North Coast Journal 05-09-2024 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, May 9, 2024 Vol. XXXIV Issue 19 northcoastjournal.com 8 CPH post protest 18 Eureka eats
2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com

NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Mike Kelly, Collin Yeo

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Rory Hubbard ncjads@northcoastjournal.com

SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Asia Benoit asia@northcoastjournal.com

Heather Luther heather@northcoastjournal.com

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com

BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com

OFFICE MANAGER/DISTRIBUTION

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com

Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com

Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

May 9, 2024 • Volume XXXV Issue 19 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2024 4 Mailbox 4 Poem Virginia St., fool 8 News Campus Closed 10 NCJ Daily Online 12 On The Cover Summer of Fun 18 On the Table What’s Good: Thai, Doughnuts and a Rooftop View 20 Front Row Albee at the EXIT 22 Nightlife Live Entertainment Grid 24 The Setlist Pomp and Circumstance 25 Home & Garden Service Directory 26 Calendar 30 Screens The Fall Guy Takes it on the Chin 31 Humboldt Made Special Advertising Section 32 Get Out! Lions and Dragons in Old Town 34 Field Notes Doubting Shakespeare, Part 3: Whodunnit? 34 Sudoku & Crossword 40 Workshops & Classes 40 Classifieds On the Cover Illustration by Dave Brown Pad see ew at K&B Dining. Read more on page 18. Photo by Jennifer
Cahill The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink. CIRCULATION COUNCIL VERIFICATION MAIL/OFFICE 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com
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Re: The CPH Protests

Editor:

I admire the moral concern of the protesting students around the nation, even as actions by students, faculty and administrators differ from school to school (“On Siemens Hall Hill,” May 2). Disruptive, but peaceful, civil disobedience is an acceptable form of protest, and it comes with personal consequences.

The revulsion against the unimaginable Hamas attack is clearly the right impulse. But as Israel’s genocidal reaction became evident, the focus changed, and the possibility of stopping it emerged as the goal. But, the utter stupidity of threatening Jewish students or institutions diminishes the credibility of the protestors.

Except for the focus on the protests by the news and personal media, the effect on policies they oppose is very limited. So, without leverage to achieve it, protestors are left with symbolic results like faculty votes or campus-wide teachins.

The real rub, of course, is that the U.S. is an accessory to the Israeli actions, meaning the protests implicate all of us, even as many avoid facing the uncomfortable truth.

My suggestion to protestors is that, now that the message of the protests is clear, it’s time to substitute disruptions with legal, political and technical work necessary to disconnect schools from the military industrial complex.

Greg Movsesyan, Fieldbrook Editor:

It’s dumbfounding to me that Rep. Jared Huffman could vote to approve another $20 billion toward Israel’s genocide in Gaza, and, in his lengthy excuse for doing so, and in nearly a single breath, write, “I support continued funding for Israel’s security needs,” and yet, “innocent civilians in Palestine are out of time.”

Shame on Jared Huffman. He is a smart man. He knows the scale of the human atrocities now being committed in Palestine. He knows that American munitions comprise about 70 percent of the bombs and drones and bullets being wielded in Gaza. He knows that children are being blown to pieces in front of their parents or otherwise starving, that Israeli settlements in the West Bank are illegal and that none of this would be happening if the U.S. denied Israel its political and economic support. We expected more of Rep. Huffman, but he has hewed to a dangerously centrist party line. He will never again get my vote.

Greg King, Arcata Editor:

President Jackson, I just read your

Virginia St., fool

sometimes when a black hand is raised the two first fingers split in the air it doesn’t mean Virginia Street, fool all day!!, riding..., it just means peace. It just means peace

statement regarding the protests and the arrests that occurred last night (“Large Police Operation Clears Cal Poly Humboldt Campus; No Injuries Reported,” posted April 30).

Your statement opposes the peaceful expression of civil disobedience. When you make false claims about the protests, I wish that you would consider the safety of the protesters. To claim that what they were doing was not in fact a protest, but fundamentally just crime mischaracterizes them. Mischaracterizing protestors as criminals endangers the protestors. It invites the alt-right to attack the protestors. Closing the campus at the end of the semester was entirely unnecessary. The students were never a threat to their fellow students, you or anyone else. I believe, and I will continue to believe, that the reason you closed the school and summoned out-of-town SWAT teams is that you heard Speaker Mike Johnson call for universities to establish order. Mike Johnson is an agent of the alt-right. Don’t listen to him!

Did you personally witness any of the actual protests? One of the roles of a leader is to be present, observant and cognizant when something unfortunate occurs. The university relies on you to do your best to negotiate in good faith, to attempt to understand what the protestors are asking for and to at least consider the demands. If you did any of this, I never heard about it.

I personally am appalled at the ongoing attacks on Gazan civilians. A bare minimum response by you should be to examine the ways in which CPH may be contributing to the killings in Gaza. You

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
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still can. You have not yet been fired. I’m not holding my breath.

Geoffrey Robinson, Blue Lake Editor:

Will the Cal Poly Humboldt protestors’ parents — and grandparents — have to indemnify some or all of the $1 million in flagrant and useless physical damage that their youngsters inflicted?

And to what end? Their politically ignorant and jejune vandalism helped not a single soul in Gaza and changed nothing in Israel’s ultra-nationalist, criminally anti-Palestinian government.

Only the tiniest fraction of Cal Poly Humboldt’s 7,000 student population joined in the protest, strongly suggesting that the 25 to 32 arrested protestors were

politically impotent, even on campus, never mind the larger world.

What is free speech worth if it isn’t effective and productive?

If you’ve seen the local media’s videos of the students — with their fancy smartphones and cameras — rampaging through the president’s office, the Corbett Conference Center and Siemens Hall at large, you’ve witnessed an adolescent joyride with no purpose other than gleeful destructiveness.

Painting the word “Gaza” in big letters on the walls is childish and useless, bordering on nihilistic. What a repudiation of responsible political activism and civic-mindedness. Surely the students are not learning these tactics in the university’s

political science classes.

Paul Mann, McKinleyville Editor:

I would hope that not all who express consternation over the direction taken by some of the CPH protestors would lead them to be considered more affected by the demonstrations than the suffering in Gaza (“Desperados Under the Eves,” May 2). I, for one at least, fear that the images of graffiti, screaming confrontations and the disruption of the closing of the school year with its final exams, projects and ceremonies will obscure the legitimate concerns of the protestors. I agree with the sentiment and agree that the response by CPH was both overreactive and insensitive and displayed a serious abdication of leadership at the highest levels of administration.

sity campuses statewide while making nice with agitators at Cal Poly without really concerning the experiences of students, faculty, of the university who may have had an adverse impact of their judgement to publish the declaration to state officials.

Luta Belcher, Eureka Editor:

I’m just afraid that what will be remembered is not the righteousness of the message but the scrawls which cheapened it.

Scott Graves, Eureka

Editor:

As a Jewish resident of Humboldt County for 50 years I would kindly like to state that the Antisemitism Task Force of Eureka’s Temple Beth-El (TBE) is not representative nor expressive of my views or opinions of local occurrences of Jew hatred masked as “anti-Zionism,” recent political issues nor of Jewish Torah values.

May I also add that the one local Jewish organization that has actually served the students of the local university on campus for the past 12 years; Rabbi Eliyahu and Rebbitzen Mushkie Cowen, of Chabad of Humboldt, has provided student and community spiritually.

Furthermore, I strongly advance that the leadership of TBE is hardly representative of Humboldt Country’s Hebrew or Israelite-adjacent population. I also have my doubts that the majority of TBE membership endorses or supports the report regarding incidents of antisemitism, the intimidation of Jewish students on campus, and the letter of endorsement of “no Jew hatred here” regarding the recent campus vandalism and occupation by agitators and the resulting school closure, that was sent to California congressional district leaders. Hatred of the only Jewish country on the planet and denial of the ancestral Jewish homeland in the land of Israel is essentially antisemitic to its core, no matter what terminology is used be it “Zionist” or “Israel,” and, yes, Jewish people can be antisemitic too.

I personally find the letter sent by the task force to be a message of self-contradictory appeasement that does little to help the situation other than scold state officials for daring to address instances of antisemitism by these activists on univer-

Democrats equate spending money with success, the more money spent the larger the success. That mantra has been demonstrated twice at Cal Poly Humboldt. First by hiring Thomas Jackson as president of HSU back in May of 2019. He was the savior of the moldy campus from the awful Lisa Rossbacher. She set the stage for Jackson’s success by giving him the opportunity to return the football program, return KHSU to the airwaves as local radio, institute a nursing program, engage the community with honest communications, return the college to WSJ College rankings and make HSU a smaller desirable institute of higher learning.

Unfortunately, Jackson — despite being paid about $600,000 in salary and benefits — was unable to capitalize on the gifts Rossbacher left him.

Enter the Democrat regime in Sacramento. Looking for another way to waste the taxpayers money they decided to make HSU a polytechnic university. A half billion dollars was allocated for changing the signs at the Spanish style/modern/ old/disjointed campus to reflect the pride of a third polytechnic teaching the same stuff they already did.

All that money has gotten CPH into the Wall Street Journal. The lead editorial “Rules for Campus Radicals, 2024” in the May 3 newspaper includes the line, an analysis of the protests at Cal Poly Humboldt, “the pro-Palestinian movement must be a movement against the police.” Also that student occupations should take over buildings whenever possible. And, “We can wield the most power by occupying the spaces where classes are held and administrators have offices.”

Under Jackson’s leadership, the quad has an unpronounceable name and a destructive riot costing the taxpayers a million dollars and probably millions more. The good news for him is he is eligible for the same exit Rossbacher used, five and out. His five years are up this month and he will be able to leave with a pension.

Dennis Scales, Fortuna

‘Our

Wantonly Ways’ Editor:

The mega offshore floating wind turbine experiment is a colossal gamble (Mailbox, May 2). Environmentally it contributes little to zero good outcomes; actually creating more of a negative impact from

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what I am learning. The ocean is full of life, home to so many life forms that we probably can’t even conceive.

We need to quit making nature pay for all of our wantonly ways.

If the Earth flag had been flown years ago maybe we’d all be better off. Maybe wars would be a thing of the past. Maybe there would be respect for all life. Capitalism and nationalism killed any chance of that.

As to our country’s history of honoring treaties, it is horrible, especially as regards Native Americans! But Putin needs no provocation ... he is delusional and power crazed.

It was a real pleasure reading Karen Shepherd’s letter and Greg King’s very informative piece. Thank you so much!

Kathryn Travers, Eureka

‘A Form of Bullying’

Editor:

I appreciate that Jennifer Savage raised the issue of how the internet and social media distort our perceptions (“Making Change: The Internet, the self in the shadow,” April 25). It is an important topic that deserves more coverage. Unfortunately, by choosing to focus on Naomi Klein’s mischaracterization of Naomi Wolf and her work, Savage amplified that distortion.

In the article, Wolf is simply labelled as a “conspiracy theorist.” There is no explanation given for dismissing her with this derogatory term. What I know is that Wolf worked tirelessly to bring the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial documents to light. This is the data that the FDA perused for only four months before licensing the vaccine, but asked for 75 years to fully release, when they received a Freedom Of Information Act request. When a judge ordered them to release the documents in our lifetime, a large team of medical professionals went to work analyzing the documents, and Wolf reported the findings as widely as she was able to reach. That is called journalism. To label it as “conspiracy theories” is bizarre.

The media outlets that ignored this important story displayed poor journalistic judgement and ethics. To deride Wolf for publicizing this information is a form of bullying. The readers of the NCJ deserve better.

Amy Gustin, Ettersburg

Write a Letter!

Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 7

Celebrates National NURSES WEEK

Campus Closed

Fallout from protests at Cal Poly Humboldt continues

By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

In the week after Cal Poly Humboldt brought a large police force to campus to clear pro-Palestinian protesters from the area around Siemens Hall, arresting 32 people, including a professor and 13 students, the campus has remained closed, with discord seemingly growing between faculty and administration.

entrances and exits with tables and other furniture. An eight-day occupation ensued until the university brought in police from throughout the state to clear the campus, beginning around 3 a.m. on April 30.

A group of several dozen protesters entered Siemens Hall the afternoon of April 22 with the intent of starting an open occupation, holding space in the building and surrounding area to raise awareness of the impact of the Israel-Hamas War on Palestinian civilians. When police attempted to clear the building that evening, the protesters tried to physically prevent them from entering and a tense, briefly violent, standoff ensued with police in riot gear trying to shove through the doorway with shields and batons as students pushed back. Some blows were exchanged, with a student using an empty 5-gallon plastic water jug to hit a helmeted officer over the head, and at least two officers delivering blows to protesters with a baton and an elbow, the exchange reportedly resulting in one protester being treated at a local hospital. When police retreated, the protesters barricaded themselves in the building, blocking its

Humboldt County District Attorney Stacey Eads said no charging decisions have yet been made regarding the arrested protesters, who were booked on suspicion of trespassing and unlawful assembly, among other charges, adding she had yet to receive investigative reports from police. All have been released from custody. Meanwhile, Cal Poly Humboldt has sent interim notices of suspension to 72 students “related to protest activities,” though university spokespeople have repeatedly declined to answer how the students were identified as suspects and what campus policies they stand accused of violating. As the dust settles from the protests and their abrupt end, here’s a rundown of what’s happened since more than 150 police officers in riot gear cleared the Arcata campus.

Civil Liberties Groups Push Back Against Campus Closure

In a May 1 letter to the campus community acknowledging “an extremely challenging week,” Cal Poly Humboldt

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
An Arcata police truck blocks access to the center of the Cal Poly Humboldt campus. Mark Larson
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administrators charged that the “unlawful actions” taken by protesters put others and themselves at risk, and could not be tolerated.

“We have already begun assessing the state of the campus and working to clean up the buildings and grounds,” the letter signed by President Tom Jackson Jr. and the school’s top administrators said. “The campus will certainly remain closed through the end of the semester, likely much longer.”

Responding to a Journal inquiry, CPH spokesperson Aileen Yoo advised that the hard closure of the campus instituted April 27 — under which people face citation or arrest for entering campus without permission — would remain in place indefinitely “due to clean-up work, concerns about maintaining the security of buildings, and the ongoing criminal and campus conduct investigations.” Asked to clarify a prior statement that there would be no access to “Siemens Hall and Nelson Hall East and the areas surrounding both buildings, which should be considered to be crime scenes,” Yoo noted the areas had been fenced off and were “still part of UPD’s ongoing investigation.”

In a separate email, Yoo advised local media they would need permission before accessing campus, and outlined a request process that required reporters to submit their press credentials, photo ID and emergency contact, as well as other information.

None of this sits well with the nonprofit First Amendment Coalition (FAC) and the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California (ACLUNC). The organizations wrote a joint letter to Jackson on May 4 questioning the legality of the campus closure and media access procedures.

“We believe that the university’s policy limiting public access — and especially press access — is constitutionally suspect,” wrote FAC Legal Director David Loy and ACLUNC Senior Staff Attorney Chessie Thacher. “We recognize that this closure has been asserted in response to the recent civil unrest and involvement of law enforcement at Cal Poly Humboldt, but it is precisely in these moments that reporting by a free press is essential. We urge you, in the strongest possible terms, to lift this campus-wide closure.”

In the letter, the two attorneys go on to explain the law holds that complete bans on access to public spaces are only allowable when narrowly tailored, leaving alternatives, which they charge is the “opposite” of CPH’s “24-hour ban on public access continuing day-to-day for days on end.”

“Students, faculty and members of the public are not an evil to be guarded

against or silenced,” the attorneys wrote. “Keeping them away from campus while the academic year is still underway is disruptive and punitive to the entire school community.”

Further, the attorneys argue the closure violates the university’s own policy, which only applies in the event of an emergency or “unplanned event” that threatens the safety of people and property, but does not allow the university to close campus “on mere speculation about danger.”

The two attorneys also argue that the process for allowing media access is “far too limited,” concluding by them taking “this opportunity to respectfully remind the university that the press, including student journalists, are not the enemy.”

Commencement Moved Off

Campus, Decentralized

With campus closed indefinitely, the university announced May 3 that its May 11 commencement ceremonies would be moved off campus to the Blue Lake Casino, the Eureka Theater and the Eureka High School Auditorium, which will collectively host 17 separate ceremonies, organized by major.

“Facilities staff on campus typically spend a month or more preparing for commencement, and that has not been possible,” the announcement states. “Those same staff have been responding to the campus emergency, and now they are focused on the extensive clean-up following the restoration of order to campus. There is no way, at this point, to get the campus ready to host graduates and thousands of guests.”

Faculty/Staff Call for President’s Termination

A group of more than 300 members of CPH’s staff and faculty penned a letter to Gov. Gavin Newsom, California State University Chancellor Mildred Garcia and her board of trustees on April 29, demanding the “immediate removal and termination” of Jackson and his chief of staff Mark Johnson. Having not received a reply on May 3, they shared the letter with the press.

“Their repeatedly extreme and reckless actions in response to recent campus protests have systematically endangered students, staff and faculty, undermined the principles of shared governance and shattered any remaining trust in their leadership,” states the letter, signed by professors across disciplines. “President Jackson and Chief of Staff Johnson’s decision to deploy law enforcement against student demonstrators on April 22, 2024, resulted

in direct physical harm to members of our campus community.”

The letter goes on to criticize the administration’s “persistent lack of transparency,” referencing the faculty’s “overwhelming” no-confidence vote in Jackson, which received 193 out of a possible 203 votes in support.

Post Sheds Light on Decision Making

Throughout the week of the occupation and in its aftermath, faculty, staff and community leaders have said they were unclear about who was making decisions on behalf of CPH’s administration. A post on LinkdIn by Jenny Novak, a director of emergency management for the chancellor’s office, that appeared briefly with a photo of her and local administrators before being taken down sheds some light on who may have been involved in deciding the university’s response.

According to the post, Novak was brought into the role of Emergency Operations Committee (EOC) coordinator during days five through eight of the occupation.

“As the experiences of the past four days swirl in my mind, I want to document just a few of the things for which I am so very thankful,” Novak wrote.

Novak then launches into a list that includes items ranging from her husband’s willingness to hold things down at home while she was away to staff who helped her troubleshoot technical issues. But a couple of things are noteworthy about the post.

First, it mentions that the local EOC was in a video conference call with Newsom, the California Office of Emergency Services director, Garcia, CSU presidents and University of California chancellors on April 28, indicating the highest levels of state government were at least briefed on what was happening at CPH.

Second, the tone of the post is a marked contrast to the university’s messaging surrounding the protests, which it repeatedly characterized as dangerous and lawless, posing imminent threats to student safety. For example, Novak notes that she was thankful for friends who helped her with a fantasy sports draft and another who met her in town for a beer on short notice, while also joking the EOC team had plans to “create ‘jug of justice’ challenge coins,” a reference to the water jug a protester used to hit a police officer, video of which went briefly viral. At another point, she seems amused at hearing a state official explain the term “Oink Boink,” which had come up in relation to the video.

Jewish Leaders ‘Not Consulted’

In response to a joint statement North Coast state Assemblymember Jim Wood and state Sen. Mike McGuire issued following law enforcement’s clearing of campus that implied the protests had crossed a line with “destruction of school property, vandalism and antisemitic hate speech,” a group of local Jewish leaders pushed back on the characterization.

“Yes, there have been instances of antisemitism,” wrote Rabbi Naomi Steinberg and Rabbi Bob Rottengberg, as well as Temple Beth El President Courtney Ladika, Vice President Caroline Connor, Board Secretary Ann Alter and Antisemitism Task Force member David Boyd. “Yes, there is important work to be done. But we do not find the protests themselves to be antisemitic and we reject it as justification for the police force used against protesters. This inappropriate justification is all the more problematic because it was done without any consultation with Jewish community leaders.”

Further, the group wrote in the letter that Jewish community leaders had attempted to contact the university in early February in response to concerns of Jewish students, faculty and staff, including an incident in which a student was “viciously harassed.”

“It took three months to get a onehour meeting,” the group wrote, adding by that time the situation had deteriorated. “We were surprised to read a recent press release in which the university stated they ‘have been in touch with Jewish community leaders.’ This is inaccurate. Now it appears our well-intentioned elected officials have been misled by the university.”

The protests, the group wrote, demonstrated a lack of cultural sensitivity and an “indifference to alienation of Jewish students with opposing views,” which could have been mitigated had the university not ignored offers of help from Jewish leaders.

“This must change,” the group write. “At a long-awaited meeting on May 2 with the dean of students, it was agreed that vigorous, long-term effort is needed to educate the Cal Poly Humboldt community about and respond to antisemitism. Crimes and discrimination must be taken seriously, and spurious charges of antisemitism must be scrupulously avoided.”

lThadeus Greenson (he/him) is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at (707) 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 9

needs a break....

CPH University Senate Calls on DA Not to Prosecute Protesters, for Independent Investigation

Meeting at the Arcata Community Center because the Cal Poly Humboldt campus remained guarded by police under a hard closure, the University Senate voted overwhelmingly May 7 to pass resolutions calling on the Humboldt County District Attorney to drop all charges against students and faculty involved in the pro-Palestinian protests that caused administration to shutter campus April 27.

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In a separate resolution also overwhelmingly passed at the meeting, the Senate called for an independent investigation into “events and related decision-making process that followed the April 22, 2024, student protest actions.”

Both resolutions passed at a special, standing-room-only meeting that saw more than two hours devoted to the Senate hearing input from dozens of students, faculty and sta , as well as a handful of community members, about the protests and administration response that have deeply divided campus. While voices cracked, raised and faltered with emotion, senators largely sat silent and listened in what was the first organized forum allowing campus leadership to hear directly from the community it governs since hundreds of police o cers descended on campus April 30, arresting 32 people — including 13 students and one professor — while clearing the protests that had occupied the heart of campus for more than a week.

Those arrested have not been charged by the Humboldt County District Attorney’s O ce, as it has not yet received police reports documenting the cases against them. Meanwhile, 72 students have been served with interim suspension notices, though campus spokespeople have repeatedly declined to answer Journal questions detailing how the students were identified or what specific policies they stand accused of violating.

Protesters entered Siemens Hall, which

houses a handful of classrooms and administrative o ces, including that of the president, around 4:30 p.m. on April 22. Protesters have maintained their plan was to execute a “soft occupation” of the building that would bring attention to the Israel-Hamas War in Gaza, and the devastation it is causing Palestinian civilians in what protesters describe as an attempted genocide. Protesters said they intended to allow classes and core administrative functions to continue while they held the space.

A university press release issued May 7, however, maintains vandalism to the interior of the building had begun by the time police arrived, after which protesters refused police requests to leave the premises and began barricading entrances and exits.

Police wearing riot gear and wielding shields and batons would later try to force entry into the building while protesters pushed back, prompting a brief but violent exchange that left some o cers with minor injuries and at least one protester with a head wound. Police then stood down and a week-long occupation of the building ensued, with protesters setting up tents around Siemens Hall and using Dumpsters, tables and other furniture to erect large barriers blocking access to the heart of campus.

Throughout the occupation and its aftermath, President Tom Jackson Jr. has faced sharp criticism, including a no-confidence vote from the Senate and a letter calling for his resignation signed by more than 400 members of the university’s sta and faculty. Both the vote and letter stem from his handling of the situation, with many saying his early decision to call law enforcement ran against a campus tradition of allowing peaceful protest and dramatically escalated the situation.

Jackson did not attend the May 7 meeting of the Senate, of which he is a member, and instead sent his chief of sta Mark Johnson to stand in as his proxy. Asked why Jackson wasn’t in attendance, Johnson said

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it was due to “legitimate concerns about his personal safety.”

At the outset of the meeting, Johnson said there has to be a “reckoning” on campus for decisions made by everyone involved in the protests and their aftermath, but added, “There is some investigative work that needs to be done before that reckoning can occur.”

To that end, the Senate voted — with 23 in favor, none opposed and one abstention — to call for an independent investigation into the protests and the university response that gives the investigator the authority to interview everyone involved and gives access to “all relevant documents.”

Senator Stephanie Burkhalter, a Department of Politics professor, said an unbiased account is crucial to reconcile the divergent views of what transpired.

“They’re trying to shape the narrative of what happened,” she said of campus administration, “and we really need an independent party to shape the narrative.”

Senator James Graham, a professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Management, said he’s deeply concerned about the campus’ ability to open in the fall if steps aren’t made to “know what happened and make sure we can prevent it from happening again.”

The vote to call on the district attorney not to prosecute student and faculty protesters was similarly decisive, with 21 senators voting in favor, one voting no and four abstaining.

Senator Tim Miller, representing the university library, said there is no consensus on campus that the protesters should have been arrested in the first place, pointing out similar occupations at Sonoma and Sacramento state universities were resolved peacefully without police.

When the meeting opened up to public comment, a steady stream of students, faculty and staff addressed the Senate, universally expressing concern for the treatment of protesters and the hard closure and ensuing police presence that disrupted campus life, shifted classes online and caused widespread unease among students and their families.

A group of students read a proposed draft senate resolution calling on the university, and the California State University system, to divest from interests profiting from the Israel-Hamas War and to call for a cease fire, which Senate President Jim Woglom, a professor in the Department of Art and Film, pledged the Senate Executive Committee would do in the coming days.

Speakers’ comments ranged from the history of Palestine, the Israel-Hamas conflict and the humanitarian crisis on the ground in Gaza to Jackson and his administration’s

handling of the protests, which speakers almost universally regarded with sadness and disapproval, as they did the president’s having referred to the protesters as “criminals” who were not there for “noble causes.”

“It’s still like a police state,” Meredith Oram, an advisor, said of campus. “If I try to go to my office, I risk being arrested.”

Dan Barton, who chairs the Wildlife Department, said the university has failed its students, threatening them with arrest if they exercise their rights to assembly, protest and speech.

“This is some dystopian shit,” he said, apologizing that he didn’t have “better words.” He continued, “I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t believe in the mission of a public university and right now we are not meeting that mission.”

Another speaker charged that the university spends more on its police department annually than its cultural centers and Title IX office combined, which reflects its values, later blasting the university for calling police on the Black, brown and Indigenous students it works so hard to recruit to campus.

“They were not protecting us that night when they called the police, they were protecting property,” she said.

Loren Cannon, an environmental studies lecturer, expressed gratitude that student protesters had been the ones to push people on campus to pause and be “horrified” at what’s happing in Gaza, at “what’s happening to human beings.”

“We got to think about what’s happening and our responsibility for it,” Cannon said, adding that gratitude turned to deep disappointment at administration’s response.

Cannon ended by noting that Jackson wasn’t present, saying he never has been, imploring administrators who were in the room to take speakers’ messages back to the president and to ask him to respond to them in writing.

“He doesn’t just get to keep hiding,” Cannon said.

Lisa Tremain, who chairs the English Department, said she hadn’t planned on speaking but felt compelled to, saying she feels the university is crafting a media narrative that criminalizes students, robbing them of their voices.

She then turned to the students in attendance: “The reason the campus is still closed is because they are terrified of you.”

The meeting ran 30 minutes longer than scheduled, wrapping when it was announced a youth basketball league needed the community center floor for practice. As Johnson left the building, a group of students stood by, chanting, “Mark Johnson, please step down.”

—Thadeus Greenson POSTED 05.07.24

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 11 1716 5 TH ST., EUREKA • 707.442.6300 1716 5 TH ST • EUREKA • 707.442.6300 UP TO 50% STOREWIDE SAVINGS SALE PRICES ALL MONTH LONG!

Summer break is nearly here, and with it the sunshine and long days that seem infinitely longer when the kids have nothing to do. Pour yourself a tall lemonade and peruse this year’s Summer of Fun listings, where you’ll surely find the right camp, class or summer excursion for your youngster, whether they’re into stages, sewing machines, sports or forests.

GENERAL & MULTI ACTIVITIES

Big Lagoon Coastal Camp. Mon., July 1, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Mon., July 8, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Mon., July 15, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Mon., July 22, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Mon., July 29, 10 a.m.3:30 p.m., Mon., Aug. 5, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. and Mon., Aug. 12, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Big Lagoon Union Elementary School, 269 Big Lagoon Park Road, Trinidad. Canoeing, archery, songs, skits, fishing, Indigenous skills and epic adventures in one of the state’s most breathtaking areas. We have two offerings for summer camp. Overnight camp offers three days and two nights of fun-filled activities. Day camp offers all school-aged kids outdoor adventures in our magical forest and sunny days at the beach. Thanks to the California Coastal Commission, there are scholarships available for campers of Indigenous descent. Big Lagoon students are free. Cost per week varies based on your selection. Free-$375. ian@biglagoon.org. ian2161.wixsite. com/my-site-2/summer-camps. (707) 677-3688. Camp Combo Option. Mondays-Fridays. City of Arcata, Arcata. Ages 4-12. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers Camp Combos. Add variety to your child’s summer by combining two half-day camps. Enroll your camper for a morning camp (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.), then choose an afternoon camp (1 to 5 p.m.) for a full day of fun! Monday-Friday, June 17-Aug. 16. Transportation is not provided to/from the Arcata Skate Park or the Arcata Marsh, therefore some combos require parents to transport their camper to their next camp. Weekly Fee: $170/$197 non-resident. rec@cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Camp Living Waters. July 21-26. Cookson Ranch, 200 Cookson Lane, Redwood Valley. Camp Living Waters is July 21-July 26, open to ages 9- 15 and ages 16-17 serve as counselors. Join us for a week of Real Super Heroes, full of madcap cape adventures, identifying our God-given super powers and discovering the real superheroes all around us. Camp encourages diversity. Tuition includes five nights lodging, meals. Registration online. Scholarships available. We encourage those who cannot afford it to apply for a scholarship. $200. CLWHumboldt@gmail. com. camplivingwatershumboldt.org/. (707) 822-4102. Camp Ravencliff. Sun., June 30. YMCA Camp Ravencliff, 2830 Briceland Road, Redway. On the Eel River in Redway. Overnight Summer Camp for kids ages 9-14. Session Dates: June 30-July 7, July 7-14, July 14-21. Teen Leadership programs are also available. Financial assistance is available for all camp programs. Register and more info at scfymca.org/camp-ravencliff. scfymca. org/camp-ravencliff.

City of Eureka’s Get Out & Play Day. Sat., July 27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sequoia Park, 3414 W St., Eureka. Join the Eureka Community Services Department for the 10th annual event with playful excursions at a variety of city locations such as Sequoia Park & Zoo, the Discovery Museum, Cooper Gulch Skatepark, Hartman & Kennedy Fields, Hammond Park, the Eureka Golf Course, Old Town Eureka, Clara May Berry Park and the Eureka Waterfront. Participants immerse themselves in the world of outdoor recreation all while taking some knowledge home. Free. GetOutAndPlayDay. com. (707) 441-4248. Dream Quest Summer. Dates TBA. Dream Quest, 100 Country Club Drive, Willow Creek. Camps and activities including swim lessons, dance camp, drama club and camp, River Safety Day, field trips, cooking classes, historical fencing, music

lessons, StepUP, youth service learning work and volunteer experience, free lunch program and youth center. dqwc.org. (530) 629-3564.

For the Love of Animals – Humane Education Summer Program. June 24-28, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., July 8-12, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and July 15-19, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Companion Animal Foundation Community Animal Program Center, 3954 Jacobs Ave., Eureka. Calling all youth animal lovers: Companion Animal Foundation is offering For the Love of Animals humane education summer program, the perfect way to explore all things animals. From dog training to animal care and nutrition, we explore the life and care of pets. Animal Friendships (ages 8-10) is from June 24-28 from 9-1. First Session Animal Ambassadors (ages 11-16) is from July 8-12 from 9-1. Second Session Animal Ambassadors (ages 11-16) is July 15-19 from 9-1. $200. cafanimals.org. (707) 296-4629.

Fortuna Parks and Recreation Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. Ages: newborn-5 years. A safe and comfortable environment for children to interact with other children while learning important playtime social skills. Thursdays and Fridays. Free. friendlyfortuna.com. (707) 725-7620.

Fuente Nueva Charter School Spanish Immersion Summer Program. Mondays-Fridays, starting July 8, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Fuente Nueva Charter School, 1730 Janes Road, Arcata. Four weeks of summer fun. Week 1: El mundo de los dinosaurios. Blast into the past: Dinosaurs. Week 2: Viaje hacia las estrellas. Journey into the Stars. Week 3: La magia de la tierra. Plant Magic. Week 4: Verano con los compañeros. Summertime Buddies. Full day and half day available. $150/week, $100/week half day. dlopez@ fuentenueva. org. (707) 822-3348.

Leader-In-Training. Mondays-Fridays, starting Jun. 16. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. Ages: 13-16 years. Work with youth ages 4-12 helping plan and lead camp activities.

Gain real life work experience and leadership skills all while having fun. Leader-In-Training Program experience can also count towards community service and looks great on a college application. Half day and full day options. Sessions are one week. $5 per week, includes T-shirt. friendlyfortuna.com. (707) 725-7620. Leader-in-Training Program. Mondays-Fridays . City of Arcata, Arcata. Ages 13-17. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers the L.I.T. Program as a full day camp (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) or half-day camp (9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.), Monday-Friday, June 17-Aug. 16. Become a L.I.T. and gain real life work experience and leadership skills, all while having fun in the sun. Work with campers ages 4-14, helping to plan and lead summer camp activities, field trips and more. Get a head start for future paid job opportunities as a Recreation Camp Leader. Weekly fee: $22/$24.50 non-resident, five+ weeks for $110/$123.50 non-resident. Fee includes T-shirt. rec@cityofarcata. org. (707) 822-7091.

Lost Coast Camp Session 2: Makers Camp. July 15-22. Lost Coast Camp, 1199 Lighthouse Road, Petrolia. Ages 11-13. A sleepover camp in Petrolia with swimming, hiking, art, campfire, farming and more. Boys only. $850, camperships available. lostcoastcamp.org.

Maker’s Apron Creature Camp. June 24-28, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Maker’s Apron Creative Reuse is offering three creative reuse summer camps for mini makers ages 8 to 11. In these Mon.-Fri. day camps, crafty makers will create creatures, costumes and contraptions to explore the world. Edu-makers lead campers through a variety of individual and group projects along with team-building challenges and collaborations. All tools and materials included, plus free lunches and snacks. Campers will appreciate our big blue home planet from an artistic point of view while learning about the 4Rs of waste reduction: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rot. $265, scholarships available. makersapron.org/summer-camps.

Maker’s Apron Robots v Fairies Camp. July 8-12, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Maker’s Apron Creative Reuse is offering three creative reuse summer camps for mini makers ages 8 to 11. In these Mon-Fri day camps, crafty makers will

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
ON THE COVER

create creatures, costumes and contraptions to explore the world. Edu-makers will lead campers through a variety of individual and group projects along with team building challenges and collaborations. All tools and materials included, plus free lunches and Snacks. Campers will appreciate our big blue home planet from an artistic point of view while learning about the 4Rs of waste reduction: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rot. $265, scholarships available. makersapron. org/summer-camps.

Redwood Day Camp. Mondays-Fridays. Redwood Lodge, Redwood Park, Arcata. Ages 5-12. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers Redwood Day Camp Monday-Friday with two options: Morning Only (9 a.m.-1 p.m.) or Full Day (9 a.m.-5 p.m.) Free Extended Care: 7:30-9 a.m. and 5-5:30 p.m.: June 17-Aug. 16. Campers will make new friends and memories to last a lifetime as they explore the world of nature, art, cooking, and cooperative games in the beautiful setting of Redwood Park. Campers will enjoy the newly renovated playground. On Tuesday afternoons, full-day campers will walk to the Arcata Community Pool for swimming. Each week’s unique theme adds new and exciting activities for a whole summer of fun. Weekly Fee: morning only $120/$133.50 non-resident, full day $170/$183.50 non-resident. rec@ cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Summer Enrichment and Fun at Mistwood Montessori School. Mon., July 8, 9 a.m.-noon. Mistwood Montessori School, 1801 10th St., Eureka. Ages: 3-7. Two sessions: July 8 to 19, July 22 to Aug. 2. mistwoodmontessori.com. (707) 444-8100.

Summer FUN Camp. Mondays-Fridays, starting Jun. 17, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. Campers explore the world of nature, art, cooking and cooperative games all in the beautiful setting. Sessions are one week. $130/weekly, $140 non-resident. friendlyfortuna.com. (707) 725-7620.

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

Art Camp. June 24-28, 1-5 p.m., July 8-12, 1-5 p.m., July 1519, 1-5 p.m., July 22-26, 1-5 p.m. and Aug. 5-9, 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Ages 7-12. The City of Arcata Recreation Division offers Art Camp Monday-Friday, 1-5 p.m. Free Extended Care: 5-5:30 p.m.: June 24-28, July 8-12, July 15-19, July 22-26, and Aug. 5-9. Artists explore the visual arts, while discovering their own style. Camp is held in the Arcata Community Center’s Teen Room. Weekly Fee: $120/$133.50 non-resident. rec@cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Creative Dance Classes. Wednesdays, 10-10:30 a.m. Trillium Dance Studios, 855 Eighth St., Arcata. For ages 3-4 yrs old. Leap, twirl, roll and get inspired! Students will learn basic dance concepts with lots of time for fun and creativity. W, 10-10:30 a.m. for $25/mini-session (2 classes). Mini-Session 1: July 10 and 17. Mini-Session 2: July 24 and 31. $25/session. info@TrilliumDance.com. trilliumdance. com/register/. (707) 822-8408.

Pageant at the Playhouse. Mondays-Fridays. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Ages 11-17. Two weeks of classes in movement, stilt-walking, storytelling, mask-making,

and puppet creations aim to build physical theater skills and ensemble building foundations. This workshop concludes with an outdoor processional performance. playhousearts.org/event-details/summer-workshop-pageant-at-the-playhouse. Sequoia Chamber Music Workshop. June 16-22,3-10 p.m., 7-8:30 p.m. and Sat., June 22, 10-11:30 a.m. Cal Poly Humboldt, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. A unique opportunity for young musicians to study and perform at least four different works with four different chamber groups over the course of a six-day session. Since 1972, Sequoia’s goal has been to offer young musicians ages 13-20 the opportunity to develop their technical skills and passion for music through a program of total immersion in the world of chamber music. Instead of focusing on a single “command performance” at the conclusion of the workshop, Sequoia provides each participant with the opportunity to perform four times during each six-day session. $575. sequoia@humboldt.edu. extended.humboldt.edu/ extended-education/program/sequoia-chamber-music-workshop. (510) 507-9738.

Summer Camps. Mon., June 24, 9 a.m. North Coast Dance, 426 F St., Eureka. North Coast Dance Summer Dance Camps for Ages 3-12. Join for a week of ballet, jazz, tap, hip hop, musical theater and contemporary. Week 1: June 24-28. Week 2: July 15-19. Week 3: Aug. 5-9. Register online or call. $200/week. reception.ncd@gmail. com. northcoastdance.org. (707) 442-7779.

Summer Dance. Mon., July 15. No Limits Dance Academy, 1093 10th St., Arcata. Ages 3 and up. Tap, jazz, ballet and hip-hop. Through Aug. 8. nolimitsdanceacademy.com. (707) 825-0922.

Summer Dance Camp. Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Trillium Dance Studios, 855 Eighth St., Arcata. Ages 7-12 yrs. Join us for an inclusive summer camp experience with a variety of dance styles including ballet, modern, jazz, workshops, crafting, dance games, choreography, dance movies and more! No previous experience required. M-F, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. for $150/week. Week 1: July 8-12, Week 2: July 15-19. $150/week. info@TrilliumDance.com. trilliumdance.com/register/. (707) 822-8408.

Summer Dance Intensive Program. Mondays-Fridays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Trillium Dance Studios, 855 Eighth St., Arcata. For the dedicated dancer ages 12 and up, join us for 2 weeks of technical training in ballet, pointe/ pre-pointe, contemporary, jazz, dancer Pilates and workshops! Dancers are encouraged to attend both weeks for an immersive experience of growth and value. M-F, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. for $195/week or $375/both weeks. Week 1: July 22-26. Week 2: July 29-Aug. 2. $195/week. info@TrilliumDance.com. trilliumdance.com/register/. (707) 822-8408.

Summer Sewing Camps. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Notions Sewing Studio, Eureka, Eureka. Join us in the studio for a variety of fun sewing camps this summer. Camps include: Quilted pillows, Stuffed Animals, Bags and Backpacks, Dolls and Doll Clothes, Fiber Art Mixed Media and Monster Making. $155. sewing@notionssewingstudio. com. notionssewingstudio.com. (707) 601-9804.

Summer Stage Workshop: Finding Nemo KIDS. Mon., July 22, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and Mon., Aug. 12, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Disney’s Finding Nemo KIDS is a 30-minute musical adaptation of the beloved 2003 Pixar movie, with new music by award-winning songwriting team Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez. Week 1: July 22-26; performances July 26. Week 2: Aug. 12-16; performances Aug. 16. Ages 6-11. Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Light Opera Company SPACE. $250/full week workshop. Continued on next page »

AGES 3-7

TWO SESSIONS

July 8 to 19

July 22 to August 2 9 am–noon

Call 707-444-8100 for more info 1801 Tenth St., Eureka www.mistwoodmontessori.com

FUENTE NUEVA CHARTER SCHOOL SPANISH IMMERSION SUMMER PROGRAM

4 WEEKS OF SUMMER FUN!

JULY 8TH - AUGUST 2ND

Week 1: El mundo de los dinosaurios. Blast into the past: Dinosaurs

Week 2: Viaje hacia las estrellas. Journey into the Stars

Week 3: La magia de la tierra. Plant Magic

Week 4: Verano con los compañeros. Summertime Buddies

FULL DAY AND HALF DAY AVAILABLE

FOR MORE INFORMATION dlopez@ fuentenueva.org

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 13

FREE LEARN TO ROW DAY

Saturday, June 8th

Online registration opens May 18

2-week

ON THE COVER

Continued from previous page

childrensdivision@mainstagehumboldt.org. mainstagehumboldt.org/youth-productions. (707) 200-1778.

Suzuki Summer Day Camp. Dates TBA. Sunny Brae Middle School, 1430 Buttermilk Lane, Arcata. All ages. Every child can become fluent in music. We will explore the art of music individually, in duets and ensembles. Offering instruction in guitar, piano, ukulele and vocals. Week-long study wraps up with an evening dinner cabaret-style performance. Full (9 a.m.-5 p.m.) and half (10 a.m.-1 p.m., 2-5 p.m.) day options available. $180/$125. (707) 601-2434. Very Beginner Sewing Camp. 9:30 a.m.-noon and 1:30-4 p.m. Notions Sewing Studio, Eureka, Eureka. Learn to use a sewing machine in a safe, encouraging environment. We will explore basic skills through a variety of fun useful projects. No experience necessary. This class meets the prerequisites for all other sewing classes. Ages 7 and up. All materials included. Sign up online. $155. sewing@ notionssewingstudio.com. NotionsSewingStudio.com. (707) 601-9804.

Yarn Craft Camp. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Yarn, 2840 F St., Eureka. Yarn is teaming up with Notions Sewing Studio for a week-long summer craft camp for kids age 7-12. Campers will explore a variety of crafts involving fiber, paper, nature and more. With a $15 discount for siblings. A $35 non-refundable deposit is required to hold a spot. $165. yarnfun.com. (707) 443-9276.

Weekly Fee: $120/$133.50 non-resident. rec@cityofarcata. org. (707) 822-7091.

Jr. Explorers Science Camp – Marsh. June 24-28, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and Aug. 5-9, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Ages 4-6. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers Jr. Explorers Science Camp – Marsh, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free Extended Care: 8-9 a.m.: June 24-28 and Aug. 5-9. Campers explore the natural world through experiments, outdoor exploration, are projects and engaging, age-appropriate scientific learning at Arcata’s unique Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary. Weekly Fee: $120/$133.50 non-resident. rec@ cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Junior Rohner Ranger Camp . June 17-21, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., July 8-12, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., July 29-Aug. 2, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. and Aug. 19-23, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. Ages: 4-6 years. A ranger’s motto is be prepared. Through investigation, individual and group projects and engaging, age-appropriate hands-on learning campers will explore the natural environment. $80/weekly, $90 non-resident. friendlyfortuna.com. (707) 725-7620.

Maker’s Apron Space Explorers Camp. June 17-21, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. For mini-makers going into third through sixth grade next fall. Each five-day themed camp is packed with creative projects, big group games, building challenges and a grand finale photo shoot to show off what they’ve made. Through creative play and collaboration, campers will learn about the 4Rs of waste reduction: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rot. Early drop off and late pick up available. Sign up online. $265, some scholarships available. makersapron.org/summer-camps.

Young Creators Art Camp. June 17-21, July 1-5, July 29Aug. 2 and Aug. 12-16. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Ages 4-6. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers Young Creators Art Camp Monday-Friday, 1-5 p.m. Free Extended Care: 5-5:30 p.m.: June 17-21, July 1-5, July 29-Aug. 2, and Aug. 12-16. Young aspiring artists focus on age-appropriate art projects, imaginative play and inspiring activities. Artists create new projects every day while exploring a variety of art mediums. Camp is held in the Arcata Community Center’s Teen Room. Weekly Fee: $120/$133.50 non-resident. rec@ cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Young Dancer Summer Mini-Sessions. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10-11 a.m. Trillium Dance Studios, 855 Eighth St., Arcata. For ages 4-6 yrs old. Grab your ballet slippers and join us! Students will practice ballet skills and musicality with a focus on joy and expression. T/Th, 10-10:55 a.m. for $50/mini-session (4 classes). Session 1: July 9, 11, 16, 18. Session 2: July 23, 25, 30, Aug. 1. $50/mini-session. erin@trilliumdance.com. trilliumdance.com/register/. (707) 822-8408.

NATURE & SCIENCE

Explorers Science Camp – Laurel. July 1-5, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., July 8-12, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., July 15-19, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and July 22-26, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Laurel Tree Charter School, 4555 Valley West Blvd., Arcata. Ages 5-9. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers Explorers Science Camp –Laurel, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free Extended Care: 8-9 a.m. and 5-5:30 p.m.: July 1-5, July 8-12, July 15-19, and July 22-26. This camp offers a full day of fun and scientific exploration. Enjoy group games, arts and crafts, S.T.E.M. projects, outdoor adventure and play. Each weeks’ unique theme adds new and exciting hands-on activities. Weekly Fee: $170/$183.50 non-resident. rec@ cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Jr. Explorers Science Camp – Forest. June 17-21, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., July 29-Aug. 2, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and Aug. 12-16, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Redwood Lounge, Redwood Park, Arcata. Ages 4-6. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers Jr. Explorers Science Camp – Forest Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free Extended Care: 8-9 a.m.: June 17-21, July 29-Aug. 2, and Aug. 12-16. Campers uncover the wonders of the natural world through play, exploration, games and crafts.

Museum Youth Summer Camps. Mon., June 24, 1-5 p.m., Mon., July 8, 1-5 p.m. and Mon., July 15, 1-5 p.m. Natural History Museum of Cal Poly Humboldt, 1242 G St., Arcata. Camps are for ages 6-9. Sign up for a membership and get a discount. Sign up for one or all three weeks. All weeks will include themed art projects, hands-on exploration of materials, story time, research practice, and many games. June 24-28: Jump, Slither and Run with live reptiles and amphibians, practice animal tracking while learning about different animal careers. July 8-12: Natural Science Explorers. Dive into marine science, learn to use telescopes, put on puppet show theater. Learn about what different types of scientists study. $100/$120. https://natmus.humboldt.edu/summer-youth-camps. (707) 826-4480.

Summer Adventure Camp. Mon., June 24. King Range National Conservation Area, 768 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. From tide pools to creeks and ridge tops to meadows, every day SAC campers embark on a new adventure. Based in Whitethorn, the camp serves 12+ kids each week, bringing them outside to hike, create nature inspired crafts, learn about edible and medicinal plants, journal, observe wildlife, swim, play, explore and learn the value of giving back through service projects. Week 1 runs June 24-28, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and is open to ages 10-13. Week 2 runs July 8-12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and is open to ages 7-9. Week 3 runs July 15-19, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and is open to ages 4-6. Week 4 runs July 22-26, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and is open to ages 4-6. Week 5 runs July 29-Aug. 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and is open to ages 7-9. Week 6 runs Aug. 5-9, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and is open to ages 10-13. Full and partial scholarships are available. info@lostcoast.org. Summer Adventure Camp - week 2. Mon., July 8. King Range National Conservation Area, 768 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. “Summer Adventure Camp is the best camp ever!” said 9 year old Gigi of her camp experience. From tide pools to creeks and ridge tops to meadows, every day SAC campers embark on a new adventure. Based in Whitethorn, the camp serves 12+ kids

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
www.hbra.org
at
summer
sessions for Juniors start on June 17, July 8, August 5 HUMBOLDT BAY ROWING ASSOCIATION www.hbra.org For more information - 707 267-7976 HumboldtBayRowingAssoc@gmail.com Dream Quest DQWC.ORG (530) 629-3564 Swim Lessons • Dance Camp Drama Club & Camp River Safety Day • Field Trips Cooking Classes Historical Fencing Music Lessons • StepUP Youth Service Learning Work & Volunteer Experience Free Lunch Program • Youth Center Summer 2024 Tap, Jazz, Ballet and Hip-hop July 15 th - August 8 th Ages 3 and up nolimitsdanceacademy.com 707-825-0922
rowing
Summer Dance

each week, bringing them outside to hike, create nature inspired crafts, learn about edible and medicinal plants, journal, observe wildlife, swim, play, explore, and learn the value of giving back through service projects. Week 2 runs July 8-12, 10am-4pm and is open to ages 7-9. Full and partial scholarships are available. info@lostcoast.org.

Summer Adventure Camp - week 3. Mon., July 15. King Range National Conservation Area, 768 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. “Summer Adventure Camp is the best camp ever!” said 9 year old Gigi of her camp experience. From tide pools to creeks and ridge tops to meadows, every day SAC campers embark on a new adventure. Based in Whitethorn, the camp serves 12+ kids each week, bringing them outside to hike, create nature inspired crafts, learn about edible and medicinal plants, journal, observe wildlife, swim, play, explore, and learn the value of giving back through service projects. Week 3 runs July 15-19, 10am-4pm and is open to ages 4-6. Full and partial scholarships are available. info@lostcoast.org.

4pm and is open to ages 4-6. Full and partial scholarships are available. info@lostcoast.org.

Summer Adventure Camp - week 4. Mon., July 22. King Range National Conservation Area, 768 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. “Summer Adventure Camp is the best camp ever!” said 9 year old Gigi of her camp experience. From tide pools to creeks and ridge tops to meadows, every day SAC campers embark on a new adventure. Based in Whitethorn, the camp serves 12+ kids each week, bringing them outside to hike, create nature inspired crafts, learn about edible and medicinal plants, journal, observe wildlife, swim, play, explore, and learn the value of giving back through service projects.

Summer Adventure Camp - week 5. Mon., July 29. King Range National Conservation Area, 768 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. “Summer Adventure Camp is the best camp ever!” said 9 year old Gigi of her camp experience. From tide pools to creeks and ridge tops to meadows, every day SAC campers embark on a new adventure. Based in Whitethorn, the camp serves 12+ kids each week, bringing them outside to hike, create nature inspired crafts, learn about edible and medicinal plants, journal, observe wildlife, swim, play, explore, and learn the value of giving back through service projects. Week 5 runs July 29-August 2, 10am-4pm and is open to ages 7-9. Full and partial scholarships are available. info@lostcoast.org.

Summer Youth Science Camps and Activities. Thu., May 9. Natural History Museum of Cal Poly Humboldt, 1242 G St., Arcata. In June, July and August. Hands-on inquiry based activities integrating science, arts and crafts, live animals and games. natmus.humboldt.edu.

Continued on next page »

ian2161.wixsite.com/my-site-2/

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 15 BIG LAGOON COASTAL CAMP (707) 677-3688
ian@biglagoon.org
summer-camps OVERNIGHT CAMP Week 1 July 22nd - July 24th Week 2 July 29th - July 31st Week 3- Aug. 5th - August 7th Week 4 Aug. 12th - August 14th DAY CAMP Week 1 July 1st - July 5th Week 2 July 8th - July 12th Week 3 July 15th - July 19th

Suzuki Summer Day Camp

ON THE COVER

Continued from previous page

Every Child Can become fluent in music! We will explore the art of music individually, in duets, and ensembles. Offering instruction in guitar, piano, ukulele, and vocals. Week long study wraps up with an evening dinner cabaret- style performance.

All ages. Full (9-5) and half (10-1; 2-5) day options available @ $180/ $125. Please call/text 707-601-2434 for additional information and enrollment.

SPORTS, ATHLETICS & ADVENTURE

Adventure Camp. Mondays-Fridays, 1-5 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Ages 9-14. The city of Arcata Recreation Division offers Adventure Camp Monday-Friday, 1-5 p.m. Free Extended Care: 5-5:30 p.m.: June 17-Aug. 16. Campers will learn to tap into the adventure that awaits in their own backyards. Each week’s theme brings new activities and adventures. Camp is held at the Arcata Challenge Course, 14th Street entrance. Weekly Fee: $120/$133.50 non-resident. rec@cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Lost Coast Camp: Day Camp 1. July 7-11. Lost Coast Camp, 1199 Lighthouse Road, Petrolia. Ages 5-7. Camp in Petrolia. $400, Camperships available. lostcoastcamp. org.

Lost Coast Camp Session 1: Ranch and Wild. July 6-12. Lost Coast Camp, 1199 Lighthouse Road, Petrolia. Ages 8-11. A sleepover camp in Petrolia with swimming, hiking, art, campfire, farming and more. Places available, boys only. $750, camperships available. lostcoastcamp.org.

Rohner Ranger Camp. June 24-28, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., July 1-5, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Aug. 5-9, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. and Aug. 12-16, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Rohner Park, 5 Park St., Fortuna. Ages: 7-9 years. Learn about adventure preparedness and Rohner Park’s rich history. Explore, protect and respect the land, resources, and heritage of our Eel River Valley. $80/weekly, $90 non-resident. friendlyfortuna.com. (707) 725-7620.

Skate Camp. Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Skate Park, 900 Sunset Ave. Ages 6-12. The dity of Arcata Recreation Division offers Skate Camp Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free Extended Care: 8-9 a.m.: June 17-Aug. 16. Skateboard enthusiasts of all skill levels learn how to be safe and have fun at our local skate park. Instructed by skilled, local skateboarders, this program focuses on park safety, park etiquette, street and vert riding, and, of course, style. Weekly fee: $120/$133.50 non-resident. rec@cityofarcata.org. (707) 822-7091.

Teen Leadership Camp/Backpacking. June 23-30. Lost Coast Camp, 1199 Lighthouse Road, Petrolia. Ages 14-16. A sleepover camp in Petrolia with swimming, hiking, art, campfire, farming and more. $900, camperships available. lostcoastcamp.org.

Youth Aquatic & Adventure Camp for ages 10-14. July 15-19, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. This five-day course teaches the basic skills necessary to get out on the water safely in an encouraging and exciting environment. We will cover basic waterfront safety as well as activity-specific skills for kayaking, canoeing, paddle boarding, surfing and more. These will be fun days on the bay filled with games and learning about the local environment. $375. cntracts@humboldt.edu. centeractivities.humboldt. edu/program/GetProgramDetails?courseId=28c1c5cd-e5fe-472d-a50e-cc3e4b4fc95c. (707) 826-3357.

Youth Sailing Summer Camp for ages 10-14. Aug. 12-16, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. This five-day summer camp teaches the basic skills necessary to sail small vessels including the Laser and Coronado 15 sailboats. Junior sailors learn boat rigging, points of sail, capsize recovery, boat handling skills, situational awareness and more while making friends. This course is sure to provide a safe and supportive learning environment for youth of all skill levels. The week will be spent engaging in hands-on learning, having fun races, and learning to play some great sailing games. $425. cntracts@humboldt. edu. centeractivities.humboldt.edu/Program/GetProgramDetails?courseId=cdd25588-d19c-40d5-a5ac-ff3c1d8b86c6. (707) 826-3357.

Teen Three-Day Sailing Progression ages 14-17. Fri., July 12, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. This three-day summer progression teaches the basic skills necessary to sail small vessels including the Laser and Coronado 15 sailboats. Sailors learn boat rigging, points of sail, capsize recovery, boat handling skills, situational awareness and more while making friends. This course is sure to provide a safe and supportive learning environment for all skill levels. $425. cntracts@humboldt.edu. centeractivities. humboldt.edu/Program/GetProgramDetails?courseId=712773e3-f442-4d74-8117-2877c2268638. (707) 826-3357.

Youth Volleyball Camp. Mon., June 24, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. and Mon., July 15, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The city of Eureka Community Services Department camp will teach the basic fundamentals of passing, setting, bumping, serving and ball control. It will also cover the techniques for offense and defensive court positioning. June 24-27 (ages 9-12); July 15-19 (ages 13-16). Knee pads are required along with court shoes. Loose clothing is recommended. (Ages 9-12) $120 per participant (ages 13-16), $150 per participant. senes@ ci.eureka.ca.gov. eurekaca.gov/157/Community-Services. (707) 441-4248.

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
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Mother's Day Brunch

What’s Good: Thai, Doughnuts and a Rooftop View

Willow Creek Thai in Eureka

Willow Creek has long drawn campers, hikers, rafters and Bigfoot hunters. And if, when you pull o the cartoonishly winding, cli -hugging State Route 299, you can unlock your hand from the grab bar, you can enjoy a view of majestic trees and the sunlight bouncing from a glossy chicken wing on the patio of (40640 State Route 299). And now that its owner Kim Pravong has opened K&B Dining, an o shoot of the “Thai fusion” restaurant in Eureka, the view at 621 Fifth St. is similarly improved.

Back to those wings, specifically the Spicy Honey Wings ($15), which retain their juiciness under a sticky, sweet glaze flecked with dried red chili flake. While muted, tepid versions populate chain menus, these have the flavorful kick of an auntie knocking an Applebee’s menu from your hands. And yes, like the rest of the menu, they are available at both the Willow Creek and Eureka restaurants.

Happily, the same is true of the stirfried eggplant with Thai basil ($18). The smoky, silky slices of fried eggplant and ground pork play against the sweet red and green pepper, and fragrant Thai basil. Pravong says she’s yielded to requests for favorites not yet printed on the menu, like larb and papaya salad. The wide rice noodles of the pad see ew carry the char kiss of wok hei, balancing the mild sweetness of the soy-based sauce that clings to broccoli, fried egg and fried tofu ($17).

Pravong says she and her husband, Bill (the B in K&B), are still getting used to the new locale. “Willow Creek is a small community and everybody knows everybody. Over here, it’s a bigger space,” she says. Though one suspects they’ll get to know regulars soon enough.

Hole Foods

Steve and Rebecca Bands have made good on their vow to expand the doughnut menu since taking over Frankie’s NY Bagels (3750 Harris St., Eureka) in 2022. The

rotating lineup shows up doused in an array of glazes to tempt anyone — that most of the springy treats are vegan is somewhat miraculous. Lime, tamarind and hibiscus sprinkled, anyone? (Tragically, we have yet to make it in time for the crunchtopped créme brûlée before it’s sold out. And yet options for sweet, fried solace remain within reach.)

But don’t overlook the boxes of doughnut holes in the case, brimming with browned nuggets tossed in crunchy sugar or cinnamon sugar ($3.50). Wait, $3.50 for a small mountain of wholesome joy? In this economy? Firmer than the standard glazed item at a doughnut shop, these skew chewier, reminiscent of Italian street fair zeppoli. Charmingly disregarding uniformity, they are tender inside when fresh from the fryer. Should they cool, don’t despair — a few seconds in a microwave will revive them to near their original glory. The glorious smell in your kitchen comes at no additional charge.

Look up for Rooftop Sushi

Those of us craning our necks in Old Town can satisfy our curiosity at last. The frankly named Rooftop Sushi is out in the daylight at last (148 E St., Eureka). Slip into the modest entrance on the E Street side of the new building and ride the elevator (a Eureka rarity) to the fourth floor, where the soft opening is in full swing.

Opened amid a welcome streak of sunshine, chef Joe Tan says the first couple of days have been busy. While the indoor dining space and counter were empty o hours, every seat on the patio was taken with diners enjoying nigiri, maki sushi and plates of spiraling beef carpaccio. And sunshine — lots of sunshine. The view of the bay is reserved for the event space on the other side of the rooftop, but the restaurant’s half of the partially covered wood deck overlooks Old Town and environs.

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
ON THE TABLE tu e r nch To s Stuffed French Toast Quich Quiche Veg Egg Bit s Vegan Egg Bites r h rui Fresh Fruit Ho e a e d Chic e Honey Lavender Chicken Eggs lor ti e Eggs Florentine (in eureka only) (in mckinleyville only)
Momosa Special Served 10am-2pm Sunday, May 12th 1450 Broadway St, Eureka 707-442-6325 Sunrise Momosa Pretty In Pink Momosa fresh Squeezed Blood Orange Juice w/ raspberries fresh Squeezed Blood Orange Juice w/ Pineapple juice 2165 Central Ave, McKinleyville 707-839-3636

Tan has said he was looking forward to turning his sole attention to the venture, a smaller restaurant, now that he’s moved on from Curry Leaf and Nori, both of which have a new owner in Nina Zhao, while Overtime Pizza is up for sale. Fans of Nori will recognize some of the style and standards on the Rooftop Sushi menu. Along with the sushi, Tan is offering miso and shoyu ramen, as well as yakitori skew-

ers. Specials, he says, will come as the crew and cook Norberto Andon, in the back turning out turning out katsu and tempura, settle in. l

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal Reach her at (707) 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Instagram @JFumikoCahill.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 19
The counter at Rooftop Sushi. Photos by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
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Cinnamon sugar doughnut holes at Frankie’s NY Bagels. Blue Lake

Albee at the EXIT

Ihave never liked Edward Albee’s The American Dream, not as a part of my script analysis classes, nor in the multiple productions that I’ve seen performed. I find it to be shrouded with intellectual commentary and unfollowable simile that leaves the audience wondering what the hell is actually happening. Yet, I am still drawn to it. Perhaps it is an id-feeding desire to engage in intellectual conversations with the post-production audience who seek answers for the experience, or just to laugh at the confusion. Either way, it is a piece of theater that still baffles like an absurdist, unsolvable mystery that will be revisited but remain unresolved.

Director John Heckel’s approach at EXIT Theatre does not offer the audience a clear commentary on their view of the script. Instead, they present a perfectly imperfect scene in an unremarkable ’50s apartment with their characters Daddy (Michael Murdock), Mommy (Heather Petersteiner) and Grandma (Sally L’Herogan) that allows Albee’s masterful scriptwriting to drive the one-act play. Like many of Albee’s works, it is a snippet of suspended time in everyday life where the audience intuits the plot as opposed to being forcefed a narrative, soliloquy or disposition. In this piece however, Albee relies too much on his personal commentary and loses the nuanced plot development that he is famous for in other works. What is it about? A mystery of Grandma’s boxes? Mommy and Daddy’s invitation for Mrs. Barker (Kimberly Mallett Alvarez)? The Young

Man (Bryce Campos) who will do anything for money? A particularly gruesome act to a “bumble of joy”? It is about the underlying darkness hidden in the societal ideal of the American family, though the work done to arrive at that this conclusion makes it questionable. Perhaps if it was presented absurdly or caricatured or surreal, it would make more sense. Still, Heckel stays true to the author’s intent and directs from Albee’s perspective, however confusing. I suggest the audience see everything as a metaphor for the author to soapbox and try not to piece together the action.

As challenging as all that, Heckel’s cast is mesmerizing. They present themselves as exactly who they are and don’t overreach for comedy or drama. I would have liked to see some of the actors ground themselves in an emotional base with their chest voice as opposed to the stereotypical falsetto Lucy voice that disengages their bodies, but it is still an appropriate choice. The entire cast exudes a calm power as the smaller space allows for more intimate conversation that still embodies big energy. On the evening I attended, intermission was filled with conversations rooting for the cast, as we wanted to love the play as much as the performances.

Heckel pairs the one act with another, The Zoo Story, which focuses on two strangers having a conversation in New York’s Central Park and is outstanding. Larry Crist as Jerry walks from the zoo to a park bench and engages Michael Murdock

as Peter. This piece is a technical actor’s dream: The script is dripping with exact locations and story that allow for an actor to step into the being of their characters, as both do expertly. They draw the audience in by seeing the surroundings and circumstances they describe. While Larry tells the story of a dog, Peter looks down and vividly sees it, which makes the audience hang on every word. As good as Crist is in his long monologues and character development, Murdock does not get lost in the action with simple and real active listening that is so often overplayed by less experienced actors. It is a gorgeous piece of theater that deserves to be seen.

The Albee pairing of one-acts is for theater nerds and dramaturgy. Both are challenging pieces that the EXIT Theater loves producing. Both are well done, conversation-inducing intellectual candy. Go spend a couple hours in the theater to have a lifetime of conversation about them.

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EXIT Theatre presents The American Dream and Zoo Story Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m., and Sundays at 3 p.m. through May 19. Tickets at the door or email mail@theexit.org to reserve. l

Tiggerbouncer Custodio (he/she/ they) is an empowered queer Indigenous Filipino artist whose works have been seen on Humboldt stages and elsewhere.

COMING SOON

Redwood Curtain Theatre presents A New Brain, a drama about a composer facing mortality, at the 5th and D Street Theater May 17 through June 9. Call (707) 442-6278 or visit redwoodcurtain.com.

Ferndale Repertory Theatre invites you to The Prom, a musical comedy about Broadway stars descending on a smalltown prom. Performances run May 24 through June 16. Call (707) 786-5483 or visit ferndalerep.org.

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20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
Michael Murdock, Heather Petersteiner, Bryce Campos, Sally L’Herogan and Kimberly Mallett Alvarez in The American Dream Photo by John Heckel, submitted
FRONT ROW
THE NORTH COAST’S COMPLETE Wedding Guide local,
journalism SHOP.COM questions THROUGH MARK LARSON’S LENS Humboldt County’s 2023 in photos Photos by Mark Larson COLORING BOOK
in-depth

MURPHY’ S MARKET MURPHY’ S MARKET COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

Meet Mike

Mike O’Dell is a devoted father to Evelyn, an eighth-grader at Sunnybrae Middle School. He moved to Humboldt County from Chicago about 21 years ago and works at Open Door Clinic as a pod specialist.

They both rely on Murphy’s Market – a longstanding fixture in their routine. “I’ve always shopped o and on at Murphy’s,” Mike reflects.

“Very low prices and the sta is key,” says Evelyn, an aspiring young actress who made her debut as the donkey in Shrek. “They really go out of their way to make sure everybody’s taken care of, and that’s really nice.”

For Mike and Evelyn, Murphy’s Market isn’t just a grocery store; it’s a community hub. “Plus they have good donuts!” Evelyn chimes in. “And we love Jaime! Don’t forget to add that!”

Join Mike and Evelyn in experiencing the warmth, quality, and a ordability that Murphy’s Market has to o er!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 21 WWW . MURPHYSMARKETS . NET

Nightlife

1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville (707) 839-2013

LOUNGE

Scenic Drive, Trinidad (707) 677-3611

CRISP LOUNGE 2029 Broadway, Eureka, (707) 798-1934

EUREKA VETERANS MEMORIAL HALL 1018 H St. (707) 443-5341

HISTORIC EAGLE HOUSE

Second St., Eureka (707) 444-3344

JAM 915 H St., Arcata (707) 822-4766

MIKE'S PIZZAFORTUNA 1095 S Fortuna Blvd., Suite 48, (707) 777-7550

MOUNTAIN MIKE'S PIZZA - McKINLEYVILLE 1500 Anna Sparks Way, (707) 203-8500

SPACE

837 H St. (707) 633-9160

VENUE THURS 5/9 FRI 5/10 SAT 5/11 SUN 5/12 M-T-W 5/13-5/15 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251
Jerry Martien and the Usual Suspects (poetry, music) 8 p.m. $18
THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St.
616-3030 Bass Culture.004 (dubstep) 9 p.m. $25 Mamma Mia! (2008) (film) 6 p.m. preshow at 5 p.m. $8, $12 admission an poster [W] Sci-Fi Night: Phantasm (film) (1979) 7:30 p.m. $6, $10 admission and poster, preshow at 6 p.m. THE BASEMENT 780 Seventh St., Arcata (707) 845-2309 Francis Vanek Quartet (jazz) 8 p.m.-midnight Free Flashback Friday, 90s Edition w/DJs Anya Slayer Zero One 9 p.m. $5 The Red Room w/DJs Unseelie, KreepeeO & Zero One (dark wave, synth wave, post punk) 9 p.m. $5 BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta (707) 733-9644 Tish Non Ballroom: Comedy Night 8 p.m. Free, Thirsty Bear: TLC New Year Party w/ DJ Statik 9 p.m. Free Thirsty Bear: Mojo Rockers (classic rock) 9 p.m. Free Thirsty Bear: Karaoke Sundays 9 p.m. Free [W] Thirsty Bear: Bootz N Beers (country music/line dancing lessons) 7-9 p.m. Free BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake
Wave: Throw'emback Thursday (DJ) 9 p.m. Free Wave: Dr. Squid (dance hits) 9 p.m. Free Wave: Lucky Spin Vinyl Dance Party w/DJs Dacin and Pandemonium Jones 9 p.m. Free CENTRAL
SPORTS BAR
Karaoke 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Free [M] Pool Tournament 6 p.m., [W] Karaoke 8 p.m.-midnight Free
FIREWATER
Firewater Lounge: Jimi Je and the Gypsy Band (funk, blues, R&B, rock & roll) 9 p.m. Free [T] Karaoke 8 p.m. Free
Up in Joke! Comedy Open Mic 8-10 p.m. Free Smoke N' Joke Comedy Night 7 p.m. $5 Open Mic Night (15-minute time slot) 6:30 p.m. Free [M] Pete's Projecting Again! (comedy/variety) 7-9 p.m. $5, [T] Pool Tournament 6 p.m. $10, [W] Kara-Smokey! 7 p.m. Free
Ninth St. (707) 822-1575
ARCATA
(707)
(707) 668-9770
STATION
CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO
27
[T] Humboldt Comedy Open Mic 7-10 p.m. Free
139
Phatsy
7-9 p.m. Free Phatsy
6-9 p.m. Free [M] Line Dancing in the Ballroom 6-8 p.m. $10, [T] Baywater Blues Fusion Dance 7:15-9:15 p.m. $5-$15 sliding, free for kids 12 and under HUMBOLDT BREWS 856
AJ Lee & Blue Summit, Canary & The Vamp (bluegrass) 8 p.m. $20/$23 Skullfetti
8 p.m. $10 Gradu-Rave-Tion
9
[W] Fruition (Americana) 8 p.m. $25, $20 THE
Hip Hop Thursdays (DJ) 9 p.m. Free [M] Karaoke 9 p.m. Free, [W] Weds Night Ting (DJs) THE LOGGER BAR 510
Lake Je Landen
8-10 p.m. Jesse Mills Band (blues) 9-11 p.m. Flynn Martin (soulful duo) 9-11 p.m. [T] Trivia 6-8 p.m.. [W] Karaoke 8 p.m. THE MADRONE TAPHOUSE 421
[W] Reel Genius Trivia. 6-8 p.m. Free MINIPLEX 401
Heavyweight Hi-Fi w/DJ Roots N Soil and Friends 9 p.m. Free before 10 p.m., $5 after John Ludington Album Release Party 8-10:30 p.m. $10-$20 suggested donation Karaoke 8:30 p.m. two-drink minimum [M] An Evening w/Qwanqwa (Ethiopia, psych-roots) 8 p.m. $25 MOUNTAIN
[T] Reel Genius Trivia 6-8 p.m. Free
[W] Reel Genius Trivia. 6-8 p.m. Free OUTER
[M] Ora Cogan, Nighttime, Wild Abandon 7 p.m. $10-$20, [T] Lane Lines, Queen Karma, Los Perdidos 8 p.m. $10, [W] Good Time Charlies, Pichea, Boss Daughter 7-11 p.m. Free PAPA WHEELIES PUB 1584 Reasor Rd., McKinleyville, (707) 630-5084 Live Music TBA 6-9 p.m. REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., Arcata (707) 826-7222 DJ L Boogie 9 p.m. Free REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY MYRTLE AVE. TASTING ROOM, 1595 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, (707) 269-7143 Buddy Reed (blues) 6-9 p.m. Free CALENDAR
Kline's: The Vatcher Brothers (indie-alternative)
Kline's: Laura White and Xe Scolari (originals)
10th St., Arcata (707) 826-2739
(Grateful Dead)
Party w/DJ Rundat, DJ Spadafora
p.m. $5
Railroad Ave., Blue
(guitar)
Third St., Eureka (707) 273-5129
I St., Arcata (707) 630-5000
ARCATA
Got a gig or an event? Submit it to calendar@northcoastjournal.com by 5pm Thursday the week before publication. Tickets for shows highlighted in yellow are available at NorthCoastTickets.com. More details at northcoastjournal.com. Shows, times and pricing subject to change by the venue. 341 West Harris St., Eureka 707 445-3138 poletskis.com “LARGEST BRAND SELECTION IN THE COUNTY”
Servicing Humboldt County for over 40 years
Largest in stock new & used inventory
Competitive price guarantee
Delivery and Service after the sale 22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
VENUE THURS 5/9 FRI 5/10 SAT 5/11 SUN 5/12 M-T-W 5/13-5/15 ROCKSLIDE BAR & GRILL 5371 State Route 299, Hawkins Bar Jimi Je Jam Nite (Hendrix, Prince, funk, blues) 7:30 p.m. Free THE SANCTUARY 1301 J St., Arcata (707) 822-0898 Nature Stories (dance, spoken word) 8 p.m. $20-$30 sliding scale We All Live In Gaza Film Pre-Screening 7-9 p.m. $15-$20 [M] Boardgame Night 6-10:30 p.m. $2-$12 SAVAGE HENRY COMEDY CLUB 415 Fifth St., Eureka (707) 845-8864 Drink & Draw 6 p.m. Free, Hayden Greif-Neill (stand-up) 9 p.m. $10 Valerie Tosi (stand-up) 9-11 p.m. $15 Valerie Tosi (stand-up) 9-11 p.m. $15 Comedy Church 1-3 p.m. Free; Stand-up Comedy Workshop 7-8 p.m. Free; Comedy Open Mic 9 p.m. Free [M] Metal Monday 7-11 p.m. $5, $10 or $20 [T] Evan Vest's Let's Watch: Ralph Bakshi's Wizards (film) 9-11 p.m. Free, [W] Metal Wednesday 7-11 p.m. $5 05 $10 SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka (707) 442-8778 Open Mic Night 8 p.m. (all acts) sign ups at 7 p.m. Gooseneck, Scathe, Brain Dead Rejects, Pit Junkies, Kolonizer 8 p.m. All ages $10 Sunday Funday (board games provided or bring your own) Free [T] Second Sunday Deadhead Jamdown 3-7 p.m. Free, Sweet 'n' Juicy with Fact Of Matter 8 p.m. $8 SIX
BREWERY, TASTING ROOM & RESTAURANT 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville
Piet Dalmon (guitar) 5-7 p.m. Free SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka (707) 444-2244 Friday Night Jazz 8-10 p.m. Free Jenni and David and the Sweet Soul Band (soul, funk) 7-10 p.m. Free [T] Tuesday Night Jazz 7-10 p.m. Free, [W] RLAD Jazz/Fusion Every First Wednesday 7-10 p.m. Free SUSHI SPOT ARCATA 670 Ninth St. (707) 822-1221 [T] Ponies of Harmony (originals and classics) 6 p.m. THE WINE CELLAR 407 Second St., Eureka (707) 834-2773 Reel Genius Trivia 6-8 p.m. Free A S tudy in Contr AS t S MAY 31 & JUNE 1, 7:30 P.M. ARKLEY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS SPONSORED BY COAST CENTRAL CREDIT UNION Featuring Terrie Baune, violin Dmitri Shostakovich Violin Concerto No. 2 in C-sharp minor, Op. 129 Antonin Dvorˇák Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 “From the New World” 2023-2024 CONCERT SEASON WITH ARTISTIC DIRECTOR & CONDUCTOR CAROL JACOBSON TICKETS: www.EurEka S ymphony.org SUBMIT your Calendar Events ONLINE or by E-MAIL northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com Print Deadline: Noon Thursday, the week before publication Crack The Vault Escape Room - Ferndale California SCHEDULE ONLINE ow OPEN! Now OPEN! www humboldtshometownstore com LOCATED WITHIN 394 Main Street, Ferndale WALK-INS ARE WELCOME DURING NORMAL STORE HOURS. RESERVATIONS REQUESTED PRIVATE PARTY RESERVATIONS AVALIABLE northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 23
RIVERS
(707) 839-7580

Mother's Day

BREAKFAST AT PORTUGUESE HALL ARCATA

May 12, 2024, 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Celebrate with us and make your mother feel special!

Mother's are free - Adults $12

Children $10

(children 5 and under free)

There will also be a silent auction.

We can't wait to see you there!

Pomp and Circumstance

It’s graduation time again at Cal Poly Humboldt and due to the circumstances of our times, as well as the stupid pomposity of the University’s president and his enablers, grads will be walking just about everywhere around the county except for on the campus. I don’t have much to say about that beyond what I have written already but I will offer one piece of advice to the folks getting their diplomas this week. It comes from a song title by a favorite musician of mine, Dan Behar, aka Destroyer, from an album he released when I was college-aged myself, called Your Blues: “Don’t Become the Thing You Hated.” Have a nice week.

Thursday

A.J. Lee & Blues Summit is fronted by singer, songwriter and mandolinist A.J. Lee, who was considered something of a teenage prodigy when she started her career a decade ago in her hometown of Santa Cruz. The intervening years have built her and her group a reputation as masterful modern bluegrass players capable of putting on a great show that will pack the seams of any venue or festival. Local manouche jazz act Canary and the Vamp provides an excellent choice for local support. At Humbrews at 8 p.m. ($23, $20 advance).

Friday

Bass-heavy electronic dance music comes with nearly as many subgenre titles as it does artists, and I’ve never been very interested in getting too far out there in terms of cataloging, preferring instead to go by my own impressions of the sounds pasted together with a little artist info gleaned from my research. Tsuruda and Onhell are two DJs on a tour called “sushirrito,” a nod to the half-Asian background of the former and the half-Mexican background of the latter. They first crossed paths in a Humco trim scene back in the early 20-teens, when such places still existed in abundance, and the sounds produced by the two reflect that background to a T. Deep bass, post-U.K. dubstep dance tunes for woodland/urban

hybrid, fairy-dusted psychonauts. If that interests you, swing by the Arcata Theatre Lounge at 9 p.m. to relive some of the glory days of the industry ($25, $20 advance).

Saturday

John Ludington is generally known in the area as one of our more versatile bassists and singers, providing rhythm and back-up for Canary and the Vamp, or holding it down as one quarter of Absynth Quartet, our beloved oddball jam act, so you know right from the jump here he’s got chops. However, what you might not know is that he’s recorded a solo album, MinuteHand, and is throwing an album release party for it at the Miniplex tonight at 8 p.m. ($10-$20 sliding scale). I have listened to the tunes a few times and have become endeared to several of them, from the instrumental pitter-patter of “‘Cats,” to the more plaintive “4th of July,” to the country-folk shuffle of the title track. Lots to enjoy here, but a favorite line comes from the ravings of “C’mon Ned!” in which our bayfront is described as a place “where the tweakers rap and the seagulls crap.” You know, I believe the reverse is true as well. Tonight’s gig is going to have a full band made up of some of our finest musicians, including Tofu and Ryan Roberts from Absynth, as well as Aleister Page from Canary, who will be trading in his pedal steel for a violin. If you enjoy the best and quirkiest of what our local folk, roots and jam scene has to offer, do not give this one a miss.

Sunday

Portland’s best fruit-flavored funk trio Sweet N’ Juicy is back at it again, stopping at the Siren’s Song Tavern tonight at 8 p.m. to make some hot jam. For the uninitiated, or for those who may have forgotten, these fellas dress up as a banana, a strawberry and a pineapple, and play tight and funky dance grooves exceptionally well. Just a perfect party back, really. Also on the bill is Fact of Matter and if you roll through before the show, you will be greeted by a free and open deadhead jam starting at 3 p.m. Enjoy or be forewarned, depending on your tastes. The evening’s

gig costs a reasonable $8, which looking at gas prices, ain’t nothing for an ace band from Portland.

Monday

Ethiopian jazz, roots and funk music has enjoyed a well-deserved appreciation in the West for the last two decades, due in part to several reissues and compilations from the ’60s and ’70s making their way to the right record collectors and tastemakers. Qwanqwa is a quintet from the nation’s capital of Addis Ababa, and represents the new generation of Ethiopian musicians building on the fantastic sounds of the past and creating new tunes for those of us lucky enough to catch an earful. You can be among that group tonight at 9 p.m. at the Miniplex, and I highly suggest you snag a $20 advance ticket, as I cannot guarantee how many $25 door spots will be available the night of. If you didn’t make the list for that one, fear not. There’s another hot show going down at the Outer Space. And it starts at 7 p.m., so you might even be able to double-dip! Nighttime is the “cosmic folk” solo act from Los Angeles of one Louise Goodman, who will be in good company with the indie folk pop and global forest tones of local supporters Wild Abandon and Die Geister Beschwören ($10-$20 suggested).

Tuesday

Speaking of our local all-ages, sober gem the Outer Space, there’s an evening of dream pop awaiting you there at 8 p.m. tonight for a suggested door price of $10. Lane Lines hails from Seattle and Phoenix, two very different places, and has, I imagine, harnessed the contradictions of such into a personal songbook of expression. Locals Queen Karma just released a rip-snorting rock single called “Lost,” and will probably be bringing the most amplified energy to the gig, while house band Los Perdidos will do its indie-folk magic.

Wednesday

Portland’s Fruition features trio-vocal harmonies generally led by singer/guitarist Jay Cobb Anderson, who you may recognize

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
SETLIST
Local tickets. One place. LOCAL NORTH COAST JOURNAL MARKETING TEAM FREE TO EVENT CREATORS CALL (707) 442-1400 OR VISIT THE WEBSITE TO SCHEDULE A DEMO northcoasttickets.com

as having passed through this way as a solo act not so long ago. The music is electro-folk, country and modern blues with a confessional quality to the lyrics, which does nothing to dampen the instrumental bombast of the group’s sound. Humbrews is the perfect spot for this kind of pickin’ and yowlin’, and I encourage any fans of

roots music to give the group a listen online and consider a midweek trip to the dancefloor. Doors open at 8 p.m., where admission costs $25. Those already on board can get their tickets in advance for $5 less. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 25
Collin Yeo (he/him) lives in Arcata. Nighttime plays the Outer Space at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 13.
Locally Built Rustic R ghsawn Redw d Picnic Tables NEW BATCH JUST IN! 6 FEET LONG, OIL FINISH $695 5301 Boyd Rd, Arcata Just off Giuntoli Lane at Hwy 299 www.almquistlumber.com (707) 825-8880 YOUR SOURCE FOR THE FINEST HARDWOODS & WOOD WORKING SUPPLIES YOUR SOURCE FOR THE FINEST HARDWOODS & WOOD WORKING SUPPLIES HOME & GARDEN HOME & GARDEN Tell them you saw their ad In the North Coast Journal! (707) 442-1400 • display@northcoastjournal.com Garden Supplies Home Improvement Furniture Paint Supplies Flooring Construction Roofing Hardware Submit your gigs online: northcoastjournal.com HEY, BANDS.
Photo by Sara Wallach, submitted

Calendar May 9 – 16, 2024

Don’t miss Nature Stories, a one-night-only event celebrating Mother Nature through art, science, dance and activism, taking place Friday, May 10, at 8 p.m. at the Sanctuary ($20-$30 sliding scale). The special performance is directed by acclaimed New York City artist Kaeshi Chai and features performances by Ilonka Zlatar, Shoshanna Rose, Rachel Noel and others. Zlatar, 2019’s Environmental Hero of the Year, will share insight on conservation and science’s role in protecting the planet. More information, along with tickets, available online at kaeshi.com/naturestories.

9 Thursday

ART

Figure Drawing at Synapsis. 7-9 p.m. Synapsis Collective, 1675 Union St., Eureka. With a live model. Bring your own art supplies. Call to contact Clint. $5. synapsisperformance.com. (707) 362-9392.

May/June Art Show. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Copies of winning artwork from the 21st annual Student Bird Art Contest are on display.

EVENTS

Southern Humboldt Job Fair. 2-6 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Meet local employers and find out about local jobs and pathways to training for skilled jobs. Presented by the Humboldt Workforce Coalition. mateel.org.

OUTDOORS

Nature Quest. 3-6 p.m. Headwaters Forest Reserve, End of Elk River Road, 6 miles o U.S. Highway 101, Eureka. Explore trails and share mindfulness practices, group conversation and other eco-therapeutic activities. Transportation available for Eureka residents. Call to pre-register. Free. chaskell@eurekaca.gov. eurekaheroes. org. (707) 382-5338.

10 Friday

ART

Arts! Arcata. Second Friday of every month, 4-8 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Businesses all across Arcata stay open late with music, art on display, live art and more. gloria@arcatachamber.com. arcatachamber. com. (707) 897-6004.

Life Drawing Sessions. 10 a.m.-noon. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. Hosted by Joyce Jonté. $10, cash or Venmo.

Poet Jerry Martien and his musical accomplices, the Usual Suspects, take the stage at Arcata Playhouse on Saturday, May 11 , at 8 p.m. ($18). Martien will read poems from new and old collections, spanning half a century of Humboldt County life. He will be accompanied by old friends Fred Neighbor (guitar), Gary Davidson (bass) and Mike LaBolle (percussion). From nature to social issues and even AI, Martien’s verses promise a thought-provoking evening. Copies of his books and CDs will also be available.

BOOKS

Weekly Preschool Story Time. Eureka Library, 1313 Third St. Talk, sing, read, write and play together in the children’s room. For children 2 to 6 years old with their caregivers. Other family members are welcome to join in the fun. Free. manthony@co.humboldt.ca.us. humlib. org. (707) 269-1910.

DANCE

Nature Stories. 8 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. New York performing artist and producer Kaeshi Chai presents a one-night-only event celebrating Mother Nature through the fusion of art, science, dance and activism. With Ilonka Zlatar of San Francisco, Shoshanna of Arcata, Rachel Noel of Humboldt and beyond, and additional performers. Tickets online. $20-$30 sliding scale. kaeshi.com/naturestories.

THEATER

The American Dream and Zoo Story. 7 p.m. EXIT Theatre, 890 G St., Arcata. Two early one-act plays by Edward Albee directed by John Heckel. Through May 19. $15, $10 seniors/high school students.

EVENTS

District 1 Dairy Princess Contest. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. Three young women compete for the prestigious title of Dairy Princess. This year’s contestants are Grace Scilacci and Mariah Bravo, both of Fortuna, and Talyn Hodson of Crescent City. dmarenner@ frontiernet.net. (707) 496-1501.

The Fig Twig Mother’s Day Market. 4-9 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Shop more than 60 vendors and local makers and artists. Live music Friday night only. Free swag bags for shoppers. Plus food trucks, beverages and cocktails. $8 Friday and Saturday, $5 Saturday. figtwigmarket@gmail.com. figtwigmarket.com. HSRC’s 50th Anniversary Block Party Celebration. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. Enjoy food, music by Blue Rhythm Revue, fun and more. Free. (707) 443-9747.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com

This Mother’s Day, head to the historic Bayside Grange for a memorable Mother’s Day Luncheon, Sunday, May 12 , from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m . (TBA). Pineapple Express will serve up delectable Hawaiian dishes, while the cash bar o ers special cocktails to toast the amazing moms in attendance. Ponies of Harmony, Path of Totality and DJ Goldylocks provide the perfect musical backdrop. Don’t miss the ra e benefi ting the Humboldt Literacy Project — you could win prizes and support a great cause!

FOR KIDS

Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop o your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17-$20. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org/ classesprograms.html. (707) 443-9694.

Nature Stories w/Kaeshi Chai - A Family Literacy Party. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Humboldt County Library - Main Branch, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Experience nature-themed creative movement, singing and dance. Free. literacyhelpers@ gmail.com. humlib.org. (707) 445-3655. Tiempo de Cuentos en español/Storytime in Spanish. 3:30-4 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Cultiven la alfabetización temprana y bilingüismo en sus niños con cuentos, canciones, rimas y diversión. Todos son bienvenidos, mejor diseñado para edades 2-6 años. Spanish Storytime is geared towards growing early literacy skills in young children and bilingualism. Best-suited for 2-6 year-olds but everyone is welcome. Storytime includes stories, songs and fun. Free/Gratis. (707) 725-3460.

Weekly Preschool Storytime. Eureka Library, 1313 Third St. Talk, sing, read, write and play together in the children’s room. For children 2 to 6 years old with their caregivers and other family members. Free. manthony@co.humboldt.ca.us. humboldtgov.org/Calendar.aspx?EID=8274. (707) 269-1910.

FOOD

Garberville Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Meat, eggs, produce, oysters, plants, mushrooms, jam, hot food and art. (707) 441-9999.

MEETINGS

Breastfeeding Circle. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. North Country Prenatal Services, 3800 Janes Road, Unit 101, Arcata. Welcome all new and expecting parents. Meet with an IBCLC and/or CLC educator in a comfy space. Snacks provided. Free.

Language Exchange Meetup. Second Friday of every month, 5-7 p.m. Familia Co ee, 1350 Ninth St., Arcata. Speak your native language. Teach someone a language. Learn a language. familiaco ees.com/. (925) 214-8099.

11

Saturday

ART

Pottery and Glass Spring Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. Locally made mugs, plates, bowls, planters, vases, artwork and more. fireartsarcata.com.

Second Saturday Family Arts Day. 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Create landscape compositions using painting and collage techniques inspired by the artworks of Shawn Gould. All materials supplied. Free. humboldtarts.org.

BOOKS

Book Signing. 1-3 p.m. Humboldt Redwoods State Park Visitor’s Center, 17119 Avenue of the Giants, Weott. Saving the North Coast Redwoods by Susan J.P. O’Hara. humboldtredwoods.org. (707) 946-2263.

Book Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. The Friends of the Arcata Library’s used book sale. Hardbound books: $2, trade-size paperbacks: $1, small paperbacks: $.50, CDs and media: $1, and all children’s materials are free. In the community room next to the library. amichaelstuart@gmail.com. (707) 822-5954.

MUSIC

Scotia Ragtime Band. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. An evening of music, including early Scott Joplin, Tin Pan Alley ragtime, piano roll rags and some from the Roaring ’20s, some with Humboldt history. Also live accompaniment to Buster Keaton’s silent film One Week composed by Michael McClimon. $15.

SPOKEN WORD

Jerry Martien and the Usual Suspects. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Poet Jerry Martien reads poems from new and old collections, accompanied by musicians Fred Neighbor (guitar), Gary Davidson (bass) and Mike LaBolle (percussion). $18. info@arcataplayhouse.org. playhousearts.org. (707) 822-1575.

THEATER

The American Dream and Zoo Story. 7 p.m. EXIT Theatre, 890 G St., Arcata. See May 10 listing.

EVENTS

Black Humboldt’s Sixth Birthday Party. 3-7 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Black Humboldt invites the Humboldt community for barbecue in the park, skating for all ages (bring your own if you have them), music and community. $20 suggested per family for food/skating. blackhumboldt@gmail.com.

The Fig Twig Mother’s Day Market. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See May 10 listing.

Humboldt Lao New Year. 9-midnight. Tish Non Community Center, 266 Keisner Road, Loleta. A New Year’s celebration of Lao culture, food and art. (707) 616-6433. Sidewalk Sale and Showcase. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Old Town, Eureka, 317 Third St. Explore Downtown and Old Town Eureka and discover deals, unique products and vibrant community spirit. List of participating businesses online. eurekamainstreet@eurekaca.gov. linktr.ee/ eureka_main_street. (707) 441-4187.

FOR KIDS

Breakdancing with Reckless Rex - A Family Literacy

Sadira, Kaeshi Chai, Rachel Noel. Submitted Jerry Martien. Submitted Ponies of Harmony. Submitted
26

Party. 11 a.m. Eureka Library, 1313 Third St. Explore breakdancing and hip-hop culture with Humboldt Rockers’ Reckless Rex. Learn about the history of breaking, some moves and see it in action. For children and the adults who love them. Each attendee gets a free book to keep. Free. literacyhelpers@gmail.com. humlib.org. (707) 445-3655.

FOOD

Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Humboldt-County-Grown and GMO-free produce along with plants, meats and other products. Live music.

Farm Stand. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Table Bluff Farm, 101 Clough Road, Loleta. Regeneratively grown seasonal veggies, flowers, meats and other items made by Humboldt County locals and small businesses. Cash, card, Venmo, Apple Pay and soon to accept EBT payments. info@ tableblufffarm.com. TableBluffFarm.com. (707) 8906699.

Mother’s Day Brunch. 10 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Julia Morgan Redwood Grove, 255 Benbow Dam Road, Garberville. Treat that someone special to brunch, a champagne toast and a historical tale of the Julia Morgan home. Two seatings at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Advance ticket reserve only. $55/person. juliamorganredwoodgrove. com. (707) 272-8668.

Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown on site, local eggs and sourdough bread. Work from local artists and artisans. flowerstone333@gmail. com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN

Ferndale Garden Club Spring Plant Sale. 9 a.m.-noon. Stitch, 385 Main St., Ferndale. A curated collection of rhododendrons and azaleas, plus succulents, perennials, seeds and more. All sales support club scholarships for local youth.

Mother’s Day Weekend Plant Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Grange #501, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka.

MEETINGS

Woodturners Meeting. Second Saturday of every month, 1-3 p.m. Almquist Lumber Company, 5301 Boyd Road, Arcata. Beginning and experienced turners exchange ideas, instruction and techniques. Themed project demo, show-and-tell opportunities and Q&A. This month’s topic is: Rolling Pins demo with Bob LeLonde Free. redcoastturners@gmail.com. (707) 633-8147.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Field Trip. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet trip leader Chet Ogan at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) for easy-to-walk trails. As spring arrives, many resident birds may be singing, nesting and showing signs of breeding activity. Free. rras.org.

Citizen Science Series: Plant Identification. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Sequoia Park, 3414 W St., Eureka. Meet Eureka Community Services at the Elk River Park and Ride for an outdoor, rain-or-shine class focusing on native plants and how they build the ecosystem. Bring a water bottle and weather appropriate clothes and shoes. facebook.com/ events/933997501525675?ref=newsfeed. (707) 441-4248.

Dune Restoration Volunteer Day. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Restore the biodiversity of the coastal dunes with the team. Snacks and tools provided. Meet at the center a few minutes before 10 a.m. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes.org. (707) 444-1397.

FOAM Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Sharon Levy at 2 p.m. in the lobby for a 90-minute, rainor-shine walk focusing on birds, wastewater treatment and/or marsh history. Free. (707) 826-2359.

Habitat Improvement Team Volunteer Workday. Second Saturday of every month, 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Help restore habitat by removing invasive, non-native plants and maintaining native plant areas. Wear long pants, long sleeves and closed-toe shoes. Bring drinking water. Tools, gloves and snack provided. denise_seeger@ fws.gov. fws.gov/refuge/humboldt-bay. (707) 733-5406.

Habitat Restoration Volunteer Work Day. 9 a.m.-noon.

Sue-meg State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Join park staff to remove invasive plant species in the park. Gloves and tools provided. All attendants receive a free day pass to Sue-meg State Park. Ask entrance station attendant for that days’ work site. Rain/wind/ smoke may cancel the event. Free. desten.mertens@ parks.ca.gov. (707) 677-3109.

ETC

Homeowner Disaster Preparedness Workshop. 1-4 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Join the Greater

Trinidad Area CERT team to learn about disaster preparedness (earthquake, wildfire, winter storms, power outages). Refreshments and raffle with prizes. Free. redwoodlarry@gmail.com. (707) 845-7272.

Thursday-Friday-Saturday Canteen. 3-9 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Enjoy a cold beverage in the canteen with comrades. Play pool or darts. If you’re a veteran, this place is for you. Free. PearceHansen999@outlook.com. (707) 443-5331.

12 Sunday

ART

Pottery and Glass Spring Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. See May 11 listing.

DANCE

Afro - Fusion Feel and Flow. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Explore and enjoy a fusion of West African movements from Guinea, Senegal, Liberia, Congo and Mali with the genre of Afro beats and traditional West African drumming. $10-$15. together@ sanctuaryarcata.org. sanctuaryarcata.org. (707) 822-0898.

MOVIES

Mamma Mia! (2008). 5-8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show 5 p.m. Movie 6 p.m. Rated PG13. All ages. For Mother’s Day, the story of a bride-to-be trying to find her father. With songs by ABBA. $8, $12 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/ arcatatheatrelounge/events. (707) 613-3030.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 27

Continued from previous page

THEATER

The American Dream and Zoo Story. 3 p.m. EXIT Theatre, 890 G St., Arcata. See May 10 listing.

EVENTS

Atalanta’s Victory Run. 10 a.m.-noon. Arcata Co-op, 811 I St. Six River’s Running Club’s annual running and walking celebration of women and women’s health. Benefits the Breast and GYN Health Project. $15 for 2-mile, $20 for 5-mile. atalantasvictoryrun@gmail.com. atalanta-run. com. (707) 825-8345.

Creekside Arts in Bloom. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Creekside Arts, 475 Howard Hts. Rd, Freshwater. A vibrant blend of art, music, poetry, theater, wine, cuisine and many blossoms in the gardens. Bring your mom. Free.

Mother’s Day Luncheon. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Hawaiian food by Pineapple Express, cash bar offering special cocktails, musical guests Ponies of Harmony, Path of Totality and DJ Goldylocks, raffle benefiting the Humboldt Literacy Project.

FOOD

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

Pancake Breakfast - Mother’s Day. 8-11 a.m. Mattole Grange Hall, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. All the pancakes you can eat, eggs cooked any way you like, choice of bacon or sausage, coffee, milk and organic orange juice. Bring your mom. $15, free for kids 6 and under. mattolegrangehall@gmail.com. mattolegrange. org/pancake-breakfast. (707) 629-3421.

GARDEN

Mother’s Day Weekend Plant Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Grange #501, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. See May 11 listing.

OUTDOORS

Humboldt Bay NWR Birding Trip. 9-11 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Meet leader Ralph Bucher at the Visitor Center for this two-mile walk along a wide, flat trail that is packed gravel and easily accessible. Email to sign up. Free. thebook@ reninet.com. rras.org.

Second Sunday Cycling Tour of the Arcata Marsh. Second Sunday of every month, 2-3:30 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Andy Feinstein leads a 90-minute tour focusing on wetlands, wildlife and wastewater treatment. Heavy rain cancels. Free. (707) 826-2359.

SPORTS

Sunday Springles Disc Golf League. 12-3:30 p.m. Beau Pre DiscGolfPark at the Beau Pre Golf Course, 1777 Norton Road, McKinleyville. PDGA-sanctioned, flexstart league. Membership not required to play in any or all weeks. $10 buy-in. beauprediscgolf@gmail.com. instagram.com/beauprediscgolf/. (406) 579-7078.

13 Monday

ART

Life Drawing Sessions. 6-8 p.m. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. See May 10 listing.

Zine Club. Second Monday of every month, 6-9 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Bring your DIY self-published projects to work on, share and/or trade. Connect with fellow writers and artists, spark ideas for new material, and work independently in a creative and supportive environment. All skill levels welcome. $5 donation, no one turned away for lack of funds. millsguf@riseup.net. sanctuaryarcata.org. (707) 822-0898.

DANCE

Line Dancing in the Ballroom. Second Monday of every month, 6-8 p.m. The Historic Eagle House, 139 Second St., Eureka. Boot, scoot and boogie under the stained glass ceiling. Instructor led, all skill levels welcome, ages 21 and up. $10. events@historiceaglehouse.com. fb.me/e/4fAlv98B0. (707) 444-3344.

MUSIC

Metal Monday. 7-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Four metal bands. $5 -$10. savagehenrycomedy.com.

Ora Cogan, Nighttime, Wild Abandon. 7 p.m. Outer Space Arcata, 837 H St. Ora Cogan (psychedelic gothic country), Nighttime (cosmic folk), Wild Abandon (indie folk rock). All ages. Masks recommended. $10$20. outerspacearcata@gmail.com. facebook.com/ events/400056129613575.

FOOD

Miranda Farmers’ Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, mushrooms, beef and pork, eggs, honey, crafts, body products, jams and plants. (707) 441-9999.

ETC

Boardgame Night. 6-10:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Quick 30-minute or long strategic games in a supportive and stress-free space. Feel free to bring your favorites as well. All ages. $2-$12. together@sanctuaryarcata.org. sanctuaryarcata.org. (707) 822-0898. Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email for the link. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. a1aa.org/ homesharing. (707) 442-3763.

14 Tuesday

DANCE

Baywater Blues Fusion Dance. 7:15-9:15 p.m. The Historic Eagle House, 139 Second St., Eureka. Half hour dance lesson followed by social dancing. Come solo or with a friend to learn and enjoy partner dancing to blues and modern music. $5-$15 sliding, free for kids 12 and under. baywaterbluesfusion@gmail.com. facebook.com/profile. php?id=100089815497848. (707) 496-4056.

MOVIES

Evan Vest’s Let’s Watch: Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. The film follows a battle between two wizards representing magic and technology. Free. savagehenrycomedy.com.

EVENTS

Quarter Craze Fundraiser. 5:45 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange

CALENDAR
28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com

Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Presented by Soroptimist International of Arcata. A lasagna dinner plus nonalcoholic drinks, beer and wine available for an additional fee. Desserts also available for a donation. Ra e bidding for the Quarter Craze at 6:30 p.m. (Bring lots of quarters.) Auction with items from local businesses. $10 dinner, $5 per bidding paddle, $10 for three. dowsprairiegrange.org. (707) 822-8454.

FOOD

Shelter Cove Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. In-season produce, veggie starts, plants, grass-fed beef, pastured poultry and eggs, flowers, soap, herbal products and arts and crafts. gyppo.com. (707) 441-9999.

MEETINGS

Fortuna Parent Project. 6 a.m.-8 p.m. Gene Lucas Community Center, 3300 Newburg Ave., Fortuna. A 10-week series that addresses topics like improving family relationships, e ective discipline to improve school attendance and performance, reduce substance use, negative peer influences and how to address destructive behavior. Free. fortunatc@bgcredwoods.org. glccenter.org. (707) 617-8160. Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players. Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. $3-$8. 31for14@ gmail.com. (707) 599-4605.

Toastmasters International. Second Tuesday of every month, 8:30-9:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Members meet to deliver and evaluate prepared and impromptu speeches to improve as speakers and leaders. Meetings stream at https://tinyurl.com/zoomwithmidday and https://us02web.zoom.us/j/9239283290. distinguished@ rocketmail.com. 4139.toastmastersclubs.org. (855) 4028255.

ETC

Disability Peer Advocate Group. Second Tuesday of every month, 3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Peer advocates supporting each other and furthering the disability cause. Email for the Zoom link. alissa@tilinet.org.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Virtual World, Online. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. (707) 443-5021.

15 Wednesday

BOOKS

Family Storytime. Third Wednesday of every month, 3:30 p.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Enjoy stories with local storyteller Kit Mann every third Wednesday of the month. For children of all ages with their caregivers and other family members. Free. humlib. org. (707) 668-4207.

MOVIES

Sci-Fi Night: Phantasm (1979). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Pre-show 6 p.m. Ra e 7:15 p.m. Main feature 7:30 p.m. Rated R. All ages. A teenage boy and his friends face o against a mysterious grave robber, known only as the Tall Man. $6, $10 admission and poster. info@ arcatatheatre.com. facebook.com/arcatatheatrelounge/ events. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC

Metal Wednesday. 7-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy

Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Upon a Field’s Whisper (Black Metal from Colorado Springs) More bands TBA $5 or $10. savagehenrycomedy.com.

EVENTS

Homeshare Meet and Greet. 1-3:30 p.m. Eureka Library, 1313 Third St. Join others interested in learning more about homesharing arrangements and what they look like locally, benefits and challenges, format, how to get started, etc. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. a1aa.org/ homesharing. (707) 442-3763.

MEETINGS

Mother’s Support Circle. Third Wednesday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. The Ink People Center for the Arts, 627 Third St., Eureka. Mother’s Village circle for mothers with a meal and childcare. $15 to attend, $10 childcare, sliding scale spots available. (707) 633-3143.

16 Thursday

ART

Craft Night at the Grange. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Freshwater Grange, 48 Grange Road. Bring whatever project you’re working on: sewing, knitting, crochet, needlepoint, spinning wheel, sketchpad or whatever is inspiring you. $5 suggested donation. freshwaterhall@gmail.com. (707) 498-9447.

Figure Drawing at Synapsis. 7-9 p.m. Synapsis Collective, 1675 Union St., Eureka. See May 9 listing. May/June Art Show. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. See May 9 listing.

LECTURE

“What’s Song Got To Do With It? The ‘Mystery’ of Humpback Whale Song”. 7-9 p.m. Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road, Arcata. Je Jacobsen reviews what has been learned about humpback whale song. Live program at Six Rivers Masonic Lodge and simultaneously Zoomed. Link online. Drinks/goodies at 7 p.m.; program starts at 7:30 p.m. rras.org.

OUTDOORS

Nature Quest. 3-6 p.m. Headwaters Forest Reserve, End of Elk River Road, 6 miles o U.S. Highway 101, Eureka. See May 9 listing.

Heads Up …

The Humboldt Local Agency Formation Commission seeks applications from members of the public interested in serving on the commission as a regular public member. To obtain an application, visit humboldtlafco.org or email info@humboldtlafco.org. The deadline is June 14.

Call to Artists: California Seaweed Festival Commemorative Poster contest. The California Seaweed Festival will take place in Humboldt County Oct. 18-20, 2024, at locations in Eureka, Samoa, Arcata and Trinidad. Festival organizers are seeking submissions for a commemorative poster celebrating seaweed and the festival theme of “Biodiversity and Aquaculture on the North Coast.” The entry deadline is May 31. Winner will be chosen by June 30. Visit californiaseaweedfestival.org for contest details and the application form.

Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call (707) 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org.

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Samplefest Samplefest

The Fall Guy Takes it on the Chin

THE FALL GUY. At the risk of speaking more reboots into existence, the storeroom of old media is not always the refuge of the unimaginative. For it to work, some part of its original DNA that still resonates must be preserved, while others are tweaked to make it new. Listen, Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida was a reboot of Chaucer. And few would argue the 1980s TV series about a stuntman/ bounty hunter starring Lee Majors and Heather Thomas is a sacred text, the tomb of which should remain untouched. Its big-screen comedy-action resurrection is, as director and former stuntman/stunt coordinator David Leitch (John Wick, 2014; Atomic Blonde, 2017) says in the preview, a tribute to unsung stunt performers, many of whom show their faces in the movie. It also manages to amp up the excitement for our post-Bourne-Wick-Fast-and-Furious era, add self-reflexive humor, chemistry and the goofy vulnerability of its star Ryan Gosling.

The fantastically named stuntman Colt Seavers (Gosling) is happily dating camerawoman Jody (Emily Blunt) and doubling for massive movie star Tom Ryder (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), who is definitely not the oft name-checked Tom Cruise. But an accident on set sends him spiraling, ditching his career and ghosting his girlfriend. A year and change later, Ryder’s producer Gail (Hannah Waddingham with a Diet Coke welded to her hand) cajoles him back into service for an action-sci-fi epic Ryder is shooting in Australia with first-time director Jody. He agrees in hopes of winning Jody back, despite his fear of getting back in the saddle. And once she’s had him set on fire and thrown into rocks for a few cathartic retakes (who among us?), things are looking up. That is, until Gail enlists him to hunt down the movie’s AWOL star, a mission that sends him down a rabbit hole filled with real-life danger.

The pace of Fall Guy is fast and pulled along by momentum, rolling along like a car flipping on a beach. The physical stunts are as spectacular as one would hope and a welcome respite from the detached perfection of CGI. Car jumps, chase scenes and prop-heavy set pieces are alternately jaw dropping and funny. Simple stunts, like smashing through a window or dodging a sword while trying not to spill a cup of co ee are a pleasure, too. A fight in a spinning Dumpster as it’s dragged behind a speeding truck is inspired, as is the sparky, neon, drug-enhanced throwdown in a club.

The versatile Blunt is funny and charming, alternately focused and distracted, with an awkwardness that belies the fighting chops that made her a compelling action lead in Edge of Tomorrow (2014). As usual, we don’t get enough Winston Duke, here quipping and scrapping as Colt’s stunt coordinator and buddy. Waddingham delivers an excellent send-up of a myopic Hollywood bigwig, as does Taylor-Johnson, and there’s plenty of self-mockery as Gosling the glamorous leading actor plays a stuntman rolling his eyes at the entitled star he’s spent years making look good.

Amid calls for the Academy of Motion Pictures to recognize stunt performers and coordinators, the timing of The Fall Guy is good. And maybe it’s the pink aura still hanging around Gosling in the wake of Barbie (2023), but it also feels like a good time for a shift in the male action hero template. There’s only so much stoicism and indestructibility an audience can take. Instead of unrelenting alpha male swagger, Gosling and writer Drew Pearce give Colt a bewildered confidence and shrugging humility. After all, the stuntman isn’t the star. He looks at the thing he’s about to jump o , be run over by or thrown into matter-of-factly, like someone who knows

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
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he’ll probably survive it but it’s going to hurt.

When Gosling rolls onto the concrete, we feel it with him; his thumbs up, given from under a crumpled car or in a heap on the pavement, is a reflex disguised as optimism. Gosling’s performance in retro action-comedy-noir Nice Guys (2016) showcased a similar, albeit sketchier, hero vibe. It would be reminiscent of young Harrison Ford’s wincing or Humphrey Bogart taking a punch in the mouth, though you’d never have caught Indiana Jones or Philip Marlowe sighing in his car over a relationship montage while Taylor Swift croons “All Too Well.” But even making a cheesy declaration of love, delivering a punchline or dangling in peril, Gosling maintains a vulnerability that creates a di erent kind of tension in contrast — maybe harmony — with the action. Fall Guy is genuinely fun and absolute catnip for action movie fans. While it opens with a supercut of epic stunts being shot, wires and all, it ends with footage of the stunts shot for the movie you just watched. Don’t cheat yourself out of it. PG13. 114M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. ●

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at (707) 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Instagram @JFumikoCahill.

NOW PLAYING

ABIGAIL. Kidnappers (Kathryn Newton, Dan Stevens) find themselves trapped with a vampire ballerina (Alisha Weir). R. 109M. BROADWAY.

CHALLENGERS. Mike Faist and Josh O’Connor play pro tennis while playerturned-coach Zendaya serves. R. 131M.

BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

CIVIL WAR. Kirsten Dunst and Wagner Moura play a photographer and writer who travel from New York to Washington, D.C. to interview the president (Nick Offerman) amid a future American conflict. R. 109M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

GHOSTBUSTERS: FROZEN EMPIRE. Remaining original cast members (Bill Murray, Ernie Hudson, Dan Aykroyd, Annie Potts) team up with a new generation. With Paul Rudd. PG13. 115M. BROADWAY.

GODZILLA X KONG: THE NEW EMPIRE. Bring back the Mothra twins, you cowards. BROADWAY.

KINGDOM OF THE PLANET OF THE APES. A sequel to the primate power struggle skipping ahead generations. PG13. 145M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

KUNG FU PANDA 4. Jack Black returns to voice the roly-poly warrior with legend James Hong, Awkwafina and Viola Davis. PG. 94M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

MET OPERA – MADAME BUTTERFLY. Asmik Grigorian and Jonathan Tetelman star and Xian Zhang conducts. NR. 180M. MINOR.

SASQUATCH SUNSET. Jesse Eisenberg and Riley Keogh star in the Humboldt-shot Bigfoot comedy adventure people already hate. R. 89M. MINOR.

STAR WARS: EPISODE I – THE PHANTOM MENACE (1999). Star Wars like it’s 1999. PG/ 136M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. TAROT. A cursed deck raises heck in this horror. PG13. 92M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

UNSUNG HERO. Big Christian music family biopic about the Smallbones. PG. 112M. BROADWAY.

Fortuna Theatre is temporarily closed. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema (707) 443-3456; Mill Creek Cinema 8393456; Minor Theatre (707) 822-3456.

Fresh La Granola available at a location near you!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 31
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Lions and Dragons in Old Town

Arts Alive! on Saturday in Eureka had the usual art and music lineup, but Old Town also featured several costumed May the Fourth Star Wars characters and a big crowd at the third annual Eureka Chinatown Street Festival - Year of the Dragon.

The festival on three blocks of E Street in front of the Clarke Historical Museum began at 4 p.m., when lion dancers wandered through businesses on the streets offering the Lion Blessing of Businesses for good luck and prosperity. Attendees began checking out the numerous Asian food vendors, artists’ offerings, a kids zone and other activities.

At a 6 p.m. opening ceremony, Sheila Moon (a descendant of Charlie Moon for whom an alley in Eureka’s historic Chinatown is named) welcomed the large crowd and introduced the Humboldt Taiko drum-

mers, who quickly had to retreat under a tent to perform as heavy rain arrived. After the rain stopped, most of the crowd stayed for performances by traditional lion and dragon dancers, Humboldt County Lao Dancers, the K-Pop Dance Team from Eureka High School, Humboldt Rockers and Samba da Alegria.

The Eureka Chinatown Project is an initiative by community members and Humboldt Asians and Pacific Islanders in Solidarity (HAPI) to honor the history and culture of the first Chinese people in Humboldt County, the vast majority of whom were forcibly exiled during Eureka’s 1885 expulsion. A current project goal is to build a Eureka Chinatown Monument to be located at the corner of First and E streets. l

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
See the full slideshow at
northcoastjournal.com.
Humboldt Taiko, led by Gary Ronne (center), found refuge from the rain under a large tent for their performance leading off the Eureka Chinatown Street Festival program. Photos by Mark Larson
GET OUT Being the BEST ain’t no game! The BEST work hard to get where they are, so let everyone in Humboldt know about them. boh.northcoastjournal.com
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Nominate them —  or yourself! — once per day from May 1st through May 30th at Round 1:
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Announced in the North Coast Journal Aug. 1, 2024
northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 33
The Eureka Chinatown Street Festival featured a team of dragon dancers who manipulate a long, flexible puppet of a dragon using poles positioned along its length.
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The lion dancers at the Eureka Chinatown Street Festival created the illusion of a lion moving with two or more performers in each costume dancing and interacting with the audience.

1. Mil. officers

6. Razor guy

11. Really quiet, on sheet music

14. Photoshop creator

15. Damages

16. Before, poetically

17. “Friends” character with a namesake hairstyle

19. Actor Pace

20. Pompousness

21. Co-founder of the Pittsburgh Penguins (with state senator Jack McGregor)

23. “___ Kleine Nachtmusik”

25. Burpee unit?

26. ___ Field (Mets ballpark)

27. 1976 best-seller that opens in The Gambia

29. “Straight, No Chaser” jazz pianist Thelonious

31. English actor who played Tywin Lannister on “Game of Thrones”

38. High points

41. “1984” superstate

42. Mess of a room

43. Nephrologist played by Hugh Laurie

46. Honeycomb locale

47. Mystik Dan, for one

51. Grocery store area

53. Discover rival 57. Critical hosp. department

58. “Saturday Night Live” alum (20002001) who was also on “Mr. Show” and “Arrested Development”

60. Course estimate

61. Prefix with raptor

62. Description of the five theme answers?

65. Flying fox, actually 66. Nebraska’s largest city

67. Actor Rami

68. Shady

69. Clearance events

70. Detroit soul singer Payne

DOWN

1. Professional path

2. Barber’s “___ for Strings”

3. ___ Mountains (Appalachian range)

4. “Frankly,” in texts

5. Look at

6. “Golly!”

7. A la ___

8. “Rocky” character Apollo

9. NAFTA part, briefly

10. Ari Melber’s network

11. Some exercise bikes

12. Area in a crime drama

13. Cheat at cards, in a way

18. Stacks of wax

22. L as in “NATO”?

24. “... and so forth”

28. “Get outta here!”

30. It may have a fob

32. Crossworder’s dir.

33. Wrestler ___ Mysterio

34. “Well ___-difrickin’-dah!”

35. “Music for Airports” musician Brian

36. Char ___ (Cantonese-style barbecued pork)

37. Morse code symbol

38. “It’s so annoying!”

39. Like the earliest life forms

40. What storm levels may indicate

44. Machinery part

45. Many, many millennia

48. Small wave

49. Climbed

50. Cry of epiphany

52. Misbakes like this one

53. Like some videos

54. Nip it ___ bud

55. Tofu beans

56. Surrealist sculptor Jean

58. Apple co-founder Steve

59. One of the Berenstain Bears

63. “Unbelievable” group of 1991

64. Rower’s paddle

Doubting Shakespeare, Part 3: Whodunnit?

Last week, I presented arguments supporting the anti-Stratfordian case, that Stratford’s “Shakspere” wasn’t the sublime writer William Shakespeare. If the man from Stratford didn’t write the Shakespearean canon, who did?

Originally, Francis Bacon was considered the prime candidate. Later contenders included: Christopher Marlowe; Henry Neville; Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke; William Stanley, sixth Earl of Derby and many more. Or an amalgam of these, writing under a single pseudonym. However, the candidate most frequently cited is the 17th Earl of Oxford, Edward de Vere, someone with a motivation for writing under a pseudonym and with the right background: classical education (attended Cambridge), knowledge of the law (studied at Grays Inn law courts), worldly (traveled extensively in Italy and France), confidant of Queen Elizabeth (whose chief advisor was de Vere’s fatherin-law, William Cecil Burghley). He was also a good writer, “the most excellent” of Elizabeth’s courtier poets. De Vere’s motivation for anonymity is obvious. Take the character of Hamlet’s Polonius, chief advisor in the Danish court, portrayed as a garrulous, bumbling old man — clearly, to most Shakespeare scholars, modeled on Burghley himself. In those days, to openly mock the crown or government was considered treason, punishable by maiming, imprisonment, or death. The main strike against de Vere is that he died in 1604, so that if he was Shakespeare, several plays had to have been published posthumously, edited, perhaps, by someone in the know — Mary Sidney?

If de Vere, or someone else, was posing as Shakespeare, why that particular name? One possibility is that the Stratford man, who was involved in the London theater scene as an occasional actor and as an investor in the Globe and Blackfriars theaters, was paid to act

as the face for a playwright who wished to remain anonymous. Or, more likely, Stratford’s Shakspere had nothing to do with it. Shakespeare, or sometimes Shakespeare, may be a play on the goddess Pallas Athena, who sprang from the head of Zeus “shaking a sharp spear.” William, meanwhile, is cognate with the Old Dutch for “golden helmet,” which Athena is often portrayed as wearing. Not incidentally, it was common practice in that time to indicate pseudonymous works with a hyphen, so Shake-speare would then be seen alongside such giveaways as Tom Tell-troth and Simon Smell-knave.

To legitimize this debate, veteran Shakespearean actors Sirs Derek Jacobi and Mark Rylance, among others, sponsored a “Declaration of Reasonable Doubt about the Identity of William Shakespeare,” which you can read at doubtaboutwill.org. Jacobi and Rylance are hardly the first to question the authorship, being preceded by, among others, Mark Twain, Henry James, Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Orson Welles, Sir John Gielgud, Sigmund Freud, U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, historian David McCullough and physicist Roger Penrose — none of whom, I trust you’ll agree, were or are lacking in intelligence.

I’ll leave the final word to Nobel Prize-winning novelist John Galsworthy, who declared the original proposal that Edward de Vere was Shakespeare (in a 1920 book by English schoolteacher John Looney) to be “the best detective story I’ve ever read.” Which is a fitting tag-line for the entire attempt to figure out who wrote Shakespeare. We’ll probably never know, but damn, it’s fun to try.

Barry Evans (he/him, barryevans9@ yahoo.com) votes for a long shot: writerspy Christopher (Kit) Marlowe who, after faking his own death in 1593, wrote the “Shakespeare” plays from Italy.

l
Edward de Vere in 1575, age about 25, in a 17th century painting by unknown artist based on a lost original work. Public domain
FIELD NOTES CROSSWORD
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TO NO FEAR 34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
L
LAST
ANSWERS

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION ON JUNE 10TH, 2024, OF TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY FOR DELINQUENT TAXES

Made pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3702

On, February 27th, 2024, I, Amy Christensen, Humboldt County Tax Collector, was directed to conduct a public auction sale by the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, California. The tax-defaulted properties listed on this notice are subject to the Tax Collector’s power of sale and have been approved for sale by a resolution dated February 27th, 2024 of the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors.

The sale will be conducted at www.govease.com, on June 10th, 2024, as a public auction to the highest bidder for not less than the minimum bid as shown on this notice. Due diligence research is incumbent on the bidder as all properties are sold as is. The winning bidder is legally obligated to purchase the item.

Only bids submitted via the Internet will be accepted. Pre-registration is required. Register on-line at www.govease. com by June 7th, 2024 Bidders must submit a refundable deposit of $2,500.00 electronically, or by certified check at www.govease.com. The deposit will be applied to the successful bidder’s purchase price. Full payment and deed information indicating how title should be vested is required within 48 hours after the end of the sale. Terms of payment are limited to wire transfers or Certified Checks. A California transfer tax will be added to and collected with the purchase price and is calculated at $.55 per each $500 or fraction thereof.

All property is sold as is. The county and its employees are not liable for the failure of any electronic equipment that may prevent a person from participating in the sale.

The right of redemption will cease on Friday June 7th, 2024 at 5 p.m. and properties not redeemed will be offered for sale. If the parcel is not sold, the right of redemption will revive and continue up to the close of business on the last business day prior to the next scheduled sale.

If the properties are sold, parties of interest, as defined in California Revenue and Taxation Code Section 4675, have a right to file a claim with the county for any excess proceeds from the sale. Excess proceeds are the amount of the highest bid in excess of the liens and costs of the sale that are paid from the sale proceeds. Notice will be given to parties of interest, pursuant to California Revenue Taxation Code section 3692(e), if excess proceeds result from the sale.

More information may be obtained by contacting the Tax Collector at www.humboldtgov.org or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free at 877-448-6829.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION

The Assessor’s Assessment Number (Parcel No.), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map (if applicable), and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and an explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s Office.

The properties subject to this notice are situated in Humboldt County, California, and are described as follows:

109-211-035-000 FLORES, ANDRES & FIALLO, IVAN

109-241-029-000 BUCK, SCOTT M

109-261-029-000

TAGHI $2,800.00

109-271-001-000 RODERICK, DELLA P

109-271-011-000 LAND TITLE LLC $5,400.00

109-271-012-000 THOMPSON, SHERYL L & CALEB W $8,200.00

109-271-041-000

109-271-042-000

SZEKERES, MICHAEL & KILLINGSWORTH, IRIS $23,200.00

032-102-002-000 OLSEN, GWENDOLYN R $16,900.00

032-231-016-000 REYES, EDITH & HERNANDEZ, JAMES $12,900.00

033-271-008-000 BOWMAN, CONRAD K & TRUDY L $4,600.00

033-271-027-000 BOWMAN, CONRAD K II & TRUDY L $72,700.00

052-072-033-000 SANDERSON, EDWARD D & ROGER D $2,500.00

052-141-006-000 AUGUSTINE, JOHN & ERICKSON, NIKOLAI K $16,300.00

053-021-048-000 BUSALD, JANINE L $25,400.00

053-152-007-000 RIO DELL CHURCH OF CHRIST $10,800.00

095-061-018-000 GREENFIELD, JONAH $19,300.00

107-051-009-000 HULSE, COLIN W $34,000.00

107-056-009-000 COUCH, DAVID $28,200.00

107-291-009-000 SHINN, JIM $42,300.00

108-141-027-000 RILEY, KEVIN J $17,700.00

108-141-028-000 RILEY, KEVIN J $32,800.00

JONATHAN

BIGHAM-SMITH, GAILE P $11,400.00

BIGHAM-SMITH, GAILE P $13,100.00

109-271-056-000 CARTER, GREGORY D $5,800.00

109-291-017-000 BENNETT, CHRISTINE A $55,500.00

109-311-044-000 HUFF, CHRISTIAN F $3,200.00

109-321-005-000 LAND TITLE LLC $5300.00 109-341-012-000 MULLEN, OMER W MULLEN TRUST $6,000.00

110-021-011-000 BENNETT YVONNA $6,800.00

110-041-017-000 JAEGER, CARLA D $4,000.00

110-051-012-000 GREGORIO, ELIZABETH $9,200.00

110-071-010-000 BRONTE HEIGHTS DEVELOPMENTS LTD $5,000.00

110-071-038-000 YORK, TOMMY A & PAULINE N $7,200.00

110-081-013-000 EGER, ELMER F $21,300.00 110-081-027-000 JOHNSON, DALLERIE J $4,700.00

110-081-030-000 MUNOZ, OSCAR

110-111-006-000 CORTAZAR, JIM

110-191-026-000 MCFARLAND, GLEN & ELIZABETH $5,300.00

110-191-027-000 MANBEIAN, TAGHI $2,200.00

110-211-044-000 COX, ZEBULON & RHONDA $10,500.00

110-211-045-000 COX, ZEBULON & RHONDA $10,500.00

110-221-012-000 MCFARLAND, GLEN & ELIZABETH $5,300.00

110-221-032-000 PARKER, MARIAN $6,700.00

110-221-033-000 PARKER, MARIAN $5,700.00

110-221-034-000 PARKER, MARIAN $8,700.00

110-221-035-000 PARKER, MARIAN A $8,500.00

110-221-036-000 PARKER, MARIAN $6,700.00

110-251-008-000 DILLON, LYGLE W & RACHEL C $7,600.00

110-281-009-000 PARKER, RONALD W & BETTY $6,800.00

110-291-024-000 REZAPOUR, GASSEM $8,800.00

111-012-037-000 INGEBRETSEN, KARLA & GRIFFEY BOBBI S $6,000.00

111-022-014-000 LAND TITLE LLC $7,500.00

111-031-040-000 DIGGS, BOBBY D $5,600.00

111-052-022-000 VICKERS, JOCK M III & ANDREA M $8,400.00

111-052-034-000

111-081-013-000

SULLIVAN, CAROL M $11,300.00

MARCOTULLI, KATHLEEN $5,700.00

111-112-025-000 MCCLURE, MORGAN E & CLARK, DANIEL E JR $5,000.00

111-133-017-000 GUZMAN, ELSE W $6,400.00

111-201-020-000 SIMPSON, MIKE $5,100.00

111-201-021-000 SIMPSON, MICHAEL L $5,200.00

111-202-056-000 WILLIAMS, KEVIN S & AMY L $8,100.00

201-301-015-000

MASTERSON, EUGENIA MASTERSON EUGENIA LIVING TRUST $7,900.00

202-102-008-000 MACY, TY K & MARY M $3,000.00

208-111-020-000

OPENROADAGENCY LLC CO $13,400.00

208-112-012-000 COLEMAN, ROBERT M $13,600.00

208-221-018-000

STARKEY, RAYMOND E & JOHNNIE L/ THOMAS, GEORGE/ JACKSON, BERKELEY B FREY, LENNY/ BRANDLI, ROXANN $9,600.00

LEGAL NOTICES
ASSESSMENT NO. ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS AMOUNT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2022 001-071-004-000 FLOYD, BRADFORD C $923,600.00 001-103-004-000 SQUIRES, FLOYD E III & SQUIRES BETTY J $134,300.00 006-153-013-000 TAYLOR, LONNIE L $7,900.00
$7,900.00
009-042-007-000 AHO, RICHARD & RONALD
011-092-014-000
A
ANNA A $4,800.00 109-182-017-000 PERALTA, CRYSTHIAN & KRISTIN $6,800.00 109-202-010-000 FRANKLIN, MARSHAYNE SCOTT
109-041-026-000 PENROD,
S $5,500.00 109-042-018-000 KUTINA, SUSAN K/NIVINSKY STANLEY $12,700.00 109-091-046-000 SANCHEZ-GRAVES, YVONNE K $28,500.00 109-131-043-000 FLORES, ANDRES & FIALLO IVA $3,800.00 109-131-047-000 LAND TITLE LLC $5,400.00 109-141-028-000 WATT, NATHAN
&
KELLY H & MARK S $5,200.00
$4,400.00
$5,800.00
109-221-025-000 PETROV, PETER
109-221-037-000 DRIEDGER, DIRK J $7,800.00
$6,500.00
$7,300.00
109-241-038-000 ALDAYA, ALEXANDER
MANBEIAN,
$7,400.00
$3,700.00
$19,100.00
Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 35

210-221-002-000 FRANKLIN, WILLIAM L

210-231-005-000 HUNTER, JONAH S & SMART RYAN

211-363-007-000 (COMBINED SALE) RICE, JOE C & JILL R

211-371-009-000 (COMBINED SALE) RICE, JOE C & JILL R

211-385-008-000 LOCONTE, RUTH

214-071-010-000 LOPEZ, HULFRANO JR

215-202-041-000 OSBORNE, DANIEL D & KIA C

216-381-015-000 DUBIEL, PAUL S

216-382-012-000

216-382-032-000

DIMITROV, DIYAN

DIMITROV, DIYAN

216-382-033-000 DIMITROV, DIYAN

216-382-034-000 DIMITROV, DIYAN

216-391-027-000 PHELPS, CARL A

216-393-001-000 KOTZEVA, DANIELA

216-393-012-000 TEMPO PLUS INC

216-393-013-000 BOGDANOV, ANGEL

216-393-012-000 TEMPO PLUS INC

216-393-013-000 BOGDANOV, ANGEL

216-393-028-000 BOGDANOV, ANGEL

$28,600.00

$39,600.00

$95,000.00

$30,000.00

$3,200.00

$58,800.00

$40,800.00

$11,100.00

$41,700.00

$12,300.00

$5,900.00

$8,200.00

$24,100.00

$53,500.00

$28,300.00

$53,500.00

$28,300.00

$8,700.00

217-111-005-000 HOYES, VEDA E & JOHNSON STEVEN W $4,700.00

221-111-014-000 REISSMAN, JESSE & MAYIM

$9,500.00

221-221-037-000 NELSON, MICHAEL T $41,600.00

222-171-012-000 LEWIS, MARSHA L $10,900.00

223-183-006-000 PARKER, JARELLE R $6,500.00 223-311-017-000

400-101-014-000 VICKERS, DEBORAH L $7,000.00

509-091-004-000 DUNCAN, HARRY R/ DUNCAN HARRY LIVING TRUST $10,300.00

509-112-009-000 DAVIS, KENNETH S $11,000.00

509-212-004-000 MORROW, GREGORY I $18,800.00

511-381-027-000 PETERSON, ASHLEY J $45,200.00

512-101-076-000 MCCULLOUGH, JAMES R & MARY M $2,200.00 514-041-002-000 MASON, IAN/ MASON IAN C 2016 TRUST $20,700.00

520-086-004-000 (COMBINED SALE) GREEN VALLEY MOTEL LLC

520-086-007-000 (COMBINED SALE) GREEN VALLEY MOTEL LLC

520-086-008-000 (COMBINED SALE) GREEN VALLEY MOTEL LLC

520-086-009-000 (COMBINED SALE) GREEN VALLEY MOTEL LLC

$202,000.00

522-044-034-000 PARKS, BASHO $19,700.00

522-231-011-000 JURIN, CHARLES R & BILLIE J PIROVANO CARLO A & VIVIAN L REV LIVING TRUST/ PIROVANO VIVIAN L

$7,800.00

524-191-013-000 TRENT, CHRISTOPHER W $10,600.00

525-211-029-000 BAKER, DION E & DALE L

$8,000.00

529-211-012-000 STARRITT, VICTOR & BART/ ROGERS, CLAUDETTE $12,300.00

530-151-001-000 ROMAN, MOISES

$18,500.00

Executed At Eureka, Humboldt County, California, On May 6, 2024. Published In The North Coast Journal On May 9, 16 & 23, 2024

NOTICEOFPETITIONTO ADMINISTERESTATEOF JIMMIELEEBROWNaka JIMMIEL.BROWN,aka JIMMIEBROWN CASENO.PR2400119

Toallheirs,beneficiaries,creditors, contingentcreditorsandpersons whomayotherwisebeinterestedin thewillorestate,orboth,of JIMMIELEEBROWNakaJIMMIEL. BROWN,akaJIMMIEBROWN APETITIONFORPROBATEhasbeen filedbyPetitionerKENNETHD. BRINK

Thepetitionforprobaterequests thatKENNETHD.BRINK beappointedaspersonalrepresen− tativetoadministertheestateof thedecedent.

THEPETITIONrequestsauthorityto administertheestateunderthe IndependentAdministrationof EstatesAct.(Thisauthoritywill allowthepersonalrepresentative totakemanyactionswithout obtainingcourtapproval.Before takingcertainveryimportant actions,however,thepersonal representativewillberequiredto givenoticetointerestedpersons unlesstheyhavewaivednoticeor consentedtotheproposedaction.) Theindependentadministration authoritywillbegrantedunlessan interestedpersonfilesanobjection tothepetitionandshowsgood causewhythecourtshouldnot granttheauthority.

AHEARINGonthepetitionwillbe heldonMay23,2024at1:31p.m.at theSuperiorCourtofCalifornia, CountyofHumboldt,825Fifth Street,Eureka,inDept.:4,Room:4

Forinformationonhowtoappear remotelyforyourhearing,please visithttps://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/

IFYOUOBJECTtothegrantingof thepetition,youshouldappearat thehearingandstateyourobjec− tionsorfilewrittenobjectionswith thecourtbeforethehearing.Your appearancemaybeinpersonorby yourattorney.

IFYOUAREACREDITORora contingentcreditorofthedece− dent,youmustfileyourclaimwith thecourtandmailacopytothe personalrepresentativeappointed bythecourtwithinthelaterof either(1)fourmonthsfromthe dateoffirstissuanceofletterstoa generalpersonalrepresentative,as definedinsection58(b)oftheCali− forniaProbateCode,or(2)60days fromthedateofmailingor personaldeliverytoyouofanotice undersection9052oftheCalifornia ProbateCode.OtherCalifornia statutesandlegalauthoritymay affectyourrightsasacreditor.You maywanttoconsultwithan attorneyknowledgeableinCali− fornialaw.

YOUMAYEXAMINEthefilekept bythecourt.Ifyouareaperson interestedintheestate,youmay filewiththecourtaRequestfor SpecialNotice(formDE−154)ofthe filingofaninventoryandappraisal ofestateassetsorofanypetition oraccountasprovidedinProbate Codesection1250.ARequestfor SpecialNoticeformisavailable fromthecourtclerk. AttorneyforPetitioner:

YOUMAYEXAMINEthefilekept bythecourt.Ifyouareaperson interestedintheestate,youmay filewiththecourtaRequestfor SpecialNotice(formDE−154)ofthe filingofaninventoryandappraisal ofestateassetsorofanypetition oraccountasprovidedinProbate Codesection1250.ARequestfor SpecialNoticeformisavailable fromthecourtclerk.

AttorneyforPetitioner: DanielE.Cooper 710IStreet Eureka,CA95501 707−443−8011

Filed:May3,2024

SUPERIORCOURTOFCALIFORNIA COUNTYOFHUMBOLDT

5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−163)

PUBLICSALE

NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthatthe undersignedintendstosellthe personalpropertydescribedbelow toenforcealienimposedonsaid propertypursuanttoSections 21700−21716oftheBusiness& ProfessionsCode,Section2328of theUCC,Section535ofthePenal Codeandprovisionsofthecivil Code.

Theundersignedwillsellatauction bycompetitivebiddingonthe22th ofMay,2024,at9:00AM,onthe premiseswheresaidpropertyhas beenstoredandwhicharelocated atRainbowSelfStorage.

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 4055BroadwayEureka,CA,County ofHumboldt.

PongVongsak,Space#5232 CierraMouraux,Space#5319 AlmaBaker,Space#5321 DanielleMiller,Space#5429

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 639W.ClarkStreetEureka,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale oftheaboveunits.

CaseyRowland,Space#2014 KevinScott,Space#2703 MarcBorde,Space#2910 AliciaCulver,Space#2915 MarkAndersen,Space#3203 AlmaBaker,Space#3411

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 3618JacobsAvenueEureka,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale oftheaboveunits.

Margins are just a safe area

MarkAndersen,Space#3203 AlmaBaker,Space#3411

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 3618JacobsAvenueEureka,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale oftheaboveunits.

JobPatereau,Space#1120 MaryGulley,Space#1125 RaymondVogel,Space#1192 LeeannKennedy,Space#1370 JesseVanZanten,Space#1393 DavidaMiller−White,Space#1503 ReginaHamilton,Space#1723 DanielLemieux,Space#1801

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 105IndianolaAvenueEureka,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale oftheaboveunits.

GaryUpshaw,Space#268 DavidCasanova,Space#282 DanConant,Space#286 CaseyRowland,Space#310 CharlesKreuter,Space#398 KatrinaJackson,Space#426 KiaBiddle,Space#467 JenniferRiggs,Space#808

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 100IndianolaAvenueEureka,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale oftheaboveunits.

ReidSpana,JudySpana,Space#J181

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 1641HollyDriveMcKinleyville,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale oftheaboveunits.

HannaLandini,Space#1102

ZacharyThoma,Space#1126

LeviLanderos,Space#2114

KristenWise,Space#3136

DanielleStewart,Space#3288 IsaacWilliams,Space#7202 IsaacWilliams,Space#7208 ScottLuiz,Space#9120

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 2394CentralAvenueMcKinleyville CA,CountyofHumboldtandwill besoldimmediatelyfollowingthe saleoftheaboveunits.

NathanHentley,Space#9213

PUBLIC NOTICE - REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

JobPatereau,Space#1120 MaryGulley,Space#1125 RaymondVogel,Space#1192 LeeannKennedy,Space#1370 JesseVanZanten,Space#1393 DavidaMiller−White,Space#1503 ReginaHamilton,Space#1723 DanielLemieux,Space#1801

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 180FStreetArcataCA,Countyof Humboldtandwillbesoldimmedi− atelyfollowingthesaleofthe aboveunits.

Sealed proposals will be received by the Department of Community Services, First Floor, Eureka City Hall, 531 K Street, Eureka, California, 95501, until 4:00 PM on Friday, the 24th day of May, 2024.

Sequoia Park Zoo Café Operator

TeriRoss,Space#4384 TiffanyBigler,Space#6104 LeifLastine,Space#6141

Proposals are required for the entire work as described herein:

PROJECT SCOPE

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 105IndianolaAvenueEureka,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale oftheaboveunits.

GaryUpshaw,Space#268 DavidCasanova,Space#282 DanConant,Space#286 CaseyRowland,Space#310 CharlesKreuter,Space#398 KatrinaJackson,Space#426 KiaBiddle,Space#467 JenniferRiggs,Space#808

The City of Eureka’s Community Services Department is in the process of searching for qualified applicants to operate the café at the amazing Sequoia Park Zoo located at 3414 W Street, Eureka, California. The City is looking to receive applications and inquiries for a lease for operation of approximately 1,800 square feet of the café/dining facility to operate a dining space and café. The equipped kitchen is complete with sinks, ovens, stove burners, grill top, fryers, refrigeration and freezers. The City is open to customization of kitchen items to provide food services. In operation since 1907, the Sequoia Park Zoo provides animal and nature experiences enhanced by the recent additions of the Redwood Sky Walk and Bear exhibit.

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 940GStreetArcataCA,Countyof Humboldtandwillbesoldimmedi− atelyfollowingthesaleofthe aboveunits.

None

The RFP can be obtained for free at eurekaca.gov/ZooCafeRFP or the Community Services Department as stated above.

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 100IndianolaAvenueEureka,CA, CountyofHumboldtandwillbe soldimmediatelyfollowingthesale

Itemstobesoldinclude,butare notlimitedto: Householdfurniture,officeequip− ment,householdappliances,exer− ciseequipment,TVs,VCR,micro− wave,bikes,books,misc.tools, misc.campingequipment,misc. stereoequip.misc.yardtools,misc. sportsequipment,misc.kidstoys, misc.fishinggear,misc.computer components,andmisc.boxesand bagscontentsunknown.

DOWNARD
CR $25,300.00
LINTON,
$2,500.00 315-184-001-000 REX REAL ESTATE LLC CO $10,100.00 316-185-001-000
$3,300.00 317-063-005-000 CFV-KMV
$3,700.00
& HILL TRUCKING INC
300-082-030-000
DANIEL G
KERLIN SPRINGS RANCH LLC CO
LLC CO
317-105-003-000 GYANI, PARMINDER $4,100.00
GREEN STURGEON
$55,500.00
531-102-007-000
LLC
I Certify Or (Declare), Under Penalty Of Perjury, That The Foregoing Is True And Correct.
Amy Christensen Humboldt County Tax Collector
default
1993TravelSupremeCCH5th LEGAL NOTICES 36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com

besoldimmediatelyfollowingthe saleoftheaboveunits.

NathanHentley,Space#9213

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat

180FStreetArcataCA,Countyof Humboldtandwillbesoldimmedi− atelyfollowingthesaleofthe aboveunits.

TeriRoss,Space#4384 TiffanyBigler,Space#6104 LeifLastine,Space#6141

Thefollowingspacesarelocatedat 940GStreetArcataCA,Countyof Humboldtandwillbesoldimmedi− atelyfollowingthesaleofthe aboveunits.

None

Itemstobesoldinclude,butare notlimitedto: Householdfurniture,officeequip− ment,householdappliances,exer− ciseequipment,TVs,VCR,micro− wave,bikes,books,misc.tools, misc.campingequipment,misc. stereoequip.misc.yardtools,misc. sportsequipment,misc.kidstoys, misc.fishinggear,misc.computer components,andmisc.boxesand bagscontentsunknown.

1993TravelSupremeCCH5th WheelTrailerTRSUP

License#1ED6884Vin#1T9F− W3320P1000788

Anyoneinterestedinattending RainbowSelfStorageauctionsmust pre−qualify.Fordetailscall707−443 −1451. Purchasesmustbepaidforatthe timeofthesaleincashonly.Allpre −qualifiedBiddersmustsigninat 4055BroadwayEurekaCA.priorto 9:00A.M.onthedayoftheauction, noexceptions.Allpurchaseditems aresoldasis,whereisandmustbe removedattimeofsale.Saleis subjecttocancellationforany reasonwhatsoever.

Auctioneer:NicolePettit,Employee forRainbowSelf−Storage,707−443− 1451,Bond#40083246.

5/9,5/16/2024(24−160)

PublicSale

Noticeisherebygiventhatthe undersignedintendstosellthe personalpropertydescribedbelow toenforcealienimposedonsaid propertypursuantsections21700− 21716ofthebusinessandprofes− sionscode,section2328ofthe UCC,section535ofthepenalcode andprovisionsofthecivilcode.The undersignedwillsellatpublicsale bycompetitivebiddingThursday the16thofMay2024ontheprem− iseswheresaidpropertyhasbeen storedandwhichislocatedat SherlockMiniStorageatlocations listedbelow:

10:30−SherlockMiniStorage−1725 Sutterrd.McKinleyvilleCA95519: NiramayaHodges,BennyMartinez, CatherineCrandall.

11:30−SherlockMiniStorage−901 W.DelNorteSt.EurekaCA95501: KrystinaDiaz,SharryAnderson− Costa,TomDuncan,DuaneEzedi, CandiceAndrews,DouglasBishop, BrettSchultz,CesarLopez,Richard Reynolds,WilliamCharter,Rose Bennett,JuanOrtega,SteveFoley, LarryDutra,LedaorKennethJones.

2PM−SherlockMiniStorage−1749 AlamarWayFortunaCA95540:

11:30−SherlockMiniStorage−901 W.DelNorteSt.EurekaCA95501: KrystinaDiaz,SharryAnderson− Costa,TomDuncan,DuaneEzedi, CandiceAndrews,DouglasBishop, BrettSchultz,CesarLopez,Richard Reynolds,WilliamCharter,Rose Bennett,JuanOrtega,SteveFoley, LarryDutra,LedaorKennethJones.

2PM−SherlockMiniStorage−1749 AlamarWayFortunaCA95540: JessicaBruga,ArleneLennox,Angela Kammoun,CassieMilligan,April Bocock,CraigHaberstock,Rick Miller,LeonCanada,ErikaMelton, LeahBluhm

Itemsbeingsoldinclude:House− holditems,tools,appliances,furni− ture,personalitems,misc.bagsand tubs.Purchasesmustbepaidforat thetimeofsale.CASHONLY.The unitsaresold"asawhole"All purchaseditemsaresoldasis, whereisandmustberemovedat timeofsale.Saleissubjectto cancellationintheeventofsettle− mentbetweenlandlordandobli− gatedparty.

SherlockMiniStorage−Bond #349177

5/2,5/9/2024(24−153)

PublicSale

Noticeisherebygiventhatthe undersignedintendstosellthe personalpropertydescribedbelow toenforcealienimposedonsaid propertypursuanttoSections 21700−21716oftheBusiness& ProfessionsCode,Section2328of theUCC,Section535ofthePenal CodeandprovisionsoftheCivil Code.

Propertywillbesoldviaanonline auctionat www.StorageAuctions.com. Auctionbiddingwillbeginat10:00 AMonMay14th,2024andwillclose atorafter1:00PMonMay16th, 2024atwhichtimetheauctionwill becompletedandthehighbidder willbedetermined.Theproperty willbeavailableforpickupwhere saidpropertyhasbeenstoredand whichislocatedatAirportRoad Storage,LLC.1000AirportRoad Fortuna,CA95540Countyof Humboldt,StateofCalifornia. (707)725−1234

B40NathanSjoquist C21BeverlyHanns D39CaseyRowland K6DaleNielsen

Saleissubjecttocancellationinthe eventofasettlementbetween ownerandobligatedparty.Please refertowww.StorageAuctions.com forallothertermsandconditions governingthebiddingandauction process.

Datedthis23thdayofApril,2024 5/2,5/9/2024(24−146)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00191

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas CORAZÓNCOMMUNITYCOUN− SELING

Humboldt 537GStreet,Suite204

Eureka,CA95501

POBox300

Eureka,CA95502

AbigailBHudson−Crim POBox300 Eureka,CA95502

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonJuly1,2022 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sAbigailHudson−Crim,Owner ThisApril4,2024 JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−151)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME

STATEMENT24-00163

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas LOSTCOASTPHYSICALTHERAPY

Humboldt 232023rdSt Eureka,CA95501

SarahCorderoPhysicalTherapy Inc CA 232023rdSt Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbya Corporation.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonMarch21,2024 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sSarahCordero,President ThisApril9,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk

4/18,4/25,5/2,5/9/2024(24−138)

HUMBOLDT BAY MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT OWNER 828 7TH STREET. EUREKA, CA 95501

SEPARATE SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED FOR THE: KORBLEX RESERVOIRS 2 TANKS SEISMIC RETROFIT PROJECT

Separate sealed bids will be received for the Korblex Reservoirs Seismic Retrofit Project. The work for this project consists of furnishing all labor, materials, equipment, and supervision required for the seismic retrofit of the Korblex 1 million-gallon (MG) tank and the Korblex 2 MG tank, as well as other related work.

A non-mandatory, but highly recommended, pre-bid meeting will be held to familiarize potential bidders with the project and is scheduled for 1:00 pm, Thursday, May 9th, 2024 at the Korblex site at the top of Pipeline Road, off West End Road, near Arcata, CA. A site overview outside of this meeting time can be arranged by contacting Nathaniel Steen at Ghirardelli Associates by telephone at (707) 382-8931 or by email at nsteen@ghirardelliassoc.com.

Bids will be received by the General Manager of the Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District at the District Office, 828 Seventh Street, Eureka, California, 95501 until 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time, May 31, 2024, and then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. If forwarded by mail, the sealed envelope containing the bid must be enclosed in another envelope addressed to the Owner at Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District, PO Box 95, Eureka, CA 95502-0095 and must be delivered to the District office by the above referenced time and date.

Contractors may obtain an electronic copy of the Contract Documents for free by emailing a request to Justin Palmaymesa (justin@albat.com).

The Contract Documents are also available for download at the HBMWD website: www.hbmwd.com Each proposal must

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00184

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

EMERALDEARTHBIRTHWORK

Humboldt 2510DavisWay Arcata,CA95521

RachelJHanson 2510DavisWay Arcata,CA95521

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sRachelHanson,Owner ThisMarch28,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−156)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00189

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

SPARKLYLADIESCLEANING SERVICES

Humboldt 3434ChurchStreet Fortuna,CA95540

EsperanzaRBonilla 3434ChurchStreet Fortuna,CA95540

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonJune1,2023 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sEsperanzaBonilla,Owner ThisApril3,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/9,5/16,5/23,5/30/2024(24−159)

be submitted on the prescribed form and accompanied by a certified check or Bid Bond in an amount of not less than 10 percent of the amount bid. Successful bidders will be required to furnish both a Payment Bond and Performance Bond in the full amount of the Contract Price. In accordance with Public Contract Code Section 10263, the Contractor will be allowed to substitute securities for monies normally withheld by the owner to insure performance under this contract.

This project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations, State of California. The general prevailing wage rates applicable to the work are set by the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations. The Contractor will be required to comply with any changes in these wage rates as they are updated by the State government at no cost to the Owner.

All contractors and subcontractors must furnish electronic certified payroll records directly to the Labor Commissioner (Division of Labor Standards Enforcement).

Pursuant to Senate Bill 854, all contractors bidding on public works projects must register with the Department of Industrial Relations. Contractors are subject to a registration and annual renewal fee. No contractor or subcontractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code section 1725.5 [with limited exceptions from this requirement for bid purposes only under Labor Code section 1771.1(a)].

Accordingly, all Prime and Subcontractors contained in a bid must provide valid Department of Industrial Relations registration number(s). Failure to provide valid DIR registration numbers in the bid documents shall disqualify the bid.

Neal Latt May 3, 2024

President Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District

Continued on next page » LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices 442-1400 ×314 LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 37

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00143

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

CUSTODIANLLC

Humboldt 1408TompkinsHillRd Fortuna,CA95540

CustodianLLC CA202017810189 1408TompkinsHillRd Fortuna,CA95540

Thebusinessisconductedbya LimitedLiabilityCompany.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonAugust1,2020 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sTimothyDonaghy,CEO

ThisMarch13,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 4/18,4/25,5/2,5/9/2024(24−140)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00198

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

NJSARTWORKS

Humboldt 238PonderosaCourt Eureka,CA95503

NakiahJScott 238PonderosaCourt Eureka,CA95503

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sNakiahScott,Owner ThisApril8,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk

5/9,5/16,5/23,5/30/2024(24−158)

HUMBOLDT BAY MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT OWNER 828 7TH STREET. EUREKA, CA 95501

SEPARATE SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED FOR THE: SAMOA RESERVOIR 1 TANK SEISMIC RETROFIT PROJECT LOCATED BETWEEN LP DRIVE & BAY STREET ON NEW NAVY BASE ROAD

Separate sealed bids will be received for the Korblex Reservoirs Seismic Retrofit Project. The work for this project consists of furnishing all labor, materials, equipment, and supervision required for the seismic retrofit of the Korblex 1 million-gallon (MG) tank and the Korblex 2 MG tank, as well as other related work.

A non-mandatory, but highly recommended, pre-bid meeting will be held to familiarize potential bidders with the project and is scheduled for 10:00 am, Thursday, May 9th, 2024 at the Samoa site along New Navy Base Rd near Samoa, CA. A site overview outside of this meeting time can be arranged by contacting Nathaniel Steen at Ghirardelli Associates by telephone at (707) 382-8931 or by email nsteen@ ghirardelliassoc.com.

Bids will be received by the General Manager of the Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District at the District Office, 828 Seventh Street, Eureka, California, 95501 until 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time, May 31, 2024, and then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. If forwarded by mail, the sealed envelope containing the bid must be enclosed in another envelope addressed to the Owner at Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District, PO Box 95, Eureka, CA 95502-0095 and must be delivered to the District office by the above referenced time and date.

Contractors may obtain an electronic copy of the Contract Documents for free by emailing a request to Justin Palmaymesa (justin@albat.com).

The Contract Documents are also available for download at the HBMWD website: www.hbmwd.com Each proposal must be submitted on the prescribed form and

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00199

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

SYMPHONYCONSULTING

Humboldt 1434JSt

Eureka,CA95501

SymphonyConsultingLLC CA202356717235 1434JSt

Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbya LimitedLiabilityCompany.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonJuly12,2023 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sGabrielAcosta,CEO ThisApril9,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk

4/18,4/25,5/2,5/9/2024(24−137)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00202

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas VNNAILSPA

Humboldt 2916CentralAve#B Eureka,CA95503

VNDInc

CA5943860 804OSt Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbya Corporation.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sHanViThiTran,CEO

ThisApril10,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk

4/18,4/25,5/2,5/9/2024(24−139)

accompanied by a certified check or Bid Bond in an amount of not less than 10 percent of the amount bid. Successful bidders will be required to furnish both a Payment Bond and Performance Bond in the full amount of the Contract Price. In accordance with Public Contract Code Section 10263, the Contractor will be allowed to substitute securities for monies normally withheld by the owner to insure performance under this contract.

This project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations, State of California. The general prevailing wage rates applicable to the work are set by the Director of the Department of Industrial Relations. The Contractor will be required to comply with any changes in these wage rates as they are updated by the State government at no cost to the Owner.

All contractors and subcontractors must furnish electronic certified payroll records directly to the Labor Commissioner (Division of Labor Standards Enforcement).

Pursuant to Senate Bill 854, all contractors bidding on public works projects must register with the Department of Industrial Relations. Contractors are subject to a registration and annual renewal fee. No contractor or subcontractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code section 1725.5 [with limited exceptions from this requirement for bid purposes only under Labor Code section 1771.1(a)]. Accordingly, all Prime and Subcontractors contained in a bid must provide valid Department of Industrial Relations registration number(s). Failure to provide valid DIR registration numbers in the bid documents shall disqualify the bid.

Neal Latt May 3, 2024

President Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00207

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas KLAMATHRIVERCREATIONS

Humboldt 37497Hwy96 Orleans,CA95556

POBox394 Orleans,CA95556

NancyNDoman 37497Hwy96 Orleans,CA95556

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril1,2024 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sNancyDoman,Owner ThisApril12,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 4/25,5/2,5/9,5/16/2024(24−143)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00209

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas GUSMELESIOTRUCKING

Humboldt 2290SilverbrookCt McKinleyville,CA95519

GustavoMelesio-Ramirez 2290SilverbrookCt McKinleyville,CA95519

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril1,2021 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sGustavoMelesio−Ramirez, Owner ThisApril15,2024

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

WHATCHANEEDHUMBOLDT

Humboldt 6620ThirdSt FieldsLanding,CA95537

POBox122 FieldsLanding,CA95537

JoshNYork 6620ThirdSt FieldsLanding,CA95537

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril15,2024

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sJoshYork,Owner

ThisApril15,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 4/25,5/2,5/9,5/16/2024(24−145)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00211

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

HUMBOLDTBAYSOCIALCLUB/ SOCIALSPAS

Humboldt 900NewNavyBaseRoad Samoa,CA95564

ZephyrHospitalityLLC 900NewNavyBaseRoad Samoa,CA95564

Thebusinessisconductedbya LimitedLiabilityCompany. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril9,2024 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sNicoleRFryer,Manager/CEO

ThisApril15,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 4/18,4/25,5/2,5/9/2024(24−141) FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00210

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas WHATCHANEEDHUMBOLDT

Humboldt 6620ThirdSt FieldsLanding,CA95537

POBox122 FieldsLanding,CA95537

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−147)

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas SEADANCEONTHELOSTCOAST/ SEADANCE Humboldt 887LowerPacificDrive Whitethorn,CA95589 14045WillowCreekRoad Ione,CA95640

14045WillowCreekRoad

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00219
RandyIlich
14045WillowCreekRoad Ione,CA95640 HeidiIlich
STATEMENT24−00210
LEGAL NOTICES 38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com

887LowerPacificDrive

Whitethorn,CA95589

14045WillowCreekRoad

Ione,CA95640

RandyIlich

14045WillowCreekRoad Ione,CA95640

HeidiIlich

14045WillowCreekRoad Ione,CA95640

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sRandyIlich,Owner

ThisApril18,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES

byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk

4/25,5/2,5/9,5/16/2024(24−144)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00220

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas REYNOLDSRVREPAIR

Humboldt 646CAHighway36 Fortuna,CA95540

NewRocksIncorporated CA6160632 646CAHighway36

Thebusinessisconductedbya Corporation.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sKathleenRoss,CFO

ThisApril19,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES

byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk

5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−152)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00224

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas REEVESREDWOOD

Humboldt

1438CaliforniaStApt2 Eureka,CA95501

POBox8011 Eureka,CA95502

CoryWReeves 1438CaliforniaStApt2 Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril23,2024

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis

Eureka,CA95502

CoryWReeves 1438CaliforniaStApt2 Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril23,2024 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sCoryWReeves,Owner

ThisApril23,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−148)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00226

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas AFTERGLOWCLEANINGSERVICE

Humboldt 2950JanesRd Arcata,CA95521

MaceyMLawrence 2950JanesRd Arcata,CA95521

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril24,2024 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sMaceyLawrence,Owner

ThisApril24,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−157)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00232

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas STU'SBREWS

Humboldt 71W4thStreet Eureka,CA95501

723BWLongStreet Eureka,CA95501

AaronRSalles 71W4thStreet Eureka,CA95501

VictoriaHSalles 71W4thStreet Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril18,2024 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto

Eureka,CA95501

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril18,2024

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sVictoriaSalles,Owner/Operator ThisApril25,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES

byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk

5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−150)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24−00235

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

COASTALNDNART

Humboldt

1986SagewoodWay,Unit284 McKinleyville,CA95519

2050GwinRoad McKinleyville,CA95519

CaseyJPederson

1986SagewoodWay,Unit284 McKinleyville,CA95519

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonApril26,2024

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect.

Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sCaseyPederson,Owner/Founder ThisApril26,2024 JUANP.CERVANTES byjc,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/2,5/9,5/16,5/23/2024(24−153)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00254

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas BEARPAWENTERPRISES

Humboldt 10316thStreet Arcata,CA95521

POBox517 Arcata,CA95518

ChristopherLAckerman 10316thStreet Arcata,CA95521

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars

transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sChrisAckerman,Owner ThisMay6,2024 JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/9,5/16,5/23,5/30/2024(24−165)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00255

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas

HAPPYTACOMEXICANFOOD

Humboldt 2085MyrtleAve Eureka,CA95501

UbaldoJVielmaGarcia 1201AllardAveSpcD8 Eureka,CA95503

BlancaPacheco 1201AllardAveSpcD8 Eureka,CA95503

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonMay2,2024

Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sUbaldoJVGarcia,Owner

ThisMay6,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk

anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sUbaldoJVGarcia,Owner

ThisMay6,2024

JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/9,5/16,5/23,5/30/2024(24−164)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00256

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas WININGERFARMS

Humboldt 1815EelRiverDr Fortuna,CA95540

KeithRWininger 1815EelRiverDr Fortuna,CA95540

Thebusinessisconductedbyan Individual.

Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonJune13,1975 Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sKeithRWininger,Owner ThisMay6,2024 JUANP.CERVANTES bysc,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/9,5/16,5/23,5/30/2024(24−161)

FICTITIOUSBUSINESSNAME STATEMENT24-00253

ThefollowingpersonisdoingBusi− nessas LOSTCOASTCANDLECOMPANY

Humboldt 3206NStreet Eureka,CA95503

MaraMSchaeffer 3206NStreet Eureka,CA95503

JamesTSchaeffer 3206NStreet Eureka,CA95503

Thebusinessisconductedbya MarriedCouple. Thedateregistrantcommencedto transactbusinessundertheficti− tiousbusinessnameornamelisted aboveonNotApplicable Ideclarethatallinformationinthis statementistrueandcorrect. Aregistrantwhodeclaresastrue anymaterialmatterpursuantto Section17913oftheBusinessand ProfessionsCodethattheregis− trantknowstobefalseisguiltyofa misdemeanorpunishablebyafine nottoexceedonethousanddollars ($1,000).

/sMaraSchaeffer,Co−Owner

ThisMay6,2024 JUANP.CERVANTES byjr,HumboldtCountyClerk 5/9,5/16,5/23,5/30/2024(24−169)

LEGALS? 442-1400 × 314 classified@north coastjournal.com County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices
Call 707-613-4228 to schedule your free quote!
northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 39

We Print

Obituaries

Submit information via email to classified @ northcoastjournal.com or by mail or in person.

Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office.

The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 FAX (707) 442-1401

WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

List your class – just $5 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm.

Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com

Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

WOODFIREDKILNBUILDINGCERAMICSCLASS May13,2024CallCollegeoftheRedwoods CommunityEducationat(707)476−4500.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

STRING&WINDMUSICINSTRUCTIONWITH ROBDIGGINS Privatelessons,coaching,etc.,for kids&adults.Alllevels.Moststyles.Violin,Fiddle, Viola,ElectricViolectra,SynthViolectra,Trumpet, Cornet,Guitar(acoustic&electric).In−personand/ or,online.NearArcata/Eurekaairport.$80/hr, $60/45min,$40/30min.(707)845−1788 forestviolinyogi108@gmail.com

Fitness

SUNYI’SACADEMYOFTAEKWONDO. Classes forkids&adults,childcare,fitnessgym&more. TaeKwonDoMon−Fri5−6p.m.,6−7p.m.,Sat10−11 a.m.Comewatchorjoinaclass,1215GiuntoliLane orvisitwww.sunyisarcata.com,(707)825−0182.

50 and Better

TAKEACLASSWITHOLLI New!Registrationfor OLLIclassesclose3businessdaysbeforetheclass startdate.AnyonecantakeanOLLIclass.JoinOLLI todayandgetthememberdiscountonclasses. Non−membersad$25totheclassfeelisted. humboldt.edu/olli/classes

Spiritual

EVOLUTIONARYTAROT OngoingZoomclasses, privatementorshipsandreadings.CarolynAyres. 442−4240www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com

Therapy & Support

INJECTIONS May30,2024CallCollegeofthe RedwoodsCommunityEducationat(707)476− 4500.

INSTRUCTORSNEEDED: Bookkeeping(Quick− Books),ServSafeManager’sCertification& CannabisBusinessTraining.CallCollegeof RedwoodsCommunityEducationat(707)476− 4500.

MEDICALASSISTINGZOOMINFORMATIONAL MEETING June5,2024CallCollegeofthe RedwoodsCommunityEducationat(707)476− 4500.

NOTARYCLASS June13,2024CallCollegeofthe RedwoodsCommunityEducationat(707)476− 4500.

PHLEBOTOMYZOOMINFORMATIONAL MEETING June13,2024CallCollegeofthe RedwoodsCommunityEducationat(707)476− 4500.

TRUCKDRIVINGINFORMATIONALMEETINGS May13and15,2024CallCollegeoftheRedwoods CommunityEducationat(707)476−4500.

VENIPUNCTURE June4,2024CallCollegeofthe RedwoodsCommunityEducationat(707)476− 4500.

EMPLOYMENT

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K’ima:w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions: PHARMACY CLERK – FT Regular ($16.24-$22.48)

PURCHASED REFERRED CARE (PRC) CLERK – FT Regular ($18.62-$25.09)

HOUSING COORDINATOR – FT Regular ($24.18-35.90)

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION

SPECIALIST – FT Regular ($28.43-$37.30)

ASSISTANT PROJECT MANAGER – FT Regular ($35.59 - $45.46 DOE)

FLOATING SUPPORT CLERK – FT Regular ($17.90 - $24.25)

CLINICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANT – FT Regular ($22.05-29.72)

DESK TECHNICIAN – FT Regular ($18.54-$20.86 per hour DOE)

ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN – FT Regular ($19.54 - $26.33 DOE)

HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, MANAGER – FT Regular ($30.60 - $35.49 DOE)

MEDICAL BILLING SPECIALIST – FT/ Regular ($17.90-$24.25 per hour DOE).

EMT-1 – Temporary and FT Regular ($16.00 - $18.00 DOE)

OUTREACH COORDINATOR (BEHAVIORAL HEALTH) – FT/Regular ($20.00 - $24.00 DOE)

SENIOR RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST – FT Regular ($35.59 - $48.60 DOE)

COALITION COORDINATOR – FT Regular ($17.14 - $20.01 per hour)

PERSONAL HEALTH RECORD (PHR)/ MEDICAL RECORDS SPECIALIST – FT Regular ($18.62 - $23.77 per hour DOE)

MAT CARE MANAGER NURSE – FT/Regular (Salary DOE and licensure) RN or LVN Licensure.

CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT – FT Regular ($25.67 - $29.04 per hour DOE)

MEDICAL ASSISTANT – FT Regular ($22.05 - $25.25 per hour DOE)

ALCOHOLICSANONYMOUS. Wecanhelp24/7, calltollfree1−844−442−0711.

SEX/PORNDAMAGINGYOURLIFE&RELATION− SHIPS? Confidentialhelpisavailable.707−499− 0205,saahumboldt@yahoo.com

Vocational

ADDITIONALONLINECLASSES Collegeofthe RedwoodsCommunityEducationandEd2GOhave partneredtoofferavarietyofshorttermand careercoursesinanonlineformat.Visit https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/Detail /ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/4916/Additional−Online −Classes

DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT/ Regular ($39.00-43.00 DOE)

PHYSICIAN – FT/Regular ($290K-$330K)

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIAN – FT/Regular (DOE licensure and experience) LMFT, LCSW, Psychologist, or Psychiatrist

DENTIST – FT/Regular ($190K-$240K)

All positions above are Open Until Filled, unless otherwise stated.

For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 OR call 530-625-4261 OR apply on our website: https://www.kimaw.org/ for a copy of the job description and to complete an electronic application. Resume/CV are not accepted without a signed application.

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
442-1400 × 314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com YOUR CLASS HERE Arts & Crafts Computer Fitness Kids & Teens Lectures Dance & Music Theatre & Film Spiritual Support Therapy Wellness Bodywork

CITY OF FORTUNA RECREATION PROGRAM COORDINATOR (SUMMER CAMP)

Part-time.

$16.52 - $20.10 PER HOUR.

Under the general supervision of a Recreation Program Supervisor, to plan, direct, and conduct an assigned recreation program for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; to perform a variety of assignments for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; and to do related work as required.

Complete job description available at friendlyfortuna.com.

To apply, please create an online account at governmentjobs.com.

Position is open until filled.

CITY OF FORTUNA RECREATION LEADER (SUMMER CAMP)

PART-TIME.

$16.00 - $19.47 PER HOUR.

Under the general supervision of a Recreation Program Supervisor and Recreation Coordinators, to plan, direct, and conduct assigned recreation programs for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; to perform a variety of assignments for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; and to do related work as required.

Complete job description available at friendlyfortuna.com. To apply, please create an online account at governmentjobs.com.

Position is open until filled.

THE CITY OF RIO DELL

Is now accepting applications for

CHIEF OF POLICE

($97,980 - $118,199 + Benefits)

Lead the best small police department on the north coast! Rio Dell is a supportive environment for law enforcement professionals who are adaptable to modern policing. The community needs an experienced Chief who can multitask, mentor and train officers while providing exceptional services to the community and our law enforcement partners.

Rio Dell does not participate in CalPERS and as a result, this is an ideal position for a safety annuitant or those nearing that status, offering an added 20 percent of Deferred Compensation annually in addition to platinum level health, vision and dental insurance at no cost for the employee. Some of the benefits also include Spanish-English bilingual pay, POST certification incentives of 3 percent for each Intermediate, Advanced & Supervisory certification, severance pay and vacation, sick, holiday and executive time off and more.

RDPD has a $1.37 million dollar annual budget with 8 LEO’s, 1 Community Services Officer with clerical support and a cadet program. The city has made significant investments to modernize its communications, record keeping, vehicle fleet and the organization is interested in making continued investments towards modernization. The department also has responsibilities for code enforcement and animal control. Dispatch and animal care are under contract.

Please submit a cover letter and résumé in addition to the City’s standard application. Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue, www.cityofriodell.ca.gov or call (707)764-3532. Applications are due no later than noon on May 24, 2024.

STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER II

ESSENTIALCAREGIVERS NeededtohelpElderly VisitingAngels 707−442−8001

CALFRESHSERVICECOORDINATOR

Fulltime,non−exemptposition(35hours/week).Startingrangeis $21.00−$23.00/hour.TheCalFreshServiceCoordinatorprovides outreach,applicationassistance,andeducationrelatedtoCalFresh andoverseestheSAILprogram.TheCoordinatorprovidesprimary supportforandsupervisionofCalFreshandSAILvolunteers.This positioncouldbebasedineitherHumboldtorDelNorteCounty. Travelinbothcountiesrequired.Mayberequiredtoworkweek− ends.https://www.a1aa.org/about−us/job−opportunities/

$37,463 – $45,579 PER

Under the general supervision of the Lead Streets Worker and General Services Superintendent, to perform a variety of unskilled and semiskilled work assignments in the maintenance, repair, and construction of City streets and storm drains; to learn basic equipment operation assignments; and to do related work as required.

Complete job description available at friendlyfortuna.com.

To apply, please create an online account at governmentjobs.com. Applications must be received by 4pm on Friday, May 24, 2024.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL Continued on next page » default
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Full-time
CITY OF FORTUNA
YEAR.
PLACE YOUR JOB LISTINGS CLASSIFIEDS.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM Place Ad Hiring? 442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com Post your job opportunities in the Journal. Hiring? 442-1400 × 314 northcoastjournal.com Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH POSITIONS:

Health Rehabilitation Specialist, part-time, 20 hours/ week $24.56/hour

Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org.

www.changingtidesfs.org Hablamos español @changingtidesfamilyservices

Electronics

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Merchandise

WATERDAMAGECLEANUP& RESTORATION Asmallamount ofwatercanleadtomajor damagetoyourhome.Our trustedprofessionalsdryout thewetareaanddorepairsto protectyourfamilyandyour home’svalue!Ifyouhavewater inyourhomethatneedstobe dried,call24/7:1−888−290−2264 Havezipcodeofserviceloca− tionreadywhenyoucall!

Miscellaneous

BATH&SHOWERUPDATESIN

ASLITTLEASONEDAY! Afford− ableprices−Nopaymentsfor18 months!Lifetimewarranty& professionalinstalls.Senior& MilitaryDiscountsavailable. Call:1−877−510−9918

BIGGUY,LITTLEPICKUP

Smallcleanupsandhauls. Eurekaarea.Reasonable rates.CallOddJobMikeat 707−497−9990.

CIRCUSNATUREPRESENTS A.O’KAYCLOWN& NANINATURE

JugglingJesters&Wizards ofPlayPerformancesforall ages.MagicalAdventures withcircusgamesandtoys. Festivals,Events&Parties. (707)499−5628 www.circusnature.com

CLARITYWINDOW CLEANING

Servicesavailable.Callor textJulieat(707)616−8291 forafreeestimate

2GUYS&ATRUCK. Carpentry,Landscaping, JunkRemoval,CleanUp, Moving.Althoughwehave beeninbusinessfor25 years,wedonotcarrya contractor’slicense.Call845 −3087

24/7LOCKSMITH: Wearethere whenyouneedusforhome& carlockouts.We’llgetyouback upandrunningquickly!Also, keyreproductions,lockinstalls andrepairs,vehiclefobs.Callus foryourhome,commercialand autolocksmithneeds!1−833−237 −1233

AGINGROOF?NEWHOME− OWNER?STORMDAMAGE? Youneedalocalexpert providerthatproudlystands behindtheirwork.Fast,free estimate.Financingavailable. Call1−888−292−8225Havezip codeofpropertyreadywhen calling!

BATH&SHOWERUPDATESIN

FRAMES&ART½OFF

@DreamQuestThriftStore May7−11.KidsClothes alwaysjust$1!Senior DiscountTuesdays!Spin’n− ’WinWednesdays!Willow Creek.(530)629−3006 Whereyourshopping dollarshelplocalyouth realizetheirdreams!

GOTANUNWANTEDCAR??? DONATEITTOPATRIOTIC HEARTS.Fastfreepickup.All50 States.PatrioticHearts’ programshelpveteransfind workorstarttheirownbusiness. Call24/7:1−855−402−7631

AFFORDABLETV&INTERNET. If youareoverpayingforyour service,callnowforafree quoteandseehowmuchyou cansave!1−844−588−6579 PAYINGTOPCA$HFORMEN’S SPORTWATCHES! Rolex,Breit− ling,Omega,PatekPhilippe, Heuer,Daytona,GMT,Subma− rinerandSpeedmaster.Call1− 855−402−7109

MACTREANOR.COM Event Operations,ProjectManage− ment,RnDPrograms,Brand Strategy,CreativeServicesby ThomasMacTreanor,basedin Arcata,HumboldtCounty,CA mactreanor@mail.com

NEEDNEWWINDOWS? Drafty rooms?Chippedordamaged frames?Needoutsidenoise reduction?New,energyeffi− cientwindowsmaybethe answer!Callforaconsultation& FREEquotetoday.1−877−248− 9944.Youwillbeaskedforthe zipcodeofthepropertywhen connecting.

PESTCONTROL:PROTECT YOURHOME frompestssafely andaffordably.Roaches,Bed Bugs,Rodent,Termite,Spiders andotherpests.Locallyowned andaffordable.Callforservice oraninspectiontoday!1−833− 237−1199

ROCKCHIP? Windshieldrepairisour specialty.Foremergency serviceCALLGLASWELDER 442−GLAS(4527)humboldt windshieldrepair.com

STOPOVERPAYINGFORAUTO INSURANCE! Arecentsurvey saysthatmostAmericansare overpayingfortheircarinsur− ance.Letusshowyouhow muchyoucansave.CallNow forano−obligationquote:1−866 −472−8309

YOUMAYQUALIFY for disabilitybenefitsifyouhave arebetween52−63yearsoldand underadoctor’scarefora healthconditionthatprevents youfromworkingforayearor more.Callnow!1−877−247−6750 MARKETPLACE

ASLITTLEASONEDAY! Afford− ableprices−Nopaymentsfor18 months!Lifetimewarranty& professionalinstalls.Senior& MilitaryDiscountsavailable. Call:1−855−402−6997

×314

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IN HOME SERVICES

We are here for you

Registered nurse support

Personal Care

Light Housekeeping

Assistance with daily activities

Respite care & much more

Insured & Bonded

Serving Northern California for over 20 years!

Toll free 1-877-964-2001

defaultHUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts.

Annual Income Limits:

1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150

Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922

Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

TOPCA$HPAIDFOROLD GUITARS! 1920−1980Gibson, Martin,Fender,Gretsch, Epiphone,Guild,Mosrite,Rick− enbacker,PrairieState, D’Angelico,Stromberg.And GibsonMandolins/Banjos.1− 855−402−7208

WRITINGCONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction,nonfiction, poetry.DanLevinson,MA, MFA. (707)223−3760 www.zevlev.com

BODY MIND SPIRIT

professionalismtometaphysics. (707)822−2111

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • northcoastjournal.com
default default Margins are just a safe area Residential & Commercial Weekly • Bi-Weekly One-Time Clean ups Call or Text for a FREE Quote 707-854-5033 Lic. #BL-3987 REDWOOD LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT HIGHEREDUCATIONFORSPIR− ITUALUNFOLDMENT. Bache− lors,Masters,D.D./Ph.D., distancelearning,Universityof MetaphysicalSciences.Bringing
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EMPLOYMENT MARKETPLACE
Your Ad Here classified@north coastjournal.com 442-1400 × 314 442-1400
northcoastjournal.com YOUR AD HERE classified@northcoastjournal.com (707) 442-1400 × 314 PLACE YOUR AD HERE YOUR AD HERE 442-1400 ×314 classified@ northcoastjournal.com Continued from previous page
Mental

STREET

1775 RAINERI ROAD, MANILA/ARCATA

$256,000

Cute and cozy bungalow with a rural vibe. 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, with a large enclosed sun porch. Sits on .48 acres with plenty of room to enjoy the outdoors. The friendly location on a dead-end lane promotes neighbors waving to each other, and walks to the bay, beach, and dunes. Amenities include wood stove heat, propane range/ oven, Manila CSD water and sewer, remnants of a chicken coop, and a few fruit trees. Property is being sold as-is.

Winship Land Agent

598 PACIFIC LUMBER CAMP ROAD, FRESHWATER

$1,290,000

Beautifully crafted estate set on ±5.5 acres alongside Freshwater Creek. Recently updated, this 2900 sq ft home boasts 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, and seamless indoor-outdoor living. Additionally, find a riding arena, horse paddocks, and a spacious barn/shop offering the potential for a second unit.

3820 & 3816 THOMAS ROAD, MIRANDA

$675,000

Experience the very best of Southern Humboldt rural living on this remarkable ±120 acre Salmon Creek property that enjoys end of the road privacy and a gorgeous custom home overlooking your own pond and expansive views of the Salmon Creek watershed. Additional features include two additional cabins, natural clearings, an orchard, creeks, springs, a hydroelectric system, solar system, outbuildings, and much more!

4511 HENNESSEY ROAD, SALYER

$399,000

One of a kind ±160 acre property conveniently located off South Fork Road. Enjoy beautiful views, lush meadows, a mixture of fir and oak timber, and two creeks running though the parcel. Property is surrounded by Forest Service offering privacy and seclusion.

3070 PIGEON POINT ROAD, EUREKA

$260,000

Uncover the hidden potential of this fixer nestled in a highly sought-after location! 3 Bedroom, 1 bathroom house on a ±.42 acre lot with a detached 2-car garage. If you’re seeking a project brimming with potential in an idyllic setting, this property is an absolute must-see!

$179,000

Meticulously maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home in the Northwood Park Community!

Mobile home features an open floor plan for common areas, on demand water heater, carpeted bedrooms, and a detached tool shed. Enjoy the fenced, grassy yard offering ample space for gardening and enjoying the outdoors!

32 DEADWOOD COURT, BIG BAR

$60,000

±1.2 Acres of beautiful space perfect for your dream home! This property already has septic and electrical in place, this parcel is ready to build. Included in purchase, parcel development plans that just need to be submitted with an architect and county!

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 9, 2024 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 43 OPEN HOUSE! SAT. 5/11 11AM - 1PM 645
Kyla Nored Owner/Broker BRE #01930997 707.834.7979 Barbara Davenport Associate Broker
01066670 707.498.6364 Mike Willcutt Realtor
# 02084041 916.798.2107 Ashlee Cook Realtor BRE# 02070276 707.601.6702 Tyla Miller Realtor BRE 1919487 707.362.6504 Zipporah Kilgore Realtor BRE #02188512 707.497.7859
7TH
ARCATA
BRE#
BRE
MCKINLEYVILLE
2580 CENTRAL AVENUE #49,
BRE #01332697 707.476.0435
Charlie
NOMINATE US FOR BEST CANNABIS DISPENSARY & BUDTENDER 1662 Myrtle Ave. Ste. A Eureka NEW HOURS 707.442.2420 M-F 10am-7pm, Sat 11am-6pm, Sun 11am-5pm License No. C10-0000997-LIC 21+ only MYRTLE AVE. BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT UP THE ALLEY AND TO THE LEFT OF OUR OLD LOCATION The Humboldt County Collective
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