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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

CONTENTS 5 Editorial

A Deadly Finale

6 Mailbox 6 Poem

The Time of Hearth and Home

6 News

Changing Territory

11 News

Food Sovereignty in a Food Desert

13 News

‘Sounding the Alarm’

17 NCJ Daily Online 18 On the Table

Nov. 26, 2020 • Volume XXXI Issue 48 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2020

PUBLISHER

Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com GENERAL MANAGER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

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Apples and Apples

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NCJ Holiday Gift Guide

DIGITAL EDITOR

Special Advertising Section

22 Trophy Case

The Brothers Iorg

23 Fishing the North Coast Kings Tough to Come by on Smith, Chetco

24 Calendar 26 Home & Garden Service Directory

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29 Workshops & Classes 29 Cartoon 30 North Coast Night Lights

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


EDITORIAL

A Deadly Finale By Thadeus Greenson

I

thad@northcoastjournal.com

f the stakes weren’t so high, it would be amusing — the last weeks in office of a reality show president, the one who made a career of the callous catchphrase “you’re fired,” now wholly unable to accept the fact that he was just resoundingly fired from the most important job of his life, destined to go down in history with Martin Van Buren, Benjamin Harrison and a small handful of others as the only presidents voted out of office after a single term. If the circumstances were different, it would be entertaining to watch his team of infomercial lawyers’ lawsuits laughed out of courts across six states as the president bloviates about a fictional multi-state conspiracy involving Republicans and Democrats, state and county officials, as well as media outlets from MSNBC and the New York Times to Fox News and the Wall Street Journal, to deny him a second term despite his wild popularity, good looks and all that “winning.” Of course, this is the president of the United States we’re talking about, as well as the sacred peaceful transition of power in the world’s flagship democracy, and all the president’s bluster and baseless fraud allegations have real consequences, so none of this is funny. Not at all. It’s not funny to the millions of voters who apparently don’t trust news outlets or judges or local elections officials or even the attorneys general that William Barr has given the authority to investigate voter fraud but have found none. No, these voters trust Trump — and have continued to trust him despite thousands of blatant lies spread over four years about everything from the innocuous (crowd size) to the deadly (COVID-19). And lest you forget, some of these people are our neighbors: The president got more than 21,000 votes in Humboldt County and the local GOP is currently organizing a “stop the steal” rally for Saturday. The anger inside these folks — no matter how ill informed — is real and being fanned. Where does that end? But in this perfect storm that is 2020, there’s so much more at stake than just anger and resentment and a fractured nation with diminished world standing. Contrary to the president’s wild, baseless assurances, COVID-19 did not disappear on Nov. 4, nor did it fall off the front pages of this nation’s newspapers. That’s because it’s real and it’s deadly and it’s surging in the leadership void of a president who simply could not care less about the governed. It’s surging in

deep red states like South Dakota and Wyoming, just as it’s surging in blue states like Illinois and Wisconsin, and just as it’s surging — thankfully to a lesser degree — in Humboldt County. The nation is seeing close to 200,000 new cases confirmed daily, with reports of overwhelmed healthcare systems coming from areas both rural and urban. And it’s only getting worse. In the midst of this national emergency that’s already seen more than 255,000 Americans killed, what’s the president’s national strategy? He doesn’t have one. How is he messaging the urgency of the situation and the need to flatten the curve? He isn’t. Instead, like the grifter he has always been, he’s flooding his supporters’ email accounts with urgent pleas to fund a legal defense to “stop the steal,” never mind the fact that donations less than $8,000 instead go to paying down his campaign debt and the Republican National Committee. Meanwhile, President-elect Joe Biden is building his team and his plan for a national COVID-19 response — one that surely could have rolled out last February had our current president chosen to lead rather than lie to the American people. But our president’s petulant refusal to accept his loss — and his even more petulant refusal to share information with Biden’s transition team — means the president-elect is going to be largely in the dark about many facets of the virus and what can be done to mitigate its spread until he takes office next year. So here we are, bracing to see unprecedented suffering and death in all corners of the country over the coming months as the most powerful man in the world treats the U.S. presidency like some reality show, peddling new catchphrases to his own personal benefit while the country burns around him. History will look back harshly. To our neighbors who have taken this heretic’s word over all reason, science and decency, and who plan to stand in solidarity with his tantrum Saturday, know this: History will judge you harshly, too, though your neighbors may not wait. And whatever you choose to do Saturday, wear a mask. We say that because, unlike your president, we still care about you, our community and this nation. ● Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, o thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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NEWS

MAILBOX

Terry Torgerson

Editor: Barry Evans’ “Of Course We Still Love You, Voyager!” (Nov. 19) reminded me that most of us pay little attention to the radio debris shed by our planet. But perhaps we should. I’m thinking specifically of the first radio broadcast that was powerful enough to leave the earth’s atmosphere. Punching through the layers of charged particles surrounding our planet requires brute power. On Aug. 30, 1933, the first station with enough wattage to get the job done broadcast a speech from Nuremberg, Germany, to millions of Nazi soldiers by their fuhrer, Adolph Hitler. As usual, he did a lot of screaming and ranting. Traveling at the speed of light, this broadcast can’t be modified, much less rescinded. It will always remain ahead of any other radio signal generated on this planet. It has become Earth’s calling card to the rest of the universe. Gordon Inkeles, Bayside

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

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The Time of Hearth and Home The last of the apples hang from storm-lashed limbs the mints are little more than desiccated sticks while an Anna’s Hummingbird drinks from yonder grevillea A vine maple’s glowing embers are beginning to subside musky scent of mushrooms pervades their forest lair birds flit and flutter in glistening hedgerow Scarlet blueberry leaves remind us of the bounty in the freezer Yule lights on the tree mimic swirling flames in the stove upon the hearth Violin, accordion and uilleann pipes speak to me whispers from departed elders circle of life

in from field and forest to the warmth of hearth and home — Tom Leskiw

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

A city map shows one of the business zones in which camping will be prohibited under the city’s new ordinance. Submitted.

Changing Territory

Informed by its past, Eureka takes another crack at homeless ordinance By Linda Stansberry

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

O

n Nov. 17, the Eureka City Council voted to repeal and replace its existing camping ordinance, approving new language that prohibits camping in the city’s business districts and trails, anywhere in the city during daylight hours and anywhere on public property where said camping would be considered “obstructive conduct.” Discussion stretched nearly two hours, with several councilmembers seeking to assuage public concern that the new ordinance would further criminalize homelessness. The ordinance was amended to change the recommended criminal charge for camping from a misdemeanor to an infraction and then passed with a 4-1 vote, with Councilmember Leslie Castellano dissenting. According to City Attorney Robert Black, the new language was drafted to re-

place an existing ordinance rendered moot by a 2019 Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision, Martin vs. The City of Boise. In that case, the court found Boise’s camping ordinance unconstitutional on the grounds that it violated the Eighth Amendment by criminalizing “necessary human behavior; specifically, sleeping, sitting and lying on public property when homelessness and lack of available shelter gives individuals no alternative.” “The city has been involved in litigation stemming from the Palco Marsh abatement,” Black told the council in his opening comments. “One step in the direction of resolving that litigation is to revise our camping ordinance and bring it into compliance with federal law. [Martin v. City of Boise] basically said that houseless, homeless people by virtue of their status cannot be criminalized through total


prohibition of camping in public spaces. We now have an ordinance that essentially contains such a total prohibition. This is an attempt to try to establish a set of values on the use of public property but, at the same time, allow large areas of public space within the city of Eureka to be available to people for whom there is no available shelter space.” In the new ordinance, this conduct is referred to as “involuntary camping,” and is prohibited in Old Town, the Northern Gateway District, all of the Waterfront Trail and the Henderson Center business district. Councilmember Austin Allison opened discussion with two questions: “Will ordinances like this put houseless people in jail? Will it take people off the streets?” Black responded that “for all practical purposes, the answer is no,” adding that there was a “theoretical legal construct” in which violators could be charged with a misdemeanor but in practice it would be an opportunity for police officers to contact those violating the ordinance and try to convince them to seek services. Eureka Police Capt. Brian Stephens confirmed that EPD currently has a practice of not rousting people who are camping overnight except in complaint-driven circumstances, and said the ordinance would give officers the authority to contact individuals and connect them with services, with the “ultimate goal being able to get them off the street.” “The ordinance gives us the ability to legally maintain order and address overall community needs and, hopefully, encourage these community members to seek out services and sheltered spaces,” Stephens wrote in a follow up email. “Those that do have a change of heart about accepting assistance often do so because of the multiple contacts and the relationships that are built between members of our CSET and UPLIFT team and the community member. There are times and areas that the behavior is not acceptable and there needs to be balance and the ability for all our community members to freely utilize our public spaces.” The city has been on a circuitous journey with its relationship to its homeless residents since 2013, when a lawsuit brought by a homeless advocate who broke her shoulder while visiting people in the Palco Marsh sparked a series of events culminating in abatement of that encampment, which at one time consisted of several hundred people living behind the Bayshore Mall. City staff attempted an array of different tactics to disband the Palco Marsh camps, including straightforward eviction notices, regular visits by clean-up crews and resource fairs before the camp was finally forcefully dispersed May 2, 2016. The city’s ongoing exposure to litigation, as referenced by Black at the top of the meeting, informed much of Nov. 17 discussion. The case, which Black said is largely inactive, arose from that 2016 eviction. Eleven litigants represented by Eureka attorney Shelley Mack filed a restraining order against the city just prior to the clear-out of the encampment. A judge at the time ruled that the city would have to provide alternative shelter for the plaintiffs. The ruling resulted in a series of “sanctioned camps” set up at different places in Continued on page 9 » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS Continued from page 7

the city, but they were discontinued in November of 2016, with city staff citing complaints from neighboring business owners about theft and vandalism. In the four years since the events of 2016, the city has diversified its approach to homelessness, with departments changing in a variety of ways to meet the challenge. The city’s Community Services Department (formerly Parks and Recreation) helped establish UPLIFT Eureka, which matches participants with community volunteers to help guide them through services. EPD modified and expanded its homeless outreach services. The city also supported several transitional and permanent housing projects through the Betty Kwan Chinn Foundation and the state’s Project Homekey initiative. But the question of where people without homes can legally be, especially with winter bearing down, limited local shelter capacity and the continuing spectre of a pandemic. Castellano asked if the maps created by counsel were counter-intuitive: “If someone was camping somewhere and told they couldn’t stay, and they ask where they could go, what would happen — would we show them a map of where they could go?” Black said questions like that “get worked out in practice,” in the field by EPD officers, and that there is a general reluctance to sanction any particular area for camping, saying it could lead to a “concentrated zone or area.” Stephens, in an email, acknowledged this concern, saying there is “a risk with telling a community member that they can camp in a particular place.” Although public comment leaned largely against approving the new language, with one opponent saying it sounded like “just pushing people around,” a council majority supported the change. Several councilmembers cited complaints from business owners about homeless camping in doorways and entryways and having to clean up messes before opening up to customers. “It’s really important to learn from your past,” said Councilmember Kim Bergel, referring to instances when the city allowed camps to become entrenched. “We’ve experienced this with Palco Marsh … if you remember what a nightmare that was.” Castellano, who cast the lone dissenting vote, wrote in a follow-up email that she had several concerns with the new ordinance. “The legal territory of when and where a person can sleep in public is quickly changing,” she wrote. “I think that it is better to take our time in developing a replacement ordinance, if that is indeed the best tactic, in order to create some-

thing that will not be subject to continued legal challenge.” She expressed concerns that continued litigation would ultimately be costly for the citizens of Eureka and felt some of the language in the ordinance has too much room for interpretation and it is unclear how enforcement would work in practice. “I also have concerns about encouraging people to seek a shelter during a pandemic,” she added. “I know that the people who manage shelters in Eureka

are doing tremendous work and abiding by good health protocol, but there are many unknowns during this time and the numbers of people who have COVID-19 are on the rise.” “I know we need some better systems to support our local business owners who are facing many challenges and do not also want to be confronted by having to clean up after someone or manage a situation that may feel unsafe to them, and I am committed to figuring out what the best

policies may be for that, but I think that we are not fully there yet,” she wrote. l Linda Stansberry (she/her) is a freelance journalist. She lives in Eureka. The Community Voices Coalition is a project funded by Humboldt Area Foundation and Wild Rivers Community Foundation to support local journalism. This story was produced by the North Coast Journal newsroom with full editorial independence and control.

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NEWS

Food Sovereignty in a Food Desert By André Cramblit

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here has been a lot of talk about Native reservations being food deserts. With no corporate supermarket and little access to the necessary amounts of salmon, a traditional staple, the Yurok Tribe has started the Yurok Agricultural Corporation (YAC) to overcome this imbalance and move ahead with hope for a brighter future planted in the soil of a concept called food sovereignty. The YAC recently purchased the latent Weitchpec Nursery and will repurpose it to benefit tribal members, according to Toby Vanlandingham, president of the YAC. “The Yurok Agricultural Corporation has an opportunity to once again bring that business back into the community to stimulate economic growth, create decent paying jobs and to assist residents with becoming self-sustaining by growing their own food.” In 2011, the U.S. Department of Agriculture classified the Yurok Reservation as a food desert, which it defines as “a low-income census tract where a substantial number or share of residents has low access to a supermarket or large grocery store.” Food options on the reservation are at a minimum, Vanlandingham reports. The two mini marts with limited stock, Pek-Tah fuel mart in Weitchpec and Pem-Mey fuel mart in Klamath, are the only places to shop; Hoopa, with its grocery store that opened last year, is 14 miles away (“Hoopa’s Long Wait for a Grocery Store is Over,” March 6, 2019). It’s 60 miles to multi-store Crescent City from Weitchpec, Orleans Market is 14 miles off going the other way and Orick Market is 16 miles from Klamath. These distances are even more significant when taking into account lack of transportation and funds for fuel. Vanlandingham, who is also a Yurok Tribal Council member, said on behalf of the YAC that the purchase revitalization of the Weitchpec Nursery will provide the community with jobs, as well as access to low-cost vegetable starts, gardening supplies, educational workshops on food growing and preserving, as well as the opportunity to grow produce for sale at local stores and a future farmers market in the Weitchpec area. “Food sovereignty to me is the people’s right to define their own healthy and culturally relevant food system that utilizes ecologically and sustainable methods for growing and harvesting,” he said. Home gardens have a long tradition among local tribal people. Growing squash, corn, beans and watermelon helps fill out the family menu. The nursery, it’s hoped, will provide a stable

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source of items, like seeds and starts, for them to plant in their own gardens. Food nurtured from the earth also helps to support the animals and plants Native people have hunted and gathered from time immemorial. Harvesting homegrown foods is especially vital for those who live in a subsistence economy, many far below the poverty line. According to Vanlandingham, unemployment rates on the reservation are above 80 percent and the median annual household income is roughly $11,000. While the USDA reports 12.9 percent of Americans received assistance from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program in 2017, Vanlandingham stated that on the Yurok Reservation, some 64 percent of households rely on some kind of nutritional assistance and, among them, 84 percent reported they worried “about running out or ran out of food in the past year.” Vanlandingham indicated the YAC is working to end food shortages on the Yurok Reservation. “The Yurok Agricultural Corporation’s goal is to assist the Yurok reservation and surrounding communities in building a concrete foundation for an environmentally sustainable food production and distribution system that is equitable and socially just. There are a multitude of building blocks working now toward that goal; the YAC is the missing piece that ties economics into the equation and brings all these blocks together.” Vanlandingham went on to say, “Food choices are strongly tied to our culture, with the decline in access to traditional foods like salmon, acorns, deer and elk, our people are forced to turn to heavily processed foods from store shelves or through the USDA commodity programs. Our long-term goal is to achieve food sovereignty that revitalizes our traditional ecological knowledge and practices that results in healthier communities that are free from so much processed food items.” Time will tell if the revitalization of the Weitchpec nursery will have a favorable impact on the food availability for Yuroks on that part of the reservation. At least it is a step in the right direction of getting back what was once theirs in terms of available fish, acorns, mushrooms and other items traditionally gathered by the tribal members. For more information you can contact the Yurok Agricultural Corporation at 482-0441. ● André P. Cramblit (he/him) is a Karuk tribal member who fondly recalls the gardens of his great-uncle Leonard Super and his great-great-aunt Bessie Tripp.

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NEWS

rates in adults aged 20 to 30 is that they are more likely to fill jobs in the “frontline workforce.” “Partly, it’s just exposure,” she said. At one point in the supervisors meeting, Third District Supervisor Mike Wilson seemed to ponder whether the county and local agencies could be doing more to protect that frontline workforce, recounting his recent trip to a burrito shop where he found two young male customers weren’t wearing masks and being a “little bit jerky about it.” Wilson said the sole employee in the front of the house, a young woman, seemed to feel threatened and reluctant to ask them to mask up or leave. He asked Sheriff William Honsal if the county could be doing more. Honsal responded that the first step is businesses and their employees really need “to be comfortable having those By Thadeus Greenson conversations” and need to say, “No thad@northcoastjournal.com mask, no service.” “If they’re not comfortable with it, hortly before Journalbewent to then really theythe shouldn’t working that register or that job,” Honsal presscash Nov. 23, Humboldt County said, also takingreported the opportunity Public Health it had to not it’s a misdemeanor to not wear a confirmed 56 newoffense COVID-19 cases facial in an indoor public since covering Nov. 20 — obliterating thesetting, or one whererecord 6 feet of distance single-day reporting andphysical continuing can’t be maintained at all times. a dramatic case surge that saw 214 cases Honsal then added that the goal is confirmed through the first 23 days of “voluntarily compliance” and employees November after 59 in October. need to ask customers to mask up and Throughout the week ending Nov. 20, then, if they refuse, call law enforcement. as a single-week record 71 new COVID-19 “Businesses should confront those cases were confirmed, Humboldt people,” the sheriff said. “IfCounty they don’t Health Officer Teresa increasleave, then callFrankovich the police or sheriff and ingly rang alarm bells anda conversation recommended allow us to have with local schools to distance learning those shift people.” sheriff also took a moment to for the twoThe weeks following Thanksgiving make a of plea directly to the anti-maskers in anticipation a continued surge in who believe the facial covering mandate infections. is misguided, their civil liber“I want to make itinfringing very clearonthat I am ties or both. also concerned,” Frankovich said in a Nov. “If we valueadding our community, then I 20 media availability, she expects think we should do everything we possithe surge in case activity to continue for bly can to reduce risk to our community,” at least aHonsal couple more weeks and that it said. “Your decision not to wear a was “very likely” to move theaffect county facial covering could ourinto businessthe state’s restrictive “widespread” es, most our schools, our churches — everypurple risk tieryou of hold regulations. “When you thing dear could be impacted look at our localdecision case counts, by your not towe’ve wear more a mask.” than tripledAtthose very in recently and acone point the meeting, First celeration at thisSupervisor pace is exactly thewondered thing District Rex Bohn aloud whether some people just feel invincible or think the virus is just the flu and doesn’t pose a substantial risk, before urging them to “listen to the scientists and experts.” “It’s not the flu,” Frankovich said, pointing out that much is not yet known about the long-term effects of COVID-19 infection, which have been preliminary

California Activity and Business Tiers

‘Sounding the Alarm’

Go to cdph.ca.gov for the complete list.

Gatherings

State and local officials plea for compliance as cases surge

All Retail

(including critical infrastructure, except standalone grocers)

Shopping Centers (Malls,

Destination Centers, Swap Meets)

S

Restaurants Bars, Breweries, and Distilleries (where meals are provided, follow restaurant guidance)

Places of Worship

Offices

WIDESPREAD Tier 1

SUBSTANTIAL Tier 2

MODERATE Tier 3

MINIMAL Tier 4

Outdoor gatherings only with modifications. Max 3 households.

Indoor gatherings strongly discouraged, allowed with modifications. Max 3 households.

Indoor gatherings strongly discouraged, allowed with modifications. Max 3 households.

Indoor gatherings strongly discouraged, allowed with modifications. Max 3 households.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 25% capacity.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 50% capacity.

Open indoors with modifications.

Open indoors with modifications.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 25% capacity. Closed common areas. Closed food courts.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 50% capacity. Closed common areas. Reduced capacity food courts.

Open indoors with modifications. Closed common areas. Reduced capacity food courts.

Open indoors with modifications. Reduced capacity food courts.

Outdoor only with modifications.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is fewer.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 50% capacity or 200 people, whichever is fewer.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 50% capacity.

Closed.

Closed.

Open outdoors with modifications.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 50% capacity.

Outdoor only with modifications.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is fewer.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 50% capacity or 200 people, whichever is fewer.

Open indoors with modifications. Max 50% capacity.

Remote.

Remote.

Open indoors with modifications. Encourage telework.

Open indoors with modifications. Encourage telework.

we’ve been trying to avoid throughout.” California moved Humboldt County to cardiovascular, respiratory, renal fromlinked the state’s lowest risk tier — “miniand neurological issues. “We don’t know mal” or yellow — to “substantial,” or red, as we’re to know about Nov.as 16,much skipping overgoing the “moderate” the virus, but the one thing we know orange tier entirely. And that was before about the flu is that if you get it and you the county went on to confirm more survive it, you’re fine. We can’t say the casessame that with weekCOVID.” than it saw in the entirety of October. There’s simply no question that The state ofisCalifornia largely relies COVID-19 surging throughout the on countwo ty, metrics a county state to anddetermine country atwhere a terrible time. falls in itsweather tier system: the percentage of The is turning colder throughout much of the country — and wetter in Humboldt — making it harder for people to gather outdoors and tempting them to do so inside, which studies have repeatedly shown to be much more dangerous as the virus is airborne and can linger for hours in enclosed spaces. “COVID likes the indoors,” California Health and Human Services Secretary Mark Ghaly said at the state’s Nov. 16

COVID-19 tests administered that come back positive over a seven-day period press on the new tierpositive restricand theconference average number of new tions, adding that sitting across a dining cases confirmed per 100,000 in population tableover fromthe someone daily course unmasked of a week.while Both eating and drinking is a moment of “high have spiked locally over the course of transmission risk.” the The last month. The population-adjusted spike also comes as the holiday daily average of new cases season — traditionally the went single from largestless than oneofintravel the last of October to stretch andweek multi-household 7.7 for the week 20, apwhich is gatherings of theending year —Nov. rapidly high enough to push Humboldt County proaches. intoFor theweeks, state’sifpurple “widespread” not months, Frankov-tier. ich and Ennis have warned residents that travel and social gatherings are the primary drivers of infections in Humboldt County. When it comes to travel, they said many local cases have been tied to both people and families traveling outside the local area to visit friends and relatives and returning with the virus, as well as local households welcoming outof-area guests who unwittingly bring the

The test-positivity rate, meanwhile, had gone from 0.6 percent in the last week of virus with them. despite October to 3.5And percent therepeated week ending warnings throughout the pandemic, Nov. 20 — indicating a significantFranspike in kovich the board 17 that people virustold activity in theNov. community. continue to gather socially with people On Nov. 23, Gov. Gavin Newsom outside their households. announced the state would be updat“It’s a significant risk,” she said. “We’ve ing its risk tiers 24,parties with numerous had instances withNov. dinner in a counties to be moved into home whereexpected most of the individuals at more restrictive though he didn’t that dinner becomegroups, ill.” specify which. (Check www.northcoastIn a video released to the community Nov. 16, explaining what Humboldt’s move Continued on page 15 » to the state’s red tier means, Frankovich ended with a plea. “If we want to be able to keep our schools operational and keep our business community operational, we have to stop gathering, and that’s a particularly difficult challenge at the holiday season, but it’s essential to protect our families and our community,” she said. “I’m really Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS Continued from page 13

on having students on camjournal.com for the latest on “The virus is pus for in-person instrucHumboldt County’s status tion. Long a proponent of and restrictions.) As the spreading at a pace having students on campus Journal went to press Nov. where safe, Frankovich 23, county officials indicated we haven’t seen urged local districts to take they expected Humboldt a break. would be moved into the since the start of “Considering the conpurple “widespread” tier the ditions across the country, following day, forcing movie the pandemic ... state and increasingly our theaters, places of worship, own county, there are siggyms and restaurants to We are sounding nificant concerns regarding cease all indoor operations, increasing transmission after with a state shelter-in-place the alarm.” the Thanksgiving holiday,” curfew order imposed nightshe wrote. “Humboldt ly from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. — Gov. Gavin Newsom County Public Health re“The virus is spreading at mains supportive of schools a pace we haven’t seen since continuing in-person education in the the start of the pandemic and the next red tier. However, travel and gatherings several days and weeks will be critical to are currently an enormous driver of local stop the surge,” Newsom said in a press cases. At this time, Humboldt County release. “We are sounding the alarm.” Public Health is strongly recommending Frankovich has repeatedly said it’s social that schools move to distance learning for gatherings between households and travel the 14-day period following the Thanksthat have driven the rate of spread locally. giving holiday. Although schools have Now, she says, colder weather seems to done a remarkable job of implementing be pushing more social gatherings indoors, preventative measures to promote safety which is much riskier. in on-site education, we anticipate a “Those drivers are getting us in trouble marked increase in local infections due — there’s no doubt about it,” she said. to travel and gatherings occurring around And with the Thanksgiving holiday Thanksgiving. This would threaten rapid approaching, Frankovich said it was crucialidentification and containment of cases, ly important residents refrain from having leading to increased transmission in the dinners or get-togethers with anyone with school setting.” whom they do not live. In her Nov. 20 media availability, Fran“I’m asking everyone to really join on kovich indicated the coming week would board and stop the gathering,” she said. be critical for Humboldt County’s trajec“We have to stop the gathering or we are tory in navigating COVID-19. The health not going to see this slow.” officer pleaded with local residents who The ripple effects of the elevated case do test positive for the virus to be fully counts were starting to become apparent open and honest with county contact as the Journal went to press. According to investigators, who were spread thin with a state database, Humboldt County had the surge in cases and are vitally important four confirmed COVID-19 patients hospito efforts to quickly identify and contain talized locally, with another patient suscase clusters before they spread further pected to have COVID-19. Fortuna Union into the community. High School, meanwhile, announced that But mostly, Frankovich urged residents two of its students have tested positive to refrain from travel and gathering, and if for the disease, prompting it to quarantine they must get together with people outother groups of students, while Ridgeside their household for the holiday, she wood Elementary in Cutten also informed said it was imperative they do so outdoors parents that it had put a classroom pod in and distanced. quarantine following a COIVD-19 exposure, “There really is not a safe way to have according to a report in the Lost Coast a gathering around a table, eating with Outpost. In Arcata, restaurants Campmasks off indoors — there isn’t. There ground, Wildflower and Salt Fish House all just isn’t,” she said. “Being outdoors if announced they were closing temporarily you’re going to be with others is critically after staff members tested positive or important.” were exposed to COVID-19. Then on Nov. 23, Humboldt Bay Fire announced that two ● of its firefighters had tested positive for COVID-19. Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the In another indication of the state of Journal’s news editor. Reach him at her alarm, Frankovich penned a Nov. 17 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ letter to all county school districts, a day northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on after the Fortuna Union High School DisTwitter @thadeusgreenson. trict board had voted to stay the course

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Bushnell’s Lead Looks Insurmountable in Second District Race

T

here are fewer than 3,000 ballots in Humboldt County remaining to be counted, according to Registrar of Voters Kelly Sanders, seemingly making it incredibly unlikely two-term incumbent Supervisor Estelle Fennell will be able to make up her deficit to challenger Michelle Bushnell With 11,742 ballots tallied in the Second District race thus far, Bushnell has taken 51.5 percent of the vote and holds a 356vote lead. In an email to the Journal, Sanders said her office still has approximately 2,950 ballots left to process countywide, though likely not all will prove valid. She said 2,500 provisional ballots were cast on Election Day that still need to be tabulated, as well as 100 vote-by-mail ballots the office still has to scan. Finally, she said, her office has about 350 ballots it received in which the voter’s signature was missing or did not match the one the Elections Office had on

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file. Those voters, Sander said, were sent a letter and still have the opportunity to fill out a signature verification form and prove their ballots are valid. As such, precisely how many votes remain outstanding in the Second District race is not entirely clear. Sanders said 284 provisional ballots were cast at two Second District voting locations, but it’s possible Second District ballots were cast at other locations, too. But it appears unlikely to matter. Even if all the approximately 2,950 ballots remaining prove valid and fall within the Second District, Fennell would have to pull 56 percent of them to make up the deficit — a margin she has yet to meet in any batch of ballots thus far. Down in Ferndale, meanwhile, incumbent Mayor Don Hindley has grown his lead to a slim 57 votes over challenger Robin Smith with 887 ballots counted in the race thus far. It’s unclear how many votes may still be counted in the race.

Yurok Tribe Confirms Third Case: The Yurok Office of Emergency Services reported Nov. 20 that it had confirmed a third COVID-19 case on the tribe’s reservation, this one coming on the Del Norte side. The tribe and Del Norte County Public Health are conducting contact investigations. The tribe is urging all residents to remain home and refrain from gatherings. POSTED 11.20.20

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The number of new COVID-19 cases reported on Nov. 23 and confirmed since Nov. 20 by Humboldt County Public Health, breaking the prior single-day reporting record of 29 set on two prior occasions. POSTED 11.23.20

Crab Deferred

northcoastjournal

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife has delayed the start of commercial crab season for the North Coast as the crab didn’t meet weight qualifications for the season to begin. The delay impacts Humboldt, Mendocino and Del Norte counties, and comes after samplings conducted Oct. 27 and Nov. 12 did not meet minimum criteria established by the Tri-State Dungeness Crab Committee. Another round of samples is scheduled for Dec. 1 and if the crab pass quality tests then, the season would begin Dec. 16. POSTED 11.20.20 Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

The Nov. 20 update pushes countywide turnout for the election to 67,985 voters — roughly 80 percent of those registered and 66 percent of those eligible. Sanders indicated she expects to have the last of the outstanding ballots tallied soon.

Arcata Restaurants Close: A handful of Arcata restaurants — including Plaza Grill, Salt Fish House, Campground and Wildflower Café & Bakery — closed temporarily last week after staff members tested positive for or were exposed to COVID-19. Wildflower re-opened Nov. 22 after negative tests cleared its employees, while Plaza Grill announced it was closing indefinitely and wouldn’t be doing its Thanksgiving to-go boxes after a positive test. POSTED 11.22.20

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

They Said It “Research is clear on the effect of shutdown and social isolation on an individual’s mental health. The negative health effects are potentially long-lasting and very consequential for individuals and their families.” ­— The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in a press release, urging people experiencing mental health or substance use challenges to call Substance Use Disorder Services at 476-4054, the Behavioral Health Warm Line at 268-2999 or the 24-hour Behavior Health Crisis Line at 445-7715. POSTED 11.19.20

“We’re a lot closer to finishing,” she said. For full local elections results, visit www.northcoastjournal.com. — Thadeus Greenson POSTED 11.20.20 Read the full story online.

Two Firefighters Test Positive: A pair of Humboldt Bay Firefighters have tested positive for COVID-19, the department announced Nov. 23, adding that both are “recovering well and currently isolated at home.” According to the department, it’s currently under investigation where the firefighters may have become exposed to the virus, and contact tracing is ongoing. HBF also reported it is now certified to do in-house testing of employees. POSTED 11.23.20

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newsletters

Comment of the Week “You can’t judge the efficacy of expert advice when a decent portion of people obstinately ignore it.” ­— Kristen Baum Colby on the Journal’s Facebook page commenting on a post about Humboldt County’s surging COVID-19 case numbers. POSTED 11.21.20

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Flash Fiction Contest

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NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. northcoastjournal.com/whatsgood Have a tip? Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Sara Borok masked and pressing apples on her hand-cranked press. Photo by Jeanette Cooper

Apples and Apples

Sara Borok presses for the people By Jeanette Cooper

onthetable@northcoastjournal.com

M

any of us wait expectantly for Humboldt’s annual abundance of apples with a plan for baking, canning, pressing or distributing them. I have encountered a rather remarkable number of people, however, who would like to do something with the apples growing on their properties but don’t know what. Apples can be used to make so many delicious things to eat. They can also make delicious things to drink, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic. If you don’t want to eat or drink your apples, you may be able to donate them to a food bank, depending on available storage space. Just contact the food pantry closest to you. For a list of pantries and more information, you can contact Food for People at 445-3166, extension 312, or via its website www. foodforpeople.com. One of the great things about having an abundance of apples in Humboldt is, if you want to press them for juice, you do not have to own a bulky and expensive press. Sara Borok of Erie Street Farms, whom I endearingly refer to as “the Apple Lady,” has offered her presses to our community for about 10 years now at Kneeland Glen Farm Stand. For those of you who have not already discovered this delightful little venue, it is located at 5851 Myrtle

Ave. in Eureka, not far from the intersection of Freshwater Road. In years past, she also pressed at Coastal Grove’s Medieval Festival, unfortunately canceled this year due to COVID-19, as was the Fortuna Apple Harvest Festival. This service to the community is even more important now than in the past as Miller Farms in McKinleyville is not pressing this year, nor is Humboldt Beer Works in Eureka. All Borok asks in return is a donation (most people put in $2 to $3 per gallon). There are approximately 7,500 apple varieties worldwide, of which some 2,500 are grown in the U.S. California is one of the top apple-producing states, and Fruits of the Humboldt Bay, edited by Sean Armstrong, notes about 16 varieties that grow well near the bay. Borok, however, says she’s probably pressed 20 or 30 varieties of local apples over the years and suspects there are probably more varieties than that in the county. Borok has been pressing apples at Kneeland Glen twice a week since Labor Day weekend. So far this year, her presses have produced more than 700 gallons of juice. On dry days, Borok sets the presses up outside and on rainy days, she sets them up in the barn. Either way, there is plenty of room for social distancing and masks are required. You might need to


wait your turn but not for too long. I went on Halloween, one of her busiest days, and didn’t feel as though I had to wait long at all. There is a grill set up selling burgers and potato wedges, adding to the festive environment. While you are there, you could go for a stroll on the nature trail, or visit Kneeland Glen’s charming shop. It’s also just great to be in a place that smells so sweet. Borok used the old press and its slightly more modern sibling — both with hand grinders — for the first three years of her community pressing mission. She eventually upgraded to a newer and more efficient model with an electric grinder. It works like a charm, chopping up those apples in no time and with virtually no human effort. Asked why she goes through all the fuss and work, Borok said simply, “I hate seeing food go to waste.” At a time when Humboldt’s food insecurity is high, it is especially important to utilize the resources growing around us. Humans can’t live on apples alone, but there are a whole lot of things that they can be used for: applesauce, apple pancakes, apple cakes, apple jelly, apple butter, apple chutney, apple pies, apple cobbler, apple kombucha, hard apple cider, apple wine and, of course, apple juice. Apple juice can be drunk straight, watered down, splashed in some mineral water or used as a sweetener for drinks like iced tea. It can be preserved for years frozen or canned. So pick those apples off the tree and pick them up from the ground. You can cut out any rotten bits, press the remainder and enjoy the sweet golden nectar. If you’re not blessed with apples but instead have an abundance of quince, carrots, pears or even pumpkins, Borok is willing to press those, too. Borok will continue to offer her presses and assistance at Kneeland Glen Farm Stand every Thursday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., rain or shine, for as long as people keep coming to press their apples. She will not be pressing on Thanksgiving Day, but will be available on Wednesday, Nov. 25, instead. Last year, she said she was open until the end of December. Bring your apples and don’t forget to bring some containers to put the juice in, as well. (I use cleaned milk cartons.) Borok advises bringing more containers than you think you will need — people are often surprised how much juice their apples produce. ● Jeanette Cooper (she/her) is a freelance writer and educator.

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TROPHY CASE

The Brothers Iorg Blue Lake’s baseball stars By Rod Kausen

trophycase@northcoastjournal.com

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he most famous swing of a baseball bat by anyone Humboldt grown was at a pitch slung by Todd Worrell of the St. Louis Cardinals in the ninth inning of the sixth game of the 1985 World Series against the Kansas City Royals. With the bases loaded and a 1-0 lead, the perfect pitch would produce a double play and a World Championship for the Cardinals. Worrell had become the ace of a St. Louis bullpen that had not lost a game in the ninth inning all season. The pinch hitter for the Royals, Dane Iorg, had starred in the World Series as the designated hitter three years earlier for the same Cardinals he was facing that day. He had nine hits in 17 at-bats in that series and already owned a World Series ring. Ironically, he was playing against his former manager, Whitey Herzog, who was instrumental in his development, especially as a pinch hitter. It was not the hardest ball he ever hit but it was the most important. After a ball in the dirt and the bases loaded, he knew he was sitting on a fastball in a moment he had dreamed of since his childhood in his backyard, a house he lived in with his parents, his older sister and two younger brothers just off Railroad Avenue on a little knoll in “downtown” Blue Lake. He told himself to relax and enjoy the dream. All eyes in the packed Logger Bar in Blue Lake were suddenly glued to the TV. “Dane is in the on-deck circle, Dane is going to pinch hit.” Mike Gillespie, a great East Coast sports

writer wrote after the game: “People may not always remember who hit it, but Dane Iorg’s two-run, pinch-hit single in the sixth game of the World Series put the KC Royals in a position to win their first fall classic title.” Old-timers in Blue Lake remember his name and how his walk-off, two-run single led to pandemonium. The Royals came back out the next night and walloped the Cardinals to win their first World Series. Iorg had had his worst season due to injury and had only batted 27 times that season. In his career, Iorg had twice batted over .300, led the Cardinals in batting average in 1981, batting .327, and was a versatile defensive player. But it is those two World Series rings locked in his safe he’s remembered for most. The citizens in Blue Lake who worked the Simpson and Levittown mills, shipping lumber and nails to East Coast towns, remember other things about the Iorg brothers. For one, Dane’s youngest brother Garth played against him on the Toronto Blue Jays in the American League playoffs to get to that same World Series in 1985. Garth was four years younger than Dane with another brother, another local sports legend, Lee Iorg, sandwiched between the two. From 1978-1987, Garth played every position for the Blue Jays but pitcher and catcher — he could play either, all the boys had learned how to pitch, catch and hit in their backyard, one boy for each position. He played mostly in a platoon at third base and retired from the Blue Jays

Dane Iorg as a St. Louis Cardinal. Wikimedia Commons

as their career-leading pinch hitter. He had led the team in hitting in that 1985 season and stayed with the organization for years as a coach at every level of the big leagues.

All three boys were multi-sport stars and played on what are arguably the best baseball teams in the history of Humboldt County. Seven players Garth played with in high school were drafted into the major leagues. His batting stance was quite odd — standing on his toes and leaning back toward the catcher. Unlike Dane, he was drafted soon out of high school straight to the big-league system.

Between the two was Lee Iorg, another star multi-sport athlete at Arcata High School. Don Terbush, the longtime Times-Standard sports editor, said Lee “was possibly the better of the three athletes.” Garth wouldn’t go that far but said, “Lee might have been the better of us as a football player.” Lee, on the other hand, once said, “Garth is the best player to come out of our area.” Lee, like Dane, had gone to Brigham Young on an athletic scholarship to play baseball and, again like Dane, was voted

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FISHING THE NORTH COAST

into the Brigham Young Hall of Fame. He played in the New York Mets organization in Triple-A ball but took different routes. One year at Brigham Young, he played summer ball in the National Semi-Pro League for Alaska and was awarded the Most Valuable Player in the National Baseball Congress Tournament. Baseball has stayed in their family, as Garth has three sons that played professionally and a daughter who played NCAA softball. But it all started with their dad, Charles, who taught them to hit rocks with a broom handle, play Wiffle ball in their backyard and didn’t blink an eye as the three boys broke at least a dozen windows in the house. Amid the smell of

the logs on the logging trucks constantly downshifting and squealing through town, their dad always had patience with the rambunctious boys, coaching their Little League teams after working the dayshift at the Simpson Korbel Mill. When their dad retired from coaching after Lee’s 12-year-old season and Garth’s 10-year-old season, John Tomini, one of the baseball gurus in the Northern Humboldt area, took over. They had time to practice, as the boys’ mom, Leona, who worked at the only grocery store in the town of 1,200, wouldn’t let the kids inside until dinner was ready. Their dad was their greatest sports influence but the Iorg brothers had great coaches in the Arcata area and lots of quality athletes to play with. Credit goes to their teammates but even more to their high school coach Dennis Pontoni and American Legion coach Dave Del Grande for the time, energy and a great traveling schedule.

In the 1960s, this trio of brothers growing up in Blue Lake became a source of town pride. Their dad always told them to say they were from Blue Lake, not Eureka or Arcata. With mitts hanging off their handlebars, they rode their bikes down to what would later be named Iorg Field. Who’d a thunk it? They swam and fished the Mad River and now, spread across the country, they remain best friends and avid fishermen, fishing together as much they can. When I asked Garth Iorg what it was like to grow up in Blue Lake, he thought for a second and said, “It was awesome.” I got to grow up in one those towns in those times with the influences of the barber, the police chief, my coaches, my parents, my friends’ parents — well, the whole town. I wish every girl and boy of every color and economic background could have a childhood like we had. We were so lucky. l Rod Kausen (he/him) is a retired teacher and coach.

Kings Tough to Come by on Smith, Chetco By Kenny Priest

341 West Harris St., Eureka 707 445-3138

poletskis.com

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

A

fter being open for just over a week, salmon fishing on both the Smith and Chetco has proven to be challenging. By the sound of things, the end is likely near for the run of late-fall kings on the coast. Only a couple small storms hit the coast and dropped enough rain to open the two rivers to fishing. While the fishing window was very small, that doesn’t necessarily mean the number of returning salmon was small. Even during the low water conditions, salmon were seen making their way upriver on all of our coastal streams. Typically, the season’s first big rains come in October, leaving us a good four-to-five-week window to fish. That hasn’t been the case the last few years as the salmon didn’t bother to wait for us or the strong flows to get them to their end destinations. On the other hand, as we inch closer to December, it’s time to start thinking about winter steelhead. There are some half-pounders around, and the adults typically start showing up in December. But don’t give up entirely on salmon just yet. The Smith, Chetco and even the Eel could each see another spurt or two of fresh kings move in on the next substantial river rise.

Sport crab fishing update

Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sportfishing reports the crabbing is a little on the slow side out of Eureka. “We’re still getting limits but it’s getting a little tougher,” said Klassen. “We’ve only had one trip where we didn’t get full limits. On an overnight soak, we’re averaging between four to six keepers per pot. Longer soaks are definitely producing better results. There are a lot of small crabs that are chewing up the bait pretty quickly. Fresh bait, like tuna scraps or rockfish carcasses, will improve the number of keepers as well. The crabs are in great shape, but we aren’t seeing very many jumbos.” Big swells are in the forecast Tuesday night through Thursday morning. Seas could reach up to 20 feet on Wednesday.

Nov. 27 and 28 free fish days in Oregon ODFW is waiving all fishing licensing requirements on the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving to encourage people to experience fishing during the long holiday weekend. All fishing, crabbing and clamming in Oregon will be free for both Oregon residents and non-residents. No licenses, tags or endorsements are needed on those days, but all other fishing regulations apply. Visit www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2020/11_ Nov/112020b.asp for more info.

The Rivers: Smith

Since it opened to fishing Nov. 14, salmon fishing has steadily gotten tougher. There are some fish around but most of the boats are having a hard time getting one per trip. Flows were down to 1,200 cubic feet per second on Monday and the river is low and clear. Roe under a float or back-bouncing the deeper holes are your best bets until we get some significant rainfall.

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Chetco/Elk/Sixes

The Chetco opened to salmon fishing last Tuesday but quickly blew out, reports Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. He said, “After cresting at 12,000 cfs, flows dropped below 5,000 cfs on Friday and were down to 2,200 cfs on Sunday. Overall, fishing has been slow but a few nice kings are being caught. The best action is on the lower end. The Elk is now low and clear, while the Sixes is low but fishable. The Sixes has been fishing the best of the Southern Oregon rivers.” l Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@ fishingthenorthcoast.com.

“LARGEST BRAND SELECTION IN THE COUNTY”

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26,26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23 3


Calendar Nov. 26 – Dec. 3, 2020

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. King Maxwell Quarantine Funk #9. 9-11 p.m. Virtual World, online. King Maxwell spins funk, soul, electro, disco, roller skating jams and boogie, and adds vocoder flavor. Free. arcatasoulpartycrew@gmail. com. www.youtube.com/watch?v=pssTRy5HLAk. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www.facebook.com/groups/224856781967115.

EVENTS

Shutterstock

Discover what artistic and toothsome things your community artists/makers/producers have concocted during lockdown. The Bayside Community Holiday Market, starting Friday, Nov. 27 and running through Saturday, Dec. 19 at Bayside Community Hall, is a holiday craft and makers fair perfect for finding that unique, Humboldt gift for your loved ones. The market will be open Wednesdays-Saturdays, noon to 7 p.m. and Sundays noon to 4 p.m. Masks and social distancing required.

Shutterstock

Hospice of Humboldt’s annual ceremony to celebrate loved ones, the Light Up a Life Remembrance Ceremony, will be televised this year on Access Humboldt’s Channel 11 on Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 5 p.m. (and also available for viewing through Hospice of Humboldt’s website, Facebook and YouTube pages). The ceremony will include reflections from hospice speakers as well as music from Elizabeth Smith, Mary Isis, the Threshold Choir and Chaplain Taylor Hagbo. Submit names of loved ones to be displayed during the candle lighting and blessing.

Shutterstock

Just like the National Christmas tree and the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, the ones trees at St. Joseph and Redwood Memorial hospitals will be lit for a virtual audienc this year. Pop on to the St. Joseph Health, Humboldt County Facebook page on Monday, Nov. 30 at 5 p.m. to see Redwood Memorial Hospital’s Virtual Live Christmas Tree Lighting. Tune in again on Dec. 1 at 5 p.m. for St. Joseph Hospital’s tree-lighting event. You can also drive by both locations at their respective tree-lighting times and watch from your car, wave to Santa and get a candy cane.

The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, online. An evening of strange tales, live chats and parlor games hosted by Altar Ego: Curious Art & Fashion Design. www.facebook.com/events/939880849742122.

FOR KIDS Feathered Friends. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. School-age Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Bayside Community Holiday Market. Noon-7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Holiday craft and makers fair Wednesdays through Sundays until Dec. 19. Social distancing and masks required. www.baysidecommunityhall.org.

OUTDOORS

26 Thursday ART

ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. Original and limited edition local art auction open for online viewing and bidding until Jan. 31, 2021. Hosted by Carl Johnson Co. auctioneers. www. eurekachamber.com/art-biz. 442-3738.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Learn Brazilian dances with instructors Rocío Cristal and María Vanderhorst. All levels. Limited to five people. Register online. $15. talavera.rocio@gmail.com.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, online. Tune in for a heartwarming versions of classics in many genres and original tunes. Via Facebook and Instagram @ creative.sanctuary. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. www.facebook.com/ thesanctuaryarcata. (646) 245-6865. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. A Facebook group to join if you like fun group singing. Song of the day posted at 3 p.m., sing starts at 7 p.m. Free. www.facebook.com/ groups/quarantinesingalong.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Vir-

24

tual World, online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom.us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www.facebook. com/NorthCoastRedwoods.

EVENTS

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www.englishexpressempowered.com. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. Free. annconstantino@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

Trinidad Blessing of the Fleet. 10 a.m. Virtual World, online. A Facebook Live stream of the annual event. Axel Lindgren III and his family give a traditional Native blessing followed by a nondenominational blessing from officiant Dana Hope.

FOR KIDS Feathered Friends. Virtual World, online. The Humboldt State University Natural History Museum’s weekly after-school science program geared toward 9 to 12 year olds. $25 per week. natmus@humboldt. edu. www.humboldt.edu/natmus. Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, online. Hosted by the Fortuna Branch Library on its Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryFortuna. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger Badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. California State

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

ETC

27 Friday ART

ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

LECTURE Ask the Curator. 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, online. Clarke Museum Curator Katie Buesch and guest hosts showcase weekly topics with a trivia contest the last Friday of every month. Free. Dana.f@ clarkemuseum.org. www.facebook.com/ClarkeHistoricalMuseum/. 443-1947.

Critical Mass. Last Friday of every month, 6-7 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Community bike ride through town 6 feet apart with masks. Free. www.instagram.com/criticalmass_arcata/. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email inviation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www. forms.gle/CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com.

28 Saturday ART

Art Reception. 4-7 p.m. Shelter Cove Art Gallery, 205 Wave Drive. Featured artists. www.sheltercoveartsrecreation.com. ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

BOOKS Reading in Place–An Online Reading Group. 1


OPEN FOR DELIVERY, TO-GO & CURBSIDE PICK UP p.m. Virtual World, online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms.gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

MUSIC EmRArt with James Zeller. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, online. Cross-platform entertainment from remote locations. James Zeller plays jazz from Arcata, and Emily Reinhart lays charcoal on birch wood in Eureka. Watch via Facebook (www.facebook.com/ EmRArt) or by YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart. com. www.youtube.com/channel/UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

EVENTS Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www.facebook.com/clubtriangl.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Winter Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday, rain or shine, Humboldt County farmers gather on the plaza to share their bounty. Current COVID safety guidelines online. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Bayside Community Holiday Market. Noon-7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See Nov. 27 listing. Small Business Saturday. Noon. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Shop local and enjoy special surprises for those who visit the Arcata Plaza throughout the day. Learn about the PASSPORT program, where you can win a shopping spree giveaway. www. arcatamainstreet.com.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Redwood Region Audubon Society Field Trip. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Participants limited. Reservations required. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet leader Amaya Bechler in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata. Rain or shine. Free. shirkethree@ gmail.com. www.rras.org/home.aspx. Wigi Wetlands Volunteer Workday. 9-11 a.m. Wigi Wetlands, Behind the Bayshore Mall, Eureka. Help remove invasive plants and trash along the Eureka Waterfront Trail behind Wal-Mart. Tools, snacks and hand sanitizer provided. Bring your own gloves, drinking water and face mask. Six feet social distancing at all times. Limited to 10 people. Contact Jeremy. jeremy.cashen@yahoo.com. www. rras.org/home.aspx. (214) 605-7368.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

Buy any Medium or Larger Pizza at reg price get a FREE small Jo-Jo. Limit 1 per visit.

29 Sunday ART

Arcata Sunday Art Market. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Farmers Market (off the plaza), Eighth and I streets. Open-air market showcasing the work of local artists and crafters. Self-screen for symptoms, wear masks, keep safe distance. ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

MUSIC Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Bayside Community Holiday Market. Noon-4 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See Nov. 27 listing.

MEETINGS Readings in the Redwoods. Noon-2 p.m. Carlotta, Humboldt County. Readings of Paul Selig’s I am the Word. Email or text for directions to the outdoor firepit at the Redwood River Lodge in Carlotta and observe social distancing. Free. btngineer2011@ gmail.com. www.paulselig.com. 298-3466.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

Can’t be combined with any other offer.

GOOD THRU 11-30-20

Angelo’s Pizza Parlor

215 W. 7th St. Eureka 444-9644 OPEN FOR DELIVERY, TO-GO & CURBSIDE PICK UP

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email us your tip and we’ll check it out!

Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

30 Monday ART

ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Redwood Memorial Hospital Virtual Live Christmas Tree Lighting. 5 p.m. Virtual World, online. Visit the St. Joseph Health, Humboldt County Facebook page at 5 p.m. for this live event or drive by Redwood Memorial Hospital’s main entrance to enjoy the lights, wave to Santa and get a candy cane. Free.

OUTDOORS

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Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

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Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 27 listing.

1 Tuesday ART

ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

COMEDY Savage Henry’s BigFish Open Mic via Zoom. 9 p.m. Virtual World, online. Enjoy or participate in some stand-up open-mic Zoom style. Five-minute sets. Zoom: www.us02web.zoom.us/j/86421967992 Password: comedy.

MUSIC Daniel Nickerson Hosts The J Street Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, online. Artists give a one-hour program to connect, send healing music, educate on American music history, celebrate artists of color and more. Free, donations encouraged. music@sanctuaryarcata.org. www. facebook.com/thesanctuaryarcata. James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

FOR KIDS Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata

Library’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ HumCoLibraryArcata.

HOLIDAY EVENTS St. Joseph Hospital Virtual Live Christmas Tree Lighting. 5 p.m. Virtual World, online. Visit the St. Joseph Health, Humboldt County Facebook page or drive by the hospital’s main entrance to enjoy the lights, wave to Santa and get a candy cane. Free.

MEETINGS Local Homesharing Info Session. 1-1:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. If you have a spare bedroom and could use extra income or help around the house, Northcoast Homeshare (a program of Area 1 Agency on Aging) can connect you with a compatible housemate. Join the weekly 30-minute Zoom informational session. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. zoom.us/j/2673010045?pwd=eTJvajJXaWR4eEMwOUErQlpGZHBJZz09. 442-3763, ext. 213.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 27 listing. Light Up a Life Remembrance Ceremony. 5 p.m. Virtual World, online. Hospice of Humboldt’s annual ceremony to celebrate loved ones airs on Access Humboldt’s Channel 11 and Hospice of Humboldt’s website, Facebook page and YouTube. Music by Elizabeth Smith, Mary Isis, the Threshold Choir and Hospice Chaplain Taylor Hagbo. Submitted names of loved ones will be displayed for the candle lighting and blessing. www.hospiceofhumboldt. org. 445-8443.

2 Wednesday ART

ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

COMEDY Drive-In Comedy w/Eric Fitzgerald. 9 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Pull in behind the club, tune into 107.9 FM. No public restroom. Mask required outside vehicle. Venmo donations @Savage-Henry. www.savagehenrymagazine.com.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 28 listing.

LECTURE

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Meet the Expert. 5 p.m. Virtual World, online. Humboldt-Del Norte Film Commissioner Cassandra Hesseltine interviews film industry professionals and discusses local filming. New videos posted to the commission’s YouTube channel and social media. www.youtube.com/channel/UCsbPoRUx8OJlzuLCUNlBxiw.

Bayside Community Holiday Market. Noon-7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See Nov. 27 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

ETC

MUSIC

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Reel Genius Virtual Trivia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. Create a team via Facetime, Skype, Messenger, Hangouts etc., order some food and brews from the Madrone and play while dining

James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

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outdoors, or enjoying takeout at home. Invite link will be posted prior to the event. www.facebook. com/events/657139721581557. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 27 listing. Weekly Check-in with Rep. Huffman. Noon. Virtual World, online. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) will hold Facebook Live check-ins to engage with his constituents on the latest updates regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic and to answer questions about the federal response. More information at www.huffman.house.gov/coronavirus. Free. www. facebook.com/rephuffman.

3 Thursday ART

ArtBiz Virtual Online Auction. 2021. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Nov. 26 listing.

MOVIES HIFF 54 Self-Care & Wellness Film Night. 6 p.m. Virtual World, online. Join Humboldt International Film Festival for a virtual screening of feel good films and a wellness check in. A Q&A and panel discussion follow. RSVP to www.forms.gle/

RCVCWNEJ482wR2teA. www.hsufilmfestival.com.

MUSIC James Zeller Hosts the J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Bayside Community Holiday Market. Noon-7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See Nov. 27 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, online. See Nov. 26 listing.

Heads Up This Week Soroptimist International of Humboldt Bay offers six monetary awards and scholarships for women and girls. Call 845-2057, email missmiddle@suddenlink.net or visit www.facebook.com/soropintlhumbay or www.soroptimistofhumboldtbay.org. The Humboldt Arts Council is distributing CARES Act relief-funded grants to aid local arts organizations serving socially vulnerable populations not eligible for direct CARES Act grants. Details and application at www.humboldtarts.org/ cares-act-grant-application. The Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt is seeking additional applicants for the 2020/2021 Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury. Visit www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov or call 269-1245. Interested parties may also complete, download and email an application to: GrandJuryApps@ humboldtcourt.ca.gov. The Arcata Police Department is looking for Volunteer Patrol members. Contact Administrative Sgt. Brian Hoffman at 822-2428. Humboldt Senior Resource Center offers lowcost firewood vouchers to households with low to moderate income seniors 55 or older. Call 4439747, ext. 3232. The city of Arcata seeks applicants for the Historic Landmarks Committee. Submit applications at the City Manager’s Office at Arcata City Hall. Visit www. cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. ●

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MANGROVE. In yet another telling instance regarding the state of contemporary cinema, one more of its preeminent voices, Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, 2013) has transitioned to the small screen. Collaborating with the BBC and Amazon, he has created a five-part anthology series (really five movies varying in length from 60 to 120 minutes) to be released weekly until mid-December. The project, Small Axe, draws its title from a Jamaican proverb and tells stories drawn from real life about London’s West Indian immigrant community between the late 1960s and early 1980s. The first installment, Mangrove, is a feature-length episode and introduces us to the vibrant Notting Hill neighborhood, circa 1969. Frank Crichlow (Shaun Parkes) prepares for the grand opening of the titular restaurant, serving Caribbean food and serving as a gathering place for the mostly recent émigrés of the area. Frank, we learn tangentially, had previously operated an establishment called the Rio, which came to the attention of the constabulary as a gambling den where drugs may or may not have been available. And so, based on that history but mainly on virulent systemic racism, the police come down hard on Frank and his restaurant. Led by the repellent P.C. Pulley (Sam Spruell), they conduct a number of baseless raids and arrests, waging a campaign of terror and oppression with no clear recourse for the victims. The constant harassment scares away the restaurant’s customers, leaving Frank disempowered and enraged. Enter Altheia Jones (Letitia Wright), a representative of the Black Panthers dispatched to Notting Hill to advise laborers of their rights, and Darcus Howe (Malachi Kirby), a charismatic Trinidadian who refuses to submit to the legacy of

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

The Black Panther/Black Panther crossover you’ve been waiting for. Mangrove

discrimination inherent in British culture. They begin to give voice to the frustrations and rage of their community, eventually organizing a protest and march to the steps of the police station. The demonstration boils over into off-screen violence and the police seize the opportunity to respond with force. A number of the protestors are arrested and nine, Crichlow, Jones and Howe among them, are charged with inciting a riot. Further, they are to be tried in the Old Bailey, London’s central criminal court, usually reserved for the trials of murder, treason and the like. The trial of the Mangrove Nine, which takes place over the course of several months, finds the defendants fighting not only for their freedom, but also to illuminate the intrinsic, cultivated racial and economic prejudices of the British police and the entire legal system. Here in the U.S. in 2020, there have been a great number of conversations about 1968 as a sort of spiritual predecessor. It was a year when the anguished energy of youth, Civil Rights and anti-war movements came to head. There were riots and assassinations, and the conflict in Vietnam took a turn for the intractable. The frustrations of a generation were made manifest and then, arguably, crushed and transmuted by a bigoted, corporatized infrastructure. Interestingly, we rarely discuss the same period in U.K. history, or really the experience of being Black and British, at all. Which is an unsurprising but dispiriting oversight,

another example of the isolationism and exceptionalism that have lately become so visibly problematic in this country. Of course we would have little to no understanding of the parallel struggles of the county from which ours was improbably and troublingly birthed. We’ve been too busy actively ignoring our own culture of inequality and unfairness. Anyway, credit is due to McQueen for bringing his tremendous narrative focus and artistic acumen to bear on a sprawling, prickly project like this one. It remains to be seen, of course, what shape the rest of the series will take. But Mangrove, while evoking a London of half a century ago, feels exceedingly current. And while it could be seen as an example of how far we have failed to come as a greater society, it is also propulsive and powerful and insistent, reminding us that change does come, even if it doesn’t assume the seismic, tidal proportions we may desire. Mangrove doesn’t feel quite as precise or as finely finished as some of McQueen’s other work, but it exemplifies both his sumptuous, patient visual style and his insistence on thoroughly exploring subjects and stories of historical and human significance. This feels like material he is singularly equipped to render as narrative art and I’m excited and a little unnerved to see what’s next. 124M. AMAZON. ● John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.


WORKSHOPS & CLASSES List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−1231) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (D−1231)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1231)

50 and Better OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1231)

CARTOONS

NO ONE’S SLAVE WITH MOLLY CATE. Explore the little known history of family groups and individ− uals who escaped bondage and constructed hidden, free communities during the slavery era in the Southeastern U.S. Wed., Dec. 2 & 9 from 10 a.m.−noon OLLI Members $20. Sign up today! 826− 5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1126)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1231) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1231)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1231)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1231) SMARTRECOVERY.ORG 707−267−7868 (T−1029)

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES − ARE YOU LOOKING FOR AN ONLINE CLASS? College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format Visit: https://w ww.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/ 17724/ArticleID/4916/Additional−Online−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−1126) INJECTIONS JAN 24, 2021 Visit: https://www.redw oods.edu/communityed/Register−for−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 1126) IV THERAPY JAN 4 − 6 OR JAN 11−13, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Regist er−for−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−1126) MEDICAL ASSISTANT PROGRAM ONLINE INFO MEETINGS DEC 9, 2020 OR JAN 6, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail /ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/3706/Medical−Assistant −Program or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−1126) MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING SPECIALIST ONLINE INFO MEETINGS JAN 23 OR 28 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail /ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5110/Medical−Billing−and −Coding−Specialist or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−1126) PHARMACY TECHNICIAN ONLINE INFO MEET− INGS FEB 6 OR 18, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwo ods.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/Arti cleID/3704/Pharmacy−Technician or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−1126)

REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start Anytime! Visit: https:// www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Real−Estate or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 1126) VENIPUNCTURE JAN 31, 2021 Visit: https://www.r edwoods.edu/communityed/Register−for−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−1126)

Wellness & Bodywork 2021 AYURVEDA COURSES WITH TRACI WEBB & GUESTS. Online @ Ayurvedic Living School * Ayurveda Foundations & Nutrition: Starts Jan 13. (Part 1 of Ayurveda Health & Life Coach Training) * Ayurveda Herbalist Training: Starts Feb. 2 * "Ayurvedic Mentorship" Starts March 4 Learn ancient ayurvedic wisdom + modern psych− ology & life skills. Evolve Your Health, Relation− ships & Life. Launch a career aligned w/your purpose and passion! Ayurveda is the Nurturing Mother of All Medicines. Empowering the Femi− nine to Rise for 5000 Years! Details on website: www.ayurvedicliving.com Email: info@ayurvedicliving.com (W−0121) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. January 20 − March 10, 2021, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Call or email for more info. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2021. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0121)

YOUR CLASS HERE

442-1400 × 314

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. northcoastjournal.com/whatsgood Have a tip? Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

29


NORTH COAST NIGHT LIGHTS

LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ROSE MARY SCOTT CASE NO. PR2000276

A starry night above budding cannabis plants at Schackow Farms. A close focus on the plants allowed the stars of the Milky Way to blur into prismatic shapes. Nestled among the buds to the left, Saturn (above) and Jupiter, the two brightest white points, sink into the west. In the sky at right, a portion of the Milky Way floats above the horizon. Photographed at Schackow Farms, Humboldt County, California. October of 2020. Photo by David Wilson

’Tis the Harvest Season By David Wilson

ncnightlights@northcoastjournal.com

T

he girls are all grown up, beautiful young blossoms in their prime. They’ve overcome tremendous obstacles in their young lives and now they are ready to spread their wings and change the world. Where did the time go? Harvest season has arrived in the Emerald Triangle. From seedlings, you nursed and protected them. You watched as their genders showed. You sent the boys off to boarding school, hopefully before any mischief occurred — boys and girls are trouble when mixed together. Unexpected seeds will completely derail your plans. You fed and nurtured them as they grew, guiding them through each new challenge. Like a mountain lion protecting her young, you held predators at bay. You trapped mice and rats, and your heart hurt when you lost girls to them anyway. You fenced out the deer, hoping it would also keep the wild pigs from rooting up your babies. Sometimes it didn’t work. You protected their tender roots from the subterranean threats of gophers and moles with sonic deterrent spikes, finding that they aren’t 100-percent effective. You supported them with netting or with ties when their branches became long and the winds picked up. When the rains came,

your redoubled efforts kept most of the sopping bud-laden branches from breaking. You sprayed the girls with expensive organic compounds to keep the mildew off … but watched as the devastating mold spotted here and there anyway. Through it all, you stayed awake at night worrying about navigating the complicated bureaucratic details of the legal cannabis industry, and about whether you would lose the farm to it if you weren’t perfect. You worried about people coming to rip you off. And would there be enough water in these years of drought? Would you have to order water trucked in just to get by? What about the crazy wildfire season roulette wheel — would a disaster land on you? Will insurance even cover the farm from wildfire next year? There’s more work for you as you prepare to send your girls out into the world, maybe into the medical profession or perhaps recreation, but you find yourself already looking to the challenges of next year. l To keep abreast of David Wilson’s (he/ him) latest photography or purchase a print, visit www.mindscapefx.com or follow him on Instagram at @ david_wilson_mfx and on Twitter @ davidwilson_mfx.

NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL • Thursday, • Thursday, Nov. Nov. 26,26, 2020 2020 • northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 30NORTH 2

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of ROSE MARY SCOTT, ROSE M. SCOTT, and ROSE SCOTT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner RICKY J. DAMASSA In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that RICKY J. DAMASSA be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on December 17, 2020 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6, Room: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Daniel E. Cooper Morrison, Morrison & Cooper

interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Daniel E. Cooper Morrison, Morrison & Cooper 611 I Street, Suite A Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−8011 Filed: November 12, 2020 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 11/19, 11/26, 12/3 (20−276)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN: 217-034-004 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED MARCH 27, 2009. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: Duane Primofiore, an unmarried man DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Harland Law Firm LLP DEED OF TRUST RECORDED: April 7, 2009 INSTRUMENT NUMBER: 2009−7188− 6 of the Official Records of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California DATE OF SALE: December 15th, 2020 at 11:00 A.M. PLACE OF SALE: Front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, CA 95501 THE COMMON DESIGNATION OF THE PROPERTY IS PURPORTED TO BE: 37788 Alderpoint Rd., Blocks− burg, CA 95514. Directions to the property may be obtained by pursuant to a written request submitted to Harland Law Firm LLP, 212 G Street, Suite 201, Eureka, CA 95501, within 10 days from the first publication of this notice.

publication of this notice. See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof for the Legal Description. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges as of November 5, 2020: $518,332.41. Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount. The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated above, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at (707) 444−9281. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement infor− mation is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: This 5th day of November, 2020 in the city of Eureka, and the county of Humboldt, California. Harland Law Firm LLP

See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof for the Legal Description. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges as of November 5, 2020: $518,332.41. Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount.

John S. Lopez, Attorney, and Trustee for Beneficiary The Mel and Grace McLean Founda− tion, a California Non−Profit Public Benefit Corporation Exhibit "A" Legal Description


Harland Law Firm LLP John S. Lopez, Attorney, and Trustee for Beneficiary The Mel and Grace McLean Founda− tion, a California Non−Profit Public Benefit Corporation Exhibit "A" Legal Description THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE UNIN− CORPORATED AREA IN COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT, STATE OF CALIFORNIA AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL ONE Those portions of Sections 16 and 21 of Township 1 South, Range 4 East, described as follows: BEGINNING at a point which bears North 80 degrees 59 minutes 08 seconds West, 1196.68 feet from the section corner to 15, 16, 21, and 22; thence North 50 degrees 57 minutes 49 seconds East, 213.81 feet; thence North 31 degrees 26 minutes 54 seconds East, 255.83 feet; thence North 00 degrees 11 minutes 36 seconds East, 388.47 feet; thence North 29 degrees 41 minutes 13 seconds West, 240.16 feet; thence North 10 degrees 05 minutes 04 seconds East, 231.52 feet; thence North 30 degrees 32 minutes 16 seconds West, 151.00 feet; thence North 30 degrees 32 minutes 16 seconds West, 59.62 feet; thence North 44 degrees 47 minutes 32 seconds West, 59.62 feet; thence North 28 degrees 58 minutes 05 seconds West, 143.14 feet; thence North 13 degrees 57 minutes 17 seconds West, 264.40 feet; thence North 66 degrees 33 minutes 11 seconds West, 450.31 feet; thence South 43 degrees 06 minutes 45 seconds West, 317.31 feet; thence South 20 degrees 52 minutes 30 seconds West, 323.88 feet; thence South 39 degrees 33 minutes 56 seconds West, 597.12 feet; thence North 36 degrees 52 minutes 51 seconds West, 93.84 feet; thence South 70 degrees 15 minutes 23 seconds West, 159.48 feet; thence South 38 degrees 35 minutes 55 seconds West, 75.57 feet; thence South 10 degrees 56 minutes 50 seconds East, 120.35 feet; thence South 43 degrees 05 minutes 10 seconds West, 152.87 feet; thence South 28 degrees 45 minutes 19 seconds West, 466.37 feet; thence South 10 degrees 43 minutes 14 seconds East, 202.28 feet; thence South 46 degrees 10 minutes 02 seconds East, 75.86 feet; thence South 2 degrees 30 minutes 07 seconds West, 272.94 feet to Station "L" 12+24.59 E.C. as shown on that certain Record of Survey for the County of Humboldt, recorded at Book 48 of Surveys, Page 89. Said Station is the center line of Alderpoint Road #6B 165; thence in an Easterly and South− easterly direction along the center

thence South 2 degrees 30 minutes 07 seconds West, 272.94 feet to Station "L" 12+24.59 E.C. as shown on that certain Record of Survey for the County of Humboldt, recorded at Book 48 of Surveys, Page 89. Said Station is the center line of Alderpoint Road #6B 165; thence in an Easterly and South− easterly direction along the center line of said road, as shown on said Record of Survey, to the center of Martin Creek; thence Easterly along the center of Martin Creek to the West line of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 21 of said Township and Range; thence Northerly along said West line to the Northwest corner of the said Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; thence Northerly to the point of begin− ning. PARCEL TWO All that portion of Sections 16, 17, and 20, Township 1 South, Range 4 East, Humboldt Meridian, described as follows: A non−exclusive ease− ment for recreational ingress and egress for access to a swimming hole, described as follows: (1) A non−exclusive easement for ingress and egress, both pedestrian and vehicular, over and across a strip of land described as follows: BEGINNING at "Gate 3", being the intersection of Alderpoint Road and "Road 300". Said point being Easterly, approxi− mately 100 feet from the North− west corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of said Section 16; and run thence along said "Road 300", Westerly, Southerly and Southeast− erly, within the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 17, and within the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 20 to the riverbar on the North− easterly side of Larabee Creek. (2) A non−exclusive easement for pedestrian ingress and egress over and across a strip of land described as follows: BEGINNING at said point where said "Road 300" crosses the riverbar on the Northeasterly side of Larabee Creek; thence Westerly across said riverbar (being along the Northeasterly side of Larabee Creek) approximately 75 feet to the swimming hole (a pool in Larabee Creek). Said swimming hole being in the Northeast Quarter of the North− east Quarter of Section 20, near the corner to Sections 16, 17, 20, and 21 in said Township and Range. (3) The right to use the "swimming hole" on said Larabee Creek located approximately 75 feet down− stream from where the "300 Road" crosses Larabee Creek. Said Parcel Two being the same easement as conveyed to John Selvage, Eugene Lucas, Co−Trustees of the Melvin F. McLean Survivors Trust, by Sierra Pacific Holding Company, a California Corporation, by Easement Deed recorded February 1, 2007 as Instrument No. 2007−3525−8, Humboldt County Records.

stream from where the "300 Road" crosses Larabee Creek. Said Parcel Two being the same easement as conveyed to John Selvage, Eugene Lucas, Co−Trustees of the Melvin F. McLean Survivors Trust, by Sierra Pacific Holding Company, a California Corporation, by Easement Deed recorded February 1, 2007 as Instrument No. 2007−3525−8, Humboldt County Records. 11/12, 11/19, 11/26 (20−282)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On September 17th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11366.5 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Chester Court in Arcata, California. The seized property is described as: $5,260.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−43 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. If your claim is not timely filed, the Humboldt County District Attorney will declare the property described in this notice to be forfeited to the State and it will be disposed of as provided in Health and Safety Code Section 11489. 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−308)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On June 22nd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture from Kelsey Lane in Myers Flat, California, in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359(B) of the Health and Safety Code of California. The seized property is described as: $111,188.00 in U.S. Currency. Control Number 20−F−29 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−292)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On April 30th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11366 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Maple Lane in Arcata, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $51,145.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F− 32 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. If your claim is not timely filed, the Humboldt County District Attorney will declare the property described in this notice to be forfeited to the State and it will be disposed of as provided in Health and Safety Code Section 11489. 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−293)

Continued on next page »

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On August 18th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11352 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Montgomery Street in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $7,081.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−38 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On August 6th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11366 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Dolbeer Street and Harris Street in Eureka, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $7,834.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−37 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On August 5th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11377 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 270 5th Street in Eureka, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $17,393.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F− 36 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

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PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On July 14th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Northbound Highway 101, in Phillipsville, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $2,613.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−30 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On July 19th, 2020, an Officer from the California Highway Patrol seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Garberville, Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $3,825.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−33 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On June 4 th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Alderpoint Road in Alderpoint, California. The seized property is described as: $7,920.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−31 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspon− dence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

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11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−296)

11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−295)

NOTICE OF REMOVING $1 TOKENS FROM INVENTORY Cher−Ae Heights Casino is removing the $1 token from inventory. The last day to redeem them for cash is December 11, 2020. As of December 12, 2020, the $1 token will have no monetary value. 11/26, 12/3, 12/10

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On August 3rd, 2020, an Officer from the Eureka Police Department seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of California from the Broadway Motel on Broadway Street in Eureka, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $2,600.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F− 34 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−298)

LEGALS? classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 × 314

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On September 30th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force and Officers from the Eureka Police Department seized property for forfeiture in connec− tion with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11351 of the Health and Safety Code of Cali− fornia from C Street in Eureka Cali− fornia. The seized property is described as: $5,517.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−41 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney

On September 17th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11359 of the Health and Safety Code of California from 5th and I streets in Eureka California. The seized property is described as: $5,665.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−40 has been assignedto this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−305)

11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−306)

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

On July 31st, 2020, an Officer from the Eureka Police Department seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11378 of the Health and Safety Code of California from West Hawthorn and Broadway Streets in Eureka, California. The seized property is described as: $5,841.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−35 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

On September 27th, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force and Officers from the California Highway Patrol seized property for forfeiture in connec− tion with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11366 of the Health and Safety Code of Cali− fornia from SR299 in Humboldt County, California. The seized prop− erty is described as: $12,599.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F− 42 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any correspondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney.

11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−300)

11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−307)

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

31


LEGAL NOTICES PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE On September 3rd, 2020, Agents from the Humboldt County Drug Task Force seized property for forfeiture in connection with controlled substance violations, to wit, Section 11379 of the Health and Safety Code of California from Hill− side Drive, in Fortuna California. The seized property is described as: $2,469.00 US currency and Control Number 20−F−39 has been assigned to this case. Use this number to identify the property in any corre− spondence with the Office of the Humboldt County District Attorney. 11/26, 12/3, 12/10

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 2nd of December, 2020, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage. The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Vicki L. Ford, Space # 5205 James Karoll, Space # 5250 Cheryl Conley, Space # 5419 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Eric Carr, Space # 2604 Brandy Navarro, Space # 3115 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Riley Bean, Space # 1120 Louis Prado, Space # 1157 Louis Prado, Space # 1189 Vance Fewell, Space # 1192 Cazzmirr Middleton, Space # 1383 Jamie Catalig, Space # 1673 Max Powell, Space # 1703 Juanita Scott, Space # 1774 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units.

Charolette Friedrich, Space # 160 (Held in Co. Unit) Chia Her, Space # 171 Suzanne Stenecker−Diekman, Space # 206 Joanel Hotalen, Space # 214 Lisa Hitchcock, Space # 218 Michael Stinson, Space # 255 Marco Ramirez, Space # 384 Michael Lee Cox, Space # 400 Terre Leveton, Space # 420 Michelle Casanas, Space # 453 Vanessa Ocampo Sandoval, Space # 534 Diana Baltzley, Space # 601 Monica Upshaw, Space # 720 Ty Moser, Space # 776 Alexander Gregory, Space # 825 (Held in Co. Unit) Alfreda Marshall, Space # 838 The following spaces are located at 1641 Holly Drive McKinleyville, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Linda Campbell, Space # 1123 Alexander Claybon, Space # 2101 Bradly Killingsworth, Space # 2119 Charles Burns, Space # 3152 Juliette Paris, Space # 4102 Danielle Gallaty, Space # 6209 Wyatt Ivey, Space # 7223 Mario Maggio, Space # 8130 The following spaces are located at 2394 Central Avenue McKinleyville CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Cameron Vasquez, Space # 9423 The following spaces are located at 180 F Street Arcata CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Kristina Crummett, Space # 4316 Colin Hulse, Space # 4436 David Cool, Space # 4627 Frank Murphy, Space # 4748 Adelaide Spofford, Space # 6154 Fernando Castano, Space # 7032 The following spaces are located at 940 G Street Arcata CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Kori Evans, Space # 6313 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown.

−qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 19th day of November, 2020 and 26th day of November, 2020 11/19, 11/26 (20−287)

Lien Sale Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. Property will be sold via online auction at www.StorageAuctions.com. Bidding will begin at 10:00 AM on November 27th, 2020 and will close at or after 1:00 PM on December 4th, 2020 at which time the auction will be completed and the high bidder will be determined. The property will be available for pick up where said property has been stored and which is located at Airport Road Storage, LLC. 500/ 1000 Airport Road Fortuna, CA 95540 County of Humboldt, State of California. (707)725−1234 B134 Sherrie Nichols E64 Melissa LaCount E66 Melissa LaCount Household items, furniture, appli− ances, tools, and personal items. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Refer to www.StorageAuctions.com for all other terms and conditions governing the bidding and auction process. Dated this 16th day of November, 2020 11/19, 11/26 (20−288)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00519

11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26 (20−274)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00527 The following person is doing Busi− ness as KINGTIDE DESIGNS Humboldt 3731 Spear Ave Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 41 Bayside, CA 95524 Matthew Diggins 3731 Spear Ave Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Matthew Diggins, Owner This October 19, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26 (20−272)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00533 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LIGHTHOUSE LED AND HORTICUL− TURAL CONSULTING LLC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MOSS LYFE

Humboldt 3845 G Street Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 75 The Terrace Willow Creek, CA 95573

Lighthouse LED and Horticultural Consulting LLC California 202004110899 3845 G Street Eureka, CA 95503

PO Box 1242 Willow Creek, CA 95573

Shaqura E Moore Anyone interested in attending 260 Enchanted Springs Ln Rainbow Self Storage auctions must Willow Creek, CA 95573 pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. The business is conducted by an Purchases must be paid for at the Individual. time of the sale in cash only. All pre The date registrant commenced to Charolette Friedrich, Space # 160 −qualified Bidders must sign in at transact business under the ficti− (Held in Co. Unit) 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to tious business name or name listed Chia Her, Space # 171 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, above on Not Applicable Suzanne Stenecker−Diekman, Space no exceptions. All purchased items I declare that all information in this # 206 are sold as is, where is and must be statement is true and correct. Joanel Hotalen, Space # 214 removed at time of sale. Sale is A registrant who declares as true Lisa Hitchcock, Space # 218 subject to cancellation for any any material matter pursuant to Michael Stinson, Space # 255 reason whatsoever. NORTHSpace COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com Section 17913 of the Business and Marco Ramirez, # 384 Auctioneer:Nov. Kim 26, Santsche, Professions Code that the regis− Michael Lee Cox, Space # 400 Employee for Rainbow Self− trant knows to be false is guilty of a Terre Leveton, Space # 420 Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # misdemeanor punishable by a fine Michelle Casanas, Space # 453 40083246.

32

The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shaqura Moore, Owner/Sole Proprietor This October 19, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Aaron Gustaveson, Owner This October 26, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS

statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Aaron Gustaveson, Owner This October 26, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/3 (20−280)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00538 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LOCO LOAN SIGNINGS Humboldt 576 Main St Fortuna, CA 95540 Sharleign Zavaglia 576 Main St Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sharleigh Zavaglia, Owner This October 30, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 11/26, 12/3, 12/10, 12/17 (20−294)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00566

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00539 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EUREKA OPTOMETRIC CENTER Humboldt 2369 Harrison Ave Eureka, CA 95501 Zuzana R Gellner 2856 Graham Rd Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on June 15, 1993 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Zuzana R Gellner, Owner/Sole Proprietor This November 2, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/3 (20−279)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00542 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SURFSIDE BURGER SHACK Humboldt 455 5th Street Eureka, CA 95501

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JEFFERSON STATE TRADING CO

Martin Bravo 1121 Olympia Street Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 2729 Sunnygrove Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Martin Bravo, Sole Proprietor This November 4, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

PO Box 2102 McKinleyville, CA 95519 Peter P Leipzig 2729 Sunnygrove Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on November 9, 2020 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Peter Leipzig, Owner This November 17, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/3 (20−281)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00546 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ARCATA PRO HANDYMAN Humboldt 425 Grotzman Lane Arcata, CA 95521

11/26, 12/3, 12/10, 12/17 (20−299)

Philip J Cuddihy 425 Grotzman Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to


Humboldt 425 Grotzman Lane Arcata, CA 95521 Philip J Cuddihy 425 Grotzman Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on November 4, 2020 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Philip Cuddihy, Owner This November 5, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/3 (20−283)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00550 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUPERGLASS Humboldt 1700 Campton Rd #2 Eureka, CA 95503 Brandon A Langston 1700 Campton Rd #2 Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on November 1, 2020 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brandon A. Langston This November 6, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 11/19, 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−284)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00554

The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Eric Kinney, President, CEO Royalbis, LLC This November 10, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 11/19, 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−289)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00558 The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE SHADOW GALLERY: VIDEOS AND MORE Humboldt 320 2nd Street Suite 1A Eureka, CA 95501 Harley Demarest 309 E Street #17 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on November 11, 2020 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Harley Demarest, Owner/Propri− etor This November 11, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 11/19, 11/26, 12/3, 12/10 (20−286)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00542 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SURFSIDE BURGER SHACK Humboldt 455 5th Street Eureka, CA 95501

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ZEN HUMBOLDT

Martin Bravo 1121 Olympia Street Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 437 F St Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Martin Bravo, Sole Proprietor This November 4, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

Royalbis, LLC CA 201804510794 437 F Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine

11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/3 (20−281)

Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Martin Bravo, Sole Proprietor This November 4, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 11/12, 11/19, 11/26, 12/3 (20−281)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JACQUELINE VICKERMAN CASE NO. CV2001109 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JACQUELINE VICKERMAN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JACQUELINE MARIE VICKERMAN to Proposed Name JACQUELINE MARIE LABINSKY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 11, 2020 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: October 20, 2020 Filed: October 22, 2020 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26 (20−277)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME MEGAN WOODS CASE NO. CV2001108 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: MEGAN WOODS for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MEGAN NICOLE WOODS to Proposed Name MEGAN NICOLE LABINSKY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 11, 2020 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,

the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 11, 2020 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: October 19, 2020 Filed: October 22, 2020 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26 (20−276)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME PHYLLIS SUZANNE KEARNS (aka EMMA NATION) CASE NO. CV2001098 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: PHYLLIS SUZANNE KEARNS (aka EMMA NATION) for a decree changing names as follows: Present name PHYLLIS SUZANNE KEARNS to Proposed Name EMMA NATION−MYERS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 4, 2020 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: October 15, 2020 Filed: October 15, 2020 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 11/26 (20−273)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 ×314

CITY OF FORTUNA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Fortuna will hold a public hearing on the 7th day of December, at 6:00 p.m. to consider amending the City’s Comprehensive Fee Schedule to add fees for Small Cell Wireless Facilities and amend fees for Police Department Parking Citations. This meeting will be held in accordance with the Brown Act as currently in effect under the State Emergency Services Act, the Governor’s Emergency Declaration related to COVID-19, and the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 issued on March 17, 2020 that allows attendance by members of the City Council, City staff, and the public to participate by teleconference, videoconference, or both. A copy of the Agenda and full staff report for these items will be available at City Hall or www.friendlyfortuna.com no later than Friday, December 4, 2020. Submitted by: Buffy Gray Deputy City Clerk Dated: 11/23/2020

We Print Obituaries Submit information via email to classified@northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

310 F STREET, EUREKA (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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51. ____ Goldfinger (Bond villain) 53. Singer ____ King Cole 56. “Calm down, competitive problem solver!”? (hint: why have a four-word answer when two will suffice?) 59. Sundae alternative 60. Prada competitor 61. Female name that’s the name of a female assistant backward 62. Upscale hotel amenities 63. NFL’s Aikman and Polamalu 64. Pac-Man’s food

5. Turn 6. “Wake Up Little Susie” singer Don or Phil 7. Scandalous selfie, maybe 8. “Can’t argue with that” 9. LAX listing 10. Counsel 11. Fire place? 12. Soothing ointment 13. City NNE of San Antone 18. 18 or 21, typically 19. Butcher’s cuts 23. Foul mood 24. Weightlifting units 25. 1950s WMD 26. Baseball’s Doubleday 27. Pre-euro coin 28. Went for office 29. Mazda model 30. “Delish!” 31. Org. that puts its seal on toothpaste DOWN tubes 1. Baby’s first word, maybe 2. Mars, to the Greeks 34. Ruby of “Do the Right Thing” 3. Farfalle alternative 36. Sinister 4. Musician’s asset

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H A S T R H O O P A T E S S T T O O P R I P O O P P A N E S T O R

P A R I T U B B R M I P E S C L S I H S L U R I S B A L D Y O

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37. Doc for dachshunds 38. Massage target for a runner 40. Hail 41. Historical period 43. Animals with bills that appear on bills 44. “Sweet Rosie ____” (Betty Grable film) 45. “You’re right after all” 48. Secretly adds to an email 49. It uses 1.5 million gallons of maple syrup per year 50. Simone who sang “I Put a Spell on You” 51. Paul Bunyan, at times 52. “... on second thought, pass” 53. “I, Claudius” role 54. Squabbling 55. “____ of the D’Urbervilles” 57. Toward the stern 58. Ceiling

© Puzzles by Pappocom

A M I G A S

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M R H Y D E

U S O C

B A L L E I E

N D J E A R O P S

www.sudoku.com

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ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

will suffice?) 31. 1960s activist Hoffman 32. Freestyles, say 33. Birth control option, briefly 35. “Stop that!” 36. Olympic swimmer Janet 38. Arrived 39. Letters in some church names 40. Deadlocked 41. Wonderland cake words 42. Dressing up like Theresa May or Boris Johnson to espouse their isolationist views? (hint: why have a four-word answer when two will suffice?) 46. Georgia’s capital: Abbr. 47. Err 48. “Correct!”

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO OOPS W A L K O W I E K E N N Y E L O O P S A L F A V A N Y A F O U R P R E S T P P O R T S A D I E T C A S E E T O N X E N A

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1. Pac-Man’s place 5. “Beau ____” 10. His last words are “Thus, I give up the spear!” 14. Opera solo 15. Plain to see 16. Supermarket section 17. Modern-day urban fop’s YouTube journal? (hint: why have a four-word answer when two will suffice?) 20. “Take me ____ am” 21. Strong suit 22. Like bicycle chains 23. AMC’s “Better Call ____” 24. Ocasek of the Cars 25. False ally who’s cranky due to a lack of food? (hint: why have a four-word answer when two

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com

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ASTROLOGY

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “A little too much is just enough for me,” joked poet and filmmaker Jean Cocteau. I suspect that when he said that, he was in a phase similar to the one you’re in now. I bet he was experiencing a flood of creative ideas, pleasurable self-expressions, and loving breakthroughs. He was probably right to risk going a bit too far, because he was learning so much from surpassing his previous limitations and exploring the frontiers outside his comfort zone. Now here’s your homework, Aries: Identify two actions you could take that fit the profile I’ve described here. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Biologists believe that no tree can grow more than 436 feet tall. As much as an individual redwood or spruce or mountain ash might like to sprout so high that it doesn’t have to compete with other trees for sunlight, gravity is simply too strong for it to pump enough water up from the ground to its highest branches. Keep that in mind as a useful metaphor during the next ten months, Taurus. Your assignment is to grow bigger and taller and stronger than you ever have before—and know when you have reached a healthy level of being bigger and stronger and taller. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I haven’t felt the savory jolt of bacon in my mouth since I was 15, when I forever stopped eating pigs. I still remember that flavor with great fondness, however. I’ve always said I’d love to find a loophole that would allow me to enjoy it again. And then today I found out about a kind of seaweed that researchers at Oregon State University say tastes like bacon and is healthier than kale. It’s a new strain of a red marine algae called dulse. If I can track it down online, I’ll have it for breakfast soon. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that you, too, are primed to discover a fine new substitute—something to replace a pleasure or resource that is gone or taboo or impossible. What could it be? CANCER (June 21-July 22): By age 49, Cancerian author Norman Cousins had been struck with two debilitating diseases. His physicians gave him a one in 500 chance of recovery. He embarked on a series of unconventional attempts to cure himself, including “laugh therapy” and positive self-talk, among others. They worked. He lived lustily for another 26 years, and wrote several books about health and healing. So perhaps we should pay attention to his belief that “each patient carries his own doctor inside him”—that at least some of our power to cure ourselves resides in inner sources that are not understood or accredited by traditional medicine. This would be a valuable hypothesis for you to consider and test in the coming weeks, Cancerian. (Caveat: But don’t stop drawing on traditional medicine that has been helping you.) LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In accordance with astrological rhythms, I’m giving you permission to be extra regal and majestic in the coming weeks. You have a poetic license to be a supremely royal version of yourself, even to the point of wearing a jeweled crown and purple silk robe. Would you prefer a gold scepter with pearls or a silver scepter with rubies? Please keep in mind, though, that all of us non-Leos are hoping you will be a noble and benevolent sovereign who provides enlightened leadership and bestows generous blessings. That kind of behavior will earn you the right to enjoy more of these lofty interludes in the future. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the coming weeks, I will refer to you as The Rememberer. Your task will be to deepen and refine your relationship with the old days and old ways—both your own past and the pasts of people you care about most. I hope you will take advantage of the cosmic rhythms to reinvigorate your love for the important stories that have defined you and yours. I trust you will devote treasured time to reviewing in detail the various historical threads that give

such rich meaning to your web of life. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Those who build walls are their own prisoners,” wrote Libran author Ursula K. Le Guin. She continued, “I’m going to fulfill my proper function in the social organism. I’m going to unbuild walls.” I hope that sounds appealing to you, Libra. Unbuilding walls is my first choice for your prime assignment in the coming weeks. I’d love to see you create extra spaciousness and forge fertile connections. I’ll be ecstatic if you foster a rich interplay of diverse influences. If you’re feeling super-plucky, you might even help unbuild walls that your allies have used to half-trap themselves. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If you can’t help me grow, there’s no point with you being in my life.” Singer and actress Jill Scott said that. In my view, Scorpios may be the only sign of the zodiac that can assert such a sentiment with total sincerity and authority. For many of the other tribes, it might seem harsh or unenforceable, but for you it’s exactly right—a robust and courageous truth. In addition to its general rightness, it’s also an especially apt principle for you to wield right now. The coming weeks will be a potent time to catalyze deep learning and interesting transformations in concert with your hearty allies. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “You live best as an appreciator of horizons, whether you reach them or not.” Those words from poet David Whyte would be a perfect motto for you to write out on a piece of paper and tape to your bathroom mirror or your nightstand for the next 30 years. Of all the tribes in the zodiac, you Sagittarians are most likely to thrive by regularly focusing on the big picture. Your ability to achieve small day-by-day successes depends on how well you keep the long-range view in mind. How have you been doing lately with that assignment? In the coming weeks, I suspect you could benefit from hiking to the top of a mountain—or the metaphorical equivalent—so you can enjoy seeing as far as you can see. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Sensible Capricorn author E. M. Forster (1879–1970) said, “Passion does not blind. No. Passion is sanity.” That’s the opposite of what many poets and novelists have asserted down through the ages, which is that passion isn’t truly passion unless it renders you half-crazy, driven by obsession, and subject to delusion and irrationality. But in offering you counsel in this horoscope, I’m aligning myself with Forster’s view. For you in the coming weeks, Capricon, passion will help you see clearly and keep you mentally healthy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Alpine swifts are small birds that breed in Europe during the summer and then migrate long distance to Africa for the winter. Ornithologists were shocked when they discovered that at least some of these creatures fly for more than 200 days without ever once landing on the ground. They’re not always flapping their wings—sometimes they glide—but they manage to do all their eating and drinking and sleeping and mating in mid-air. Metaphorically speaking, I think it’s important for you to not act like the alpine swifts in the coming months, dear Aquarius. Please plan to come all the way down to earth on a regular basis. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): There’s substantial evidence that when people talk to themselves out loud in the midst of doing a task, they improve their chances of succeeding at the task. Have you ever heard athletes giving themselves verbal encouragement during their games and matches? They’re using a trick to heighten their performance. In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to experiment with this strategy in the coming weeks. Increase your brainpower by regularly offering yourself encouraging, supportive instructions. It’s fine if you just sort of whisper them, but I’d love it if now and then you also bellowed them.l

Homework: Imagine it’s 30 years from now and you’re telling God the worst things and best things you ever did. What would they be? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

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©2020 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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EMPLOYMENT

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Opportunities

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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is now hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262. ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001 default

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

Seeking a qualified preschool teacher. 24 ECE units including core courses plus 16 General Ed. units are required. We are looking for a team player 3−5 days per week at our center in Southern Humboldt. Please call 923−3617. beginningsbriceland.org default

Hiring?

NOW HIRING! Are you passionate about making a difference in your community? Are you tired of mundane cubicle jobs and want to join a friendly, devoted community with limitless potential? Join the Humboldt County Education Community. Many diverse positions to choose from with great benefits, retirement packages, and solid pay. Learn more and apply today at hcoe.org/employment Find what you’re looking for in education!

SoHum Health is HIRING

YUROK TRIBE

Post your job opportunities in the Journal.

442-1400 ×314 northcoast journal.com

The Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation is Hiring! Associate Tribal Attorney Administration of the legal affairs of the government, departments and enterprises. The Associate Tribal Attorney will complete professional assignments provide legal advice and represent Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation. $73,161-$115,606/yr

Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707) 923-3921

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS INFECTION PREVENTION / EMPLOYEE HEALTH Full Time Position. Position includes, but is not limited to, infection monitoring and reporting, infection risk assessment and prevention, policy and procedure development, staff education, and outbreak management. Employee Health role includes new employee and annual health assessments, immunization programs, exposure management, and safe patient handling programs. Must be able to communicate clearly, verbally and in writing to interface with employees, medical staff, and state, local, and federal health departments and programs. BSN preferred. Certification in Infection Control (CIC) preferred, but willing to train the right candidate.

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE – CLINIC & HOME VISITS Full Time position, 8 or 10 hr. shifts, 4 or 5 days a week, Monday - Friday. Current California LVN license and BLS certification required. Work 8 or 10 hour shifts in our outpatient New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment!

Family Services Project Coordinator Coordinate grants management and other grant related duties with a high degree of independence and initiative. $17.85-$27.68/hr

SHCHD minimum wage start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

General Counsel Manage the legal affairs of the government, divisions and enterprises. Chief legal counsel for the Nation and provide legal advice as well as representation. $102,903-$145,142/yr

City of Arcata

Construction Specialist/Senior Construction Specialist

$40,924 to $ 58,925/yr. (based on 12/27/20 salary increase) Filing Deadline: 4pm Mon., Nov. 30, 2020 Performs a variety of semi-skilled and skilled technical concrete duties related to the construction, maintenance, repair, installation and monitoring of City streets and utilities systems and infrastructure; The position has a primary focus on technical and specialized concrete work in addition to fully supporting the overall accomplishments of the Department by frequently assisting the Streets/Utilities maintenance crews as needed. See full job description located at www.cityofarcata.org for further duties information and application requirements. Application materials which can be mailed, hand delivered, faxed or emailed are available on the jobs page or at Arcata City Manager’s Office Lobby 736 F Street, Arcata; or by calling (707) 822-5953. EOE.

Housekeeper Housekeeper will be responsible for the upkeep, in depth cleaning, and day-to-day cleaning of the Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation facilities. $13.08-$16.91/hr Housing Manager Manage properties and services necessary to best implement Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation’s Tribal Housing Plans. $51,626-$81,744/yr Staff Accountant II Incumbent supports the fiscal department in the specialized area of general ledger, accounts payable and receivable. $15.88-$22.00/hr TANF Program Technician Case management and eligibility tasks, support the TANF program, participate in community outreach activities and contribute to the goals of the CFS Department. $15.88-$24.76/hr Tribal Resource Specialist – Marine Collect, compile, input, manage information and data pertaining to Tribal resources, including but not limited to; natural, cultural, freshwater and marine resources. $19.88-$31.01/hr TTCW Project Coordinator This position will coordinate service delivery, coordinated procedural changes, the development of coordinated policy, the grant project and programs pursuant to approved program and grant objectives. $19.88-$31.01/hr Visit Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nations website for full job description and to apply today! For all job inquiries contact HR@tolowa.com

www.tolowa-nsn.gov/employment/

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

City of Arcata

OUR MISSION

DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

$93,028—$113,076 annually

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First review date is December 21, 2020

Child Care Case Manager $15.71(full-time)

Generous benefit package For full details and application materials: www.cityofarcata.org/jobs; or Arcata City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, or (707) 822-5953. EOE.

Program Assistant $14.56(full-time) We are operating under strict COVID-19 safety protocols including daily health screenings, required masks, and increased hand washing and cleaning practices per the Reopening Plan certified by Humboldt County.

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        

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293 www.changingtidesfs.org

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

ASSOCIATE TRIBAL ATTORNEY

   default

THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL IS SEEKING

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS

Wednesday afternoon/ Thursday morning routes in

Northern Humboldt and Willow Creek/Hoopa Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

Contact Michelle

707.442.1400 ext. 305 michelle@northcoastjournal.com

36

Hablamos español

@changingtidesfamilyservices

 

CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

The Hoopa Valley Tribe, a federally recognized Indian Tribe located in Hoopa, CA, seeks an attorney to fill the position of Associate Tribal Attorney. The successful candidate will serve in the Office of Tribal Attorney and will provide a broad range or legal services to the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council, Chairperson tribal departments and entities, including consultation, research, drafting, representation in administrative proceedings, and other duties as assigned. Contractual, Salary: DOE. Minimum Qualifications: Minimum of one (1) to five (5) years practicing law; at least two (2) years practicing Federal Indian Law or Administrative/Governmental Law (preferred). Juris Doctorate Degree. Member in good standing of any state bar; California Bar Membership (highly desired) or willing to obtain California Bar membership within one year of hire. Outstanding writing, research and communication skills required. Experience in employment law, civil litigation, contracts and business law, and tax law preferred.

  

TEMPORARY TEACHER, McKinleyville

      

CLASSROOM ASSISTANT, Eureka

           default

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position:

FINANCIAL INSTITUTION DIRECTOR Hoopa Development Fund, Regular, F/T, Salary: $53,400.00/yr. Responsible for the management of the Hoopa Development Fund Credit Division and EDA Loan Fund Division. Directs and coordinates activities to implement Hoopa Development Fund policies, procedures and practices concerning granting or extending lines of credit for real estate and consumer credit loans, among other administrative duties.

Must possess a valid CA Driver’s License (or able to obtain within 10 days of hire) and be insurable. Preference will be given to qualified Native American Indian applicants. This position classified safety-sensitive.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Bachelor’s Degree (B.A.) from a four-year college or university, or one to two years of related experience and/or training, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must possess a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Must successfully pass an employment background check in accordance with Title 30A. This position is classified safety-sensitive.

POSITION IS OPEN UNTIL FILLED.

DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 16, 2020.

Submit application, cover letter, resume and writing sample to: Human Resources Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546 or call (530) 625-9200 ext. 20. Email submission: liz@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol and Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resource/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546 or Call (530) 6259200 Ext. 20 or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


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sequoiapersonnel.com

K’ima:w Medical Center

436 Harris St, Eureka, CA 95503

(707) 445.9641

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions: TRANSPORTATION PLANNER Humboldt County Association of Governments (HCAOG) A Regional Transportation Planning Agency for Humboldt County is seeking to fill a full−time Transportation Planner position: Assistant: $60,329 − $73,330 Associate: $66,640 − $81,002 Insurance Benefits: health, dental, vision, life, CalPERS Retirement Application Deadline: 5:00 p.m. November 30, 2020 Send cover letter, resume, and three work−related references to HCAOG at: 611 I Street, Suite B, Eureka CA 95501 or email: debbie.egger@hcaog.net A detailed job description may be obtained @ www.hcaog.net

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

SENIOR TRIBAL ATTORNEY The Hoopa Valley Tribe, a federally recognized Indian Tribe located in Hoopa, CA, seeks an Attorney to fill the position of Senior Tribal Attorney. The successful candidate will serve in the Office of Tribal Attorney under the supervision of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council and Tribal Chairman. Provides a wide range of legal services to the Hoopa Valley Tribe, including without limitation advice, negotiation, drafting, research, lobbying, representation in litigation and administrative proceedings and other duties as assigned by the Council. Senior Tribal Attorney does not provide legal services or advice to individual Tribal members, except upon resolution of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council. Contractual, Salary: DOE. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: • Juris Doctorate (J.D.) Degree. • Minimum of five to ten years practicing Federal Indian Law and/or training; or equivalent combination of education or experience. • Member in good standing of any state bar; California Bar Membership (highly desired) or willing to obtain California Bar membership within one year of hire. • Outstanding writing, research and communication skills required. • Experience in employment law, civil litigation, contracts and business law, and tax law. • Must possess a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. • Subject to a successful employment background check in accordance with Title 30A. • Preference will be given to qualified Native American Indian applicants. • This position classified safety-sensitive. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED Submit application, cover letter, resume and writing sample to the Human Resources Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546, e-mail submission to liz@ hoopainsurance.com, or call (530) 625-9200 ext. 20. The Tribe’s Alcohol and Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

EMT 1 – ON-CALL HOUSEKEEPER – ON-CALL HR DIRECTOR – FT/REGULAR IT& APPLICATIONS TECHNICIAN – FT/REGULAR (2)PATIENT ACCOUNTS CLERK I – FT/REGULAR ACCOUNTANT – FT/REGULAR REVENUE CYCLE SPECIALIST MANAGER – FT/REGULAR MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN – FT/REGULAR ALL POSITIONS OPEN UNTIL FILLED For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Planning Technnician Maintenance Technician Warehouse Laborers • CPA General Laborers • Bookkeeper Const Ops Manager

Pl Mai Ware Genera C

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SoHum Health is HIRING     

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS default

FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER (FNP)

                 MINIMUM POSITION QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED:

    SPECIAL SKILLS/EQUIPMENT:

     LICENSES/CERTIFICATES:

          

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


MARKETPLACE Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 888−519−0171 (AAN CAN)

ART & FRAME SALE! ALL ½ OFF! Dream Quest Thrift Store, where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams. November 26−December 2 Plus: Senior Discount Tues− days & Spin’n’Win Wednes− days! (530) 629−3006.

REAL ESTATE SAVE YOUR HOME! Are you behind paying your MORT− GAGE? Denied a Loan Modifica− tion? Is the bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Homeowners Relief Line NOW for Help 1−855− 439−5853 Mon−Fri : 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Sat: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm(all times Pacific) (AAN CAN) STRUGGLING WITH YOUR PRIVATE STUDENT LOAN PAYMENT? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888−670−5631 (Mon−Fri 9am− 5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN) TRANSFER FOR A BAHAMA CONDO. One week yearly. $275 plus maintenance of $700. 707−502−4983

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 855−978−0215 (AAN CAN)

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

GUARANTEED LIFE INSURANCE! (AGES 50 TO 80). No medical exam. Affordable premiums never increase. Benefits never decrease. Policy will only be cancelled for non−payment. HOURS: M−F 9a−10p & Sat 11a−2p EST 1−888−386−0113 (Void NY) (AAN CAN)



Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

L4E4 2G ALS? -1 4 0 0 × 3 1 4

Comm. Property for Sale

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

JACOBY CREEK LAND 6.52 acre parcel in desirable Jacoby Creek. Building site with approved plans. Power to the property and county approved perc. test. Southern exposure. Call/ text Karen Orsolics at (707) 834−1818 bhhsredwoodrealty.com DRE #01200980

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE DOGS! BUSINESS FOR SALE $225,000 Large warehouse facility with kennels, secu− rity system, cameras, and grooming stations. Business is open with established clientele. Call/text Karen Orsolics (707) 834−1818 bhhsredwoodrealty.com DRE #01200980

MARKETPLACE

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

MARKETPLACE

  

116 W. Wabash • 443-3259 Mon. Weds. Thur. Fri. & Sat. 2-6 Closed Sun. & Tues. with masks & bacterial wipes



Musicians & Instructors CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Computer & Internet

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

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Let’s Be Friends Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806

OVER $10K IN DEBT? Be debt free in 24−48 months. Pay a frac− tion of what you owe. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 877−590−1202. (AAN CAN)

38

Acreage for Sale



HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−844− 416−7147 (AAN CAN)

SAVE BIG ON HOME INSUR− ANCE! Compare 20 A−rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 844− 712−6153! (M−F 8am−8pm Central) (AAN CAN)

Apartments for Rent default

Auto Service

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855− 569−1909. (AAN CAN)

HEARING AIDS!! Buy one/get one FREE! High−quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competi− tors. Nearly invisible! 45−day money back guarantee! 1−833− 585−1117 (AAN CAN)

Lodging

macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair

YOUR AD

HERE

classified@north coastjournal.com

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

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         

    

   

 

@ncj_of_humboldt

 



BODY, MIND & SPIRIT HIGHER EDUCATION FOR\ SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

BRE #01927104

BRE #02109531

BRE #02044086

BRE # 02084041

BRE #01956733

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

530.784.3581

916.798.2107

707.601.1331

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

TING!

NEW LIS

707.498.6364

Bernie Garrigan

Dacota Huzzen

Hailey Rohan

DINSMORE – CULTIVATION – $899,000

613 15TH STREET, FORTUNA – $242,000

±40 Acres off Highway 36 with Interim Permit for 9,200 sq ft of mixed light and 800 sq ft of outdoor cultivation space. Property features a 2 bedroom 1 bathroom home, barn, green houses, and additional outbuildings.

Wildly affordable and attractive 1/1 bungalow near downtown Fortuna! Property features a new roof, new back deck, new kitchen flooring, utility room, and fresh paint! Appliances are included. Pleasant backyard with gardening space.

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $125,000

ARCATA – COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT – $570,000

±2.7 Acre parcel in a small intimate neighborhood with few neighbors on a dead-end road. Parcel is wooded with fir, madrone, and oak trees and features a flat building site and utilities at the street.

Commercial building on a high visibility corner just blocks from the Arcata Plaza! Two buildings, 10 dedicated parking spaces, and tenants are in place.

FORTUNA – LAND/PROPERTY – $999,000

WILLOW CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE – $1,050,000

±24 Acres w/ development/subdivision potential! Features public utility access w/ flat mountain top & hillside views of Fortuna, Eel River, & Fernbridge. Owner may carry for qualified buyers!

Stunning ±4.5 acre river front property just minutes from Downtown Willow Creek! Parcel features a grand main 2/3 home, secondary 2/1 home, pool, outdoor kitchen, industrial sized shop/ multipurpose bldg., orchard, and trail to the river!

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY – $249,000

WHISKEYTOWN – LAND/PROPERTY – $65,000

±160 Remote acres in Weitchpec, with beautiful mountain views! Property features a well-constructed cabin, outbuildings, newly created ½ million gallon pond, spring, and timber.

±80 Acres w/ Hwy 299 frontage, gated access road, mountain views, and deed water rights to a spring on an adjacent parcel. This property is not agricultural and is in need of development, with no existing roads, building sites, or water system.

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY – $115,000

SHELTER COVE – LAND/PROPERTY – $40,000

This ±46 acre parcel in Weitchpec awaits the adventurer who enjoys pristine forests and amazing views. Large stands of doug fir, ample water, and several fruit trees are an added bonus!

Two lots in Shelter Cove totaling nearly half an acre. Enjoy the sounds of the nearby ocean and Humboldt Creek that borders the property. Utilities are at the street.

Mike Willcutt

Katherine Fergus

NEW LIS

TING!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


BLACK FRIDAY SALES

TALKING TREES

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BUY A PACK OF GUMMIES, GET AN INDICA OR SATIVA FOR $1. (LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER)

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BUY 1/8TH GET A PRE-ROLL FOR $1

HONEY LEAF

LIVE RESIN CARTRIDGES 40% OFF. REGULAR CARTRIDGES 30% OFF

SPACE GEM

BUY 1 GET 1 1/2 OFF

HUMBOLDT APOTHECARY 20% OFF

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50% OFF CARTRIDGES. BUY TWO & GET A BATTERY FOR FREE .

+ MUCH MORE!

SALES ONLY GOOD 11/27

1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka CA 707.442.2420 M-F 10am-6pm Sat + Sun 11am-5pm

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT


THE THOUGHT REALLY DOES

COUNT GIFT GUIDE

0 2 0 Gifts p. 2 2-23 Index p. 24

Well, this is different. We won’t be packing into shops or elbowing one another out of the way for bargains. This year, a more thoughtful approach is the way to go. Even when we’re apart, we can still send one another something special, a little cheer at the close of a roller coaster year. And instead of a frenzy of clicks on massive corporate websites, we can look around at the local shops we want to support and do our browsing and buying there, whether online or in person. Flip through this year’s Gift Guide and you’ll find something for the gourmet in your life (wooden spoons? prestige cast iron?), the reader (local novel? beautiful journal?), the wilderness explorer (Everest-worthy boots? wood-handled axes?) and the little tykes (you think you have enough puzzles for winter but you don’t). And you’ll find all kinds of little luxuries that make staying home a pleasure, like cozy throws, sturdy mugs, comfy chairs and Humboldt-grown cannabis products. Every one of these does double duty, bringing joy to the person who unwraps it and a boost to the local businesses that sell it. It’s not just holiday spending, it’s investing in our community. That’s why the thought counts even more this year. …

Illustration by Dave Brown

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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pacific outfitters

arcata artisans

eureka natural foods

delish on 5th

arcata artisans

furniture design center

Shakespeare Wild Series 862MH50 salmon/steelhead rod/reel combo, $69.99

2

Elaine Shore porcelain mug, $42

Carl’s Woodworking toys, large, $16.99; small, $12.99

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Henckles knives, prices vary

Kurt Hellmich exotic woods cheese cutter $36

Frigidaire chest freezer, $349


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plaza shoe shop

arcata artisans

picky picky picky

american indian art & gifts

north coast co-op

north coast co-op

Anabaglish Cari quilted shoulder bag, $140

Kurt Hellmich wood box, $50

Grändsfors Carpenters axe $179.99, Hunter’s axe $186.99

Large deer horn earrings by Robert Super, Karuk, $160

Evolution salt lamps, $12.99-$33.99

Why Not Wood Designs locally made cheeseboards, $16.99

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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arcata artisans

many hands gallery

the blacksmith shop

eureka natural foods

pacific outfitters

mad river gardens

Carolyn Jones handwoven silk, bamboo and wool scarf, $125

4

Moving sand art by Klaus Bösch, from $90

Hand-forged Damascus knife, $395

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Feel Good Slippers open slipper, $29.99; closed slipper, $39.99

Bogs Sweetpea ladies rain boot, $69.99

National Park Foundation hand-poured soy wax candles in reusable containers, $29.99


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abraxas shoes and leather

delish on 5th

picky picky picky

north coast co-op

delish on 5th

eureka natural foods

Scully jacket, $245; Blundstone No. 1671 or No. 587, $199.95

Butterbell ceramic butter keeper, $26

Dovetail Maven slim pant $99.99

Light My Fire BPA-free, biobased plastic six-piece lunch kits, $20.99

Salt and pepper grinders, $26.00 each

Pomegranate Puzzles puzzle, $15.99

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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trinidad art gallery

eureka natural foods

pacific outfitters

miller farms nursery

picky picky picky

just my type letter press

Patricia Sundgren Smith original drawing, $195; prints from $45

6

Liscom Hill Pottery soup mug, $19.99; half glass, $8.99

Goal Zero Venture 30 7,800 mAh power bank with micro-USB cable, $79.99

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Lucky Bamboo tiered arrangement in bowl circled by frogs (other styles available), $34

Stanley Classic Ultra vacuum bottle $39.99

Herbin Vert Atlantide special edition ink, $32; Herbin glass pen, $27; Poketo project planner, $38; Blackwing pencils, $2.25-$27.95


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7. pure water spas

Hot Spring Spas Hot Spot Relay - Newly remodeled

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north coast co-op

miller farms nursery

pacific outfitters

plaza shoe shop

mad river gardens

Amy’s Almost Perfect locally made towels and aprons, $10.99

Tin sign, Social Distancing Champ, $16.99 (T-shirts and masks also available)

Giant Pre Push 2021 kids bikes, $149.99

Oboz Men’s Bozeman, $120

Handcrafted and handpainted Boleslawiec Polish Pottery, from $20

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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pacific outfitters

north coast co-op

humboldt craft spirits

humboldt craft spirits

humboldt craft spirits

humboldt craft spirits

Eagles Nest Outfitters (ENO) SingleNest, $49.99

8

Alpaca Arte wool-alternative with alpaca fiber, $16.99

Redwood Rye, see website for retail locations.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Little River Gin, see website for retail locations.

Blue Lake Vodka, see website for retail locations.

Eureka Chocolate Liqueur, see website for retail locations.


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belle starr

hot thommolly

eureka natural foods

pen & pine

miller farms nursery

pacific outfitters

PJ Salvage 100 percent cotton flannel sets, sizes XS-XL, $65.

Handmade-to-order masks with adjustable tie or ear loops in kid, adult and large (for big beards) sizes, $8-$10

Beeswax Reusable Food Wraps, $18.99

16-ounce Happy Trails enamel silk-screened mug, $22

Sloggers boots, women’s sizes 6-10 on select styles, $42.00

Ocean Kayak Malibu Two XL tandem kayak, $949.99

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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furniture design center

s.t.i.l.

north coast co-op

furniture design center

north coast co-op

dick taylor craft chocolate

Ashley Furniture Signature Design Kexlor accent chair in gray, $399

10

Skate Package: Riedell Joyride Hightop boot in black with Moxi Outdoor teal wheels, S-One glitter helmet, Moxie Six Pack pads in teal, $363.96

Green Tree Jewelry sustainable wooden holiday ornaments and jewlery, $9.99

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

White Queen contour foam pillow, $49

California Native Glass Native American fused glass art, $14.99

Orange Bourbon Pecan (with maple syrup and 65 percent Belize dark chocolate), $9.50


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pen & pine

picky picky picky

belle starr

trinidad art gallery

eureka natural foods

w.e. roberts

Illustrated Humboldt County map on cardstock, 8.5-by-11inch $20; 11-by-17-inch $25

Leatherman Supertool $89.99, WavePlus $99.99

Christina Anastasia nomad moon earrings in nine sparkly colors, made in Eureka, $39

Loryn White ceramics, $48

Eureka Natural Foods Essential Oils Sleep Dreams, $11.99; Rose Geranium, $17.99

W.E. Roberts’ mystery novel The Rivers, set on the Klamath River.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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north coast co-op

abraxas shoes and leather

just my type letter press

eureka natural foods

booklegger

abraxas shoes and leather

The Idea Box Kids Christmas and Hanukkah winter activity ideas on wooden coins, $24.99

12

HOBO bags (Ferndale store only): Bond-Black, $348; Sable-Garnet , $108; WindPearled Ivory, $138; BeautyHeavy Metal, $98

Pfeil carving tool, $20; Speedball 2.5-inch brayer, $16.60; Moo Carve 2.5-by2.5-by-7.5-inch block, $3.20; Charbonnel Aqua-Wash ink, $14.50-$23.95

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Andes Clothing beanie, $29.99; scarf, $39.99

Pomegranate and Carellini Co. 1,000-piece puzzles, $19.95

Bedstu Orchid handbag, $245; Yurisa bootie, $235; Tango tall boot, $345


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eureka natural foods

s.t.i.l.

north coast co-op

living styles fine furniture

many hands gallery

picky picky picky

Zing Bee T Clothing apron, $24.99; hat, $22.99.

Mama Wunderbar Stick Aura Quartz, $21.99

Kiss Naturals 100 percent natural materials activity kits, $22.99

Stressless wing chair and ottoman

Fair trade matryoshka dolls handmade in Russia, from $24

Pendleton cotton throw $98.99, tote $147.99

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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picky picky picky

just my type letter press

pacific outfitters

abraxas shoes and leather

the blacksmith shop

picky picky picky

Danner boots, Quarry $239.99, Vicious $159.99

14

JMTL cards, single card, $6; box of six cards, $22; box of 12 cards, $42

Slumberjack Big Timber Pro 20° sleeping bag with Big Toe foot box, $99.99

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Bos&Co. Saint BK/Tweed, $225; Horton Tan boot, $275; Major Olive boot, $220

Hand-spun carbon skillet with hand-forged handle, $225

Carhartt sweatshirts, $49.99-$54.99


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pure water spas

american indian art & gifts

plaza shoe shop

picky picky picky

delish on 5th

mad river gardens

Sundance Spas 880 Cameo with SmartTub

Beige Bear split loom set by Nadine McNeal, Karuk, $140

Keen Women’s Kaci II Winter, $150

Georgia Romeo boots for kids, women and men $52.99-$74.99

Staub cast iron 4-quart cocotte, $149.99

Bonsai tool kit, $200

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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north coast co-op

picky picky picky

many hands gallery

delish on 5th

abraxas shoes and leather

booklegger

Nature’s Mosiac local jewelry and keepsakes, $15.99-$24.99

16

Kuhl men’s jacket, $128.99, women’s vest, $128.99

Fair trade Turkish lamps, from $127.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Chopping board, $50

Timberland Davis Square, $85; 6-inch Premium boot, $198

Slipcased facsimile first editions of classic American novels by First Edition Library, prices vary


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eureka natural foods

pure water spas

booklegger

pacific outfitters

delish on 5th

american indian art & gifts

Island Bamboo Utensils, $9.99

Hot Spring Spas Limelight Beam with Freshwater Salt System

PaperBlanks journals, prices vary

IceMule Classic coolers, from $59.99

Pure Mexican vanilla bean paste, $28

Kokopelli Enterprises leather dreamcatchers, $20 each.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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many hands gallery

furniture design center

furniture design center

abraxas shoes and leather

furniture design center

living styles fine furniture

Fair trade upcycled Haitian steel drum art, from $17

18

Frigidaire beverage center, $799

Coaster Home Office Chairs Collection office chair, $199

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

UGG Zarina boot, $225; Bailey Button, $220; Fluff Yeah Zebra, $100

La-Z-Boy rocking recliner, $399

Beautyrest Black Mattress with adjustable base


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furniture design center

pacific outfitters

picky picky picky

eureka natural foods

pacific outfitters

furniture design center

Rogness coffee table with lift top, $449

Arbor Element Rocker Snowboard & Arbor Spruce binding package, $624.98

Filson Deer Island Jac-Shirt $142.99, Camo Down Cruiser Vest $224.99

Witch in the Woods white tea candle, $21.99

The North Face men’s and women’s Thermoball Eco jacket, $199.99

Stearns & Foster queen mattress, $1,499

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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country club cannabis

the heart of humboldt

the heart of humboldt

3.5 g of flower available in Ettersburg Valley Ice Cream Cake, Uncle Phil’s

20

Beanies, $20

Royal Key Organics M Con 8, 3.5 g $70

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5.

6.

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the humboldt county collective

s.t.i.l.

the humboldt county collective

satori wellness

Cannariginals All Natural Transdermal Rub

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Focus V Carta Lazer Edition, $349.99

Crumboldt Ice Water Hash

Locally made Space Gem vegan, solventless 600 mg Blackberry Tincture, $58


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the heart of humboldt

the humboldt county collective

the heart of humboldt

the heart of humboldt

hendrx

the humboldt county collective

the heart of humboldt

Warlock 1/4 ounce, $50; 1 ounce, $170

Talking Trees Ice Water Extract Bubble Hash

Coffee cup, $15

Papa’s Select 1 g Garlic Cookies live rosin, $90

T-Shirts, see site for details.

Lunchbox Alchemy Tangos Sour Fruit Bites

Wyld Edibles Marionberry, $22

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

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the heart of humboldt

the humboldt county collective

hendrx

the heart of humboldt

the heart of humboldt

the humboldt county collective

Full-zip hoodie, $45

22

Emerald Genetics Premium cannabis flower

HENDRX & Humboldt Seed Co. Wedding Tree seed packs. Available at a dispensary near you.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Carhartt hat, $30

Good Stuff Tonic 100 mg THC Raspberry Yerba, $25

Keef cannabis-infused Classic Soda


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the humboldt county collective

the humboldt county collective

the humboldt county collective

s.t.i.l.

the heart of humboldt

hendrx

Blue Raspberry Lunchbox Alchemy Squib cannabisinfused soft chews

Pineapple Lunchbox Alchemy Squib cannabisinfused soft chews

Keef cannabis-infused mocktail

Smoker Girl Package: Mini chocolate bar set, Stoner Girl mug, Toker Poker, Blazy Susan Cones, Rompotodo Geo pipe, $89.95

Dab Bod and Roll Model T-shirts, $25

Premium clones, stock varies. See site for details.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE

23


Gift Guide Advertiser Index Abraxas Shoes & Leather 615 Fifth St., Eureka, 798-6194 430 Main St., Ferndale, 786-4277 pages: 5, 12, 14, 16, 18

Bring this coupon in for

10% off

1 item

GOOD IN THE EUREKA STORE ONLY All proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society.

Happy Holidays

American Cancer Society Discovery Shop 2942 F St., Eureka 443-2155 page: 24 American Indian Art & Gift Shop 241 F St., Eureka 445-8451 ncidc.org/american-indian-art-gift-shop pages: 3, 15, 17 Arcata Artisans 883 H St., Arcata 825-9133 arcataartisans.com pages: 2, 3, 4 Belle Starr 405 Second St., Eureka 441-1296 belle-starr.com page: 9, 11 The Blacksmith Shop 445 Main St., Ferndale 786-4216 ferndaleblacksmith.com pages: 4, 14 Booklegger 402 Second St., Eureka 445-1344 pages: 12, 16, 17 Country Club Cannabis 3525 Redwood Dr., Redway 888-5953 @countryclubcannabis page: 20 Delish on 5th Kitchen Store and Modern Deli 440 F St., Eureka 273-5155 delishon5th.com pages: 2, 5, 15, 16, 17 Dick Taylor Craft Chocolate 4 West Fourth St., Eureka 798-6010 dicktaylorchocolate.com page: 10 Eureka Natural Foods 1450 Broadway, Eureka, 442-6325 2165 Central Ave., McKinleyville, 839-3636 eurekanaturalfoods.com pages: 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 17, 19

24

NORTH COAST JOURNAL GIFT GUIDE • Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Furniture Design Center 1716 Fifth St., Eureka 442-6300 furnituredesigncenter.net pages: 2, 10, 18, 19

North Coast Co-op 25 Fourth St., Eureka, 443-6027 811 I St., Arcata, 822-5947 northcoast.coop pages: 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 16

The Heart of Humboldt 601 I St., Arcata 822-9330 theheartofhumboldt.com pages: 20, 21, 22, 23

Pacific Outfitters 1600 Fifth St., Eureka, 443-6328 pacificoutfitters.com pages: 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 14, 17, 19

HENDRX 840-5667 hendrx.farm pages: 21, 22, 23 Hot Thommolly hotthommolly.com page: 9 The Humboldt County Collective 1670 Myrtle Ave., Eureka 442-2420 pages: 20, 21, 22, 23 Humboldt Craft Spirits 205 Seventh St., Suite C, Eureka 499-9999 humboldtcraftspirits.com page: 8 Just My Type Letterpress 501 Third St., Eureka 267-8727 justmytypeletterpress.com pages: 6, 12, 14 Living Styles Furniture & Mattress Showroom 37 West Second St., Eureka 443-3161 livingstyles.net pages: 13, 19 Mad River Gardens 3384 Janes Road, Arcata 822-7049 madrivergardens.com pages: 4, 7, 15 Many Hands Gallery 438 Second St., Eureka 445-0455 manyhandsgallery.net pages: 4, 13, 16, 18 Miller Farms Nursery 1828 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-1571 millerfarmsnursery.com pages: 6, 7, 9

Pen & Pine penandpine.com pages: 9, 11 Picky Picky Picky 600 E St., Eureka 444-9201 pickypickypickystores.com pages: 3, 5, 6, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19 Plaza Shoe Shop 699 G St., Arcata 822-1125 pages: 3, 7, 15 Pure Water Spas 3750 Broadway, Eureka 444-8001 jaysooter.com pages: 7, 15, 17 S.T.I.L. 2940 Broadway #E, Eureka 269-0210 stilhumboldt.com pages: 10, 13, 20, 23 Satori Wellness 1551 Nursery Way B, McKinleyville 839-4599 satoriwellness.org pages: 20 Trinidad Art Gallery 490 Trinity St., Trinidad 677-3770 trinidadartgallery.com pages: 6, 11 W.E. Roberts Gallery of Arts and Culture, Trees of Mystery Giftshop page: 11

Profile for North Coast Journal

North Coast Journal 11-26-2020 Edition  

NCJ Gift Guide 2020, plus Humboldt's COVID status goes purple, possible new county supervisor, and it's apple cider season!

North Coast Journal 11-26-2020 Edition  

NCJ Gift Guide 2020, plus Humboldt's COVID status goes purple, possible new county supervisor, and it's apple cider season!

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