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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday May 23, 2019 Vol XXX Issue 21 northcoastjournal.com

From auditions to preview with the cast of Cabaret By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill


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2  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


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Contents 4 Mailbox 4 Poem Raggedy Rainbow

6 News Draft Housing Element Calls for Drastic Solutions to Humboldt’s Housing ‘Crisis’

8 News ‘Today is Your Day’

9 News The Pink Lady Could be Yours

10 Week in Weed Old School Sensi-bilities

12 NCJ Daily 14 On The Cover Eleven Weeks Till Curtain

19 Front Row In Transition

20 Table Talk A Life in Brisket

21

Down and Dirty A Creative Mess

22 Get Out! For the Glory and All the Marbles

23 The Setlist Moving Pictures

24 Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

28 Calendar 30 Home & Garden Service Directory

32 Filmland Man of the Hour

34 Workshops & Classes 35 Hum Bug Bald Faced Fliers and Beetle Mania

35 Sudoku & Crossword 41 Free Will Astrology 41 Cartoons 42 Classifieds

May 23, 2019 • Volume XXX Issue 21 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2019 Publisher Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Special Publications Publisher Creative Services Director Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Art Director Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Heidi Beltran, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Senior Advertising Representative Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Marna Batsell marna@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Multimedia Content Producer Zach Lathouris zach@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Administrative Assistant Sam Leishman sam@northcoastjournal.com Chief Executive Officer Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com

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Jennay SeKwa and Christian Barreto in Cabaret. Read more on page 14. Mark McKenna

On the Cover Photo by Mark McKenna Photoillustration by Jonathan Webster

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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Mailbox

Terry Torgerson

‘Fight This Ridiculous Plan!’

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4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Editor: I read with a horrible, sinking feeling that Caltrans, again, is planning to kill our community (NCJ Daily, May 16)! It is taking our main artery, north and south, and altering it in such a way that traffic will then go to Old Arcata Road. I live on this road. I have had my fence destroyed three times by drunk drivers driving off the road. I have contacted the CHP and collected stats on the wrecks on our road. Those reflect recklessness and drunken drivers, but also reflect those who are going over the speed limit. We cannot have traffic routed to our road. Bikes would not be safe ... there is no lane for them. There is no sidewalk. There are no lights. Please people, come together and fight this ridiculous plan! It does not include sea-level rise and it does not respect businesses on the highway. It does not respect personal safety. It does not respect home owners. Ginni Hassrick, Bayside

Stop Fighting This Plan! Editor: To the Coastal Commission, Humboldt Baykeeper, Coalition for Responsible Transportation Priorities, North Coast Environmental Center, and Surfrider Foundation: Stop prolonging the Safety Corridor’s overhaul. Start worrying about who will die on this lethal stretch of highway. I’m a “safety” corridor casualty. Two years ago, a car gunned it to cross the

Raggedy Rainbow My colors aren’t quite shining, on this dim lit day. I’m usually pinks and purples, now I’m just plain grey. People see right through me, although I shine quite bright. Sparkling in the sunshine, hiding late at night. Some say I’m well rounded i’d like to think so too. But this misty little mess, Can’t help feeling blue Or red, Or 50 shades of green. That’s why I’m on the spectrum. Whatever that may mean. — Terra Lovio

median, broadsided my van, spun it around and totaled it. One second sooner and I wouldn’t be here to write this letter. I was “lucky to only” sustain a serious, painful, life-time injury. Over the next two days, my doctor shared how her car was rear-ended on the corridor, and then an acquaintance pointed out his multiple-roll-over after being broadsided on the corridor. Since then, I’ve met others who’ve barely survived this insane stretch of highway between Arcata and Eureka. It’s way past time to get priorities straight. Stop delaying Caltrans’ overhaul. Diana Lynn, Blue Lake


Where’s the Respect? Editor: I am still puzzling over my supervisor’s mysterious admonition to his colleague Supervisor Steve Madrone at a recent meeting: “Respect is earned, not given and I hope you know that.” (“Got Water?,” May 16.) What actions or character traits could earn Rex Bohn’s respect? Not spearheading the construction of the Hammond Trail? None of the outstanding restoration work accomplished by Madrone in Bohn’s own district? His dedicated teaching at Humboldt State University? If Bohn doesn’t respect Madrone, then he doesn’t respect the people of the Fifth District, who elected Madrone. So whom then does my supervisor respect? Ellen Taylor, Petrolia

remarks showed me I want some new bodies like Madrone sitting in the BOS chambers. I agree with Madrone’s request, though I am not a constituent of his district, and applaud his position and grace in the face of such treatment. In light of the article “Got Water?” by Elaine Weinreb (May 16) concerning other issues of the Trinidad Rancheria hotel project, it seems more serious consider-

ation should have been given to Madrone’s request regarding a letter to BIA. Erica Boyd, Garberville

No Surprise Editor: In regard to the HSU dismantling of KHSU (NCJ Daily, May 9): What do you expect from an institution that chooses California Mission as a decorative motif? Stephanie Silvia, Trinidad

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The Journal will be closed May 27 in observance of Memorial Day, so the deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Friday, May 24. ●

‘Appalled’ Editor: Thank you, Thadeus Greenson, for your editorial (“Incredibly Disappointing,” May 16) regarding the incumbent Humboldt County supervisors’ treatment and comments toward the newest board member Steve Madrone when he requested the board send a letter to the Bureau of Indian Affairs requesting the California Coastal Commission delay a hearing on the Trinidad Rancheria hotel project so local residents can provide input. Not only was I appalled at Virgina Bass, Rex Bohn and Estelle Fennell being unwilling to work with Madrone on this issue but their comments — and the tone of said comments — were troubling. What I heard was the “good old boy” and “business as usual” dismissal to not consider the request at hand in a civil manner. Did Rex Bohn really think it was a good idea to state, “Respect is not given, it is earned?” on the heels of his lovely remarks regarding Latinos and stealing hubcaps? Not that I had a lot of respect for the man before but my opinion of him certainly tanked then. I feel their refusal to consider the letter to BIA as requested and their snide

@ncj_of_humboldt @ncj_of_humboldt

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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News

Draft Housing Element Calls for Drastic Solutions to Humboldt’s Housing ‘Crisis’

HUMBOLDT HOUSING BY THE NUMBERS

43,719

$

Median Household Income in Humboldt County

310,000

$

By Freddy Brewster

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

I

t is no surprise that Humboldt County has a lack of affordable housing. For years, county government has identified the need for more housing of all types but the private sector hasn’t built enough and many of the new builds are simply too expensive for the majority of Humboldt residents to afford. Consequently, the 2019 draft Housing Element update is calling for some dramatic changes, from the creation of a tiny home village to a county development department. Planning and Building Department Director John Ford said the county needs to start thinking about solutions for housing needs in a new way because, “unless something changes, we are not going to be able to build affordable housing in Humboldt County.” “The old notion of, ‘Zone it and build it and they will come,’ is not working and there are a lot of hurdles for the county to overcome,” Ford told the Journal. One of the ways Ford hopes to solve the housing crisis is by establishing a county-run development department that would build or acquire low-rent housing. In order for the county to be able to build low-rent housing, voters would have to approve a ballot measure due to Article 34 of the California Constitution, which prohibits counties from developing, constructing or acquiring low-rent housing without voter approval. “What we would be doing is going to the county (voters) and asking if they want us to undertake a housing project that the county can put up and develop,” Ford said. “Some of it is just being able to build homes at a price point where people can afford.” The 2019 Housing Element, which came

before the Humboldt County Planning Commission on May 16, is a roadmap that lays out the path the county needs to take in order to address housing needs of the residents in unincorporated areas for the next eight years. It is currently in the draft stage and staff expects to present a final draft to the planning commission June 6. The draft element outlines seven main goals, including promoting regulatory practices and incentives to increase production of affordable housing; providing workforce housing that is close to local businesses; promoting affordable housing opportunities for the disabled, homeless and single parents; and providing opportunities for the creation of more emergency shelters, day centers and supportive and transitional housing. In the draft, the cost of building is identified as the biggest barrier to solving the county’s housing needs, but the draft notes other factors, as well, including environment constraints, a “lack of knowledge about the permitting process” and “a lack of access to expertise.” But the draft element makes plain that Humboldt County’s historic approach has not addressed what it now refers to as a “crisis.” The median home price in Humboldt County is $310,000, which most residents can’t afford, as the median household income in Humboldt County is $43,718, according to the U.S. Census. “About 70 percent of Humboldt households cannot afford the median priced home,” Michelle Nielsen, senior planner with the planning and building department, said during the May 2 planning commission meeting, adding that the minimum household income needed to afford a $310,000 home is $67,210, or 35 percent

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Median Home Price in Humboldt County

62,210

$

Minimum Household Income Needed to Afford a $310,000 Home

70 Percentage of Humboldt County Residents Who Can’t Afford the Median Home Price

HOME BUILDING 2014-2019 Median Income Homes:

205

built (140 percent of need)

Low-income Homes:

127

built (37 percent of need)

Sources: The 2019 draft Humboldt County Housing Element and the U.S. Census. infographic by Jacqui Langeland


more than the county’s median household income. “What you will see is large numbers of people overpaying for their housing. So, then, they have less money available for other matters like childcare and those sorts of things.” Although the cost of housing seems to be a barrier even for those in the median-income group — an income of $59,900 for a family of four— a surplus of units were built from 2014-2019. According to county data, 205 units were built to meet the need of only 146 units in that category, likely because developing middle-class, single-family homes is one of the few areas developers still find profitable. Nielsen said the housing needs of the low-income categories outlined in the 2014 Housing Element were not adequately met and there are a multitude of reasons for the shortfalls. “It seems to be a combination of factors with a lot of it surrounding the economy, the cost of housing, the cost of building housing and the labor market,” Nielsen told the Journal. “It can be whether the pay is enough, or if we have enough skilled labor to do the work. There are a combination of factors that contribute to the problem.” According to the 2014 Housing Element, Humboldt needed 859 new residential units built by 2019 to meet the housing needs of the county’s unincorporated areas. Of the 859 units, 347 were needed for residents who fall into low-income categories but only 127 were built. That’s a pattern that has continued since the 2007 Housing Element, which estimated 567 units would be needed for people in the low-income categories only to see just 20 percent of them constructed. Planning Commission Vice Chair Alan Bongio, a developer by trade, said there are two main problems that stand in the way of addressing the county’s housing needs. One is the cost and the other is the lack of housing being built. Bongio said that in the last four years, he can only think of two subdivisions being built. “The bigger problem that we have facing Humboldt County is that we have nobody that is developing,” Bongio said during a May 16 meeting. “There’s no money left in it and everything’s got too expensive.”

When it comes to sheltering and housing the county’s homeless population, the draft 2019 Housing Element states that there’s “no question there is a crisis” and the number of homeless people in Humboldt County “far exceeds shelter capacity.” According to the biennial Point in Time Count, which attempts to calculate the number of people sleeping without shelter on a single night, there are almost 1,500 people living without shelter in Humboldt County, a per-capita rate that is roughly three times the state average, according to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development data. The draft 2019 Housing Element calls for the building of more shelter space and transitional housing. Additionally, it proposes rezoning the regulations for tiny homes, an allowance of movable tiny homes and a tiny home village. The tiny home village would consist of a group of three or more tiny homes that have a centralized location for cooking, cleaning and showering. Betty Chinn’s Blue Angel Village on West Washington Street in Eureka, where approximately 40 people live in converted shipping containers, is an example of a similar model. Ford said the county is also going to pursue grants in a more aggressive way in order to find funding to meet housing needs. He also wants to build partnerships with the people building the homes and the people trying to get into them. “One of the things we would like to do is to move the needle to allow more people to get into homes with a focus on median-income and less,” Ford said. “We need to build housing that is affordable for the people that live and work here.” l

Freddy Brewster is a journalism student at Humboldt State University and enjoys covering breaking news events, public records and holding those in power accountable. Brewster has received multiple Presidential Honor awards for his academic achievements and in his free time, you can find him rock climbing, surfing or attending a local art event. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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News

‘Today is Your Day’

Charmaine Lawson accepts son’s degree at emotional ceremony By Iridian Casarez

iridian@northcoastjournal.com

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onchos, umbrellas and rain jackets surrounded Humboldt State University’s Redwood Bowl the morning of May 18 as graduates celebrated their commencement. Among them, in a full cap, gown and graduation stole, was Charmaine Lawson, sitting in place of her son, David Josiah Lawson. David Josiah Lawson, who was a 19-yearold sophomore when he was fatally stabbed at an off-campus party two years ago in the early morning hours of April 15, 2017, would have spent this weekend celebrating his graduation from HSU. Instead, his mother accepted an honorary posthumous degree on his behalf. After all graduates in the criminology and justice studies major were named, professor Michihiro Clark Sugata announced the presentation of his posthumous degree. “The degree will be accepted by his mother, Charmaine Lawson,” Clark Sugata told the crowd. Cheering, applause and a standing ovation followed, as Lawson continued her walk onto the stage. “David. Josiah. Lawson,” the professor continued. Raising both her hands and the HSU diploma, Lawson stayed on stage to celebrate her son’s degree. As the crowd went silent someone shouted, “Justice for Josiah,” more cheering and chanting followed. “Justice for Josiah. Justice for Josiah.” Lawson went back to her seat and stood as the crowd continued to cheer. Two years ago at David Josiah Lawson’s funeral service in Moreno Valley, HSU Vice President Craig Wruck spoke and presented a Certificate of Achievement to Lawson’s family. Charmaine Lawson

8  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Charmaine Lawson celebrates after accepting an honorary posthumus degree on behalf of her son during Humboldt State University’s May 18 commencement ceremony. Mark McKenna

respectfully declined the gesture, telling him, “We’re going to do this the right way. Hold on to it until his graduation date, where we’re going to go and accept it at the Redwood Bowl as he would have on his graduation date.” David Josiah Lawson was also celebrated at the Black Heritage Graduation Celebration on May 17, where Lorna Bryant introduced him and his accomplishments. “Now, I’ve painted a picture but I want you to hear his voice,” she said before playing a recording of Lawson’s “To Be a Man” speech. “Josiah talked about being a man in the face of adversity. ... The thing with adversity, it makes you stronger, it gives you just what Josiah talked about: integrity and being a person of your word,” Bryant said. “Josiah planned to be a district attorney, and changing the laws that harm our community, harm our people and harm our lives. It was his intention to make a change. That won’t be stopped by the day of April 15, 2017. I say that because he has a strong family, particularly a strong mother.” At the Black Heritage Graduation Celebration graduates were given two roses to dedicate to their families or whomever. A presentation of each of the graduates was displayed on a screen behind the stage showing their name, pictures, major and a quote. When it was David Josiah Lawson’s turn to accept his roses, Charmaine Lawson, wearing a graduation cap, and her family walked onto the stage to accept

on his behalf. Charmaine Lawson took the roses and said her son would have dedicated the first one to his family, his brother and sister, his Los Angeles family and his Humboldt family. She grabbed the second one and said, “He would have said, ‘This rose goes to my MVP, my mom Charmaine, that would be sitting over there (pointing to the seats) rather than standing right here today. My MVP, my mom, my dad who raised three outstanding children.’” She congratulated the rest of the class and walked off the stage. Just before the graduation ceremony at the Redwood Bowl, Charmaine Lawson posted a video on Facebook live, “This is a really sad and really emotional day, I’m here at Humboldt State University standing in for my son, DJ, David Josiah Lawson, that was taken from us, but DJ, even though you were taken, your mommy is still here, the community is still here, your professors are here,” she told the camera. “Mommy’s walking for you today and our family is waiting out there to see me walk out for you, Today is your day DJ and I’m going to make sure it’s special. This is for you DJ. I love you, my baby.” l This story was first published May 18 at www.northcoastjournal.com. Iridian Casarez is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez.


News

The Pink Lady Could be Yours By Iridian Casarez

iridian@northcoastjournal.com

T

he Pink Lady is up for grabs and for a cool $1.2 million, the Queen Anne Victorian house can be yours. Known for its elegant exterior and blush color, the four-bedroom vacation rental hit the market May 13. The Pink Lady has stood on M Street for 130 years, first as a wedding gift to William Carson’s eldest son Milton Carson in 1889. After Carson died in 1912, Milton moved into the Carson mansion but the Pink Lady stayed in the family for eight years. After its departure from the Carsons in 1920, it passed through many hands but was most notably owned by two German sisters who used it as a boarding house until 1942, when it was seized as Nazi property. Before 2016, it was used as an office space before being turned into a vacation rental. Coldwell Banker Cutten Realty Realtor Jill MacDonald said the iconic property has gained serious consideration from a couple of prospective buyers and she’s held a few viewings since the listing went up. It’s also on the New York Times real estate page. “Since putting the listing up on social media, it’s spreading out and gaining a lot of attention,” MacDonald said. “My son

even called me and asked me, ‘Mom did you put the Pink Lady listing up?!’” The owner, she said, put many significant improvements into the property when she bought it a few years ago, adding that it’s now in great condition, “fabulous” and ready for a new proprietor. While the Pink Lady is currently set up as a vacation home, its future is uncertain, depending on the desires of its next owner. Mike Reinman, owner of Redwood Coast Vacation Rentals (where the Pink Lady is listed), said that while it’s up for sale people can still rent the Pink Lady for their Humboldt County visit. Reinman believes the mansion will most likely continue as a “late 1800s Queen Anne/ Eastlake Victorian” vacation rental. “Its demand has grown a lot and has done pretty well, even in this economy.” Reinman said. “It’s a beautiful place to stay and a great place for weddings and private events.” l This story was first published May 17 at www.northcoastjournal.com. Iridian Casarez is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez.

The Pink Lady is up for sale. Amy Kumler

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Week in Weed INTRODUCING

Old School Sensi-bilities By J.A. Savage

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

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I

n the ’70s, when it was still called marijuana, my buddy and I grew a crop near Briceland. Last week, we returned to the scene of our then crime. To minimize security concerns for our research, we booked safe passage to a couple grows via Humboldt Cannabis Tours. We expected to be impressed by technology because four decades ago “’high tech” consisted of CB radios to spread the word when we heard law enforcement helicopters in the distance. While there were some rudimentary solar installations for the most basic needs, many of us used propane refrigerators and stinky kerosene lamps. Preparing for the tour, we imagined apps and gadgets that not only enable an easier and more profitable way of life, but also facilitate high-volume, precise flowers at a lower environmental impact. And if technology increases workers’ pay and safety, too, it gets our old school gold star. That expectation came true. Even my friend, a man who abhors smart phones, was impressed by algorithms that can control nearly every nuance of a grow. That’s a big leap from our ’70s grow management: dumb luck. Let me send you through Mr. Peabody’s SoHum WayBack Machine for a 1970s minute, just before the “green rush” when environmental impacts from huge grows became common. Whoosh! We loved growing marijuana in SoHum for the scrubby freedom. We could work half-naked in the sun with only the occasional disruption from a law enforcement helicopter toting Vietnam War-era weapons. We endured the outdoor privy in bad weather, sweaty daily hikes with bags of chicken manure on our shoulders out to rocky plant sites and a general lack of funds. In our analog day, environmental threats — like illegal water diversions — were blunted by the distributed nature of growing. We scattered plants near tiny, infrequent springs because diverting a water source would be a crappy thing to do. For those who may have given it a flicker of consideration at the time, diversion was still rejected for fear it would call attention to the grow and they’d end up in jail with the other big category of

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

1970s miscreants: draft dodgers. No one was poisoning wildlife en masse, although many deer repelling plans resulted in utter failure. Some growers staked out unfortunate dogs howling in the wild to fend off wildlife. There wasn’t much to be done about rip-offs, unless we stayed in our patches all night long. Let’s climb back in the Wayback Machine and fast forward to our air-conditioned tour bus as it heads toward Fortuna. At the tech-heavy end of the tour, Bryan Robinson of Riverbar Pharms, who is also the president and CEO of Hygro, shows us a Dutch-made computer — the HortiMax-Go! from Growspan — that operates in the Cloud and controls 70,000 square feet of greenhouses in an indoor mixed-use grow. It allows him to regulate humidity, air flow, low-watt lights and irrigation. He manages his clone cuttings while he’s on the sofa with his smart phone. He adds, though, that he still puts his hands in the soil to see if the plants need water. We discovered that technology allows for cannabis that’s high-volume and meets exacting requirements for medical and recreational consumption. Technology enables a plant that is, most importantly, predictable. The impetus behind the technology is investors. Riverbar’s investors pulled their money out of the stock market to finance the farm, according to Robinson. With those investors to consider, and regular employees, not transient ones, to pay, he wants low-risk and predictability. He finds it in technology. “I like to control the environment,” he says. And the technology allows him to grow three times as much, he adds. Using technology reduces the environmental impacts in his new scene compared to his old grow, he says. The county helped Riverbar come out of the black market at his grow in Whitethorn to the white market, he says, and the old grow was decommissioned, with past water and grading impacts made healthy again. Technology also helps blunt environmental impacts from electricity use. He’s experimenting with very low-watt lights — just 6 watts per square foot. He also uses biodegradable plastics and other greener models for production.

Still, there’s electricity, plastic, pumps and water consumption. But his investors hang onto that “three times the volume” capacity, assured they’ll receive lower risk rates of return. While the financial angle was unintentional on the tour’s behalf, we couldn’t help noticing that after the blizzard of technology controlling Riverbar’s indoor farm, the tour plopped us down at nearly the exact opposite: a “no-investor” example of family farming. Mikal Jakubal’s self-financed Plant Humboldt nursery is just beyond the old Country Store near Briceland, a site where I used to drive miles of dirt road to use the pay phone to file news stories with the L.A. Times’ state editor. The articles, primarily about the horrors the Campaign Against Marijuana Planting was inflicting on SoHum residents, were hammered out on a manual typewriter and transcribed over the pay phone. The now-shuttered store currently displays a rusting sign for “High-Speed Internet Access.” At the Plant Humboldt nursery, we were gobsmacked by how healthy Jakubal’s 30,000 seed-grown plants were turning out this spring. The difference between the squat outdoor crop and the spindly-but-accurately-grown indoor scene was abrupt. We didn’t want to marvel at them like we did the tech-driven plants in the greenhouse. We wanted to take them home and smoke ‘em. Jakubal says he can grow these outdoor beauties because he doesn’t have to promise investor returns. He says he bootstrapped a small scene with 2,000 to 4,000 seedlings in 2016 into his operation now. “No consultants, no big investors,” he says. “It was the American Dream.” He adds that growers who start up now have other expectations and require millions in capital. Jakubal and his crew water the seedlings by hand. The extent of technology is in his inventory, which he processes with bar code scanners. His energy costs are, well, the cost of sunshine. His water comes from rain storage. There’s some plastic in piping and containers. Without relying on technology to guarantee sensimilla using clones/cuttings, Jakubal’s seed-grown plants have the problem of male infiltration. And that sends me and my buddy again


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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Mikal Jakubal at Plant Humboldt nursery. J.A. Savage

into the Wayback Machine. In the ’70s, sensimilla was a goal, not a prosaic reality. We planted the seeds that fell out of our baggies and hoped they grew. We hovered over our plants every day to see signs of male pollen sacs dropping so we could frantically sequester the pubescent plants until their in-vitro services were needed to produce seed for the next crop. The seed-grown scene is not so much different now. Yeah, Jakubal buys seed in bulk instead of rifling through baggies but he still has to root out males using a jeweler’s loupe to discover nascent pollinators. We were unable to check out a trim scene so I don’t get to relate how I found myself more than once in mid-winter at a grower’s kitchen table with a few others, clipping away, with a pile of cocaine over by the woodstove for enthusiasm and bottles of cognac for cleaning our hands between plants. It was OSHA’s worst nightmare. I can only assume that technology has obviated that part of the process and OSHA bureaucrats are not hyperventilating. We thought this story would be about two back-to-the-landers looking at how legalization has brought about shiny and scientifically elegant technology to make for better quality flower. We expected

that technology is helping grows to be less environmentally damaging and produce physically less-demanding crops since our labor of love in the ’70s. While that turned out to be true, we also learned how financial risk aversion is turning plants into a commodity by pushing techno-grows. Yet, technology also blunts some of the hard edges of our environmental concerns and allows for the type of grows that satisfy consumer demand and investors’ need for returns. In the ’70s, long-term rates of return for me and my growing buddy were about as important as Manhattan hotel real estate. What we were after were those 10-foot tall, sun drenched plants with “donkey dick” buds. It wasn’t much of a business plan. We did grow a few but after the harvest, we were still driving beaters and looking for an easier gig. We could’ve used a lot more technology but it didn’t exist and, hey, it wouldn’t have made for good stories. l After a multi-decade hiatus from Humboldt in an urban area where she still had to avoid police helicopters, J.A. (Honest) Savage now resides near Trinidad, where the helicopters are mostly U.S. Coast Guard. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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From NCJ Daily

Most Weapons in Brazen 2015 Gun Theft Still Missing

T

he Eureka man with an outlaw name who was behind a brazen gun theft at Pacific Outfitters nearly four years ago was recently sentenced to 33 months in prison after pleading guilty to the crime in federal court. Jesse James Marquez was 19 when he cut power lines to the sporting goods store in August of 2015 to dismantle the alarm before breaking in through a skylight and proceeding to make off with the trove of 55 handguns that had been stored in a cabinet. Two weeks, later he took off to Oregon. Since then, only 17 of the weapons have been recovered, according to the Eureka Police Department, with most found during criminal investigations — several drug-related — from Southern Humboldt to Oregon and even out east in Georgia. One was brandished by Ervin Eugene Sweat Jr. when he nearly killed University Police Department officer Louis Altic, who was shot in the leg in September of 2017 after responding to the Arcata Plaza

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on reports of a fight involving an armed suspect. Sweat was killed when Altic and another officer returned fire. “In addition to the prison term, Judge Breyer sentenced Marquez to a three-year term of supervised release and ordered Marquez to pay restitution to Pacific Outfitters in the amount of $56,600,” a Department of Justice press release states. The brash crime was one of the main reasons then Eureka Police Chief Andrew Mills proposed an ordinance — which he withdrew days later amid a public backlash — that would require gun owners and sellers within city limits to lock up their weapons when they weren’t home or a business was closed. “People have the right to bear arms but that’s just the point — to bear arms. Not to leave them lying around unprotected,” Mills said at the time. “[The ordinance was] written specifically so if someone is home or at their business, they can have all the guns they want lying about, because they’re in control of their firearms. It has nothing to do with ‘when somebody goes

Fatal Hit and Run: Clinton Eugene Deckert II, 47, of McKinleyville, was killed May 18 while walking along Central Avenue by a hit-and-run driver who was later arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence. According to a press release, Deckert was walking near Bella Vista Road when he was struck just before 7:30 a.m., allegedly by Shala Marie Bianco, 25, who reportedly later called CHP to say she was the driver. POSTED: 05.20.19

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The value of items recently burgled from a residence in the 1000 block of Stagecoach Road in Trinidad, which reportedly included $200,000 worth of jewelry, as well as gold bars, furs, coins and more. One arrest has been made but other suspects remain outstanding. POSTED 05.15.19

Congrats, Grads!

northcoastjournal

Graduating seniors walked into the Lumberjack Arena to take their seats at the start of Friday’s Latinx Graduation Ceremony. See the full slideshow of Friday and Saturday’s HSU graduation events at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED: 05.21.19 Photo by Mark Larson

to bed at night, can they have a gun on their nightstand?’ Of course they can. This is America.” According to an EPD release, detectives “developed probable cause” that Marquez was involved in the theft and requested the assistance of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which

Missing 4 Year Old: The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is asking for the public’s help locating Ariana Bemis-Eib, a missing 4-year-old girl, who is believed to be with her mother, Delisse Lalee Jones, 37, who allegedly failed to drop her off at daycare on May 15 after an overnight visitation. The girl’s father reported her missing and law enforcement’s subsequent attempts to contact Jones have been unsuccessful. POSTED: 05.16.19

ncj_of_humboldt

took over the investigation. A federal warrant was issued for Marquez on May 10, 2018, one year to the day of his sentencing, and he was arrested by ATF special agents on July 16, 2018, in a home just outside Eureka. POSTED: 05.19.19 — Kimberly Wear

Seeking Housing Solutions: Approximately 40 people attended a May 18 town hall meeting put on by True North Organization Network to discuss the need for transitional housing in Humboldt County. Those attending were urged to attend the June 6 planning commission meeting to weigh in on the 2019 draft Housing Element update and to sign a pledge to honor the dignity of all people and work toward ensuring everyone “has a safe place to call home.” POSTED 05.19.19

ncjournal

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They Said It

Comment of the Week

“What happens to a group of people whose antigovernment ethos was sustained by an illegal plant that is now the most regulated crop in California?”

“Thank you!””

New Yorker contributing writer Emily Witt in a May 20 article headlined “How Legalization Changed Humboldt County Marijuana” that takes a deep dive into how legalization has changed Southern Humboldt County. Spoiler alert: The piece isn’t entirely optimistic. POSTED 05.20.19

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

newsletters

— Brian Scott Kleinmeyer commenting a Journal Facebook post about North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman voting to pass the Equality Act, which aims to extend federal civil rights protections to the LGBTQ community by explicitly prohibiting any form of discrimination on the basis of sex, gender identity and sexual orientation. The act passed the House and will now be considered by the Senate. POSTED 05.17.19


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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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On the Cover

The opening number on preview night.

From auditions to preview with the cast of Cabaret By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

Photos By Mark McKenna

O

n a Saturday morning early last June, Eureka High School’s halls are cool and quiet. But past the heavy auditorium doors, dozens of men and women in leotards, yoga pants, sneakers and lace-up dance shoes are running through a choreography sequence, a sheen of sweat visible on a few of their faces. They kick, drop down, slap their thighs and swivel over and over. “One, two, three, four, nasty-nasty, seven, eight,” calls Tigger Bouncer Custodio

as he paces upstage in a neon pink RuPaul T-shirt, his dark hair pushed back under a bandana. Some move like trained dancers, slinking across the scuffed black floorboards. Others shuffle, hands curled as they eye their neighbors’ feet. Still, everyone here has already made the first cut in auditions for North Coast Repertory Theatre’s spring musical Cabaret, to be directed and choreographed by Custodio. Today they’ll dance, sing and act out scenes alone and in pairs, hoping to land a part and, starting

Kelly Hughes, Tigger Bouncer Custodio and Nanette Voss deliberate over casting. Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

14  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

in March, rehearse 10, 15, sometimes 20 hours a week for 11 weeks, then perform 16 shows, all unpaid but for a stipend of maybe $75 that doesn’t cover gas to and from the theater. Nobody is getting famous performing community theater in Humboldt County, either. But here they are, belting beside the piano at stage right and poring over pages of dialogue. Musical director Nanette Voss explains that dance-heavy shows often hold callbacks but the rigor is unusual. “Tigger is pushing them … we want to see their stamina,” she says. Girlish braids hang below the bandana tied over Voss’ head, belying the exactitude of her role here and as an English and drama teacher at EHS, where she’s also director of the theater program. She’s been doing theater since she was 10 and later began professional training. “Then I realized I’d rather do this for fun,” she says. Voss plays a verse of “Cabaret” on the piano for four women whose hair is still damp with sweat, watching them intently. Kelly Hughes, assistant director for the show, huddles around a folding table with Voss and Custodio during a break to go over the relative merits of the 40 performers on the list — whose vocals are “all over the place,” who dances with “charm”

and who’s giving them goosebumps. Two days later, they post the 19 parts and wait to hear who accepts and who’s going with another show.   On March 4, just less than 11 weeks from opening night, a dozen members of the cast are back at the EHS auditorium, scattered in the first few rows of the house. Custodio tells them he wants everyone “off book” — with songs and dialogue memorized — in two weeks. There’s still a call out for actors of color, he says, “because that’s part of the story we’re telling.” A few minutes later, Claire Fuxabull (her VaVa Voom Vixens burlesque name), a tall African American dancer with a bob of loose curls, walks in and assures Custodio she can pick up choreography quickly. Custodio sits back in his velvet seat and sighs, “God is on my side.”  Based on Christopher Isherwood’s 1939 novella Goodbye to Berlin, the musical adaptation Cabaret centers around a seedy nightclub in 1930s Berlin, where the Nazis are rising to power. The characters are increasingly swept up in the terrors of fascism, despite the varying depths of their denial. The connections to the current moment are hard to miss, given the resurgence of Nazis and their white suprem-


Craig Benson as Herr Schultz and Dianne Zuleger as Fräulein Schneider.

“I’m Jewish. It tells the story of Kristallnacht. I’m playing Schultz, a man who’s in denial.” acist brethren in the U.S. and abroad. By bringing people of color and more LGBTQ performers into the Kit Kat Club, Custodio, who is a Filipino Indigenous American gay cis man, is hoping to expand the idea of the vulnerable — then and now. Likewise, the Nazis are updated, sporting white polo shirts and khakis like their contemporary counterparts. In this production, some of the furniture is portrayed by people, too — frozen in place as lamps, doors and coat racks. Little by little, it goes from shocking to expected, played for laughs, then cruel. Finally, Custodio says, it ends in “complete objectification. Complete loss of humanity. … Because that’s what happens. … It’s how people of color are looked at. How queer people are looked at.” Of all the emotional aspects of the show, the last degradation is the most taxing for Fuxabull. “Being a footstool is the hardest part for me. Because I am not,” she says, hand raised, “a footstool.” Craig Benson, who plays Herr Schultz the fruit seller, says he was drawn to the show partly because he knew Custodio would have “a take that was courageous, definitive and political.” He leans into the lobby table, his eyes, one blue and one green, unblinking. “I’m Jewish,” he says. “It

tells the story of Kristallnacht. I’m playing Schultz, a man who’s in denial.” Aside from the emboldened anti-Semitism, Benson sees parallels with denial about climate change and attacks on the rights of LGBTQ people. Cabaret will be Benson’s third show with NCRT, though he’s directed five shows and acted in somewhere around 10 other Humboldt productions. By day, he teaches environmental science and management at Humboldt State University. “My head is in the sciences all the time and I need something for the other side of my brain,” he says gesturing toward his gray hair. And while he finds creativity in his field, “I don’t get to move like this. I don’t sing. … It’s mind, body, spirit and community.” Most of his colleagues don’t know about his other life. “I’m not outed as an artist,” he says with a smile.   On March 28, seven weeks out from opening night, the small mirrored studio at CalCourts Health and Fitness on Broadway in Eureka is crowded with dancers running through the choreography for “Don’t Tell Mama.” Noel August, who performs in drag as Tucker Noir, stands in the corner, a Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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On the Cover Continued from previous page

beanie tipped back on her head, watching them spin and drift into line with varying degrees of smoothness, sneakers squeaking above the music. She’s here to “tighten up” the choreography. “It’s like hearing it from another parent,” she says. When the music stops, the dancers drop their saucy postures, blow the hair off their faces and listen to August’s notes. They’re to watch finger positions and other details that will “cue the audience that this is a tight number.” She deomonstates how they can achieve “sharpness” by engaging every muscle as though they’re moving against something more than empty air. They go again, this time with Custodio shadowing them, his double claps cracking through the room. A couple weeks later on April 15, half the cast is scattered around the stage under the fluorescent lights of the Jefferson Community Center. Once the set is more or less built, they’ll move to NCRT. Jenni Simpson, who plays the prostitute Fräulein Kost, holds a script tabbed with pink Post-its. Simpson is used to performing with Jenni and David and the Sweet Soul Band but, she says, pressing the red curls back from her forehead, “Acting is not something I do.” Voss encouraged her to try out for the show and Simpson, who works as a project analyst for the environmental consulting firm GHD, saw it as a chance to stretch creatively. “It’s interesting to have a really full life and to have this absorb everything,” including some of the time she’d typically

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16  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

devote to her band and her dog. “I like [Kost],” Simpson says. “Ballsy isn’t the right word but she’s kind of a badass.” It makes Kost’s betrayal, aligning herself with the Nazis, more painful to portray. “Her choice is out of her own heartbreak and despair,” she says. “After I sing ‘Tomorrow Belongs to Me,’ we come back and have a circle and I’m really grateful.” Tonight they’re going through the scene leading up to the song “Somebody Wonderful,” a duet with Benson and Dianne Zuleger as Schultz and Schneider, who are newly engaged, with a wistful Kost singing in German in the background. Simpson is tentative in Kost’s telling off her landlady but soon she leans into it, sneering. “Yesss!” roars Custodio, cackling. “Give it to her!” Once the song begins, the scripts they’ve been sneaking glances at fall away and Benson and Zuleger lock eyes, their voices filling the room, which suddenly feels like a theater. Then Simpson, who doesn’t speak German, picks up the melody, singing the words with Kost’s lonely cynicism and a splinter of hope in her broad alto. When the song ends, she huffs a breath and a couple of castmates swipe at tears. Custodio asks Simpson how she’s doing during the break, telling her to let him know if anything becomes too much. There will be rough and gritty scenes in the show, depicting prostitution, violence and humiliation that could be difficult or triggering. “I’m not interested in capitalizing on anyone’s trauma,” he says. His own

training at the Webster University Conservatory of Theatre Arts was in method acting, drawing upon one’s own personal experiences and pain to bring “emotional rawness” to a performance. The result, he says, was “really powerful. But was it worth it?” The word “consent” comes up frequently in rehearsals and the players check in with each other about scenes with any contact — and there’s plenty of slapping, grinding and crotch grabbing. This is Custodio’s first time directing community theater, though he has four years directing kids at Fuente Nueva Charter School. He’s performed in Les Miserables, Rent and Chicago in Humboldt, as well as choreographing Pippin. “I know I have the ability to do what’s in my head. I do it on stage, I do it as Mantrikka [Ho],” he says, referring to his drag persona. But “to direct others and see a different interpretation is another level.” He stops to make a note in his battered spiral notebook to remind Hughes it’s time for them to “get real about consent” and what’s coming emotionally in the second act.   On May 1, two weeks away from opening night, the cast is rehearsing on the NCRT stage, where the bones of the Kit Kat Club set are built and awaiting paint. The smell of sawdust is sharp. The players move through their warmup exercises in a mix of workout clothes, skimpy costumes and heels that require some getting used to, particularly for the

“You’re hoping for that moment when the plane lifts off before you run out of runway, which is opening night.” Calder Johnson and Tigger Bouncer Custodio watch rehearsal a week before opening.


NOMINATE US! men who’ve never worn them. Tonight they’ll run through the second act accompanied by piano under the hard, white lights. Emma Johnstone sings Sally Bowles’ iconic anthem “Cabaret” for an audience of a dozen castmates. Top to bottom: “Where are my NaTen-year-old Lily zis?” shouts Custodio, Herlihy helps summoning a handful Maggie Hockaday of actors to loom with her makeup; menacingly in the members of the wings. Choreographer Caroline McFarland orchestra; Tyler runs them through the Elwell glams up fight scene, which is to become a Kit still stiff. Kat Club boy. Once they’ve made it through to the grim finale, the cast takes seats in the house to hear notes on their singing, dancing, posture, acting and accents. Calder Johnson, the theater’s creative director, addresses the troops, too. “Well, that got dark, didn’t it?” Johnson’s is an actor’s voice and it carries to the rafters. The darkness, he tells them, is necessary to this “story from 100 years ago about people trying to get all the joy they can out of life as the world falls into fascism and darkness.” He jokes that it’s not relatable at all before continuing. “We have to commit to that 100 percent and because of that we have to take care of ourselves as actors and as a family. We have to be able to step out of it.” He also reminds them to project their voices from their diaphragms and thanks them for the hard work that’s taken them this far. Now, he says, “You’re hoping for that moment when the plane lifts off before you run out of runway, which is opening night.” Johnson started at NCRT as an actor in a production of Cabaret 15 years ago, working with the theater off and on before becoming managing artistic director three years ago. “In some ways,” he says, Humboldt County is “an anomaly because so many people value the arts. … People love to have these visceral experiences that you can’t get from Netflix on your couch.” That a largely rural county like Humboldt fills seats not only at NCRT but Redwood Curtain Theatre, Ferndale Repertory Theatre, the Arcata Playhouse, Dell’Arte International, HSU productions and Redwood Playhouse in Garberville is remarkable. According to his estimates, the theater is able to survive financially on 75 to 80 percent earned income from ticket and other sales, in contrast to the national average of 60 percent, with the other 40 percent coming from grants and individual donations. Even so, there isn’t enough cash to pay the actors like professionals without boosting ticket prices to $40 or $50.

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BEST DISPENSARY Mounting a production is made significantly easier by the fact that NCRT owns its building, but it still adds up to between $9,000 and $12,000. Just renting the rights to perform a show runs $4,000 to $5,000. Another $1,500 to $2,000 goes to costumes and scenery, $2,000 to $3,000 goes to the musicians, stage manager and costume and set designers. That leaves $800 to $1,200 to split among the cast. Johnson points out that some of the actors donate the small amount of cash back to the theater. “It’s a tremendous amount of hard work,” Johnson says, basically for free. “It’s unlike any other hobby.” There’s one week left for rehearsal, all under “show conditions,” meaning makeup and costumes, lights and orchestra. On May 8, the band is upstairs in their own mishmash of black, gauzy,

skin-flashing costumes. They’ve had a month of weekly practice and two weeks of intensive rehearsals late into the night with the cast. Backstage is a rabbit warren of small rooms littered with the detritus of construction and costuming. The dressing room is a narrow space flanked by lit mirrors, the vanity shelves below them covered with an explosion of makeup palettes and train cases, abandoned eyeglasses and water bottles. Down the center of the room a clothes rack is packed with vintage coats, dresses and lingerie marked with the name of an actor and the corresponding character. By the end of the night, everything will be everywhere. Gary Bowman, who plays the Emcee, arrives early to tune the cello he’ll play Continued on next page »

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

17


On the Cover Continued from previous page

on stage and practice his choreography. Luckily it’s a quick commute from his job as an eligibility worker in the CalWorks division, helping people get food, cash and healthcare assistance. He sits at the mirror with his eyes closed as Karen Echegaray, who plays a trans sailor, fixes his makeup. Soon he’ll have a glittery black stripe painted down the center of his smooth head. Bowman toured with the Broadway revival of Cabaret in ’99 as a cellist in the orchestra and understudy for the part of Ernst, and he’d played the Emcee back in junior college. Still, he was “shocked and a little intimidated” to land the part at NCRT. Like some of the folks Bowman works with at his day job, “The Emcee is a person on the fringe also.” He adds, “Half the reason I do theater is to keep you sane from your day job. It’s very cathartic.”                           Stage manager Kira Gallaway has added a bulky headset to her uniform of black leggings and tank top, her blonde hair pulled back in a ponytail dyed pale lavender at the end. She’s zipping between the crowded dressing room and the house. She may, in the midst of talking, put one finger up and pivot away, talking to someone on her headset “I’ve always liked being behind the scenes more,” Gallaway says. Her day jobs are more of the same, as a “black shirt” stage manager for Center Arts and technical director for the Arcata Arts Institute’s theater. She likes being in charge and fixing problems, she says, as well as “watching the process, watching the actors just blossoming … and all the technical aspects coming together. It just gives me such joy.” Her family isn’t into theater, she says, and she doesn’t expect them at the show. Which is fine. It’s fine not being out there for the curtain call or applause, too. “I don’t need the glory. I just need what gives me that joy.” The cast warms up with yoga in heeled boots and bustiers. Then they run through the show from start to finish, with Custo-

dio occasionally calling “Hold!” to make adjustments. Bowman flubs a line and hops, muttering “fuck” for a second before he’s back in character. “Don’t Tell Mama” is tight enough for the dancers to add playful winks. When it’s over, Voss gives her notes first. “Feel the music,” she tells them, and “pull into the band” to keep up. Everything still needs to go faster. She wants Johnstone to “really push the song out of your heart.” Custodio flips through his notebook and speaks in the clear rapid fire manner Hughes says “engenders loyalty” and confidence. It also leaves little room for disagreement. “This is a non-nipple Cabaret,” he says, dead serious. “If you have nipples and they have the possibility of showing, you need to put pasties on them.” Also, “Everybody needs to be louder.” Preview night is always a Thursday and lightly attended, mostly by other theater folks, but it’s the first time the cast will get the real-time feedback of seeing an audience’s faces and hearing the laughs, applause and silences. “It’s the last ingredient they need,” says Johnson. At 6:55, much of the cast is on stage, still in street clothes. Voss calls down from the orchestra above with some quick notes: “Practice makes permanent,” she reminds them, and hold the note longer at the end of “Willkommen.” Custodio arrives in a black button-down shirt and pink bowtie. After his job at Dirty Business Soil Analytics, he taught a Zumba Class at CalCourts before running to the theater. Rehearsals went until midnight the day before, which, he explains, is why this is called “hell week.” He shares the feedback he got from a couple of folks he’d invited last night. “I got, ‘Was it your intention to have people counting the choreography?’ Of course, I said, ‘Yes.’” He tells the cast to trust and enjoy themselves, to make the audience “want to

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Gary Bowman plays cello as the Emcee. “jump on stage and join you.” After one more run through the fight choreography, the cast retreats to the dressing room and the house fills to about a quarter capacity. Gallaway snakes through the dressing room reminding everyone to whisper. A few people are smoking out back under umbrellas and someone needs a shoe glued. Custodio is moving between actors, giving them last-minute notes and words of encouragement. Bowman’s knee is bothering him, which he says is “kinda par for the course.” “This is my most nerve-wracking night,” Custodio says, hunkered in the back row. He wants the audience to be engaged, to get “the general gender fuckery of it all.” He’d been taught you only get two scenes to draw in the audience. “Mein herr und herren, ladies and gentlemen and everyone beyond the binary,” calls Bowman under the pink lights, kicking off the ribald “Willkommen.” The audience hoots and whistles. The mood shifts when the Nazis show up before intermission. It’s jarring and the audience members blink at one another in silence when the lights come on. It’s the shock Custodio had hoped for instead of applause.

Backstage someone whispers, “They’re feeling it.” After the grim finale and curtain call, the cast members wade into the audience to greet friends and the theater becomes an impromptu party. Voss has only one page of notes, rather than her usual three or four. Hughes has a couple of technical issues to fix. Most take off their makeup, change and head to Ernie’s bar for drinks and a smoke on the patio, where, Custodio informs with an arched brow, “Everything is off the record.” Friday’s opening night is already sold out. Custodio feels good, though he has a couple of tweaks. He’s sure that no matter how strong the show is, it won’t “get a standing O,” since the harsh ending is difficult to clap for. But opening night receives a standing ovation after all. In a message, Custodio is pleased but still unwilling to declare victory. “Can’t really judge that until Sunday.” l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the Journal’s arts and features editor. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or Jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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Front Row

In Transition

Dell’Arte Thesis Festival and NCRT’s Cabaret By Pat Bitton and David Jervis frontrow@northcoastjournal.com

Alfredo Romero and Daniel Loyola in Deshuesadaro Suite. Photo by Tushar Mathew

Thesis Festival Dell’Arte’s annual Thesis Festival represents the graduating MFA students’ transition to the world beyond school — a world to which they will bring the totality of their three-year immersion in theater of place. The four pieces presented are all very different, reflecting the broad range of techniques studied, but all also very much about transitions: between life and death, love and disillusion, childhood and old age, disintegration and reconstruction. Performances are spread over two nights, with the first two pieces presented on Thursday and Saturday, and the second two on Friday and Sunday. In Go Below Yourself, Southern belle Susan (Kathryn Cesarz) finds herself unexpectedly dead and, even more unexpectedly, in what appears to be hell. Greeted by a bizarre cast of characters (Melanie Schauwecker, Jesse March, Evan Grande and Janie Pinard), Susan decides she must teach them some manners, which she believes will lead to her atonement and ultimate transfer to a more appropriate afterlife. All the characters are wonderful but on opening night had not quite coalesced into an integrated ensemble. I’m sure this will have been resolved by the second weekend. Visions of A Crying Girl is a very different piece — no comedic script, no colorful costumes, just two performers (Cleo DeOrio and Jordan Rosin) performing the quiet dance of a dying relationship. We watch with growing sadness the rituals of coupledom descend into mundane, meaningless rote and unfulfilled dreams float away as they try desperately to recapture the magic. With black-and-white costumes and

Pierrot makeup, this is minimalist theater at its expressive best. The word Kedma encompasses both the distant past and the unknown future, the beginning and end of the day, and the turning of the earth, so it is appropriate that the piece is performed outdoors in the round. Extracting maximum interpretive power from masks and movement, Kedma takes us inside the final journey of an old woman (Idit Kischinovsky), weaving together both real and imagined characters from her past (Leslie Castellano and Shawn Wagner) against a visceral soundscape by Maggie Lally. The final piece, Deshuesadero Suite, is by far the most abstract. Deshuesadero (“untying” in Spanish) is an apt metaphor for this extraordinarily choreographed dance of bodies in search of themselves. Set in a dark space with only a coffin-like box, Alfredo Romero, Carolina Pimentel and Daniel Loyola play with each other’s minds as they tear apart and reconstruct semblances of self with the assistance of grotesque masks, giant potato sacks, a suitcase and a small, mysterious container. In a recent Peanuts strip, Peppermint Patty wonders “Is love a ‘now’ kind of thing … or is it mostly hope and memories?” Every one of the characters presented in the 2019 Thesis Festival is, in their own way, wondering the very same thing. All four pieces are sufficiently well-developed and rounded to stand alone; together, they form an arc of interpretation that is well worth two trips to Blue Lake. — Pat Bitton The Thesis Festival continues Thursday through Sunday, May 23-26. Call 668-5663 or visit www.dellarte.com.

Cabaret

Perched between two tragic periods in 20th century history was Germany’s era of the Weimar Republic from 1919 to 1933. Laid low by the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, the nation of Germany was in a time of economic and political ruin but it was also a time of cultural freedom that dovetailed with the American Jazz Age of the 1920s. It was a time of sexual liberty and freedom that was yet unseen in Europe, and American writer Christopher Isherwood lived in Berlin at the time and documented it in his writings. His works give the basis for the 1966 Broadway musical Cabaret, which North Coast Repertory Theatre presents now in what may be their best production so far this season. Cliff Bradshaw (Jordan Dobbins) arrives in Berlin on a New Year’s weekend in the early 1930s, a young American writer traveling through European capitals looking for inspiration. He makes friends in the rooming house belonging to Fräulein Schneider (a sharp Dianne Zuleger) as he teaches English to make some extra money, including from Ernst (Evan Needham), who has a side hustle himself smuggling Parisian goods into the impoverished nation. But at the center of Cabaret is the titular venue and all that goes on onstage and in the shadows. Ernst tips off Cliff about the Kit Kat Club, a popular Berlin nightspot. “Willkommen” is the opening number of Cabaret and it is a flashy, knockout start for the gender-bending and raucous tone of Tigger Bouncer Custodio’s great production. The Emcee of the Kit Kat (Gary Bowman) introduces the dancers of the club and remains the central presence of

the show throughout. Most of the drama centers on Cliff’s burgeoning relationship with Sally Bowles (Emma Johnstone), an English singer at the Kit Kat who comes to live in Cliff’s room. Johnstone, last seen at NCRT in King Lear, winningly belts two of the play’s best numbers, “Don’t Tell Mama” and “Mein Herr,” and she and Dobbins have good chemistry. The plum role belongs to Bowman, last seen in Ferndale Repertory Theatre’s Chicago, and he’s stunning in a role that steals the show and earns it with audacity and rigorous physical work. Director Custodio clearly is in his wheelhouse as the choreographer of the production and all of the Kit Kat dancers do great double duty throughout in creative ways, big and small. Germany’s libertine Weimar Republic gave way to the rise, the rule and the ruin of the Third Reich, and Cabaret’s second act is unflinching in making clear what is ahead for its principals and for the nation. For an often fun and rowdy production, Cabaret’s final moments drive that home in a moment during which you could hear a pin drop even from the back row. — David Jervis Cabaret plays at the North Coast Repertory Theatre on Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. through June 16. For more information, call 442-NCRT or visit www.ncrt.net.

Continuing Ferndale Repertory Theatre’s poppy, playful Mamma Mia! plays Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. through June 2. Call 786-5483 or visit www. ferndalerep.org. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

19


Table Talk

A Life in Brisket

Steven Raichlen’s “steaks” with herbed butter Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

I

f you smell smoke in Blue Lake this week, stay calm. Barbecue guru and James Beard and Julia Child award winner Steven Raichlen will be over at the Sapphire Room at Blue Lake Casino and Hotel for a PBS North Coast fundraiser on Thursday, May 30 (see Calendar). He’ll be hosting a feast and sharing a lean slice of the exhaustive knowledge he put into his book The Brisket Chronicles, as well as his suite of cooking shows, Project Fire, Project Smoke and Primal Grill. Brisket devotees, prepare to feel seen. Raichlen believes we’re in a “brisket moment.” The phrase popped into his head, he says, about two years ago when Aaron Franklin of Franklin Barbecue won a James Beard Award and the humble bovine chest meat that had for so long been sequestered in Texas and Kansas City barbecue, and so-called “ethnic” restaurants started popping up everywhere. “It’s hugely flavorful because it’s a load bearing muscle,” he says, making it worth the time and effort to prepare. “There are many cuts of meat that are deserving but none that has the emotional weight that brisket has,” says Raichlen, explaining why he chose to focus on the history, science and legion of recipes for the cut in his latest cookbook. “It’s comfort food for so many cultures,” he says. And the recipes from all manner of chefs — Irish corned beef, barbecued low and slow Texas style, sliced over pho or braised like his aunt made for Rosh Hashanah — bear out his point. Growing up Jewish in Baltimore, Raichlen says, “probably my first solid food was brisket.” In fact, he looks at this compendium as a kind of autobiography via brisket, starting with family dinners, moving to his college job at a deli that cured its own meats, then to his travels abroad in France and Germany, where he discovered different takes on the cut. Brisket showed up again and again all over the world when he entered food writing: “In every stage of my life, in every key moment, brisket has been with me.” Not a bad traveling

companion, when you think about it. Raichlen’s completist approach also takes him beyond the barbecue to ovens pots and fryers, which is not to say his grill is going cold anytime soon. Asked if there’s any food even he — having featured smoked ice cream and grilled cheesecake on Project Fire — would hesitate to smoke, he says he’d initially written off chocolate as a possibility because of its bitter flavor, only to find other chefs had yielded wonderful results. “I don’t know if I’d smoke a raspberry,” says Raichlen. “That might be cruel.” But he quickly recants, not wanting to rule anything out. “It’s possible there is not a single food on the planet that could not be improved by smoking.”

Brisket “Steaks” with Shallot Sage Butter Yield: Serves 4 Method: Direct grilling Prep time: 5 minutes Cooking time: 4 to 8 minutes Heat source: Grill You’ll also need: A microplane or other fine-hole grater What else: I take a savory approach to these steaks, basting them with Shallot Sage Butter and grating fresh horseradish root on top. (It’s amazing how fiery fresh horseradish invigorates the smoky meat.) Alternatively, you could take the sweet route, seasoning the steaks with barbecue rub instead of salt and pepper, and slathering them with your favorite sweet barbecue sauce in place of the butter. The brisket “steak” takes me back to my Barbecue University days at the Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. A chef there had the genius idea to cook thick slabs of barbecued brisket on a screaming hot grill, just as you would a New York strip. This gave the brisket a sizzling, crusty exterior that lay midway

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Raichlen’s brisket “steaks” with shallot sage butter. Photo by Matthew Benson, courtesy of Workman Publishing

between traditional barbecued brisket and steak, with a handsome smoky crosshatch of grill marks. (It’s also a great way to repurpose leftover barbecued brisket.) To this, add a shallot sage butter and a dusting of fiery fresh horseradish and you may just barbecue your next brisket solely to turn it into steak. Note: If you like your steaks lean, cut them from the flat. If you like them richer and fattier, cut them from the point. You’ve probably guessed by now that I like the latter. Ingredients: Vegetable oil, for oiling the grill grate 2 pounds barbecued brisket (about 4 pounds uncooked), cut across the grain into 1¼-inch-thick slices Coarse sea salt and freshly ground black pepper Shallot Sage Butter (recipe follows) 2-inch chunk of fresh horseradish root, peeled Set up your grill for direct grilling (lit coals in a single layer in the center of the grill, leaving the front third coal-free or, for a gas grill, with the rear burner on high, the center burner on medium and the front burner off) and heat to high. Brush or scrape the grill grate clean and oil it well. Season the brisket slices on both sides with salt and pepper. Brush the slices on both sides with half the Shallot Sage Butter; set the remaining butter aside. Arrange the brisket slices on the grill running diagonal to the bars of the grate. Grill until browned on the bottom, 2 to 4 minutes, giving each slice a quarter turn

halfway through to lay on a crosshatch of grill marks. Gently flip the brisket slices and grill the other side the same way, 2 to 4 minutes more. Serve the brisket steaks hot off the grill, with the remaining Shallot Sage Butter spooned over them and the fresh horseradish grated on top with a Microplane or other fine-hole grater.

Shallot Sage Butter Makes ½ cup Shallot Sage Butter brings a Mediterranean note to a smoked meat with deep American roots. Allium lovers can substitute garlic for the shallots. Ingredients: 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter 2 to 3 large shallots, peeled and minced (½ cup) 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage leaves (plus an optional handful of whole leaves) Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallots and sage and cook until just beginning to brown, 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and keep at room temperature until ready to use. Reheat the butter gently if it solidifies. l Excerpted from The Brisket Chronicles by Steven Raichlen, photographs by Matthew Benson. Workman Publishing © 2019.


Down and Dirty

Don’t be afraid to get your hands and garden dirty planting. Shutterstock

A Creative Mess

Ornamental vs. productive gardens By Katie Rose McGourty

downanddirty@northcoastjournal.com

‘‘A

creative mess is better than tidy idleness,” stated a neatly typed sign on the door to our grandmother’s art room. Inside were shelves overflowing with art supplies, canvases stacked on every wall and boxes and boxes of wrapping paper, and forgotten Christmas presents. Here on the home farm, we’ve been inspired by Grandma’s wisdom, focusing on boosting productivity (aka creative mess) rather than ornamental perfection (tidiness). In more populated parts of the state, this approach to gardening often raises eyebrows. In certain suburbs, pristine landscaping is expected and all front yard landscape designs must be approved by homeowner associations. Allowing the lawn to grow longer

than three inches might result in a warning letter taped to the front door. Growing vegetables is another story entirely. In South Central Los Angeles, gardener Ron Finley was fined for growing food on a median in front of his home — his only available garden space. He remained determined to grow food because there was nowhere in his neighborhood within walking or biking distance where he could buy fresh organic vegetables, something to which he thought everyone should have daily access. He persevered, attending public meetings and applying for permits until he finally earned the right to grow his own vegetables. Luckily, here in Humboldt we have more breathing room. We can let the grass wave in the wind while we bustle to get our garden packed

with as many vegetables as possible. Now that frost season is officially over, we are planting all the vegetables on our list. With the beautiful sunshine and light breezes of mid-spring, we sow corn, beans, squash (summer and winter), basil and pumpkins. In order to have the most growing area possible, we long ago got rid of all the lawns to produce more food and cut flowers. Yes, luscious green lawns are very pleasing to the eye and bare toes. But does it compare to a bowl of blueberries still warm from the sun? We’d rather sacrifice a little tidiness for a lot of creative mess when it comes to fresh berries and vegetables. And listening to the drone of lawnmowers around the neighborhood every weekend morning, we revel in the relative silence that is vegetable growing. Routine tasks such as tilling the earth, composting, sowing seeds, transplanting, watering and weeding give us a chance to unwind from our busy work schedules — listening to birdsong and watching butterflies. Our friends who don’t grow vegetables complain about mowing the lawn and we feel bad their only experience with yardwork is operating a loud machine. If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to take out even a portion of the lawn, now is a great time to start. Simply measure out the desired growing space, cover with a thick layer of cardboard and top it with a couple inches of mulch. The area can be bordered with boards for a raised garden bed (two 2-by-12-foot Douglas fir boards can be cut into 3- and 9-foot sections and stacked two boards high for a simple wall). Perhaps a more organic border, such as cut logs or river rocks, will do the trick. Either way, once covered, the lawn will die back. If making a raised bed, be sure to install hardware cloth along the bottom to keep out underground critters such as gophers and moles. Fill it with organic soil and compost, and plant away. We suggest a few raised beds for good measure, as it’s nice to have a variety

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of vegetables. For those without a lawn but with abundant concrete and asphalt, you can also build raised beds on these surfaces. For drainage, it’s best to place cobble and gravel on the bottom 12 to 16 inches of the raised bed. In our marine climate, growing vegetables on asphalt and concrete may be ideal (especially in windy areas) because it absorbs heat from the sun, even on cool, overcast days. Given that we balance growing food with a full-time work schedule, time is often the limiting factor. We have two dueling aesthetics: Neat Nancy and Sloppy Suzy. Neat Nancy likes the grass trimmed to a manageable 1 to 3 inches, every shrub and tree neatly pruned, and not a leaf out of place. Sloppy Suzy makes piles everywhere, running from one job to the next. During busy planting times (such as right now), Sloppy Suzy prevails. The grass grows tall and waves in the breeze as she digs up the corn patch and plants out rows of beans and snap peas. Sloppy Suzy wants to add a compost pile with fresh manure on top to attract worms, dig up areas of the yard for new planting beds and generally create chaos that never seems completely contained. She tells Nancy to get over it — if you want to grow something there’s going to be a bit of a mess. The transition from ornamental to productive might seem daunting at first. However, every time dinner or dessert features something from the yard, it becomes that much easier to forget about neatness. Yes, the weeds may grow long as time is spent planting but this will only attract beneficial insects, create habitat for frogs and give the cats a chance to feel like they live in a jungle. Once we’ve done our planting, Sloppy Suzy can kick back and let Neat Nancy come in to pull all the weeds and cut back the grass. l

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


Get Out

For the Glory and All the Marbles Gearing up for the Kinetic Grand Championship By Cassaundra Caudillo getout@northcoastjournal.com

E

very Memorial Day weekend, sculptures come to life with the beating hearts of those furiously pedaling and rowing inside them. With a 50-mile course around Humboldt County, one would assume the teams are training day and night to make the trek, but that’s not the case for all teams. For teams with members nearly as old as the race itself, the approach is more laid back. Ken Beidleman, captain of Team 420 Hippy-potamus and six-time first starter winner, has been competing in the race since 1982. This is his 35th time so he knows his way around building a sculpture that can withstand hills, sand and sea. On his team are members who have been a part of the same squad for more than a decade. So how do these veterans train to complete the course each year? They don’t. For now, the goal is to have as much fun as possible. “I get the same team back because we have so much fun that they want to return,” Beidleman said. Getting their ride in shape is workout enough. Some racers don’t start their sculptures from scratch and it’s common to use the body of an older one, building on top of it or stripping it down to its bare bones and starting from there. Beidleman will be taking that route again this year

and reusing the large Pepto Bismol-colored hippopotamus that caught the eyes of spectators in years past. She was originally created in 2008 and has been used four times since. This will be her retirement run, so if you see her, make sure to grab a quick photo or two. Still, there is a good chance she might make a return like the Hamtastic Glory, brought out of retirement last year by co-captains Lush Newton and Malia Matsumoto and set to race again this year. As the duo was trying to bring another retired sculpture back to life, Beidleman offered up the ham, which was gathering dust above Lost Coast Brewery. Last year it had an Elvis Presley twist and the theme will continue this time around. As “Blue Hawaii” plays softly in the backs of their minds, Newton and Matsumoto are sprucing up the ham and their helmets. Since the theme is Blue Hawaii Kalua pork, their helmets in the shape of the King’s iconic hairstyle will be given a coat of blue paint and some larger-than-life pineapple slices will be added on the sculpture itself. “It’s a real piece of history and a privilege that we’re able to ride this ham,” Newton said. Like Team 420, they will be competing light-heartedly. Their main form of training is getting prepared mentally to tackle the course and its sheer length. Both co-cap-

Hippy-potamus 420 mid-makeover. Photo by Cassaundra Caudillo

tains have been competing for over a decade, though last year was their first time helming a vessel, and they know how much time must be dedicated to these sculptures, which doesn’t leave much room for training anyway. “In Kinetic Sculpture you can race two ways,” Matsumoto said. “Ace where there’s a lot of rules and restrictions and then there’s non-ace where the physical rigor isn’t as intense. With the constraints of all of our jobs, we didn’t have enough time to get ready for that but in the future, we plan to ace.” A brand new aspect to the race for spectators to get in on will be an added marble hunt. Spearheaded by Wende White with the help of Topher Reynolds of Copious Glass, the Great Marble Hunt and Race, will run like most, with clues given out on the day. The marbles, donated by Copious Glass, will be hidden alongside

the race route. Others will be sold at the race to offset the price of the marbles in the hunt. The marbles are offered up to be found by both spectators and racers, so expect it to be competitive. But organizers will also be handing out some free marbles to children. This year’s sculptural trophy for the winner of the race will also feature marbles. “We’ve hooked up together two Humboldt County centered things,” White said. “Kinetic racing, which is around the world but really started in Humboldt, and glass marble hunting. The sculpture itself will be a marble drop and it’ll spin around, displaying the higher quality marbles.”● The Kinetic Grand Championship kicks off at noon on May 25 on the Arcata Plaza. It travels over land and water to finish on Ferndale’s Main Street. See the Calendar for details.

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22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

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Setlist

Moving Pictures

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

By Colin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s that time of year again where the bright and colorful statues ride around the plaza and across the land and into the sea — sort of — to find their terminal point on Main Street in Ferndale on Memorial Day. It’s a unique local event we locals tend to take for granted but is a fairly special thing if one stops to consider it for a moment. I am usually working or out of town for it, but this year I find my schedule open enough to allow me to observe the kick-off, so that’s something to look forward to. Here’s hoping that there’s a nice crowd, good weather and, if neither of those things, a free seat in the Alibi for me to listen in to the mirth with cocktail-assisted ears. Or perhaps an oasis somewhere on the sand strip route in Manila. I’m easy to please. Have a good one, see you all in the funny pages.

Riders in the Sky play the Old Steeple on Sunday, May 26 at 7:30 p.m. Courtesy of the artists

talented group Invincible Czars. First up at 7 p.m. is the Lon Chaney masterpiece The Phantom of the Opera, which I prefer in this format because the musical gets a giant “boooo” from this writer. Next up at 9 p.m. is F.W. Murnau’s ragged treasure Nosferatu, a movie that flutters in a series of strobe-lit silent screams. Admission to each showing is only $10, which will surely leave you some money in the budget for a bit of velvet and makeup.

Saturday

Come check out Just Joshin’, the only not-quite-late-night comedy variety show in Humboldt County, hosted by Josh Barnes at 9 p.m. Comedy is a priceless commodity in the age of extinction and this show is value-priced at a mere $5. Where you might ask? Why, the only comedy club in Eureka, named after a periodical which was itself named after a character from a desultory anecdote told by the protagonist in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, the Savage Henry Comedy Club.

It’s the kick-off to the now probably world-famous Kinetic Grand Championship on the Arcata Plaza. I usually get to the plaza — it’s all literally downhill from my place — around mid-morning to get a good eyeball on the entries before the high noon peel-out, so perhaps you will want to do the same. Regardless, if you have any fuel left in you this evening, I suggest you go check out the Eastern European string sounds of Chubritza at Cafe Mokka for free at 8 p.m. Say hello to a certain handsome orange feline with a wandering nature named Chester while you are there. He’s good people.

Friday

Sunday

Thursday

I wanted to only showcase Blue Lake tonight but I found something pretty compelling a few miles south. So real quick, write this down: The Mad River Brewing Co. is hosting the ninth annual birthday bash for Bob Dylan starting at 5 p.m. This free celebration of the poet of Hibbing, Minnesota, will be helmed by Chris Parreira and friends. Nearby at The Logger Bar at 9 p.m., another free shindig goes down as Mojave Green and The Scum Lourdes team up to twang up the night. However, I have found a real corker of a double feature so read on, please. The Eureka Theater is hosting two horror staples of the silent film era with a live soundtrack which will be provided by the

For more than 40 years, Riders in the Sky has been entertaining families with fun and theatrical western music. If Toontown from the seminal half-human flick Who Framed Roger Rabbit? had a cowpoke house band for a cartoon saloon, it could only be voiced by these buckaroos. In fact, the group recorded “Woody’s Roundup” from Toy Story 2. Tonight the bright chuckwagon stops at the Old Steeple at 7:30 p.m. for an evening of be-hatted harmonizing. Load up and bring the kids, this show’s made for them ($45).

Monday (Memorial Day)

From Crab Park to Main Street, Ferndale, it’s the end of the line for yet another iteration of the earth and water race

of brightly absurd human-powered craft. Come revel in the glory somewhere along the route, sometime before afternoon. I’ll be away and en route to a much-needed voyage of my own out of town, so take a few pics for me, please.

Tuesday

live jazz, small bites & craft cocktails

THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS

RampArt Skatepark is hosting yet another all-ages punk show tonight at 8 p.m. ($7). Tonight’s headliner is Atlanta, Georgia’s Malevich, a group whose harsh sound is built on the notion of inclusivity and tolerance instead of nihilistic edgelord cruelty. Joining in for local support will be Cross Oceans CA, KLOD and FHOG aka Finger Hash of the Gods. Cool.

in the basement of the jacoby storehouse

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THIS IS WHAT LUNCH LOOKS LIKE AT LE MONDE!

Wednesday

It’s sci-fi pint night at the Arcata Theatre Lounge again. Tonight’s offering is the 1973 film GodMonster of Indian Flats, and alls you need for admission is a $5 purchase of food or beverage. It’s a good deal and one made sweeter by the free raffle of science fiction curios and artifacts into which one is automatically entered by simply walking in the door. The hour of power tonight is 6 p.m., so shake a leg and come watch what is in all likelihood a truly terrible, albeit fun, flick. l Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo is still waiting for the day when one moving sculpture will overtake another sculpture, defeat it in a brief scuffle and triumphantly consume the loser and its crew while Mars, the Bringer of War from Holst’s The Planets plays at ear-splitting volume. He lives in Arcata or, as it will be called on that day, Valhalla.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


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Music & More VENUE

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Organic Products Excellent Wine & Spirits

What’s your food crush?

Fresh Seafood & Steaks Drink Specials & Full Bar Student & Senior Discounts

We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt.

Free WiFi Spot

Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for What’s Good.

773 8th St. Arcata 822-1900

100 MOONSTONE BEACH RD. TRINIDAD • 677-1616 moonstonegrill.com

mazzottis.com www.facebook.com/Mazzottis

Dinner ser ved Wednesday-Sunday 5 pm - 8:30 pm Reser vations Recommended

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free

Email jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

THUR 5/23

FRI 5/24

Mix Tape Vol. 6 (DJ music) 9:30pm TBA

LARRUPIN CAFE 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake 668-5000

Eureka and South on next page

SAT 5/25 Rocker’s Saturday 9pm $10

Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free

MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151

Live Music TBA 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000 NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187 OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad 677-3543

Goat Karaoke 9pm Free

SUN 5/26

M-T-W 5/27-5/29

Deep Groove Society 10pm $5

[T] Top Grade Tuesdays Dancehall Reggae w/DJ RealYouth, Cassidy Blaze 10pm $5 [W] Trivia Night 6pm, Whomp Whomp Wednesdays 10pm TBA

Tim Randles Jazz Piano 6-9pm Free

Mojave Green (alt. country) 9pm Free

Queer Night Lumberhunk Dance Party 9pm

Bob Dylan’s Birthday Bash w/ Chris Parreira & Friends, The Hibbings et al. 5pm Free

Live Music TBA 6pm Free The Getdown with DJM 9:30pm Free

Open Mic 7pm Free

Potluck Dinner 6pm

Goat Karaoke 9pm Free Two Mic Sundays (comedy) 5pm Free

RAMPART SKATE PARK 700 South G St., Arcata 826-0675 REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7224 SIX RIVERS BREWERY 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-7580 SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 TOBY AND JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

Jimi Jeff Acoustic (Hendrix, Prince, funk, blues) 8pm Free DJ Dance Party 10pm DJ Dance Party TBA

[T] Old Time Music Jam 8pm Free [T] Live Music TBA 6pm Free [W] Paula Jones Band 6pm Free [T] Sonido Pachanguero 9pm [T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6-8pm Free [M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5 [T] Malevich, Cross Oceans, KLOD, FHOG (grind, metal, death, rock) 7:30pm $7 [M] Open Bluegrass Jam 7pm

Trivia Night 8pm Free DJ Dance Party 10pm Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

[M] Karaoke with DJ Marv 8pm

Dance Party w/DJ Pressure 10pm Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

[W] Old School Hip Hop w/DJ Hal TBA

ALL MONTH LONG Breakfast Served all day Coffee & Espresso Lunch & Specialty Dishes

MIX AND MATCH APPAREL DEALS BUY ANY 2 SAVE 15% DOES NOT APPLY TO CLEARANCE ITEMS DOES NOT INCLUDE HEADWEAR OR ACCESSORIES

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(707) 822-3090 987 H St, Arcata

www.humboldtclothing.com

MIDDLE OF G ST. ARCATA PLAZA 707.826.7578

Sun - Thurs 8 am - 3 pm Fri. & Sat. 7 am - 3pm

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

25


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

THUR 5/23

EUREKA & SOUTH

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway FRI 5/24

SAT 5/25

ARTS & DRAFTS 422 First St., Eureka 798-6329

A Caribbean Bistro

613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

20% OFF our TEPPANYAKI menu

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

SUN 5/26

Karaoke 5-10pm

Lone Star Junction (outlaw country) 9pm Free

BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Dr., Redway 923-3188 DOUBLE D STEAK & SEAFOOD 320 Main St., Fortuna 725-3700

M-T-W 5/27-5/29 [T] Craft Singles: A Cheesy Trivia Night 6-8pm Free [W] Onesie Wednesday TBA

The Clint Warner Band (blues) 9pm Free

Pool Tourney 8pm

Savannah Rose (folk/ country) 8pm Free

[T] Karaoke 9pm [W] Open Mic/Jam session 7pm Free

Anna Hamilton (blues, humor) 6-9pm Free Invincible Czars Double Feature w/Live Score: Phantom of the Opera 7pm $10, Nosferatu 9pm $10

EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., Eureka 442-2970

Seabury Gould and Evan GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 Morden (Irish/Celtic) 6pm Free Thursday Trivia Night GYPPO ALE MILL 986-7700 1661 Upper Pacific Dr., Shelter Cove 6-8pm Free HUMBOLDT CIDER CO. TAPROOM 517 F St., Eureka 497-6320 MADRONE BRICK FIRE PIZZA AND TAPHOUSE 421 Third St., Eureka 273-5129

[T] Pizza & Pints for Non Profits 4-8pm [W] Trivia Night Game of Thrones Seasons 5-8 6-8pm [W] Brian Post and Friends Jazz Trio 7pm Free

DJ Goldylocks 7pm TBA

NORTH OF FOURTH 207 Third St., Eureka 798-6303 OLD STEEPLE 246 Berding St, Ferndale 786-7030 OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 PALM LOUNGE - EUREKA INN, 518 Seventh St., Eureka 497-6093

HUMBOLDT

Live Music Fridays 6pm Free

Open Mic with Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free Indigo - The Color of Jazz 7-11pm Free

BAY BISTRO

Oaxaca

Friday Night Improv Show 7pm Free

Open Bluegrass & Folk Jam 6-8pm Free

Riders in the Sky (country, comedy) 7:30pm $45 Hillbilly Gospel Jam 2-4pm Free

[M] Improv Show 6pm Free

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Always Authentic, 7 days a week! Big Shrimp Appetizer 47.99 (feeds

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26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

1-Medium 1-Topping Pizza ONLY $5.99 * BRING IN THIS AD *

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Chris Parriera and Friends celebrate Bob Dylan’s birthday at Mad River Brewing Co. on Friday, May 24 at 5 p.m. Photo by Mark Larson

PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka 444-3344 SAVAGE HENRY COMEDY CLUB 415 Fifth St., Eureka 845-8864

VENUE

THUR 5/23

FRI 5/24

SAT 5/25 Michael Dayvid 6pm DJ Statik (Hip-hop, trap) 10pm Free

Laidback Lounge 6pm Free Just Joshin’ 9pm $5

DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, dance remixes, trap) 10pm Free The Jim Lahman Band (rock, blues, jazz) 8pm Free Drew Harmon 9pm $10

THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

Vinyl Tap 7pm Free

Signals Presents: Goth Night (industrial, goth, EBM ) 8pm

Radio Clash (DJs) 9pm $3

Humboldt Jazz Collective 8:30pm Free

Paula Jones Band 9pm Free

Absynth Quartet (strings) 9:30pm $5 Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free

Soul Hum (DJ music funk, soul) 10pm

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 Upstate Thursdays w/DJs G. 744 Redway Dr., Garberville Davis, Just One 9pm Free VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950 VISTA DEL MAR 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka

SUN 5/26

Brad Barton Reality Thief (magic) 7:30pm Pete Nelson’s 30 9pm $5

Two Mic Sundays 9pm Free

M-T-W 5/27-5/29 [T] Phat Tuesdays 7:30pm Free [W] Jazz with Bill Allison & Friends 7pm Free [M] Monday Night Pod 7-11pm Free [T] Trivia Tuesdays 9pm $5 [T] Only A Visitor, Mister Moonbeam (eclectic pop) 9pm TBA [W] Dawn Ray’d w/Dead to a Dying World, Exulansis, Unholy Orifice 8pm TBA [T] Opera Alley Cats 7:30pm Free [W] Buddy Reed and the Rip it Ups (blues) 7:30pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in [M] Adamas (ballads, jazz) 6pm Free [T] Blues Tuesdays 7pm Free [W] Karaoke 9pm Free

The

Sea Grill CRAFT COCKTAILS SPRING IS HERE WILD CAUGHT ALASKAN HALIBUT 316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187 D I N N E R : M O N D AY- S A T U R D AY 5 - 9 pm

HAPPY HOUR 4-6

W W W. S E A G R I L L E U R E K A . C O M

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


Calendar May 23 – 30, 2019

23 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

BOOKS A Novel Idea Book Group: The Fifth Season. 6-7:30 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. N.K. Jemisin’s first title in The Broken Earth Trilogy. Free. 822-5954.

COMEDY Submitted Submitted

On Friday, May 24 at 7 p.m., Northtown Books hosts author, comedian, musician and LGBTIQ activist Lynn Breedlove (free). The Lambda Literary Award-winning poet will read and sign his new collection of stories 45 Thought Crimes.

Nosferatu

The Invincible Czars return to the Eureka Theater to play along live with the 1920s classic horror films Phantom of the Opera and Nosferatu. Gather your gouls on Friday, May 24 for a thrilling double feature. Doors at 6:15 p.m. $20 double feature, $10 each movie.

The 24th annual Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse Ceremony takes place Sunday, May 26 from 2 to 3 p.m. This event honors those who have been lost or buried at sea, and whose names are engraved on the memorial plaque at the Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse. The afternoon begins with bagpipe music by Matthew Marshall, followed by the flag ceremony and Pledge of Allegiance led by McKinleyville Boy Scout Troop 99 and Girl Scouts from the Redwood Service Unit.

Just Joshin’. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Humboldt’s live not-so-late-night late night show with comedy, music and guests. Hosted by Josh Barnes. $5. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www.redwoodraks.com.

LECTURE On the Road to Climate Action. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Friends of the Dunes and the Northcoast Environmental Center co-host UC Irvine air pollution scientist Shahir Masri and educator Athina Simolaris. Basic climate science will be addressed, as will information about impacts and solutions. Free. roadforaction@gmail.com. www.shahirmasri.com/book.html.

THEATER 2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Featuring culminating works by the graduating MFA class. pay-what-you-can. www. dellarte.com. A Night On Broadway. 6:30-9 p.m. The Historic Eagle House, 139 Second St., Eureka. AllStar Theatre Arts presents A Night On Broadway featuring performances by Allstar teams and soloists. Dessert auction, raffle prizes and Sound of Music giveaways. $10, $8 advance. Return of the Pink Panther. 6-7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. It’s the pinkest of the panther plays, produced by the graduating class of Coastal Grove Charter School. $5 students/children; $10 adults. deidrepike@gmail.com. 825-8804. Photo by Mark McKenna

Courtesy of Dennis Mayo

Wheels Up

Old Macktown Road

Since 1969, locals have been building art that moves and putting it to the test on land, sea and sand. This year, the 50th annual Kinetic Grand Championship continues that tradition as teams face off in a three-day, human-powered, 42-mile race. This Memorial Day weekend, you’ll see steampunk sharks, metal dragons, souped-up cycles, mega-monsters and more on the move. It all starts on Saturday, May 25 on the Arcata Plaza at 9 a.m. After a few circles around the square and initial assessment by Kinetic judges, the racers take off for some dune buggy-ing and the highly-anticipated Deadman’s Drop in Samoa. Drink beer, dance and celebrate with the teams at the Day 1 Finish Line at Halvorsen Park at 1 p.m. Then rest up and get ready for action on Sunday, May 26. Day 2 begins with a splash at 9:32 a.m. in Humboldt Bay at the Samoa Bridge Boat Ramp, then stops at Eureka Natural Foods for a quick lunch break and keeps on rollin’ (uphill) to Table Bluff. Day 3 kicks off on Monday, May 27 at 10:01 am, as the teams cross the Eel River and put the pedal to the metal in order to cross the finish line at Ferndale’s Main Street, where “the best party in the universe” awaits participants and spectators, alike. For the Glory! — Cassie Curatolo

Back to back weekends of fun await you in McKinleyville. Peruse local history and community-built art at the free, limited-run McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum on Friday, May 24 from 5 to 8 p.m., Saturday, May 25, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, May 26, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Opening night includes a reception, live music, raffles and more. Then, giddy-up for Pony Express Days the following weekend. A chili cook-off warms up locals on Thursday, May 30 at 5:30 p.m. Then $5 gets you into the Pony Express Dance at Six Rivers Brewery on Friday, May 31 at 8 p.m. The next morning, fill up on vital fun fuel at Saturday’s pancake breakfast at Azalea Hall at 8 a.m. and mosey on down to watch the Pony Express Parade make its way through town. An all-day festival follows at noon, with live music, activities, food and craft vendors, horseshoe tournament, Coast Guard helicopters, fireman’s games and more at Pierson Park. Put on your cowboy pants Saturday, June 1 and Sunday, June 2 for competitive games on horseback at the Kjer Rodeo Grounds at 9 a.m. Yee haw, as they say. — Cassie Curatolo

28  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

EVENTS Written Off. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Communities Against Abuse of Prescription Drugs presents this screening of the documentary about the realities and dangers of opioid misuse. Free. www. arcatatheatre.com.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. Every other Thursday, 3-4:30 p.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. For ages 5 and up. Free. trihuml@ co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

MEETINGS Toastmasters. Fourth Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

ETC Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining


Center, 321 Community Park Way. New members welcome. Anyone with sewing or quilting experience or who wants to learn. Free. Open Mic Thursdays at Peace Cafe. 7-9 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Poets, troubadours, essayists, vocalists and speakers perform. Light refreshments. Donations accepted. www. gracegoodshepherd.org. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Travel Safety Presentation. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Fortuna Volunteer Fire Department, 320 South Fortuna Blvd. Whether you are traveling across the state or out of the country, before you travel this summer learn how to stay safe. Presented by the Fortuna, Eureka and Arcata Police Departments and the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office.

24 Friday ART

Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Drop-in volunteering every Friday to help the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@ scraphumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452. McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum. 5-8 p.m. McKinleyville Shopping Center, Central Avenue. A limited-run, community-built art and history museum. Opening night includes a reception, live music, raffles and more. Free. kelleybrookgarrett@gmail.com. 497-4376.

BOOKS Lynn Breedlove. 7-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Lambda Literary Award winning author and LGBTQ activitst reads and sign his new poetry book 45 Thought Crimes. free. info@northtownbooks.com. www.northtownbooks.com/event/lynn-breedlove-45thought-crimes.

COMEDY Drew Harmon. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. The Bay Area comedian headlines. Liz Stone and Andrew Orolfo open. David Eubanks hosts. $10. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www. savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864. Friday Night Improv Show. 7-9:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games with audience suggestions. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www. oldtowncoffeeeureka.com. 497-9039. On The Spot Improv Comedy. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. An improv comedy showcase with spontaneous scenes, hilarious games, snappy songs and stories all made up on the spot based on audience input. You say it, they play it. Ages 10+. $7. www. arcatatheatre.com.

DANCE Milonga!. 8-11 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Argentine Tango dance party. Socialize, dance, watch, listen to great music, have fun! $10, first time beginners free. www.redwoodraks.com. World Dance. 7:30-10 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor teaching and easy dances from 7:30-8:30pm. Request dancing 8:30-10:00pm. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal. net. www.stalbansarcata.org. 839-3665.

MOVIES Fourth Friday Flix: Invincible Czars Double Feature: Phantom of the Opera and Nosferatu. Eureka The-

ater, 612 F St. Watch the classic horror films with live musical accompaniment by The Invincible Czars. www. theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC Bob Dylan’s Birthday Bash. 5-8:30 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tap Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. The ninth annual tribute concert. Performances by Chris Parreira & Friends, The Hibbings, Sway Sisters and the Soft Opening, Jeff DeMark, Linda Faye Carson, Dylan in Translation, Matt Brody, Fred Huff and Don Marr. All ages. Free. chrisparreira@gmail.com. www. facebook.com/events/808857916180122/.

SPOKEN WORD

St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt. ca.us. 822-5954. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

25 Saturday ART

McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. McKinleyville Shopping Center, Central Avenue. See May 24 listing.

COMEDY Pete Nelson’s 30. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Savage Henry Comedy Club staple Peter Nelson headlines his first 30 minute set. Evan Vest, Ki Man Harder and Gavin Smiley open. Amaber Heidinger hosts. $5. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE The Redwood Youth Ballet presents The Paquita Grande Pas de Deux. 6 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Professional-level classical ballet Continued on next page »

Poetry Reading and Book Signing. 6-8 p.m. Bayside Books, 64 Sunny Brae Center, Sunny Brae. Local poet David Holper will be reading from his new book of poem, The Bridge. Copies available for purchase at signing at the event. Free. david-holper@redwoods.edu. 476-4370.

THEATER 2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 23 listing. Cabaret. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. American author Cliff Bradshaw discovers the seedy underbelly of 1931 Berlin with Sally Bowles, a British dancer at the Kit Kat Klub, amid the rise of Nazi party. Winner of 15 Tony awards. $16-$18. www.ncrt.net. Mamma Mia!. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. A musical about a mother, her daughter and three potential fathers, plus ABBA’s greatest hits. Appropriate for ages 14+. $18-$10. www.ferndalerep.org. Return of the Pink Panther. 6-7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. See May 23 listing.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Volunteer storytellers read to children ages 4 and under, sometimes with songs and puppets. Free. 725-3460. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@gmail.com. 845-0094. Zumba Kids and Kids Jr.. 6-7 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Every Friday night, instructor Vanessa Maloney. Open to kids ages 5 and up. $8, $5 prepay. ecooper@ervmgc.com. www.ervmgc.com. 725-3300.

FOOD Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local produce, pasture-raised meats, baked goods, plant starts, crafts and more. Live music and food vendors. S.T.A.R. Dinner and Silent Auction. 6 p.m. Mad River Community Hall, 591 Van Duzen Road. The feast includes roast pork, roast beef, fish, oysters, salads, bread, homemade desserts and more. With a silent auction and Dutch raffle for kids. Benefits the nonprofit. $18, $10 ages 12-16, $5 ages 6-11, free to kids under 5.

MEETINGS Enriching Lives Workshop. Noon-1:30 p.m. Enriching Lives, 325 Second St., Ste 202, Eureka. Learn about the 4-8 week process of becoming certified as a family home provider for individuals with developmental disabilities. Free. www.eventbrite.com/e/make-a-difference-workshop-learn-how-to-work-from-home-caring-for-others-tickets-61433908474. 268-8891.

ETC A Call to Yarns. 12-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

29


Home & Garden

Calendar Continued from previous page

with original choreography by Heather Sorter. $15. www. humboldtarts.org.

MOVIES Movies in the Park: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. 7 p.m. Sequoia Park, 3414 W St., Eureka. Music at 7 p.m. Feature film at dusk. Dress warmly, bring a blanket or chairs. Popcorn, candy and refreshments available by donation. Free.

MUSIC May Night By The Bay. 6-11 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. The Sand Fleas, The Port Orford Heads and more perform. Benefits Resonance Rising, a music education program for incarcerated and at-risk youth. There will be a silent auction, beverages and hors d’oeuvre. Donation. resonancerising777@gmail.com. www. facebook.com/resonancerising/. 845-2329. McKinleyville Community Choir Sprint Concert. 3 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. The choir performs in the first of three spring concerts. Free. 831-410-3247.

SPOKEN WORD David Holper book signing. 12-3 p.m. Chapman’s Bookery and More, 471 Main St., Ferndale. Local poet David Holper will be signing copies of his new book of poetry, The Bridge. Hard back and paperbacks available. Free. www.chapmansbookery.com. 607-3051.

THEATER 2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 23 listing. Cabaret. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 24 listing. Mamma Mia!. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 24 listing.

EVENTS Flow 2019. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The 13th annual culminating fashion showcase for the Arcata Arts Institute, featuring students’ original pieces. $30, $20 students/seniors. www.arcatatheatre.com. Kinetic Grand Championship. Countywide, The annual 42-mile, human-powered, all-terrain, art-vehicle race for glory. Free. www.kineticgrandchampionship.com. Memorial Weekend Open House Wine Tasting. 1-5 p.m. Briceland Vineyards, 5959 Briceland Road, Redway. Celebrating vintage 33. Tastes include Humboldt pinot noirs, reds and 2018 whites. Also served are pate, local cheese and oysters plus vegan and gluten free options. andrew@bricelandvineyards.com. www.bricelandvineyards.com. 923-2429. Yard and Plant Sale: Humboldt Mediation Services Annual Fundraiser. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sixth and J streets, Sixth and J streets, Arcata. Home goods, furniture, cookware, crafting, books, art, movies, jewelry, crystals and plants of all kinds. Free. humboldtmediation@reninet. com. www.humboldtmediationservices.org. 445-2505.

FOR KIDS Story Time with Kathy Frye. Fourth Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 764-3333. Storytime. 11:30 a.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Stories for children and their parents. Free. Storytime and Crafts. 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Followed by crafts at noon. Now with a Spanish and English story every first and third Saturday. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. 668-4207.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers’ Market Open Today Just off the Plaza. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Farmers’ Market (off the

30  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

plaza), Eighth and I streets. Find the market on “9th” and “I” Streets today and find Kinetics on the Plaza. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www. northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

GARDEN Birds & Bees Educational Series - Creating Water Features. 10 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, North Entrance, Eureka. “The Waterfall Guy” Ben Goulart discusses creating custom water features for your home, focusing on the benefits, including biological filtration, water reclamation and more. General admission, free for members. hbgf@hbgf.org. www. waterfallguy.com. 499-3133.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Elliott Dabill at the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute walk focusing on the plants, history and/or ecology of the Marsh. Loaner binoculars available with photo ID. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Interpretive Seal Pup Tour w/ Northcoast Marine Mammal Center. 9 a.m.-noon. Kayak Trinidad, 385 Stumptown Road. Explore Trinidad Bay by kayak and welcome new harbor seal pups. With guest experts from the Northcoast Marine Mammal Center. All ages and abilities welcome. $99. Reservations@kayaktrinidad. com. www.kayaktrinidad.com. 329-0085. Spring Plants in the King Range. 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sanctuary Forest Office, 315 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. Learn about our native plants and how to identify them and explore riparian and forest habitats at the Nadelos Campground with Cheryl Lisin of the Lost Coast Interpretive Association. Easy to moderate hike. Bring a snack and drinking water and dress in layers. Waterproof footwear is a plus. Meet at Sanctuary Forest at 10 a.m. to carpool. Free. anna@sanctuaryforest.org. sanctuaryforest.org/event/spring-plants-in-the-kingrange/. 986-1087. Wigi Wetlands Restoration and Clean Up. 9-11 a.m. Wigi Wetlands, Behind the Bayshore Mall, Eureka. Help remove invasive plants along a stretch of the Bay Trail and create habitat for native plants and the birds that need them. Trash pick up is also part of the work. Refreshments and tools provided. Free. jeremy.cashen@ yahoo.com. rras.org. 672-3346.

ETC Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

26 Sunday ART

McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. McKinleyville Shopping Center, Central Avenue. See May 24 listing. Trinidad Artisans Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saunder’s Plaza, 353 Main St., Trinidad. Next to Murphy’s Market. Featuring local art and crafts, live music and barbecue. Free admission.


COMEDY

arcatatheatre.com.

Two Mic Sundays. 5 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. At Northtown Coffee at 5 p.m. and Savage Henry Comedy Club at 9 p.m. Free. editor@ savagahenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine. com. 845-8864.

ETC

MOVIES Dumplin’. 6-9 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. A fundraiser and raffle benefiting The Raven Project for supplies needed for local youth. Doors at 6 p.m., movie starts at 7 p.m. $5 (suggested donation), $1 raffle tickets. www.facebook.com/ravenproject/. 443-7099.

MUSIC Bayside Community Hall Music Project. 6-8 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Bandemonium, community activist street band, from 6-8 p.m. Bring wind instruments and drums. Free. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/ Bayside. 499-8516. Classical Piano/Vocal Recital. 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Presented by Felicia Oldfather and William Frazee. The musical selections include works by Barber, Handel, Mendelssohn and Schubert, as well as various folk songs. Free. www. humboldtarts.org. 822-3260. Riders in the Sky. 7:30 p.m. The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. Comedy and western. $45.

THEATER 2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 23 listing. Cabaret. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 24 listing. Mamma Mia!. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 24 listing.

EVENTS Kinetic Grand Championship. Countywide, See May 25 listing. Memorial Weekend Open House Wine Tasting. 1-5 p.m. Briceland Vineyards, 5959 Briceland Road, Redway. See May 25 listing. Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse Ceremony. 2-3 p.m. Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse, Trinity Street. The 24th annual ceremony honors those who have been lost or buried at sea, and whose names are engraved on the memorial plaques. The event begins with bagpipe music by Matthew Marshall, followed by the flag ceremony and Pledge of Allegiance led by McKinleyville Boy Scout Troop 99 and Girl Scouts from the Redwood Service Unit. Free. lynda@trinidadbayvacationrentals.com. www.facebook.com/trinidadcivicclub.org. 845-1144.

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Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

27 Monday

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Improv Show. 6-7:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games. Audience suggestions taken for scenes, plays, films, songs and more. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www.oldtowncoffeeeureka.com. 497-9039. Monday Night Pod. 7-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Live recordings of podcasts on the Savage Henry Podcast Network. Usually two recordings 7 and 9 p.m. Free. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

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DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Paso a Paso host dance therapy. Free. jorge.matias@stjoe.org. 441-4477.

MUSIC Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. In the EHS band room located in the rear with parking at Del Norte and J streets. Free. SrJoePapa@gmail.com. 834-0909. Join the Scotia Band. 7:30-9 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Woodwind, brass and percussion musicians (intermediate level and above) of all ages are invited. The band rehearses Monday evenings in the Fortuna High Band Room and performs publicly throughout the year. Free. thescotiaband@yahoo.com. www.scotiaband2.org. 599-4872. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. All voices welcome, with a particular call for male voices. Opportunities for solos and ensemble groups. $50 registration fee w/scholarships available. 839-2276.

EVENTS Kinetic Grand Championship. Countywide, See May 25 listing. Continued on next page »

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. For ages 4 and up. Free w/museum admission. www.discovery-museum.org. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See May 24 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

SPORTS NBA Playoffs - Western Conference Finals: Game 7. 5 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. For more details and updates as they come, visit www.arcatatheater. com. Free w/$5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

31


Filmland

Calendar Continued from previous page

HOLIDAY EVENTS Memorial Day Observance. 11:30 a.m. Myrtle Grove Memorial Cemetery, 900 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka. More than 200 veterans will be honored in a brief program featuring the presentation of colors and the laying of a memorial wreath by the Redwood Veterans Honor Guard. Free. myrtlegroveeureka@gmail.com. Memorial Day Parade & Remembrance. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Ferndale Main Street, Ferndale. Ferndale veterans and other organizations march from the Veterans Memorial Building down Main Street to Ferndale Cemetery for a memorial service. Refreshments at the Vets building follow. info@visitferndale.com.

MEETINGS Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

28 Tuesday COMEDY

Trivia Tuesdays. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Teams of three. Three rounds. Real prizes. $5 team entry fee. editor@savagehenrymagazine. com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Live music. All ages. $5. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

FOR KIDS Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460.

FOOD Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. sohumfm@yahoo.com. 943-3025. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers and premium plant starts.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbers. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Humboldt Cribbage Club plays weekly. Seven games in summer and nine games during the season. $8. grasshopper60@aol.com. 444-3161. Northcoast Networkers. 12-1:30 p.m. Village Pantry, Eureka, 1912 Broadway. Connect with other business leaders in Humboldt County and find out why they joined. No-host lunch. Free. Andrea@AppImprints. com. 616-3442. Talk with a Queer Business Owner. 5:30-7:30 p.m. The RAVEN Project, 523 T St., Eureka. Queer Coffee House Presents: A Queer Business Owner Talk. Come and meet Sprout, co-owner of the bicycle shop Moon Cycles in Arcata. Ages 10-21 only. Free. Westhaven/Trinidad Community Meeting. 6:30-8 p.m. Westhaven Fire Hall, 446 Sixth Ave., Trinidad. Discuss the zoning changes, review mapping in your community, and help the Board of Supervisors align the County’s General Plan with the community’s needs and interests Purpose of the Meeting. Free. 268-3781.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Slower Speed Plant Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Friends of the Arcata Marsh (FOAM) guides John DeMartini and

Mary Ann Madej lead a special tour that will take a look at what’s beginning to bloom at the Marsh. Tour meets at the first parking lot on South I Street in from Samoa Boulevard. Please RSVP. Free. (707) 826-2359.

ETC American Red Cross Volunteer Information Session. 11 a.m.-noon. Red Cross Building, 3101 Concorde Drive, Ste. H, McKinleyville. Volunteers are needed in: disaster response, community education, logistics, training, client casework and more. There are opportunities for groups and individuals of all ages. Free. VolunteerHumDel@ redcross.org. www.redcross.org/volunteer. 832-5480. Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See May 23 listing. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See May 26 listing.

29 Wednesday BOOKS

RIY (Read It Yourself) Book Club. Last Wednesday of every month, 7-8 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. No assigned books, just bring your favorites to share or get reading ideas from neighbors. Refreshments served. Free. 725-3460.

Heads Up … The Godwit Days Board is asking the public to help decide the design of its 25th anniversary kid’s T-shirt. Stop by the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center and vote between May 12 and June 16, Tuesdays through Sundays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Mondays 1 to 5 p.m. The Bureau of Fantastical Spectacles and Arcata Main Street are seeking vendors, performers and nonprofits for the June 30 Fairy Festival on the Arcata Plaza. For more information, visit www.arcatafairyfestival.com or phone 822-4500. Arcata Main Street is seeking vendors and nonprofits for Oyster Festival. For more information, visit www. arcatamainstreet.com or call 822-4500. The Summer Arts and Music Festival in Benbow is now accepting vendor/music applications. Vendors, go to www.mateel.org/vendors and select Summer Arts & Music Festival. Bands and performing artists submit EPK materials for consideration to bands@mateel.org or complete the application at www.mateel.org/june1-2nd-summer-arts-music-festival. Faben Artist Fund now accepting applications. Grant guidelines are posted at www.humboldtarts.org. Email Jemima@humboldtarts.org or 442-0278, ext. 205. The Redwood Art Association is looking for artists to compete in the first Humboldt Open Paint Out. This event is open to all artists and mediums and will be held Oct. 7-11. Find more information and register at www.redwoodart.us. Email any inquiries to humboldtopenpaintout@gmail.com. l

32  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Man of the Hour

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 - PARABELLUM. As we struggle for footing on the shifting sands of national leadership in constant cartoon crisis, a broader geopolitical landscape tilting toward global conflict and socioeconomic dissolution, and increasingly centralized popular entertainment defined by literal and figurative monsters, there is hope in John Wick. Everything else can continue to get bigger and worse, and continue to circle the drain, but if Keanu Reeves can stalk the night in exquisitely tailored suits, killing everything by whatever (and always more inventive) means necessary, there will be a source of catharsis, of solace. Once again: This is not for everyone. Any reader who has wandered this far down the path will likely understand the disclaimer applies to nearly all of my opinions. I will admit that part of my revelry in the ongoing success of the John Wick saga — yeah, I called it a saga — is petty and a little self-congratulatory. Parabellum is the first movie to finally unseat Avengers from its throne atop the box office. That it had already made a trillion dollars or however much is of little consequence; in this war we’re counting pyrrhic victories, including the near simultaneous end of Game of Thrones, which has apparently left the lives of everyone around without a focal point. As I’ve had no interest in that particular time-suck since the beginning, I can’t say I’ll miss it. But its absence soothes me. So that’s the petty part. Now, I understand that a generation of consumers have grown up on both the MCU and GoT, and more power to them. And I’ll acknowledge that I seem to be aging almost exponentially, at least in my opinions of culture at large, raging from my rocker on the front porch at the death of cinema and such. But the vast popularity of these things speaks more to the FOMO phenomenon than it does to the quality of the work, though I admit that is significant. Just as our stupid smartphones ostensibly connect us while actually making us lonelier than ever, so these vast, strictly commercial enterprises displace imagination and ingenuity in the popular entertainment marketplace. They give everybody something to talk about because nobody has anything to talk about.

The easy counterargument, of course, is that John Wick has also become a cultural phenomenon. “It’s No. 1 at the box office so get off your high horse!” I will; I shouldn’t have been up there in the first place. But there are a few vital differences: Looking back five years, I don’t think people particularly expected John Wick (2014) to gain the traction it did. It was released relatively quietly, with Reeves’ name-recognition as its only real marketing leverage. And, if we’re being honest, the man has been in as many bad movies as good. Don’t mishear, I still love him. Just saying. The front cover blurb on my physical copy of the movie is from something called Joblo’s Movie Emporium — not exactly a resounding endorsement. The first movie gathered momentum, though, because it is an exquisitely crafted and unrelentingly entertaining thing. The audience at-large may not recognize the pain and experience and volume of work required to execute so many incredible stunt sequences with so little trickery, but thanks to Reeves, director Chad Stahelski and writer Derek Kolstad, all of that incredible work plays beautifully onscreen as integral to an ever-expanding storyline. As that narrative, and its encompassing universe along with it, has continued to enlarge, so too have the stunts. Chapter Two took the action back to the Old World, introduced the High Table and played up the ancient ritual binding these assassins all together. And that it brought that aesthetic back to New York, crushed it between the unseen world of the King’s (Laurence Fishburne) Bowery and the ultra-modernity of nighttime Manhattan blew minds. Parabellum continues that trajectory: farther, bigger, more and maybe even better. For the uninitiated (as if any would have gotten this far), Chapter Two left our hero with one hour to put his affairs in order before he would be deemed excommunicado with a global $14 million bounty placed on his head. And so Parabellum opens with the clock ticking on that hour. John needs to get a nasty stab wound attended to, see to the care and feeding of his dog, and hopefully get out of New York alive. Which, of course, means he will need to meet with the Director (Anjelica Huston), rebuild an Old West six-shooter,


NCJ

Trying to dress nice in Humboldt. John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

win a(nother) knife/hatchet fight with a couple of villains and, oh yeah, outrun assassins on Ducatis with a carriage horse. That’s basically just the opening salvo. Provided he survives all of that, John might have to meet up with Sofia (Halle Berry) in Casablanca in an attempt to climb the ladder to the head of the High Table. The two of them might have to fight their way out of a Moroccan stronghold, aided by her Malinois attack dogs. I wouldn’t say one way or the other, but it might be the greatest action sequence ever assembled. And I haven’t even mentioned the ninja. Parabellum advances both the world-creation/story-construction and the standard for action commensurately with the series to date. Which is to say it outdoes itself at every turn and is giddily satisfying, all for a budget one-sixth that of Endgame. PS: The Chapter Four release date has already been announced. R. 130M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. — John J. Bennett See showtimes at www. northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards› Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

ALADDIN. Live-action Disney remake with (hopefully) less racism and a hotter Jafar than the original. Starring blue Will Smith, Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott and Marwan Kenzari. PG. 128M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK MINOR. BOOKSMART. Olivia Wilde’s comedy about a pair of high school overachievers (Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein) trying to make up for four years of not partying. R. 102M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. BRIGHTBURN. Sometimes you find a crash-landed alien baby and instead of growing up to be Superman he makes a hard turn to the dark side. Starring

Elizabeth Banks and Jackson Dunn. R. 91M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. GREASE (1978). Checking my phone if Rizzo’s not in the scene. PG13. 110M. BROADWAY.

Continuing

AMAZING GRACE. A documentary with footage of Aretha Franklin singing with a choir in Watts in 1972. G. 89M. MINOR. ASK DR. RUTH. Documentary about the 90-year-old sex therapist, Holocaust survivor and petite suit icon. NR. 100M. MINOR. AVENGERS: ENDGAME. Joe and Anthony Russo’s vast, multi-faceted, three-hour finale is a project management master-class with tragedy, triumph and leavening comedy. Compelling performances are hampered by the requisite climactic battle and antiseptic aesthetic. PG13. 181M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK . A DOG’S JOURNEY. Oh, so now reincarnated pets are a good thing? Starring Josh Gad, Dennis Quaid and Kathryn Prescott. PG. 108M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. HAIL SATAN? Documentary on the Satanic Temple, religious freedom, the separation of church and state, and serving looks in black leather. R. 95M. MINIPLEX. THE HUSTLE. A weak, unfunny script and poor pacing in this gender-swapped remake of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels wastes its leads (Rebel Wilson and Anne Hathaway) and only reinforces outdated gender norms it could be skewering. PG13. 94M. BROADWAY. POKÉMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU. Ryan Reynolds voices the cuddly CGI creature, thus precluding a Deadpool crossover. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. THE SUN IS ALSO A STAR. Romance about a young woman (Yara Shahidi) who’s about to be deported with her family when she meets a charming stranger (Charles Melton) on the street in New York. PG13. 100M. BROADWAY. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill l

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

33


INTRODUCING

Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

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POTTERY AND GLASS CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: Summer Session June 24 − August 31. Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826− 1445. Sign up starts May 20 (A−0606) WOOD FIRED CERAMICS Jun 4 − Jul 9. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (A−0523)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BALLET CLASSES WITH NANCY CALL: May/June Teens, Adults at Trillium Dance Studios, Arcata n− call@sbcglobal.net 707−442−8665 (D−0613)

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In-Depth Reporting. Convenient access to ticket sales data 24/7 Easily export your customer database anytime Cloud based system offers real-time access to sales information Our platform is free to event creators. Work with the team you trust, who cares about your business or organization and the success of the Humboldt county area. Contact Melissa Sanderson at 707-498-8370 or melissa@northcoastjournal.com

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA Learn a Brazilian martial art which is a rich combination of dance, acro− batics, self−defense, and music! Monday/ Wednesday − Kids 4:30−5:30, Adults 4:30−6:30 Summer Special!!! 8 Classes for $20 at Redwood Raks World Dance Studio in Arcata, 824 L Street humboldtcapoeira.org REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (D−0425) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m. −8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0502)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0502)

Kids & Teens POTTERY AND GLASS CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: Summer Session June 24 − August 31. Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826− 1445. Sign up starts May 20 (K−0606)

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0530)

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

POTTERY AND GLASS CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: Summer Session June 24 − August 31. Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826− 1445. Sign up starts May 20 (O−0606)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442− 4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0425) HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP. We are here to change lives with our love. Services at 9am and 11am on Sunday. Child care is provided at 9am. 24 Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0228) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−0530)

FREE GED/HISET PREPARATION Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Educa− tion at 70−7476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) GED TESTING Earn your GED. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information or to schedule your appointment at (707) 476−4500. (V−0523) LEADERSHIP WORKSHOPS Jun 7 − Jun 28. Attend all four workshops for a reduced rate! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (W−0523) LOAN DOCUMENT SIGNING Jun 25. One day training! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0523) NOTARY Jun 24. One day training! Call CR Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0523) OFFICE SPECIALIST May 28 − June 10. Call Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0523) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start anytime! Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0523) TRUCK DRIVING INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS Attend one on May 28, 30 or Jun 4. Call CR Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0523)

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Wellness & Bodywork

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0530)

AYURVEDA AWESOMENESS! WITH TRACI WEBB. AYURVEDA PULSE IMMERSION: Aug. 16−18. Learn the most powerfu ayurvedic tool to heal yourself & discover your client’s deeper bodily & emotional needs, $299 by 8/1 ($375 after). AROMATHERAPY TRAINING IMMERSIONS & ESSENTIAL OIL DISTIL− LATION start your aromatic career & lifestyle, heal yourself & others, create your own aromatic prod− ucts, lots of take−homes! Sept. 7−8, 14−15 & 21−22. Topics Vary. Take 1, 2, or all 3 weekends for certifi− cate. AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & FALL DETOX (’Ultimate Rejuvenation Therapies’ Module): Oct. 9−13. Bring on the Bliss! Deadline: 9/ 30. REGISTER: www.ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601− 9025 (W−0815)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−0530) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0425)

Vocational COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICES June 4 − Aug 13. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0523) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707− 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE BEGINNING LITERACY CLASS Call College of The Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620)

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 18 − Nov 6, 2019, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2020. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0829) UPCOMING MASSAGE CLASSES AT LOVING HANDS INSTITUTE OF HEALING ARTS Acupres− sure: June 2−July 2 Mon−Thurs 10am−2pm 72 contact hours $940 Reflexology June 27−29 Thurs & Fri 5:30−9:30pm and Sat 9:30−6pm 16 contact hours $250 call 725−9627 and ask for Hilary to sign− up! (W−0620)


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Bald Faced Fliers and Beetle Mania By Anthony Westkamper humbug@northcoastjournal.com

The bald faced truth I decided to devote this week’s contribution to a single unpopular species. Known for its large size, aggressive behavior and powerful sting, the bald faced hornet (Dolichovespula maculata) is liked by few people. They’re neither completely bald faced nor technically hornets. Their white faces are sparsely covered with setae (hairs) and they are, in fact, the largest member of the yellow jacket clade of wasps. When I spotted one building a slender, gray stalactite from the ridge of my greenhouse, I knew it was preparing to build a nest. Instead of reaching for the wasp killer, I reached for a camera. I really wanted to find where she was gnawing the wood she ground into a pulp to build her nest. I was going to stain some paper with food coloring and try to get her to build a multi colored hive. Sadly, I never found the source of her building materials. Over the next few days I visited often. Whenever I got too close, she let me know by facing me, putting her wings back in a “V” shape and vibrating them loudly. To quote an immigrant friend, “I love this country, even the snakes warn you.” Not only does she sport black and (well almost) yellow aposematic coloration (conspicuous coloration or markings of an animal serving to warn off predators), but also what I’ve termed “aposematic sonification.” Like a rattlesnake, she makes warning sounds. They do have their good points. First and foremost, as good mothers, they are voracious hunters of other insects, including yellow jackets, which they chew up and feed to their young. A hornet or paper wasp nest near your garden can provide both a lot of pest protection and pollination services, as the adult workers

feed largely on nectar. She laid eggs in the first four cells she had built and then one day never returned. I suspect a bird probably got her. The eggs will never hatch and the nest will forever be unfinished. If one starts to build her nest nearby and you spot it before the first generation of workers hatches, watch for her to leave to gather wood or feed herself, and knock it down. Then leave for a while. Most likely she will get the message and move on.

Beetles in the spring While beetles were my first love when I started studying insects and are believed to have the greatest number of species of any of the insect orders, I find I seldom write about them. Two years ago I wrote about the night stalking tiger beetle (Omus californicus), a nocturnal terror with a Darth Vader demeanor (“Darth Omus,” May 4, 2017). That was the first one I’d ever seen, and I was impressed by its ferocious face. This year I’ve seen several, both at night and in the daytime. Like their cousins within the family Carabidae, they possess huge mandibles to subdue prey and with which the males hold onto their mates. Unlike genus Omus, which are completely black, the locally common western tiger beetle (Cicindela oregona) comes in various hues, from a conservative faun gray to iridescent blue green. On close inspection even the somber hued ones have metallic undertones. You can find these on the sandy spaces along our local river bars. At about half an inch long, they run rapidly ahead of you and take wing, flying a short distance to get out of your way. ● Read more of Anthony Westkamper’s HumBug on Sundays at www.northcoastjournal.com.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Legal Notices NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY AND IMPENDING DEFAULT Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3351, 3352 I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, State of California, certify as follows: That at close of business on June 30, 2019 by operation of law, any real property (unless previously tax-defaulted and not redeemed) that have any delinquent taxes, assessments, or other charges levied for the fiscal year 2018-19, and/or any delinquent supplemental taxes levied prior to the fiscal year 2018-19 shall be declared tax-defaulted. That unless the tax defaulted property is completely redeemed through payment of all unpaid amounts, together with penalties and fees prescribed by law or an installment plan is initiated and maintained; the property may be sold subsequently at a tax sale to satisfy the tax lien. That a detailed list of all properties remaining tax-defaulted at the close of business on June 30, 2019, and not redeemed prior to being submitted for publication, shall be published on or before September 8, 2019 That information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption of tax-defaulted property will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector at 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, California 95501 (707)476-2450. I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2010, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2009-2010: ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 021-121-002-000 109-292-057-000 503-211-032-000 503-211-034-000 507-271-023-000 507-282-004-000 507-283-009-000 512-151-077-000 513-141-001-000 506-171-001-000

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 13th, 2019. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 16th, May 23rd, & May 30th, 2019.

NOTICE OF IMPENDING POWER TO SELL TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3361, 3362 Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code 3691 and 3692.4, the following conditions will, by operation of law, subject real property to the Tax Collector’s power to sell. 1) All property for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for five or more years. Note: The power to sell schedule for nonresidential commercial property is three or more years of tax-defaulted status, unless the county adopts, by ordinance or resolution, the five-year tax default schedule. 2) All property that has a nuisance abatement lien recorded against it and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. 3) Any property that has been identified and requested for purchase by a city, county, city and county or nonprofit organization to serve the public benefit by providing housing or services directly related to low-income persons and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. The parcels listed herein meet one or more of the criteria listed above and thus, will become subject to the Tax Collector’s power to sell on July 1, 2019, at 12:01 a.m., by operation of law. The Tax Collector’s power to sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed or made subject to an installment plan of redemption initiated as provided by law prior to close of business on the last business day in June. The right to an installment plan terminates on the last business day in June, and after that date the entire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale of the property at public auction. The right of redemption survives the property becoming subject to the power to sell, but it terminates at close of business on the last business day prior to the date of the sale by the Tax Collector. All information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501, (707)476-2450. The amount to redeem, including all penalties and fees, as of June 2019, is shown opposite the assessment/parcel number and next to the name of the assessee.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION

The Assessor’s Parcel/Assessment Number (APN/ASMT), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the Assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The Assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s office.

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L Christie John F No Situs, Arcata Bastian Bradley S 141 Eel Ct, Shelter Cove Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L Christie John F No Situs, Arcata Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L Christie John F No Situs, Arcata Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L No Situs, Arcata Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L No Situs Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L 6226 Wymore Rd, Arcata Christie John F & Betty L Tr 75 Anker Rd, Fieldbrook Daly Richard, Christie Family Trust Estate of John F Christie 725 Crannell Rd, Trinidad Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L 295 Jackson Ranch Rd, Arcata

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $439.49 $1,195.82 $11,931.79 $317.43 $4,299.42 $1,081.25 $8,379.18 $4,709.76 $6,263.08 $35,816.40

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2011, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2010-2011: ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 004-012-004-000 200-264-001-000 220-191-029-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Fulton Gary O 924 Pine St, Eureka Rose Virginia K 203 Hansen Dr, Fortuna Whitmire Chad B & Jessica Berry Laura L 12600 Briceland-Thorn Rd, Whitethorn

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $1,459.31 $5,923.27 $11,976.69

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2012, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2011-2012: ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 011-183-003-000 109-341-010-000 218-021-008-000 313-203-021-000 313-241-014-000 505-182-002-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Tripp Robert W 3004 M St, Eureka Retherford T L & Z L 7077 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Maher Thomas J 574 Road C Rd, Garberville Goodman Robert H Jr & Brenna K D Goodman Robert H & Brenna K 7184 Fickle Hill Rd, Arcata Goodman Robert H Jr & Brenna K D No Situs, Arcata Santos Harla L & Mark D 1985 Zehndner Ave, Arcata

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $11,220.47

007-112-001-000 012-103-015-000 018-341-003-000 021-144-002-000 053-151-019-000 100-212-026-000 110-251-007-000 110-251-009-000

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Thompson Ray & Darline Annis Jean, Bannister Coleman R Linden Amy, Millis Jack B & Tom/ Thompson Ethel 1134 3rd St, Eureka Kirkpatrick Edward L No Situs, Eureka Kirk Eric V & Kirk-Levine Jana L 3551 N St, Eureka Thompson Raymond F & Darline M 1154 Vista Dr, Eureka Good Wine LLC 937 10th St, Arcata Smither Alvin D & Michelle A 353 1st Ave, Rio Dell Walworth Parker 1483 Rose Ave, Ferndale De-Martin Laura M 1602 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove De-Martin Laura M 1574 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove

ASSESSEE’S NAME & AMT TO REDEEM PROPERTY ADDRESS BY JUNE 2019 De-Martin Laura M $1,982.96 8642 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove 111-063-032-000 Fagundes Anthony E & Laura S $7,206.44 Tarrant Russell V & Sharon K D 426 Parkview Rd, Shelter Cove 210-162-005-000 Parvanov Vincent $6,296.13 No Situs, 220-301-006-000 Dillon Vicky $2,902.79 3510 Elk Ridge Rd, Redway 303-091-098-000 Hunt Jamie S $16,367.72 No Situs, Eureka 303-151-002-000 Forster-Gill Inc Cr $39,185.93 No Situs, Eureka 303-151-003-000 Forster-Gill Inc Cr $19,697.86 No Situs, Eureka 303-151-004-000 Forster-Gill Inc Cr $19,697.86 No Situs, Eureka 303-191-048-000 Forster Gill Inc Cr $14,392.65 No Situs, Eureka 306-026-011-000 Banfill Shawlyn E & $10,886.48 Flannery Richard A 420 Railroad Ave, Fields Landing 314-152-002-000 Fulton Betty Joe $35,972.23 Fulton Betty Joe 2017 Rev Family Trust 10641 Kneeland Rd, Kneeland 316-233-014-000 Ochoa Aaron G $12,086.53 No Situs 511-390-009-000 Harmon Roger $9,526.37 4217 Douglas Ave, McKinleyville 526-101-015-000 Andreoli Andrew L & Tamara L $4,602.33 No Situs, Hoopa PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2014, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2013-2014:

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 004-014-003-000 004-056-013-000 005-012-001-000 008-181-003-000

$2,240.83

009-252-006-000

$6,543.92

011-202-008-000

$13,768.03

015-131-016-000 017-012-017-000

$2,327.37 $1,752.01

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2013, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2012-2013: ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 001-173-003-000

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 111-031-012-000

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $5,033.71

018-332-007-000 025-161-008-000 033-031-019-000 033-051-018-000 052-011-002-000 053-152-009-000

$3,452.45

053-161-010-000

$9,105.07

053-161-019-000

$6,675.12

053-161-021-000

$47,772.85

077-141-022-000

$11,550.50

108-033-026-000

$7,997.38

109-041-001-000

$2,585.34

109-041-003-000

$2,585.34

109-042-004-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Manos Lawrence P 117 W Grant St, Eureka Smoker Sarah M, Marvin E Jr & Jason 615 W Del Norte St, Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J 805 H St, Eureka Olsen Norman S Jr & Joanne 3136 Oregon St, Eureka Jones Jessie M 3212 California St, Eureka Goff Janet L 1105 Hodgson St, Eureka Davis Robert E & Wendy K 1920 Hayden Ln, Eureka Scott John 3195 Montgomery St, Eureka Anderson Mark 4355 Ridgecrest Dr, Eureka Tellez Thomas A No Situs, Blue Lake Baassiri Giovanni O 60 Pepperwood Circle, Garberville Baassiri Giovanni O No Situs, Garberville Mcwhorter Kralicek Collyn L 510 Woodland Dr, Rio Dell Pollard Ralph D & Harriett F 216 1st Ave, Rio Dell Rio Dell Farmers Market LLC Co 108 Wildwood Ave, Rio Dell Rio Dell Farmers Market LLC Co No Situs, Rio Dell Rio Dell Farmers Market LLC Co 116 Wildwood Ave, Rio Dell Aquarian Rachael 143 Apple Ln, Redway Parker Leonard D 1120 Windy Ridge Ln, Ettersburg Dollarhide Kimberly 2344 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Dollarhide Kimberly 2320 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Silverado 10 Inc Cr 438 Beach Rd, Shelter Cove

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $13713.90 $2454.14 $201,816.42 $5262.35 $3893.13 $6060.55 $1401.93 $9837.61 $33,257.39 $22,562.29 $6,056.19 $3647.18 $7343.31 $2380.31 $1701.28 $492.91 $6943.48 $25,762.13 $25891.44 $3216.12 $ 3844.65 $4368.94


Continued on next page » ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 109-081-049-000 109-081-053-000 109-151-025-000 109-161-038-000 109-183-026-000 109-221-017-000 109-231-020-000 109-251-004-000 109-251-024-000 109-291-002-000 109-302-052-000 109-311-027-000 109-321-003-000 109-351-019-000 109-351-055-000 110-021-024-000 110-041-010-000 110-041-011-000 110-041-018-000 110-051-015-000 110-121-033-000 110-251-026-000 110-261-045-000 111-021-002-000 111-031-001-000 111-071-039-000 111-141-016-000 111-151-010-000 111-161-002-000 111-202-034-000 201-151-001-000 201-232-001-000 202-102-008-000 205-271-022-000 206-091-016-000 207-161-002-000 207-161-010-000 208-071-030-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Peter Richard 173 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove Auyong Victor C G 172 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove Caceros Gracelyn I 1303 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Hand Roger D & Cathy Marchant Judith & Atkinson Carol 51 Whale Point Ct, Shelter Cove Silverado 10 Inc Cr 735 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove Exley Jesse R 138 Horseshoe Ct, Shelter Cove Fontanez-Pilon Irene & Flores Darlene 151 Lindley Loop, Shelter Cove Carrillo Phillip D 221 Oak Dr, Shelter Cove Perkins Memi C 29 Thistle Ct, Shelter Cove Tan Sherwin 341 Humboldt Loop Rd, Shelter Cove Lepenske Trevor 56 Beach Rd, Shelter Cove Piazza Michael E & Alison K 38 Beaver Ct, Shelter Cove Perlman Harold & Robbin L 7901 Shelter Cove Ct, Shelter Cove Fisher Frank P & Lupe 701 Upper Pacific Dr, Shelter Cove McDaniel Darrell A 288 Dolphin Dr, Shelter Cove Chakos Chris & Berg Lisa 7523 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Taylor Justine 98 Warden Ct, Shelter Cove Taylor Justine 99 Warden Ct, Shelter Cove E L & Associates Inc 146 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Lum Stanley 2963 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Reid Arlin & Denise 567 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Lindauer Robert 1585 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Carrillo Phillip D 30 Forest Rd, Shelter Cove Heater Derrick L No Situs, Shelter Cove Perlman Harold & Robbin L 8484 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Lai Richard & Anthony 15 Salmon Ct, Shelter Cove Tine Richard J & Lisa A 50 Buckhorn Ct, Shelter Cove Puccio Dayami G 39 High Ct, Shelter Cove Green Aaron A & Nancy A 143 Landis Rd, Shelter Cove Colette Otto 176 Fawn Dr, Shelter Cove Khatua Chidananda No Situs, Shelter Cove Cruz Casey J & Desirae H 2606 Old State Hwy, Alton Macy Ty K & Mary M No Situs, Fortuna Combs Stephen K 31835 Ave Of the Giants, Scotia Lange Brenda J 190 Wilder Rd, Carlotta Agnew Ivan L & Beryl H Talsma Charles j & Blanche C No Situs, Carlotta Agnew Ivan L & Beryl H Talsma Charles J & Blanche C No Situs, Carlotta Johnson Dennis L 46255 St Hwy 36, Dinsmore

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $2452.70 $1121.60 $2298.61 $5000.13 $4368.94 $3,003.39 $2403.29 $1456.32 $2863.25

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 209-241-001-000 209-241-002-000 211-276-005-000 212-041-001-000 212-192-001-000 214-201-033-000 214-211-003-000 214-211-006-000 216-023-011-000

$2499.70

216-322-003-000

$1597.05

216-382-028-000

$2848.46

216-391-008-000

$2342.94 $3848.53 $25274.09 $3170.08

217-163-001-000 217-241-006-000 218-051-003-000 218-091-001-000

$9540.34 $3544.15

216-382-060-000

$2121.64

220-261-074-000

$2522.65

223-043-002-000

$1685.84

300-093-014-000

$2646.87

301-061-028-000

$2515.73

303-071-029-000

$2558.28

306-381-051-000

$2328.38

306-381-054-000

$4016.83

306-381-060-000

$3823.16

306-381-061-000

$9413.28

306-381-062-000

$881.55

306-381-063-000

$1352.64

306-381-064-000

$1224.75

306-381-065-000

$22661.55

400-031-027-000

$3093.98

500-041-014-000

$3817.56

503-031-001-000

$10122.76

508-291-047-000

$174.00

511-131-058-000 511-301-005-000

$174.00 $1012.25

513-151-032-000 513-190-014-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Collenberg David A Collenberg David A No Situs, Pepperwood Trent Family Trust Trent Christopher W & Robin A 601 McCann Rd, McCann Van Den Branden Eric No Situs, Miranda Creech Edward E 98 Forest Grove Ln, Miranda Toborg Henry R & Levine Sharon M No Situs, Phillipsville Skillern Kisha No Situs, Phillipsville Skillern Kisha No Situs, Phillipsville Lasbury Chaytawn P & Contreras James C Branham Jody V & Sherainian Becky 8911 Bell Springs Rd, Harris Glovin Amy J 6516 Bell Springs Rd, Harris Rodriguez Vicente 5100 Rancho Sequoia Dr, Alderpoint Green Martha F & Ponce Augustine Jr 2650 Rancho Sequoia Dr, Alderpoint Phelps Jesse & Bellach Tyson No Situs, Myers Flat Silva George F Jr No Situs, Blocksburg Kozak Anthony J 1657 Road A, Garberville Morse Charles F III Morse Charles F III Living Trust 810 Road M Rd, Garberville Anderson Mark A 5355 Rancho Sequoia Dr, Alderpoint Lines John M 1745 Perry Meadow Ln, Redway Cowling Kathleen No Situs, Garberville Arias Adalberto D 2050 Simmons Rd, Eureka Goff Timothy C S & Janet L 4611 Meyers Ave, Eureka Gustafson Kent 2014 Hazelwood Ln, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka James Darrell D 1969 Peerless Ave, Arcata Boberg Daniel 44 Wagon Jack Ln, Arcata Miller Dietrich B 1472 Chester Ave, Arcata Cain Jerry A & Cammi M 897 Knowles Ct, McKinleyville Barbagallo Alan A & Rita T 1625 Letz Ln, McKinleyville Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L 1371 Clam Beach Rd, McKinleyville Christie Ray & Jennifer L 5466 Dows Prairie Rd #A, McKinleyville Roberts Rick D & Susan J 1122 Ox Ln, Trinidad

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $852.96 $852.96 $16785.60 $3661.76 $2022.22 $2885.41

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 516-111-028-000 522-332-004-000 522-351-003-000 522-391-017-000 526-291-010-000 529-171-042-000

$1335.86 $660.51

531-085-012-000

$20,806.25

532-055-009-000 534-141-021-000

$8496.59 $9038.95 $2220.74

215-300-006-000 215-300-007-000 301-082-079-000

$8351.06

005-053-005-000

$1434.12

510-281-034-000

$16307.70

011-191-006-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS OBriain Jordan 221 Glenwood Dr, Blue Lake Huff Gale J 149 The Terrace, Willow Creek Hames Elmer J Hames Elmer J Living Trust 520 Delaney Dr, Willow Creek Trinity Enterprises Inc 315 Moccasin Dr, Willow Creek Catron Dorothy L No Situs, Hoopa Hamlin Ellen E Gault Alta E Estate of Gault Alta E Rev Trust of 2018 No Situs, Orleans Fryer Nicole R No Situs, Hoopa Graves Garland A No Situs, Orick Erickson Robert P No Situs, Orleans Bremer Lonny D & Pyle Richard A 16388 Briceland-Thorne Rd, Whitethorn Bremer Lonny D & Pyle Richard A 16400 Briceland-Thorne Rd, Whitethorn Smith Amber R & Paul R 4889 Starlund Ct, Eureka Chase Richard 1615 G St, Eureka Bazan-Suarez Jaime & Stein Lisa 985 Railroad Dr, McKinleyville Blank Christopher C & Carolyn Y 3332 K St, Eureka

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $4739.90 $3301.56 $9685.09 $256.47 $1754.85 $721.69 $28,946.02 $820.88 $3754.75 $382.98 $1963.78 $146.47 $13459.24 $1701.67 $5458.86

$10928.39 $8347.53

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

$15948.66 $423.61 $3714.91 $6367.52 $4486.96

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 13th, 2019. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 16th, May 23rd, & May30th, 2019.

$3497.02 $3306.50 $3446.31 $3319.35 $8563.00 $3649.25 $4131.85 $4652.46 $10132.13 $3385.21 $8975.20 $9191.40 $11166.44 $9649.20 $7679.30 $38131.20

Corinna Zubin Lyon Friends of Corinna Zubin Lyon, please join together to honor the life of our beloved Corinna. CELEBRATION OF LIFE Saturday, May 25, 1 p.m. Mad River Grange 110 Hatchery Rd Blue Lake, CA Bring a memory to share.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

37


Legal Notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF J. WARREN HOCKADAY CASE NO. PR190088

of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Continued from previous page ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: William T. Kay, Jr. 628 H Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−445−2301 Filed: May 13, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

Trust, to pay the remaining prin− cipal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the prop− erty to be sold and reasonable esti− mated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $292,637.39 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclu− sive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust hereto− fore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned or its predecessor caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this prop− erty lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280−2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 069737−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280− 2832 CLEAR RECON CORP 4375 Jutland Drive San Diego, California 92117

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−156) who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of J. WARREN HOCKADAY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been T.S. No. 069737-CA APN: 305filed by Petitioner LISA K. HOCK− 240-015-000 NOTICE OF ADAY TRUSTEE'S SALE IMPORTANT In the Superior Court of California, NOTICE TO PROPERTY County of Humboldt. The petition OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT for probate requests that LISA K. UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, HOCKADAY be appointed as DATED 7/14/2006. UNLESS personal representative to admin− YOU TAKE ACTION TO ister the estate of the decedent. PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT THE PETITION requests authority to MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC administer the estate under the SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLAIndependent Administration of NATION OF THE NATURE OF Estates Act. (This authority will THE PROCEEDING AGAINST allow the personal representative YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT to take many actions without A LAWYER obtaining court approval. Before On 6/14/2019 at 10:00 AM, CLEAR taking certain very important RECON CORP, as duly appointed actions, however, the personal trustee under and pursuant to Deed representative will be required to of Trust recorded 7/31/2006, as give notice to interested persons Instrument No. 2006−22171−19, , and unless they have waived notice or later modified by a Loan Modifica− consented to the proposed action.) tion Agreement recorded on 10−22− The independent administration 2010, as Instrument 2010−23133−7, of authority will be granted unless an Official Records in the office of the interested person files an objection County Recorder of Humboldt to the petition and shows good County, State of CALIFORNIA cause why the court should not executed by: SHAWNA BRISCO, A grant the authority. SINGLE WOMAN WILL SELL AT A HEARING on the petition will be PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST held on June 6, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S the Superior Court of California, CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK the petition, you should appear at DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL the hearing and state your objec− SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIA− tions or file written objections with TION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR the court before the hearing. Your SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN appearance may be in person or by SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL your attorney. CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: IN THE contingent creditor of the dece− FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE dent, you must file your claim with HUMBOLDT COUNTY COURT− the court and mail a copy to the HOUSE, 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, personal representative appointed CA 95501 all right, title and interest by the court within the later of conveyed to and now held by it either (1) four months from the under said Deed of Trust in the date of first issuance of letters to a property situated in said County general personal representative, as and State described as: MORE defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− ACCURATELY DESCRIBED IN SAID fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days DEED OF TRUST. The street address from the date of mailing or and other common designation, if personal delivery to you of a notice any, of the real property described under section 9052 of the California above is purported to be: 2370 LEE Probate Code. Other California LN EUREKA, CA 95503−8108 The statutes and legal authority may undersigned Trustee disclaims any affect your rights as a creditor. You liability for any incorrectness of the may want to consult with an street address and other common attorney knowledgeable in Cali− designation, if any, shown herein. fornia law. Said sale will be held, but without YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept covenant or warranty, express or by the court. If you are a person implied, regarding title, possession, interested in the estate, you may condition, or encumbrances, file with the court a Request for including fees, charges and Special Notice (form DE−154) of the expenses of the Trustee and of the filing of an inventory and appraisal trusts created by said Deed of of estate assets or of any petition Trust, to pay the remaining prin− or account as provided in Probate cipal sums of the note(s) secured by Code section 1250. A Request for said Deed of Trust. The total Special Notice form is available amount of the unpaid balance of from the court clerk. the obligation secured by the prop− ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: erty to be sold and reasonable esti− William T. Kay, Jr. mated costs, expenses and 628 H Street advances at the time of the initial Eureka, CA 95501 publication of the Notice of Sale is: 707−445−2301 $292,637.39 If the Trustee is unable Filed: May 13, 2019 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, 23,any 2019 • northcoastjournal.com to convey May title for reason, the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA successful bidder’s sole and exclu− COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT sive remedy shall be the return of 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−156) monies paid to the Trustee, and the

38

5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−158)

T.S. No.: 19-22131 A.P.N.: 203291-070 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 3/29/2012. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably esti− mated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor: SHEYNE DEMELLO AND MELISSA DEMELLO, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Carrington Foreclosure Services, LLC Recorded 3/30/2012 as Instru− ment No. 2012−8152−13 in book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, Described as follows: "AS FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST" Date of Sale: 6/7/2019 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: At the front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $222,229.67 (Estimated) Street Address or other common designa− tion of real property: 1522 NELEEN DR FORTUNA, CA 95540 A.P.N.: 203 −291−070 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the

beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagees Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder’s rights against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obli− gations. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear owner− ship of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be respon− sible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this prop− erty by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this informa− tion. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 758− 8052 or visit this Internet Web site www.Xome.com, using the file number assigned to this case 19− 22131. Information about postpone− ments that are very short in dura− tion or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not imme− diately be reflected in the tele− phone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date:

8052 or visit this Internet Web site www.Xome.com, using the file number assigned to this case 19− 22131. Information about postpone− ments that are very short in dura− tion or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not imme− diately be reflected in the tele− phone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 05/07/2019 Carrington Foreclosure Services, LLC 1500 South Douglass Road, Suite 150 Anaheim, CA 92806 Automated Sale Information: (800) 758−8052 or www.Xome.com for NON−SALE information: 888−313− 1969 Vanessa Gomez, Trustee Sale Specialist 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−150)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 5th of June, 2019, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage. The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Robert Lopez−Fregoso, Space # 5103 Alicia Porter, Space # 5209 Kanakope Leaana, Space # 5241 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Diana Edwards, Space # 2915 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Byron Albertson, Space # 1316 James Stratton, Space # 1593 John Black, Space # 1623 Jennifer Cooper, Space # 1657 Salina Vanderwaal, Space # 1779 Bonnie Vansickle, Space # 1784 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Joshua Bosie, Space # 323 Nancy Buzzard, Space # 478 Fred Fox, Space # 550 (Held in Co. Unit) John Hurst, Space # 711 Hasan Mansur, Space # 753 Trevis Perkins, Space # 829 Rachael Cortez, Space # 830 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc.


Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 23rd day of May, 2019 and 30th day of May, 2019 (19−159)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00246 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EMERALD FOREST RV AND CAMP− GROUND/TRINIDAD EXTENDED STAY RV PARK Humboldt 753 Patricks Point Dr Trinidad, CA 95570 Trinidad RV Investors, LP CA 201909800505 3511 Del Paso Road, Suite 160/147 Sacramento, CA 95834 The business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elias Weiner, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 15, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−132)

LEGALS? classified@north coastjournal.com

442-1400 × 314

classified@north coastjournal.com

Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

Continued on next page »

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00265

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00269

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00278

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00284

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00293

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HOUSES OF MUSIC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as GLOBE PROPERTIES

The following person is doing Busi− ness as DONOVAN CAMP

The following person is doing Busi− ness as WOODY RIDGE FARMS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MOONSTONE IMAGES / KC TRAVEL

Humboldt 1947 Eubanks Rd Garberville, CA 95542 P.O. Box 55 Whitethorn, CA 95589 Brody F. Fales 1947 Eubanks Rd Whitehorn, CA 95589

Humboldt 423 First Street Eureka, CA 95501 P.O. Box 952 Eureka, CA 95502

Humboldt 1231 T St Eureka, CA

Humboldt 1901 Old Briceland Rd Garberville, CA 95542 PO Box 231 Garberville, CA 95542

Humboldt 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA 95570

Woody Ridge Farm LLC California 201620710158 1901 Old Briceland Road Garberville, CA 95542

Chantele J leatherwood 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA 95570 Stephen K Leatherwood 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA 95570

1947 Eubanks Rd Whitehorn, CA 95589 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brody Fales, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 23, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−112)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00266 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEW GREAT PRINTS Humboldt 3610 Pryor Ct. #B Fortuna, CA 95540 Alec N Dale 1754 I St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Alec Dale, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 23, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

Globe Imports Ltd, Inc. CA 496208 423 First Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Robert P. Maxon, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 24, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

Donovan V Camp 1231 T St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Donovan Camp, Owner/Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 30, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−143)

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s David Dickinson, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 3, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−132)

5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−142)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00277

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00280

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JONAH MADE IT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CHINILU SYSTEMS

Humboldt 316 W Grant Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 4497 Excelsior Rd Eureka, C 95503

Jonah W Simmons 316 W Grant Eureka, CA 95501

George H Mitchell 4497 Excelsior Rd Eureka, CA 95503 Marina T Mitchell 4497 Excelsior Rd Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jonah Simmons, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 30, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−149)

5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−113)

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Chantele Leatherwood, Co− Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 7, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by bs, Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−151)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00286 The following person is doing Busi− ness as 707 PRO−CLEANERS Humboldt 115 Samoa Blvd #20 Arcata, CA 95521 P.O. Box 531 Bayside, CA 95524 Deanna Rogers

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s George H Mitchell, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 1, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Deanna Rogers, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 3, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−144)

5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−145)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00295 The following person is doing Busi− ness as DANDARS BOARDGAMES AND BOOKS Humboldt 1264 Giuntoli Lane Suite A Daniel A Gilkey Jr 1891 Wavecrest Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Doranna R Benker Gilkey 1891 Wavecrest Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Daniel A Gilkey Jr, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 8, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−148)

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00302

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00311

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ROOF RESTORATION & EXTE− RIORS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ABC REALTY/AMERICAN BROKERS COOPERATIVE

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARIA De JESUS PIMENTEL CASE NO. PR190094

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in Humboldt the will or estate, or both, of Humboldt 4591 Kjer Rd MARIA De JESUS PIMENTEL 922 E Street STE 203 McKinleyville, CA 95519 A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been Eureka, CA 95501 filed by Petitioner JAVIER 1444 Terrace Way Corradini LLC PIMENTAL Eureka, CA 95501 CA 201912610095 In the Superior Court of California, 4591 Kjer Rd County of Humboldt. The petition In A Heartbeat Inc McKinleyville, CA 95519 for probate requests that JAVIER CA C1865682 PIMENTAL be appointed as 922 E Street The business is conducted by a personal representative to admin− Eureka, CA 95501 Limited Liability Company. ister the estate of the decedent. The date registrant commenced to THE PETITION requests authority to The business is conducted by a transact business under the ficti− administer the estate under the Corporation. tious business name or name listed Independent Administration of The date registrant commenced to above on Not Applicable Estates Act. (This authority will transact business under the ficti− I declare the all information in this allow the personal representative tious business name or name listed statement is true and correct. to take many actions without above on Not Applicable A registrant who declares as true obtaining court approval. Before I declare the all information in this any material matter pursuant to taking certain very important statement is true and correct. Section 17913 of the Business and actions, however, the personal A registrant who declares as true Professions Code that the regis− representative will be required to any material matter pursuant to trant knows to be false is guilty of a give notice to interested persons Section 17913 of the Business and misdemeanor punishable by a fine unless they have waived notice or Professions Code that the regis− not to exceed one thousand dollars consented to the proposed action.) trant knows to be false is guilty of a ($1,000). The independent administration misdemeanor punishable by a fine /s Carlos Coradines Flores, CEO authority will be granted unless an not to exceed one thousand dollars This statement was filed with the interested person files an objection ($1,000). County Clerk of Humboldt County to the petition and shows good /s Theresa Kessenich, CFO on May 10, 2019 cause why the court should not This statement was filed with the KELLY E. SANDERS grant the authority. County Clerk of Humboldt County by sc, Humboldt County Clerk A HEARING on the petition will be on May 16, 2019 held on May 23, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at KELLY E. SANDERS 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−155) the Superior Court of California, by sm, Humboldt County Clerk County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth 5/23, 5/30, 6/6, 6/13 (19−161) Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME the petition, you should appear at STATEMENT 19−00309 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME the hearing and state your objec− The following person is doing Busi− STATEMENT 19−00315 tions or file written objections with ness as The following person is doing Busi− the court before the hearing. Your FULL CIRCLE FARMS ness as appearance may be in person or by SMALL WONDERS CHILDCARE your attorney. Humboldt IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a 1797 Smith Lane Humboldt contingent creditor of the dece− Fortuna, CA 95540 3526 Utah St dent, you must file your claim with PO Box 774 Eureka, CA 95503 the court and mail a copy to the Fortuna, CA 95540 personal representative appointed Megan N Woods by the court within the later of Stephen P Bohrer 3526 Utah St either (1) four months from the 848 Newell Drive Eureka, CA 95503 date of first issuance of letters to a Fortuna, CA 95540 general personal representative, as The business is conducted by an defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− The business is conducted by an Individual. fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days Individual. The date registrant commenced to from the date of mailing or The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− personal delivery to you of a notice transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed under section 9052 of the California tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable Probate Code. Other California above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statutes and legal authority may I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. affect your rights as a creditor. You statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true may want to consult with an A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to attorney knowledgeable in Cali− any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and fornia law. Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a by the court. If you are a person trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine interested in the estate, you may misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars file with the court a Request for not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). Special Notice (form DE−154) of the ($1,000). /s Megan Woods, Childcare filing of an inventory and appraisal /s Stephen P. Bohrer, Owner Provider of estate assets or of any petition This statement was filed with the This statement was filed with the or account as provided in Probate County Clerk of Humboldt County County Clerk of Humboldt County Code section 1250. A Request for on May 15, 2019 on May 20, 2019 Special Notice form is available KELLY E. SANDERS KELLY E. SANDERS from the court clerk. by sm, Humboldt County Clerk by kt, Humboldt County Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: 5/23, 5/30, 6/6, 6/13 (19−160) Kenneth M. Bareilles 5/23, 5/30, 6/6, 6/13 (19−162) Attorney at Law 533 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−0338 (office) NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com 707−443−0923 (Home) Filed: April 29, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

40

Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Kenneth M. Bareilles Attorney at Law 533 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−0338 (office) 707−443−0923 (Home) Filed: April 29, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−133)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. R-1400598 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name TASTY TACOS AND MORE Humboldt 3943 Walnut Drive − Suite A Eureka, CA 95503 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on September 9, 2009 Rosa C Devere 3943 Walnut Drive − Suite A Eureka, CA 95503 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ Rosa C. DeVere This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date May 7, 2019 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office s/ sc, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−154)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME GREGORY ALLAN CHAFFIN CASE NO. CV190340 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: GREGORY ALLAN CHAFFIN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name GREGORY ALLAN CHAFFIN to Proposed Name GREGORY ALLAN LINDBERG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 7, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 7, 2019 Filed: June 7, 2019 /s/ William H Judge of the Superior Court 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−135)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JAMES MCLAIN PAIGE HARBAUGHGREGG CASE NO. CV190384 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JAMES MCLAIN PAIGE HARBAUGH−GREGG for a decree changing names as follows: Present name CHANEL ROSE MCLAIN to Proposed Name CHANEL ROSE GREGG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 21, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: May 3, 2019 Filed: May 3, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−152)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JENNA LEE CHAFFIN CASE NO. CV190342 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JENNA LEE CHAFFIN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JENNA LEE CHAFFIN to Proposed Name JENNA LEE LINDBERG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 7, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 7, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 7, 2019 Filed: June 7, 2019 /s/ William H Judge of the Superior Court 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−134)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME LAURA ELIZABETH LEE-CHAFFIN CASE NO. CV190341 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: LAURA ELIZABETH LEE−CHAFFIN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name LAURA ELIZABETH LEE−CHAFFIN to Proposed Name LAURA ELIZABETH LEE LINDBERG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 7, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 7, 2019 Filed: June 7, 2019 /s/ William H Judge of the Superior Court 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−136)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

classified@north coastjournal.com

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Astrology

Cartoons

Free Will Astrology Week of May 23, 2019 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: Make up a secret identity for yourself. What is it? How do you use it? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming weeks, I suspect you will have the wisdom to criticize yourself in constructive ways that will at least partially solve a long-standing problem. Hallelujah! I bet you will also understand what to do to eliminate a bad habit by installing a good new habit. Please capitalize on that special knowledge! There’s one further capacity I suspect you’ll have: the saucy ingenuity necessary to alleviate a festering fear. Be audacious! TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What standards might we use in evaluating levels of sexual satisfaction? One cruclal measure is the tenderness and respect that partners have for each other. Others include the ability to play and have fun, the freedom to express oneself uninhibitedly, the creative attention devoted to unpredictable foreplay, and the ability to experience fulfilling orgasms. How do you rate your own levels, Taurus? Wherever you may currently fall on the scale, the coming months will be a time when you can accomplish an upgrade. How? Read authors who specialize in the erotic arts. Talk to your partners with increased boldness and clarity. While meditating, search for clues in the depths. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If there were a Hall of Fame for writers, Shakespeare might have been voted in first. His work is regarded as a pinnacle of intellectual brilliance. And yet here’s a fun fact: The Bard quoted well over a thousand passages from the Bible. Can you imagine a modern author being taken seriously by the literati if he or she frequently invoked such a fundamental religious text? I bring this to your attention so as to encourage you to be Shakespeare-like in the coming weeks. That is, be willing to draw equally from both intellectual and spiritual sources; be a deep thinker who communes with sacred truths; synergize the functions of your discerning mind and your devotional heart. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “People will choose unhappiness over uncertainty,” writes Cancerian author and entrepreneur Timothy Ferriss. He doesn’t do that himself, but rather is quite eager to harvest the perks of dwelling in uncertainty. I presume this aptitude has played a role in his huge success; his books have appeared on bestseller lists and his podcasts have been downloaded more than 300 million times. In telling you this, I’m not encouraging you to embrace the fertile power of uncertainty 24 hours a day and 365 days of every year. But I am urging you to do just that for the next three weeks. There’ll be big payoffs if you do, including rich teachings on the art of happiness. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Many eighteenth-century pirates were committed to democracy and equality among their ranks. The camaraderie and fairness and mutual respect that prevailed on pirate ships were markedly different from the oppressive conditions faced by sailors who worked for the navies of sovereign nations. The latter were often pressed into service against their will and had to struggle to collect meager salaries. Tyrannical captains controlled all phases of their lives. I bring this to your attention, Leo, with the hope that it will inspire you to seek out alternative approaches to rigid and hierarchical systems. Gravitate toward generous organizations that offer you ample freedom and rich alliances. The time is right to ally yourself with emancipatory influences. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t wait around for fate to decide which decisions you should make and what directions you should go. Formulate those decisions yourself, with your willpower fully engaged. Never say, “If it’s meant to be, it will happen.” Rather, resolve to create the outcomes you strongly desire to happen. Do you understand how important this is? You shouldn’t allow anyone else to frame your important questions and define the nature of your problems; you’ve got to do the framing and defining yourself. One more thing:

don’t fantasize about the arrival of the “perfect moment.” The perfect moment is whenever you decree it is. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll regularly give yourself to generous, expansive experiences. I hope you’ll think big, funny thoughts and feel spacious, experimental emotions. I hope you’ll get luxurious glimpses of the promise your future holds, and I hope you’ll visualize yourself embarking on adventures and projects you’ve been too timid or worried to consider before now. For best results, be eager to utter the word “MORE!” as you meditate on the French phrase “joie de vivre” and the English phrase “a delight in being alive.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to Popular Mechanics magazine, over three million sunken ships are lying on the bottoms of the world’s oceans. Some of them contain billions of dollars’ worth of precious metals and jewels. Others are crammed with artifacts that would be of great value to historians and archaeologists. And here’s a crazy fact: fewer than one percent of all those potential treasures have been investigated by divers. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I hope it might inspire you to explore your inner world’s equivalent of lost or unknown riches. The astrological omens suggest that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to go searching for them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Some days you need god’s grace,” writes poet Scherezade Siobhan. “On other days: the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire.” I’m guessing, Sagittarius, that these days you might be inclined to prefer the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire. But according to my astrological analysis, those flashy phenomena would not motivate you to take the corrective and adaptive measures you actually need. The grace of god—or whatever passes for the grace of god in your world—is the influence that will best help you accomplish what’s necessary. Fortunately, I suspect you know how to call on and make full use of that grace. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet William Stafford articulated some advice that I think you need to hear right now. Please hold it close to your awareness for the next 21 days. “Saying things you do not have to say weakens your talk,” he wrote. “Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” By practicing those protective measures, Capricorn, you will foster and safeguard your mental health. Now here’s another gift from Stafford: “Things you know before you hear them — those are you, those are why you are in the world.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Love is an immoderate thing / And can never be content,” declared poet W. B. Yeats. To provide you with an accurate horoscope, I’ll have to argue with that idea a bit. From what I can determine, love will indeed be immoderate in your vicinity during the coming weeks. On the other hand, it’s likely to bring you a high degree of contentment — as long as you’re willing to play along with its immoderateness. Here’s another fun prediction: I suspect that love’s immoderateness, even as it brings you satisfaction, will also inspire you to ask for more from love and expand your capacity for love. And that could lead to even further immoderate and interesting experiments. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You will know you are in sweet alignment with cosmic forces if you have an impulse to try a rash adventure, but decide instead to work on fixing a misunderstanding with an ally. You can be sure you’re acting in accordance with your true intuition if you feel an itch to break stuff, but instead channel your fierce energy into improving conditions at your job. You will be in tune with your soul’s code if you start fantasizing about quitting what you’ve been working on so hard, but instead sit down and give yourself a pep talk to reinvigorate your devotion and commitment. ●

@ncj_of_humboldt

@northcoastjournal northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment default

default

default

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For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350

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RG/FT KLAMATH $22.84-29.80 5/24/19

#1087 Self Governance Director RG/FT KLAMATH $74,838/88,608 5/31/19

     

#1092 HS Site Supervisor

RG/FT KLAMATH $21.23-27.70 5/24/19

#32 Environmental Tech III

RG/FT KLAMATH $16.91-22.06 5/31/19

#56 Head Start Manager

Finance Director ANNUAL SALARY $88,608-115,613 Under administrative direction of the Executive Office and Tribal Council, plans, organizes and directs the activities and programs of the Fiscal Department. Provide professional assistance to management staff and Council on financial, procurement, risk management including insurance, investments, accounting, relevant policy development, and associated matters. EDUCATION EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT: A minimum of a BS and CPA/CMA. 10 years demonstrated knowledge of governmental and/or nonprofit accounting practices, preferably in a tribal government setting. Must have 5 years of experience in supervision. An MBA is a plus. Must be a seasoned and mature leader, with at least 12-15 years of broad finance experience in auditing, followed by experience gathering and evaluating financial information and making actionable recommendations to senior leadership.

RG/FT KLAMATH $47,507-61,986 5/31/19

#58 Social Worker(2)

RG/FT KLAMATH $25.12/27.56 5/24/19

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open door

#63 Finance Director

RG/FT KLAMATH $88,608-115,613 OUF

#64 Home Base Visitor

Community Health Centers

RG/FT KLAMATH $15.6017.34 6/7/19

#65 Admin Assistant II YTEP

NOW SEEKING:

RG/FT KLAMATH $16.91-22.06 5/31/19

Data and Reporting Analyst

RG/FT KLAMATH $20.72-27.03 5/31/19

Open Door is developing its business intelligence capacity and is looking for team members who are passionate about transforming data and analytics into actionable information to support our patient centered mission. The Analyst provides and enhances a number of routine and ad hoc reports, develops and maintains dashboard summaries and supports training to users of business intelligence products. The Analyst will coordinate reporting efforts and facilitate data source development by proactively communicating across user groups to identify patterns, trends, problems or opportunities for improvements and efficiencies. The Analyst will demonstrate strong problem solving and analytical skills with an emphasis on team driven collaboration.  Positions Available in: Arcata  For details and online applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com

EXCELLENT BENEFIT PACKAGE: VACATION: 12 days per year to start, Sick leave: 1 day per month with no limit, and 16 holidays. Insurance: Federal Employee Health Benefit, Life, Ameritas dental and vision (100% paid for employee and 70% paid for dependents). Retirement: 401(k) (3% match by employer). For more information go to www.yuroktribe.org or call (707) 482-1350 ext. 1376

#66 Environmental Cop #67 Head Start Cook

TEMP EUREKA $14.01 5/31/19

#68 Evidence/Property Specialist

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FT/RG KLAMATH $18.75-24.26 6/7/19

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The City of Rio Dell Is now accepting applications for

 

($29,919 - $37,750 + Benefits) Provides customer service to the public and complex support to the Finance Department. Position is time limited: June through September. This is a great way to get experience and earn a reference. Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue in Rio Dell, online at www.cityofriodell. ca.gov (bottom of the webpage) or call (707)7643532. Applications are due by Friday, May 24, 2019 at 5:00pm for first review. Position is open until filled.

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Financial Grant Analyst Position, entails reconciliation & coordinating of reporting for State/Federal funders across a 36 county service region in Northern California.

APPLY TODAY! Wage: $25-35.55/hr. DOE Hours: Full Time Benefitted Location: HSU Campus, Arcata Deadline: May 28, 2019 • 5pm For details visit: https://hraps.humboldt.edu/other-employment


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K’ima:w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

• • • • • •

Emergency Medical Technician-1, PT/ Temporary and On-Call available, ($10.1512.00 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, May 30, 2019. Billing Office Manager, FT/Temporary ($18.77-24.40 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, June 5, 2019. Medical Biller (Patient Accounts Clerk I), FT/ Regular ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, June 5, 2019. Medical Biller (Patient Accounts Clerk I), FT/ Temporary ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, June 5, 2019. Community Health Representative (CHR), FT/ Regular ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, June 6, 2019. Director of Nurses - DON, FT/Regular ($83,688-108,678 per yr DOE) Physician FT, Contract ($190,000240,000 per yr DOE) Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor, FT/ Regular ($39,600-51,500 per yr DOE)

All positions are open until filled, unless otherwise specified For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

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Post your job opportunities here. 442-1400 • northcoastjournal.com

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CITYof EUREKA



CITIES OF ARCATA, EUREKA & FORTUNA



ENTRY LEVEL–DISPATCHER TEST

     

Are you interested in a career as a Police Dispatcher at one of the above agencies? Attend our next test session at 9 a.m., Thursday, June 20th in Arcata. The 3 ½ hour test is free of charge. Passing scores qualify you for employment opportunities at any P.O.S.T. agency.

            

Visit www.cityofarcata.org for a test reservation form to secure your space. EOE default

                   

     

     

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

   

    



    

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CITY OF FORTUNA



           



  



       .

DEPUTY CITY ENGINEER 69,200 - $84,193/year, Full-time

$

Under the administrative direction of the City Engineer, to plan, organize, schedule, direct, and review the functions and activities of the City’s Engineering Division; to perform a wide variety of the most complex engineering assignments; to be responsible for the design and inspection of Public Works projects; to review and approve development plans including subdivisions, building permits, encroachment permits, and specialty projects; and to do related work as required. Education equivalent to graduation from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering is required. Any combination of training and experience that would likely provide the required knowledge and abilities is qualifying. Complete job description and required application available at  or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm 

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Employment

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CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 16 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

       

         

 

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         

                 

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Join the ambitious and caring.

New opportunities at United Indian Health Services! Help us continue toward our vision- A healthy mind, body, and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community. One way we work toward this goal is by being an integrated health organization. Our divisions include: Medical, Dental, Behavioral Health, Vision and Community Health and Wellness. We strive to bring members of the community together so they can not only be unified in ensuring the best care is provided to their families, but also help in preserving Native culture through education, community outreach, and medicine. UIHS offers an excellent work life balance. Our clinic is open Monday through Friday, from 8 am-5 pm. Fulltime employees enjoy 3 weeks of paid time off per year, as well as 11 paid Holidays. Other benefits include: comprehensive health care plans for individuals and families, 4% matched retirement plans, and loan repayment programs.

Current employment opportunities:

Substance Abuse Counselor (FT) Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Prevention (FT) Clinical Nurse- RN (FT)

Run a local business and be part of something that matters. Join the community of good neighbors as a State Farm agent. Visit statefarm.com/careers today. ®

Contact a local recruiter: Adriana Barkhurst adriana.barkhurst.p1x2@statefarm.com 916-342-9383

Health Promotion & Education Specialist (FT) Our job application and all of our open opportunities with full job descriptions are on our website unitedindianhealthservices.org/jobs Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.

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      

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.”

State Farm, Bloomington, IL

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

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Join the team!                    


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CITY OF FORTUNA

CHIEF TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR 59,153 - $71,968/yr, Full-Time

$

Under the general direction of the Director of Public Works, to supervise and perform a variety of administrative, operational, control, and maintenance functions in the City’s water and wastewater treatment and pumping systems; supervise and perform laboratory testing and sample collection; supervise and perform a variety of work at all levels in the maintenance, repair, and construction of water and wastewater treatment and pumping systems. High School diploma or GED required. Possession of Grade III Wastewater Operator certificate (or higher) from SWRCB is desired, Grade II Water Treatment Operator certificate (or higher) from SWRCB is required at time of hire. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm 

CRESTWOOD BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER is looking for a licensed art, dance, music, recreation, or occupational therapist to oversee the Recreation program at our mental health residential facility. Please contact Campus Administrator Robert Pitts for more details about this wonderful opportunity − 707−442−5721 x11060 or email at rpitts@cbhi.net

NORTHERN HUMBOLDT UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT IS HIRING! Multiple positions available: Auto/Small Engine and Spanish Teachers; Instructional Aides; Substitute teachers, bus drivers, custodians, food service workers; and Training Specialists. For more information visit our website or contact Jamie Kester at 707−839−6473. www,nohum.org

Opportunities AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

Body, Mind & Spirit HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

Loving Hands

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Institute of Healing Arts

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

Est. 1979

State-licensed school of Massage Therapy Private Practice Finnish Sauna 725-9627

739 12th St. Fortuna

www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Marketplace

Continued from previous page

Art & Collectibles

Miscellaneous

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Real Estate Auto Service

OXYGEN − ANYTIME. ANYWHERE. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All−New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 877−459−1660 (AAN CAN)

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

Clothing THE COSTUME BOX Costume Rental & Sales Ben Nye Makeup, Wigs Festival, Rave, Unique Thrift Dress up Party Venue 202 T St. Eureka 443−5200

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

KILL ROACHES−GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets, Sprays, Traps, Concentrate. MOST EFFECTIVE! Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN)

New Listing!

YOUR LISTINGS HERE

Realtor Ads • Acreage for Sale & Rent Commercial Property for Sale & Rent • Vacation Rentals

call 442-1400 ×319 or email melissa@northcoastjournal.com

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals default

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

Home Repair

Simple!

50 GLORIOUS YEARS  Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027 2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka

HUGE Garage Sale May 24, 25, 26 9-4

LUGGAGE, BACKPACKS, BAGS & CASES 1/2 OFF!!! Plus: Monday Munchies, Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednesdays, New Sale Thursdays, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Satur− days. Where your shopping dollars support local youth! Dream Quest Thrift Store May 23−29. (530) 629−3006.

Come Check Out this Well-Kept Home! This 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home features a new roof, while laminate floors in the living room and hallway, and custom features throughout the home, accent it nicely. The garage has been turned into extra storage space, but could even be the perfect man-cave. There is also an additional 180 sq.ft. covered play room. Call Ken Murrell at 407-7280 today for a private showing! MLS# 253790

Computer & Internet

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1−866−535− 9689 (AAN CAN)

DO YOU OWE MORE THAN $5000 iin tax debt? Call Wells & Associates INC. We solve ALL Tax Problems! Personal, Busi− ness, IRS, State and Local. "Decades of experience"! Our clients have saved over $150 Million Dollars! Call NOW for a free consultation. 1−855−725− 5414. (AAN CAN)

$

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

Miscellaneous

CELLO, BOW AND CASE FOR SALE. Cello−−Roman Teller (German) 1971. Bow−− Morgan Anderson, 1985. Case−−BAM Classic, 2010. Great buy on set of all three −−$5000. 707−273−5075.

297,500

■ McKinleyville

Tools, Furniture, Household, Camping, XBOX, Sports, Electrical Clothing, DVDS, Games

(707) 826-1445 550 S. G St. #10 Arcata, CA Behind Redwood Curtain Brewery

Lodging

Other Professionals



TRINITY ALPS WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

(530) 266-3505

Other Professionals default



Housing



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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,900, 2 pers. $23,900; 3 pers. $26,900; 4 pers. $29,850; 5 pers. $32,250; 6 pers. $34,650; 7 pers. $37,050; 8 pers. $39,450 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

YOUR AD

HERE

OFFICIANT Celebrating Life’s Important Moments WEDDINGS, ELOPEMENTS, CELEBRATIONS OF LIFE Denise L. Ryles, Officiant Contact The Costume Box 707−443−5200

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

         

    

   

442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com



 


Kyla Tripodi

Katherine Fergus

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

Charlie Tripodi

707.476.0435

HIOUCHI – CABIN ON ACREAGE - $165,000

Mike Willcutt Realtor/ Commercial Specialist BRE # 02084041

916.798.2107

±1.2 Ac w/ creek frontage, 2/1 home, guest cabin, pool & deck, garage/shop, tool shed, orchard.

NEW LIS

TING!

HARRIS – LAND/PROPERTY - $2,590,000

4 bedroom, 2 ½ bathroom home featuring glass front gas fireplace, 2 car garage (with work bench), RV parking, and more!

NEW LIS

TING!

±160 Acres on 3 parcels w/ permitted cultivation space, RRR space, multiple homes, outbuildings, wells, water tanks, and much more!

ALDERPOINT – LAND/PROPERTY - $719,000

SHOWERS PASS – LAND/PROPERTY - $479,000

±6 acre turn key farm w/State & County Interim permit for 20k OD and 4k ML! Complete with PG&E, community water, pots & greenhouses!

±40 Acre remote parcel with interim permit for 9,606 of mixed light cultivation, cabin, green houses, and more!

FERNDALE – LAND/PROPERTY - $1,100,000

DINSMORE – LAND/PROPERTY - $199,000

±80 acres w/State approved and County stamped permit for 19,370 sq ft ML and 6,400 sq ft OD cultivation space!

Remote ±40 acre flat parcel easy access, views, creeks, and beautiful rock outcroppings.

ALDERPOINT – LAND/PROPERTY - $395,000

691 GREENHORN DRIVE, TRINITY CENTER - $249,900

±70 Flat acres w/ .5 mile of Eel River frontage featuring cabin, outbuildings, power, meadows, and views!

Meticulously maintained 3/1 cabin and large shop on over half an acre. Just a few minutes drive from Trinity Lake!

HORSE MOUNTAIN – HOME ON ACREAGE - $625,000

FERNDALE – LAND/PROPERTY - $385,000

±155 Acres w/ panoramic views of the Trinity Alps, custom high end cabin w/ wood floors & wood vaulted ceilings.

±110 Acres close to Ferndale featuring spring, open meadows, developed flats, & small cabin.

RUTH – LAND/PROPERTY - $295,000

ELK PRAIRIE VINEYARD, MYERS FLAT - $1,350,000

±160 Acres surrounded by NFS land w/ meadows, a mix of oak and fir timber, cabin & outbuildings, pre-existing ag infrastructure.

DINSMORE – LAND/PROPERTY - $189,000

Hailey Rohan

REDWOOD VALLEY – HOME ON ACREAGE - $399,000

±20 Acres with end of road privacy, productive well, small cabin, and large garden site.

5419 WALNUT DRIVE, CUTTEN - $369,000

Tyla Miller

REDUCE

D PRICE

±122 Acres with panoramic views and oak studded meadows. Great for hunting or grazing!

HYAMPOM – LAND/PROPERTY - $189,000

Established ±15 acre vineyard w/ 3 homes, winery, cellar, tasting room, mature grapes & olive trees.

±160 Acres w/ beautiful mountain views, developed flats and roads, timber, and water source.

!

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $499,000

±40 Acre remote parcel with interim permit for 9,606 of mixed light cultivation, cabin, green houses, and more!

1648 B STREET, EUREKA - $299,999

Great investment opportunity with exiting duplex in good condition. Zoning allows for additional units!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 23, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

47


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North Coast Journal 05-23-19 Edition  

Eleven Weeks Till Curtain: From auditions to preview with the cast of Cabaret, by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

North Coast Journal 05-23-19 Edition  

Eleven Weeks Till Curtain: From auditions to preview with the cast of Cabaret, by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

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