) 445-8801 Address: 2650 Harrison Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501 HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, Trustee Address: 1034 Sixth Street, Eureka, CA 95501 Telephone: (707) 443-0837 5/17, 5/24, 5/31/2012 (12-142)

PUBLIC SALE

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to sections 21700-21716 of the Business and Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will be sold at public auction by competitive bidding on the 25th day of May, 2012, at 11:00 AM on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at INDIANOLA STORAGE, 673 Indianola Cutoff, Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt, State of California. The following units will be sold: Daniel Vermeulem, Unit #123, Misc. household items Heidi Schrack, Unit #170, Misc. household items Jaimo Mayo, Unit #306, Misc. household items Purchase must be paid for (cash only) and removed at the time of sale, with the unit left broom clean. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Owner reserves the right to bid. Call 442-7613. Indianola Storage, Jerry Avila, bond # 0327592

48 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

5/17, 5/24/2012 (12-154)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 2170021716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 23rd of May, 2012, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Sherry Gallagher, Unit # 5042 Nanette Dean, Unit # 5206 William Bailey, Unit # 5280 Michelle Sovereign, Unit # 5531 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Gregory Edwards, Unit # 2702 Christian Shutler, Unit # 3009 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Cynthia Falk, Unit # 1152 Robert Burrus, Unit #1186 Elizabeth Gibson, Unit # 1382 Ernest Rocha, Unit # 1691 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Aaron Daviau, Unit # 111 Ian Weatherbee, Unit # 141 Joshua Pearlston, Unit # 142 Sarah Simmons, Unit # 148 Axten Ruberto, Unit # 410 Jeremy Martinson, Unit # 471 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appliances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self-Storage, 707-443-1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 10th day of May 2012 and 17th day of May 2012 5/10, 5/17/2012 (12-140)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00247

The following persons are doing business as WHOLE TRUTH MINISTRY at 1226 Freshwater Rd., Eureka, CA 95503. Lester Edward Alexander 1226 Freshwater Rd. Eureka, CA 95503

Teresa Adriana Alexander 1226 Freshwater Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/20/2012. /s Lester Edward Alexander. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 20, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7/2012 (12-150)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00285

The following person is doing business as BINDU STUDIO at 3703 Spring Street, Eureka, CA 95503. Michael Lewis Thayer 3703 Spring St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/8/12. /s Michael Lewis Thayer. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 8, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7/2012 (12-152)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00287

The following person is doing business as RAGGS’ 101 SPORTS BAR at 3534 Broadway, Eureka, CA 95503. Darrell Evenson Jr. P.O. Box 213 Fields Landing, CA 95537 344 Railroad Fields Landing, CA 95537 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Darrell Evenson Jr. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 9, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7/2012 (12-149)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00297

The following persons are doing business as FJ COYOTE at 45442 Highway 96, Orleans, CA 95556, P.O. Box 30, Orleans, CA 95556. Francis Voignier 45442 Highway 96 Orleans, CA 95556 Jocelyn Dominger 99531 Highway 96 Somes Bar, CA 95568 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/1/2012. /s Francis Voignier. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/17, 5/24, 5/31, 6/7/2012 (12-153)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00248

The following persons are doing business as FURRY FRIENDS ALPACA FARM at 8521 Butler Valley Rd., Korbel, CA 95550, P.O. Box 439, Arcata, CA 95518. Rama E. Zarcufsky P.O. Box 439 Arcata, CA 95518 Danielle L. Matthews 8521 Butler Valley Rd. Korbel, CA 95550 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/24/2012. /s Danielle Matthews. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 24, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/10, 5/17, 5/24, 5/31/2012 (12-148)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00275

The following person is doing business as MONICA’S CUSTOM MEALS/MUNCHIEZ CAFE at 3372 Antoinette Ct., Arcata, CA 95521. Monica Christes 3372 Antoinette Ct. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/3/12. /s Monica Christes. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 3, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/10, 5/17, 5/24, 5/31/2012 (12-141)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00278

The following person is doing business as RED MOUNTAIN RESOURCE COMPANY at 1452 Horrell Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Harry Hergenrather 1452 Horrell Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Harry Hergenrather. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 4, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/10, 5/17, 5/24, 5/31/2012 (12-144)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00215

The following person is doing business as BIKE PED ED at 1000 Lighthouse Rd., Petrolia, CA 95558, P.O. Box 8, Petrolia, CA 95558. Kristen Swanson 1000 Lighthouse Rd. Petrolia, CA 95558 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/9/12. /s Kristen Swanson.


5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24/2012 (12-130)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00251

The following persons are doing business as THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN at 325 2nd St., Eureka, CA 95501. Phyllis Barba 210 C St. Eureka, CA 95501 Nathan Swenson 7781 Butler Valley Rd. Korbel, CA 95550 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Phyllis Barba. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 25, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24/2012 (12-133)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00261

The following persons are doing business as ENVISION at 3115 Lowell St., Eureka, CA 95503, P.O. Box 475, Eureka, CA 95502. Simone Mellor 3115 Lowell St. Eureka, CA 95503 Lisa Jennings 2485 Jones Avenue McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/1/2012. /s Lisa J. Jennings, Simon Mellor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 26, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24/2012 (12-136)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00267

The following persons are doing business as MASAKI’S KYOTO JAPANESE RESTAURANT at 320 F St., Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 3386, Eureka, CA 95502.

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24/2012 (12-137)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00268

The following persons are doing business as MASAKI’S MONGOLIAN GRILL at 465 I St., Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 3386, Eureka, CA 95502. Masaki Group LLC 322 W. Sonoma Eureka, CA 95501 LLC California The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Eric Masaki, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24/2012 (12-138)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00209

The following person is doing business as LADY LUXX at 615 11th St., Arcata, CA 95521. Siobhan Reynolds 2040 Thiel McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Siobhan Reynolds. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 4, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/26, 5/3, 5/10, 5/17/2012 (12-125)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00237

The following persons are doing business as BUTTONS at 621 Third St., Eureka, CA 95501. Margaret Wyles 233 Tree Lane Kneeland, CA 95549 Rosemary Price 62 Sole Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Margaret Wyles, Rosemary Price. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 16, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/26, 5/3, 5/10, 5/17/2012 (12-124)

4/26, 5/3, 5/10, 5/17/2012 (12-126)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00245

The following persons are doing business as HABIT FOODS, THE HABIT BAKERY at 1620 Pickett Rd., McKinleyville, CA 95519, P.O. Box 2583, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Corey Winer 2163 Park McKinleyville, CA 95519 Michelle Francis 2163 Park McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Michelle Francis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 19, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/26, 5/3, 5/10, 5/17/2012 (12-127)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BERYL IVY STOCKEL CASE NO. PR120102

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ATTACHMENT A, BERYL IVY STOCKEL also known as BERYL IVY WRIGHT, BERYL I. GRAY, BERYL I. NOAD, BERYL GRAY STOCKEL, BERYL G. STOCKEL, BERYL I. STOCKEL. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CHERYL K. LUDY in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CHERYL K. LUDY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the per-

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

The following person is doing business as TRILLIUM HOMECARE SERVICES at 754 5th Street, #C, Arcata, CA 95521. Jessica McCollough 754 5th Street, #C Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessica N. McCollough. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 10, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing business as PROMINENCE ART at 2186 Chaney Lane, Eureka, CA 95503. Danny James Jones 2186 Chaney Lane Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Danny James Jones. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 16, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

26. “Let’s take ____” 28. Dodger Hershiser and others 31. Bay Area hub: Abbr. 32. Digital camera maker 33. Sics on 35. Agcy. concerned with fraud 37. Mark’s replacement 38. T, in Morse code 39. “Yo, it’s after the 2008 election and the last president ain’t here no more” 42. The NCAA’s Buckeyes 43. G or PG issuer: Abbr. 45. Suffix with glob 46. Rain forests and grasslands, e.g. 48. Sleep problem 50. Turkish title

DOWN

12. Toy with blueprints 13. Present, slangily 18. Followers: Abbr. 24. Capp and Capone 25. “Let’s roll!” 27. Be in the running 28. Michelangelo and Rembrandt, e.g. 29. Names to a new position 30. Green Mountain Boys leader 34. Cal. column 36. Den delivery 40. “Shane” star

1. Gets away from 7. “Now!” 11. “Don’t tell ____ don’t want to know” 14. Ritzy 15. Keaton’s “Mr. Mom” costar 16. Prince Valiant’s son 17. “Yo, I’m talkin’ Indian and Italian and those types of foods” 19. Living in Fla., maybe 20. Actor Diesel 21. Suffix with heir or host 22. ____ Jones Industrials 23. German “I” 24. Walter who managed the Dodgers for 23 seasons

1. 1999 Ron Howard satire 2. City northwest of Provo 3. ____ Bator, Mongolia 4. Hwy. offense 5. Has more than a knack for 6. “The Lorax” author 7. Dept. of Justice chiefs 8. Denied 9. River of Tuscany 10. Antebellum 11. “You campaign in poetry. You govern in prose” speaker

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

52. Gush on stage 53. Skyrockets 54. Start of a neatnik’s phrase 56. Up to, in ads 57. Part of RSVP 59. Film director Roth 60. ____-A-Fella Records 63. Photo blowup: Abbr. 64. “Yo, I don’t need a sweater ‘cause I ain’t feeling cold” 67. USPS carrier’s assignment 68. Word from a crib 69. Twinkler in a Paris sky 70. Fig. sought by an identity thief 71. Kicks in 72. At an earlier time 41. Connects with 44. ____ Lingus 47. Meditation chants 49. “Law & Order” fig. 51. Iowa college town 55. “____ Gold” (1997 film) 58. “____ a hunch ...” 60. Bankruptcy 61. Eye up and down 62. Chaz Bono’s mom 65. Univ. aides 66. Tic-tac-toe winner EASY #9

www.sudoku.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00222

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00238

Solution, tips and computer program at

5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24/2012 (12-131)

Masaki Group LLC 322 W. Sonoma Eureka, CA 95501 LLC California The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/04/07. /s Eric Masaki, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 9, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 17, 2012

49


NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BERYL IVY STOCKEL CASE NO. PR120102

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ATTACHMENT A, BERYL IVY STOCKEL also known as BERYL IVY WRIGHT, BERYL I. GRAY, BERYL I. NOAD, BERYL GRAY STOCKEL, BERYL G. STOCKEL, BERYL I. STOCKEL. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CHERYL K. LUDY in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CHERYL K. LUDY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 24, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: WILLIAM T. KAY, JR. (SBN 59581) LAW OFFICE OF WILL KAY 628 H STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-2301 APRIL 24, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/3, 5/10, 5/17/2012 (12-134)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF EDDIE RAY UNDERWOOD CASE NO. PR120104

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: EDDIE RAY UNDERWOOD. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by REBECCA L. RAMIREZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that REBECCA L. RAMIREZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 24, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA, CSB NO. 69056 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-0804 APRIL 25, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/3, 5/10, 5/17/2012 (12-135)

Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at northcoastjournal.com

the Employment Northcoast Children’s Services

PROGRAM ASSISTANT III Arcata Main Office

Perform clerical duties & regular front desk coverage. Set-up & clean-up for in-service trainings, food & supply purchasing. Requires 3 years office exp. including 2 years computer experience & advanced clerical skills. Part-Time (partial year, 4-6 wk layoff): 30 hrs/wk (Mon–Thursday, 9-3:15; Friday, 8-3:15 pm); $9.75-$10.74/hr Application Deadline: May 22, 2012

Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata CA 95521

For additional information, please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

Code enforCement Program manager CiTy of EurEkA $4,363 - $5,306/mo + excellent benefits. The City of Eureka is looking for an administrative professional to perform a variety of advanced journey-level work in coordinating, implementing, and maintaining community improvement projects, and programs. This individual provides budgetary, grant, training and work-flow support, acts as liaison for the City with a variety of private, public and community organizations and regulatory agencies; researches, develops recommendations for action; provides professional assistance to City management staff in the area of Code Enforcement. An Associate’s Degree in Construction Technology, Planning, Public Administration, Criminal Justice, or a related field; four (4) to six (6) years of increasingly responsible experience in building inspection, code enforcement, public safety, or related fields; and Two (2) years of supervisory experience is required.

for a complete job description and application packet: visit the Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov.

Recruitment closes at 5:00 pm, Thursday May 31, 2012. EoE

LegaL Secretary CiTy of EurEkA $2,953 - $3,592/month + excellent benefits. The City of Eureka is looking for a highly motivated, enthusiastic, customer service oriented individual to perform a variety of journey-level confidential, complex legal secretarial and clerical work in support of the City Attorney. Equivalent to an Associate’s degree with major coursework in law, legal assistance, or a related field, and five (5) years legal office experience in the research, review and preparation of legal documents and pleadings is required. for a complete job description and application packet: visit the Personnel Department at 531 k Street in Eureka, or call the Job Line at (707) 441-4134, or apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov.

Recruitment closes at 5:00 pm, Thursday May 31, 2012.

50 North Coast Journal • Thursday, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

EoE

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

Positions in arcata! dental assistant iii (2-Positions) Must have a 2+ yrs. exp. as a CA licensed RDA/CDA in addition have a CA Dental X-Ray & Coronal polish certificate. Medical receptionist per diem Must have a HS diploma or equivalent & 6 months direct experience as a receptionist. Experience in medical setting preferred. clinical nurse Must have a valid CA RN license and two to three year’s related experience, preferably in an outpatient clinic. UIHS is an electronic health record site and offers competitive wages & benefits. Computer skills & ability to work in fast paced environment required.  In accordance with P.L. 93-638 American Indian Preference will be given. Must have valid driver license and be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/ required testing. An Application can be obtained at www.uihs.org or 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata or call HR (707) 825-5000. Closes 5/25/12

System Administrator for Local Wholesale Company:

Maintains system performance by performing system monitoring and analysis, and performance tuning; troubleshooting system hardware, software, networks and operating and system management systems; designing and running system load/stress testing; escalating application problems to vendor. - Experience in SQL Database Administration. - Experience in EDI software support duties. - Knowledge of ERP Software maintenance and administration. - Familiar with Virtual Server Maintenance We are in the middle of an ERP implementation and looking for assistance either short or long term. Full-time position - Competitive salary, 401k plan and full health Insurance. Email resume to hr@tomasjewelry.com

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, May 10, 2012

45


CONTINUED ON PAGE 52

Employment

Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Reliable Laborers Inside Sales/Telemarketing Licensed Insurance Agent Secret Shopper (21–25 yrs old) CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care. OFFICE MANAGER-DENTAL 1 F/T Eureka Responsible for the overall supervision of the front desk and working as the liaison between the providers, patients and other staff members. Supervisor experience in a medical or dental setting, strong computer skills and exceptional communication skills required. REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka Requires current California RDA license, CPR,, strong computer skills and excellent teamwork and communication skills. REGISTERED NURSE 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Crescent City Requires current RN license for State of California, CPR, EMR experience and exceptional teamwork and communication skills. MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Arcata Must have injection certification, CPR certification, strong computer skills and 6 or more months experience.

Open Door Community Health Centers offers great benefits, competitive compensation and a rewarding work environment. Application may be downloaded from: www.opendoorhealth.com PLEASE submit complete applications (EOE) To: Carolyn Webb, Human Resources Manager Open Door Community Health Centers, 670 Ninth Street, Suite 203, Arcata, CA 95521 (707) 826-8633, ext.5140 • FAX (707) 826-8628 cwebb@opendoorhealth.com

CLINICAL NURSE MANAGER, RN OR LVN. Community Clinic in Redway seeks a hands-on Clinical Nurse Manager to actively manage patient care and supportive services. Redwoods Rural Health Center is a small, moderately paced primary care medical practice with integrated behavioral health care and dental services. Candidates must possess clinical experience, strong triage skills, leadership attributes and management skills. Bilingual Spanish and experience with Electronic Health Records systems preferred. Beautiful location with compassionate and dynamic team. Four-day work week, competitive salary and benefits. E-mail resume and cover letter to Tina Tvedt, MHA, Executive Director at ttvedt@rrhc.org. (E-0524)

AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214. (E-0517) PT RETAIL SALES POSITION. Now available at Kokopilau. Recent women’s apparel, footwear or jewelry sales experience preferred. Apply in person or mail resume with references to: KOKOPILAU, 515 Second St., Eureka, Ca 95502. (E-0607) R.N. PART TIME. Experience working w/elderly preferred. No weekends/holidays. Application/job description may be picked up at Adult Day Health Care of Mad River. Applications accepted until position filled. (707) 822-4866. (E-0524)

PART-TIME POSITIONS Dishwasher/Prep Cook 2 - Crown Club Rep 2 - Cage Cashier Bingo Admit Wait Staff (Sunset) Bartender (Sunset) Bartender (Lounge) 2 - Deli Worker Janitorial Security Officer 2 - Slot Attendant FULL-TIME POSITIONS Fiscal Assistant/AP Clerk SEASCAPE, PART-TIME POSITIONS Cook Gift Shop Clerk Charter Boat Captain Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

BECOME A MENTOR! California Mentor is seeking committed, positive people willing to share their home & help an adult with developmental disabilities lead and integrated life in the community. Become part of a professional team and reive a competitive monthly reimbursement, training & continuous support. Contact Matthew, (707 442-4500 ext. 14, 317 Third St., Eureka. www. mentorswanted.com (E-1227) SERVICE COORDINATOR (CASE MGR). FT in Eureka, CA. Knowledge of infant development, early intervention services for developmentally disabled & at-risk infants. Requires M/A or BA w/experience in human services or related field. Salary $2749-$3868 + excellent benefits. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more information and required documents. Closes 5-22-12 at 5 p.m. (E-0517) CAREGIVER WANTED. 42-yearold quadriplegic in Fieldbrook, looking for energetic assistant able to multitask. PT, experience preferred but not essential. Wage negotiable/gas allowance. 8397827 (E-0531) ELITE CAREGIVERS NOW HIRING. Humboldt/Del Norte FT/ PT Certified Caregivers, CNA/ HHA. Competitive wages and Benefits. elitecaregivers@gmail. com. (E-0607)

CAR OWNERS EARN $600/ MONTH. Rent out your car safely with RelayRides.com/Earn. You control the price, times & people for each rental. RelayRides provides all insurance & support. Free to join. Questions? Email Earn@ RelayRides.com or call (415) 7294227 (AAN CAN) (E-0517) HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN) (E-0607) FULL TIME HOUSE CLEANING POSITION. Available with Dependable Cleaning. Mon.-Fri. No evenings or weekends. Bi-lingual a plus.Valid license and reliable vehicle required. Call 445-1094 and leave name, phone number and best time to call. (E-0531) PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) (E-0607) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-0614) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1227)

Rentals HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 ARCATA APARTMENT. 2bd/1bath, newly remodeled unit. New carpets, floor, fixtures, appliances. Near HSU/Downtown. Patio, parking. No pets/smoking. $850/ month. 2122 Heather Ln., #C. 4997246. Available now. (R-0607)

Rentals

Business Rentals

HUMBOLDT BAY PROPERTIES. Apartments, rooms and houses. 443-5228. (R-0524) ARCATA 1BD, 2BD & STUDIOS. Available now. Some or all utilities paid, coin op laundry, close to buses. Near HSU! Call for more info! 822-4557 (R-0531) EUREKA APARTMENT 1335 6th St. 1/1 Apt., SEC 8 OK, W/S/G Paid., MtM, Rent $600, Vacant 6/2. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0517) EUREKA DUPLEX. 711 N St. 312 Duplex, SEC 8 OK, W/G Paid., Rent $1100, Available Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0517) EUREKA HOUSE. 4622 Kincaid. 3/2.5 House, Private Master Suite, Walk-In Closet’s, Pet Friendly, Rent $1600, Available Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0517) EUREKA ROOM FOR RENT. 314 E St. ALL UTILITIES PAID. Affordable Room in Old Town. Locked entrance building, shared laundry, kitchen & baths. OSRM. MTM Rent $350, Vacant Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0517) EUREKA STUDIO. 2734 F St., Studio B. Craftsman Style Studio Cottage, Beautiful! Must See! W/S/G Paid, Rent $725, Available Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0517) MCKINLEYVILLE HOUSE. 2670 Bolier. 3/2 House, Pet OK, .78 Acre, Ocean View, RV Storage, Rent $1800, Vacant Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0517) SUMMER RENTAL. Need responsible person to rent my home for 3 months, $300/month. Must feeds cats and parrots, mow lawn and water plants. Will stay in touch via internet. Call (707) 498-7737. (R-0517) BY THE BAY & OLD TOWN. Eureka 1BD/1BA Apartment. $650/ month, $1000/deposit. No Smoking/Pets. W/S/G paid. References required. 445-4679. (R-0524) ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-0531)

DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

It’s here! The 2012 Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt. View it online on our

Real Estate BY OWNER FRESHWATER AREA. 5.15 area, 2400 sq, ft., 3 bedroom, 3 bath, a solarium 12 x 16, woodstove, country kitchen, all appliances, stepdown living room, forced air, hardwood floors, 3 car garage, carport, RV pad, large barn/ workshop, orchard, garden hen house, 425k. some financing (707) 445-4165 (RE-0621) TRINITY VILLAGE 1.3 ACRES WITH CREEK. 3BD/2BA main house. PLUS: Guest House, Art Studio/ Workshop, Pool, Sauna, 2 Car Garage, Amenities Galore. $375,000. Call Gail Packard Realty, Owner/ Broker, (530) 629-4181. (RE-0531) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

Lodging/Travel

INSID E

Venues Jewelry Gowns and Tuxedoes Flowers Bakeries And More

Special Publications northcoastjournal.com Coast Journal • Thursday, MAY 17, 2012 • Northpage.

51


4

Lodging/Travel DO YOU HAVE A TRIP IN MIND, WANT TO TRAVEL, BUT CAN’T IMAGINE GOING ALONE?. I am the patient and level-headed delightful companion for you to hire! I am a women in her fifties, with good humor and good people skills, and, I can be easily scheduled for short or long trips this year. Call (707) 498-8981. (L-0531) HAVE A VACATION RENTAL. List it in The North Coast Journal, email classified@northcoastjournal. com, or call 442-1400 for more info. and Great Rates. (L-0531)

the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51

Pets

Buy/Sell/Trade

      

 

Adopt a pet, get 20% off your purchase

616 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

3954 Jacobs Ave. Eureka 443-7397

Auto

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

USED , NEW & RARE

Mon-Fri 10-6 pm Sat 10-5pm

Stop by for sound gardening advice!

BOOKS

402 2 Street • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344 nd

707-822-7049 3384 Janes Rd.

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0712) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

Buy/Sell/Trade

FLASHBACK 443-3259 116 W. Wabash Approx. 1-6 Closed Tues & Sun 50% OFF SALE:

SELECT LINGERIE OVERWHELMED WITH STUFF? Have an extra fixer up cars in the driveway? List it all here. 4421400. VISA/MC

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

Services

Custom Pet Portraits by Sophia Dennler •

For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets HORSE PASTURE. Barn and 12’ Stall. Round Corral. Year round creek. (707) 822-5092. (P-0524) ON 4/5/12 FOUND 2 FEMALE BOSTON TERRIER. Carlotta near mile marker 9. Very cute. If by chance you lost these guys please reply and describe them to me. Call Adam (707) 599-7662. (P-0517) PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at wwwhumboldtherbals.com (P-1227)

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

DEANNA’S CLEANING SERVICE. $15 hr. Residential, $20 hr. MoveOuts, Rentals & Estates, 2 hr.min. lic #8132, call 445-3610 (S-0517) AMUSING GAMES & AMAZING PERFORMANCES FOR ALL AGES. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) HOUSE CLEANING. Riana Terrill. Experienced, Reliable & Efficient to meet your needs. 668-5205, 499-1536. $15/hour. (S-0531) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0531) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded #3860. Spring Cleaning Special! (707) 444-2001. (S-0712)

le garage sa › this way

SEWING, ARTS & CRAFT SUPPLIES 1/2 PRICE! Time to get creative! May 15-19. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. Providing Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-0517) 40KW DIESEL GENERATOR. Cummins Model 40DGBC, weatherproof enclosure, 175 gallon tank, 300 hours. Auto-transfer switch. $10,000 OBO Steve (707) 834-0987 (BST-0531) BUYING COIN COLLECTIONS. Big or Small. I will come to you. Private and Confidential. Call William (707) 845-7420 or email goodsign111@yahoo.com. (BST-0621) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530-629-3540. krchase@yahoo. com. (BST-1227)

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

2doorsDownWineBar.com

place your ad ONLINE @

52 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Services 2 GUYS & A TRUCK Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up. Contact (707) 845-3087. (S-0607) HOUSE CLEANING BY JEANNIE. Residence $15/hour, Move-outs $20/hour. Call 445-2644. References Available. (S-0809)

www.northcoastjournal.com


CONTINUED ON PAGE 54

Music

Services

Need help with

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

Sales

Service

Solutions

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

MCKEEVER ENERGY AND ELECTRIC. Residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural. Electrical contracting and design. Renewable energy. Energy efficiency and sustainability. Energy consulting, documentation and field verification. Contact Nate McKeever at 707-822-0100 or info@mckeeverenergyandelectric.com or visit www.mckeeverenergyandelectric.com. Lic. # CA C10 876832 (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 4438373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson Attorney DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc.

ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-0524)

SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0809) A-1 STEAM CARPET CLEANING. Ask us about our $99.00 2 room special. Also now offering Green Guard 442-3229 ext 13 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) DISORGANIZED? HIRE A PRO! Paper, clutter, kitchens, closets. A.D.D. specialist. Experienced, Affordable, Friendly. Claire Josefine 268-8585. www.clairejosefine. com. (S-1227)

FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

Music ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-0517) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0524) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227)

Spring

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

Community LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. Why is the cycle of sexual abuse in families so difficult to break? And how can those who’ve suffered childhood sexual abuse find healing? Discussion Sun., May 20, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@ hotmail.com. (C-0517) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-0531) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0726)

projects?

See page 27

home & garden

service directory

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012

53


body, mind ▼

&Spirit

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53

MamaG at Siana Salon

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

Love Your Hair and Your Hair Care, You Deserve it.

50% discount for first time clients

Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating. Kim Moor, MFT #37499

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

Call 441-1484

Loving Hands,

Institute of Healing Arts

TIME FOR A MASSAGE?

Sabrina Knight MA, MFT Marriage & Family Therapist Individuals & Families

Est. 1979

MASSAGE THERAPY

443-3611  517 3rd Street, Suite 21 Eureka, CA 95501

Weekend Massage Clinic Special ½ hour $30 1 hour $45

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 12 to 4

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

CERTIFIED IN MASSAGE THERAPY & FOOT REFLEXOLOGY. Reidun Olsson, (707) 822-7247. (MB-0809) GOD GIFTED PSYCHIC. Love Specialist, Stops Divorce, Cheating, Reunites Separated Partners, Solves Severe Problems. Never Fails. FREE 15 MINUTE Reading By Phone 254-420-6794 (AAN CAN) (MB-0517) HAWAIIAN LOMI LOMI MASSAGE. Rejuvenate and Activate your Body, Mind & Soul. Birgit Loehrer, (808) 936-5008. (MB0705) KICK BUTTS! Become a nonsmoker in one session with Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist, Life Coach, and Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). (707) 845-3749. www. ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-0628)

ArtByRoman.com

(707) 497-8042, 685 F Street, Arcata

Therapeutic Massage Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

Certified Massage Therapist

www.northcoast-medical.com do- TERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 498-7749, www.thinkdoterra. com/19719. (MB-0517) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0726) CRANIAL SACRAL THERAPY. Infused with Shiatsu, Quantum Touch Healing, Energywork. Crescent City, (517) 974-0460. (MB-0726) JUPITERS LIGHT ASTROLOGY READING. The Sacred Geometry of Our Lives. Individual, Family & Relationship Readings. Shakati L. Walsh, MA Spiritual Psychology, MS Educational Counseling. 1-800-ASK-Keen ext: 02466043 first 3 minutes are Free (707) 616-3163, shakatiwalsk@yahoo.com (S-1227) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 4424240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (MB-0517)

COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0920) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0920) _ HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227)

54 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 17, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Mon. Club, 610 Main St. Every Tue. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (MB-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www.northcoastaikido.org. (MB-1227)

NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 2680929. (MB-1025) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup.org. (MB-1227)

ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227) GOOD HEALTH is a great New Year’s resolution. Your new health practitioner may be listed here. Tell them you saw their notice in the Journal.

Place your ad online! www.northcoastjournal.com


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center),

www.northcoastjournal.com

707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

this week Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

$259,900

$379,900

3 bed, 2 bath, 2,200 sq ft beautiful custom Myrtletown home, panoramic views, vaulted living room ceilings, two Mt Lassen rock fireplaces, newly remodeled master bath, 10’ x 16’ solarium

this

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,345 sq ft McKinleyville home, GO GREEN, lower your heating bills, even grow your own tomatoes indoors in the Lindal Cedar Sunroom added in 2007, great open floor plan

$179,000

2 bed, 1 bath, 850 sq ft Eureka cottage, move in ready with large fenced yard, great for gardening, dual pane windows, newer roof, woodstove, detached garage w/ workshop and laundry

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

real estate

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages ■ EUREKA

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

GOOD LOCATION ON BUS ROUTE! Built around 1900, this 4 bedroom, 1 bath home has a refurbished kitchen with cherrywood cabinets and an oak floor. The home has a small sunroom, separate laundryroom, and a familyroom with a woodstove. Big corner lot, detached garage. mls#235343 $235,000

Sylvia Garlick

#00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

■ McKINLEYVILLE

www.northcoastjournal.com

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT:

real

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Ettersburg Land/Property +/-40 acres with 3 bd/2 bath 1,600 square foot custom home and additional guest house. property features power, phone, 3 developed springs, outbuildings, mature orchard, timber, seclusion and more.

795,000

OPEN HOU

SE

SUN., MAY TH 20 11AM 1755 CAMEL-3PM LIA DRIVE

Your fortune... Ferndale Land/Property

IMMACULATE HOME ON 1/4 ACRE. 4Bed/2.5Bath Home, large living room w/ vaulted ceilings, huge master suite with spacious bathroom, oversized soaking tub & walk-in closet. Close to shopping & public s transportation. Call Lucky Today! bMLS REDUCED TO $385,000. ie233056. y ell . Happ ait you aw

+/-160 acres off of Centerville Road. property boasts beautiful ocean views, open meadows, standing timber, a pond, year round springs, fruit trees, gardening sites, small rustic cabin and more.

$ 699,000

Orick Land/Property

± 40 acres Bald Hills undeveloped, wooded with amazing views and year round spring. owner may carry with large down.

$ 129,000

Thavisak “Lucky” Syphanthong

Lucky Star Realty 707-954-2070 lucky@luckystarrealty.com www.luckystarrealty.net License #01708681

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

JOURNAL •• THURSDAY, THURSDAY, MAY MAY17, 17,2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com• •NORTH NORTHCOAST COAST JOURNAL

55 55


Sunny Brae •Glendale Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Prices Effective May 16 through May 29, 2012

Meet our Staff Shaffer worked at Spears Market in Forestville on Russian River so has brought plenty of grocery experience to his job at Murphy’s. “I really like all the customers. There are a lot of college students and friends that shop here. It is a really a great connection with the community. Everyone is super friendly and inviting,” says Shaffer. He lives McKinleyville, attends Humboldt State University and his major is Environmental Resources Engineering. He will be a senior when classes begin again. Alisha, Shaffer’s girlfriend is majoring in elementary education. Shaffer is an active guy. He works at Murphy’s, plays tennis, singles mostly, and likes to make electronic music. He plays guitar, too, when he is at home, and his cat, with the very unusual name of Story, seems to think all of that is just fine.”

Heinz

Vlasic Kosher or Dill Pickles

Top Down Cap, Easy Pour 40 Oz.

Crunchy or Zesty 46 Oz.

Ketchup

2

49 Ea.

2

99 Ea.

Shaffer Smith Sunny Brae S taff

Capri Sun

Daisy

10 Pak

Regular or Light 16 Oz.

Fruit Drinks

Sour Cream

2

49 Ea.

1

79

Ea.


North Coast Journal 05-17-12 Edition