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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday June 20, 2019 Vol XXX Issue 25 northcoastjournal.com

The Gray Whale Die-off As strandings continue, scientists scramble to figure out why By Kimberly Wear


! E T O V ! E T O V ! E T V OTE ! V OTE ! V O

F O T S E B T

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t – only the biggest Yeah, Best of Humbold . It’s not just a event of the whole year know. Whoever we popularity contest, you ldt,” like, represents crown “Best of Humbo and things that win us. The people, places and beyond to make should totally go above azing place. So, who Humboldt County an am the prom committee uz ‘C n? ow cr u yo ld ou w nal is taking votes. at the North Coast Jour be a super fun party, Oh, and there’s gonna ning your outfit now. so you should start plan

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ries ny or as few subcatego You can vote for as ma June 1 n vote every day from as you like, and you ca ories day!) Most of the categ to June 30. (Just once a ta nees to choose from, bu have the top three nomi d An s! you to break those tie few have ties. We need usly. mboldt, like, super serio FYI, we take Best of Hu ll to monitor voting. We wi NCJ has installed bots . l nominations and votes totally remove wrongfu re, so can you just not? There’s a lot at stake he

19 0 2 H O B / m o c l. a n r u o tj s a nor thco ! E T O V ! E T O V ! E T V OTE ! V OTE ! V O 2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 4 Mailbox 4 Poem The Big Dipper

6 News Trinidad Hotel Faces Uncertain Future After Coastal Commission Vote

9 News ‘Encroachment’

11 Week in Weed Village Down and Holding in Prison

12 13

NCJ Daily On The Cover The Gray Whale Die-off

16 Home & Garden Service Directory

17

It’s Personal It Didn’t Get Better, I Did

18 Table Talk The Drama and the Winners at Oyster Fest

19 The Setlist Summer Farewells and Metal as Hell

20 Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

24 Calendar 29 Filmland Men Out of Time

30 Field Notes Global Population and Kids

31 Workshops & Classes 32 Sudoku & Crossword 35 Classifieds

June 20, 2019 • Volume XXX Issue 25 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2019 Publisher Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Special Publications Publisher Creative Services Director Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Art Director Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Heidi Beltran, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Senior Advertising Representative Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Marna Batsell marna@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Multimedia Content Producer Zach Lathouris zach@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Administrative Assistant Sam Leishman sam@northcoastjournal.com Chief Executive Officer Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com

Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

A tray of Sushi Spot oysters enters the Best Oyster competition. Read more on page 18. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

On the Cover Photo by David Weller/NOAA Fisheries

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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Re: Impeachment Editor: Thank you to Thadeus Greenson and the North Coast Journal for an excellent interview with Congressperson Jared Huffman (“The Case for Impeachment,” June 13). His answers clarified matters for me in regard to whether or not to pursue impeachment now. For many years I lived in Southern California and was pleased to have Adam Schiff as my congressperson. I have now been in Humboldt County for three and a half years and I am equally pleased and satisfied with Congressperson Huffman. Mark Chaet, Arcata Editor: Can the republic — any republic — survive a clinically delusional president? Combined with a see-no-evil Republican Senate; and a willfully purblind GOP base that supports Trump 89 percent? There is not the remotest chance the 2020 GOP convention will ditch Trump for a second term. At present, House Democrats appear hamstrung by a White House engaged in mutinous and serial law breaking. Will the voters turn out in enough numbers next year to ensure Trump’s ouster? Will Trump accept the verdict if he loses? The latter is not a rhetorical question. His assertion on national TV that he would happily accept political dirt from foreign sources is yet another impeachable offense, a breach of the presidential oath. (No bars to foreign influence peddling.) Translation: “I’ll do anything to win,” illegality be damned — tantamount to, “I won’t leave, period.” He knows he’ll go to prison if does. What if Trump, like Putin, resorts to a cyber or artificial intelligence attack of his own making if he is losing next year, possibly throwing the voting machines into disarray in key states and tying up ballot counts indefinitely in the courts? Even if the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against him, would he and Attorney General Barr defy it, too? Why not, if you’re scorning House subpoenas across the board? Trump’s obstruction of justice goes on to this very moment, barefaced and militant. He’ll stop at nothing, including attacking this nation. The more imperative it is to remove him, the more desperate he becomes and the more dangerous to the rule of law. Trump has set in train a sequence of national crises likely to culminate in tragedy. A la Henry II and Thomas à Beckett, “Who will rid us of this man?” Who can? Congressman Huffman may be mistak-

The Big Dipper Dangles above the coastline Where countless stars and waves Welcome me home. One of these stars Is extremely rare Having immigrated From a Dwarf Galaxy Far, far away … All of the waves come From foreign lands Much closer to home. — Kirk Gothier

en about how much time is left before it’s too late. Paul Mann, McKinleyville

It’s Not So Bad Editor: With two view points about galleries and art sales recently — “Artists without Galleries” (April 11) by Gabrielle Gopinath and “More on Galleries” by Alan Sanborn (Mailbox, April 25) — I feel compelled to add my own experience to the mix. Galleries have long struggled to maintain a footing in Humboldt County and I have shown with many since 1979. The late Mike Atlee ran by far the most successful gallery for roughly a three-year period in the early ‘90s. It’s always been hard in a small art-loving community like ours for artists to maintain a relationship with a gallery and at the same time not invite clients to their studio and offer them a lower price without the gallery commission. With that said, sales in Humboldt still continue, at artists’ studios as well at any venue that shows and sells the work. In the broader and larger picture in the country, yes, many galleries have closed but new ones keep opening and long-standing galleries keep selling work. They sell work to renters, home owners, businesses, de-


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signers and those who love the work and can afford it. Sales are very brisk all over the country and it’s not the 1 percent that are buying. The 1 percent has little or no interest in the work most of us do. I personally find there are more opportunities for artist to show and sell work through galleries, plein air events for landscape painters, juried shows, online competitions and so many ways on the internet to connect with others artist, dealers, clients and art lovers than ever before. Within our community, I know several painters who are making those connections and selling their work. It is true, no matter what, we will keep making art. Jim McVicker, Loleta

‘So Savage and Relevant’ Editor: I read Jennifer Fumiko Cahill’s “This is Not a Weed Tampon” (June 13) at 9:30 Thursday night. It was so spot on I didn’t even flinch from firing off an annoying group text to friends and colleagues late in the evening. It was a risk worth taking. Fumiko Cahill’s article was so savage and relevant, I knew my crew would appreciate her elegant writing even if they were trying to shake off the day through various means of nighttime rituals; meditation, taking a CBD tincture, writing memos on rural economic development or cocktails. Not 10 minutes passed before a flurry of comments came in and a structured debate was held. Unlike Humboldt’s ap-

proach to issues like, um, industrial hemp or wind energy (yeah, I said it), we found a rational consensus that this was the best Week in Weed thus far. How did we come to this position, you may ask? Well, we all have “mini heart attacks in our uteruses,” all are fighting for the normality of cannabis, all pay taxes on tampons and all have had to deal with one form or another of the gym teacher Jennifer references in her article (I see your sideways glance and raise ya a forward middle finger). Whoa, whoa, whoa you may say. Was the proverbial bird really necessary? We should have these conversations with professionalism, right? Wrong. My high school gym teacher told me, “Buck up as the boys do,” when I asked to go to the nurse as an impressionable 14-year-old girl. This is the same mentality that is currently trying to regulate women’s bodies across our nation and keep cannabis federally illegal. Call your relatives in those swing states and make sure they vote. Maybe we will get a lucky two for and push cannabis and women’s issues, alike, in the next election. Terra Carver, Kneeland

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

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News

An artistic rendering created by the Trinidad Rancheria of what its proposed Scenic Drive hotel project would look like from Trinidad Bay. Trinidad Rancheria

Trinidad Hotel Faces Uncertain Future After Coastal Commission Vote By Thadeus Greenson thadm@northcoastjournal.com

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conflicted California Coastal Commission voted 6-3 on June 12 to object to the Trinidad Rancheria’s proposed 100-room hotel project on Scenic Drive, finding it inconsistent with state coastal protections. Commissioners made clear during the nearly two-hour hearing in San Diego that the main consistency issue lies with water, and namely whether the city of Trinidad has the capacity to supply water to

the project. The city currently has several studies underway but can’t commit to providing water to the proposed five-story hotel adjacent to Cher-Ae Heights Casino until they are complete, which is expected to happen before August. Multiple commissioners lamented that the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which has jurisdictional oversight of the project because it is on sovereign tribal land, repeatedly declined staff requests to postpone the hearing until the commission’s meet-


ing in August, which would have allowed for more local input and — potentially — completion of the water studies. Before the vote, several commissioners indicated they intended to vote to object to the project at this time but urged the Rancheria to resubmit its application so it can be heard at the August meeting. After the meeting, Trinidad Rancheria Economic Development Corporation CEO David Tyson told the Journal in an email that the Rancheria would decide how to proceed after conferring with BIA officials. The Rancheria has pushed the proposal to build the hotel on the bluffs along Scenic Drive about a mile south of city limits as a way to bring economic development to what Tribal Chair Garth Sundberg described to the commission as a small tribe with a high-unemployment rate and “tremendous needs.” “We have a right to economic development on our tribal lands,” he said. Because the project is on the tribal land of the Rancheria, a sovereign nation, it falls under the purview of the BIA and is subject to a federal environmental review process. As a part of that process, the BIA must bring the project to the California Coastal Commission, which must concur with or object to the BIA’s assessment that the project will have no discernible effect upon the coastal environment and will not violate the California Coastal Act. If the Coastal Commission disagrees with BIA’s assessment, the bureau can proceed anyway but must offer a thorough explanation of why it disagrees, a path that leaves the decision susceptible to a legal challenge. Or, the two agencies can enter into non-binding mediation. In a series of public meetings hosted by the Rancheria to discuss the project, area residents have raised concerns about everything from traffic impacts to the geologic stability of the site. But Coastal Commission staff’s review of the project found most impacts would be negligible but zeroed in on two areas where it felt the project wasn’t in compliance with the Coastal Act: water and visual impacts. While the project would not be subject to local zoning regulations, a provision of the coastal act requires that it be “visually compatible” with the surrounding community. Commission staff pointed out that this is a potential problem, as the proposed five-story hotel would be the tallest structure by 30 feet in the surrounding 20 miles, and those doesn’t fit with the existing character of the area. But staff noted the Rancheria has worked to mitigate those impacts, re-

designing the hotel to feature earth-tone paints and non-reflective glass designed to make it less visible from Trinidad Bay and Trinidad Head. Staff requested the Rancheria further alter its plans to decrease the height of the hotel and potentially disperse some of the hotel rooms to other parts of the Rancheria’s property. But the Rancheria responded that the hotel needs 100 rooms to be economically viable and there are already

plans for the other pieces of Rancheria property identified by Coastal Commission staff. Commissioners indicated they weren’t overly concerned about the visual impacts or believed something could be worked out with the Rancheria to further minimize them. The sticking point, they indicated, was the water. The Rancheria has argued the city’s water treatment plant has the capacity to

serve the project — and Tyson even indicated at the hearing that the Rancheria believes that its existing agreement with the city to provide water to the property should cover the project. The city, on the other hand, has told the commission it would like to commit to supplying water to the hotel but can’t until it determines if the flows of Luffenholtz Creek are Continued on next page »

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sufficient to provide for existing and that the “Rancheria water supply analysis future needs within city limits, which take was, frankly, backwards.” He said a good priority. analysis would be to look at Luffenholtz “This water issue is particularly Creek’s maximum capacity in drought concerning to me,” Commissioner Linda years to ensure a sustainable water supply, which he alleged hasn’t been done. Escalante said. “This needs to be done Rancheria CEO Jacque Hostler-Carright for long-term sustainability and mesin told the commission that much of self-sufficiency.” the public concern is due to misinformaCommissioner Erik Howell asked tion widely circulated by a few project staff if the commission could vote in opponents. She specifically pointed to support of the project conditioned on the fact that the petitions and a couple the Rancheria and the city coming to an public fliers used images agreement on water. But of the proposed hotel site Commission Executive that were either plucked Director Jack Ainsworth “This water issue from early conceptions or said water is a basic filing had been manipulated, requirement, a “fundais particularly mental component of the but didn’t accurately project we have to have portray the Rancheria’s concerning to me. assurance on.” plans. She also said some “So the answer would be media coverage of the This needs to be no on a condition like that,” project has been unfair he said. and pointed to an April done right for longAt one point, clearly 4 editorial cartoon that ran frustrated, Commissioner in the Journal and depicted term sustainability Steve Padilla called Dan a human-like hotel in a tugHall, a representative of of-war over a hose with the and self-sufficiency.” BIA, up to the podium to city of Trinidad. ask why the agency has not “The cartoon was offensive,” she said. “We’ve been allowed the hearing to be the subject of a lot of harassment.” postponed to a later date, pointing to the Commissioner Effie Turnbull-Sanders lack of clarity on the water issue and the said she was concerned about the way fact that an August hearing would allow the project had been portrayed in the for local input, an important provision press and elsewhere, saying she felt the under the commission’s “environmental cartoon depicted the tribe “as this kind justice” policy. of greedy caricature.” Hall, who indicated earlier in the meeting that BIA fully supports the RancheWhile the commissioners appeared ria’s proposed development as a means sympathetic to the Rancheria’s concerns toward its “self-determination, self-sufand like they wanted to support the proposal, the water issue was ultimately too ficiency and economic development,” much for six of them. said he didn’t have the authority to grant extensions, which rests with the regional After Commissioner Donne Brownsey’s director, who was not in attendance. motion to support staff’s recommendaIn addition to representatives of the tion that the commission should object Rancheria, a few local residents did make to the BIA’s determination that the project was consistent with the Coastal Act the trip down to San Diego to address was seconded, Padilla again lamented that the commission on the project. the commission couldn’t postpone a vote David Hankin, representing the on the issue until August. Humboldt Alliance for Responsible “Why isn’t someone from BIA who is in Planning, indicated the local community fact in power to make this decision here has a number of concerns about the today?” he asked. project’s impacts, but mostly centered Ultimately, the commission voted to his comments on the uncertain water support staff’s recommendation, with supply and visual impacts. He pointed Howell, Turnbull-Sanders and Roberto to the fact that more than 100 people Uranga dissenting, leaving the project’s turned out to an October meeting in path forward uncertain. l Trinidad to discuss the project and that an online petition received more than This story was first published at www. 700 signatures opposed to the project as northcoastjournal.com on June 13. evidence of widespread public concern. Fifth District Humboldt County Supervisor Steve Madrone also addressed Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news the commission, saying the project’s editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension visual impacts would be inconsistent 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. with protections in the Coastal Act and Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.


News

HUMBOLDT

BAY BISTRO

‘Encroachment’ With inadequate state and federal funding, local districts stretch to provide special education services By Iridian Casarez

Special Education Facts (2017-2018 year data) Students in Special Education in Humboldt County — 3,859 Total student enrollment in Humboldt County — 18,501 Special education students made up 20.86 percent of the student population

Disability Types in Humboldt County Students Traumatic Brain Injury 0.4%

iridian@northcoastjournal.com

Autism 15.4%

A

Multiple Disability 0.4%

bill introduced earlier this year by North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman would make good on long-promised funding for special education. It also puts a spotlight on the issue in Humboldt County, where disproportionate rates of students need special education services and inadequate state and federal funding streams leave districts’ budgets stretched thin. Take Northern Humboldt Unified High School District as an example. Superintendent Roger Macdonald said the district received $1 million in special education funding from the state and federal governments, but spent more than $3.7 million providing for its students, leaving a deficit of more than $2.6 million to be taken from the district’s general fund. “It’s called an encroachment on the general fund,” Macdonald said. “It sounds scary to parents and teachers but it just means we don’t have the $2.6 million to spend on other things, like expanding culinary or music classes, or give raises or benefits.” Special education funding comes from a complex patchwork of state and federal streams, but the two don’t cover the costs of providing services, meaning districts like Northern Humboldt have to bridge the gap. County Superintendent of Schools Chris Hartley said part of the problem is that the structure for special education funding was set up in the 1970s and is “no longer relevant to the current student population.” “For Humboldt County, this is an equity issue,” he said in an email to the Journal, adding that the county remains near the lowest in per-pupil state special education spending. “As a result, Humboldt County districts are disproportionately using more

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Specific Learning Disability 39.6% Source: California Department of Education, Special Education Division, Reporting Cycle Dec. 2017

general fund dollars to fund the mandated services required to meet the needs for students in special education.” Statewide, about 11 percent of the student population, or about 795,000 students, have documented disabilities. But locally, students with disabilities make up 20 percent of Humboldt and Del Norte counties’ student population, a nearly two-fold increase from the state, according to Mindy Fattig, executive director of the Humboldt-Del Norte County Special Education Local Plan Areas, also known as SELPA, which oversees special education services in the two counties. Fattig, whose career in special education services spans 24 years, said that funding in California is allocated to each SELPA and then a policy council — SELPA’s governing body made up of 13 local superintendents — determines how much funding goes to each district. There are 132 SELPAs in California that serve as the state’s designated associations “of professional educators organized to present, review and evaluate major special education issues.” They collaborate with school districts and county agencies to

ensure a “healthy and enriching environment” for students with disabilities and are responsible for ensuring program availability, staff development, regionalized services and program specialists, and much more. In addition to managing the SELPA as its executive director, Fattig’s role is mediating conflicts between districts and families, ensuring students are receiving the services they need, helping staff write and providing professional training on the Individualized Education Programs required for all special education students. In 1975, Congress passed the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which committed to funding 40 percent of the cost of special education and related services, though Congress has never fully funded the pledge. Jonathan Mendick, a representative with the California Department of Education, said IDEA is allocated using a formula that’s based on population and poverty levels. Announcing the introduction of his funding bill earlier this year, Huffman said he hopes to bridge the gap between alloContinued on next page »

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cated funding and the overwhelming costs of special education services. In California, the projected cost for the 2017-2018 school year was $14.9 billion, but California’s federal IDEA was just $1.3 billion, roughly 8 percent of the cost, Mendick said. According to Fattig, that same year, Humboldt-Del Norte County SELPA received $4.1 million in federal funds but local districts spent $51 million providing special education services. “The original premise of IDEA was to cover 40 percent of the excess cost of providing special education and related services to children with disabilities,” Mendick said in an email to the Journal. “Nationally, it is estimated IDEA only covers about 15 percent of the excess costs for special education, less than half the original full-funding level promised when IDEA was enacted.” The second part of special education funding in California comes from the Special Education Program under Assembly Bill 602, which provides funding to SELPAs based on average daily attendance. For the 2017-2018 school year, Humboldt and Del Norte counties received about $10 million in state funding to provide special education services. Together, the federal and state governments provided about $14.1 million for local districts to provide special education services that year, which covered only a small portion of the $51 million spent locally, according to Corey Weber, Humboldt County Office of Education’s director of fiscal services. The rest of the expenses, Weber wrote in an email to the Journal, are “covered by various grants, local funds and contributions from the district/county’s general fund unrestricted revenues.” Fattig, who’s in her eighth year as SELPA’s executive director, said the funding gap has impacts. “Even though we don’t have enough (special education) funding, we still find a way to provide the services that are necessary through other funding,” Fattig said. “Humboldt County has the highest number of students in special education in the state of California, but we are one of the lowest funded SELPAs.” Fattig also said preschool special education doesn’t receive federal funding and only minimal funding from the state. Preschoolers are one of Humboldt and Del Norte counties’ highest growth areas of children needing special education services, Fattig said. She added that early intervention is very important but difficult without a designated funding stream. On top of directing Humboldt-Del Norte SELPA, Fattig also spends time working with state legislators tracking bills

to increase funding for special education and often offers the perspective of providers in rural areas. Fattig is working to push Assembly Bill 428, which would adjust state special education funding formulas and provide funding for preschool special education services. Huffman, meanwhile, has submitted his IDEA funding bill twice before but it has never passed the House. Now on his third attempt, Huffman has recruited 53 bipartisan cosponsors for the bill, according to his office. Recently, Huffman helped ensure the Appropriations Committee and the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies subcommittee approved an additional $1 billion in IDEA funding for the fiscal year, according to a press release from his office. “All students deserve access to a free and appropriate public education — that’s the promise of federal law,” he said in the press release. “But Congress and the president have repeatedly failed to meet the federal commitment to children with disabilities. This funding increase is an important step in the right direction. … I will keep pushing to fully fund IDEA so that we support children with special needs, their families and their schools.” Marilyn Lucey, who received a graduate degree in special education and currently works for Special Education Advocacy, is familiar with the funding legislation. She said the first step to equalize special education funding is to raise the federal contribution to IDEA’s originally pledged 40 percent. “While the efforts in California to increase the funding to special education is a step in the right direction, until we can fully fund the promise of the federal government in IDEA to fund 40 percent of the true cost of providing the supports and services our students with disabilities require for a free and appropriate public education, we still have more work to do,” Lucey said in an email. “The unfunded mandate has placed a great burden on the state and local school districts and has created a fiscal responsibility that is nearly impossible to meet … and also created a system that pits the schools and caregivers in opposition, which isn’t fair to anyone,” she said. “With less than half of the 40 percent ever provided, it is easy to see how schools and caregivers struggle to provide truly individual education plans.” ● Iridian Casarez is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez.


Week in Weed

Village Down and Holding in Prison By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

M

ake sure and pour a little bong water out this week for Reggae on the River and its Cannabis Village. We hardly even knew ye, Cannabis Village! For reasons that aren’t entirely clear, High Times unceremoniously pulled the plug on the 35-year-old festival June 17, posting a brief message on the concert’s website saying it would be canceled, with ticket holders getting full refunds within 10 business days. High Times folks said the decision was made in collaboration with the Mateel Community Center, whose board of directors promptly sent out a statement saying it was “disappointed, shocked and saddened” to learn of the cancelation. While details are sparse at this point, it seems likely this also means plans to erect a permitted 40,000-square-foot “Cannabis Village” with more than 100 vendor and exhibitor tents and a designated smoking area are also now on the scrap heap. The festival was poised to become Humboldt County’s first special event with permitted recreational sales on site. l

The Los Angeles Times published a detailed report this week on the virtual civil war going on in Santa Barbara County over cannabis and it’s well worth a read. But here’s the short of it: The county opened its arms wide to the cannabis industry — offering permits to all who apply without any size restrictions and no site inspections — and those chickens are now coming home to roost. The county has been inundated with large grows and is now home to 35 percent of the cultivation licenses issued in the state. Its famous wineries now have views of rolling hills dominated by white hoop houses, the warm breeze now carrying pungent, skunky odors into their tasting rooms. Its avocado orchards are facing devastating losses as they can’t spray them with pesticides for fear they will be held liable if any were to drift and contaminate neighboring cannabis farms worth millions of dollars. And the quaint beach town of Carpinteria is worried the whole situation will cripple the tourism industry that is the backbone of its economy. So, you might be asking, just how big are these grows? Massive. According to the Times, one is currently in the works that would span 147 acres — roughly the size of 130 football fields — which would be the largest legal pot grow on Earth. Another is 83 acres. There are numerous others that are 30 acres or more.

l The California Third District Court of Appeals issued a bit of a head-scratcher ruling this week, reversing the convictions of five state prison inmates who’d been found with marijuana in their cells and charged with felony possession. Because Proposition 64 does not carve out an exception for prisoners, the appeals court ruled that it’s no longer illegal to possess cannabis in state prisons. But that doesn’t mean you can smoke it or ingest it, as the proposition apparently does include language criminalizing consumption in prison. And, of course, prisons can still set rules against possession — doling out punishments like the revocation of good behavior credits or punitive housing placements — as they do with pornography, cell phones and other “contraband.” But it will no longer be illegal. In an interview in the San Jose Mercury News, attorney Dan Horowitz said the situation underscores just how untenable the nation’s patchwork of cannabis laws is. “I have a client who’s facing life in prison for allegedly shipping marijuana to Missouri, yet California inmates can have it in their prison cells,” he said. “It’s insane.”

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l The Department of Veterans Affairs, Harvard Medical School and the University of Pennsylvania released a study this week indicating military veterans use cannabis instead of prescription medications and other drugs to treat physical and mental conditions. Researchers surveyed nearly 100 veterans and found almost 80 percent reported using marijuana to treat health issues from chronic pain and insomnia to PTSD and depression. Nearly two-thirds of the veterans said they use cannabis in place of other drugs — including alcohol and prescription pharmaceuticals. “Given that cannabis use is associated with a much lower dependency potential and risk of overdose compared to other substances with a risk of misuse, this finding could suggest a positive impact of reduced barriers to medical cannabis among veterans,” the study concludes. l Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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From NCJ Daily

Oyster Fest

Fortuna Man Arrested for Allegedly Threatening Church Group at HSU

A

n 18-year-old Fortuna man was arrested June 15 after allegedly making criminal threats against a church group that planned to visit Humboldt State University, with the threats making reference to a pair of mass shootings. University Police Chief Donn Peterson told the Journal that Sean Allman made the threats via text messages to church members, with some of the messages referencing mass shootings at a New Zealand mosque and Columbine High School. “The congregants communicated through their network, their church, and a person there reached out to authorities here in Humboldt County that included UPD and Fortuna PD,” Peterson said, adding that local police learned of the threats the previous afternoon. Peterson said it’s still unclear why Allman allegedly directed these threats at this particular church group. According to a UPD press release, Allman lives in Fortuna with his family and is not an HSU student.

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While Allman was in custody when UPD sent out the press release, UPD asked the campus community to remain vigilant in the event he was released. UPD distributed a flier asking anyone who sees Allman on campus to contact UPD immediately.  Asked if Allman had the means to carry out an attack or follow through on his threats, Peterson said it’s not immediately clear, though he said it is incumbent upon UPD to take all threats seriously. “If you’re going to make threats toward campus, idle or otherwise, and you’re going to invoke the memories of other mass killings to do it, we’re going to take those things very, very seriously,” he said.  According to the HSU press release, Allman is described as standing 5 feet, 8 inches tall and weighing 135 pounds, with brown hair and hazel eyes. UPD asks that anyone who sees him on campus contact the department immediately by dialing 911 or calling 826-5555. While Allman was arrested on suspicion

Reggae Canceled: Reggae on the River, the annual three-day concert on the banks of the Eel River near Piercy, has been canceled. The concert’s website promised to refund ticket holders within 10 business days but offered no reason for the cancelation. Mateel Community Center board member Dusty Hughston said it was High Times, which stepped in to produce the event in May of 2018, that decided to cancel. The Mateel, he said, will hold a small event that weekend at its hall. POSTED: 06.18.19

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

The number of categories the Journal was announced a finalist for in the Association of Alternative Newsmedia’s national awards. Being considered for top honors are the Journal’s June 7, 2018, “Media Literacy Issue” and a trio of “Seriously?” columns by arts and features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill. Read more at www.northcoastjournal.com POSTED 06.17.19

Photo by Mark Larson

of making criminal threats and attempting to obstruct someone from practicing their religion by means of a threat, as the Journal went to press June 18, the Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office had not

Timber Protesters Arrested: Four people were arrested before dawn on June 17 while protesting Humboldt Redwood Co.’s logging operations. The protesters were trying to protect about 1,000 acres of forestland on Rainbow Ridge, which include old growth Douglas fir. The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office reported that the four protesters were arrested on suspicion of trespassing and impeding traffic. According to the Bay Area Coalition for Headwaters, a tree-sitter who goes by the name “Rook” remains on the property. POSTED: 05.16.19

northcoastjournal

Digitally Speaking

Participating for the first time in the Shuck & Swallow Contest, the two members of the Sand Biters team (foreground) slowly worked their way through their allotted oysters at Saturday’s Arcata Bay Oyster Festival. See more photos of the festivities (and the alternative Shuck Yeah event) at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 06.17.19

ncj_of_humboldt

They Said It “Well… That didn’t take long.” ­— The National Weather Service’s Eureka office in a June 12 tweet at 9 a.m., announcing that — with a temperature of 71 degrees — the day had already become the hottest June 12 on record. POSTED 06.12.19

12  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

decided whether to charge Allman with a crime. He remained held in the Humboldt County jail on $1 million bail. — Thadeus Greenson POSTED 06.15.19 READ THE FULL STORY ONLINE.

Veteran’s Remains Returned Home: The remains of 23-year-old U.S. Army Sgt. Elden C. Justus, of Eureka, are returning home almost 70 years after he was killed in the Korean War, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced June 14. Justus had been recorded as missing in action since Dec. 6, 1950, when his battalion was overwhelmed by Chinese forces. His remains were recovered in 2004 during a joint recovery operation and were later identified using dental records and an anthropological analysis. POSTED 06.14.19

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Comment of the Week “I miss Mike…” ­— David Tyson referencing former North Coast Congressman Mike Thompson in his reply to a Journal Facebook post about last week’s cover story, which detailed current North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman’s argument for impeaching President Donald Trump. POSTED 06.13.19


On the Cover

The Gray Whale Die-off

As strandings continue, scientists scramble to figure out why

30 2019

By Kimberly Wear

W

Above: A 40-foot gray whale washed up at Long Beach, Washington. Bob Pool Right: Combined 2019 gray whale strandings in California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

that we’ve seen this year demands an investigation to determine what might be causing the die-off, such as environmental conditions, disease or human activities,” says Deborah Fauquier, a veterinary medical officer with NOAA’s Office of Protected Resources. More than 150 of the marine giants have been found dead on beaches from Mexico to Alaska since January, a dramatic upswing in deaths not seen in two decades. More are expected in the coming weeks and months. And because whales — especially emaciated ones — are more likely to sink into the ocean depths than wash ashore, marine biologists believe the reality is far worse than what’s been found. “It’s a number that’s difficult to quantify,” says John Calambokidis, a marine biologist studying West Coast whale populations with the Washington state nonprofit

Number of strended Whales

kim@northcoastjournal.com

ith a bulbous upper jaw jutting out from an elongated head dappled by a patchwork of barnacles, the gray whale may not cut the same sleek figure as its oceanic cousin — and mortal enemy — the orca, which recently made some forays into Humboldt Bay. But the whales named after their slate coloring can be easy to spot from shore during their twice yearly jaunts past the North Coast, sometimes showing off with spectacular displays of breaching or a simple flip of the tail fluke. Currently returning from a winter break in the warm water lagoons of Mexico, where a new generation was born, gray whales are nearing the last leg of their journey back to the cool Arctic waters where they will spend the summer feeding and fattening up for next year’s trek. The marathon migration — traversing some 13,000 miles — is believed to be the longest of any mammal. But in recent months, something has gone terribly wrong. Gray whales, the official state marine mammal of California, have been washing up dead in such alarming numbers that NOAA Fisheries recently declared what is known as an “Unusual Mortality Event,” freeing up resources and triggering a multi-faceted scientific review to try to figure out why. “The significant die-off of these animals

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and May — an adult female observed in Cascadia Research in Olympia, noting the 150 number could represent as few as 10 heavy surf near Scotty’s Point in the Trinipercent of the actual deaths. “The event is dad area and an adult male that washed up still very much ongoing.” on the oceanside of the South Spit. The whales were What has been estab“emaciated” and bore no lished is that most of the obvious signs of being stranded grays seem to If you find a stranded or be starving. hit by a ship or other “We know many of “human interaction,” says deceased marine mammal the whales have been Dawn Goley, a zoology skinny and malnourprofessor at Humboldt in our region, contact the ished, and that suggests State University and the they have not gotten Marine Mammal Stranding Northern California coordinator for the Marine enough to eat during Mammal Stranding Nettheir last eating season Hotline at 826-3650. work, who responded to in the Arctic,” Mark both scenes. Milstein, a public affairs “There was none of that,” she says. “So, officer with NOAA, said during an announcement of the mortality declaration it seems it’s mostly along the same lines late last month. as the others that died along the Pacific That was the case with the two whales Continued on next page » discovered in Humboldt County in April northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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Northwest.” That, Goley says, raises the question: Have the food resources dwindled for some reason or is there simply not enough food to go around? “Hopefully, we’ll be able to figure some of that out,” she says. The local network has teams scouring 31 beaches in Humboldt, Del Norte and Mendocino counties each week, with every found whale helping to build another data point as scientists strive to unlock the mystery of the high mortality rate. But even that level of effort leaves vast stretches of shoreline unchecked in the isolated reaches of the North Coast. It’s important, Goley notes, to reach the whales as soon as possible to collect samples in order to glean as much information as possible before nature takes its course in the form of decomposition and scavengers. The network collaborates with as many organizations as possible, including the Bureau of Land Management and state and national park employees, Goley says, but it always needs more help. And, that’s where the public comes in. “The quicker people call (the stranding hotline to report a washed-up whale), the quicker we can get there,” she says. “The more eyes the better. … The more of a community effort we can get, the better the understanding we can get of what is going on.” Goley notes the Guadalupe fur seal has been facing a similar dilemma to the gray whale since 2015, washing up alive and dead across coastal California in numbers NOAA describes as “eight times higher than the historic average.” “Those stranding are mostly weaned pups and juveniles (1-2 years old),” the NOAA mortality event page for the seals states. “The majority of stranded animals showed signs of malnutrition with secondary bacterial and parasitic infections.” Guadalupe fur seals found alive are sent to The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito or Sea World in San Diego for treatment. Unlike the gray whales, which can reach lengths up to 49 feet and weigh in at a boisterous 90,000 pounds (with females slightly larger than males), Guadalupe fur seals are “quite slight” at 3 to 7 feet and perhaps a few hundred pounds, making them harder to spot, Goley says. “They can be preyed upon pretty quickly,” she says. The animals may differ greatly in size but both were nearly hunted to extinction a century ago with the gray whale, now often thought of as a gentle giant, earning the name “devil fish” for fiercely fighting back when harpooned in a grisly hunt to provide lamp oil.

Above: Fur seals — including one with a great white-induced scar on its back — doze in the sun on Mexico’s Isla Guadalupe. Jenna Rose Robbins Right: Annual Guadalupe fur seal strandings in California. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The entire population of Guadalupe fur seals, once coveted for their luxurious pelts as well as oil-rich blubber, was thought to be lost until a small colony was discovered in the 1950s. Both species are recovering from near decimation after protections were put in place but both are now facing a different battle, although any role humans may have played this time around is still unclear. While data is now being processed in the case of the Guadalupe fur seals, the search for what is causing the unusual mortality event for gray whales is just getting started. An investigation into a similar gray whale die-off two decades ago found starvation to be a “significant contributing factor,” according to the report, but no conclusion was reached on why the whales were unable to find enough food. One question raised today is whether the gray whale population of 27,000 — one of the largest recorded in recent decades — has exceeded its so-called “carrying capacity,” or the ecosystem’s ability to support the burgeoning population. David Weller, a research wildlife biologist with the Southwest Fisheries Science


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Center, says that is one theory but also notes that “carrying capacity is not a set ceiling but it is a shifting threshold.” “The capacity of the environment to support a whale population varies from year to year,” he says, adding that as dire as the die-off sounds, the whales should be able to bounce back. Another potential factor is the interplay between the early melting of Arctic ice due to climate change and how that impacts the shrimp-like amphipods that make up the whales’ primary food source. “It becomes a complex question,” says Sue Moore, a biological oceanographer at the University of Washington, adding the whales may eventually need to “shift to other prey.” One aspect being researched is whether “sea ice provides fertilizer to those amphipods beds” amid the sediment of the Arctic seafloor, Moore says, noting that the beds appear to be shifting northward. “Right now, we are just piecing it together as we can,” she says, noting there are a number of potential factors, including environmental changes and disease, that will be examined in the coming months.

Like Goley, NOAA Fisheries officials and marine biologists are asking for the public’s help by reporting distressed, floating or beached whales, while also emphasizing that people should not approach the animals, which is against the law. And with more strandings expected, NOAA has even put out the call to property owners in the Pacific Northwest to volunteer sites where the unusual number of whales can be allowed to naturally decompose. Meanwhile, marine biologists will continue to assess the situation as they collect samples and pore over data in an attempt to unravel what is behind the massive die-off. “The No. 1 priority is learning all we can from the stranded animals,” Weller says. “We’ve got our fingers on the pulse and I would say we want to continue to monitor it closely. The expectation is we’re halfway into to this.” l Kimberly Wear is the Journal’s assistant editor. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear.

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It’s Personal

It Didn’t Get Better, I Did Reflections during Pride month

THE NORTH COAST’S COMPLETE R E STA U R A N T D I R E C T O RY

By Aydan Ash Tillett

itspersonal@northcoastjournal.com

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appy Pride month! I am so excited to be living in a time when the LGBTQ+ community has experienced so much progress that we are able to have an entire month dedicated to celebrating our culture and raising awareness. As with any and all things that involve humans, it is not perfect. But I have personally decided to make the best effort I can to focus on the positive progress while never forgetting what it cost and how far we still have to go. As with many holidays, this time of year can be difficult for members of the LGBTQ+ community. Even during a time of year dedicated to the celebration and education about their own community, LGBTQ+ people still experience oppression, aggression, fear and trauma. For some, even more than usual. This may be confusing for some of you and, if you are anywhere near a decent human being, probably saddening. But contrary to the popular saying “It gets better,” sometimes it does not. For me, it got much worse. I came out as a gay man in August of 2013, three months before my 30th birthday. This was after decades of being raised to believe that homosexuality was the “worst sin ever,” as bad as murder or abuse. Needless to say, this caused quite a few difficult psychological conflicts. You can imagine how liberated and elated I felt when I finally came to the conclusion that I was not the one with the “problem,” that the individuals who used religion as an excuse to abuse and manipulate me were the monsters. I genuinely believed that it would almost immediately start getting better. And I had every reason to believe so. It absolutely does get better for many people. Coming out is the beginning of their authentic life, the discovery of the path to their truth and the knowledge of how to truly love themselves. That is better. But a short six months after coming out

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as a gay man, I ended up in the hospital with meningitis, nearly on my deathbed. After four days, I was told by my doctor that my bloodwork revealed I was HIV positive. So began a long journey of health, self-discovery, pain, trauma and healing that felt like the end, but also the beginning. I kept waiting for it to get better. I kept thinking that “after this,” or “when I feel better physically” it will be better. I built my hopes up and saw them crashing down further and further every time. Instead of having a lifetime to learn, grow, accept my sexuality, accept my identity, explore my personality and sexuality, I was thrown into a storm of discovery, mental and physical health issues and psychological trauma surfacing from long ago, as well as adding new trauma because you haven’t dealt with the original one. This was not better. But people kept telling me that it would get better. They had my best interests in mind. Just be patient. Just be strong. Don’t give up. You’re so strong. It gets better. It has been five years. I have created a drag persona I love, helped build LGBTQ+ opportunities in my community, experienced new sexual abuse trauma in the midst of beginning to deal with my past sexual abuse trauma, had the foundation of my entire worldview crumble underneath me, came out as a transgender woman, became suicidal, survived becoming suicidal, became an advocate for my personal and mental health, discovered a wonderful support system and learned how to let go of people who are not good

for me. There were many other experiences, too, that I do not have the space to describe here. Still, I never felt like it was getting better. I felt it was getting much worse. But this Pride month, as I reflect on these past five years, I realized something powerful. It didn’t get better — I did. It is a fact that my situation is difficult every single day. It has not improved. But I have dug my 6-inch heels and acrylic nails in deep and held on for dear life. At other times, it felt like climbing upward an inch at a time to a future I wasn’t even sure existed. But I never stopped. It still isn’t easy. It never felt good and often still doesn’t. I was confused, depressed, frustrated, angry, sad, happy, hopeless and full of vision. I don’t have a feel-good Pride story. What I do have is the knowledge that I am better. I have improved. I have learned. I have grown. I have changed. I like the person I am now. And that is powerful. I like the person I am now. Yes, of course, there are things I wish were different, better, easier. But that does not change the fact that the person who emerged is beautiful, strong, compassionate, fierce and basically an allaround badass. Nothing and nobody can ever take that away from me. I don’t have any control over “it” and whether or not it gets better. But I can do my best to ensure that the part I do have control over — myself — always improves in whatever way I decide is best. It is my right and privilege. So this Pride month, I encourage you to remember: It may not always get better but that doesn’t mean you won’t.l

2019-2020 EDITION

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Table Talk

All the Pretty Oysters

The drama and the winners at Oyster Fest By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

T

From top to Bottom: Fregoso’s Comida Mexicana’s winning raw oyster; Blue Lake Casino and Hotel’s winning cooked oyster; Best in Show winner Sushi Spot’s cooked oyster; Chef David Velasco of Fregoso’s Comida Mexicana with his winning raw oyster. Photos by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill.

18  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

he lead-up to the 2019 Arcata Bay Oyster Festival was a lot. Local beer brewers were once again shut out of the plaza taps when event organizer Arcata Main Street made an exclusive deal with Crescent City’s SeaQuake Brewing, prompting backlash and the alternative Shuck Yeah event at Eel River Brewing Co. Then, a mere two days before the festival booths went up, a math error in a bacteria count led health officials to temporarily close Humboldt Bay’s oyster fisheries and warn vendors and restaurants not to serve our local bivalves before quickly rescinding the warnings and declaring Humboldt oysters safe to eat. Head Oystress Sydney Morrone said she hadn’t heard of any oysters actually dumped in the pre-festival panic but this was a close enough call for everyone. In fact, before the oysters were tested and declared safe Friday, organizers were already working on shipping in more than 100,000 alternate oysters from Oregon. Happily, it wasn’t necessary and the oysters on the plaza — and up for judging — were homegrown. Despite the drama, early estimates from Arcata Main Street come in with just under 12,000 attendees milling around the plaza with paper boats of oysters and trying to avoid that drunk fool spilling his beer on everyone’s shoes. Yeah, I see you, jackass. This year the 14 judges, myself included, were glamping out in a tent where SeaQuake beer and Cook’s sparkling wine — once forbidden during judging — flowed freely as “oystresses” glided in and out with paper trays and platters of oysters. (See the slideshow at www.northcoastjournal. com for a full perusal of the contestants.) We were informed that the five points for presentation would be restricted to the look of the single oysters in their shells, not the serving plates — which, in years past, have included flashing LED lights, a model of Atlantis and a working carousel. Best Cooked Oyster was the broadest field with eight contenders. The entries ran the gamut from thick, bubbling sauces to fruity vinaigrettes and yes, a little butter and lemon. In the end, Blue Lake Casino and Hotel repeated its 2018 win, this time with a sweet and spicy barbecue sauce, a little miso, wasabi and “dancing” bonito flakes that curl in contact with moisture. Perhaps because it doesn’t carry the

same cachet as the oyster prizes, Best Non-Oyster only found three entrants. But the winner was a standout. Again, Blue Lake Casino and Hotel scored with a fried wonton “tostada” with spicy tuna, jalapeño, avocado, aioli and eel sauce. Best in Show once again went to the perennially high-scoring Sushi Spot, which won over palates with a raw Goose Point in sesame-lime vinaigrette with peppered avocado puree, cilantro oil, crushed Himalayan salt, lime zest and sambal, as well as its cooked oyster in creamy garlic-kimchee sauce with pineapple, cilantro, sesame, scallion, seven-spice and habanero-infused masago. I’ll give judges the benefit of the doubt for the raw but any of us who say we didn’t recognize the cooked as a signature — and very good — Sushi Spot oyster are sleeping or pulling your leg. The number of oyster contest entrants has been steadily shrinking in recent years. The competition for Best Raw Oyster came down to a mere four entries, down from last year’s five and nearly double that in 2015. Notable was the total absence of shooters — are shooters over? Discuss. In any case, first-timers Fregoso’s Comida Mexicana came away victorious with an “al pastor” marinated Kumamoto with grilled pineapple salsa. Well, sort of first-timers — much of the same team was in place at Savory when it won in 2017. This was, for me, the best offering of the day, and one that chef David Velasco came up with on his first try. “We’re a Mexican restaurant,” he said. “I feel like all the Mexican ingredients are in the oyster, you know, the pineapple, the guajillo peppers for the pastor marinade, the habanero peppers.” The result was the total package, a beautiful oyster dressed in color, the sweetness of fruit, a little heat and tang, all without masking the light brine and sweet, creamy meat our fresh oysters are prized for the world over. And that’s the trick of both oysters and Oyster Fest that’s so hard to pull off — making something exciting without crushing the very thing that made it special in the first place. l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.


Setlist

Summer Farewells and Metal as Hell By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s been an interesting local news cycle as far as the local music scene is concerned. The Mateel Community Center can’t seem to catch a break, with back-to-back cancellations of Reggae on the River and the Andre Nickatina show in July. This doesn’t augur well for the state of SoHum or the rest of the area, as the Mateel in general and the festival in particular have not only served as strong cultural institutions, but as real boosters for the local economy. It can be hard living in the Alaska of California — as I think of the remote triad of Mendo, Humboldt and Trinity counties — and we need every dollar we can get from our summer visitors. I hope things turn around before they get worse. On a brighter note, summer is officially here and that’s absolutely something to rally around. We don’t get too many flashes of the sort of “eternity in an hour” that William Blake was talking about in “Auguries of Innocence,” but we might catch something nearby during the right sunrise, afternoon at the river or sunset on the ocean. And that’s always good food for the soul. Have a long week of daylight.

Thursday The Gatehouse Well is playing a free show at Pierson Park in McKinleyville at 6 p.m. today. Imagine this: The penultimate longest day of the year, sunshine and grass everywhere and the sounds of insects in the late afternoon punctuating the songs of one of Humboldt’s premier Celtic folk bands. Pretty fine, right?

Friday (Summer Solstice) It’s finally the official beginning to the summer and I have two great shows for you to check out tonight to celebrate. The Outer Space is hosting Seattle psych rock act Spirit Award at 7 p.m. ($7-$20 sliding scale). The stereophonic trio will be joined by local musician Gabriel Lubowe from the band Wild Abandon, who will be debuting his solo set for you, as well Arcata garage duo Two Platoon. Ami Dang is a sitar player whose work fuses Indian classical music and ambient sounds via contemporary electronics and sonic manipulation. The Baltimore-based

Spirit Award plays the Outer Space at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 21. Photo by Stephanie Severance, courtesy of the artists

musician will be appearing tonight at the Miniplex at 9 p.m. ($8-$10). The local ethereal sound collective Medicine Baul will also be on the bill.

Saturday The Northcoast Regional Land Trust is holding a fundraiser at Freshwater Farms Reserve today at 4 p.m. This family-friendly event will feature the music of Wild Abandon and Huckleberry Flint in a rare live show since its big holiday to-do at the Arkley Center for the Performing Arts last December. There will be a limited amount of tickets available at the event but be prompt if you wish to attend, this will very likely sell out ($15 adults/ $5 kids). The boys in the band are going their separate ways, in the literal geographic sense of the term, so it’s time for Unholy Orifice to play its swansong at The Jam tonight at 8 p.m. ($5). I will always look back fondly at the many times I reflexively shuddered as I typed out the group’s name and I am sorry to lose that experience. Along for the fun is the black metal band Miasmic, who haven’t played in town for a minute, as well as deth techs Locust Furnace and crusty duo Klod. Parenthetically, I’d like to add that apart from being genuinely impressed by the trio’s sonic output, I will also miss the full, yet concise press packs sent out by Sam from Unholy Orifice and Angry Hammer Productions. It’s been my experience that metalheads really understand the need for good promotion so kudos, pal, and safe journeys.

Sunday It’s another installment of Sundaze at the Jam — tonight’s techno dance will be curated by Paul Leath and go All Night Long. Like many of these Sundaze gigs of yesterday, the show’s free until 10 p.m., at which point a mere $5 gains you entrance through the door. Baggadonuts also has a slot tonight. Come one, come all.

Monday and Tuesday It’s summertime now and with the stu-

dents out of town there is a bit of a slump going on, live music-wise. So may I recommend some books for your evening’s fun? I’ve been putting a lot of eye-time into contemporary weird fiction and can suggest some quick corkers for any fans of the outré out there. Thomas Ligotti’s first two collections of deeply uncomfortable horror stories, Songs of a Dead Dreamer and Grimscribe, have both been compiled into the same paperback and make for great reading. If you want things weird dialed back in the horror department though, I have also been enjoying Karen Russell’s Vampires in the Lemon Grove. Her stories are oddly funny but no less strange. And speaking of strange, Kelly Link’s stories from the 1990s are collected as Stranger Things Happen, and if you have ever wondered how deconstructed sci-fi, horror and fairytales could be funny, then this is the book for you.

Fresh from our roaster to your mug

Wednesday It’s Sci-Fi Pint and Fry night over at the Arcata Theatre Lounge and this week’s installment is a favorite musical of mine from childhood, one whose themes range from sadistic medical professionals to the best organic body disposal unit in the universe. I am, of course, talking about the 1986 iteration of Little Shop of Horrors, starring Rick Moranis, Steve Martin and Levi Stubbs in director Frank Oz’s remake of the Roger Cormin classic. Admission is just a $5 minimum purchase of food and/ or beverages, and, as always, there will be a free raffle. Dig in. l Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo would like to say goodbye to an old friend who introduced him to thrash metal and, in the process, proved that early Metallica is actually good. He lives in Arcata.

Between 2nd & 3rd on “F” St. OLD TOWN, EUREKA 502 Henderson Street IN FRIENDLY HENDERSON CENTER

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

19


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-1220

THUR 6/20

ARCATA & NORTH FRI 6/21

BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 822-3453

Ben Rice Band (blues) 8pm Free

Front Ear (jazz) 9pm Free

Jim Wilde and Francis Vanek Trio 9pm Free

Open Mic 7pm Free

THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS in the basement of the jacoby storehouse

BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Eyes Anonymous (hits) 9pm Free

CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-2013

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

Johnny Young CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE (acoustic covers and originals) 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611 7-10pm Free

Johnnie Young Band (rockin country) 9pm Free

780 7th st. ARCATA

C I T N E H AUTALIAN IT ENU M Organic Products

Triple Junction (rock n roll) 9pm Free

BEST Fried Pickles

773 8th St. Arcata 822-1900 mazzottis.com www.facebook.com/Mazzottis

[W] Boot Scootin’ Country w/ McKenna Faith 8pm Free [W] Karaoke w/Rockstar

Live Music TBA 9pm Free

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free

The Triple Tones (rock, blues, country) 7:30pm Free

[T] Trivia Tuesday 6-8pm Free All agesc

DJ Rickshaw/The Bustop 10pm Free

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free

Dan and the Americans T-shirt Achilles Wheel (rock and roll) Release party 9:30pm $5 9:30pm $10

Open Daily 8am -2am

Bloody Mary

Free WiFi Spot

Karaoke 8pm Free

[W] Democratic Debates Watch Party 6pm Free

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

Fresh Seafood & Steaks Student & Senior Discounts

Jazz Noir 6pm Free

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

Excellent Wine & Spirits Drink Specials & Full Bar

[W] Open Mic Night 7pm Free

Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

FIELDBROOK MARKET 4636 Fieldbrook Road 633-6097 THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

M-T-W 6/24-26

Jazz Jam 6pm Free

CLAM BEACH TAVERN 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-0545 live jazz, small bites & craft cocktails

SUN 6/23

[M, W] FIFA Women’s World Cup FIFA Women’s FIFA Women’s 2019 8:30am Free w/$5 food/bev World Cup 2019 8am World Cup 2019 8:30am purchase [W] Sci-Fi Night: Little Free w/$5 food/bev purchase Free w/$5 food/bev purchase Shop of Horrors (1986) 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev purchase

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019 11:30am Free w/$5 food/bev purchase

THE BASEMENT 780 Seventh St. 826-2345

SAT 6/22

Hangover Breakfast

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets.

northcoastjournal.com/ whatsgood

Have a tip? Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 6/20

THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

FRI 6/21

SAT 6/22

Unholy Orifice, Locust Lovebush w/Meganora (afrobeat/psychfunk) 10pm $7 Furnace, Miasmic, Klod (metal) 8pm $5

LARRUPIN CAFE 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad

SUN 6/23

M-T-W 6/24-26

Deep Groove Society 10pm $5

[T] Top Grade Tuesdays Dancehall Reggae w/DJ RealYouth, Cassidy Blaze 10pm $5 [W] Trivia Night 6pm, Whomp Whomp Wednesdays 10pm TBA

HERE’S TO THE GOOD TIMES

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake

Culture Clash ((world, funk, reggae, hip hop) 9pm Free

Bump Foundation (funk, soul, jazz ) 9pm Free

[T] Old Time Music Jam 8pm Free [T] Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free [W] RLA w/Paula Jones & Don Baraka 6pm Free

MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151

The Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 6pm Free

The Yokels (rockabilly soul) 6pm Free

The Lost Dogs (blues) 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

Goat Karaoke 9pm Free

Ami Dang (bollywave) w/ Kendra Amalie 9pm$10

The Getdown with DJM 9:30pm Free

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

Open Mic 7pm Free

Goat Karaoke 9pm Free

[T] Sonido Pachanguero 9pm

Two Mic Sundays (comedy) 5pm Free

[T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6-8pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad 677-3543 PIERSON PARK 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville

PAI R U P FOR THI S SU MME R S FE STI VAL SE ASON

Eureka and South on next page

[M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5 Music in the Park w/ The Gatehouse Well 6-8pm Free

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7224

Mikey Bilello (solo guitar) 8pm Free

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-7580

Husky Burnette (dirty rock, blues) 8pm Free

Buddy Reed & The Rip-It-Ups (blues, rock) 8pm Free

[M] Open Bluegrass Jam 7pm

Trivia Night 8pm Free

SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919

DJ Dance Party 10pm

DJ Dance Party 10pm

Dance Party w/DJ Pressure 10pm

TOBY AND JACKS 822-4198 764 Ninth St., Arcata

DJ Dance Party TBA

Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

[M] Karaoke with DJ Marv 8pm

[W] Old School Hip Hop w/DJ Hal TBA

ALL TSHIRTS, TANKS + HATS SAVE 20% WHEN YOU BUY 2 MIX + MATCH FOR A GREAT COMBO DEAL

(707) 822-3090 987 H ST, Arcata

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BEST OPTOMETRY O FF I C E Full Service Optometry & Frame Gallery Monday-Saturday • atozeyecare.com 707.822.7641 northcoastjournal.com/BOH18

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

20% OFF our TEPPANYAKI menu

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

FRI 6/21

SAT 6/22

Sip n Knit (fiber arts potluck) Pre-game Game Night Music by ARTS & DRAFTS Karaoke 422 First St., Eureka 798-6329 5-10pm 5:30-8:30pm CuppaJo (jazz) 5-10pm Backstreet Band Uptown Kings (jump blues) BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 (classic rock) 9pm Free 9pm Free Pool Tourney Latin Peppers Summer Solstice BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Dr., Redway 923-3188 8pm at Brass Rail 9pm $5 Anna Hamilton DOUBLE D STEAK & SEAFOOD 320 Main St., Fortuna 725-3700 (blues, humor) 6-9pm Free Friday Night Noir: Mildred EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 442-2970 Pierce (1945) 7:30pm $5 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

Seabury Gould & Banjovi (Irish/ Celtic) 6pm Free

Oaxaca G R I L L

SUN 6/23

M-T-W 6/24-26 [W] Queeraoke! 6-9pm [T] Karaoke 9pm [W] Open Mic/Jam session 7pm Free

Michael Dayvid (guitar) 6-9pm Free

Live Music Fridays GYPPO ALE MILL 986-7700 1661 Upper Pacific Dr., Shelter Cove 6pm Free LOST COAST BREWERY TAPROOM 30th Anniversary Celebration 1600 Sunset Drive, Eureka noon-8pm Free 445-4480 MADAKET PLAZA Summer Concert Series w/Irie Foot of C St., Eureka Rockers (reggae) 6-8pm Free MADRONE BRICK FIRE PIZZA AND TAPHOUSE 421 Third St., Eureka 273-5129 NORTH OF FOURTH 207 Third St., Eureka 798-6303 Open Mic with Mike Friday Night Improv Show OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 Anderson 6:30pm Free 7pm Free Buddy Reed (original blues, PALM LOUNGE - EUREKA INN, The Color of Jazz Triple Tones (country rock, 518 Seventh St., Eureka 497-6093 7-11pm Free blues) 9pm Free rock) 8pm Free PEARL LOUNGE DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, dance DJ Statik (Hip-hop, trap) 10pm 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 remixes, trap) 10pm Free Free Friday Night Market Afterparty Northern Nights Music PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE Pride Mixer 4-7pm 139 Second St., Eureka ft. Tera Shae Miller 7:30pm Festival Grove Pre-Party Laidback Lounge 7-11pm 444-3344 Build to (jazz) edge of the document Disco Night 7pm Margins are just a safe area

Check out our Spring menu - Try our poke salad! -

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway

[W] SPIN - A Weekly Recreational Ping Pong Tournament 6-8pm $25

[W] Trivia Night 6-8pm [W] Brian Post and Friends Jazz Trio 7pm Free [M] Improv Show 6pm Free [T] Cocktail Piano 6-8pm Free [W] Aloha 808 (Hawaiian) 7pm Free [T] The Great Race Afterparty with Tristan Norton 7pm [W] Jazz with Bill Allison & Friends 7pm Free

Always Authentic, 7 days a week! Big Shrimp Appetizer 47.99 (feeds

A Caribbean Bistro

613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

THUR 6/20

EUREKA & SOUTH

Big Shrimp Appetizer 47.99 (feeds

1718 4th St. Eureka •Mon-Fri 10am-9pm •Sat & Sun 9am-9pm

Cultured Cuisine 2 8 5 0 F S T, E U R E K A 7 0 7. 7 9 8 . 6 4 9 9

Find our speciality salsas at Eureka Natural Foods in Eureka & McKinleyville • Eureka & Arcata Coop • Murphy’s Market in Trinidad 508 Henderson St Eureka 707.445.9702 M-Sat 11am-8pm

Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30am-2pm Dinner: Tue-Thu 5pm-9pm Fri-Sat 5pm-10pm

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

1-Medium 1-Topping Pizza ONLY $5.99 * BRING IN THIS AD *

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Rene’ Elyce European Education

The Gatehouse Well play at Pierson Park for Music in the Park, Thursday, June 20 from 6-8 p.m. (free).

VENUE

THUR 6/20 Noma Steaks Trashy Craft Studio 9pm $5

SAVAGE HENRY COMEDY CLUB 415 Fifth St., Eureka 845-8864 THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778 THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 744 Redway Dr., Garberville VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950 VISTA DEL MAR 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka

FRI 6/21

SAT 6/22

Matt Lieb 9pm $15

Matt Lieb 9pm $15

Fetish Night 9pm $7

Elderberry Rust Stringband (folk, bluegrass) 8pm TBA

SUN 6/23 Cornell/Vest Live Recording 7pm, 9pm $5

Live Jazz 8:30pm Free Upstate Thursdays w/DJs G. Davis, Just One 9pm Free Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free

Joan Woodcock Insurance Services

All Hair Color starts at $50 All Hair Cuts start at $20 ask for Rene’

Complimentary Consultation Cell: 541-373-7268 Landline: 707-443-5614

M-T-W 6/24-26 [M] Monday Night Pod 7-11pm Free [T] Trivia Tuesdays 9pm $5 [W] Fun, Games & Lies: Critical Listening at Presidential Debates 5:30pm Free [W] Diversity & Debauchery 7pm Free [T] Opera Alley Cats 7:30pm Free [W] Buddy Reed and the Rip it Ups (blues) 7:30pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in [W] Adamas (ballads) 6pm Free [T] Blues Tuesdays 7pm Free [W] Karaoke 9pm Free

Medicare Supplements • Life Prescription Drug Plans • Dental Plans 725-1200 • 1506 a Main Street Fortuna, 95540

LOCAL KING SALMON! SEA TO PLATE SINCE ‘88 316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187

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EUREKA GROCERY OUTLET 625 Commercial St. Eureka, CA 95501

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KIC I kramer investment corp. • 707-444-2919 • www.kkramer.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


Calendar June 20 – 27, 2019

20 Thursday ART

Photo by Kali Cozyris

Sweet summertime, the first fair of the season is here. The Best of Humboldt Fair 2019 is underway June 20-23 at Redwood Acres Fairgrounds ($15, $5 seniors/kids 6-12, free for active military and kids under 6, 15 and under free w/student I.D., presale carnival wristbands: $25. Thursday, free day) with loads of entertainment, animal shows, a carnival, stock car racing, food, family fun and more.

Bite Me

Look sharp for the Bite Me Red Carpet Screening on Sunday, June 23 at 4:30 p.m. at the Minor Theatre ($10). The Joyful Vampire Tour of America presents a one-nightonly screening of the award-winning independent feature film, brought to you by the Minor and the Humboldt Del Norte Film Commission. Rub shoulders with independent filmmakers, snap photos on the red carpet and end the evening down in the Basement at Jacoby’s Storehouse for the vampire afterparty.

Shutterstock

Eureka is on the map as a destination city for a souped-up, super cool classic car rally. The Great Race, featuring street-legal vintage automobiles from 1915 to 1975, rolls into town Tuesday, June 25 with 150 vintage automobiles and their entourages, stopping in Old Town for the night to fuel up on hospitality and good food. Mix and mingle with the cars and their teams starting at 5 p.m. (free).

COMEDY Noma Steaks Trashy Craft Studio. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Crafts and comedy together. Hosted by Stephanie Knowles. $5, includes materials. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www.redwoodraks.com.

Mad Tidings We certainly have it good right here in our beautiful, rural backyard. When it comes to arts and entertainment, Humboldt County consistently delivers top-of-the-line theater, art and music performances. You could travel out of the area for such experiences but why waste airfare when you can save your money for the tip jar at the Logger Bar? Keep your currency circulating right here in the same place that churns out the good stuff. Dell’Arte International is one such treasure. Spanning five weeks each summer, the school’s extraordinary Mad River Festival sets the stage(s) for world-class performance featuring local and international students, staff, alumni and community members showcasing professional-level talent and creativity with original plays, comedy, street theater, live music and more. This year’s festival, happening June 21 through July 20, introduces Turning Gray Skies Blue: The Music of Timmy Gray, opening June 21, a concert celebrating a lifetime of work by Dell’Arte’s award-winning composer/sound designer. It revives the powerful Radioman, inspired by the writings of Eric Hollenbeck beginning June 26, and starting June 22 premieres Going Down in Flames, the story of renowned actor and professional clown Joan Mankin, who, while creating a play about a clown with dementia, actually develops dementia.

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309. Healing Sketchbook Workshop. Third Thursday of every month, 5-6 p.m. Outer Space, 1100 M St., Arcata. Conversations About Power will hold a workshop focusing on mixed-media sketchbook techniques. All levels welcome. Bring sketchbook and art supplies. Some art supplies available. Free, donations appreciated. ConversationsAboutPower@gmail.com. www.conversationsaboutpower.com. 442-8413.

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816. Pierson Park Music in the Park. 6-8 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Enjoy a fun evening listening to live music and playing lawn games Thursday evenings from 6-8 p.m. through Aug. 15. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music each week on Eureka’s waterfront. Presented by Eureka Main Street. Every Thursday through Aug. 15. Live reggae with Irie Rockers on June 20 Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org.

EVENTS

Submitted

New this year is The Best Drag Show Ever on July 3, co-produced with Club Triangle and featuring drag performances in every shade of the rainbow, hosted by Martha T. Lipton. And back again bawdy as ever, starting July 5, is the good time, late-night, adults-only cabaret Red Light in Blue Lake: An Adult Cabaret. In addition to these shows, the festival presents new works-in-progress by Dell’Arte alumni, faculty and staff in Mad Labs on July 2, an evening of storytelling performances featuring stories from the Humboldt community in Stories in the Tent on July 9 and a “highly-physical play” acrobatic movement and storytelling with UpLift Physical Theatre in Through

24  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

the Waves opening July 10. The festival also takes performances off-site with Forgive Us, Gustavito! at the Arcata Playhouse starting July 5, and caps off all the fun with the wildly popular, week-long Humboldt Folklife Festival, with all things string from July 13-20. Bravo, Humboldt. No need to travel out of the area for out-of-this-world entertainment. Just make hay to Blue Lake and grab a seat under the stars, inside the big top tent or in Carlo’s intimate theater, and be dazzled. For a full schedule of events, visit www. dellarte.com. Tickets are available online, by phone at 668-5663 or in person at 131 H St., Blue Lake. — Kali Cozyris

Best of Humboldt Fair 2019. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Four days of arts, entertainment, agriculture, racing, local products, tastings and livestock showings. Gates open at 8 a.m. for livestock shows. Thursday is free all day. $15, $5 seniors/kids 6-12, free for active military and kids under 6, 15 and under free w/student I.D., $25 presale carnival wristbands. www.redwoodacres.com.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. Every other Thursday, 3-4:30 p.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. For ages 5 and up. Free. trihuml@ co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Live music every week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer.


GARDEN Fortuna Community Wellness Garden Drop-In Volunteer Time. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Health Center, 3750 Rohnerville Road. Learn about growing a variety of produce. Volunteers are welcome to harvest and take away fresh nutritious foods. Kid-friendly. Tools provided. Please bring a reusable water bottle to stay hydrated. Hablamos Español. Free. garden@ opendoorhealth.com.

MEETINGS 350 Humboldt monthly meeting. 6-8 p.m. El Chipotle Restaurant, 850 Crescent Way, Sunny Brae. The topic is “Building the Power of 350 Humboldt.” All are welcome. gailmail@reninet.com. 223-0382.

SPORTS 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup. 11:30 a.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Free w/$5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

ETC Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. New members welcome. Anyone with sewing or quilting experience or who wants to learn. Free. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

21 Friday ART

Community Art Night. Third Friday of every month. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Family friendly, all ages welcome. All supplies are provided. Free. www. ervmgc.com. Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Drop-in volunteering every Friday to help the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@ scraphumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452.

COMEDY Friday Night Improv Show. 7-9:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games with audience suggestions. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www. oldtowncoffeeeureka.com. 497-9039. Matt Lieb. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. The Los-Angeles-based comedian performs. $15. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www. savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE World Dance. 7:30 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor teaching and easy dances, 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. Request dancing, 8:30 - 10:00 p.m. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. www.stalbansarcata.org. 839-3665.

LECTURE Biology & Conservation of Native Lampreys. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Damon Goodman presents. Seating for the first 50 attendees. 826-2359.

MOVIES Friday Night Noir: Mildred Pierce (1945). 7:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. After throwing her cheating husband out of the house, a young mother named Mildred Pierce tries to find suitable work in Depression-era

California. *Screening was rescheduled after deadline for last week’s Journal. $5. www.theeurekatheater.org. Movie Night. 7 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Film TBA.

MUSIC Lady Flavah Live KMUD Broadcast. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Music and speakers on the square. Spirit Award, Gabe Lubowe, Two Platoon. 7-10 p.m. Outer Space, 1100 M St., Arcata. Seattle psych rock, Arcata singer-songwriter, Arcata garage rock. All ages. ADA accessible. $5-$20. outerspacearcata@gmail.com. The Gatehouse Well Album Release Show. 7-9 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. The band’s live release show of its second album Bring You Ashore. $15, includes copy of album. thegatehousewell@gmail.com.

PRESENTS

Passport to Dance for ages 3-6

- Hula - Jazz - Tap - Ballet - Musical Theatre - Belly - Dance - Songs - Stories - Crafts - Snacks - Contemporary - Hip Hop -

THEATER Turning Gray Skies Blue: The Music of Timmy Gray. 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. The Dell’Arte Company celebrates a lifetime of work by Dell’Arte’s award-winning composer/sound designer Timmy Gray. The concert features 16 songs from 10 shows including Blue Lake: The Opera, Mary Jane: The Musical, Wildcard, Grasshopper and others. $17, $15 student/senior, $13 veterans, $10 kids 12 and under. info@ dellarte.com. 668-5663.

EVENTS Best of Humboldt Fair 2019. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 20 listing. Creamery District Night Market. 5-9 p.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. Night market with local artists, businesses, music and food. Free. creameryinfo@ gmail.com. Mad River Festival. -July 20. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. The 29th annual Mad River Festival includes a concert celebrating a lifetime of work by Dell’Arte’s award-winning composer/sound designer Timmy Gray, Dell’Arte’s first ever drag show, an experimental theatrical laboratory, a storytelling night, a late night cabaret, a week of local music with the Humboldt Folklife Festival and more. Prices vary. www.dellarte.com. Friday Night Market. 5-8 p.m. Clarke Plaza, Old Town, Eureka. A night farmers market with live music, farmers, local artists, beer/wine/distillery features and more. Farmers’ Market portion will be on E Street between Second Street and Opera Alley.

3 separate weeks $110/per week

June 24 - 28 / 9am - 1pm July 15 - 19 / 9am - 1pm August 5 - 9 / 9am - 1pm

To register call 442.7779 or visit www.northcoastdance.org

FOR KIDS Baby Read & Grow. Third Friday of every month, 11-11:45 a.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Babies and their families are invited to share songs, finger plays and short stories at this early literacy event. Free. jlancaster@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.humlib.org. 269-1910. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@gmail.com. 845-0094. Zumba Kids and Kids Jr. 6-7 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Every Friday night, instructor Vanessa Maloney. Open to kids ages 5 and up. $8, $5 prepay. ecooper@ervmgc.com. ervmgc.com. 725-3300.

FOOD Beer, Cheese and Chocolate Pairing. 7 p.m. Dick Taylor Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

25


Calendar Continued from previous page

Chocolate Factory, 4 West Fourth St., Eureka. Push the boundaries of flavor with an evening combining craft chocolate, beer and cheese. $25. Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local produce, pasture-raised meats, baked goods, plant starts, crafts and more. Live music and food vendors.

GARDEN Arcata Community Wellness Garden Drop-In Volunteer Time. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden, Corner of F and Eleventh streets. Learn about growing a variety of produce. Volunteers are welcome to harvest and take away fresh nutritious foods. Kid-friendly. Tools provided. Please bring a reusable water bottle to stay hydrated. Free. garden@ opendoorhealth.com.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

22 Saturday BOOKS

Writers Support Group. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Share writing with the group. The group offers encouragement for all writers — from those just picking up a pencil through published authors — as well as feedback and general discussion. Free. 822-5954.

COMEDY Matt Lieb headlines the Club. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. The Los-Angeles-based comedian performs. $15. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Dancing Through the Classics. 3:30-5:45 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Trinity Ballet Academy of Mckinleyville presents dancers ages 4 to adult performing ballet classics, including Paquita Variations and a Fourth of July tribute. Doors open at 2:30 p.m. $20, $12 children 11 and under. 839-1816.

MUSIC Summer Kick Off Concert ft. Huckleberry Flint. 4-8 p.m. Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Enjoy music by local band Huckleberry Flint, food and drinks, kids activities, small group tours of Freshwater Farms Reserve and more. $15, $5 kids under 12, free for kids under 3.

THEATER Turning Gray Skies Blue: The Music of Timmy Gray. 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte Amphitheatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 21 listing. Going Down in Flames. 2-3:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Play about a clown who gets dementia, based on the true story of legendary San Francisco clown Queenie Moon. $20, $18 student/ senior, $16 veterans. info@dellarte.com. www.dellarte. com. 668-5663.

EVENTS 30th Anniversary Celebration. Noon-8 p.m. Lost Coast Brewery Taproom, 1600 Sunset Drive, Eureka. Lost Coast Brewery celebrates with Los Giles Taqueria and Romans

Kitchen, cake, giveaways, cornhole, disc golf, giant Jenga and ladder ball. Dog friendly. Free. events@lostcoast. com. www.lostcoast.com. 267-9651. Best of Humboldt Fair 2019. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 20 listing. Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 21 listing. Singles Mixer. 7-10 p.m. The Trim Scene Salon, 930 Samoa Blvd., Arcata. food, drinks, music and silent auction. All proceeds donated to suicide prevention efforts in Humboldt County and The Ink People nonprofit. $10. www.trimscenesalon.com. Taste of Summer Kick-Off. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. North Coast Co-op, Eureka, 25 Fourth St. $3 root beer floats made with Lost Coast Brewery root beer and organic vanilla ice cream, free samples, hot bar coupons and free bamboo forks. Enter to win a new Hyper Mountain Bike. Live broadcast of KSLG radio. www.northcoastco-op.com.

FOR KIDS Story Time with Kathy Frye. Fourth Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 764-3333. Storytime. 11:30 a.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Stories for children and their parents. Free. Storytime and Crafts. 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Followed by crafts at noon. Now with a Spanish and English story every first and third Saturday. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. 668-4207. Summer Reading Program Kick-off Party. 11 a.m.-noon. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Watch, learn and play with the Circus Nature Wizards of Play. Kids and teens are invited to sign up for the library’s summer reading program after the event. Free. www. humlib.org. 269-1910.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Live music from 10:30 a.m to 1:30 p.m.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Leslie Anderson at the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute walk focusing on the plants, history and/or ecology of the Marsh. Loaner binoculars available with photo ID. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Birding By Ear. 8-10 a.m. Simmons Gallery/Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. Meet at the TCLT office for a walk from Saunders Park to Old Home Beach with Andrew Orahoske to learn how to identify birds by their calls and songs. Registration is required. Call 677-2501 or email info@trinidadcoastallandtrust. org. Free. info@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. 677-2501. Crew Speeder Rides in Samoa. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Samoa Cookhouse, 908 Vance Ave. A scenic ride on the historic Crew Speeder Car along the bay from Samoa to Manila and back. Rides on the half hour. First come-first serve. Suggested donation: $8, $7 seniors, $4 kids 3-10, free for kids 2 and under. www.samoacookhouse.net. Dune Ecosystem Restoration. Every third Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help remove invasive plants

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

to make room for native plant diversity. Tools, gloves and snacks provided. Please bring water and wear work clothes. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. www. friendsofthedunes.org/calendar. 444-1397. Humboldt Pet Supply Monthly Marsh Cleanup. 10:30 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Help clean up left-behind waste that greatly impacts the marsh ecosystem. Volunteers can win prizes from local business by finding painted rocks hiding in the marsh as they clean. Supplies provided, but bring gloves, bags if you have them. Meet at South G St. parking lot. Restoring Coastal Prairie Hike. 9:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mattole Valley Community Center, 29230 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Join Sanctuary Forest and the Mattole Restoration Council to tour the MRC’s Native Plant Nursery and recent grassland restoration sites on Prosper Ridge. Bring lunch, water, wear layers. Spots are limited, RSVP required. anna@sanctuaryforest.org, 986-1087 ext. 9#; or 629-3514 or monica@mattole.org. Free. www. sanctuaryforest.org/event/restoring-coastal-prairie/. Volunteer Trail Stewards Work Day. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Corner of Margaret and Buttermilk lanes, Sunny Brae. Help with brushing and cleaning trails in Sunny Brae Forest. Bring water, gloves and wear protective footwear and clothing. Extra gloves, tools and lunch will be provided. Volunteers of all ages are welcome. Rain or shine. Free. Wigi Wetlands Restoration and Clean Up. 9-11 a.m. Wigi Wetlands, Behind the Bayshore Mall, Eureka. Help remove invasive plants and trash along a stretch of the Bay Trail and create habitat for native plants and the birds that need them. Refreshments and tools provided. Free. jeremy.cashen@yahoo.com. rras.org. 672-3346.

SPORTS 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup. 8 a.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See June 20 listing.

ETC Women’s Peace Vigil. Noon-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

23 Sunday ART

Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.

COMEDY Cornell/Vest Live Recording. 7 & 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Cornell Reid and Evan Vest team up to record Savage Henry Records’ first release. $5. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www. savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864. Two Mic Sundays. 5 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. At Northtown Coffee at 5 p.m. and Savage Henry Comedy Club at 9 p.m. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. At Northtown Coffee at 5 p.m. and Savage Henry Comedy Club at 9 p.m. Free. editor@savagahenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

MUSIC Bach to Poulenc: A Summer Bouquet of Classical Music. 4-5 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Christ Episcopal Church presents the

summer’s first “Sundays at 4” concert. The program features Douglas Moorehead, Christ Church Organist Emeritus, on keyboards (organ, harpsichord, piano) joined by local musicians in performing music by Bach, Soler, Schubert, Bizet, Poulenc and Giordani. Free. christchurcheureka@gmail.com. www.christchurcheureka. org/concerts. 442-1797. Bayside Community Hall Music Project. 6-8 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Bandemonium, community activist street band, from 6-8 p.m. Bring wind instruments and drums. Free. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/ Bayside. 499-8516.

THEATER Going Down in Flames. 2-3:30 & 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 22 listing.

EVENTS Best of Humboldt Fair 2019. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 20 listing. Bite Me Red Carpet Screening. 4:30 p.m. Minor Theatre, 1013 H St., Arcata. The Joyful Vampire Tour of America presents a one-night-only Humboldt screening of the award-winning independent feature film. Doors at 4 p.m. with red carpet photos. Q&A with the film’s writer and star follows. A Joyful Vampire Ball afterward at The Basement. $10. Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 21 listing. Mural Painting, Skate Jam, Live Music. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mattole Valley Community Center, 29230 Mattole Road, Petrolia. Mural painting by Toenail during the Farmers Market. Farmers Market from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Skateboarding and music until 6 p.m Free. mattolecraftsman@gmail.com.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. For ages 4 and up. Free w/museum admission. www.discovery-museum.org. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 21 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

OUTDOORS Butterflies at the Humboldt Botanical Garden and Its Butterfly House. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods campus, north entrance, Eureka. Meet Redwood Region Audubon Society walk leader Gary Falxa at the garden entrance at 10 a.m. Spend the morning examining butterflies and their associated plants. Bring binoculars and any pocket guides you have. Contact Gary Falxa to reserve a place. $5, members free. garyfalxa@gmail. com. www.rras.org.

SPORTS 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup. 8:30 a.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See June 20 listing.

ETC Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Speeder Rides. 10 a.m. Ride the rails on a historic crew car speeder offering spectacular views of Humboldt Bay. All-ages. Rides every half an hour. $8, $7 seniors, $4 children 3-10, free for ages 2 and under. 443-2957.


24 Monday COMEDY

Improv Show. 6-7:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games. Audience suggestions taken for scenes, plays, films, songs and more. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www.oldtowncoffeeeureka.com. 497-9039. Monday Night Pod. 7-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Live recordings of podcasts on the Savage Henry Podcast Network. Usually two recordings 7 and 9 p.m. Free. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Paso a Paso host dance therapy. Free. jorge.matias@stjoe.org. 441-4477.

LECTURE Education Under Occupation: Moving from Hopelessness to Informed Action. Noon-1 p.m. Humboldt State University Library, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. HSU professor Janet Winston discusses her recent trip to Palestine/Israel to meet with Palestinian professors and human rights activists. In Library room 317. Free. jmw82@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.libcal.com/ event/5460635. 826-3441.

MUSIC Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. In the EHS band room located in the rear with parking at Del Norte and J streets. Free. SrJoePapa@gmail.com. 834-0909. Join the Scotia Band. 7:30-9 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Woodwind, brass and percussion musicians (intermediate level and above) of all ages are invited. The band rehearses Monday evenings in the Fortuna High Band Room and performs publicly throughout the year. Free. thescotiaband@yahoo.com. www.scotiaband2.org. 599-4872. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. All voices welcome, with a particular call for male voices. Opportunities for solos and ensemble groups. $50 registration fee w/scholarships available. 839-2276.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 21 listing.

MEETINGS Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

SPORTS 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup. 8:30 a.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See June 20 listing.

25 Tuesday COMEDY

Trivia Tuesdays. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Teams of three. Three rounds. Real prizes. $5 team entry fee. editor@savagehenrymagazine. com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Live music. All ages. $6. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 21 listing. The Great Race. 5-8 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. A classic rally for street-legal vintage automobiles at least 45 years old. Welcome 400 plus racers as they stop in Old Town for the night. Free. info@ visiteureka.com. www.eurekamainstreet.org. 798-6411. Quarter Craze. 6 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. The Eureka Woman’s Club is sponsoring a Quarter Craze on June 25 to raise money to upgrade their bathroom to be ADA compliant. RSVP is recommended as these events sell out. Pizza, salad and drink for $7. Doors open at 6 pm for dinner and shopping. Bidding begins at 7. www.eurekawomansclub.org. 845-7243.

FOR KIDS Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Farmers’ Market, 10th and Main streets. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. WIC and Cal Fresh accepted with $10 bonus match when using EBT card. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. sohumfm@yahoo.com. 943-3025. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. GMOfree produce, humanely raised meats, pastured eggs, plant starts and more. Live music weekly and CalFresh EBT cards accepted. Free. www.humfarm.org. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers and premium plant starts.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbers. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Humboldt Cribbage Club plays weekly. Seven games in summer and nine games during the season. $8. grasshopper60@aol.com. 444-3161. Redwood Coast Village Volunteer/Member Orientation. 1-3 p.m. Area 1 Agency on Aging, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Redwood Coast Village is looking for new members and volunteers to help seniors stay active, independent and living in their own homes. Find out more about RCV’s member services and volunteer opportunities at this orientation. office2@redwoodcoastvillage.org. www. redwoodcoastvillage.org. 442-3763.

OUTDOORS Slower Paced Wetlands Restoration & Plant Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Mary Ann Madej and/or John DeMartini will lead this slower-paced tour that covers wetlands restoration and plants at the Marsh. This tour only will happen if at least one phone reservation is received. Call the Marsh Interpretive Center at 826-2359 if you plan to attend. Tour meets at the first parking lot on South I Street in from Samoa Boulevard. Free.

SPORTS 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup. 8:30 a.m. Arcata Theatre Continued on page 34 » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Calendar Continued from previous page

Lounge, 1036 G St. See June 20 listing. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. The 75th anniversary season is underway. Crabs vs. Humboldt B52s June 25-26 $9, $6 seniors/ students, $4 children 12 and under.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See June 20 listing. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See June 23 listing.

26 Wednesday BOOKS

RIY (Read It Yourself) Book Club. Last Wednesday of every month, 7-8 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. No assigned books, just bring your favorites to share or get reading ideas from neighbors. Refreshments served. Free. 725-3460.

COMEDY Fun, Games & Lies: Critical Listening at Presidential Debates. 5:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. North Coast People’s Alliance, Centro del Pueblo and the Eureka Branch of the NAACP host this night of presidential debate watching, Dodge and Spin Bingo and other events. Free admission. carrie@ northcoastpeoplesalliance.org. www.savagehenrymagazine.com.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Pint & Fry Night: Little Shop of Horrors (1986). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Rock musical comedy horror film about a geeky florist shop worker who finds out his Venus flytrap can speak. Free w/$5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre. com.

MUSIC Sweet Harmony Women’s Chorus. 6-8 p.m. Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St. All-female barbershop-style chorus that sings a variety of music in four-part, a cappella harmonies. Accepting new members. Ability to read music not required. barbershophumboldt@gmail.com. (802) 490-9455, 601-8219.

THEATER Radioman. 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Radioman blends the stories which represent soldiers from the Vietnam War through to current military conflicts across race, gender, rank and file. $20, $18 student/senior, $16 veterans. www.dellarte. com. 668-5663.

EVENTS Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 21 listing.

FOR KIDS Family Movie Night: Moana. 5:45-7:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Hosted by the Eureka Chapter of the NAACP, as part of a film series

highlighting the accomplishments of people of color. Sponsored by the Friends of the Redwood Libraries. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1910. Lego Club. 3-4:30 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A weekly Lego Club for ages 5 and up meets at the library. We have many Lego sets, bring your friends to build and create! 0. 725-3460.

MEETINGS Health Care for All/Physicians for a National Health Program. Fourth Wednesday of every month, 5-6 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Learn about the benefits and cost savings of a single-payer healthcare system for California. Free. healthcareforallhumboldt@gmail.com. (805) 844-6655.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See June 20 listing.

LECTURE From Boy Scouts and Bagpipes to Gershwin and Super Mario Bros.: Getting an Education in the West Bank. 6-8 p.m. Temple Beth El, Hodgson and T streets, Eureka. HSU professor Janet Winston shares her experiences meeting West Bank university professors and human rights activists as part of a U.S. faculty delegation. Her talk will focus on Palestinians’ access to higher education and the conditions of daily life under occupation. Free. jmw82@humboldt.edu, bethel@reninet.com. 444-2846.

Home/Business Solar and Net Energy Metering Workshop. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Learn about generating your own renewable energy. Local solar installers and solar system owners answer questions. Current solar system owners are invited to bring their bills and learn how to read them with RCEA account managers. Upstairs in Room 203. Free. outreach@redwoodenergy. org. redwoodenergy.org/events-workshops/. 269-1700.

MUSIC

Humboldt Bay Harbor Working Group. Noon. Samoa Cookhouse, 908 Vance Ave. John Ford with the Humboldt County Planning and Building Department provides an overview of the effort to update the Humboldt Bay Area Plan. No-host lunch. Please RSVP. $16 fried chicken lunch, $12 soup/salad. charles.bean@ yahoo.com.. www.samoacookhouse.net. 441-1974.

EVENTS

SPORTS Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ball Park, Ninth and F streets. See June 25 listing.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Community Board Game Night. Last Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@northcoast.com. www.baysidecommunityhall.org. 444-2288. Family Night. 4-7 p.m. Blood Bank, 2524 Harrison Ave, Eureka. The Blood Bank will make dinner and watch the kids while you donate. Free. recruit@nccbb.org. www. nccbb.org. 443-8004.

27 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See June 20 listing.

COMEDY Fun, Games & Lies: Critical Listening at Presidential Debates. 5:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 26 listing. Just Joshin’. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Josh Barnes runs his Comedy Extravaganza the last Thursday of every month. Variety shows, late night talk shows, stand-up showcases. $5. editor@ savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine. com. 845-8864.

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Pierson Park Music in the Park. 6-8 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. See June 20 listing. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. Madaket Plaza, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 20 listing.

THEATER Radioman. 8-9:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 26 listing. Mad River Festival. Blue Lake, Off State Route 299, Exit 5. See June 21 listing.

FOR KIDS Kid’s Day: Sequoia Zoo Past, Present & Future. 3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Garberville Town Square has teamed up with the Sequoia Park Zoo Educational Outreach Program to offer activities designed to provide fun experiences on a variety of topics including wildlife, environment and conservation. Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See June 20 listing.

FOOD Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See June 20 listing. Willow Creek Farmers Market. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Veteran’s Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. See June 20 listing.

GARDEN Fortuna Community Wellness Garden Drop-In Volunteer Time. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Health Center, 3750 Rohnerville Road. See June 20 listing.

MEETINGS Toastmasters. Fourth Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

SPORTS Humboldt B52s Baseball. 7:05 p.m. Bomber Field, Redwood Acres, Eureka. The semi-professional, woodbat summer ball team swings away. Through first weekend in August. B52s vs. Team Australia June 27 $5, $3 seniors/kids 5-12, free for kids 4 and under. www. humboldtb52sbaseball.com.

ETC Community Board Game Night. Last Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See June 26 listing. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See June 20 listing.

Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See June 20 listing. Wags, Wine & Wills. 4-7 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Sequoia Humane Society partners with Petrusha Law to kick off an estate planning extravaganza with local vendors. Free. sequoiahumaneadopt@gmail.com. 442-1782.

Heads Up … Friends of the Arcata Marsh and the city of Arcata seek welcome desk volunteers for weekends at Marsh Interpretive Center. Shifts are four hours, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Dall 826-2359 or email amic@ cityofarcata.org. Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is seeking donations of good books in good condition for its annual Fourth of July book sale. Call 822-5711 or 633-6654 to arrange for pick-up or drop-off. Applications are still being accepted for Humboldt County grand jury service for 2019/2020. For more information and to print or complete an online application, visit www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov or call 269-1245 and request an application be mailed to you. The city of Eureka and the Ink People Center for the Arts are accepting applications for the inaugural Poet Laureate of Eureka. Applications for this year are due by July 1. Visit www.inkpeople.org/eureka-poet-laureate, contact eurekapoet@inkpeople.org or call 442-8413. The Peninsula Community Collaborative (PCC), in partnership with the Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District (Water District) and Friends of the Dunes, invites local artists to propose mural designs for concrete structures (vaults) on the Samoa Peninsula along New Navy Base Road and within the dunes. Contact Carla Avila-Martinez at carla@nrsrcaa.org or 269-2055 for an application. Applications are due Friday, June 21 at 5 p.m. The Gyppo Ale Mill is booking Pints 4 Nonprofits through the summer. Contact julie@gyppo.com or visit 1661 Upper Pacific Drive in Shelter Cove. The Blue Lake Chamber of Commerce invites businesses, organizations and individuals to participate in this year’s Annie & Mary Day Parade on July 14. Also, craft and food vendors are invited to have a booth at the celebration. For information and an online application visit www.sunnybluelake.com. The Eureka Street Art Festival is seeking host families for visiting artists during this year’s event. Hosts will provide a private room and access to a bathroom and kitchen facilities for a visiting artist from July 25-Aug. 4. If interested, email eurekastreetartfestival@gmail.com. The Bureau of Fantastical Spectacles and Arcata Main Street are seeking vendors, performers and nonprofits for the June 30 Fairy Festival on the Arcata Plaza. Visit www.arcatafairyfestival.com or phone 822-4500. Faben Artist Fund now accepting applications. Grant guidelines are posted at www.humboldtarts.org. Email Jemima@humboldtarts.org or 442-0278, ext. 205. The Redwood Art Association is looking for artists to compete in the first Humboldt Open Paint Out. This event is open to all artists and mediums and will be held Oct. 7-11. Find more information and register at www.redwoodart.us. Email any inquiries to humboldtopenpaintout@gmail.com. l


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Filmland

now accepting ncj smartcard Sarah Huckabee Sanders would like to be remembered as “transparent and honest.” Shaft

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Men Out of Time

Shaft and Rolling Thunder Revue By John J. Bennett

menu changes seasonally

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

SHAFT. Isaac Hayes’ Theme from Shaft is a certified slapper (that’s what the kids are calling them, right?). Trouble is, so is John Shaft, at least as characterized by Richard Roundtree in the original movie from 1971. (I haven’t explored the quick succession of sequels, TV movies or the kinda-sorta sequel in 2000, starring Jackson as the nephew of the Roundtree character and directed by John Singleton.) It’s been a while but I remember coming away with the distinct impression that the character was a misogynist and a brutalist, unburdened by morality or emotional nuance. He was a product of his place and time, a manifestation of the abandonment, blight and decay of New York City in the 1970s. Of course, he was also intended as a symbol, an avenging angel against its violent decrepitude. I’ll be the first to admit that I, a white boy from Northern California, don’t have much purview on the cultural context for 1970s Harlem or the popular art that depicts it. But Shaft always stuck with me as problematic: an ostensible defender of his community who plows through it with guns, fists and phallus. So 2019, when we hopefully find ourselves at the beginning of a renewed fight for awareness and equality, seems to me like an odd moment to roll this relic back out. But Shaft is part of our collective cultural consciousness; even people who don’t think they know the theme song actually do. And it’s Samuel L. Jackson, so I couldn’t not go, could I? This time he plays John Shaft, son of John Shaft (Roundtree) — anyone complaining about spoilers can keep it to themselves; he’s in the trailer — a crusading cop who left the force under a cloud and struck out on his own as a private detective. Then, in the ’80s, he found love with Maya (Regina Hall) and they had a baby. Shaft’s milieu being what it was/ is, though, Maya felt compelled to leave and raise the child somewhere safer. And so she did, cultivating in her son a sensitivity and sense of fairness that she hoped would serve

him well. (We see, in a perhaps unnecessary montage, his father’s presence as defined by Christmas gifts of porno mags, condoms and a Lawrence Taylor Super Bowl ring). Her parental instincts would seem affirmed by her son’s trajectory: Present-day JJ (Jessie T. Usher), an MIT graduate, works as an analyst with the FBI based in New York City. He forswears violence, respects everyone equally and shops at the Gap. His life becomes complicated, though, when he reunites with a childhood friend named Karim (Avan Jogia), an Army veteran who has struggled with self-medication. Karim ends up dead under suspicious circumstances and JJ finds himself overmatched in his attempts to investigate. So, of course, he calls on his estranged father for assistance. Together they unravel a frankly hackneyed plot involving a veterans’ assistance organization, a sinister bodega and trans-continental heroin smuggling network. There’s some background noise about the elder Shaft’s old nemesis and a will-they-or-won’t-they with JJ’s lifelong friend Sasha (Alexandra Shipp). And, of course, Maya re-enters the picture. Taken on its own merits, this Shaft is a serviceable if under-written action comedy (there’s violence aplenty, though the execution leaves something to be desired). There’s an attempt to bring the Shaft mythology into the light of the 21st century but it fails, laden as it is with winking homophobia and easy sex jokes. I wouldn’t expect a “woke” Shaft (maybe I should?) but this one’s stuck awkwardly between eras, unable to recognize or acknowledge his own position, straining — unsuccessfully — to contextualize itself. R. 111M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. ROLLING THUNDER REVUE: A BOB DYLAN STORY BY MARTIN SCORSESE. The music and mythology of Bob Dylan has always been a part of my consciousness; I suspect this is true for many of us. I explored his catalog in earnest as a pre-teen, enamored

RESTAURANT 301 & CARTER HOUSE INNS 301 L St. Eureka 707.444.8062 carterhouse.com

Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Field Notes

Filmland Continued from previous page

Average Number of Babies Born, Worldwide Per woman from 1800 to 2017 6

See showtimes at www.northcoastjournal. com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards› Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Opening

ALL IS TRUE. Kenneth Branagh, Judi Dench and Ian McKellan in a drama about William Shakespeare returning to his family in his last years. PG13. 101M. MINOR. ANNA. Trash-ass Luc Besson returns to lady assassin stories with Sasha Luss and Helen Mirren. R. 119M. BROADWAY. BUT I’M A CHEERLEADER (1999). Natasha Lyonne stars in a comedy about a teen sent to a conversion camp. R. 85M. MINOR. CHILD’S PLAY. Aubrey Plaza and Mark Hamill take a stab at rebooting the killer doll horror. R. 90M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. DIRTY DANCING (1987). Swivel with Swayze. PG13. 100M. BROADWAY. THE LAST BLACK MAN IN SAN FRANCISCO. Drama about a young man (Jimmy Fails) who tries, with his best friend (Jonathan Majors) to get back the family home his grandfather (Danny Glover) built. R. 120M. MINOR. TOY STORY 4. Go ahead, little toys (lights cigarette), see if I have any soul left to crush. Starring Tom Hanks, G. 100M. FORTUNA, MINOR.

Continuing

ALADDIN. Live-action Disney remake with (hopefully) less racism and a hotter Jafar than the original. Starring blue Will Smith, Mena

Massoud, Naomi Scott and Marwan Kenzari. PG. 128M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM. John Chester’s documentary about starting a sustainable farm with his wife Molly Chester illustrates challenges with great, if unflattering, footage that could have done without his voiceover narration. PG. 91M. MINOR. THE DEAD DON’T DIE. Director Jim Jarmusch puts the dead in deadpan with Adam Driver and Bill Murray in a zombie-filled comedy-horror. R. 105M. MINOR. GODZILLA: KING OF THE MONSTERS. Kaiju cage match for the planet with Godzilla, Mothra, Rodan and Ghidorah. With humans Vera Farmiga, Ken Watanabe and Millie Bobby Brown. PG13. 131M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 - PARABELLUM. This installment outdoes itself with world-creation and giddily satisfying action sequences as Keanu Reeves outruns an international assemblage of assassins with Halle Berry and more dogs. Also starring Laurence Fishburne and Anjelica Houston. R. 130M. BROADWAY. LATE NIGHT. Mindy Kaling plays a newbie diversity hire in an all-white, male writers room for a stale late-night show hosted by a prickly icon (Emma Thompson). R. 102M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. MA. Octavia Spencer stars as a woman who lets the cool kids party at her house and then turns scary. R. 99M. BROADWAY. MEN IN BLACK: INTERNATIONAL. Tessa Thompson and Chris Hemsworth dip out of Asgard to revive the alien-friendly franchise and suit tailoring with Emma Thompson. PG13. 104M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. THE RAFT. Danish documentary about a 1973 floating social experiment that was supposed to examine sex and violence but veered closer to mutiny. NR. 97M. MINIPLEX. ROCKETMAN. Elton John biopic promising sex, drugs, glittering sunglasses and rock ’n’ roll with the greatest hits soundtrack to match. Starring Taron Egerton. R. 121M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2. This sequel lacks the charm, inventiveness and sweetness of the original, despite a strong cast that includes Patton Oswalt, Jenny Slate, Kevin Hart and Harrison Ford. PG. 86M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. SERENGETI RULES. Documentary reflecting on the work of a group of scientists who studied the dynamics of survival in nature in the 1960s. NR. 84M. MINIPLEX. X-MEN: DARK PHOENIX. Simon Kinberg’s do-over of the Marvel plot where Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) turns dangerous has the cast but not the character development and emotional power it needs. With James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender. PG13. 113M. BROADWAY. l — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

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with his early electric stuff. But I moved on to other things without parsing my relationship to the music or Dylan’s place in the cultural landscape. And so Scorsese’s new documentary struck me as a bolt from the blue. It presents a deceptively straightforward portrait of Dylan and Co.’s 1975 tour with footage from the road and present-day interviews (a number of which are apparently scripted and fake). While the movie doesn’t answer any questions about Dylan’s identity (nor does it pretend to), it captures the sheer magnetism of the man as a performer. The live performances depicted here are beyond compelling, revealing an artist who comes to singular life, eyes wild, face caked in stage makeup, while performing his songs. There’s also a great deal of ambiguity, the staged interviews being only one example. Scorsese goes to great lengths to place the tour within the context of an America in conflict with itself on the eve of its 200th birthday and to subtly incorporate almost fevered notions of identity real and manufactured, of masks on masks. It bears re-watching, even if one only goes back for the songs. TVMA. 142M. NETFLIX. — John J. Bennett

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Gapminder/UN Population Division/ North Coast Journal. Free material from www.gapminder.org

Global Population and Kids By Barry Evans

T

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com he only proven method for curbing population growth is to eradicate extreme poverty and give people better lives, including education and contraceptives. — Hans Rosling, Factfulness

Quick quiz to get us started. There are 2 billion children under 16 alive today. According to the United Nations, how many under-16-year-olds will be alive in the year 2100? Pick one: (a) 2 billion; (b) 3 billion; (c) 4 billion. Does it help if I tell you that only 10 percent of people answer correctly? (I sure didn’t.) Or you can cheat and look at the accompanying graph. Before I get to the answer, let’s consider the global population in general. At the time of “Our Worst Mistake” (Field Notes, April 4), when agriculture was invented roughly 10,000 years ago, about 5 million people lived on the planet. Fast forward to our second big jump, the Industrial Revolution: In 1800, there were about 1 billion of us. Today, it’s nearly 8 billion. In 2100, it’ll be 10-12 billion. Here’s the surprising fact that 90 percent of us get wrong: The number of children will remain about the same, at 2 billion. According to the United Nations Population Division, the correct answer to the question above is (a). It’ll be adults who make up the vast bulk of the increase. At this point, if you picked (b) or (c), you’re supposed to be saying, “But women in developing countries have huge families, so the number of kids in the world has got to increase, amirite?” You would have been right 70 years ago. After World War II, women were, on average, having five babies apiece, for obvious reasons: In most parts of the world, only half of kids survived to age 5. Several factors have combined to bring the birth rate down dramatically.

Thanks to vaccination, sanitation and clean water, less than 4 percent of children die before their fifth birthday worldwide. (In 1800, it was 44 percent). Global rates of extreme poverty (per the UN definition) are plummeting, from 50 percent in 1966 to 9 percent today. Education, in particular that of girls, has soared. Today, 90 percent of girls and 92 percent of boys of primary school age attend school. The wide availability of contraception means that parents can choose to limit how many children they have, while still enjoying sex. The net result is that the average number of babies worldwide has plummeted from five in 1965 to half that today. It’s true that in the poorest 10 percent of the world’s population (places like Somalia, Niger and Chad) women still have an average of five babies, but in the rest of the world — including Mexico, India, Bangladesh and Indonesia — couples are having two children on average. The bottom line is this: If you are concerned about the exponential growth of the number of humans on this planet, you’ll support every effort to improve the lives of the 1 billion people still living in extreme poverty. Key factors to accomplish this include girls’ education and women’s rights, good nutrition, availability of contraception, vaccination and healthcare, clean water and sanitation and microloans. And peace. Don’t forget peace. Take another look at the graph showing that astonishing decline in birth rates. If that doesn’t give you hope for the planet, nothing will. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) believes things are bad, but that many of them are getting better.


Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts CREATING EMOTIONAL IMPACT FOR YOUR STORIES, NOVELS AND FILM Jul 11 − Jul 25. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (A−0620)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0627)

Spiritual

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0627)

EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442− 4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0627)

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (D−0627)

HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP. We are here to change lives with our love. Services at 10am on Sunday. Child care is provided. 24 Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0620)

STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m. −8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0502)

SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−0530)

Fitness

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0627)

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0627)

Kids & Teens 19TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP Water enthusiasts of ALL levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skills necess. for all types of wave riding & SURFING while being immersed in JUNIOR LIFEGUARD water safety, surf etiquette, beach & ocean awareness. Lead by former Cali− fornia State Lifeguard & school teacher along w/ male & female instructors. Where: Moonstone Beach Ages: 8 and up When: 4 sessions: June 24−28, July 8−12, July 22−26, Aug 5−9. It’s Barrels of Fun! Cost: $195 Contact: (707) 822−5099 Website: www.moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com (K−0801) SUMMER POTTERY CLASSES at Fire Arts for Kids 7−12 yrs. Mondays 3−5 Jun 24−Jul 22 and Jun 25 − Jul 23. $100.00 per class. Full schedule of classes @fireartsarcata.com or cal 707−826−1445 Sign up today ! (K−0627)

50 and Better LEARN THE BASICS OF MEDICARE Join us 4 Free Educational Seminar. 6/28/19 4−5 pm @ Hum.Area Foundation 363 Indianola Rd, Bayside, Ca.

Therapy & Support SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−0530) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0627)

Vocational BEGINNING BOOKKEEPING Aug 13 − Sep 24. Call College of the Redwoods Workforce and Commu− nity Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620)

FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE GED/HISET PREPARATION Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Educa− tion at 70−7476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) GED TESTING Earn your GED. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information or to schedule your appointment at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620) INJECTIONS JULY 20. One day certification! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620) LEADERSHIP WORKSHOPS Jun 21 − Jun 28. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (W−0620) LOAN DOCUMENT SIGNING Jun 25. One day training! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620) MASTERING THE DIGITAL SLR AND ADOBE LIGHTROOM. An introduction to digital photog− raphy from photography to print. Sat. − Sun. June 29 − 30 at HSU campus. Register at www.humboldt.edu/digicomm or call 707−826− 3731. (V−0620) MEDICAL ASSISTING Jul 10 OR Jul 31. FREE Informa− tion Meeting at 3 p.m. 525 D Street Eureka, CA 95501. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620) MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING Aug 6 − Nov 11. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620)

REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start anytime! Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620) VENIPUNCTURE JULY 21. One day certification! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620)

Wellness & Bodywork AROMATHERAPY TRAINING & AROMATIC PRODUCT MAKING with Traci Webb. Start your aromatic career & lifestyle, learn to distill your own essential oils, heal yourself & others, Topics Vary: Sept. 7−8, 14−15 & 21−22. www.ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601−9025 (W−0919) AYURVEDA PULSE IMMERSION WITH TRACI WEBB. Aug. 16−18. Healers & Therapists learn ancient pulse system for self−healing & to support your client’s physical and emotional well being. Early Save$! www.ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601− 9025 (W−0815) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 18 − Nov 6, 2019, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2020. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0829) UPCOMING MASSAGE CLASSES AT LOVING HANDS INSTITUTE OF HEALING ARTS Reflex− ology June 27−29 Thurs & Fri 5:30−9:30pm and Sat 9:30−6pm 16 contact hours $250 call 725−9627 and ask for Hilary to sign−up! (W−0620)

Our platform is free to event creators. Work with the team you trust, who cares about your business or organization and the success of the Humboldt county area.

CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH Aug 2 − Sep 6. Call CR Workforce and Community Education at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620)

FREE BEGINNING LITERACY CLASS Call College of The Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620)

PHLEBOTOMY Jul 11. FREE Information Meeting at 5 p.m. CR Main Campus, Room HU 129. Call Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620)

INTRODUCING

CLAY PORTRAIT SCULPTURE. An introduction to clay portrait sculpture. Sat. − Sun., Aug. 3−4, 9 a.m. − 5 p.m at HSU campus. Register at www.humboldt.edu/extended or call 707−826− 3731. (V−0620)

FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707− 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620)

NOTARY Jun 24. One day training! Call CR Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0620)

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©2019 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

T.S. No. 077123-CA APN: 204152-071-000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 3/11/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER

LAUGH ACROSS

1. Nickname for Miriam 5. President between Washington and Jefferson 10. ____ degree 13. Supermodel from Somalia 14. The Washington Post, CNN, etc. 15. Manhattan area north of TriBeCa 16. “Girls” actress 18. “Lemme ____!” 19. “Oh, that’s a shame” 20. Something people love to reach out and take? 22. Code-cracking org. 25. ____ Aviv 26. Line that ended with Nicholas II 27. “Schitt’s Creek” actress 32. “That makes perfect sense now!” 33. Ye ____ Shoppe

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

34. Answer from fans of 16-, 27-, 44- or 58-Across when asked “What is it about her that you like?” 42. Hans Christian Andersen, by nationality 43. Elaine ____, first female AsianAmerican cabinet member 44. “New Girl” actress 50. World’s smallest island nation 51. A.L. West team, on scoreboards 52. Fútbol stadium cry 53. On deck 55. ____ Belt 57. ____ Bell 58. “Private Benjamin” actress 63. Hwys. 64. Strand at a ski lodge, maybe 65. Garfield’s frenemy

66. Flashlight inserts, perhaps 67. Babes in the woods 68. Will’s opposite

DOWN

1. “Cool” amount of money 2. The Beatles’ “____ Mine” 3. The Beatles’ “Nowhere ____” 4. Sworn ____ (officially given the role of) 5. Jester, e.g. 6. Mount McKinley, now 7. What Adderall treats, for short 8. Farrow of “Hannah and Her Sisters” 9. ____ Club (Costco competitor) 10. In the neighborhood, say

11. Militant org. in a 1994 peace agreement 12. Great Lakes mnemonic 15. It may involve dips, in two different senses 17. What many grandparents do 21. Blues legend Waters 22. Longtime CBS police procedural 23. Pageant wrap 24. Precisely, after “to” 28. Fashion line? 29. ____-um (gnat) 30. Common street name 31. Work from Keats or Shelley 35. For two, in music 36. Eloise creator Thompson 37. Put the kibosh on 38. Pres. Obama’s signature achievement 39. “You might think so,

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO I OBJECT

but ...” 40. Iona College athlete 41. Evidence left by a moth 44. Mexican revolutionary played by Brando 45. There are eight in a cup 46. Cookies that flavor some ice cream 47. Came home feet first, maybe 48. Mountain retreats 49. In good shape 50. Commercial lead-in to Sweet 54. Cry to kick off the weekend 55. Erupted 56. Popular self-help website 59. Mozart’s “L’____ del Cairo” 60. Bustle 61. Triumph 62. ____ neutrality

www.sudoku.com

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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MEDIUM #4

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32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

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On 7/9/2019 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 4/28/2005, as Instrument No. 2005−13629−7, , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: TERUKO K MAGINNIS UNMARRIED WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIERS CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIA− TION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINAN− CIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: AT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 825 5TH ST., EUREKA, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: MORE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST. The street address and other common desig− nation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6705 ROHNERVILLE RD HYDESVILLE, CALIFORNIA 95547 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common desig− nation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining prin− cipal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the prop− erty to be sold and reasonable esti− mated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $204,362.88 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclu− sive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust hereto− fore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned or its predecessor caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this prop−

under said Deed of Trust hereto− fore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned or its predecessor caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this prop− erty lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (844) 477−7869 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.STOXPOSTING.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 077123−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (844) 477− 7869 CLEAR RECON CORP 4375 Jutland Drive San Diego, California 92117 6/13, 6/20, 6/27 (19−185)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF HOWARD ANTHONY LEMING CASE NO. PR190137 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of HOWARD ANTHONY LEMING A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner KRISTI LYN ELLIOTT In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that KRISTI LYN ELLIOTT be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner KRISTI LYN ELLIOTT In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that KRISTI LYN ELLIOTT be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 11, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Leon A. Karjola 732 Fith Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 707−445−0804 Filed: June 11, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−192)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF TONETTE LOUISE JOHNSON CASE NO. RP190115 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of TONETTE LOUISE JOHNSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner KATHY L. MITCHELL


CASE NO. RP190115 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of TONETTE LOUISE JOHNSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner KATHY L. MITCHELL In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that KATHY L. MITCHELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 18, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Michael I. Lamay, Esq 800 S. Broadway, Suite 301 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 (925) 932−2670 Filed: May 20, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/6, 6/13, 6/20 (19−177)

SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN THE COUNTY OF KING IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF TILLY ANNE TARAVELLA, a person under the age of eighteen. NO. 19−5−00326−1 SEA SUMMONS AND NOTICE BY PUBLI− CATION OF PETITION/ HEARING RE RELINQUISHMENT OF CHILD/ TERMINATION OF PARENT−CHILD RELATIONSHIP TO: JOHN DOE (UNKNOWN) AND TO ANY OTHER INTERESTED PARTY You are hereby summoned to appear within thirty days after the date of first publication of this summons, to−wit, within thirty days after the 13th day of June, 2019, and defend the above−entitled action in the above−entitled court, and answer the petition of the Peti− tioners and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for Petitioners at the office below stated; if you fail to do so, judgment may be rendered against you according to the request of the petition which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a petition has been filed in this court praying that the parent−child rela− tionship between the parents of the above−named child and the above−named child be terminated. The object of the action is to seek an order relinquishing the child to the Petitioners for adoption and to terminate the parent−child rela− tionship. The child was conceived in July 2018 in California and was born in Seattle, Washington on March 10, 2019. The child’s natural mother is Tabitha Taravella. The court hearing on this matter shall be on the 15th day of July, 2019, at 9:00 a.m. in the King County Superior Court; address: King County Courthouse, Ex Parte Department, Court Room W−325, 516 Third Avenue, Seattle, Wash− ington 98104. YOUR FAILURE TO APPEAR AT THIS HEARING MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT ORDER PERMANENTLY TERMINATING ALL OF YOUR RIGHTS TO THE ABOVE−NAMED CHILD. NOTICE: State and federal law provide protections to defendants who are on active duty in the mili− tary service, and to their depen− dents. Dependents of a service member are the service member’s spouse, the service member’s minor child, or an individual for whom the service member provided more than one−half of the individual’s support for one hundred eighty days immediately preceding an application for relief. One protection provided is the protection against the entry of a default judgment in certain circum− stances. This notice only pertains to a defendant who is a dependent of a member of the national guard or a military reserve component under a call to active service for a period of more than thirty consec− utive days. Other defendants in military service also have protec−

application for relief. One protection provided is the protection against the entry of a default judgment in certain circum− stances. This notice only pertains to a defendant who is a dependent of a member of the national guard or a military reserve component under a call to active service for a period of more than thirty consec− utive days. Other defendants in military service also have protec− tions against default judgments not covered by this notice. If you are the dependent of a member of the national guard or a military reserve component under a call to active service for a period of more than thirty consecutive days, you should notify the petitioner or the peti− tioner’s attorney in writing of your status as such within twenty days of the receipt of this notice. If you fail to do so, then a court or an administrative tribunal may presume that you are not a depen− dent of an active duty member of the national guard or reserves, and proceed with the entry of an order of default and/or a default judg− ment without further proof of your status. Your response to the peti− tioner or petitioner’s attorneys about your status does not consti− tute an appearance for jurisdic− tional purposes in any pending liti− gation nor a waiver of your rights. You are further notified that any non−consenting parent or alleged father has a right to be represented by an attorney, and an attorney will be appointed for an indigent parent who requests an attorney. You are further notified that your failure to file a claim of paternity under Chapter 26.26 RCW within thirty days of the first publication of this notice or to respond to the petition within thirty days of the first publication of this notice is grounds to terminate your parent− child relationship with respect to the child. You are further notified that if you are the alleged father of an Indian child, and you acknowledge pater− nity of the child, or if your pater− nity of the child is established prior to the termination of the parent− child relationship, your parental rights may not be terminated unless you: (i) give valid consent to termination, or (ii) your parent− child relationship is terminated involuntarily pursuant to 26.33 or 13.34 RCW. One method of filing your response and serving a copy on the Peti− tioner is to send them your written response by certified mail with return receipt requested. WITNESS the Honorable HENRY H. JUDSON III, Judge/Court Commis− sioner of said Superior Court and the seal of said Court hereunto affixed this 6TH day of June, 2019. BARBARA MINER King County Superior Court Clerk By A. GALLARDO Deputy Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00320

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00312 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MATTOLE RIVER ORGANIC FARMS Humboldt 42354 Mattole Rd Petrolia, CA 95558 Ian C Sigman 42354 Mattole Rd Petrolia, CA 95558 Melissa M Sigman 42354 Mattole Rd Petrolia, CA 95588 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ian Sigman, Owner This May 16, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−186)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00316 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEND LOVE Humboldt 790 Dorothy Ct Arcata, CA 95521 Elizabeth J Knaus 790 Dorothy Ct Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elizabeth Knaus, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 20, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/30, 6/6, 6/13, 6/20 (19−165)

Petitioners’ Attorney: Albert G. Lirhus Lirhus & Keckemet LLP 1200 5th Avenue, Suite 1550 Seattle, WA 98101

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00320 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ARISE

6/13, 6/20 6/27 (19−179)

Humboldt 627 16th St Arcata, CA 95521

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ARISE

Humboldt 328 Grotto Street Eureka, CA 95501 6212Continued Younger Ln on next page » Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 627 16th St Arcata, CA 95521

Silvia E Barragan−Mendee 6212 Younger Ln Eureka, CA 95503

Alexia A Ammon 2340 Fickle Hill Rd Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Silvia Barragai, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 22, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Alexia Ammon, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/30, 6/6, 6/13, 6/20 (19−167)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00321 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT REGENERATION Humboldt 2320 CENTRAL AVE, STE. F MCKINLEYVILLE, CA 95519 Jacob R Pressey 732 Hiller Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jacob Pressey, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by bs, Humboldt County Clerk 5/30, 6/6, 6/13, 6/20 (19−168)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00325 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ESMERELDA’S MEXICAN FOOD Humboldt 328 Grotto Street Eureka, CA 95501 6212 Younger Ln Eureka, CA 95503

6/6, 6/13, 6/20, 6/27 (19−173)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00330 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUPER 8 ARCATA Humboldt 4887 Valley West Blvd Arcata, CA 95521 Abssunia Me, Inc CA C2614177 4887 Valley West Blvd Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Mekonnen Abraha, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 28, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 6/6, 6/13, 6/20, 6/27 (19−176)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00331 The following person is doing Busi− ness as REDHEADED BLACKBELT Humboldt 3849 Thomas Rd Miranda, CA 95553 PO Box 182 Phillipsville, CA 95559 Kym M Kemp 3849 Thomas Rd Miranda, CA 95553

The business is conducted by an Silvia E Barragan−Mendee Individual. 6212 Younger Ln northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH JOURNAL The dateCOAST registrant commenced to Eureka, CA 95503 transact business under the ficti− Alexia A Ammon tious business name or name listed The business is conducted by an 2340 Fickle Hill Rd above on Not Applicable

33


PO Box 182 Phillipsville, CA 95559 Kym M Kemp 3849 Thomas Rd Miranda, CA 95553

Legal Notices

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kym Kemp, Publisher This May 28, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−180)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00338 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SIX RIVERS GEOSCIENCES Humboldt 3521 Trinity Street Eureka, CA 95501 Jennifer M Wilson 3521 Trinity Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer M. Wilson, Principal Geologist This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 29, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 6/6, 6/13, 6/20, 6/27 (19−175)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00343 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CRUZ CLEANING SPECIALIST

The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable Continued previous in page I declare thefrom all information this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Juan Cruz Hernandez, Owner This June 3, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 6/6, 6/13, 6/20, 6/27 (19−172)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00354 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CUSTOM CRAB POTS Humboldt 601 Bay St Eureka, CA 95501 Griggs & Associates, Inc. CA C2104004 601 Bay St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elena Griggs, Secretary This June 5, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by bs, Humboldt County Clerk 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−183)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00355 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EL CHIPOTLE MEXICAN & AMER− ICAN FOOD Humboldt 850 Crescent Way Arcata, CA 95521 Oscar Santiago Anguiano Zamudio 1769 Chanterelle Dr #A McKinleyville, CA 95519

Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Oscar Santiago Anguiano, Owner This June 5, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−181)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00362 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT COMPUTER TECH− NOLOGY Humboldt 1380 Clipper Ln Bayside, CA 95524 Chuck W Chen 1380 Clipper L Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Chuck Chen, Owner This June 10, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−187)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00363 The following person is doing Busi− ness as COMPACT HOUSES Humboldt 140 Raven Ridge Rd Trinidad, CA 95570 PO Box 599 Trinidad, CA 95570 Clay C Johnson 140 Raven Ridge Rd Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Clay Charles Johnson, Owner This June 10, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed Juan C Cruz−Hernandez above on Not Applicable 294 Hillsdale St #C I declare the all information in this Eureka, CA 95501 statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true The business is conducted by an any material matter pursuant to Individual. Section 17913 of the Business and The date registrant commenced to Professions Code that the regis− transact business under the ficti− trant knows to be false is guilty of a tious business name or name listed misdemeanor punishable by a fine above on Not Applicable not to exceed one thousand dollars I declare the all information in this ($1,000). statement is true and correct. /s Oscar Santiago Anguiano, Owner A registrant who declares as true This June 5, 2019 any material matter pursuant to KELLY E. SANDERS COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com SectionNORTH 17913 of the Business and by sc, Humboldt County Clerk Professions Code that the regis− 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−181) trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine Humboldt 294 Hillsdale St # C Eureka, CA 95501

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6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−189)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00372 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ETMG, INC. Humboldt 5550 West End Road, Ste. 9 Arcata, CA 95521 Emerald Triangle Management Group, Inc. CA C3944836 5550 West End Road, Ste. 9 Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stacia Eliason, Chief Executive Officer This June 14, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−190)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME BRENT OPAROWSKI CASE NO. CV190501 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: BRENT OPAROWSKI for a decree changing names as follows: Present name BRENT OPAROWSKI to Proposed Name BRENT CLOTHIER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 26, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 10, 2019 Filed: June 10, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−191)

OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 10, 2019 Filed: June 10, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−191)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JASON KINCAID LeBLANC CASE NO. CV190514 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JASON KINCAID LeBLANC for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JASON KINCAID LeBLANC to Proposed Name JASON EARENDIL AVON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 2, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 13, 2019 Filed: June 13, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11 (19−193)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME NATHAN WYTHE SKRZYPCZAK CASE NO. CV190477 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: NATHAN WYTHE SKRZYPCZAK for a decree changing names as follows: Present name NATHAN WYTHE SKRZYPCZAK to Proposed Name NATHAN WYTHE SKY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 26, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4

includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 26, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 4, 2019 Filed: June 4, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (19−184)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME THOMAS APPLEWHITE CASE NO. CV190431 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: THOMAS APPLEWHITE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DAVID JERRY BOVECAMP to Proposed Name THOMAS JERRY APPLEWHITE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 19, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: May 23, 2019 Filed: May 23, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 5/30, 6/6, 6/13, 6/20 (19−164)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

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    

       

   

                   

        

 

      



     

 

          

      default

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350 #0991 Survey Specialist RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $30.19-39.39 OUF

#1041 JOM Tutors RG/PT ALL AREAS $15.22-22.06 OUF

#1072 Title IV E Manager RG/FT KLAMATH $57,325-74,796 6/28/19

#1074 Construction Manager RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $30.19-39.39 OUF

#58 Social Worker RG/FT KLAMATH $25.12/27.56 6/21/19

#64 Home Base Visitor RG/FT KLAMATH $15.6017.34 6/21/19

#77 Tribal Court Program Driver KMUD STATION MANAGER Community radio station KMUD seeks full−time (32 hours) StationManager Must have management experience, strong fundraising and finan− cial skills, ability to work with diverse groups, commitment to community, and strong interpersonal and communication skills. Radio experience preferred, including knowledge of FCC and CPB regulations. Full job description at kmud.org Submit resume and three professional references to smhiring@kmud.org by June 30 www.kmud.org

PT/RG KLAMATH $16.91-22.06 6/21/19

#80 Police Officer RG/FT KLAMATH $24.68-31.16 6/21/19

#81 Conservation Warden Temp Klamath $18.91-23.87 6/27/19

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Employment

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Tri-County Independent Living (TCIL) is a community-based, non-residential, non-profit, multicultural organization. Are you looking for meaningful, fulfilling work with benefits? We have it! TCIL is expanding and has these new positions: Office Manager, Full-Time Manages day-to-day Administrative and Human Resources operations for this high energy agency. Compensation: Competitive Pay DOE. Independent Living Skills Specialist, Full-Time Support people with disabilities learn independent living skills, achieve greater independence, access benefits and services and make their own choices. Compensation: $15–$17/hr. DOE Outreach/Volunteer/Youth Coordinator, Full-Time Outgoing, highly organized, self-starting “people person” sought to initiate and provide programs for youth with disabilities, outreach and organize volunteers. default Compensation: $14—$16/hr. DOE

THE NORTH COAST Excellent medical,IS dental, sick leave, JOURNAL SEEKING vacation and holiday benefits. For DISTRIBUTION information on how to apply, application and position descriptions go to DRIVERS www.tilinet.org. OPEN UNTIL FILLED People with Disabilities strongly encouraged to apply. Alternative format will be provided upon request. EOE. default

Wednesday afternoon/ Thursday morning routes in

THE NORTH COAST Arcata • Fortuna/Ferndale Willow Creek/Hoopa JOURNAL IS SEEKING Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS Contact Sam 707.442.1400 ext. 308 sam@northcoastjournal.com

CRESTWOOD BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER is looking for a licensed art, dance, music, recreation, or occupational therapist to oversee the Recreation program at our mental health residential facility. Please contact Campus Administrator Robert Pitts for more details about this wonderful opportunity − 707−442−5721 x11060 or email at rpitts@cbhi.net

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    



 

           

 

          



   



  



       .

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.”

New opportunities at United Indian Health Services! Help us continue toward our vision- A healthy mind, body, and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community. One way we work toward this goal is by being an integrated health organization. Our divisions include: Medical, Dental, Behavioral Health, Vision and Community Health and Wellness. We strive to bring members of the community together so they can not only be unified in ensuring the best care is provided to their families, but also help in preserving Native culture through education, community outreach, and medicine. UIHS offers an excellent work life balance. Our clinic is open Monday through Friday, from 8 am-5 pm. Fulltime employees enjoy 3 weeks of paid time off per year, as well as 11 paid Holidays. Other benefits include: comprehensive health care plans for individuals and families, 4% matched retirement plans, and loan repayment programs.

Current employment opportunities:

Substance Abuse Counselor (FT) Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Prevention (FT) Clinical Nurse- RN (FT) Health Promotion & Education Specialist (FT) Our job application and all of our open opportunities with full job descriptions are on our website unitedindianhealthservices.org/jobs Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.


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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

WANTED – DAY CLEANER



Job Purpose:

To undertake cleaning in areas as directed to ensure the areas are kept in a clean and hygienic condition in order to provide a professional and customer friendly service to homeowners, property managers, renters, governments, schools and commercial industrial - retail businesses.



        

Requirements: Possess valid DL and vehicle, as your own vehicle is required for use. • Be able to pass Motor Vehicle Request, so our insurance can place you on our work policy during business hours.

     

Start/Shift: Starts ASAP. Monday-Friday, 830-5 (overtime required) Email Resume to: restif@restif.com default

     

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Hiring? 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com default

INDEPENDENT MASSAGE THERAPIST We would like to contract with a massage therapist to add 5−10 clients to their schedule per week. In−home gentle therapeutic massage. Please email nicole @humboldtmobilemassage. com with your letter of interest or any questions.

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 

            default

  

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CITY OF FORTUNA

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT I $15.48 – $18.84 per hour.

Part-Time. Under general direction of the City Clerk / Human Resources Manager, performs a variety of complex administrative and clerical support for the Administration Department in such areas as Human Resources, Risk Management, City Clerk, IT, special projects; and performs related work as assigned. This is an experienced level office support position. Must be 18 and have valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna. com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm Friday, July 5, 2019.

                              

MAINTENANCE/UTILITY WORKER I/II – WASTEWATER COLLECTIONS DIVISION I - $2,500 - $3,208 PER MONTH II - $2,747 - $3,509 PER MONTH PLUS EXCELLENT BENEFITS This position performs a variety of semi-skilled labor in the construction, maintenance and repair of City infrastructures. This recruitment will be used to fill current and future vacancies in the Wastewater Collections Division. Desirable qualifications include a combination of education equivalent to graduation from high school, and at least 1 year of experience related to area of assignment. For a full job description and to apply, please visit our website at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Applications will be accepted until 5 pm on Monday, June 24th, 2019. EOE

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment

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Marketplace

Body, Mind & Spirit

Miscellaneous

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Cleaning

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1−855−993−2495 (AAN CAN)

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         

Hiring?

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1−866−535− 9689 (AAN CAN) DISH SALE: 1/2 Off Plates, Bowls, Cups & Glasses Plus: Monday Munchies, Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednesdays, New Sale Thursdays, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Satur− days. Where your shopping dollars support local youth! Dream Quest Thrift Store June 20−26. (530) 629−3006. DISH TV − Over 190 Channels Now ONLY $59.99/mo! 2yr price guarantee, FREE Installa− tion! Save HUNDREDS over Cable and DIRECTV. Add Internet as low as $14.95/mo! Call Now 1−800−373−6508 (AAN CAN)

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CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

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Art & Collectibles FORTUNA TREASURE SALE 9am to 2pm June 22, 2019 at the Corner of 16th and L Streets in the Parish Hall of St. Francis Episcopal Church in Fortuna. There are many lightly used Treasures to Rummage through and Baked Goods for Sale. Proceeds help with programs of outreach in our community. default

BOB DYLAN T−SHIRTS FOR SALE. Heavy black shirt and white silk screened image. A design I created in 2001. $30.oo plus shipping. He’s 78 and still on tour! Contact: Thom: 707−497−6351 cell 707−296− 3271+ thomatwell5@gmail.com

Merchandise NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN) REAR SWING OUT TIRE RACK for jeep $199 497−6618

OFFICIANT Weddings, Elopements Celebrations of Life Denise L. Ryles, Officiant Contact: The Costume Box 707−443−5200

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

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Computer & Internet Est. 1979

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Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Simple!

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

50 GLORIOUS YEARS 

(707) 445-3027 2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka 

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Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Lin Bauer Owner

    

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Lodging HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,900, 2 pers. $23,900; 3 pers. $26,900; 4 pers. $29,850; 5 pers. $32,250; 6 pers. $34,650; 7 pers. $37,050; 8 pers. $39,450 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

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Musicians & Instructors WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

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Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

KILL ROACHES−GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets, Sprays, Traps, Concentrate. MOST EFFECTIVE! Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

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BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com default

      

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

    




Kyla Tripodi

Katherine Fergus

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

Charlie Tripodi

707.476.0435

REDUCE

EUREKA – LAND/PROPERTY - $135,000

D PRICE

!

2 Eureka lots totaling ±.14 acres. With permits paid for 2 commercial buildings and city services, these parcels are ready to go!

Hailey Rohan

Mike Willcutt Realtor/ Commercial Specialist BRE # 02084041

916.798.2107

HONEYDEW – LAND/PROPERTY - $275,000

±159 Acres located in Panther Gap area with developed water system, and existing flats.

172 MARIE LANE, CARLOTTA - $399,000

HARRIS – LAND/PROPERTY - $2,590,000

3/2 Home on one acre of park like setting! Features ponds, garden, fruit trees, pool, hot tub, and more!

±160 Acres on 3 parcels w/ permitted cultivation space, RRR space, multiple homes, outbuildings, wells, water tanks, and much more!

1293 MARSHALL LANE, HOOPA - $199,000

HORSE MOUNTAIN - HOME ON ACREAGE - $625,000

Flat, usable ±.65 parcel, fully fenced, w/ Mill Creek frontage, fruit trees, 2 cabins w/ bath & electric.

±155 Acres w/ panoramic views of the Trinity Alps, custom high end cabin w/ wood floors & wood vaulted ceilings.

400 CATHEY ROAD, MIRANDA - $1,500,000

FERNDALE – LAND/PROPERTY - $1,100,000

±66 Acres boasting breathtaking panoramic views of the Eel River Valley and Bear Butte Mountain w/ a 3000 sqft custom home!

±80 acres w/State approved and County stamped permit for 19,370 sq ft ML and 6,400 sq ft OD cultivation space!

NEW LIS

ALDERPOINT – LAND/PROPERTY - $395,000

TING!

NEW LIS

TING!

±80 Private acres with beautiful views of the Mattole River Valley. Property features a creek, terraced gardens, and multiple building flats.

ARCATA – LAND/PROPERTY - $699,000

Huge development potential on ±7.2 Ac near HSU and Arcata Community Forest w/ access to comm. services.

DINSMORE – LAND/PROPERTY - $199,000

Remote ±40 acre flat parcel easy access, views, creeks, and beautiful rock outcroppings.

REDWOOD VALLEY – HOME ON ACREAGE - $399,000

±1.2 Ac w/ creek frontage, 2/1 home, guest cabin, pool & deck, garage/shop, tool shed, orchard.

DINSMORE – LAND/PROPERTY - $179,000

±40 Acres with mountain views! Features a creek, spring, well, woodlands and meadows, and a large flat area near spring for potential building.

±70 Flat acres w/ .5 mile of Eel River frontage featuring cabin, outbuildings, power, meadows, and views!

PETROLIA – LAND/PROPERTY - $325,000

Tyla Miller

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY - $49,900

±0.247 Acre lot available in Big Foot Subdivision in sunny Willow Creek! Has community water, sewer, and power at the property line. NEW LIS

TING!

HYDESVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $1,290,000

Stunning ±7.25 acre parcel with an STAMPED Permit for 10,000 sq. ft. of mixed light cultivation space!

DINSMORE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $499,000

±15 Acre riverfront w/ pond, 2 /2 home, 2/1 guest cabin, patio, shop, gardens & greenhouse.

ORLEANS – HOME ON ACREAGE - $999,999

±8 Acres featuring a beautiful custom home, outbuildings, power, creek frontage, and so much more!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, June 20, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


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North Coast Journal 06-20-19 Edition  

The Gray Whale Die-off — As strandings continue, scientists scramble to figure out why, by Kimberly Wear

North Coast Journal 06-20-19 Edition  

The Gray Whale Die-off — As strandings continue, scientists scramble to figure out why, by Kimberly Wear

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