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11 Mountain lion mama 19 Have your cake and vote, too 20 Ramble on

Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 Vol. XXXI Issue 43 northcoastjournal.com

D L CO RT O F M O C

s e s i r e t a t s e l a e e g r n t a d l h o c b e t Hum OVID, clima amid C EINR W E N I A L BY E

EB


Endorses Humboldt & Del Norte Labor Council Endorses

Working People Building A Better Eureka Together • Closes property tax loopholes benefiting wealthy corporations. • Cuts small business taxes. • Reclaims billions every year to invest in our schools and local communities. • Exempts homeowners, renters, small businesses and agricultural land so they continue to be protected by Prop 13. • Prioritizes transparency and accountability by requiring public disclosure of all new revenues and how they are spent. • Just 10% of California’s most expensive nonresidential commercial properties account for 92% of Prop 15’s loophole-closing revenues.

A BUSINESS MODEL BASED ON THREATS, SHUTDOWNS, AND EXPLOITATION • Creates a loophole in existing law just for app-based companies to continue exploiting their workers for profit. • Lets app companies boost their profits by refusing to provide their drivers with the benefits required under current law like paid sick leave, unemployment insurance, or healthcare. • Prop 22 waters down existing protections for workers against harassment and discrimination, and eliminates required sexual harassment training as well as the obligations on Uber and Lyft to investigate both customers’ and drivers’ harassment claims.

Humboldt & Del Norte Labor Council Endorses

Working People Building A Better Arcata Together 2

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS

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Mailbox 11 News

About that Mountain Lion Video …

15

NCJ Daily Online 16 On The Cover Cold Comfort

18

Home & Garden Service Directory

19 On the Table Election Cake

20 Get Out!

Hiking in Place with the Ramblers

21 Fishing the North Coast

Salmon and Anglers Waiting on Rain

22 Calendar 25 Field Notes

Every Breath You Take

25 Screens

Lingering Feelings

26 Workshops & Classes 27 Sudoku & Crossword 30 Classifieds

Oct. 22, 2020 • Volume XXXI Issue 43 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2020

PUBLISHER

Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com GENERAL MANAGER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com BREAKING NEWS CORRESPONDENT

Kym Kemp kym@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com ART DIRECTOR

Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com MEDIA ADVISOR

John Harper john@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com MARKETING SPECIALIST

Kara Scofield kara@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER/DISTRIBUTION

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

Feed your 2020 election feelings with election cakes. Yes, they have liquor in them. Read more on page 19. Photo by Mark McKenna

On the Cover Photo illustration by Jonathan Webster

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

Saturday, October 24 at 4 PM Hospice of Humboldt and KEET-TV invite you to a free ONLINE screening of the documentary Speaking Grief, which explores the transformative experience of loss in a society that avoids the expression of sorrow. After the film, Dr. Gina Belton with Redwood Palliative Psychology will facilitate conversations with participants exploring how grief is a universal yet individual experience. She will support you with discovering your path through this process.

Sign-up at workshop@keet.org

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MAILBOX

Terry Torgerson

Editor: I agree with Fhyre Phoenix’s suggestion about offering refuge to people who are living with an intolerable degree of smoke (Mailbox, Oct. 8). We here on the coast are so lucky. Our air quality is much better than the air inland. We should be doing something to help. At the very least we could offer free camping. The large area between U.S. Highway 101 and the ocean just south of Orick used to be available for campers for free. The county should permit that again. Contact your supervisor. Martha Walden, Westhaven

stance inclusive of all, campaign spending requires reform so allegiance lies with the people and not with those intending favors. It’s sinful the amount of money spent on campaigns when the needs are so great. Mr. Rogers said: “There are three ways to ultimate success: The first way is to be kind. The second way is to be kind. The third way is to be kind.” No one is perfect yet our present Commander in Chief fails to embrace this concept at all. His rhetoric has become dangerously toxic. He needs to move on. Let us try to accept each other’s differences and honor them in a way that presents a compromising, peaceful reality of what it means to be united. Mairead Dodd, Eureka

‘Be Kind’

‘Concerned’

Editor: I am feeling a deep sense of grief for our country (“A Plea for Understanding,” Oct. 15). We should be more civilized and evolved than this. We are living in a realm where there are differences. Differences of beliefs. Differences of cultures. A blend of water and oil living together in one big melting pot. The earth sustains us, deserving our utmost respect and stewardship. Denying this is denying the future of those who will be here long after we have become dust. Extinction of species is a prelude for what will ultimately come. Our waters are becoming a cesspool of plastics and toxins fill the air endangering all the living. When it comes to politics I feel like a child of a bitter divorce, caught in the middle with polarized parents. Lies and power struggles have reached a level of overwhelming discord. A war brews between leaders who have lost sight of their purpose. There is no doubt our government needs a major overhaul. Our constitution necessitates fine tuning to fit these modern times, politicians should take a moderate

Editor: There have been various worries relating to voting but I am concerned about the efficiency of our county elections office (“Pandelection,” Oct. 1). Months before the primary, I went, in person, to the election department’s office, filled out the required paperwork to change from Republican to no party preference, turned it in and was assured that was all I needed to do. However, come the primary, I received only the Republican version. I waited a while to contact the election department. In the past, I had to answer phones for various offices and departments, so I make it a priority to always be friendly to whomever is stuck answering the phone. I posed the lack of my registration not being changed as a puzzle rather than complaint, abruptly I was told I could do it myself on the computer. So I did and it is changed now, but I do wonder why the paperwork I turned in didn’t get processed. Also people should be aware that not everyone has a computer or smartphone and some areas don’t have broadband anyway. Joan Collier, Eureka

‘The Very Least We Could Do’

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Continued on page 6


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MAILBOX Continued from page 4

Vote! Editor: A vote for Measure A will ensure that the city of Arcata’s trails, parks and open spaces will continue to provide users a healthy natural environment. The citizens of Arcata are extremely fortunate to have had city staff, elected officials and citizen volunteers over the years that have had the foresight to have a strategy for providing these spaces. These outdoor opportunities are recognized internationally as characteristics of a healthy community and add value to both our lives and property. The true value of these community investments cannot only be measured by numbers of users but also by type and quality of uses; environmental education, art and photography, aesthetic landscapes, encounters and closeness with nature, and many others. The heavy use of outdoor spaces during the COVID pandemic has emphasized the value of these spaces for both exercise and stress relief. I urge you to vote yes for Measure A and help maintain and improve our outdoor spaces. Bob Gearheart, Arcata Editor: This election is a perfect example of why we need ranked choice voting in Eureka and why we should vote yes on Measure C. The number of candidates running for city council is exciting. More candidates means different points of view, and voters get to hear a wider range of ideas. Unfortunately, because of our current system, there is a very good chance that we will end up with winners who got less than a majority vote. In Ward Four, five people are running, so we could have a winner who only receives 21 percent of the vote, meaning 79 percent of people didn’t vote for them. We can have elections with multiple candidates and majority winners. Measure C will allow us to vote for the candidates we truly support, rather than voting strategically against ones we don’t like. It’s still one person, one vote, but better. Vote yes on C! Caroline Griffith, Eureka Editor: My name is Liza Welsh. I am a candidate to represent Ward Four on the Eureka City Council but, today, I am writing in support of Measure C, the ranked-choice voting initiative in Eureka. Ranked choice voting is good for democracy. It gives voters the option to rank candidates by order of preference, reducing vote splitting, something that may affect us in the Fourth Ward this election. The winning candidate ends up having the support of more voters, avoiding the weak plurality effect. Rankedchoice voting has been in effect in Oakland since 2010. While working on my master of public policy (MPP) degree, I voted in two

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Oakland elections, and I found the rankedchoice system to be intuitive and sensible. I strongly support ranked-choice voting and, frankly, I wish that we already had it! I hope that Eureka voters will agree! Liza Welsh, Eureka Editor: Two days ago, a friend had a medical emergency in McKinleyville, the kind of health crisis that requires a response within minutes if there is to be minimal damage. I’m asking everyone to vote yes on Measure F so that our friends, relatives and community do not have to worry if that station is fully staffed on the day there’s a medical crisis. There’s a reason we have three stations to serve a large geographical area that includes not only Arcata and McKinleyville, but also Jacoby Creek, Bayside and Samoa. You may not ever have an emergency caused by health issues or a fire, but your neighbor might. Please consider everyone who might be, already has been or will be affected. Don’t short change our service providers. Pamela Ann Brown, Arcata Editor: Arcata Fire Department claims that 44 percent of its vehicles are out of commission due to deferred maintenance. Perhaps AFD should manage its money more wisely. According to Transparent California, the chief’s salary (total pay and benefits) was $186,983.00 in year 2016. Year 2017, it increased to $195,962.00. Year 2019, it increased again to $212,693.00. His brother’s salary, along with all battalion chiefs and captains increased substantially, too. Instead of using funds for maintenance, it went toward substantial salary increases. To review the exorbitant salaries received by the AFD, please enter Arcata Fire Department Salaries in California on the Yahoo page. Scroll down and click on Transparent California. Scroll down to Fire Protection, then click on Arcata Fire Protection District. Search records for years 2016, 2017 and 2019. State employees have had a 10 percent reduction in their salaries. Why not the Arcata Fire Department? Vote NO on Measure F (another tax). Linda Palmrose, Bayside Editor: With a pandemic, unprecedented wildfires (neither of which are going away any time soon), and a ratings-obsessed president (who, hopefully, will be going away soon) – we cannot dispute that we live in difficult times. Measure F funds the real heroes in our community — the firefighters who put their lives on the line every time someone calls 911. In an emergency, seconds count. A simple fire can easily escalate out of control. We all know this. Measure F is not perfect, but at times like this we need

to give our real heroes the resources they need to do the job. And this will cost the average household less than a couple of bucks a week. That’s a bargain. “F no,” no. “F yes.” Charles Davy, Bayside Editor: I am a Fortuna resident and fully support Measure G on the Nov. 3 ballot. Measure G extends Measure E for eight years, at which time the voters can decide if they want to continue the measure. Measure G is not a new tax. It extends current Measure E, an essential services ¾-cent sales/ use tax. All proceeds will remain in Fortuna. Fortuna voters passed Measure E in 2016 with the promise by the city to use all proceeds on: police services, programs for youth and seniors, parks and recreation improvement, streets, sidewalks and drainage, city hall administration, nuisance abatement and infrastructure improvement. A community oversight committee was formed by the mayor and city council and meets on a regular basis. The promises have all been kept. Fortuna is a safer, cleaner, better city thanks to funds derived under Measure E and Fortuna residents deserve to continue to enjoy these benefits into the foreseeable future. Please vote yes on Measure G on Nov. 3. Walt Wilson, Fortuna Editor, Your Oct. 8 article on Measure H talks of negative COVID-19 economic impacts and the $4.65 million cut in general fund spending for Eureka. A March 8, 2019, Times-Standard article talks of how Eureka’s unfunded pension liability payment was $5.4 million in 2019 and how these yearly pension debt payments will increase to $8.4 million in 2029. Eureka needs Measure H funding to restore police funding and provide services. These increasing yearly pension debt payments will slowly diminish financial gains made by Measure H. Dec. 10 and 19, 2019, articles in the Mad River Union about Measure Z explain how increasing personnel costs are diminishing services provided by Measure Z. When will government move beyond raising taxes, increasingly a partial and temporary fix, and bring forth and implement serious pension reform? Patrick Cloney, Eureka Editor: Proposition 15 requires reassessment only on large commercial and industrial properties paying property taxes at market values set when purchased, decades ago. Big corporations would pay property taxes based on current fair market value — just like the rest of us! Exemptions: residential property, in-


cluding rentals; agricultural land including timberland; land trusts, refuges, dedicated “open space”; and business property valued less than $3 million. The money, about $8 billion to $12 billion annually, must go to a “dedicated” fund, not the state general fund. It can only be paid to schools and communities. Local governments could use the funds to reduce the need for bond issues and assessments. Our schools desperately need more funding! There already is a budget shortfall, due to pandemic costs, forcing cuts to school funding. What further cuts will be forced by the cost of fires? The need is urgent — please vote yes on Proposition 15! Margaret Dickinson, Eureka Editor: For California voters the single most important vote this election may be a yes vote on state Proposition 15. You’ll correct almost 40 years of injustice in property tax law that has allowed the wealthiest corporates to benefit from a law that was sold as protection for individual homeowners (Proposition 13 in 1978). These corporations have pocketed what should be their fair share of our collective tax burden to the detriment of our schools and our communities’ safety. Homeowners and small businesses are exempt (in fact it cuts small business taxes!), as are all agricultural and timberlands. This tax will be levied on just 10 percent of our most expensive commercial properties. Proposition 15 will close property tax loopholes benefiting wealthy corporations, cut small business taxes, reclaim billions every year to invest in our schools and local communities, exempt homeowners, renters, small businesses and agricultural land so they continue to be protected by Prop 13, and prioritize transparency and accountability by requiring public disclosure of all new revenues and how they are spent. Just 10 percent of California’s most expensive nonresidential commercial properties account for 92 percent of Proposition 15’s loophole-closing revenues. Learn more at: www.yes15.org. Richard Salzman, Arcata Editor: I will be voting for Estelle Fennell for Second District supervisor. I have watched Estelle work very hard to bring many projects to fruition over the years, and believe she wants to bring many more to the finish line. Estelle is not an ideologue. She listens respectfully to all sides and is capable of changing her mind when the facts support it. She is a kind, sensitive person who I believe has had to develop a thicker skin to serve our diverse, outspoken community. Cannabis legalization was always going to be messy. It is a work in progress. She

has my support and admiration. Lisa Cyrek, Whitethorn Editor: There are times when we have “people treasures” among us, like Dr. Fauci, who is a national treasure guiding us on our coronavirus behavior from his many years of experience. Likewise, we have a local treasure in Estelle Fennell, serving on our Humboldt County Board of Supervisors. I am old enough to recall the opening

of our Humboldt radio station, KMUD. It included a news program that I never listened to until Estelle took it over and provided a half-hour of significant news and interviews. I was so impressed with the quality, I was sure she must have had experience with CBS, which she did not. Dedication, intelligence and reliable information was part of her enormous ability to contribute. A welcomed treasure. We need to retain this high level of dedication, intelligence and ability to

provide reliable information by re-electing Supervisor Estelle Fennell. Lee Becker, Redway Editor: Estelle Fennell is the right choice for the Second District supervisor. Estelle has worked diligently on the local, regional, state and federal level to bring needed resources and services to our rural district and county. Estelle was a key player in helping to Continued on page 9

Humboldt IPA The Priority Care Center Humboldt IPA/Priority Care Center is now offering Medical and Behavioral Treatment for Addictions. Patients will work with a safe, supportive professional and understanding care team to identify specific health needs and develop goals.

Services are offered for: � Alcohol Use � Opioid Use � Stimulant Use

� Tobacco Cessation � Cannabis Use � Benzodiazepine Use

Our team includes Candy Stockton, MD a Board Certified Addiction Specialist, Shawna Bell, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Addiction Specialist, Wellness Coaches and Personal Coaches.

Services are for patients over 16 years who have one of the following health plans: Anthem PPO/HMO, Blue Shield HMO, and Blue Lake Rancheria.

Please call 707-442-0478 to learn more! northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


MAILBOX Continued from page 7

consolidate the operations of the Rio Dell, Scotia, Redcrest and Shively fire departments. This will make a strong and efficient regional fire district to help protect our Southern Humboldt area. Estelle has proven herself for the last eight years in developing many working relationships, not only for the Second District but for the entire county. We urge you to vote for Estelle Fennell for Second District supervisor. Walt Giacomini, Rio Dell Editor: I want to put in a plug for Scott Bauer for Eureka City Council. Though I don’t live in his ward, I live nearby and I’ve known him for many years. He is thoughtful, passionate and very hardworking. He wants a future for Eureka that enhances opportunity for everyone and embraces families, a city that builds on our unique natural environment and small town qualities. In the short term, we know that tough times lie ahead and being on the council will require a skill set that champions innovation, thoughtful assessment and the ability to balance competing interests. It will require being a good listener, a desire to engage citizens with different points of view and working well with fellow councilmem-

bers. Scott holds these qualities in abundance and he wants to keep moving Eureka forward — to help local businesses recover from the impacts of the COVID, improve city streets and parks, add trails, protect and encourage a thriving arts scene, bring new good-paying jobs, build new housing and address neighborhood blight. Scott’s enthusiasm and can-do attitude is right for Eureka now. If you live in the Fourth Ward, please consider casting your vote for Scott – he’ll be good for all of Eureka. Elizabeth Murguia, Eureka Editor: I am endorsing Kati “Texas” Moulton to represent the Second Ward on Eureka City Council. I’ve known Kati for more than 15 years and we have worked together at North Star Quest Camp for Girls for eight years. Kati brings out the best in people with amazing projects, like the beloved Kinetic Grand Championship, which showcases creativity and brings positive recognition to our region. As camp director, Kati has helped empower hundreds of young campers navigating adolescence, and coached camp staff to be safe, fun, inspiring adults. She has shown humility in studying racial equity to open her own heart and mind to the challenges

communities of color face and reminded us that we can all learn and do better. Eureka is a microcosm of the issues affecting the state and nation, a place where we can do things differently when the same old things no longer work. Vote Kati! Julie Ryan, Eureka Editor: I have worked with Kati Moulton for more than a decade through North Star Quest Camp and have witnessed her leadership and efficiency firsthand. From her work with the Kinetic Grand Championship to the Ink People, Kati has spent her life working hard to serve and improve our community and wants to continue to do so as a councilmember. She wants to celebrate what is remarkable about Eureka and help improve what needs to be addressed. Kati is a natural leader, a nurturing mother and a downright fantastic human being. She has an innate way of bringing people together — something we could all use a little more of right now. If there is anyone I trust to shoulder the complexities of Eureka, it’s Kati. Let’s elect Kati for Ward Two! Natalia Nelson, Arcata Editor: Liza Welsh has been and always will be

a person of the highest integrity. I have seen her fight for the rights of others for the entire seven years I have known her. When she was attending university in Oakland at Mills, she went before the city council there in support of equity for small cannabis business owners. When she worked for music festivals, I saw her organize workers and assist peers who had been taken advantage of. Recently, I see her working hard to protect the benefits and pay for her fellow county workers. She spent her quarantine days this year diving head first into assembling, distributing and helping with a project to provide face shields for medical providers. Liza would go above and beyond for the people of Eureka and would absolutely be the hardest worker that the City Council could hope to have. Matt Stephenson, Eureka

Write a Letter!

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

The Women Of Eureka Natural Foods

Since the beginning of Eureka Natural Foods woman have played a major role woman in business for Eureka Natural Foods has been a pioneer in the Health Supplement & Organic Food industry for over thirty years. Now Betty’s daughter Suzanne has followed in her footsteps and oversees the Wellness and Global Goods departments, also serving on the board of directors as a co-owner. We believe that a diverse workforce ...

1450 Broadway St, Eureka • (707)442-6325

... is an innovative workforce. Working in a diverse environment can mean better talent acquisition, increased productivity, and higher job satisfaction. Eureka Natural Foods is proud of the women who work throughout our company. In these times, women have played a vital role in showing strength, intelligence, and resilience when it is needed most. To the women of Eureka Natural Foods and Humboldt, we thank you.

3265 Central Ave, McKinleyville • (707)839-3636 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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We’re Looking For The

Best

COMPANIES TO WORK FOR Humboldt County 2020

1 2

Top Companies GOHumCo is looking for the top companies in Humboldt County that set the standard for work environment, rewards and recognition, benefits, communications, responsibility and decision-making, and executive leadership for Humboldt County’s Best Companies to Work For program in 2020.

Submit your company to be in the running.

TheHumboldtsBest.com

When nominations do close later this year, you’ll be contacted and will receive an email for this program. This email will provide the survey which the HR contact at your company will be responsible for sending to all your FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES ONLY. Please note employee participation requirement in order to qualify: Small Companies (5-49 full-time employees) = 70% participation Midsize Companies (50-150 full-time employees) = 50% participation Large Companies (150+ full-time employees) = 30% participation

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3

If your company makes the FINAL list, your HR representative will be contacted directly to announce the exciting news.

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All companies that make the FINAL list will be featured in the North Coast Journal in January 2021, where Humboldt County’s Best Companies to Work For will be announced in real-time.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


NEWS

About that Mountain Lion Video … By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

A mountain lion, like this one, was protecting her cubs, not stalking a runner who came along the family in Provo, Utah. California Department of Fish and Wildlife/File

C

hances are most people have seen — or at least heard about — the now viral video of a Utah man who went out for a run in a Provo canyon on Oct. 10 and ended up face to face with a very angry mama mountain lion. For six tense and profanity-laced minutes, Kyle Burgess kept filming with his cellphone as he backed away from the cougar, sometimes cussing and other times telling her she needed to go back to her babies, which he had inadvertently stumbled upon on a trail, at first mistaking the cubs for bobcat kittens. “I don’t feel like dying today,” Burgess says at one point in the video posted to his Instagram account.

(Spoiler alert: He was shaken up but otherwise fine, and had to traverse the same area of the encounter to get back to his car, according to an interview in the Deseret News, but did so this time while carrying a rock and a stick.) While certainly scary, several wildlife experts who have commented on the chance meeting share the assessment of Humboldt County conservationist and California State Parks guide John “Griff ” Griffith, who described the mountain lion’s actions as a mother protecting her young. “I know a little something about mountain lions,” he says, in a recent Facebook video while taking many a media outlet to task for labeling her behavior as “stalking” in a riff that skirts the conspiracy the-

ory line. “That was not a mountain lion stalking. That was a mama mountain lion trying to get someone away from her cubs. There is a difference.” Along similar lines, Beth Schaefer, director of animal programs at the Los Angeles Zoo, described the cougar’s response as “escorting behavior” to the Los Angeles Times. In other words, the mountain lion was making it clear to an unwelcomed visitor in her territory that it was time to get (we can only imagine she would have added a certain expletive here) out. Schaefer noted the sudden pounces that caused many who watched the video to jump were actually what’s known in the animal world as bluff charges, which cats

like a mountain lion don’t use if they are about to take down prey. The truly scary part, Schaefer tells the Times, is when the mother lion disappears off-screen — which is more along the lines of a hunt — before quickly returning to the path. Those who watch it might also note she repeatedly keeps looking back in the direction of her cubs. The Mountain Lion Foundation, a Sacramento-based nonprofit dedicated to the animal’s preservation, put out a plea soon after the video went viral asking individuals and the media to be careful in how they described the encounter when sharing the story. Continued on page 13 »

Email us Here: press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: music@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: classified@northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Announcing new dental services at Southern Trinity Health Services, Scotia Bluffs We offer Behavioral Health, Covid-19 testing, Dental, Laboratory, and Medical services. We accept Medi-Cal / Denti-Cal, private insurances, and offer a slide fee discount program.

Please call Scotia Bluffs for an appointment at 707-764-5617 12

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


NEWS

The Zwerdling Law Firm is honored to have Zachary Zwerdling voted Best Attorney on the North Coast

Continued from page 11

“She clearly did not view him as prey,” Debra Chase, the foundation’s CEO, says in a post. “The behavior was meant to chase him away, which it did very well. The mother lion was reacting to a perceived threat to her young.” The foundation also states that misunderstandings about animal behavior can put not only wildlife at risk, but people as well. “We need to counter the idea that mountain lions are naturally dangerous to humans,” Chase adds. “The lion wasn’t looking for a conflict and she left the area as soon as she was able.” Griffith notes that Humboldt County is mountain lion country but even though they are around us all the time, the likelihood is most people will never see one. And that is the way they like it. Sightings do, of course, happen occasionally in both rural and more urban areas, with more than one being spotted at the forest-adjacent Humboldt State University campus over the years without incident, not to mention Cutten or Sunny Brae. But mountain lion attacks on humans are very rare, Griffith says, and if it’s going to happen, it will likely be stealthy, not the paw-pounding display the Utah cougar put on for Burgess. “They are going to attack you usually from behind,” says Griffith, a popular producer of videos about the North Coast parks, who himself went viral in the past with a posting of him dancing with a California Conservation Corp crew and hosted the online show Wild Jobs for Animal Planet. That rear approach was the experience of former Fortuna resident Jim Hamm, who made international headlines after he barely survived a 2007 attack during a hike with his wife Nell in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, where she fought off the mountain lion with a pen and a

branch. Jim Hamm died a year ago this month of pancreatic cancer. He was 82. Griffith says he’s only seen a mountain lion a handful of times, but if you do encounter one, there are basic rules to follow: Make yourself seem as large as possible, make noise, keep eye contact and slowly create space away from the animal. Never run away. In that regard, Griffith says Burgess did just about everything right, except bring a partner along for the run in a rural area, which would have allowed one person to keep acting big while another reached for a rock or other implement to chase the cat away. Ultimately, the encounter ends when Burgess does throw a rock, which he told Griffith about after getting wind of Griffith’s original video and coming on board to film a follow-up. Burgess says she kept bluff charging every time he started to reach down and he waited until there was a bit more room between the two of them to finally grab one and send her scurrying. The 26 year old says he hopes to turn his experience into one that can help people better understand and respect wildlife. “This video has shown a lot of people things they’ve never seen before,” Burgess says, with Griffith quickly chiming in, “Biologists things they never seen.” “Exactly,” Burgess responds. When asked, the avid runner says he doesn’t regret the encounter. “I’m just glad we both went out of this unscathed,” Burgess says.

If you have been in a serious motor vehicle accident, you may start receiving direct “solicitations” from law firms outside the area who want your case. These solicitations are illegal and should be reported to the State Bar. Out-of-town law firms will sometimes create a website or post a YouTube video about your accident. While not technically illegal, these are indirect efforts to solicit you as a client. Beware many of these lawyers (who seem to be primarily from Los Angeles) do not have significant trial experience and no connection to Humboldt County. They are looking for quick lowball settlements from the insurance company.

Please take a look at our blog post, zwerdlinglaw.com/blog, which discusses these issues more in detail. 937 6th Street, Eureka, CA | (707) 798-6211 office@zwerdlinglaw.com | zwerdlinglaw.com

● Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the digital editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear.

NCJDAILY

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

13


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Humboldt Country Strong – For Over 40 Years 14

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Veiled Display

Arkley’s ‘Dog Ranch’ Sold to Conservation Coalition

I

t turns out “never, ever, ever, ever, ever” isn’t so long after all — sometimes it’s a little more than 15 years, in fact. Back in 2005, after swooping in at the 11th hour to outbid Friends of the Dunes and the Humboldt Bay Harbor District for a 200-acre property on the Samoa Peninsula known as the Dog Ranch, foiling preservation plans, Eureka businessman and billionaire Rob Arkley made no effort to conceal his glee, according to a report in the Journal. “They got in second place!” he said, adding that one of the first things he intended to do was fence the property off from public access. “And it’ll never, ever, ever, ever be sold to them. I’m not going to give it to the government agencies. I believe there’s far too much government land.” While it’s unclear what prompted the change of heart or wallet, there clearly was a change, as Friends of the Dunes announced Oct. 15 that it, the Harbor Dis-

trict, the Wildlife Conservation Board, the California Natural Resources Agency and the California Coastal Conservancy had completed a deal with Arkley’s Security National Investments X to purchase the property “for the purposes of conservation and public access.” Arkley put the property west of the Samoa Bridge — which included an older home, outbuildings, a ranch facility, a wide swath of sensitive dune habitats and an ecologically significant piece of coastal forest — back on the market in 2014 with an asking price of $2 million. Friends of the Dunes Executive Director Mike Cipra said the final purchase price was “right around” that number. Cipra, who said he “picked up the keys from Security National” on Oct. 16, described the property as special and repeatedly expressed gratitude to the other agencies and organizations involved in the purchase. — Thadeus Greeson POSTED 10.16.20. Read the full story online.

Isadora Sharon joined Shoshanna and Jessica Vonada practicing with their long veil during rehearsal of “Veil/Re-Veil” before sunset on Moonstone Beach. The dance, with no in-person audience, was part of the Arcata Playhouse Arts virtual presentation Intersections, Where We Meet, which featured remote performances from locations around the county and beyond. See the full slideshow at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 10.20.20. Photo by Mark Larson

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Charges Filed: Humboldt County District Attorney Maggie Fleming announced Oct. 16 that her office has charged the driver of a red Jeep who drove through a crowd of protestors on May 30 with reckless driving. The person who was hit suffered a concussion and significant bruising. POSTED 10.16.20

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

northcoastjournal

Homicide Investigation: Pelican Bay State Prison authorities are investigating the death of Joshua E. Kirtley, in prison for the 1998 murder of Paul Sanders at a marijuana grow in the Southern Humboldt area, as a homicide. He was found dead in his cell on Oct. 17. POSTED 10.19.20

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Yurok Homeless Grant: The Yurok Tribe received a $2.2 million grant from California’s Homekey Program to address homelessness, the same grant St. Joseph Health received for its Providence Eureka housing project. POSTED 10.16.20

northcoastjournal

They Said It

Comment of the Week

“To recognize the land is an expression of gratitude and appreciation to those whose homelands we reside on and is a recognition of the original people and nations who have been living and working on the land since time immemorial.”

“ Mac and cheese is back!!!! I’ve missed you so!”

— A staff report by Eureka City Clerk Pam Powell on an agenda item being decided as the Journal was going to press on opening council future meetings with a land acknowledgement. POSTED 10.17.20

newsletters

— Reader Debbie Rush commenting on a Facebook post about the news that Italian restaurant mainstay Babetta’s is starting to offer a trio of family-sized take-out meals, including one of Rush’s apparent favorites. POSTED 10.19.20

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

15


ON THE COVER

Homes in Trinidad. Photo by Mark Larson

Cold Comfort

Humboldt real estate rises amid COVID, climate change By Elaine Weinreb

“I’d never come here before ... I found Trinidad on a map — and here I am.”

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

H

umboldt County hasn’t always been well known to the rest of the state, with many Californians placing the northern border somewhere near San Francisco, long unaware one could drive six hours past “the City” and still be south of Oregon. But things are different now. The Redwood Curtain has been lifted. Trinidad has always been a tourist town but longtime residents will tell you this year has been unlike others in the past. Despite COVID-19, the streets of the tiny village were crowded with strangers and the big parking lot next to Trinidad State Beach was packed day in and day out. License plates were from Utah, Texas, Arizona and other hot, dry states. Long lines formed for take-out service at the town’s restaurants. While the tourists are usually gone by Labor Day, the season continued well into October this year. A few said that

16

they were fleeing the fires and looking for permanent housing. Many more said they were escaping the smoke that has blanketed the entire West Coast. Though there were smoky days here, it just didn’t seem as bad as where they came from. But the most common comment was that it was cool. They were not referring to lifestyles. They were referring to temperature. While 78 degrees might be a record-breaker for the foggy coastal town of Trinidad, it was not 110. Wildfires — and the hot, dry conditions that drive them — are the most visible symptom of climate change. Scientists warn more rather than fewer of them are likely as the global temperature inexorably climbs upward. But the change is not evenly distributed and the increase of even one degree can make a great deal of difference in local climate, says National Weather Service

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

warning coordination meteorologist Ryan Aylward. In coastal Humboldt, according to graphs furnished by Aylward, the average temperature has increased by two degrees Fahrenheit over the past 30 years. In comparison, Ukiah, some 150 miles to the southeast, has increased by three degrees, making a town that was always hot in the summer now unbearable to many. Realtors are well aware that Humboldt’s coastline has suddenly become attractive as a climate refuge to both Californians and residents of other states. “I’d never come here before,” one house hunter said. “I found Trinidad on a map — and here I am.” Others have come here before for vacations and decided it might be a good place to settle in — especially if their jobs enable them to work remotely, something many are doing in the COVID age. And, as restaurants, small shops and

entertainment venues began closing, the attraction of large cities — with the crowds and higher rates of COVID — is losing its luster for some. Statistics kept by the California Association of Realtors show that home sale prices in the Bay Area and Southern California have started to drop as people emigrate to less crowded areas. And, not surprisingly, housing prices have risen in the coastal areas of Humboldt County. “Real estate follows the laws of supply and demand,” local Realtor Patti Stearns said. “The supply is limited; the demand is high; so the prices go up.” Stearns, who notes 60 percent of her new buyers are from outside Humboldt, estimates the price of a two-bedroom house in Arcata as $350,000 and one in Eureka as $300,000. Prices, however, can go a lot higher. “When people come here from other areas, they are initially surprised by the


WHAT SHOULD PUBLIC TRANSIT LOOK LIKE IN MCKINLEYVILLE? prices. They have the ‘Humboldt Dream’ in their mind,” Stearns said. “They want clean, breathable air, and open space. They want a nice big house with a lot of acreage that is close to town but has lots of privacy. They don’t want to be in a subdivision. They are surprised to realize that even if they can find this combination of attributes, it may cost over $5 million.” Another factor in the real estate boom is the drop in interest rates. With rates hovering at about 2.5 percent, the cost of a mortgage is much lower than it would have been five years ago. Somebody who might not have previously dreamed of buying a fixer-upper can now borrow the money to make the necessary repairs without going broke in the process. But salaries, like temperatures, are not evenly distributed throughout the state, and rural counties like Humboldt are not in the same range as large urban ones. So, a Bay Area climate refugee who is able to hold onto a high-paying tech job and work from home has a distinct financial advantage over a local nurse or teacher who thought they’d saved enough for a down payment on a starter home. Meanwhile, a strong housing market coupled with a limited housing stock puts additional pressure on the rental market, pricing some current residents out of it. With prices increasing, there is an incentive for property owners to put their houses up for sale, which means if it was previously being rented, the tenants must find a different place to live. This can be difficult in an environment where there is already a shortage of rental housing. “I have people who are waiting for a house to come onto the market — and in the meantime they are renting here,” said Mike Reinman, the owner of North Coast Furnished Rentals. He noted there is an incentive for owners of rental properties to convert cheap unfurnished apartments or houses into more lucrative furnished rentals. Moreover, state and local laws protecting tenants against eviction because of COVID-related financial problems have had an unforeseen side effect. Some landlords, especially small landlords who own one or two rental properties and depend on the rent for their own income, may be beginning to wonder what would happen to them if their tenants couldn’t

pay the rent. Those cases might create another incentive to put rental property on the market while they still can — resulting in more displaced tenants. Few people are willing to discuss their financial difficulties publicly — but a close look at the local housing section of Craig’slist shows about a third of the listings are from people wanting housing. Many convey a sense of desperation. “I’m looking for a studio in Arcata,” said one young woman, “but I’ll settle for anything within a 45-mile driving distance.” Lowest rents, not surprisingly, can be found in Crescent City, which is 78 miles north of Arcata. For those with a mobile home, RV or a tiny house, a space can be had for less than $400 a month compared to double for a one-bedroom apartment in Arcata, at around $900 per month. That’s not including deposit, the possible need to pass a rigorous screening test and a potential several month wait to get in. At the bottom of the ladder are those without any four walls to call their own, camping in their vehicles, couch-surfing with friends or doubled up with other family members. Even getting into a homeless shelter requires one to be connected to a social services agency. And there is a three- to five-year waiting list for affordable housing units sponsored by HUD, also called “Section 8 housing.” One elderly woman, who asked not to be identified, said she had finally gotten into a HUD apartment “after being on the waiting list for three years.” How will this all turn out? Will Humboldt turn into another Carmel, available only to millionaires? Will a sudden housing boom place even more pressure on our agricultural and forested lands? What will happen when sea level rise becomes more noticeable and unaffordable flood insurance starts affecting residents of King Salmon and the peninsula? Only time will tell.

“I’m looking for a studio in Arcata,” said one young woman, “but I’ll settle for anything within a 45-mile driving distance.”

We’re studying how to improve public transit in McKinleyville. If you live or work there, we want to hear from you!

Where do you travel to or from in McKinleyville, and how could transit get you there and back? What transit improvements do you think McKinleyville needs?

Visit www.mckinleyvilletransitstudy.com or email mckinleyvilletransitstudy@gmail.com to let us know.

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● Elaine Weinreb is a freelance journalist. She tries to repay the state of California for giving her a degree in environmental studies and planning (Sonoma State University) at a time when tuition was still affordable.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com


ON THE TABLE

Election Cake

A recipe for democracy (don’t mess it up) By Nora Mounce

onthetable@northcoastjournal.com

I

n the highly charged political culture of the day, hardly a word has been left untagged with electoral rhetoric. Take “patriotic”: the darling of the conservative minority, coopting the red, white and blue, and displays of affection for our incredible yet terribly flawed nation. On the other hand, progressives have claimed “science,” once a benchmark of Gen Ed, yet somehow now a popular elective. Regardless of political bent, few seem to be enjoying the hostile bifurcation of our country. So far, 2020 has ushered in periods of civil unrest unseen since the Vietnam War era and the COVID-related deaths of almost a quarter-million Americans. Families are advised to stay physically distant by public health officials, and doubtless some are finding it a convenient way to avoid relatives whose yards bear the wrong campaign signs. Wading into the mess, “vote” is often waved as a white flag that says, “I’m not here to fight with you on Facebook — just vote.” Former First Lady Michelle Obama gave an impassioned speech during this year’s Democratic National Convention wearing a V-O-T-E necklace and last week, Demi Lovato performed at the Billboard Music Awards in front of giant white block letters reminding us to “VOTE.” At the same event, Lizzo accepted an award in a dress stamped all over with the word. Personally, I’m clinging fast to the hope that November delivers swift and radical change. But if we believe in the project of American democracy, despite it being Swiss cheesed with holes (holes like rac-

Mark McKenna

ism), an election should be determined by the will of the people. People have fought and died for our privilege to vote. Other people are fighting right now to remove that right from immigrants, the differently abled and elderly Americans who desperately need the protections that will come with a new administration. With less than two weeks until Election Day, please, in the name of whatever you consider holy, vote. To lean into the spirit of civic duty and make the most of our #staythefuckhome lifestyles, try baking your politics into this fortifying election cake. With an Americana twist on the boozy fruitcakes popular in colonial times, election cake recipes date back to the Revolutionary War. Cookbook author Amelia Simmons is credited with publishing the first election cake recipe in 1796, which called for a whopping 8 pounds of flour and 4 pounds of raisins. Women, who of course couldn’t vote themselves, would bake massive quantities of the cake to encourage (white) men to participate. The tradition was a way for women, stripped of representation until 1920, to celebrate the crown jewel of democracy: Election Day. A highly malleable recipe, my own version blends European and North American traditions by showcasing hearty dried figs, zesty candied ginger and Jack Daniel’s. Traditionally baked as a Bundt cake, I downsized to a cupcake tin to stay in vogue with pandemic etiquette single servings. Feel free to use whatever dried fruits, nuts and brown spirits you have on hand — your election cake is your decision. Don’t mess it up!

Thanks for local, regional journalism. Members “ say, ”

Election cake for our times: spicy, boozy and individually portioned.

Consistently great job by NCJ staff; thank you.

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2020 Election Cake Ingredients: ¼ ounce packet active dry yeast ½ cup warm water (about 105 F) 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour, divided ½ cup dried figs, chopped ½ cup candied ginger ½ cup walnuts, coarsely chopped ¼ cup Jack Daniel’s whiskey ½ cup, plus 1 tablespoon firmly packed dark brown sugar ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom ¼ teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature 2 eggs ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract 6 ounces confectioner’s sugar 3 tablespoons orange juice Grease a 12-cup muffin pan with butter or fill with cupcake liners. Sprinkle yeast over the warm water in a large bowl. Stir, then let stand until the yeast has dissolved and the mixture bubbles on top, 1-2 minutes. Add ¾ cup flour into the bowl and stir until smooth. Cover and set aside in a warm place for about 30 minutes or until the mixture has large bubbles on the surface. Meanwhile, place the dried fruit, walnuts, whiskey and 1 tablespoon brown sugar in a small pot over medium heat. Stir until the sugar is dissolved and mixture is hot and bubbling. Remove from heat and

allow it to cool. In a medium bowl, whisk together remaining flour, cinnamon, cardamom and salt. When the flour-yeast mixture has risen, beat the butter, the remaining ¾ cup brown sugar with an electric mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes. Beat in the eggs, 1 at a time, until combined, then add ½ teaspoon vanilla. Beat in the flour-yeast mixture. Reduce the mixer speed to low, then gradually beat in the flour-spice mixture, followed by the fruit-nut mixture. Beat on medium until well blended. The dough should be soft and elastic, almost like brioche dough or an extremely thick batter. Distribute the dough evenly in the prepared cupcake tin, filling each no more than ¾ full. Cover the pan with a dish towel and let the cupcakes rise in a warm place for 1 hour. When cupcakes are almost done rising, preheat oven to 375 F. Uncover the pan and bake until cupcakes are golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean, 18-20 minutes. Let cool in the pan and then loosen sides with a small metal spatula before removing each cupcake, allowing them to cool completely on a wire rack. Before serving, stir together confectioners’ sugar and orange juice, thickening to your preference with more or less sugar. Pour glaze over each cupcake and allow to set before serving. ● Nora Mounce (she/her) is a writer and educator based in Humboldt County.

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The Ramblers spread out on the Ma-le’l Dunes. Photo by Louisa Rogers

Hiking in Place with the Ramblers

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

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getout@northcoastjournal.com

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

he North Coast, with its wealth of natural environments to explore, from mountains and marshes to river trails and redwood forests, is also rich in hiking groups. Recently I checked out one of the oldest: the Ramblers. We met promptly at 9 a.m. at the Ma-le’l Dunes south parking lot on a sunny Monday morning. For the next two hours, seven of us followed leader Gail Popham to tromp through coastal forest, steep sand dunes and beaches in what the Bureau of Land Management brochure calls “one of the most biologically diverse dune communities on the West Coast.” Our group consisted of two men and five women, mostly single, all 60 and up. As we walked in ones, twos and threes, masked or carefully separated, we were sometimes companionably silent, other times chatting about the pandemic, real estate prices, the marriage of two members last year, other local hiking groups and the breathtaking views. Noticeably — and to my relief — no one brought up politics or the election season.

The Ramblers was started in 2007 by Kathy Layton and Jenny Hanson, who met in a hiking class offered by Elderhostel (now Road Scholar). Afterward, they agreed they wanted to create an ongoing group for people who liked to walk. Layton was new in town and unfamiliar with the area, but was willing to create and manage the mailing list, while Hanson, a professional nature guide, knew the North Coast intimately. Though their members joined by word of mouth and never through advertising, at one point they had more than 200 on the list, with 10-15 people on a hike, occasionally up to 30. “The Ramblers was more than just a hiking group,” Hanson says. “Over time we developed into a cohesive, close-knit group with anniversary parties and a culture of civility and inclusion, providing a safe place to be outside with other people.” For years, every Monday and Friday the group would hike all over Humboldt and Del Norte counties, from Jedediah Smith State Park near Crescent City to the Avenue of the Giants. Then came the pandemic. “When we found out that


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

hiking was one of the exceptions to the shelter-in-place rule, we never missed an opportunity,” says Popham. But since members are discouraged from carpooling, they choose trails closer to home. Recent scheduled hikes included Trillium Falls in the Redwood National Park, Patrick’s Point, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fortuna Riverwalk, the Hammond Trail and the Hikshari’ Trail. Most hikes are 3 to 4 miles, or about two hours. No dogs are allowed. During COVID-19, some members continue to walk, while others temporarily dropped out, interpreting the shelter-inplace rules more strictly. Numbers now range from seven to 12 and hikers wear masks or maintain 6-foot separation. Popham joined the Ramblers three years ago after retiring from her job as a Caltrans biologist. In her role as leader, she sends out the hiking schedule, choosing from a pool of around 50 hikes and alternating between northern and southern locations. During the hike, she keeps an eye on the slower walkers, making sure no one gets lost. (As someone who has gotten lost at Ma-le’l Dunes, I was grateful to be looked after.) Photographer Gary Todoroff says, “I joined as a way to get past my doldrums after my wife’s death.” His friend Annie, who went to the same church, thought he should get out of the house more and go hiking, biking and camping. Eventually, as they spent more time together outdoors, their friendship deepened and last year they got married. Karen Nessler, a widow from Blue Lake, began hiking with the Ramblers two years ago but had to pause when she broke her arm after tripping on a rock on a hike at Trinidad Head. Nessler moved to Blue Lake when she was 10. “I spent most of my life here, worked as a clerk for the city of Blue Lake and raised a family,” she says. “I had no idea there were so many beautiful areas to visit nearby. I just love being out in the fresh air with friendly people who enjoy exploring nature.” The Ramblers, like Coleridge, Wordsworth and others throughout history who’ve taken up this ancient practice, know that walking in areas of natural beauty is a balm for the spirit — even more so during this poignant era of isolation, fear and stress. People interested in the Ramblers can contact gailpopham@gmail.com. ● Louisa Rogers (she/her) is a leadership coach and writer who lives in Eureka and in Guanajuato, Mexico.

McKinleyville resident Alyssa Cardoza landed this nice king salmon last weekend while trolling the Chetco River estuary. With very little rain forecasted for the rest of the month, the Chetco estuary is the best bet for fresh kings. Photo courtesy of Curt Wilson

Salmon and Anglers Waiting on Rain

341 West Harris St., Eureka 707 445-3138

poletskis.com

By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

I

n an all too familiar pattern, October is again looking like it will be void of substantial rainfall. Aside from a few weak systems, it seems we won’t see enough rain to put a rise into any of our North Coast rivers or open them up to fishing anytime soon. This is nothing short of torture for coastal salmon anglers chomping at the bit to drift the Smith, Chetco or Eel rivers. What makes it even more painful are the memories that keep popping up on social media showing big green rivers, very large salmon and even bigger smiles. Humboldt and Del Norte counties have been dry since the weekend of Oct. 11, when just enough rain fell to put the Smith and Chetco on a very slight rise. That got some fish out of the estuary and into the lower sections of the river, but it wasn’t enough to open the rivers to fishing. There hasn’t been any rain to speak of since then. And there isn’t much on the horizon. “There is a weak front moving into the area on Friday night and into Saturday morning,” said Kathleen Zontos of Eureka’s National Weather Service. “It won’t do much to our river levels. We’re looking at maybe 1/10 of an inch in the Smith basin and less in Humboldt. Another weak system is forecasted for the 27th, but that is looking light as well. A ridge of high pressure has been either blocking or weakening systems that are trying to move onshore and forcing storms to track far to our north, keeping them from sagging into the northern end of the state. The models are showing below normal rainfall at least through the end of the month.”

Upper Trinity quota update

According to CDFW, the Upper Trinity quota for adult king salmon will be met as of 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 25. This triggers the closure of the adult Chinook salmon fishery downstream of the Old Lewiston Bridge to the State Route 299 West bridge at Cedar Flat. No closure date has been provided for the Lower Trinity. The Upper

Klamath, which closed to the reten97 tion of adult kings on Oct. 18, and Upper Trinity will remain open for harvest of jack (2-yearold) Chinook salmon (less than or equal to 23 inches). All adult Chinook salmon caught must be immediately released and reported on an angler’s North Coast Salmon Report Card.

The Rivers: Trinity We started to see some fresh salmon move into the Junction City area last week, reports Junction City Store owner Frank Chapman. “Right now, there’s a mix of older fall fish and some really bright ones,” said Chapman. “Quite a few steelhead showed up as well, so the fishing has really picked up in our area. Roe under a bobber has been really good for salmon and will also catch steelhead.”

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Chetco Salmon fishing has been fair on the Chetco estuary, reports Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. “One or two big fish are being caught a day, along with a decent number of jacks, but boat traffic has increased and overall catch rates are a fish for every fifth or sixth rod,“ said Martin. “The outgoing tide has been best. Lots of salmon moved upriver with the rain in early October, while salmon also are being caught and released by anglers finding for rockfish in the ocean.” l

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Read the full fishing forecast at www. northcoastjournal.com. Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast. com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


Calendar Oct. 22 – 29, 2020 22 Thursday DANCE

Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Learn Brazilian dances with instructors Rocío Cristal and María Vanderhorst. All levels. Limited to five people. Register online. $15. talavera.rocio@gmail.com.

LECTURE Submitted

Well, happy 20th anniversary, Northcoast Regional Land Trust. No way the folks who’ve spent the last two decades conserving wild and working landscapes are going to let a pandemic stop them from celebrating and fundraising. Instead, the annual Boots & Birkenstocks party goes virtual on Saturday, Oct. 24 at 6 p.m. (free). You can start perusing auction items now, ahead of guest auctioneer state Sen. Mike McGuire’s appearance at the podium. Visit www.ncrlt.org/AC2020 for details.

Redwood Coast Telecom Resilience. 4-5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Schatz Energy Research Center presents a talk on bridging the digital divide in rural areas with Karen Eckersley of the California Public Utilities Commission and Jana Ganion of the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe. Part of the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series at HSU. info@schatzcenter.org. schatzcenter.org/2020/10/sfss-ganioneckersley/. 826-4345.

MOVIES

Let’s Talk About the Middle East - Mirrors of Diaspora. 5-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Film and discussion series. HSU history professor Leena Dallasheh hosts Mirrors of Diaspora, following seven exiled Iraqi artists over three decades. RSVP at www.forms.gle/3z53fxKfRgLczu6m9 Free. ld1145@humboldt. edu. fb.me/e/2XmNTMRP8. Zero Waste October Thursday Nights Film Series. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Oct. 22: “Food Waste” (2015). Oct. 29: Group discussion. Sign up to attend by email or on Facebook. Free. zerowastehumboldt@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/ ZeroWasteHumboldt.

Always wanted to loosen your lederhosen and enjoy a traditional Oktoberfest feast of beer, bratwurst, German potato salad, red cabbage and pretzels on your couch, where you can immediately lie down afterward? On Sunday, Oct. 25 from 4-6 p.m., the Rotary Club of Arcata Sunrise serves up Oktoberfest Drive-by Dinner to-go from the Griffin ($20). Mason jar doubles of saffron and orgeat Lemon Drops and spicy Margarita d’Oros are on the pre-order menu, too, ($22) at www.arcatasunrise. org/oktoberfest-dinner.

Shutterstock

22

Huddie’s Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. Pumpkins, corn maze and farm stand. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. Pumpkin patch. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. A month-long BINGO game with a natural history twist. Photograph a spider, visit a park or make a Halloween costume. Get a card at Redwood Capital Bank in Arcata or on the NHM’s website, and enter to win a yummy prize. natmus@ humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu/natmus.

OUTDOORS

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www. facebook.com/NorthCoastRedwoods.

ETC

MUSIC

SPOKEN WORD

LECTURE

The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom.us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09

EVENTS

Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. A creative-reuse fashion show/competition to become Trashionista Gloriosa. Spectators vote by donation from Oct. 15-Nov. 13. Entry form and vote purchase online. www. kineticgrandchampionship.com/kinetic-kouture.

FOR KIDS

Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Fortuna Branch Library on its Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryFortuna. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger Badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

FOOD

Hey, you were gonna wear a mask anyway, right? So put one on, follow social distancing rules and take the little ones in your household to Arcata Main Street Trick or Treat around the plaza on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays this month from 2 to 4 p.m. (free). Just look for the ghost signs in the windows of participating shops — follow their guidelines and keep it safe and spooky.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. On YouTube at English Express Humboldt. Free. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. Free. annconstantino@gmail.com. www. sohumhealth.org. 923-3921.

Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A Facebook group to join if you like fun group singing. Song of the day posted at 3 p.m., sing starts at 7 p.m. Free. www.facebook.com/groups/quarantinesingalong. Shutterstock

the McKinleyville Eureka Natural Foods. Locally grown fruits, vegetables, plant starts, succulents, flowers and more. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

Eureka Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh and local fruits, vegetables, plant starts, flowers and more. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Food for People’s Free Produce Distribution. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Every third Thursday in the north parking lot at Bayshore mall. Masks and 6-foot distancing required. Make room for volunteers to load produce directly into the trunk. Those without vehicles can visit the Eureka Food Pantry (2112 Broadway) Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. In the parking lot of

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

23 Friday

Ask the Curator. 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Clarke Museum Curator Katie Buesch and guest hosts showcase weekly topics with a trivia contest the last Friday of every month. Past segments at www.clarkemuseum.org. Free. Dana.f@ clarkemuseum.org. www.facebook.com/ClarkeHistoricalMuseum/. 443-1947.

MUSIC

King Maxwell Quarantine Funk #9. 9-11 p.m. Virtual World, Online. King Maxwell spins funk, soul, electro, disco, roller skating jams and boogie, and adds vocoder flavor. Free. arcatasoulpartycrew@gmail.com. www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pssTRy5HLAk. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, all humans welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www.facebook.com/ groups/224856781967115.

EVENTS

The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An evening of strange tales, live chats and parlor games hosted by Altar Ego: Curious Art & Fashion Design. www.facebook.com/ events/939880849742122. Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

FOR KIDS

School-age Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD

Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh, locally grown fruits, vegetables, plants starts, flowers and more. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@northcoastgrow-

ersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Mateel Drive Through Dinners - Oktoberfest Friday. 4:308:30 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Featuring German food combo platters. Gluten-free available. Drive into the lower parking lot to place and pick up orders, and exit out the back gate. Limited socially distanced table seating on the hillside. $18, $14 vegan dinner. www.mateel.org.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Huddie’s Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 22 listing. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 22 listing. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Arcata Main Street Trick or Treat. 2-4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Stay in household groups (no gathering), keep safe distance, wear masks and follow the COVID-safety precautions of participating businesses. Dress up all month and look for the ghost sign in windows.

OUTDOORS

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

ETC

A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email inviation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com. Yoga for Ecological Grief: An online OLLI course. 2-3 p.m. and 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An accessible, heart-opening practice to work with collective pain amid socio-ecological crisis over five-weeks. All are welcome. $35. extended. humboldt.edu/olli/course/yoga-ecological-grief?fbclid=IwAR2NBuAiy2ppnbFfOER5GmOY_h7YghAq4qlQwHSvtbLRFgiVuVVTdaxAkq4.

24 Saturday BOOKS

Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms.gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

MUSIC

EmRArt with James Zeller. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Cross-platform entertainment from remote locations. James Zeller plays jazz from Arcata, and Emily Reinhart lays charcoal on birch wood in Eureka. Watch via Facebook (www.facebook. com/EmRArt) or by YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart.com. www.youtube.com/channel/UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ. Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

EVENTS

Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www.facebook.com/clubtriangl . Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. NRLT’s Boots & Birkenstocks. 6-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Northcoast Regional Land Trust’s 20th anniversary, with short films, a virtual auction from Oct. 19-25 with guest auctioneer state Sen. Mike McGuire and musical guests. Visit www. ncrlt.org/AC2020. Benefits conservation of wild and working landscapes. Free. info@ncrlt.org. events.readysetauction.com/ northcoastregionallandtrust/ac2020. 822-2242.

FOR KIDS

Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD

Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Local fruits, vegetable, plant starts, flowers and more. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Huddie’s Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 22 listing. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 22 listing. Luna Farm Pumpkin Patch. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Luna Farm, 3345 Dyerville Loop Road, Redcrest. Open weekends Oct. 17-25. Pick pumpkins. Small vegetable stand with hot apple cider, pumpkin soup and baked goods. Masks are required at all times except when eating in designated areas. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Robo-Cat Productions Present: The Bat-Tacular. 4:30-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Nearly three hours of songs, stories and short films with a bite. Prizes for brave viewers. Link to the live show at www.facebook.com/events/1008895389625818 a few days prior. Arcata Main Street Trick or Treat. 2-4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 23 listing.

OUTDOORS

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Redwood Region Audubon Society Field Trip. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Participants limited. Reservations required. Bring your binoculars and meet leader Ken Burton in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata. Rain or shine. Free. shrikethree@ gmail.com. www.rras.org/home.aspx.

21 with ID at pick up.) Benefits our Food for People’s Backpacks for Kids program and Rotary projects. $20, cocktail doubles $22. www.arcatasunrise.org/oktoberfest-dinner.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Huddie’s Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Huddie’s Harvest, 3364 Foster Ave., Arcata. See Oct. 22 listing. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 22 listing. Luna Farm Pumpkin Patch. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Luna Farm, 3345 Dyerville Loop Road, Redcrest. See Oct. 24 listing. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Arcata Main Street Trick or Treat. 2-4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See Oct. 23 listing.

MEETINGS

Readings in the Redwoods. Noon-2 p.m. Carlotta, Humboldt County. Readings of Paul Selig’s I am the Word. Email or text for directions to the outdoor firepit at the Redwood River Lodge in Carlotta and observe social distancing. Free. btngineer2011@gmail.com. www.paulselig.com. 298-3466.

OUTDOORS ETC

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

26 Monday MUSIC

Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

EVENTS

Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

FOOD

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

25 Sunday

Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Farmers and vendors bring fresh food weekly. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www. northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

COMEDY

HOLIDAY EVENTS

MUSIC

Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

EVENTS

Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Love In Lockdown Season 2. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A live virtual dating reality show. Episodes stream for a week Meet the cast on social media @limeartsproductions. $3 per episode, $10 for all four episodes. www.limearts.org/shop.

FOOD

Brunch in Bayside 100-mile Challenge. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Breakfast ratatouille with sausage or roasted shitake garnish and more, all sourced within 50 miles of the hall. Meals, including gluten-free, diryfree, vegan and vegetarian options, packed to go. Pre-order online by Oct. 23. Proceeds support window restoration. $12. baysidecommunityhall@gmail.com. baysidecommunityhall. org/content/brunch-bayside-2. 599-3192. Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Oktoberfest Drive-by Dinner. 4-6 p.m. The Griffin, 937 10th St., Arcata. The Rotary Club of Arcata Sunrise presents Bratwurst, German potato salad, red cabbage, pretzels and Halloween treats. Pre-order canned beer or cocktails. (Must be

metrc made easy

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

ETC

Sunday Service Virtual Resurrection. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Virtual stage-time with Pastor Paula and aspiring comics. Audience members welcome. Hosted by Savage Henry Independent Times. www.facebook.com/ events/1638900342951102.

gosello ut .co m/scan

Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 22 listing. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

OUTDOORS

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

ETC

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 23 listing.

27 Tuesday COMEDY

Savage Henry’s BigFish Open Mic via Zoom. 9 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Enjoy or participate in some stand-up open-mic Zoom style. Five-minute sets. Zoom: www.us02web.zoom. us/j/86421967992 Password: comedy.

LECTURE

Dr. Bettina Love. 5-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Campus/ Community Dialogue on Race Featured Speaker, Love of the University of Georgia presents “We Want to Do More than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom.” Free. cdor@humboldt.edu. dialogue.humboldt. edu. 826-5656.

MUSIC

Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


CALENDAR Continued from previous page

ELECTIONS

Vote Smarter - The Info You Need Before You Vote in 2020. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A Humboldt County Library series of Zoom events to help voters prepare before voting. Presented on Zoom. Sign-up at www.forms.gle/47x5tyLVGiPV7oy97 or on the library’s website. www.humlib.org. 269-1915.

EVENTS

Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

FOR KIDS

Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Facebook page, www. facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

FOOD

Eureka Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Fresh produce, plant starts, flowers and more. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets, 10th and Main streets, Fortuna. Local farmers bring fresh

fruits, vegetables, plants starts, flowers and more. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Farmers and vendors bring a variety of fruits, vegetables, plant starts, flowers and more. Visit the NCGA website for safety updates and protocols. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 22 listing. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

MEETINGS

Cooper Gulch Park Public Input Meeting. 10 a.m.-noon. The city of Eureka is applying for funding to make improvements to Cooper Gulch Park and would like your input to identify priorities of this community space. Spanish interpretation available. HabrĂĄ interpretaciĂłn para nuestros participantes hispanohablantes. Zoom meeting on the city website. Submit a written comment at Zoom meeting on the city website. Free. rpraszker@ci.eureka.ca.gov. www.facebook.

New 2020

com/events/691448024801547/. 441-4206. Local Homesharing Info Session. 1-1:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. If you have a spare bedroom and could use extra income or help around the house, Northcoast Homeshare (a program of Area 1 Agency on Aging) can connect you with a compatible housemate. Join the weekly 30-minute Zoom informational session. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. zoom.us/ j/2673010045?pwd=eTJvajJXaWR4eEMwOUErQlpGZHBJZz09. 442-3763 ext. 213.

OUTDOORS

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

ETC

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Virtual Reentry Legal Clinics. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Speak with a lawyer to learn about your legal rights with an arrest or conviction record, and navigating barriers related to employment, housing, public benefits, family and children, immigration, parole, probation and more. For residents of Humboldt, Del Norte, Mendocino and Lake counties, and Karuk Tribe members. RSVP for an appointment. Free. www.bit.ly/RSVPoct. (510) 279-4662.

EVENTS

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

ETC

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

SPOKEN WORD

The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

FOR KIDS

FOOD

Eureka Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Oct. 22 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Oct. 22 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 22 listing. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

OUTDOORS

24

Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

FOR KIDS

Leonardi Pumpkin Patch. Noon-5:30 p.m. Leonardi Pumpkin Patch, 1901 Christensen Lane, Ferndale. See Oct. 22 listing. Natural History Museum Halloween Bingo. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

 

MUSIC

OUTDOORS

HOLIDAY EVENTS

ance charges, and any emission testing charge. All new car fees include a

Zero Waste October Thursday Nights Film Series. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 23 listing. Kinetic Kouture: Fashion with a Re-Purpose. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 24 listing.

          

MOVIES

Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

Quarantine Sing-a-long. Ongoing, 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

 

Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Oct. 22 listing.

Drive-In Comedy w/Eric Fitzgerald. 9 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Pull in behind the club, tune into 107.9 FM. No public restroom. Mask required outside vehicle. Venmo donations @Savage-Henry. www. savagehenrymagazine.com.

COMEDY

MUSIC

www.mid-citytoyota.com

DANCE

28 Wednesday

Meet the Expert. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Humboldt-Del Norte Film Commissioner Cassandra Hesseltine interviews film industry professionals and discusses local filming. New videos posted to the commission’s YouTube channel and social media. www.youtube.com/channel/UCsbPoRUx8OJlzuLCUNlBxiw.

(707) 443-4871

29 Thursday

EVENTS

LECTURE

IN STOCK NOW!!

Virtual Reentry Legal Clinics. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 27 listing. Weekly Check-in with Rep. Huffman. Noon. Virtual World, Online. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) will hold Facebook Live check-ins to engage with his constituents on the latest updates regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic and to answer questions about the federal response. More information at www.huffman.house.gov/coronavirus. Free. www.facebook. com/rephuffman.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing. Reel Genius Virtual Trivia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Create a team via Facetime, Skype, Messenger, Hangouts etc., order some food and brews from the Madrone and play while dining outdoors, or enjoying takeout at home. Invite link will be posted prior to the event. www.facebook.com/ events/657139721581557. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 23 listing. Towards Citizenship. Virtual World, Online. Prepare to be a U.S. citizen. Local online classes to prepare for the citizenship exam/interview. Join anytime. Free. www.englishexpressempowered.com. 362-3968.

Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Oct. 22 listing.

ETC

Heads Up ‌

Pandemic Photojournalism Contest for All Humboldt County Students (Grades Preschool-16). To enter, students need to take a photo of life during the pandemic. It might be an image of how our communities look different, how home life has changed, or some other visual story. Students then complete their artist statement which will explain the story behind their image. They will also submit media permission. Contest rules and submission form available in English and Spanish at www. artsintegration.net/pandemic-photojournalism-contest.html or www.bit.ly/C19photo. Deadline: Oct. 30, 2020. Kinetic Universe’s annual Kinetic Kouture trash fashion show and competition is accepting three to 10 photos of each design between Oct. 1-31 with a completed questionnaire. Visit www. kineticgrandchampionship.com/kinetic-kouture. The Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt is seeking additional applicants for the 2020/2021 Humboldt County Civil Grand Jury. Visit www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov or call 269-1245. Interested parties may also complete, download and email an application to: GrandJuryApps@humboldtcourt. ca.gov. l


FIELD NOTES

SCREENS

Right: X-ray taken in the ER soon after my accident shows all five lobes of my lungs (white spidery lines) filling up my entire chest cavity. Left: By the next morning my right superior lobe (top left) had collapsed. “What’s that white blob in the middle?” I asked. “Your heart.” Photo courtesy of Barry Evans

Every Breath You Take By Barry Evans

The 1980s realness of this outfit is the scariest thing in the basement.

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

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ther than The Anatomy Coloring Book (you have to be a certain age), I can’t say I’ve paid much attention to my internal organs. Most of the time they all worked fine, so why worry? This lackadaisical attitude came to an abrupt end a few weeks ago when I suffered a collapsed lung — see illustration — marring 73 years, starting at age 5, of accident-free bicycling. Suddenly I had an investment in learning about lungs — their origin, how they work and how to recover full use of mine. Not to mention the arcane and painful business of chest tubes. Lungs are a relatively recent innovation in the 4-billion-year saga of life on Earth. For 90 percent of its existence here, life got by fine without lungs because it only happened in the oceans. It wasn’t until 400 million years ago, early in the warm Devonian Period, that plants established themselves on dry land (not counting non-vascular plants, like mosses, which emerged earlier). Some 20 million years later, plants were followed by tetrapod fish. Since tissues don’t leave fossils, the exact time frame is speculative, but we do know that by 360 million years ago our audacious four-limbed ancestors had traded gills for lungs — possibly with swim bladders (sacs that allow fish to change buoyancy) as the intermediate step. The invention of lungs turned out to be a giant leap for animal-kind, since it’s far more efficient to obtain oxygen from air than from water. The numbers tell the story: Air contains 21 percent free oxygen compared to less than 1 percent dissolved oxygen in water. (Fish can’t extract oxygen directly from the strongly bonded H2O molecules of water.) Fast forward to humans today. We

The Haunting of Bly Manor

breathe in and out about 12 times a minute, for roughly half a billion breaths in a lifetime. Unbidden, unappreciated. That’s a lot of available oxygen for our 40 trillion cells to use for energy while excreting carbon dioxide as a waste by-product. Which, of course, is where lungs come in: They’re essentially gas exchangers, swapping freshair oxygen for carbon dioxide. Air enters the body via the nose and mouth, through the windpipe, thence to fork left and right into the lungs. The large tubes branch out into smaller and smaller airways that terminate in some 300 million alveoli — miniscule balloon-like air sacs arranged in clusters. Tiny blood vessels surrounding the thin-walled alveoli take up oxygen while simultaneously ridding the body of carbon dioxide. That may sound more efficient than it actually is; the exhaled air still contains about 15 percent oxygen (remember it went in as 21 percent) but obviously it’s good enough to do the job of keeping us alive. One happy adaptation that evolution came up with is that our two lungs are subdivided into five lobes, three on the right and two on the left, where the heart takes up space. Happily for me, anyway: Only my right superior lobe was punctured (a result of three fractured ribs), leaving the other four lobes to carry on regardless. Meanwhile, I can report that the insertion of a chest tube — to relieve pressure and drain fluid from the chest cavity normally occupied by the lobe — was worth the excruciating pain. It did the job in five days. Big appreciative sigh! ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) can’t say enough about the wonderful care he received during his five-day stay at St. Joseph Hospital.

Lingering Feelings The Haunting of Bly Manor By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

THE HAUNTING OF BLY MANOR. As I looked up the offerings for this week, I knew The Trial of the Chicago Seven, the Aaron Sorkin drama about the courtroom aftermath of the protests at the1969 Democratic convention, would be the movie of the moment. The New York Times even published a historical explainer as a kind of viewing guide. But trapped in its political echoes as we are — amid protests and escalating police and National Guard response, on the cusp of an election that spotlights racism and other cultural divisions — reader, I recoiled. Please watch what is surely an important film and tell me how it is because for all my curiosity, I know right this second I am one righteous Sorkin Speech™ away from finally and completely losing my damn mind. Instead I retreated to The Haunting of Bly Manor, the second installment of Mike Flanagan’s haunted house series for Netflix (following in the creaking footsteps of the excellent The Haunting of Hill House) and found myself caught in another kind of echo altogether. Based on the oft-adapted 1898 Henry James novella The Turn of the Screw, the nine-part ghost story melds a handful of plots and themes from the author’s other supernatural stories, too,

“Sir Edmund Orme” and “The Romance of Certain Old Clothes” among them. (Screen Rant has a full cataloguing for those looking for seasonal reading material to keep the mood going.) A handful of Hill House cast members return in new roles and, like that first mini-series, it’s beautifully shot, engrossing horror that sustains interest and suspense, playing with the timeline and achieving more with atmosphere than high-tech effects. And like the reverberating traumas upon which Hill House is built, the heavy stone foundation of Bly Manor is heartbreak and our terror of losing ourselves. Like James’ novella, we start with a gathering, this time a wedding rehearsal dinner, where the guests gather around a fire and listen to a ghost story from a guest (Carla Gugino). In that story, set in 1987, plucky young American Dani Clayton (Victoria Pedretti) pushes past a bad interview in London and nabs a job as au pair for the orphaned nephew and niece, 10 and 8, of Henry Wingrave (Henry Thomas). Replacing the previous au pair — recently deceased — she’s to home school and care for the eerily well-spoken Miles (BenContinued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SCREENS Continued from previous page

jamin Evan Ainsworth) and Flora (Amelie Bea Smith) at the family’s country estate, the sprawling Bly Manor, with its storied portraits, double staircase, misty lake and forbidden wing. (As a wise woman once said, “You in danger, girl.”) But some of Dani’s pluck is forced, masking fear of her own ghost — one that sends her speed walking out of rooms when she catches sight of a glowing-eyed figure staring her down silently in reflections. Showing up at Bly with a spirit stalker, though, is bringing coals to Newcastle. At the property, she meets the elegant and kind Mrs. Grose (T’Nia Miller), whose composure is only occasionally broken by episodes of spacing out, and the cook Owen (Rahul Kohli), a chef cheerfully slumming it cooking for kids while he cares for his mother, who suffers from severe dementia. The wry, lightly cynical gardener (Amelia Eve) rounds out the roster of the living. All are concerned with the increasingly odd behavior of the children, with Miles growing angry and disturbingly violent, and Flora falling into trances. The pair are keeping secrets about the house, as well, and something is definitely up with Flora’s twig figures and faceless dolls. Outside the house, the appearance of former valet and vanished thief Peter Quint (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) also puts the staff on edge. The theory is that, unaware that she’s dead, he may be sniffing around after the late au pair Rebecca (Tahirah Sharif), with whom he had an affair but abandoned. While there are sections where the pacing lags, the cast — bravely decked out in period correct ’80s atrocities — is uniformly excellent and pulls one along. Flanagan was clearly born to shoot creepy mansions and, as Hill House demonstrated, has harnessed the power of the shadowy figure in the background to its greatest effect. Unlike The Turn of the Screw and the 1961 adaptation The Innocents, which I love, there’s comparatively little ambiguity beyond the practical metaphysics of the haunting. Instead, trippy time jumps give us insights into the living and the dead, sometimes transitioning us from fearing them to fearing for them. Everyone at Bly is trapped by guilt or obsession or sheer habit, repeating a cycle of grief, violence and thwarted happiness. It’s not so much death that’s to be feared as the slow wearing away of memories, leaving only, as the narrator tells us, need and rage. TVMA. NETFLIX. l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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WORKSHOPS & CLASSES List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−1231) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (D−1231) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:15a.m.−12:45p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m.−8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−1231)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1231)

50 and Better BALLET FOR ADULTS WITH NANCY CALL. Step into the beautiful world of ballet and walk out with grace, good posture, and a toned body. Appreciate the benefits of musicality, flexibility, strength, coordination, and balance. Tues. & Thurs., Nov. 3−Dec.10 from 10:30−noon. OLLI Members $125. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1022) BUTTERFAT PALACES IN DAIRYLAND WITH RAY HILLMAN. Develop a greater understanding and appreciation for the Humboldt County dairy industry and its importance statewide. Through lecture, slide show and artifacts we will explore the history of local dairying from the late 1850s to recent times. Tues., Oct. 27 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI Members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1022) DISCOVERING HUMBOLDT: LEARNING ABOUT THE EXTRAORDINARY MAN BEHIND THE NAME WITH HANNAH ECKBERG. This class will offer an intriguing historical look at this polymath and share ways his work continues to have influence today. Thurs., Oct. 29 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI Members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1022) HUMBOLDT’S HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHS AND THE STORIES THEY TELL WITH LYNETTE MULLEN. Delve into the history of well−known and familiar Humboldt County sites and events and see how structures and landscapes have evolved over time. Wed., Oct. 28 from 2−4 p.m. OLLI Members $20. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−1022)

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

GOOGLE DOCS WITH SARAH GODLIN. This course is a very basic introduction to Google Docs, Google’s word processing tool. Learn how to create a document, store it, and share it with others. Tues., Oct. 27 from 4−5 p.m. OLLI Members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1022) OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1231) THINK YOU DON’T LIKE PODCASTS? WITH MOLLY CATE. Extend your lifelong learning with these free − and often beautiful − programs. We’ll sample some of the best and explore ways to find more in areas of interest to you. Wed., Nov. 4 from 10 a.m.−noon. OLLI Members $15. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O− 1022)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1231) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1231)

Therapy & Support

FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASS Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1022) FREE GED/HISET PREPARATION CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1022) FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information and to register. (V−1008) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start anytime! Visit https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Real− Estate or call CR Workforce & Community Educa− tion for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V− 1022)

Wellness & Bodywork DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Mid− January − Mid−March, 2021, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Call or email for more info. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2021. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−1105) FOOT MASSAGE FOR COUPLES Learn how to give your dear one a soothing, nurturing foot massage to ease the worries of the day. Excellent for calming the body and the mind. Zoom course Saturday November 14, 11am−12:30pm, $15. Instructor Alexandra Seymour, Center for Reflex− ology & Intuitive Healing Arts 707−822−5395, as@reflexologyinstruction.com (W−1112)

YOUR CLASS HERE

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1231) ARCATA SMART 707−267−7868 (T−1029) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1231)

Vocational EMT REFRESHER NOV 5 − 15, 2020. Visit https://w ww.redwoods.edu/communityed/Online or call CR Workforce & Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−1022) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1022) FREE BEGINNING LITERACY CLASS Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more informa− tion and to register. (V−1022) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS Call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. (V−1022)

50 and Better Arts & Crafts Computer Fitness Kids & Teens Lectures Dance & Music Theatre & Film Spiritual Support Therapy Wellness Vocational

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1. Bit of butter 2. “What was I thinking?!” 3. It’s often brown or amber 4. Wide-eyed in wonder 5. Foot-long item? 6. “Meet the Press” host Chuck 7. “Kinda sorta” 8. Math set with an unspecified number of elements 9. Looks down on 10. Wilber who founded a fast-food chain 11. Rifle filler 12. Tropical vine 13. Sportswriter whose Twitter handle is @ Buster_ESPN

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43. NNW’s opposite 47. Lucy of “Elementary” 49. Pop-up or foul ball, say 50. “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” family 51. Doing the job 52. Some easy baskets 53. “You got that right!” 54. Many “Frozen”inspired Halloween costumes 55. “You Will ____ Tall Dark Stranger” (2010 film) 56. “SNL” alum Cheri 60. Equine : horse :: cygnine : ____ 61. River near the Sphinx 62. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit 63. Derive (from) 65. Preceder of com, org or edu 66. Swelled head 67. Free (of) 68. Fitting last word in a crossword grid

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UNMET TRANSIT NEEDS — PUBLIC HEARINGS

The Humboldt County Association of Governments (HCAOG) and its member entities will conduct Public Hearings to solicit transit needs input for Humboldt County. Meeting dates listed below will be held remotely. Please visit the websites for meeting information.

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in City of Arcata Wed, Nov 4 at 6 p.m. cityofarcata.org the will or estate, or both, of NANCY MARIE ALLEN, aka NANCY City of Fortuna Mon, Nov 2 at 6 p.m. friendlyfortuna.gov CLLEN Tues, Oct 20 at A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been City of Rio Dell cityofriodell.ca.gov 6:30 p.m. filed by Petitioner GRETA LOUISE WALDSMITH City of Trinidad Tues, Nov 10 at 6 PM trinidad.ca.gov In the Superior Court of California, County of County of Humboldt. The petition Tues, Nov 3 at 9 a.m. humboldtgov.org/167/ Humboldt Board-of-Supervisors for probate requests that GRETA LOUISE WALDSMITH be appointed HCAOG Thurs, Nov 19 at 4 p.m. hcaog.net as personal representative to administer the estate of the dece− Humboldt Transit Wed, Dec 2 at 9 a.m. hta.org/boarddent. Authority meetings/ THE PETITION requests authority to You may also send email comments to marcella.clem@hcaog.net or administer the estate under the call (707) 444-8208. For more information about the Unmet Transit Needs Independent Administration of process, please visit www.hcaog.net/documents/unmet-transit-needs Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATION unless they have waived notice or FOR PROJECT/CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT consented to the proposed action.) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Governing Board of the Redwoods The independent administration Community College District, of the County of Humboldt, State of Califorauthority will be granted unless an nia, is soliciting proposals for qualified project management and construcinterested person files an objection tion management firms in connection with capital improvement projects, to the petition and shows good proposals are due on November 13, 2020 at 2:00 PM PST. cause why the court should not grant the authority. Proposal Documents (RFQ) are available at: College of the Redwoods A HEARING on the petition will be 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka, CA 95501 Website: https://www.redwoods. held on November 19, 2020 at 2:00 edu/businessoffice/Purchasing Inquiries may be directed to: Julia Morrison, p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− Vice President Administrative Services, Email : Julia-morrison@redwoods. fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 edu. PROPOSALS ARE DUE: No later than 2:00 PM PST on November Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 6. 13, 2020. All proposals must be submitted by email to Julia-Morrison@ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of redwoods.edu. the petition, you should appear at Only proposals that are in strict conformance with the instructions the hearing and state your objec− included in the Request for Statements of Qualifications will be considered. tions or file written objections with Redwoods Community College District the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a NOTICE OF PROVISIONAL APPOINTcontingent creditor of the dece− MENT TO THE FIELDBROOK SCHOOL dent, you must file your claim with DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES the court and mail a copy to the Be advised that the Fieldbrook School personal representative appointed District Board of Trustees has provisionally apby the court within the later of pointed Colleen Barrick, Richard Grissom and either (1) four months from the Tori Holt on Monday, October 12, 2020, to vacant date of first issuance of letters to a positions representing the Fieldbrook School District area pursuant to general personal representative, as California Education Code, Section 5091. defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− The vacant positions, effective May 12, 2020 were created because of fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days the resignation of board member and vacancies that were not satisfied from the date of mailing or through the election process. personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Unless a petition bearing sufficient number of signatures of the regisProbate Code. Other California tered voters of the Fieldbrook School District calling for a special election statutes and legal authority may pursuant to California Education Code, Section 5091 is filed in the Office affect your rights as a creditor. You of the County Superintendent of Schools (901 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA) may want to consult with an within 30 days of the provisional appointment, they shall become effecattorney knowledgeable in Cali− tive appointments until the next regularly scheduled election for school fornia law. district governing boards. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept FIELDBROOK SCHOOL DISTRICT by the court. If you are a person Justin Wallace interested in the estate, you may Principal/Superintendent file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal County Public Notices of estate assets or of any petition Fictitious Business or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Petition to Administer Estate Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Trustee Sale classified@north ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Other Public Notices coastjournal.com Thomas C. Petersen Bldg 3 41130 State Hwy 299 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL PO Box 1585 Willow Creek, CA 95573 (530) 629−2557 Filed: September 23, 2020

LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314

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or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. LEGAL ATTORNEY FORNOTICES PETITIONER: Thomas C. Petersen Bldg 3 41130 State Hwy 299 PO Box 1585 Willow Creek, CA 95573 (530) 629−2557 Filed: September 23, 2020 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/22, 10/29, 11/5 (20−264)

T.S. No. 20-20137 Loan No. Sustainable / FYM RE Order No. 05941949 APN: 316-075008-000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/2/2016. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.

of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust and personal property, if any,, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust, to wit: amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $579,042.93. (Estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Title No.: 05941949 T.S. No.: 20−20137 Loan No.: Sustainable / FYM RE AP No.: 316−075−008−000 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty or necessarily a 100% owner− ship interest in the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off or resolving ownership interest issues, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the exis− tence, priority, and size of outstanding liens as well as the ownership interest(s) that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.

diately be reflected in the tele− phone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a Written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The Notice of Default and Election to Sell was recorded in the county where the real property is located, and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. OFFICE VISITS ARE BY APPOINT− MENT ONLY, NO WALK INS CAN BE ACCOMMODATED. PLEASE CALL FIRST. Date: 10/14/2020 WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Best Alliance Foreclosure and Lien Services Corp., as Trustee 16133 Ventura Blvd., Suite 700 Encino, California 91436 For Payoff/Reinstatement: (888) 785−9721 Sales Line: (714) 848−9272 or www.elitepostandpub.com

On :11/5/2020 at 10:30 AM (or as postponed from time to time), Best Alliance Foreclosure and Lien Services Corp. as the duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded 6/21/2016, as Instrument No. 2016− 011401, of Official Records in the s/Cindy Sandoval for Best Alliance office of the Recorder of Humboldt Foreclosure and Lien Services Corp. County, California, executed by FYM Real Estate, LLC as Trustor, Title No.: 05941949 Sustainable Mountain Center, LLC, T.S. No.: 20−20137 Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC Loan No.: Sustainable / FYM RE AUCTION SALE TO THE HIGHEST AP No.: 316−075−008−000 BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the EXHIBIT A United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national ALL THAT REAL PROPERTY SITU− bank, check drawn by a state or ATED IN TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, federal credit union, or a check RANGE 4 EAST, HUMBOLDT drawn by a state or federal savings MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS and loan association, or savings FOLLOWS: association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial SECTION 8: Code and authorized to do business in this state) SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE At: the front entrance to the SOUTHWEST QUARTER; County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST Eureka, CA 95501 , QUARTER; all right, title, and interest NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The conveyed to and now held by it SOUTHEAST QUARTER. sale date shown on this notice of under said deed of trust in the sale may be postponed one or property situated in said county, SECTION 17: more times by the mortgagee, California describing the land beneficiary, lien holder, trustee, or therein: PLEASE SEE EXHIBIT "A" NORTHWEST QUARTER. a court, pursuant to Section 2924g ATTACHED HERETO AND INCOR− of the California Civil Code. The law PORATED HEREIN EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT requires that information about The property heretofore described PORTION OF SAID SECTION 17 trustee sale postponements be is being sold "as is". The street LYING SOUTHERLY OF THE made available to you and to the address and other common desig− NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF US public, as a courtesy to those not nation, in any, of the real property HIGHWAY 299 AS CONVEYED TO present at the sale. If you wish to described above is purported to be: THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 1953 learn whether your sale date has vacant land AND RECORDED AT BOOK 240 OF been postponed, and, if applicable, The undersigned Trustee disclaims OFFICIAL RECORDS, PAGE 538, the rescheduled time and date for any liability for any incorrectness of HUMBOLDT COUNTY RECORDS. the sale of this property, you may the street address and/or other call (714) 848−9272 or visit this common designation, if any, shown BEING THE SAME LANDS Internet Web site herein. Said sale will be made, but DESCRIBED AS RESULTANT PARCEL www.elitepostandpub.com using without covenant or warranty, "A" IN NOTICE OF LOT LINE the T.S. number assigned to this expressed or implied, regarding the ADJUSTMENT AND CERTIFICATE OF case. Information about postpone− physical condition of the property, SUBDIVISION COMPLIANCE ments that are very short in dura− title, possession, or encumbrances, RECORDED INSTRUMENT NO. 2012− tion or that occur close in time to to pay the remaining principal sum 7130−5, HUMBOLDT COUNTY OFFI− the scheduled sale may not imme− of the note(s) secured by the Deed CIAL RECORDS. diately be reflected in the tele− of Trust and personal property, if phone information or on the any,, with interest and late charges RESERVING THEREFROM A NON− Internet Web site. The best way to thereon, as provided in the note(s), EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR ALL verify postponement information is advances, if any, under the terms of LEGAL PURPOSES IN AND ACROSS to attend the scheduled sale. the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, A STRIP OF LAND 40 FEET WIDE, charges and expenses of the AND SUCH ADDITIONAL WIDTHS The beneficiary under said Deed of trustee and of the trusts created by Oct. 22, 2020 •and northcoastjournal.com AS MAY BE REQUIRED FOR CUTS Trust heretofore executed said deedNORTH of trust,COAST to wit: JOURNAL amount • Thursday, AND FILLS, THE CENTERLINE OF delivered to the undersigned a of unpaid balance and other WHICH IS THE CENTERLINE OF THE written Declaration of Default and charges: $579,042.93. (Estimated) EXISTING ROAD WHICH BEGINS Demand for Sale, and a Written Accrued interest and additional

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7130−5, HUMBOLDT COUNTY OFFI− CIAL RECORDS. RESERVING THEREFROM A NON− EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR ALL LEGAL PURPOSES IN AND ACROSS A STRIP OF LAND 40 FEET WIDE, AND SUCH ADDITIONAL WIDTHS AS MAY BE REQUIRED FOR CUTS AND FILLS, THE CENTERLINE OF WHICH IS THE CENTERLINE OF THE EXISTING ROAD WHICH BEGINS ON THE NORTHERLY LINE OF HWY 299 AND RUNS IN A GENERAL NORTHERLY DIRECTION TO THE A POINT NEAR THE MOST WESTERLY NORTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL ONE ABOVE. EXCEPTING AND RESERVING UNTO GRANTOR, IN GROSS, AND GRANTOR’S SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, FROM ALL LANDS DESCRIBED ABOVE ("THE PROP− ERTY"), ALL TIMBER AND TIMBER MANAGEMENT RIGHTS IN PERPE− TUITY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT NECESSARILY LIMITED TO, THE RIGHT TO PRESERVE, HARVEST, ACCESS, MANAGE, INVENTORY, INSPECT, AND CONDUCT SILVICUL− TURAL PRACTICES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT NECESSARILY LIMITED TO, PRE−COMMERCIAL THINNING, PLANTING, VEGETATION CONTROL, AND FERTILIZATION. SUBJECT TO THE LIMITATIONS CONTAINED HEREIN, IT IS THE INTENT OF THE GRANTOR TO RESERVE ALL TIMBER AND FOREST PRODUCTS OF ANY SIZE, KIND, OR NATURE, INCLUDING ANY AND ALL FOREST PRODUCTS NOW OR HERE− AFTER STANDING, GROWING, LYING OR BEING ON SAID PROP− ERTY, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO MANAGE, INSPECT, INVEN− TORY, HARVEST AND TO REMOVE THE SAME AT ANY TIME HERE− AFTER. THIS RESERVATION IS NOT LIMITED TO FOREST PRODUCTS CURRENTLY GROWING OR EXISTING ON SAID LAND, BUT ALSO INCLUDES ALL GROWTH AND RE−GROWTH IN PERPETUITY. INCLUDED IN THIS RESERVATION ARE ALL NECESSARY AND CONVE− NIENT RIGHTS−OF−WAY, EASE− MENTS AND PRIVILEGES FOR THE CONDUCT OF ANY OF THE ACTIVI− TIES HEREIN DESCRIBED, IN PERPE− TUITY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT NECESSARILY LIMITED TO, THE EXPANSION OF EXISTING ROAD− WAYS AND ROAD NETWORKS, AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW SKID TRAILS, ACCESS ROADS AND HAUL ROADS, ALL TO BE LIMITED TO THE EXTENT REASONABLY NECESSARY AND CONVENIENT TO GRANTOR. THE TERMS OF THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT AGREEMENT, RECORDED IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY OCTOBER 16, 2013, DOCUMENT NO. 2013−023410−8, ARE INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE, AND GRANTOR HEREIN INTENDS THAT THE GRANT OF EASEMENT AND ALL OTHER TERMS DESCRIBED THEREIN SHALL BE BINDING UPON AND, TO THE EXTENT RELEVANT, INURE TO THE BENEFIT OF, GRANTEE HEREIN, AS A SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO GRANTOR THEREIN. ALSO RESERVING UNTO GRANTOR THE RIGHT TO USE AND DEVELOP WATER FROM ANY AND ALL SOURCES ON THE PROPERTY FOR DUST ABATEMENT AND OTHER

AND, TO THE EXTENT RELEVANT, INURE TO THE BENEFIT OF, GRANTEE HEREIN, AS A SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO GRANTOR THEREIN. ALSO RESERVING UNTO GRANTOR THE RIGHT TO USE AND DEVELOP WATER FROM ANY AND ALL SOURCES ON THE PROPERTY FOR DUST ABATEMENT AND OTHER PURPOSES RELATED TO TIMBER OPERATIONS. SAID RESERVATIONS, AND EACH OF THEM, ARE INTENDED TO RUN WITH THE LAND, AND TO BE BINDING ON ANY AND ALL SUBSE− QUENT GRANTEES AND HOLDERS OF ANY INTEREST IN THE LANDS DESCRIBED ABOVE. SIMILARLY, ALL RESERVATIONS RESERVED HEREIN ARE ASSIGNABLE, IN GROSS, TO GRANTOR’S SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS. THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO THAT CERTAIN RESTRICTIVE COVENANT AND PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION AGREEMENT, RECORDED IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY OCTOBER 16, 2013, DOCU− MENT NO. 2013−023411−117, WHICH DESCRIBES RESTRICTIONS RUNNING WITH THE PROPERTY AND BINDING ALL SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS TO CERTAIN TERMS GENERALLY REQUIRING THE PRESERVATION OF ALL FORESTS AND VEGETATION ON THE PROP− ERTY, WITH LIMITED EXCEPTIONS, FOR THE TERM OF THE AGREE− MENT. GRANTOR, ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, SHALL HAVE THE RIGHT TO ENFORCE, BY ANY PROCEEDING AT LAW OR IN EQUITY, ALL RESTRICTIONS, COVENANTS, AND CONDITIONS IMPOSED AS PART OF THIS DEED AND IN ANY SUCH ACTION SHALL BE ENTITLED TO RECOVER REASONABLE ATTOR− NEYS’ FEES AS AWARDED BY THE COURT. FAILURE BY GRANTOR TO ENFORCE ANY COVENANT, CONDITION, OR RESTRICTIONS HEREIN CONTAINED SHALL IN NO EVENT BE DEEMED A WAIVER OF THE RIGHT TO DO SO THEREAFTER. 10/15, 10/22, 10/29 (20−251)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00467 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HOME PLATE BATTING CAGES Humboldt 3751 Harris Street Eureka, CA 95503 1200 Ridgewood Drive Eureka, CA 95503 Katherine Scarpellino 1200 Ridgewood Drive Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Katherine Scarpellino, Owner/

above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Katherine Scarpellino, Owner/ Operator This September 14, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29 (20−258)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00481 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LOVE AND LAVISH PET SPA Humboldt 1884 Central Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Maci S Moser 1195 Spear Ave Unit A Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Maci Moser, Owner This September 23, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29 (20−254)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00483 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MAIDEN MABEL Humboldt 4361 Ridgecrest Place Eureka, CA 95503 Jenna L Esselman 4361 Ridgecrest Place Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jenna L Esselman This September 24, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29 (20−253)


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00507

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00492

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00478

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00516

The following person is doing Busi− ness as AFFORDABLE ESTATE SALES ON 5TH

The following person is doing Busi− ness as THINK N’ TANK BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTER

The following person is doing Busi− ness as DRESDEN STAR ORNAMENTS/ SOFTWEAR MASK/G&G ENTER− PRISES

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SISTERS CLOTHING COLLECTIVE

Humboldt 528 5th Street Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 512 I Street Eureka, CA 95501

1528 G Street Eureka, CA 95501

PO Box 3255 Eureka, CA 95501

Paul S Regalo 1528 G Street Eureka, CA 95501

Teisha M Mechetti 316 W Jackson Street Medford, OR 97501

Lori L Regalo 1528 G Street Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Teisha M. Mechetti, Owner This September 29, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Paul Regalo, Owner/Operator This October 6, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5 (20−259)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00491 The following person is doing Busi− ness as A. SANDDOLLAR BOOKKEEPING

Humboldt 1392 Port Kenyon Rd Ferndale, CA 95536 Glenn Giaimo 1392 Port Kenyon Rd Ferndale, CA 95536

10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29 (20−257)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00495 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BLACKSTONE APARTMENTS Humboldt 539 G St. #109 Eureka, CA 95501

Gail Giaimo 1392 Port Kenyon Rd Ferndale, CA 95536 The business is conducted by Copartners. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Glenn Giaimo, Partner This September 22, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 10/1, 10/8, 10/15, 10/22 (20−247)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00514 The following person is doing Busi− ness as WOMAN WITHIN WESTERN USA Humboldt 1579 13th St Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 1030 D Street Eureka, CA 95501

PO Box 6291 Eureka, CA 95502

Debra J Henner 1030 D Street Eureka, CA 95501

Virgina Beebe 539 G St. #109 Eureka, CA 95501

Women Worldwide−West Coast, Inc CA C2016778 1579 13th St Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Debra J Henner This September 29, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Virgina Beebe This September 28, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on September 10, 2015. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Beth Shipley, Treasurer This October 8, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5 (20−262)

10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29 (20−255)

10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12 (20−263)

@northcoastjournal

Let’s Be Friends

Humboldt 328 2nd Street Eureka, CA 95501 Jennifer Bessette 2355 16th Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer Bessette, Owner This October 9, 2020 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5 (20−261)

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING OF THE FORTUNA CITY COUNCIL NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Fortuna City Council will hold a public hearing on Monday, November 2 at 6:00 P.M. to consider an amendment to Title 17 – Zoning Regulations of the Fortuna Municipal Code, Adding Section 17.06.220 Small Wireless Communications Facilities and Amending Section 17.07.004 Administration. The proposed amendments will adopt design, maintenance, and performance standards for small wireless communication facilities. This meeting will be held in accordance with the Brown Act as currently in effect under the State Emergency Services Act, the Governor’s Emergency Declaration related to COVID-19, and the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 issued on March 17, 2020 that allows attendance by members of the City Council, City staff, and the public to participate by teleconference, videoconference, or both. If you wish to watch this meeting, it is scheduled to stream live on television via Access Humboldt on November 2, 2020 at 6:00 p.m. Information on the project is available at City Hall for review at the Community Development Department. Written comments may be submitted to the City Clerk in person at City Hall or by email to cityclerk@ci.fortuna.ca.us by noon on Monday, November 2, 2020. All public comments received by noon will be read into the record (limit to 3 minutes) during the meeting. If your public comments are received after noon on Monday, they may not be read into the record, but will be included in the official minutes. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Building Department at (707) 725-7600. Notification 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting (28 CFR 35.102–35.104 ADA Title II).

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME LAUREN EVENGELINE WALKER CASE NO. CV2000929 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: TALIA WALKER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name LAUREN EVANGELINE WALKER to Proposed Name CLARA EVANGELINE WALKER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 6, 2020 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: September 25, 2020 Filed: September 24, 2020 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

We Print Obituaries Submit information via email to classified@ northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

310 F STREET, EUREKA (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29 (20−252)

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT Opportunities

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ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

Hiring? northcoastjournal.com

NOW HIRING! Are you passionate about making a difference in your community? Are you tired of mundane cubicle jobs and want to join a friendly, devoted community with limitless potential? Join the Humboldt County Education Community. Many diverse positions to choose from with great benefits, retirement packages, and solid pay. Learn more and apply today at hcoe.org/employment Find what you’re looking for in education!

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN Responsible for all aspects of facili− ties management to ensure the cleanliness, safety, and security of buildings and grounds during the day − Responsible for the upkeep of lawns, and landscaping − Removing bulk trash (including appliances) − Turnover on vacant apartments − Performing work at occupied units, and reporting health and safety issues $20.00. Benefits include: sick, vacation, holiday, and health insur− ance. 30 hours weekly. Qualified candidates please submit: completed AHP employment application from our website, www.arcatahouse.org, cover letter, and a resume to HR@arcatahouse.org. Please call 822−4528 for a full job description. EOE

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FREELANCE WRITERS WANTED

(Class A or B license needed)

(707) 445.9641

Food Warehouse Associate FT Retail • Warehouse Laborers General Laborers • Planning Technician Emergency Preparedness Coordinator Pest Technician • Delivery Helper HR Generalist • Bookkeeper Customer Service Manager

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

The successful candidate will serve in the Office of Tribal Attorney and will provide a broad range or legal services to the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council, Chairperson tribal departments and entities, including consultation, research, drafting, representation in administrative proceedings, and other duties as assigned. Contractual, Salary: DOE. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Minimum of one (1) to five (5) years practicing law; at least two (2) years practicing Federal Indian Law or Administrative/Governmental Law (preferred). Juris Doctorate Degree. Member in good standing of any state bar; California Bar Membership (highly desired) or willing to obtain California Bar membership within one year of hire. Outstanding writing, research and communication skills required. Experience in employment law, civil litigation, contracts and business law, and tax law preferred. Must possess a valid CA Driver’s License (or able to obtain within 10 days of hire) and be insurable. Preference will be given to qualified Native American Indian applicants.

The North Coast Journal is looking for smart, talented writers and reporters to add to the ranks of freelance journalists who contribute news and features to the weekly paper and its website. If you’re interested in helping us tell Humboldt County’s stories, please send an email introducing yourself, along with a couple of writing samples, to editor@northcoastjournal.com with “freelance” in the subject line.

TRANSIT BUS DRIVERS

436 Harris St, Eureka, CA 95503

ASSOCIATE TRIBAL ATTORNEY

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City of Arcata

sequoiapersonnel.com

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is now hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

442-1400 ×314

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This position classified safety-sensitive. DEADLINE TO APPLY: November 7, 2020 Submit application, cover letter, resume and writing sample to: Human Resources Department,Hoopa Valley Tribe P.O. Box 218. Hoopa, CA 95546 Or call (530) 625-9200 ext. 20, Email submission: warren@hoopainsurance.com The Tribe’s Alcohol and Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

$17.36 - $19.16/hr. 20 hrs/wk - PT/Seasonal Immediate vacancies – Open until filled

Minimum Education Required: High school diploma or equivalent. Minimum Experience Required: Class B license with passenger and air brake endorsements. Applications available at www.cityofarcata.org or contact Transit Manager at 707-822-3775 or lschuetzle@cityofarcata.org

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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

SENIOR TRIBAL ATTORNEY The Hoopa Valley Tribe, a federally recognized Indian Tribe located in Hoopa, CA, seeks an Attorney to fill the position of Senior Tribal Attorney. The successful candidate will serve in the Office of Tribal Attorney under the supervision of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council and Tribal Chairman. Provides a wide range of legal services to the Hoopa Valley Tribe, including without limitation advice, negotiation, drafting, research, lobbying, representation in litigation and administrative proceedings and other duties as assigned by the Council. Senior Tribal Attorney does not provide legal services or advice to individual Tribal members, except upon resolution of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council. Contractual, Salary: DOE. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: • Juris Doctorate (J.D.) Degree. • Minimum of five to ten years practicing Federal Indian Law and/or training; or equivalent combination of education or experience. • Member in good standing of any state bar; California Bar Membership (highly desired) or willing to obtain California Bar membership within one year of hire. • Outstanding writing, research and communication skills required. • Experience in employment law, civil litigation, contracts and business law, and tax law. • Must possess a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. • Subject to a successful employment background check in accordance with Title 30A. • Preference will be given to qualified Native American Indian applicants. • This position classified safety-sensitive. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED Submit application, cover letter, resume and writing sample to the Human Resources Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546, e-mail submission to liz@ hoopainsurance.com, or call (530) 625-9200 ext. 20. The Tribe’s Alcohol and Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.


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CITY OF FORTUNA

POLICE OFFICER $47,226 – $57,457 PER YEAR (INCENTIVES AVAILABLE).

Law enforcement, crime prevention, traffic control, and crime investigation activities; specialized law enforcement assignments; community outreach. Must be 21 years of age at time of hire. Graduation from, or current enrollment in, POST Academy required at time of application. Requires valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna. com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, CA 95540, (707) 725-7600. Applications deadline is 4 pm on Friday, November 13, 2020.

CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

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The Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation is Hiring! Social Worker I or II Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation’s Social Worker position is a professional position that is responsible for providing a wide range of case management and supportive services to Indian families. They assist clients in understanding the causes of their problems and work with them to modify and change attitudes and behaviors.$19.88 – $31.01/hour Come work for us today!

Family Services Project Coord. Essential Duties and Responsibilities: 1. Develop and maintain grant program/ project policies and procedures to meet federal, state and local regulations; 2. Create and maintain files on current and past grant projects and applications; 3. Assist in preparation and monitoring of grant reporting, including tracking client services and other grant specific data; Plus more!

APPLY NOW AT WWW.TOLOWA-NSN.GOV/EMPLOYMENT HR@TOLOWA.COM

OUR MISSION

Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

SoHum Health is HIRING Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707) 923-3921

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS NURSE MANAGER – EMERGENCY DEPT/ACUTE Full Time Position. Critical Access Hospital; 4-bed Emergency room & 9-bed Acute care unit, seeking an ER/Acute Care Nurse Manager to provide leadership, administrative responsibility and oversight of the ER and Acute care departments. Current California RN license required. BSN, PALS, & ACLS required. Minimum 2 years ER experience required. Minimum 1 year Management Experience strongly preferred.

ER/ACUTE CARE REGISTERED NURSE

Full-Time, 12-hour shift, 3 days/week. Current California RN License, BLS, ACLS, & PALS certification required. Work 12-hour shifts in our critical access acute care & emergency room.

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE – CLINIC & HOME VISITS

Full Time position, 8 or 10 hr. shifts, 4 or 5 days a week, Monday - Friday. Current California LVN license and BLS certification required. Work 8 or 10 hour shifts in our outpatient Rural Health Clinic and at patient homes. New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment! SHCHD minimum wage start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

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Child Care Intake Specialist

This full-time and benefited position will interview applicants to determine eligibility for subsidized child care programs and assists parents and families in identifying their child care options that best meet the child and family needs. Must be able to pass a DOJ and FBI fingerprint background clearance, possess a valid California driver’s license and proof of automobile insurance; and as this position is computer based, must be able to sit for extended periods of time in front of a video display terminal and maintain attention to detail with a demonstrated ability to use a calculator, or keyboard pad. Appointments are typically made at the starting wage of $15.71, may vary depending on experience. APPLICATION DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED. Application and job Description available at www.changingtidesfs.org and at 2259 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka, CA 95501 We are operating under strict COVID-19 safety protocols including daily health screenings, required masks, and increased hand washing and cleaning practices per the Reopening Plan certified by Humboldt County. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293 www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

@changingtidesfamilyservices

Humboldt County Office of Education

Para Educator-Trades College & Career Resources Temporary Qualifications: High school diploma or equivalent, ability to foster student development in the trades and workshop setting. Requires experience gained through job training or on work related to job training. The successful candidate will be required to pass a fingerprint clearance with the Department of Justice and show proof of eligibility to work in the United States Application Procedure: Classified application form, available online at hcoe.org/job, cover letter stating reasons for application and summarizing candidate’s qualifications, resume, 3-5 Current Letters of recommendation Return your Application packet to: PERSONNEL, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Avenue Eureka, CA 95501 APPLY BY: OCTOBER 15, 2020 4 PM The Humboldt County Office of Education supports the principles of Equal Opportunity Employment

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

SoHum Health is HIRING

   TEACHER, Fortuna Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler program. Meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Dev. Permit Matrix & have 1 yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. P/T 28 hrs./wk. $14.78-$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

HIRING FOR THE HOUSING SPECIALIST −fully accountable for all day−to−day housing operations, landlord outreach, rent rolls, and tenant files. $17.23. DOE, sick, vacation, holiday, and health insur− ance. 30−40 hours weekly. Qualified candidates please submit: completed AHP employment application from our website, www.arcatahouse.org, cover letter, and a resume to HR@arcatahouse.org. Please call 822−4528 for full job description . EOE

TEMPORARY TEACHER, Eureka

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

WATER TREATMENT SUPERVISOR, Hoopa Valley Public Utilities District, Regular, F/T, Salary: $27.40/hr. Responsible for operating, maintaining and controlling the District’s Micro Filtration and Pressure Plants, consisting of water pumping, distribution and water treatment facilities. Performs preventative maintenance checks and repairs of District water pumping, distribution and treatment facilities, machinery, equipment and grounds. Minimum Qualifications: Must possess a Grade III Water Treatment Operator’s Certificate (T3) AND a Grade II Distribution Certification. Must possess First Aid & CPR certifications within one (1) year of hire. Supervisory experience required. Ability to work odd shifts, weekends and/or holidays. Must possess a Valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: Open Until Filled These positions are classified safety-sensitive. For a complete job description and employment application, contact the Human Resources Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 20 or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.

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CURRENT JOB OPENINGS ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT

Part-Time Position. Position reports to CFO and is responsible for accounts payable, the general ledger, and preparing reports for the state and other regulatory bodies. 2-3 year’s work experience in finance or accounting, health care experience preferred.

HOUSEKEEPER

Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a preschool prog. Meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Dev. Permit Matrix & have 1 yr. exp. teaching in a preschool setting. Temporary F/T 40 hrs./wk. (M-Fri) $14.78-$16.30/ hr. Open Until Filled. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707) 923-3921

SoHum Health is HIRING Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707) 923-3921

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER (FNP)

The Family Nurse Practitioner is an advanced practice Registered Nurse with additional preparation and skills in physical diagnosis, psycho-social assessment and management of health needs in primary health care, and who possesses the ability to assist the health status in individuals and families. The FNP provides for the continuity of healthcare to patients, provides instruction and counseling to individuals, families and groups concerning preventive health care; and collaborates with other providers and agencies to assure the provision of coordination of health care delivery to individuals and families. The FNP functions within the scope of practice as authorized for the RN pursuant to Business and Professions Code, Division 2, Chapter 6. The FNP functions within the scope of practice as specified in the Nursing Practice Act and as it applies to all Registered Nurses. MINIMUM POSITION QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED:

Education/Knowledge: Graduation from an accredited nursing school; completion of an accredited nurse practitioner program and proof of current California licenses. SPECIAL SKILLS/EQUIPMENT:

Ability to display professionalism in the work environment; ability to concentrate on details in a busy, distracting environment; ability to solve practical problems and deal effectively with situations where limited standardization exists. LICENSES/CERTIFICATES:

Must possess valid California license as a registered nurse; California certificate as Nurse Practitioner; furnishing and dispensing number within six months of hire; current CPR certification. Job Type: Full-time New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment! SHCHD minimum wage start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

Full-Time Position. The Housekeeper performs cleaning and general maintenance of assigned hospital building areas to promote sanitary, orderly and attractive conditions.

INFECTION PREVENTION / EMPLOYEE HEALTH

Full Time Position. Position includes, but is not limited to, infection monitoring and reporting, infection risk assessment and prevention, policy and procedure development, staff education, and outbreak management. Employee Health role includes new employee and annual health assessments, immunization programs, exposure management, and safe patient handling programs. Must be able to communicate clearly, verbally and in writing to interface with employees, medical staff, and state, local, and federal health departments and programs. BSN preferred. Certification in Infection Control (CIC) preferred, but willing to train the right candidate.

PATIENT FINANCIAL SERVICES / HEALTH INFORMATION MANGEMENT CLERK

Full Time Position. Must be available on weekends. High school diploma or equivalent. Performs clerical and computer tasks to support Health Information Management (HIM) and Patient Financial Services (PFS) functions under the immediate supervision of the PFS Manager, with consultation from the contracted HIM manager. Serves as a customer service representative to patients, their families, the public and the Medical Staff. Effective computer and software skills, a knowledge and experience with a wide array of various software systems and applications. Ability to work as a team member within the department and within the hospital. Ability to maintain confidentiality with regard to patient medical records and other sensitive issues. Prefer minimum of two years of customer service in a professional environment and one year secretarial or general office experience. New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment! SHCHD minimum wage start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@northcoastjournal.com


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The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position:

YUROK TRIBE

FINANCIAL INSTITUTION DIRECTOR

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

Hoopa Development Fund, Regular, F/T, Salary: $53,400.00/yr. Responsible for the management of the Hoopa Development Fund Credit Division and EDA Loan Fund Division. Directs and coordinates activities to implement Hoopa Development Fund policies, procedures and practices concerning granting or extending lines of credit for real estate and consumer credit loans, among other administrative duties. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Bachelor’s Degree (B.A.) from a four-year college or university, or one to two years of related experience and/or training, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must possess a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Must successfully pass an employment background check in accordance with Title 30A. This position is classified safety-sensitive.

DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 16, 2020. For job descriptions and employment applications, contact the Human Resource/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546 or Call (530) 6259200 Ext. 20 or email hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance.

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

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TRANSPORTATION PLANNER Humboldt County Association of Governments (HCAOG) A Regional Transportation Planning Agency for Humboldt County is seeking to fill a full−time Transportation Planner position: Assistant: $60,329 − $73,330 Associate: $66,640 − $81,002 Insurance Benefits: health, dental, vision, life, CalPERS Retirement Application Deadline: 5:00 p.m. November 30, 2020 Send cover letter, resume, and three work−related references to HCAOG at: 611 I Street, Suite B, Eureka CA 95501 or email: debbie.egger@hcaog.net A detailed job description may be obtained @ www.hcaog.net

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         

             

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        

 

K’ima:w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

VAN DRIVER DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM, NOVEMBER 6, 2020. IT & APPLICATIONS TECHNICIAN DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM, OCTOBER 23, 2020. PATIENT ACCOUNTS CLERK I DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5 PM, OCTOBER 30, 2020. ACCOUNTANT DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5 PM, OCTOBER 9, 2020. REVENUE CYCLE SPECIALIST MANAGER DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5PM, OCTOBER 30, 2020. HR DIRECTOR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. MMIW ADVOCATE/EDUCATOR GRANT FUNDED OPEN UNTIL FILLED. NATIVE CONNECTIONS PROJECT COORDINATOR SAMHSA GRANT FUNDED OPEN UNTIL FILLED. MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN OPEN UNTIL FILLED. RN CARE MANAGER OPEN UNTIL FILLED. HOUSEKEEPER ON-CALL OPEN UNTIL FILLED. ULTRASOUND CONSULTANT/TRAINER/ SONOGRAPHER ON-CALL OPEN UNTIL FILLED. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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COSTUME SALE BOOTIQUE Create Your Own Costume Unique, Classic, Retro Costumes, Wigs Hats, Shoes Professional Makeup Halloween Hours Monday−Sunday 11−6 The Costume Box 202 T St. Eureka 443−5200 CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN)

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com default

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Computer & Internet

Auto Service

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

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HEARING AIDS!! Buy one/get one FREE! High−quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competi− tors. Nearly invisible! 45−day money back guarantee! 1−833− 585−1117 (AAN CAN) NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

34

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027

442-1400 ×314

CalBRE: #01144618, NMLS: #323296

classified@ northcoastjournal.com

 

Cleaning

  



249,999

$

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

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         

707-826-1806

 

macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

@ncj_of_humboldt THEATRICAL QUALITY COSTUME RENTALS Personalize Your Costume With Designer Assistance Call for Appointment The Costume Box 707−443−5200

    

  



BODY, MIND & SPIRIT HIGHER EDUCATION FOR\ SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

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 



116 W. Wabash • 443-3259 Mon. Weds. Thur. Fri. & Sat. 2-6 Closed Sun. & Tues with masks & bacterial wipes

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

Musicians & Instructors

50 GLORIOUS YEARS  2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

New Listing!

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

STRUGGLING WITH YOUR PRIVATE STUDENT LOAN PAYMENT? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888−670−5631 (Mon−Fri 9am− 5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN)

Convenient

HATS, GLOVES & SCARVES ½ OFF! Dream Quest Thrift Store, where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams. October 22−28 Plus: Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629−3006.

Affordable Property ! close the the Dunes as well as the Arcata Marsh. 2 small houses on a large lot of approximately .41 acres. The 2 bedroom, 1 bath home is in good condition, but the other one needs work. The big backyards are open and ready for some gardening! Great investment property with a little hard work. Call Erica today at 707-498-4094 for a private showing. $249,999 MLS# 257515

MARKETPLACE

PLACE

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 855−978−0215 (AAN CAN)

MANILA

Let’s Be Friends

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • northcoastjournal.com

442-1400 × 314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

707.834.7979

BRE# 01066670

BRE #01927104

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

530.784.3581

BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

!

D PRICE

REDUCE

707.498.6364

Bernie Garrigan

Dacota Huzzen

Hailey Rohan

Mike Willcutt

Katherine Fergus

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #02109531

BRE #02044086

Realtor/ Commercial Specialist

BRE #01956733

BRE # 02084041

Realtor 707.601.1331

916.798.2107

LEWISTON – HOME ON ACREAGE – $489,000

WILLOW CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE – $1,050,000

±17 Acres with 4/2.5 farm home with wood floors and many upgrades! Property features a 4,200 sqft shop, well, pond, beautiful views, and is just 40 mins from Redding!

Stunning ±4.5 acre river front property just minutes from Downtown Willow Creek! Parcel features a grand main 2/3 home, secondary 2/1 home, pool, outdoor kitchen, outbuildings, orchard, and trail to the river!

WEITCHPEC – LAND/PROPERTY – $149,000

DOUGLAS CITY – HOME ON ACREAGE – $355,000

±80 Remote acres on the Reservation in Weitchpec. Wooded parcel w/ year round stream, spring, and large flat.

±124 Acres overlooking Reading Creek! Easy access, year round creek (with fish), buildable flats, solar system, and an unfinished 2,100 sqft 3/2 house!

FORTUNA – LAND/PROPERTY – $999,000

KING SALMON – LAND/PROPERTY – $94,900

±24 Acres w/ development/subdivision potential! Features public utility access w/ flat mountain top & hillside views of Fortuna, Eel River, & Fernbridge. Owner may carry for qualified buyers.

Three parcels totaling ±.4 acres on the canal in King Salmon. Water and power on the property.

476 SUNSET LANE, WILLOW CREEK – $199,000

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $150,000

Charming 2+ bed/2 bath mfg home in the Bigfoot Subdivision in Willow Creek! Features a mud/laundry room area, large step-in pantry, and beautiful views!

±9 Acre lot located at the top of the Bigfoot subdivision! This property boasts buildable flats, community water and power at the street.

SALMON CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE – $749,000

ZENIA – LAND/PROPERTY – $250,000

±120 acres w/ three cabins nestled in the hills of Salmon Creek w/orchards, water sources, solar, and much more!

±30 Acres in Trinity County w/ established road, spring, large meadows and power nearby. Currently used for grazing.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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HI PODS $10 1/2G

*COMPA TIBLE WITH STIIIZY PRODUCTS ZKITTLEZ, WEDDING CAKE, STRAWBERRY BANANA & ORANGE COOKIES

M

YR

E TL

AV

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Behind American Foot Comfort

License No. C10-0000011-LIC

1670 Myrtle Ave. Ste. B Eureka CA 707.442.2420 M-F 10am-6pm Sat + Sun 11am-5pm

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT

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North Coast Journal 10-22-2020 Edition