North Coast Journal 03-16-2023 edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, March 16, 2023 Vol. XXXIV Issue 11 northcoastjournal.com 8 Meet the new MMIP investigator 22 The fur flies
2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com April 6-16, 2023 FEATURING TACOS FROM AA Bar and Grill • Carmela’s Mexican Restaurant Curtain Cookin’ Nook • Gallagher’s Irish Pub • Loco Fish Co. Manzanilla Kitchen • Six Rivers Brewery • South G Kitchen AND MORE! ncjtacoweek.com #ncjtacoweek It’s coming.
northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 3 5 Mailbox 5 Poem Outdoor Vacuum 6 News Newsom’s Climate Budget Would Slash Funds that Protect Coast 8 NCJ Daily Online 10 On The Cover An Industry on Edge 16 On the Table Gettin’ Saucy with Pot Wings 18 Get Out! Staying in Touch 21 Fishing the North Coast Sport and Commercial Ocean Salmon Season Closed Statewide 22 Front Row Who’s Your Venus? 23 Seriously Wishful Weed Strains for 2023 24 The Setlist In Bloom 26 Calendar 30 Home & Garden Service Directory 33 Screens Thrown Back 34 Workshops & Classes 35 Field Notes Dolbeer’s Donkey Engine 36 Cartoon 38 Free Will Astrology 42 Sudoku & Crossword 43 Classifieds Sweet and spicy wings with a hit of lime and a cannabis kick. Read more on page 16.
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4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com

March 16, 2023 • Volume XXXIV Issue 11 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com

ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2023

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com

NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest, Collin Yeo

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Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com

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Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com

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Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com

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VERIFICATION

Outdoor Vacuum

I had to cut the grass.

The mower’s electric, so not as loud as gas. Chaco still growled and glared.

When I finally stopped, Chaco finally shared, “I dislike the outdoor vacuum.”

“Duly noted,” I replied, as Chaco sniffed an early bloom. Having picked up the clippers, Chaco asked me, “Are those outdoor scissors I see?”

“Sort of,” I replied, and let a pruning sail. “I don’t mind scissors,” Chaco stated, while wagging his tail. Chaco proclaimed, “It’s time for a walk.”

I concurred, but first had to ask, “When did you learn to talk?”

What About Medicare?

Editor:

We read with interest about Assemblyman Wood’s continuing efforts to find remedies for the ongoing abuses to our dysfunctional healthcare non-system (NCJ Daily, March 2). A.B. 1537 is the newest example as it tries to reign in the horrendous profiteering in privately run nursing homes in California.

However, as Tony Chicotel, attorney for the nonprofit advocacy group California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform (CANHR) observes, impact of the bill will be limited and without significance. Overwhelmingly, the explanation for this lies with skilled nursing facilities’ (SNF) operators continuing to find ways to game the system. It’s like putting fingers in the dike. As water seeks its own level, so does the never-satisfied thirst for profit continue to find ways to feed itself. In the realm of health care, this runs 180 degrees counter to public need.

Chicotel says, “government is a terrible consumer of long-term care” and, absent some kind of seismic reform, we are stuck with “the status quo.” Not so: For 58 years, Medicare has been a public health safety net for elders and the disabled. Medicare is a revered and valued government program that spends some 98 percent of its funds for patient care.

When it is improved (adding vision, dental, hearing and long-term care, for example) and expanded to every resident in California, it would cure the SNF abuses simply by streamlining administrative costs and eliminating profiteering. There’s your seismic reform, with efficiency that far exceeds that of any for-profit entity.

The California Nurses Association with Assemblyman Ash Kalra have introduced A.B. 1690 to develop a program

designed to bring equitable, accessible, guaranteed, high-quality healthcare service to all Californians. Given Dr. Wood’s ongoing search for healthcare justice and his avowed support for single-payer, universal healthcare in the past, we look forward to his enthusiastic support for this bill.

Write a Letter!

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 5
Terry Torgerson
MAILBOX
On the Cover Illustration by Renée Thompson The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink. CIRCULATION COUNCIL

Newsom’s Climate Budget Would Slash Funds that Protect Coast

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposed budget would cut funding for coastal resilience projects almost in half, eliminating more than half a billion dollars of state funds this year that would help protect the coast against rising seas and climate change.

The cuts are part of Newsom’s proposed $6 billion in reductions to California’s climate change programs in response to a projected $22.5 billion statewide deficit.

California’s coastal resilience programs provide funding for local governments to prepare coastal plans and pay for some projects that protect beaches, homes and infrastructure at risk from rising sea levels. Greenhouse gases are responsible for warming the planet, which melts ice and causes sea levels to rise, which is projected to have a disproportionate impact on Humboldt County.

Newsom’s proposal would budget $734 million for coastal resilience, a cut of 43 percent or $561 million compared to 2021 and 2022, according to the Legislative Analyst’s Office.

Some lawmakers told CalMatters that they are concerned about Newsom’s proposal to gut the programs that help coastal towns prepare for climate change and flooding, which already has damaged some communities.

Sen. Josh Becker, who chairs the Senate’s budget subcommittee, called the cuts “highly concerning,” especially because they are excessive compared to the cuts applied to other state programs.

“Most programs received 10 percent cuts,” Becker, a Democrat from San Mateo, said in an interview. “I’m very concerned

about it, given the timing that we are experiencing these floods. My county is among the most endangered in the state for sea level rise.”

Becker said he hopes to restore some of the money, possibly by finding federal funds to backfill some programs.

“These are dramatic cuts to something we agreed upon, and I’m going to try to get it back,” he said.

Newsom’s budget, released Jan. 10, is not final, with revisions due in May.

Experts say there’s a lot at stake if sea level rise and coastal projects are not addressed now. Last month the state Department of Transportation, Caltrans, released a draft management plan estimating that it needs nearly $15 billion over the next ten years to protect bridges and roads from sea level rise.

A 2020 report by the Legislative Analyst’s Office projects more than $20 billion worth of California property will be at risk or underwater by 2050 without planning and funding. “Waiting too long to initiate adaptation efforts likely will make responding effectively more difficult and costly…. The next decade represents a crucial time period for taking action to prepare for” sea level rise,” the report says.

Much of the funding on the chopping block is in the form of grants to local governments to fund projects and planning. Among the proposed cuts is $64 million for cities to prepare extensive management plans to prepare for sea level rise.

Chris Helmer, director of environmental and natural resources for the city of Imperial Beach, said “if the state cuts adaptation projects, that would be a concern.”

The city received about $200,000 to prepare a draft sea level rise plan, he said.

It also has a grant pending with the Ocean Protection Council for another project to protect the city from encroaching seas.

“If there’s no money, that’s a major concern for us,” Helmer said. This winter’s storm exacerbated already massive flooding issues, he said. Waves broke on city streets, sand was driven well past the beach and rocks were thrown through residents’ windows. The cleanup took two months.

Up the coast in Ventura, the storms also undermined beachfront infrastructure and proved the value of a project at Surfers’ Point, partially funded by a $1.6 million state grant, that relocated a parking lot and bike path away from the water and protected the beach with a “living shoreline.”

The second phase of that project is contingent on a $16.2 million grant application with the state. The timeline to begin is this winter.

Cody Stults, the city’s associate engineer, said he is optimistic that the grant funding would survive the cuts, but added that there is no way the city could afford to pay for the next phase of the Surfers’ Point project.

“If we can’t get the money, I can almost guarantee that the work will not be going through this winter,” he said.

Among the statewide programs with deep proposed cuts are protecting the coast from climate change, with a 65 percent cut; adapting infrastructure to sea

level rise, a 74 percent cut; and implementing S.B. 1, a 63 percent cut.

S.B. 1 provides funding for much of the state’s sea level rise response. The author, Senate President Pro Tem Toni Atkins, said the threat is more urgent now than when the 2021 law passed.

“The intent of S.B. 1 was to empower communities to work to find solutions at the local level to address sea level rise in partnership with the state,” the San Diego Democrat said in a statement to CalMatters. “While we are facing challenging times, the past decade of responsible budgeting has prepared the state to withstand a downturn without devastating cuts to critical programs.”

In recent testimony before the Legislature, Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot characterized the governor’s proposed cuts as “surgical.” When pressed to explain how the administration prioritized programs that would be trimmed, he said the focus was on addressing “clear and present danger.” He identified wildfire and water projects as posing a direct and immediate threat to Californians.

Environmentalists said the governor’s proposal to cut climate funding is shortsighted: Rising seas are often described as a “slow moving disaster,” as the most devastating impacts are projected to show up in coming decades.

“Sea level rise is here,” said Laura Walsh, California policy manager for Surfrider Foundation. While wildfires are a “huge

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
King Tides brought high water to the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Center. File photo
NEWS

deal and we don’t want to compare sob stories, at this particular moment, living on the coast feels like an emergency. This is not belt-tightening, this is drowning,” she said.

Newsom proposed the cuts right when California was lashed with a damaging series of atmospheric rivers, flooding and high surf, which was proof enough that sea level rise is harming the state now, said Donne Brownsey, chair of the California Coastal Commission.

Brownsey didn’t criticize the governor’s proposed cuts, but said she hoped they would be re-evaluated because coastal programs are critical to addressing an imminent crisis.

“What we saw in January was the trailer for the movie. That’s the way it’s going to roll,” she said. “We’re hopeful that given what happened — all the flooding and damage up and down the coastline — we are hoping there will be a reevaluation of these programs. It’s not a future problem. It’s today.”

Brownsey and others noted that past budgets have been generous, but also that their programs are increasingly under pressure.

“We still have unprecedented amounts

of funding to make these investments. The state is committed,” said Jenn Eckerle, deputy secretary for oceans and coastal policy and executive director of the state’s Ocean Protection Council. “But we also know impacts are happening now and we know they are only going to get more extreme over time. We also recognize that failure to invest in planning now can lead to significant costs later.”

Crowfoot told the budget panel that state agencies have been scouring federal programs for money to backfill any state funding losses. About $4 billion in new federal money is set aside for coastal resilience projects.

The Newsom administration floated the idea of a general obligation bond to make up for the cuts, and a “trigger” provision that would restore funding if the revenue picture brightens.

But Rachel Ehlers of the Legislative Analyst’s O ce told the Senate subcommittee that expecting revenues to rebound is “optimistic.” She said there is a strong chance that the deficit will grow. ●

CalMatters is a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom dedicated to explaning California policy and politics.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 7
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Yurok Tribe Hires MMIP Investigator

Julia Oliveira, a Wyandotte Tribe citizen with 25 years of local law enforcement experience, most recently leading the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribal Police Department, is breaking new ground after being hired by the Yurok Tribe to become the first investigator in California fully dedicated to investigating Missing and Murdered Indigenous People cases.

“I applied for the MMIP investigator position because I am very passionate about this subject,” Oliveira said. “Throughout the state of California, very few resources are allocated to cases involving missing and murdered Indigenous people. I was very excited when I saw the opportunity to be the person who is solely focused on finding missing Indigenous people.”

Oliveira spent 20 years with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, holding a number of positions during her tenure, including conducting missing person and child abuse investigations. She continues to serve on the HCSO’s Crisis Intervention Team and holds a leadership position within the United States Office of Violence Against Women’s Task Force on Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women, according to a Yurok Tribe release.

“We are so fortunate that Julia decided to accept the investigator position. She has the ideal background for this important job,” said Yurok Tribal Chair Joseph L. James. “She will help bring closure and justice to the families of missing tribal citizens. The new investigator will be engaged in our MMIP prevention effort too.”

Oliveira’s hire is yet another step in the Yurok Tribe’s continuing efforts to address the MMIP crisis, which only gained real

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standing outside of Native communities in 2020, when the Sovereign Bodies Institute released a groundbreaking report that found Native women and girls were far more likely to go missing, especially in Northern California, or become victims of violence than the general population.

In December of 2021, the Yurok Tribe declared a state of emergency after a spate of attempted abductions and reports of missing persons, and the tribe hosted its first-ever Missing and Murdered Indigenous People Symposium in October, which brought tribal leaders from throughout California, as well as state, federal and local officials, together to discuss the crisis and prioritize reform efforts.

The release states Oliveira will work within the Yurok Office of the Tribal Prosecutor, which is part of the tribe’s MMIP response team, and “will conduct inquiries into current and cold MMIP cases.”

Prior to accepting the position, Oliveira served on the Office of the Tribal Prosecutor’s MMIP Roundtable, which the release states meets regularly to “discuss solutions to the MMIP crisis.”

The roundtable currently includes the Yurok Tribe, Hoopa Valley Tribe, Trinidad Rancheria, Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria and Quartz Valley Tribe.

Oliveira’s position was funded by a $350,000 grant from the San Manuel Band of Mission, with the monies also going to “support the creation of a database that will be employed to analyze patterns in missing persons cases and identify potential perpetrators,” as well as being used to purchase “billboard space to raise awareness about specific cases” and for supporting the “deployment of canine

Disaster Declared: With winter storms having wreaked havoc across the region and more on the way, Humboldt County Sheriff William Honsal declared a state of local emergency March 8, allowing the county to apply for state and federal response funds.

POSTED 03.08.23

At the Gala

handlers, human remains detection dogs and ground-penetrating radar when necessary,” the release states.

The Yurok Tribe was also integral in last year’s passage of the Feather Alert bill, signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom in September, which — like an Amber Alert for children or Silver Alert for seniors — allows for the quick dissemination of information when an Indigenous individual is reported missing under unexplained or suspicious circumstances.

In February, the Yurok Tribe was selected to serve as the first pilot location

Record Rainfall: It’s official, rainfall totals recorded at the National Weather Service’s Woodley Island office March 13 set a new record for the date at 1.54 inches. The Eel River, meanwhile, hit flood stage early March 14, with an expected peak at 23.1 feet.

POSTED 03.14.23

of the U.S. Marshals Service’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Initiative, which — according to a previous news release from the tribe — aims to “develop tribally-led collaborative partnerships to proactively examine public safety issues – particularly those involving missing endangered children.”

“We hope to leverage our relationship with the U.S. Marshals to build out our investigative program,” said Yurok Prosecutor Rosemary Deck.

— Kimberly Wear POSTED 03.10.23

Sprung Forward: Daylight saving time arrived March 12, meaning darker mornings, brighter evenings and a lost hour of sleep, as Congress once again takes up a measure to end the practice, which many see as antiquated.

(Check those smoke detector batteries.)

POSTED 03.11.23

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
ncj_of_humboldt northcoastjournal newsletters ncjournal northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily northcoastjournal
Jessica Jones, Mona Giaromini and Malinda Hinton pose in the Eureka Theater lobby March 12, during the eighth annual Red Carpet Gala and Oscars watch party. See more photos at northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 03.15.23
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An Industry on Edge

Reform initiative headed for ballot would dramatically overhaul cannabis regulation in Humboldt

The Humboldt County cannabis industry is on edge, with an initiative slated to come before voters next year that would dramatically reshape cultivation regulations, capping the number and limiting the size of farms, and overhauling how the county’s primary cash crop can be grown moving forward.

More than four dozen cannabis farmers and industry advocates addressed the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors on March 7 to warn of what they see as the catastrophic consequences the initiative would have, pleading with the board to publicly oppose the measure, which has qualified to be on the March 5, 2024, ballot. Speaker after speaker decried the initiative, describing it as everything from “anti-cannabis” and “anti-community” to the work of “economic terrorists” and, perhaps most antagonistically, “the Karen Initiative.”

“Do we want Humboldt to be just another part of rural America — bleak, devastated?” one speaker asked. “That’s what you get with the Karen Initiative.”

Initiated by a group of Kneeland area residents concerned about the environmental and neighborhood impacts of cannabis cultivation, the measure is shaping up to be one of the more contentious and divisive in recent memory. Signature gatherers for the initiative said they faced organized harassment while gathering the more than 7,000 signatures collected to qualify it for the ballot, while some who say they signed on to support the measure now say they were misled to think it was

designed to protect the county’s small farms.

After hearing speaker after speaker at the March 7 meeting decry the initiative, and receiving an alarming analysis from county staff that warned of “dire consequences” for both the industry and the planning department should it pass into law, the Board of Supervisors voted to form an ad hoc committee to meet with the initiative’s proponents to see if a compromise can be reached to withdraw it. Fourth District Supervisor Natalie Arroyo, Second District Supervisor Michelle Bushnell and Planning Director John Ford are now slated to meet with the proponents in the coming weeks to start that conversation. But, in a letter to the board, one of the initiative’s authors indicated such an accord is unlikely, as the group feels an obligation to the measure’s 7,000 signees to move forward. It should also be noted that if passed, the initiative could only be amended or altered by another vote of the people.

The initiative’s primary author, Mark Thurmond, declined to comment for this story when reached by the Journal, saying its proponents want to wait to speak with the ad hoc committee before responding publicly.

As the industry waits on proverbial pins and needles to hear the outcome of that meeting and contemplates next steps, we take a look at the current state of cannabis regulation in Humboldt and how it would change should the initiative be voted into law.

As it Stands

Once home to an estimated 15,000 cannabis farms, Humboldt County is now home to 1,027 active permitted farms, while the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office estimates another 1,000 are operating illicitly, primarily growing cannabis indoors to be sold illegally out of state. Of those with active permits, 739 are for pre-existing farms — meaning they were actively cultivated prior to obtaining permits — and 210 are new, with another 78 comprising a mix of the two.

The majority of these active permits are for farms cultivating less than 10,000 square feet of cannabis, with 189 ranging in size from a half-acre to an acre and 19 cultivating more than 1 acre of cannabis.

What constitutes a large-scale farm or a mega grow is in the eye of the beholder. While many have affixed the term to anything spanning an acre or more, the county staff report notes the largest farms in Humboldt County — ranging between 7 and 8 acres — are far shy of the 100-plus acre farms permitted in Santa Barbara and San Bernardino counties, or even the 60-plus acre farms closer to home in Lake County.

While there is certainly some disagreement about the adequacy of controls, applicants for cultivation permits have to show their farms’ access roads are serviceable, that most neighborhood impacts will be mitigated and that the farms’ water will be sourced in a way that won’t negatively harm the environment — usually through rainwater catchment and storage systems and ground wells. In the case of ground

wells, the county requires a geologic study to determine if they will impact nearby streams and rivers, or neighbors.

Permitted farms also continue to be monitored by the county for permit compliance, as well as state agencies, and the county staff report notes the Planning Department conducted more than 900 site inspections in 2022, as well as more than 400 “remote inspections,” with some overlap between the two.

Combined with the changing market forces brought by full-scale legalization, the county’s regulatory framework — which has evolved from an initial commercial medical cannabis land use ordinance passed in 2016 to one governing both medical and recreational commercial cultivation in 2018, which was further tweaked in 2020 — has unquestionably reduced the collective footprint of the industry in Humboldt. Regulation has also changed the nature and impacts of cannabis cultivation in Humboldt, weeding out most of the most egregious environmental damage and concentrating farms in certain areas, as the county’s land use ordinances aimed, in part, to move cultivation out of the areas where it was deemed likely to cause the most environmental damage and onto land deemed better suited for farming.

The county staff report notes that areas with what’s deemed prime agricultural land — communities like Honeydew, Shively and Holmes Flat in Southern Humboldt — have attracted concentrations of permitted farms, bringing neighborhood impacts that have frustrated some residents. A couple larger cannabis farms

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
The Cannabis Reform Initiative is slated to go before voters March 5, 2024, and if passed would overhaul the county’s commercial cannabis cultivation regulations. Miguel Gutierrez Jr., CalMatters
ON THE COVER

— particularly a 5.73-acre grow on a 7,000acre property known as Rolling Meadows and a proposed 22-acre grow in the Arcata Bottoms that was reduced to 5.7 acres — have also drawn a lot of community concern and attention, the report notes.

Few seem fully happy with the current lay of the land. Farmers have repeatedly complained of the costs of permitting and compliance — especially amid an oversaturated cannabis wholesale market that has sent prices plummeting and what they deem high state and local tax rates — noting that geologic and hydrological studies cost money, as do water storage systems and road improvements. Environmental groups, meanwhile, seem to feel that regulation has curtailed many of the most egregious abuses, though oversight is laxer than they would like and they have ongoing concerns about the permitting of new farms in outlying, off-the-grid areas, generator use and the lack of comprehensive studies on groundwater draws and their cumulative impacts.

The Initiative

Distressed by an application to permit a more than 40,000-square-foot grow on Barry Ridge, a group of Kneeland residents convened a community meeting, worried about the impact the farm and others

They soon met with people from other areas of the county who had similar concerns and personally financed the effort to draft the reform initiative and then volunteered their time over the span of months to gather enough signatures to qualify it for the ballot.

If passed, the 38-page initiative would modify the county’s General Plan — considering the guiding document for all county land use planning — to dramatically alter the cannabis cultivation permitting landscape in Humboldt. The fact that the initiative would amend the General Plan is noteworthy, as it would also then require the county to modify any codes or regulations deemed in conflict with the initiative so they align.

Perhaps most notably, the initiative would cap the size of cannabis farms at 10,000 square feet, which would immediately render more than 400 permitted farms “non-conforming.” Additionally, the initiative would require farms be located on roads that meet or exceed Category 4 standards (two-lane roads that can accommodate speeds of 25 to 40 mph, according to the county website), that those using artificial light only use low-wattage lighting systems to reduce climate impacts and phase out of the use of generators to the point they will ultimately be allowed for emergency use only. It would also extend

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would have on everything from traffic and water resources to the elementary school. About 100 people attended, and several — including the initiative’s chief proponents — walked away deeply concerned the county was permitting too many farms and exercising too little oversight.

the forbearance period — the part of the year when farmers with water rights are prohibited from drawing surface water from streams and rivers — and require additional studies of groundwater impacts.

Continued on page 13 »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 11
SALE ITEMS LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND. PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH MARCH 31st, 2023 #709994 Members of the cannabis industry, complaining of over regulation, high compliance costs and heavy tax burdens, protest the county’s Measure S tax in January of 2022. File photo

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ON THE COVER

Continued from previous page

The initiative would also cap the total number of cannabis permits allowable in the county to 1.05 times the number issued as of March 4, 2022 (the day the initiative was certified to begin signature gathering), which would equate to 978 permits, according to the county staff report.

Under the initiative, cultivation permits would also expire annually, requiring farmers to reapply, while the planning department would be required to conduct on-site inspections annually for every permit and broadly increase public noticing efforts for every permit application. While the initiative specifies it would require public hearings for permits for all grows larger than 3,000 square feet, it is ambiguous whether this would apply for renewal applications, as the initiative doesn’t describe a renewal process, but the prospect of holding 1,000 or so public hearings for permit renewals annually seems logistically untenable.

The initiative also includes a provision that states “no approval of a permit for commercial cannabis cultivation” would be allowed that results in “any one person holding more than one active permit.” It’s ambiguous whether that would simply limit the number of cultivation permits a single person can hold or should be interpreted to prevent a cultivation permit holder from also holding a tourism or processing permit, a point of significant concern for the industry. It’s again important to note the initiative cannot be changed or amended from the form that was circulated for signatures and, if passed, could only be changed through another election.

If passed, between its cap on the size and number of farms and the number of permits an individual can hold, road requirements and limitations on the use of artificial light, the initiative would immediately render most of the county’s farms “non-conforming,” meaning that while they met the requirements at the time of permitting they are not in compliance with current regulations. The initiative would allow these farms to stay in operation as long as they don’t “expand” their uses — which is defined to mean “an increase in cultivation area, water usage, energy usage, or the number or size of any structures used in connection with cultivation” — or apply for another permit.

There are unanswered questions about

whether simply applying to renew one’s permit, as required by the initiative, would constitute a new permit application that would require a non-conforming farm to come into compliance with the letter of the initiative. If that’s the case, it would require swaths of the county’s farm to reduce their footprints after a year. It’s also unclear whether environmental improvements — like adding water storage capacity or a solar array — would fit the definition of an expanded use and thus force a non-conforming farm to come into compliance.

If the initiative passes, county planners would be put in the position of reconciling these ambiguities, with the potential that their determinations would then be challenged in court, whether by an unhappy cultivator or a disgruntled neighbor. From farmers to environmental groups to county staff, many have said they see implantation of the initiative, if passed, to be rife for legal challenges.

The initiative would also inherently leave some currently in the process of pursuing cultivation permits behind. It allows the county to continue processing all applications that were complete by March 4, 2022, but the processing of all permits received after would halt until the number of permitted farms falls below the cap set by the initiative. This would leave some applications pending indefinitely. Ford, the planning director, also noted this would mean some farmers who voluntarily participated in the county’s “Retirement, Remediation and Relocation Program” — which allowed existing farms in environmentally unsuitable areas to retire their grows and remediate the land in exchange for a promise they would be allowed to relocate them to more suitable agricultural land — would be left out.

The initiative itself makes clear its primary concern is the environment, not the industry, farmers or the county.

“The purpose of this Humboldt Cannabis Reform Initiative is to protect the county’s residents and natural environment from harm caused by large-scale cannabis cultivation,” it states. “Specifically, the initiative seeks to promote environmentally responsible cultivation practices and support watershed health for residents, property owners and eco-

Continued on page 15 »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 13
Perhaps most notably, the initiative would cap the size of cannabis farms at 10,000 square feet, which would immediately render more than 400 permitted farms “non-conforming.”

HICAP is the Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program, a program of the Area One Agency on Aging. Registered HICAP volunteer counselors help senior and disabled Medicare beneficiaries understand their Medicare and health insurance benefits and choices.

HICAP volunteers advocate for Medicare beneficiaries regarding problems with Medicare or a Medicare provider. Volunteers counsel individual clients on a variety of Medicare and insurance issues and inform lowincome Medicare beneficiaries about programs that can help pay for Medicare costs.

HICAP provides free training to become a registered HICAP Counselor with the California Department of Aging.

It takes just 24 hours of initial training and 10 hours of counseling observation time to become a certified HICAP Counselor. Volunteer counselors must provide a minimum of 40 hours per year of client counseling to maintain certification.

HICAP pays for volunteer mileage and ongoing training. Call HICAP to learn about this opportunity to assist older adults.

Call 444-3000 or 1-800-434-0222 for more

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
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“The production of this document was supported, in part, by grant number CFDA 93.924 from the US Administration for Community Living (ACL), DHHS, Washington, DC. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration of Community Living policy. Its contents are solely the responsibility of A1AA/HICAP and do not necessarily represent the official views of ACL.” PREVENT HEALTHCARE FRAUD Guard your Medicare card like your credit card I GOT THESE AT CAL COURTS Reasonable Rates HIGH QUALITY CARDIO AND STRENGTH TRAINING EQUIPMENT LARGE FREE WEIGHT ROOM FREE CLASSES FAMILY ENVIRONMENT 3909 Walnut Dr. Cutten (707) 445.5442 Coloring Book CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS Hey, artists! Team up with NCJ for our next collaborative coloring book project. Details at northcoastjournal.com Deadline: March 31
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systems affected by cannabis cultivation activities. This initiative accomplishes its purpose by limiting the number, type and acreage of permits for commercial cannabis cultivation ….”

Enviros’ View

While most of Humboldt County’s environmental organizations have yet to take an official stance on the initiative, there seems to be consensus that the current regulatory framework needs to be improved and the initiative constitutes a significant overhaul of a complex industry.

“At least on the environmental side, there are things we’ve always wanted to have cleaned up,” said Environmental Protection Information Center Executive Director Tom Wheeler, specifically pointing to a “loophole” that allows permitting of farms on prime agricultural soil even if it’s in remote, off-the-grid areas, the pervasive use of generators and the need for a more thorough analysis of the cumulative hydrological impacts of wells.

Caroline Griffith, the executive director of the Northcoast Environmental Center, agreed current regulations need work, saying she does see a “kind of bias” toward “large, industrial” grows, which she would define as anything larger than an acre. Griffith also pointed to the continued permitting of farms in remote, off-the-grid areas, which require employee commutes and, often, generator use, adding to cumulative impacts.

“We share a lot of the same concerns” as the initiative’s writers, Griffith said, though she noted the NEC has not taken a stance on the initiative despite months of internal discussion. “The reason we have

not is because it is really such a complex issue that it’s hard to address it with an initiative.”

Griffith said she personally hopes the initiative might push the county to revamp its cannabis land use ordinance for a third time.

“The thing I would like to stress is there are a lot of people from all different sides who see issues with the state of our current ordinance and where it stands,” she said.

Ultimately, the initiative’s official proponents are the only ones who can pull it from the 2024 ballot, and it remains to be seen if they are willing to do so. If not, there’s talk from the industry and officials of trying to put forward a competing ballot initiative, though what that might look like is anyone’s guess at this point.

Wheeler, whose EPIC has officially come out opposing the initiative, said the petitioners are absolutely right in recognizing there are real environmental inadequacies in the county’s existing framework and seeking to address them. But the issues involved are extraordinarily complex, he said, and a more collaborative process is required to adequately address them.

“I would like to see revisions to the county’s ordinance, or new ordinances, come by the same way as the old ones, which was through that grueling, exhausting process where there are tradeoffs and we work together,” he said. “I just think that’s a better way of making laws.” l

Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the news editor at the Journal. Reach him at (707) 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 15 JUDY DAVIS Insurance Services, Inc. Auto • Business • Home Family • Farms • Ranches www.jdinsurance.com Lic. # 41787 Serving Northern California Since 1977 Clyde 744 10th Street Fortuna CA 95540 707.725.5411 1933 Central Ave. Ste. D McKinleyville CA 95519 707.839.5288 Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area Planning & Permitting Civil Engineering • Land Development Subdivisions & Lot Line Adjustments Project Management • Land Surveying Flood Elevation Certifi cates (707) 443-8651 402 E Street, Eureka www.omsberg.com ON THE COVER Continued from previous page
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Sandi DeLuca, pictured here at a cultivation tax protest in January of 2022, was one of dozens of people who spoke in opposition of the Cannabis Reform Initiative at the March 7 meeting of the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors. File photos
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From Seed To Flower

Gettin’ Saucy with Pot Wings

Infused honey-lime chipotle and Buffalo

It was the day after Super Bowl LVII. I awoke to hazy memories of Rihanna, funny commercials and something about a sports game before thoughts of leftovers took over. (Some of us are only here for the food, OK?) I peeked in my fridge and saw a whole bag of uncooked wings we hadn’t gotten to at the party. I always outsource cooking the wings and these babies were left by some serious wing-loving friends. This had just turned into a case of finders keepers and I decided I was going to experiment. Dear friends, your poultry sacrifice was not in vain. I went so far down the hot-wing rabbit hole I ended up on the other side with a vision of cannabis-infused (ahem), pot wings.

I discovered the foundation of the perfect wing starts with the right cooking method. You can roast in an oven, you can deep fat fry, you can barbecue, sure, but for me, an air fryer is best. It creates the perfect contrast of juicy interior and crisp exterior with no oil necessary, making them maybe not healthy, but certainly a tad healthier than traditional frying, and in half the time as cooking in a traditional oven. Next is the sauce — finding a balance of flavors between the heat, the acid, and any sweetness is vital. Of all the iterations I’ve experimented with, my favorites turned out to be regular old Buffalo wings and honey-lime chipotle wings made from the Oh So Heavy Buffalo and Chipotle sauces from local brand Huck’s

Humboldt Hotties. And the last component: infused butter.

For those of us who love edibles, savory infusions are a nice reprieve from gummies day in and day out. When I don’t have homemade canna-butter on hand, I head to a local dispensary for a jar of Heavenly Sweet, which does the trick just fine. I typically use about 30 milligrams of THC-infused canna-butter for a 2-pound batch of wings to be shared by two people. Add more or less, depending on your tolerance. When you’re done digging in, do yourself a favor and grab some crusty bread to soak up any extra sauce. Or just lick the plate, I promise I won’t tell your mother.

Infused Honey-Lime Chipotle Wings

If you prefer to use infused honey, you can skip the canna-butter and use regular butter.

Ingredients:

2 pounds chicken wings

Salt and pepper, to taste

½ teaspoon granulated garlic

½ cup honey

2 tablespoons brown sugar

Chipotle hot sauce, to taste

1 lime (zest and juice)

2 tablespoons butter (mix of regular and your preferred dose of infused canna-butter)

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
ON THE TABLE Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area
Offering Small Batch Flower And Solventless Concentrates

Heat an air fryer to 400 F and set the timer to 18 minutes. Pat the wings dry with a paper towel, then season generously with salt and pepper. Place wings in a single layer in the air fryer and cook for 18 minutes, turning halfway through. While the chicken cooks, prepare the sauce.

Measure your preferred dose of cannabis-infused butter. Add enough regular butter to reach 2 tablespoons total. (Use regular butter only if using infused honey.)

Melt the honey, brown sugar and butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, whisking frequently. Add the lime zest and juice, garlic and chipotle hot sauce, whisking until fully incorporated. Let simmer until the sauce thickens, then remove from heat. Remove the wings to a large bowl. Pour the sauce directly over the wings, then toss to evenly coat. Place the wings back into the air fryer for 2 to 3 minutes to caramelize the glaze. Serve immediately on a plate, then use a spatula to scrape the remaining sauce in the bowl over the wings — we don’t want to waste all that infused goodness.

Infused Bu alo Wings

Ingredients:

2 pounds chicken wings

Salt and pepper, to taste

¾ cup Bu alo sauce

3 tablespoons butter (mix of regular

and your preferred dose of infused canna-butter)

Heat an air fryer to 400 F and set the timer to 18 minutes. Pat the wings dry with a paper towel, then season generously with salt and pepper. Place wings in a single layer in the air fryer and cook for 18 minutes, turning halfway through. While the chicken cooks, prepare the sauce. Measure your preferred dose of cannabis-infused butter. Add enough regular butter to reach 3 tablespoons total. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Once melted, add the Bu alo sauce and whisk until heated through and fully incorporated. Remove from heat. Place the wings to a large bowl and pour the sauce directly over them, then toss to evenly coat. Serve with carrot and celery sticks and your favorite ranch or bleu cheese sauce. Pro-tip: Have some crusty bread on hand — it’s perfect for sopping up any leftover bits of sauce to make all those milligrams count. ●

Jessica Ashley Silva (she/her) is a technical and corporate writer living in Humboldt County, California. Her freelance writing covers the tastes and sights of California’s North Coast. She’s an avid foodie and forager of mushrooms who loves exploring forests, falls and rivers up and down the Pacific Northwest.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 17
Honey-lime chipotle and Bu alo wings sticky with cannabis-infused sauce.
Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. NCJ WHAT’S GOOD northcoastjournal.com/ whatsgood Have a tip? Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com
Photo by Aoife Moloney

Staying in Touch

On, in and around the water

Some sports are like foreign languages — infinitely easier to learn when you’re younger. Once humans reach a certain age, our hips, knees and balance operate as they always have, and it’s much harder for our body to move in new, contrasting directions. For example, if you are a runner or a cyclist, your joints are used to moving bilaterally, forward and backward, but not side to side. Similarly, languages are easier to learn at a young age because the brain is still elastic and neural pathways are still forming. The body is not yet so set in its ways.

At 36, my sense of balance is what it is and doesn’t seem to be improving much, despite my best efforts. Learning how to surf over the past year has felt rickety at best and impossible at worst. Young surfers glide by me, making it look easy in choppy, unpredictable conditions. Meanwhile, I am paddling for waves that often leave me behind, while the aforementioned young surfers stand on their boards in the most relaxed postures, like they are waiting for the bus.

It might be too late for me to become fluent in surfing, French or Spanish, but I keep trying to learn at least some words and movements, forcing my brain to take paths or make connections where it doesn’t want to. My joints sometimes feel like they missed a turn and can’t quite work in the ways that I wish they would, but I still go out to surf. This morning, when I was staring at the nearly full waning moon to the West, I wasn’t thinking about my bad right hip, or my healing rotator cuff. I was just happy to be out there, content to be in touch with my surroundings, watching pelicans gliding a foot above the water and the sandpipers picking at the sand in the shorebreak. I was keenly aware it was just past low tide. Being aware of the tides is new to me, and one of my favorite parts of this new hobby (surfing is certainly a sport, but I still hesitate to call what I do out there a sport). More than

anything, this in-tuneness is what gets me out. Gets me out of the house, gets me into the water and makes me feel alive, no matter the season.

Watching the sunrise from the water, a unique vantage point, has become one of my greatest joys in life. The distant golden orb advances from the East and illuminates the clouds in its soft, foamy light, reaching the westernmost water and rocks first. Watching the glow spread from Camel Rock to shore is pure delight. But you don’t have to pick up surfing to see this; in fact, at the behest of territorial surfers and due to limited space in the water, I’m not encouraging (or discouraging) you to do so.

There are other avenues to get on the water for sunrise, sunset or midday. It doesn’t matter how or where. Borrow a stand up paddleboard from a friend, or rent a kayak from Cal Poly Humboldt’s Center Activities (visit centeractivities. humboldt.edu; you don’t have to be a student), or get a good wetsuit and take a dip in one of our huge, brackish lagoons. Pay attention to the tides and the water levels, and pretty soon you too will have familiar landmarks in odd places throughout Humboldt County. Lagoon swimmers are familiar with, “the Snag” at Big Lagoon, a sun-bleached tree skeleton that for years has been laying on its side with its root wad facing East (0.9 miles from the boat ramp, if you were wondering). There are muddy spots further out in Big Lagoon and a sometimes-submerged snag laying on its side in Stone Lagoon. There’s the anchored tree in the Mad River, placed there for salmon habitat. Countless trees, rock formations, sand bars and other landmarks serve as friendly orientation guides and markers of change in that place.

Knowing the coast, the tides, the shells

and other creatures we share the world with gives a deeper meaning to our own existence. It feels like sitting down to pen a letter to an old friend — something intangible is exchanged, with knowledge or information passed from one being to another. With a letter, pen meets paper and words conglomerate to convey feelings, ideas and past events. When we write letters or even emails, we are making an effort to stay in touch with a person or persons. When we know the tides, natural landmarks and migration patterns of our neighbors, we are making an effort to stay in touch with the dynamic, ever-changing landscape of other lives around us.

If you’re averse to being in the water, or to mornings, no need to fear. There are plenty of other opportunities to stay in touch. We already passed the King Tides (Jan. 21 and 22) but there are low enough tides in other months for decent tide pool viewing, if the weather isn’t howling. Or snowing. Trinidad State Beach is a great place to look at tide pools, but so are College Cove, Moonstone Beach and Baker Beach. With any luck, you’ll be able to say, “Hi,” to the anemones and starfish.

This morning, as I watched a friend paddling toward me, I didn’t think about how bad I am at actually catching waves. I thought about the tides and the pelicans and how just knowing this moment — just being there — felt right. I splashed the water with my hand and felt like I was in touch with the ocean, if only a tiny part of it. l

Hollie Ernest (she/her) is a botanist and forestry technician. She is writing a book about her international bike adventures, gardening and exploring the corners of Northern California. Find her on Instagram @Hollie_holly.

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March. 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
The author with her board, fresh from Humboldt’s waters. Photo courtesy of Hollie Ernest
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Community Spotlight Community Spotlight

Bayside Corners revitalization project

Bouncing back after the pandemic, nonprofit Bayside Corners, has an ambitious community revitalization project --- the repair and restoration of Bayside’s 131 year old Temperance Hall and beautification of the surrounding property. Built in 1882, this centerpiece of Bayside’s historic district at the intersection of Old Arcata and Jacoby Creek Roads, has provided the space for public meetings, socializing, cultural events, classes and youth groups. For many years, the Hall’s main use has been Mistwood Educational Center.

With Mistwood’s cooperation, Bayside Corners aims to beautify the site and upgrade the Hall kitchen, bathrooms, stage and meeting hall, to make it attractive for community uses after-school hours, weekends, and summer months.

Maggie Gainer, Bayside Corners’ president, said, “We took ownership of the building because providing a social gathering place perfectly matches our community-building mission. Social isolation is caused by community design, social norms, public policy, neglect, and systems that make it hard to build connections. Communities are safer and healthier when residents know their neighbors to reach out to in times of need.”

This ambitious Master Plan needs community support to accomplish the project in stages. Phase I will address the stormwater drainage problems onsite, raise the building and strengthen the foundation. A USDA grant program for rural facilities can match local funds raised up to $52,000.

The first benefit for this project is a St. Patrick’s Day event on Friday, March 17th. An Evening of Irish Music & Humor in Bayside will feature The Fiddle Academy All-Stars and Seabury Gould. Doors open at 7:30 and live Irish music starts at 8:00 PM. Drinks and desserts will be available and the best of a limericks contest will be read aloud and win a free beer. Winning limericks will name local leaders, favorite landmarks and hangouts. See limerick instructions at the website www.baysidecorners.org where $20 tickets are also sold, or by contacting 707-826-2021, baysidecorners@gmail.com, or at Mistwood in the Temperance Hall Monday – Thursday 4-5:00 PM. Make this your St. Patrick’s Friday date night in Bayside.

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20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com

Sport and Commercial Ocean Salmon Season Closed Statewide

The Pacific Fishery Management Council on March 10 provided three options for recreation and commercial salmon fishing from the California/Oregon border all the way south to the California/Mexico border. Unfortunately, but not surprising, all three options included the words “closed.” In an unprecedented decision, the PFMC was left with little choice but to close recreational and commercial salmon fishing this season statewide. Southern Oregon, which also impacts Sacramento and Klamath River fall Chinook, will also be closed from Cape Falcon south.

The sport fishery had been scheduled to open o California in most areas on April 1. The closures were made to protect Sacramento River fall Chinook, which returned to the Central Valley in 2022 at near-record low numbers, and Klamath River fall Chinook, which had the second lowest abundance forecast since the current assessment method began in 1997.

Yet to be determined are the fishing seasons within the Sacramento and Klamath Rivers. It’s widely believed neither will be open to the retention of fall Chinook, but two of the alternatives included both Klamath recreational and tribal allocations. Alternative one and two called for 1,804 recreational quota and 1,872 tribal allocation. Alternative three, which agency representatives and industry advisors view as the most likely, have zero recreational fall Chinook and just 68 for tribal. To view all salmon management alternatives, visit pcouncil.org/annual-salmon-management-process/.

Up next, the PFMC will hold a public hearing March 21 in Santa Rosa to receive

Due to low abundance, the sport and commercial Chinook salmon season has been shut down statewide in 2023. The decision was made last Friday by the Pacific Fishery Management Council. Anglers will have to wait until at least 2024 to catch a salmon like the one pictured with Riley Skillman from Mesa, Arizona, a few years ago out of Shelter Cove.

public comment on the three proposed regulatory alternatives. The PFMC will then meet April 1 through April 7 in Foster City to procedurally finalize the closures. Details on how to attend the public hearing and PFMC meeting, as well as instructions to provide public comment, can be found at pcouncil.org.

Weekend weather

According to Ryan Aylward of Eureka’s National Weather Service o ce, we’ll begin to dry out following Tuesday’s rain. “Wednesday and Thursday are looking dry,” said Aylward. “We may see a few showers on Friday and through the weekend, but not enough to raise the river levels. Monday, we’re looking at more widespread rain in the area, and we could see the rivers go back on the rise. And more rain is expected through the week.”

The rivers: Mad

The Mad nearly reached flood stage Tuesday but is now dropping slowly. With only a couple weeks left in the steelhead season, it’s unlikely it will be anything close to green, especially with Ruth Lake dumping over the spillway.

Main stem Eel

The main Eel is forecast to reach 179,000 cubic feet per second Wednesday. Needless to say, it will be blown out for weeks. The main stem Eel, from its mouth to the South Fork is open to fishing all year. From April 1 through Sept. 30, only artificial lures with barbless hooks may be used.

South Fork Eel

The South Fork is also big and brown, running at 32,900 cfs and rising as of Tuesday. It’s going need to stop raining soon or it may not be fishable prior to closing at the end of the month.

Van Duzen

The Van Duzen topped monitor stage Tuesday, peaking at over 13 feet at Bridgeville. It will be on the drop from Wednesday through the weekend, but more rain is in the forecast next week. Like the SF Eel, it may not have time to turn green before the season ends.

Smith

The fast-clearing Smith reached monitor stage, 25 feet at the Jed Smith gauge, Monday night. As crazy as it sounds, it could be in fishable shape by Thursday. Conditions for Friday and Saturday are looking even better, when it will be under 11-feet. There were some fresh steelhead caught late last week and there should be some downers starting to make their way to the ocean.

Read the complete fishing report at northcoastjournal.com. ●

Kenny Priest operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@ fishingthenorthcoast.com.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 21

Who’s Your Venus?

Venus in Fur at NCRT

It would be foolish to not see the limited run of Venus in Fur at North Coast Repertory Theatre. Also, what a shame that this is not a full run of David Ives’ 90-minute comedic play of intricacies, intrigue and intimacy. Jesse March and Kathryn Cesarz will undoubtedly find even more nuance layered between the spaces of Ives’ gorgeous writing and deserve the time to explore the subtleties that birth their fresh and bold work. Obvious products of Dell’Arte’s approach to character exploration through the physical, this work is a strong evolution. They tone back the technique that’s often too apparent in other Dell’Artians’ work, and make way for the truth of their characters through relationship and chemistry. This creates the space for the audience to be swept away with what is not being said as much as the actual dialogue. Yet it still feels authentic and in-the-moment, where the same approach by other actors could feel overly produced.

The stage design is underwhelming, messy even. And absolutely brilliant. I have, in the past, felt that the staff of various otherwise incredible productions put minimal time into supporting the actors’ work at this theater. However, this production and Managing Artistic Director Calder Johnson use that note almost as a joke. Was there not enough fabric to actually close the curtains to hide the backstage/ onstage clutter? In fact, the clutter is necessary to give March’s character Thomas support as the playwright trying to cast his show. It’s also simultaneously the peek-aboo Cesarz’s character Vanda uses for her playground as the whirlwind actress seeks to land the role. In addition to the “mature themed” warnings and advertisements with scanty costumes painting a picture of a seedy show, there’s the stripper pole in the middle of the stage. Quickly all this pretense and assumption fades into the metaphors of the boxes, unlit backstage, yet in plain sight. I love all of it. Brian Butler and Johnson’s lighting design (executed

perfectly by Butler on the night I attended) is simple, effective and divine. Megan Hughes’ costume design is good, though there are many lines that specifically reference the textiles or circumstances of costumes that require suspension of disbelief. That’s not leather, that’s not a fur, those heels are absolutely not stuck in a New York City sidewalk grate — is that really a period coat and dress? These were my thoughts as the play’s dialogue differed from what I saw. And still, somehow, it works. Perhaps it’s in the magic of the show or the magic of Hughes. Further, all hail the mirror heel, thigh-high stiletto platform boot that is centered in a stunning, elongated moment that had me biting my lip and on the edge of my seat. (Please, Goddess Aphrodite, let them be my size!)

I wish March and Cesarz paid the same attention to their dramatic realism as to their comedy in their phenomenal acting. This is particularly true toward the end of the production, where power dynamics turn physical and their Dell’Artian-isms come out. In comparison to their abilities elsewhere, the end didn’t seem dire enough, and I wish they would have leaned into the consequence and survival of the moment. Perhaps this could have been aided by a clever sound design producing more chaos the actors would be forced to push through. Perhaps I am just inspired to get in on a fantastic production, as lovers of the craft sometimes are,

by offering suggestions.

The show, this production and its staff and actors question where the boundaries of reality and theater go askew. It asks us to look at chemistry and its meaning. It plays with power and power dynamics, comparing itself to BDSM. It gives social commentary that is not preachy, leaving room for interpretation and opinion. It plays with magic. It is the kind of production you should see because it will inspire you to see it again and experience the newness of the moments created by nuances highly skilled actors use to create an entirely fresh take, specific and special to that exact moment. You only have this weekend left to witness it.l

North Coast Repertory Theatre’s Venus in Furs shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. through March 18. Call (707) 442-6278 or visit ncrt.net.

Tiggerbouncer Custodio (he/she/they) is an empowered queer Indigenous Filipino artist whose works have been seen on Humboldt stages and elsewhere.

Coming Soon

Cal Poly Humboldt’s players present Radium Girls by D.W. Gregory, about the women who suffered radiation sickness from painting illuminated watch hands, at the Van Duzer Theatre from March 24 through April 2. Visit centerarts.humboldt.edu.

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
Kathryn Cesarz and Jesse March in Venus in Furs. Courtesy of North Coast Repertory Theatre
FRONT ROW RALLY FOR PEACE IN UKRAINE! SATURDAY, MARCH 18TH – 2PM ARCATA PLAZA Speakers, Music, Rally and Walk for Peace! END THE UKRAINE WAR WITH CEASEFIRE AND DIPLOMACY! 20th ANNIVERSARY OF IRAQ “SHOCK AND AWE” BOMBING STOP THE MASTERS OF WAR!

Wishful Weed Strains for 2023

Weed Who Must Not Be Named. Who knew we’d need a Patronus against J.K. Rowling? Here to aid you in the defense against dark transphobes is a Potions Master’s concoction of three magical strains: TERF War, Neville Bongbottom and Strawberry Snape. Soon hateful takes, like those of a children’s author turned fascist cheerleader, will fizz into the background. If you need to dull the anxiety of your state trying to legislate you out of existence, try it with a dab rig or cook it over a spoon and inject it into your neck.

Hotbox the House. Hoo-boy, has it been frustrating watching Republican officials abandon the health and safety of their constituents to push wildly unpopular forced birth legislation. There’s probably a nice indica that will help you find some calm. But might it be more useful to pump a political ambition-dulling, empathy-boosting cloud of smoke into chambers for a couple rounds of debate and voting? Just an idea.

Scramble On. Blueberry Muffin is cool but now that eggs are basically chicken caviar and cannabis prices are in freefall, wake-and-bake aficionados can light up a strain with terpenes that taste like precious, cage-free contraband. Coop DeVille and Shell Crack deliver the simple country flavor you can no longer afford.

Bargewreck. The housing market is tough, especially for new and returning Cal Poly Humboldt students. Is it a massive logistical nightmare or a matter of perspective? A hit of this twist on Humboldt Hostel and Couch Surfer will allow

What’s your food crush?

We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt.

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you to hallucinate that your temporary accommodations — your busted car, a weird motel, an anchored barge — is the luxurious concrete-walled dorm room of your dreams.

Chat OG. Well, looks like we’ve learned nothing from the canon of science fiction and artificial intelligence is exceeding our ability to control it. Learn to be cool with the singularity by gradually upping your dose of this AI-engineered strain combining the genetics of, well, we don’t know but the robots seem to think we should ingest it. Anyway, here’s a cool airbrush-y image our new overlords made of you but, like, as a fairy elf with glowing skin.

Cancel Kulture Kush. Criticism or, worse, the consequences of your own terrible actions, can be stressful. Put down your phone and try this combination of Mel Gibskunk and the high-CBD strain Non-apology Tour that does what every good PR team strives to do: shut you up for a couple of weeks until this all blows over.

Keto Survivor. This one is all about the flavor, specifically the freshly baked bread you’ve denied yourself in relentless pursuit of visible abs. The aroma of Flour Power and Sour Doh will take you back to the bakery as soon as you open the baggie. Does it even get you high? Who cares? This stuff really smells like bread.

Parent-Teacher Confrinz. Another phone call from school about your kid? What you need to get through another scolding while seated at a tiny desk is a numbing combo of Breakfast Klub and Pineapple Permanent Record. Then you can talk to your kid calmly tomorrow.

Be sure to arrange a ride home, though, because you are going to be extremely stoned for a long time.

Sour Apple for the Teacher. Parents only have to make it through as many school conferences as they have children. But teachers need a little something extra to get through back-to-back, face-to-face meetings with the same parents who’ve been staring, screaming and crying at them through Zoom for two years. When the last collage has been collected, go home, lock the door and let this fruity one-two punch of Razberry Retirement and Diesel Detention knock you the hell out.

Crypto Crasher. Listen, it took a lot of weed to wrap your head around crypto. It’s going to take a lot of weed to purge it from your brain. Ultra-potent Tech Bro and OG NFT pair up to clear some data from your blockchain thing or whatever and make room for the next Ponzi scheme your cousin pitches you at a wedding.

Mummybear. This fruity combination of Tricky Treatz and Stranger Danger is bred for use in gummies to help you stop worrying that randos are going to give your kids edibles at Halloween or whenever. Store them in a secure location.

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at (707) 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal. com. Follow her on Instagram @ JFumikoCahill and on Mastodon @ jenniferfumikocahill.

Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the What’s Good blog.

Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

press releases & news tips: newsroom@ northcoastjournal.com

letters to the editor: letters@ northcoastjournal.com

events/a&e: calendar@ northcoastjournal.com

music: music@northcoastjournal.com

advertising: display@ northcoastjournal.com

classified/workshops: classified@ northcoastjournal.com

distribution: distribution@ northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 23
l
SERIOUSLY?
Us Here:
Email

Throughout the month of March, a selection of the Co-op’s best cheeses will go head-to-head to earn your votes, but only one will be crowned the winner!

Taste and vote for your favorite cheeses each week during in-store sampling events, and the final winner will be put on sale in April.

NEXT TASTING

& VOTING DATES

Friday, March 17 (4pm-7pm)

Jarlsburg vs P’tit Basque

Saturday, March 18 (11am-2pm)

Prairie Breeze vs Marin French Camembert

No purchase necessary. Full details and tasting schedule available at northcoast.coop/cheesemadness.

Your organic, member-owned grocery store since 1973

www.northcoast.coop

In Bloom

Iremember describing irony in a high school English class as something that fundamentally deals with opposites. I was looking down when I said it, having at the time not yet developed any of the obnoxious confidence that I am now unfortunately surging with. One girl in the class took my downward gaze as evidence of me reading out of the book for my definition, which wasn’t possible, as none of our textbooks actually offered such a straightforward definition of irony. That might be part of the problem. There’s no shortage of irony in contemporary life. Take the assholes at Silicon Valley Bank, the “venture capitalists” who, having taken advantage of massive deregulation, are now clamoring for a bailout after their institution got gutted by a spooked run when interest rates hiked enough to prove that not everyone with an MBA is actually a genius. Quite the opposite, really.

Or take the dark suspicion that I, a nominal pacifist, has regarding the work required toward actually making a peaceful society. I’ll give you a hint, it involves something different than bailouts for the wealthy, something more along the lines of screaming, burnt offerings of our elite class to a fertile harvest god. I am, of course, being ironic here, right?

I’m not a fan of orgies, bloodthirsty or otherwise. I’m probably just thinking about the coming spring, of renewal, of the opportunity for a thriving and vibrant world of pungent life. Of wet fecundity bubbling out of the rot of yesteryear, of sprouts growing out of the black desolation of the fire. We need those blooms, dearly. But more to the point, we need the rot and the fire first to make the grounds ready for the age of blossom. Think about that the next time you hear a politician calling for another war, or an expert economist calling for another capital bailout. Some experiments shouldn’t be repeated, and some ideas (and their makers) should be retired. The soil awaits fertile nurturing.

Thursday

Philadelphia is famous for creating a lot of funk and R ‘n’ B musicians, particularly in the genre of “blue-eyed soul,” epito-

mized by native sons Hall and Oates. One band carrying on that laidback tradition of pop and rock merged with a basic backbeat and funky syncopation is G. Love and Special Sauce, a veteran act from the 1990s trench days of the alternative jam scene. Tonight at 7 p.m. these playas can be found at the Arcata Theatre Lounge, with special guest Nat Myers opening the night ($26).

Friday, St. Patrick’s Day

As I have mentioned here before, I am not a fan of this holiday, mostly celebrated in this country by mixing two of our less savory national pastimes: binge drinking and lying (in this case, about being Irish). Blame it on my former life as a bartender, I have a reflexive revulsion for this green day. But let the good times roll on, Here are three worthy gigs for your consideration. Casa Nada productions is putting on a Goth Night at Synapsis at 7 p.m., featuring Dry Wedding, Dastbunny, Zero One and DJ Datura. A $10 bill gets you in the door. At the same hour, up north at the Trinidad Town Hall, you can enjoy some jazz with RLA Trio featuring guest appearances by trumpet master Nicholas D. Talvola and guitarist Doug Marcum The entrance fee here is a sliding scale set between $10 and $20.

Finally, at 9 p.m. at Humbrews, Absynth Quartet will be doing its very fine thing for whoever chooses to darken the door and spit out $10 to the warden.

Saturday

The Miniplex is hosting a night of cool, synthy hipness from Los Angeles, as Madeline Goldstein headlines a gig with More Ephemerol. But wait, there’s more. Former Humboldt County musical institution Patrick Tabor, aka Tabor Mountain, will also be on the bill, bringing his high-energy party rock glory back to town for the joy of the assembled masses. DJs Rosé and Mae will also preside. Things should start swinging by 9 p.m. and $10 will secure a spot for you.

Sunday

Well, the cosmos has decreed that it’s a Grateful Dead day in these parts. There’s

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
SETLIST

an all-ages matinee show at Humbrews featuring the Magnificent Sanctuary Band, which will be playing songs from the Jerry songbooks beginning at 3 p.m. for a mere $10.

Later that evening at 8 p.m. at the Arcata Theatre Lounge, you will find The Garcia Project, a band dedicated to recreating the sounds of the Jerry Garcia Band, which I guess sounds different than and distinct from the Grateful Dead somehow ($25, $20 advance, $15 early bird).

Monday, Spring Equinox

Well, spring is sprung and, to quote P.G. Wodehouse’s Bertie Wooster quoting the only poem he remembered by Robert Browning, “God is in his heaven, and all’s right with the world.” Which means that Savage Henry must be putting on yet another installment of Metal Mondays. This week’s gig features F. Emasculata from the United Kingdom, as well as two local groups, Gooseneck and The DTs. Ten bucks seems to be a popular price these days regarding entrance fees, so there you have it.

Tuesday

The Humboldt Bay Social Club has been doing its level best to stick out as a cool spot and, as far as I can tell, is succeeding. There are the regular free Thursday gigs played by guitar-slinging American Primitivist and all-around world traveler Oryan Peterson-Jones (did I forget to mention his gig Thursday, March 16? Shame on me; rewind and go if you are reading this in time). And on top of other live events, the venue is now hosting a regular movie night. Tonight’s offering is the SNL-related ’90s outing The Coneheads, about which I

am curious as to whether it is still decently funny or excruciatingly dated. One could show up at 6 p.m., grab a refreshment and find out.

Wednesday

When people couple up, magic can happen, whether that magic is creative musical excellence (Linda and Richard Thompson’s albums come to mind), scientific advances (see: Pierre and Marie Curie) or wild violence (like the exploits of the protagonists of Terrence Malick’s Badlands, whose behavior was based on the actions of infamous characters I have no desire to name). In the case of Mark and Maggie O’Conner, I think musical excellence is the outcome here. These fiddling folksters have been ripping it up for the better part of a decade, and it shows in their flawless, collaborative frisson. Come on down to Humboldt’s finest cemetery-adjacent venue, the Old Steeple to hear for yourself at 7:30 p.m. ($55). l

Collin Yeo (he/him) actually supports a school-to-prison pipeline, assuming that the school is an Ivy and the prison is a gulag. He lives in Arcata.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 25
Tabor Mountain plays the Miniplex on Saturday, March 18, at 9 p.m.
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Calendar March 16 – 23, 2023

Please Don’t Leave. 11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Scott Hoyle runs this improv-based comedy show with a rotating panel of the best local comedians and touring comics. $5. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

MUSIC

There are numerous St. Patrick’s Day celebrations happening across the county (check this week’s calendar and Setlist), but we’re highlighting this one because it’s full-kilt Irish fun. Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at the Logger Bar on Friday, March 17, from 5 p.m. to close (free) — and wish Michael Fields congrats on the one-year anniversary of owning the joint. This high-spirited event features Irish food (corned beef and cabbage, potatoes and Irish soda bread for donation) from 5 to 7:30 p.m., Irish songs with David Powell and Bud Ownings starting at 5 p.m., dancing by the Irish Dance Academy at 6 p.m., live music from the Humboldt Highlanders Pipe Band at 7 p.m. and music from the California Poppies at 9 p.m.

16

ART

Thursday

Figure Drawing at Synapsis. 7-9 p.m. Synapsis Collective, 1675 Union St., Eureka. With a live model. Bring your own art supplies. Call to contact Clint. $5. synapsisperformance.com. (707) 362-9392.

Thursday Night Art. 4-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Bring your own supplies or use what’s around to collage, paint, draw, make an art book. Bring an instrument to jam in the Great Hall. Free, $5-$20 donation appreciated. sanctuaryarcata.org.

BOOKS

Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson Radio Hour. 10-11 p.m. Episode 10, Chapter 8: Ekim Bey. Free. rybopp@ suddenlink.net. HumboldtHotAir.org. (707) 826-7567.

COMEDY

Bored Games. 6-8 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Every Thursday night we pull out the board games and it’s free play. Snacks, drinks and laughs. All ages w/caution for language. Age 21 and up w/ID to drink. Free, donations accepted. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

LECTURE

Understanding the Earthquake Sequence. 5:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Hear from local geologists about the earthquakes of Dec. 20, 2022 and Jan. 1, 2023, and what we can expect in the future. Local Community Emergency Response Teams share tips to prepare and how to respond. Tsunami Tspaghetti dinner served. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Presentations at 6:30 p.m. facebook.com/humboldt. grange. (707) 442-4890.

MUSIC

Creative Differences, Blank Space, The Critics. 8 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. Live music. All ages show. $10. sirensongbar@gmail.com. sirenssongtavern.com. (707) 599-8986.

Dopapod, Yak Attack. 8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Funk, rock, jazz, bluegrass and electronica.

Spring is coming. We promise! Help usher it in with family friendly fun at the Spring Equinox Celebration , happening Saturday, March 18 , from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Humboldt Coastal Nature Center (free). Join Friends of the Dunes for spring-themed activities in nature, including a Dune Scavenger Hunt, Wildflower Walk and a Spring Storytime. This Spanish bilingual event is geared toward families with young children (ages 3-10), but all are welcome. Springthemed snacks provided. RSVP is recommended, so call (707) 444-1397.

$20. humbrews.com/live-entertainment/. (707) 826-2739.

G. Love and Special Sauce. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. With Nat Myers. All ages. Doors at 7 p.m. $29, $26 advance. arcatatheatre.com.

McKinleyville Community Choir Rehearsal. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Arcata Presbyterian Church, 670 11th St. Join if you like to sing or play an instrument. Reading music or prior experience not necessary. Rehearsals are every Thursday evening. ccgreene46@gmail.com. (831) 419-3247.

S.R. Laws. 6-9 p.m. Redwood Curtain Brewing Co. Myrtle Ave. Tasting Room, 1595 B Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Acoustic American rock. Free.

THEATER

Venus in Fur 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. On a dark and stormy night, a desperate playwright/director and an eccentric actress collide in a hilarious and mystifying test of wills. For mature audiences only. $20, $18 students/seniors. ncrt.net.

EVENTS

Meet and Greet Life Plan Humboldt. 4-7 p.m. Phatsy Kline’s Parlor Lounge, 139 Second St., Eureka. Learn about a local, grassroots effort to create the first resident-led, not-for-profit life plan community for active older adults on the North Coast. Free. ann@lifeplanhumboldt.org. lifeplanhumboldt.org/events/meet-and-greet/. (707) 262-6762.

FOOD

Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.org/volunteering. (707) 445-3166, ext. 310.

ETC

Free Income Tax Preparation. 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. Preparation and electronic filing of federal and state tax returns for low- to moderate-income individuals and families by IRS-certified volunteers. By appointment only, call to schedule. Free. (707) 443-9747 ext. 1240.

Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused

OK, here’s one more: An Evening of Irish Music and Humor, a benefit to support the repairs, site improvements and beautification of the 130-year-old Temperance Hall at the corner of Old Arcata and Jacoby Creek roads, is happening Friday, March 17, from 7:30 to 10 p.m. ($20, $18 online advance). This shindig should be a lively affair with people reciting Limericks about local faces and places, live Irish music by the Fiddle Academy All-Stars and Seabury Gould, and delightful desserts and drinks. Get tickets at the door or online in advance by March 15 at baysidecorners.org.

on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3-$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@ gmail.com. sohumhealth.org. (707) 923-3921.

DJS

DJ Statik and Friends. 9 p.m. Thirsty Bear Lounge, Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Your favorite hits. Free. bearrivercasino.com.

Throw ‘Em Back Thursdays. Third Thursday of every month, 9 p.m. Wave Lounge, Blue Lake Casino, 777 Casino Way. DJ Statik spinning throwback, hip hop and R&B. Free. bluelakecasino.com/entertainment/wave.

OPEN MIC

Blondies Open Mic. 6 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Share your gifts. Free. blondiesfoodanddrink.com.

Siren’s Song Open Mic. 7 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. Step up to the mic. Free. sirenssongtavern.com.

KARAOKE

G.O.A.T. Karaoke at the Goat. 8:30 p.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. Supportive atmosphere, more than 45,000 songs to choose from, all skill levels welcome. Two-drink minimum purchase at the bar. Age 21 and up. info@miniplexevents.com. instagram. com/richardsgoat/. (707) 630-5000.

17 Friday

ART

Stations of the Cross. 5:30 p.m. St Mary’s Church, 1690 Janes Road, Arcata. Linda Neely’s rendition of the Stations of the Cross. Lenten retreat to follow. Free.

COMEDY

Home Improv-ment. 7 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Hosted by Stephanie Knowles with no pressure, just fun and a chance to try something out of your comfort zone. Free, donations accepted. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

Absynth Quartet St. Paddy’s Humbrewsiversary. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Help kick off Humbrews’ anniversary weekend with live music made in the Humboldt Nation. $10. humboldtbrews.com. Blu Axis. 5-8 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. Blues/rock power trio that plays original songs and covers by Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Winter, Robin Trower, Willie Dixon. family@gyppo.com. www.gyppo. com. (707) 986-7700.

Casa Nada Presents: GOTH NIGHT w/Dry Wedding. 7 p.m.-midnight. Synapsis Union, 1675 Union St., Eureka. Southern Gothic influenced post-punk. All-ages until 10 p.m. Ages 21 and up bring ID to drink. Baby Bats welcome. $10. dastbunnyenlacasa@gmail.com. facebook.com/ events/2463105900512624. (559) 760-7554.

Castalian String Quartet Concert + Conversation. 7 p.m. Lutheran Church of Arcata, 151 E. 16th St. The internationally renowned quartet performs. With conversation. $20 General, $5 Student.

An Evening of Irish Music and Humor. 7:30-10 p.m. Temperance Hall, 1928 Old Arcata Road, Bayside. A benefit to support the repairs, site improvements and beautification of the 130-year-old Temperance Hall at the corner of Old Arcata and Jacoby Creek Roads. Featuring two local bands, drinks and desserts. Doors at 7:30. $20, $18 online advance by March 15. baysidecorners@gmail.com. www. baysidecorners.org. (707) 845-5524.

Friday Night Jazz. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. Live local jazz with the Opera Alley Cats. Free. elvisatemydonuts@hotmail.com. (707) 444-2244.

Kenny Bowling. 9-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Country music. Every Friday. Live Music. 6-8:30 p.m. Fieldbrook Market & Eatery, 4636 Fieldbrook Road. Every Friday, local bands play folk, bluegrass, Americana. Always family friendly. Check Facebook or Instagram for updates on who’s playing. Free. fieldbrookmarket@gmail.com. (707) 633-6097.

RLA with Nicholas Dominic Talvola: Trumpet. 7 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Westhaven Center for the Arts presents the RLA jazz trio and Nicholas Dominic Talvola, trumpet, and Doug Marcum, guitar. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Snacks and drinks available. $10-$20 sliding scale. westhavencenter.org. (707) 834-2479.

The Stallions - St. Patty’s Day. 7:30-10:30 p.m. The Historic Eagle House, 139 Second St., Eureka. Playing tribute to Ween and performing the Mollusk album in its entirety. In the ballroom to celebrate with the spirit of chef Dave Griswold and the music he loved. Free. brad.phatsyklines@gmail.com. facebook.com/ events/231257579326984. (707) 407-0634.

THEATER

Venus in Fur 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See March 16 listing.

EVENTS

Humboldt County Transition Fair. 4-7 p.m. Sequoia Conference Center, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Information about services, planning tools and more to help prepare students with disabilities for a full life in the community after high school. Register online to attend the 5 p.m. workshop. Free. sbraggs@redwoodcoastrc.org. tinyurl. com/IncludingEmploymentHum. (707) 445-0893 ext. 348.

Submitted Seabury Gould. Submitted
The Humboldt Highlanders Pipe Band. Submitted
26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com

St Patrick’s Day Pints 4 Nonprofits. 6-10 p.m. Scotia Lodge, 100 Main St. Support the Bridgeville Community Center upstairs at the Lounge. Free. www.thescotiainn. com. (707) 298-7139.

St. Patrick’s Day at the Logger Bar. 5 p.m. The Logger Bar, 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Celebrate with food (corned beef and cabbage, potatoes and Irish soda bread for donation), Irish songs with David Powell and Bud Ownings, dancing by the Irish Dance Academy, the Humboldt Highlanders Pipe Band and the California Poppies. Free. facebook.com/LoggerBar.

St. Patrick’s Day Family Fun Bingo. 6-8 p.m. Freshwater Grange, 48 Grange Road. Games start at 6:30 p.m. Profits benefit the building restoration and community projects. $5 buy-in and extra cards $3, $20 dinner special (includes buy-in, dinner, beverage and dessert). freshwaterhall@ gmail.com. (707) 498-9447.

FOR KIDS

Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop off your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17-$20. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org/ classesprograms.html. (707) 443-9694.

Weekly Preschool Storytime. Eureka Library, 1313 Third St. Talk, sing, read, write and play together in the children’s room. For children 2 to 6 years old with their caregivers, but other family members are welcome to join as well. Free. manthony@co.humboldt.ca.us. humboldtgov.org/ Calendar.aspx?EID=8274. (707) 269-1910.

FOOD

Corned Beef and Cabbage. 4-7 p.m. Wrangletown Cider Co., 955 I St., Arcata. Chef Brett Shuler is preparing corned beef and cabbage with Irish soda bread. $15. wrangletowncidercompany.com.

Corned Beef and Cabbage Dinner and Fundraiser. 5-8 p.m. Belotti Hall, 1250 Fifth St., Humboldt County Fairgrounds, Ferndale. Ferndale Youth Football and Cheerleading’s annual fundraiser. $15, $10 children.

Food Truck Fridays. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. The Humboldt Senior Resource Center hosts local food truck weekly in March. A portion of proceeds benefit Meals on Wheels Redwood Coast. March 17: Fry Burger, March 24: Manzanilla Kitchen, March 31: The Diver.

Mad River Brewery Tasting. 3-5 p.m. North Coast Co-op, Eureka, 25 Fourth St. Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day the local way. Taste a selection of Mad River Brewery’s beers. Must be 21 to participate. Free. kirstenlindquist@ northcoast.coop. www.northcoastco-op.com. (707) 443-6027.

GARDEN

Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@ gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

SPORTS

Skate Night. 6:30-9 p.m. Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St. All ages. First-come, first-served. No pre-registration needed. Maximum 75 skaters. $6, $5 for ages 17 and under.

ETC

Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. sohumhealth.com.

OTHER

Reel Genius Trivia at Old Growth. Third Friday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Old Growth Cellars, 1945 Hilfiker Lane, Eureka. General trivia, fun for everyone. Prizes for winners. Max seven people per team. Food truck on site. Free. partners@ reelgeniustrivia.com. oldgrowthcellars.com. (707) 601-1606.

KARAOKE

Pretty Kitty Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Hosted by Jamie Kohl of Little Red fame. Cash only. Ages 21 and up. Veterans welcome. Shuffleboard. PearceHansen999@outlook.com. facebook. com/profile.php?id=100082987501904. (206) 348-9335.

18 Saturday COMEDY

Farm to Table: Late Night Comedy. 11 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Baseball Robby cu-

rates this small batch artisanal stand-up comedy showcase. $5. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy. com. (707) 845-8864.

MUSIC

Castalian String Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Calvary Lutheran Church, 716 South Ave., Eureka. The internationally renowned quartet performs. $40, $10 students. The Lost Dogs. 5-7 p.m. Mad River Brewing Co. & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Blues and Americana. Free. madriverbrewing.com. 707 668-4151.

Madeline Goldstein, Tabor Mountain, More Ephemerol. 8 p.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. Dream-pop. Synth-punk. Ages 21 and up. $10. info@miniplexevents.com. miniplex.ticketleap.com/ madeline-goldstein/. (707) 630-5000.

Rock Stew. 5-8 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. Alternative, punk and rock covers. family@gyppo.com. www.gyppo.com. (707) 986-7700. Seabury Gould. 6-9 p.m. Redwood Curtain Brewery & Tasting Room, 550 South G St., #4, Arcata. Singer, multi-instrumentalist. Free. redwoodcurtainbrewing.com.

THEATER

Venus in Fur 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See March 16 listing.

EVENTS

Get Lucky w/the Sisters Bingo. 8 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. BINGO with the Eureka Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. Costume contest, raffle, snacks and refreshments for sale. Masks

Continued on next page »

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CALENDAR

Continued from previous page

required inside the event. Ages 18 and up. Benefits the Jefferson Community Center and the Sisters’ General Operating Fund. $20.

Small & Home-Based Business Marketplace. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. Meet and shop from local small business owners. All ages. Adults receive a free raffle ticket for hourly door prize baskets full of local products. You must be present to win. Free. ceo@fortunachamber.com. (707) 725-3959.

Spring Equinox Celebration. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join Friends of the Dunes for spring-themed activities in nature including a dune scavenger hunt, wildflower walk and Spring Storytime. Spanish bilingual event geared for families with young children (ages 3-10). Snacks provided. RSVP recommended. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes.org. (707) 444-1397.

Trail Obstacle Challenge and Backcountry Mini Clinics. 10 a.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Hosted by Backcountry Horsemen of California- Redwood Unit for equestrians or those leading stock by hand featuring four mini-clinics related to camping, hiking, backpacking and horse packing in the backcountry wilderness. Arrive early to register. Snack bar open. $40 for riders, free for spectators. (707) 601-9035.

FOOD

Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh produce, meat, fish, cheese, eggs, bread, flowers and more. Enjoy music (during the main season) and hot food vendors at this family-friendly event. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ arcataplaza.html. (707) 441-9999.

Irish Stew To Go. 5-7:30 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. A hearty beef stew accompanied by bread, green salad and something green for dessert. Order online. $12. irish-stew-to-go. cheddarup.com.

Knights of Columbus St. Patrick’s Day Dinner. 5 p.m. St. Bernard Church, 615 H St., Eureka. Corned beef and cabbage dinner, Pot o’ Gold raffle, silent auction and musical entertainers. Call for tickets. $30, $15 for children 12 and under. (707) 442-6844.

Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown on site, local eggs and sourdough bread. Work from local artists and artisans. flowerstone333@gmail. com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN

Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See March 17 listing.

MEETINGS

Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Guided Field Trip w/Rob Fowler. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring binoculars and meet trip leader Fowler at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) for easy-to-walk trails and an opportunity to view a diverse range of overwintering shorebirds and soon-to-be nesting resident songbirds. Free. rras.org.

Beginning Birdwatching & Project Feeder Watch. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon Jacoby Creek School, 1617 Old Arcata Road, Bayside. Drop in to watch and learn about birds in an informal, family-friendly setting. Bring binoculars. A few pairs available. Visit feederwatch.org/about/project-overview. Free. daseeger@gmail.com. rras.org/home.aspx.

FOAM Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Meet leader Paul Johnson in the lobby of the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute, rain-or-shine walk focusing on marsh ecology. Masks are strongly recommended inside the building. Free. (707) 826-2359.

Forest Restoration at Rohner Park. Third Saturday of every month, 9-11 a.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Remove invasive English ivy and French broom. Tools and gloves available but you are encouraged to bring your own. High winds or heavy rain cancels. Light snack provided. Free. unde1942@gmail.com. (707) 601-6753.

Gould Grove Winter Walks. 11 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Redwoods State Park, 17119 Avenue of Giants, Weott. A guided walk with information on cultural and natural history. Meet in front of the Humboldt Redwoods State Park Visitor Center. Bring comfortable walking shoes, water and maybe a rain jacket. Walks are 0.6 miles long, on an ADA trail and take about 1 hour. Free. humboldtredwoods.org.

Richardson Grove State Park Winter Walks. 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Richardson Grove State Park Visitor’s Center, 1600 U.S. Highway 101 #8, Garberville. A guided walk with information about the park’s cultural and natural history. Bring comfortable walking shoes, water and maybe a rain jacket. Walks are 0.5 miles long and about one hour on an ADA trail on Exhibit Trail or Nature Loop. Free. Samoa Dunes & Wetlands Conservation Area. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Samoa Dunes & Wetlands Conservation Area, Coper Lane, Arcata. Join a Friends of the Dunes naturalist for a tour of this recently conserved area. Includes walking on loose sand and up and down some moderate slopes. Email or call to sign up. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes. org. (707) 444-1397.

Walk in the Park Fitness. 10-11 a.m. Sacco Amphitheater, 1101 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Join Samantha from Eden Personal Fitness for a functional fitness walk down Waterfront Trail. All fitness levels welcome. Dress for the weather. Free. edenpersonalfitness@gmail.com. edenpersonalfitness.com. (707) 362-9004.

SPORTS

St. Paddy’s Hair of the Dog 5/10K Run. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. Registration opens at 9 a.m. Enjoy a 5K or muster up a full 10K while breathing in the fresh coastal air with incredible views. $30. family@gyppo.com. gyppo.com/ hair-of-the-dog. (707) 986-7700.

ETC

Rally For Peace in Ukraine. 2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Speakers, music, rally and walk for peace.

DJS

DJ Mikey Bones. 9 p.m.-midnight. Mad River Brewing Co. & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Ages 21 and up. $5. fb.me/e/zPgFEI8X.

OTHER

Hunks - All Male Revue. 7 & 9:30 p.m. Bear River Casino and Resort Tish Non Ballroom, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Exotic male dance show. Two shows. Ages 21 and up. $69. bearrivercasino.com/events-and-shows/hunksthe-show/. (707) 733-9644.

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com

Thursday-Friday-Saturday Canteen. 3-9 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. See the newly remodeled Memorial Building and enjoy a cold beverage in the canteen with comrades. Play pool or darts. If you’re a veteran, this place is for you. Free. PearceHansen999@outlook.com. (707) 443-5331.

19 Sunday

COMEDY

Stand-up Comedy Workshop. 7-8 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Led by local stand-up comic Jessica Grant. Bring a pen or pencil, and circle up to talk shop about jokes. Open to anyone interested in performing stand-up comedy. Drop-ins welcome. Free, donations accepted. JessicaGrantComedy@gmail.com. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

Sunday Open Mic. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Sign-ups at 9 p.m., show at 9:30 p.m., local favorite features for the 10@10. Comics get five minutes. Zero hate speech tolerated. All-ages w/caution for language. Snacks, drinks. Free, donations accepted. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy. com. (707) 845-8864.

LECTURE

Disasters of Humboldt Bay 2-4 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Three videos and a discussion by experts selected by leaders of the Wiyot tribe. Current COVID recommendations apply. Reservations are recommended at arcataplayhouse.org. Free. humboldthistory.org.

MUSIC

An Afternoon of Jazz with Db Geare. 3 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Jazz standards, original tunes and swing music. $5 adults, $2 students/ seniors/military, free for museum members, children under 18, and families with an EBT card. humboldtarts.org. Sunday Jazz Jams. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Every Sunday. Jazz players, all ages, all levels. Bring your ax and play some Real Book tunes. Everybody who wants to plays. Free. blondiesfoodanddrink@gmail.com. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. (707) 822-3453.

FOOD

Corned Beef and Cabbage Dinner. 4-7 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Drive thru only. Online pre-order suggested. $15. humboldt-grange501-seasonal-drive-thru-dinners-copy.cheddarup.com. (707) 442-4890.

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

Pancake Breakfast. Third Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. All the scratch-made pancakes you can eat, organic eggs cooked to order, bacon or local sausage, coffee or milk, organic orange juice. $10, $5 for ages 7-12 , free for ages 6 and under. evenson@igc.org. (707) 629-3421.

GARDEN

Sequoia Park Ivy League - Volunteer Work Day. 9 a.m.1 p.m. Sequoia Park, 3414 W St., Eureka. Help remove invasive ivy from Sequoia Park. Live ukulele and guitar music courtesy of Angels Creations Guitar School Eureka. facebook.com/events/590715239742190/590715243075523/. (707) 441-4080.

OUTDOORS

Art and Nature at the Refuge. Third Sunday of every month, 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge,

1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Art and nature exploration activities for all ages and abilities. Drop-in anytime between 1 and 4 p.m. Rain or shine. Themes change each month. Free. denise_seeger@fws.gov. fws.gov/refuge/ humboldt-bay. (707) 733-5406.

Audubon Guided Field Trip. 9-11 a.m. Eureka Waterfront, Foot of Del Norte Street. This flat, paved, wheelchair accessible and relatively urban trail offers the potential to observe species abundance and diversity compared to many more remote locations. Email to sign up. Free. thebook@reninet.com. rras.org.

Dune Restoration Volunteer Days. Third Sunday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Ma-le’l Dunes South, Young Lane, Arcata. Help restore the biodiversity of the coastal dunes with the Dune Ecosystem Restoration Team. No experience necessary. Snacks and tools provided. Meet at the Ma-le’l Dunes South parking lot a few minutes before 10 a.m. dante@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes.org/dert-days. (707) 444-1397.

ETC

Old Town Vintage Market. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. On G Street between Second and Third streets. eurekamainstreet.org.

MISC. NIGHTLIFE

Siren’s Song Sunday Funday. 4 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. Card games and board games like Scrabble, Boggle, Magic the Gathering, giant Jenga, Cards Against Humanity and Munchkin. Also, stand-up comedy. All ages. Free. sirensingbar@gmail. com. sirenssongtavern.com. (707) 599-8986.

KARAOKE

G.O.A.T. Karaoke at the Goat. 8:30 p.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. See March 16 listing.

Karaoke at Clam Beach Tavern. 8-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Sunday night.

Karaoke Sundays. 9 p.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Come sing your heart out in the Thirsty Bear Lounge every Sunday night. Ages 21 and up. Free. bearrivercasino.com/thirsty-bear-lounge/. (707) 733-9644.

20 Monday

BOOKS

Equity Arcata’s Community Book Club. Third Monday of every month, 4-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Alia Dunphy and Meridith Oram discuss Adrienne Marie Brown’s book Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds On Zoom. Register online. equityarcata.com.

FOOD

Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See March 16 listing.

ETC

Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email for the link. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. a1aa.org/ homesharing. (707) 442-3763.

Humboldt Bounskee League. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Weekly league nights. Purchase of any wood bounskee from Humbrews or the website includes one-month family membership for future events. All ages.

Build to edge of the document
are just a safe area HWMA maintains a stock of Clearstream and Slim Jim bins that we loan out for free to local event coordinators. We’ll even give you the bags for the Clearstream bins! Call or email us for details: 268-8680 or info@hwma.net Need Help Recycling at Your Next Local Event? Humboldt Waste Management Authority 1059 W. Hawthorne St. Eureka www.hwma.net Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 29
Margins

Free. bounskee@gmail.com. bounskee.fun. (707) 601-9492. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See March 17 listing.

OPEN MIC

Clam Beach Open Mic. 8-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Monday night.

KARAOKE

Karaoke at the Jam. 9 p.m. The Jam, 915 H St., Arcata. Hosted by Dustin Thompkins. Free. thejamarcata.com.

21 Tuesday

ART

“A Celebration of Local Birds” Art Show. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Photography by Mike Anderson and Leslie Scopes Anderson.

COMEDY

‘No Strings Attached’ Trivia. 6-8 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Enjoy trivia games hosted by local comedians and compete for prizes. Trivia is followed by a feature comedy show at 9.p.m. Free. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

MOVIES

Faith E. Briggs - Screening and Conversation. 6-7 p.m. HSU Art B 102, 1 Harpst Street, Arcata. The documentary filmmaker, creative producer and podcast host screens and discusses her short films and activism. Free. sel128@humboldt.edu.

MUSIC

Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. See March 17 listing.

The Sirens Sessions: Open Jam. 8 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. Big open jam night with a lot of musicians. It become quite a spectacle every time as the night wears on. sirenssongtavern.com.

FOOD

Taco Tuesday. 6-8 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Community potluck with prep from 6 p.m. and eating from 7 to 8 p.m. Homemade tacos provided, bring your favorite taco filling. Donation. sanctuaryarcata.org.

MEETINGS

Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players. Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. $3-$8. 31for14@gmail.com. (707) 599-4605.

ETC

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Virtual World, Online. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. (707) 443-5021.

Free Income Tax Preparation. 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. See March 16 listing.

Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See March 16 listing. Trivia Night. Third Tuesday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Redwood Curtain Brewing Co. Myrtle Ave. Tasting

Room, 1595 B Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Test your knowledge while enjoying craft beer. The winning team wins a Redwood Curtain gift card. (707) 269-7143.

DJS

Hip Hop Night w/DJM. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Tuesday night.

Latin Dance Tuesdays w/DJ Pachanguero. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. Salsa, cumbia, tropical bass, pop and more. Tacos from 5 to 10 p.m. Ages 21 and up. Twodrink minimum purchase. info@miniplexevents.com. fb.me/e/2lgBtuaZc. (707) 630-5000.

MISC. NIGHTLIFE

Trivia Night!. 6-9 p.m. Redwood Curtain Brewing Co. Myrtle Ave. Tasting Room, 1595 B Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Trivia Night, test your knowledge with some good beer and food. Free.

OTHER

You Guessed It. 7-9 p.m. Thirsty Bear Lounge, Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. A fun survey game with great prizes hosted by the Burlyman. Put together a team and have fun. Free. bearrivercasino.com/thirsty-bear-lounge.

OPEN MIC

Spoken Word Open Mic. 6-9 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. Performances from local and nationally known poets, local business spotlights and more. Open mic list will be out at 5:45 p.m. Free.

KARAOKE

Karaoke. 8 p.m. Firewater Lounge, Cher-Ae Heights Casino, 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad. Pick a song and sing.

22 Wednesday

ART

Figure Drawing. 6-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. $5. blondiesfoodanddrink.com.

BOOKS

On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

COMEDY

Bingo and Beer. 6-8 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. Join host Davey G every other Wednesday for this family-friendly game of numbers. Get one card free and additional cards with food and drink orders. Free. family@gyppo. com. gyppo.com/calendar-of-events. (707) 986-7700.

Open Mikey. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. The longest running comedy openmic in the county. Sign up at 9 p.m. for a five-minute set. Show at 9:30 p.m. Snacks, drinks, zero hate speech tolerated. All-ages w/caution for language. Free, donations accepted. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

Washington Square Wednesdays. 6-9 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Bring your own board and play chess. Snacks, drinks, friendly atmosphere for all-ages. ID to drink. Free, donations accepted. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

Wicked Wednesday Comedy. 8 p.m. The Siren’s Song

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Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. Peter Nelson hosts a hilarious stand up open mic with different comedians. Free. sirenssongtavern.com.

LECTURE

Spring Lecture Series. 6-7 p.m. Bob McPherson of the Cal Poly Humboldt Geology Department presents Kinematics of the Mendocino Triple Junction. More info and Zoom links online. Free. info@lostcoast.org. lostcoast.org/event/spring-lecture-series-kinematics-of-the-mendocino-triple-junction/.

MOVIES

Sci-Fi Night: Clash of the Titans (1981). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show at 6 p.m. Raffle a 6:55 p.m. Main feature at 7 p.m. Rated PG. All ages. Perseus embarks on a quest to defeat the wrathful gods and save the city of Argos in the stop-motion classic by Ray Harryhausen. $8, $12 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ events/933267127687431. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC

Bayside Ballads and Blues. 6-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Wednesday. Hooveriii, Dark Dazey. 8 p.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. Psych, synth, funk. $10. info@miniplexevents.com. miniplex.ticketleap. com/hooveriii-dark-dazey/. (707) 630-5000. Mark and Maggie O’Connor. 7:30 p.m. The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. Fiddlers. $56.50.

THEATER

The Tempest. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. Mack High Drama’s spring production of one of Shakespeare’s infamous romances. In the Multipurpose Room. Doors at 6:30 p.m. Tickets at the door. $10, $8 students and seniors.

GARDEN

Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See March 17 listing.

ETC

Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See March 17 listing.

DJS

Weds Night Ting. The Jam, 915 H St., Arcata. Reggae, dancehall, Afrobeats, basshall. Resident DJs Pressure and D’Vinity. Surprise guest DJs and bands. TBD. thejamarcata.com.

OTHER

Reel Genius Trivia at The Pub. 6:30-8:30 p.m. The Pub at The Creamery, 824 L St., Suite A, Arcata. General trivia. Fun for everyone. Free to play, win prizes. Max seven per team. Free. partners@reelgeniustrivia.com. (707) 601-1606.

Reel Genius Trivia Wednesdays. 6-8 p.m. The Madrone Taphouse, 421 Third St., Eureka. General trivia; fun for everyone. Free to play, win prizes. Max seven players per team. partners@reelgeniustrivia.com. fb.me/e/2ewBnU70H. (707) 601-1606.

23 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing at Synapsis. 7-9 p.m. Synapsis Collective, 1675 Union St., Eureka. See March 16 listing. Spirituality in Contemporary Art. 6-8 p.m. This class looks at contemporary artists who focus on spirituality, and the concept in art over time. You do not have to be an OLLI member to attend a class. $30 for OLLI members. olli@humboldt.edu. extended.humboldt. edu/olli/course/spirituality-contemporary-art. (707) 826-3731.

Thursday Night Art. 4-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. See March 16 listing.

COMEDY

Bored Games. 6-8 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. See March 16 listing.

LECTURE

Relativity of Simultaneity. 4-5 p.m. Albert Einstein’s theory explained simply and clearly. Membership not required. $20 for OLLI members. olli@humboldt.edu. extended.humboldt.edu/olli/course/relativity-simultaneity. (707) 826-3731.

State of the City. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Minor Theatre, 1013 H St., Arcata. Presentations from the city of Arcata and Equity Arcata, City Manager Karen Diemer and city council members discussing upcoming projects, Community Ambassadors programs, the city partnership

with Cal Poly Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, and more. Moderated Q&A follows. $10-$15. gloria@ arcatachamber.com. business.arcatachamber.com/ events/calendar/2023-03-01. (707) 897-6004.

MUSIC

Anna Hamilton. 6-9 p.m. Redwood Curtain Brewing Co. Myrtle Ave. Tasting Room, 1595 B Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Hot vocals, burning guitar licks and solid original tunes. Free.

McKinleyville Community Choir Rehearsal. 6:308:30 p.m. Arcata Presbyterian Church, 670 11th St. See March 16 listing.

THEATER

The Tempest. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Rd. See March 22 listing.

Eureka High Players present: City of Angels 7:30-10 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. A satirical musical comedy that looks at Hollywood through the eyes of a successful writer who is adapting his latest novel into a film. $15, $10 students. nelsont@ eurekacityschools.org to reserve tickets. redwoodcurtain.com. (707) 441-2537.

Here Comes The Flood. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre’s Professional Training Program ensemble presents an exploration of the realm of the Dramatic Mask. $10 advance, pay what you can at the door. dellarte.com.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 31

FOOD

Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See March 16 listing.

MEETINGS

350 Humboldt. Fourth Thursday of every month, 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The local grassroots climate action group holds its general meetings on the fourth Thursday of every month on Zoom. Get Zoom info online. actionnetwork.org/events/350-humboldt-general-meeting.

ETC

Free Income Tax Preparation. 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. See March 16 listing.

Home Seller’s Seminar. 3-4 p.m. Learn what is involved in selling your home in today’s market. You do not have to be an OLLI member to attend. $20 for OLLI members. olli@humboldt.edu. extended.humboldt.edu/olli/course/ home-sellers-seminar. (707) 826-3731.

Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See March 16 listing.

DJS

DJ Statik and Friends. 9 p.m. Thirsty Bear Lounge, Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. See March 16 listing.

OTHER

Reel Genius Trivia at Tres Chiles Picosos. 6-8 p.m. Tres Chiles Picosos, 3502 Broadway St., Eureka. General trivia; fun for everyone. Free to play, win prizes. Max seven players per team. Free. partners@reelgeniustrivia.com. treschilespicosos.com. (707) 601-1606.

OPEN MIC

Blondies Open Mic. 6 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. See March 16 listing.

Siren’s Song Open Mic. 7 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. See March 16 listing.

KARAOKE

G.O.A.T. Karaoke at the Goat. 8:30 p.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. See March 16 listing.

Heads Up …

KEET-TV looking for performing and visual artists for Tubman-Douglass Freedom Festival at the Eureka Library on March 25. Deadline for art submissions: March 22; deadline to sign up to perform is March 24. More information at KEET.org and via email to kwhiteside@keet-tv.org.

KEET-TV is looking for one kindergarten to fifth-grade child from the community who loves to read to be on CAMP TV, a PBS show for kids. Parents and families can send in a video of their child reading a storybook or attend Audition Day at the Eureka Library April 1. Parents or guardians must submit permission slip and video to submissions@keet.orgby April 4.

The Trinidad Civic Club announces $2,000 academic and trade/vocational scholarships for graduating high school seniors in Orick, Trinidad or McKinleyville zip codes. Applications must be postmarked by March 31 and packets can be downloaded at trinidadcivicclub.org/projects/ scholarships.

The Eureka Street Art Festival seeks mural artists for the sixth annual event July 31 to Aug. 5. Information and application at eurekastreetartfestival.com. Deadline March 24. This year’s murals will be located along South Broadway and U.S. Highway 101.

Providence Redwood Memorial Hospital Foundation

offer scholarships for Redwood Memorial Hospital employees, high school seniors and/or community members in the Eel River Valley, Van Duzen River Valley and Southern Humboldt County who are pursuing careers in nursing, medicine, pharmacy or physical therapy. Deadline is March 31. Contact Jennifer Partsafas at the Redwood Memorial Foundation at (707) 269-4281 or email jennifer.partsafas@ stjoe.org.

The Eureka Cultural Arts District seeks a graphic designer to create a logo and supporting basic style guide. Submit a portfolio or samples of graphic design work (three to five images total) and a statement of interest to inkpeopleinc. submittable.com by March 10. Diverse/BIPOC/underrepresented artists are encouraged to apply; preference will be given to groups and artists in alignment with the values of the Cultural Arts District.

Friends of the Dunes is accepting gently used outdoor gear for the Get Outside Gear Sale on April 1. Drop off Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane in Manila and at Adventure’s Edge in Eureka and Arcata. Coast Central Credit Union is accepting applications for up to 25 college scholarships for students graduating this year from high schools throughout Humboldt, Del Norte and Trinity counties. Deadline is March 24. Applications at coastccu.org/community/college-scholarships.

Creekside Arts, a DreamMaker Program of the Ink People Center for the Arts, announces the $2,500 Libby Palmquist Fiber Arts Sponsorship for a fiber artist to attend the Spring Residency Program. Apply at creeksidearts.org/residency. The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom seeks applications for its Edilith Eckart and Jene McCovey Memorial Peace Scholarship of $150-$500 to support projects promoting peace and social justice, locally or globally. Deadline is April 1. Information and application at wilpfhumboldt.wordpress.com/ scholarship- information. Or mail application to: WILPF at P.O. Box 867, Arcata, CA 95518 and call (707) 822-5711 with any questions.

2023 Godwit Days registration is now open . Visit godwitdays.org.

Friends of the Arcata Marsh and Redwood Region Audubon Society are co-sponsoring a Student Bird Art Contest in conjunction with the Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival. Artwork may be dropped off at the Interpretive Center (open Tuesday-Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Monday, 1 to 5 p.m.) or mailed to Sue Leskiw, 155 Kara Lane, McKinleyville, CA, 95519. Entries must be received by 5 p.m. March 18. Questions should be e-mailed to sueleskiw1@gmail.com.

Redwood Region Audubon Society is sponsoring its 18th annual student nature writing contest with cash prizes for the best essay(s) or poem(s) on “What Nature Means to Me,” by Humboldt or Del Norte County students in grades four through 12. Visit rras.org or godwitdays.org for instructions. Deadline for receipt: 5 p.m., March 18. Questions should be directed to sueleskiw1@gmail.com.

Soroptimist International of Humboldt Bay announces six monetary awards and/or scholarships. Find more and find a link to all applications at soroptimistofhumboldtbay. com.

KEET-TV seeks a diverse group of individuals to join its Community Advisory Board. Meetings are held quarterly on Zoom. Go to KEET.org to find the link at the bottom of the page.

Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call (707) 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org. l

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from previous page 32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
Continued

Thrown Back

Scream VI and 65

SCREAM VI. The world’s infatuation with Scream (1996) kicked off just as I was entering a protracted contrarian period in my own cinema education. I hadn’t yet come to appreciate the craft and silliness of horror and teen movies were too easily enjoyable to possibly be of merit; I was insufferable.

Because I live in the world, just as I did then, the franchise quickly became all but inescapable, one of the most ubiquitous, referenced, oft-parodied forces in contemporary culture. And so, yes, I’ve seen them — with the notable exception of Scream (2022), which would seem to have become the most essential of them all.

With his original script, Kevin Williamson pulled off the neat trick of recasting horror-nerdom (heretofore among the gamiest and most sacrosanct of realms) as something funny and ironic. Within a cinematic era defined by sarcasm and ostensible self-awareness, he created a template for the re-mainstreaming of horror and a third act for director Wes Craven (The Hills Have Eyes, 1977; A Nightmare on Elm Street, 1984). With admitted deftness, Williamson and Craven combined the outright nastiness of ’70s horror (which Craven had a heavy hand in creating) with the silliness of some of the more exploratory genre exercises of the ’80s. Then they channeled it through the sweaty conversations of VHS obsessives, doubled the jump scares and knife kills, and made something new (as well as a vast fortune).

While Scream seemed a little too cute (and probably too scary) for me at the time, the die-off of risk and invention at the upper tiers of American movie industry allows me to look at many of the movies of my youth with a new (old) eye, or at least through the heavily distorted lens of nostalgia. Which effect is compounded, in this case, by the presence of directors of a certain age — Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett (Ready Or Not, 2019) — who seem similarly afflicted.

I last checked in with the franchise for Scre4m (2011 — wait, when?), Craven’s final movie. I remember it as being competently made, if extraneous, despite the presence of much of the original cast.

In the interim (I gather), the specter of Ghostface continues to loom: The daughter of original killer Billy Loomis (Skeet

Ulrich), Samantha Carpenter (Melissa Barerra), her sister Tara (Jenna Ortega) and their friends having become the focus of the latest copycat’s sadistic impulses.

Having survived that bloodbath, they’ve regrouped in New York City, where Tara et al. attend college and Sam contends with a social media onslaught accusing her of masterminding the recent killings. And then, more killings.

Much of the success of Scream VI (and presumably its predecessor) lies in the directors’ (and writers James Vanderbilt and Guy Busick) fealty to the source material which, if one is not among the true faithful, is as much a weakness as a strength. What starts as clever homage and expansion on the theme (a film student dons the mask and kills the film studies professor who gave him a bad grade on a Giallo paper) eventually and inevitably feels a little long in the tooth (several sequences take place in the killers’ movie-theater shrine to the antecedent murderers and the books and movies they inspired).

Still, this outing has a better sense of humor than the fourth installment and, much to its credit, finds some revolting new ways to dispatch victims with knives. Though not yet a convert to True Fan status, I’ve begun to better understand the appeal. As much as Scream VI may serve the faithful, there is enough to it for even the less-ardent to enjoy. R. 122M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

65 While probably unavoidable, the reveal in the trailer for 65 so spoils the surprise of the movie that it cannot but taint the experience of watching it. This may be unfair of me to say — I actually like the movie and can understand the need to use whatever marketing tricks are available to sell tickets. But it makes me nostalgic (there’s that word again) for a lower-stakes era in movies, when a gamble could be taken in not revealing too much, when inherent risk and the chance of unexpected reward were an assumed and accepted

aspect of moviegoing.

Before I bury myself in that lamentation, I will say that someone, somewhere in the halls of power did have the temerity to back a non-franchise, science-fiction adventure about the ancient past. Whether that person still has a job remains to be seen.

Mills (Adam Driver) takes a work assignment that will keep him away from home for two years. The job, piloting an exploratory spacecraft filled with people in cryosleep, promises to pay enough to afford treatment for his chronically ill daughter Nevine (Chloe Coleman). Even for ancient alien races, things rarely go to plan.

Written and directed by Scott Beck and Bryan Woods (writers of the A Quiet Place series) is humble enough in its ambitions that, tragically, it seems unlikely to succeed. Cleverly conceived, well-crafted and anchored by a customarily substantive performance from Driver with co-star Ariana Greenblatt, 65 is a movie out of its time, a work of popular entertainment that deserves a chance to be evaluated on its own merits, but may well (hopefully not) be lost among the avalanche of franchise commodities surrounding it. PG13. 93M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. l

John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

NOW PLAYING

ANT-MAN AND THE WASP: QUANTUMANIA. Getting small with Paul Rudd. PG13. 125M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK (3D). AVATAR: THE WAY OF WATER. Catching up with the blue cat aliens 10 years later in James Cameron’s sequel starring Sam Worthington, Zoe Saldaña, Sigourney Weaver and Kate Winslet. PG13. 192M. BROADWAY (3D).

CHAMPIONS. Woody Harrelson stars as a washed-up coach trying to get a team to the Special Olympics. PG13. 123M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. COCAINE BEAR. The late Ray Liotta and Kerri Russell dodge a black bear that’s housed a brick of blow and wilding out like Don Jr. on Twitter. R. 95. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

CREED III. Michael B. Jordan directs and stars as the boxer squaring off against a rival from his past (Jonathan Majors). PG13. 116M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. DEMON SLAYER: TO THE SWORDSMITH VILLAGE. Demon-whooping anime action, dubbed or subtitled. R. 110M. BROADWAY.

EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE. Michelle Yeoh blows minds in the multiverse in a moving kung fu/sci-fi with Ke Huy Quan and Jamie Lee Curtis. R. 150M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. JESUS REVOLUTION. Kelsey Grammer and Jonathan Roumie star in a movie about a religious hippie commune in the ’70s. PG13. 120M. BROADWAY.

MET OPERA: LOHENGRIN. The Metropolitan Opera performs Wagner’s Medieval German romantic opera. NR. 300M. MINOR.

PUSS IN BOOTS: THE LAST WISH. Sequel spinoff starring the swashbuckling cat voiced by Antonio Banderas. With Salma Hayek. PG. 100M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

SHAZAM! FURY OF THE GODS. Zachary Levi reprises his DC hero role with Helen Mirren and Lucy Liu. PG13. 130M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

Fortuna Theatre is temporarily closed due to earthquake damage. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema (707) 443-3456; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre (707) 822-3456.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 33
Explaining to your kid that this is how you used to walk to school every day in Humboldt. 65
SCREENS

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314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com YOUR CLASS HERE 50 and Better Arts & Crafts Computer Fitness
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Dolbeer’s Donkey Engine

“... improvement is the order of the day, and there is no reason why the ox team should not make way for the steam engine as the stage coach has the [railroad] engine.”

— Humboldt Times, July 31, 1881

Depending on your point of view, the Dolbeer Steam Donkey was the greatest labor saver in the logging industry’s history or the nemesis of redwoods, being the machine that hastened the reduction of the once mighty groves to just 5 percent of what they’d been before the coming of Europeans. The engine revolutionized the lumber business, replacing teams of oxen — sometimes 20 and more — for several decades before its own replacement by the internal combustion engine.

Introduced by John Dolbeer in 1881 and patented the following year, the steam donkey’s advantages were immediately obvious. Unlike oxen, it performed flawlessly in hot and cold weather and wasn’t bothered by muddy, slippery conditions. By the turn of the century, 35 were in use in Humboldt and Mendocino counties, with nearly 400 working down the entire West Coast.

Dolbeer’s original steam donkey, inspired by similar engines on ships, consisted of a wood-burning boiler and a “simplex” (single acting cylinder), connected to a horizontal “gypsy” winch drum (see illustration). The whole contraption was mounted on wooden skids, so the donkey could haul itself to a convenient location near the trees being felled. Later models were larger and more complicated, with duplex (compound) engines and multiple drums. (Why “donkey?” The usual story is that, when steam-powered winches were first to load ships, seamen considered them half as powerful as horses.)

Although later adapted for many tasks in the timber harvesting business, steam donkeys were originally used to haul newly felled redwoods (branches pruned) from

where they lay to a skid road, en route to the company sawmill. A thick hemp rope, later a steel cable, was attached to the downed log by the “choker setter,” who visually signaled the “whistle punk” — usually a kid — who in turn let the “donkeyman” know to start dragging the log in by opening the regulator which activated the winch. The fourth member of the team, the “spool tender,” guided the line over the drum with a stick. Once the log had been yarded, or hauled in, a “line horse” pulled the line back out for the next log. By one estimate, a good crew could haul 5,000 tons of logs in a single day.

John Dolbeer (1827-1902) headed west from New England, hoping to join the Gold Rush. Instead, in 1853, he purchased a mill in Eureka before joining forces with lumber baron (and, later, mansion builder) William Carson, forming the Dolbeer and Carson Lumber Co. in 1863. Their huge mill operated on the waterfront, on the present site of Halverson Park, until the 1970s.

Dolbeer’s life story is not a happy one. After recovering financially from several lumber mill fires, he married late in life, only to have his wife take her own life following a long illness, and his young son die in an accident. His bad luck reached beyond the grave: His daughter also committed suicide two years after his own death. He is memorialized today in the name of the Eureka street that runs south from St. Joe’s Hospital to Hemlock Street.

Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) wonders why it took so long to develop the donkey engine after James Watt’s 1776 steam engine was shown to be viable.

l
Wonder machine or nemesis? One of Dolbeer’s original single-cylinder, single-drum 1880s steam donkeys, now sitting next to Cookhouse Road in Samoa. Photo by Barry Evans
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Free Will Astrology

Week of March 16, 2023

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I highly recommend the following experiences: 1. ruminating about what you learned in a relationship that ended—and how those lessons might be useful now. 2. ruminating about a beloved place you once regarded as home—and how the lessons you learned while there might be inspiring now. 3. ruminating about a riddle that has long mystified you—and how clarifying insights you receive in the coming weeks could help you finally understand it.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): For “those who escape hell,” wrote Charles Bukowksi, “nothing much bothers them after that.” Believe it or not, Taurus, I think that in the coming weeks, you can permanently escape your own personal version of hell—and never, ever have to return. I offer you my congratulations in advance. One strategy that will be useful in your escape is this idea from Bukowski: “Stop insisting on clearing your head—clear your f*cking heart instead.”

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini paleontologist Louis Agassiz (1807–1883) was a foundational contributor to the scientific tradition. Among his specialties was his hands-on research into the mysteries of fossilized fish. Though he was meticulously logical, he once called on his nightly dreams to solve a problem he faced. Here’s the story: A potentially crucial specimen was largely concealed inside a stone. He wanted to chisel away the stone to get at the fossil, but was hesitant to proceed for fear of damaging the treasure inside. On three successive nights, his dreams revealed to him how he should approach the work. This information proved perfectly useful. Agassiz hammered away at the slab exactly as his dreams suggested and freed the fossilized fish. I bring this marvel to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that you, too, need to carve or cut away an obstruction that is hiding something valuable. Can you get help from your dreams? Yes, or else in deep reverie or meditation.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Will you flicker and sputter in the coming weeks, Cancerian? Or will you spout and surge? That is, will you be enfeebled by barren doubts, or will you embolden yourself with hearty oaths? Will you take nervous sips or audacious guzzles? Will you hide and equivocate, or else reveal and pounce? Dabble gingerly or pursue the joy of mastery? I’m here to tell you that which fork you take will depend on your intention and your willpower, not on the caprices of fate. So which will it be: Will you mope and fritter or untangle and illuminate?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I applaud psychologists who tell us how important it is to feel safe. One of the most crucial human rights is the confidence that we won’t be physically or emotionally abused. But there’s another meaning of safety that applies to those of us who yearn to express ourselves creatively. Singer-songwriter David Bowie articulated the truth: “If you feel safe in the area you’re working in, you’re not working in the right area. Always go a little further into the water than you feel you’re capable of being in. Go a bit out of your depth, and when you don’t feel that your feet are quite touching the bottom, you’re in the right place to do something exciting.” I think this is a wise strategy for most of us, even those who don’t identify as artists. Almost everyone benefits from being imaginative and inventive and even a bit daring in their own particular sphere. And this will be especially applicable to you in the coming weeks, Leo.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You are in the sweet, deep phase of the Receiving Season. And so you have a right and a duty to show the world you are ready and available to be blessed with what you need and want. I urge you to do everything necessary to become a welcoming beacon that attracts a wealth of invigorating and healing influences. For inspiration, read this quote by author John Steinbeck: “It is so easy to give, so exquisitely rewarding. Receiving, on the other hand, if it be well done, re-

quires a fine balance of self-knowledge and kindness. It requires humility and tact and great understanding of relationships . . It requires a self-esteem to receive—a pleasant acquaintance and liking for oneself.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran poet E. E. Cummings wrote that daffodils “know the goal of living is to grow.” Is his sweet sentiment true? I would argue it’s only partially accurate. I believe that if we want to shape our destinies with courage and creativity, we need to periodically go through phases of decay and decline. They make periods of growth possible. So I would say, “The goal of life is to grow and wither and grow and wither and grow.” Is it more fun to grow than to wither? Maybe. But sometimes, withering is educational and necessary. Anyway, Libra, I suspect you are finishing a time of withering and will soon embark on a series of germinations and blossoms.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): All of us have elements of genius. Every person on the planet possesses at least one special talent or knack that is a gift to others. It could be subtle or unostentatious, like a skill for communicating with animals or for seeing what’s best in people. Or maybe it’s more spectacular, like composing beautiful music or raising children to be strong and compassionate. I mention this, Scorpio, because the coming weeks will be an excellent time to identify your unique genius in great detail—and then nurture it and celebrate it in every way you can imagine.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The emblem associated with Sagittarius is an archer holding a bow with the arrow pointed upwards. This figure represents your tribe’s natural ambition to always aim higher. I bring this to your attention because your symbolic quiver is now full of arrows. But what about your bow? Is it in tip-top condition? I suggest you do some maintenance. Is the bow string in perfect shape? Are there any tiny frays? Has it been waxed recently? And what about the grip? Are there any small cracks or wobbles? Is it as steady and stable as it needs to be? I have one further suggestion as you prepare for the target-shooting season. Choose one or at most two targets to aim at rather than four or five.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s prime time to feel liberated from the urge to prove yourself to anyone. It’s a phase when your self-approval should be the only kind of approval you need, a period when you have the right to remove yourself from any situation that is weighed down with gloomy confusion or apathetic passivity. This is exciting news! You have an unprecedented opportunity to recharge your psychic batteries and replenish your physical vitality.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I suspect you can now accomplish healthy corrections without getting tangled up in messy karma. Here are my recommendations: 1. As you strive to improve situations that are awry or askew, act primarily out of love rather than guilt or pity. 2. Fight tenderly in behalf of beautiful justice, but don’t fight harshly for ugly justice. 3. Ask yourself how you might serve as a kind of divine intervention in the lives of those you care about—and then carry out those divine interventions.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In describing her process, Piscean sculptor Anne Truitt wrote, “The most demanding part of living a lifetime as an artist is the strict discipline of forcing oneself to work steadfastly along the nerve of one’s own most intimate sensitivity.” I propose that many Pisceans, both artists and non-artists, can thrive from living like that. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to give yourself to such an approach with eagerness and devotion. I urge you to think hard and feel deeply as you ruminate on the question of how to work steadfastly along the nerve of your own most intimate sensitivity. l

motheroftheminor(s),subjectto thispetition,andhassolelegaland physicalcustodyofsaidminor(s). Petitionandtheminor(s)residein HumboldtCounty,California.

2.Thewhereaboutsof:Elyjah Grenchfieldthenaturalbiological fatheroftheminor(s)child(ren): RileyD.R.Gossien

3.Oneorbothofthefollowingare true:

Thenaturalfather/motherof theminor(s)leftsaidminor(s)inthe custodyandcontrolofthePeti− tioner,themother/fatherofthe minor(s),withtheintentto abandonsaidminor(s).

Thenaturalmother/fatherof theminor(s)hasnotcommunicated withtheminor(s),ormadeany provisionsforthesupportofthe minor(s),orhasmadeonlytoken effortstocommunicateand/or supporttheminor(s)foraperiodof overoneyear.

WHEREFORE,Petitionrespectfully requeststheCourttoOrderof Judgmentdeclaringtheminor(s)be freefromthecustodyandcontrol of:ElyjahGrenchfield.

VERIFICATION

ThestatementsintheabovePeti− tionaretrueofmyownknowledge, exceptastothemattersthatare thereinstateonmyinformation andbelief,andastothosemattersI believethemtobetrue.

Ideclareunderpenaltyofperjury thattheforegoingistrueand correct.

Dated:August9,2022

Filed:August10,2022 s/KarissaChairez 3/9,3/16,3/23,3/30(23−074)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23-00089

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas HIGHQUALITYHUMBOLDT/LOST COASTTRAININGANDEQUIPMENT

Humboldt 42101MattoleRd Petrolia,CA95558

SaferSolutionsLLC 201724910182 42101MattoleRd Petrolia,CA95558

Thebusinessisconductedbya LimitedLiabilityCompany. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonJanuary2016 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sDavidSmith,CEO

ThisFebruary8,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk 3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−073)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00092

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

REDWOODTRUSTVALUATIONS

Humboldt

7571BenbowDrive Garberville,CA95542

RTValuations,LLC CA202251616811 7571BenbowDrive Garberville,CA95542

Thebusinessisconductedbya LimitedLiabilityCompany. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sJohnMaguire,CEO

ThisFebruary9,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk 3/9,3/16,23,3/30(23−075)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00098

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas ALLDOGSBISCUITBAKERY

Humboldt 4612UnionSt Eureka,CA95503

POBox6162 Eureka,CA95502

LindaSReed 4612UnionSt Eureka,CA95503

RaymondCRitter 4612UnionSt Eureka,CA95503

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonJune2000 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sLindaSReed,Owner

ThisFebruary10,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−066)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23-00105

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

PRECISIONALARMSYSTEMS

Humboldt

2808QStreet Eureka,CA95501

MichaelGCarpenter 2808QStreet Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonFebruary14,2023

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sMichaelGlennCarpenter,Owner

ThisFebruary14,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

2/23,3/2,3/9,3/16(23−057)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00109

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas BREATHE

Humboldt

1525AndersonAve McKinleyville,CA95519

AnneEFricke

1525AndersonAve McKinleyville,CA95519

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sAnneFricke,Owner

ThisFebruary14,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

2/23,3/2,3/9,3/16(23−058)

LEGAL NOTICES
38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
Homework: What element is most lacking in your life right now? Your assignment: Get more of it. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com ASTROLOGY LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices 442-1400 ×314 38 NORTH

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00115

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

EAFAMILYSERVICES

Humboldt

350MainStreet

Quincy,CA95971

POBox3940

Quincy,CA95971

EnvironmentalAlternatives

CA1018430

350MainStreet

Quincy,CA95971

Thebusinessisconductedbya Corporation.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonOctober9,2017

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

aboveonOctober9,2017

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto

Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sMarkCross,BoardSecretary

ThisFebruary16,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−086)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00118

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas HUMBOLDTBIKEANDKAYAK RENTAL

Humboldt 1680OceanDr McKinleyville,CA95519

SamuelMDibble 1680OceanDr McKinleyville,CA95519

CrystalMDibble 1680OceanDr McKinleyville,CA95519

CONSTRUCTION OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS RE-ENTRY RESOURCE CENTER COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

/sMarkCross,BoardSecretary

ThisFebruary16,2023

McKinleyville,CA95519

CrystalMDibble 1680OceanDr McKinleyville,CA95519

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sSamuelDibble,Owner

ThisFebruary17,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bysc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−067)

LEGALS?

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23-00120

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

LOVELYLAWNS

Humboldt 625ZanoneRd Eureka,CA95503

AlishaLDavey 625ZanoneRd Eureka,CA95503

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonJanuary1,2023

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sAlishaDavey,Owner/Operator

ThisFebruary21,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES

bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−062)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23-00122

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

RYAN'SEXTERIORCLEANING SERVICE

Humboldt 15307thSt Eureka,CA95501

RyanRoberts 15307thSt Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonFebruary20,2023

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23-00129

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

GREENSUNLANDSCAPING/STARDOUGH'SPIZZA/COLLECTIVE LENSPHOTOGRAPHY/THE RICERIA

Humboldt

448RailroadAvenue BlueLake,CA95525

POBox542

BlueLake,CA95525

OriginalBuddies,LLC CA202110610458

430RailroadAvenue BlueLake,CA95525

PROJECT NUMBER: 170223

JUANP.CERVANTES bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−086)

/sAlishaDavey,Owner/Operator

equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the Bid.

ThisFebruary21,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids from the prequalified General Contractors listed below are invited by the Department of Public Works of Humboldt County, a public body, corporate and politic, for the performance of all the work and the furnishing of all the labor, materials, supplies, tools, and equipment for the following project:

Pursuant to the Contract Documents on file with the Department of Public Works of Humboldt County.

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars

A pre-bid meeting is scheduled for 2:00 p.m. Pacific Time, March 07, 2023 at the Humboldt County Jail Administration Office, 901 5th Street, Eureka, California. Contract Documents, Plans and Specifications will be available on March 1, 2023.

($1,000).

/sSamuelDibble,Owner ThisFebruary17,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES

The following Contractors successfully prequalified through a public prequalification RFQ process released by the County of Humboldt in July of 2022: Arntz Builders, Inc., CA Lic. #856393; Broward Builders, Inc., CA Lic. #602146; Roebbelen Contracting, Inc., CA Lic. #734124; Sletten Construction Company, CA Lic. #446809; Stronghold Engineering, Inc., CA Lic. #787490; S+B James Construction Co., CA Lic. #521929. Bids for this work will only be accepted from the General Building Contractors listed above.

Each Bid must be contained in a sealed envelope addressed as set forth in said Bid Documents, and filed at the office of the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, 825 5th Street, Room 111, Eureka, California at or before 2:00 P.M., Pacific Daylight Time, on April 4, 2023. All Bids will be publicly opened and summary amounts read aloud. The officer whose duty it is to open the Bids will decide when the specified time for the opening of Bids has arrived.

Each bid must be in accordance with the bid documents, construction drawings and specifications on file at the Humboldt County Department of Public Works, 1106 Second Street, Eureka, CA 95501. These bid documents, construction drawings and specifications are available for viewing or downloading through the Humboldt County Department of Public Works website at humboldtgov.org/bids.aspx. Also through this website, a bidder may view and join a Document Holder’s List for this work. Joining the Document Holder’s List, and checking to see if there are addenda issued prior to bidding are the sole responsibility of the bidder. If any addendum is issued, the County will attempt to notify each document holder on the Document Holder’s List using the email address entered onto the Document Holder’s List. County shall not in any way be responsible or liable for failure of a document holder to receive notification. It is the bidder’s responsibility, prior to submitting the bid, to check the website or otherwise inquire to determine whether the County has issued any Addenda.

Each Bid shall be submitted on the forms furnished by the County within the Bid Documents. All forms must be completed.

Each Bid shall be accompanied by one of the following forms of Bidder’s Security to with a certified check or a cashier’s check payable to the County, U.S. Government Bonds, or a Bid Bond executed by an admitted insurer authorized to issue surety bonds in the State of California (in the form set forth in said Contract Documents). The Bidder’s security shall be in the amount

The successful Bidder will be required to furnish and pay for a satisfactory faithful performance bond and a satisfactory payment bond in the forms set forth in said Bid Documents.

bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−062)

The County reserves the right to reject any or all Bids or to waive any informalities in any Bid. No Bid shall be withdrawn for a period of onehundred (100) calendar days subsequent to the opening of Bids without the consent of the County.

All Bidders will be required to certify that they are eligible to submit a Bid on this project and that they are not listed either (1) on the Controller General’s List of Ineligible Bidders/Contractors, or (2) on the debarred list of the Labor Commissioner of the State of California.

The successful Bidder shall possess a valid Contractor’s license in good standing, with a classification of “B” (General Building Contractor) at the time the contract is awarded.

The successful Bidder will be required to comply with all equal employment opportunity laws and regulations both at the time of award and throughout the duration of the Project.

This project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. Pursuant to Section 1771.1(a) of the California Labor Code, a contractor or subcontractor shall not be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of Section 4104 of the Public Contract Code, or engage in the performance of any contract for public work, as defined in Sections 1770 et seq. of the Labor Code, unless currently registered and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Section 1725.5 of the Labor Code. It is not a violation of Section 1771.1(a) for an unregistered contractor to submit a bid that is authorized by Section 7029.1 of the Business and Professions Code or by Section 10164 or 20103.5 of the Public Contract Code, provided the contractor is registered to perform public work pursuant to Section 1725.5 at the time the contract is awarded.

The Contractor, and each subcontractor participating in the Project, shall be required to pay the prevailing wages as established by the Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Labor Statistics and Research, P.O. Box 420603, San Francisco, CA, Phone: (415) 703-4780.

The attention of Bidders is directed to the fact that the work proposed herein to be done will be financed in whole or in part with State and County funds, and therefore all of the applicable State and County statutes, rulings and regulations will apply to such work.

In the performance of this contract, the Contractor will not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment in accordance with the provisions of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act. (Government Code section 12900et seq.)

In accordance with the provisions of Section 22300 of the Public contractors’ code, the Contractor may elect to receive 100% of payments due under the contract from time to time, without retention of any portion of the payment, by entering into an Escrow Agreement for Security Deposits In Lieu of Retention.

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sRyanRoberts,Owner

ThisFebruary21,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bytn,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−065)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23-00128

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

LOSTCOASTPESTCONTROL

Humboldt

851PearlSt Eureka,CA95503

CynthiaRRusso 851PearlSt Eureka,CA95503

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto

Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sCynthiaRoseRusso,Owner/ QualifyingManager

ThisFebruary24,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−071)

Thebusinessisconductedbya LimitedLiabilityCompany. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sJrindeHudson,Manager

ThisFebruary24,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−070)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00134

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

TULIP

Humboldt 1660CentralAve SuiteA McKinleyville,CA95519

VictoriaAEngland 1777RaeCt McKinleyville,CA95519

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonMarch1,2007 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sVictoriaEngland,Owner

ThisMarch1,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES bywc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−087)

Continued on next page »
3/2,3/9,3/16,23(23−067)
bysc,HumboldtCountyClerk
classified@north coastjournal.com 442-1400 × 314 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 39

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR DINING SERVICES POURING AND BEVERAGE RIGHTS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Governing Board of the Redwoods Community College District, of the County of Humboldt, State of California, is soliciting proposals for Dining Services Pouring and Beverage Rights on April 18, 2023 at 2:00 PM PST.

Proposal Documents (RFP) are available at: College of the Redwoods 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka, CA 95501 Website: https://www.redwoods.edu/businessoffice/Purchasing

Inquiries may be directed to: Ashley Mitchell, Manager, Dining Services and Bookstore via Email: Ashley-Mitchell@redwoods.edu.

PROPOSALS ARE DUE: No later than 2:00 PM PST on April 18, 2023

All proposals must be submitted by email to Julia-Morrison@redwoods. edu or by thumb drive via USPS mailed to: College of the Redwoods, Attn: Julia Morrison, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka, CA 95501.

Only proposals that are in strict conformance with the instructions included in the Request for Statements of Proposals will be considered.

Redwoods Community College District

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23-00151

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

BUNKERSTASH

Humboldt

1264GiuntoliLnSteD Arcata,CA95521

725BaysideRdAptK Arcata,CA95521

AaronBRichey

725BaysideRdAptK Arcata,CA95521

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonMarch1,2023

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sAaronRichey,Owner

ThisMarch7,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk 3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−083)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00152

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

LUGO’SLANDSCAPING

Humboldt 2615BooneStreet Fortuna,CA95540

SalvadorLugo−Alcazar

2615BooneStreet Fortuna,CA95540

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR GENERAL CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTOR

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Governing Board of the Redwoods Community College District, of the County of Humboldt, State of California, is soliciting proposals for qualified general construction contractors for capital improvement projects, proposals are due on March 31, 2023 at 2:00 PM PST.

Proposal Documents (RFQ) are available at: College of the Redwoods 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka, CA 95501 Website: https://www.redwoods.edu/businessoffice/Purchasing Inquiries may be directed to: Julia Morrison, Vice President of Administrative Services, Julia-Morrison@ redwoods.edu. PROPOSALS ARE DUE: No later than 2:00 PM PST on March 31, 2023. All proposals must be submitted electronically by email to Julia- Morrison@redwoods.edu, or a hard copy by mail to: College of the Redwoods, Office of the Vice President, Administrative Services, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka, CA 95501.

Only proposals that are in strict conformance with the instructions included in the Request for Statements of Proposals will be considered. Redwoods Community College District

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00158

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

TREEFROGPOTTERY

Humboldt

670FutureStreet Loleta,CA95551

POBox746

Loleta,CA95551

AngelaRCameron

670FutureStreet Loleta,CA95551

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonMarch9,2023

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sAngelaRCameron,Owner

ThisMarch9,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−084)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT23−00164

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas BLUETIMBERREALESTATE/BLUE TIMBER

Humboldt 296CenterSt RioDell,CA95562

BlueTimberRealEstate,LLC CA202251212973 296CenterSt RioDell,CA95562

Thebusinessisconductedbya LimitedLiabilityCompany.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonMarch10,2023

STATEMENTOF ABANDONMENTOFUSEOF

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME

FILENO.23-00083

Thefollowingpersonhasaban− donedtheuseofthefictitious businessnameRYAN’SPOWER

WASHING

Humboldt 15307thSt

Eureka,CA95501

Thefictitiousbusinessnamewas filedinHUMBOLDTCountyon

February6,2023

RyanRoberts 15307thSt

Eureka,CA95501

Thisbusinesswasconductedby:An Individual

/s/RyanRoberts,Owner

Thisstatementwasfiledwiththe HUMBOLDTCountyClerkonthe

dateFebruary16,2023

Iherebycertifythatthiscopyisa trueandcorrectcopyoftheorig− inalstatementonfileinmyoffice

JuanP.Cervantes bytn,HumboldtCountyClerk

2/23,3/2,3/9,3/16(23−059)

ORDERTOSHOWCAUSEFOR CHANGEOFNAME NEREIDATALAVERA CASENO.CV2300377 SUPERIORCOURTOFCALIFORNIA,COUNTYOF HUMBOLDT825FIFTHST. EUREKA,CA.95501

PETITIONOF: NEREIDATALAVERA foradecreechangingnamesas follows:

OFCALIFORNIA, COUNTYOFHUMBOLDT 825FIFTHSTREET

EUREKA,CA95501

Date:March9,2023

Filed:March9,2023

/s/TimothyA.Canning

JudgeoftheSuperiorCourt

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−090)

ORDERTOSHOWCAUSEFOR CHANGEOFNAME

CHRISTOPHERMATTHEW ROSEN CASENO.CV2300254

SUPERIORCOURTOFCALIFORNIA,COUNTYOF HUMBOLDT825FIFTHST. EUREKA,CA.95501

PETITIONOF:

CHRISTOPHERMATTHEWROSEN foradecreechangingnamesas follows:

Presentname

CHRISTOPHERMATTHEWROSEN

toProposedName

MATTCHRISTOPHERTHOMPSON THECOURTORDERSthatall personsinterestedinthismatter appearbeforethiscourtatthe hearingindicatedbelowtoshow cause,ifany,whythepetitionfor changeofnameshouldnotbe granted.Anypersonobjectingto thenamechangesdescribedabove mustfileawrittenobjectionthat includesthereasonsfortheobjec− tionatleasttwocourtdaysbefore thematterisscheduledtobeheard andmustappearatthehearingto showcausewhythepetitionshould notbegranted.Ifnowrittenobjec− tionistimelyfiled,thecourtmay grantthepetitionwithouta hearing.

NOTICEOFHEARING

Date:April7,2023

Time:1:45p.m.,Dept.4

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sSalvadorLugo−Alcazar,Owner

ThisMarch7,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−092)

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sHeatherR.Watkins,Manager

ThisMarch10,2023

JUANP.CERVANTES

bytn,HumboldtCountyClerk

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−089)

Presentname NEREIDATALAVERA toProposedName NEREIDAEVANS THECOURTORDERSthatall personsinterestedinthismatter appearbeforethiscourtatthe hearingindicatedbelowtoshow cause,ifany,whythepetitionfor changeofnameshouldnotbe granted.Anypersonobjectingto thenamechangesdescribedabove mustfileawrittenobjectionthat includesthereasonsfortheobjec− tionatleasttwocourtdaysbefore thematterisscheduledtobeheard andmustappearatthehearingto showcausewhythepetitionshould notbegranted.Ifnowrittenobjec− tionistimelyfiled,thecourtmay grantthepetitionwithouta hearing.

NOTICEOFHEARING

Date:April21,2023

Time:1:45p.m.,Dept.4

Toappearremotely,checkin advanceofthehearingforinforma− tionabouthowtodosoonthe court’swebsite.Tofindyourcourt’s website,gotowww.courts.ca.gov/ find−my−court.htm.

SUPERIORCOURT OFCALIFORNIA, COUNTYOFHUMBOLDT 825FIFTHSTREET EUREKA,CA95501

Date:March9,2023

Filed:March9,2023

/s/TimothyA.Canning

JudgeoftheSuperiorCourt

3/16,3/23,3/30,4/6(23−090)

SUPERIORCOURT OFCALIFORNIA, COUNTYOFHUMBOLDT 825FIFTHSTREET EUREKA,CA95501

Date:February16,2023

Filed:February16,2023

/s/TimothyA.Canning JudgeoftheSuperiorCourt 3/2,3/9,3/16,3/23(23−069)

LEGAL NOTICES default
default
LEGALS? classified@north coastjournal.com 442-1400 × 314 LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314 Get Your Markers Ready www.ncjshop.com FIND IT ONLINE Benefits Local Artists and Local Journalism. 13 Artists to Color! COLORING BOOK Benefits Local Artists Local Journalism 40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com

Title Order No.:05946998

Trustee Sale No.: 86125 Loan No.: 2022001 APN: 221-021-008-000

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 1/5/2022. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 3/28/2023 at 11:00 AM, UNION HOME LOAN, INC. as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 1/20/2022 as Instrument No. 2022-001228 in book ////, page //// of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, executed by: H2 EQUITY, LLC, A CALIFORNIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY , as Trustor SEE ATTACHED BENEFICIARY ADDENDUM

Beneficiary Addendum Loan # 2022001 Edelman Media, Inc. a California Corporation as to an undivided 15.000% interest and Wayne Mollard and Lori Mollard, husband and wife, as joint tenants as to anundivided 15.000% interest and Mark Grumet and/or Pearl Grumet, Trustees of the Grumet Family Trust u/t/d April 18, 2013, or any successor trustee thereto as to an undivided 12.500% interest and Jason D. Grumet and Natalie R. Grumet, husband and wife as joint tenants as to an undivided 12.500% interest and William Houck, Trustee of the Houck Family Trust, as to an undivided 10.000% interest and Malkim Capital, LLC a California limited liability corporation as to an undivided 10.000% interest and Bruce Harris and Anastasia Harris, husband and wife as joint tenants with rights of survivorship as to an undivided 10.000% interest and Millennium Trust Co., LLC Custodian FBO James Maloney Traditional IRA as to an undivided 9.800% interest and Solomon Alexander Mizrahi, Trustee of the Solomon Alexander Mizrahi Living Trust dated June 11, 1990, as to an undivided 5.200% interest , as Beneficiary WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state). At: Outside the front entrance to the County Courthouse located at 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501, NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE –continued all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California describing the land therein: See Exhibit “A” Attached Hereto And Made A Part Hereof. TS# 86125 / APN # 221-021-008000 LEGAL DESCRIPTION EXHIBIT “A”

THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE UNINCORPORATED AREA IN COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT, STATE OF CALIFORNIA AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL ONE: THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 2 EAST, HUMBOLDT MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT OF SAID LAND. PARCEL TWO: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT, APPURTENANT ONLY TO PARCEL ONE ABOVE, FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND PUBLIC UTILITIES, TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO CONVEY SAID EASEMENT TO OTHERS, OVER THOSE STRIPS OF LAND OF THE UNIFORM WIDTH OF 70 FEET, THE CENTERLINES OF WHICH ARE DESIGNATED AS ROADS “A” AND “D” ON THE RECORD OF SURVEY MADE BY JOSEPH J. SCHERF, WHICH SURVEY IS ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, IN BOOK 25 OF SURVEYS, PAGES 32, 33 AND 34. PARCEL THREE: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT, APPURTENANT ONLY TO PARCEL ONE ABOVE, FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND PUBLIC UTILITIES, TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO CONVEY SAID EASEMENT TO OTHERS, OVER A STRIP OF LAND, 60 FEET IN WIDTH, AS GRANTED IN THAT CERTAIN DEED FROM JAMES O. JOHNSON, ET AL AND RECORDED DECEMBER

27, 1968 IN BOOK 986 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, PAGE 236, HUMBOLDT COUNTY RECORDS. EXCEPTING FROM PARCEL THREE THAT PORTION THEREOF LYING WITHIN PARCEL TWO ABOVE. PARCEL FOUR: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT, APPURTENANT ONLY TO PARCEL ONE ABOVE FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND PUBLIC UTILITIES, TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO CONVEY SAID EASEMENT TO OTHERS, OVER A STRIP OF LAND OF THE UNIFORM WIDTH OF 70 FEET, THE CENTERLINE OF WHICH BEING THE CENTERLINE OF THE EXISTING ROAD RUNNING FROM THE MOST NORTHERLY TERMINUS OF COURSE NO. 38 OF ROAD “D” AS SHOWN ON THE RECORD OF SURVEY IN BOOK 25 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 33, REFERRED TO IN PARCEL TWO ABOVE, IN A GENERAL EASTERLY AND NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF PARCEL ONE ABOVE, THE APPROXIMATE LOCATION OF SAID EXISTING ROAD BEING SHOWN ON THE RECORD OF SURVEY MADE BY DONALD E. BUSHNELL ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, IN BOOK 25 OF SURVEYS, PAGE 150, BEING THE SAME AS LEGAL DESCRIPTION CONTINUED RESERVED BY MCKEE & SONS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, IN THE FOLLOWING DEEDS: (A) DEED TO EUGENE RAY SPANGLER AND WIFE, RECORDED FEBRUARY 10, 1971 IN BOOK 1076 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, PAGE 229, UNDER RECORDER’S

FILE NO. 2092, HUMBOLDT COUNTY RECORDS. (B) DEED TO JEAN G. GREENE, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1971, IN BOOK 1080 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, PAGE 596, UNDER RECORDER’S FILE NO. 4179, HUMBOLDT COUNTY RECORDS. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3845 Thomas Road, Miranda, CA 95553 “VACANT LAND” Directions to said land may be obtained by submitting a written request within ten(10) days from the first publication of this notice to: California TD Specialists 8190 East Kaiser Blvd., Anaheim Hills, California 92808. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $1, 120,335.72 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election of Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: 2/17/2023 UNION HOME LOAN, INC., as Trustee 8190 EAST KAISER BLVD., ANAHEIM HILLS, CA 92808 PHONE: 714-283-2180 FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION LOG ON TO: www. stoxposting.com CALL: 844-477-7869 PATRICIO S. INCE’, VICE PRESIDENT CALIFORNIA TD SPECIALIST IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

“NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid on a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate

the existence, priority, and size of the outstanding lien that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE

TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 844-4777869, or visit this internet Web site www.stoxposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case T.S.# 86125. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.” For sales conducted after January 1, 2021: NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of the California Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (844) 477-7869, or visit this internet website www.STOXPOSTING.com, using the file number assigned to this case 86125 to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid; by remitting the funds and affidavit described in Section 2924m(c) of the Civil Code; so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase.

ORDERTOSHOWCAUSEFOR CHANGEOFNAME

SHANEUSARIANJUHOLA CASENO.CV2300325

SUPERIORCOURTOFCALIFORNIA,COUNTYOF HUMBOLDT825FIFTHST. EUREKA,CA.95501

PETITIONOF:

SHANEUSARIANJUHOLA foradecreechangingnamesas follows:

Presentname

SHANEUSARIANJUHOLA

toProposedName

SHANEUSARIANSWANSON

THECOURTORDERSthatall personsinterestedinthismatter appearbeforethiscourtatthe hearingindicatedbelowtoshow cause,ifany,whythepetitionfor changeofnameshouldnotbe granted.Anypersonobjectingto thenamechangesdescribedabove mustfileawrittenobjectionthat includesthereasonsfortheobjec− tionatleasttwocourtdaysbefore thematterisscheduledtobeheard andmustappearatthehearingto showcausewhythepetitionshould notbegranted.Ifnowrittenobjec− tionistimelyfiled,thecourtmay grantthepetitionwithouta hearing.

NOTICEOFHEARING

Date:April14,2023

Time:1:45p.m.,Dept.CR4

Toappearremotely,checkin advanceofthehearingforinforma− tionabouthowtodosoonthe court’swebsite.Tofindyourcourt’s website,gotowww.courts.ca.gov/ find−my−court.htm.

SUPERIORCOURT OFCALIFORNIA, COUNTYOFHUMBOLDT 825FIFTHSTREET EUREKA,CA95501

Date:February28,2023

Filed:February28,2023

/s/TimothyA.Canning

JudgeoftheSuperiorCourt

3/9,3/16,3/23,3/30(23−077)

ORDERTOSHOWCAUSEFOR CHANGEOFNAME

HAYDINSCOTTWELCH

CASENO.CV2300291

SUPERIORCOURTOFCALIFORNIA,COUNTYOF HUMBOLDT825FIFTHST. EUREKA,CA.95501

PETITIONOF:

HAYDINSCOTTWELCH

foradecreechangingnamesas follows:

Presentname

HAYDINSCOTTWELCH

toProposedName

HAYDINSCOTTMELA

THECOURTORDERSthatall personsinterestedinthismatter appearbeforethiscourtatthe hearingindicatedbelowtoshow cause,ifany,whythepetitionfor changeofnameshouldnotbe granted.Anypersonobjectingto thenamechangesdescribedabove mustfileawrittenobjectionthat includesthereasonsfortheobjec− tionatleasttwocourtdaysbefore thematterisscheduledtobeheard andmustappearatthehearingto showcausewhythepetitionshould notbegranted.Ifnowrittenobjec− tionistimelyfiled,thecourtmay grantthepetitionwithouta hearing.

NOTICEOFHEARING

Date:April7,2023

Time:1:45p.m.,Dept.4 SUPERIORCOURT OFCALIFORNIA, COUNTYOFHUMBOLDT

825FIFTHSTREET EUREKA,CA95501

Date:February22,2023

Filed:February22,2023

/s/TimothyA.Canning JudgeoftheSuperiorCourt 3/9,3/16,3/23,3/30(23−076)

LEGALS?

classified@north coastjournal.com 442-1400 × 314

We Print Obituaries

Submit information via email to classified@northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person.

Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office.

The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

Continued on next page »
310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401 Deadline: March 31 Coloring Book CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 41

Sponsorships • Subscriptions • Swag

HOLD YOUR FIRE

ACROSS

1. Tests, at a winery

5. Beanstalk climber in a fairy tale

9. Squeeze together

14. Risk territory that borders Siberia

15. ____ all-time high

16. Left, on un mapa

17. Gram alternative

18. Emmy-winning comedian Love

19. Traveling in a Winnebago, perhaps

20. “... don’t forget the sulfur!”?

23. Sportage automaker

24. ____ buco

25. Obedient puppy’s reward

28. “No Scrubs” group

29. Phillipa who was the original Eliza in “Hamilton”

30. Doomed from the

start, for short

32. “Independence Day is good for me!”

38. At an end

39. Museum-funding org.

40. Cinco de ____

41. Fantasy creature that’s very much alive?

46. Comedian Vulcano of “Impractical Jokers”

47. Nov. honoree

48. We’re in the Phanerozoic one

49. “I rock!”

51. Seating that might be L-shaped

53. Catch in the act

56. “Don’t shoot!” (or this puzzle’s theme)

59. Israeli desert

62. Pitching staff, figuratively

63. Teri’s “Young Frankenstein” role

64. Stevenson of ‘50s politics

65. Clear, as data

66. Wow

67. Gooey treat

68. Casual turndowns

69. French word in many bistro names

DOWN

1. Rishi ____, British P.M. beginning in 2022

2. Farsi speaker

3. Black-and-white vegetarian

4. Big chunk

5. Guadalajara is its capital

6. They bond

7. “Oh, yeah? Watch me!”

8. Make bootees, maybe

9. Tight braid

10. Bank that everyone hopes won’t fail

11. “____ was saying ...”

12. Part of a range: Abbr.

13. Tent holder

21. Massage deeply

22. Tweeter’s “That said …”

26. “What ____!”

(“Bummer!”)

27. City whose name is an anagram of Kyoto

28. Banks of fashion

29. Without a date

31. John Irving’s “____ of the Circus”

32. Common campaign promise

33. It’s blocked by sunblock

34. “Futurama” woman with one eye and purple hair

35. Fathom or furlong

36. Stimpy’s pal

37. Its national anthem is “Salute to the

Sultan”

42. Film not seen in theaters

43. Stiletto, e.g.

44. Renders harmless

45. Crowd eruption

50. “Get what I’m sayin’?”

51. The Euphrates flows through it

52. Vim and vigor

53. Closer’s inning

54. Lock horns

55. “____ Meanz Heinz” (old ad slogan)

57. Curfew for a vampire

58. Money-related: Abbr.

59. “Montero” singer Lil ____ X

60. Oilers, on NHL scoreboards

61. Mop & ____ (floor cleaner)

MEDIuM #52.pDf LAST

© Puzzles by Pappocom 7 2 8 1 9 4 6

5 4 1 8 3 4 1 7 3 6 1 5 5 8 3 7 9 5 4 1 7

CROSSWORD
ANSWERS
WEEK! ©2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK www.sudoku.com
NEXT
WEEK’S ANSWERS TO GARAGE ANSWERS Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area SHOP.COM
SUPPORT
42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com

Redwood Community Action Agency is hiring!

ADMINISTRATION

DIVISION

• Administrative Assistant

$19.00/hr. fulltime

Available immediately

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

• Program Coordinator, Financial Literacy Program, 32/hrs. week

$18.50 - $20.00/hr. D.O.E.

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES PROGRAM

• Program Manager $31/hour F/T, 40/hrs. salary/exempt.

FAMILY SERVICES PACT PROGRAM (transitional living)

• Caseworkers I/II, fulltime

$18.00-$20.00/hr. D.O.E.

All F/T positions have health insurance. Go to www.rcaa.org for complete job descriptions & required job application. Positions are open until filled. Must be vaccinated for COVID. RCAA is an EOE default

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Dispatcher: $37,972.21 - $46,155.46/yr.

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*Base salary for this position will increase by 5% in 2024. Plus excellent benefits including free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more!

This position maintains the daily financial records for utility accounts, including receiving utility payments, performing data entry and maintaining receipt records. Issues business licenses, dog licenses and processes renewals, assessing penalties, late fees, and recording new license numbers. Any combination of training and experience which would provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities is qualifying. A typical way to obtain the required qualifications would be equivalent to the completion of 12th grade and one year of clerical experience is required. You may apply online at www.eurekaca.gov.

Application deadline is 5:00 p.m. Monday, March 27th 2023. EOE

COMMUNITY SERVICES SUPERVISOR - RECREATION

$4,033 – $4,902/month

*Base salary will increase by 5% in 2024. Plus excellent benefits including free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more!

Under general supervision, plans, directs, administers, and supervises one or more major recreation program areas while coordinating and participating in various special projects and community events as assigned. Incumbent will function as a cooperative and productive member of the Recreation Division’s program operations team and provide responsible professional and complex staff assistance to the Community Services Deputy Director. Requirements include equivalent to graduation from an accredited four-year college or university with major coursework in recreation administration, child development, liberal studies, physical education, public administration, or a closely related field, and three (3) years of progressively responsible experience directing and supervising significant recreational programs and activities, including supervising staff and other administrative functions. For more information and to apply online at www.eurekaca.gov.

Application deadline is 5pm on Monday, April 3, 2023. EOE

formerly know as Southern Trinity Health Services.

Southern Trinity Health Service is taking applications for the open positions at the

Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish)

Resource & Referral Specialist

$18.38/hr

Bilingual Resource & Referral Specialist $19.35/hr

Clinician I/II

$27.09/hr., $5,381.09

Bilingual Clinician I/II (Spanish) $28.94/hr., $5,730.85

We are seeking a self-motivated, quick learning, and career-minded individual seeking long-term employment. Please send resume to hr@sthsclinic.org or call (707) 764-5617 ext. 2110.

Benefits include paid vacation and sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid, platinum level health insurance, dental, vision, and life insurance, as well as a retirement plan with matching contributions and profit-sharing. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org

www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

@changingtidesfamilyservices

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 43 Continued from previous page default
736 F Street, Arcata, (707) 822-5953. EOE. EMPLOYMENT Continued on next page » Registered Nurse/LVN Dental Support Manager Clinical Support Manager Environmental Services Medical Doctor Dentist Scotia Location
THE CITY OF FINANCE DEPARTMENT
THE CITY OF COMMUNITY SERVICES

HICAP Counselor

Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program

(HICAP) – Based in Humboldt County

Part time (20 hours/week). Provides information and advocates for Medicare eligible clients. Duties include informing the public about Medicare and private hea lth insurance programs and assisting Medicare beneficia ries through counseling and advocacy to support informed decision making. Generous holiday, vacation, sick l eave, health and dental package. Salary is $18.50-28.50 D OE

K’ima:w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

PATIENT BENEFITS-REGISTRATION CLERK

– FT Regular ($18.62 - $23.13 per hour DOE)

COMMUNITY HEALTH REPRESENTATIVE CHR

– FT Regular ($19.54 - $26.33 per hour DOE)

PHARMACIST – FT Regular ($70.31 - $87.42 per hour DOE)

COALITION COORDINATOR – FT Regular ($17.14 - $20.01 per hour)

Northcoast Children’s Services

ASSOCIATE TEACHER, Willow Creek

Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Req. a minimum of 12 ECE units—including core classes—& at least one-year exp. working w/ children. F/T. 32 hrs./wk., $17.93- $18.83/ hr. Open Until Filled.

TEACHER, McKinleyville

Submit A1AA application submit application, found a t https://www.a1aa.org/about-us/job-opportunities/ , two letters of recommendation, and a cover letter t o 333 J Street, Eureka, CA 95501. A pre-employment backgr ound check is required of all final candidates. Open until filled. Contact Ben Winker at 707-444-3000, Ext. 222 or BWINKER@A1AA.ORG

PERSONAL HEALTH RECORD (PHR)/ MEDICAL RECORDS SPECIALIST – FT Regular ($18.62 - $23.77 per hour DOE)

MEDICAL BILLING SPECIALIST – FT Regular ($17.90 - $24.25 per hour DOE)

HOUSEKEEPER – FT Regular ($15.00 - $19.57 per hour DOE)

CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSIST – FT Regular ($20.44 - $27.55 per hour DOE)

MEDICAL ASSISTANT – FT Regular ($18.62 - $25.09 per hour DOE)

CARE MANAGER (RN OR LVN) – FT Regular ($43.05 - $53.78 per hour DOE)

OUTREACH MANAGER/PHN/RN – FT Regular ($40.02 - $49.99 per hour DOE)

Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—provide support and supervision for a toddler program. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, and one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. P/T position: 25 hrs./wk. $18.44-$20.33/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEACHER, Eureka

4% Salary increase in July 2023

Apply online by 11:59pm, March 26, 2023. Performs a variety of semi-skilled and skilled tasks related to the construction, maintenance, repair, installation and monitoring of City facilities, parks, and natural resource areas. An ideal candidate excels in working independently, communicates effectively and respectfully with members of the public, and is a proven team player.

Apply or review the full job duties at: https:// www.governmentjobs.com/careers/arcataca 



STAFFPSYCHOTHERAPISTPOSITIONS CalPolyHumboldtCoun− seling&PsychologicalServices(CAPS)iscollectingapplicationsfor twoStaffPsychotherapistpositions:onewithaparticularfocuson identifyingandsupportingthementalhealthneedsofstudentsof colorandasecondwithafocusspecificallyonservingourLatinx studentpopulation.Thesearefulltimepositionsprovidingdirect clinicalservicestostudentsandcollaborationwithourUniversity’s CulturalCenters.Pleaseapplyonline: https://careers.humboldt.edu

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER –FT Regular (Salary DOE)

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/BILLER – FT REGULAR – ($18.42 - $20.00 per hour)

EMT-1 – Temporary

PARAMEDIC – FT Regular

GRANT WRITER & PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS – FT/Regular ($29.00-36.00 per hour DOE)

DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT/ Regular ($39.00-43.00 DOE)

PHYSICIAN FT/Regular

MEDICAL DIRECTOR – FT/Regular

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN – FT/Regular

MAT RN CARE MANAGER – FT/Regular

DENTIST – FT/Regular

All positions above are Open Until Filled unless otherwise stated.

For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-6254261 or email: apply@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at www.kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Responsible for development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support and supervision for a toddler program. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, and have one-yr. experience teaching in a toddler setting. F/T position: 36 hrs./wk. $18.44-$20.33/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHER, Crescent City

Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities for toddler age children. Must have 12 core in ECE/ CD (with 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, and have one-yr. experience teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $18.69-$19.62/hr. Open Until Filled.

Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS  COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are  for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions.

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com EMPLOYMENT default
Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org
default
default
default City of Arcata Maintenance Worker/Senior Maintenance Worker (Current Assignment in FACILITIES)
$38,251.68 - $52,464.08/yr.
Continued from previous page

Northcoast Children’s Services

Do you love being with children?

Do you enjoy supporting children learn and grow?

Are you looking for a meaningful profession?

Do you want a job that has evenings and weekends off?

Northcoast Children’s Services may be what you’re looking for!

Northcoast Children’s Services provides early education and family support services to children and families from pregnancy to

Northcoast Children’s Services

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, (Various Programs/Locations)

of the classroom for a preschool program. 6-12 ECE units preferred or enrolled in ECE classes and have 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T 17-27 hrs./wk. $15.88-$17.50/hr. Open Until Filled.

INTERPRETERS, Eureka, Fortuna

Assist in interpreting in class, at parent meetings and on home visits for children and families. Bilingual Spanish required. Must have 6 months’ experience working with children and

Education. P/T 12-20 hrs./wk. $15.88-$17.50/ hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT COOK, McKinleyville

Lead dishwasher for a preschool kitchen. Additional duties include assisting in food prep (breakfast, lunch & snack), & organizing food

Opportunities

ESSENTIALCAREGIVERS NeededtohelpElderly VisitingAngels 707−442−8001

We have a variety of full and part time positions working with children and families.

 holidays to all employees and an additional  care option to full time employees. All employees may also obtain assistance with education and child development permits.

We are currently looking for people   center directors and home visitors.

  after 2 months of full-time employment.

 for more information on how to join our growing team! https://ncsheadstart. org/employment-opportunities/

up & clean-up of classroom meal service & maintaining a clean kitchen. Req. basic cooking skills. Prior exp. in food handling & service  (M-F) $15.88 per hour. Open Until Filled.

Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS  COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are 

 for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Please contact 

Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

Electronics

Miscellaneous

4GLTEHOMEINTERNETNOW

AVAILABLE! GetGotW3with lightningfastspeedsplustake yourservicewithyouwhenyou travel!Aslowas$109.99/mo!1− 866−571−1325

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

AREYOUBEHIND$10KOR

MOREONYOURTAXES? Stop wage&banklevies,liens& audits,unfiledtaxreturns, payrollissues,&resolvetaxdebt FAST.Call844−836−9861(Hours: Mon−Fri7am−5pmPST)

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 45
MARKETPLACE Continued on next page » default
 toddler and preschool centers in
of
and
a variety
locations in Humboldt
Del Norte counties.

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


regarding vaccinations or exemptions. default Redwood Coast Regional Center Be a part of a great team!
WORKER FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for indiv. w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3990/mo. Exc. bene. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs. EOE 2GUYS&ATRUCK. Carpentry,Landscaping, JunkRemoval,CleanUp, Moving.Althoughwehave beeninbusinessfor25 years,wedonotcarrya contractorslicense.Call845 PLACE YOUR JOB LISTINGS CLASSIFIEDS.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM Place Ad Hiring? 442-1400 ×314 www.northcoastjournal.com Post your job opportunities in the Journal. Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoast journal.com
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■ McKinleyville

SPECTACULAR ONE OF A KIND OCEAN VIEW!! This home offers unobstructed, panoramic ocean, river, beach, and dune views. Built in 2006, with 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, and approx. 3,140 sf, it includes a large office and a separate den. There are 2 bed/1.5 baths downstairs and 3 bed/2 baths upstairs. Vaulted ceilings, skylights, freshly painted interior, on demand water heater and more. Situated on a flat .45 acre parcel close to the Hammond Trail. Call today and Make this your Dream Home!! MLS# 263790

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IN HOME SERVICES

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PLATES&PLATTERS

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defaultHUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts.

Annual Income Limits:

1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150

Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922

Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

HIGHEREDUCATIONFORSPIR− ITUALUNFOLDMENT. Bache− lors,Masters,D.D./Ph.D., distancelearning,Universityof MetaphysicalSciences.Bringing professionalismtometaphysics. (707)822−2111

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • northcoastjournal.com
default
Personal
Light
activities
care & much more
you
& Bonded
Northern California for over 20 years!
Toll free 1-877-964-2001 Registered nurse support
Care
Housekeeping Assistance with daily
Respite
We are here for
Insured
Serving
MARKETPLACE
SPIRIT Room For Rent default Lawn Care Service •Riding & cordless mowers, both with baggers •Dump runs •Weed eating •Hedge trimming •Pressure Washing •Small tree and brush removal Call Corey 707-382-2698 $35/hour 2 hour minimum
BODY MIND
ESTATE / FOR SALE MARKETPLACE Continued from previous page
Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • sgarlickmingtree@gmail.com
New Listing $1,100,000 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com YOUR AD HERE 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal. com YOUR AD HERE YOUR AD HERE classified@northcoastjournal.com (707) 442-1400 × 314 PLACE YOUR AD HERE 442-1400 × 314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

130 CARLSON LANE, EUREKA

$699,000

Extremely private ±2.5 acres located behind a locked gate. This two-story home features wide plank hardwood floors on the bottom story with an open concept living and dining room, kitchen, half bathroom and laundry room. Upstairs enjoy a spacious master bedroom and bathroom overlooking the Redwood Forest. Two additional guest bedrooms and a bathroom also boast forest views. The tiered parcel offers a large deck for entertaining while overlooking the bottom meadow portion of the property perfect for horses, farm animals or other activities. Located just 5 minutes from Eureka, take advantage of a rural lifestyle while being close to the conveniences of town.

$249,000

Three parcels totaling ±90 acres with easy Trinity Lake access! Perfect vacation getaway with privacy and seclusion surrounded by Forest Service and a large timber holding. Take advantage of the existing NTMP with a 20 year old growth projection of 1,500,000 board feet of timber! Parcel also features a spring and deeded right of way. Owner may carry!

1865 HIGHWAY 96, WILLOW CREEK

$995,000

Beautiful river view estate on over 4 acres just minutes from Willow Creek! Property boasts a 3/3 3,650 sq. ft. main residence, large in ground pool complete with outdoor kitchen and pool house featuring a full bathroom and kitchenette area, separate barn with a 1/1 apartment above and so much more!

184 EMPIRE DRIVE, FORTUNA

$63,000

Spacious and open floor plan with an enclosed sun porch on the south side, and a full length carport and storage shed on the other. Separate laundry/utility room has an exterior door opening to the carport with a stair lift for ADA access. All appliances included. There is some deferred maintenance. Senior park has clubhouse with numerous activities, a community computer, and other amenities.

$1,295,000

Astonishing business opportunity on Trinity Lake! Become the new owner and steward of The Pinewood Cove Resort featuring cabins, RV camping spaces, tent camping spaces, boat slips, convenience store, recreation pavilion, saltwater pool, and more! Take advantage of the amazing location, the first park coming into Trinity Lake, just 15 minutes from Weaverville!

$425,000

Rare ±45 acre property with Redwood Creek frontage! Parcel features a huge building site for homesteading & gardening, stunning swimming hole, large utility building with metal roof, and newly drilled well at the top of the property. Bonus 5th wheel trailer with outdoor cooking area, and outdoor shower. Enjoy privacy and seclusion while being just 35 minutes away from Arcata!

$500,000

±60 Secluded acres just 30 minutes off 101. With a large shop and two story house with surrounding views this property is a diamond in the rough. House will need to be remodeled which is a perfect opportunity to make it into the getaway home of your dreams. Large flats are pushed and cleared giving endless possibilities for gardening or building another home or shop!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, March 16, 2023 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 47 Tyla Miller Realtor BRE 1919487 707.362.6504 Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent BRE #01332697 707.476.0435 Kyla Nored Owner/Broker BRE #01930997 707.834.7979 Barbara Davenport Associate Broker BRE# 01066670 707.498.6364 Mike Willcutt Realtor BRE # 02084041 916.798.2107 Ashlee Cook Realtor BRE# 02070276 707.601.6702
±45 ACRES REDWOOD CREEK, BLUE LAKE 4595 LOWER THOMAS ROAD, MIRANDA ±90 ACRES HAY GULCH ROAD TRINITY LAKE PINEWOOD COVE RESORT, TRINITY LAKE REDUCED PRICE!
1662 Myrtle Ave. Ste. A Eureka NE W H O U RS 707.442.2420 M-F 10am-7pm, Sat 11am-6pm, Sun 11am-5pm License No. C10-0000997-LIC 21+ only MYRTLE AVE. UP THE ALLEY AND TO O THE LEFT OF OUR OLD LOCATION BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT ST. PATRICK’S DAY come celebate wit us tis DEALS ALL DAY
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