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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, May 6, 2021 Vol. XXXI Issue 18 northcoastjournal.com

CRISIS KLAMATH ON THE

With too little water to go around, the fighting has begun in a zero-sum game pitting farmers against fish and endangered species against one another BY JESSICA FU

13 COVID surge

continues 18 Native comfort food


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS

4 News

Two Paths Forward

11 Guest Views

Stick the Landing

13 NCJ Daily Online 14 On The Cover

Crisis on the Klamath

18 On the Table

Sharing the Frybread Love

20 Home & Garden Service Directory

22 Down and Dirty

Transplanting your Seedlings

May 6, 2021 • Volume XXXII Issue 18 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2021

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

23 Fishing the North Coast

STAFF WRITER

24 Arts! Arcata

CALENDAR EDITOR

Breezy Start to the Saltwater Season Friday through Sunday, the second weekend of the month

25 Calendar 29 Screens

Hominids and Homicide

30 Field Notes

Not So Dark Ages

30 Workshops & Classes 35 Free Will Astrology 35 Sudoku & Crossword 36 Classifieds

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Rod Kausen, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com ART DIRECTOR

Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com MEDIA ADVISOR

John Harper john@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING GET MOM THE FLOWERS SHE REALLY Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER WANTS THIS MOTHER’S DAY

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER

Moms love flowers

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

Carol Andersen, painting. Read more on page 24. Submitted

On the Cover Photo by Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management / Shutterstock

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The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 15,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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A slide in February covered the highway at Last Chance Grade. Caltrans

Two Paths Forward

Last Chance Grade project reaches a major milestone By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

T

his has not been a good year for Last Chance Grade. The notoriously unstable stretch of U.S. Highway 101 just south of Crescent City in Del Norte County has been closed several times in recent months due to landslides, stranding travelers, cutting off commerce and — for a time — preventing school children who live south of the closure site from getting to school. Motorists trying to traverse the 3-mile section of roadway that serves as a major artery between the northernmost reaches of the state to points south are still facing sometimes lengthy delays as Caltrans works to shore up the most recent geological activity in an area with more than 200 documented active landslides. Should a catastrophic failure occur, Del Norte County alone stands to lose some $300 million to $400 million per year in economic productivity, along with an estimated 3,000 to 4,000 jobs.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

And the only way around is an arduous 320-mile, seven-hour detour via U.S. Highway 199 to Interstate 5 to State Route 299. But officials recently announced a major milestone in the decades-long effort to find a solution to the Last Chance Grade dilemma — a list of seven potential alternatives has been narrowed to two final contenders. “The decision will allow Caltrans to concentrate its work on necessary, superior alternatives and avoid wasteful analyses on routes that studies have already shown are not viable,” North Coast Congressmember Jared Huffman said in a news release. “This will save money, but more importantly it will save time and get this critical infrastructure over the finish line sooner.” One of the routes — known as Option F — detours traffic around the most problematic portion into a 5,600-foot tunnel before returning back to the current alignment of U.S. Highway 101. The cost?

An estimated $1.1 billion to $2 billion, with a construction timeline of seven years. The other — called Option X — would be what the announcement describes as “a landslide mitigation alternative along the current route — permanently shoring up slopes and hillsides,” including the construction of around 15 walls, at a cost of $300 million. The construction period is half that of option F at three and a half years. “The Last Chance Grade is the lifeblood for Del Norte County. Relying on temporary fixes just isn’t acceptable,” state Sen. Mike McGuire said in a release. “We all want to start moving dirt on a new route ASAP and narrowing down the alternatives is another big step in the right direction. You can count on all of us to continue a full-court press on this critical project in the months and years to come.” Engineering and environmental data gathered over the past year helped inform Continued on page 7 »


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NEWS Continued from page 4

Caltrans

National Nurses Week May 6th - 12th

A heartfelt

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the selections — made with input from more than 80 people from more than 30 agencies with permitting and regulatory authority as well as elected officials, businessowners, tribal governments and others, according to Caltrans. A narrowed field now eliminates the need for studies and analysis on the other previous options. That, according to Caltrans, is expected to shave $10 million off costs moving forward and bring whichever choice makes it to the end a year closer to completion. “This decision by our stakeholders gets us another step closer to a safe, reliable and sustainable solution at Last Chance Grade,” said Caltrans District 1 Director Matt Brady. “Narrowing the alternatives will reduce the schedule time by concentrating our efforts to a smaller study area. We are so grateful for the support of the many participants involved in this process.” But there’s still a long road ahead. The environmental review process and

the ultimate selection of an alternative is now expected in 2025, with an estimated opening date of 2038 or sooner. So, in the meantime, Caltrans will be tasked with the seemingly never-ending work to maintain the desolate stretch of roadway on which so much depends. Over the last 25 years, the price tag has been in the tens of millions to keep traffic moving on the highway, which has shifted some 50 feet west since 1937. Of course, landslides are nothing new at the site, which came upon its ominous name when one dubbed Last Chance Slide came down on the original wagon trail built in 1894. When the current route was started in 1933, the instability was a constant barrier and caused countless delays. While there were discussions even then about moving the road inland, none took root, mainly due to cost. So, what’s next? A lot of studies and surveys accessing the impacts of each

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NEWS Continued from page 7

alternative, with a plan to have work on the necessary environmental documents beginning next year and a draft version going out for public comment in 2023. “Caltrans will then coordinate with stakeholders as we decide on what alternative to select,” agency spokesman Myles Cochrane said in an email. “We will have an open and engaging process that considers how the alternatives measure up in terms of performance measures that have been selected by stakeholders. Key

performance measures include safe and reliable operations of the highway, impacts to environmental resources and costs to build, mitigate and maintain the finalized route.” If all goes well, some 100 years after the highway was first being carved into the towering cliffside, a new or altered route will be completed. “I’m encouraged to see progress, especially speeding up the project,” Assemblymember Jim Wood said. “I know this has

been a long process, but one that can’t be avoided because of the complexities of this huge project. I appreciate the participation of the many stakeholders and the patience of the public as we work toward the best solution.” l

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Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the Journal’s digital editor. Reach her at 442-1400 extension, 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @Kimberly_Wear.

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here’s a good reason getting everyone out the door on-time — with their shoes on — can feel like a major accomplishment for parents. It’s more or less the same reason bedtime is the number one topic parents contact me to discuss. Whether it’s the transition from the living room to the car seat or bath-time to sleep-time, periods of adjustment from one thing to another are times when even the most on-top-of-it parents can find the situation going sideways. The same strategies I once used in class to get 20 5 year olds happily seated on the rug and ready to read after playing on the swings can get the job done in your home, too. Right now, as we round out a full year of uncertainty and limitation, packs of kids are readjusting to in-person class just in time to get ready for one of the biggest annual transitions of all: the end of the school year. As a parent or caregiver, you might be looking for ways to make these, and other ordinary changes more manageable. The most critical thing to keep in mind when addressing transitions is that you and your kids are on the same side. Even when it seems like your little ones are working against you at every turn, remember your children really aren’t making things difficult at you. They’re being kids. The minute you lose that perspective you risk slipping into a power struggle, and all power struggles ever achieve is frustration. Understanding that you are on the same side, you can support your children while remaining in charge.

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It’s helpful to remember transitions can be tough for everyone, not just the preschool set. Any of us who have stayed up past our own grown-up bedtimes to watch one more episode of whatever have felt this. The difficult aspects of transitions are amplified for children because they have necessarily shorter attention spans and are neurologically less equipped to regulate their emotions. As there is loss inherent in all change, even very positive change, kids are likely to have some hefty feelings in response. This is particularly true for changes that alter the structure of their lives. When you make room for emotional responses, the feelings don’t need to derail the program. Making room for emotions means not immediately trying to fix them or making them shameful. If it’s acceptable to have and to express feelings, the feelings don’t need to become explosive or direct the show. Transitions go best when adults stick to the plan. Huge, unforeseen catastrophes aside, moving forward with the actions you said you were going to take, when you said you were going to take them, is the real key to smooth progressions from one thing to another. There are psychological reasons why children try to take control of the situation right when you are doing your best to move on to the next thing. It’s the job of the caregiver to continually redirect everyone back to the task at hand, regardless of your charges’ wily diversion tactics. Don’t get distracted — your kids really can be sad and still get in the car. You really can be an invested

parent and still tell your child that you’re excited to hear about this cool thing they learned after they’ve packed their backpack and put on their shoes. Especially when it’s a big turning point, there’s tremendous value in communicating to children what’s going to happen next. Talk with your kids about changes before they occur, multiple times. Let them ask questions and imagine together what it’s going to be like. One reason that transitions are so anxiety-provoking is that they generally involve moving into something (at least partially) unknown. If you help your children conceptualize the new conditions, you can remove some of the threat. Finally, cut everyone — including yourself — some slack. It will help just to recognize that transitions take attention and allow yourself enough time. For large, structural changes, accept that your family might be best served by letting some less-pressing tasks go during the adjustment period. This will afford you more energy, time, and a greater emotional capacity to smooth out the change. It can also be very effective to mark significant transitions with some small special event. Talk it up. Make it meaningful. Balloons at dinnertime, a favorite treat the day before or the weekend after, or watching a movie with sleeping bags in the living room can be just the thing that flips a sad, annoying or scary change into an exciting adventure. ● Lindsay Kessner (she/her) is a longtime nanny, teacher, artist, cat-lover and owner of Treehouse Parent Coaching.

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FROM

DAILY ONLINE

Variant-fueled COVID Surge Continues

P

ublic Health confirmed Humboldt County’s 39th COVID-related death May 4, along with 11 new cases, making 44 so far for the week amid an ongoing surge as the Journal went to press. Addressing the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors that morning, Hoffman made clear that he believes the surge — which saw the county confirm 137 cases last week and 130 the week before, along with dozens of related hospitalizations — can be attributed to the highly contagious B.1.1.7 variant of the virus, commonly known as the UK variant. “We had been suspecting that B.1.1.7 was here in Humboldt as early as March but without clear evidence and only a few confirmed cases in the state, it was hard to be sure,” he said. “Now, that evidence is clear. B.1.1.7 is here and it has been here, and now we’re seeing the effects of a more contagious and more virulent form of this coronavirus. Our hospital cases for COVID-19 in the last few weeks of April rival the worst weeks yet of the pandemic for Humboldt County, with those who are younger and healthier getting sicker.” Hoffman added that the county is seeing younger patients hospitalized, with some admitted to intensive care units, and recently saw a resident under the age of 19 hospitalized for the first time locally. Fur-

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ther, Hoffman said the county has had to transfer more patients out of the county in the previous two weeks due to the severity of their illness or a lack of resources to care for them than at any other time during the pandemic. Humboldt County’s case and test-positivity rates, meanwhile, have gone from some of the best in the state to some of the worst, Hoffman said. According to a state database, 11 people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 locally — down from 13 yesterday — including five receiving intensive care. The May 4 cases were confirmed after laboratories processed 161 samples with a test-positivity rate of 6.8 percent, bringing the county’s cumulative case total to 3,895. The good news, Hoffman told the board, is that it’s clear what the county must do to reverse current trends — continue masking and physical distancing, while getting as many people vaccinated as possible. “We need to get vaccinated,” he said. “There is sufficient vaccine now for everyone. We are not seeing infections in people who are vaccinated. While there are a handful of so-called ‘breakthrough’ cases, none of our sickest patients who are feeling very ill, are hospitalized or are in the ICU, none of them have been vaccinated. That is the power of this vaccine.”

Another Hazing Allegation: Humboldt State University announced May 4 that it is investigating another alleged hazing incident, just a week after one surfaced involving the university’s softball team. HSU reported that it is looking into potential violations of student and sports club codes of conduct involving its men’s and women’s rugby teams, both of which have been placed on interim suspensions. POSTED 05.04.21

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The number of large, homemade ornaments Six Rivers National Forest is trying to collect to adorn this year’s U.S. Capitol Christmas tree, which will be harvested from the North Coast. Get all the details on the decorative effort at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 05.03.21

Up In The Sky

northcoastjournal

Photo courtesy of Eddy Alexander on behalf of the city of Eureka

The Redwood Sky Walk at the Sequoia Park Zoo is slated to open May 14 to zoo visitors, who will be able to access the 100-foot-high suspended pathways through the trees, with a grand opening event planned for June 4. Get all the details and a slideshow of photos at www.northcoastjournal.com. POSTED 05.02.21 Vaccine appointments can be made by visiting www.myturn.ca.gov. The state of California also updated its COVID-19 risk tiers May 4 and, despite escalating case rates, kept Humboldt County in the “moderate” or orange tier it entered last month, which allowed businesses such as restaurants, gyms and movie theaters to increase indoor operations while allowing others — including bowling alleys and family fun centers — to open.

The state data showed that Humboldt County has a test positive rate of 6.4 percent (compared to 3.1 percent last week) and a daily case rate of 12.8 per 100,000 compared to the prior week’s 5.9. California overall, meanwhile, reports a 1.3 percent test-positivity rate and 4.2 cases per 100,000. — Thadeus Greenson POSTED 05.04.21 Read the full story online.

NCJ Offering Free Obituaries: The Journal announced this week that we are now offering free, reader-submitted online obituaries, giving people a chance to notify the community of the passing of a local resident and to honor their lives. Readers can now submit death notices for local residents to obituaries@ northcoastjournal.com. Please include your name and contact information. Submissions will be lightly edited for spelling and grammar.

Cultural Site Vandalized: Six Rivers National Forest announced that it is increasing patrols at the culturally significant Mvs-yee-se’-ne — known locally as Pappas Flat — after recent vandalism at the site, including off-roading, racist graffiti and the chopping down of Oregon white oak trees in the area. The site includes a 15-acre Oregon white oak forest established before 1809 that has been maintained by the Tolowa for centuries.

POSTED 04.30.21

POSTED 04.28.21

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

They Said It “All employees who had contact with the one positive case have been tested and received COVID negative results. Seascape Restaurant has been thoroughly cleaned and disinfected by an independent cleaning company following CDC guidelines.” ­— A Trinidad Rancheria press release announcing the restaurant’s re-opening after a COVID-19 exposure. POSTED 05.03.21

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newsletters

Comment of the Week “Personally I just reported and blocked that John fellow. I don’t believe he’s a real person and his posts are pure garbage.” ­— Andrew Kuebbing on the Journal’s Facebook, responding to a commenter spreading COVID-19 misinformation and conspiracy theories on a post about the county seeing 12 new hospitalizations. POSTED 04.30.21

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

Crisis on the Klamath

This participant in the 2019 Klamath Salmon Festival parade led chants in support of tribal water rights, dam removal and environmental protection. Photo by Mark Larson

With too little water to go around, the fighting has begun in a zero-sum game pitting farmers against fish and endangered species against one another By Jessica Fu

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

T

he federal government is strictly curtailing irrigation this year in an attempt to protect endangered fish important to Indigenous tribes. Farmers say this will make it all but impossible to farm, while tribal groups say the plan doesn’t go far enough to save their fisheries. In mid-April, a farming region in southern Oregon began to release water from the Klamath River into its irrigation canals. According to the local water authority, this was a standard move to jumpstart the farming season during one of the driest seasons in recent memory. But according to the federal government, it was an illegal maneuver that could further jeopardize the survival of multiple endangered species and food sources important to Indigenous tribes and fisheries in the region.

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Because of severe drought conditions in the region and low snowpack levels, the Upper Klamath Lake — a large, natural reservoir of freshwater that drains into the Klamath River — has experienced historically low inflow this year. That means there’s not enough water to go around for everyone who needs it: tribes that depend on the lake to sustain culturally important species of suckerfish, commercial and tribal fisheries downstream who depend on flow from the lake to support salmon populations, and farmers and ranchers who rely on irrigation to harvest crops. On April 14, the Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), a federal agency that oversees the Klamath irrigation project, announced that farmers would only get 33,000 acre-feet of water this year due to drought conditions — the lowest allotment in its history. The

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

project spans from southern Oregon to northern California. For context, farmers say they need 400,000 acre-feet in drought years. That didn’t stop the Klamath Drainage District (KDD) in southern Oregon — a public entity contracted to deliver water in the region — from turning on the spigot for its constituents two days later. “We tried to hold off [diversion] as long as we could,” said district manager Scott White. White said the district board faced immense pressure to divert water from farmers in the region dealing with low soil moisture. “Our landowners were just champing at the bit.” White said that the district was accessing water from the Klamath River through a state water permit rather than through the federal government’s allocation, which

he claimed was standard operating procedure. The federal government doesn’t see it that way. In a letter addressed to the district shared with The Counter, USBR ordered White to stop making the diversions, which it called unlawful. “[The] water that is currently in the Klamath River is committed to satisfying the Endangered Species Act (ESA), an obligation that supersedes irrigation deliveries and rights,” the agency wrote. “Therefore, KDD’s diversion of water … is contrary to the ESA and may subject KDD to legal action if it does not immediately cease diversions.” The releases mean that there’s less water to go around for everyone else who needs it, in a year where there was already little to begin with. According to a USBR spokesperson, the agency is making up


for the diversions by releasing more water from the lake. However, tribes and commercial fishermen downriver are worried that prolonged diversions will reduce river flow long-term, in turn exacerbating poor environmental conditions and further harming salmon populations that they depend on for food, income and ceremonial practices. “It felt very, very disappointing that individuals would take actions, such as to illegally divert water, when there is so much pain being felt throughout the basin for communities who aren’t getting the flows or the water levels necessary for their communities,” said Frankie Myers, vice-chair of the Yurok tribe. “It felt like a pretty selfish act.” Salmon are a culturally and economically important species for the Yurok. But poor river flow, pollution, disease and dams that obstruct movement have all played a role in the decline of the Klamath River’s salmon population. Every year, a coalition of tribal representatives, fishermen and community and environmental advocates sets catch limits on salmon in the region in order to maintain long-term viability. Three decades ago, Myers recalls, Yurok families could each harvest hundreds of fish from the Klamath River, enough to sustain themselves for a year. This year, he estimates that the tribe will be allocated the equivalent of one fish per person, raising concerns about food sovereignty. The water shortage also exacerbates the woes of non-tribal commercial fisheries. For years, the region has put in place strict quotas to conserve salmon populations. Earlier this month, the coalition closed off commercial fishing in the region completely. “It’s really a very sad situation,” said Glen Spain, northwest regional director for the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations, which represents West Coast commercial fishermen. “I understand how people get desperate, but violating the law and stealing your neighbor’s water is not the way to solve this problem.” Not only does the water shortage pit agricultural interests against the needs of communities downriver — the scarcity also puts the survival of different endangered species in conflict with one another. Shortly before USBR announced this year’s allocations, the Klamath Tribes — which are a separate tribal nation from the Yurok and have senior water rights in the Upper Klamath Lake — filed a lawsuit against the agency. The tribes are accusing USBR of letting the lake’s water levels fall below minimum thresholds required by the Endangered Species Act for two years in a row. This, in turn, puts two spiritually important suckerfish species, the C’waam

and Koptu, at risk of extinction, the lawsuit reads. The tribes are demanding that USBR more than halve the average rate of water flow out of the lake until it recovers to a minimum threshold set by the Fish and Wildlife Service. That action, in turn, would mean less abundant flows for farmers and salmon fisheries downriver. Someone loses, no matter what. “The Klamath Tribes certainly believe that everything should be done to satisfy all of the biological needs of all of the species,” said Jay Weiner, attorney for the Klamath Tribes. Weiner points out that salmon are also significant for the Klamath Tribes, which retain fishing rights to them. “The difficulty we find ourselves in this particular year is that there is not enough water in the system to do that. And under those conditions, we believe that the needs of the C’waam and Koptu, as much more critically endangered and vulnerable species, need to come first.” For some, the diversions are reminiscent of a painful chapter in the region’s history. In 2001, USBR curtailed irrigation to farms to prioritize the survival of endangered fish in compliance with the Endangered Species Act. Farmers responded by physically forcing open irrigation gates and even staging a symbolic “bucket brigade,” in which residents manually diverted water from the river via buckets passed from person to person along a human chain. The next year, Washington Post reported, Vice President Dick Cheney personally lobbied the Bureau of Reclamation to release water to farmers — a move that resulted in the largest salmon die-off recorded in the region. Growing resentment from farmers has caused some to worry about potential violence this year. Last Thursday, the “People’s Rights” group announced a call to farmers and ranchers in the basin to “STAND UP AND PROTECT YOUR PRIVATE PROPERTY, YOUR WATER!” People’s Rights is the far-right militia group founded by Ammon Bundy, known for leading a takeover of a federal wildlife refuge in 2016.  “I’m worried about it,” said Craig Tucker, a natural resources consultant for the Karuk tribe, another downriver community that depends on the salmon for food. “The politics here in the Klamath, just like in the rest of the country, are pretty volatile.” Farmers and ranchers commonly frame USBR’s obligations under the Endangered Species Act as a form of “single-species management” that prioritizes conservation efforts to the detriment of other interests.  “We’re looking at not being able to produce crops this year,” said Ben Duval,

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president of the Klamath Water Users Association and farmer in Tulelake, California. “When that’s what you do for a living, it makes it pretty tough.” It’s worth noting USBR and USDA have set aside $25 million in relief funds to help farmers in the region recover drought-related losses. In addition, farmers who have opted into crop insurance and disaster assistance programs may also be able to recover some of their expenses through those avenues, as well. However, Duval said, relief money doesn’t accurately reflect the true loss of farming, which can have a multiplier effect within local economies. Many people I spoke with believe that today’s water crisis is a catastrophe created by the federal government, which historically overcommitted the region’s water resources and is now under-delivering to all stakeholders. Environmentalists point out that these kinds of crises are likely to become more common in the future, as the climate crisis reduces snowpack in the mountains and drought conditions become more frequent. “There’s got to be some retreat in the Klamath Basin,” said Dan Tarlock, a professor emeritus of environmental law at the Illinois Institute of Technology, who has written extensively about water conflicts in the basin. “I think it’s pretty clear there’s not enough water to support the existing

level of agriculture.” This year’s water crisis just might spur some dialogue on what a sustainable level of farming in the region should look like in the long-term. Last Wednesday, in response to unprecedented water shortages in the West, the White House announced that it would create an interagency task force, led by Secretaries of the Interior Deb Haaland and Agriculture Tom Vilsack, to “explore opportunities to improve our nation’s resilience to droughts.” Until then, the ongoing crisis may continue to raise tensions in the region, and even lead some to obtain limited water resources by any means necessary. As of April 27, according to live discharge data from the U.S. Geological Survey, the Klamath Drainage District continued to divert water from the river at a rate of 200 cubic feet per second. l Jessica Fu (she/her) is a staff writer for The Counter. Her reporting has won awards from the Association of Food Journalists and the Newswomen’s Club of New York. This story was originally published by The Counter, a nonprofit newsroom covering the forces shaping how and what we eat. It is republished here by permission.

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From left: Emma Sundberg, Aliesha Brown, Lisa Sundberg and Kayla Maulson at the Frybread Love stand. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

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atching frybread go from a fist of pale dough pulled from a bucket to its final form, cumulus in shape and caramel in color, is like watching up-close magic. In a straw hat with a kitchen towel hanging from her shoulder, Lisa Sundberg pats, then pulls the dough with practiced hands, turning it to stretch under its own weight, pinching a few holes and laying it gently into the hot vegetable oil, where it bubbles and puffs, the oil shush-ing like distant applause. Frybread itself is a feat of metamorphosis. In Native communities across the U.S., frybread is a staple and a comfort food born from displacement and the destruction of traditional resources and foodways that were replaced by government commodity foods, dating back to the Navajo people’s “Long March” from their homelands to New Mexico. “The government made us make frybread,” says Kayla Maulson, Sundberg’s daughter and owner of the Frybread Love stand newly opened outside Cher-Ae Heights Casino. “We were only given commodities … my dad said he grew up on commodities; they were given powdered milk, sugar, flour, salt.” From those rations came what Sundberg calls “a delicacy,” a base for a hearty chili taco, a jam-schmeared treat crispier and chewier than doughnuts, a satisfying comfort eaten plain and warm.

“It really is the shared experience across Indian country,” says Sundberg, who is Yurok. Maulson, who studied childhood development and American Indian education, as well as business at Humboldt State University, was looking for something she could do while staying home with her two kids after the pandemic hit. Finally, the urgings of old rugby teammates and coworkers who’d been eating her family’s frybread for years got through and she started Frybread Love with help from her family, including her mother, her sister Aliesha Brown and cousin Emma Sundberg. By the time they packed up the tent the first night in front of the Cher-Ae Heights Casino, Maulson estimates they’d sold 200 orders. The next night it was triple that. Now, along with nights at the casino, she’s arranged a spot at the McKinleyville Farmers Market and is working on Arcata. The ingredient list is short: flour, salt, sugar, baking powder and water. Maulson says her first try at frybread was making it for her father when her mother was out of town and she was 8 or 9. She’d mistakenly added cups of sugar rather than teaspoons. “But I was so happy he still ate it.” She’s got it down now but her mother remains the go-to frybread person in the family. “I can finally accept that title,” says Sundberg. “I remember my first roll at fry


Frybread Love’s Indian taco. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

bread … it was like the bottom of a shoe.” Technique, Sundberg says, is everything. Working in the gaming industry helping design cash access systems, she traveled to Native-owned casinos all over the country, sampling frybread and asking questions. Mixing, emulsifying and kneading methods were a little different everywhere, with some regions using yeast or shaping the dough differently. Sundberg and Maulson worked with Rhonda Beck of Beck’s Bakery to source freshly stone-milled flour with higher amounts of gluten and protein. When allowed to rise for two hours, the result is a delicate chewiness, crisp exterior and fluffy center. The printed menu has an Indian taco with chili, cheese, lettuce and tomato, and a couple of sweet options, Nutella and powdered sugar. Both curious first-timers and those who grew up eating it order the plain bread. “It’s just a cherry on top having anything else with it,” says Maulson. She herself loves peanut butter and jelly. But the women are batting around all kinds of additions. Maulson, who’s also Ojibwe, notes that in the Midwest, frybread is sometimes served with wild rice and chicken soup. Her mother had served pork sliders with apple slaw on frybread and they’re hoping to work with local farmers on ingredients like blackberries and huckleberries. According to Maulson and Sundberg, frybread isn’t something you make unless you’re serving 15 people. At Maulson’s grandmother’s family gatherings, 100 pieces, enough for dinner and dessert, would be standard. But a big gathering isn’t hard to come by for her family. “We have Grandma next door, we have Uncle down the hill, so we’re making it for at least 20 people. … You want to share it all, you’ve got a big huge pot of chili you’re making it with. You bring all your cousins or your

aunties over. ‘Come over for a barbecue, we’re making frybread.’” Maulson and Sundberg’s family is among those who provide food for cultural events and ceremonies, too, like the annual Sumeg Brush Dance. There, community members share traditional foods like eel, acorn, salmon and frybread. They bring enough to feed the dancers, attendees and campers, sometimes up to 300 people. “I think that’s what everyone’s missed this past year,” says Maulson. “I really do miss the dances and staying up all night with the girls and hearing the songs.” They also cook for the recently revived girls’ Flower Dance coming-of-age ceremony, in which Maulson was among the first participants after its decades of dormancy. Those ceremonies have been absent from local Native life since the COVID-19 pandemic put gatherings on hold. But the frybread is a taste of those days and dinners when people could come together to share traditions and meals that carry their shared history. “We love frybread,” says Sundberg. “We love feeding people and we need that love to spread, to use frybread as a seed of love to reach out and hopefully bring us together again.” ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill. The Community Voices Coalition is a project funded by Humboldt Area Foundation and Wild Rivers Community Foundation to support local journalism. This story was produced by the North Coast Journal newsroom with full editorial independence and control.

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. northcoastjournal.com/whatsgood Have a tip? Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

19


DOWN & DIRTY

From left to right, transplanted Swiss chard, mustard greens and kale. Photo by Julia Graham-Whitt

Transplanting your Seedlings By Julia Graham-Whitt

downanddirty@northcoastjournal.com

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Leaves

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

The leaves tell us when the plants are ready. For all seed-bearing plants, the first three leaves aren’t their true leaves; rather, they’re called cotyledons (from Latin meaning “seed leaf”). The true leaves are usually darker and larger. Of course, you’ve hardened off all of your little seedlings by now, right? If not, you need to do that first — get them adapted to being outside their protective starting place, whether greenhouse, windowsill, or just some small pots on your deck or balcony.

Temperature

We’ve had some pretty frosty nights here on the coast, cooler than our usual temperatures, so it may be a little early to put those transplants out just yet.

Soil temperature

It’s best to wait until the soil temperature is about 50 degrees or so, especially for warm weather crops (tomatoes and peppers, which are a challenge to grow

outdoors on the coast unless you have the variety that does well in cooler weather). You can purchase a soil thermometer at your local garden center, or you can just stick your hand in the dirt and see if it feels like an ice cube. If it does, it’s too cold to plant. So let’s say we’ve checked all these things and it’s time to transplant. You can transplant directly into the ground or you can put your seedlings in pots, depending on the space. But first, the soil. You want to give your plants the best possible chance to get big and strong, so you need the soil to be prepped — definitely weed it first. If the soil is crappy, add some compost or well-rotted manure, and mix well. Doing this a week or so before transplanting can be helpful, but it’s not necessary as long as you amend the soil prior to planting. Now it’s time to plant. The best way to not damage the sweet little seedlings is to pinch the bottom of the cell the plant is in (if you used plastic pots), then gently lift it, root ball and all, out of the cell. Handle gently by the leaves if you can because you can easily damage the stem if you grab it there instead. Try to retain as much of the soil and the roots as possible when you put it in the ground. Make sure the hole is big enough and deep enough for the plant start, then gently replace the


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soil around the plant. Water in with some diluted fish emulsion or some compost tea to give it some extra nutrients. Since we haven’t had a lot of rain in April, it’s going to be important to keep the plants watered, but don’t overdo it. You can kill a plant with too much water just as easily as you can by depriving it of water. Now is also a good time to spread that Sluggo around, especially for tender plants like lettuce, greens and, well, anything that slugs like to eat (basically everything in my garden). Keep up with the Sluggo, especially if we do end up getting more rain this month and next. It’s easier to battle the slugs when they are small, rather than when they get big and fat, and come out at night to mow down all of your carefully nurtured seedlings. Ask me how I know. There are a few plants that benefit from planting deeper than you think you may need to. Tomatoes are a good example. Again, make sure you’re growing a variety that does well in our cool climate if you’re here on the coast. Inland growers have more choices in tomatoes since it gets so much warmer there. I take the very tiny bottom leaves off but you don’t need to do this. Plant the tomato all the way up to the first set of leaves. Tomatoes can create roots all along the stem when you plant them this way and it makes for a stronger plant that can draw up nutrients better. Some seedlings come several to a pot — many summer squashes come this way at the nursery. It’s not a bad idea to just plop the whole thing in the hole because odds are one or two of the plants won’t make it. Do not plant a gazillion seedlings in one spot, however. This can happen if you’ve started your own seeds and didn’t have the heart to thin out the extra when they started growing. Crowding will not benefit the plants — rather, it will hinder growth. Finally, spacing. Speaking from personal experience, here’s where we all go a little bananas when transplanting: It’s tempting to put those little tiny plants right next to each other but it’s crucial to give them the space they need to grow. The seed packet (or tag on the six pack, if you purchased the plants rather than seeds) should give you some clues about spacing. Make sure you’ve planted your starts in a spot that gets at least six hours of sun, more for plants that require a lot of light. Lettuces, kales and other greens can do fine in six hours of light, tomatoes not so much. Make sure you’ve watered the transplants well and watch them grow! ●

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Breezy Start to the Saltwater Season By Kenny Priest

M

fishing@northcoastjournal.com other Nature can be so cruel. In the week leading up to Saturday’s rockfish and Pacific halibut openers, ocean conditions out of Eureka were pristine. Then, as if someone was playing a bad joke, the north winds picked up and the ocean swells grew steep, spoiling the weekend plans of the Eureka fleet. That’s the bad news. The good news is the seas have since subsided and boats will be headed out through Humboldt Bay Wednesday in search of the season’s first haul of halibut and rockfish. But the weather window could be small. Winds will begin to pick up Friday and the weekend is again looking very breezy. There’s plenty of season ahead of us and this won’t be the last time Mother Nature has her way.

Sunday is looking similar, with winds out of the north 15 to 25 knots. Waves will be northwest 10 feet at 9 seconds. These conditions can and will change by the weekend. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www. Nine-year-old Joey Swancey, of Palo Cedro, scored a pair of black weather.gov/eureka/ rockfish while fishing out of Trinidad Monday. or www.windy.com. Photo courtesy of Curt Wilson/Wind Rose Charters To monitor the latest and found a decent bite,” said Huber. Humboldt bar conditions, visit www.wrh. “We made a couple of moves before the noaa.gov/eka/swan. You can also call the weather go too bad.” Huber was back on National Weather Service at 443-7062 or the water Monday and found plenty of the office on Woodley Island at 443-6484. hungry rockfish and a few lingcod south near the Sisters.

Razor clam fishery opens back up in Del Norte

Shelter Cove

After a five-year closure, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife director has re-opened the recreational razor clam fishery in Del Norte County following a recommendation from state health agencies that the consumption of razor clams in the area no longer poses a significant threat for domoic acid exposure according to a press release issued Friday. During the closure, state health agencies have continued to assess domoic acid levels in razor clams. Razor clams have consistently exceeded the federal action level of 20 parts per million. However, clams recently collected from Crescent City in March and April 2021 all had lower concentrations. CDFW, the California Department of Public Health and the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment continue to monitor domoic acid in razor clams to determine when the recreational fishery in Humboldt County can be opened safely. Visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/ Fishing/Ocean/Regulations/Sport-Fishing/ Invertebrate-Fishing-Regs#mollusks for specific razor clam regulations.

Weekend marine forecast

Breezy conditions are once again in the forecast for the weekend. Saturday is calling for north winds 15 to 25 knots with waves out of the northwest 9 feet at 10 seconds.

The Oceans:

Brookings rockfish update

The wind was howling all weekend, which kept most of the boats off the water according to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing. He said, “Jared Morris of C’Mon Sport Fishing and one other boat made a quick run to the rockfish grounds Saturday morning and found some hungry rockfish. Each boat came home with one ling apiece. The weather looks decent starting Wednesday before the wind comes back on Saturday.”

“Rough ocean conditions put a damper on the halibut opener out of Brookings as well as the Point St. George Reef opener south of the border,” said Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “The inshore reefs still produced limits of rockfish and a few lingcod during the windy weekend. Calmer conditions are expected Wednesday before a storm brushes the area Thursday and Friday.”

Trinidad

A few spring salmon were caught on the lower Rogue after last week’s rain but overall catch rates remain poor, reports Martin. “This year’s springer run has been well below average. Rogue anglers looking for action are waiting with anticipation for the salmon fly hatch on the upper river, which produces the best trout fishing of the year,” added Martin. Read the complete fishing roundup at www.northcoastjournal.com. ● Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@ fishingthenorthcoast.com

Captain Curt Wilson, who runs Wind Rose Charters, was able to put clients on limits of black rockfish and crab over the weekend. “We only had a to hit a couple spots towards Patrick’s Point to score limits of quality black rockfish,” said Wilson. “Conditions weren’t great but we were able to get in and out early before the wind picked up. We’ll have a little more time this week to look around for some variety as conditions will be much better.”

Crescent City

Despite the conditions, a few boats trudged their way to the rockfish grounds before the winds came up Saturday. Steve Huber, who runs Crescent City Fishing Charters, battled minus tides and rough water to put his clients on some quality rockfish. “We started north of the harbor

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ARTS NIGHTS

Works by Joyce Jonté are at The Garden Gate, The Griffin and Hot Knots Boutique. Submitted

Arts! Arcata

Friday through Sunday, the second weekend of the month

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rts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at locations in downtown Arcata, Friday through Sunday, the second weekend of the month for 2021. Due to COVID-19, there is no gathering, and attendees are asked to keep safe distances, wear facial coverings and observe guidelines in each location. There are no extended hours. See the art during regular business hours (some businesses are open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. with others open until 6 p.m.). Several events are offered online. Visit www.arcatamainstreet.com, check out the Arts! Arcata event on Facebook and Instagram, or call 822-4500 for more information. Arcata Artisans 883 H St. Susan Morton, glass and watercolors and Gilbert Castro, ceramics and metal. Arcata Main Street Downtown Arcata Mermaids of May themed Ball Gown Stroll, Saturday, May 8, noon to 3 p.m. The first Spring Sunday Art Market will be Sunday, May 9, featuring Amberz Art, Barbara Caldwell and more. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Eighth Street between G and H streets.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Arcata Playhouse Outdoor reception and unveiling of “Keep the Giant Jolly” public art sculpture installation by James Hildebrandt, Saturday, May 8, noon to 3 p.m. The Garden Gate 905 H St. Joyce Jonté, paintings. The Griffin 937 10th St. Joyce Jonté, paintings. Hot Knots Boutique 898 G St. Joyce Jonté, paintings. InfuZions 863 H St. Honoring the healing arts for May Lyme Awareness Month: Loreta Flemingaite, Baltic amber resin art and crystal art and Jenny Rhae, handcrafted natural products. Offering a special healing arts celebration on Saturday, May 8, with Carley Rose, Uma Till and more. Moonrise Herbs 826 G St. Alex Carlbon, abstract art. Plaza 808 G St. Carol Andersen, paintings. ●


Calendar May 6 – 13, 2021 6 Thursday

DANCE

James Hildebrandt. Submitted

See what students from Fieldbrook Elementary and Redwood Coast Montessori have been working on this past year at Art and the Environment: Keeping the Giant Jolly, the unveiling of two new public art projects being installed in the Creamery District this Saturday, May 8 at 11:45 a.m. The students, working with Playhouse Arts’ Education team, created a mural depicting the plant and animal life of the Jolly Giant Creek. Additionally, artist James Hildebrandt designed and created two 14-foot stainless steel sculptures based on the ecosystem of the creek that will be permanently installed along the L Street bike path at Eighth and Ninth streets. Be there at 11:45 for the unveiling of these impressive projects and music by Bandemonium.

Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Learn Brazilian dances with instructors Rocío Cristal and María Vanderhorst. All levels. Limited to five people. Register online. $15. talavera.rocio@gmail.com.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom. us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

EVENTS Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. The Adventure Never Ends auction continues keeping HBRA afloat with community fundraising. Check out the auction and giveaways online. $5 per giveaway drawing/auction bids. www.hbra.betterworld.org.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Fortuna Branch Library on its Facebook page. www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryFortuna. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit.ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

Submitted

Arcata Main Street knows you’re ready for fun and they are serving it up. Legs, tails, whatever you’ve got, walk or flip ’em down to the Arcata Plaza for the Mermaids of May Ball Gown Stroll, happening Saturday, May 8 from noon to 3 p.m. (free). Wear your masks (add a little glitter) and practice social distancing while celebrating with your sea friends. Then, it’s the return of the Sunday Art Market on Sunday, May 9 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the Arcata Plaza. The festive outdoor market features local arts and crafts along Eighth Street between H and G streets and is the kick-off of Arcata Main Street’s Oyster Festival, in planning stages still, but coming soon …

GARDEN Humboldt Botanical Garden Plant Sale. Virtual World, Online. Online plant sale featuring blooming flowers and native plants. Through May 8. Pick-ups by appointment. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139.

MEETINGS Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from equity arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook. Free. www.facebook.com/ NorthCoastRedwoods.

ETC

Shutterstock

Waited until the last minute to get Mom something this year? Fear not, you have plenty of options and all in one stop at the Mother’s Day Market, happening Saturday, May 8 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Humboldt County Fairgrounds ($3, kids free). Browse local vendors for just the right gift (remember, phone calls are free). Social distancing and masks required.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www. englishexpressempowered.com. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. Free. annconstantino@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth. org. 923-3921.

Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join on Zoom at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a one-hour class with three group meditations, guidance and Q&A. Suitable for all levels. Free. mindfullymatt@gmail.com. www.us02web.zoom. us/j/86371764436?pwd=a1hJaVBoRC93cHd0ckcwQ1lFd2ltZz09.

7 Friday

ART

Arts! Arcata. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art in downtown Arcata, surrounding area and online. Due to COVID-19, there is no gathering. Keep safe distances, wear facial coverings and observe guidelines in each location. View art during regular business hours. Free. arcatamainstreet@gmail.com. www.arcatamainstreet.com. 822-4500. Studio Space. KEET TV, Channel 13, Humboldt. This 13-week series hosted by Kati Texas and David Ferney features 26 local artists including potters Peggy Loudon and Conrad Calimpong, animator Steven Vander Meer, Native carver Alme Allen, copper sculptor Scott Hemphill, printmaker Lynn Jones, painter Leslie Price and others.

DANCE Dance Visions. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The Theatre, Film and Dance Department at Humboldt State University presents a student and faculty live streamed concert with a variety of styles and themes. Register to watch at www.humboldtstate.zoom.us/webinar/ register/WN_klXaryk2Tr-5xOtJaWrXOw. Free.

MUSIC

Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Weekly meals prepared by local chefs. Drive into the lower parking lot to pick up orders and exit out the back gate. Limited table seating is available on the hillside. www.mateel.org.

GARDEN Humboldt Botanical Garden Plant Sale. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

OUTDOORS Eel Zoom. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A happy-hour presentation on the Eel River watershed. Go to the website or Eel River Recovery Project Facebook page for Zoom links. Upper Eel River Salmon Parkway with Gregg Young, Robin Leler and Pat Higgins. eelrecovery@gmail.com. www.eelriverrecovery.org. 839-4987. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email inviation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/ CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@ gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com.

8 Saturday

Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www. facebook.com/groups/224856781967115.

ART

EVENTS

BOOKS

California Trout Trout Camp Gala. 6:30-8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Virtual event celebrating 50 years of taking action for California’s fish, water and people. A showcase of innovative conservation work across the state, cameos from CalTrout staff and more. Register online. Free. events@caltrout.org. www.caltrout.org/ trout-camp-gala. 415-392-8887. Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Young MediaMakers 20th Big Screen Showcase Red Carpet Premiere. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Short films by local kids and students from the Bay Area Video Coalition. Featuring speaker Jules Coronado. View on YouTube at www.youtube.com/channel/ UCHnkvp92eBhFceR673ywnEg.

Book Sale. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. The Friends of the Redwood Libraries’ one-day only fundraiser. Fiction only. In the parking lot. Masks required. All books are $1 and exact change is appreciated. Checks should be made out to FRL. No book donations. Rain cancels. www.humlib.org. Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www.forms.gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

FOR KIDS

EmRArt with James Zeller. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Cross-platform entertainment from remote locations. James Zeller plays jazz from Arcata, and Emily Reinhart lays charcoal on birch wood in Eureka. Watch via Facebook (www.facebook.com/EmRArt) or by YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart.com. www. youtube.com/channel/UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ.

School-age Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farmers, prepared food vendors and crafters bring their bounty to Southern Humboldt. Non-GMO produce. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999. Mateel Drive-Through Dinners. Mateel Community

Arts! Arcata. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See May 7 listing.

DANCE Dance Visions. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 7 listing.

MUSIC

EVENTS Art and the Environment: Keeping the Giant Jolly. 11:45 a.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. Two public art projects will be installed in the Creamery District highlighting the ecosystem of Jolly Giant Creek. Brief speeches from project participants, music by Bandemonium and free popcorn. Free. 822-1575. Continued on page 27 »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Mon-Sat 10am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

CALENDAR Continued from page 25

Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Mermaids of May Ball Gown Stroll. Noon-3 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. A socially distanced ocean-themed stroll. Fancy yourself up and join the Mermaids of Moonstone. All ages. Approved by Humboldt County Public Health, follow COVID-19 safety protocols. Mother’s Day Market. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Local vendors offering plants, flowers, jewelry, fashion, sweet treats, home and garden and bath and body gifts. Social distancing and masks required. County approved. $3, kids free.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday Humboldt County farmers bring their non-GMO bounty, rain or shine. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Information and COVID rules online. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

GARDEN Humboldt Botanical Garden Plant Sale. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Mother’s Day Plant and Bake Sale. Noon-3 p.m. HART (Humboldt Animal Rescue Team), 8 West Sixth St., Eureka. Meet adoptable kitties and pick up a Mother’s Day gift. Cats, plants and treats.

OUTDOORS Freshwater Farms Reserve Tour. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Join Project Manager Karlee Jewell for a leisurely paced walk on the nature trail. Limited to 10 people. RSVP by email. Following local guidance, participants will be outside, distanced and required to wear a mask. Free. k.jewell@ncrlt.org. www.facebook.com/ events/290262229224519. 822-2242. Habitat Improvement Team Volunteer Workday. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Help restore habitat by removing non-native plants. Bring drinking water and gloves if you have them. Wear a facial mask, long sleeves, long pants and shoes that can get muddy. Tools, snacks and extra gloves provided. Meet at the Visitor Center. Free. denise_seeger@fws.gov. www.fws. gov/refuge/humboldt_bay/. 733-5406. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

ETC Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www. facebook.com/clubtriangl . English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Virtual Streamflow Enhancement Workshop. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The community is invited to join Salmonid Restoration Federation and Sanctuary Forest for a Virtual Flow Enhancement and Restoration workshop to explore the evolving restoration in Redwood Creek and the Mattole River. These watersheds are intertwined historically, geologically and from a fisheries recovery

perspective. Join us as we discuss land use history, geology and water storage, coho straying, and how restoration techniques and flow enhancement strategies have evolved to address climate change resilience and longer dry seasons. This workshop will be held via Zoom and will be available later as a video recording. $10 suggested donation, but everyone is welcome! $10. anna@sanctuaryforest.org. www.calsalmon.org/ node/1093.

9 Sunday

ART

Arts! Arcata. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See May 7 listing.

COMEDY Sunday Service Comedy Open Mic: Zoom. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Virtual stage-time with Pastor Paula for aspiring comics working out sets and trying to land jokes. Five-minute sets. Join the show at www. us02web.zoom.us/j/82295455754. Zoom room: 822 9545 5754. Password: comedy.

EVENTS Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Sunday Art Market. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art and crafts by local creators in a festive outdoor market. Enter at Eighth and H streets. Please observe 6-foot distance and masking. Official kick-off for Oyster Festival 2021.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

GARDEN Mother’s Day Plant and Bake Sale. Noon-3 p.m. HART (Humboldt Animal Rescue Team), 8 West Sixth St., Eureka. See May 8 listing.

OUTDOORS Bike Month Humboldt Cycle Sundays. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Celebrate Bike Month with a ride every Sunday in May. Register on Love to Ride and log your rides. Post to social media with #BikeMonthHumboldt for a chance to win weekly prizes. Free. stephen.luther@hcaog.net. www.bikemonthhumboldt.org. 444-8208. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Redwood Region Audubon Society Field Trip. 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Two- to three- hour trip at a leisurely pace with an emphasis on enjoying the birds. Beginners welcome. Reservations required. COVID-19 participation guidelines online. Sign up by text or email with the walk date, name and phone number for each participant. Free. thebook@reninet.com. www.rras. org/home.aspx. 499-1247.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

10 Monday LECTURE

Worker Owned Academy. 6-7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Coaching and support to create or convert to a worker-owned enterprise. All sessions via Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

Zoom. Income-based scholarships available. Contact morgan.lo.march@gmail.com for information. $60 for six sessions. admin@northcoastsbdc.org. www. northcoastsbdc.org/events/worker-owned-academy-april-2021. 445-9720.

EVENTS Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

FOOD Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Featuring local farmers and crafters. Non-GMO produce. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation. org. 441-9999.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 7 listing.

11 Tuesday COMEDY

Savage Henry’s BigFish Open Mic via Zoom. 9 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Enjoy or participate in some stand-up open-mic Zoom style. Five-minute sets. Zoom: www.us02web.zoom.us/j/86421967992 Password: comedy.

EVENTS Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

FOR KIDS Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

FOOD

SUBMIT your

Calendar Events ONLINE or by E-MAIL

northcoastjournal.com • calendar@northcoastjournal.com Print Deadline: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

@ncj_of_humboldt 28

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Mobile Produce Pantry. Second Tuesday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Redway Baptist Church, 553 Redway Drive. Food for People’s walk-up food distribution for those in need. Participants must wear face masks and maintain 6-foot social distancing. Free. www. foodforpeople.org. 445-3166. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. This sea town farmers’ market provides fresh, non-GMO produce and locally made crafts. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation. org. 441-9999.

MEETINGS Local Homesharing Info Session. 1-1:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. If you have a spare bedroom and could use extra income or help around the house, Northcoast Homeshare (a program of Area 1 Agency on Aging) can connect you with a compatible housemate. Join the weekly 30-minute Zoom informational session. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. www.zoom.us/j/2673010045?pwd=eTJvajJXaWR4eEMwOUErQlpGZHBJZz09. 442-3763 ext. 213.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

ETC Disability Peer Advocate Group. Second Tuesday of every month, 3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Peer advocates supporting each other and furthering the disability cause. Email for the Zoom link. alissa@ tilinet.org. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Virtual Yoga: Gentle Vinyasa Flow. 5-6:15 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join online at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a mellow practice. Suitable for all levels but previous yoga experience is helpful due to the limitations of online instruction. Free. mindfullymatt@ gmail.com. www.facebook.com/abbeyoftheredwoods.

12 Wednesday BOOKS

On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

LECTURE Naturalist Notes Webinar Series. 6-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Experts share stories of the creatures, plants and people of California’s North Coast dunes each week. Topic schedule online. May 5: Introduction to Lichens of the Dunes with Loriel Caverly. $10. www. friendsofthedunes.org/naturalistnotes.

EVENTS Bike Month Humboldt Friendly Driver Program. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An interactive session educating motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists on safely sharing the roadway and collision data in Eureka. Via Zoom. Free. stephen.luther@hcaog.net. www. facebook.com/events/211921390380317/. 444-8208. Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 8 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Reel Genius Virtual Trivia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Create a team via Facetime, Skype, Messenger, Hangouts etc., order some food and brews from the Madrone and play while dining outdoors, or enjoying takeout at home. Invite link will be posted prior to the event. www.facebook.com/ events/657139721581557. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 7 listing. Weekly Check-in with Rep. Huffman. Noon. Virtual World, Online. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) will hold Facebook Live check-ins to engage with his constituents on the latest updates regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic and to answer questions about the federal response. More information at www. huffman.house.gov/coronavirus. Free. www.facebook. com/rephuffman.


SCREENS

13 Thursday DANCE

Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See May 6 listing.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

THEATER Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. The Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre presents “The Cauldron of Destiny Thesis Festival,” four original works by graduating MFA students in the theater and Big Top Revival Tent. Only 25 seats per night. $10 suggested, paywhat-you-can. www.dellarte.com. 668-5633.

EVENTS Humboldt Bay Rowing Association Online Auction. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

MEETINGS Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

OUTDOORS Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing. Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See May 6 listing.

Heads Up … The Ink People Center for the Arts and the city of Eureka are now accepting applications for the next Poet Laureates. Poets must live or have a writing studio within 1 mile of Eureka city limits. Apply by May 28. Go to www.inkpeople.org/eureka-poet-laureate. KZZH 96.7 seeks submissions of original audio recordings up to five minutes long for its new weekly late-night show The Repository, featuring old and odd recordings, spoken word, poetry and more. Email digital submissions to kzzh@accesshumboldt. net. For a sample, visit www.archive.org/details/ the-repository-04032021. The city of Arcata seeks applicants for the Economic Development Committee. Email applications to citymgr@cityofarcata.org, fax to 822-8081 or drop off in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office” at the City Hall drop boxes. For more information visit www.cityofarcata.org or call 822-5953. The Humboldt-Del Norte County Medical Society’s Humboldt-Del Norte PreMedical Education Task Force offers two $1,000 Future Physician scholarships to students planning on attending medical school. Application at www.hafoundation. org/Grants-Scholarships/Scholarships-Apply-Now

l

Hominids and Homicide Sasquatch goes into the woods By Grant Scott-Goforth screens@northcoastjournal.com

SASQUATCH. I imagined a collective groan when trailers for Hulu’s Sasquatch rolled across screens on the North Coast. Another exploitative, sensationalist “documentary” on the Emerald Triangle to make a buck off a bunch of curious outsiders, great. That wouldn’t be unfair, given the impact of Murder Mountain. We’re a proud and insular bunch, not necessarily unfriendly to outsiders but certainly to the misconceptions that breed outside of the redwood curtain. I didn’t watch Murder Mountain and, unlike this column’s regular writer, I have largely steered clear of the true crime/documentary boom of the streaming age. I enjoyed the podcast Serial, an honest exploration of the journalistic process, a messy, ambiguous journey fraught with uncertainty. My few other forays into the contemporary genre — Three Identical Strangers, Making a Murderer — left me incensed with their careless and borderline unethical treatment of the subjects and their stories. But back to Sasquatch, which, for its faults, is an astute, entertaining portrait of a quirky, dangerous, insular community most North Coast viewers are familiar with. The three-part series, directed by Joshua Rofé (Lorena), begins with journalist David Holthouse recounting a nearly 30-year-old experience that haunts him. In the fall of 1993, he was working a cannabis farm off Spy Rock Road in Northern Mendocino County. One night, sheltering from a rainstorm in the owner’s A-frame cabin, two very spooked neighbors arrived, saying that Bigfoot had brutally killed some Mexican farm workers at a grow down the road. Holthouse and a friend clearly remember their visitors’ fear, and the deluge of stories about the area being terrorized by Bigfoots. Holthouse never believed Bigfoot murdered the men, but couldn’t shake that memory or his curiosity. The first episode explores the Bigfoot angle. He interviews all of the cryptozo-

Anything you have to say to me you can say in front of him. Sasquatch ological heavyweights: local legend James “Bobo” Fay (of Animal Planet’s Finding Bigfoot), professor Jeff Meldrum, Bob Gimlin (of the Patterson-Gimlin Film fame), as well as a neighbor of Gimlin’s who claims to be the man in the suit in that recognizable clip. The true believers are canny interview subjects, though Holthouse clearly doesn’t believe. They also provide the foundation for Sasquatch’s biggest strength: an exploration of mythmaking, dark truths, belief and how these ancient human constructs play out in a small community’s consciousness. Holthouse himself is interesting material. A survivor of childhood sexual assault, he translated the feelings of worthlessness brought on by trauma into a fearlessness he’s applied to gonzo journalism, making himself welcome among criminal enterprises, neo-Nazis and gutter punks. “Stalking monsters was a recurring thing for me,” he says. His unsettling charisma and wit make his infiltrations believable, and he spends much of the documentary driving rural backroads or holed up in a road motel, giving off Dale-Cooper-doppelganger vibes. As the series progresses, Holthouse delves deeper into the 1990s grow scene of Spy Rock, which was rumored to be largely under Hell’s Angel control, with back-tothe-landers being replaced by increasingly militarized mega-growers. This change is, of course, in conjunction with the highly militarized CAMP operations that saw heavily armed law enforcement teams raiding and razing all over the North Coast. Sasquatch summarizes the tensions of this era well, and interviews with former CAMP members show how little has been learned from that costly, misguided approach. Holthouse and interviewees also provide a good, if brief, history of the brutality that white settlers — after gold, then timber — brought to the area, and the parallels within the cannabis industry. Tensions between white and Latinx growers becomes a central point in Holthouse’s search for what happened to the three

men in 1993, who were never found. Holthouse’s interviews with people from the ’90s Northern Mendocino scene — including Razor, who was born into the Hell’s Angels and is now in the legal industry near the Salton Sea; and Ghostdance, an idiosyncratic grower — lead him to people who heard similar tales of murder on Spy Rock. He eventually hones in on a pair of big-timers, Bigfoot Gary and &^%#, a source who is never named. The filmmakers ratchet up the suspense, as Holthouse conducts interviews with anonymous sources in motel rooms, squalid grows and Laytonville parking lots. In the end, Holthouse is forced to go back to his 1993 memory. Like Serial, I appreciate that Sasquatch does not shy away from the ambiguities of the search for truth. Memory is a tricky thing and a pre-internet, secretive, drug-laden community only tangles the story more. There are missteps locals will easily spot, like the attempt to make the redwood forest an ominous character with spooky music over B-roll of misty canopies and dark, winding roads. Never mind how much of Bigfoot lore and interest focuses on more inland areas. The pixelated faces and recreated phone calls become a bit much by the third episode, and, in one inane moment, Holthouse enters a sheriff ’s office with a hidden camera, then promptly asks (and receives) permission to record the detective’s conversation. Why try to appear covert? Regardless, Sasquatch’s three episodes are well crafted and never feels like it’s wasting your time. Sure it’s sensational — it’s about Bigfoot and illegal drugs in the 1990s. But it doesn’t paint all of the Emerald Triangle with a broad brush. It focuses on a small area and explores how powerful mythmaking can be within and beyond its borders. TVMA. 138M. HULU. ● — Grant Scott-Goforth (he/him) wants to believe.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

FIELD NOTES

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration. Items from the Sutton Hoo ship burial, now in the British Museum. Top: Gold garnet shoulder clasp encrusted with Sri Lankan garnets (RobRoy/Creative Commons/Wikimedia). Bottom: Gold belt buckle, weighing nearly 1 pound. Photo by Jononmac46, Creative Commons/Wikimedia

Not So Dark Ages By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

A

ll the objects shone in the sunshine as on the day they were buried.” — Basil Brown’s diary, August of 1939.

Britain’s “Dark Ages” may have formally ended in a field in Suffolk, England, on July 21, 1939. That’s when archaeologist Peggy Piggott uncovered a tiny gold pyramid encrusted with garnets from the Sutton Hoo ship burial. Within days, the excavators had discovered a fabulous Anglo-Saxon hoard of precious metal objects. They had been buried alongside a local king, Raedwald, within a 90-foot-long ship. He died in 624 A.D., thus dating the site to nearly 1,500 years ago. The so-called “Dark Ages” weren’t dark any more. In one stroke, Sutton Hoo changed archaeologists’ understanding of early English culture. If the inhabitants of fifth-century Britain (in the middle of “the darkest of the Dark Ages,” according to the Oxford Illustrated Histories) were capable of making, or acquiring by trade, such intricate objects — see illustration — buried with their king, they can hardly be considered as anything other than enlightened. Check out The Dig, a dramatized version of the find (with Ralph Fiennes as Basil Brown, the working-class “excavator,” and Carrie Mulligan as landowner Edith Pretty), reviewed by John Bennett in the Journal (“Digging Up the Past,” Feb. 4). And if and when you visit London, treat yourself to a day at the British Museum, including an hour upstairs in Room 41, which houses the European Medieval collection. The literal

centerpiece of this room is the Sutton Hoo ship burial, with nearly 300 pieces on display. To be fair, almost no one now uses the term “Dark Ages.” It originated with the worldly Tuscan scholar Petrarch, writing in the 1330s. Believing himself to be living in an age of darkness (despite the Renaissance), he looked back longingly to the enlightened and cultured “classic ages” of ancient Greece and Rome. Later writers identified Dark Age Europe as the time between about 500 and 1100 A.D., when records were few and classical learning all but lost. The Fall of Rome in 476 A.D. is usually given as the start of the collapse, even though subsequent Germanic kings maintained many of the Roman traditions (including the Senate), while the Eastern Roman Empire, centered in Constantinople, survived for another millennium. Modern historians, in avoiding the term “Dark Ages,” refer instead to the Early Middle Ages. Not only do we now know much more about those times from archaeology, paleography and other fields of study, but ask yourself: Does an age that gave us Charlemagne, the Abbasid Golden Age of Islam, Beowulf, The Book of Kells, Peter Abelard, Hildegard of Bingen, Avicenna and more really deserve the label “dark?” And for that matter, were the dysfunctional, slave-holding, warring Greeks and Romans all that enlightened? l Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) swears his infatuation with Carrie Mulligan has absolutely nothing to do with his enjoyment of The Dig.

NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL • Thursday, • Thursday, May May 6, 2021 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 30NORTH 2

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 845−8167. (DMT −1230)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1230)

50 and Better OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1230)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1230) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1230)

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1230) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−499− 0205, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1230) SMART RECOVERY MEETINGS 707 267 7868 rebtarcata@yahoo.com

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES Are you looking for an online class? College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format Visit: https://www.redwoods.e du/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleI− D/4916/Additional−Online−Classes or call (707)476 −4500 (V−0506) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register.

FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASS visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. FREE HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA HISET PREPARA− TION visit https://www.redwoods.edu/adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707−476−4500 for more information and to register. FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES CLASSES visit https://www.redwoods.edu/ adulted or call College of the Redwoods at 707− 476−4500 for more information and to register. INJECTIONS 1 day training 5/24 or 5/25 8a−6p. Visit Injections (redwoods.edu) for more info or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0506) NOTARY Online instruction − in person certifica− tion exam Jun 23, 2021. Visit https://www.redwood s.edu/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/Article ID/3692/Notary or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0506) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start Anytime! Visit: https://www. redwoods.edu/communityed/Real−Estate or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0506) SERVSAFE Manager’s Certification 6/23, 830a−5p. Visit ServSafe Manager Certificate (redwoods.edu) or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0506) SPANISH FOR EMTS & PARAMEDICS May 17 − Jul 8, 2021. Online Visit https://www.redwoods.edu/c ommunityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleI− D/5286/Spanish−for−EMTs−Paramedics or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0506)

Wellness & Bodywork DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Herb Walk through the Seasons. May 22, July 10, Sept. 11, Explore wild edibles, medicinal plants & more as you get the know & enjoy the rich flora of Humboldt County in Spring, Summer & Fall on this trio of 4−hour walks. Begin− ning with Herbs. Sept 15 −Nov 3, 2021, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2022. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identifica− tion, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb. com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0603)


LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOAN ELLEN SANDERS CASE NO. PR2100111 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOAN ELLEN SANDERS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner CHARLES RANDALL HENSLEY In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that CHARLES RANDALL HENSLEY be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 27, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. Effective Monday, May 18, 2020, Humboldt Superior Court will resume Probate calendars using remote video and phone confer− encing. You have been served with Notice of Petition to Administer Estate pursuant to which a court hearing has been scheduled. Due to the COVID−19 pandemic, if you wish to appear at the court hearing, you must do so remotely. Instructions to appear remotely are set forth on the Court’s website: www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the

under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: Charles Randall Hensley Filed: April 30, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−169)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARLENE PATENAUDE HOVER CASE NO. PR2100108 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MARLENE PATENAUDE HOVER, aka MARLENE A. HOVER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner WILLIAM A. HOVER In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that WILLIAM A. HOVER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 3, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali−

appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: William A Hover 410 Ole Hansen Eureka, CA 95503 (707) 443−3793 Filed: April 26, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/29, 5/6, 5/13 (21−163)

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN: 316-032-002 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED APRIL 23, 2015. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: Art Banks, a married man dealing with his separate prop− erty DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Harland Law Firm LLP DEED OF TRUST RECORDED: May 13, 2015 INSTRUMENT NUMBER: 2015− 009092−5 of the Official Records of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California DATE OF SALE: May 14, 2021 at 11:00 A.M. PLACE OF SALE: Front entrance to

erty DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Harland Law Firm LLP DEED OF TRUST RECORDED: May 13, 2015 INSTRUMENT NUMBER: 2015− 009092−5 of the Official Records of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California DATE OF SALE: May 14, 2021 at 11:00 A.M. PLACE OF SALE: Front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, CA 95501 THE COMMON DESIGNATION OF THE PROPERTY IS PURPORTED TO BE: Vacant Land. Directions to the property may be obtained by pursuant to a written request submitted to Harland Law Firm LLP, 212 G Street, Suite 201, Eureka, CA 95501, within 10 days from the first publication of this notice. See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and made a part hereof for the Legal Description.

California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at (707) 444−9281. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement infor− mation is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: This 13th day of April, 2021 in the city of Eureka, and the county of Humboldt, California. Harland Law Firm LLP

Amount of unpaid balance and other charges as of April 13, 2021: $178,908.56.

John S. Lopez, Attorney, and Trustee for Beneficiary The Mel and Grace McLean Founda− tion, a California Non−Profit Public Benefit Corporation

Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount.

Exhibit "A" Legal Description

The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated above, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice.

THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE UNIN− CORPORATED AREA IN COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT, STATE OF CALIFORNIA AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.

PARCEL ONE: Parcel 1 as shown on Parcel Map No. 3551 for McLean Survivors Trust, filed October 12, 2012 in Book 35 of Parcel Maps, Pages 38 and 39, Humboldt County Records. PARCEL TWO: An easement 40 feet in width for ingress, egress and public utilities, designated as Parcel D and Parcel F on Parcel Map No. 3551 for McLean Survivors Trust, filed October 12, 2012 in Book 35 of Parcel Maps, Pages 38 and 39, Humboldt County Records.

purpose of freeing Mykal James Laferriere for placement for adop− tion. The following information concerns rights and procedures Continued onproceeding next page that relate to this for» the termination of custody and control of said minor as set forth in Family Code Section 7860 et seq.: 1. At the beginning of the proceeding the court will consider whether or not the interests of the minor child require the appoint− ment of counsel. If the court finds that the interests of the minor do require such protection, the court will appoint counsel to represent them, whether or not they are able to afford counsel. The minors will not be present in court unless the court so orders. 2. If a parent of the minor appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless the parent knowingly and intelligently waives the right to be represented by counsel. The court will not appoint the same counsel to represent both the minor and his parent. 3. The court may appoint private counsel. If private counsel is appointed, he or she will receive a reasonable sum for compensation and expenses, the amount of which will be determined by the court. That amount must be paid by the real parties in interest, but not by the minor, in such proportions as the court believes to be just. If, however, the court finds that any real parties in interest cannot afford counsel, the amount will be paid by the County. 4. The court may continue the proceeding for not more than thirty (30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case. Kim M Bartleson, Clerk By: Jackson W. DATE: April 1, 2021 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13 (21−150)

PUBLIC SALE

APN: 316−032−002 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−145)

CITATION TO PARENT CASE NO.: AD2000028 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT In the Matter of the Adoption Peti− tion of: WILLIAM JAMES LAFERRIERE Adopting Parent TO: Jeanette LAFERRIERE By order of this court you are hereby advised that you may appear before the judge presiding in Department 6 of this court on May 18, 2021 at 8:30 am then and there to show cause, if any you have, why Mykal James Laferriere, should not be declared free from your custody and control for the purpose of freeing Mykal James Laferriere for placement for adop− tion. The following information concerns rights and procedures that relate to this proceeding for the termination of custody and control of said minor as set forth in Family Code Section 7860 et seq.:

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 12th of May, 2021, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage.

The following spaces are located at NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The 105 Indianola Avenue, Eureka, CA, sale date shown on this notice of County of Humboldt and will be sale may be postponed one or sold immediately following the sale more times by the mortgagee, of the above units. beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Ian Fusi, Space # 108 (Held in Co. California Civil Code. The law Unit) requires that information about Michael Godecki, Space # 275 trustee sale postponements be Timra Cornelius, Space # 511 (Held in made available to you and to the Co. Unit) public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to Items to be sold include, but are learn whether your sale date has not limited to: been postponed, and, if applicable, northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL the rescheduled time and date for GS1100 Suzuki Motorcycle, license 1. At the beginning of the the sale of this property, you may number 15E2635 registered in Cali− proceeding the court will consider call the trustee’s information line at fornia. VIN # GS110X702621, Engine whether or not the interests of the (707) 444−9281. Information about

31


Ian Fusi, Space # 108 (Held in Co. Unit) Michael Godecki, Space # 275 Timra Cornelius, Space # 511 (Held in NOTICES Co.LEGAL Unit) Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: GS1100 Suzuki Motorcycle, license number 15E2635 registered in Cali− fornia. VIN # GS110X702621, Engine #GS110X−109301. To be sold 5/12/21 at 9:00 am at 105 Indianola Eureka, CA. Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip., misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 AM on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. 4/29, 5/6, (21−152)

SUMMONS (Citation Judicial) CASE NUMBER: CV2000557 NOTICE TO Defendant: Daniela Valdez Leal; and DOES 1 to 50 You are being sued by Plaintiff: Yanly Yang; Analisa Yang; Derek Yang, a minor

your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal require− ments. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the Cali− fornia Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self−Help Center(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California 421 I Street Eureka, CA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Daniel T. Platt, Esq. 310772 Scranton Law Firm 2450 Stanwell Drive Concord, CA 94520 (925) 602−2727 Date: April 16, 2021, clerk, by Kim M. Bartleson/Cindy C 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−164)

SUMMONS (DOMESTIC VIOLENCE RESTRAINING ORDER) CASE NUMBER: FL2000210 Superior Court of California County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA 95501 1. Person asking for protection: Danielle Muniz 2. Notice to: Ryan Edward Darvish

will be on form DV−100, Request for Domestic Violence Restraining Order. Free legal information is available at your local court’s self−help center. Go to www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp to find your local center. You are not required to have a lawyer, but you may want legal advice before your court hearing. For help finding a lawyer, you can visit www.lawhelpca.org or contact your local bar association. Kim M Bartleson, Clerk By Deputy Kimberlyn S. Filed: April 19, 2021 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13 (21−151)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00253 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SACRED ARTIFACT TATTOO Humboldt 818 Redwood Drive Garberville, CA 95542 PO Box 728 Garberville, CA 95542 Sacred Artifact, Inc. CA 4548807 818 Redwood Drive Garberville, CA 95542 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Pirkko T Gomsi, CEO This April 06, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

You have a court date on May 17, 2021 at 8:30 am in Department 6 at Notice: You have been sued. The the Superior Court. court may decide against you without you being heard unless you 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−160) If you do not go to your court date, respond within 30 days. Read the FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME the judge can grant a restraining information below. STATEMENT 21−00254 order that limits your contact with You have 30 calendar days after The following person is doing Busi− the person in "1". If you have a child this Summons and legal papers are ness as with the person in "1", the court served on you to file a written ROOSEVELT BASE CAMP could make orders that limit your response at this court and have a time with your child. Having a copy served on the plaintiff. A Humboldt restraining order against you may letter or phone call will not protect 121130 US−101 impact your life in other ways, you. Orick, CA 95555 including preventing you from Your written response must be in having guns and ammunition. If you proper legal form if you want the PO Box 101 do not go to your court date, the court to hear your case. There may Orick, CA 95555 judge could grant everything that be a court form that you can use the person in "1" asked the judge to for your response. You can find Carrie L Greenlaw order. these court forms and more infor− 81 Lundblade Street mation at the California Courts Orick, CA 95555 To find out what the person in "1" is Online Self−Help Center asking the judge to order, go to the (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), The business is conducted by an courthouse listed at the top of this your county library, or the court− Individual. notice. Ask the court clerk to let house nearest you. If you cannot The date registrant commenced to you see your case file. You will pay the filing fee, ask the court transact business under the ficti− need to give the court clerk your clerk for free waiver form. If you do tious business name or name listed case number, which is listed above. not file your response on time, you above on Not Applicable The request for restraining order may lose the case by default, and I declare that all information in this will be on form DV−100, Request for your wages, money, and property statement is true and correct. Domestic Violence Restraining may be taken without further A registrant who declares as true Order. warning from the court. any material matter pursuant to There are other legal require− Section 17913 of the Business and Free legal information is available at ments. You may want to call an Professions Code that the regis− your local court’s self−help center. attorney right away. If you do not trant knows to be false is guilty of a Go to www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp know an attorney, you may want to misdemeanor punishable by a fine to find your local center. call an attorney referral service. If NORTH JOURNAL not to exceed one thousand dollars you cannot affordCOAST an attorney, you • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com ($1,000). You are not required to have a may be eligible for free legal /s Carrie Greenlaw, Owner lawyer, but you may want legal services from a nonprofit legal This April 6, 2021 advice before your court hearing. services program. You can locate

32

I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Carrie Greenlaw, Owner This April 6, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−134)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00299 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FAR NORTH CLIMBING GYM Humboldt 1065 K St. Ste C Arcata, CA 95521 Far North Climbing LLC CA 202109810260 1065 K St. Ste C Arcata, CA 9521 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on April 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Paul McGuire, Member Manager This April 26, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−161)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20−00310 The following person is doing Busi− ness as REDWOOD SORREL JEWELRY Humboldt 2236 Ralphs Ct Eureka, CA 95503 Meagan R Canter 2236 Ralphs Ct Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on April 25, 2021 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Meagan R Canter, Business Owner This April 29, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−174)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00248

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00249

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BECOME−RETREAT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as GUNS AND BUNS FITNESS

Humboldt 329 Bayside Rd Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 2512 Dragonfly Place McKinleyville, CA 95519

Wendy J Parkhurst 329 Bayside Rd Arcata, CA 95521

Janelle D Jones 2512 Dragonfly Place McKinleyville, CA 95519

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 29, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Wendy J. Parkhurst, Owner This April 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Janelle Jones, Owner This April 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−138)

4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−157)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00221

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00258

The following person is doing Busi− ness as AKUA TEA COMPANY

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEVEN SEAS SURF & CYCLE

Humboldt 500 Quail Valley Rd Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 64 Sunnybrae Center Arcata, CA 95521

Walker J Collin 500 Quail Valley Rd Eureka, CA 95503

Benjamin T Conrad 1878 Golf Course Rdoad Bayside, CA 95524

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Walker Collin, Owner This March 23, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Benjamin Conrad, Owner This April 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−144)

4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−137)

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

classified@north coastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices


Continued on next page »

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00244

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00275

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00283

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00286

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00287

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00311

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SIP CAFE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HAIR BY SUPERKATE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as COPIOUS GLASS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ROCKY’S BARBER SHOP

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HOOVEN PROPERTY MANAGE− MENT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TWO TREES HANDMADE

Humboldt 1935 5th Street Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 823 3rd Street Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 2104 A Street Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 308 F Street Eureka, CA 95501

Sarah Ith Phe 5423 Alpine Court Eureka, CA 95503

2605 Garland Street Eureka, CA 95501

Christopher J Reynolds 2104 A Street Eureka, CA 95501

Lawrence (Rocky) L. McCovey 6337 Humboldt Hill Road Eureka, CA 95503

Tana J Reynolds 2104 A Street Eureka, CA 95501

Barbara J. McCovey 6337 Humboldt Hill Road Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on October 13, 2008 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Tana J Reynolds, Co−owner This April 20, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lawrence L. McCovey This April 20, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−165)

4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−156)

Kathryn R Knight 2605 Garland Street Eureka, CA 95501

Henry Phe 5423 Alpine Court Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sarah Ith Phe, Owner This April 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−153)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00290

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kathryn Knight, Owner This April 12, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13 (21−147)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00279

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00297

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00298

The following person is doing Busi− ness as MY TIME SOAP AND SELF−CARE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BESPOKEN GLASS

Humboldt 2400 Spring St Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 2025 Adkins Lane Eureka, CA 95503

Arlette A Large 2400 Spring St Eureka, CA 95501

Suzanne Lamar 2025 Adkins Lane Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on January 25, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sheilla K Salinger, Owner This April 21, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jennifer Hudson, Owner/Oper− ator This April 19, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Arlette Large, Owner This April 21, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Suzanne Lamar, Owner This April 26, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−168)

4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−158)

5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−166)

5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−173)

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HIDDEN TREASURES

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ROLLING SPIRITS Humboldt 2521 Renfrew St Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 3220 Freese Ave Eureka, CA 95503

Jennifer M Hudson 2521 Renfrew St Eureka, CA 95501

Sheilla K Salinger 3220 Freese Ave Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 3384 Pigeon Point Road Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 1806 H Street Arcata, CA 95521 Julie L Spinks 6650 Humboldt Hill Rd Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on April 20, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Julie Spinks, Owner This April 20, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−154)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00304 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT MEDICINALS COOP− ERATIVE Humboldt 1839 Quaker St Eureka, CA 95501

Bianca C Hayashi 3384 Pigeon Point Road Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on April 27, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Bianca Hayashi, Owner This April 21, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−170)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00266 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EVERETT’S CLUB Humboldt 784 9th Street Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 606 Arcata, CA 95518

Humboldt Medicinals Cooperative Inc CA C3894801 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Randy S Harris, CEO This April 27, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−172)

Timberline Liquor Co. California C0816521 784 9th Street Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on May 16, 1977 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Linda M Puzz, Owner/Secretary/ Treasurer This April 12, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20 (21−155)

Submit your Calendar Events ONLINE or by E-MAIL @ northcoastjournal.com / calendar@northcoastjournal.com PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

classified@north coastjournal.com

County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

33


LEGAL NOTICES South Bay Union School District is requesting qualifications for Architectural Services. For more information please visit www.southbayusd.org

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FIST Humboldt 417 2nd Street, Suite #204 Eureka, CA 95501

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for the City of Fortuna and Unincorporated Areas of Humboldt County, California, and Case No. 20-09-1637P. The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) solicits technical information or comments on proposed flood hazard determinations for the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, the Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report for your community. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations, base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. The FIRM and, if applicable, the FIS report have been revised to reflect these flood hazard determinations through issuance of a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR), in accordance with Title 44, Part 65 of the Code of Federal Regulations. These determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to adopt or show evidence of having in effect to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. For more information on the proposed flood hazard determinations and information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, please visit FEMA’s website at https://www.floodmaps.fema.gov/fhm/ BFE_Status/bfe_main.asp, or call the FEMA Mapping and Insurance eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).

NOTICE OF RIGHT TO CLAIM EXCESS PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Made pursuant to Section 4676, Revenue and Taxation Code Excess proceeds have resulted from the sale of tax defaulted property listed on this notice on March 29th, 2021. Parties of interest, as defined by California Revenue and Taxation Code section 4675, are entitled to claim the excess proceeds. All claims must be in writing and must contain sufficient information and proof to establish a claimant’s right to all or any part of the excess proceeds. Claims filed with the county more than one year after recordation of the Tax Collector’s deed to the purchaser on April 20th, 2021 cannot be considered. ADDRESS/LOCATION

EXCESS PROCEEDS

109-182-022-000

894 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove

$147.64

109-341-030-000

80 Willow Glen Rd, Shelter Cove

$3448.25

110-041-010-000

98 Warden Ct, Shelter Cove

$4090.51

ASSESSMENT NO.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00305

110-041-011-000

99 Warden Ct, Shelter Cove

$910.00

111-012-004-000

570 Upper Pacific Dr, Shelter Cove

$1535.78

PO Box 368 Eureka, CA 95502 Linda Hang 323 3rd Street, Apt #E Eureka, CA 95501 Michael Galan 323 3rd Street, Apt #E Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 20, 2014 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Linda Hang, Owner/Partner This April 28, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−167)

Let’s Be Friends

Claim forms and information regarding filing procedures may be obtained at the Humboldt County Tax Collector’s Office, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501 or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free (877) 448-6829 between 8:30 am-Noon and 1:00pm-5:00pm, Monday through Friday. I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector State of California Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on April 20th, 2021 Published in North Coast Journal on April 22, 29 & May 6, 2021.

34

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100493

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100459

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100590

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: M SANTA FINNEY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name M SANTA FINNEY to Proposed Name MARIA SANTA LOURENCO RAFAEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 28, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: April 7, 2021 Filed: April 7, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: MARTHA SUZANNE MEADE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MARTHA SUE MEADE to Proposed Name MARTHA SUZANNE MEADE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 21, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: April 2, 2021 Filed: April 2, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: DANIEL AARON FISK for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DANIEL AARON FISK to Proposed Name ERIK ALFKIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 11, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: April 26, 2021 Filed: April 27, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−139)

4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−143)

5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27 (21−171)

Obituary Information Obituary may be submitted via email (classifieds@ northcoastjournal.com) or in person. Please submit photos in jpeg or pdf format. Photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for the weekly edition is at 5 p.m., on the Sunday prior to publication date.

310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401


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By Rob Brezsny

Homework: The Dream of the Month Club wants to hear about your best nightly dreams. Truthrooster@gmail.com

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): Created by Leonardo da Vinci in the 16th century, the Mona Lisa is one of the world’s most famous paintings. It’s hanging in the Louvre museum in Paris. In that same museum is a less renowned version of the Mona Lisa. It depicts the same woman, but she’s unclothed. Made by da Vinci’s student, it was probably inspired by a now-lost nude Mona Lisa painted by the master himself. Renaissance artists commonly created “heavenly” and “vulgar” versions of the same subject. I suggest that in the coming weeks you opt for the “vulgar” Mona Lisa, not the “heavenly” one, as your metaphor of power. Favor what’s earthy, raw and unadorned over what’s spectacular, idealized and polished. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus poet Vera Pavlova writes, “Why is the word yes so brief? It should be the longest, the hardest, so that you could not decide in an instant to say it, so that upon reflection you could stop in the middle of saying it.” I suppose it makes sense for her to express such an attitude, given the fact that she never had a happy experience until she was 20 years old, and that furthermore, this happiness was “unbearable.” (She confessed these sad truths in an interview.) But I hope you won’t adopt her hard-edged skepticism toward YES anytime soon, Taurus. In my view, it’s time for you to become a connoisseur of YES, a brave explorer of the bright mysteries of YES, an exuberant perpetrator of YES. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Indigenous cultures from West Africa to Finland to China, folklore describes foxes as crafty tricksters with magical powers. Sometimes they’re thought of as perpetrators of pranks, but more often they are considered helpful messengers or intelligent allies. I propose that you regard the fox as your spirit creature for the foreseeable future. I think you will benefit from the influence of your inner fox — the wild part of you that is ingenious, cunning, and resourceful. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The universe conspires in your favor,” writes author Neale Donald Welsch. “It consistently places before you the right and perfect people, circumstances, and situations with which to answer life’s only question: ‘Who are you?’” In my book Pronoia Is the Antidote for Paranoia: How the Whole World Is Conspiring to Shower You with Blessings, I say much the same thing, although I mention two further questions that life regularly asks, which are: 1. What can you do next to liberate yourself from some of your suffering? 2. What can you do next to reduce the suffering of others, even by a little? As you enter a phase when you’ll get ample cosmic help in diminishing suffering and defining who you are, I hope you meditate on these questions every day. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The poet Anne Sexton wrote a letter to a Benedictine monk whose real identity she kept secret from the rest of us. She told him, “There are a few great souls in my life. They are not many. They are few. You are one.” In this spirit, Leo, and in accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to take an inventory of the great souls in your life: the people you admire and respect and learn from and feel grateful for; people with high integrity and noble intentions; people who are generous with their precious gifts. When you’ve compiled your list, I encourage you to do as Sexton did: Express your appreciation; perhaps even send no-strings-attached gifts. Doing these things will have a profoundly healing effect on you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “It’s a temptation for any intelligent person to try to murder the primitive, emotive, appetitive self,” writes author Donna Tartt. “But that is a mistake. Because it is dangerous to ignore the existence of the irrational.” I’m sending this message out to you, Virgo, because in the coming weeks it will be crucial for you to honor the parts of your life that can’t be managed through rational thought alone. I suggest you have sacred fun as you exult in the mysterious, welcome the numinous, explore the wildness within you, unrepress big feelings you’ve

buried and marvel adoringly about your deepest yearnings. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Science writer Sharman Apt Russell provides counsel that I think you should consider adopting in the coming days. The psychospiritual healing you require probably won’t be available through the normal means, so some version of her proposal may be useful: “We may need to be cured by flowers. We may need to strip naked and let the petals fall on our shoulders, down our bellies, against our thighs. We may need to lie naked in fields of wildflowers. We may need to walk naked through beauty. We may need to walk naked through color. We may need to walk naked through scent.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): As Scorpio author Margaret Atwood reminds us, “Water is not a solid wall; it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, being like water will be an excellent strategy for you to embrace during the coming weeks. “Water is patient,” Atwood continues. “Dripping water wears away a stone. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In a letter to a friend in 1856, Sagittarian poet Emily Dickinson confessed she was feeling discombobulated because of a recent move to a new home. She hoped she would soon regain her bearings. “I am out with lanterns, looking for myself,” she quipped, adding that she couldn’t help laughing at her disorientation. She signed the letter “From your mad Emilie,” intentionally misspelling her own name. I’d love it if you approached your current doubt and uncertainty with a similar light-heartedness and poise. (PS: Soon after writing this letter, Dickinson began her career as a poet in earnest, reading extensively and finishing an average of one poem every day for many years.) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now is a favorable time to celebrate both life’s changeableness and your own. The way we are all constantly called on to adjust to unceasing transformations can sometimes be a wearying chore, but I suspect it could be at least interesting and possibly even exhilarating for you in the coming weeks. For inspiration, study this message from the “Welcome to Night Vale” podcast: “You are never the same twice, and much of your unhappiness comes from trying to pretend that you are. Accept that you are different each day, and do so joyfully, recognizing it for the gift it is. Work within the desires and goals of the person you are currently, until you aren’t that person anymore.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian author Toni Morrison described two varieties of loneliness. The first “is a loneliness that can be rocked. Arms crossed, knees drawn up; holding, holding on, this motion smooths and contains the rocker.” The second “is a loneliness that roams. No rocking can hold it down. It is alive, on its own.” Neither kind is better or worse, of course, and both are sometimes necessary as a strategy for self-renewal — as a means for deepening and fine-tuning one’s relationship with oneself. I recommend either or both for you in the coming weeks. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): England’s Prince Charles requires his valet to iron his shoelaces and put toothpaste on his toothbrush and wash all of his clothes by hand. I could conceivably interpret the current astrological omens to mean that you should pursue similar behavior in the coming weeks. I could, but I won’t. Instead, I will suggest that you solicit help about truly important matters, not meaningless trivia like shoelace ironing. For example, I urge you to ask for the support you need as you build bridges, seek harmony, and make interesting connections. l

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53. Overly 56. Howard’s end? 57. Classic hymn ... or what the five circled letters represent 62. Caesar’s end? 63. Ornamental light fixture 64. High fever for Caesar? 65. Avg. 66. “Yes, honey” 67. Usually fuzzy tabloid pics

24. Meat in many an omelet 25. Word after funny or serious 28. Indian flatbreads 31. Leaf (through) 32. iPhone alternative, once 33. Israel’s Barak and Olmert 34. Thingamajig 36. Like some accents 38. Tart pie filling 41. One who’s morally flawed 43. Cordoned (off) 44. Twin of Jacob in the Bible 46. Cousin of -trix 47. Blissful areas 48. Monopoly deed figure 50. More than unfriendly 51. Finalize, as a deal 52. Celebrity chef Garten

DOWN

1. ____ fatigue 2. Ye ____ Shoppe 3. Real estate claim 4. Red or black insect 5. Deep divide 6. “Why do the French have only one egg for breakfast? Because one egg is an ____” (old joke)

7. Rebellion leader Turner 8. 1989 play about Capote 9. You can bank on it 10. Singer Lauper 11. Rain on one’s parade? 12. Anxiety 13. To the greatest extent 18. The O in “Jackie O” 23. Biological immunity agent 24. Places to lie low 25. “Harrumph!” 26. Lorre’s “Casablanca” role 27. MacFarlane or Meyers 28. WNBA official 29. “What have we here?!” 30. Recovery 31. Dominating, in gamer lingo 35. “No prob!”

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO RIP T A P E

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1. Nominee for the first two Nobel Prizes in Literature (1901-02), but never won 5. Popular cold and flu medicine 11. There is a “super” one every four yrs. 14. “Thirtysomething” actor Ken 15. Like some laughs and stews 16. Bookkeeper’s mailing: Abbr. 17. Keats poem that opens “Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness” 19. Artichoke heart? 20. “It’s Raining ____” 21. Check bouncer’s letters 22. Westernmost capital in mainland Africa

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37. Greek earth goddess 39. “Star Wars” character Kylo ____ 40. What directors sit on: Abbr. 42. Pittsburgh-toBuffalo dir. 44. Award show hosts 45. Went for in an auction 49. Painter’s base 50. Prefix with galactic and spatial 52. Speakers of Quechua 53. Cry after a hectic week 54. Only state with a nonrectangular flag 55. Singer Redding 58. “Bleah!” 59. El Al hub city 60. Chemical ending 61. Post-op locale

© Puzzles by Pappocom

U V E X P O S R U E R X E

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www.sudoku.com

Week of May 6, 2021

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

Free Will Astrology

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©2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ASTROLOGY

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT Lost & Found

Opportunities

LOST/STOLEN MEDICAID CARD IN ORIGINAL ENVELOPE. Was tucked inside 2021 Medicare and You handbook. Please return to Deborah L. Fisher 759 Rigby Ave, Apt 15, Rio Dell, CA 95562, 707− 764−1774

Hiring? 442-1400 ×314

northcoastjournal.com

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is now hiring. Clean record. Driver’s license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262 ESSENTIAL CAREGIVERS Needed to help Elderly Visiting Angels 707−442−8001

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NYLEX.net, Inc. is accepting applications for the full time position of

Network Support Technician Experience preferred, but excellent opportunity for new graduates/motivated individuals. Prefer applicants be familiar with: • current Microsoft desktop and server operating systems • setting up and configuring server hardware • firewalls and VPN protocols • backup and recovery software and methodologies • virtualization technologies such as VMWare or Hyper-V • Network diagnosis testing tools and commands • TCP/IP networking, routing, switching, wireless • Must be able to lift/move 40lbs, hold valid driver’s license, and available for occasional after hours/ weekend projects. Compensation: Starting pay based on experience, 100% employer paid health, dental and vision, life, paid holidays, gym membership, and 8 hours paid time off earned each month. Send resume: elizabeth@nylex.net Questions: 707-443-4944

Mentor providers needed now, Make a difference today! As a mentor with us, adults with special needs live in your home and you mentor them towards a better life. You even earn $1,400-$4,800/mo from the comfort and safety of your home while receiving professional support from our team. For more information call Sharon at 442-2500 x16 or visit us at mentorswanted.com

Make a Difference 36

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

SHOVEL LOADER OPERATOR

HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: DOE. Operates a shovel loader, performs daily maintenance, loads a logging trucks to meet production standards, decks logs in a safe manner, and observes all safety precautions for self and co-workers. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

HOOK TENDER

HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: DOE. Observes all safety precautions for self and co-workers; layout roads for yarder logging; rigging tail hold trees; cut guy stumps; and lay guidelines in a safe manner. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION LEAD

Fisheries Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $65,535.00118,316.00 DOE. Leads the division; oversees subordinate staff of biologists and technicians; studies basic principles of animal life such as origin, relationship, development, anatomy, and functions; collaborates with department staff and other agencies (Tribal, federal, and state agencies); and manages 2-3 subordinate supervisors who supervise 6-10 employees. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

POLICE OFFICER

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/hr. Performs a wide variety of peace officer duties; see position description for details. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

SERGEANT

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $34.13/hr. Under general supervision of the Chief of Police, shall perform a wide variety of peace officer duties, additional requirements are listed in the job description. OPEN UNTIL FILLED These positions are classified safety-sensitive. Obtain position description for minimum qualifications. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200, or email hr1@hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

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Redwood Coast Regional Center Be a part of a great team!

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator) FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for individuals w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3665/mo. Exc. bene. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs. Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

APPLY TODAY!

NOW HIRING WE HAVE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN OUR MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT MILLWRIGHTS ELECTRICIANS OILERS FABRICATORS Humboldt Sawmill Company continues to expand our Scotia, CA Operations! We are an essential business and offer secure employment, family-level wages, company paid medical, dental, and vision benefits, 401K plus much more. We have Immediate job placement available for the right people! Call 707-620-2940 or visit www.getredwood.com/Careers to apply now!

Get listed today for

FREE

Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com Free Ad Terms and Conditions: Limited to 1 Box size with text only, 50 words/300 characters.  Free ads will run weekly based on space available. Free ads will run for one issue and must be submitted weekly to be eligible for each issue printed. Ads that are submitted that do not run in print are not guaranteed to run in the following printed issue.  Free Ads will not be accepted past deadline.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

YO U R G LISTIN

HERE

Equal Opportunity Employer, Valuing Diversity of our Workforce and Offering a Drug Free Workplace


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CITY OF FORTUNA

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THE CITY OF

CITY OF FORTUNA

TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR II FULL TIME $40,066  $48,747 PER YEAR.

Under the general supervision of a senior operator, to perform a variety of operations, control, and maintenance functions in the City’s water and wastewater treatment systems; to perform laboratory testing and sample collection; to perform a variety of semiskilled, and skilled work in the maintenance, repair, and construction of wastewater treatment facility; and to do related work as required. Applicants must possess valid CDL, and be at least 18 years of age. Valid certifications are required at time of hire. Complete job description and application available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street or friendlyfortuna.com. Application packets must be received by 4pm on Monday, May 10, 2021.

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COMMERCIAL DELIVERY TRUCK DRIVER

FACILITY CUSTODIAN PART TIME $15.81  19.24/HR.

COMMUNITY SERVICES

SENIOR BUILDING INSPECTOR $4,455 -$5,415 MONTHLY The City of Eureka Building Division is seeking a qualified individual for the position of Senior Building Inspector. Some duties include: Performing field inspections of a variety of types of properties; performing plan checking; conferring with various staff and outside agencies for safely, zoning and other code interpretations; reviewing and issuing building permits; investigating complaints regarding existing buildings or new construction. The ideal candidate will have the equivalent to an associate’s degree in a related field and four (4) years of progressively responsible, advanced journey-level experience in the building trades. For a complete job description or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Final filing date: 5:00 pm, Friday, May 14th, 2021. EOE

Samoa/Humboldt County Area This position is responsible for driving a companyowned commercial sleeper/day cab to safely and

Under general supervision of the Director of Parks and Recreation and/or their designee, to perform a variety of custodial assignments for the upkeep of City facilities, equipment and grounds; and to perform related work as required. Must be at least 18 years of age and maintain a valid California Driver’s License throughout employment. Full job description and application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm on Friday, April 9, 2021. Extended to May 14, 2021

ARTISTIC PRODUCING DIRECTOR (APD) This top management position of Ferndale Repertory Theatre is responsible for all oper− ational aspects of the organization and for implementing the poli− cies set by the Board of Directors. For more information and appli− cation portal visit website. http://www.ferndalerep.org/apdsearch/

efficiently deliver/pickup products and materials.

IT SUPPORT TECHNICIAN The Support Technician will provide general end user support via our Help Desk ticketing system, troubleshoot the repair or replacement of network equipment, and maintain an up to date master equipment list, among other tasks.

SOILS PRODUCTION LABORERS Day and night shifts are available for this full time position. Requires continuous standing/walking and repetitive lifting of up to 70 pounds.

FERTILIZER PRODUCTION LABORERS Day shifts are available for this full time position. Requires continuous standing/walking and repetitive lifting of up to 40 pounds. Find our employment application on our site at: www.foxfarm.com/careers

PLEASE NOTE FoxFarm Soil & Fertilizer Company is an equal opportunity employer dedicated to an alcohol and drug-free work environment. Pre-employment drug screening is required. No phone calls, please.

DESIGN & MARKETING ASSISTANT (FULL-TIME), HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY View full job announcement on our website here: hsu.link/Zqi Job Title: Design and Marketing Assistant Location: Arcata, CA Hours: 40 hours/week, 12 months/year Wage: $18 − $22 per hour, depending on experience Project Name: Northern California Procurement Technical Assis− tance Center (Norcal PTAC) HSU Sponsored Programs Foundation − This is not a state position POSITION SUMMARY This is an hourly, 12−month position that works 40 hours/week. The job offers a competitive benefits package including group health, dental, vision, and 403b employer match. The location of this posi− tion is temporarily 100% remote but will eventually require some in −person work on HSU’s campus. This position is responsible for the coordination of tasks and projects related to maintaining the PTAC brand, and developing, designing and producing print and online communications. This position will also assist in planning, implementing, and managing events as well as assist with administrative and customer service related duties as needed. The ideal candidate will have great communication skills and thrive in a team environment. FULL APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS HERE: hsu.link/Zqi Initial Review Date: May 19, 2021; position is open until filled.

PUBLIC WORKS MAINTENANCE OPERATOR FULL-TIME SALARY $18-22.00/HR DOE, 40 HR/WEEK, PLUS HEALTH AND RETIREMENT BENEFITS. Performs a variety of repair, maintenance, and operation duties for City facilities including streets, trails, parks, and buildings, as well as the City’s Water Treatment Plant and water distribution system. This position requires certifications for Water Treatment Plant Operation (T2) and Water Distribution Systems (D1). Working knowledge of carpentry, landscaping, and plumbing desirable. This position involves strenuous physical labor and regular interaction with the public. Visit www.trinidad.ca.gov for complete job description and City Employment Application. Send resume and/or application to the City of Trinidad by mail; P.O. Box 390, Trinidad 95570, by email; cityclerk@trinidad.ca.gov, or deliver to 409 Trinity St, Trinidad CA. Deadline: WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2021.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation is Hiring!

YUROK TRIBE

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant positions:

Head Start Program Manager Full Time - Exempt $60,049-$83,824

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CITY OF FORTUNA

HUMAN SERVICES DIRECTOR

Human Services Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Provides administrative oversight and management to the Tribe’s Human Services Department and Child & Family Services Program, including program planning and development, budget preparation, grant and contract compliance, and monitoring and reporting. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor degree in Human Services, Social Work, Business or Public Administration, or a related field (Master’s degree preferred); 5 to 10 years of recent experience in administering Human Services programs in a Tribal community; and working knowledge of Indian Child Welfare Act and Indian law as it pertains to the work. Must have familiarity with accounting software (Abila MIP preferred), and be proficient with spreadsheet and word processing software (MS preferred). Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: May 14, 2021

ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

Office of Tribal Attorney, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Represents the Hoopa Valley Tribe in civil lawsuits, draws up legal documents, advises Hoopa Valley Tribe, Tribal departments, and entities of the Tribe; Provides a broad range of legal service to the Tribe as set forth more fully in the position description. Minimum Qualifications: Minimum 1 to 5 years practicing law, at least 2 years practicing federal Indian law or administrative/governmental law preferred. Member in good standing of any state bar, California bar preferred. If not a California bar member, must be willing to take California State Bar Exam within a year of hire. Outstanding writing, research, and communication skills required and a writing sample must be submitted with application and resume. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. Title 30A background check required. DEADLINE: June 3, 2021 These positions are classified safety-sensitive. Obtain position description for minimum qualifications. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200, or email hr1@hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

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COMMUNITY SERVICES OFFICER FIELD CSO PARTTIME $17.92  $21.80 PER HOUR.

Under general supervision of a Police Sergeant and on-duty Watch Commander, performs routine supportive police duties, such as Parking Enforcement, Animal Control, Receptionist Tasks, Evidence Tracking, minor reports and other related work as required within assigned department. Must be at least 18 and have a current CDL. Full job description and required application available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600 or www.friendlyfortuna.com.  default

CITY OF FORTUNA

CONFERENCE CENTER MANAGER FULLTIME, $40,805  $49,646 PER YEAR.

Under the general direction of the Parks & Recreation Director, to be responsible for the daily operation of the River Lodge Conference Center and Monday Club rental facilities, including the planning, coordinating and supervising of all events; maintenance of the facility, grounds and equipment; supervision of the Conference Center Coordinator, and the conference center employees; daily operation of the gift shop; administrative duties; and related work as required. Must be at least 18 and maintain a CDL throughout employment. Complete job description and applications are available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, or friendlyfortuna.com.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Application must be received by 4pm on Friday, May 14, 2021.

Under the general supervision of the, Education Director the Head Start Program Manager will manage the dayto-day operations and oversee the program to ensure smooth functioning of the Head Start program in all areas to provide quality services to children and families, and to support the goals of the program. The Head Start Program Manager is responsible for ensuring adequate systems are in place to maintain the highest quality of services to children and families in compliance with Head Start Performance Standards. The Head Start Program Manager will perform the duties required to manage family partnership functions, case management services and activities, and recruitment and enrollment responsibilities. This position serves as principle agent in the development of collaborative agreements with family support services and related agencies. The Head Start Program Manager is responsible for development and coordination of comprehensive nutritional services for enrolled children and ensures that parents, staff, and volunteers receive training in various elements of the health and nutrition component. Application: www.tolowa-nsn.gov/employment/ Email: HR@tolowa.com

Come work for Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation today!

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Bridgeville Community Center

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Permanent 30 hours per week with sick and vacation benefits. Salary negotiable. Bachelor’s degree in social work or related field preferred. Two years minimum relevant non-profit work experience required; may be considered in lieu of education.

General Responsibilities: • Interaction and communication with the Board of Directors in order to fulfill BCC mission and strategy. • Ongoing development, administration and communication for funding resources such as grants, fundraising programs, government funding. • Effective and organized administration of operations, including staff and volunteers. • Financial management, including budgets and reporting. Must have working knowledge of QuickBooks for Nonprofits. • Excellent written and verbal communication skills, computer skills. • Establish and maintain rapport with diverse community clientele and complementary organizations. Contact BCC at (707) 777-1775 for a complete job description and application. Position available immediately.


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CITY OF FORTUNA

Redwood Community Action Agency is hiring!

RECREATION PROGRAM SUPERVISOR

Natural Resources Field Crew

FULLTIME.

$15/hr. Seasonal F/T position

$30,656  $37,298 PER YEAR

Youth Shelter Residential Staff

Energy Services Weatherization Field Crew

City of Fortuna. Under the general direction of the Director of Parks and Recreation, to plan, direct, create, promote and conduct recreation programs for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; to supervise and train other recreation staff; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and applications are available at City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, or friendlyfortuna.com.

Intake & Outreach Specialist

Application must be received by 4pm on Wednesday, May 12, 2021.

P/T $15/hr.

Youth Shelter Residential Staff F/T $15/hr. Plus Full Benefits

Family Services Residential Staff F/T $14/hr. Plus Full Benefits

F/T $18/hr. Plus Full Benefits F/T $16/hr. Plus Full Benefits

Go to www.rcaa.org for complete job descriptions, qualifications and required employment application. All positions are open until filled. EOE

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NYLEX.net, Inc. is accepting applications for

Communications Cabling Installer Excellent opportunity for motivated, recent high school/ CR graduate. Work leads to eligibility to apply for C7 low voltage cabling license. Requirements: • Ensure that a high level of customer service is provided to all clients before, during and after projects • Be a self-starter • Uphold highest level of safety standards • Support other team members as needed on projects. • Have excellent written/verbal communication and record keeping skills • Lift 30-50 lbs. • Use 8’-12’ ladder • Able to crawl into small spaces • Maintain proper grooming and attire • Valid Driver’s License • Pass Live Scan and Drug Test • Prefer some experience with: • Telephone Systems • Wireless systems • Video Surveillance Systems • Low Voltage Cabling Compensation: Starting pay based on experience. Position is full time. 100% employer paid health insurance, dental and vision, life insurance, paid holidays, gym membership, and 8 hours paid time off earned each month. Send resume: elizabeth@nylex.net Questions: 707-443-4944

        







 

Northcoast Children’s Services ACCOUNTING/FISCAL SPECIALIST, Arcata Assist w/ fiscal & general ledger analysis; assist w/ prep for annual audits & federal/state monitoring. Assist w/payroll & accounts payable. Req. 3 yrs. business related exp. Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or Finance/Accounting preferred, but not req. F/T, starting 32 hrs./wk. $19.52-$20.50/hr. Open Until Filled

TEMPORARY CENTER DIRECTOR, McKinleyville Responsibilities include overall management of an Early Head start prog. AA/BA in Child Development or related field prefer. Must have 1 course in Infant Toddler coursework. Temp F/T 40 hrs./wk. M-Fri. $17.53-$19.33/hr. Open Until Filled

TEACHERS, Eureka/Fortuna Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities—supporting & supervising a toddler program. Must have 12 core in ECE/ CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting.  P/T positions, 28 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78-$15.52/hr.  Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHER, Arcata Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities for toddlers. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $15.08-$15.83/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEMPORARY TEACHER, McKinleyville Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler program. Have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. Temp. F/T 36 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78-$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, Arcata/McKinleyville Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min. of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T positions available, 25 hrs./wk. M-Fri $14.00$14.62/hr. Open Until Filled.

Hiring?

HOUSEKEEPER, CRITC (Partnership)

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com

Perform duties required to keep site clean, sanitized & orderly. Must have experience & knowledge of basic tools & methods utilized in custodial work and have the ability to learn and follow health & safety requirements. P/T 6 hrs./wk. (M-Fri) $14.00/hr. Open Until Filled. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

39


EMPLOYMENT

Continued on page 42 »

Miscellaneous

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CITY OF FORTUNA

RECREATION PROGRAM LEADER PART-TIME $14.00 - $16.37 PER HOUR, PART TIME.

(707) 445.9641 • 436 Harris St, Eureka, CA 95503

www. sequoiapersonnel.com default

K’ima:w Medical Center

Under the general supervision of a Recreation Program Supervisor, to plan, direct, and conduct

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

an assigned recreation program for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; to perform a variety of assignments for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Application Deadline: Open until filled

THE CITY OF

P OLICE DEPARTMENT

PARKS/WATERFRONT RANGER $4,660 - $5,664 MONTHLY Successful Lateral Candidates may be hired at any step in the salary range, depending on experience. Applicants who hold POST Professional Certifications will be eligible for certification pay as follows: POST Intermediate: 7% of Basic Salary POST Advanced: 14% of Basic Salary Come join the City of Eureka’s team with this very unique opportunity in the Eureka Police Department helping carry out EPD’s mission to enhance communityoriented police service by protecting our beautiful trails, parks, and historic waterfront. Engaging with the local public and visitors will be a primary aspect of this position, by providing information as well as protection to those who utilize the City’s abundant and varied public recreational areas. This sworn, working-level law enforcement class performs all non-supervisory assignments found in a municipal police department and is exclusively assigned to the City’s parks, trails, harbor, and waterfront areas for patrol and all functional areas of the law enforcement field, with a highly visible and engaging community presence. Based upon needs of the assignment, duties are carried out on foot, bicycle, from vehicles and/or aboard watercraft. This class is distinguished from Police Officer in that the latter is assigned varied law enforcement responsibilities throughout the entire city while the former’s duties are primarily constrained to proactive, high visibility patrol within the city’s parks and waterfront areas. For a complete job description, and to apply, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. This recruitment will remain open until positions are filled. EOE

40

DENTAL ASSISTANT/ RDA FT REGULAR- OPEN UNTIL FILLED DENTAL BILLER FT REGULAR- ($15.38‐$20.00) OPEN UNTIL FILLED DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL RECORDS FT REGULAR ($27.02 – $ 30.00) OPEN UNTIL FILLED ACCOUNTANT FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED ACCOUNTANT FT/TEMPORARY OPEN UNTIL FILLED BILLING OFFICE SUPERVISOR FT REGULAR OPENED UNTIL FILLED ELDER CARE/DISABILITY ADVOCATE FT REGULAR OPENED UNTIL FILLED PATIENT BENEFITS CLERK FT/ REGULAR – OPEN UNTIL FILLED PHYSICIAN FT/REGULAR - OPEN UNTIL FILLED HEALTH FACILITIES PROJECT MANAGER FT/ REGULAR – OPENED UNTIL FILLED RECEPTIONIST/DATA CLERK (DENTAL) FT/REGULAR - OPENED UNTIL FILLED CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED OUTREACH COORDINATOR FT TEMPORARY GRANT FUNDED OPENED UNTIL FILLED LAB TECHNOLOGIST FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CODER TECHNICIAN FT/REGULAR OPENED UNTIL FILLED MEDICAL DIRECTOR FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. HOUSEKEEPER FT/REGULAR TEMPORARY (UP TO 6 MONTHS) OPENED UNTIL FILLED MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. RN CARE MANAGER FT/REGULAR OPEN UNTIL FILLED. SECURITY GUARD ON- CALL OPEN UNTIL FILLED. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

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THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL IS SEEKING

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS

Wednesday afternoon/Thursday morning routes in

Willow Creek/Hoopa Fortuna/Ferndale Arcata Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

Contact Michelle

707.442.1400 ext. 305 michelle@northcoastjournal.com


7,595

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2010 Ford Fusion SE

2010 Nissan Versa S

98,456 miles #291633

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2019 Kia Soul

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WE BUY CARS. FOR CASH! PAID OFF OR NOT.

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2014 GMC Sierra 1500 4WD SLT 122,155 miles #312201

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2016 Chevrolet Suburban 1500 LT 107,160 miles #419447

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2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia 31,670 miles #534628

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2020 Subaru Forester Limited 8,919 miles #525712

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2019 Ford Ranger 4WD XLT 25,516 miles #A51352

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Sale price does not include tax, license or $80 document fee. Subject to prior sale. Loans subject to credit lenders approval. Ad expires 05/31/21 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

41


MARKETPLACE DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1−855−380−250 STILL PAYING TOO MUCH FOR YOUR MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order − prescription required. Call 1−855−750−1612 (AAN CAN) LONG DISTANCE MOVING: White−Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888−841−0629 (AAN CAN) NEVER PAY FOR COVERED HOME REPAIRS AGAIN! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1−877−673−0511 | Hours Mon−Thu, Sun: 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE default

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What’s New

CLOSING SALE EVERYTHING

50% OFF

EXCEPT FURS & JEWELRY

EVERYTHING MUST GO! 335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079 Open Wed, Thu. & Fri.

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027

2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka CalBRE: #01144618, NMLS: #323296

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−844− 416−7147 (AAN CAN)

Auto Service

FREE

Place a free classified ad in the North Coast Trader You may submit a free classified ad online at thetrader707.com/free-classified-ads Or submit your ad by snail mail, phone or email to 310 F St. Eureka CA 95501, (707) 442-1400 ads@thetrader707.com Free Ad Terms and Conditions: Limited to 1 Box size with text only, 50 words/300 characters.  Free ads will run weekly based on space available. Free ads will run for one issue and must be submitted weekly to be eligible for each issue printed. Ads that are submitted that do not run in print are not guaranteed to run in the following printed issue.  Free Ads will not be accepted past deadline.

Cleaning

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Get listed today for

42

$

EXCELLENT LOCATION FOR THESE 4 ACRES WITH MULTI-FAMILY ZONING IN SUNNY FORTUNA! There is subdivision potential for a contractor/developer. Or how about a nice urban estate or two, or three? Or perhaps just a good location for a big new home with acreage for some animals! Public sewer, water, and utilities at the street. MLS #257872

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

MARKETPLACE

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

YO U R G LISTIN

HERE

Computer & Internet

  MAC & PC REPAIRS + MORE

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

  

Let us be a one−stop−shop for all of your technology needs. We offer high quality repairs and fast turnaround times. (707) 308−1660 service@humboldttech.net https://humboldttech.net

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087 PLUMBING DRAIN CLEANING HT Services Plumbing and drain cleaning service.Over 40 years expe− rience as plumbing contractor. Licensed and insured.Please call or text 707 499 2327.Serving Fortuna and surrounding areas.Cal lic. 753894 accept credit cards for payment (707) 499−2327 1954harrytho mas@gmail.com

Musicians & Instructors Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

  

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues, Private Parties, Bars. Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419



Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com default



 

BODY, MIND & SPIRIT HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com default



Done Making Babies?



Consider Vasectomy…

     

Twenty-minute, in-office procedure In on Friday, back to work on Monday Friendly office with soothing music to calm you

  



LEGALS? 442-1400 ×314

Performing Vasectomies & Tubal Ligations for Over 35 Years Tim Paik-Nicely, MD 2505 Lucas Street, Suite B, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442-0400


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

Bernie Garrigan

Dacota Huzzen

BRE# 01930997

707.834.7979

Associate Broker

Realtor

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TING!

NEW LIS

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FIELDS LANDING – LAND/PROPERTY – $115,000

HAWKINS BAR – LAND/PROPERTY - $129,000

CUTTEN – LAND/PROPERTY – $450,000

TING!

659 FOREST VIEW DRIVE, WILLOW CREEK - $344,500 2 Bed, 2 bath house with an updated kitchen, solar power, 2 car garage and large great room that acts as a 3rd, master bedroom. Property features a pool, large deck, great sun and storage space under the house that could be converted into a guest or hobby room!

Undeveloped ±3.8 acre parcel with excellent sunset and bay views! Property is wooded, sloping, and has community water and sewer at parcel’s edge. Don’t miss your opportunity to build your dream home in this desirable neighborhood!

NEW LIS

Mike Willcutt

Katherine Fergus

Ashlee Cook

NEW LIS

TING!

±1.45 Acres along the Trinity River featuring river views, a flat building site, PG&E lines through the property, community water hookups, and a community river access point.

323 & 329 P STREET, EUREKA - $200,000

±9.25 Acres in Cutten/Ridgewood area! Property has redwoods, open meadows, a skid road, and the potential to subdivide.

2 units with long term tenants close to the Humboldt County Library. First unit is a 1,050 sq. ft. 2 bedrooms and 1 bathroom, and rents for $950. Second unit is a 360 sq. ft. studio and rents for $500. New roof on both units in 2016. Owner will carry.

MIRANDA – LAND/PROPERTY - $490,000

LARABEE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $699,000

±35 Acres in the Salmon Creek area with a very nice cabin, new 1,600 sq. ft. outbuilding, 2 ponds, additional water storage, flats, and fiberglass greenhouse!

±19.18 Acre river retreat in beautiful So Hum! Features a 2/2 home, shop, PG&E, open meadows, mature orchard, Eel River frontage with boat and fishing access, and end of the road privacy!

WEAVERVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY – $109,000

RIO DELL – LAND/PROPERTY – $379,000

Undeveloped, mostly steep ±40 acre parcel with top the of the world mountain views! Property is conveniently located just off Highway 299, only 10 minutes west of Weaverville.

±14 Acres in Rio Dell! Spring, flat tillable land, and subdivision potential. City lot across the street included in sale. Adjacent parcels also listed for sale.

NEW LIS

TING!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 6, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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