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thursday april 12, 2012 vol XXIII issue 15 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

Questions linger in million-dollar embezzlement scheme after fugitive surrenders By Ryan Burns

7 And the ugliest sign is ... 8 Meet the new goats 22 Drunken Botanist: Be your own monk 26 Marching Lumberjacks! 35 Reunion stinks, Titanic sinks 39 Know the horse


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2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 6

Mailbox Poem

At 5 pm damp cold

7

News

Coors Blight

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover

17

The Yurok Grift

Home & Garden

Service Directory

19 In Review

a CD and four dvds

20 Gotta Dance

Ethnochoreological Fun

22 The Drunken Botanist

Chartreuse

23 Art Beat

Stop and Smell the Ceanothus thyrsiflorus

24 Arts! Arcata

friday, april 13, 6-9 p.m.

26 The Hum

Stoner Fables

28 Music & More! 31 Calendar 35 Filmland

The Crass Rehash Cash-In

37 Workshops 38 Seven-o-Heaven

cartoon by andrew goff

39 Field Notes

41 41 43 46 47

From Eohippus to Percheron

Sudoku Crossword Marketplace Body, Mind & Spirit Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

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Thoughtless Thinking

Editor: I’d like to take a shot at neutralizing the disservice your reviewer may have done to thoughtful readers with last week’s remarkably obtuse hit piece on Daniel Kahneman’sThinking: Fast and Slow . (In Review, April 5) I’ve been a fan of Kahneman and Tversky’s unexpected insights for years, so of course I bought the book when it was announced late last year. I’ve been enjoying going through it very slowly (generally one or two of its short chapters at a time), certainly not because the writing isn’t clear, but because I want to savor and digest each pregnant implication before moving on. To that end, I’ve been using post-it stickers to mark passages I expect to want to check out again — a device I often use for particularly thought-provoking books. I’m up to page 362 with 19 of these tags sticking out, which is a new record. The review opens with the comment that this book “got a lot of attention,

partly because the author won the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics for his work on decision-making.” If this is meant to suggest that all this attention stems from celebrity-fawning rather than the book’s significance, let’s turn that around and wonder why the Nobel in economics went (that time only, I’ve heard) to a psychologist rather than an economist? Might that imply that the psychological insights Kahneman and Tversky discovered and explicated undermine certain shaky pillars of academic economics and are therefore quite probably worth understanding if psychology or economics interests you? The review closes with: “Despite the fulsome praise by academic heavyweights displayed on its back cover…” In fact the back cover is chock full of 14 laudatory comments ranging from a line to a paragraph. Pick up a copy and look at that cover before you let this one dyspeptic review misdirect you from a real, eyeopening treat. (By the way, “fulsome” means “offensive; disgusting; esp., offensively excessive or insincere” — Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 1936. I doubt that’s what the reviewer meant to say. Google “fulsome

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Cartoon by joel mielke

praise” and read the first few entries for clarification and usage advice.) Mark Drake, Fortuna   Editor: Upon reading William Kowinski’s review of Thinking, Fast and Slow,  I  was reminded of the story of the mathematician, the engineer, and the statistician. A mathematician, an engineer, and a statistician were given the problem: What is 2 plus 2? The mathematician said, “If it is precisely 2 plus precisely 2, the answer is

precisely 4.” The engineer said, “I’ll have to go out and take some measurements and get back to you.” The statistician said, “What do you want it to be?” Sandy Walsh, Eureka  

Antarctic Memories Editor: I really enjoyed the March 29 Journal, cover to cover. The redevelopment article was top notch. But I got chills when I


turned to page 39 and Field Notes (“Scott of the Antarctic: Glorious Failure?”). Great Scott! The photo brought back a flood of memories of one of the most marvelous theatre experiences I’ve ever had, playing Robert Falcon Scott in the Pacific Art Center Theatre’s production of Terra Nova (mumble, mumble) years ago. Jerry Nusbaum, who played Roald Amundsen, is still here, and we’ve been known to still reminisce about our epic journey. We loaded our sledge as heavy as we could and pulled it over wood chips at the bird sanctuary just to feel what the effort must have been like. A little side note: The lighting wizard of Dell’Arte, Michael Foster, created the aurora australis in the theatre with some motorized filters, bright lights and shimmering pans of water. In the words of Scott on his way back from the pole (taken from his actual journal) “Great God, this is an awful place!” James Floss, Freshwater      

Ugly Contest

Editor: I am writing in response to your article/ poll about what you call the “ugliest billboard” (March 29). What kind of thought process led you to write an article that

demonizes good local businesses? Not only are you throwing honest, hardworking businesses under the bus, but you are attacking local children’s nonprofit organizations. You are running an ad for Mid City in your paper that is two pages away from casting them as possible producers of the ugliest billboard. I’m sure they are thrilled to be spending their advertising dollars in your paper, only to have you slander them two pages later. I also find it ironic that atop your online article you are running a tasteless ad for Tip Top, featuring an almost completely naked woman. My only hope is that you recognize how this article does nothing but hurt our community and pull it down. Geoff Wills, Eureka    

Bonds to Rescue?

Editor: I think that each of our cities ought to move on and sell bonds for redoing areas that are planned redevelopment (“The Death of Redevelopment,” March 29). This would need to be done in such a way that the state would not be able to touch the bonds. This would not be a tax, but would be money from bonds that would be

interest-bearing for a number of years and could be renewed for another number of years. A lot of us want to see redevelopment continue. And many of us would be willing to buy bonds to do so. Certainly in this day of financial distress in public areas, it would be a good idea to go outside the box and see how things can continue to be funded. With the state taking redevelopment funds, selling bonds would be one idea that could bring in enough money to fund projects. Along with businesses and private investors in the targeted area, all of us working together could continue to see our county be a very good showcase. It would also help us to continue to develop our community in green ways. In all of this, may we all see how we can come together as a community to refurbish, clean up and go green for the future we all want and desire. Ted Adams, Arcata

‘Surly Cur’ Salzman Editor: In response to Sylvia De Rooy’s letter (Mailbox, March 29) beginning “Shame on you Richard Salzman” for doing what he

promised her he wouldn’t do on “a question of ethics,” it strikes me, sadly, that Ms. De Rooy’s outrage is unfortunately misplaced. As all the higher attributes of human decency are founded upon being truthful, decent people — like Sylvia — who are lied to rightfully feel a sense of ethical betrayal. The problem with Sylvia’s having “expected better of you, Richard,” is that we are absolutely not dealing with either an ethical or a decent person here. The NCJ‘s own Ryan Burns recently wrote an article describing the man as “the disgraced Richard Salzman.” While certainly accurate, “surly cur” would be a far more apt description. Those who have dealt with him know his form of politics is attack-dog blood sport, forcefully engaging not merely in lying but badgering, beleaguering and bullying anyone opposed to that which he advances. This is a man who has introduced into Humboldt County politics crafty push polling, professional out-of-area consultants, and advanced forms of character assassination. The creeping consequence of this has been a metropolitan-style guttering of electioneering rhetoric, the slick obfuscation of issues, and ever-spiraling campaign costs. Our county’s oncecontinued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

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continued from previous page decent, rural style of electoral democracy panies” mentioned in your article, we are increasingly resembles a knife fight in a approved by NeighborWorks, a national phone booth, to everyone’s detriment network of more than 240 community (except, doubtless gleefully, his own). development and affordable housing Lest anyone think my position is one of organizations. Our organization is acsour grapes (which will be the inevitable credited by the Council on Accreditation canine spin to come), let me point out and all of our counselors are certified by that this is a the National man who once Foundation wrote a letter for Consumer to a HumCounselboldt County ing. Our free newspaper, service helps praising himself individuals but lighter and his work, navigate the yes lighter than last week lighter than and dishonestly all-too-murky yesterday signing it with waters of loan the name of modification.  still time for gray wool hats and red scarves his dog. I do If you are knotted around that place on the neck not apologize trying to save that might have once liked to be nuzzled by for my disgust your home, someone else’s at his degradwe are here ing behavior, to help. Our lips not time yet to loosen up and believe in clearly neither counselors (nuzzling lips) (unknotted scarves) new love would Ms. know about De Rooy, nor the many almost should anyone. programs The true available. They insult and include Keep almost betrayal of Your Home his pernicious California, — Stephanie Silvia conduct is that Home Affordall of us are able Modificanow stuck with tion Prowhat the son of gram, Home a bitch has done to our county and, as Ms. Affordable Refinance Program, and Home De Rooy’s letter so well demonstrates, will Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives. shamelessly continue to do. We can provide information on short   Paul Hagen, Arcata sales, deeds in lieu and transition assis    tance as well as scam-prevention. We are not lenders, realtors or attorneys. We are not the government. We are your local, nonprofit housing resource. In these very Editor: difficult economic times for our county, As a financial counselor at Consumer there are unfortunately many housing Credit Counseling, I and my fellow staff scams lurking about. The reality is that members were astounded at the huge there are entities and individuals in our glaring omission — namely, no mention community exploiting and taking advanof our agency or the housing services we tage of the already vulnerable. Informaoffer — in the Journal‘s March 1 cover tion and education is the key and that is article, “Going Once: Who buys, who wins what we provide. CCCS is here to help; we and who loses at foreclosure auctions.” have been all along.  Find us on 11th Street Consumer Credit Counseling Service in Arcata, next to the Brio bakery. Call of the North Coast has been serving us at 822-8536 or visit us on the web at: Humboldt County for over 25 years!  It www.cccsnojuggle.org. is a HUD-certified agency — presently Kerri Cook, Arcata the ONLY local one around — and is the   homeowner’s main source of information and education in this community. We provide pre- and post-purchase Please try to make it no more than 350 education as well as work with individuals words and include your full name, place on home loan modifications and foreof residence and phone number (we won’t closure prevention. Housing counseling print your number). Send it to letters@ services are free to the public. Unlike the northcoastjournal.com l nebulous “home loan modification com-

At 5 pm damp cold

Foreclosure Help

Write a letter!

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


April 12, 2012 Volume XXIII No. 15

in case you missed it, the winner of our ugliest billboard contest. photo by andrew goff.

Coors Blight

Voters agree: It’s the ugliest billboard to come between us and the bay By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg editor@northcoastjournal.com

P

it free market economics against Humboldt’s soul-satisfying bay views and what happens? Even beer loses. Coors’ “Silver Bullet Aluminum Pint,” tossed out there in front of the eyeballs of southbound drivers on Highway 101, took the dubious top honor in the North Coast Journal’s Ugliest Billboard Contest this week, snagging 12 percent of the votes. “It’s ugly and there are much better beer options,” huffed one voter. “It blocks the view of the cows,” wrote another. When it comes to fielding bad press, though, Coors is slick. At home with a cold, Miller Coors spokeswoman Karina Diehl thought for about two seconds, and then offered, “I absolutely don’t think our billboards are ugly … (pause) … but I totally respect the opinion of your readers.” Feel better now? While we’d hoped the contest might start a conversation about how some of Humboldt’s prettiest roadways could look, we also tapped into a seething undercurrent of graphic design critique. Take heed, future billboard creators, because Humboldt does not like “eyeball searing colors,” busy designs, giant people

or that little lower case i so ubiquitous in front of certain phones and pods. Some of us are picky about typefaces, slamming signage with a dismissive: “It’s big. It’s ugly. And I don’t like the font.” Many voters were happy to just blast ’em all: “I HATE HATE the signs on the bay,” one wrote. Not that we’d generally want to encourage any haters out there, but oh, you billboard haters, you are not alone. From Arcata City Council members to the North Coast Railroad Authority board, lots of Humboldt heavy hitters have tried for years to get rid of the billboards lining Hwy. 101, intruding on shoreline and pastures. Mostly, they’ve failed. Some signs are protected by legal settlements, and others with murkier provenance are fighting hard to stay anyway. (Stay tuned next month for the latest tussle over two that Caltrans wants gone.) Meanwhile, even some of the business owners who rely on them are ambivalent. “I don’t particularly like billboards myself; I’ve got to be honest,” said Trevor Harper, general manager of Harper Motors. His dealership shares with Mid-City Motor World the billboard that came in second-ugliest, with 10 percent of the

vote. The thing is, say members of the family that owns both businesses, if the car dealers don’t use them, someone else will. “Those are CBS boards,” said Trevor Harper’s father Dan Harper, president and general manager at Mid-City. “They’re owned by the CBS media corporation. They’re going to be there. … If they’re there, I’m inclined to use them because they do help the business.” If he actually owned the billboard, the elder Harper said, he’d consider taking it down. And for the voters who complained that this particular sign was just too cluttered looking, with all those logos? Dan Harper is listening. “I’m open to input on what people would like to have on there, as far as design goes,” he said. On the bright side, billboard haters had a warmer spot for the dealerships’ little free carousel directional sign, on the other side of the highway. Voters who stopped short of “they’re all ugly” and actually singled out the worst offenders — whether because of the view they blocked or the images they bore — spared just four of our 31 contestants: Harley-Davidson and the Bear River Casino on the bay side of the road, and a 4-H sign and the auto dealers’ carousel sign on the land side. The 4-H’ers had some indignant defenders — (Note to future NCJers: Never come between a youngster and a baby farm animal). A hand-painted sign, they chided us. With donated materials, they said. Where was our heart? Almost as doting were supporters of the not-quite-billboard-backside of the long defunct Midway drive-in. With 8 percent of the vote, it came in as third-ugliest along our chosen stretch of 101. But its fans were loyal. “Wabi-sabi,” one called it. “So old and ugly it’s kinda cool.” The old theater screen sits on property now owned by Jay Bahner, who runs J’s RV Center. “I left that screen up there for nostalgia,” he said, although it’s also a handy landmark when he’s directing people to his business. “I get comments all the time about how people like it, and it’s a landmark in this county.” The metal in the old movie screen is valuable, Bahner said, and he’s had offers from people who’d gladly disassemble it. He’s not ready for that. “I like the screen. It still stands up to the storms and the weather. If that drivein screen could talk, believe me, it would be full of stories … children that have been conceived and probably relationships that have been split up.” The impermanent and the imperfect. Wabi-sabi. l

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2012

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Zach St. George zach@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production interns Kimberly Hodges, Jonathan Webster sales manager Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Illustration by Holly Harvey.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

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Dairy Diary

Cypress Grove settles into McKinleyville, with nearly 200 knocked-up goats

above: dairy manager ryan andrus surveys pasture and barns, part of cypress grove chevre inc.’s new 37-acre dairy. photo by drew hyland.

Carrie Peyton Dahlberg editor@northcoastjournal.com

O

n a glistening green pasture at the far northern end of McKinleyville, goats leap and jostle as they run toward the man who is managing their sex lives. They are a soft creamy white, or a dozen combinations of brown or black edged with white. Many bear the telltale smear of chalk that is the dairy goat equivalent of a scarlet letter. The bright red or blue or aqua chalk comes from the harness of a buck. It is color-coded proof that a doe has had a close encounter with one of the four males busily trying to impregnate 194 females in the start-up herd of Cypress Grove Chevre Inc.’s new dairy. The dairy is here, on rolling pastureland bordering Dow’s Prairie Road, partly because some neighbors were aghast over plans to establish it instead in the Arcata Bottom, where Cypress Grove now makes gourmet cheeses. So the cheese maker walked away from a pending land purchase near the Arcata city limits last year, and instead bought 37 acres in McKinleyville. The new dairy is now home to Saanen, Toggenburg and

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Alpine goats, mostly purchased from Washington state. They are the founding mothers of a herd that could grow within a few years to 800 to 1,200 goats, or perhaps even more. Dairy manager Ryan Andrus has settled the animals into six corrals where they are browsing on vetch and rye grass, as well as steadily nibbling away all the bark they can reach on trees earmarked for removal. Andrus is the one who feeds them more nutritious fodder, scratches their heads and makes sure each buck spends time productively in a pen with a small harem of does. The animals, who have learned that people likely mean food, trot up to him whenever he comes by. They nibble at his sleeve and bump up against the fence for petting. Goats, he says, are as friendly as dogs but sporadically as aloof as cats. Andrus nudges one away in mid-nuzzle as she gently samples a visitor’s hair. Next month, when these does start bearing kids — two or sometimes three per mother — Andrus’ wife will bottle feed them to make sure they’re getting

enough nutrition. And the milking will begin. The male kids will be quickly sold off to be raised as meat animals, and the females will be old enough to breed in less than a year. Bob McCall, sales and marketing director for Cypress Grove Chevre Inc., figures it will take around three years for the dairy to hit its preliminary target of 800 female dairy goats. At that point, he said, Cypress Grove will assess how many more animals it wants at the dairy, where two gigantic, plastic-topped barns have already been raised and more could be built. Cypress Grove’s vision of its future in McKinleyville is an open-ended one, full of promises that the dairy will be humane-certified and that best practices will be evaluated as the herd grows. Sean Armstrong, one of the loudest voices in keeping the dairy out of Arcata, remains convinced that unless regulators step in, the place could grow into a monster, a disease- and pollution-spewing factory farm. Armstrong tried unsuccessfully to


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: BOB McCALL MAKES FRIENDS WITH A COUPLE OF THE DAIRY’S RESIDENTS. GOATS GATHER, LOOKING FOR A HANDOUT OR A HEAD SCRATCH FROM ANYONE COMING CLOSE ENOUGH TO THE FENCE. RYAN ANDRUS’ SHIRT GETS A NIBBLE FROM A CURIOUS GOAT. PHOTOS BY DREW HYLAND.

persuade the county to demand an environmental impact report for the dairy. He insists on calling it a feedlot instead of a dairy, even though state law clearly defines feedlots as places where 500-plus cattle are raised for slaughter, and dairies as places where animals are in lactation. He wants to know where the wastewater used to wash down the facility will go, and where the goat poop will go. “They’ve been playing hide the ball,” Armstrong says. Let’s just say right here, plenty of people think Sean Armstrong is annoying as hell. He makes up his own definitions, hypes any goat-borne disease he can find on the Internet and peppers regulators with emails that may or may not be germane to any current law or regulation. Even so, it’s hard not be a tiny bit sympathetic, because McCall can be awfully vague on some details. That might be the best strategy for a new dairy that plans to stay nimble as it goes along, but “we just don’t know yet” is an answer that leaves room for paranoia. McCall says no one knows yet how big the dairy will get eventually, although

Cypress Grove suspects this land may top out at around 1,200 goats. And the dairy’s water quality permitting status remains unclear. Cypress Grove plans to meet with the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board later this month to talk about what sort of permit it might need. Lisa Bernard, a sanitary engineering associate with the water board, said if the dairy plans to discharge any kind of waste, it will need a permit. If it gives goat poop to a third party for composting — which is what McCall says the dairy is doing now — the third party should have a permit. If the dairy composts onsite — which McCall says it might do later — it will need a permit for that. For now, there’s not much vibe of a Frankenfarm, out there in green, rainsparkled McKinleyville, where Andrus is scritching his goats on the tops of their heads, and neighbors have dropped by with tangerines and cookies. And if that’s a just façade, well, one thing seems certain. Sean Armstrong will be watching. And he’ll email everyone with updates. ● northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012

9


Blog Jammin’ AVIATION, BUSINESS / BY RYAN BURNS / APRIL 10, 1:37 P.M.

American Airlines Deal Falls Through It has been on the ropes over the past week, but now the deal to start twice-daily service between the Arcata-Eureka Airport and Los Angeles International in June has been officially and indefinitely postponed. American Airlines subsidiary American Eagle announced March 23 that a deal had been struck, but the announcement proved to be premature. County officials hadn’t yet lined up a funding source for the $1 million revenue guarantee required by the airline, and despite concerted efforts by the Redwood Region Economic Development Commission, the board of the Headwaters Fund and county staff, that proved to be a fatal stumbling block. Part of the problem was a lack of community buy-in, said County Supervisor Mark Lovelace. Like many people who have voiced concerns over the last few weeks, Lovelace said he, too, was skeptical after Delta Air Lines came and went, taking county revenue with them. But eventually he was convinced that the American deal was sufficiently different, and offered enough potential for economic benefits, to be worth exploring. “We didn’t have adequate time to really kick the issue around and explain it to folks,” Lovelace said. He said American Eagle officials are open to considering an agreement in the future, possibly starting service next spring. A press release from the Redwood Region Economic Development Commission said in part: “The Redwood Region Economic Development Commission announced today that negotiations with American Airlines for a revenue guarantee agreement have been deferred into the future to allow more time for all parties to come to an equitable agreement in advance of the start of service.” POLITICS / BY ZACH ST. GEORGE / APRIL 9, 3:18 P.M.

Vote for me – but this isn’t a political sign! It seems like a simple thing to label an advertisement as political or not. There’s the message — on a political sign it usually goes something like, “Elect so-and-so for whatever.” Then there’s the color scheme — red, white, and blue seem to show up a lot. Last, take a look at the image on the

HERE ‘TIS. RIGHT ON THE NORTH END OF FORTUNA. PHOTO BY ZACH ST. GEORGE

sign — is it some politician’s smiling mug? Just how political that approach is — or isn’t — is a subject of a debate in Fortuna, where a sign promoting 2nd District supervisorial candidate Estelle Fennell has prompted complaints to the city manager’s office. If the blue and white billboard, which sports a picture of grinning Fennell, is indeed political in nature, then it violates Fortuna ordinances regarding both the size and timing of political signs. The sign says, “Vote June 5 Estelle Fennell SUPERVISOR—Fighting For YOUR Future, Paid for by Estelle Fennell for Supervisor.” Fortuna Municipal Code § 17.05.180(D)(b) reads, One political campaign sign not exceeding four square feet in area or four feet in height is permitted on private property. These signs shall be removed within 10 days after the election. Such signs shall not be erected prior to 30 days before the election. “It looks and walks like a political sign, so therefore the city’s position is that it must be a political sign,” said City Manager Duane Rigge. He said that the sign has been up for at least three weeks — far in advance of the one-month rule. Following a consultation with the city attorney, Rigge sent Fennell a cease-and-desist letter, also requesting that she take down smaller signs posted in a downtown storefront. As of Saturday however, the billboard remained, Rigge said. He’s unsure how the city will deal with it. “We were hoping she would come forward and do something about it,” he said. But Fennell isn’t ready to concede the point. “It’s not a political sign; it’s an ad,” Fennell said in an interview. “We consider the issue resolved.” Despite the ordinance, she invited her opponent to respond with his own sign. “Clif [Clendenen] is free to put up a billboard too, in our view,” she said. The city’s letter said that Fortuna’s campaign signage law “applies equally to signs

mounted on private commercial property, banners hung on a building’s exterior, or glued onto a roadside billboard.” Read the full letter on our blog. ●

run at least until 10. Around 9:45 p.m. a sheriff’s deputy warned protestors on the courthouse steps that they would have to leave that area or face arrest. Bill Thompson and Richard Gilchrist opted to stand their ground and commit civil disobedience. They were arrested just before 10 p.m. and taken to jail. Gilchrist, age 76, is a Vietnam veteran; Thompson, age 82, is a veteran of the Korean War and a survivor of the battle of Pork Chop Hill. Both are active in the local chapter of Veterans for Peace and have participated in Friday evening anti-war vigils at the courthouse and on the Arcata Plaza for years. “I wanted to get a bunch of people out there to defend the First Amendment in light of the emergency ordinance,” said organizer Dave Meserve, a former Arcata city councilman. “A lot of people feel it’s a violation. Beyond that, you have cops out there doing their job and people making a statement by being arrested.” The officers returned around 45 minutes later and arrested two more protestors: another member of Veterans for Peace, Robin Donald, and activist Kim “Verbena” Starr, who has been part of the Occupy Eureka protest since the beginning. Starr was arrested March 31 with three others in a similar protest against the ordinance. According to Occupy stalwart James Decker, two other protestors were arrested and taken to jail later. All six arrestees were released last night. “I think there’s a big amount of concern about what the board of supervisors did,” Meserve said. “I don’t know what the next step is, but we have to keep the pressure on.”

BILL THOMPSON, VETERANS FOR PEACE ACTIVIST, BEING ARRESTED AT COURTHOUSE VIGIL. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

● BY ANDREW GOFF / APRIL 6, 2:10 P.M.

ACTIVISM, EUREKA, OCCUPY / BY BOB DORAN / APRIL 8, 12:39 A.M.

Arrests at Courthouse Protest Humboldt County Sheriff officers arrested a half dozen protestors Saturday night on the steps of the County Courthouse. A crowd of around 120 had assembled for a post-Arts Alive! candlelight vigil to protest the “urgency ordinance” that county supervisors passed on March 27 in response to complaints about Occupy Eureka protestors. Among other things, the new ordinance restricts protests to the sidewalk in front of the courthouse between the hours of 9:30 p.m. and 6 a.m. The candlelight protest was scheduled to start at 9 p.m. and

Postpone Your Illicit Outdoor Activities, Eurekans Reschedule that steamy walk through Old Town with your Zumba instructor, wait ’til tomorrow to resume your impulsive car window-smashing, and for Zeussakes put on a damn shirt! We’re guessing you don’t want your dalliances preserved on the most trafficked website in the cosmos. So, just for today, cool it. Back for another look since it last visited us in January 2011, NCJ staffers spotted the Google Street View car’s eye-in-the-sky rollin’ down Second Street Friday at 12:50 p.m. If you were in the vicinity, we hope you had pants on. ●

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


MARINE LIFE PROTECTION ACT / BY HEIDI WALTERS / APRIL 5, 5:45 P.M.

BUSINESS/ BY RYAN BURNS / APRIL 5, 5:15 P.M.

Marine Protected Areas From On High

Plaza Design to be Reborn, Sans ‘Design’

Journal graphic designer and photographer Drew Hyland zoomed through the skies on Monday to get a look at the sites along our stretch of coast that could become marine protected areas under the Marine Life Protection Act. Check out his great video on our blog. After that, if you haven’t already done so, you might want to weigh in on the draft environmental impact report on these proposed protected areas. You have until April 16 to comment on the draft — in writing and at the final public hearing, next Wednesday, April 11, in Eureka. The Draft Environmental Impact Report analyzes potential impacts of Marine Protected Areas in California’s North Coast Study Region, from Alder Creek near Point Arena in Mendocino County to the California/Oregon border. As part of the Marine Life Protection Act, protected areas are being designated up and down California’s coastline. You can read the DEIR on the state Department of Fish and Game’s website, http:// www.dfg.ca.gov/mlpa/impact_nc.asp. You can also read printed copies at these public libraries: Del Norte County’s Crescent City Branch and Smith River Branch libraries; Humboldt County’s Eureka Branch, Trinidad Branch, Hoopa Branch, Ferndale Branch, Fortuna Branch, and Rio Dell libraries; Mendocino County’s Ukiah Branch, Willits Branch, Round Valley, Fort Bragg, and Coast Community Branch libraries; Sacramento County Public Library. And you’ll find copies at the DFG field office in Eureka (619 Second St.) and the DFG field office in Fort Bragg (2330 N. Harbor Drive). Or just go rant and praise — or turn in your written comments — at the final public hearing, in Eureka (the ones in Fort Bragg and Crescent City have already taken place): Wednesday April 11 at the Red Lion Hotel, 1929 Fourth St. Send your written comments to: MLPA North Coast CEQA Comments Department of Fish and Game c/o Horizon Water and Environment P.O. Box 2727 Oakland, CA 94602 Or send them by email: MLPAcomments@HorizonWater.com. (Include “MLPA CEQA Comments” in the subject line.) Be sure to put your name, address and daytime telephone number on your comments. Postmark them by no later than 5 p.m. on April 16. if you jump through all the hoops correctly, your comments will be included in the final EIR. ●

Plaza Design remains dead (the Arcata Economic Development Corp. shut it down last month for defaulting on a large loan), but its flagship store location on the corner of the Arcata Plaza will soon be reincarnated as, simply, “Plaza.” The new tenant, a retail store owned by Baroni Jewelry creator Sarah Baroni, will reportedly offer similar fare and is scheduled to open in time for next month’s Arts Arcata festivities. The company’s press release offered these quotes from Baroni: “Like so many of us, I was really sad when I heard that Plaza Design was closing,” says Sarah. “To me, Plaza Design has been such a cornerstone of the Arcata Plaza. We really wanted to keep the Arcata plaza local and vibrant, and this seemed like a perfect opportunity. Our idea is to keep the offerings similar, but with a slightly different twist. We’re so excited to bring vitality back to this area!” Watch for a “Fresh Start Inventory Clearance Event” April 13-16, then an interim closure before the store reopens in May. ● HEALTH / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / APRIL 4, 3:38 P.M.

Joe Mark Leaving St. Joe’s A couple of hours after word hit the Humboldt rumor mills, the St. Joseph Health System confirmed Wednesday afternoon that top boss Joe Mark is leaving, effective June 30. (And yes, Lost Coast Outpost nailed the rumor earlier than we did. Friends now HS?) In a press release, St. Joseph and Redwood Memorial hospitals said Mark and his wife want to spend more time with their young granddaughter in Ohio. Mark did not return a call seeking comment. Mark’s departure comes just days after the two hospitals announced 68 layoffs, and later clarified that nearly one-third of those ousted are nurses or other clinical personnel. Mark blamed those cuts partly on reduced demand for elective surgeries and outpatient care. Meanwhile, in a move that could further eat into both hospitals’ business, the system is considering a ban on sterilizations, including cutting or blocking a woman’s fallopian tubes after C-section deliveries. The hospitals’ press release about Mark’s departure is on our website. ●

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012

11


The Yurok Grift Questions linger in million-dollar embezzlement scheme after fugitive surrenders By Ryan Burns

PHOTO ILLUSTRATIONS BY HOLLY HARVEY

ryan@northcoastjournal.com

I

t was shortly after 4 a.m., still 2 ½ hours becions about Raymond. A fore dawn on Monday, Oct. 24, 2011, and Roland tribal employee named Raymond was behind the wheel of his new Chevy Forrest Gregg had Tahoe. In front of him, dual cones of light spread discovered that seven across the black asphalt rushing beneath and Apple iPads purchased by Raymond were missing, and a brushed the thick forests whizzing past. Raymond, closer look revealed much larger irregularities. who had recently been fired from the Yurok Tribe On the night he was pulled over and arrested, Raymond after 17 years as its forestry program director, was was under investigation by the Del Norte County District zooming northbound through the hills of Attorney’s Office for allegedly masterminding a massive Southern Humboldt, hugging the curvy fraud scheme, using the Yurok Tribe and a few local concontours of Hwy. 101 as it crisscrossed federates to embezzle nearly $1 million, the vast majority the Eel River. He was 11 miles north of it coming from the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs. of Garberville when the California In a Valentine’s Day letter to fellow Yurok tribal Highway Patrol pulled him over. members, Tribe Chairman Thomas O’Rourke expressed In the mug shot taken later “great disappointment and outrage” over the alleged that morning, Raymond, who embezzlement and laid out a number of new safeguards was a few weeks shy of his that the tribe will implement to prevent such a crime from 49th birthday, looks like a happening again. But details about the alleged theft were zombie. Bony cheekbones scant. No other suspects were named. Nine days later, protrude from his wan face, a $1 million arrest warrant was issued for Raymond, but his mouth hangs slightly open, when officers showed up at his house in Myrtletown, just and his eyes stare outside Eureka city limits, he had disapblankly into the middle peared. Raymond remained a fugitive distance. According to for six weeks. Last Thursday, he turned the CHP he’d been driving — himself in. He has pleaded “not guilty.” speeding, actually — while But Raymond is not the only person under the influence of a facing charges. When news of the controlled substance. In embezzlement case broke publicly his Tahoe the arresting in late February, it hit with a one-two officer allegedly found punch. The crime itself was plenty an undisclosed amount of shocking, but even more confounda controlled substance, drug ing were the identities of Raymond’s paraphernalia and more than an alleged confederates. Ron LeValley and ounce of marijuana. Sean McAllister, two respected local These are serious allegations, biologists with shining credentials and for which Raymond has yet to be long histories of working with private charged. (The Humboldt County and public clients, were identified as District Attorney’s Office is still fellow suspects. They stand accused of HUMBOLDT COUNTY MUG SHOT reviewing the case.) But he had bigger using fake invoices to collect money OF ROLAND RAYMOND TAKEN LAST OCTOBER problems on his plate. Much bigger. for spotted owl research that was Raymond had been fired three weeks never conducted. Warrants for their earlier for failing to report for work after three months of arrest were issued in the amount of $1 million apiece (the family medical leave. Shortly after, Yurok Tribe Executive same as Raymond’s) and they’ve been charged with felony Director Troy Fletcher contacted the Del Norte County embezzlement of public funds, grand theft and conspiracy District Attorney’s Office to report some serious suspi(same as Raymond).

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


MAD RIVER BIOLOGISTS’ OFFICES OVERLOOK THE GAZEBO IN OLD TOWN EUREKA. PHOTOS BY RYAN BURNS

To people who know and have worked with LeValley, 65, and McAllister, 45, over the past 20-plus years the allegations seemed incongruous to the point of lunacy. “Even though I don’t know what’s going on, I know Ron,” said Crescent City biologist Craig Strong, who was just a kid when he first met LeValley. “And there is no way in hell that he would intentionally do anything criminal. He’s an honest man, and he’s a really good biologist, too.” It’s not just personal friends who feel this way. A March 2 comment on the Humboldt Herald blog articulated a common reaction: “The accusations levied against LeValley and McAllister are so wildly inconsistent with their reputations that I was left with some serious cognitive dissonance.” While Raymond evaded law enforcement on the morning of Feb. 23, McAllister was arrested without incident at the Old Town Eureka offices of Mad River Biologists, a professional consulting firm where he works as an associate biologist. LeValley, who founded Mad River Biologists 30 years ago, turned himself in that evening. Both men have since been released on dramatically reduced bail ($150,000 for LeValley, $50,000 for McAllister). Late last month the embezzlement investigation was taken over by the FBI and the U.S. Department of the Interior. The case likely will be prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office. The next court date is

scheduled for May 1. The community, meanwhile, doesn’t know quite what to make of the charges. Much of LeValley and McAllister’s consulting work has been on controversial projects, including California’s Marine Life Protection Act Initiative, for which LeValley served as co-chair of the North Coast Study Region’s science advisory team, and conservation-oriented surveys on threatened and endangered species such as the northern spotted owl, the western snowy plover and the marbled murrelet. Critics of those efforts have seized on the biologists’ arrests in an attempt to discredit their work. Others simply wonder how LeValley and McAllister got mixed up in this mess.

northcoastjournal

@ncj_of_humboldt

Evidence against

all three suspects is laid out in an affidavit written by A.C. Field, chief investigator for the Del Norte County District Attorney’s Office. The main character in this storyline is definitely Roland Raymond. Circumstantial evidence against him dates back several years. For example, in the last three years of his employment Raymond allegedly used a tribal credit card to buy gasoline — an average of $1,000 worth per month — for a Ford F-250 truck that belongs to the continued on next page

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tribe. Investigators later learned that the truck has been inoperable and parked in a secured lot at Yurok tribal headquarters since September 2010. Also suspicious: Raymond and his wife allegedly deposited more than $30,000 in cash into their joint U.S. Bank account in 2009 alone. That’s the same year, according to the affidavit, that fake invoices with “Mad River Biology” headers YUROK TRIBE CHAIRMAN THOMAS O’ROURKE started showing up at Yurok tribal PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF offices. In just over a year — from October 2009 through November these biologists are involved in this.’ 2010 — 50 suspect invoices totaling Why would they risk their careers, their nearly $600,000 were submitted to the company, all this stuff?” Later, after coltribe, along with just eight invoices (tolecting more evidence, he changed his taling $24,962) that have been deemed mind. Before we get to the reasons why, legitimate. Before it ended, this scam it’s worth looking at the full trajectory of is alleged to have produced 75 invoices Raymond’s alleged crimes. totaling $870,065, which the tribe paid In the fall of 2010, around the time the in full using federal funding. alleged Mad River Biologists swindle was This was the central con, the real winding down, Raymond embarked on a moneymaker in this alleged grift, and mad spending spree using other people’s according to Yurok tribal leaders it was money, court documents claim. He had successful for so long only because Rayauthority to issue purchase orders on the mond occupied a position of uncomtribe’s behalf, and he also had two tribal mon trust and autonomy in the tribal credit cards issued in his name — one for structure. The affidavit says all but three travel expenses and another for purchasof the suspected fake invoices were es. In August 2010, the affidavit claims, he delivered to the tribe’s fiscal departstarted exploiting these resources for his ment by Raymond himself, along with own benefit, spending $218 on a deluxe a written request to cut the check imshower door from Pierson’s; $267 at mediately (or as soon as possible) so he Kragen Auto Parts; $335 on new brakes for could hand-deliver the payments. his wife’s sedan; $315 on a fuel pump and Field, the chief investigator for Del filter; and $1,886 on heavy-duty tractor Norte County’s D.A. office, initially tires that someone later tried (and failed) believed Raymond was acting alone. to exchange for cash. “When I first started working on Field obtained search warrants for this thing I thought, ‘There’s no way

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Raymond’s bank accounts, which revealed that in a one-month timespan, from mid-September to mid-October 2010, 11 checks totaling more than $35,000 were cashed or deposited into a joint checking account belonging to Raymond and his wife. These handwritten checks, ostensibly for travel reimbursement, were issued by the California Indian Forest and Fire Management Council, a Sacramento-based nonprofit where Raymond once volunteered. Field believes Raymond made the checks out to himself and forged the signature of a council official. There’s more: Last September, Raymond allegedly submitted an afterthe-fact purchase request, asking to be reimbursed for “mac data entry systems” for use “by crew in the field.” These “data entry systems” turned out to be the seven Apple iPads. With accessories, the bill for these devices came to $4,671.73. The iPads remain missing. Biologists LeValley and McAllister aren’t the only people suspected of helping Raymond. Last year, Wonder Brothers Auto Body in Eureka submitted two invoices to the Yurok tribe — one for $1,457 and another for $3,750 — for work that was never done, at least not on the vehicles claimed, the affidavit states. Field suspects Wonder Brothers may have been complicit in more fraud, and a search warrant was served at the business in February. Reached by the Journal, a co-owner of the business declined to comment. Even when Raymond was on his threemonth family medical leave — during which he was expected to refrain from of-

ficial tribe business — he allegedly used a tribal credit card to buy more than $2,100 worth of gasoline. Raymond and his wife live in a modest, one-story home on Hillcrest Ave., a quiet street in Myrtletown that runs all of one block, sandwiched between Trinity and Glenwood streets. Court documents do a good job of describing the house’s color scheme: “crème and taupe … with plumcolored trim.” Potted plants and flattopped hedges line the cement walkway leading to a lattice-topped side gate. On a recent sunny weekday afternoon, the property was quiet and tidy. A next-door neighbor described Raymond as “a nice guy” who always mowed both his own and his neighbor’s front yards, just to be nice. Reached by phone a week before Raymond’s arrest, his wife claimed she hadn’t heard from him and didn’t know where he was. Then she hung up. When Del Norte County District Attorney Jon Alexander and his investigators searched the house on Feb. 23, the D.A. recently told the Journal, they found evidence that might explain his appearance in the mug shot taken that early October morning. “There were numerous syringes found throughout the house as well as a suspected amount of heroin, which has been sent to the U.S. Dept. of Justice for analysis.”

No such track record

can be traced for the two biologists alleged to have helped Raymond. Ron LeValley’s fascination with marine birds and mammals dates back more than 40 years, and he has built a reputation on his ability to identify coastal seabirds and track


RON LEVALLEY, FOUNDER OF MAD RIVER BIOLOGISTS, CONDUCTS SNOWY PLOVER RESEARCH ON CLAM BEACH IN 2004. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

BIOLOGIST SEAN MCALLISTER AT MAD RIVER BEACH IN 2004. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

their distribution. According to a profile in the Conservation Yellow Pages, an online resource guide, “Virtually all of the marbled murrelet surveyors in California and southern Oregon have gone through [LeValley’s] training program.” A 1969 graduate of Sacramento State College, LeValley earned his master’s in biology from Humboldt State University in 1980 and went on to found an ecotourism company called Biological Journeys, which he ran for 15 years. Now semi-retired and living in Mendocino County, LeValley spends much of his time photographing wildlife. He claims to have shot more than 90,000 wildlife images, and he frequently displays them at a gallery in Fort Bragg rented by the Mendocino Coast Photographer Guild, which he helped found. On his photography website you can sign up to receive a free LeValley photo in your email inbox daily. This speaks to another aspect of LeValley’s reputation: generosity. His own website claims, “One of Ron’s outstanding

attributes is sharing his knowledge and enthusiasm with others.” Craig Strong, LeValley’s friend and fellow member on the MLPA science advisory team, seconded that assessment. “One of his philosophies was to share his information openly, which is very unusual in science,” Strong said. When Strong was just a kid growing up in Deep Springs Valley, east of the Sierra Nevada, LeValley, then a college student in his early 20s, taught Strong’s mother how to band birds’ legs, an identification technique that enables studies of bird migration, social structures, lifespan and more. “He was like a mentor to me,” Strong said. Strong believes that Roland Raymond likely took advantage of LeValley’s generosity and trusting nature, convincing him to launder money by pretending it would be reallocated back to the Yurok Tribe. “I think he was just being extremely naïve in agreeing to do this,” Strong said. “He thought he was doing the Yurok Tribe a favor when actually he was feeding the

funds back into Roland Raymond’s personal [accounts].” Though 20 years younger than LeValley, McAllister enjoyed similar respect, both personally and professionally. After spending his childhood in Mendocino County, McAllister came to Humboldt for college. He’s been a wildlife consultant for the past 20 years and joined Mad River Bi-

ologists in 1995. He specializes in studying threatened and endangered bird species and frequently supervises field crews and manages large projects. Dr. Mark Colwell, a wildlife professor at HSU, has had a 12-year professional relationship with LeValley and McAllister. In 2000, LeValley approached Colwell continued on next page

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and asked to collaborate on a long-term on the project, project to monitor the local snowy plover with LeValley and population. “I’ve enjoyed working with McAllister setting up them over the years,” said Colwell, who predator exclosures described the biologists as “warm, sort of around plover nests calm — just guys that I respect, certainly. and doing leg-bandA lot.” ing on chicks and While widespread, that respect is not adults. Colwell and universal. Established critics of the MLPA his students conduct process and some of the biologists’ the analytical work conservation efforts are now arguing independently, and that their scientific work is suspect. “The Colwell personally arrest will undoubtably [sic] bring up manages the data more questions as to the integrity of the sets. Besides, he SNOWY PLOVER science, financial practices, and public said, LeValley and FILE PHOTO/RON LEVALLEY policy procedures” of the Marine Life McAllister’s work Protection Act, Mendocino video jourhas been beyond nalist David Gurney argued on his blog. reproach. “They’ve been critical to the (Gurney’s battles with the MLPA date success of this project, and until someback years; he tried to sue the initiative thing changes, I don’t see altering that as an entity unto itself in 2010, but the [relationship].” courts quashed the effort.) As for LeValley’s involvement with the The Department of Fish and Game is Marine Life Protection Act, Jordan Traaccepting comments on the initiative’s verso, deputy director of communications draft environmental impact report until for the California Department of Fish and April 16. Gurney seized the opportunity Game, said the agency is standing by the to ask, ”How are we to trust any of the work of the North Coast region’s science science that justifies these closures, advisory team. when the co-chair of the science team has recently been arrested on felony reputations fraud charges?” can carry only so Colwell has heard much weight in a similar arguments court of law, and afabout the snowy ter examining bank plover project. Efrecords that he forts to protect the obtained via search plover’s habitat have warrants, district atsparked criticism torney’s investigator from fishermen, A.C. Field concludgravel miners, advoed that LeValley and cates for human and McAllister were acequine beach access tive participants in and others who Roland Raymond’s say Pacific Coast embezzlement snowy plovers are scheme. “I take ingenetically identical vestigative steps to to thriving inland try to prove people NORTHERN SPOTTED OWL populations (“The innocent,” Field FILE PHOTO/ZACH ST. GEORGE Plight of the Plover,” said. “If I can’t prove June 17, 2004). ’em innocent then But Colwell argued that the charges the evidence builds up to guilt.” against LeValley and McAllister have no The evidence here revolves around relevance to their scientific work. “To call tax records and two North Valley Bank into question the plover project is sort of accounts — one in the name of Mad silly,” he said. “It suggests a real ignorance River Biologists and the other in the of how science is done.” For one thing, name of Ron LeValley. In analyzing bank he explained, there’s a division of labor records, Field recognized three major

The biologists’

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

patterns of dispersing money from the Yurok Tribe. In the first technique he describes, a Yurok tribal check would be deposited into the Mad River Biologists account “less cash.” According to North Valley Bank records, Sean McAllister is an authorized signer for this type of transaction, which allegedly happened 31 times. The total amount of cash withheld from Yurok checks came to $244,625, court documents state. The second technique allegedly worked as follows: The entire amount of a Yurok Tribal check would be deposited into the Mad River Biologists account, and within a few days (or sometimes on the same day) a check would be written from that account to either “Cash” (20 times), “North Valley Bank” (three times), “MRB Research” (once) or “Sean McAllister” (twice). This technique yielded $234,581, or more than $9,000 per transaction, according to Field’s affidavit. The third technique worked like the second, Field says, except rather than writing checks from the Mad River Biologists account, money would be electronically transferred into Ron LeValley’s personal account. “On the same date of the electronic transfer, a personal check from LeValley’s account would be written out to ‘Roland Raymond,’” Field’s affidavit says. This allegedly occurred 18 times for a total of $123,352. Much or all of the cash generated by these means may well have been funneled back to Raymond. But once the money got converted to hard currency, there’s no way to track it. Field said he wanted to check the security camera footage from the banks, but by the time he requested it the tapes had been erased. At the end of each of the three years that this alleged scam was being run — 2008 through 2010 — the Yurok Tribe sent an IRS 1099 form to Mad River Biologists. “The amounts on these forms represent the total amounts of suspected true and

false invoices together,” Field writes in his affidavit. And no one balked. The obvious question is: Why would a company pay taxes on hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of work that it hadn’t actually done — and hadn’t been paid for? Field had already figured out that the Mad River Biologists invoices submitted for spotted owl research were fakes, likely created on a personal computer. The formats, headers and invoice numbers didn’t match legitimate invoices. Plus an associate at Mad River Biologists acknowledged that they hadn’t conducted the surveys in question. But the bank and tax records were a revelation. “This is one of those things you define as the ‘a ha moment,’” he said. In his eyes, this paper trail proves the relationship and criminal intentions of all three men — Raymond, LeValley and McAllister. When the latter two men appeared in court for their arraignment, LeValley’s attorney, Bill Bragg, said his client believed he was helping the Yurok Tribe by reallocating funds, The Del Norte Triplicate reported. That’s exactly what LeValley’s friend and fellow biologist Craig Strong believes was the case. He said there’s no way LeValley would have taken tribal money for his own gain. “He’s secure, semi-retired, just doing what he likes to do — biology, birdwatching and photography. He lives in a beautiful house, he’s secure financially, and he’s not a greedy person.” Contacted by the Journal, Sean McAllister expressed interest in being interviewed for this story, but his attorney, Greg Rael, advised him against it. LeValley’s attorney also declined an interview request on his client’s behalf. Many of the two men’s colleagues and clients did not respond to requests for comments. While he’s convinced of his longtime friend’s fundamental innocence, Strong said he worries about how things will play out in court. “The sad thing is that there may be some substance to [the charges] because he was trusting and didn’t realize what he was getting into,” Strong said. From the perspective of law enforcement, good intentions may well prove irrelevant. “Roland Raymond — we believe he’s the primary suspect in the case,” Field said. “But if you assist in the conspiracy you’re just as guilty.” ●


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cd Port of Morrow By The Shins Aural Apothecary/ Columbia Records After The Shins’ last record, the 2007 release  Wincing the Night Away, bandleader, songwriter  and vocalist James Mercer dismissed his entire band.  He reconfigured the line-up with a group of indie  musicians including drummer Joe Plummer from  Modest Mouse, Crystal Skulls bassist Yuuki Matthews and Eric D. Johnson from The Fruit Bats. It’s no great surprise that The Shins is (and always  was) Mercer’s vehicle. What is a surprise, however,  is how much Mercer’s songwriting has matured. He  explores less anxious themes and executes melodies  in a more relaxed delivery, while allowing for a  broader, expansive production. Hard core Shins fans  may shout in protest, but James Mercer may have  pulled off delivering one of The Shins’ strongest and  overall most satisfying records to date in the form  of their new release, Port of Morrow.  From the upbeat opening cut, “The Rifle’s  Spiral,” a dark narrative wrapped in a deceptively  bouncy pop blanket, Port of Morrow‘s layered  sound instantly emits with a big splash. Experienced  producer and instrumentalist Greg Kurstin works  well with Mercer’s compositions, achieving a sound  that enhances but is never excessive. In between Shins records Mercer collaborated  with high-profile producer Brian Burton, aka Danger  Mouse, on the project, Broken Bells. Fueled by that  experience, Mercer’s confidence — both as a songwriter and performer — is evident. He commented  in a recent Mojo magazine interview that Burton  “opened me up to the idea that I could be more of  a collective.” By tapping into this new “collective” of  musicians, Mercer and Kurstin exploit strengths, like  employing Wild Flag’s drummer Janet Weiss for “A  Simple Song,” enabling them to transform a previously spare song into a full, dynamic piece. While Port of Morrow possesses many of Mercer’s familiar ascending/descending vocal melodies,  there are also a number of songs that break from  the mold, fitting into more of a solo category. “Bait  and Switch” revs with a Brazilian Tropicalia swing  (reminiscent of the territory staked out by Beck),  while “Fall of ‘82” cops a melody from Steely Dan’s  “Reeling In The Years,” and “40 Mark Strasse” lifts  from Daryl Hall & John Oates. (Kurstin’s duo project  The Bird and The Bee recorded a 2010 tribute record  to the ’70s blue-eyed soul duo.) Oddly, the combination of using borrowed  influences and a rich production blend smoothly  with Mercer’s defined, melodic sense of pop. Port of Morrow doesn’t always succeed — as in “September,” which sounds like a rewriting of “New Slang”  — but it places Mercer in an interesting career  point, one that straddles the fence between his past  band and his solo voice. Regardless, Port of Morrow  offers a sparkling harbor and point of departure for  its evolving leader.  — Mark Shikuma

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Four Indie DVDs MELANCHOLIA. Never one to shy away  from mischief, director  Lars Von Trier feels that  “a film should be like a rock in the shoe.” Uneasiness  plays a large role in most of his films: Breaking The Waves, Dancer In The Dark, Dogville and The Idiots are full of characters driven to insanity and forced to  endure the dark side of human psychology. Stunning  and critically lauded, Melancholia is the flipside to  Malick’s Tree of Life, an intergalactic doomsday sci-fi  as metaphor for psychological disorder. Charlotte  Gainsbourg and Kirsten Dunst play sisters holding  on and letting go as life in the universe seems to be  coming to an end. IN THEIR OWN WORDS: BRITISH NOVELISTS. This ambitious two-disc set from the BBC  is more than just an impressive collection of archival  footage from some of Britain’s most influential  authors. From Bertrand Russell to Virginia Woolf,  on through to J.R.R. Tolkein and Salman Rushdie,  the works of great thinkers serve to illuminate the  broader culture climates that produced them. This  excellent six-part series serves as a crash course  on the history of Western thought over the 20th  century, and its relationship to the world we have  created. TINY FURNITURE. Born in 1986, Lena Dunham may just be the richest, most coherent voice of  her generation. After accidentally becoming a YouTube phenom (a clip of her using an Ohio University  fountain to shower in went viral), Dunham decided:  “This is not how I want to emerge to the world.”  The 25-year-old writer/director/actress has since  landed her very own HBO series, Girls. That came  largely as a result of her critically praised feature,  Tiny Furniture, now a Criterion Collection DVD. In  it, Dunham plays herself, a recent college graduate  who less than gracefully returns to the nest, hoping  to figure things out. Dunham cast her real life sister  and mother (NYC photographer Laurie Simmons) in  the story of her awkward homecoming. The result is  a remarkably fresh and honest portrait of the hopes  and shortcomings of privileged young America. MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE. A  surprisingly well made debut from Borderland Films  co-founder T. Sean Durkin, who simply “wanted to  make a movie about a cult.” The film stars Mary-Kate  and Ashley’s younger sister Elizabeth Olsen as a  young woman who musters the will to leave a communal cult in upstate New York led by John Hawkes  (Winter’s Bone, Eastbound & Down). The film  avoids cartoonish characterizations of cult life and  feels entirely believable. By juxtaposing commune  flashbacks with scenes of Martha trying out regular  life with her big sister, Durkin calls into question the  morality behind conventional family structures. Skillful, dreamlike edits draw us into the inner world of a  sweet kid whose naive charms become her potential  undoing. — Merrick McKinlau is co-owner of La Dolce Video in Arcata.

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Ethnochoreological Fun

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he Humboldt Folk Dancers are gearing up to present the 13th Arcata International Folk Dance Festival the weekend of April 13-15. This biennial event (as in every two years), started in 1995 as an annual affair until it “grew too big for our little community” to put together every year, explained Craig Kurumada, one of the organizers and a member of the much loved local band, Chubritza. Anyone who has gone to a Chubritza show knows what an exuberant music and dance party the band ignites. “It started as a fun weekend,” Kurumada reminisced wistfully. Sure, it’s still a fun weekend but it’s gone from having fun with one guest band and one guest teacher, to having a ton o’ fun with five guest teachers and 10 bands. That’s how much the festival has grown over the years. All this special fun happens from Friday evening to Sunday midday in the main room and the kitchen of the Bayside Grange, and next door in the classrooms of Mistwood School. Kurumada exudes the same enthusiasm speaking about everyone involved in this extravaganza, from the teachers who lead the dance and music workshops to the musicians who come to jam and the bands performing throughout the weekend. The line-up of classes and performances is packed with internationally known teach-

ers, dancers and musicians, not to mention Bulgarian food catered by the Bebelekovs family and friends, who incidentally are on the program as performers. The Grange’s main room serves as the dance hall, with dance workshops during the day and concerts and dance parties at night. After hosting workshops and jam sessions during the daylight hours, the Grange kitchen becomes a kafana, a Balkan-style coffeehouse “where people don’t have to dance. They can sit and socialize, have a nosh, have some refreshment.” During the concert performances, two bands are always playing, one in the dance hall and one in the kafana. The Grange’s doors open wide on Friday at 6:30 p.m. for registration and a potluck dinner accompanied by the local Celtic quartet Good Company, with violin, whistle, mandolin, cello, guitar, accordion, cittern (a stringed instrument dating from the Renaissance) and bodhran, an Irish frame drum. Pretty impressive for ambient dinner music. The evening continues with simultaneous performances in the dance hall and the Kafana showcasing eight, (yes, count ‘em, eight), different bands. That’s just a warm-up. On Saturday night there are five different time slots in both performance spaces, meaning you can potentially hear 10 different bands if you so choose. Let’s say after working up a sweat dancing


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co-founded Planet Chai. Filcich will teach Croatian couple and circle dances with unusual steps called Drmeš, that entail bouncing up and down really quickly. I was surprised to see Jerry Duke’s name — he was teaching folk dance at San Francisco State back when I was there in the early ‘80s. Kurumada laughed, “Jerry doesn’t age,” and said Duke teaches, “a mixed bag, including African and Indian, an Indian Bhangra, Bollywood dancing … His specialty is different kinds of Balkan dancing from Greece and Turkey — really popular. He may do a workshop in Appalachian music: bowed saw, mouth harp and mouth bow.” Kurumada described Daniela Ivanova, who will teach Bulgarian dance, as “an amazing dancer with a beautiful voice. She’ll sing as she dances and shows you the steps. She’s extraordinarily graceful.” For the first time Dave and Emma Charlebois will be teaching Scandinavian folk dances: schottisches, polkas and the polska, “a slow and graceful couples dance, that is in a three, but not at all like a waltz [with] turns, spins, alternating walks and spins — very elegant.” The weekend is sure to be filled with rich, soulful, joyous surprises making for big fun for all ages. The 13th Biennial Arcata Folk Dance Festival takes place Friday, April 13 through Sunday, April 15, at the Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Friday’s potluck and party starts at 7 p.m. Admission $7; Saturday dance, instrument and singing workshops run from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 each; Saturday concert and party, 7 p.m.-midnight, $15; Sunday morning wrap-up 9:30 a.m.-noon, $3. Full package: $55; children under 14, free. (Meals not included.) Full schedule at www.arcatafolkdancefestival.org, info at 707-822-8045 or 707-599-0003. l

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kolos (circle dances) to the Arcatafest Tamburitza Band, you schottische (step/ step/step/hop) over to the kafana to rest your feet and reinforce yourself with some refreshments while listening to Dva Nastrave, which means (get ready) Dueling Accordions. What could be more fun than dueling accordions? Finish the night back in the dance hall, throwing it down to international folk music by Chubritza, one of the host bands, with Kurumada playing clarinet and a type of bagpipe called a gajda, plus violin, accordion, spoons, snare drum, violin, Croatian stringed instruments called prim and brac, and tupan, a large Turkish double-headed drum played with sticks. These folk are no slouches. Saturday morning, it’s time for school. The instructors’ resumes are an arm and a leg long, including prestigious international study and performance, and multiple master’s degrees and doctorates. Studying the music and dances of a region means going deep into ethnochoreology, which is the study of folk dance through the application of multiple disciplines, such as anthropology, musicology and ethnography. Traditional dance is studied as part of the cultural history of a community, leading to an understanding of the underlying power of dance in shaping culture, which intrigues the heck out of me. Among those leading dances is John Filcich, an icon in both the Croatian and American folk community, who started the ongoing Kolo Festival in San Francisco 60 years ago. Kurumada shares, “He has been this wonderful resource for us. He has this incredible knowledge of these dances that have died out in Serbia and Croatia. He’s a living history of these dances.” Filcich is connected to Humboldt through his daughter, Jana, who stayed in Arcata after graduating from HSU and

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The drunken botanist

Chartreuse Herbal Liqueurs By Amy Stewart

amystewart@northcoastjournal.com

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he directions from Lyon to the Chartreuse distillery go something like this: Exit the parking garage while trying to fire up your GPS. As it searches listlessly for a satellite (shouting “Look up!” or pointing it at the sky does not help), drive across the river with the vague feeling that the freeway might be in that direction. Eventually, a crisp Scottish voice will come to life and guide you to Quai Bellevue and from there you will find the ramp to Marseille/Genève/Grenoble/Porta de Croix Luizet/Périphérique Est, the pronunciation of which your Scottish guide will mangle in that endearing way characteristic of all British robots. Finally, you will find yourself, as I did, on the E711, stopping at regular intervals to deposit a handful of euros with the toll-

takers, and arriving eventually in Voiron, a small town with much to offer, but half the morning is gone already and there’s another distillery to visit after this one, so it’s straight to the Chartreuse. The CarthuDIY Herbal Liqueur photo by Amy Stewart sian monks who make Chartreuse do not want distillery. Draw a line from northern Spain their contemplative life disrupted by a across France to, say, Turin, and you’ll find stream of tourists who are only in it for one brand after another. They all got their the drinks, so they have taken the Napa start as medicinal remedies, handfuls of approach to distillery tours: A modern, herbs steeped in brandy with a little sugar visitor-friendly facility, staffed by hospiadded to make them go down easier. The table young women in lime green blazers, yellow version is always lower proof and is situated in Voiron to accommodate sweeter; distillers claim it was intended people like me, while the monks enjoy for women, while the stronger green vertheir solitude at the monastery up in the sion was a man’s tonic. mountains. And while the ingredients are generThe formula for Chartreuse is a secret, ally touted as being highly secret, smaller known only to two monks. It consists of distilleries will generally drop the pretense 130 herbs and other plants, but precisely with a grin and a shrug. After my visit to what goes in the bottle is anyone’s guess. Chartreuse, the next stop was the Pagès This makes a visit to the distillery rather distillery, a couple hours away in le Puy en fruitless. You’ll see that something is Velay, where we walked past open bins of being cooked up in copper stills and dried plant matter. “You may know some aged in enormous oak barrels, but you of these,” the guide said. I did. I can say won’t know precisely what. To make the with certainty that lemon verbena, citrus visit feel more worthwhile, an elaborate peel, mace, star anise, fennel, angelica, museum has been created, complete with and, well, a whole bunch of other herbs dioramas of Chartreuse-making activities, and spices, go into liqueurs of this sort. If a short film, sepia photographs and crusty it grows in the French countryside and it’s old bottles from past vintages. And there not likely to kill you, it’s probably in there. is, of course, a tasting room, where you These liqueurs are intended to be can enjoy your choice of odd and intersipped neat after a meal; using them in a esting liqueurs not usually available in the cocktail is strictly an American idea. But States. In addition to the standard green both the Chartreuse and Pagès distilleries and yellow versions found behind the bar gamely offer up recipes to satisfy the back home, there are the V.E.P. bottlings, tourists anyway. All you really need to which have enjoyed more time in the barknow is that a little Chartreuse livens up rel and benefitted considerably from it, as almost any gin drink. A fine example is well as fruit liqueurs, a nice bitter gentian The Last Word, consisting of equal parts liqueur, and one made with génépi, a type gin, green Chartreuse, lime juice and maraof artemisia. schino liqueur, shaken and poured into a If you spend a little time motoring cocktail glass. (If you don’t have maraaround France’s southernmost parts, schino, the Luxardo brand is the easiest to you’ll realize that green and yellow herbal find in these parts.) liqueurs are not unique to the Chartreuse

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

But you can also make your own herbal liqueur. Recipes for homemade versions were widely published in the 19th century; I’ll give you a list of the herbs and spices mentioned most often and you can experiment from there. Whether you keep your own recipe a secret or not is up to you. Homemade Herbal Liqueur An assortment of dried or fresh herbs, such as: lemon verbena, lemon balm, spearmint, fennel, thyme, angelica stems, sage, scented geranium, lemongrass, chamomile, bay, etc. Whole (not ground) spices such as star anise, cloves, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, saffron. Citrus peel (the thin outer zest only) of lemons or oranges. Simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water, heated until the sugar dissolves, and then cooled). Everclear or vodka.  If Everclear brings back terrible memories from your college days, it’s time to reassess. It’s nothing but a very pure, all-grain spirit intended specifically for this kind of blending. But if you prefer vodka, just don’t get the cheapest possible brand — it’ll have a nasty bite that all the herbs in the world can’t overcome. Most recipes call for combining all ingredients, in whatever quantity suits you, and letting them age together for anywhere from a few days to a few weeks. But I have learned that fresh herbs can go from fabulous to dreadful very quickly in an infusion. So my suggestion is this: Carefully wash and trim your herbs, then add them to a clean mason jar. Fill it with the booze, cap it tightly, and let it sit in a dark spot for five to six hours. Taste it. If it’s wonderful, you’re done. If you’re not satisfied, give it a little more time, but more than 24 hours is pushing it. Strain the herbs, then add citrus peel and spices, both of which can sit in alcohol for much longer without developing an off flavor. Continue to taste it regularly. You might be pleased with the result after just a few days or a week. Then strain the mixture again, and add simple syrup to taste. Let it sit for three to four weeks, then drink it within a few months — it’s not intended to keep forever. l


northcoastjournal.com

Stop and Smell the Ceanothus thyrsiflorus

Clockwise from top left: Wood Rose

painting by Rick Tolley

Elegant Cat’s Ear

monoprint by Patricia Sennott

On The Way

painting by Linda Parkinson

Wildflower Art Show at the Upstairs Art Gallery By Jason Marak

L

iving in Humboldt County, it’s easy to become desensitized to our beautiful surroundings. Majestic redwoods, dramatic seascapes and an abundance of wildlife are all right outside our windshields during just about any local commute. But rushing through our daily lives, filled with appointments and deadlines, it’s often hard to appreciate the magnificence of our coastal and inland areas. Springtime brings yet another easily overlooked element of beauty to the North Coast with hundreds of varieties of wildflowers blooming across our dunes, marshes, fields and forest floors. Fortunately, for those of us too busy (or unwilling) to put down our cell phones and go hiking this spring, the “Wildflower Art Show” at the Upstairs Art Gallery will bring some of this natural beauty to us. The Wildflower Art Show brings together 17 local artists, working in a variety of mediums, all translating the natural aesthetic of flora and floral forms from native environments into two-dimensional space: They paint, draw and photograph plants. “We have oil painters, water colorists, photographers — a lot of different styles,” said participating artist and exhibition organizer Rick Tolley. And the choice of subject matter has a great deal to offer artist and viewer alike. “The natural beauty kind of resonates — beauty resonates for people and they kind of forget the anxieties of the world for a little bit and enjoy it. I truly enjoy sharing that with other people,” said Tolley. But the Wildflower Art Show will do

much more than simply showcase this The annual Spring Wildflowthematically connected work. Tolley and er Show, put on by the North company enable local kids to experience Coast Chapter of the CNPS, is a continuawildflowers and their natural environtion of a tradition started 30 years ago by ments in an even more immediate way. Nature Discovery Volunteers. This year’s Participating artists donate portions of event takes place the first weekend in the proceeds from the sale of their work May. The show offers visitors many differto a transportation fund set up by the ent ways to see and appreciate the local North Coast Chapter of the Caliplant life. “There are workshops fornia Native Plant Society (CNPS). and guided hikes and all kinds of a rts ! arcata The fund is used to help local specimens that they can view. It’s pg 24 schools travel to the upcoming pretty wonderful to see all these annual Spring Wildflower Show to native plants … all right there in be held at the Manila Community Center. one building ” said Tolley, who is also a For some schools, during this period of member of the North Coast CNPS. shrinking budgets and limited resources, In addition to hundreds of specimens, the transportation fund could be the nature walks and seminars, there will be a difference between being able to take wildflower art workshop were participants students to the show, or not. “[We want] can try their hand at creating the kind of to help those schools that can’t pay their work that will be on display at UAG with bus drivers or can’t rent a van or need guidance from some of the participating help with fuel … whatever we can do to artists themselves. The art workshop gives help people get there,” Tolley explained. Tolley and the other artists a chance to This spirit of generosity extends beshare some of that natural wonder and yond the artists to the exhibition space creative process with members of the itself: UAG isn’t taking a percentage of the community. The Spring Wildflower Show artists’ sales and is donating the space for is clearly more than just flowers. “Both the month long exhibition. Tolley, who has the art show and the wildflower show [are taught art to kids in a variety of settings, places] where you can see things, a lot of has a keen sense of the importance of things, right in one area, it’s pretty amazexposing kids to events like the Spring ing,” said Tolley. Wildflower Show and the Wildflower Art The Wildflower Art Show will hang Show. Allowing kids to see and experifrom April 3-26 at the Upstairs Art Gallery ence their local environment directly, and in the Arcata Umpqua Bank. There will be to see the art that environment inspires, an opening event on April 13 in conjunchas the potential to instill an important tion with Arts! Arcata, with refreshments notion. “There’s wonder all around us, and provided by the Humboldt Wildlife Care maybe this is something that ought to Center and live Quebecois and Acadian be protected, and taken care of too, on fiddle music by Mon Petit Chou. down the line,” said Tolley. Participating artists include Gary

Bloomfield, Andrew Daniels, Joy Dellas, Paul Fabian, Paula Golightly, Michael Harris, Linda Parkinson, Ken Jarvela, Joyce Jonte, Leslie Reid, Alan Sanborn, Patricia Sennott, Stock Schlueter, Rick Tolley, Ann Wallace, Mira Weidman and Libby Yee. The Spring Wildflower Show will be held from Friday, May 4, to Sunday, May 6, at the Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive (off Hwy 255 between Arcata and the Samoa Bridge). It includes an “Art Night” Friday at 7 p.m. with a free art workshop with Rick Tolley and other local artists, accompanied by live music. Materials will be provided or bring your own. Full schedule at www.northcoastcnps.org. All activities are free. l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

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Second Friday Arts! Arcata Friday, April 13, 6-9 p.m. Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at more than 30 participating locations in Arcata. Visit www.artsarcata. com for even more information about the event or call 822-4500.

“nuart” by NuRoma

1) 3 Foods Café 835 J St. Live bluesy, funky music by Jenni and David. 2) Abruzzi 780 Seventh St. Live music; Serving late from 7 to 10 p.m. 3) Arcata Artisans Cooperative 883 H St. Zak Shea, woodworker; Vaughn Hutchins, photographer.  4) Arcata City Hall* 736 F St. Pete Castellano, photography. 5) Arcata Exchange 813 H St. New Works by Jay Brown; Live music by Dale Winget. 6) Arcata Main Street 791 Eighth St. Jessica Albee, paintings show entitled “yoga tree series”; Tickets for KEET-TV’s Travel Extravaganza drawing sold. 7) Arcata Marsh* 569 South G St. Michelle Remy, collage art. 8) Bon Boniere 791 Eighth St. Arcata Arts Institute. 9) Bubbles 1031 H St. Live music from the bluegrass band, Clean Livin’. 10) Café Brio 791 G St. TBA. 11) Daisy Drygoods 959 H St. Jodie Loghry, handmade bags. 12) Fire Arts Center 520 South G St. #A. Spring Sale 13) The Garden Gate 905 H St. Erin Hamilton; Live music by Rocking Ramblers. 14) Hensel’s Ace Hardware Kitchen Store 884 Ninth St. Penelope Wampler, mixed media; Ryan Johnson, photography.

15) HSU Natural History Museum 1315 G St. Wild animal portraits by Union Street Charter School students. 16) Humboldt Hardware 791 Eighth St., Suite 8. John Konyn, hand carving of draw horse. 17) Humboldt Outfitters 860 G St. Marge Miguel, watercolor/mixed media; Live Music by The Speakeasy Saints. 18) Humbrews 856 10th St. Lost Coast Print Collective, multi media glicee prints. 19) Hunter Plaid Gallery 90 Sunny Brae Center. NuRoma: The Art of Inspiration, a graphic design showcase; Live music. 20) Ironside Gallery 900 Ninth St. Gallery members and Humboldt Arts Project artists, multi media. 21) Jambalaya 915 H St. James Hildebrandt, paintings. 22) Libation 761 Eighth St. Tony Gonsalves, photography; Live music by guitarist Duncan Burgess. 
23) Lotus Organic Café 1101 H Street Suite 3. Jeff Stanley, oil paintings. 24) Mazzotti’s 773 Eighth St. Jen Mackey, mixed media. 25) Minor Theatre 1001 H St. Kaela Carson, acrylic. 26) Moonrise Herbs 826 G St. Tasha Racine, photography, oil acrylic painting and charcol/ graffite; Live music by folk singer and guitarist “Chief”; Tamalii Comadres, dulce tamale sampling.

24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

27) Natural Selection 708 Ninth St. Bea Stanley, paintings. 28) North Soles Footwear 853 H St. Marjorie Miguel, water color.
 29) Om Shala Yoga 858 10th St. Allison Pals, Photos of India; Beats by DJ Marjo Lak Butter Music Brazil and DJ Anantha at the Arts! Arcata After party: all ages dance party from 9-12. 30) Plaza 858 10th St. “Out with the old, in with the new” sale. 31) Redwood Curtain Brewing Company 550 S G St. #6. E.R. Hedstrom, pen & ink & acrylic paintings; Music by Kindred Spirits. 32) Robert Goodman Winery 937 10th St. David Steinhardt, painter; Sage Irie, pen & ink drawings; Vico, mixed media. 33) The Rocking Horse 791 Eighth St. Children’s Art. 34) Soul to Soul Spa & Footbar 854 10th St. Lynn Carlin, Koi Fish Acrylics. 35) Stair Gallery 839 Ninth St. Transitions and Explorations: Recent Works on Paper by Melanie Yazzie. 36) Upstairs Art Gallery 1063 G St. Wildflower Art Show featuring artists Gary Bloomfield, Andrew Daniels, Joy Dellas, Paul Fabian, Paula Golightly, Michael Harris, Linda Parkinson, Ken Jarvala, Joyce Jonte, Leslie Reid, Alan Sanborn, Patricia Sennott, Stock Schlueter, Rick Tolley, Ann Wallace, Mira Weidman and Libby Yee.

Hunter Plaid Gallery in Sunny brae features Oakland artist NuRoma with an Arts! Arcata Reception on Friday featuring live music. Dustin Turner, aka NuRoma, was a founding member of the co-operative artist community Hunter Plaid Gallery and Studios. During his 10 years in Humboldt, Turner worked primarily with acrylic house paint, spray paint and stencils. Broadening his interests since then, he traveled to Spain to study graphic design. His show of new work, The Art of Inspiration, is a collection of graphic pieces focusing on vector art, branding, magazine layouts and photo manipulations. “I want this work to show how art and design work together,” says Turner.


northcoastjournal.com

MANILA ARTIST JAY BROWN IS SHOWING NEW WORKS ON PAPER AT ARCATA EXCHANGE, WITH AN OPENING RECEPTION FOR ARTS! ARCATA. THE SHOW, “PIECES OF THE PUZZLE,” RANGES IN STYLE FROM ABSTRACTS AND STILL LIFE TO HIS LATEST SERIES OF EXPERIMENTS, PIECES HE SAYS “I HAVEN’T DARED SHOW BEFORE,” INVOLVING PAINTED PUZZLE PIECES. “STOREHOUSE SUNSET” IS AMONG THE “ATMOSPHERICS” AND “BAYSCAPES.” “IT’S BASED ON A PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE ROOF OF JACOBY’S STOREHOUSE – I DID A PASTEL PAINTING FROM THAT,” SAYS BROWN.

Food that one would find in an Italian home... simple, handmade and honest. A seasonal Italian menu with an extensive use of the local and organic. Also featuring regional Italian wines.

latrattoriaarcata.com • 822-6101

Dinners Thursday-Sunday, 5:30-9:00 p.m. • 30 Sunny Brae Center • Arcata

LEFT, “STOREHOUSE SUNSET” BY JAY BROWN.

23 11th St

Something Sublime.

to HSU

36

38

to HSU

15

29 18 34

LEFT, “FRENCH VOGUE” BY KAELA CARSON.

6th Street & K Street 707-633-6124 theotherplacearcata.com

10th St

32

37

14

G St

21 13

20

H St

I St

11

J St

27

9th St

35

1

3

Arcata Plaza

5

8th St

17 26

28

33 8 24 22 16 6 2

F St

THE MINOR THEATER FEATURES PENCIL, CHARCOAL AND ACRYLIC WORK BY HSU ART STUDENT KAELA CARSON DURING THE MONTH OF APRIL. CARSON, WHO SAYS SHE “REALLY LOVES PHOTOREALISM,” OFTEN WORKS FROM FILM STILLS, MOSTLY IN BLACK AND WHITE.

New Menu Available Online

9 25

30 10

ARCATA APRIL 2012 0

250 ft

7th St

4 7 12 31

to Sunny Brae

19

© NORTH COAST JOURNAL/Miles Eggelston

Double Your Memory Buy your new computer from us with Applecare, and for an additional $100, we’ll upgrade your 4GB RAM to 8GB RAM. Twice the memory for half the cost! On the Plaza • 707-825-7100

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012

25


Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

Todd Snider

Stoner Fables

Open 7 days New Thai

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

Go nuts.

Todd Snider, plus Will Bernard, ska, strings, AfroMassive, Marching ‘Jacks and a movie theater benefit By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

T

Grab one for home, the car and the office... and don’t forget, it’s online, too. www.northcoastjournal.com

here’s a note after the listing on KHUM’s Goodtime Guide for the Todd Snider show Monday at Humboldt Brews saying, “finally on the North Coast.” It ignores the fact that the songwriter has played at least a couple of local shows — opening for folk icons Joan Baez and John Prine. You could call Snider a songwriter’s songwriter. Prine was a champion early on, even hired him as an assistant for a time and later signed him to his personal label.

Like Prine, Snider is more storyteller than singer. (He released a double disc set last year titled Live: The Storyteller.) His vocal delivery is often akin to Woody Guthrie or Bob Dylan’s talking blues. As he told Paste magazine, “Lou Reed does it, Jerry Jeff Walker too. I can’t sing all that good, so I saw the talking as an ‘in.’ I heard Kristofferson and said, ‘I’m in.’” Incidentally, Snider is fulfilling a longtime ambition with a just-released record produced by Don Was, Time As We Know It: The Songs of

Jerry Jeff Walker. “He’s the guy I saw at 19 and decided to try to be like. His are the first songs I learned,” said Snider. That one follows close on the heels of Agnostic Hymns and Stoner Fables, released earlier this year, a collection of songs digging into the trials and tribulations of the 99 percent. In the opening track, “In The Beginning,” he looks at religion: “In the beginning,” he sings/drawls, “man wondered to himself, ‘Why, oh, why are we here?’ And yet with each asking, the question became less clear.” He goes on to quote from Napoleon (he says the quote was an inspiration for the song), declaring, “We still need religion to keep the poor from killing the rich.” The rockin’ “New York Banker” tells a torn-from-the-headlines Wall Street/retirement tale: “I came to the day I had waited on, just to find out all the money in our pension was gone, reinvested in something called the Abacus bond,” he sings. “Come to find out the bond born to fail’d been built so that banker could bet his bread against it — when the housing market crashed, our retirement did too.” There’s no happy ending. He eventually concludes, “Good things happen to bad people.” When Snider comes to Humboldt Brews on Monday, he’ll share the stage with Ashleigh Flynn, a Kentucky-born singer/songwriter who now lives in Portland (Todd’s original hometown). She’s good, but not quite as high profile as his opener in Los Angeles: Bill Carter and The Blames. One of Rolling Stone‘s latest “Hottest Rock Pictures” is a shot of Snider drinking beer backstage with that band’s drummer, Johnny Depp. Humboldt Brews has a week full of notable shows: Thursday it’s Diego’s Umbrella, the

It’s Springtime!

All April long, we’ll match any competitor’s sale offer.

707.826.7435

Open Mon-Sat • 10am - 6pm | Sunday • 10am - 5pm

On Hwy. 101, between Eureka and Arcata, in the Bracut Industrial Park

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

we can’t wait to show you our

goods.


gypsy-rock/flamenco/klezmer/etc. band from S.F. (Really good.) Saturday Jerry Joseph and The Jackmormons are back in town (Jerry used to live here), and back at HumBrews touring behind a new album, Happy Book. Jerry is an alt. rock road warrior; the new work is compelling as always. Sunday HumBrews goes electronic with Papadosio, an electro-rock/ jamband from Ashville on tour with new agey electro fiddler/producer Govinda, aka Shane Madden from Austin. Tuesday it’s ska time with the band that started it all back in the day, The Skatalites, although who is still with that group remains to be seen since most of the original members have passed on. Speaking of ska, DJ Gabe Pressure presents a “Ska and Soul Party” Saturday at the Red Fox Tavern with live ska by Keyser Soze from Reno and ska, rocksteady, early reggae and soul, “all on vinyl,” spun by DJ Red, DJ Zephyr, Selector J and, of course, Gabe. Brooklyn-based guitarist Will Bernard is on tour behind a groove-laden new release, Outdoor Living, with his longtime trio featuring Hammond B3 organist Wil Blades (who played here recently with Billy Martin) and New Orleans-based drummer Simon Lott. The jazzy threesome hits HumBrews next Wednesday. Across town at the Arcata Theatre Lounge that same Wednesday, it’s another night of high-altitude mega-jamgrass by Colorado’s Yonder Mountain String Band on tour with a tres cool duo from Rhode Island, Brown Bird. Guitarist/banjo picker David Lamb and fiddler/ cellist Morganeve Swain share vocals of haunting alt. folk tunes — their latest album, Sea For Salt, is well worth checking out. The semi-local Afrofunk combo AfroMassive is still aglow from a six-date tour with Seun Kuti and Egypt 80. Bassist Aaron Bortz

tells us, “The last show we did with them at the Mateel, Seun invited us on stage with Egypt 80 to perform their encore with them. It was a beautiful culmination of the musical experience of our tour and our time spent learning from them.” AfroMassive just finished a live EP, recorded at the Red Fox in November, which will be available Friday at the Jambalaya, where the big band shares the bill with SambaDá, a hot Brazilian samba/reggae/funk combo out of Santa Cruz. Get ready to rock Friday at Blondie’s with a power-packed triple bill of local alt. bands: White Manna, Strix Vega and People. Friday at Arcata Theatre Lounge, it’s a rare concert performance by the 44-year-old Humboldt State University Marching Lumberjacks. The M-Jacks are calling this “A Nightmare on Harpst Street, an evening of murder, mayhem and music.” Not sure what that means, but I hope they don’t do anything bad to Rubber Ducky. Saturday at the Lil’ Red Lion catch The Blank Tapes, which is the nom de band of Matt Adams, an L.A./S.F.-based multi-instrumentalist who records garage pop ditties on his own and with friends. He’s touring with a couple of friends who will do their own sets; add in local openers John Ludington and Gabe Rozzell (formerly a Portlander) and you have five sets of alt. this and that. Let’s talk tributes (again). The Miracle Show play Dead Friday at Blue Lake Casino. Then there’s House Of Floyd back at the ATL Saturday with that inflatable pig, a pocketful of Pink-F tunes and beaucoup lasers. The Johnny Cash tribute Cash’d Out is at the Red Fox Wednesday with Douglas Benson singing and looking a lot like the late/great man in black. Got a call from Robert Sager, drummer for

Humboldt-based Miasmic, whose sound he describes as “a blend of extreme metal: thrash, death metal, black metal.” All of those forms tend toward the dark side of course, same with the black metal outfits playing with Miasmic this Thursday at the Lil’ Red Lion: Sacrament ov Impurity and Blood Etchings from Washington and L.A.-based Vellum. (Note: The show was moved from Nocturnum, replaced there by LGBT hip hoppers God-des and She.) Meanwhile, same Thursday at The Shanty it’s Mister Moonbeam vs. The Creepy Marbles in an alt. throwdown for the ages. Young Portland-based fingerstyle guitarist Brooks Robertson stops off at the Arcata Playhouse Thursday on a West Coast tour. You might remember him from his opening set for Adrian Legg (also at the Playhouse); by all accounts the 20-something kid plays like a demon. Like many small independent movie houses, The Garberville Theater is struggling to survive, thus Saturday’s “Preservation Celebration Jam No. 5,” an all day SoHum music fest in support of theater preservation and restoration. It starts at 4 p.m. with The South Fork High School Band, Jazz Band and “Mad Jazz” choir, continues with The SoHum Girls (7 p.m.), Twango Macallan (8:30), The Fabulous Resinaires (9), and finally Jade Steel with his reggae/ rock band Emerald Triangle. Adam from Missing Link Records writes alerting us to “a famously last-minute in-store this Saturday by Adam Blake all the way from London,” (at 5 p.m.). Blake plays sitar for Cornershop and played bass with Natacha Atlas, but he’s mainly an ace blues guitar player/ teacher conversant in the styles of many blues masters. l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

27


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

see The Hum pg. 26

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI: ARCATA 822-3731 744 9th St. Arc. thealibi.com

JAH SUN

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 9th St. ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

and the

FYAH SQUAD

BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial, Eureka barflypub.com

April 18, 2012

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

at the

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453

Mateel Community Center Redway

BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake THE BRIDGE Fernbridge 725-2190

doors open at 6:00

Tickets available at usual Mateel outlets: • Lotus Organic Cafe (Arcata) • People’s Records (Arcata) • The Works (Eureka) • Redway Liquors • Ras Works (Fortuna) www.inticketing.com $30 advance $35 at door

Buy any 2 Hats/Beanies SAVE $5

CHECK DAILY FOR NEW EVENTS

Alice DiMicele Acoustic Trio 8pm

The Birds/Rear Window 8pm

Find us on Facebook!

HSU Marching Lumberjacks Spring Concert - doors at 7:30pm $5 All ages

House Of Floyd (P-Floyd tribute) Doors at 8pm $28/$24 All ages

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm

Happy Hour: $1 off wells

Happy Hour: $1 off pints

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

Vintage Soul (R&B) no cover 9pm

Billy Allen & The Roadhouse Rockets (rock) no cover 9pm

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Buy any 2 T-Shirts SAVE $5 EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 1642 G ST.

(Next to Hey Juan Burritos)

707-822-3090

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm DJ Samples, MiKEY & MOTA no cover 9pm

Blues Jam w/ Jenifer Breeze 9pm

Salsa Dancing 9pm $5

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm

LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake NOCTURNUM Eureka

Distracting the cook will only prolong the hunger Orjazzmic Sextet (jazz) 7pm

Happy Hour All Day! Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons, The Trouble 9pm $15/$12

Of Time and Rhythm 7:30pm JVD

Of Time and Rhythm 7:30pm JVD

HSU Jazz Combos 8pm FRH

The Real Nasty (rock) 9pm

SambaDa, Afromassive 9pm $15

Accurate Productions 9pm

www.libation.com

Arts! A: photos by Tony Gonsalves Duncan Burgess (guitar) 6-9pm

Bon Swing! (gypsy jazz) 6-9pm no cover

Sacrament ov Impurity, Miasmic Blood Etchings, Vellum, (metal) 9pm

Volt’J 9pm

The Blank Tapes, Gabe Rozzell, John Ludington 9pm

The Hill (local outlaw country) 8pm Fred and Jr. (swing jazz) 6pm

Steelhead XP and Dipa on sale Mateel Comedy Cabaret 8pm $10

God-des & She (gay hip hop) 9pm

Q Club Halloween in April 9:30pm

Come on out to Blue Lake, it’s probably sunny Roach Gigz, Jacka (hip hop) 8pm $30

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 RAGG’S RACK ROOM 442-2989 615 5th St., Eureka

Located in beautiful Old Town Eureka DJ MuziqLement (dance music) 10pm

Jan Bramlett & Friends (singer/songwriter) 7pm

Thirsty Thursday

DJ 9:30pm

DJ 9:30pm

Polecat (Americana) 9pm $8

Silent Giants, Splinter Cell 9pm $5

Keyser Soze + ska/soul DJs 9pm

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com DJ Jsun & friends (dance music) 9pm-midnight

Get your growlers filled West African Drum/Dance 5:30-7pm

Tasting Room open Fridays 4-midnight All ages Empire Squared benefit with Never Die (hip hop) 8:30pm

DJ Itchiefingaz (dance music) 10pm

2nd Year Anniversary Party Let us host your event!

The Pulsators (blues) 9pm $10 Happy Hour! ~ M-F 4-6pm $1 off glasses, $2 off bottles! Karaoke 7-10pm

Arts!Arcata, 6-9pm Gallery showing, wine tasting

Cyndi Harvell & Jesse Brewster (SF singer/songwriters) 7-10pm

DJ 10pm

DJ 10pm

DJ 10pm

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Ukesperience (uke rock) 8pm

Charley Orlando (Americana) 8pm

Bump Foundation (funk) 9pm

SHAMUS T BONES Eureka

Grand Opening in 6 days!

Grand Opening in 5 days!

Grand Opening in 4 days!

SugaFoot (guitar/trumpet blues duo) 7:30pm

Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (raw blues) 7:30pm

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩

Death Metal Thursday (DMT): 4:30-10 pm AND Happy Hour until Close! Diego’s Umbrella (Gypsy rock) 9:30pm $15/$12

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

The Trouble (folk/rock) 7pm

THE LOGGER BAR Blue Lake

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

CLUB: 443-5696 • BAR: 443-6923

Dr. Squid (dance rock) no cover 9pm

Mighty Redwood Ambassadors (reggae) no cover 9pm

BossLevelz w/Masta Shredda & Itchie Fingaz no cover 9pm

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

Ni g h t l y 8 p m - 3 a m 1 8 + O N LY

The Miracle Show (Dead covers) no cover 9pm

Blues Jam w/ Anna Banana 6pm

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 677-3611 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka

GENTLEMEN’S CLUB

White Manna, Strix Vega, People 8pm The Hill (local outlaw country) 7pm

Bon Swing (gypsy jazz) 8pm

HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Buy any 2 Hoodies SAVE $10 and get 2 pairs of Humboldt Shoelaces

Brooks Robertson (guitarist) 8pm $12

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata

SAVE $ WHEN YOU BUY 2 AT HUMBOLDT CLOTHING!

IS ONLINE!

www.thealibi.com

Humboldt Free Radio Alliance Benefit Cerebrate, Dead Wait (metal) $5 11pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514

HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 856 10th St. Arcata

A portion of the proceeds from this event will be donated to the family of Jamal Andrews

sat 4/14

Find us on Facebook.

CAFE MOKKA Arcata 822-2228

FIELDBROOK MARKET Fieldbrook HEY JUAN! BURRITOS 1642 1/2 G St. Arcata

Hosted By Stevie Culture

THE GRID

fri 4/13

EUREKA INN 518 7th St.

All Ages Welcome Traditional Jamaician Cuisine

thur 4/12

SIDELINES Arcata Plaza SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

THE SHANTY Eureka

WWW.FABULOUSTIPTOP .COM ! L U O F IKE

S

N

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

ACEBOOK

THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza

Mister Moonbeam, Creepy Marbles Sangria and Snacks 4-6:30 Boss Levelz 10pm

DJ 10pm


WINE SHOP *WINE BY THE GLASS ALWAYS AVAILABLE*

t

LIBATION ARTS! ARCATA Jerry Joseph and The Jackmormons Saturday at Humboldt Brews

Duncan Burgess on Guitar Tony Gonsalves Photography • Friday, April 13, 6-9 pm, No Cover

BON SWING!

Gypsy Jazz

Saturday, April 14, 6-9 pm, No Cover

SPRING WINE APPRECIATION COURSE

sun 4/15

mon 4/16

tues 4/17

wed 4/18

Hella Gay Dance Party w/ DJ Anya 11pm $3

www.thealibi.com

2-Fer Tues: buy any breakfast or lunch item 8am-3pm: 2nd for 1/2 off

Irish Pub Wednesdays: with $2 wells inkBoat (Butoh) 8pm $12

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids Doors at 5:30pm $5 Rated PG

Banff Mountain Film Festival Doors at 6pm $15/$12/$10 All ages

Banff Mountain Film Festival Doors at 6pm $15/$12/$10 All ages

Yonder Mountain String Band w/ Brown Bird 7:30pm $30/$25 21+

www.barflypub.com

Karaoke 9pm

Free Pool & $3 Wells

Karaoke 9pm

$100,000 Strike It Rich

Receive one free swipe on the Strike It Rich kiosk

Mystery Bounty Poker Tournament 6:30pm

Bear River Casino Hotel For reservations call 707-733-9644

Quiz Night 7pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 6pm

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

Open Mic Night 6pm

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints Open Jam 6pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

www.bluelakecasino.com

Berel Alexander (acoustic soul) no cover 9pm

Free Pool & $3 Wells Gin & Guitar Stan (country) 5-7pm

Thursdays in May, 6pm $25 per class • Prepay 3 & get 4th Free! • Seats Limited

Wine Bar & Store: Open Monday through Saturday 8th Street on the Arcata Plaza • 825-7596

The Sea Grill Grand Opening Wednesday, April 18th

Fresh Crab Dishes Black Angus Beef Extensive Salad Bar Famous Seafood Chowder

1911 Truesdale Street, Eureka

Historic Bar

Off Broadway behind the Best Western Bayshore Inn Grand Opening at 4pm

Rule #1: Suck it up! Rule #2: Learn rule #1 Papadosio (dance) Govinda 9pm $10

Weensday: all Ween from 4:30-10pm AND 10% off your order! Will Bernard Trio (jazz/roots) 9:30pm $15

Reservations Recommended 407-3550

Wanda Jackson, Sallie Ford 9pm

BUY TICKETS I N ADVANCE AT B O T H ADVENTURE'S E D G E LOCATIONS

Mimosa Mondays $3.00 pints of Mimosas all day long! Todd Snider (Americana) Ashleigh Flynn (folk) 9pm $20

Fish Taco Tuesdays $3.50 for one $7.00 for two The Skatalites (ska) 9pm $25

Deep Groove Society 9pm

Sadastik (hip hop) 8pm

Speed of Darkness (metal) 9pm

Dancehall Reggae Night 9pm

World Class in Your Glass

Wine Bar overlooking the Arcata Plaza

Spring Wine Appreciation Course: coming Thursday evenings in May

www.libation.com

Don’t think of it as work, think of it as fun!

The other Red Lion

We got beer.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Open Sundays

Purl and Pour Come knit!

Hotwings (eclectic folk) 6pm

Randles-Labolle-Wu Trio (jazz) 6pm

HSU Percussion Ensemble 8pm JVD

2nd Dist. Supes: Clif v Estelle 2pm

Midnite, Jah Sun (reggae) 8pm $35 WWW: Konekta/DEVi 9pm Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm

Now serving beer and wine

Come sit and sip!

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Closed www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

1/2 off pool!

$1 hot dogs

$5 8-ball tourney 8pm

Beer Pong.

Myka 9, Winstrong 9pm $5

Cash’d Out (Johnny C. tribute) 9p $10

Happy Day! Happy hour all day!

Special Release: Belgian Café Porter

West African Drum/Dance 5:30-7pm $10

Hoop Dance w/ Nicole 5:30-7:30pm, two classes

The fine taste tasting room

Zuzu’s Petals (jazz) 6:30-9:30pm no cover

Break Dancing with REX 5-10pm $10

Tasting Room open Mon-Wed 4-11pm Thu 4-12 Swing Dance Night 7:30-10:30pm $5

Zuzu’s Petals (jazz) 6-9pm no cover

Spoken Word Night Open mic, no instruments 6pm

www.redwoodcurtainbrewing.com

DJ MXMSTR KRSHN2N 10pm Karaoke 8pm Wallace and Phines 12-3pm

Lunchbox’s Karaoke 8pm w/ sushi specials

Sunny Brae Jazz 8pm w/ fried chicken

St. John: unplugged 8pm

Grand Opening in 3 days!

Grand Opening in 2 days!

Grand Opening tomorrow! Full cocktail bar

Grand Opening! 4pm

Open Sun-Thu 4-11pm Fri-Sat 4pm-2am

Guess the password: HINT: hot and sweet

SugaFoot (trumpet/guitar duo) 6pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Fresh Alaskan Halibut now in season

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

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30 North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com


YOU’LL HEAR EVERYTHING FROM METAL TO SAMBA IN A SUNDAY CONCERT AT HSU’S FULKERSON RECITAL HALL. THE HSU PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE PLAYS JOHN CAGE’S “FIRST CONSTRUCTION IN METAL” ON 58 DIFFERENT METAL INSTRUMENTS INCLUDING ANVILS, AND THE WORLD PERCUSSION GROUP PLAYS BRAZILIAN SAMBAS AND A SUITE FOCUSED ON WEST AFRICAN MANDENG DRUMMING.

12 thursday MUSIC

Diego’s Umbrella. 9:30 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. As San Francisco’s ambassadors of gypsy rock, Diego’s Umbrella captures California’s cultural multiplicity with enthusiasm, humor and decadence. $15/$12 adv. www.humbrews.com. 826-2739. Alice DiMicele Acoustic Trio. 7:30 p.m. Garberville Civic Club, 477 Maple Lane. Northwestern singer/ songwriter Alice DiMicele delivers rhythmic earthy grooves. 923-3807. Brooks Robertson. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Portland-based fingerstyle guitarist performs. $12/$10 members. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575.

EVENTS

Take Back the Night Week. 6-8 p.m. “Historical Trauma and Domestic Violence: Unique Circumstances in Indian Country.” Discussions about how historical trauma inflicted on Native American communities has contributed to the prevalence of domestic violence in Native communities today. 267-3908.

DANCE

Of Time and Rhythm. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Annual spring concert. HSU student dancers perform hip hop, ballet, Broadway and contemporary dance. Choreographed by students and faculty. $10. hsustage. blogspot.com. 826-3928.

ART

The Extreme Craft Road Show. 6:45 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Humboldt Handweavers and Spinners Guild hosts artist Garth Johnson’s funny,

HSU CHOREOGRAPHERS AND DANCERS PRESENT OF TIME AND RHYTHM THROUGH SUNDAY AT HSU’S VAN DUZER THEATRE. THE MULTI-FACETED DANCE CONCERT ENCOMPASSES BALLET, HIP HOP AND MORE, INCLUDING SHOW DIRECTOR SHARON BUTCHER’S ECO-FANTASY “NO ECOSYSTEMS WERE HARMED DURING THE MAKING OF THIS DANCE,” WITH 20 DANCERS SWATHED IN RECYCLED MATERIALS.

fast-paced lecture covering his explorations in modern craft. extremecraft.com. 541-272-2297. Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309.

FOOD

Soroptimist International of Arcata Spring Salad Luncheon. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Leavy Hall, St. Mary’s School, 1730 Janes Road, Arcata. Benefits local area service projects. $10/$5 kids 6-12, under 5 free. siarcata@soroptimist. net. 822-0539.

ELECTIONS

Stacey Lawson’s Coffee Town Hall. 1-3 p.m. Ramone’s Old Town, 209 E St., Eureka. Congressional candidate discusses her detailed plan to create middle-class jobs and economic opportunity for northern Californians and all Americans. Share your ideas. www.staceylawson. com. 499-1055.

ETC.

Green Homes Workshop. 8:30 a.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Learn about green home features such as energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Pre-registration required. webmaster@ redwoodenergy.org. 269-1700. Sustainable Futures. 5:30-7 p.m. Gist Hall Room 218, HSU. Kathleen McAfee on “Cooling the Planet or Feeding the World: Do We Have To Choose?” Co-sponsored by Environment and Community Graduate Program and Schatz Energy Research Center. humboldt.edu/ envcomm/speaker_series. 826-3653. Humboldt Rose Society. 7 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Monthly meeting with presentation by Lee Stevens. 476-8180.

OREGON-BASED SINGER/SONGWRITER ALICE DIMICELE IS IN HUMBOLDT FOR TWO SHOWS WITH HER ACOUSTIC TRIO FEATURING FIDDLER CRYSTAL REEVES AND BASSIST JEFF MARTIN. THURSDAY THE TRIO PLAYS AT THE GARBERVILLE CIVIC CLUB, FRIDAY AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE.

13 friday EVENTS

HSU Relay For Life. 5 p.m. Redwood Bowl, HSU. 24-hour fundraiser for American Cancer Society. Laura.Read@ cancer.org. 951-0582. Arts! Arcata. 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Self-guided, public art phenomenon featuring works by more than 60 visual artists and live musicians at 30 locations. www.artsarcata.com. 822-4500. Take Back the Night Rally. 5 p.m. The Quad, HSU. Main event of the week. Feature speeches, performances, music and poetry. The mic will be open to anyone who wants to speak at 6:45 p.m. followed by an empowering march through Arcata. humboldt.edu. 914-4877.

THEATER

Damn Yankees. 7:30 p.m. Forum Theater, College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Humboldt Light Opera Company presents the story of Joe Boyd, an obsessed baseball fan who exchanges his aging body and soul for a chance to lead his favorite team to victory over the New York Yankees. $15/$12 students and seniors. hloc.org. 826-2990. An Unscripted Evening. 8-10 p.m. Studio Theater, HSU. Humboldt State’s Unscripted Sutras invite fans of theater and comedy to experience an exciting, creative journey with fully improvised plays. improv@humboldt. edu. 619-733-5344. Much Ado About Nothing . 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. William Shakespeare’s comedy. $15/$12 students and seniors. ncrt.net. 442-6278.

MUSIC

A Nightmare On Harpst Street. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. HSU Marching Lumberjacks present a spooky evening of murder, mayhem and music. $5. www.kissouraxe.com. 650-224-3203. Halloween in April. 9:30 p.m. Nocturnum, 206 West Sixth St., Eureka. Queer dance costume party hosted by Q Club. Featuring evening emcee L.A. Dodger, burlesque dancers, go go dancers and DJs Kevin Dikes, Mathew Kihs, ZtheenZ and Anya. $7/$5 in costume. E-mail rantgurl@riseup.net. Alice DiMicele Acoustic Trio. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. See April 12 listing.

DANCE

2012 Biennial Arcata Folk Dance Festival. 6:30 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Weekend of live music dance parties with 10 bands, daytime workshops in Scandinavian, Bulgarian, Croatian and various dance styles, classes for accordion, fiddle, drums, brass, Balkan singing and vocal technique; sing-alongs, food and a concert! All ages and dance levels. $55 all weekend; Friday potluck $7. www.arcatafolkdancefestival.org. 822-8045. Of Time and Rhythm. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 12 listing.

COMEDY

Mateel Comedy Cabaret. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Monthly showcase of professional comedians. This month features Dan Gabriel and Dan Wilson. $10. www.mateel.org. 923-3368.

BOOKS

Heather Leigh. 7-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St.,

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Party Girl It was more than 50 years ago when Wanda Jackson started mixing country with rock and earned a crown as the unofficial “Queen of Rockabilly.” The woman who once dated Elvis Presley and scored hits in the ’50s and ’60s is now 74, but she hasn’t stopped rockin’, nor has she been relegated to the oldies circuit. A 2011 record produced by Jack White brought her back into the spotlight to play for legions of new fans. Born in Oklahoma to a musician father, Jackson started her singing career in Oklahoma City while still in high school and scored her first Top-10 country hit in 1954. Before long she was touring with (and briefly dating) Elvis, who encouraged her rock side. By 1960 she’d crossed over to the pop/rock charts with “Let’s Have a Party” and other rockabilly hits. In the mid-’60s she recorded in Germany and established a toehold overseas. As interest in rockabilly waned back home she moved back into country in the American market. In the ’70s she found Jesus and shifted into gospel. A European rockabilly revival in the ’80s led to extensive touring in England, Germany and Scandinavia. As a new century turned, she was still going strong. A new studio record in 2003 paired her with guests including The Cramps, Rosie Flores and the other Elvis (Costello), but that was just a blip compared to last year, which saw her career once again shooting skyward. It began when Jack White of The White Stripes, The Raconteurs and The Dead Weather asked her if she’d record a cover of Amy Winehouse’s “You Know I’m No Good” for a 45-rpm release. That led to a full album of White-produced covers with the title The Party Ain’t Over, echoing her ’50s hit. Concert dates with White and with young Brit phenom Adele, and guest spots on The Late Show with David Letterman and Conan followed, as well as a slot at Bonnaroo. Jackson’s latest tour with her band The Dusty 45s is working its way up the West Coast. The stop at HSU’s the Depot pairs her with Portland neo-retro rockers Sallie Ford and The Sound Outside, riding high on their latest, Dirty Radio. Showtime is at 9 p.m. on Wednesday, April 18. Tickets are $25; $15 for HSU students. Call 826-3928 or check humboldt.edu/ aspresents for further details. — Bob Doran

Make connections, have fun and raise awareness about prenatal / postpartum community resources, milk sharing and breastfeeding. Proceeds go to Baby Anthony Foundation. 949-547-4897.

THEATER

Damn Yankees. 7:30 p.m. Forum Theater, CR. See April 13 listing. An Unscripted Evening. 8-10 p.m. Studio Theater, HSU. See April 13 listing. Much Ado About Nothing. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. See April 13 listing.

MUSIC WANDA JACKSON

Arcata. Local author and illustrator signs copies of her new children’s book Hey Little Baby. 822-2834.

ETC.

Impropriety Society Presents: Stroke of Luck. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Annual public event for those curious about what the Impropriety Society is. Sultry DJ dancing, erotic games, kinky demonstrations and Imptastic education. $10. www. humboldtimps.com. 826-2739. Old Town Eureka Flower Basket Planting. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Shafer’s Ace Hardware and Garden Center, 2760 E St., Eureka. Eureka Sequoia Garden Club meets to prepare flowers for the Old Town Gazebo hanging baskets for this summer season. E-mail mgoodwin@ northcoast.com. 442-1387. Audubon Society Lecture. 7:30 p.m. Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. “Albatrosses and the Sea of Plastic.” Presentation by biologist Greg Goldsmith, who served as refuge manager on remote Midway Atoll in the Pacific. rras.org. SoHum Label GMOs Meeting. 5-6:30 p.m. Calico’s Cafe, 808 Redwood Drive, Garberville. Learn to gather signatures to get the 2012 GMO Mandatory Labeling Initiative on the ballot. 986-7469. Roller Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Fire Hall. $4.50/$3 5 and under.

14 saturday EVENTS

EPIC Spring Gala w/ Vagabond Opera and Fishtank Ensemble. 6 p.m.-1 a.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 MLK Parkway. Music by Vagabond Opera and Fishtank Ensemble and much more. $25. www.wildcalifornia. org. 822-7711. Republicans of the Year Dinner. 6 p.m. Ingomar Club, Eureka. Annual dinner honors Rob and Cherie Arkley and volunteer Rose Welsh. Featuring keynote speaker Ann Corkery. hannafordp@yahoo.com. 444-8559. Humboldt Families Get Together FUNdraiser. 5-7 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata.

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2012 Biennial Arcata Folk Dance Festival. Workshops 9 a.m.-5 p.m., concert and party 7 p.m. - midnight. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See April 13 listing. Roach Gigz, Clyde Carson, Jacka and Huslah. 7 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Hip hop. $25. www.mateel.org. 923-3368. Fortuna Concert Series. 7:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. Classical concert by violinist Terrie Baune and new piano partner John Chernoff. $8/$6 students and seniors. 768-3118. HSU Jazz Combos. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Four bands, three vocalists, playing gypsy jazz, post-bop, funk, classics, originals and the Star Wars bar tune. $7/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928.

DANCE

USO Dance. 7 p.m. Ferndale Veterans Memorial Building, 1100 Main St. Get out your ’40s-50s fashions and dance the night away. Proceeds benefit Paws for Purple Hearts—Service Dogs for Veterans. $25. 845-6943. Of Time and Rhythm. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 12 listing. Halloween Salsa Dancing. 9 p.m. Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Salsa dancing with DJ King. $5. 444-2072.

OUTDOORS

California State Parks Foundation’s Earth Day Restoration and Cleanup. 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Projects include forest habitat restoration, landscaping. calparks.org/ earthday. 888-987-2757. Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8:30 a.m. Meet at parking lot, end of South I Street. Gary Friedrichsen leads morning birding trip, rain or shine. 442-9353. Manila Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Morning of invasive plant removal. Bring water, wear work clothes; tools, gloves and cookies provided. 444-1397. Open Gardens. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Gardens, College of the Redwoods, Eureka. Roam the 44acre fully fenced property. $5. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Sierra Club Bull Creek Hike. 10:15 a.m. Humboldt Redwoods State Park Visitors Center, Weott. Wind through ancient groves skirting Bull Creek from Founders Grove to Albee Campground, returning along opposite side of creek. Friends of the Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Adam Webster leads 90-minute marsh ecology walk. 826-2359.

FOOD

Tsampa Making Workshop. 7 p.m. Los Bagels Eureka, 403 Second St. Lost Coast Rotaract Club of Eureka hosts workshop on Tibetan tsampa, a mix of barley powder, tea and yak butter. $8. www.StoryInTheSoil. ning.com. 498-9796.

FOR KIDS

Storytime at the Zoo. 1-1:45 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. North Coast Storytellers share tales, fables, myths and legends of animals from North Coast and beyond. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. 441-4263. Second Saturday Family Arts Day. 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Concert with piano teacher Larry Pitts and students while creating photograph silhouettes and hand-tinted photographs. 442-0278.

ETC.

Friends of the Eel River Symposium. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. Celebrating the work of FoER founding director, Nadananda, with an educational gathering. Seven distinguished experts offer brief presentations meant to build public understanding of the Eel River. $20/$60 sliding scale. eelriver.org. 822-3342. Save a Life Saturday. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Humboldt County Chapter of the American Red Cross offers free hands-only (compression-only) CPR and basic first aid training. 443-4521. North Coast Scottish Society Potluck. 5:30 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. Celebration of Tartan Day. Bring your favorite dish to share, table service, utensils and drink. 768-3963. Green House Flea Market. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. The Green House , 860 11th St., Arcata. Art supplies, vintage clothing, furniture, greatness. Humboldt Bonsai Society. 1-3 p.m. Freshwater Elementary School, 75 Greenwood Heights Drive. Monthly meeting. Attendees can bring their trees needing help. Senior Meetup. 8 p.m. Palm Lounge, Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Single seniors meet. Wear a rose in hair or lapel for easy ID. Non-alcohol drinkers welcome. 442-2990. Roller Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Fire Hall. $4.50/$3 5 and under. Spaghetti Feed. 5-7 p.m. Arcata Lutheran Church, 151 East 16th St., Arcata. Music by Allan Adams. Free will donation. Funds used to purchase a new furnace.

15 sunday ELECTIONS

Second District Supervisorial Candidate Debate. 2 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Debate between incumbent Clif Clendenen, and challenger Estelle Fennell. Moderated by Ed Denson and Eric Kirk. dave@maidenhumboldt.com. 923-3368.


Here for Godwit days? Fly on over to

Fire Arts Center

16 monday

THEATER

Much Ado About Nothing. 2 p.m. North Coast Rep. Benefit for Eureka Rotary Club. $25/$12 students and seniors. ncrt.net. 442-6278. Damn Yankees. 2 p.m. Forum Theatre, CR. See April 13 listing.

MUSIC

HSU Percussion Ensemble. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. “First Construction in Metal,” “The Night of the Shooting Stars” and prize-winning sambas. $7/$3 students and seniors. HSUMusic.blogspot.com. 826-3928. Outreach at the Beach. 1-7 p.m. Merryman’s Beach House, Moonstone Beach, Westhaven. Bring your singer/songwriting talent to share and enjoy with other performers. Open Celtic Music Session. 3 p.m. Mosgo’s, 180 Westwood Center, Arcata. Informal monthly gathering of musicians playing Irish and other Celtic music. Hosted by Seabury Gould. seaburygould.com. 845-8167.

DANCE

2012 Biennial Arcata Folk Dance Festival. 9:30 a.m. noon. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See April 13 listing. Second Annual Humboldt International Dance Festival. 4:30 p.m. New World Ballet, 824 L St., Arcata. Week of workshops featuring Cuban salsa, hula, Tahitian, Afro-Cuban, Afro-Haitian, Congolese and modern dance styles. Also features Afro-Cuban and Afro-Haitian drum and song classes. Check website for complete schedules. www.humboldtdance.org. 845-5247. Of Time and Rhythm. 2 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 12 listing.

MOVIES

Wal-Mart: The High Cost Of Low Price. 4 p.m. Ink Annex, 47B West Third St., Eureka. Documentary shows Wal-Mart’s impact on American families and communities. humboldtvswalmart@gmail.com. Opera Film Series. 4 p.m. Fortuna 6 Theatres, 1241 Main St. Bizet’s Carmen performed by State Opera Berlin on the big screen. 725-2121.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society SoHum Field Trip. 9 a.m. Southern Humboldt Community Park, 934 Sprowl Creek Road, Garberville. Meet in parking lot off Kimtu Road. Audubon field trip to revel in beauty of park and its avian inhabitants. 986-1112. Audubon Society Eureka Marsh Field Trip. 9 a.m. Meet at foot of West Del Norte St., Eureka. One to two hour flat loop hike led by Ralph Bucher through habitats, from bay and mudflat to riparian and marshland. 839-4365.

FOOD

Dow’s Prairie Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Delicious pancake breakfast while meeting your neighbors. $6. dowsprairiegrange. org. dowsgrange@gmail.com. 840-0100.

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 MLK Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242. Humboldt Yacht Club Open House. 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Annual open house parking lot rummage sale. 267-8272.

Meet Your New Neighbor!

The Robert Greenwald-directed documentary Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price conFILM cludes with a segment highlighting communities that 45th Annual Humboldt Film Festival. 7 p.m. Van have banded together to prevent the megacorp from Duzer Theatre, HSU. Local filmmaker’s night with Maria Matteoli, Cassandra Hesselsetting up shop. Intended tine from Film Humboldt and to inspire other towns Sean McLaughlin from Access that may be staring down Humboldt. $5, HSU student the barrel of the world’s free. filmfest@humboldt.edu largest retailer, the gospel 826.4113. music-infused montage DANCE features pictures of signMonday Night Swings. 7:30carrying, anti-Wal-Mart 10:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L protesters while names St., Arcata. Mark and Deb of 50 or so communiAllen teach beginning night ties that have collectively club two step. Lesson from said “no” flash across the 7:30-8:30 p.m. $5. 845-8795. screen. One community Second Annual Humboldt that declared “victory:” International Dance Festival. New World Ballet. See April Eureka, California. 15 listing. Go, us! As we all know, ETC. in 1999 Eureka residents FUTURE WAL-MART PHOTO BY ANDREW GOFF Humboldt Cribbage Club. voted to keep a proposed 6-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Wal-Mart off the Balloon Campton Road, Eureka. Casual Track. So, we were a natural fit for the “victory” list games and lessons to prepare you for competitive play. cribbage.org. 444-3161. in Greenwald’s documentary, released in late 2005. Communication and Healing Tools. 7 p.m. Emma Center, But then again, as we all know, someone fired the 920 Samoa Blvd., Arcata. Workshop for women on nongospel choir. Wal-Mart — or as it was long mysteriviolent communication, guided imagery, affirmations, ously listed in official City of Eureka building plans, etc. 825-6680. “TENANT” — craftily sneaked its way into the old Gottschalk’s wing of the Bayshore Mall and will tentatively begin seducing Humboldtians with low prices this summer. Public opinion about the Wal-Mart invasion has been more mixed this time around. Impassioned FILM comments across the local blogosphere have fallen on 45th Annual Humboldt Film Festival. 7 p.m. Van Duzer two sides: those excited by the prospect of jobs, jobs, Theatre, HSU. Young Media Makers Big Screen Showcase jobs and those who, like, pay attention to Wal-Mart’s Night with films by local youth and guest speakers Allen Larson and Kip Baldwin from United Filmmaker’s extensive, well-documented track record of (deep Association. $5, HSU student free. filmfest@humboldt. breath) aggressively driving out small businesses, proedu 826.4113. viding low wages and meager benefits to employees, DANCE importing sweat shop-produced products from China, Second Annual Humboldt International Dance Festidiscriminating against women and minori… val. New World Ballet. See April 15 listing. Say, you wanna just watch that documentary we MOVIES mentioned above? ‘Cuz there’s gonna be a screening The Poseidon Adventure. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County of Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price on Sunday, Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Screening of 1972 action/ adventure disaster film directed by Ronald Neame and April 14, at 4 p.m. at the Ink Annex, 47B Third St, starring Gene Hackman. Part of April’s Based on the Book Eureka. If you miss that one, you can catch it again on Film Series. Hosted by Michael Logan. 269-1910. Friday, April 27, at 6:30 p.m. in HSU’s Founders Hall ETC. Room 118. (Or, technically, you can watch it online. But Aquaculture/Mariculture Forum. 1-3 p.m. Humboldt it’s good to meet people in your community.) Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Discuss For more info, email humboldtvswalmart@gmail. the feasibility of developing an aquaculture/mariculture com or check out the People of Humboldt County facility, gather community input on overall vision for the project and determine next steps and which partners and Against Wal-Mart Expansion in Eureka group on Facestakeholders will take it forward. book. Or Google around. CASA Day Training Class. 6 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 —Andrew Goff Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Recruiting volunteers to advocate

Spring & Garden

SALE

Garden-& Nature-Themed Ceramic & Glass Art

Friday, April 20 noon-9pm Saturday & Sunday April 21 & 22 9am-4pm 520 South G Street, Arcata

... across from the marsh

www.fireartsarcata.com

17 tuesday

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012

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An Epic Gala Environmental Protection Information Center. The name might seem a bit unwieldy, but that’s only because it was designed around the awesome acronym: EPIC. The Humboldt-based organization has been fighting one epic fight after another for 30-plus years, mostly revolving around forests, rivers and wild lands in general (details on the latest battles at wildlands.org). Saturday’s EPIC Spring Gala benefit at the Arcata Community Center promises to be an epic affair of a different sort, pairing neovaudeville outfits from up north and down south with like-minded locals. With Eric Sternout out front on accordion and often operatic vocals, Portland’s Vagabond Opera throws Hot Club-style gypsy jazz, Ukrainian folk-punk, klezmer, swing and yes, opera into a hand-cranked grinder to create a sound it describes as “Bohemian operatic steampunk cabaret.” Regular visits from the wild, Los Angeles-based Fishtank Ensemble have earned the band a dedicated fanbase in Humboldt. Mad gypsy fiddler Fabrice Martinez, musical saw player and vocalist Ursula Knudson (like Sternout, trained in opera), flamenco guitarist Douglas Smolens and Serbian rockabilly bassist Djordje Stijepovic are just about done with a new record tentatively titled Edge of the World, which is an apt description of the territory they inhabit. Adding to the cabaret atmosphere: belly dancers from the Ya Habibi Dance Company, fire spinners from Mischief Lab, Steven Weven and the Humboldt Circus jugglers and ironically unfunny Master of Ceremonies Albert McFee from Dell’Arte. The EPIC Spring Gala starts at 6 p.m. at the Arcata Community Center (321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway) with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres followed by a sit-down gourmet dinner served by the Humboldt Fire Girls. The musical cabaret gets under way at 8. Tickets are on two tiers: $50 gets you the dinner/ show package. Skip dinner and pay just $25, $20 if you’re a student. Be sure to bring extra money since drinks are extra and there’s also an epic silent auction with art, restaurant and shopping certificates, vacation and spa packages, etc. Advance tickets can be found at Wildberries, Redway Liquor, at the EPIC office in Arcata (145 South G St.; 822-7711) or online at wildcalifornia.org. — Bob Doran

FOR KIDS

Family Literacy Night. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Featuring local storyteller and juggler Ross Mackinney. Each child receives a new book. 269-1910.

ETC.

Meet the Agency Night. 7 p.m. Adoption Horizons. 10 W. Seventh St., Suite F, Eureka. Open to anyone interested in discussing local adoption services and options. 444-9909.

19 thursday FILM VAGABOND OPERA PHOTO BY BEN Z. MUND

for children in foster care throughout Humboldt County. Fall advocacy training class being held from April 17 to May 17. 443-3197. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161. Healing Rooms of the Redwood Coast. 6:30-9 p.m. Wood Street Chapel, 1649 Wood St., Fortuna. Non-denominational prayer group. healingrooms.com. 834-5800.

18 wednesday FILM

45th Annual Humboldt Film Festival. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Animation and Experimental Night with guest judge John Coda. $5, HSU student free. filmfest@ humboldt.edu 826.4113.

MUSIC

Wanda Jackson. 9 p.m. The Depot, HSU. Queen of rockabilly, touring artist for more than 50 years, performs. Sallie Ford and The Sound Outside open. $25/$15 HSU students. humboldt.edu/aspresents. 826-3928. Midnite. 6 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Roots reggae from St. Croix, Virgin Islands with Jah Sun and The Fyah Squad. Dinner at 6 p.m. Music at 8 p.m. $35/$30 adv. mateel.org. 923-3368.

DANCE

Second Annual Humboldt International Dance Festival. New World Ballet. See April 15 listing.

MOVIES

Opera Film Series. 7 p.m. Fortuna 6 Theatres. See April 15 listing.

OUTDOORS

Friends of the Dunes Work Day. 5-6:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Develop native landscaping around and on top of the center. 444-1397.

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 •

45th Annual Humboldt Film Festival. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Documentary Night with guest judges John Coda and Tasha Oldham. $5, HSU student free. filmfest@humboldt.edu 826.4113.

MUSIC

Sailing To Atlantis: Visions Of A Nation Underwater. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Jerry Martien reads a cycle of poems about tidal waves and hurricanes, floods and foreclosures, with musical score composed and performed by Danny Montgomery and friends. $10. jmartien@suddenlink.net. 822-1575.

DANCE

Second Annual Humboldt International Dance Festival. New World Ballet. See April 15 listing.

ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery. See April 12 listing.

LECTURE

Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. 5:30-7 p.m. Gist Hall Room 218, HSU. Seth Wilson on “Conservation on the Edge: Large Carnivores and Building Communities of Coexistence.” Co-sponsored by Environment and Community Graduate Program and Schatz Energy Research Center. humboldt.edu/envcomm/speaker_series. 826-3653.

ETC.

CASA Day Training Class. 6 p.m. CASA of Humboldt. See April 17 listing.

Heads Up…

Are you the next Rutabaga Queen? A queen will be chosen to preside over the 2012 Kinetic Grand Championship at the Rutabaga Ball, Saturday, May 19. Hopeful monarchs can find spiritual guidance and helpful information at the newly updated RutabagaQueen.com. Fair Performers Needed. Redwood Acres is seeking performers for the 2012 Humboldt Made Fair, June 21– 24. All genres of creative performers are encouraged to apply: musicians, jugglers, magicians, artists, theatre performers, dancers and comedians. Contact Tony West at 445-4986 or west@northcoastsbdc.org for more information. ●

northcoastjournal.com

(and don’t forget to recycle your empties!)


AMERICAN REUNION

The Crass Rehash Cash-In

A pair of late-90s retreads wallow in this era of big-budget mediocrity By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews AMERICAN REUNION. As we left the theater, my wife turned to me and said, “Well, that wasn’t very funny.” She’s right; there are a handful of successful jokes in the latest American Pie sequel, but the whole thing is generally flat and pointless. I was never much of a fan of this franchise. When the first movie came out in 1999, I was an outspoken detractor. This may have had something to do with my generally sexless high school experience, or the fact that I was deep into a period of cinephiliac snobbery. Or maybe it was my tendency to bristle at anything so wantonly commercial and popular. Whatever the cause, I didn’t connect with the characters in American Pie, and the intervening years haven’t changed my mind. I skipped all the previous sequels, so I’m not aware of all the keen insights into contemporary sexual mores — and kneeslappers! — surely contained therein. Fortunately, American Reunion opens with enough ham-fisted exposition to catch-up even the completely uninitiated. The gist is that the years haven’t been as good to the principal characters as they might have hoped. Whether it’s new parent-

hood, romantic mismatches or unsatisfying career paths, turns out adulthood isn’t all awesomeness. Good thing it’s time for a 13th high school reunion! Cue the jockrock and dick jokes! Trying to keep one foot apiece in the worlds of comedy and drama, Reunion does a disservice to both. Not surprisingly, the movie is at its best when it doesn’t overreach. The most successful moments are pretty low-brow, while the heavier “grown-up” content falls flat. The cast all turn in respectable performances, but the standout performers (Seann William Scott, Allyson Hannigan, Eugene Levy, Jennifer Coolidge and John Cho) deserve better than this. By the end, American Reunion has a disconcerting air of inevitability and pointlessness. Did we really need another sequel to a teen sex comedy that inexplicably became a huge success? Of course not, but as long as there’s money to be made, I’m sure we’ll keep getting them. R. 113m. TITANIC 3D. Speaking of crass commercialism, the only other opening this weekend was Titanic 3D. The first time around (1997) I railed as loudly against continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

35


April 14 - 21 Sat April 14 - House Of Floyd Doors at 8 p.m. $28/$24 All ages Sun April 15 -

Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG

Mon April 16 & Tue April 17 -

Banff Mountain Film Festival

Doors at 6 p.m. $15/$12/$10 All ages Sat April 21- Pink Floyd’s The Wall Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 Rated R

Movie Times

continued from previous page * = EARLY SHOWS

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 4/13-4/19 unless otherwise noted. tHE RAid: REdEMPtiON “in indonESian wiTh EngliSh SuBTiTlES” 2:10, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 OCtOBER BABY 12:35, 3:15, 5:50, 8:30 tHE tHREE StOOgES 12:05, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 CABiN iN tHE WOOdS 1:20, 3:50, 6:20, 8:50 LOCkOut 11:55, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 AMERiCAN REuNiON 12:40, 3:25, 6:15, 9:05 titANiC 3d 11:50, 4:00, 8:05 WRAtH OF tHE titANS 3d 3:00, 8:10 WRAtH OF tHE titANS 2d 12:25, 5:35 MiRROR MiRROR 12:50, 3:30, 6:05, 8:45 HuNgER gAMES 11:45, 1:30, 5:00, 6:00, 8:20, 9:15 JOHN CARtER 2:55 21 JuMP StREEt 1:05, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 4/13-4/19 unless otherwise noted. CABiN iN tHE WOOdS tHE tHREE StOOgES LOCkOut AMERiCAN REuNiON titANiC 3d WRAtH OF tHE titANS 3d WRAtH OF tHE titANS 2d MiRROR MiRROR HuNgER gAMES

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET EUREKA

MONDAY-SATURDAY

11:30AM-9:00PM

*2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 *12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:05, 9:25 *1:45, 4:10, 6:35, 9:00 *1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40 11:50, 3:55, 8:00 *12:25, 8:10 3:00, 5:35 *12:55, 3:35, 6:10, 8:50 *11:40, 2:50, 6:00, 9:10

Minor theatre 707-822-3456

1001 h Street, arcata Times are for 4/13-4/19 unless otherwise noted.

HuNgER gAMES SALMON FiSHiNg iN tHE YEMEN AMERiCAN REuNiON

*1:30, 4:45, 8:00 *1:10, 3:45, 6:20, 9:00 *1:20, 3:55, 6:35, 9:15

Fortuna theater

707-725-2121 1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 4/13 -4/19 unless otherwise noted.

Hunan, Szechuan, Peking, Cantonese & Asian Cooking Beer & Wine Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week 4th & D Streets • Eureka 269-2618

tHE tHREE StOOgES AMERiCAN REuNiON titANiC 3d WRAtH OF tHE titANS 3d MiRROR MiRROR tHE HuNgER gAMES

*12:05, 2:20, 4:35, 7:00, 9:15 *1:00, 4:10, 6:45, 9:35 *12:00, 3:45, 7:30 *1:15, 4:15, 6:55, 9:30 *12:15, *2:30, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25 *12:20, 3:25, 6:30, 9:45

garberville theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood drive, garberville ACt OF vALOR tHE ARtiSt

4/13 & 4/15-16: 7:30 4/17 - 19: 7:30 ExCEPt 4/18: 6:30

Titanic 3D

James Cameron’s monstrous creation as I have at anything in my life. Like American Pie, it arrived when I was at the peak of my self-righteousness, and to my dismay it became a gigantic cultural phenomenon. I can’t say exactly what provoked my rage, which in hindsight seems so silly and immature — at least intellectually; on an emotional level there’s still some glimmer of that white-hot hatred. Looking back on it, Titanic rang in the end of a Hollywood era that started in the 1970s. It was huge, overwrought and dominated by technical wizardry. I’ll grant that it’s an amazing achievement, and often spectacular to look at, but the writing is frustratingly simple and hackneyed. I don’t have a problem with love stories, but this one has always felt antiseptic to me. Because it lacks subtlety and spark, the plot becomes a vehicle for the effects sequences. The story, which should be the heart of the movie, is secondary, almost an afterthought. And this seems to have become the blueprint for the bulk of the product Hollywood is now churning out. Gone are the days of ambitious, moderately budgeted studio movies. That middle-ground is deserted: Giant, underwritten blockbusters dominate the landscape, with occasional incursions from micro-budget independents. It may be worth noting that I really enjoy much of James Cameron’s work — everything from The Terminator (1984) through True Lies (1994), actually. When he was working in the action genre, his shortcomings as a screenwriter didn’t undermine the effectiveness of the movies. But when he decided to take on “issues” (true love in Titanic, environmentalism and intolerance in Avatar), he lost me altogether. Rather than surrendering 3½ hours to

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast JourNal • thursday, JaN. 12, 2012

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

31

Titanic 3D, I rented The Adventures of Tintin and enjoyed it immensely. Not only is it visually striking, but the plot is tense and action-packed, and the characters live vividly on the screen. Titanic is rated PG and runs 194m. Tintin is PG and 107m. —John J. Bennett

Previews THE CABIN IN THE WOODS. From the ingenious duo Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard (creators of Buffy the Vampire Slayer) comes a twisting, turning subversion of a classic horror/suspense setup. R. 95m. THE THREE STOOGES. The Farrelly brothers, whose work has declined precipitously since There’s Something About Mary, drag Larry, Curly and Moe into their scatological playpen. PG. 92m. SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN. A British fisheries expert (Ewan McGregor) gets convinced by a flirty consultant (Emily Blunt) to help a loony sheik (Amr Waked) transplant his favorite sport, flyfishing, to the high desert. Based on the book by Paul Torday. PG13. 111m. THE RAID: REDEMPTION. Hailed by critics as “the best action movie in decades,” this violent, Indonesian martial arts import follows an elite special-forces team into a 30-story building filled with gangsters. Prolonged scenes of ass-whoopin’ ensue. In Indonesian with English subtitles. R. 101m. LOCKOUT. Guy Pearce plays a man in the near-future who gets wrongly convicted of espionage against the U.S. of A. He’s offered freedom in exchange for rescuing the president’s daughter from an outer space prison where the violent inmates have escaped. PG13. 95m. OCTOBER BABY. The main character in this right-wing Christian propaganda


Communication

film is “the survivor of a failed abortion,” a young woman who suffers from epilepsy, asthma, joint problems and a mental disorder because her evil, evil mother tried to murder her in utero. Take a guilt trip to salvation. PG13. 107m. Sunday at the Arcata Theatre Lounge, Rick Moranis plays a scientist who accidentally reduces the size of his children, along with some neighborhood friends, prompting him to inform his wife, “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids“ (1989). PG. 93m. 6 p.m. On Monday and Tuesday, the Banff Mountain Film Festival delivers the stunning backdrops and adrenal secretions of adventure sports, from rock climbing and mountain biking to skiing, kayaking and tightrope walking. Doors at 6, show at 7 p.m.

Continuing 21 JUMP STREET. Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum star as cops who go undercover, inside the plot of a 1980s sitcom starring Johnny Depp. R. 109m. ACT OF VALOR. Active-duty Navy SEALs star as active-duty Navy SEALs in this fictionalized account of Navy SEALs on active duty. Paid for with your tax dollars. R. 101m. THE ARTIST. Mostly silent, blackand-white homage to cinema’s mostly silent, black-and-white early years. Winner of five Academy Awards including Best Picture. PG13. 103m. THE HUNGER GAMES. In a dystopian future state, teenagers get conscripted into a televised death match. Based on Suzanne Collins’ bestseller. PG. 142m. JOHN CARTER. A hunky Civil War vet gets transported to Mars, where, with the help of some four-armed green dudes, he must save a princess. PG13. 132m. MIRROR MIRROR. Beautiful sets, visual panache and Julia Roberts can’t save this flat and underwritten update on the story of Snow White. PG. 106m. WRATH OF THE TITANS. Perseus, a yoked demigod, stabs 3D computer images with his trident in order to save his “holier than thou” dad, Zeus. 99m. PG13. —Ryan Burns l

List your class – just 50 cents/ word per issue! • Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts ONE-ON-ONE INTRO TO LAMPWORKING. Learn basic torching-working. $50 (2 hour workshop) materials included. For more information call Kevin Stockwell at 826-1896. Fire Arts Center 520 South St. Arcata, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0412) CEDAR LEAF SHAWLETTE AT YARN. Thurs. May 3 & 10, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost $35, plus materials. Make this beautiful shawl with leaf border from Alana Dakos. Beginning knitting level required. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-0426) INTRO. TO ENTRELAC AT YARN. Tues. May 1, 15 & 29, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost $45, plus materials. Entrelac is a fascinating technique that makes a knit fabric that looks woven. Beginning knitting level required. Call 443-YARN to register and for more info. (AC-0426) CAN’T BELIEVE I’M CROCHETING WITH KC. $25 Thurs.s, Noon-2 p.m., with Kelly Card of KC Made It. Let me introduce you to the wonderful world of crocheting! Designed for complete beginners. Learn most of the basic stitches: how to chain, single crochet, and double crochet, how to work flat and in the round. We will talk about gauge, what hook goes with what yarn and how to read a pattern. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0426) CROCHET FLOWER CLASS. Fri.s, Noon-2 p.m. $25, with Kelly Card of KC Made It. Make a variety of flowers to adorn any kind of handwork! Explore several methods of construction, and leave with a bouquet of new skills. Basic crochet skills required. Bring a few hooks and scraps of yarn. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0426) FREE EUREKA BUTTON CLUB. 2nd Sun. of the month, 2 p.m. Free We are mad about buttons old and new. Our meetings are fun and educational. Come and learn more about all of those buttons in your button box. Guests are welcome any time. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0426) INTRO TO WET FELTING. Thurs.s, 6-8 p.m. $35 +$10 material fee. Learn basic wet felting techniques using warm soapy water and wool roving. Create felted balls, felted beads, pin cushions, coasters and flat felt. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab.com. (AC-0426) VERY BEGINNING SEWING Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. $30 with Jodi Lee. Learn to use and care for your sewing machine. We will have you sewing a straight line in no time, then on to fancier stitches. Origin Design Lab, 426 3rd St., Old Town Eureka, (707) 497-6237, www.origindesignlab. com. (AC-0429)

LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. “The Internet has changed everything: how we communicate, do business, and find information,” says Lifetree representative Craig Cable. “We’ll explore whether it’s changing us and what that might mean for the future.” Sun., April 15, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@hotmail.com. (CMM-0412) HAPPIER HEALTHIER KIDS. Learn what vital aspects of childhood are missing for many of today’s kids and how you can help. A fun and empowering workshop for parents, teachers, grandparents and anyone who loves a child. Workshop is offered at a sliding scale donation $10-$25. No one is turned away for lack of funds. Wed. April 18 6:30-8:30 p.m. Contact Diana (707) 445-4642 consciousparentingsolutions.com (CMM-0412) INSIDE OUT PARENTING. Five part series following the Conscious Parenting process: Awareness of the Self, Care of the Self, Awareness of the Child, Care of the Child $125 payable $25 per class Tues’s 6:30-8:30 p.m, begins April 24, Contact Diana for more info and to register (707) 445-4642, consciousparentingsolutions.com (CMM-0419) SIMPLIFY. Six class session based on the book Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier and More Secure Kids by Kim John Payne. Learn how making simple changes to your child’s room, schedule and the information they take in can impact the health and happiness of the whole family. Six Sun.s 2-4 p.m, April 22 - June 3. Cost $175 and includes an interactive workbook. Payable $25 per class, 25% discount for couples. Other payment and scheduling options are available. Contact Diana (707) 445-4642 consciousparentingsolutions.com (CMM-0419)

Computers

ADOBE CS5 PROJECT WORKSHOP. Get individualized instruction as you create a project of your choice, from start to finish, using one or more of the Adobe applications Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign or Dreamweaver. Creat that newsletter, logo, website or digital art projects with guidance from an experienced designer. With Annie Reid. Wed., April 21-May 5, 6:30-9 p.m. and Sat., 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $150. Pre-registration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended. (C-0419)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

DISCOVER ARGENTINE TANGO! Beginning lessons Sun., 5-5:45 p.m. Practica 6-7p.m., $6 Studio of Dance Arts, Eureka. 445-2655, 822-6170. (DMT-0628) INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE ARTIST SPIRAL. teaching FLOW WAND, 4/17 and DYNAMIC HOOP EMBODIMENT, 4/18 in Arcata. For videos, class description & registration : www.chakranation.com. PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED! (DMT-0412) DANCE WITH BRUCE & CAREY HART. Swing, Fox Trot, Waltz, Latin, Western Swing and more! Five-week classes beginning Wed., April 18, Jacoby Creek School and Thurs.,April 19, Cutten Elementary School. Beginners: 6:30 p.m., Intermediates: 8 p.m. $30/singles, $50/ couples, $20/high school students or younger. For more information call 839-1792. (DMT-0412) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-0531) BURLESQUE, BALLROOM & BALANCE: Guest instructors Jenica and Eric Zimmer share their unique talents at North Coast Dance. April 13-15. Fri. Ladies only Burlesque, Sat. Ballroom, Sun. A Dancer’s Workout and Arm Styling. Like us on Facebook and search WCS Workshops with Jenica & Eric Zimmer! www. ericzimmer.com, www.jenicazimmer.com. Call (707) 464-3638 to register. Sponsored by dancewithdebbie. biz! (DMT-0412) DANCE WITH DEBBIE’S: Ballroom, Latin, Swing, and Yoga group and private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex, Eureka. Drop in on our Fri. Night Swing 7:30-9:30 p.m. Contact (707) 464-3638 or debbie@ dancewithdebbie.biz. (DMT-0426) MODERN DANCE. With Bonnie Hossack. Int/Adv., Sun.s, 10:30 a.m.-noon and Wed.s, 6:15-7:45 p.m.; Int. for teens, Mon.s, 4-5:30 p.m., Pan Arts Studio at 1049 C Samoa (Samoa @ K St.), Arcata. $10/class; $5/ students with valid ID. Info: 601-1151 or panartstudiodance.gmail.com. (DMT-0531) TRILLIUM DANCE STUDIO PRESENTS: Salsa Lessons with Ozzy Ricardez and Miss Julie. All levels Welcome. Ongoing, drop-in Fri. nights, 7-8:15 p.m. 1925 Alliance Rd., in Arcata (x st. Foster) $7 single $10 couple. (DMT-0531) continued on next page

North Coast Academy Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastjournal.com• • NORTH North COAST Coast JOURNAL JourNal •• THURSDAY, thursday, APRIL april 12, 12, 2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com

37


continued from previous page GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1227) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-1227) BELLY DANCING WITH SHOSHANNA. Feel fabulous in classes for all levels in Arcata at Redwood Raks. 616-6876 or Shoshannaland.com. (DMT-1227)

Fitness

ZUMBA FITNESS. Sat.s, 10-11 a.m. Lose weight, get fit, have fun. Sun Yi’s Academy, 1215 Guintoli Ln., Arcata. $5 class. Michele, 445-2355. (F-0517) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session: Feb. 1-June 15. Classes: Beginner Basics, Tues.s & Thurs.s, 6-7:30 p.m. Advanced Adults, Mon.s & Wed.s, 6-8 p.m. All Ages All Levels Community Class, Sat.s, Noon-2 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. HSU Students First Class Free. (F-0426) NIA. Nia has arrived in Humboldt County! Dance fusion fitness program blending healing arts, dance arts, and martial arts. Weds at the Bayside Grange, 6:30-7:30pm., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. Your first class is always FREE! Regular fees $6/$4 Grange Members. Pauline Ivens 707-441-9102, waterpolly@gmail.com (F-0426) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-1206) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-1206) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at the Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707-845-4307. (F-0531) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1227) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Lau Kune Do Kung Fu, Muay Thai, Stand-up/Kickboxing & MMA. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1227) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227)

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www. northcoastaikido.org. (F-1227) RHYTHM YOGA. Hatha Yoga is combined with aerobic movement and an energizing soundtrack. Liven up your morning exercise routine! Tues.s & Thurs.s 7-8:30 a.m. $6.50/class or free with Adorni Center Fitness Membership. Call 441-4248 or visit adornicenter.com.(F-0412)

Garden

FOUNDATION COURSE. In Cannabis Law, Medicinal Uses and Horticulture. $275. Sat. & Sun., May 5-6, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. each day. This is the beginning level class. Participants will leave knowing how to start, grow, harvest, dry/cure and store their own medicine. We will address small indoor soil systems but have a focus on outdoor organic practices. The Medical Applications class addresses the cannabinoids and their effects, delivery methods, dosage and contraindications. The Law class covers the history of cannabis in the US as well as existing and evolving California law. This course held at Hummingbird Healing Center 1626 Myrtle Ave. Eureka CA. Register online at www.707cannabiscollege.com or call 707 672- 9860. (G-0503) PURE ANALYTICS WITH SAMANTHA MILLER. FREE, The Potency Testing Process. Session 4 of 4 series on medical cannabis. Fri., May 4, 6-8 p.m. This class will address the types of equipment used, how results are calculated and explain how to compare results from different types of equipment. Participants will learn the importance sampling, standards and calibration and understand the extraction process. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online at www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (G-0503)

Kids & Teens

SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE. Learn dance routines, and perform for family and friends. Ages 5-8. John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Sat.s,10:30-11:15 a.m., beginning April 14. $25. Call 441-4244 or visit Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. (K-0412) TEEN FILMMAKING. Learn basics of screenwriting & film production! Work on original movie with an experienced filmmaker. Ages 12-17. Nine-week class at John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St. Tues.s, 6-8 p.m., starting April 17. $25. Scholarships available. Call 441-4240 or visit Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. (K-0412)

Lectures

ACCESSING POWER: GENDER ISSUES IN THE CANNABIS MOVEMENT. With Kyndra Miller and Alexis Wilson-Briggs. Sat., April 28, 2-5 p.m. $45. Seminar explores the role of women in the marijuana movement. The first half of the course focused on providing an historical framework of the first three waves of American feminism. This second half is an interactive discussion about the current representations of women in the movement, gender specific legal issues, and the role of sex activism. The three hour seminar is offered for the purpose of highlighting the fundamental role that women play in legalizing marijuana. At 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Rd., #4, in Meadows Business Park. Register online at www.707cannabiscollege.com, or call (707) 6729860. (LE-0426) CANNABIS IN THE HISTORY OF HUMAN SPIRITUALITY. With Wendy Read part 1 of a 2 part series Fri., May 18, 6-9 p.m. $45. We’ll look at how religion has evolved and the role that Cannabis has played in the “great leaps forward” of human evolution and enlightenment up to the time of Christ. Excellent introduction to our Plant Spirit Communication class. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online at www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 672-9860. (LE-0517)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1227)

SEQUOIA PARK ZOO’S OUT OF SIGHT ANIMALS. For 5-7 year olds. Sat., April 14. Join us for a wild adventure. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo. net for info. (K-0412)

MANDALA. Explore the history of the mandala, create your own mandala and construct a group mandala outdoors. With Patty Yancey. Thurs’s, May 3-17, 1-3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0426)

BOYS TO MEN RAVEN WEEKEND, AGES 9-12. Packed with fun, games, adventure, mystery and stories. We celebrate each boy’s unique truth and gifts, and his relationships to family, community and society, while assisting him to decipher his own feelings and reflect on his life. May 11-13. For more info: (707) 633-4855 or www.boystomenredwoodcoast.org. (K-0419)

GLOBAL ECONOMICS. A dynamic introduction to the key concepts in economics to help you understand what you read and hear in the press. With Laurent Cleenewerck. Tues., May 1-22, 10 a.m.-Noon. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 8265880. (O-0419)

CAPOEIRA KIDS. Spring Session 2012: Feb. 1-June 15. Classes: Beginner Kids (Age 5-7), Tues.s & Thurs.s, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Beginner kids (Age 8 & up), Tues.s & Thurs.s, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Toddler Tumblers (Ages 3 & 4), Tues.s, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Advanced Kids (Ages 5-7), Mon.s & Wed.s, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Advanced Kids (Ages 8 & up), Mon.s & Wed.s, 4:30-6 p.m. Arcata, (707) 498-6155. www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (K-0426) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1227)

BRIDGES & FERRIES OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY. Examine some of the more exciting river and creek crossings in a PowerPoint program featuring old photos, postcards and maps. With Jerry and Gisela Rohde. Sat., April 21, 1-3 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0412) FINGERPAINTING ON YOUR IPAD. An introduction to iPad painting using the ArtStudio app, with local artist Claire Iris Schencke. Thurs., April 19-May 10, 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0412) LEAVING A LEGACY. Living a Life of Significance. Identify your strengths and stories, consider your audience, and learn the basic steps to leave a purposeful legacy. With Scott Hammond. Thurs., April 19-26, 6-8 p.m. $35/OLLI members, $60/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880. (O-0412)


Field notes THE HOME MUSEUM, PRESERVING YOUR HEIRLOOMS. Discover simple, low-tech and inexpensive ways to repair and preserve your treasured items, so you can enjoy them now and later pass them on. With Pam Service. Sat., April 28 and May 5, 1-3 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880 (O-0419)

Spiritual

THE SACRED MOVEMENTS OF THE FOURTH WAY. Dances for Self-Development and Awareness, April 14, 28, May 12, 26, Sat. 9:45-11:30 a.m., 854 10th St. Arcata, upstairs. (626) 379-7641. (S-0412) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www.tarotofbecoming. com. (S-0517)

TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE & WOMEN’S HEALTH. Learn how TCM (including acupuncture and herbal medicine) is well suited to helping women stay healthy and vibrant from birth through old age. With Lupine Wread. Thurs., April 19, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20. Preregistration required. Call HSU Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (W-0412) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Evening classes begin Sept. 4, 2012 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1227)

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-1227)

QIGONG WORKSHOP. REGISTER BY 4/15 FOR EARLYBIRD DISCOUNT! Six Sun’s, 9-10:30a.m., April 22-June 3 (no class 5/13), Arcata. (707) 498-1009 MistyMountainHealingArts.com (W-0531)

Sports/Recreation

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. EAT LOCAL! WILD FOODS BANQUET, May 5, 2012. Learn to positively identify and prepare many wild delicacies with numerous recipes being shared. PETROLIA SEAWEEDING WEEKEND, with Allison Poklemba. June 23-24, 2012. Learn how to identify, ethically harvest, and prepare local sea vegetables. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442-8157. (W-0426)

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat. 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parksrec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-0419) MEN’S SOFTBALL LEAGUE. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. April 28- June 9. Games on Sat’s, 11:30, 2:30 or 5 p.m. at Perigot Park, Blue Lake. $400/team. Winner receives Championship T-Shirts! Register at Blue Lake City Hall, www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932 for more information. (SR-0419) SKATING AT EUREKA MUNI! Fri.s & Sat.s, 6-8:30 p.m. Roll with your friends and family as you enjoy great music and funky strobe lights. 1120 F St. 17 & under $4, Adults $4.75, skate rental included. first-come first served. Call 441-4223 or visit adornicenter.com. (SR-0412)

Therapy/Support

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1227) JOLENE HAYES. Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist will guide you to uncovering and resolving whatever is blocking you from fulfilling your greatest potential so you can experience a life of creative expression, peace and joy. Call 707-499-9207 or email jolenehayes@sbcglobal.net to make appointment. (T-1227)

Vocational

CALIFORNIA NOTARY PUBLIC CLASS & EXAM. Become a California State Notary Public. One-day class meets the requirements to sit for the California state notary exam. CR McKinleyville, Fri., May 4, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Information or to register, call College of the Redwoods Community Education at 269-4000 or www.redwoods.edu, visit Community Education link. (V-0412)

Wellness/Bodywork

FLOWING WITH THE ELEMENTS. 5 class series on the Foundations of Chinese Medicine. We will cover Meridian Theory, Five Elements,, Medical Qi Gong, Aromatherapy and much more. Class dates April 28, May 26, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25. 12 p.m-4 p.m., taught by Jessica Baker, Licensed Acupuncturist and held at Jade Dragon Medical Spa, 827 Bayside Rd. Arcata. Price for the series is $350 for practitioners, $300 for nonpractitioners. Call 707-822-4300 to register. (W-0426)

Buster is an 18-hand (72 inch tall), 18-year old Percheron draft horse, rePresenting half the fleet of Marty l’herault’s old town carriage co. eohiPPus suPeriMPosed at the saMe scale.

HOLOTROPIC BREATHWORK. Full day workshop in Arcata. May 12. Contact Martin 498-1080. holotropicbreath@yahoo.com (W-0503)

NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING/FERTILITY AWARENESS. Safe, effective, fun, women & men, all ages. For class call Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marla_joy@ suddenlink.net (W-0426) DANCING FOR BIRTH: PREGNANCY/ POSPARTUM FITNESS. If you can walk you can dance! Classes are fun and casual, no experience needed. It’s a feel-good workout with world dance movements that will help you have a more satisfying birth experience. Babies are welcome. Two classes available: Sun.s, 2-3:30 p.m. with Sarah Biggs doula and educator, phone, 8404617, pacificbirth.com, and Wed.s, 11-12:30 p.m. with Jyesha Wren, aspiring midwife and dancer, phone: (831) 428-9647, www.jyesha-dfb.com). $10/class & first class free in Arcata at the Humboldt Capoeira Academy. (W-0705) SOAP MAKING. With Jan Neal Sat., May 19, 11 a.m.2 p.m. $40 + $20 lab fee. Learn to make luscious, soothing soaps, choosing from the finest herbs, spices and oils, to make it your own. It is also an option to use healing cannabis if you have a valid 215 recommendation. All materials with exception of cannabis will be provided. You will leave with your very own bar(s) of soap. 707 Campus, 1881 Barnett Ct., #4, Redway Meadows Business Park. Register online at, www.707cannabiscollege.com, (707) 6729860. (W-0517) ●

SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOPS AND CLASSES

ONLINE

northcoastjournal.com

Photo By Barry evans, eohiPPus drawing By heinrich harder, 1858-1935, PuBlic doMain

From Eohippus to Percheron By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

S

oon after Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859, Thomas Huxley (“Darwin’s Bulldog”) claimed that an unbroken 52-million-year-long sequence of fossils, cumulating in the modern horse, demonstrated unarguable proof of evolution. Would that it was that easy! Since the discovery of the original succession of proto-horse fossils by American paleontologist Othneil Charles Marsh in Wyoming’s Wind River Basin in the 1870s, the number of “equid” fossils has multiplied exponentially. Today, the progression from the earliest proto-horse, Hyracotherium — popularly called “Eohippus” or “dawn-horse” — to the modern horse is seen as much more complex and multi-branched than Huxley’s 1-2-3 version. The modern horse is one of the few surviving twigs on the messy “bush” of evolution that originated 52 million years ago with Eohippus. In addition to the great difference in size (see illustration) and weight (Eohippus weighed about 50 pounds, while a modern Percheron draft horse typically weighs in at around 2,000 pounds), modern horses walk differently than their ancestors. A horse walks on what was once the middle toe, while the “splint bones” — metacarpal remnants of Eohippus’ second and fourth toes — can still be seen as “buttons” a few inches above the fetlock. As long as the great continent of Beringia connected Asia and the Americas, horses roamed freely between what we now think of the Old and New Worlds.

Based on fossil records, the genus Equus (which includes modern horses, zebras and asses) originated in North America about 4 million years ago and spread to Eurasia within a million or so years, with additional to-and-fro migrations that ceased when rising sea levels created the Bering Strait 15,000 years ago. At the end of the Pleistocene, around 12,000 years ago, horses, mammoths, ground sloths and other large mammals became extinct in North and South America. Because of the synchronicity of two major events (1) a geological cooling period and (2) mankind’s expansion into the Americas (both in population and territory), the question of what killed them off is much debated. It may well be that the changing environment and the pressure of human hunting both contributed to extinction. Incidentally, Dakota/Lakota tradition holds that aboriginal horses survived the end of the Ice Age and were always part of their pre-conquest culture. According to most authorities, horses next appeared on these shores in 1493, transported across the Atlantic by Columbus on his second voyage to “the Indies.” Within a few decades, herds of feral horses were roaming the plains, and horses became a part of the cultural history of modern North and South America, yea even unto the farthest reaches of Old Town Eureka. l

Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) has fond childhood memories of riding Queenie down English lanes.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012

39


PUBLIC NOTICE

FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT is holding public hearings for the Strategic Plan and the FIRST 5 CALIFORNIA Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010-2011. • The public hearing for the FIRST 5 CALIFORNIA Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010/2011 will be on Wednesday, April 11, 2012 from 5 - 6 pm, at the Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third Street, Eureka. • The public hearing for FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT’s Strategic Plan will be on Wednesday, April 11, 2012 from 6 - 7 pm at the Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third Street, Eureka. The public is invited to attend. For more information about FIRST 5 HUMBOLDT, visit our website at www.humkids.org or call our office at (707) 445-7389. 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-111)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED APRIL 23, 2010, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER

TS. NO. 139528-AH ON April 25, 2012 at 11:00 o’clock A.M. in the lobby of Humboldt Land Title Company, 1034 Sixth St., Eureka, CA County of Humboldt, State of California, HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, as Trustee under the Deed of Trust executed by Robert J. Tait, an unmarried man, recorded on June 23, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-13086-4 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California by reason of default in the payment or performance of obligations secured thereby including the breach or default, notice of which was recorded December 8, 2011 as Instrument No. 2011-25214-3 of said Official Records, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash in lawful money of the United States, without covenant or warranty, express or implied, as to title, possession, or encumbrances, for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, the interest conveyed to said Trustee by said Deed of Trust in property situated in the City of Fortuna, County of Humboldt, State of California and described as: Parcel 2 as shown on Parcel Map No. 2511 for Joe and Marie Parlato, in Section 34, Township 3 North, Range 1 West, Humboldt Base and Meridian, filed July 1, 1987 the Office of the Humboldt County

Recorder, in Book 22 of Parcel Maps, Page 92. ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NOS. 040-121-009, 040-121-011, 040-121-028. The unpaid balance and estimate of costs, expenses and advances as of March 23, 2012 is $493,804.47; said amount will increase until date of sale. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described herein is purported to be: 320 Main St., Fortuna, CA 95540. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Dated: March 23, 2012. Beneficiary: The City of Fortuna in its capacity as the Successor Agency to the Fortuna Redevelopment Agency. Telephone: (707) 725-7600. Address: 621 11th St., P.O. Box 545 Fortuna, CA 95540. HUMBOLDT LAND TITLE COMPANY, a Corporation, Trustee, Address: 1034 Sixth Street Eureka, CA 95501. Telephone (707) 443-0837. By: /s/ Sue E. Bosch, President 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-103)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 25th of April, 2012, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Jennifer Lenihan, Unit # 5013 Christina Dimico, Unit # 5044 Heidi Schrack, Unit # 5135 Christina Dimico, Unit # 5140 Sheila Heflin, Unit # 5203 Jose Diaz, Unit # 5317 Loreen Roberts, Unit # 5453 Andrew Franks, Unit # 5532 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Chris Wallis, Unit # 2505 James Moody, Unit # 2610 Donielle Howe, Unit # 2813 Ezequiel Lopez, Unit # 3406 Jimmy Evanow, Unit # 3408 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold

immediately following the sale of the above units. Luana Hillman, Unit # 1181 Brian Murphy, Unit # 1306 Laura Elizabeth Winget, Unit #1371 William E. Woods III, Unit # 1623 Dawn Schultheis Musselman, Unit # 1721 Emalee Stewart, Unit # 1733 (Held in Co. Unit) Linda Sturtzen, Unit # 1766 Teresa Wertz, Unit # 1818 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Ian Weatherbee, Unit # 141 Christopher Vandiver, Unit # 230 Michael Soloman, Unit # 351 Richard Storre, Unit # 430 The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Marcus Grant, Unit # 4204 George Scherer, Unit # 4225 (Held in Co. Unit) Scott Mailly, Unit # 4328 Matthew Brunn, Unit # 4330 Janice Harmon, Unit # 6006 John Gehl, Unit # 6020 Frank Gunsallus, Unit # 6156 (Held in Co. Unit) Benjamin Pearsall, Unit # 6159 (Held in Co. Unit) David Gross, Unit # 6169 (Held in Co. Unit) Hector Lefebre, Unit # 6205 Lucas Estes, Unit # 7030 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Jared Morgart, Unit # 6334 Pamela Allen, Unit # 6405 Sean Brantley, Unit # 6422 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Alexandria Stauffer, Unit # 3149 Luana Redhat, Unit # 4135 Catherine Bjorkstrand, Unit # 5142 Cydney Buckman, Unit # 7209 Tawny Owens, Unit # 8202 Nicole Fisher, Unit # 8219 Leeann Williams, Unit # 9117 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Riff Del Pardo, Unit # 9217 Kevin White, Unit # 9284 Christopher Reed, Unit # 9404 Teresa Cengia, Unit # 9533 Robert Dixon, Unit # 9542

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appliances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self-Storage, 707-443-1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 5th day of April 2012 and 12th day of April 2012 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-113)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 24th of April 2012, at 9:00 A.M., on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at CUTTEN MINI STORAGE, 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt the following: Unit # 72 Sonja Ash Unit # 253-A Maribel Smith Unit # 257 Kathy McNamara Items to be sold include, but are not limited to miscellaneous of the following: household items and furniture, TVs, luggage, pictures, sewing items, clothing, books, kids toys, boxes and bags (contents unknown). Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA, prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Cutten Mini Storage 707-443-2280, Bond # 0336443. Dated this 12th day of April 2012 and 19th day of April 2012. 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-117)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 2170021716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 21st day of April 2012 at 9:00 am, on the premises where said property has

been stored and which are located at AAA Self-Storage, 2350 Central Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519. County of Humboldt, State of California, the following: Unit # 89 Chip Brocious Unit # 349 Brian Dukes Unit # 204 Carol Perry Items to be sold but not limited to industrial shelving, misc. household items, boxes of contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items sold as is where is and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. The Auctioneer will be Don Johnson, Bond # 9044453, phone number 707-443-4851. Dated this 5th and 12th of April, 2012. 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-105)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00197

The following person is doing business as BY NIEVES at 627 Lighthouse Rd., Petrolia, CA 95558, P.O. Box 9, Petrolia, CA 95558. Nieves Rathbun 627 Lighthouse Rd. Petrolia, CA 95558 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/1/2008. /s Nieves Rathbun, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/12, 4/19, 4/26, 5/3/2012 (12-112)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00184

The following person is doing business as BAYSIDE PRESCHOOL at 2051 Old Arcata Road, Bayside, CA 95524, P.O. Box 4805, Arcata, CA 95518. Scarlet Ibis 2051 Old Arcata Road Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/22/12. /s Scarlet Ibis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 22, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26/2012 (12-108)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00190

The following person is doing business as RANJITH JIM BOX at 333 Painter St., Rio Dell, CA 95562, P.O. Box 261, Rio Dell, CA 95562. Jim Box 333 Painter St., P.O. Box 261 Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above

on 3/27/12. /s Jim Box. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 27, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26/2012 (12-104)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00195

The following person is doing business as BLUE BLOSSOM DESIGNS at 4002 Greenwood Heights Dr., Kneeland, CA 95549. Kimberly Ann Haile 4002 Greenwood Heights Dr. Kneeland, CA 95549 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1/20/08. /s Kimberly Ann Haile. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 28, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 4/26/2012 (12-107)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00148

The following person is doing business as SWEET SPRINGS WATER RESOURCE CO. at 1720 11th Street, Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 453, Orleans, CA 95556. Joel Bear Rosser 1720 11th St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Joel Bear Rosser. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 07, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-101)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00174

The following persons are doing business as THE KITCHEN STORE at 452 Main St., Ferndale, CA 95536, 2197 Central Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519. North Bank Assoc. Inc 2197 Central Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 1966595 CA The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Kevin Jenkins, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 15, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-97)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00178

The following person is doing business as SALTY DAWG at 245 Splendor Ln., Kneeland, CA 95549. Morgan Oliver 245 Splendor Ln. Kneeland, CA 95549


3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-98)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00181

The following person is doing business as RUNAWAY KITE at 414 2nd St., Apt. C, Eureka, CA 95501, P.O. Box 5861, Eureka, CA 95502. David Malcolm Desoto 414 2nd St., Apt. C Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/21/2012. /s David Malcolm Desoto. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 21, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-99)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00138

The following person is doing business as ROSES AND CREAM STUDIO at 3017 L St., Eureka, CA 95501. Anna Duffy 3017 L St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Anna Duffy. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 02, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-90 )

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00145

The following persons are doing business as WHIPLASH CURVE at 423 First Street, Eureka, CA 95501.

3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-91 )

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00161

The following person is doing business as REDWOOD ORGANICS/ CELEBRATIONS at 100 Ericson Ct., Unit 130, Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 5108, Arcata, CA 95518. Elizabeth Nester 802 Hiller Rd., Unit A McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Elizabeth Nester. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 12, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-94)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00169

The following person is doing business as MIKKI MOVES REAL ESTATE, INC. at 805 7TH St., Eureka, CA 95501. Mikki Moves Real Estate, Inc 6215 Marge Ct. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/15/2012. /s Michelle Cardoza. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 13, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-89 )

3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-88 )

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV120205 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: ANTHONY TYRONE HOUSTON TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ANTHONY TYRONE HOUSTON for a decree changing names as follows: Present name ANTHONY TYRONE HOUSTON to Proposed Name WAHID ALLAH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 24, 2012 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: April 4, 2012 Filed: April 4, 2012 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 4/12, 4/19, 4/26, 5/3/2012 (12-114)

Curious about legal advertising? 442-1400

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DEANNA CHERI MCCORD CASE NO. PR120084

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DEANNA CHERI MCCORD, DEANNA C. MCCORD AND DEANNA MCCORD. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CHERI MCCORD in the

©2011 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

The following person is doing business as HUMBOLDT LAND RENOVATIONS at 2596 Maple Lane, Arcata, CA 95521, P.O. Box 5097, Arcata, CA 95518. Scott Elcan 2596 Maple Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/21/2012. /s Scott Elcan. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing business as MIKKI MOVES REAL ESTATE at 805 7TH St., Eureka, CA 95501. Michelle Cardoza 6215 Marge Ct. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/4/12. /s Michelle Cardoza. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 14, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

26. China’s Lao-____ 27. Sal of “Rebel Without a Cause” 28. St. Peter was the first 29. Actor Keach 31. Our 206 32. Affluent 35. Shake alternatives 37. Bolivian capital 38. Cords, e.g. 39. Job site standards org. 40. Meat and potatoes, e.g. 42. “Downton Abbey” airer 45. Restaurant avoided by vegans

47. Honda division 49. Vox ____ 50. Not stay on deck 52. Became less keen 53. Classic 1963 Dr. Seuss book ... or something seen three times in this puzzle 54. Record holder 55. Droid 56. Kind of torch 57. Motherland, affectionately 58. Takes too much, briefly 59. Copyeditor’s mark

DOWN

18. It comes and goes 21. Stockholm’s land: Abbr. 24. Vague quantity 25. Legis. period 27. Bad start? 29. Pennsylvania Dutch dishes 30. ____ Bo 31. Lunch inits. 32. Summer Games org. 33. Kind of toy 34. Taught 35. Succeeded 36. T or F: Abbr. 38. Not neg. 40. Went out of business

41. Yes, to Yves 42. Sermon site 43. She played Susan on “Suddenly Susan” 44. Log-cutting area 46. Spanish omelet item 47. Hematological classification system 48. Piggy bank filler 51. Gets off the fence 52. Brit. military award 53. “Curb Your Enthusiasm” network

1. “East of Eden” girl 5. Downcast 8. Didn’t remove, as a painting 14. Got home in a cloud of dust 15. Cheer for a toreador 16. Woody and Steve 17. Promising people 19. “Jackson” 20. Rocky Mountain trees 21. Sleep en el tarde 22. Sat 23. Hocking sites

1. Barbecue receptacle 2. Crips’ adversaries 3. Micro wave? 4. “Rolling in the Deep” singer 5. Sweet’s partner 6. Pumpkin pie ingredient 7. ____ Moines, Iowa 8. Barrio resident 9. Actor Cary 10. Places of lascivious entertainment 11. Long odds 12. Yet to be exploited 13. Freud subj.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

MEDIUM #1

www.sudoku.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00180

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 12-00171

Solution, tips and computer program at

3/29, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-96)

Eleanor Mae Mattingly P.O. Box 334, 133 Acacia Dr. Blue Lake, CA 95525 Bonnie Lee Stephens P.O. Box 334, 133 Acacia Dr. Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by State or Local Registered Domestic Partners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/15/12 /s Bonnie Lee Stephens. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 06, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Morgan Oliver. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2012. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

legal NOTICES northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

41


Is my Fictitious Business Name Statement good forever

?

Y

our fictitious business name statement will expire five years from the date it was last filed with the County Clerk. You have 40 days from the expiration date to renew your FBNS with the County. A new statement does not need to be published unless there has been a change in the information required in the expired statement. If any changes occur then you must file a new FBNS and have published again. Within 30 days from the stamped refiling date, you must begin publishing the statement in the newspaper. If you publish it in the North Coast Journal for the required four weeks, on the last day of publication a “proof of publication” will be sent to the County Clerk to complete the filing process. The cost for running your ficticious business name in the North Coast Journal is a flat $50 fee.

442-1400

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF NITA M. WHITAKER CASE NO. PR120083

continued from previous page. Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CHERI MCCORD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 10, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DOUGLAS A. INGOLD BAR NUMBER 068537 P.O. BOX 715 GARBERVILLE, CA 95542 (707) 923-2455 APRIL 6, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/12, 4/19, 4/26/2012 (12-116)

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NITA M WHITAKER, also known as NITA WHITAKER and NITA MARIE WHITAKER. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DANA LEWIS WHITAKER in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DANA LEWIS WHITAKER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 3, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON (SB#30716) MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 APRIL 5, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/12, 4/19, 4/26/2012 (12-115)

42 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BARBARA MAE BAKER CASE NO. PR120076

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF EDGAR A. BALDOCK CASE NO. PR120077

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BARBARA MAE BAKER. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MARVIN BAKER in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MARVEN BAKER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 26, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-0804 MARCH 27, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: EDGAR A. BALDOCK, EDGAR ALAN BALDOCK, ALAN BALDOCK. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JEROME M. BALDOCK in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JEROME M. BALDOCK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 26, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CAROL J MARTINEZ (CSB#207233) LAW OFFICE OF CAROL J. MARTINEZ P.O. BOX 129 EUREKA, CA 95502 (707) 492-7455 MARCH 29, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-106)

4/5, 4/12, 4/19/2012 (12-109)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF HAROLD WALTER TAYLOR CASE NO. PR120068

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: HAROLD WALTER TAYLOR aka HAROLD W. TAYLOR. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CHERIE TAYLOR in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CHERIE TAYLOR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 19, 2012 at 1:50 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code Section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DOUGLAS D. KABER, SBN 227193 KABER & KABER, ATTORNEYS AT LAW 730 7TH STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 441-1100 MARCH 22, 2012 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT  

3/29, 4/5, 4/12/2012 (12-100)


4

the

CONTINUED ON PAGE 44

Employment

Now Hiring: 14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Reliable Laborers Accounting Outside Sales Banquet Servers

Controller Responsible for the timely and cost-effective performance of the accounting and control functions, reporting results of operations and providing information systems oversight and support services for the entire organization. Controls the flow of cash through the organization and maintains the integrity of the Co-op’s funds. Interprets and implements the fiscal policies of the BOD, establishing financial policies and control over the activities of the organization’s various departments. Full job description @ www.northcoastco-op.com Submit resume to hr@northcoastco-op.com

Come join our dedicated team of professionals who are committed to compassionate care. SENIOR FINANCIAL ACCOUNTANT 1 F/T Arcata BA in accounting or related field, three or more years of demonstrated experience, strong teamwork and communication skills required. RN CLINIC COORDINATOR 1 F/T Arcata Requires current CA RN license and 2-4 years of supervisory experience in a medical facility as well as strong computer skills, EMR preferred MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka, 1 P/T Arcata (Prenatal Clinic) Must have injection certification, CPR certification, strong computer skills and 6 or more months experience. MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK 1 F/T Willow Creek High school diploma or GED, strong computer skills and some experience in a medical office setting preferred. REGISTERED NURSE 1 P/T Willow Creek Degree in nursing leading to license as Registered Nurse State of California. Current RN license for State of California.

Open Door Community Health Centers offers great benefits, competitive compensation and a rewarding work environment. Application may be downloaded from: www.opendoorhealth.com PLEASE submit complete applications (EOE) To: Carolyn Webb, Human Resources Manager Open Door Community Health Centers, 670 Ninth Street, Suite 203, Arcata, CA 95521 (707) 826-8633, ext. 5140, FAX (707) 826-8628 cwebb@opendoorhealth.com

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

dental assistant iii (2-positions) Arcata – FT. Must have 2+ yrs. exp. as licensed CA RDA/ CDA. Also have x-ray and coronal polish certificate. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. Information on the positions can be found at www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes: 4-18-12. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace with required testing. Application packet can be obtained at www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000.

ASSISTANT CONTROLLER - PROGRAM ACCOUNTING Dynamic international organization seeks candidate with high-level technical accounting and auditing skills to supervise and manage field and program accounting, as well as provide professional training in financial analysis and strategic planning.

Ideal candidate has: • 4+ years accounting experience with increasingly complex responsibilities • Experience in developing, implementing, and reviewing standardized internal control processes • Proven ability to effectively mentor direct reports and provide training to staff and other trainers • Experience in planning, performing, and supervising internal field program and grantee financial audits • Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Business, or closely related field For more details and to apply, visit www.internews.org/about/employment No Calls Please. EOE M/F/D/V

Hiring?

Place your ad online! www.northcoastjournal.com

PART TIME POSITIONS Dishwasher/Prep Cook Crown Club Rep Bingo Admit Gift Shop Janitorial Cage Cashier Bingo Paymaster Waitstaff HR Manager Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214. (E-0412) PROGRAMS MANAGER. The Morris Graves Museum of Art Programs Manager is responsible for the professional-level planning, coordination and production of monthly Museum Programs, Humboldt Arts Council Outreach Programs, and Community Partnerships including Arts Alive!, Family Arts Day, Musical Performances and Special Events. Degree in Art, Art History or Music and experience working with youth, families and seniors in a Fine Arts setting preferred. Parttime. Send resume, cover letter and writing sample to Humboldt Arts Council, 636 F Street, Eureka. (E-0419) HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN) (E-0607) FULL TIME HOUSE CLEANING POSITION. Available with Dependable Cleaning. Mon.-Fri. No evenings or weekends. Bi-lingual a plus.Valid license and reliable vehicle required. Call 445-1094 and leave name, phone number and best time to call. (E-0419) PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) (E-0607)

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-0614) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-6102. (E-1227)

Rentals HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Openings soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,300; 2 pers. $23,200; 3 pers. $26,100; 4 pers. $28,950; 5 pers. $31,300; 6 pers. $33,600; 7 pers. $35,900; 8 pers. $38,250.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 CUTTEN 3BD/2BA. 1 car garage. Huge storage. Half block from Murphy’s Market. 2201 Fern St. $1,050/month. 443-1913. (R-0419) EUREKA DUPLEX. 3108 Glen St., #B. Reduced Rent! Pets Considered! Available Now. Immaculate, spacious townhouse style duplex near shopping 3 BD/2.5BA, range, refrigerator, dishwasher and microwave. w/d hookups, private fenced ground floor patio, upper deck has view of bay. Will consider a small pet, Garage & off street parking, Six month lease. Rent $1195/$1245 with pet, Deposit $1700/$1900 with pet. Non-smoking unit. Cross street Harris. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0412) EUREKA ROOM FOR RENT. 314 E St., Apt. #23. Available April 20. ALL UTILITIES PAID. Super affordable room puts you in the heart of Old Town! Located in a building with a locked entrance, shared laundry, kitchen and baths. On site manager. No pets. Cross St. Third. Month to month. Rent $350, Deposit $525. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0412) EUREKA STUDIO APARTMENT. On 1 acre, Jacuzzi tub, laundry, no pets, no smoking, some utilities. $800/month. 442-0952. (R-0503)

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

43


the

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 43

Rentals

Real Estate

Lodging/Travel

EUREKA 1BD UPSTAIRS DOWNTOWN APARTMENT. $600/ month. Garbage/Water paid, No smoking. 442-5938. (R-0426) NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS. Affordable housing Myrtle Ave. Eureka. Brand new 2bed/1bath & 3bd/1.5bath Townhouses available April 2012. Rent $735-$850 & Deposit $300-$350. Svc animals only. Additional amenities include; onsite laundry, community kitchen, playground & exercise room. Contact Laura 822-9000 for qualification info. (R-0412) FORTUNA TOWNHOUSE. 2 BEDROOM 1.5 BATH, appliances, garbage paid, carport, w/d hook-up, patio. $800 mo., plus sec. deposit. No pets, (707) 725-6293 (R-0412) WILLOW CREEK 2BD/2BA. On riverfront acreage, beautiful quiet setting. $950/month, (360) 3522076. (R-0412) BY THE BAY & OLD TOWN. Eureka 1BD/1BA Apartment. $625/month, $1000/deposit. No Smoking/Pets. W/S/G paid. References required. 445-4679. (R-0412) BLUE LAKE SHARE. 1 room, $350per person; $700-deposit per person. Walk to fishing, swimming, hiking. Near Dell’Arte. 668-4041. (R-0412) ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-0531)

EUREKA FLORIST & GIFT SHOP FOR SALE. $199,000.00, Custom built 2,500 square foot, two story building complete with a customer database and purchasing history for thousands of customers. Owners are willing to train. Don’t miss out on this great offer from Wells Commercial Real Estate. (707) 832-9121. Broker Number 01700566. (RE-0503) TERRY TRAILER. Need a new place to call home? Double pop out travel trailer for sale at Trinidad’s Midway RV park. Short walk to the beach, shopping, and bus stop. Makes a great studio for an artist, student, or retiree. Many extras, Beautiful redwood deck. Rent paid for the month of April. Move in today! Must be approved with the park. Asking only $12,000, Owner willing to carry! Call (707) 599-9418. (RE-0503) SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS FOR SALE. Many Hands Gallery, turnkey opportunity for enthusiastic entrepreneur. haysmer@sonic. net, (707) 445-9434 (leave message). (RE-0426) TRINITY VILLAGE 1.3 ACRES WITH CREEK. 3BD/2BA main house. PLUS: Guest House, Art Studio/Workshop, Pool, Sauna, 2 Car Garage, Amenities Galore. $385,000. Call Gale Packard Realty, Owner/Broker, (530) 6294181. (RE-0426) OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS. Come to the quaint town of Rio Rico Arizona to make your dreams come true. This hill top 2.2 acre lot situated in a residential area is a perfect haven to build a small eco-friendly home, grow fruits and vegetables year round and live a sustainable life. Make this the bridge to your future. Offered at $28,000.00. Deborah Van De Putte, Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty, (520) 282-1111 deborah.vandeputte@russlyon. com (RE-0426) WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $99,900 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1227)

HAVE A VACATION RENTAL. List it in The North Coast Journal, email classified@northcoastjournal.com, or call 442-1400 for more info. and Great Rates. (L-0531) TRAVEL COMPANION AVAILABLE. Level headed, patient, fifty year old woman who has humor and is even tempered can be scheduled for short or long trips this year. Do you have a trip in mind but can’t imagine going alone and would like company? Delightful Companion for hire Call ( 707) 498-8981 (L-0531)

Business Rentals DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1227)

April March March & April Special Specials

Lucky Gnome!

15

Auto

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

www.northcoastjournal.com

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

OFF

18th Annual

1 SALE

$ 00

Monday, April 16th

Arcata LIQUORS OR

HUTCHINs Grocery store Limited one per customer. Not valid with any other offer. Must be 21 to redeem. min. purchase $20

EXPIRES April 30, 2012

22ND ANNUAL PLANT SALE. At College of the Redwoods Greenhouse. Fri., April 27, Noon-6 p.m. and Sat., April 28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Information, 476-4361. (BST-0426) ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES. April 14, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. April 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Redwood Acres, Home Ec. Building. Admission $1. (BST-0412)

996 1 1th s t.

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0419) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-1227)

%

Get

Yard Sale

Place your ad online! on Page 47

Buy/Sell/Trade

le garage sa › this way

Rummage

Chicks Available Now! 3954 Jacobs Ave. Eureka 443-7397

BEADS LIQUIDATION SALE. Reflections Jewelry & Accessories. Semi-precious stones, freshwater pearls, wood, pewter, crystals, loose stones. Huge Selection, Wholesale prices, Beads Liquidation Sale. One Day only, Sat., April 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1313 Union St., Eureka (between 14th and Cedar near Broadway Cinemas) Dealers Welcome. (BST-0412)

What’s New 335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079

MOVING SALE. Sat., April 14, 9 a.m-3 p.m, 1473 Airport Rd, McKinleyville, rain or shine. (BST-0412) ON SALE ALASKAN WILD SALMON!! Fresh sockeye and coho: smoked salmon and filets , Family caught in Kodiak! Arcata Plaza, Purple & Gold Tent! Kodiak Catch!, Farmers Markets: Sat., April 14, 9-3 pm, kodiakcatch@gmail.com, 839-8009 (BST-0412) SHOES, PURSES, BAGS & BELTS 1/2 PRICE! Accessorize & travel in style. April 10-14. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek. Helping Provide Opportunities for Local Youth. (BST-0412) BUYING COIN COLLECTIONS. Big or Small. I will come to you. Private and Confidential. Call William (707) 845-7420 or email goodsign111@yahoo. com. (BST-0621)

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

Send us your classified ad online. Still in a super user-friendly format. Submit your ad today! Questions? Call 442-1400


Buy/Sell/Trade

Services

616 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com Mon-Fri 10-6 pm Sat 10-5pm

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr Ste 5, Willow Creek. 530-629-3540. krchase@yahoo. com. (BST-1227)

Pets PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com PAWS OFF MY HERBS. 8% OFF SALE! Bulk herbs aren’t taxed and Buster still gets a break. It’s a dog’s life. Dot’s Vitality, Dot’s Veggie Vitality and Dot’s Arthritis. Find Dot’s at: Moonrise Herbs, Arcata, Humboldt Herbals, Eureka, or order online at wwwhumboldtherbals.com (P-0426)

PHONE SURGEON-PROFESSIONAL IPHONE, IPOD & IPAD REPAIR. Dropped your phone in beer? Threw it at the wall? The iPhone Surgeon can fix it all! DON’T TRUST AN AMATEUR WITH YOUR DEVICE! We are the North Coast’s largest and most reliable “iDevice” repair service! All iPod, iPad and iPhone models serviced. PRICE MATCH GUARANTEE! www.Facebook.com/iPhoneSurgeon, (707) 836-3496. Like our Facebook for 10% off! (S-0426) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0809)

Music

by Sophia Dennler • For more information and to order

www.sophiadennler.com/pets

Music ROAD TRIX ENTERTAINMENT. Live Music. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. Bookings, Bradley Dean, 832-7419. (M-0510)

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

Custom Pet Portraits

A-1 STEAM CARPET CLEANING. Ask us about our $99.00 2 room special. Also now offering Green Guard 442-3229 ext 13 (S-1227) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-1227) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-1227) DISORGANIZED? HIRE A PRO! Paper, clutter, kitchens, closets. A.D.D. specialist. Experienced, Affordable, Friendly. Claire Josefine 268-8585. www.clairejosefine. com. (S-1227) MCKEEVER ENERGY AND ELECTRIC. Residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural. Electrical contracting and design. Renewable energy. Energy efficiency and sustainability. Energy consulting, documentation and field verification. Contact Nate McKeever at 707-822-0100 or info@mckeeverenergyandelectric.com or visit www.mckeeverenergyandelectric.com. Lic. # CA C10 876832 (S-1227) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1227)

HOUSE CLEANING BY JEANNIE. Residence $15/hour, Move-outs $20/hour. Call 445-2644. References Available. (S-0426) DEANNA’S CLEANING SERVICE. $15 hr. Residential, $20 hr. MoveOuts, Rentals & Estates, 2 hr.min. lic #8132, call 445-3610 (S-0517) AMUSING GAMES & AMAZING PERFORMANCES FOR ALL AGES. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1227) HOUSE CLEANING. Riana Terrill. Experienced, Reliable & Efficient to meet your needs. 668-5205, 499-1536. $15/hour. (S-0426) TAI CHI GARDENER. Maintaining balance in your yard. Well equipt. Maintenance + Projects 18 yrs experience. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener.com. (S-0426) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Rentals, Estates, Residential. Gift Certificates Available! Licensed & Bonded #3860. 707-444-2001. (S-0412) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn and garden needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155, (707) 825-1082. (S-0524) SEWING SERVICE. Stitch in Time repairs & alterations. Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.- 5 p.m. 1038 11th street, Arcata. 707-496-3447 (S-1227)

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

It’s here! The 2012 Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt. View it online on our Special Publications page.

INSID E

Venues Jewelry

Gowns and Tuxedoes Flowers Bakeries And More

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

Community CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0524) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-1227) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1227) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-1227)

Community

LIFETREE CAFE: JOIN THE CONVERSATION. “The Internet has changed everything: how we communicate, do business, and find information,” says Lifetree representative Craig Cable. “We’ll explore whether it’s changing us and what that might mean for the future.” Sun., April 15, 7 p.m. Lifetree Café, 76 13th St., Arcata. Free Admission. Questions, Contact Bob Dipert 672-2919, bobdipert@ hotmail.com. (C-0412) TICKETS ON SALE FOR 32ND ANNUAL RIVER NIGHT. If a hillbilly/ charity event tickles your fancy, then River Night is the place for you! Summer LEAP, a program of the Boys and Girls Club, Annual River Night Sat., April 21, 7 p.m- 1 a.m., Portuguese Hall, 1138 11th St. Arcata and will include a benefit drawing, drinks, music and dancing. Beer provided by Mad River Brewery and dancing will be to the musical stylings of the Bret Harte Breakers, Steel Standing, Small Axe Ensemble and DJ Max Michael. Tickets available at Adventure’s Edge and Center Activities, 2 for $10 in advance. At the door, tickets will be $10 per person unless you arrive in your best hillbilly getup, where tickets will be $8 per person. (C-0419) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1227)

rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

YoutH serViCe bureau YoutH & familY Crisis Hotline

444-2273

tYpe 1 diabetiC support group

443-0124 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-0503) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-0726) be a life saver! Your blood donation is always needed!! Call the Northern California Community Blood Bank. Call for Bloodmobile schedule. 2524 Harrison St., Eureka, 443-8004

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 12, 2012

45


body, mind ▼

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45

&Spirit

TIME FOR A MASSAGE? Therapeutic Massage

Reflexology & BEST Therapeutic Footwork For Planter Fasciitis Ankle Strain/Sprain Bunions • Sore Feet

ALEXANDRA SEYMOUR

Certified Practitioner for 14 yrs Center For Reflexology & Intuitive Healing Arts Corner of Samoa & I, Arcata

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

822-5395 www.reflexologyinstruction.com

Valerie Schramm

Brenda R. Bryan Spiritual Life Coach/ Gentle Heart Mentor Building bridges between the conscious and unconscious. Call for free 1/2 hr. consultation

Certified Massage Therapist

(707)445-1538

transformation consciousness expansion to enhance overall well-being *We accept most insurances

707-839-5910

Jolene Hayes

Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist Facilitating Self-Empowerment & Healing

24-hour online verification

707-499-9207 jolene-hayes@sbcglobal.net

www.northcoast-medical.com

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals

$ 85 Any Doctor

Doctor’s office available on site State Licensed Confidential, Safe and Easy Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 12-6pm Special discount for Seniors, New Patien SSI & Veterans ts SAVE

$5

0

with menti on this ad of

Lowest Price Evaluations in HC

Medical Cannabis Consultants

(707) 407- 0527 508 I Street, Eureka

(across from HC Court House)

Sarah Biggs 707.840.4617 pacificbirth.com pacificbirth@gmail.com

Birth and Postpartum Doula Breastfeeding Counseling and Home-Visits Childbirth Education Workshops

I work with families of all income levels.

Marny Friedman

Do it Legally

Birth Services

Dancing for Birth Classes

~energy work~

CERTIFIED IN MASSAGE THERAPY & FOOT REFLEXOLOGY. Reidun Olsson, (707) 822-7247. (MB-0510) REFLE XOLOGY CL ASSES & WORKSHOPS. At the Center for Reflexology and Intuitive Healing Arts. Now accepting students to learn the art and practice of reflexology for personal and professional use. Call Alexandra, certified practitioner and instructor, 822-5395 or visit www.reflexologyinstruction.com. (MB-0503) KICK BUTTS! Become a nonsmoker in one session with Dave Berman, Certified Hypnotist, Life Coach, and Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). (707) 845-3749. www. ManifestPositivity.com. Helping the YOUniverse conspire on your behalf. (MB-0628) WHAT’S YOUR BODY TELLING YOU? Are you ill, in occasional pain, or curious about a symptom? Gentle exploration of your body’s messages, your waking life experiences, and/or dreams, combined with soothing energywork. With spiritual teacher and CMT, AnaLora Garrard. www.analora.com, 8262647. (MB-0419)

Pacific

(707) 826-1165

HAWAIIAN LOMI LOMI MASSAGE. Rejuvenate and Activate your Body, Mind & Soul. Birgit Loehrer, (808) 936-5008. (MB-0705) REBECCA PORTEOUS, LCSW. (LCS #18459) is opening a private therapy and counseling practice at 3135 Boeing Ave., Suite A1, McKinleyville. Experience working with a broad range of issues. Appointments, call 633-6145. (MB-0503) FEELING STRESSED? ANXIOUS? DEPRESSED? OR JUST UNSURE? Maybe therapy can help. Let’s talk. I offer sliding scale psychotherapy in a safe, comfortable setting where you can confidentially unpack difficult feelings. 8 years experience, located in Eureka area. Sarah Goldberg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist, Lic #47032 (707) 205-9005, www.mysilverlaketherapy.com. (MB-0426) SHAMANIC SPIRITUAL SUPPORT. For problem solving, health issues and supporting well-being with Michal Mugrage. Divination, soul-retrieval, energy clearing, heart-centered spirit release, or space clearing. Also offering spiritual mentoring and classes. www.thankful-heart.com (707) 407-7192.(MB-0426)

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2012 • northcoastjournal.com

_

doTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 4987749, www.thinkdoterra.com/19719. (MB-0517) GAIL PASCOE, RN, MFC. CA license MFC 25083 is re-opening her private practice specializing in T.B.I. & other neurological problems, health challenges, anxiety and depression. Call 362-6951. (MB-0503) CRANIAL SACRAL THERAPY. Infused with Shiatsu, Quantum Touch Healing, Energywork. Crescent City, (517) 974-0460. (MB-0726) NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING/ FERTILITY AWARENESS CLASS. Safe, effective, fun, women & men, all ages. Call Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marla_joy@suddenlink. net (MB-0426) NEEDING SOME SUPPORT RIGHT NOW? Experienced counselor & therapist Linda Nesbitt, MSW, LCSW (Lic#18830) is expanding her practice and welcoming new clients. Focusing on stress/anxiety, depression, grief/loss, trauma recovery, relationship challenges and postpartum support. EMDR Advanced Trained. (707) 268-0929. (MB-0426)

JUPITERS LIGHT ASTROLOGY READING. The Sacred Geometry of Our Lives. Individual, Family & Relationship Readings. Shakati L. Walsh, MA Spiritual Psychology, MS Educational Counseling. 1-800-ASK-Keen ext: 02466043 first 3 minutes are Free (707) 616-3163, shakatiwalsk@yahoo. com (S-1227) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres, 442-4240, www. tarotofbecoming.com. (MB-0517) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0920) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0920) MOSAIC MASSAGE. Customized pressure and style by Heather, Massage Therapist with 10 years experience. Swedish, Deep Tissue, Prenatal, Reflexology. Located at Om Shala Yoga, Arcata, (707) 3622821 (MB-1227)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-1227) ZUMBA. Latin-inspired fitness program using international music and various dance styles including Salsa, Cumbia, Merengue and Reggaeton for a great cardio workout. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Mon. Club, 610 Main St. Every Tue. at the Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m. and every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy 707845-4307. (MB-1227) NORTHCOAST AIKIDO FOUNDATION. Instructing non-violent martial arts since 1978. Mon.-Fri., 6-7:30 pm. Adult Beginning Special: 6 weeks for $99, enrollment ongoing. Children’s classes Mon. or Wed., 4-5 pm, $40/month. Visitors welcome! 890 G Street, Arcata, entrance around back. 826-9395. www.northcoastaikido. org. (MB-1227) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo. com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701, www.arcatazengroup. org. (MB-1227)


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center),

www.northcoastjournal.com

707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

739 12th St., Fortuna

ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1227) CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPIST. Samantha Dudman-Miller, (707) 616-6031. (MB-0726) T H E H E A LT H R E S O U RC E you’ve been looking for may be listed here. Say you saw it in the Journal.

body, mind

&Spirit now in COLOR !!

this week

$272,500

$319,900

4 bed, 2 bath, 1,840 sq ft very nice Cutten home with lots of amenities, single level, open floor plan, oak hardwood floors, spacious kitchen, vaulted ceilings, custom fire place, wonderful yard

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,108 sq ft charming meticulous bungalow near Henderson Center, third bedroom doubles as office/utility room, low maintenance backyard, kitchen remodel & upgrades

thi

$227,500

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,056 sq ft clean McKinleyville home on a private flag lot, room for RV parking, single level with a double attached garage, within walking distance to shopping & theater

real estat

this wee

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

■ fieldbrook

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435 LOtS Of chaRacteR In thIS cOzy hOme on an acre. 1185 sqft, with 2 bd/1 ba, plus a third bedroom without a closet which also serves as a laundry room. The deck overlooks a small pond. Redwoods. One-of-a-kind Humboldt County property. mls#235023 $308,000.

Sylvia Garlick

#00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

1625 Holmes Flat Road +/-1.5 acres on the eel River in Redcrest. this beautiful private property has a combination of flat meadows and trees, river frontage, and amazing views..

$125,000

Your fortune...

OWN AN OCEAN VIEW PARCEL in the Sand Pointe Coastal Community with all utilities to the property. Enjoy all that nature has to offer in this professionally planned upscale s community. Access to the bellieu. Hammond Trail offers miles py nearby yo and whale watching. $215,000 of hiking, biking, beach Hapcombing, t i a aw

Jessica Stretch

#01204126 Broker/ Associate 334 Main Street, Ferndale, CA. 95536 707-599-2982

Rio Dell Land/Property

±34 acres Blue Slide Road ±34-acre parcel off of Blue Slide Road. Building sites, fantastic eel River views, easy access, conifer trees and Slater Creek running through the parcel. CoC is on file - Get Your Building permit noW! parcel could be annexed into the City of Rio dell for possible sub-divides.

$250,000

■ MCKINLEYVILLE

www.northcoastjournal.com

725-9627

rea

Fieldbrook Land/Property

+/-10 acres near mckinleyville off of Fieldbrook Road. Rare parcel w/ a combination of open meadows/wooded privacy and creek running through. perfect secluded property to build your dream home just minutes outside of central mckinleyville.

$ 275,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

JourNal •• THURSDAY, thursday, APRIL april 12, 12, 2012 2012 northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com••North NORTH Coast COAST JOURNAL

51 47


Sunny Brae •Glendale Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

Prices Effective April 11 through April 17, 2012

Meet our Staff Guitar lessons, intramural volleyball, full time studies at

Humboldt State University and a part time job at Murphy’s Market … yikes! And Camille does this all with a smile. She was born and raised in Trinidad. “I have come to this store all my life. This is where my family shops and my sister even wants to work here, too,” says Camille. “Murphy’s is close to home and on nice days I can ride my bike to work.” Her guitar style is acoustic, her major at HSU is psychology and she is headed for the HSU intramural volleyball championships with her team, Mojo Unplugged. Murphy’s Markets are known for cheerful and knowledgeable service from employees like Camille. Stop in and pick up a deli sandwich, a couple of apples and some chips on your way for a walk on the beautiful beaches of Trinidad.

Boneless Skinless

Pork Loin Chops or Roasts

2

Gallons

99 lb.

USDA Grade A Bone-In

Chicken Breasts Value Pak

1

Crystal 2% Reduced Fat Milk

49

lb.

2

12 Bags

8

ian

Trinidad Staff

Gala or Fuji

Best Foods

Apples

Mayonnaise

99

99

30 Oz. Jars

¢

Ea.

Peets Whole or Ground Coffee Beans

Camille Dam

lb.

Fresh

Hawaiian Pineapples

99 lb.

1

99 Ea.

2

88 Ea.

Seattle

Sour Dough Round, Wheat or Garlic Bread 24 Oz.

2

28 Ea.

North Coast Journal 04-12-12  

The North Coast Journal of Politics, People & Art is a guide to what’s really happening on the far North Coast of California.

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