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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, April 15, 2021 Vol. XXXII Issue 15 northcoastjournal.com

THE GREEN ISSUE Tools in the Toolbox Looking for ways to restore and protect the state’s beleaguered bull kelp forests and in turn, red abalone stock

+ BY KIMBERLY WEAR

p. 18

CRV scavenger hunt p. 11 Hogs and hooch p. 25 Mountains and deserts p. 22


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CONTENTS 4 Mailbox 4 Poem 2020

7 News

Deciphering the Gaps

11 News

A System in Need of Upcycling

April 15, 2021 • Volume XXXII Issue 15 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2021

PUBLISHER

15 Guest Views

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com

NEWS EDITOR

‘Please, Come Forward’

17 NCJ Daily Online 18 On The Cover Tools in the Toolbox

25 On the Table

Pigs and Whiskey

25 Home & Garden Service Directory

29 Art Beat

Mapping Seven Artists, Seven Paths

30 Trophy Case

Kids and Sports

31 Fishing the North Coast

Brookings Kicking Out Limits of Rockfish and Lingcod

33 Calendar 37 Screens

Funny Running into You

38 Workshops & Classes 38 Cartoon 39 Field Notes

Cryptocurrency and the Blockchain

44 Sudoku & Crossword 45 Free Will Astrology 45 Classifieds

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

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ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITER

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Rod Kausen, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

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Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com MEDIA ADVISOR

John Harper john@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com MARKETING SPECIALIST

Kara Scofield kara@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

Detail from John Pound’s “Black Decks,” 2012. Read more on page 29. Courtesy of the artist

On the Cover A new stem of bull kelp is dwarfed by a red urchin. Read more on page 18. Courtesy of Tristin McHugh

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 15,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

‘Far Sleazier’ Editor: I realize that there have been a lot of complaints about the Lucky Strike ad in the NCJ, however, compared to your cover story last week, “Carrots, Sticks and Jabs,” the cigarette ad seems wholesome and honest by comparison. The ad at least contained a portion of the Surgeon General’s warning, which was more science than your cover story contained. The ad’s appeal is more honest too. It simply touts the products attributes. Nowhere in the ad do they smear non-smokers as radical, anti-social or irresponsible, nor does the ad suggest coercive measures be taken to force non-smokers to smoke Luckies. In fact, your cover story was far sleazier and more one-sided than any cigarette ad I have ever seen. There’s a place for sleazy, one-sided propaganda designed to marginalize and dehumanize people who oppose government policy. That place is North Korea, not the North Coast. Make no mistake about it, smoking cigarettes is bad for your health. Unfortunately, the same can now be

2020

Despite the Year, Nothing was clear. We all look through Our lens of choice, As Nature bats. Maybe hindsight Will be 2020?

— Kirk Gothier

said for reading the North Coast Journal. John Hardin, Redway

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com. The weekly deadline to be considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l


northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NEWS

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Deciphering the Gaps Health Officer, Latinx providers talk COVID disparities

NOW HIRING

By Iridian Casarez

iridian@northcoastjournal.com

I

n an effort to address persistent disparities in COVID-19’s impacts on the local Latinx community, Humboldt County Public Health Officer Ian Hoffman recently met with LatinoNet, a network of service providers like Open Door Community Health Clinics, Paso a Paso, Promotores, the Humboldt County Office of Education and Public Health that are dedicated to advocating for a healthier Latinx community in Humboldt County. The meeting, Hoffman’s first public discussion with the providers, focused on what can be done to address the disparities — which exist both in COVID-19 case rates and vaccination efforts and mirror statewide and national trends — in the county’s Latinx population. In July, Humboldt County’s COVID-19 dashboard highlighted the disproportionate COVID-19 case rates in the local Latinx and Hispanic communities, noting they accounted for 22 percent of COVID-19 cases while only making up 12 percent of the population. The disparity has only grown since and as of April 9, Humboldt County Latinx residents made up 25 percent of positive COVID-19 cases to date. County vaccine data, meanwhile, has seen a similar trend, with Latinx county residents falling behind on receiving their COVID-19 shots. According to the Public Health dashboard, only about 10 percent of Humboldt’s Latinx and Hispanic population are fully vaccinated, compared to 19 percent of the general population. “We know that there is a disproportionate effect of COVID-19 in this community and that’s why, from our standpoint in Public Health, and also personally, as a physician taking care of this community for a long time, it’s important that we address this,” Hoffman said. Lara Weiss, a Public Health deputy branch director who also attended Friday’s meeting, said LatinoNet invited Hoffman to speak with the group and offer an update on the pandemic and Public Health’s efforts to provide equitable vaccine clinics. But Hoffman said the meeting was also an opportunity for him to hear from the providers about what barriers and gaps in care and outreach they were seeing.

Hoffman began his presentation talking about his background working with different Latinx communities in Santa Rosa and the Bay Area with organizations like La Clinica de la Raza in Oakland and Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco. He said he learned to give culturally sensitive care to members of the Latinx, Spanish-speaking community, which he said would transfer into a better understanding of how Public Health approaches culturally competent health policies. Hoffman talked about Public Health’s rollout of COVID-19 vaccine clinics, acknowledging the signup process has been confusing at times, with a shortfall of vaccine doses, exceedingly high demand and eligibility limitations. But Hoffman said Public Health’s goal is to ensure vaccine equitability among those in the Latinx community and guarantee that any Latinx resident seeking a COVID-19 vaccine feels comfortable and confident before, during and after their appointment. “We’ve taken some steps at Public Health to make sure that when a Spanish-speaking person needs a vaccine, that they feel comfortable and confident that their needs will be met and, most importantly, [provide] Spanish-language information,” Hoffman said. Public Health is working on a few new interventions, including sponsoring California Department of Public Health’s “Let’s Get to ImmUnity” integrated media campaign with both English and Spanish ads on local news channel 3, as well as planned mass vaccination events in more rural areas of the county with the help from Open Door. And now that eligibility is open to all residents age 16 and older, Hoffman emphasized the importance of organizations serving the Latinx community helping to spread information on the vaccine rollout and the switch to the state’s My Turn website (www.myturn.ca.gov). But the message Hoffman kept repeating was that the county’s Joint Information Center (4415000) is standing by and ready to take any questions, including those in Spanish, about the vaccine and vaccination clinics. During the meeting, however, it became

clear there may be a disconnect between county Public Health and service providers looking to direct clients and patients to accurate information about COVID-19 and vaccines in Spanish. “I continue to hear that there’s not clear and correct information in Spanish that people know where to access,” LatinoNet board member Michelle Postman said, alluding to a survey by Jorge Matias, another LatinoNet board member, that found most Spanish-speaking local residents didn’t know where to go for accurate COVID-19 information. “I feel like we try and we don’t think that we’re doing that but we don’t know where the gap is, and I also know that Public Health is really stretched, there’s only so much we can do, and so I’m just curious if there’s one thing, one magical thing that can happen. Would it be like showcasing Latin[x] leaders in the community on commercials like, ‘Hey I’ve got my shot and this is working,’ or would it be to have a website? What would be the magical thing that you might spend time on to make things better if we had the capacity?” Postman’s comments led to a discussion about the best way to get information to the Spanish-speaking Latinx community, prompting Hoffman to stress that the JIC is dedicated to putting out a clear, conscious message in English and Spanish. “All of the materials on [the JIC website, social media pages] have been vetted by Spanish speakers,” he said. “They’re scientifically accurate. They try to meet the cultural sensitivity that we talked about, as well. I would say that if we’re going to put anything out there, that’s the central message.” Hoffman urged the groups at the meeting to use the resources on the Humboldt Health alert website and promoted by the Joint Information Center and push them out to the Spanish-speaking community. And if there’s one phone number the groups get to their clients in the coming weeks, he said it should be the JIC’s: 4415000. In an email sent to the Journal, Matias, in his capacity as a LatinoNet board member, said his survey found most Latinx and

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

NEWS Continued from page 7

Hispanic residents didn’t feel they had clear and correct information in Spanish about who can and can’t obtain the COVID-19 vaccine and that they felt they didn’t have a specified place to call to find more information in their language. Many, Matias said, didn’t feel had enough information about how effective vaccines are. Many people, Matias added, are afraid of costs, side effects and needing more medical interventions due to possible side effects, while others worry they aren’t eligible to receive the vaccine because of their documentation status. But Hoffman confirmed during the meeting that the only documentation those seeking a vaccine will need is any type of form with a name that matches the name on the appointment or a parental consent form for those 16 and 17 years old. These, Hoffman added, are the types of questions that could be answered by the JIC. The county JIC has been actively translating information into Spanish, including uploading social media posts in Spanish, but it seems they have yet to amplify those messages to community providers and ad-

vocacy groups in an effort to get that information to community members who may not follow county social media accounts or can’t navigate the county’s website. Matias also told the Journal that there’s a lot of information that spreads through social media that confuses Latinx and Hispanic residents, including misinformation and conspiracy theories, which was addressed during the meeting between LatinoNet and Hoffman. If Public Health hears of any misinformation or any disinformation spreading throughout the community, Hoffman said it would address it and correct it immediately. But he also cautioned there’s a balance between correcting and amplifying. Hoffman then asked attendees about the types of misinformation they were hearing and someone mentioned a conspiracy theory about the COVID-19 vaccine causing future fertility issues. “That’s one of the biggest pieces of misinformation that’s got a stronghold in a lot of communities,” Hoffman said. “There’s absolutely no evidence that this vaccine has any effect on fertility.” Continued on next page »

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

NEWS Continued from previous page

Nationwide, there have been reports of vaccine hesitancy in communities of color because of historical acts of genocide in healthcare settings, which was also mentioned by attendee Maria Ortega. “I feel like all of these organizations and clinics and community organizations have a responsibility to be sensitive about that (fertility) issue and not dismiss anybody, because they’re valid concerns, especially historically and worldwide there’s been actual efforts to change communities of color and their population impacts,” Ortega said. “Just be mindful about where they’re coming from.” Hoffman agreed with Ortega about being mindful and understanding of where those concerns take root, noting the importance of recognizing the impact of historical events and communities’ lived experiences in providing culturally sensitive care. “These are difficult things to navigate exactly, and I think if those are the barriers that we’re really seeing out there, they need to be addressed, obviously,” Hoffman said. “But I’m not sure at this point exactly what all the barriers are … My hope is that, mostly, that gap is because of eligibility and lack of vaccine and that, as we open it up

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

more broadly like we are doing right now, and we have that language ability … that we get those messages out there.” The reasons for the gaps in vaccine administration and infection rates may become more clear as the county moves into the expanded phase of its vaccination rollout but, presently, Hoffman urged providers and their clients and patients to look to the JIC for Spanish-language information about the COVID-19 virus and vaccines. “Thank you so much for inviting me and talking with me,” Hoffman said in Spanish, wrapping up the meeting. “I hope that we can do this again soon.” l Iridian Casarez (she/her) is a staff writer with the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez. The Community Voices Coalition is a project funded by Humboldt Area Foundation and Wild Rivers Community Foundation to support local journalism. This story was produced by the North Coast Journal newsroom with full editorial independence and control.


NEWS

HUMBOLDT

BAY BISTRO

A System in Need of Upcycling

The California CRV system’s problems continue to trickle down to Humboldt By Iridian Casarez

iridian@northcoastjournal.com

W

hen overwhelming demand closed Humboldt County’s last California Refund Value redemption service at the Eureka Recycling Center last September, it left residents with few options to get their CRV deposits back. Under state law, it’s now up to grocers and retailers to offer the service or face a $100 per day fee from the state, but finding a CRV in-store redemption service in Humboldt County has now become somewhat of a scavenger hunt. The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) maintains a list of all the grocery stores and gas stations in each California county that offer CRV redemption services. Humboldt County’s list contained 51 stores as the Journal went to press that are supposed to offer the service but some listed aren’t accepting CRV at all, while others say they’re still prepping to start the service. And many have set restrictions and limitations on the number of containers accepted and established limited CRV business hours. For residents, the only real way of knowing which stores do, in fact, offer CRV redemption services is to call and ask whether they are accepting bottles and cans, and about the amount allowed. Safeway in Eureka, for example, limits redemptions to 50 clean bottles and cans for a maximum possible refund of $2.50 per day. And that’s only when its CRV redemption services are open — Tuesday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. That isn’t working for grocers and

Though some grocers are offering CRV in-store redemption services, Recology Eureka continues to see high rates of CRV material coming through curbside recycling. Photo by Iridian Casarez

retailers, either, as they now must take on the responsibility of transporting CRV materials to market and refunding deposits to customers returning their containers, all on top of collecting pointof-sale CRV deposits for CalRecycle on the front end. The burden has simply become too much for some. There are reports of gas stations in the area that began accepting CRV materials and returning deposits, but the demand was too high, and the gas stations became overwhelmed and found themselves hoarding more CRV material than they could transport to the nearest CRV recycling center, which is in Crescent City. A gas station in Arcata the Journal contacted about accepting CRV materials asked not to be named in the article, with a manager saying she was worried about county residents swarming the business to redeem deposits. If demand becomes too high, she said, the business would just opt to pay the state’s $100 per day compliance fee instead. “It’s unfortunate that small businesses have to take on the burden of taking CRV,” Emily Manfredonia, the station’s manager, said. The same could apply to Eureka Natural Foods. Graig Fillmore, the store’s human resources administration officer, said ENF’s Eureka store is preparing for in-store redemption services and is just waiting for answers from CalRecycle about exact rules of operating in-store CRV redemption service. “We would really like to offer CRV

services. We’re all about recycling. But if demand gets too high, where we’re backlogged [on CRV material] and the store isn’t operational, we’ll start paying the daily $100 fee,” Fillmore said, adding that the health and safety of ENF employees comes first, noting that CRV crowds could complicate COVID-19 safety precautions. Asked what Eureka Natural Foods plans to do with the CRV materials it collects, Fillmore said it plans to just put them into the business’ curbside recycling bins to be collected by Recology, adding that transporting materials to Crescent City’s Hambro Recycling Center or to a recycling market in Sacramento would add to the burdening costs. It’s important to note that unlike CRV redemption centers and curbside haulers, grocery stores and retailers don’t get subsidies from CalRecycle for operating in-store CRV recycling. Manfredonia said the Arcata gas station will be taking CRV materials it collects to Hambro Recycling to recoup the CRV deposits taken out of its registers and given back to customers. But if there’s too much material and that becomes burdensome, she said the station will put them in its curbside recycling bin. Recology Eureka General Manager Linda Wise said the waste disposal company spends on average $850 to $1,500 per load to ship all recyclable materials (a portion of which are CRV) out of the area to market but costs all depend on where the materials are going and if Recology can take advantage of hauling efficiencies, like “haul backs” that allow the company to charge for hauling unrelated materials

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Continued on page 13 » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


NEWS Continued from page 11

back to Humboldt County for other local businesses. Recology Eureka, meanwhile, is still seeing more CRV materials coming into the curbside pickup stream with redemption centers closed and more people subscribing to curbside recycling in areas where it’s not automatically included in garbage pick-up services. Wise added that much of the CRV funds collected by Recology Eureka go directly back into subsidizing curbside rates but it’s not as much as one might think. “Recology puts any revenue we receive as far as curbside incentives toward curbside rates in our service areas, except for the case of Eureka,” Wise said in an email to the Journal. “Eureka gets the payment and they put the funds toward recycling education and environmental projects. Curbside incentives do not amount to very much — usually $8,000 in Arcata (a year), for instance. ” Wise added that buybacks haven’t been profitable for a long time, which is why all of Humboldt County’s CRV redemption service centers have closed. Humboldt Waste Management Authority Executive Director Jill Duffy has said before that HWMA was not receiving enough money from the CRV recycling market to make up for the low CalRecycle subsidies, so it offset the costs with a different service fee, which was the only way the CRV redemption center stayed open. The formulas simply didn’t support CRV, so the center’s closure was inevitable. “Buybacks have not been financially self-sustaining for a very long time or we would be seeing more crop up,” Wise said. “Mostly, this is a result of the overuse of plastic single-use containers. They have a very, very low market value and their use creates less demand for aluminum, which drives that commodity lower, too.” Encouraging people to use reusable containers, clean their recyclables and stop buying single-use plastic would help, Wise said, but the solution to California’s CRV crisis is at the legislative level. There are currently a few bills that have been introduced in the California Legislature, including one by North Coast Assemblymember Jim Wood (Assembly Bill 1311) that would incorporate appointments into CRV service process. HWMA’s Eureka Recycling Center had asked CalRecycle to allow appointments in an effort to navigate the high CRV demand that closed Broadway but was denied because the current law only allows walkin service. As Jeff Donlevy of Ming’s Resources

and Recycling told the Journal in January, the best way to fix the CRV crisis is to modernize the bottle bill formula, which is the same across the entire state and makes it hard for centers to make ends meet in rural areas. But a better solution may already be in play in Oregon and Michigan, where beverage manufacturers have more responsibility to making sure CRV cans and bottles are returned into the recycling stream. And that’s exactly what’s written in California Senate Bill 38. Introduced by state Sen. Bob Wieckowski, the bill would result in “shifting more responsibility onto beverage distributors and increasing locations where consumers can return their containers” by July of 2024. According to a press release from Wieckowski’s office, “California now ranks third to last in redemption rates among bottle deposit states. Oregon, which has a stewardship model like the one S.B. 38 proposes, has a redemption rate of 86 percent and more locations to recycle, despite having just one-tenth the population of California.” In a March 11 HWMA board meeting, Duffy spoke positively about the bill. “This is the one that actually has potential promise,” she said, adding that it would probably be a bill that HWMA and “a lot of recyclers would end up supporting.” The following month, the board approved a motion to send out letters to Wood and North Coast State Sen. Mike McGuire asking them to support S.B. 38. “HWMA supports amendments an overhaul to the Bottle Bill to restore CRV redemption opportunities to Humboldt residents,” the letter states. “S.B. 38’s Beverage Container introduced by Senator Wieckowski could bring necessary changes to California,” the letter states. Though many bills have been introduced, some with promising solutions, the legislative process can take months and, once something is passed, the implementation of the new law by CalRecycle, which will need to write regulations and requirements, could take another couple of years. Until then, Humboldt County residents will still have little option of collecting their CRV and local grocers and retailers will be stuck between a burden and a fee. As such, the scavenger hunt will continue.

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● Iridian Casarez (she/her) is a staff writer with the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

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GUEST VIEWS

Submitted

‘Please, Come Forward’ Mother offers $100K reward in quest to find justice for slain son By Charmaine Lawson views@northcoastjournal.com

I

am Charmaine Lawson, mother of David Josiah Lawson, who was known by many as DJ. If this is your first time hearing my story, here is a brief summary of the facts leading to my son’s murder and how you can possibly help. DJ was a sophomore attending Humboldt State University studying criminal law. On April 15, 2017, DJ attended a birthday party in Arcata. Lila Ortega who was also in attendance, misplaced her cell phone and began accusing several people of color of stealing it. Ortega then called her boyfriend Kyle Zoellner to come to the party to assist her. When Zoellner arrived, Ortega demanded that DJ and his friends empty their pockets looking for the phone. When they said no, an altercation ensued and Nia Wilkins and Angelica McFarland sprayed them with a bear spray chemical agent and a fight broke out involving Zoellner and DJ. When a witness separated the two of them, DJ was covered with blood and had been stabbed several times. One of those stab wounds hit DJ in the heart and as he lay dying, Ortega was heard saying, “I hope that nigger dies!” DJ later died at Mad River Community Hospital. Ortega would later find her phone after leaving the party. When police arrived, Zoellner was questioned and arrested for the murder of my son. Police recovered the knife that killed my son at the scene and a DNA test later revealed that the only identifiable blood on the knife was that of Zoellner and DJ. At Zoellner’s preliminary hearing, the Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office, whose job it is to represent the victim, appeared to intentionally present a case on

behalf of the defense. This led to the release of the suspect Kyle Zoellner. A criminal grand jury was later convened to hear the case and, again, the district attorney’s office presented a case of self-defense for the suspect. According to two members of the grand jury who reached out to me personally, they said 13 of the jurors had voted to indict Zoellner for murder, but former Deputy District Attorney Joel Buckingham led the jury to return with a decision of self-defense even though Zoellner himself never claimed self-defense. District Attorney Maggie Fleming has stated that she will not present this case again without an eyewitness. Therefore, I am pleading with the community to come forward with video of the fight and my son’s stabbing that has been reported to exist, and for any eyewitnesses to the stabbing to contact me, Arcata Police Chief Brian Ahearn or your local police department. If you know anything or anyone that can help this case, please come forward. I want to seek justice for my son. For the person who comes forward within the next 30 days and provides the evidence that leads to the arrest and conviction of my son’s murderer, I will award you $100,000. DJ was my first born son, he was loved by his family and community. Not a day goes by that he is not missed. He deserves justice. DJ had a giving and loving heart, and in his memory we will be hosting the fourth annual coat drive at the Arcata Plaza on Saturday, April 17, 2021, from 2 to 5 p.m. I hope and pray to see you all there. With love, Charmaine. l northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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HumCo Fentanyl Overdoses Hit ‘Staggering’ Level

H

umboldt County is in the midst of a surge of fentanyl-related overdose deaths, alarming local officials who have long braced for the powerful opioid’s impact on the North Coast. Fentanyl has accounted for nearly 50 percent of Humboldt County’s alcohol and other drug (AOD) deaths so far this year, with five overdose deaths logged in March alone, according to data provided by the Coroner’s Office. And through the first three months of the year, 2021 had already matched the number of fentanyl overdose deaths recorded in Humboldt County in all of 2019 and was on pace to more than triple last year’s tally. “The 2021 overdose rate of fentanyl here in the county is staggering,” said Humboldt County Sheriff William Honsal in an email to the Journal. “Our County Drug Task Force has responded swiftly to this sudden onslaught of dangerous fentanyl into our community.” After being found in one overdose victim locally in each of 2016, 2017 and 2018, fentanyl was found in seven of Humboldt

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County’s 71 (9.7 percent) AOD deaths in 2019, and nine of the 63 (14.7 percent) recorded in 2020, according to data provided by the Coroner’s Office. Sheriff’s Lt. Shawn Sopoaga, who currently commands the task force, said fentanyl has quickly become a primary focal point for the task force, a team of investigators from multiple agencies that make high-end drug cases. The task force has made a series of large busts this year, starting back in January, when it seized a local record 4 ounces of fentanyl in a traffic stop of a Eureka man returning from San Francisco. Then in March, agents arrested several people connected to the alleged trafficking of 5,000 fentanyl-laced counterfeit prescription pills into Humboldt County from San Jose. Earlier this month, the task force reported arresting a Piercy man after finding him with 1.5 ounces of fentanyl. “We are definitely reacting to what is quickly becoming one of the most influential narcotics in Humboldt County, Sopoaga told the Journal, adding that while urban areas and other parts of the country

Vaccines Open: Humboldt County Public Health announced April 9 that it was opening vaccine eligibility to all local residents ages 16 and older, nearly a week ahead of the state’s schedule. Officials urge those eligible to sign up on the state’s registration and scheduling site, www.myturn.ca.gov. Posted 04.09.21

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Digitally Speaking The number of local vaccinations potentially impacted by Humboldt County Public Health’s announcement that it will pause administration of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine after federal agencies urged the move out of an “abundance of caution” as a response to reports that six women experienced rare blood clotting in the weeks after their injections. Posted 04.13.21

northcoastjournal

have been dealing with fentanyl for years, it’s fairly new to the North Coast. While Fentanyl is tremendously addictive, it’s considered to be especially dangerous because of its potency. According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, a lethal dose of heroin is generally considered to be roughly 30 milligrams, while a 3-milligram dose of fentanyl — which looks like a few grains of salt — is enough to kill an average adult male. That potency makes it attractive for drug traffickers, officials say, as a tiny bit can be used to stretch illicit street drugs or counterfeit pharmaceuticals. But if the drug isn’t blended sparingly, thoroughly and evenly, it can prove deadly. The task force is seeing far more fentanyl circulating locally in counterfeit pills, Sopoaga said, which is a huge concern. “It’s not like these counterfeit pills are being processed with quality control in a laboratory,” he said. “They’re very inconsistent. I think we have been seeing some overdoses as a result.” Because fentanyl is so much more potent and consequently cheaper than other drugs, there have also been reports of non opioid counterfeit pills — like benzodiazepines, barbiturates and amphetamines — being cut with fentanyl, which can prove deadly for users who don’t have a built up opioid tolerance and are expecting to ingest something else. In some cases, it’s also unclear if street-level dealers are aware of what’s in the pills they’re selling. “One of my biggest concerns is that our teenagers and young adults are taking pills from these dealers that are laced with

Direct to LA: The California Redwood Coast Humboldt County Airport in McKinleyville will begin offering direct flights to the Hollywood Burbank Airport next month. Offered by Avelo Airlines beginning May 19, the flights are being offered at an introductory limited-time offer of $19 per one-way fare. Posted 04.08.21

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

fentanyl,” Honsal said. “The chances of overdose is very high. I urge the people of Humboldt County to not take any prescription pills that were not prescribed by a doctor and not purchased at a pharmacy.” But Sopoaga also made clear that some users are very actively seeking out the more powerful opioid. “The buzz on the street is people want fentanyl,” he said, adding that this will remain “the priority” for the task force. “It’s obviously the biggest issue just based on the deaths.” Sopoaga said the task force is also working with the Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office and an association of state narcotics officers and has looked into the possibility of building a homicide case against a dealer linked to an overdose death. Honsal said federal prosecutions are also possible. “We are going after the dealers and suppliers of this poison,” he said. “We are working with both our state and federal law enforcement partners to hold those persons accountable that are pushing fentanyl in our community. Dealers can be charged by the state or federal government for distributing fentanyl resulting in overdose death. This is our No. 1 priority in the county right now. We have zero tolerance for fentanyl dealers.” — Thadeus Greenson Posted 04.13.21 Read the full story online.

Karuk, Hoopa Awarded Grants: The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced April 12 that it has granted $5 million to the Hoopa Valley Tribe and $2 million to the Karuk Tribe for housing construction and rehabilitation, as well as critical infrastructure projects. Posted 04.12.21

northcoastjournal

newsletters

They Said It

Comment of the Week

“I grew up in the ‘80s so I definitely listened to a lot of Metallica.”

“I just thought that smell was wacky tobaccy.”

­— Muddy Waters Coffee Co. owner Chris Nicholas after the company teamed up with Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett on a specialty roast, Greeny’s Blues, named after Hammett’s guitar, which he purchased from Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac. Posted 04.10.21

­— “Rachel Hella Oakland” commenting on the Journal’s Facebook page on a post about a pungent corpse flower in bloom at Humboldt State University, with a wafting bouquet like rotting flesh. Posted 04.09.21

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

Tools in the Toolbox

Looking for ways to restore and protect the state’s beleaguered bull kelp forests and in turn, red abalone stock By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

T

he fragile future of the North Coast’s beleaguered bull kelp forests is perhaps best captured in a single photograph taken off the Mendocino County coast last summer. The image is at once hopeful and ominous: A tiny bull kelp stem with a single blade sways in the currents, reclaiming a spot on a once barren reef. But, looming large in the background, the shadowy figure of an urchin readies to seal the new start’s fate. For marine ecologist Tristin McHugh, who took the picture while diving a Noyo Harbor site that had recently been scoured of as many urchins as possible, the moment was emotional. “Although we didn’t see any giant bull kelp showing up, we did see a ton of tiny bull kelp starting to emerge very soon after we started,” she said during a recent Noyo Center for Marine Science presentation on the pilot project she managed for the nonprofit Reef Check. “It was amazing seeing tiny, tiny bull kelp emerge.” The rapid decline of the North Coast’s once thriving underwater forests has been well-documented in recent years, with the coasts of Mendocino and Sonoma counties bearing the brunt of what scientists describe as a “perfect storm” of changing oceanic conditions

that ultimately decimated red abalone populations. While ebbs and flows in the undersea ecosystem occur naturally, McHugh says the devastation wrought in those areas has been intense, with more than 95 percent of the waxy bull kelp canopies gone in less than a decade. “It happened very quickly,” she says. The stage for the bull kelp’s disappearance was being set back in 2013 when a still mysterious wasting disease began decimating starfish populations up and down the Western coast. Especially hard hit was the sunflower star — a voracious, 24-armed predator that can swallow a sea urchin whole — which has yet to rebound. “The Warm Water Blob” — essentially a marine heat wave — entered the scene next, stressing bull kelp forests that are dependent on nutrient-rich cold waters to thrive, only to be followed by another round of high ocean temperatures with the “Godzilla” El Niño in 2015. In the wake of these climate change-driven anomalies, a “negative feedback loop happened,” McHugh says. Bull kelp forests were left in a weakened state and fewer new stocks settled onto the region’s rocky reefs, removing vital food sources from the ecosystem. That, she says, drove sea urchins —

“Although we didn’t see any giant bull kelp showing up, we did see a ton of tiny bull kelp starting to emerge.”

A tiny baby kelp emerges at the Noyo Harbor pilot site. Credit: Tristin McHugh/Reef Check

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


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Commercial divers removed more than 26,000 pounds of urchin at the Noyo Harbor project. Photo: Mike Esgro/Ocean Protection Council

normally content to settle into nooks while feeding on drifting algae — to noticeably shift their behavior. “They went from passive grazers to active grazers,” McHugh says. At the same, with no sunflower stars to keep their numbers in check, the purple urchin population exploded and set its sights on the surviving bull kelp forests. In some places, they reduced once thriving marine ecosystems that boasted an array of sea life to wastelands known as “urchin barrens.” Unable to compete against the seemingly unstoppable urchin force, red abalone starved, their numbers plummeting across a wide swath of coastline stretching from Sonoma to Southern Humboldt. The commercial red sea urchin fishery neared collapse, creating economic reverberations for

the surrounding communities amid the ecological disaster. After shuttering the recreational season in 2017 in a bid to save the prized shellfish — the California Fish and Game Commission recently extended the closure to at least 2026. But cooperative efforts are underway to learn more about the workings of the complex bull kelp ecosystem while also bringing together a network of stakeholders, from scientists and government agencies to commercial urchin divers and nonprofits, to create a restoration framework. The Noyo project — which saw six teams of commercial divers working in conjunction with scientists cull more than 26,000 pounds of the spiky urchins Continued on page 21 »

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

ON THE COVER Continued from page 19

“Having this pilot project, understanding the lessons learned, the best practices, how it might scale up, is just incredibly valuable.”

over the course of last summer — is one part of the puzzle. Mike Esgo, the marine ecosystems program manager and tribal liaison for the state’s Ocean Protection Council — which funded the removal project — described it as a pivotal component of a restoration toolkit the agency is putting together with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife as part of a statewide kelp restoration and protection plan. The basic idea was to see whether bull kelp would return if enough of the urchin were taken. “Having this pilot project, understanding the lessons learned, the best practices, how it might scale up, is just incredibly valuable from a management perspective, as far as how we are going to try to bring kelp back and protect the

kelp that’s still here,” he says. And more ideas are on the table. For McHugh, who recently transitioned to become Nature Conservancy’s kelp project director, that includes looking at the potential of trapping urchin and leveraging the private sector to find pathways for using the catches — whether its fatting the urchins up on a farm to sell to market or using them as compost. The hope, she says, is to find ways to “reset the ecosystem,” with a focus on “scalable solutions that benefit both humans and the environment.” And Humboldt County may play an important role in those efforts, with preliminary plans underway to develop an experimental bull kelp nursery in Humboldt Bay. Continued on next page »

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ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

Still early in the works, the idea is for the environmental nonprofit GreenWave and Humboldt State University — which are already working together to launch and scale regenerative ocean farms on a separate project — to partner on the endeavor with the Nature Conservancy to create a “stock of kelp” that could possibly be used in restoration efforts. “This is novel in California,’ McHugh said, “but it’s done all over the world. Kelp is incredibly important.” Unlike its southern cousin the giant kelp, bull kelp grows as a single stalk and dies off each year — basically an annual marine plant rather than a perennial — making it more vulnerable to hungry urchin mobs that can hinder its ability to reestablish new growth. So for McHugh, the bull kelp’s return to a barren space in Noyo Harbor raised a number of questions. Primarily, how old are the kelp seen there, where did they come from and where are their parents? There’s evidence, she says, that bull kelp spores can live for a very long time, decades in some cases. But how long is still one of those knowledge gaps the Humboldt Bay project might help answer. For the most part, the bull kelp here has fared better than other areas to the south. According to Brian Tissot, director of the Humboldt State Marine Lab in Trinidad, the local coast has never really had the urchin barrens seen in other areas, like Mendocino, noting the situation along the state “really varies from site to site.” “It still is a serious problem but we’ve been spared that; why, I’m not really sure,” says Tissot, who surveyed stretches of the local coastline over the summer as part of a state Marine Protection Areas monitoring project. “We’re a little bit colder. … If anything, we’re seeing more of a recovery of bull kelp and that’s good news. Hopefully, that will continue.” But even amid that bit of good news, Tissot and other marine experts, including McHugh, are still concerned. Overall, 2020 was a good year for ocean temperature, but the question is more

“This is novel in California, but it’s done all over the world. Kelp is incredibly important.”

22

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

when, not if, another marine heatwave will return. Tissot notes that it was the warm water blob that really took a toll on the bull kelp by creating low-nutrient conditions. “What we are seeing is a slow recovery,” he says. “It’s good to see those kinds of things coming back. … The long-term prognosis is what I worry about.”


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McHugh agrees, saying projects like the bull kelp farm and efforts to minimize the grazing pressure from urchins may help put safety nets in place. “We’re thinking ahead, so when the next marine heatwave hits, we’re prepared and have tools,” she says, noting another big question is what the magnitude and frequency of the next

warming event will be. “Some situations might need a wrench and, in other cases, a really big mallet.” l Kimberly Wear (she/her) is the Journal’s digital editor. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


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onthetable@northcoastjournal.com

I

t is, perhaps, a failure of our collective education that when we think of whiskey, we don’t immediately think of rippling fields of wheat, rye, corn or barley. Those basic grains are the building blocks of most whiskeys. Alchemy Distillery, a young whiskey company based in Arcata, uses local wheat grown at the Hindley Ranch in the Mattole Valley. The harvested wheat is heated with water to convert its complex sugars into simple sugars that will be fermented into Alchemy’s Boldt Bourbon or Cereal Killer. At

this point, for most distilleries, the life of the wheat or rye is over. The spent grain is often composted. But for Alchemy, the grain gets a second life, going on to feed pigs at a farm in Fortuna, one that’s run by the Sheriff’s Work Alternative Program. “We started in 2015 and since the very first batch, we’ve donated all spent mash,” says Amy Bohner, co-owner of Alchemy. “I’ve never had to pour it out in the field or dump it.” Bohner and her crew initially donated

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


ON THE TABLE

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Continued from page 25

the mash to local farms in the Arcata area but in 2020, they formed a partnership with SWAP, in part because the program had the resources to pick up the mash as soon as it was ready, but also because Bohner appreciated SWAP’s mission. SWAP is one of several correctional work alternative programs across the state. Started in 1984, it allows low-level offenders to work in lieu of incarceration. Traditionally, participants have cut or split firewood for senior citizens, or cleaned kennels at the Humboldt County Animal Shelter, but some also have the opportunity to work at the SWAP farm in Fortuna, helping raise pigs, chickens and cows. The livestock go on to help feed people in the wider community, including folks who are incarcerated. “About two pigs a month go to the jail,” says Ryan Craig, a senior correctional deputy who helps run the SWAP program. “We sell pigs to 4-H, Future Farmers of America. They go to the fair. We also sell pigs to the public.” The number of pigs varies, Craig says, from 20 up to 150 depending on the time of year. SWAP participants do the everyday cleaning and feeding for the pigs, and other jobs such as pulling weeds and cutting firewood. It’s an eight-hour day, and the sheriff’s office touts the program’s effectiveness in reducing overcrowding in the jail and teaching participants marketable skills. Craig and Bohner first got in touch around Thanksgiving 2020. Now a truck emblazoned with the sheriff’s seal is a regular visitor to the distillery, pulling away with a sloshing tote of the still-warm grain. Bohner says it smells yeasty, like warm bread, and

the alcohol content is negligible. “The pigs seem to like it,” Craig says, adding that they mix it with store-bought grain to meet the animal’s nutritional needs. Meghan Mott, a veterinarian with the California Department of Food and Agriculture who provides oversight of the SWAP farm’s stock, says the donations are in line with best practices for animal nutrition, providing a “high protein, high fiber feed source.” “Distillers like Amy Bohner must dispose of their spent grains and the animals at the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Farm are more than happy to help out,” she wrote in an email to the Journal, adding the main risk to the animals is overconsumption. “[Brewer’s spent grain] is highly palatable to most livestock, but excess consumption can lead to digestive problems. Farmers must be careful to limit access to this rich, delicious supplement, so generally it is used as a ‘top-dress’ to the animal’s normal ration.” Bohner and her crew, whose dedication to reuse and zero-waste practices has extended to creating a whiskey from day-old Los Bagels bagels, say they plan to continue with the program. Since 2015, they’ve donated 49,390 gallons of spent grain back to local critters. “We love the concept of locally grown grains coming full circle to become locally raised pork,” says Bohner. l Linda Stansberry (she/her) is a freelance writer and journalist who lives in Eureka. You can find her work at www. lindastansberry.com.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


ARTBEAT

Mapping Seven Artists, Seven Paths A group show reopens at the Morris Graves Museum of Art By Gabrielle Gopinath artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

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he exhibition Seven Artists, Seven Paths is back. The exhibition reopens this week at the Morris Graves Museum of Art after a months-long virtual interlude due to pandemic restrictions on social gathering. The seven Humboldt artists whose work it features — Leslie Anderson, Becky Evans, Mimi LaPlant, Sanderson Morgan, John Pound, Emily Silver and Karen Sullivan — are linked through mutual acquaintance as members of a circle that has met for dinner and studio talk every two months for a dozen years. As a celebration of a long-running artists’ social network (not the online kind), Seven Artists speaks to the creative potential of the face-to-face social interactions we’ve all been waiting to resume. “We’re really different people but we can talk to one another easily,” emeritus professor and volunteer curator Morgan said. “We’re not interested in mutual criticism. What we’re interested in is the life of the artist in the studio. When things are good, when things are bad — that’s what we talk about.” Members’ processes differ vastly, he said, but the studio experience is what they have in common: “being alone, and doing all the things necessary for creation.” Drawing on his 25 years of experience as director of Humboldt State University’s Reese Bullen Gallery, Morgan brought process into the conversation by inviting artists to show notes, sketches and studio ephemera alongside their finished works. The connections this organizational structure reveals are often illuminating. Becky Evans’ finely calibrated, hand-retouched topographic maps of the forested ridges around Mount Shasta, conceived in relation to a poem by Jerry Martien, explore the possibility of a layered nature/culture laminate. This concept takes on 3-D form in a funnel-shaped sculpture made from a unique, hand-molded paper surface that is part wasps’ nest, part USGS map. Emily Silver’s species lists, “intuitive maps” and watercolor sketches of the desert bristle with densely packed annotations of colors and landscape contours. The azure-into-crimson of the western skies over Joshua Tree National

Park, painted here at sketchbook scale, relates to larger watercolors that make abstract those tequila sunrise hues and render them at a scale more reminiscent of the actual sky. Mimi LaPlant’s paintings interlace gestural brushstrokes, drips and smears with abstract motifs. Her large painting “Renewal” appears alongside a grid of smaller related studies. This hanging order makes it possible to appreciate the recurrence of certain motifs and hues, like the passages of intense spring green that flicker across several of these compositions and the scallop-like mandala forms that populate their surfaces. Several of these artists used pandemic studio time to explore new media. Morgan, who worked with photographs in curatorial positions at the Berkeley Art Museum and the Reese Bullen Gallery, shows his own photographs here for the first time. His suite of prints documents the patina of historic locomotives at the Timber Heritage Association’s Samoa roundhouse, using saturated color to draw out the oxidized layers that encrust these industrial age relics’ weathered surfaces. Leslie Price shows paintings made from feathered brushstrokes in closely modulated shades of off-white alongside a selection of the ceramic vessels he has begun making in the last few years. It’s a treat to see how this veteran abstract painter turns his hand to a new medium, seeking an equivalent for the sense of harmony and balance that animates his canvases in vessel forms. John Pound has been using computer code to make art since the 1980s. His images are made using programs he developed that position graphics on a field within certain parameters, creating randomized confrontations that look like the outcome of Mad Libs for digital images. This approach results in bright gradients populated with lozenge-shaped characters in absurdist interactions like the ones appearing in Pound’s comic, “Electric President.” Karen Sullivan’s drawings and paintings also feature images juxtaposed in weird ways — not through the service of an algorithm, but from a daily commitment to notate the movements of the unguarded mind. During the pandemic

“Unfolding the Map, Inverted Mount Shasta with Cumulus and Lenticular clouds,” 2020, by Becky Evans. Courtesy of the artist

she’s kept her creative process close to home, making daily “telephone doodles” on notes that she later arranges into plastic folders. “Yellow Falls: In the Time of Covid” drapes those notes across the gallery wall, creating a gridded arc that looks a bit like a waterfall running the dull bureaucratic yellow of the basic Post-It note. The shade is comically, unavoidably urinary in this context; the work as a whole is a cheery taking of the piss with regard to the regional tendency to enshrine a certain kind of work — uncomplicated art that gestures enthusiastically toward nature’s magnificence. This exhibition’s emphasis on preparatory work speaks to the curator’s documentary motivation. Morgan said that he has long taken an interest in “creating a historic record for this little art world we have here; recording what we do and why we do it.” He’s interested in the networks that have made it possible for these Humboldt artists to thrive, despite the challenges that go along with choosing to base a serious art practice in a remote region that’s long on natural splendor, rich in a violent history that cuts close to the bone of the American project, and yet short on capital, institutional support, patrons and exhibition opportunities. Exhibition staging connects viewers to what happens in these artists’ studios but the faceto-face social network that has linked these artists for the past dozen years remains, perhaps inevitably, more a matter of telling than of showing. Reading these artists’ statements and viewing their sketches, we connect the dots to hypothesize how individual and group affinities may have shaped the work. To connect the dots is also to make a kind of map; mapping, Morgan said, is part of what he hopes this exhibition will accomplish. This exhibition maps a single artists’ circle. A diligent curator could generate a dozen such parallel micro-histories in other local circles. Then, by connecting all those dots, a viewer might approach an understanding of the complex networks underlying the various forms of this region’s — any region’s — art. Morgan was quick to acknowledge the practical difficulties of such endeavors. He brought up Jorge Luis Borges’ short story “On

Exactitude in Science,” about a fictional empire whose rulers have developed cartography so exactly that they are able to make a map the exact size and dimensions of the empire itself. You might think such peerless location services would ensure the regime’s longevity but, in fact, decline ensues when future generations lose interest in mapmaking and the massive maps decay, causing so many impediments that the empire collapses into ruin. This absurdist reduction reminded me of Google Earth and how inhumanly unmanageable that map is at its scale — as opposed to, say, the manageable hugeness of the New York City panorama commissioned by Robert Moses for the 1964 World’s Fair, the one Fran Lebowitz bestrides Gulliver-like in Martin Scorsese’s 2021 documentary Pretend It’s a City. The medium is the message, as all the Boomers out there know: As the machine networks connecting us evolve, the nature of our communication changes in response. If Morris Graves were alive today, instead of writing newsy longhand letters that later generations could comb for insight into his life and art, wouldn’t he be sharing fruit emoji and cat memes like the rest of us? The social cartographer’s task is not easy, Morgan agreed, especially not when the terrain in question is an artists’ circle. We’re talking about a gossamer network constituted through some multi-branched social connections and experiences over time, one that can be described but never reproduced in its totality. The challenge makes a regional exhibit of this kind especially significant. Seven Artists bears witness to a creative social network that has persevered longer than most, through trying times, held together by the delicate yet durable filaments Morgan describes as “mutual respect and delight in one another’s company.” ● “Seven Artists, Seven Paths” reopened to visitors will stay open through May 23 at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. Gabrielle Gopinath (she/her) is an art writer, critic and curator based in Arcata. Follow her on Instagram at @ gabriellegopinath.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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TROPHY CASE

Kids and Sports Why don’t they play like they used to? By Rod Kausen

trophycase@northcoastjournal.com

P

1001 Main St. in Fortuna

707.725.6734

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lenty of adults label this generation of kids as lazy and spoiled. That is what older generations do: label the younger generations as not as tough as they were — walking to school, part time jobs, toeing the line and playing more sports. By one barometer concerning sports, the National Alliance for Youth Sports concludes that currently about half of kids quit sports by the time they turn 11 and about 70 percent quit by the time they reach 13. Those statistics point to a story but don’t address the causes. Youth sports can develop physical fitness, teamwork, success, the ability to deal with and overcome defeat, and, of course, provide an alternative to the internet. In our society, fewer kids participate in sports now than they did in the past. There are rising rates of obesity and consumption of junk food, which can be traced to bottom-line issues based on systemic variables in our culture. But it is not so simple as chalking it up to kids just being lazy. The COVID-19 nightmare has had a huge impact. For example, the Fortuna Major League Little League season had a smaller number of kids try out for teams this year. Many did not have the skills needed after a year of inactivity and so were sent to the younger team’s league. There will be only four teams this year — one from Ferndale and three from Fortuna — after decades of up to eight teams. Coaches at the high school level are finding fewer students than expected interested in playing in these shortened seasons with a few exceptions. Everyone was hopeful there would be lots of enthusiasm for these seasons of sports after a year of pent up kids but that has not been the case. My next-door neighbor is a sophomore in high school. He wants to play basketball for the shortened four-week season this year but the basketball season will overlap his baseball season by a week, and the last two weeks will be during his summer vacation and a planned family trip. Another year of lost skills. The effects of COVID-19 might be felt long term. Like many, I am guilty of apathy and inactivity during this pandemic. It can

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

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become ingrained. Getting into competitive shape is a lot of hard work. For the youth, loss of interest has been building for a while and the pandemic probably exponentially accelerated it. My column is about sports but there is an overlap with clubs, plays and band. The lost time socializing in groups will be taxing. The primary concern among experts is kids feeling sports are not fun. As they get closer to high school, the system has become focused on more competitive players. My coaching friends around the North Coast Section have been talking about it for years. A major shift has been a clear push toward specializing. Coaches are both witnesses to and sometimes causes of this movement. The statistics show most kids who specialize and only practice one sport all year do not significantly improve in that sport. Lost are the lessons of honing other skills, developing other muscle groups, learning to play with a variety of team members, finishing a task and other benefits that come with diversified training. The idea of picking one sport and specializing might work for some, but the underlying message can be, “If I am not the best, I have failed.” A girl who specializes in soccer and does not make the prestigious summer travel squad may think there is no point to committing to it and quit the sport. Those kids who hang in there can feel parents and coaches are disappointed if they have not excelled and “won,” concerned more with the score and the outcome. Development of skills and having fun are not prioritized. A 13-year-old struggling with grades, school standards, esteem, sexuality and a host of influences can certainly be swayed by a friend who walks away from sports. Many families cannot afford to have their child focus on sport stardom. Equipment, year-round fees, camps, travel for select teams and coaching are expensive. Low-income and single-parent families are often shut out. There are organizations that will help, but it’s harder for kids growing up on the wrong side of the financial tracks. We cannot look at contemporary youth society without coming back to the impact of social media, smart phones and online

gaming. According to Pew Center’s Internet Research Study, most kids in the U.S. have their first cell phone by the age of 12, 92 percent of teens are online every day and 24 percent are online almost constantly. If a 10-year-old boy plays center field, getting a couple chances to field a ball in a game and maybe three at bats a game, he might get bored. If he is not particularly good anyway, why not opt for staying home playing Fortnite with the constant action of a video game in which his skill level is high and rewarding? “Little League parent syndrome” is the term sports psychologists use to describe the intense need to see one’s child gets on the best teams and spends hours traveling to games and clinics. Superimposing a parent’s own ego and desires can also lead to kids not having as much fun. If you start pushing your kids at the age of 5, burnout, boredom, guilt and injuries from pushing too hard are possible outcomes. On the flip side, the 10-year-old that wants to start a sport may feel displaced and behind before even trying. Ways to counteract these issues include pointing kids toward activities such as swimming, karate and gymnastics to build coordination, not the use of equipment. To avoid burnout, instead of playing more than one sport per season, kids could focus on different sports in different seasons. Having your kid be the best at age 8 often eliminates the possibility for them to be the best at age 15. The pressure to win and excel at the age of 7 doesn’t compare to having fun and connecting with parents and coaches. My nostalgic thoughts turn to questions like: What happened to the games in the street, the bicycle and coming in at dark? What about shooting hoops just for fun and playing with new friends in the neighborhood? Try not making them little soldiers in the sport you stayed in because it was fun for you. Try not reliving every play on the way home. Try saying, “Wow, I love watching you play.” ● Rod Kausen (he/him) is a retired teacher and coach.


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

Brookings Kicking Out Limits of Rockfish and Lingcod

341 West Harris St., Eureka 707 445-3138

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By Kenny Priest

fishing@northcoastjournal.com

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hile we wait for the rockfish season to open in the Northern Management area, which includes Eureka, Trinidad and Crescent City, there’s a pretty good alternative right across our northern border. Rockfish and lingcod season is open year-round out of Brookings Harbor, and the last couple months have produced some excellent fishing opportunities. When the weather has permitted, the lingcod bite has been better than average, with limits common for private and charter boats. The rockfish bite has been equally good. “The lingcod bite, when the ocean has been flat, has been wide-open,” said Andy Martin of Brookings Fishing Charters. “The Bird Island and House Rock areas have been best.” When conditions keep the boats closer to the harbor, there’s still good fishing available. “Close-in fishing also has been good, with easy limits of rockfish just past Chetco Point,” added Martin. Brookings Harbor features an excellent launching facility with self-payment, courtesy dock, freshwater boat rinse and a large fish-cleaning station. The general marine daily bag limit is six fish per angler per day, along with two lingcod 22 inches or larger. Visit www.myodfw.com/sport-bottomfish-seasons for a complete list of bottom fish regulations.

Marine forecast Ocean conditions are shaping up nicely for the weekend. Friday is calling for north winds to 5 knots and northwest waves 2 feet at six seconds and west 4 feet at 12 seconds. Saturday is calling for winds out of the north 5 to 10 knots with 3-foot swells at six seconds out of the northwest and west 4 feet at 12 seconds. For an up-to-date weather forecast, visit www. weather.gov/eureka/ or www.windy.com.

The Beach/Jetties

Howling winds over the weekend made

Wesley Brown, of Carson City, Nevada, holds the limit of lingcod for some tough he recently caught aboard the Nauti-Lady of Brookings Fishing fishing conditions off Charters. He was using a P-Line Lazer Minnow tipped with squid. the beach and jetties. Photo courtesy of Andy Martin The best option was the mouth of Elk River inside Humboldt Bay for redtail perch. releases. A schedule of daily flow releases It’s one of the few locations not affected is available at: www.trrp.net/restoration/ by heavy winds. The fishing was good this flows/current/. weekend, with some limits reported. Conditions look excellent through Saturday. Reminder: The South Fork Eel, Van “Critically Dry” year designation Duzen, Mattole, Mad, Redwood Creek and Chetco rivers all closed to fishing March 31.

The Rivers:

for Trinity River

According to a press release issued by the Bureau of Reclamation on April 9, the lack of precipitation and snowpack in the Trinity Mountains this winter means the flow schedule for 2021 is scaled to a “critically dry” water year for the Trinity River. Critically dry is one of five water year types used by the Trinity River Restoration Program to decide how much reservoir water will be released in support of the program’s goals to improve habitat for anadromous fish — fish that migrate to fresh water from salt water to spawn — like salmon and steelhead. This year marks the third critically dry year in the last five for the Trinity watershed. This year’s flow schedule will begin April 16. Key dates and flow releases are: April 16-17: Increase daily average flows from 300 cubic feet per second to 1,300 cfs April 21: Decrease flows to 500 cfs April 23: Increase flows to 1,500 cfs April 28: Increase flows to peak release of 3,550 cfs Two additional flow increases to 1,950 cfs on May 6 and 1,600 cfs on May 28 are scheduled before flow decreases to summer baseflow (450 cfs) on June 18, which continues until Sept. 30. Visitors near or on the river can expect river levels to increase during the flow releases and should take appropriate safety precautions. Landowners are advised to clear personal items from the floodplain prior to the

Lower Rogue

The slow spring salmon fishing on the Rogue continued over the weekend, prompting some guides to start canceling trips, according to Martin. “Very few hatchery springers are being caught. The other Southern Oregon Coast rivers are closed until late May,” added Martin.

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Eel (main stem)

As of Tuesday, the main Eel dipped under 1,800 cfs on the Scotia gauge. The river is clear and the fish will be holding in the deeper slots. There should be quite a few steelhead making their way downriver, though the fishing pressure has been light. The main stem Eel to the South Fork is open all year. Only artificial lures with barbless hooks may be used from Apr. 1 through Sept. 30. l

“LARGEST BRAND SELECTION IN THE COUNTY”

Read the complete fishing roundup at www.northcoastjournal.com. Kenny Priest (he/him) operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast.com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@ fishingthenorthcoast.com northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com


Calendar April 15 – 22, 2021

online. www.northcoastcnps.org/index.php/wildflower-show-2021/art-share. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 15 listing. Studio Space. KEET TV, Channel 13, Humboldt. This 13-week series hosted by Kati Texas and David Ferney features 26 local artists including potters Peggy Loudon and Conrad Calimpong, animator Steven Vander Meer, Native carver Alme Allen, copper sculptor Scott Hemphill, printmaker Lynn Jones, painter Leslie Price and others.

MUSIC Photo by Mark Larson Lion on the Mat

Submitted

Two events are happening honoring the life of David Josiah Lawson this Saturday, April 17. The 4Years-4Miles J4J Walk and second annual Coat Drive starts with a run/walk/ skateboard/stoll starting at noon at Arcata City Hall, then heads to the Humboldt Bay Trail and Arcata Marsh, ending up at the Arcata Plaza around 2:30 p.m. for a vigil with speakers, music and outreach services. Then join the Eureka NAACP online at 6 p.m. for the David Josiah Lawson Oratory Festival featuring voices of BIPOC youth and artists. Find it at www.eurekanaacp.org.

15 Thursday ART

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Chapter of the California Native Plant Society’s virtual Wildflower Show hosts a slew of creative, interactive and informational opportunities. www.northcoastcnps. org/index.php/wildflower-show-2021/art-share. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F St., Eureka. The painter shows his work in April.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Learn Brazilian dances with instructors Rocío Cristal and María Vanderhorst. All levels. Limited to five people. Register online. $15. talavera.rocio@gmail.com.

LECTURE Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Barbara Bramble of the National Wildlife Federation presents The Hamburger is Eating the Forest: Changing the trajectory of one of Brazil’s largest exports. Register for the lecture online. www. schatzcenter.org/speakers.

MUSIC J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. Artists give a onehour program streamed live from the Sanctuary. music@ sanctuaryarcata.org. www.youtube.com/channel/ UCkssa2GDSgrmnqguTfLMEFg. 822-0898.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World,

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of pandemic stays Humboldt State University’s film students from promoting the art of film. Year after year, the oldest student-run film festival in the world keeps rolling. This year, the Humboldt International Film Festival celebrates its 54th year with four nights of independent films, April 21-24. In addition to the narration, animation, experimental and documentary categories, this year’s festival features two spotlight programs: solidarity with Black Lives Matter and social justice issues, and self care and wellness amid COVID-19. Get an all-access virtual film pass for $50 ($25 students) or drop $10 per movie ($5 students). See www.hsufilmfestival.com/ tickets for ticket and schedule details. Online. A writing workshop geared toward stand-up and comedy. Zoom Room: 857 4217 6054. Password: writers. Join Zoom Meeting www.us02web.zoom. us/j/85742176054?pwd=dWp4UGVqaUVYQ0wzekVnZkZ0VlMzZz09.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Fortuna Branch Library on its Facebook page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryFortuna. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks offers kids’ programs and activities about coast redwoods, marine protected areas and more, plus Junior Ranger badges. Register online and watch live. www.bit. ly/NCRDVirtualJuniorRanger.

MEETINGS Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Community members who identify as white are invited to weekly conversations led by white facilitator from equity arcata. Email for the Zoom link. equityarcata@gmail.com.

OUTDOORS California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. The North Coast Chapter presents wildflower fun, including art sharing, wildflower photos on www. iNaturalist.org April 17-30, interactive Zoom sessions April 24-May 2. Access through the website. theralphs@ humboldt1.com. www.northcoastcnps.org. 822-2015. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. California State Parks’ North Coast Redwoods District is broadcasting programs featuring tall trees and rugged seas from state parks via Facebook.

The 2021 Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival takes flight again — online! The free event presented virtually via Zoom runs April 16 through 18 and includes live-streamed sessions as well as pre-recorded lectures and more. Sessions include the Big Hour at the Arcata Marsh with Rob Fowler of Fowlerope Birding Tours and Gary Bloomfield, Curiosities and Oddities in the Humboldt State Wildlife Museum: A Tour with curator Tamar Danufsky, and “The Language of Birds” keynote lecture by Nathan Pieplow. The winner of Humboldt County’s Bird of the Year for 2021 and winners in the 18th annual student bird art contest will also be announced. Although free, festival goers are asked to drop a few clams to keep the festival alive and flapping for years to come. Sign up at www.godwitdays.org. Free. www.facebook.com/NorthCoastRedwoods.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. This class offers pronunciation, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary, verb conjugations and common expressions. All levels welcome. Join anytime. Free. www.englishexpressempowered.com. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. Free. annconstantino@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth. org. 923-3921. Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join on Zoom at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a one-hour class with three group meditations, guidance and Q&A. Suitable for all levels. Free. mindfullymatt@gmail.com. us02web. zoom.us/j/86371764436?pwd=a1hJaVBoRC93cHd0ckcwQ1lFd2ltZz09.

16 Friday ART

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Friday Night Art Demonstrations. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. North Coast Chapter of the California Native Plant Society’s online Friday presentations in April. No art experience necessary. Schedule and access

J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. See April 15 listing. Jus Goodie and Irie Rockerz. 7-9 p.m. Location TBA, in the area of Eureka/Arcata. Reggae. Additional bands to be announced. This event is outside and socially distant with COVID precautions in place. $25. www. eventbrite.com/e/jus-goodie-with-irie-rockerz-arcataca-tickets-148839836959. Shelter n Play. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Public group on Facebook made up of locals. Open mic for all skill levels, all styles, everyone’s welcome to watch or perform. Sign-ups Wednesdays at noon. www.facebook. com/groups/224856781967115. Sky Talk It Productions Livestream Fundraiser for the Mateel. 7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. DJs Guerilla Takeover, Just One, Rundat, Screech Owl and more perform socially-distanced sets streaming live from the Mateel stage on Twitch.Tv/MateelCommunityCenter. Robin’s Light Show Experience with visuals by Cosmic Goo and video by Digital Activism Productions. donation. mateel.org.

THEATER The Living Newspaper. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The Department of Theatre, Film and Dance at Humboldt State University in cooperation with Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre presents an original production based on current events. Streamed online. www.theatre.humboldt.edu.

EVENTS 2021 Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival. Virtual World, Online. The free, virtual includes 13 sessions spread April 16 through April 18. Sign up online to access the entire festival via Zoom webinar. www. godwitdays.org. The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. An evening of strange tales, live chats and parlor games hosted by Altar Ego: Curious Art & Fashion Design. www. facebook.com/events/939880849742122.

FOR KIDS School-age Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Mateel Drive Through Dinners. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Weekly meals prepared by local chefs. Drive into the lower parking lot to pick up orders and exit out the back gate. Limited table seating is available on the hillside. This week guest chef Christy Augustine is preparing Philly cheese steak sandwiches and roasted veggie grinders. www.mateel.org. Pulled Pork Drive-Thru Dinner. 5-7:30 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Pick up three slow-roasted pulled pork sliders, beans, coleslaw and cookies. Pre-order online and pick up. $12. www.my.cheddarup.com/c/april-16. Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

OUTDOORS California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. See April 15 listing. Eel Zoom. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A happy-hour presentation on the Eel River watershed. Go to the website or Eel River Recovery Project Facebook page for Zoom links. April 16 topic is Forest Health with Tim Bailey, Ernie Merrifield and Pat Higgins. eelrecovery@ gmail.com. www.eelriverrecovery.org. 839-4987. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. A weekly Zoom meetup for knitters and crocheters. Sign up using the Google form for an email inviation. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.forms.gle/ CkdbZSbjbckZQej89. 822-5954. English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. www.sohumhealth.com.

17 Saturday ART

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F St., Eureka. See April 15 listing.

BOOKS

at the Arcata Plaza for a vigil with speakers, music and outreach services. Free. Club Triangle Streaming Saturdays. Virtual World, Online. Weekly online queer variety show. Submissions accepted daily. Post your art on social media and tag @clubtriangle. #coronoshebettadont. Free. www.facebook.com/clubtriangl .

FOR KIDS Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Hosted by the Arcata Branch Library via Zoom. To sign up, email sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us or call 822-5954.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Every Saturday Humboldt County farmers bring their non-GMO bounty, rain or shine. EBT accepted and Market Match is offered. Information and COVID rules online. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

OUTDOORS California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. See April 15 listing. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

18 Sunday ART

Reading in Place - An Online Reading Group. 1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Sign up online for a Zoom meeting invite and the week’s reading for discussion. www. forms.gle/zKymPvcDFDG7BJEP9.

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F St., Eureka. See April 15 listing.

MUSIC

COMEDY

EmRArt with James Zeller. 2-4 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Cross-platform entertainment from remote locations. James Zeller plays jazz from Arcata, and Emily Reinhart lays charcoal on birch wood in Eureka. Watch via Facebook (www.facebook.com/EmRArt) or by YouTube. Free. emily@emilyreinhart.com. www.youtube. com/channel/UClclGc_-RErDvHWjNBsbhIQ. RLL Jazz Trio with Francis Vanek. 8-9 p.m. The ever inventive RLL Jazz Trio are made up of Tim Randles (piano), Ken Lawrence (bass) and Mike LaBolle (drums). Join them and special guest saxophonist Francis Vanek for a livestream performance at the virtual Arcata Playhouse. $5. david@arcataplayhouse.org. www.arcataplayhouse.org/ events/rll-jazz-trio-with-special-guest-francis-vanek/.

Sunday Service Comedy Open Mic: Zoom. 5 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Virtual stage-time with Pastor Paula for aspiring comics working out sets and trying to land jokes. Five-minute sets. Join the show at www. us02web.zoom.us/j/82295455754. Zoom room: 822 9545 5754. Password: comedy.

EVENTS

SPOKEN WORD

OUTDOORS

David Josiah Lawson Oratory Festival. 6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Uplifting the voices of BIPOC youth and artists in Humboldt County while coming together in celebration of David Josiah Lawson. Presented by the Eureka NAACP. www.facebook.com/ events/3772864359465013.

California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. See April 15 listing. Eureka Waterfront Birding Tour. 9-11 a.m. Eureka Waterfront, Foot of Del Norte Street. Redwood Region Audubon Society’s guided birding tour along the Eureka Waterfront Trail with leader Ralph Bucher. Reservations required. COVID-19 participation guidelines online. Sign up by text or emailing /messaging , or email thebook@ reninet.com with the walk date and your name and phone number. Free. thebook@reninet.com. www.rras. org/home.aspx. 499-1247. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

EVENTS 2021 Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival. Virtual World, Online. See April 16 listing. 4Years-4Miles J4J Walk and Coat Drive. Noon-5 p.m. Arcata City Hall, 736 F St. Run/walk for David Josiah Lawson. Starts at Arcata City Hall before heading to the Humboldt Bay Trail and the Arcata Marsh, ending

2021 Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival. Virtual World, Online. See April 16 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.


ETC

book page, www.facebook.com/HumCoLibraryArcata.

English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

FOOD

19 Monday ART

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 15 listing.

BOOKS Equity Arcata’s Community Book Club. Third Monday of every month, 4-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. The group will be discussing Adrienne Marie Brown’s book, Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds. On Zoom. Register online. www.equityarcata.com.

MUSIC J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. See April 15 listing.

EVENTS Trash-a-thon 2021. 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Northcoast Environmental Center, 415 I St., Arcata. Celebrate Earth Week with citizen science, direct-action activism and fundraising for the Northcoast Environmental Center. Participate anytime, anywhere during Earth Week. Practice social distancing and only clean up with those in your COVID bubble. Free. nec@yournec.org. www. yournec.org/trashathon2021.

OUTDOORS California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. See April 15 listing. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Little River Trail Workshop. 5:30-7 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Learn more about the Little River Trail, which will connect the Westhaven/Trinidad area to the Hammond Coastal Trail. www.trinidadcoastallandtrust.org/ little-river-ca-coastal-trail.html. 677-2501. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 16 listing.

20 Tuesday

4/20 Smoke Off and (get) Baked Sale. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Fundraiser for Summer Arts. More information online. www.mateel.org.

MEETINGS Local Homesharing Info Session. 1-1:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. If you have a spare bedroom and could use extra income or help around the house, Northcoast Homeshare (a program of Area 1 Agency on Aging) can connect you with a compatible housemate. Join the weekly 30-minute Zoom informational session. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. www.zoom.us/j/2673010045?pwd=eTJvajJXaWR4eEMwOUErQlpGZHBJZz09. 442-3763 ext. 213.

OUTDOORS California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. See April 15 listing. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Virtual Yoga: Gentle Vinyasa Flow. 5-6:15 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join online at the Abbey of the Redwoods for a mellow practice. Suitable for all levels but previous yoga experience is helpful due to the limitations of online instruction. Free. mindfullymatt@ gmail.com. www.facebook.com/abbeyoftheredwoods.

21 Wednesday ART

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first Wednesday of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at www.forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

MUSIC J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. See April 15 listing.

EVENTS

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F St., Eureka. See April 15 listing.

The Curiosity Hour: Weekly Double Dose of Weird with Veve Decay. 8 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 16 listing. Humboldt International Film Festival. Virtual World, Online. The oldest student-run film festival in the world celebrates its 54th year with four days of original films from all over the world. See website for ticket and schedule details. www.hsufilmfestival.com/tickets. Trash-a-thon 2021. 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Northcoast Environmental Center, 415 I St., Arcata. See April 19 listing.

Savage Henry’s BigFish Open Mic via Zoom. 9 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Enjoy or participate in some standup open-mic Zoom style. Five-minute sets. Zoom: www. us02web.zoom.us/j/86421967992 Password: comedy.

MUSIC J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. See April 15 listing.

FOR KIDS

EVENTS

Preschool Storytime. 11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 17 listing.

Trash-a-thon 2021. 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Northcoast Environmental Center, 415 I St., Arcata. See April 19 listing.

MEETINGS

FOR KIDS Tuesday Storytime with Ms. Tamara. Virtual World, Online. Posted every Tuesday on Arcata Library’s Face-

Let's Talk About

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F St., Eureka. See April 15 listing.

ART

COMEDY

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Activate NEC: Community Action Group. Third Wednesday of every month, 12:30-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Join the Northcoast Environmental Center for

KEET-TV invites you to join HSU English professor Dr. Janelle Adsit on Monday, April 19 at 5 p.m. as she and her diverse panel of educators from across the country explore Hemingway's writings from various viewpoints. A clip from Ken Burns and Lynn Novick's film, Hemingway, will be presented online. Go to KEET.org to sign-up.

HEMINGWAY A FILM BY KEN BURNS AND LYNN NOVICK

Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

its monthly Zoom meeting, learn about a local issue and how to take action. Free. nec@yournec.org. www. yournec.org/activate. Small Business Webinar. 10-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. ARTEMIA Communications hosts this webinar for small business owners affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Featuring speakers from California Capital and Pacific Gas & Electric. Visit artemia.com/smallbiz. Free. artemia.com/smallbiz.

OUTDOORS California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. See April 15 listing. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Reel Genius Virtual Trivia. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Create a team via Facetime, Skype, Messenger, Hangouts etc., order some food and brews from the Madrone and play while dining outdoors, or enjoying takeout at home. Invite link will be posted prior to the event. www.facebook.com/events/657139721581557. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 16 listing. Weekly Check-in with Rep. Huffman. Noon. Virtual World, Online. Rep. Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) will hold Facebook Live check-ins to engage with his constituents on the latest updates regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic and to answer questions about the federal response. More information at www. huffman.house.gov/coronavirus. Free. www.facebook. com/rephuffman.

22 Thursday ART

Art Share April. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Guest Artist Sanford Pyron. Old Town Art Gallery, 233 F Street, Eureka. See April 15 listing.

DANCE Dances of Brazil. 5:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See April 15 listing.

LECTURE Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Anthropologist Radhika Govindrajan presents Labors of Love: On the political ethics and economy of bovine politics in Himalayan India. Register online. schatzcenter.org/speakers.

MUSIC J St. Regulars Radio Hour. 7-8 p.m. See April 15 listing.

SPOKEN WORD The Writers Lounge via Zoom. 7:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

EVENTS Humboldt International Film Festival. Virtual World, Online. See April 21 listing. The Post Capitalism Conference: Building a Solidarity Economy. Virtual World, Online. Twenty one sessions facilitated by movement leaders, practitioners and scholars. Panelists include Cooperation Humboldt leaders David Cobb, Marina Lopez, Oscar Mogollon, Ruthi Engelke, Sabrina Miller, Tamara McFarland and Tobin McKee, plus local and national progressive panelists. www.events.eventee.co/detail/post-capitalism-conference-8356.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Trash-a-thon 2021. 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Northcoast Environmental Center, 415 I St., Arcata. See April 19 listing.

FOR KIDS Fortuna Library Recorded Readings. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Virtual Junior Rangers. 11:30 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

MEETINGS Virtual Whiteness Accountability Space. Noon-1 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

OUTDOORS California Native Plant Society Spring Wildflower Show. See April 15 listing. Live from Behind the Redwood Curtain. Ongoing, 3-3:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Ongoing. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing. Virtual Meditation & Mindfulness Class. 5-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See April 15 listing.

Heads Up … KZZH 96.7 seeks submissions of original audio recordings up to five minutes long for its new weekly late-night show The Repository, featuring old and odd recordings, spoken word, poetry and more. Email digital submissions to kzzh@accesshumboldt.net. For a sample, visit www. archive.org/details/the-repository-04032021. The 2021 Congressional Art Competition is accepting digital submissions from high school students in California’s Second Congressional District. The winning artwork will be exhibited in the U.S. Capitol Building for one year. The winning student will receive two round-trip tickets to Washington, D.C. and eligibility for a scholarship. All participants will receive a certificate of recognition. Online submission (no mail) by April 23. See instructions at www.huffman.house.gov/helping-you/art-competition. The City of Arcata seeks applicants for the Economic Development Committee. Email applications to citymgr@ cityofarcata.org, fax to 822-8081 or drop off in a sealed envelope labeled “City Manager’s Office” at the City Hall drop boxes. For more information visit www.cityofarcata. org or call 822-5953. Godwit Days and Redwood Region Audubon Society seek donations of new or gently used goods, as well as services, for an online auction benefitting Godwit Days. Donation deadline is May 1. Contact Alex Stillman at alexnacv@gmail.com or 845-3900 to donate to Godwit Days or Gary Friedrichsen at gary@jacobycreek.net or 496-6581 to donate to RRAS. Contact Sue Leskiw at sueleskiw1@gmail.com for general info. Dream Quest offers scholarships for students going to a two- or four-year college or vocational school. Apply by April 15. Email office@dqwc.org or visit www.dqwc.org. Graduating seniors at Humboldt County high schools who plan to major or minor in music or music education at an accredited college next fall may apply for Scotia Band’s 2021 Sewell Lufkin Memorial Scholarship ($500) until April 16. The application form is available at www.scotiaband2. org/Scotia_Band_Scholarship.html. The Humboldt-Del Norte County Medical Society’s Humboldt-Del Norte PreMedical Education Task Force offers two $1,000 Future Physician scholarships to students planning on attending medical school. Application at www.hafoundation.org/Grants-Scholarships/ Scholarships-Apply-Now. l


SCREENS

Listen, not every post-pandemic gathering is going to be a thrill. Shiva Baby

Funny Running into You

Thunder Force, Psycho Goreman and Shiva Baby By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com THUNDER FORCE. Melissa McCarthy had already established a significant CV as a character by the time I took notice. That was 2011, the movie was Bridesmaids (of course) and I doubt I was the sole latecomer to her fan club. She made an indelible impression as the irrepressible, sweetly unhinged Megan, standing out in a movie that became a star-making phenomenon. If her name is attached, I’ll watch it eventually. This has created a challenging, if not complex paradigm, because I love McCarthy best when the gloves are off and the comedy becomes a street-fight — in the moments of perceived loss of control, she approaches the sublime and it is impossible not to laugh. Her breakthrough was defined by this tonal violence; even her quietest moments suggest the coming of thunder. It is likely too much to ask of any performer to sustain that velocity throughout a whole performance, much less an entire career; such is the conundrum of an inimitable, self-defining breakthrough. I want to see McCarthy raging, balls to wall, a comedic destroyer of worlds. She doesn’t always do that. Thunder Force, written and directed by frequent collaborator (and life partner) Ben Falcone, gives us McCarthy in a heightened universe and a perplexingly muted, more accessible mode. It’s enjoyable and it boasts a pretty remarkable cast. But for its occasional suggestions of an unchecked thing that might have been,

I find it frustrating. Set in Chicago, the movie posits a world terrorized by Miscreants, sociopaths imbued with superpowers by some sort of preternatural global event in 1983. Among the early victims of the scourge were the scientist parents of Emily Stanton — played as time passes by Bria Danielle Singleton, Tai Leshaun and, in adulthood, Octavia Spencer — a bookish kid who vows to continue their research and find a way to confer superpowers onto non-murderers. Her dedication to this path leads, in adolescence, to her parting ways with rough-around-the-edges best friend Lydia Berman (Vivian Falcone, Mia Kaplan, McCarthy). They remain estranged until the night of a high school reunion, when Lydia pushes her way into the offices of Emily’s thriving tech company and accidentally gives herself a superhero injection. Crime-fighting and rekindling of friendship commence. The movie is sweet, ultimately, almost saccharine. Bobby Cannavale and Jason Bateman stand out as villains, but it’s almost as if they’re in much goofier, more adult storyline altogether. The moments of absurdity and comic asides can’t quite elevate the rest of the material, which is too safe and wholesome — not always a bad thing — to bear revisiting. PG13. 106M. NETFLIX. PSYCHO GOREMAN. From a different part of the cinematic universe, one more

frequented by iconoclasts and cinematic weirdos, comes Steven Kostanski’s version of an ’80s cult-horror-sci-fi mash-up, replete with insane make-up, winking asides and hilariously gruesome practical effects. After Mimi (Nita Josee-Hanna) defeats older brother Luke (Owen Myre) in a game of Crazy Ball (copyright Mimi), he must dig his own grave and be buried alive. In the process, he discovers the tomb of an ancient, demonic space-warrior. Previously known as the Archduke of Nightmares (Matthew Ninaber, voiced by Steven Vlahos) and imprisoned after an intergalactic campaign of untold carnage, he was condemned to spend eternity entombed behind Luke and Mimi’s house. Best laid plans. After liberating the beast and renaming him Psycho Goreman, Mimi takes control of the talisman containing his power and becomes his master. What ensues might be described as Stranger Things without the pretentiousness, filtered through the whole Troma catalog and Peter Jackson’s Bad Taste (1987). (Forgive the unavoidable comparison.) While not exactly in my top-five range, genre-wise, Psycho is clever, self-aware and well-enough executed to deserve a mention. It will be “too stupid” or “too bloody” for many, but those are among its many charms: It is pure entertainment from a line that seldom gets enough credit for its lasting influence. NR. 95M. AMAZON. SHIVA BABY is a substantial, troubling,

shockingly fully-formed debut from a very young creator. Writer-director Emma Seligmann is, I believe, still in her early 20s and this makes me optimistic as well as old and unaccomplished. Reluctantly attending memorial services for a distant relative, Danielle (Rachel Sennott) is first troubled by the presence of her estranged best friend/girlfriend Maya (Molly Gordon). They’ve drifted apart on difficult terms and Danielle is shamed by her own lack of direction in life, especially set against Maya’s acceptance to law school. Bad enough but then Danielle’s, well, sugar daddy Max (Danny Deferrari) arrives, with his seemingly perfect wife (Dianna Agron) and baby daughter to follow. Mortification abounds. Seligmann’s most impressive touch here is to render slapstick comedy as horror, establishing a precarious tone of claustrophobia and anxiety made more contritive by each one of Danielle’s actions and interactions. She also understands that sometimes less is more, editing the movie down to a lithe, perfect 77 minutes and setting it all in one location over the course of one of those afternoons we’ve all thought would never end. This is intelligent, economical, exceptionally well-cast moviemaking, hopefully the beginning of a successful and fulfilling career. NR. 77M. AMAZON. l John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

CARTOONS

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 845−8167. (DMT −1230)

SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1230)

Fitness

Therapy & Support

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1230)

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1230)

50 and Better OLLI ONLINE CLASSES: Shelter in place but stay connected with OLLI. Get more information or register @HSUOLLI (O−1230)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1230)

NCJ WHAT’S GOOD

YOUR CLASS HERE

50 and Better Arts & Crafts Computer Fitness Kids & Teens

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets.

Lectures Dance & Music Theatre & Film Spiritual

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−1230) SMART RECOVERY MEETINGS 707 267 7868 rebtarcata@yahoo.com

Vocational ADDITIONAL ONLINE CLASSES − Are you looking for an online class? College of the Redwoods Community Education and Ed2GO have partnered to offer a variety of short term and career courses in an online format Visit: https://www.redwoods.e du/communityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleI− D/4916/Additional−Online−Classes or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0415) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start Anytime! Visit: https://www. redwoods.edu/communityed/Real−Estate or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V− 0415) SPANISH FOR EMTS & PARAMEDICS May 17 − Jul 8, 2021 Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/commun ityed/Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/5286/S− panish−for−EMTs−Paramedics or call College of the Redwoods at (707)476−4500 (V−0415)

Wellness & Bodywork DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 15 − Nov 3, 2021, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2022. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0429) MASSAGE CLASSES AT LOVING HANDS INSTI− TUTE IN ARCATA! Chair massage: Sat May 1, 10− 5pm. 6 contact hours. $150 Intro to Neuromuscular Therapy. May 3−June 7. M−TH 5:30−9:30pm. 80 contact hours. $1200 for current students or $1000 for certified therapists. Workshops with Dr. Mally: Side Lying Massage June 12 & 13 9am−6pm $320. Cupping June 14 9am−6pm $177. Trigger Point Therapy and Counterstrain June 15 9am−6pm $160 www.lovinghandsinstitute.com for more info, or call 630−3407 to register!


FIELD NOTES

LEGAL NOTICES A node in the Bitcoin network is usually a “mining farm,” like this one (in Iceland, taking advantage of cheap geothermal and hydro power), in which thousands of ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit) computers compete in a worldwide lottery to find the winning Bitcoin “hash.” Photo by Marco Krohn, Creative Commons

Cryptocurrency and the Blockchain By Barry Evans

C

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com ryptocurrency, especially the largest, Bitcoin, is often touted as “new gold,” a way of holding wealth independent of banks. I discussed cryptocurrency briefly a few years ago (“Cash, Plastic or Bitcoin?” May 5, 2016), when I compared explaining Bitcoin to the challenge faced by Marco Polo when he tried to tell 14th century Venetian city fathers about the paper money (fiat) he had seen in China. Here’s my Marco Polo explanation of Bitcoin. What is Bitcoin? • A decentralized peer-to-peer electronic cash system, unlike fiat (“let it be done”) money such as dollars, where a central authority — in this case the U.S. government — promises that pieces of green paper without any intrinsic value are, in fact, valuable. • A monetary system immune from inflation, since there will never be more than 21 million Bitcoins (unlike fiat money, which can be printed and hence devalued, according to the whim of the government) • Digital currency, in the same way your credit card represents digital currency, except without any middleman or central authority like Visa or your bank or the Federal Reserve • A democratic payment system that offers a way for the nearly 3 billion “unbanked” people in the world to enter the economy and easily trade services and goods • The financial equivalent of email • A ledger (aka blockchain) containing the entire history of Bitcoin transactions What do you mean “ledger?” Bitcoin’s ledger is the record of all transactions since its inception in 2009. The ledger is anonymous, decentralized and transparent, with thousands of identical copies maintained and constantly updated by a global network of nodes. It can only be added to, not edited. The ledger is broken down into blocks, each block containing the record of approximately 2,400 new transactions together with

proof, or “hash” (see below) of the previous block. Hence the Bitcoin ledger is also called the “blockchain.” How does it work? New transactions are constantly added to the blockchain at an average rate of one block every 10 minutes. To verify that a new block is a legitimate record, so-called “miners” essentially engage in a lottery, searching by trial-and-error (using powerful custom-built computers) for the correct “nonce,” the number that will return a singularly unlikely result. Once found, the winning miner broadcasts it to thousands of rival nodes for validation, resulting in the newly verified block being added to the chain. The miner’s effort, or “proof of work,” is rewarded with 6.25 Bitcoins per block (currently about $350,000). The reward is halved every four years. What’s “a singularly unlikely result?” An arithmetical process (an algorithm known as SHA-256) is applied to the 2,400-odd new transactions, plus the hash of the previous block, plus the nonce being checked. The output (hash) is a run of 256 hexadecimal (base 16) numbers. A miner knows they’ve hit the jackpot when their hash starts with a certain number of zeros, currently 19. That number self-adjusts to keep the mining rate steady: The more miners, the greater difficulty. To give some idea what’s involved, the challenge with 17 initial zeros is equivalent to finding a particular grain of sand out of all the grains of sand in the world (about 10^20). What’s the point of miners? Thousands of miners around the world validate transactions and keep the blockchain secure by consensus, verifying everyone else’s ledger for discrepancies or fraud about every 10 minutes. Instead of a central authority, thousands of individuals are guaranteeing the integrity of the system. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) believes Bitcoin is one of the most important inventions of our time.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CHARLES W. SMITH a/k/a CHARLES WAYNE SMITH CASE NO. PR2100080 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of CHARLES W. SMITH a/k/a CHARLES WAYNE SMITH A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner BRENDA D. SMITH In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that BRENDA D. SMITH be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 29, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6.

either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: James D. Poovey 937 6th Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−6744 Filed: March 25, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−118)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF TODD JAMES COLLINS CASE NO. PR2100093

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with page » theContinued court beforeon thenext hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Thomas C. Petersen Bldg 3, 41130 State Hwy 299 PO Box 1585 Willow Creek, CA 95573 (530) 629−2557 Filed: April 6, 2021 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of TODD JAMES COLLINS, aka TJ COLLINS, TODD COLLINS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner CADEN ANTHONY COLLINS 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−135) In the Superior Court of California, SHERIFF'S BIKE AUCTION: County of Humboldt. The petition An auction conducted by Carl John− for probate requests that CADEN son’s Auction Yard, Jacobs Avenue, ANTHONY COLLINS be appointed Eureka, CA will be held starting as personal representative to April 25, 2021 at 9:00AM. Previews administer the estate of the dece− will be available through Carl John− dent. son’s Auction Yard the Friday and THE PETITION requests the dece− Saturday before the auction from dent’s will and codicils, if any, be Effective Monday, May 18, 2020, 11:30AM − 4:30PM. Details and admitted to probate. The will and Humboldt Superior Court will bidding information can be any codicils are available for exami− resume Probate calendars using obtained at nation in the file kept by court. remote video and phone confer− www.carljohnsonco.com. The Sher− THE PETITION requests authority to encing. You have been served with iff’s Auction will consist of bicycles administer the estate under the Notice of Petition to Administer that have been found, recovered, Independent Administration of Estate pursuant to which a court or unclaimed and have remained Estates Act. (This authority will hearing has been scheduled. Due to unclaimed for a period of three allow the personal representative the COVID−19 pandemic, if you wish months or more. Pursuant to to take many actions without to appear at the court hearing, you County Ordinance #281 these items obtaining court approval. Before must do so remotely. Instructions will be sold at public auction to the taking certain very important to appear remotely are set forth on highest bidder. Items not sold may actions, however, the personal the Court’s website: be offered on subsequent auction representative will be required to www.humboldt.courts.ca.gov. dates. give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of 4/15 (21−136) consented to the proposed action.) the petition, you should appear at IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF The independent administration the hearing and state your objec− THE FOURTH JUDICIAL authority will be granted unless an tions or file written objections with DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF interested person files an objection the court before the hearing. Your IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE to the petition and shows good appearance may be in person or by COUNTY OF ADA cause why the court should not your attorney. NOTICE OF TERMINATION OF grant the authority. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a PARENTAL RIGHTS A HEARING on the petition will be contingent creditor of the dece− CASE NO: CV 01 21 01394 held on May 13, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. at dent, you must file your claim with LEONARD EUGENE JOHNSON JR, the Superior Court of California, the court and mail a copy to the Plaintiff, Petitioner, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth personal representative appointed Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. by the court within the later of IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of either (1) four months from the OF: the petition, you should appear at date of first issuance of letters to a CHLOE DESA AVERILL, the hearing and state your objec− general personal representative, as Born: 3/1/2004 tions or file written objections with defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− the court before the hearing. Your fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days ADOPTEE’S NON−CUSTODIAL appearance may be in person or by from the date of mailing or PARENT(S) your attorney. personal delivery to you of a notice LEONARD EUGENE JOHNSON JR, IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a under section 9052 of the California northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • •Thursday, Thursday, April 15, 15,2021 2021• •NORTH NORTHCOAST COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL Plaintiff, Petitioner contingent creditor ofApril the dece− Probate Code. Other California dent, you must file your claim with statutes and legal authority may IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINA− the court and mail a copy to the affect your rights as a creditor. You TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS personal representative appointed may want to consult with an

39 39


IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF: CHLOE DESA AVERILL, Born: 3/1/2004

LEGAL NOTICES

ADOPTEE’S NON−CUSTODIAL PARENT(S) LEONARD EUGENE JOHNSON JR, Plaintiff, Petitioner IN THE MATTER OF THE TERMINA− TION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS BRIAN MATHEW WHITING

tion) is attached to this notice. 3. You have the absolute right to intervene (and / or object) in this proceeding 4. As a parent (and / or custodian), you have the right to a court− appointed attorney if you are determined indigent. If you intend to request a court−appointed attorney, you should contact the court immediately by telephone or in writing. s/ LEONARD EUGENE JOHNSON JR

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: Brian Mathew Whiting

4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−132)

PUBLIC NOTICE Comes now the Plaintiff, Leonard Eugene Johnson Jr, appearing propria persona, and pursuant to Section 4, Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure, hereby gives separate Notice, and Summons and Petition to Adopt the below child named herein: CHLOE DESA AVERILL You are hereby notified of the Petition to Adopt And TERMINATE YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS The grounds and personal informa− tion for which this Notice relies are contained in the Petition to Adopt and accompanying documents, attached hereto and made a part hereof this filing. You have the right to ask to inter− vene in the adoption. If your request to intervene is granted, you have the right to oppose this adop− tion. If you want to intervene in this adoption, you must file a Motion in this Court pursuant to Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure 24 and / or Family Rule 211 within the specified time to demonstrate why the adoption is not in the adoptees’ best interest. If you do not file a Motion to Inter− vene or otherwise contact the Court with your opposition after this notice is served on you, you − Waive ANY right to further notice in this adoption. − Forfeit ALL rights in relation to the adoptees. − Are barred from bringing or main− taining ANY action to assert any interest in the adoptees. If your request is granted, you may obtain further documents and other court records from the clerk of the court. If your request is denied, you may appeal the deci− sion to a higher court. PLEASE CONTACT AN ATTORNEY TO PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS To determine whether you must pay a filing fee with your response, contact the Clerk of the above named court.

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien on said property pursuant to sections 21700−21717 of the Business and Professions Code section 2328 of the UCC section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by the competi− tive bidding on the 17th day of April, 2021 at 10:00 am on the premises where the said property has been stored and which is Mad River Storage Center 1400 Glendale Drive, McKinleyville, CA County of Humboldt the following: #106 Michael Jacobsen #117 Elle Marteeny−Jones #168 Amelia Haggman #169 Steve Long #209 Stefan Duenckel #255 Jolena Tulledo #300 Chelsea Huntzinger−Carlson #332 Angela Snyder #333 Chelsea Huntzinger−Carlson #336 Abandoned Unit Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in prior to 11:00 am on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as−is, where −is and must be removed within 48 hours of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between the owner and the obligated party. Auctioneer: David Johnson bond #9044453 4/8, 4/15 (21−128)

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien on said property pursuant to sections 21700−21717 of the Business and Professions Code section 2328 of the UCC section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by the competi− tive bidding on the 17th day of April, 2021 at 11:00 am on the premises where the said property has been stored and which is Sutter Central Storage, 1649 Sutter Road, McKinleyville, CA County of Humboldt the following:

#726 Cheryl Jansen #289 Kim Johnson #632 Kim Johnson #506 Chad Bryant−Markussen #751 Julien Damwyk #423 Elsie Miller #539 Cale Yaple #829 Cynthia Bowie #250 Sean Christian

The following person is doing Busi− ness as RCM HOME & YARD SERVICES − RELIABLE CLEANING & MAINTE− NANCE

Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 1234 Allard Ave Eureka, CA 95503

Purchases must be paid for at the time of sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in prior to 11:00 am on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as−is, where −is and must be removed within 48 hours of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between the owner and the obligated party.

Marlaine Rechelluul 1234 Allard Ave Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Walker Collin, Owner This March 23, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

Auctioneer: David Johnson, bond #9044453 4/8, 4/15 (21−127)

Public Sale NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business &Professions Code, Section 2328 of UCC, Sections 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at auction by completive bidding on the 30th of April, 2021, at 12:00 pm, on the premises where the said property has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini−Storage 2031 Eich Road Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Caleb Fletcher, space # 364 Camille Brown, space # 307 Hani Abid, space # 153 Doug Camilli, space # 213 Courtney Garrett, space # 262 Mariah Cole, space # 844 Benjamin Saba, space # 731 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, Kitchenware, TV, stereo equipment, car parts, misc tools, luggage, clothing, movies, sports equipment, and misc. boxes and bags of contents unknown. Anyone interested in attending South Bay Mini−Storage auctions must register at South Bay Mini− Storage 2031 Eich Road Eureka, CA 95503 the day of the sale before 12pm, no exceptions. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. We require a $100 deposit on all units bought. All items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at the time of the sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Michael Lawrence, Employee of South Bay Mini− Storage, 707−442−4631, Bond # 65434675.

FURTHER NOTICE #669 Arron Henderson 1. A Complaint (Petition) for adop− 4/15, 4/22 (21−140) #187 Robert Hagland tion has been filed. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME #47 Lea Ann Gregg 2. A copy of the Complaint (Peti− STATEMENT 21−00173 #726 Cheryl Jansen tion) is attached to this notice. The following person is doing Busi− #289 Kim Johnson 3. You have the absolute right to ness as #632 Kim Johnson intervene (and / or object) in this RCM HOME & YARD SERVICES − #506 Chad Bryant−Markussen proceeding RELIABLE CLEANING & MAINTE− #751 Julien Damwyk 4. As a parent (and / or custodian), NANCE #423 Elsie Miller you have the right to a court− #539 Cale Yaple appointed attorney if you are Humboldt #829 Cynthia Bowie determined indigent. If you intend COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com 1234 Allard Ave #250 Sean Christian to requestNORTH a court−appointed Eureka, CA 95503 attorney, you should contact the Purchases must be paid for at the court immediately by telephone or Marlaine Rechelluul time of sale in cash only. Anyone in writing.

40

Chad E Rechelluul 1234 Allard Ave Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Marlaine Rechelluul, Owner This March 10, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−101)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00178 The following person is doing Busi− ness as AK’S DOWN Humboldt 1783 Mygina Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Aaron R Kurowski 1783 Mygina Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 5, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Aaron R Kurowski, Owner This March 10, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−133)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00221 The following person is doing Busi− ness as AKUA TEA COMPANY Humboldt 500 Quail Valley Rd Eureka, CA 95503 Walker J Collin 500 Quail Valley Rd Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 1, 2021

Walker J Collin 500 Quail Valley Rd Eureka, CA 95503

4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−144)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00179 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CUTTEN MINI STORAGE Humboldt 2341 Fern Street Eureka, CA 95503 4048 Campton Road Eureka, CA 95503 Cutten Enterprises, LLC CA 202102610241 4048 Campton Road Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Melissa R. Sutton, Manager, Owner This March 11, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−095)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00182 The following person is doing Busi− ness as JB DRAFTING & PROJECT MANAGEMENT Humboldt 511 Glenwood Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519 Jourdan O’hanen 511 Glenwood Lane McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis−

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jourdan O’Hanen, Owner This March 11, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−129)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00195 The following person is doing Busi− ness as IMBUE HERBALS Humboldt 1006 Villa Way Arcata, CA 95521 Kristin B Aalders 1006 Villa Way Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kristin Brianne Aalders, Owner This March 15, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−106)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00207 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LA PATRIA MARISCOS AND GRILL RESTAURANT Humboldt 6690 Fields Landing Dr Fields Landing, CA 95537 2300 Cochran Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 La Patria Mariscos and Grill Restaurant CA C3902379 6690 Fields Landing Dr Fields Landing, CA 95537 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Siclari Ayala, Owner This March 16, 2021


I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Siclari Ayala, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−097)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00198 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEASIDE SCHOOLHOUSE/ REDWOOD FOREST BATHING/ REDWOOD FOREST THERAPY Humboldt 1770 Market Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Scarlet Z Ibis−Roley 1770 Market Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on May 1, 2015 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Scarlet Ibis−Roley, Sole Propri− etor This March 15, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−112)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00208 The following person is doing Busi− ness as RITA’S ARCATA Humboldt 855 8th St, Suite 3 Arcata, CA 95521 2323 Harris Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Edward Fregoso, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

Humboldt 6360 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00202 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ANADA Humboldt 56 Wagon Jack Ln Arcata, CA 95521 Elin R Kronberg 56 Wagon Jack Ln Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elin R Kronberg, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−105)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00203 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ALL PHASE PROPERTY MAINTE− NANCE Humboldt 3006 Girard Ct Eureka, CA 95503 Jesse A Quinionez 3006 Girard Ct Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jesse Quinionez, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

Mad River Hardwood Company, Inc. CA C0725994 6360 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on February 22, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Wesley E. Green, Jr., President This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−096)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00205 The following person is doing Busi− ness as 4−EVER FADED BARBER SHOP Humboldt 3131 F St Eureka, CA 95501 2523 Albee St Apt B Eureka, CA 95501 Christian R.B. Reynolds 2523 Albee St Apt B Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Christian Reynolds, Owner This March 16, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−113)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00240 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SOCIAL NATURE BRAND

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−102)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00204 The following person is doing Busi− ness as WES GREEN COMPANY Humboldt 6360 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−103)

Mad River Hardwood Company, Inc. CA C0725994 6360 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by a

Humboldt 730 I Street Eureka, CA 95501 Eureka Social Operating LLC CA 202027610216 730 I Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true

730 I Street Eureka, CA 95501

Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Aaron Sweat, CEO This April 1, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Continued on next page to » The date registrant commenced transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Chris Koepsel, CEO & General Counsel This April 1, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00239 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SOCIAL NATURE DISPENSARY Humboldt 524 5th Street Eureka, CA 95501 P & B Labs Humboldt LLC CA 201633310325 122 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−121) 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−122) transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 INVITING I declare that allNOTICE information in this BIDS 1. Bid Submission. City of Fortuna (“City”) will accept electronically submitted bids for its statement is true and correct. CCF Well 5 Replacement Projectwho (“Project”), before Thursday, May 13th, 2021, at 2:00 p.m., A registrant declaresby asor true via email in the manner set forth in Section 1 oftothe Instructions to Bidders, at which time any material matter pursuant the bids will be opened theofresults will be posted Sectionand 17913 the Business and on the City’s website at: https://www. friendlyfortuna.com/your_government/public_works_notices.php. Professions Code that the regis− 2. Project Information. trant knows to be false is guilty of a 2.1 Location and Description. The Project is located at 1479 EelbyRiver misdemeanor punishable a fineDr., Fortuna, CA 95540, and is described as follows: not to exceed one thousand dollars Drilling of a replacement municipal ($1,000). well near the existing well field with non-mud method dual rotary or air rotary casing /s hammer (ARCH), CEO geophysical electric log recording for final casing Chris Koepsel, & General length and filter pack design, installation of replacement well, well development, and step Counsel drawdown pump test. This April 1, 2021 2.2 Time for Final Completion. The Project be fully completed within 30 calendar days from the start date KELLY E.must SANDERS set forth in the Notice to Proceed. anticipatesCounty that the Work will begin as soon as July 11, 2021 or as late by City kt, Humboldt Clerk as September 30, depending on Contractor availability, start date is provided solely for 4/8, 4/15,but 4/22,the 4/29 anticipated (21−122) convenience and is neither certain nor binding. 3. License and Registration Requirements. 3.1 License. This Project requires a valid California contractor’s license for the following classification(s): C-57 Well Drilling Contractor. 3.2 DIR Registration. City may not accept a Bid Proposal from or enter into the Contract with a bidder, without proof that the bidder is registered with the California Department of Industrial Relations (“DIR”) to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5, subject to limited legal exceptions. 4. Contract Documents. The plans, specifications, bid forms and contract documents for the Project, and any addenda thereto (“Contract Documents”) may be downloaded from City’s website located at: http://friendlyfortuna.com or by contacting brett.vivyan@ghd.com. A printed copy of the Contract Documents are not available. Contact brett.vivyan@ghd.com for additional options to obtain electronic copies. 5. Bid Security. The Bid Proposal must be accompanied by bid security of ten percent of the maximum bid amount, in the form of a cashier’s or certified check made payable to City, or a bid bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California on the Bid Bond form included with the Contract Documents. The bid security must guarantee that within ten days after City issues the Notice of Potential Award, the successful bidder will execute the Contract and submit the payment and performance bonds, insurance certificates and endorsements, and any other submittals required by the Contract Documents and as specified in the Notice of Potential Award. 6. Prevailing Wage Requirements. 6.1 General. Pursuant to California Labor Code § 1720 et seq., this Project is subject to the prevailing wage requirements applicable to the locality in which the Work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to perform the Work, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. 6.2 Rates. These prevailing rates are on file with the City and are available online at http://www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR. Each Contractor and Subcontractor must pay no less than the specified rates to all workers employed to work on the Project. The schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work must be at least time and one-half. 6.3 Compliance. The Contract will be subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the DIR, under Labor Code § 1771.4. 7. Performance and Payment Bonds. The successful bidder will be required to provide performance and payment bonds, each for 100% of the Contract Price, as further specified in the Contract Documents. 8. Substitution of Securities. Substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments is permitted under Public Contract Code § 22300. 9. Subcontractor List. Each Subcontractor must be registered with the DIR to perform work on public projects. Each bidder must submit a completed Subcontractor List form with its Bid Proposal (if none then write NA on sheet and include in package), including the name, location of the place of business, California contractor license number, DIR registration number, and percentage of the Work to be performed (based on the base bid price) for each Subcontractor that will perform Work or service or fabricate or install Work for the prime contractor in excess of one-half of 1% of the bid price, using the Subcontractor List form included with the Contract Documents. 10. Instructions to Bidders. All bidders should carefully review the Instructions to Bidders for more detailed information before submitting a Bid Proposal. The definitions provided in Article 1 of the General Conditions apply to all of the Contract Documents, as defined therein, including this Notice Inviting Bids. 11. Bidders’ Conference. A bidders’ conference will be held on Tuesday April 27, 2021 at 3:00 p.m., at the following location: 1479 Eel River Dr., Fortuna, CA 95540 to acquaint all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Worksite. The bidders’ conference is not mandatory. By: Siana Emmons, City Clerk Date: Publication Date: April 15, 2021 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00254 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ROOSEVELT BASE CAMP

LEGAL NOTICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00225

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00236

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00223

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRIAD CONTRACTING AND ENGI− NEERING

The following person is doing Busi− ness as WEST END DISTRIBUTION

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ZIGGYS AUTO BODY & PAINT

Humboldt 5655 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 183 Mayfair St Willow Creek, CA 95573

PO Box 778 Bayside, CA 95524

PO Box 1063 Willow Creek, CA 95573

ERLL Hill LLC CA 201731010174 5655 West End Road Arcata, CA 95521

Guy A Ziegenbein 184 Shady Ln Willow Creek, CA 95573

Humboldt 4040 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503 PO Box 6247 Eureka, CA 95502 Triad, Inc. CA C4694500 4040 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jordan M Zizza, President/CFO This March 25, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on May 1, 2015 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Randy Scott Harris, Owner This March 30, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−119)

4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−116)

4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−119)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Guy Ziegenbein, Owner This March 24, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−111)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00227 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ELYSIAN ESTHETICS Humboldt 1100 Main Street, Ste D2 Fortuna, CA 95540 2690 Campton Heights Drive Fortuna, CA 95540 Jessi A Shinn 2690 Campton Heights Drive Fortuna, CA 95540

We Print Obituaries Submit information via email to classified@ northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jessi A. Shinn, Owner This March 26, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−114)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00254 310 F STREET, EUREKA (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

42

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ROOSEVELT BASE CAMP

Humboldt 121130 US−101 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com Orick, CA 95555 PO Box 101 Orick, CA 95555

Humboldt 121130 US−101 Orick, CA 95555 PO Box 101 Orick, CA 95555 Carrie L Greenlaw 81 Lundblade Street Orick, CA 95555 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Carrie Greenlaw, Owner This April 6, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−134)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00248 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BECOME−RETREAT Humboldt 329 Bayside Rd Arcata, CA 95521 Wendy J Parkhurst 329 Bayside Rd Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 29, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Wendy J. Parkhurst, Owner This April 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

David L Cooper 1991 Hill Ave Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s David L Cooper, Owner This April 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−130)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00258

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEASIDE WEAVERS Humboldt 1991 Hill Ave Eureka, CA 95501 David L Cooper 1991 Hill Ave Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this

3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−104)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00214 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MOHO FABRICATION Humboldt 296 Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEVEN SEAS SURF & CYCLE

Kris E Mohorovich 296 Center Street Rio Dell, CA 95562

Humboldt 64 Sunnybrae Center Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kris Mohorovich, Owner This March 18, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

Benjamin T Conrad 1878 Golf Course Rdoad Bayside, CA 95524 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Benjamin Conrad, Owner This April 5, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−137)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00219 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FITZ IT RIGHT PLUMBING BY ED THE PLUMBER Humboldt 724 A St Eureka, CA 95501

4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−138)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00251

tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Clarence E Bailey, Owner/Oper− ator This March 19, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

PO Box 3772 Eureka, CA 95502 724 A St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000).

4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−131)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00233 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FOUR STAR RENTALS Humboldt 2910 J Street Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 7011 Eureka, CA 95502 Michelle L Krupa 2910 J Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Michelle Krupa, Owner/Property Manager This March 29, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−126)


trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Michelle Krupa, Owner/Property Manager This March 29, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−126)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00220 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SLAB DADDY WOODWORKS Humboldt 3533 Bay School Rd Arcata, CA 95521 Jeffrey W.W. Mason 3533 Bay School Rd Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jeffrey Mason, Owner This March 22, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−124)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00241 The following person is doing Busi− ness as PAPA & BARKLEY SOCIAL Humboldt 4325 Broadway Eureka, CA 95503 P & B Labs Humboldt LLC CA 201633310325 122 W 4th Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on March 1, 2021 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Chris Koepsel, CEO & General Counsel This April 1, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−123)

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 21−00230 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BLT DESIGNS Humboldt 140 Hatchery Rd Blue Lake, CA 95525 PO Box 952 Blue Lake, CA 95525 Rebecca L Thornton 140 B Hatchery Rd Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Rebecca L Thornton, Owner This March 29, 2021 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29 (21−125)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100392 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY KIMBERLY ELIZABETH COOPER to Proposed Name KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY KIMBERLY ELIZABETH GRAY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 7, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: March 23, 2021 Filed: March 24, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: March 23, 2021 Filed: March 24, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 4/1, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22 (21−117)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100493 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: M SANTA FINNEY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name M SANTA FINNEY to Proposed Name MARIA SANTA LOURENCO RAFAEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 28, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: April 7, 2021 Filed: April 7, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−139)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100354 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: DAVID JAMES BEAVER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DAVID JAMES BEAVER to Proposed Name DAVID JAMES PERRIER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to

persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 30, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: March 15, 2021 Filed: March 16, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 3/25, 4/1, 4/8, 4/15 (21−100)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV2100459 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: MARTHA SUZANNE MEADE for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MARTHA SUE MEADE to Proposed Name MARTHA SUZANNE MEADE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 21, 2021 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ Date: April 2, 2021 Filed: April 2, 2021 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6 (21−143)

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NOTICE OF AGREEMENT TO PURCHASE TAX DEFAULTED PROPERTY FOR (Purchase by a city)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, in accordance with the provisions of Division 1, Part 6, Chapter 8 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code (and the written authorization of the State Controller), that an agreement, a copy of which is on file in the office of the board of supervisors of Humboldt County, and in the office of the city clerk of the City Eureka, has been made between the County Board of Supervisors and the City of Eureka, and approved by the State Controller, whereby the county will sell the real property described in the agreement and in this notice. All property named in the agreement is subject to the Tax Collector’s power to sell tax defaulted property. The effective date and time of the agreement shall be May 6th, 2021 at 5:01pm. If the property is not redeemed according to law before the effective date and time of the agreement, the right of redemption will cease and the undersigned Tax Collector, pursuant to said agreement, will sell said property to the City of Eureka. If the property is sold, parties of interest as defined in California Revenue and Taxation Code section 4675, have a right to file a claim with the county for any excess proceeds from the sale. Excess proceeds are the amount of the highest bid in excess of the liens and costs of the sale that are required to be paid from the sale proceeds. Notice will be given to parties of interest, pursuant to California Revenue and Taxation Code section 3692(e), if excess proceeds result from the sale. For information as to the amount necessary to redeem or other related issues pertaining to the property described in this notice, contact John Bartholomew, Tax Collector of Humboldt, County in the State of California. PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Parcel Number (APN), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map (if applicable), and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the assessor’s office. The properties that are the subject of this notice are situated in Humboldt County, California, and are described as follows: ITEM NO 1

ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NUMBER 007-112-001-000

LAST ASSESSEE Kirkpatrick, Edward L

I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector State of California Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on April 9, 2021 Published in North Coast Journal on April 15th, 22nd and 29th, 2021.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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MRS. FIRE Spanish sherry? 64. “Yours truly” alternative 65. Co. division 66. Sitcom costar of Rue, Betty and Estelle 67. James and Owens 68. Brand with “Scooping since 1928” on its cartons 69. Emma Watson’s role in 2019’s “Little Women”

10. “The Grand Budapest Hotel” director Anderson 11. Present from birth 12. Brunch order 13. Anago, at a sushi restaurant 18. Female hip-hopper 21. Riyadh resident 23. Combat vet’s affliction 24. Words said with a sigh 25. Shepherd’s pie morsels 27. “Oy, vey!” cause DOWN 28. Places to be 1. Skin pic marooned 2. 2020 Zoom event: 29. Cardinals, on Abbr. scoreboards 3. Writer Tolstoy 31. Pre-Columbian 4. Film ____ Mexicans 5. “And therefore ...” 32. Part of a bedroom 6. Canny set 7. Zipper part 8. Chemist’s workplace 35. Military branches: Abbr. 9. Lacto-____ 38. Banana ____ vegetarian

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39. Butter alternative 40. Bank claim 41. Some stay-at-home parents 42. Word after press or mess 44. Make ____ (clench) 45. High-ranking noncom: Abbr. 46. Gibson of “2 Fast 2 Furious” 47. Colorful quartz varieties 48. Didn’t just criticize 50. Quid pro quo 54. Duplicate 55. Otolaryngologists, briefly 57. Lines for RNs 58. Capital of Canada? 59. Workplaces for RNs 61. Company with the most U.S. patents per year since 1993 62. “Precious” director Daniels 63. Streaming delay

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headquarters were ACROSS built from its own 1. Up to product 4. Tidy 34. Start to unify? 8. They keep people 35. “Never ____ out of Mensa moment!” 14. One way to go 36. ____ Moines 15. Thereabouts 16. One of 17 in Monopoly 37. Funniest Robin Williams movie, 17. Financial crisis without a doubt? mantra that was, 39. Bygone without fail, the 42. Stays fresh most memorable 43. Lago di Como locale from 2008? 45. Showing no 19. ____ and emotion Herzegovina 48. Source of updated 20. Fills, as cracks news and blog between tiles postings 22. Pro 23. Big ____, nickname 49. Edvard Grieg work that is without for slugger David peer? Ortiz 51. Na+ and Cl26. Most notable Shakespeare quote, 52. Handle in court without question? 53. Tiny amounts 56. Arizona neighbor 30. First film in CinemaScope, 1953 60. And without further ado ... a 33. Company whose

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Free Will Astrology Week of April 15, 2021 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: Tell me about your most interesting problem—the one that teaches you the most. FreeWillAstrology.com

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Today I feel the whole world is a door,” wrote poet Dennis Silk. In a similar spirit, 13th-century Zen master Wumen Huikai observed, “The whole world is a door of liberation, but people are unwilling to enter it.” Now I’m here to tell you, Aries, that there will be times in the coming weeks when the whole world will feel like a door to you. And if you open it, you’ll be led to potential opportunities for interesting changes that offer you liberation. This is a rare blessing. Please be sufficiently loose and alert and brave to take advantage. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein was called a genius by Nobel Prize-winning author Bertrand Russell. His Philosophical Investigations was once voted the 20th century’s most important philosophy book. Yet one of Wittgenstein’s famous quotes was “How hard it is to see what is right in front of my eyes!” Luckily for all of us, I suspect that won’t be problem for you in the coming weeks, Taurus. In fact, I’m guessing you will see a whole range of things that were previously hidden, even though some of them had been right in front of your eyes. Congrats! Everyone whose life you touch will benefit because of this breakthrough. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Why don’t rivers flow straight? Well, sometimes they do, but only for a relatively short stretch. According to the US Geological Survey, no river moves in a linear trajectory for a distance of more than ten times its width. There are numerous reasons why this is so, including the friction caused by banks and the fact that river water streams faster at the center. The place where a river changes direction is called a “meander.” I’d like to borrow this phenomenon to serve as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks. I suspect your regular flow is due for a course change—a meander. Any intuitive ideas about which way to go? In which direction will the scenery be best? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian poet Denis Johnson eventually became a celebrated writer who won numerous prizes, including the prestigious National Book Award. But life was rough when he was in his twenties. Because of his addictions to drugs and alcohol, he neglected his writing. Later, in one of his mature poems, he expressed appreciation to people who supported him earlier on. “You saw me when I was invisible,” he wrote, “you spoke to me when I was deaf, you thanked me when I was a secret.” Are there helpers like that in your own story? Now would be a perfect time to honor them and repay the favors. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What do you believe in, exactly, Leo? The coming weeks will be a fine time to take an inventory of your beliefs—and then divest yourself of any that no longer serve you, no longer excite you, and no longer fit your changing understanding of how life works. For extra credit, I invite you to dream up some fun new beliefs that lighten your heart and stimulate your playfulness. For example, you could borrow poet Charles Wright’s approach: “I believe what the thunder and lightning have to say.” Or you could try my idea: “I believe in wonders and marvels that inspire me to fulfill my most interesting dreams.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo poet Charles Wright testifies, “I write poems to untie myself, to do penance and disappear through the upper right-hand corner of things, to say grace.” What about you, Virgo? What do you do in order to untie yourself and do penance and invoke grace? The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to use all the tricks at your disposal to accomplish such useful transformations. And if you currently have a low supply of the necessary tricks, make it your healthy obsession to get more. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Kublai Khan, ruler of the Mongol Empire and China in the second half of the 13th century, kept a retinue of 5,000 astrologers on retainer. Some were stationed

on the roof of his palace, tasked with using sorcery to banish approaching storm clouds. If you asked me to perform a similar assignment, I would not do so. We need storms! They bring refreshing rain, and keep the earth in electrical balance. Lightning from storms creates ozone, a vital part of our atmosphere, and it converts nitrogen in the air into nitrogen in the ground, making the soil more fertile. Metaphorical storms often generate a host of necessary and welcome transformations, as well—as I suspect they will for you during the coming weeks. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Unexpressed emotions will never die,” declared trailblazing psychologist Sigmund Freud. “They are buried alive and they will come forth, later, in uglier ways.” I agree, which is why I advise you not to bury your emotions—especially now, when they urgently need to be aired. OK? Please don’t allow a scenario in which they will emerge later in ugly ways. Instead, find the courage to express them soon—in the most loving ways possible, hopefully, and with respect for people who may not be entirely receptive to them. Communicate with compassionate clarity. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian author Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz wrote a poem entitled “Not Doing Something Wrong Isn’t the Same as Doing Something Right.” I propose that we make that thought one of your guiding themes during the next two weeks. If you choose to accept the assignment, you will make a list of three possible actions that fit the description “not doing something wrong,” and three actions that consist of “doing something right.” Then you will avoid doing the three wrong things named in the first list and give your generous energy to carrying out the three right things in the second list. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the past few weeks, I hope you’ve been treating yourself like a royal child. I hope you’ve been showering yourself with extra special nurturing and therapeutic treatments. I hope you’ve been telling yourself out loud how soulful and intelligent and resilient you are, and I hope you’ve delighted yourself by engaging with a series of educational inspirations. If for some inexplicable reason you have not been attending to these important matters with luxurious intensity, please make up for lost time in the coming days. Your success during the rest of 2021 depends on your devout devotion to self-care right now. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Sometimes when a disheartening kind of darkness encroaches, we’re right to be afraid. In fact, it’s often wise to be afraid, because doing so may motivate us to ward off or transmute the darkness. But on other occasions, the disheartening darkness that seems to be encroaching isn’t real, or else is actually less threatening than we imagine. Novelist John Steinbeck described the latter when he wrote, “I know beyond all doubt that the dark things crowding in on me either did not exist or were not dangerous to me, and still I was afraid.” My suspicion is that this is the nature of the darkness you’re currently worried about. Can you therefore find a way to banish or at least diminish your fear? PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Some people, if they didn’t make it hard for themselves, might fall asleep,” wrote novelist Saul Bellow. In other words, some of us act as if it’s entertaining, even exciting, to attract difficulties and cause problems for ourselves. If that describes you even a tiny bit, Pisces, I urge you to tone down that bad habit in the coming weeks—maybe even see if you can at least partially eliminate it. The cosmic rhythms will be on your side whenever you take measures to drown out the little voices in your head that try to undermine and sabotage you. At least for now, say “NO!” to making it hard for yourself. Say “YES!” to making it graceful for yourself. l

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  default

Compensation: Starting pay based on experience. Position is full time. 100% employer paid health insurance, dental and vision, life insurance, paid holidays, gym membership, and 8 hours paid time off earned each month. Send resume: elizabeth@nylex.net Questions: 707-443-4944

46

ACCOUNTING/FISCAL SPECIALIST, Arcata

Assist w/ fiscal & general ledger analysis; assist w/ prep for annual audits & federal/state monitoring. Assist w/payroll & accounts payable. Req. 3 yrs. business related exp. Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or Finance/ Accounting preferred, but not req. F/T, starting 32 hrs./wk. $19.52-$20.50/hr. Open Until Filled

TEMPORARY CENTER DIRECTOR, McKinleyville

Responsibilities include overall management of an Early Head start prog. AA/BA in Child Development or related field prefer. Must have 1 course in Infant Toddler coursework. Temp F/T 40 hrs./wk. M-Fri. $17.53-$19.33/hr. Open Until Filled

TEACHERS, Eureka/Fortuna default



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Northcoast Children’s Services

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities—supporting & supervising a toddler program. Must have 12 core in ECE/ CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on the Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. P/T positions, 28 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78-$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEAM TEACHER, Arcata

Responsible for developing & implementing classroom activities for toddlers. Must have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher level on Child Development Permit Matrix, & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. F/T 37.5 hrs./wk. M-F. $15.08-$15.83/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEMPORARY TEACHER, McKinleyville

Responsible for the development & implementation of classroom activities—providing support & supervision for a toddler program. Have 12 core in ECE/CD (w/ 3 units in Infant/ Toddler Development or Curriculum), meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have one-yr. exp. teaching in a toddler setting. Temp. F/T 36 hrs./wk. M-F $14.78$15.52/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, Arcata/ McKinleyville/Trinidad

Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min. of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months’ exp. working w/ children. P/T positions available, 25 hrs./wk. M-Fri $14.00-$14.62/hr. Open Until Filled. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org


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Redwood Coast Regional Center

YUROK TRIBE

Be a part of a great team!

For a list of current job openings and descriptions log onto www.yuroktribe.org or Join us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ yuroktribehumanresources for more information call (707) 482-1350 extension 1376

SOCIAL WORKER (Service Coordinator) FT in Eureka, CA. Advocating & coord. services for Adults w/dev & intellectual disabilities. Requires BA w/exp in human services or related field. Sal range starts $3665/mo. Exc. bene. Visit www.redwoodcoastrc.org for more info & required docs.

CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 205 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more. default

THE CITY OF

COMMUNITY SERVICES



OUR MISSION

Changing Tides Family Services increases the health and success of children, youth, families, and individuals

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APPLY TODAY!

$

Clinician/Bilingual Clinician

Wage dependent on qualifications $ 23.24-$29.45/hr (full-time)

Child Care Specialist 15.71/hour (full-time)

$

Mental Health Support Specialist 18.30/hr (part-time)

$

We are operating under strict COVID-19 safety protocols including daily health screenings, required masks, and increased hand washing and cleaning practices per the Reopening Plan certified by Humboldt County. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 444-8293 www.changingtidesfs.org Hablamos español @changingtidesfamilyservices

The North Coast Journal is seeking

Distribution Drivers

NOW HIRING WE HAVE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN OUR MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT MILLWRIGHTS ELECTRICIANS OILERS FABRICATORS

This Regular Part-Time (RPT) position will be acting as Pre-School Aide at the City of Eureka’s Little Saplings Pre-School at the John Ryan Youth Center. The ideal candidate will have Early Childhood Education credits and experience working with pre-school aged children in a group setting. Apply online at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. EOE We will be accepting applications until 5 p.m. on Friday, April 23rd, 2021.

Humboldt Sawmill Company continues to expand our Scotia, CA Operations!

Under the administrative direction of the Board of Directors, the Director is responsible for the efficient and effective implementation of Board goals and policies; maintaining an effective relationship with and is responsive to the Board, serves as the administrative manager for the Ferndale Children’s Center. S/he is responsible for recruiting, leading, supervising and evaluating staff and programs; serves as liaison between teachers and staff and the Board of Directors and manages the day-to-day operations of the Center.

We are an essential business and offer secure employment, family-level wages, company paid medical, dental, and vision benefits, 401K plus much more. We have Immediate job placement available for the right people! Call 707-620-2940 or visit www.getredwood.com/Careers to apply now! Equal Opportunity Employer, Valuing Diversity of our Workforce and Offering a Drug Free Workplace

Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

Contact Michelle 707.442.1400 ext. 305 michelle@northcoastjournal.com

(Regular Part-Time) $14.00 – $17.01/hr

Are you patient, creative and committed to helping young children learn? Are you looking for an opportunity to gain more experience in an Early Childhood Education setting?

Intensive Care Coordinator 18.86/hr (full-time)

RECREATION LEADER/ PRE-SCHOOL AIDE

Ferndale Children’s Center

DIRECTOR

$20.00-$25.00 DOE. Full Time.

Benefit package available including medical, dental and vision as well as optional 401K. Must be 18 and have valid CDL. To request a complete job description and submit an application, please email fccboard01@gmail.com. Applications deadline is

4pm on Friday, April 30, 2021. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

47


EMPLOYMENT

Continued on next page »

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

City of Arcata

Dispatcher Testing

Mill Laborer NOW HIRING! CURRENT OPENINGS:

DAY CLEANER WINDOW WASHER NIGHT JANITOR Email resume to restif@restif.com or visit restif.com/employment for more information default

HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: $14.00/hr. Operates a chainsaw to buck logs to specific length, operates a chop saw, operates a pressure washer, pulls boards off sawmill and stacks lumber, and operates a forklift. DEADLINE: April 15, 2021

Shovel Loader Operator HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: DOE. Operates a shovel loader, performs daily maintenance, loads a logging trucks to meet production standards, decks logs in a safe manner, and observes all safety precautions for self and co-workers. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

CITY OF FORTUNA

RECREATION PROGRAM LEADER PART-TIME $14.00 - $16.37 PER HOUR, PART TIME. Under the general supervision of a Recreation Program Supervisor, to plan, direct, and conduct an assigned recreation program for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; to perform a variety of assignments for the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; and to do related work as required. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600.

Hook Tender HFI Department, Regular, Seasonal, F/T, Salary: DOE. Observes all safety precautions for self and co-workers; layout roads for yarder logging; rigging tail hold trees; cut guy stumps; and lay guidelines in a safe manner. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

Fisheries Management Division Lead Fisheries Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $65,535.00118,316.00 DOE. Leads the division; oversees subordinate staff of biologists and technicians; studies basic principles of animal life such as origin, relationship, development, anatomy, and functions; collaborates with department staff and other agencies (Tribal, federal, and state agencies); and manages 2-3 subordinate supervisors who supervise 6-10 employees. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

Police Officer

Application Deadline: Open until filled

NYLEX.net, Inc. is accepting applications for the full time position of

Network Support Technician Experience preferred, but excellent opportunity for new graduates/motivated individuals. Prefer applicants be familiar with: • current Microsoft desktop and server operating systems • setting up and configuring server hardware • firewalls and VPN protocols • backup and recovery software and methodologies • virtualization technologies such as VMWare or Hyper-V • Network diagnosis testing tools and commands • TCP/IP networking, routing, switching, wireless • Must be able to lift/move 40lbs, hold valid driver’s license, and available for occasional after hours/ weekend projects. Compensation: Starting pay based on experience, 100% employer paid health, dental and vision, life, paid holidays, gym membership, and 8 hours paid time off earned each month. Send resume: elizabeth@nylex.net Questions: 707-443-4944

48

Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $26.91/ hr. Performs a wide variety of peace officer duties; see position description for details. OPEN UNTIL FILLED

Sergeant Hoopa Tribal Police Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: $34.13/ hr. Under general supervision of the Chief of Police, shall perform a wide variety of peace officer duties, additional requirements are listed in the job description. OPEN UNTIL FILLED These positions are classified safety-sensitive. For complete job descriptions, minimum qualifications and employment applications, contact the Human Resources/ Insurance Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200, or email hr1@ hoopainsurance.com or hr2@hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance apply.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

Hiring? Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Free of Charge California Peace Officer Standards & Training (P.O.S.T.)

Testing in Arcata, 9 am Friday, May 15th, 2021 Please submit a completed test reservation form obtained from City of Arcata jobs page and email it to: personnel@cityofarcata.org with Test Reservation in the subject line. This test helps determine if you have the basic natural ability to become a Police Dispatcher, no studying is needed. Individuals from a broad spectrum of employment backgrounds often learn they have what it takes to be of great service to their community. This test may also qualify you for a career in Police Dispatching at many other California P.O.S.T. Agencies, please inquire with each agency following a passing score. Testing is compliant with Covid-19 safety protocols therefore space is limited. For further information or to drop off or obtain a hard copy of the form, please call Arcata City Manager’s Office 707-822-5953. default

Bridgeville Community Center

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Permanent 30 hours per week with sick and vacation benefits. Salary negotiable. Bachelor’s degree in social work or related field preferred. Two years minimum relevant non-profit work experience required; may be considered in lieu of education.

General Responsibilities: • Interaction and communication with the Board of Directors in order to fulfill BCC mission and strategy. • Ongoing development, administration and communication for funding resources such as grants, fundraising programs, government funding. • Effective and organized administration of operations, including staff and volunteers. • Financial management, including budgets and reporting. Must have working knowledge of QuickBooks for Nonprofits. • Excellent written and verbal communication skills, computer skills. • Establish and maintain rapport with diverse community clientele and complementary organizations. Contact BCC at (707) 777-1775 for a complete job description and application. Position available immediately.


6,995

$

6,995

$

2009 Ford Taurus SE

2010 Ford Fusion SE

2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser 93,423 miles #180742

9,995

$

2012 Hyundai Elantra GLS 84,501 miles #349435

14,595

$

2019 Hyundai Accent SE

95,033 miles #113526

10,995

17,995

2019 Toyota Corolla

18,995

2018 Hyundai IONIQ All Electric 31,951 miles #027390

20,995

$

2018 Hyundai Kona SEL 19,368 miles #153948

21,995

$

2016 Mazda CX-5 Grand Touring 26,732 miles #866233

25,995

$

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia 31,670 miles #534628

10,995

$

2016 Nissan Versa Note

2016 Hyundai Elantra SE

43,294 miles #369623

15,995

$

2019 Kia Soul

37,719 miles #006663

17,995

$

2019 Ford Ecosport

29,441 miles #936885

$

98,456 miles #291633

$

59,977 miles #059724

$

7,595

$

21,965 miles #271363

18,995

$

2019 Nissan Sentra S

80,360 miles #696342

15,995

$

2019 Kia Forte FE IVT 16,575 miles #099423

18,995

$

2017 Volkswagen Passat SE 23,545 miles #065821

19,995

$

2017 Mini Cooper S

9,698 miles #235379

20,995

$

2016 MercedesBenz CLA 250 63,951 miles #333774

24,595

$

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe SE 30,209 miles #113656

26,595

$

2017 Buick Envision Premium 8,328 miles #104076

41,333 miles #A44588

21,595

$

2019 Toyota Prius L Eco 31,229 miles #074716

24,995

$

2019 Honda Clarity Plug-In Hybrid 4,246 miles #007219

28,995

$

2014 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT 122,155 miles #312201

Sale price does not include tax, license or $80 document fee. Subject to prior sale. Loans subject to credit lenders approval. Ad expires 04/30/21 northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

49


MARKETPLACE Miscellaneous 4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 888−519−0171 (AAN CAN) BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beau− tiful new walk−in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in−home consul− tation: 877−752−6295 (AAN CAN) BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work interna− tionally. We do the work... You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844−511 −1836. (AAN CAN) CABLE PRICE INCREASE AGAIN? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877 −693−0625 (AAN CAN) DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1−855−380−250 HERNIA REPAIR? DID YOU RECEIVE A HERNIA MESH PATCH between 2009− present? Did you suffer complications from removal surgery, bowel perfora− tion, infection, abdominal wall tears, puncture of abdominal organs or intestinal fistulae after placement of this device? You may be entitled to compensa− tion. Attorney Charles Johnson 1 −800−535−5727 HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET − Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1−844− 416−7147 (AAN CAN) LONG DISTANCE MOVING: White−Glove Service from America’s Top Movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. FREE QUOTES! Call: 888−841−0629 (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE NEVER PAY FOR COVERED HOME REPAIRS AGAIN! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1−877−673−0511 | Hours Mon−Thu, Sun: 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN)

PURSE & BELT SALE Dream Quest Thrift Store, where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams. APRIL 15−21 Plus: Senior Discount Tues− days & Spin’n’Win Wednes− days! (530) 629−3006.

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Lodging

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

YOUR AD

HERE

442-1400 ×319

melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

YOUR AD

HERE

classified@north coastjournal.com

Cleaning

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

MARKETPLACE

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What’s New

Computer & Internet

CLOSING SALE EVERYTHING

50% OFF

MAC & PC REPAIRS + MORE

EVERYTHING MUST GO!

Let us be a one−stop−shop for all of your technology needs. We offer high quality repairs and fast turnaround times.

EXCEPT FURS & JEWELRY

335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079 Open Wed, Thu. & Fri.

STILL PAYING TOO MUCH FOR YOUR MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order − prescription required. Call 1−855−750−1612 (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN)

PARKINSON DISEASE? Did you or a loved one work as an agri− cultural worker or a landscaper. If you developed Parkinson’s Disease you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1−800−535−5727

DO YOU OWE OVER $10,000 TO THE IRS OR STATE IN BACK TAXES? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855−955−0702. (Hours: Mon −Fri 7am−5pm PST) (AAN CAN)

50

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s, too! Fast Free Pickup − Running or Not − 24 Hour Response − Maximum Tax Dona− tion − Call 877−266−0681 (AAN CAN)

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Musicians & Instructors

Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

 

(707) 308−1660 service@humboldttech.net https://humboldttech.net

  

  

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • northcoastjournal.com

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           



BODY, MIND & SPIRIT



BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues, Private Parties, Bars. Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419

 

Let’s Be Friends

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111


Charlie Tripodi Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE# 01930997

707.834.7979

BRE# 01332697

707.476.0435

TING!

NEW LIS

BACK ON

KET

THE MAR

Bernie Garrigan

Dacota Huzzen

Mike Willcutt

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE# 01066670

BRE# 01927104

BRE# 02109531

BRE# 02084041

BRE# 01956733

BRE# 02070276

707.498.6364

707.798.9301

707.499.0917

916.798.2107

707.601.1331

707.601.6702

590 FOREST VIEW DRIVE, WILLOW CREEK - $289,000

MIRANDA – HOME ON ACREAGE - $499,000

Open concept 2/1 home with, large kitchen, laundry room, and deck. Sloping property boasts spectacular mountain views, gardening space, and detached 2 car garage featuring a 284 square foot bonus bathroom and bedroom.

±13 Acre woodland escape conveniently located just minutes from the beautiful Eel River, this wooded parcel features a 3/1 home, 8k sq. ft. shop, hobby shack, PG&E, 2 wells, end of the road privacy, and walking paths throughout

DINSMORE - CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $699,000

FIELDS LANDING – LAND/PROPERTY – $127,500

±40 Acres. Turn key operation permitted for 2021 and ready to go. Residence, processing shed, 3 greenhouses, tank storage, and rain catchment reservoir. Interim and provisional permits for 8,250 sq ft of outdoor. Approx. 4,000 ft elevation. OMC.

Undeveloped ±3.8 acre parcel with excellent sunset and bay views! Property is wooded, sloping, and has community water and sewer at parcel’s edge. Don’t miss your opportunity to build your dream home in this desirable neighborhood!

476 SUNSET LANE, WILLOW CREEK – $160,000

HAWKINS BAR – LAND/PROPERTY - $129,000

Charming 2+ bed/2 bath manufactured home in the Bigfoot Subdivision in Willow Creek! Features a mud/laundry room area, large step-in pantry, and beautiful views!

±1.45 Acres along the Trinity River featuring river views, a flat building site, PG&E lines through the property, community water hookups, and a community river access point.

LARABEE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $699,000

ARCATA – COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT – $499,000

±19.18 Acre river retreat in beautiful So Hum! Features a 2/2 home, shop, PG&E, open meadows, mature orchard, Eel River frontage with boat and fishing access, and end of the road privacy!

Commercial building on a high visibility corner just blocks from the Arcata Plaza! Two buildings, 10 dedicated parking spaces, and tenants are in place.

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $299,000

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $42,500

±40 Acre mountain hideaway just off hwy 36 featuring southern exposure, end of the road privacy, creek, springs, building site, and cabin & outbuilding in need of some TLC.

Katherine Fergus

Ashlee Cook

±0.247 Acre lot available in Big Foot Subdivision in sunny Willow Creek! Has community water and power at the property line.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, April 15, 2021 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

51


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