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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday Jan. 10, 2019 Vol XXX Issue 2 northcoastjournal.com

LROUMvPES T HATE

‘OVERWHELMINGLY

WHITE’

Amid diversity concerns, the Eureka Women’s March comes to a crossroads By Thadeus Greenson

AL Ll IVES

MATtEr

FRELEAeNiA M

6 North Coast shutdown 18 The muraled murrelet

35 Snail boat

IF hilLARY

HAD WON wE’

ALL BE AT D

BruNcH

RiGHT NOW


2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 4 5 6 8 9 10

Broken

News

Hundreds of Federal Employees Shut Down in Humboldt

Guest Views

The Aches and Pains of Getting Older

Week in Weed

New House, Same Story

NCJ Daily

Wheeler Steps Down, MCSD Seeks New Board Member Lawson Case: DA Awaiting Additional DNA Information from DOJ

11

On The Cover

12

Humboldt Made

16

Table Talk

‘Overwhelmingly White’ Special Advertising Section Hum Plate Roundup

18

Home & Garden

18

Art Beat

19

Arts! Arcata

20 25 26 30

Serious Felonies Cultivation/Drug Possession DUI/DMV Hearings Cannabis Business Compliance Domestic Violence Juvenile Delinquency Pre-Arrest Counseling

Mailbox Poem

Service Directory

Art for the Commute Jan. 11, 6-9 p.m.

Music & More!

Live Entertainment Grid

The Setlist

Gemini Nights

Calendar Filmland

Burning Secrets

31 35

Workshops & Classes Washed Up

35 36 36 37

Sudoku & Crossword Free Will Astrology Cartoons Classifieds

The Violet Snail Conspiracy

Jan. 10, 2019 • Volume XXX Issue 2 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2019 Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Special Publications Editor Cassie Curatolo cassie@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Creative Services Manager Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Linus Lorenzen linus@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Social Media Coordinator Zach Lathouris zach@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com

Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

A handful of Janthina with their bubble rafts. Read more on page 35. Photo by Mike Kelly

On the Cover Illustration by Jacqui Langeland and Jonathan Webster

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

FREE CONSULTATION For Defense Work Only

732 5th Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 info@humboldtjustice.com www.humboldtjustice.com N

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Kathleen Bryson Attorney

Former Humboldt County Deputy District Attorney Member of National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) Member of California DUI Lawyers Association

KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION & OPEN ENROLLMENT Now through Jan. 25th Registration packets and applications for Open Enrollment are available from all school sites and the District Office, 8 am to 4 pm, now through January 25th or from www.eurekacityschools.org. Small classes in TK-3 All-day Kindergarten Transitional Kindergarten ‘only’ classes

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (T-K through 5th grades) Alice Birney Grant • Lafayette Washington

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Priority placement at your school of choice is not on a “first come, first served” basis. During this open enrollment period, all applications for transfer will be considered equally.

District Office 2100 J Street, Eureka | 441-3383 www.eurekacityschools.org northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

3


Mailbox

Terry Torgerson

Nothing New Editor: I read with interest the Dec. 13 article “The Housing Games.” In the mid-1970s, I coordinated a student survey on Humboldt State University campus for the Humboldt Tenants Union, under the umbrella of HSU student governments. Survey results back then identified pretty much the same issues covered in your recent article. Sherry Skillwoman, Arcata

Priority One

@ncj_of_humboldt

We PrintObituaries Submit information via email to classified@northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person. Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date. 310 F STREET, EUREKA (707) 442-1400 FAX (707) 442-1401

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Editor: During this past election, voters were asked what was important to them. Health care, education, living wage jobs, immigration reform, bringing manufacturing jobs back to America, nuclear weapons proliferation, affordable housing, fair trade and homelessness topped our lists (“Top 10,” Dec. 27). One that wasn’t as prevalent but that makes the others pale in comparison is climate change — possibly because we either don’t want to believe that it exists or because we personally feel helpless to do much about it. But we can, we must. Climate change can and will destroy much of human civilization as we know it. The answer is to reduce carbon emissions by reducing and eventually eliminating our reliance on fossil fuels. Solar and wind power are our salvation, along with responsible hydroelectric and nuclear power. Our top priorities must be to convince our government

to force these changes. Big power companies know the truth and that change is inevitable but they will not change quickly — their investments are too great, so they will drag their feet. To paraphrase JFK, we must not only ask our government to act but we must ask ourselves — you and me — what we can do. We can do much in small ways: eliminating single use plastic containers including straws (these are petroleum products), driving less and with fuel efficient cars and gradually converting to electric vehicles, buying food products from local farmers, cutting back on red meats from animals that produce methane and that consume food that we can eat, conserving forest lands that efficiently absorb carbon dioxide, and — you finish the list. What can we do to keep carbon emissions growth to a less than a 1.5 centigrade increase in the near — very near future? I am nearing age 82 and will avoid the apocalypse. Will you? Will your children and grandchildren? Edward Webb, McKinleyville

‘Pity’ Editor: I am always stirred to pity for the human race when I read an article like “A Special Place” (Dec. 20). How desperately we little people have to struggle to save the last fragments of our once rich, elaborate, creative, imaginative forests! What huge sums we have to scrape together to pay these giant money-raking corporations not to annihilate our water-purifying,


Broken is the black body Broken its name Broken its fine bones, its dark flesh Broken the soul into which we peer (blood pooling, unmoving over whom some badged bully looms) Broken the spirit incarcerated emasculated forgotten Broken the family without this ______: (blank) ever absent: Broken the neighborhood, the barred and shattered windows the gangs, the bullet always keening and hungry Broken the word we employ to tell this story. Mere graffiti. Broken the language that cannot help us understand Broken the eye that watches Broken the eye that spins us what to watch Broken the leaders who say what the eye should show, what the eye should see, what all that must mean Broken the machine that says face it this is the only system everyone must obey Broken the words by which we intone this sorry story. Broken in turn are we who place the wafer of hatred onto our children’s tongues. Broken the children who choke down this lie, knowing no better than what we insist must be so. — David Holper

soil-generating, climate-cooling, species-hosting, carbon sequestering, mystery-harboring friends who are thousands of times more ancient than we are as a community of beings! We’re not getting pepper spray poured into our eyes any more, as once happened in our congressman’s office, or lowered hundreds of feet upside down wrapped in duct tape. And MAXXAM isn’t selling us back 1 percent of its land for the price it paid for the whole thing. All the same, we are paying through our noses to these accidental landlords for forests, much of which they’ll continue to log. Part of the reason we on the North Coast are in a climate refuge is because of our forests. “You can replace forests with plantations. You can also arrange Beethoven’s Ninth for a kazoo,” as Richard Powers put it. The land trusts are polite and dignified about it, as described in your article. They “highlight” the generosity of the sellers. But what we buyers are really like is the medieval French peasants who ran up the mountains and hugged the trees when the king’s soldiers came to cut them down for his wars because they knew their water, farms and livelihoods would be destroyed. As David Brower said, “We did not inherit the Earth from our fathers, we are stealing it from our children.” Therefore let us bravely greet the New Year and salute in sorrow all we have lost in the old. Ellen Taylor, Petrolia

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lunch special 12PM-2PM and Happy hour 4PM-6PM Come in for draft specials along with an $8 Cheese or $10 single topping pizza Wed 1/16 6-8pm

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‘Truly Mesmerizing’ Editor: David Wilson’s breathtaking photographs are a marvelous way to herald a new year (“North Coast Night Lights,” Jan. 3). The truly mesmerizing images capture the wonder that people throughout the ages have experienced when gazing skyward at night. In a place of natural beauty, the epic cascade of Milky Way stars stretching across the heavens is enhanced by the well-composed setting for each photograph. The counterpoint of firelight, a trestle, fences and headlights in some of the photos places us in the midst of this beautiful scenery adding to the connection we have with our surroundings. The glow of horizontal moonlight in another adds a touch of mystery to all we can see in the heavens. Thank you David for your artistic renderings of the heavens and to the Journal for such an inspirational first issue of the New Year. Stephen Avis, Ferndale

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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News

Enrollment Information Night Thursday, January 17th 6:00 - 7:30 PM T

Hundreds of Federal Employees Shut Down in Humboldt North Coast services brace for impact, should impasse continue into February By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

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n one of his first acts with the newly seated House of Representatives, North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman joined his Democrat colleagues in voting to pass two bills to end the federal government shutdown. The votes — one to fund the Department of Homeland Security into February as lawmakers seek out a compromise on President Trump’s demands of $5.7 billion to construct a wall along the nation’s southern border and the other to fund the balance of federal departments through the end of the year — were largely symbolic, of course, as Trump hasn’t budged on his demands and Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has refused to bring any funding bill to a vote that the president hasn’t promised to sign. The day following the votes, Huffman was back in his home district, picking up trash in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which is run by the National Park Service. Working with Rep. Jackie Speier, Huffman filled two 32-gallon trashcans with what he dubbed “Trump trash” and planned to deliver the trash to the White House on Jan. 8, shortly before Trump was slated to address the nation. The congressman has been withering in his criticism of the president and his demands for border wall funding. “I voted to end President Trump’s callous shutdown and reopen the government,” he said in a statement issued after the Jan. 4 votes. “President Trump and his Republican allies in the Senate are cheapening public service, when they should be showing our federal workers the dignity and respect they deserve by reopening the government and providing these workers with the pay they earned.” In addition to hundreds of federal employees in Humboldt County who are working without a paycheck, there are a host of programs that rely on federal funding. It seems most are operating on reserves but many indicate they are bracing for impact should the shutdown

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

continue into next month. Nationwide, there are approximately 800,000 federal employees affected by the shutdown, with some forced to work without pay while others have simply been directed to stay home. Humboldt County is home to about 1,500 federal workers, according to Cheston McGuire, spokesperson for the American Federation of Government Employees, spread across the Bureau of Land Management, the National Park Service, the National Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, the U.S. Coast Guard, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other agencies. McGuire said his union still doesn’t know how many of those locals are furloughed or working without pay. Journal attempts to ascertain the full impact of the shutdown on Humboldt County workers have similarly been unsuccessful. At some agencies there was simply no one available to pick up the phone and field media inquiries, while others sent reporters’ calls back to Washington D.C., where spokespeople issued generic statements and declined to offer specifics. What we do know is that the more than 200 local members of the U.S. Coast Guard feared they wouldn’t be paid as scheduled Dec. 28, having been warned to prepare for the worst and inquire about short-term loans and mortgage deferments, but were granted a last-minute reprieve when Coast Guard officials and the administration worked out a stop-gap measure that allowed the agency to make payroll. However, Vice Commandant Adm. Charles Ray warned in a department-wide email that there wouldn’t be money to issue checks for service members next pay day — Jan. 15 — should the shutdown continue. The median American household has $11,700 in savings, according to a survey from the personal finance site MagnifyMoney.com, which also found that the median savings for the bottom 40 percent of American households by income is

$0. A report last year from CareerBuilder. com, meanwhile, found that 78 percent of full-time workers across the nation report living paycheck to paycheck. But federal employees are only one side of the shutdown coin; there are also those who rely on federal services and federal funding. The New York Times reported this week that the administration has ordered the Internal Revenue Service to issue tax returns — something that had been in doubt — meaning that early filers will be due to receive their returns as scheduled but the employees cutting the checks will be working without pay. Then there are locally administered programs that rely on federal funds. Most notable among these are CalFresh, which provides food assistance to low-income households, the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program, which provides nutrition and health care referrals for low-income new mothers and their children, up to the age of 5, and CalWORKs, which provides temporary financial assistance and employment services to low-income families. All three operate on federal funds, though they are administered through the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services. According to DHHS spokesperson Christine Messinger, CalFresh served 20,082 local individuals in November, while CalWORKs provided assistance to 3,830 people that same month in Humboldt County. WIC, meanwhile, averages about 3,360 clients per month. Messinger told the Journal that CalFresh and WIC both have funding into February. If the shutdown persists beyond then, she said California could opt to continue providing its portion of benefits until it ends. She said she expects CalWORKs benefits to continue, noting that through previous shutdowns the state has used reserves to continue providing benefits. The Humboldt Senior Resource Center and Food for People, meanwhile, also rely


North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman with his “Trump trash.” Twitter

on federal funds to offer their programs. Both organizations have indicated they have yet to see any disruption in funding, though they are fearful that may change should the shutdown stretch on. As for what impact the shutdown is having on local tribes, some of which rely on federal funds to administer a variety of programs, from medical services to childcare, Journal attempts to get on-therecord information from local tribes were largely unsuccessful by deadline. During the 2013 shutdown, however, the Yurok Tribe temporarily shut down its childcare facility and furloughed its 60 employees for two weeks. But so far, the tribe remains operating at full capacity, according to Executive Director Javier Kinney. “The Yurok Tribe, the largest tribe in California, provides essential and direct services that will be impacted in the event of an extended federal government shutdown,” Kinney said in a statement. “Currently, the tribal government is running at full capacity. If a protracted shutdown occurs, we are prepared to implement a plan, prioritizing the health and welfare of the Yurok people, to continue operations at a reduced level.” Meanwhile, Blair Kreuzer, director of Two Feather Native American Family Services in McKinleyville, said services there have so far been unaffected but indicated that may change. Mike Sawyer of Potawot Health Village said the facility has been similarly untouched thus far. As to Huffman and his trash bags, it’s worth noting that while he spent time in the southern part of his district picking up refuse on National Park Service land, Redwood National and State Park — by

far Humboldt County’s most notable attraction — remains open. Additionally, California State Parks has extended trash removal and restroom cleaning services to the federally owned portions of the park. For his part, Huffman has adamantly referred to the shutdown as a “political stunt” by the president, who has insisted the border wall is a matter of national security and necessary to keep immigrants and drug smugglers from illegally crossing the border. “As the shutdown continues, President Trump is placing American families, federal employees, diplomats, Coast Guard service members, small businesses, Indian Country and national parks in jeopardy,” he said in a statement. “I urge Mitch McConnell and President Trump to put the interests of the American people over this ridiculous request for a border wall and allow Congress to get back to the business of governing.” While the impacts of the shutdown have so far been largely invisible in Humboldt County to those who don’t draw a federal paycheck, it seems that could change quickly should the impasse continue into February. “We encourage Democrats and Republicans to expeditiously end the federal government shutdown,” Kinney, of the Yurok Tribe, said in his statement. ● Freddy Brewster and Tony Wallin contributed to this report. Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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SORRY ABOUT YOUR ROAD… BUT LEON’S CAN REPAIR YOUR CAR! (707) 444-9636 é M-F 7:30-5:15 929 BROADWAY é EUREKA

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Guest Views

The Aches and Pains of Getting Older One Native’s perspective By André P. Cramblit views@northcoastjournal.com

A

ccording to the American Association of Retired People, there are 108.7 million folks in the United States over the age of 50. This includes 76.4 million Boomers (born 1946-1964), compared with 49 million Gen Xers and 82 million millennials. Moreover, the number of people 50-plus will continue to grow over the next decade to the tune of 19 million, versus a growth of only 6 million for the 18-to-49 population. I am in the tail end of the Baby Boomer generation having been born in 1963. At 55 years of age, I am eligible for a few discounts at a variety of shopping locations and am experiencing the cadre of issues that confront the growing demographic of aging Americans. My first clue that I was getting older came when I started hearing my favorite rock and roll songs done up as easy listening tunes and played in elevators and as background Muzak at places I shop. Then people started calling me sir. Now this happened to me at an earlier age than most since I have been going prematurely gray since my early teens. I stopped getting carded years ago. I don’t mind getting a bit older but hearing Pink Floyd at the mall was anathema to me. I had my only child, a son, when I was 32. With an average life expectancy of 78.9 years in the United States, I wasn’t quite a middle-age father but I was certainly older than a lot of my friends and others in my generation who had children right out of college while in their early 20s. I felt my age as my little crumb cruncher ran me through my paces as he grew up. My declining amount of time, due to work obligations, and vigor, due to my advancing years, was no match for his boundless energy. It didn’t help that I was breaking the scales at a whopping 365 pounds. So, I had a gastric bypass surgery that resulted in some complications, nearly a year-long recovery and, eventually, 180 pounds of lost weight. Now I am at an age in which I have to take proactive care of my health. (My colonoscopy story is an odyssey unto itself that I will not bore you with at this time.) My monthly trip to the pharmacist leaves me laden with a lengthy list of prescriptions that requires a pill caddy. I have a pedometer app for my phone to help remind me to keep my step count up to recommended levels (not that I make it that often). I have

also switched my diet to incorporate more organic fruits and vegetables and I try to cook with less fat and salt. As I age I have noticed my body has created a cacophony of clicks and pops in my bones from old injuries and arthritis. If you can believe it, I have found that it is even possible to sleep wrong, waking in pain from having my arm in an inappropriate position. Being a modern Native, I now crawl into bed with a heating pad rather than the heated rock wrapped in newspapers that my great Aunt Violet was fond of. Just as important as heat to bring blood to my spasming lower back, I have found that ice is now my friend to help reduce swelling. I have faced age discrimination, to be certain. Nearly four years ago, I decided it was time to explore new career challenges and I began looking for work with new organizations. Having been in my job for a number of years, I was used to a certain level of pay. It seemed like every interview I went to was looking for younger people who would be willing to do the same job for significantly less money. It took nearly a year and half to find an organization that appreciated my unique combination of skills and experience and was willing to compensate me accordingly. I enjoy the work I do now. My only regret is that, as I get older, I realize I may have been more of a grasshopper than an ant in the fable that gave merit to saving for lean times, or retirement, in this case. Like most Americans, I have lived outside my means and accrued a heady level of debt. This includes home and car loans, as well as credit cards. Now that I have a son in college, I realize retirement is but a distant, shimmering dream as equity in my house has gone to tuition and we are part of the middle class that gets little financial aid other than loans. Hindsight being 20/20 and all, I should have set up a tax deferred tuition fund for my son when he was born. My advice: Find extra income where you can, use your spare hours in a profitable way, play the lottery more and put as much as you can away for the time when you will need that retirement income. Just my two dentalias worth. ● André Cramblit is at ease with getting older though he shed a tear or two when the Arcata School of Massage closed down.


New House, Same Story

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Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

I

n one of its first acts, the newly seated House of Representatives introduced bipartisan legislation that would require the federal government to take a hands-off approach to cannabis and let states establish their own laws and programs. “The national consensus on medical marijuana is solid and bipartisan, but our federal drug laws continue to treat patients and their doctors like criminals,” one of the bill’s authors, Steve Cohen (D-Tennessee) said in a statement supporting the bill, which boasted 42 co-sponsors. Over in the Senate, a bipartisan coalition stands ready to introduce the bill, with senators Cory Booker (D-New Jersey), Cory Gardner (R-Colorado) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) all having pledged support. And President Trump indicated last summer that he “probably will end up” supporting the bill. So bully, right? Weed is all but legalized. Not so fast. Those pushing to see the end of the folly that is federal prohibition still have two huge hurdles. First and foremost, there’s the fact that the Senate is still under Republican control, meaning Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) is still in the driver’s seat as majority leader. Not only has McConnell flatly stated that he has “no plans to endorse the legalization of marijuana,” he also just trumpeted a big win with the legalization of industrial hemp — marijuana’s THC-less cousin — and CBD products in the passage of the federal Farm Bill. McConnell supported that effort in large part because industrial hemp is poised to become a huge cash crop in Kentucky, especially as the legal market for CBD products is projected to expand rapidly. Plainly, legalizing cannabis outright undercuts that. The one thing working in weed’s favor here is that Gardner is facing a tough re-election fight in 2020 in Colorado, where close to 70 percent of voters favor federal legalization. Republicans currently hold a three-seat majority in the Senate and, if it looks like that’s in danger, it’s possible McConnell would allow the bill to go to a Senate vote in an effort to keep Republicans’ majority. But that 2020 thing cuts both ways and there in lies the second hurdle. If the bill were to win the blessing of the Senate

and head to Trump’s desk, his signature would give a huge win to Booker, rumored to be mulling a 2020 presidential run, and Warren, who last week became the first prominent Democrat to announce she’ll take Trump on in 2020. Faced with signing a bill that ends decades of disastrous federal policy that has disproportionately hurt people of color or protecting his own self-interests, what do you think Trump would do?

l In somewhat related news, Lori Ajax, who heads California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control, told the New York Times last week that the solution to the Golden State’s staggering cannabis surplus, which has hamstrung legal markets and propped up black market actors, is federal legalization. “It would be wonderful if we could sell to other states,” she told the Times. Sure. Some think it would be wonderful to have their weed delivered via unicorn-operated drones, too. But at other points in the story, Ajax seems to have her feet more squarely on the ground, saying the bureau plans to launch a public education campaign promoting the benefits of buying cannabis from licensed retailers — hey, we’re on record, too, urging folks to buy legal or risk contributing to excruciating deaths of a variety of furry critters, some of which are endangered (see “The Choice is Yours,” Jan. 25, 2018). But it’s also clear California’s glut runs deeper than Californians’ purchasing preferences. A report published last year by the California Department of Food and Agriculture found that while Californians produce an estimated 15.5 million pounds of cannabis a year, they only consume about 2.5 million pounds, leaving 13 million pounds traveling across state lines. Ajax told the Times the state would have to “get more aggressive” and “step up” enforcement. Unfortunately, history has shown that strategy has a pretty dismal track record. l

Cannabis Permitting & Environmental Services Need help with the State, County, Water Board, or CDFW? Call Us Today! (707) 633-0420

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Week in Weed

Email us Here: press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: music@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: classified@northcoastjournal.com

Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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From NCJ Daily

Wheeler Steps Down, MCSD Seeks New Board Member

Lawson Case: DA Awaiting Additional DNA Information from DOJ

I

T

n 2011, George Wheeler, a McKinleyville resident and Vietnam veteran was horrified to see a neighbor spraying a potent herbicide on the hayfields near his home. As a victim of Agent Orange poisoning, Wheeler did not want his five children exposed to anything that might endanger their health. He quickly found other neighbors were just as concerned and a little research revealed that the property belonged to the McKinleyville Community Services District (MCSD), which leased it to a dairy farmer. The neighborhood organized and began attending the district board meetings, demanding that spraying of herbicides cease. Board members — as well as some members of the public —wondered how the hundreds of acres of open space that the district manages could be maintained without pesticides. Wheeler introduced the board to the concept of integrated pest management, which has been described as “an intermediary between organic and conventional methods.” It is often used by agencies or cities, such as Arcata, which must manage large areas of open space. Maintenance staff emphasize prevention, using materials and designs that discourage pests, using organic practices like mulching and encouraging grazing where appropriate. Weeds are hand-pulled, mowed or burned. Insect egg-masses are removed by hand. If that is not enough, biological controls can be used. But chemical pesticides may only be used as a last resort and those least harmful to human health and the environment must be tried first. Wheeler was elected to the district board of directors in 2013 and has served since then, winning re-election to another four-year term in November. During his term of office, integrated pest management was adopted as an official policy of the district. Wheeler is also passionate about solar

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energy. The district uses a large amount of energy to operate its sewage treatment and drinking water distribution pumps. Wheeler convinced the board to design a solar photovoltaic energy system for these purposes and, last year, won a $4.9 million grant from the state. The timing was perfect, since the district was also upgrading its sewage treatment plant to meet new upgraded environmental standards. However, Wheeler’s personal health has been failing. He has been struggling with Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma since 2001 but managed to maintain a normal life. He saw no reason to believe this would change when he filed his intention to run for another term on the board with the county elections office in June. But over the next few months, the cancer took a turn for the worse and, by December, it became obvious that he could no longer fulfill the duties of a board member. He submitted his letter of resignation Dec. 10 and the Humboldt County Elections Office was notified of the vacancy four days later. Although the board could hold a special election to fill Wheeler’s seat, it would be costly and they consequently decided to appoint a replacement who will serve until the next general election in 2020. Members of the public are invited to apply for the position. The board wants somebody who is a McKinleyville resident, understands the district’s mission and whose prior history of employment, education and community service shows that he or she would be suited for the position of a director. The ideal candidate would have some business and financial experience. Letters of interest can be written to the Board Secretary, McKinleyville Community Service District, PO Box 2037, McKinleyville, CA 95519. They must be received at the office by Jan. 30. — Elaine Weinreb POSTED: 01.04.19

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10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

he mother of slain Humboldt State University sophomore David Josiah Lawson took to Facebook Jan. 8 to express frustration that the Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office still hasn’t made a charging decision in her son’s case two months after the Arcata Police Department handed over its investigation. “The Department of justice [has] identified my son’s DNA on the knife that was used to stab him to death,” Charmaine Lawson posted on the Justice for David Josiah Lawson Facebook page. “They have also identified my [son’s] murderer on the knife, yet the case is still being reviewed. Where’s the justice?” District Attorney Maggie Fleming, meanwhile, indicated her office is still doing due diligence in determining the strength of the case in order to determine how to proceed. David Josiah Lawson, 19, was fatally stabbed during an altercation at an off-campus party April 15, 2017. A 23-yearold McKinleyville man, Kyle Zoellner, was arrested at the scene and charged with Lawson’s murder but a judge later found there was insufficient evidence to hold him on the charge and dismissed the case. The case was again turned over to the Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office Nov. 9 after former APD interim Chief Richard Ehle said forensic testing had found “unequivocal physical evidence” linking a specific suspect to Lawson’s killing. Ehle declined to publicly elaborate on either the evidence or the suspect at the time. District Attorney Maggie Fleming told the Journal on Dec. 2 that her review of the case was ongoing and would span another four to six weeks. Asked to respond to Charmaine Lawson’s Jan. 8 Facebook comments, Fleming indicated in an email to the Journal that the evidence may not be as clear as indicated.

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“The interpretation of the analysis of DNA on the knife is of course critical to the case,” Fleming wrote. “That is one of the issues we found incompletely resolved in the case file we received from the Arcata Police Department, therefore we requested additional information on the analysis from the California Department of Justice. We must know what experts will say under oath about the DNA analysis to make a just decision about the case. We are also seeking additional information on a second issue. Justice would not be served by a decision by our Office that does not take into account critical existing information.” Charmaine Lawson, who has filed a claim for damages against the city of Arcata alleging APD botched the initial investigation into her son’s death, has repeatedly pushed officials in the city, the district attorney’s office, HSU and the California State University system to bring her son’s killer to justice. “Today makes 2 months since Humboldt County DA Maggie Fleming has received my son DJ’s case from APD for review,” she wrote on Facebook. “January 15th will be 21 months since my Son was viciously murdered ... I will not stop fighting for you my son, I promise you we will get justice. #JusticeForDJ.” She then urged supporters to call the Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office and to ask Fleming, “if it was her daughter what would she do?” Fleming declined to offer a timeline for her office’s review moving forward. “I do not have a way to provide a timeline because justice would not be served by making a decision without all the information we need and I’m not in control of when we will receive it,” she wrote. A vigil for David Josiah Lawson is planned on Jan. 15 at Arcata City Hall. — Kym Kemp and Thadeus Greenson POSTED: 01.08.19

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On the Cover

‘OVERWHELMINGLY WHITE’ Amid diversity concerns, the Eureka Women’s March comes to a crossroads By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

F

rom the outside looking in, the announcement came like the explosive crack of a falling tree limb after its center gives way, under too much pressure to bear its weight. On Dec. 28, the eight to 10 people organizing this year’s Eureka Women’s March sent out a short press release announcing they would not be holding a rally on Jan. 19 in conjunction with hundreds of cities across the nation, where women and others will gather in a public show of resistance to the policies and rhetoric of President Donald Trump. “The local organizers are continuing to meet and discuss how to broaden representation in the organizing committee to create an event that represents and supports people who live here in Humboldt,” the release stated. “Up to this point, the participants have been overwhelmingly white, lacking representation from several

Demonstrators gather at the foot of C Street in Eureka to listen to speakers before the 2018 Women’s March. Mark McKenna perspectives in our community. Instead of pushing forward with crucial voices absent, the organizing team will take time for more outreach.” Within a couple of days, the group’s announcement had made national headlines, with media outlets from The Washington Post and Fox News to Newsweek and Breitbart picking up the news and zeroing in on the phrase “overwhelmingly white.” Some treated the story purely as novelty — the notion that a rural town with a population that’s 75 percent white would cancel its march because the majority of the people who turned out were white. Others tied it into national news and reports that marches had been canceled in Chicago, New Orleans and Washington amid allegations of anti-Semitism. And some conservative pundits treated the news with a mix of indignation and glee, using it both as an example of “reverse racism” — what would happen if a march

were canceled for being “overwhelmingly black,” they asked breathlessly — and that the left is turning on itself, consumed by politically correct infighting. A few days after its initial release, on Dec. 31, the Eureka organizing committee sent out another press release, trying to make clear its decision was about the makeup of the committee, not the demographics of the march itself. The organizing committee was entirely white, they said, and they feared that without incorporating the voices of people of color and varying gender identities, they wouldn’t be able to organize an event that spoke for all women, especially those most vulnerable. Instead, the organizers said, they were doubling down on their efforts to form a more diverse committee, with an eye on holding an event on March 9 in conjunction with International Women’s Day. The release included a statement from local NAACP chapter

President Sharrone Blanck applauding the committee’s decision. “They want to do it right,” Blanck said. “That means the organizers want to build relationships with the larger community of women so that the march actually reflects the diversity of experiences of women in Humboldt County. The organizers checked themselves. They want to do it right, not just have a march.” But, while some voiced support for the organizing committee’s decision and attempts at inclusion, it quickly became apparent a large swath of local community really wants to march Jan. 19. On Jan. 3, a former Eureka city councilmember, Linda Atkins, filed a permit application with the city to put the event on in conjunction with cities throughout the nation. “I heard that the march was canceled and I was really disappointed and I was Continued on next page »

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looking for someone to come in and start it again and nobody did. So I did,” Atkins said, adding that she really didn’t understand the organizers’ decision. “There was a problem with the organizing committee, they thought they should have had a more diverse group. But if they had been organizing for a while, why didn’t they just do that?” A few days before Atkins filed the permit application, several organizing committee members — Allison Edrington, Kelsey Reedy and Beth Wylie — appeared on KHSU Magazine to discuss their decision. Asked about people in the community who wanted to proceed with a Jan. 19 march, Wiley said she worried it had the potential to be a “divisive event.” “I applaud those who really want to march and I ask them to check themselves and ask what their purpose is in marching,” Wiley said, adding that she hoped such introspection would cause them to join her and her colleagues in planning the March 9 event. As the Journal went to press Jan. 8, Atkins and a small cohort of volunteers were busily planning for Jan. 19. While some enthusiastically supported the effort, others locally pledged to boycott the event.

The first Women’s March was held Jan. 21, 2017, the day after Trump’s inauguration, planned as a public showing of resistance to the election of a presidential candidate many in progressive circles felt is simply anti-women. In what was heralded as the largest single-day protest in U.S. history, people flooded the streets in communities throughout the nation denouncing Trump’s harsh campaign rhetoric — including disparaging comments about minorities and women — and to advocate policies of inclusion, reproductive rights and equity. The unmistakable symbol of the march quickly became the “pussy hat,” a nod to Trump’s infamous “grab-them-bythe-pussy” comments in a leaked Access Hollywood tape. The hats, knit of pink yarn, have floppy cat-like ears on the corners, an effort to reclaim the term — one echoed by many march signs that read “This Pussy Grabs Back.” In Eureka, the 2017 march was planned in less than three weeks. “By then, (Trump) had pretty much insulted people across all demographics — veterans, immigrants, people with disabilities, members of the media, people of all ethnicities,” Julie Fulkerson said. “It


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The 2017 march moves up F Street and turns down Third Street. Mark McKenna was an endless onslaught of vulgarities and insults. A group of us who had spent entire lives fighting for human rights jumped in to organize the first march.” Fulkerson said the effort was largely led by Terry Uyeki (who declined to comment for this story) but included task-specific teams of volunteers. “There were several subgroups who worked day and night to pull this off, everything from coordinating with police and fire and ambulance service, raising funds for equipment and toilets to making sure the speakers on the podium represented as many aspects of the community as possible,” Fulkerson said. “We worked hard to make sure that everyone felt welcome in the march.” The march drew as many as 8,000 people, by police estimates, becoming the largest march or rally in Eureka history — eclipsing those held in recent decades to protest foreign wars, timber companies and immigration laws. It was heralded as a success, and many expressed that they walked away feeling empowered and emboldened. After the march, Fulkerson said the original organizers went back to their lives, following other passions and causes,

content to hand the march off to a new group in the coming year. A new organizing committee ultimately stepped forward a couple of weeks before the 2018 march and put it together on the fly. While down from 2017, the turnout was strong again, with up to 5,000 people flooding the streets of Old Town to protest Trump, promote the #MeToo movement and advocate for women’s rights. But almost immediately some fissures surfaced.

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some in the community voiced concerns. The speakers list was less diverse than the first year. It included a cisgender man and left some voices absent entirely. Tina Sampay, a Humboldt State University graduate and member of the local NAACP, posted to the Women’s March Facebook page about a week after the event: “As a black woman in Humboldt County I did not feel included or represented at that march. #DoBetter #WomensMarchEureka.” In a follow-up comment, Sampay

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lamented that organizers had only asked the NAACP about scheduling a speaker a “day or two before the event.” Edrington quickly responded. “That is a completely valid criticism of this year’s march,” she wrote. “We can do better. … The organizing team was also distressed about this lack of representation of black women. Planning will start much sooner for next year’s march so I am hopeful that we can get commitments from speakers earlier and include more people in the planning process, both to respect people’s time and to ensure the facets of our community are represented.” Other issues quickly became apparent, too. Some said that the march — with its high turnout and visibility — was failing to bring energy to other local social justice efforts. “I held out hope that my sisters’ visibility and amplified voices on mic in front of hundreds of neighbors would mean more folks showing up to directly support explicitly anti-racist, pro-justice efforts being led primarily by women of color, young women, queer and trans women and non-binary folks,” Leila Roberts posted to the Women’s March Facebook page on Jan. 28, 2018, lamenting that “hardly anyone showed” for a pair of events that had been plugged at the march. Reedy said she heard from people that the event didn’t do enough to spur change. “I received input from local individuals and groups … that protesting the inauguration of Trump is missing the underlying issue when Trump is only a symptom of the larger problem of patriarchy, white supremacy and capitalism, which are all under the umbrella of colonization,” she wrote in an email to the Journal. “This march is a single action event where all these women, particularly white women, get to mark the box of being ‘politically active’ and then are nowhere to be seen within the social movement world the rest of the year. Where are these 5,000 people when other marches/rallies/ campaigns are happening for women facing more systems of oppression than patriarchy?” Meanwhile, some also voiced that they found the pussy hats — the most visible symbol of the march — offensive. First off, they noted, the pink color didn’t seem inclusive of people of color. Second, they said, the hats seemed to intone that a certain type of genitalia is integral to womanhood, leaving some transgender women and non-binary folks out of the movement. Finally, some Native women, including Tia Oros Peters, executive director of the Seventh Generation Fund, said they found the hats terribly offensive,

14  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

given that after the massacres of native people in some places whites would cut off their victims genitalia to fasten to hats or belts as trophies. When the march’s organizing committee reconvened in late September to begin planning this year’s event, it’s clear all this was at the forefront of their minds. Edrington and Reedy both said members felt an urgency to broaden the committee and bring in a more diverse swath of voices. “Primarily, our outreach consisted of connecting with individuals and groups whom the organizing team was aware of and/or connected to, and we used the Facebook group and our email list developed from the event,” Edrington wrote in an email to the Journal, conceding that the group “definitely should have done more outreach.” When the committee reconvened for its second meeting, it was clear the outreach efforts had not born fruit. Reedy said she then pushed the committee to commit to canceling the event if it could not diversify the committee in the coming weeks. What’s unclear — and what Reedy and Edrington didn’t directly answer — is why

the committee didn’t opt to take their effort public, to issue a press release inviting participation or to let the community know the event was in danger of being canceled or postponed. The only thing intoning there were issues surrounding the 2019 event on the group’s Facebook page was a cryptic Dec. 17 post by Wylie: “Our march is at a crossroads as we seek to create an event that represents all members of our community. Come help us decide the march’s fate.” It invited people to attend a meeting the following day. It’s also unclear when the final decision not to hold the Jan. 19 march was made. But when it was announced Dec. 28, the backlash from some circles was fierce. “Some individuals (on the committee) have been getting an influx of hate mail, primarily from white men out of the area, and at least one person has received death threats,” Edrington wrote. There was also an uproar locally from some who — like Atkins — expressed the feeling that the Women’s March was being taken away from them.

The controversy surrounding the women’s march — both locally and


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A group of Native women near the front of the 2017 march. Mark McKenna nationally — shouldn’t necessarily be surprising, said College of the Redwoods political science professor Ryan Emenaker. “This is a common struggle with social movements and event planning that is looking to promote social change,” he said. “The first one, sometimes it’s enough to just have people be in a space together to vent frustrations. But after you’ve done that, people start to look for more than a parade or a rally and start asking, what are we doing to push things forward? The first year is always easier because people are happy to grab a sign and show up.” One of organizers’ biggest goals in holding these events is to galvanize people, to inspire them to do more. But by their nature the organizers are almost always more invested than the majority that shows up to these very visible rallies and marches. Emenaker said this was a recurring issue in the civil rights movement, when organizers would struggle to get handfuls of people involved in actions, sit-ins and protests only to see thousands show up for a speech from a notable leader, like Martin Luther King Jr. “The infighting between organizers and others engaged, that’s one of the com-

mon themes throughout all social change work,” he said. “It’s how you then address and deal with that. Sometimes, I guess, that’s canceling a march and other times it’s probably keeping it going.” And sometimes, apparently, it means divergent factions, each doing what they think is right. For her part, Atkins said she attended last year’s march and walked away energized, and wants folks to have a similar experience this year. “It was just an amazing coming together from all the different communities that make up Humboldt County, and it was a time when people were talking to people they didn’t normally talk to,” she said. “It just felt really good to participate and I didn’t want to see us not have one.” As to whether the event will prove divisive, Atkins said she’s not concerned. “We really want everyone to join in, in the march and the rally, and there’s no barriers to anyone doing that,” she said. “I’m not trying to create any division. I’m just trying to bring people together. … It’s a fairly simple thing.” Simple, in this case, is clearly in the eye of the beholder. After Atkins’ announcement that the march was back on, Oros

Peters took to Facebook. “This region has serious wounds,” she wrote. “There are many deep holes — vacancies in the thinking and actions of people of this area who consider themselves progressive, or even ‘woke.’ This is especially in regard to bringing into public discourse and most importantly into positive action remedies for the issues … regarding Indigenous Peoples and, also, the unresolved murder of a black student, Josiah Lawson … There has to be more than a sea of smiling pink hats with pats on their own backs for an annual walk around Old Town, while silencing, marginalizing and ignoring real issues of justice and ongoing colonization. “I am boycotting the Eureka Women’s March. I encourage all Peoples of Conscience and Honor to do the same. No justice, no peace.” l

Thadeus Greenson is the Journal’s news editor. Reach him at 4411400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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Table Talk

Old-school eggplant parm in Ferndale. Photo by Lynn Leishman

Hum Plate Roundup

Parm, pastrami and double dessert By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

Red sauce for the blues Pity those whose otherwise broadening travels render them unable to enjoy American immigrant iterations of their ancestral cuisines. I think of my old classmate returning from a semester in Rome, heartbroken from an affair and recoiling from the messy red spaghetti and glass shakers of parmesan cheese and red pepper flakes that seemed to him newly inauthentic. It was loss upon loss, in my view, to break up with the very vinyl booths and candle-stuffed chianti bottles that might have given solace. By all means, let love break your heart but not your appetite. An NCJ staffer’s recommendation sent us to Ferndale Pizza Co. (607 Main St., Ferndale) for an eggplant parmigiana ($13.70) that would make a fine emotional salve. A solid Italian American classic, the broad slices of eggplant, dipped in egg and homemade breadcrumbs with parmigiana cheese, and fried until their flesh is soft and translucent, are stacked and topped with mozzarella and marinara sauce. That a block of lasagna is one of your side options solves the conundrum of which to order but not where you will nap later. The lasagna, too, carries old-school, pizza parlor cred, with thick, curly edged noodles, ricotta, an all-day-big-pot meat sauce and

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

mozzarella under a ladle of still more red sauce. Though it bears the saucy, meaty markers of the dish’s evolution stateside, its mail-order DNA test kit would skew toward Southern Italy, with nary a spoonful of northern béchamel in sight. In those layers lies the comfort of tradition. And sauce. Lots of red sauce.

Sandwich craft After months and years of wishing, manifesting, prayer and vision boards failed to yield a deli within medium-heel walking distance of the NCJ offices, I was about to move on to witchcraft. Then Delish on 5th (440 F St.) opened up in Old Town with its case full of cured meats and cheeses, for which I’m deeply grateful, as spellwork looks like a steep learning curve. The setup — fancy kitchen shop on one side, fancy baked goods and sandwiches on the other — is a little more bespoke than I was going for but, in fairness, I did only skim The Secret. The hot pastrami sandwich ($11), for example, comes on a crusty, Dijon-swiped hunk of house baked ciabatta and grilled until the Swiss cheese bubbles down over the sides. The meat itself has some smoke and pepper to it, but its fall-apart texture and edge-browned fat is more akin to a


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roasted brisket than what you’d normally order on rye or in a Rueben. This is not in any way a bad thing. Likewise the handful of tart giardiniera, with its pickled carrots, cauliflower and green beans in place of the usual dill spear. The ciabatta shows up again panini-pressed around the Muffuletta ($11), rather than the big, soft, round Italian namesake loaf the traditional New Orleans sandwich is made on. It is, however, generously layered with salami, ham, provolone, tangy olive tapenade and Dijon, which you might ask to go easy on if you’re not a fan of strong mustard. The giardiniera stays on the side and the mortadella stays on the bench, but, departures from the standard recipe aside, it’s a meaty joy worth the napkins you’ll need. The sea salted chocolate chip cookies are marvelous but if you’ve got room, invest in a hefty wedge of cheesecake ($4.25). A pinky-thick graham cracker crust cradles the fluffy, creamy filling — listen as your fork makes its way through to the plate and fully appreciate the experience.

Fresh takes So long, Savory. Hola, Fregosos Comida Mexicana (1504 G St., Arcata). In November, Savory’s owners, who also own the Fregoso Market across from the Arcata North Coast Co-op, made the switch with a bright coat of paint, a fully Mexican menu and a new name in the same location across from Stars Hamburgers in Arcata’s Northtown. Those in thrall to the queso fresco-stuffed chile relleno served in a bub-

bling molcajete ($12) will be happy to learn it’s still on the menu, along with a side of homemade corn tortillas, whole pinto beans and saffron risotto. The Mason jars of house made horchata, with telltale sediment and deep vanilla and cinnamon flavor, deserve an equal following ($3.50). Branch out for the octopus and aguachile ($14), a bright tumble of seeded cucumbers, yellow tomatoes, radish, red onion, fresh jalapeño and cilantro, with thinly sliced octopus and shrimp in a chile lime marinade. It’s possibly the only salad you can lord over your companions in a Mexican restaurant. The aguachile also comes with a handful of crispy wontons, which you have missed at Chinese restaurants, whether or not you can admit it. It also leaves room for two desserts worth your gastronomic real estate. The tres leches cake ($6) is a light sponge soaked in its namesakes — condensed milk, evaporated milk and cream — and updated with a fresh mint syrup. Its polar opposite is the thick, alabaster flan ($6). You may marvel equally at its intense caramel flavor and the richness of the custard, which offers your spoon more resistance than the typical flan. And if you do order both desserts for yourself, I’m happy to report your server won’t blink. That is service. ● Share your Hum Plate tips with Jennifer Fumiko Cahill, arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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“Marvelous Mural of Marbled Murrelets” off Samoa Boulevard By Gabrielle Gopinath artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

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his time of year, as many of us migrate to or from our points of origin, it’s time to consider Arcata’s biggest, newest and most noteworthy piece of public art about the experience of transit: the 256-foot-long, 27-foot-tall painting by Lucas Thornton, “Marvelous Mural of Marbled Murrelets,” sweeping across two sides of the Arcata Bay Crossing building at Samoa Boulevard and U.S. Highway 101. Arcata’s newest work of public housing at Arcata Bay Crossing turned a blank face to the highway from the time it was built in 2015 until this summer, when the combined efforts of the Center for Biological Diversity, the Footprint Foundation, the city of Arcata and individual community members made it possible to put a bird on it. The subject is the marbled murrelet, an endangered species that haunts this stretch of the redwood coast. The artist, also locally based, is Lucas Thornton, who got his start in Duane Flatmo’s Rural Burl Mural Bureau. Thornton painted murrelets from a “bird’s eye” perspective, placing them against an aerial view of Humboldt Bay as seen from Fickle Hill, based on his plein-air oil study. Choice of bird matters a lot in an ornithologically sophisticated town like Arcata. Here, it was inspired. The sel-

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

dom-seen marbled murrelet is a dark, subtly patterned, densely feathered little bird whose adaptation for its baroque niche in the ecosystem is hyper-specialized and heartbreakingly perfect; heartbreaking because the unique way this bellwether species evolved now makes it highly vulnerable. While close relatives like murres nest on sea stacks and spend essentially the entirety of their lives in the ocean, the murrelet is unique: a fisher of the open ocean that has evolved to nest exclusively in the canopies of mature redwood forests, in groves where the trees are at least 200 years old. The territory where marbled murrelets could possibly exist was never vast; what with warming oceans, depleted fisheries, ongoing logging, deforestation and habitat loss, there is no reason to doubt the future will become more difficult for humans and murrelets alike. We should care about the murrelet, in other words, and Thornton’s composition makes it easy to do that by making the most of the wall’s immensity. Dark redwood forest along the northerly part of the wall nearest the highway gives way to the shining surface of Humboldt Bay as the eye moves south. The scene is suffused in a light that suggests morning (no easy feat at this colossal scale). The murrelets, winging their miraculous way

from the redwood forest to the Pacific, are unobtrusive — especially when you consider that the audience for this mural is a challenged one, consisting almost exclusively of multitasking drivers merging with highway traffic or navigating the exit ramp. (Highly visible from the highway, the mural is by no means easy for a pedestrian to view in its entirety). Since July, many motorists must have glimpsed a shining expanse of painted ocean in their peripheral vision and wondered about the murrelets’ exact whereabouts. I was certainly in that camp. Details, including the speckled murrelet chick charmingly nestled in the redwood canopy, continued surprising me for several weeks under a commuter’s viewing regimen. Not that I’m complaining — as any birder can attest, often the birds you remember best are the ones that are hardest to see. ● “Marvelous Mural of Marbled Murrelets” can be seen from the overpass and exit ramps at Samoa Boulevard and U.S. Highway 101 (but not from a static vantage point and never for very long). Gabrielle Gopinath is an art writer, critic and curator based in Arcata.


Arts Nights

33rd Anniversary Sale! Storewide

Sharon King, mixed media encaustics, at Stokes, Hamer, Kaufman & Kirk, LLP. Submitted

Arts! Arcata

Anniversary Prize Giveaway! Two Ways Social Media or In Store

Jan. 11, 6-9 p.m.

A

rts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at locations in Arcata. Visit www.arcatamainstreet. com, Arts! Arcata on Facebook, or call 707-822-4500 for more information.

ARCATA ARTISANS 883 H St. Winter Group Show. Wine pour by the GYN Breast Health Project. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Music by Kathe Lyth. FOODWISE KITCHEN 971 Eighth St. Pen & Pine, illustrations. MIA BELLA CUPCAKES 1041 H St. Eric Brooks, cupcake paintings MOONRISE HERBS 826 G St. “Psychedelic Landscapes,” Jess Aldeghi; Music by Lisa Sharry; Wine pour by Arcata Rotary. PACIFIC OUTFITTERS 737 G St. Sheranda Kumara, silks. Wine pour by the American Legion. PLAZA SHOE SHOP 699 G St. Mira Eagle, acrylic paintings. PLAZA GRILL (3RD FLOOR) JACOBY’S STOREHOUSE “Points of the Compass,” Jay Brown, mixed media drawings. THE ROCKING HORSE 791 H St.

Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 11-5 Mira Eagle, acrylic paintings, at Plaza Shoe Shop. Submitted

Savings $100-$800

ADJUSTABLE BASES starting at $799 www. mooressleepworld .com

Fortuna McKinleyville Arcata Eureka (707) 822-9997 (707) 444-2337 (707) 725-2222 (707) 840-9233

Hands-on event with the Gravitrax system, a design and build system where you can build your own race tracks using gravity, magnetism and kinetics to propel your ball around the track. STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP. 381 Bayside Road. Sharon King, mixed media encaustics; Music by Striped Pig StringBand; Wine pour benefits the American Cancer Society — Relay for Life. THREADBARE DANCEWEAR 668 Eighth St. Sarah Arrigo, circus banners in acrylic. TIN CAN MAILMAN 1000 H St. Hannah Meredith, ceramics.

NCJ HUM PLATE

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. northcoastjournal.com/HumPlate Have a tip? Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

19


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

THUR 1/10

ARCATA & NORTH FRI 1/11

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-1220 Claire Bent (blues, funk, R&B) 8pm Free

BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 822-3453

Open Mic 7pm Free

BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Latin Nights 9pm Free

CAFE MOKKA 822-2228 495 J St., Arcata

PD3 - Paul DeMark Trio (classics ’30s/’40s) 8pm Free Jazz Jam 6pm Free Psychedelvis (Elvis/Bowie) 9pm Free

NightHawk (rock, dance) 9pm Free

The Fusilli Brothers (Italian) 8pm Free

Good Company (Celtic) 8pm Free

CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-2013

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611

Claire Bent & Citizen Funk (Funk, Soul, R&B) 9pm Free

CLAM BEACH TAVERN 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-0545

Legends of the Mind (jazz, blues) 6pm Free

FIELDBROOK MARKET 4636 Fieldbrook Road 633-6097 THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

EASY HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL Business by Appointment Only

Residential Drop Off

M-T-W 1/14-16

NFL Playoffs - Divisional and NFL Playoffs - Divisional and [W] Sci-Fi Night: Things to Come Conference TBA Conference TBA (1936) 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev

THE BASEMENT 780 Seventh St., Arcata 826-2345

No-charge

SUN 1/13

March and the Months (rock show of classics) 8pm $5-$20 sliding

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 Ninth St. 822-1575

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

SAT 1/12

Karaoke 8pm Free

[M] 8-Ball Tournament [W] Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free Lone Star Junction (Outlaw Country) 9pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

[W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

Live Music 7:30pm Free Arts! Arcata - DJ EastOne & Friends 6-9pm Free

[T] Trivia Tuesday 6-8pm Free Strictly Soul Saturdays w/L Boogie 9pm Free

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free

THE BEST DRINK SPECIALS IN TOWN! EARLY BIRD HAPPY HOUR 5-6pm Bar Specials Small Plates $5

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OPEN SUN-THURS 5-9 PM FRI & SAT 5-9:30 PM · 707.826.0860

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek THUR 1/10

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739 THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

FRI 1/11

SAT 1/12

SUN 1/13

M-T-W 1/14-16

Club Triangle Retro Dance Party Free before 10pm, $5 after

Deep Groove Society 10pm $5

[T] Top Grade Tuesdays Dancehall Reggae w/DJ RealYouth, Cassidy Blaze 10pm $5 [W] Whomp Whomp Wednesdays 10pm TBA

Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds (reggae, rock, pop) 9:30pm $15 Tropicali Norte Bass Night w/G. Davis and Just One 10pm

Mixtape Vol. 3 10pm

LARRUPIN CAFE 677-0230 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad

Tim Randles Jazz Piano 6-9pm Free

LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWING CO. 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151

Ethan Joseph Perry & The Remedy Band 9pm Free Fred & Jr. (swing jazz) 6pm Free

MAZZOTTI’S ON THE PLAZA 773 Eighth St., Arcata 822-1900 THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

The Jim Lahman Band (rock, jazz, blues) 6pm Free

Blase & the Stellar Jays (rock and soul) 6pm Free

[T] Tide Pool Highdivers (country western) 6pm Free

Michael Dayvid (guitar, vocals) 6-9pm Free Karaoke 9pm Free

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

The Getdown w/DJM 9:30pm Free Open Mic 7pm Free

Karaoke 9pm Free

[T] Sonido Pachanguero 9pm [W] Local Trivia + Pint Night 8pm

Two Mic Sundays (comedy) 5pm Free

[T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6-8pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Drive., Trinidad 677-3543

[M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5

RAMPART SKATEPARK 700 South G St., Arcata 826-0675 REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY 550 South G St., #4, Arcata 826-7224

Eteraz, Dead Drift, Grumpus, Grimweepers (punk) 7:30pm $5 [M] Bingo 7pm [W] Pints for Nonprofits - Jacoby Creek School noon-midnight

Elwood Music (hip-hop) 8pm Free

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville

Breakfast Served All Day Coffee & Espresso Lunch & Specialty Dishes

After Work Sessions with DJ D’Vinity 4-7pm Free

1-Medium 1-Topping Pizza ONLY $5.99 * BRING IN THIS AD *

Trivia Night 8pm

[M] Karaoke with DJ Marv 8pm

JANUARY DISCOUNTS Buy 3 save 20% HOODIES, JACKETS & CREWNECKS T-SHIRTS & TANKS HATS & BEANIES COLLECTIBLES & ACCESSORIES (707) 476-0400 Bayshore Mall, Eureka

(707) 822-3090 987 H St., Arcata

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Fieldbrook Winery 1115111

600 F Street 432 S. Fortuna Blvd. ARCATA FORTUNA (707) 822-9990 (707) 725-9990

Order Online westsidepizza.com

Wine Tasting & Wood-Fired Pizza Every Sunday plus cozy indoor seating in our tasting room too!

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VENUE

THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Eureka and South on next page

708 9th St. Arcata 707.822.1414 tomoarcata.com Open nightly at 4 pm Happy Hour 4-5:30 pm

Pumpkin Pancakes with Maple Butter MIDDLE OF G ST. ARCATA PLAZA 707.826.7578

Sun - Thurs 8am-3pm Fri. & Sat. 7am-3pm

Sundays noon-5pm 4241 Fieldbrook Rd. fieldbrookwinery.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

21


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

A Caribbean Bistro

613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

The

Sea Grill Always Fresh Local Seafood Full Bar Private room seats up to 50 for your holiday celebration! 316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187 D I N N E R : M O N D AY- S A T U R D A Y 5 - 9 pm

ARKLEY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 412 G St., Eureka 442-1956 ARTS & DRAFTS 422 First St., Eureka 798-6329 BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 923-3188 3188 Redwood Drive, Redway THE EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 442-2970 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 GYPPO ALE MILL 986-7700 1661 Upper Pacific Dr., Shelter Cove HUMBOLDT BAY PROVISIONS 205 G St., Eureka 672-3850 THE MADRONE BRICK FIRE PIZZA AND TAPROOM 421 Third St., Eureka 273-5129 NORTH OF FOURTH 207 Third St., Eureka 798-6303

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 PALM LOUNGE - EUREKA INN, 518 Seventh St., Eureka 497-6093 PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

15% Off

15% Off

15% Off

20% Off

Pizzas & Calzones

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway FRI 1/11

SAT 1/12

Cruizin Kings (oldies, blues, funk) 9pm Free

Craft Singles: A Cheesy Trivia Night 7pm Free Mojo Rockers (blues, classic rock, funk) 9pm Free

SUN 1/13

M-T-W 1/14-16

Los Lobos (rock and roll) 8pm $66

Pool Tourney 8pm

[T] Karaoke [W] Open Mic/Jam session 7pm Free Friday Night Noir: Sunset Blvd (1950) 7:30pm $5

The Gatehouse Well (Celtic/Irish) 6pm Free Trivia Night 5:30-7:30pm Free Dinner Music 6-8pm Free Resilience Night 100% of proceeds go to the Camp Fire fund

Libations & Creations - Bob Ross Paint Night 3-5pm $25

Open Irish/Celtic Music Session 3-6pm Free Libations & Creations - Fire Cider Workshop 3-5pm $25

[W] Trivia Night 6pm [W] Brian Post and Friends Jazz Trio 7pm Free

THE OLD STEEPLE 786-7030 246 Berding St., Ferndale

Select Your Savings! Steaks & Seafood

THUR 1/10

EUREKA & SOUTH

Open Mic with Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free Indigo - The Color of Jazz 7-11pm Free Reggae Thursdays 9:30pm Free

The Brother Brothers (Apalachian folk, klezmer, bluegrass) 7:30pm $30, $25 advance Improv Show 7pm Free

Selecta Arms (hip-hop, reggae hits) 10pm Free

[M] Improv Jam 6pm Free

DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, top 40) 10pm Free

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

STUF’T POTATO TRADITIONAL GERMAN & AUSTRIAN CUISINE

Daily Specials

Lunches M-Sat 11-3

limit one item per person, per day

Open Every Day For Lunch & Dinner 773 8th St. Arcata & 305 F St. Eureka CLOSED

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

3220 Broadway Suite. 8 Eureka Open Tues-Sat 4-9pm 707.444.6200


HOT FRENCH DIP

FRIDAYS!

Psychedelvis plays Blue Lake Casino on Friday, Jan. 11 at 9 p.m. (free).

VENUE PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka 444-3344

THUR 1/10

FRI 1/11

SAT 1/12

SUN 1/13

M-T-W 1/14-16

Two Mic Sundays 9pm Free

[M] Not-So-Trivial Trivia Night 8pm Free [T] Phat Tuesdays w/Tristan Norton 8pm Free [W] Live Jazz with Bill Allison & Friends 7pm Free [T] Trivia Tuesdays 9pm $5

Laidback Lounge 7-10pm

SAVAGE HENRY COMEDY CLUB Reuben Mayes: Comedy in My The Jokin’ Andrew Holmgren Keith Lowell Jensen 415 Fifth St., Eureka 845-8864 Work Boots 9pm $5 9pm $10 9pm $10 Down the Rabbit Hole 2 THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN Fetish Night: Arabian Nights 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778 9pm $7 (music, art, dance) 9pm $8 THE SPEAKEASY Live Jazz and Blues Jenni & David and the Sweet 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 8:30pm Free Soul Band 9pm Free STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 Upstate Thursdays w/ DJs G. Beats and Rhymes hip-hop w/ 744 Redway Dr., Garberville Davis, Just One 9pm Free Just One and JRiggs 10pm TIP TOP CLUB Friday Night Function (DJ Sexy Saturdays w/Masta 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696 music) 9pm Free before 10pm Shredda 9pm TBA Jeffrey Smoller VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950 (solo guitar) 6pm Free VISTA DEL MAR 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka

a lifestyle for a lifetime

[T] Opera Alley Cats 7:30pm [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in

Cultured Cuisine 2 8 5 0 F S T, E U R E K A 7 0 7. 7 9 8 . 6 4 9 9

[M] Tony Roach (standards) 6pm Free [T] Blues Tuesdays 7pm Free [W] Karaoke Nights 9pm Free

Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30am-2pm Dinner: Tue-Thu 5pm-9pm Fri-Sat 5pm-10pm

RING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH CAL COURTS FITNESS Sign up in JANUARY- get a FREE Month

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• One low processing fee for the entire household • Kids under 10 are free • Offer valid until January 31st calcourtsfitness.com Two locations, one low rate. 518 W Clark St.Eureka, CA 707.445.5445 M-F 5am-10pm Sat-Sun 8am - 8pm

Annex 3909 Walnut Dr.Cutten, CA 707.445.5442 M-F 5am-10pm Sat-Sun 9am - 3pm

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

23


24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Setlist bring this coupon in and receive

Gemini Nights

10%

music@northcoastjournal.com

W

ho needs an intro in these short, wet and cold days? By the time I get started the sun will have come and gone and we will all be mocked heartily by the massive frozen charioteers who pull the night across the sky at the bored whim of the gods. (Note: I have never actually taken an astronomy course and I apologize for my childlike understanding of the cosmos.) Anyway, get out and do it. These are long nights and we must own them occasionally lest they pummel us into submission every night with the promise of a lazy early bed. Viva.

Thursday

March and the Months gets the band together again as young ingenue March Adstrum takes a vacation break from college to kick out the jams in her hometown with friends and family at the Arcata Playhouse tonight at 8 p.m. ($5-$20 sliding scale). Expect covers and originals all woven together with the fine glossy threads of vintage glam and psychedelia. Over in Eureka at the same hour, you can catch the Latin rock ‘n’ roll champs of East L.A. for four decades running when Los Lobos takes the stage at the Arkley Center for the Performing Arts. It’s unlikely that I will cough up the needed skrill to see Mr. David Hidalgo and company jam in The Neighborhood with my winter budget being what it is, but I suggest that you do so if you can float the $66 ticket because these chaps aren’t getting any younger and they remain one of the last true organic roots bands in our troubled nation. As for me, I’ve got a VHS copy of La Bamba at home I’ve been meaning to watch so I’ll be all right.

Friday

Multi-instrumentalists and identical twins Adam and David Moss hail from Brooklyn by way of Peoria, Illinois. Together they make up The Brother Brothers and play a noir style of folk and bluegrass that draws on the twilit chapters of the Great American Songbook. The music is

The Brother Brothers play the Old Steeple on Friday, Jan. 11 at 7:30 p.m. Photo by Justin Camerer, courtesy of the artists

tight and technically advanced, but it’s the feeling, that beautiful plangent feeling, that makes these brothers so special. Come see what I am talking about at The Old Steeple tonight at 7:30 p.m. ($25). Catch the twins on stage and then, weather permitting, allow yourself a peek at the Gemini constellation of Castor and Pollux on the drive home because this is a great time to do so.

Saturday

I am old fashioned in my wrestling tastes, having formed and left all of my aesthetics back in the late 1980s when I was a very small child and therefore at the peak of my development as far as appreciation of the sport goes. Hulk Hogan ruled over a menagerie filled with the likes of Jake the Snake, Ric Flair, Andre the Giant and the Iron Sheik, while Jesse “The Body” Ventura was a B-lister at best and much better remembered as a color commentator. Suffice it to say, the seeds are planted deep for wrestling fanboy-dom but have thus far yielded no grain. Perhaps that will change for me tonight when Oakland-based wrestling troupe Hoodslam takes over the Eureka Municipal Auditorium at 8 p.m. The unorthodox and free-wheeling wildmen will shake, rattle and roll the turnbuckles in a tailor-made Humboldt production with Savage Henry called Emerald Triangula. Broseph Joe Brody presides over the night with live music provided by the Hoodslam Band at 8 p.m. (21+, $20).

Sunday

Eteraz is a relentless and brilliant hardcore act from Olympia and Seattle up in the northernmost state in our Pacific Northwest triad. With an expansive d-beat and reverb sound and lyrics in English and Farsi, there is nothing but a new and glorious mutant in this band. RampArt is the host tonight at 8 p.m. and local support will be provided by Dead Drift, Grumpus and Grimweepers. At $5 this show is an absolute steal.

Monday

The Outer Space has a good one going

on tonight at 7 p.m. when Sarchasm makes the drive up from the Bay Area to bang the gong in the temple of alt-punk (sliding scale $6-20). Daniel. (yes, with a period at the end that forces Google docs to capitalize the next word and I am sure the preciousness is worth the annoyance but if they did it on purpose to troll then bravo, actually) provides a local taste of contemporary folk, while Blood Hunny does what it does best, namely playing a fine set.

Tuesday

Tristan Norton tunes up the guitars over at Phatsy Kline’s tonight at 8 p.m. to deliver a free set of carefully chosen pieces by the fine likes of John Fahey, John Coltrane, Hank Williams, Blind Willie Johnson and more. If playing older music is more your taste, hit up the Logger Bar at the same hour for the Old Time Music Jam, which so happens to be another free joint.

off it’s crazy good!

By Collin Yeo

*EXPIRES 1/31/19. NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. LIMITED TO ONE COUPON PER TRANSACTION.

Authentic mexican food hours location Mon-Fri 10-9 sat 11-8 Closed Sun

955 Main St., Fortuna (707) 725-5546

stay & dine with us

Wednesday

Hey, maybe strap this on for size: Richards’ Goat has a trivia night at 8 p.m. that I have been hearing quite a lot of good things about from my more competitive friends on the specialized information circuit. It’s only a two-drink minimum and every sitcom memory I have suggests that trivia nights are full of fun and unruly diversion. I once helmed a team in the fifth grade called The Impalers after my then-recent infatuation with Vlad Dracula. Anyway, grab some sharp friends and test your mettle. l

ENJOY A

5 COURSE DINNER AND COZY

ROMANTIC NIGHT WITH THAT SPECIAL

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo thinks that calling the president a “motherfucker” should be the bare minimum requirement for any opposition political figure’s legitimacy and he dismisses any reactionary pearlclutching with absolute mocking scorn. Viva Rashida Tlaib. He lives in Arcata.

SOMEONE HERE AT THE CARTER HOUSE INN.

Until the last day of March our friends and neighbors here in Humboldt can get a Queen room and 5 course dinner for 2 for $199! Call us directly at 707.444.8062 to book *Not good with any other promotions/discounts or Smartcard

RESTAURANT 301 & CARTER HOUSE INNS 301 L St. Eureka 707.444.8062 carterhouse.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

25


Calendar Jan. 10 – 17, 2019

10 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

BOOKS Trinidad Library Book Buddies Club. Second Thursday of every month, 11 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. This casual community gathering discusses books, shares recent reads and offers new suggestions of titles to read. No mandatory reading, just a love of books. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

COMEDY Sunset Boulevard

In Sunset Boulevard (1950), Gloria Swanson plays an aging silent film queen, forgotten by Hollywood, who refuses to believe her star has dimmed. Revel in this critically acclaimed masterpiece, also starring William Holden, by director Billy Wilder at Friday Night Noir on Friday, Jan. 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the Eureka Theater ($5). Popcorn, snacks and cocktails befitting a goddess available in the lobby.

Submitted

Based on poems by Historic Blue Ox Mill founder Eric Hollenbeck and written by playwright James McManus, Radioman plays Jan. 10-12 and Jan. 17-19 at 8 p.m., with two Sunday matinees on Jan. 13 and 20 at 2 p.m. at Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre ($35 opening night reception, $15-$20 rest of run). Directed by Michael Fields and Roman Sanchez.

Submitted

March and the Months bring their genre-defying It’s Just a Whim rock show to the Arcata Playhouse on Thursday, Jan. 10 at 8 p.m. ($5-20 sliding scale). Expect high energy from March Adstrum on vocals/ guitar/keyboards, Rob Diggins on synth violin/cornet, Joli Einem on electric bass, Fiona Shaughnessy on vocals and Gabe LuBowe on drums.

Are you the kind of sci-fi/action film fan that goes along with the whole suspension-of-disbelief thrill ride or do the maddening missteps of science/tech/logic elicit a passionate “Come on!” from you? Your friends may roll their eyes but we get it. If you’re curious whether some harebrained Hollywood theory could actually work, there are experts who can tell you yes or no. Thanks to a grant from the Coolidge Corner Theatre Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, there’s a nifty project called “Science on Screen” that pairs feature films with experts in the fields of science, tech, engineering and mathematics. The Eureka Theater is one of hundreds hosting this series and it kicks off by bringing down the science hammer with Avengers: Infinity War (2018) — featuring a nanobiotechnology discussion with Frank Cappuccio — on Thursday, Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. ($5). Other films in the series include Tank Girl (1995) and apocalyptic technologies w/Lonny Grafman on Feb. 21, National Week of Science on Screen, a yet-to-be-named film on March 21, Tremors (1990) and shaky ground discussion with Lori Dengler on April 18, Jurassic Park (1993) and “how to clone a dinosaur” with Sam Del Campo on May 16, and Hackers (1995) and coding with Brian Behlendorf on June 22. Right in line with that series is Dumb Movies with Smart People over at the Humboldt County Library. Take a seat with other smarties for a showing of The Core (2003), a hot mess about scientists planning to drill to the center of the earth to set off nuclear bombs to get it spinning again. Seismologist/geologist/smart person Lori Dengler hosts this one, too, on Saturday, Jan. 12 at 1 p.m. (free). On Saturday, Feb. 9 at 1 p.m. catch feverish Outbreak (1995) — filmed right here in Humboldt County, with Ferndale as a contagion hotspot — with Ron Largusa. —Kali Cozyris

26  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www.redwoodraks.com.

MUSIC

Armageddon it Wrong

The Core

Reuben Mayes: Comedy in my Work Boots. 9-11:45 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Artist Reuben Mayes’ comedy set explores his experiences, commentary and more. $5. peter@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

Los Lobos. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Rock and roll from East L.A. $66. March and the Months. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. A rock show of classics and originals entitled “It’s Just a Whim” featuring March Adstrum, vocals, guitar and keyboards, Rob Diggins, SynthViolin and cornet, Joli Einem, electric bass, Fiona Shaughnessy, vocals, and Gabe LuBowe, drums. $5-20 sliding scale.

THEATER Radioman. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. A theatrical production built from the writings and stories of veterans from Vietnam War to today. Based on poems written by Eric Hollenbeck. Written By James McManus. Directed by Michael Fields and Roman Sanchez. Warning: strong language. $35 opening night reception, $15-$20 rest of run. www.dellarte.com.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A drop-off program for children ages 3-5 with stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@ gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Third Thursday Food Demos. Every third Thursday, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Humboldt County Agriculture Center, 5630 South Broadway, Eureka. Free food preservation demos presented by the Humboldt County Master Food Preservers. Free. tinyurl.com/MFPDemo. 445-7351.

MEETINGS Conservation Meeting. Second Thursday of every month, 12-1:30 p.m. Rita’s Margaritas & Mexican Grill, Fifth St., 1111 Fifth St., Eureka. Discuss conservation issues


of interest to the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www.rras.org/calendar.html. 445-8311. Humboldt Grange 501. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Regular monthly meeting. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/ humboldt.grange. 443-0045. Toastmasters. Second Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

SPORTS HSU Women’s Basketball vs. Cal State Los Angeles. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Lumberjack Arena, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Tipoff at 5:30 p.m. $10, Free for HSU students, staff and faculty with valid ID. kelly.kime@ humboldt.edu. www.hsujacks.com. 826-3666.

Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. World Dance party with The Humboldt Folk Dancers featuring easy dances and an evening of world music with international bands. All ages and dance levels welcome. $5. kurumada@humboldt.edu. www.humboldtfolkdancers.org. 496-6734.

Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Keith Lowell Jensen has appeared on The History Channel, Spike TV and The Starz Network, and has five comedy albums to his credit. $10. editor@savaghenrymagazine.com. www. savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

MOVIES

MOVIES

Friday Night Noir: Sunset Blvd. (1950). 7:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. “All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my close-up.” $5. www.theeurekatheater.org.

Dumb Movies with Smart People: The Core. 1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. If the planet stops spinning, should scientists drill to the center of the Earth and set off nuclear bombs to get it going again? Watch the movie and then find out from seismologist/geologist/smart person Lori Dengler. Free. www.humlib.org.

MUSIC The Brother Brothers. 7:30 p.m. The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. Appalachian folk, klezmer and bluegrass. $30, $25 advance.

THEATER Radioman. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See Jan. 10 listing.

ETC

FOR KIDS

Community Board Game Night. Second Thursday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@northcoast.com. www.baysidecommunityhall. org. 444-2288.

Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@gmail.com. 845-0094.

Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. New members welcome. Anyone with sewing or quilting experience or who wants to learn. Free. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

OUTDOORS

ART

ETC

Arts! Arcata. Second Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art. Downtown Arcata and surrounding area. Free. arcatamainstreet@gmail.com. www.arcatamainstreet. com. 822-4500.

A Call to Yarns. 12-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt. ca.us. 822-5954.

11 Friday

Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Drop-in volunteering every Friday to help the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@ scraphumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452.

BOOKS Dana York. 7-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Botanist Dana York speak about his new book from the California Native Plant Society, An Illustrated Flora of Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. Free. info@ northtownbooks.com. 822-2834. Friday Afternoon Book Club. Second Friday of every month, 12-1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Discussion group focusing on adult fiction and nonfiction. Call ahead for upcoming titles. Free. www. humlib.org. 269-1905.

COMEDY The Jokin’ Andrew Holmgren. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Comedians Andrew Holmgren and Ben Kolina headline. Locals Nando Molina and Jessica Grant open. Hosted by Trevor Lockwood. $10. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

Building Bird Friendly Yards and Communities. 7-8:30 p.m. Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road, Arcata. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society for a presentation about some simple things you can do to build bird friendly habitats in your own yard and community. Free. daseeger@gmail.com. www.rras.org.

Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

12 Saturday BOOKS

Family Yoga Storytime. 11:15-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Stretch your body and your imagination with certified yoga instructor Jessalyn Delucchi, who tells stories with accompanying yoga poses. Free. Sponsored by Friends of Arcata Library. 822-5954. Intro to Bookmaking. 1-4 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Create a handmade, hand-bound book by reusing fabrics and papers from SCRAP’s archive. Leave with a one-of-a-kind book and the skills to make more. Ages 12 to 16 must be accompanied by a paying adult. $15. outreach@scraphumboldt.org. scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452.

EVENTS Hoodslam - Emerald Triangula. 8 p.m. Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St., Eureka. Wrestling, music, beer. 21 and up. $20.

DANCE

COMEDY

Live Music Dance Party. 8-11 p.m. Redwood Raks World

Keith Lowell Jensen. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy

MUSIC The Fire. 7:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. The Fortuna Concert Series presents “The Fire” featuring Rebecca Lomnicky, David Brewer and Adam Hendey performing Scottish music on fiddle, bagpipes, guitar, bodhran, whistle and bouzouki. $10. fortunaconcert@ live.com. www.fortunaconcertseries.com. 845-5652.

THEATER Radioman. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See Jan. 10 listing.

FOR KIDS Family Arts Day. Second Saturday of every month, 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Offering hands-on arts projects and activities inspired by current exhibitions designed families and youth 5-12 years old. $5, $2 seniors/military/students, free members and children. alex@humboldtarts.org. www. humboldtarts.org/content/ssfad. 442-0278.

M-F 8am-3pm Sat & Sun 9am-3pm 307 2nd St. Eureka (707) 798-6083

Story Time with Kathy Frye. Second Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 764-3333. Storytime. 11:30 a.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Stories for children and their parents. Free. Storytime and Crafts. 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Followed by crafts at noon. Now with a Spanish and English story every first and third Saturday. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. 668-4207. Weekend Play Group. Second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. The only weekend play group in Humboldt County. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Winter Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza Farmers’ Market, Eighth and I Street block. Fresh GMO-free foods direct from the farmers. Fruits and vegetables, humanely raised meats, pastured eggs, artisanal body products, plants, hot food stands and more. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.northcoastgrowersassociation.org. 441-9999.

GARDEN Master Food Preservers. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, North Entrance, Eureka. Learn to preserve lemons and candied citrus. $10, $5 members. hbgf@hbgf.org. www.hbgf.org. 499-3133. Rose Pruning Demonstration. 10 a.m. Miller Farms Nursery, 1828 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Improve your rose pruning technique with the Humboldt Rose Continued on next page »

623 Fernbridge Dr., Fortuna 707-786-3900 Open Daily 8am-2pm, Closed Tuesdays Wednesday dinners 4-7pm

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

27


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Calendar Continued from previous page

Wa f f l e s + d e l i c i o u s to p p i n g s

folded to go

Society’s rosarians. Phone RSVP appreciated. Free. www. humboldtrose.org. 839-1571 ext. 5.

presents the photographs of Nancy Rae Burrow and Alan Samuel. Free. annintrin@lycos.com. 677-0128.

OUTDOORS

COMEDY

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. With leader Sharon Levy. Free. 826-2359.

Two Mic Sundays. 5 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. At Northtown Coffee at 5 p.m. and Savage Henry Comedy Club at 9 p.m. Free. editor@ savagahenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine. com. 845-8864.

Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Larry Karsteadt. Free. www. rras.org/calendar. Hikshari’ Volunteer Trail Stewards. 9-11 a.m. Hikshari’ Trail, Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary, Eureka. At our next VTS workday, we will start the next stage of planting natives all along the edge of the marsh next to the Hikshari’ trail. Meet at the Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary parking lot at the south end of Hilfiker Lane/A Street in Eureka at 9am, rain or shine. New and old, frequent and infrequent volunteers are always welcome. For more information, contact Wanda . Free. wnaylor@sonic.net. Inland Birding Adventure. 9-11:30 a.m. Studio 299, 75 The Terrace, Willow Creek. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society for birding in Willow Creek. All ages and interest levels welcome. Meet at Studio 299 to arrange carpooling. Contact Birgitte at 267-4140 Free. willowcreekbirdwalks@gmail.com. www.rras.org. Volunteer Restoration Day. March 8, 9 a.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Help remove English ivy, a moderate activity. Wear sturdy shoes. Gloves and tools are provided. Free. Michelle. Forys@parks.ca.gov. 677-3109.

SPORTS HSU Women’s Basketball vs. Cal State Dominguez Hills. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Lumberjack Arena, Humboldt State University, Arcata. 5:30 p.m. tip-off. $10, Free for HSU students, faculty and staff with valid i.d. card. kelly. kime@humboldt.edu. www.hsujacks.com. 826-3666.

Now accepting NCJ smar tcard

NFL Playoffs - Divisional and Conference. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. For more details and updates visit www.arcatatheater.com. Free w/$5 food/bev purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

ETC Media Center Orientation. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, 1915 J St., Eureka. Learn about the recording studio, field equipment, editing stations and cable TV channels available at Access Humboldt. Free. 476-1798.

nor thcoastjournal.com /NCJsmar tcard

770 WILDWOOD AVE RIO DELL, CA 95562 LOCATED IN ROOT 101 NURSERY

28  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

13 Sunday

DANCE Afternoon of Dance. Second Sunday of every month, 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Enjoy an afternoon of dance at the Morris Graves with a different local dance group every month: Jan. 13, Humboldt County Lao Dancers; Feb. 10, Dance with Debbie; March 10, Academy of Irish Dance; April 14, North Coast Dance. Humboldt County Lao Dancers $5, $2 students/seniors, free for children/members. alex@humboldtarts.org. humboldtarts.org/content/ afternoon-dance. 442-0278.

MUSIC Bayside Community Hall Music Project. 6-8 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Bandemonium, community activist street band, from 6-8 p.m. Bring wind instruments and drums. Free. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/ Bayside. 499-8516. Eteraz. 7:30-11:30 p.m. RampArt Skatepark, 700 South G St., Arcata. Queer D-beat hardcore from Olympia/Seattle, WA. With local support from Dead Drift, Grumpus and Grimweepers. Punk. All ages. $5. info@rampartskatepark.org. www.rampartskatepark.org. 826-0675.

THEATER Radioman. 2 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See Jan. 10 listing.

FOR KIDS Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See Jan. 11 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Pancake Breakfast. Second Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. Breakfast with your choice of eggs, ham, sausage, toast, pancakes, coffee, tea and orange juice. $5, $2.50 kids ages 6-12, free for kids under 6. Veterans Pancake Breakfast. Second Sunday of every month, 8 a.m.-noon. Fortuna Veterans Hall/Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Pancakes, sausage, eggs and bacon. Coffee and orange juice included. Benefits local youth groups and veterans events in the Eel River Valley. $8. vfwpost2207@gmail.com. 725-4480.

MEETINGS Redwood Coast Woodturners. Second Sunday of every month, 1 p.m. Almquist Lumber Company, 5301 Boyd Road, Arcata. All interested in are welcome, beginner to pro, no experience needed. $20. pajhum42@gmail. com.. 499-9569.

ART

OUTDOORS

Opening Reception. 1-4 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. The new show at the Westhaven Center for the Arts, “A World in Color,”

Guided Bird Walk. 9-11 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society walk leader Ralph Bucher on


a two-to three-hour trip with a leisurely pace with an emphasis on enjoying the birds. Beginners welcome. Free. thebook@reninet.com. www.rras.org. 499-1247. Audubon Society Birding Trip. Second Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Learn the common birds of Humboldt on a two- to three-hour walk. Meet at the Visitor Center. Free. 822-3613.

SPORTS NFL Playoffs - Divisional and Conference. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See Jan. 12 listing.

ETC Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

14 Monday DANCE

Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Paso a Paso host dance therapy. Free. jorge.matias@stjoe.org. 441-4477.

MUSIC Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 900 Hodgson St., Eureka. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. Free. singfourpart@gmail.com. 445-3939. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. All choral voices are welcome with a particular call for male voices. Opportunities for solos and ensemble groups. $50 registration fee w/scholarships available. 839-2276.

SPOKEN WORD Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/perform your original poetry or hear others. Note: No Dece $1.

GARDEN Drop-in Garden Hours. 1-4:30 p.m. The RAVEN Project, 523 T St., Eureka. Learn how to grow a vegetable garden, compost, cook, and make garden crafts. For youth ages 10-21. Free. hmccarthy@rcaa.org. 672-9944.

MEETINGS VFW Post 2207 Monthly Meeting. Second Monday of every month, 7-8:30 p.m. Fortuna Veterans Hall/Memorial Building, 1426 Main St. Fostering camaraderie among U.S. veterans of overseas conflicts and advocating for veterans, the military and communities. Free. 725-4480. Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

15 Tuesday COMEDY

Trivia Tuesdays. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Teams of three. Three rounds. $5 entry fee per team. Real prizes $5. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Live music. All ages. $5. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

MOVIES The Palm Beach Story (1942). 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Part of the Written and Directed by Preston Sturges series. Hosted by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill. Free. www.humlib.org.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbers. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Humboldt Cribbage Club plays weekly. Seven games in summer and nine games during the season. $8. grasshopper60@aol.com. 444-3161. Soroptimist of McKinleyville. Third Tuesday of every month, 5:45 p.m. Luzmila’s, McKinleyville, 1751 Central Ave. Monthly general meeting of a local volunteer organization working to improve the lives of women and girls. Free. aprilsousa13@gmail.com. www.facebook. com/208188105867679.

McKinleyville. Get involved in your community Grange. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Interested in Teaching Special Education?. 4:30-6 p.m. Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. HSU orientation meeting for future candidates. Convenient 1 year program. For more information contact Bernie Levy, bjl31@humboldt.edu, 826-5795.

17 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See Jan. 10 listing.

ETC

COMEDY

Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games $1-$10.

Practice Lap. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. A few local comics try some longer set times. Free. editor@savaghenrymagazine.com. www. savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See Jan. 10 listing. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Jan. 13 listing.

16 Wednesday LECTURE

Suzi Fregeau. 5:30-7 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Suzi Fregeau, LTCOP Coordinator/Manager, will speak at the January After Work Network meeting. Learn more about the importance of the Ombudsman’s advocacy role in elder care and mingle with other businesswomen in the area. Free. ewc@eurekawomansclub.org. www. eurekawomansclub.org/about-us/afterwork-network/. 442-3458.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Night: Things to Come (1936). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A decades-long second World War leaves plague and anarchy, then a rational state rebuilds civilization and attempts space travel. Free w/$5 food/bev purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Sweet Harmony Women’s Chorus. 6-8 p.m. Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St. All-female barbershop style chorus that sings a variety of music, including pop, jazz, gospel and Broadway show tunes in tight, four-part, a cappella harmonies. Accepting new members. Ability to read music not required. barbershophumboldt@ gmail.com. facebook.com/barbershophumboldt. (802) 490-9455, 601-8219.

MEETINGS Dow’s Prairie Grange. Third Wednesday of every month, 6 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road,

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Jan. 10 listing.

MOVIES Ocean Night. 6:30-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Surfrider Humboldt screens Mission Blue! Mission a documentary on legendary oceanographer, marine biologist, environmentalist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle and her campaign to create a global network of protected marine sanctuaries. $5 suggested donation (free for Surfrider members). humboldt@surfrider.org. www.arcatatheatre.com. Science on Screen: Avengers: Infinity War (2018). 7 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. This series pairs feature films with experts in the fields of science, tech, engineering and mathematics. This film’s discussion features nanobiotechnology with Frank Cappuccio. $5. www. theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816. The Temptations - SOLD OUT. 7 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Legends of the original Motown sound perform.

THEATER Radioman. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See Jan. 10 listing.

EVENTS Peaceful Moments Yoga for Adults. 6-7 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Stretch your body and calm your mind with certified yoga instructor Jessalyn Delucchi. Free. Sponsored by Friends of Arcata Library. 822-5954.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad

Library, 380 Janis Court. See Jan. 10 listing. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See Jan. 10 listing.

FOOD Humboldt Republican Women Luncheon. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Red Lion Hotel, 1929 Fourth St., Eureka. Featuring guest speaker Anthony Mantova. Lunch is chicken carbonara, salad, fruit and bread. Raffle drawing. RSVP to phone number or email listed. $20 lunch, $5 beverage only. fritzsimons@suddenlink.net. www. redlion.com. 839-3543.

ETC Healthcare for Families with Substance Abuse: How Can We Do Better?. 7-7:45 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Guest Speaker: Carrie Griffin, Addiction Medical Specialist. Free. 822-5954. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See Jan. 10 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Jan. 10 listing.

Heads Up … The Humboldt County Planning Commission will have a vacant seat for which the public is invited to apply. Deadline to apply is Jan. 10 at 5 p.m. Fill out an application at www.humboldtgov.org/194/Planning-Commission or by visiting the Humboldt County Clerk of the Board, 825 Fifth St., Room 111, Eureka. The Humboldt Arts Council invites community members to share collections in the show Humboldt Collects! send a completed submission form, which can be downloaded at www.humboldtarts.org and up to three digital images (high resolution JPEG: minimum 300 dpi, 1 MB) to jemima@humboldtarts.org by Jan. 18. Donations and consignments are now being accepted at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center for the annual Get Outside Gear Sale, happening April 13. Stop by Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 444-1397 or visit friendsofthedunes.org/get-outsidegear-sale for more info. Faben Artist Fund now accepting applications. Grant guidelines are posted at www.humboldtarts.org. Email Jemima@humboldtarts.org or 442-0278, ext. 205. The Eureka Symphony holds auditions for its Young Artist Competition on Jan. 20. Two artists will receive cash awards and be selected to play with the symphony in the Inventive Voices concert on April 12 and 13. For more information and an application, email eurekasymphony@gmail.com. Humboldt International Film Fest call for entries. Independent filmmakers, share your art. Submission deadline: Feb. 15. Visit www.HSUfilmfestival.com to learn more. Scholarships available for HSU undergrad and graduate-level women re-entry students. Go to www. humboldt-ca.aauw.net and Educational Opportunities to download the application. Call (415) 517-2813. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife Dove Banding Program seeks volunteers. More information at www.wildlife.ca.gov/Science-Institute. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

29


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Filmland

SEMIT E IVOM JCN

MOVIE TIMES.

TRAILERS. REVIEWS.

Burning Secrets Shoplifters and Burning By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

!semitwohS dniF

Browse by title, times and theater.

northcoastjournal.com

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

In the gradual but somehow instantaneous acceleration of time, wherein it seems to expand and contract with no regard for our pleas and protestations, I have found my movie-nerdiness largely subsumed by what I’m told is “real life.” Going back to the VHS/DVD rental days, I would stage my weekends with a dozen hours of esoterica from around the world, exploring history and genre, taking in the “important” contributions to cinema along with the elevated trash I hold so dear. When Netflix hit the scene, it became an almost too convenient extension of the same impulse: As soon as I had a membership, I top-loaded my queue with 150 or so deep cuts, vital classics and rough-cut gems — stuff one is supposed to see. My Netflix queue become something of a totem, a symbolic demarcation of the sapping of psychic energy that so often attends “growing up.” As the realities of full-time employment set in, the Fassbinders and Cocteaus and Powell & Pressburgers started to slide farther down the list, displaced by whatever contemporary, low-commitment entertainment happened to be of the moment. Concurrently, theaters began shying from limited-releases and fell into line with the tent-pole machine. Streaming became the norm but by then the emotional exhaustion of the day generally left room for short-attention entertainments that wouldn’t overtax my already depleted reserves — serialized television, in other words. It’s a sad state of affairs I’ve been remiss in rectifying. And so I’m thankful to the kind proprietors of the refreshed and rejuvenated Minor Theater and of the Miniplex, where I had the opportunity to be challenged by Hirokazu Koreeda’s Shoplifters and Chang-Dong Lee’s Burning. SHOPLIFTERS. Within the orchestrated chaos of contemporary Tokyo, the pack-ofstrays Shibata family work together to stay together. Packed into grandmother Hatsue’s (Kirin Kiki) too-small house are Osamu (Lily Franky) and Nobuyo (Sakura Andô), ostensible dad and mom to teenaged Aki (Mayu Matsuoka) and pre-adolescent Shota (Jyo Kairi). Osamu works part-time as an unskilled laborer on building sites, Nobuyo in some sort of quasi-Dickensian laundry facility. Aki does her thing in a peep show booth. It’s a struggle to keep everybody fed and clothed, and so Osamu has taken on Shota as an apprentice shoplifter. After a successful raid

in the opening moments of the movie, the two come across a 5-year-old neighbor girl alone and cold and hungry in the dooryard of her house. Together they decide to take her home with them to get fed and warm. Soon enough, they’ve incorporated the little girl, who they’ve named Yuri (Miyu Sasaki), into their family, despite the ongoing news coverage of her missing persons case. As days turn into months into seasons, we come to a sort of inchoate understanding that the Shibata household dynamic is more complicated than it may seem. Koreeda, with whose work I am woefully inexperienced, sets out for and achieves a level of intimacy here with both story and character that are rarely even approached in contemporary cinema. With deceptively delicate camera work, he puts us deep inside the lives of the Shibotas while allowing them to reveal themselves. It’s a masterful example of showing without telling, of editing both before and after the cameras have rolled. In a gradual, immersive transition, we learn what we need to about these characters; in a test of our preconceptions we learn that they are all hiding something and yet also being completely honest. That’s the true achievement here, one that might be missed for lack of patience. Koreeda and his actors present a fiction that is suffused with the stuff of real life, the little crimes we all may or may not commit daily to make life livable, the lies that keep the truth intact. It’s a remarkable and remarkably controlled work that, if perhaps too long, rewards the watching. R. 121M. MINOR. BURNING. Had I not known this was adapted from the Haruki Murakami short story “Barn Burning” from his 1993 collection The Elephant Vanishes, I might not have identified it as such. But that is the beauty of an effective adaptation: It makes the written word something else and new, giving life to it as imagined by a reader who doesn’t share the author’s brain. But with Murakami in mind, I noticed elements of his style throughout. And while Lee’s vision of the story has even more negative space, silence and darkness than I would usually attribute to the author, it is an all the more satisfying — if troubling — adaptation for it. In the course of an unremarkable workday, Jong-su (Ah-In Yoo) encounters a girl from his countryside childhood, Hae-Mi (Jong-seu Jun). She’s cute and flirty, and they


Workshops & Classes

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List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Hey, girl. You’re on my zombie apocalypse team. Burning

strike up a conversation. After a couple of dates, Jong-su is impossibly smitten and Hae-Mi is leaving the country. She asks him to take care of her cat while she vacations in Africa. All well and good, but when she returns, it’s with a handsome, wealthy stranger named Ben (Steven Yeun). This is complicated enough to make Jong-su’s life difficult, let alone the fact that he must tend the family farm while his angry father awaits trial on assault charges. But he also doesn’t think Ben is quite what he seems and the majority of the movie is charged with a silent sense of doubt and dread that must inevitably find voice. There are some exquisitely beautiful images within Burning but it is mostly defined by austere style and its internal approach to the story and its characters. The focus of the narrative is exceptionally narrow but we are offered only rare insights into the internal lives of the characters. In high Murakami fashion, absence and not knowing are defining characteristics, elevated here almost to horror-genre levels. While the movie is a at times almost unbearably slow to build, the climax offers a perfect, terrible, wordless payoff. NR. 148M. MINIPLEX. — John J. Bennett See showtimes at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 4433456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards› Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

A DOG’S WAY HOME. Live action drama in which a lost dog (voiced by Bryce Dallas Howard) searches for her owner cross country. Starring Ashley Judd. PG. 96M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

GONE WITH THE WIND (1939). You really have to see all four hours on the big screen to appreciate the insanity and Vivien Leigh’s eyebrow game. G. 238M. BROADWAY. ON THE BASIS OF SEX. Wear your favorite lace collar to this Ruth Bader Ginsburg (Felicity Jones) biopic. PG13. 120M.

(Kevin Hart) becomes an assistant to a wealthy man with quadriplegia (Bryan Cranston). With Nicole Kidman. PG13. 125M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

Continuing

AQUAMAN. James Wan directs the butched-up ocean superhero’s (Jason Momoa) solo feature with Amber Heard and an army of CG sea creatures. PG13. 143M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

BUMBLEBEE. Transformers spinoff starring Hailee Steinfeld and John Cena. PG13. 113M. BROADWAY.

ESCAPE ROOM. A handful of strangers use their wits to make it out of a deadly series of high-tech immersive puzzles. Starring Taylor Russell and Deborah Ann Woll. PG13. 100M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

GREEN BOOK. The set-up of a racist white man driving a black concert pianist around the South in the ’60s is cringeworthy but Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali give immersive, deeply-felt performances in director Peter Farrelly’s surprisingly restrained film. PG13. 130M. BROADWAY, MINOR.

MARY POPPINS RETURNS. The original super nanny (Emily Blunt) takes on the children of her former charges. With Lin-Manuel Miranda and a freakishly spry Dick Van Dyke. PG. 130M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

THE MULE. Clint Eastwood’s storytelling is as controlled as his performance as an aging, failed father smuggling drugs for a cartel as the DEA closes in. With Bradley Cooper and Michael Peña. R. 116M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET. More video game hijinks voiced by John C. Reilly and Sarah Silverman. PG. 112M. BROADWAY. SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE. Inter-dimensional spider heroes team up in an animated adventure. Starring Shameik Moore, Jake Johnson and Hailee Steinfeld. PG. 117M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

REPLICAS. Keanu Reeves plays a scientist on the run with the family he brought back from the dead in his lab. PG13. 107M.

VICE. Adam McKay’s comprehensive, sometimes frustratingly balanced portrait of Dick Cheney (Christian Bale) from college flameouts to his catastrophic rise to the White House. With Amy Adams. R.

BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

132M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

THE UPSIDE. An inexperienced parolee

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill l

Arts & Crafts WATERCOLOR @ PLUM BLOSSOM STUDIO, ARCATA 6 Fridays $120 (01/18−02/15); (03/01−04/ 05); beg−int 9−11:30 am; int 12:30−3 pm (6 spaces) (707) 601−9955 thaovillagepainter@gmail.com www.thaoart.biz

Dance/Music/Theater/Film GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0131) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (DMT−0131) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m. −8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0131)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0131) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Community Hall 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0131)

50 and Better IS SELF−PUBLISHING FOR YOU? WITH MARGOT GENGER. Explore the independent publishing industry and discover tips from successful indie authors. Thurs., Jan. 31, 2−4:30 p.m. $35 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0110) OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0131) PILATES PLUS: INTRODUCTION TO CORE ENGAGEMENT WITH JOANNE FORNES. Learn to enhance any activity by applying breath, move− ment and core engagement. Wed., Jan. 30, 10:30 a.m.−1 p.m. $25 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0110)

PUBLIC ART 101: TOURING THE MURALS OF OLD TOWN EUREKA WITH GABRIELLE GOPINATH. Learn about street art’s recent history and explore influences of street artists’ and contemporary muralists’ styles during this half−mile walking tour (weather permitting). Sat., Feb. 2, 10:30 a.m.−1 p.m. $35 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0110) REMINDERS OF OUR ONCE EXTENSIVE RAIL− ROAD NETWORK WITH RAY HILLMAN. Compare historical photos and take a field trip to explore surviving railroad equipment, station houses, tres− tles and even a tunnel. Fri., Feb. 1, 10:30 a.m.−4:30 p.m. $50 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0110) SEQUOIA PARK ZOO: AN EVOLVING LEGACY WITH GRETCHEN ZIEGLER. Take a peek at exciting new projects, including the Redwood Canopy Walk. Thurs., Jan. 31, 10:30 a.m.−1 p.m. $35 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0110) THE GIFT OF GRIEVING WITH GINGER OLSEN. Get an overview of the stages of grieving to help you grow in every aspect of life. Wed., Jan. 30, 2− 4:30 p.m. $35 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0110) WINES OF ITALY WITH PAMELA LONG. Learn about and taste a variety of Italian wines. Expand your repertoire and delight your palate with world −class vino Italiano. Sat., Feb. 2, 2−4:30 p.m. $35 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0110)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT New classes begin January 2019. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1101) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0131) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−0131)

Sports & Recreation BECOME A RIVER GUIDE : R&R Guide School March 17−22 .Work Scholarships available www.redwoods−rivers.com 800−429−0090

northcoastjournal.com NORTHCOAST COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL northcoastjournal.com•• Thursday, Thursday,Jan. Jan.10,10,2019 2019• •NORTH

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Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0131) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−1227) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (TS−0131) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0131

Vocational AUTO BODY COLLISION REPAIR Informational meetings Jan 30 or Feb 13! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) CULINARY FUNDAMENTALS Feb 14 − Mar 7. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) EVER WANTED TO BECOME A SPECIAL EDUCA− TION TEACHER? Come to an HSU Orientation @Humboldt County Office of Education. 901 Myrtle, Eureka in the Alder Room on Wed. 1/16/19 @ 4:30. Contact: Bernie Levy, bjl31@humboldt.edu. (V−0301) EXCEL, BEGINNING Feb 12 − 21. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) EXCEL, INTERMEDIATE Feb 26 − Mar 7. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) EXCEL, ADVANCED Mar 26 − Apr 4. Call CR Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707− 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0110) FREE BEGINNING LITERACY CLASS Call College of The Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−1010) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0110) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0110) FREE GED/HISET PREPARATION Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0110)

YOUR CLASS HERE 442-1400 ×314 classified@north coastjournal.com

FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Educa− tion at 70−7476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0110) INJECTIONS Feb 3. One day training! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) IV THERAPY FOR LVNS January 8, 9 & 10, 2019 8am − 8pm. Call CR Workforce and Community Educa− tion for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) LOAN DOCUMENT SIGNING Feb 4 One day training! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) MEDICAL ASSISTING CERTIFICATION REVIEW Jan 12 − Feb 23. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) MICROSOFT PUBLISHER AND POWERPOINT Jan 22 − 24. Call CR Workforce and Community Educa− tion for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) NOTARY Feb 5 OR Feb 6 One day training! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) RETAIL TRAINING FOR YOUTH AND BEYOND Jan 14 − Feb 4, 2019. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110) VENIPUNCTURE Jan 27. One day training! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0110)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDA AWESOMENESS! with Traci Webb. Classes and Professional Trainings: AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & SPRING DETOX. March 1−3 & 8−10. Become an Ayurvedic Massage Therapist. Learn Ayurvedic Warm Oil Massage, Hot Stones Marma Points, Essential Oils + Spring Detox Dead− line 2/19. AYURVEDA LIFE MASTERY! 9−Month Professional AYURVEDA HEALTH & LIFE COACH TRAINING: Starts May 7. Take your Health & Life to the next level! Make a difference not just a living! Register Early Save up to $650! AYURVEDIC SELF−CARE IMMERSION: May 11−12, Yoga~Ayurveda~Lunch, $197 by April 19 ($249 after). Professional AYURVEDIC PRACTITIONER PROGRAM Starts May 7. REGISTER: www.ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601−9025 (W−0214) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs: Medicinal Preparations. Jan 23 − Mar 13, 2019, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2019. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identifica− tion, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Springtime in Tuscany: An Herbal Journey. May 25 − June 5, 2019. Immerse yourself fully in the healing traditions, art, architecture, and of course the food of an authentic Tuscan villa! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−1025)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Legal Notices T.S. No.: 18-21033 A.P.N.: 040206-004 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 2/2/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably esti− mated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor: ELLEN L KEENE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, AND SUSAN E HALL, A MARRIED WOMAN, ALL AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Carrington Foreclosure Services, LLC Recorded 2/10/2006 as Instrument No. 2006− 4474−16 in book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. Date of Sale: 2/5/2019 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: Outside the front entrance to the County Courthouse located at 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $274,134.00 (Estimated) Street Address or other common designa− tion of real property: 410 11TH STREET FORTUNA, CA 95540 A.P.N.: 040−206−004 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designa− tion, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be

be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder’s rights against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obli− gations. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear owner− ship of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be respon− sible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this prop− erty by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this informa− tion. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (844) 477− 7869 or visit this Internet Web site www.STOXPOSTING.com, using the file number assigned to this case 18 −21033. Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is

property, you may call (844) 477− 7869 or visit this Internet Web site www.STOXPOSTING.com, using the file number assigned to this case 18 −21033. Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 01/02/2019 Carrington Foreclosure Services, LLC 1500 South Douglass Road, Suite 150 Anaheim, CA 92806 Automated Sale Information: (844) 477−7869 or www.STOXPOSTING.com for NON− SALE information: 888−313−1969 Vanessa Gomez, Trustee Sale Specialist 1/10, 1/17, 1/24 (19−009)

TS # 18-2575 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED: 10/23/15. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings bank speci− fied in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. TRUSTOR: Brenden Morton, a married mas as his sole and separate property DULY APPOINTED TRUSTEE: Foreclosure Specialists, a General Partnership RECORDED: 10/30/15 AS INSTRU− MENT NO. 2015−020749−8 of Offi− cial Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California. DATE OF SALE: Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: At the front entrance to the County Courthouse at 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 THE COMMON DESIGNATION OF THE PROPERTY IS PURPORTED TO BE: Vacant Land−Directions to the property may be obtained pursuant to a written request submitted to the Beneficiary, Veena K. Menda, Trustee of The Veena K. Menda Revocable Trust utd June 19, 1992, within 10 days from the first publi− cation of this notice at P.O. Box 994465, Redding, CA 96099−4465. PARCEL ONE: Lot 6 in Section 31, Township 11 North, Range 3 East, Humboldt Meridian. PARCEL TWO: A non−exclusive right of way for ingress and egress, 20 feet in width, the center line of which is the center line of the existing road, as to any portion of said road located within Lot 11, the east half of the southwest quarter, the west half of


cation of this notice at P.O. Box 994465, Redding, CA 96099−4465. PARCEL ONE: Lot 6 in Section 31, Township 11 North, Range 3 East, Humboldt Meridian. PARCEL TWO: A non−exclusive right of way for ingress and egress, 20 feet in width, the center line of which is the center line of the existing road, as to any portion of said road located within Lot 11, the east half of the southwest quarter, the west half of the southeast quarter and the southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of said section 31. Said right of way is appurtenant to Parcel One above described and to any lands in the vicinity of Parcel One vested of record in the grantees herein, or any of them, or any lands that may be acquired by the grantees, or any of them, in the vicinity of said Parcel One, together with the right to convey said right of way with said appurtenant land or any resubdivisions thereof. PARCEL THREE: A non−exclusive right of way as to any right, title or interest of the grantor therein, over the road known as Hancorne Road, running from the southerly end of the right of way described in Parcel Two in a general southerly direction to the County Road known as Johnson Road. APN: 533−014−008 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $ 102,749.94 Benefi− ciary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount. The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated above, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this prop− erty lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fee and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at 530−246−2727; Toll Free: 844−333−

California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at 530−246−2727; Toll Free: 844−333− 6766, or visit this Internet Web site: calforeclosures.biz, using the file number assigned to this case: TS # 18−2575.Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. NPP website and sales line number: www.nationwideposting.com Trustee Sales Automated Number: 916−939−0772 DATE: 12/19/18 FORE− CLOSURE SPECIALISTS P.O. Box 994465 REDDING, CA 96099−4465 530−246−2727; Toll Free: 844−333− 6766 Sheena Hunter Foreclosure Specialists is assisting the Benefi− ciary in collecting a debt. Any and all information obtained may be used for that purpose. NPP0345826 To: NORTH COAST JOURNAL 01/ 03/2019, 01/10/2019, 01/17/2019

wood & metal, misc furniture Unit#727 Dylan J Young − generator, saw, desk, trail bike frame, wood chest Unit #814 Gary D Sweaney − glass chess set, old books, clothes misc Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items are sold "as is" and must be removed from the premises within 24 hours. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Deposit of $100.00 is required on each unit purchased. Bring a flashlight and padlock(s). Dated this 3rd and 10th day of January 2019. CA BOND NO. 0336118 (19−002)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code.

01/03, 01/10, 01/17 (19−001)

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at a public auction by competitive bidding on January 18, 2019 at noon, on the premises where said prop− erty has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini−Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as follows. Items to be sold include but are not limited to the following: Unit#162 Marissa Ting −Coleman 5 person tent, Coleman mattress Unit#246 Donald M Lawrence− gamer weapons, swords, Xbox 360 Unit#254 Carolyn F Snow − hope chest, furniture, clothes misc Unit#261 Jennifer R Covert − Coleman stove, 3 person tent, crab trap misc Unit#450 Jeannie K Raya − 10 person free standing tunnel tent, misc Unit#517 Perry Mykham − fishing pole, coolers, baby products, tires, engine stand Unit#705 Dennis F Martin − scrap wood & metal, misc furniture Unit#727 Dylan J Young − generator, saw, desk, trail bike frame, wood chest Unit #814 Gary D Sweaney − glass chess set, old books, clothes misc Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items are sold "as is" and

The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 23rd of January, 2019, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage. The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Jennifer Lenihan, Space # 5013 Margaret Holverson, Space # 5067 Robert Lopez−Fregoso, Space # 5103 Dagan Short, Space # 5118 Heidi Schrack, Space # 5135 Lindsey White, Space # 5274 Gene Tyldsley, Space # 5332 Danielle Miller, Space # 5429 Asika Nicks, Space # 5551 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Richard West, Space # 2117 Kenton Armstrong, Space # 2611 Dixie Rogers, Space # 3114 Justin Alora−Bryant, Space # 3309 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Viviana Hollenbeck, Space # 1105 Paul Woodard, Space # 1227 Kristy Lee, Space # 1312 Jordan Carroll, Space # 1661 Kimberly James, Space # 1719 Bridjett Potter, Space # 1737 Kristopher Koreen, Space # 1787 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Ian Fusi, Space # 108 Lois Stevens, Space # 173 Jonathan Bruce, Space # 229 Julie Saravia, Space # 231 Lois Stevens, Space # 342

The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Ian Fusi, Space # 108 Lois Stevens, Space # 173 Jonathan Bruce, Space # 229 Julie Saravia, Space # 231 Lois Stevens, Space # 342 Jayme Cohn, Space # 471 Jonathan Penrod, Space # 481 Joseph Calvosa, Space # 490 Monique Hernandez, Space # 710 Robert Plitnikas, Space # 745 Monica Robinson, Space # 766 Brooxie Cruse, Space # 785 Angela Maldonado, Space # 853 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 10th day of January, 2019 and 17th day of January, 2019

trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shelley Addison, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 12, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10 (18−331)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00751 The following person is doing Busi− ness as NOR−CAL TAX SERVICES Humboldt 405 West Harris Street Eureka, CA 95503 Charles C Williams 218 Boyle Drive Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Charles C Williams, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 13, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10 (18−330)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00005 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EUREKA SKATE SHOP

(18−333)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00747 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ADDISON LAW Humboldt 2233 H St Eureka, CA 95501 Shelley C Addison 2233 H St. Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 539 G St, Ste 105 Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 365 Eureka, CA 95502 Thavisak Syphanthong 4391 Cedar St Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Thavisak Syphanthong, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 2, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

Continued on next page »

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00772 The following person is doing Busi− ness as JODI LEE BOOKKEEPING SERVICES Humboldt 517 3RD St, Ste 9 Eureka, CA 95501 Jodi L Demontigny 517 3rd St, Ste 9 Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jodi Demontigny, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 21, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 (19−006)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00771 The following person is doing Busi− ness as KIMO Humboldt 303 Dick Smith Rd Fortuna, CA 95540 Dale K Bagley 303 Dick Smith Rd Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Dale K. Basley, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 21, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. 12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17 (18−338) A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Section 17913 of the Business and STATEMENT 18−00762 Professions Code that the regis− The following person is doing Busi− trant knows to be false is guilty of a ness as misdemeanor punishable by a fine THE BIGFOOT not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). Humboldt /s Shelley Addison, Owner 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 (19−008) 1750 Central Ave This statement was filed with the McKinleyville, CA 95519 County Clerk of Humboldt County PO Box 2482 on December 12, 2018 COAST McKinleyville, CAJOURNAL 95519 KELLY E. SANDERS northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH by kt, Humboldt County Clerk LNR Holdings 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10 (18−331) CA 201811710638

33


ness as TOKU

The following person is doing Busi− ness as THE BIGFOOT

Legal Notices

Humboldt 1750 Central Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 PO Box 2482 McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt Continued 1255 CA 96 from previous page Willow Creek, CA 95573 600 F St Ste 3 PMB 422 Arcata, CA 95521 Sacred Earth Apothecary Inc CA C3858708 1255 CA 96 Willow Creek, CA 95573

LNR Holdings CA 201811710638 2334 Sutter Rd McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ray Noggle, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 18, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17 (18−335)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00764 The following person is doing Busi− ness as TOKU Humboldt 1255 CA 96 Willow Creek, CA 95573 600 F St Ste 3 PMB 422 Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Edward Janicki, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 19, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 1/3, 1/10, 1/17, 1/24 (19−003)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00767 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SOUTH FORK RIVER RANCH LLC 130 Carlson Lane Eureka, CA 95503 PO box 2095 McKinleyville, CA 95519

Humboldt South Fork River Ranch LLC NOTICE OF RIGHT TO PROCEEDS FROM THE CA 201814510659 Sacred Earth Apothecary Inc CLAIM EXCESS PROPERTY 130 Carlson Lane CA C3858708 SALE OF TAX-DEFAULTED 95503 1255 CAMade 96 pursuant to Section 4676, Eureka, RevenueCAand Taxation Code Willow Creek, CA 95573 Excess proceeds have resulted from the sale of tax-defaulted property The business conducted by a on November 16th-19th 2018, listed below. Parties ofisinterest, as defined Limited Liability Thebybusiness is conducted by aTaxation Code California Revenue and Section 4675,Company. are entitled to The date registrant commenced to Corporation. claim the excess proceeds. transact business under the ficti− The date registrant All claims mustcommenced be in writingtoand must contain sufficient information tious business or the nameexcess listed transact business under the ficti− s right and proof to establish a claimant’ to all or anyname part of on Not tious businessClaims namefiled or name proceeds. with listed the county above more than oneApplicable year after recordatheonallDecember information this above Applicable tion on of Not the tax collector’s deed to theI declare purchaser 18,in2018 statement is true and correct. I declare all information in this cannotthe be considered. A registrant who declares as true statement is true and correct. ASSESSMENT NO. as true ADDRESS/LOCATION EXCESSpursuant PROCEEDSto any material matter A registrant who declares Section 17913 of the Business and any material matter pursuant to Rd, Shelter 109-032-024-000 508 Beach Cove $2,498.47 Professions Code that the regis− Section 17913 of the Business and be false is guilty of a Professions Code that the211regis− 109-201-022-000 Beach Rd, Sheltertrant Cove knows to$11,101.87 misdemeanor punishable by a fine trant knows to be false is guilty of a 109-271-050-000 No Situs, Shelter Cove $680.67 not to exceed one thousand dollars misdemeanor punishable by a fine ($1,000). not to exceed one thousand dollarsRd, Shelter 110-131-033-000 117 Parsons Cove $8,582.11 /s Ryan Holcomb, Owner ($1,000). 111-011-035-000 Shelter Cove $1,154.39 statement was filed with the /s Edward Janicki, CEO 622 Upper Pacific Dr,This County Humboldt County This statement was filed with 111-071-018-000 145 Duthe Luard Dr, Shelter Cove Clerk of $193.83 on December 20, 2018 County Clerk of Humboldt County 111-071-019-000 151 Du Luard Dr, Shelter CoveE. SANDERS $1,577.72 KELLY on December 19, 2018 by sm, Humboldt County Clerk KELLY E.111-112-016-000 SANDERS No Situs, Shelter Cove $3,118.62 by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 (19−005) 202-102-027-0001/3, 1/10, 1/17,No1/24 Situs, Fortuna (19−003)

208-221-007-000

$5,716.94

No Situs, Dinsmore

$37,065.33

223-181-039-000

549 Timber Ln, Garberville

$27,862.09

520-081-002-000

114 Lundblade St, Orick

$16,324.94

Claim forms and information regarding filing procedures may be obtained at the Humboldt County Tax Collector’s Office, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501, on our website www.humboldtgov.org/tax or by calling (707) 476-2450 or toll free (877) 448-6829 between 8:30 am-Noon and 1:00pm-5:00pm, Monday through Friday.

34

130 Carlson Lane Eureka, CA 95503 PO box 2095 McKinleyville, CA 95519 Humboldt South Fork River Ranch LLC CA 201814510659 130 Carlson Lane Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ryan Holcomb, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 20, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 (19−005)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00768 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SUNKISSED BOSWORTH CREEK FARMS LLC Humboldt 36490 Alderpoint Rd Blocksburg, CA 95514 Sunkissed Bosworth Creek Farms LLC CA 201828110097 36490 Alderpoint Rd Blocksburg, CA 95514 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Penny Harris, Primary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 20, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by se, Humboldt County Clerk 12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17 (18−336)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−007770

4132 Soule Street Eureka, CA 95503 Rita R Keating 4132 Soule Street Eureka, CA 95503 Sandra J Saldana 4056 Walnut Drive #F Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sandra J. Saldana, Co−Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 21, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17 (18−337)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00004 The following person is doing Busi− ness as LUCKY STAR REALTY Humboldt 430 Grotto St Eureka, CA 95501 PO Box 365 Eureka, CA 95502 Thavisak Syphanthong 4391 Cedar St Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Thavisak Syphanthong, Broker/ Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 2, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 (19−007)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00014

The following person is doing Busi− ness as EMERALD CARAVAN Humboldt 4132 Soule Street Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 890 L Street Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by a General Partnership.

McKinleyville, CA 95519

Kathleen A. Salamunovich 2966 Woodland Court Arcata, CA 95521

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Mark Friedrich, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on December 18, 2018 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kathleen A. Salamunovich, Owner/Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 3, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 (19−004)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00020 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SOURCE NURSERY Humboldt 5550 West End Road, Ste 6 Arcata, CA 95521 Yager Creek Farm, LLC California 201615310078 5550 West End Road, Ste. 6 Arcata, CA 95521

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRPA FISH BIOLOGISTS 890 L Street Arcata, CA 95521

Rita R Keating 4132 Soule Street Eureka, CA 95503 Sandra J Saldana 4056 Walnut Drive #F NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com Eureka, CA 95503

Arcata, CA 95521

Kathleen A. Salamunovich 2966 Woodland Court Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed

The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Anthony Douglas Frink, Member/ Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on January 7, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 1/10, 1/17, 1/24, 1/31 (19−010)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 18−00763 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BLUE SKY ROOFER Humboldt 1716 Van Eaton Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Clear−sighted Inspections CA Corporation C4094958 1716 Van Eaton Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to

12/27, 1/3, 1/10, 1/17 (18−334)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME KENNETH WALTER CHMIEL CASE NO. CV181038 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: KENNETH WALTER CHMIEL for a decree changing names as follows: Present name KENNETH WALTER CHMIEL to Proposed Name KENNETH WALTER WILSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 7, 2018 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: December 7, 2018 Filed: December 7, 2018 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court 12/20, 12/27, 1/3, 1/10 (18−332)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

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loses its raft, it will sink and die. Other hazards include being eaten by juvenile sea turtles. The violet snail’s prey include floating “jellies,” such as the Portuguese man-o-war and by-the-wind sailors. As you may know, the Portuguese man-o-war has a powerful sting, so that’s why I said the snail’s prey could take down a human. The Type 2 person says, “You’re changing your story! That totally verifies the snailtrail conspiracy!” No, that’s simply a clarification following some harmless hyperbole. It doesn’t prove anything. The Type 3 person says, “Do they ever wash up nearby so we might see some for ourselves?” Yes. In April of 2015 I found dozens washed up near the Mad River mouth, mixed in with stranded by-the-wind sailors. Keep an eye out for them whenever you see those blue jelly-like things washed up. “I knew it,” says the Type 2 person. “The blue jelly things are part of the conspiracy, too. Your overlords are obviously trying to cover up their snailtrail mind control plot by concocting a series of lies involving many high-level politicians, the military and a fake super-snail that can supposedly save us from our enemies if we’ll only look out to sea instead of right under our own noses! Your so-called column in this so-called paper has been advancing this agenda in coded language all along. Plus, plus … Fukushima!” Wow, Type 2 person ... You are right — it’s an inside job. You’d better post a link to this story on your social media before it’s too late. And tell your followers to click “like” or else, um, my handlers will add fluoride to the world’s supply of flu vaccines. I turn to wink at the Type 3 people but they already went to the beach. ● Biologist Mike Kelly writes science-based satire as M. Sid Kelly on Amazon.

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29. Making a mess of 30. Actress Perlman of “Cheers” 31. HBO series that won 2018 Emmys for Lead Actor and Supporting Actor 33. Accusation from a justice to a lawyer, perhaps ... or what can be said to 17-, 22-, 48- and 54-Across? 40. “Be ____ ...” (“Help me out ...”) 41. Has a bug 42. Hold back 46. “Meet the Press” guest, maybe 48. “Ms. Supreme Court justice, don’t forget about city chiefs, as well!” 51. Congress, with “the” 52. Grammy-winning singer India.____ 53. Three-time Frazier

foe 54. “Mr. Supreme Court justice, give your sphere a break!” 61. Write 62. First in a line of Russian autocrats 63. TWA competitor 64. Printemps follower 65. Washtub 66. Italian city known for its prosciutto and cheese

9. “Solve for x” subj. 10. Grp. with a co-pay 11. Tutti-____ 12. Fall 13. It gets in hot water 18. English horn, e.g. 21. Male delivery 22. Small salmon 23. In ____ of 24. A long way off 25. Swashbuckling Flynn 26. Explore, as the Internet 27. “____ Silver, away!” DOWN 1. Month with two natl. 28. Get blubbery 31. “____ sera” holidays 32. Georgia’s capital: 2. The Cavaliers, on Abbr. scoreboards 34. “I could ____ 3. Stat for A-Rod or horse!” Hammerin’ Hank 4. Prey for a barracuda 35. 2004-11 Lakers forward Lamar ____ 5. Clichéd company 36. Many a one-star slogan Yelp review 6. Reject, as a lover 37. Singer with the 4x 7. Org. platinum album “No 8. Root word?

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The violet-shelled Janthina snail.

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

By Mike Kelly

hen it comes to snail appreciation, there are three types of people. Type 1 people display no curiosity about snails and don’t want to learn anything new anyway. Fortunately, these shit-for-brains wouldn’t read this newspaper, so I haven’t offended anyone yet. Type 2 people are snail-curious and may actively seek information about snails but they’ll only accept information that supports what they already believe. Fortunately, nobody places themselves in this category, so I still haven’t offended anyone. Type 3 people are also curious snail information seekers but they typically use objective reality as the basis for their beliefs. These people go without bias to wherever snail science takes them. So, let’s see what happens when Type 2s and 3s are presented with hitherto unknown radical snail facts. Everyone knows that snails crawl along the forest floor, on the bottom of a tide pool or through gardens. They always ride a trail of slime, munching on plants or gunk as they cruise along. So far both parties are comfortable. But now I tell them that there are beautiful carnivorous snails that build rafts and drift around on the high seas hunting their prey — prey that could take down a human. The Type 2 person says, “I’ve never heard of that before, so snails don’t do it. You’re obviously a shill for the Snailluminati. Your lies prove that the shadow government covertly places chemicals in snailtrails to control the minds of the workers!” But the Type 3 person says, “Beautiful rafting predatory snails? Tell me more!” Thank you, open-minded Type 3 person. It’s called the violet snail. There are several species around the world that are normally found in tropical and subtropical waters. Its genus name is Janthina, which conveniently means “violet colored.” Its raft is made of fortified bubbles that the snail holds onto with its foot. If the snail

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The Violet Snail Conspiracy washedup@northcoastjournal.com

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Astrology

Free Will Astrology

Cartoons

Week of Jan. 10, 2019 By Rob Brezsny

Homework: I’ve gathered all of the long-term, big-picture horoscopes I wrote for you: https://bit.ly/YourGloriousStory2019

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): Computer-generated special effects used in the 1993 film Jurassic Park may seem modest to us now but at the time they were revolutionary. Inspired by the new possibilities revealed, filmmakers like Stanley Kubrick, George Lucas and Peter Jackson launched new projects they had previously thought to be beyond their ability to create. In 2019, I urge you to go in quest of your personal equivalent of Jurassic Park’s pioneering breakthroughs. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may be able to find help and resources that enable you to get more serious about seemingly unfeasible or impractical dreams. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I’m a big proponent of authenticity. I almost always advise you to be yourself with bold candor and unapologetic panache. Speak the truth about your deepest values and clearest perceptions. Be an expert about what really moves you and devote yourself passionately to your relationships with what really moves you. But there is one exception to this approach. Sometimes it’s wise to employ the “fake it until you make it” strategy: to pretend you are what you want to be with such conviction that you ultimately become what you want to be. I suspect now is one of those times for you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The students’ dining hall at Michigan State University serves gobs of mayonnaise. But in late 2016, a problem arose when 1250 gallons of the stuff became rancid. Rather than simply throw it away, the school’s Sustainability Officer came up with a brilliant solution: load it into a machine called an anaerobic digester, which turns biodegradable waste into energy. Problem solved! The transformed rot provided electricity for parts of the campus. I recommend you regard this story as a metaphor for your own use. Is there anything in your life that has begun to decay or lose its usefulness? If so, can you convert it into a source of power? CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you grow vegetables, fruits and grains on an acre of land, you can feed twelve people. If you use that acre to raise meat-producing animals, you’ll feed at most four people. But to produce the meat, you’ll need at least four times more water and twenty times more electric power than you would if you grew the plants. I offer this as a useful metaphor for you to consider in the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you should prioritize efficiency and value. What will provide you with the most bang for your bucks? What’s the wisest use of your resources? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Modern kids don’t spend much time playing outside. They have fun in natural environments only half as often as their parents did while growing up. In fact, the average child spends less time in the open air than prison inmates. And today’s unjailed adults get even less exposure to the elements. But I hope you will avoid that fate in 2019. According to my astrological estimates, you need to allocate more than the usual amount of time to feeling the sun and wind and sky. Not just because it’s key to your physical health, but also because many of your best ideas and decisions are likely to emerge while you’re outdoors. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): NASA landed its robotic explorer Opportunity on Mars in January of 2004. The craft’s mission, which was supposed to last for 92 days, began by taking photos and collecting soil samples. More than 14 years later, the hardy machine was still in operation, continuing to send data back to Earth. It far outlived its designed lifespan. I foresee you being able to generate a comparable marvel in 2019, Virgo: a stalwart resource or influence or situation that will have more staying power than you could imagine. What could it be? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1557, Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde invented the equals sign (=). Historical records don’t

tell us when he was born so we don’t know his astrological sign. But I’m guessing he was a Libra. Is there any tribe more skillful at finding correlations, establishing equivalencies and creating reciprocity? In all the zodiac, who is best at crafting righteous proportions and uniting apparent opposites? Who is the genius of balance? In the coming months, my friend, I suspect you will be even more adept at these fine arts than you usually are. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There’s a modest, one-story office building at 1209 North Orange Street in Wilmington, Delaware. More than 285,000 businesses from all over the U.S. claim it as their address. Why? Because the state of Delaware has advantageous tax laws that enable those businesses to save massive amounts of money. Other buildings in Delaware house thousands of additional corporations. It’s all legal. No one gets in trouble for it. I bring this to your attention in the hope of inspiring you to hunt for comparable situations: ethical loopholes and workarounds that will provide you with extra benefits and advantages. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): People in the Solomon Islands buy many goods and services with regular currency, but also use other symbols of worth to pay for important cultural events like staging weddings and settling disputes and expressing apologies. These alternate forms of currency include the teeth of flying foxes, which are the local species of bat. In that spirit and in accordance with current astrological omens, I’d love to see you expand your sense of what constitutes your wealth. In addition to material possessions and funds in the bank, what else makes you valuable? In what other ways do you measure your potency, your vitality, your merit? It’s a favorable time to take inventory. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1984, singer-songwriter John Fogerty released a new album whose lead single was “The Old Man Down the Road.” It sold well. But trouble arose soon afterward when Fogerty’s former record company sued him in court, claiming he stole the idea for “The Old Man Down the Road” from “Run Through the Jungle.” That was a tune Fogerty himself had written and recorded in 1970 while playing with the band Creedence Clearwater Revival. The legal process took a while but he was ultimately vindicated. No, the courts declared, he didn’t plagiarize himself, even though there were some similarities between the two songs. In this spirit, I authorize you to borrow from a good thing you did in the past as you create a new good thing in the future. There’ll be no hell to pay if you engage in a bit of self-plagiarism. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book is a collection of fables that take place in India. Three movies have been made based on it. All of them portray the giant talking snake named Kaa as an adversary to the hero Mowgli. But in Kipling’s original stories, Kaa is a benevolent ally and teacher. I bring this to your attention to provide context for a certain situation in your life. Is there an influence with a metaphorical resemblance to Kaa: misinterpreted by some people but actually quite supportive and nourishing to you? If so, I suggest you intensify your appreciation for it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Virginia Woolf thought that her Piscean lover Vita Sackville-West was a decent writer but a bit too fluid and effortless. Self-expression was so natural to Sackville-West that she didn’t work hard enough to hone her craft and discipline her flow. In a letter, Woolf wrote, “I think there are odder, deeper, more angular thoughts in your mind than you have yet let come out.” I invite you to meditate on the possibility that Woolf’s advice might be useful in 2019. Is there anything in your skill set that comes so easily that you haven’t fully ripened it? If so, develop it with more focused intention. ●

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

@ncj_of_humboldt

@northcoastjournal


Employment Opportunities

sequoiapersonnel.com

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262. HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. 707−725−3611  DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com

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2930 E St., Eureka, CA 95501

(707) 445.9641

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custo− dians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

Route Driver • Laborers Investment Administrator CPA • Bookkeeper • Job Coach Administrative Assistant Maintenance Person default

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CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with an extra bedroom to help support and care for adults with developmental delays. Receive ongoing support, training, and a generous monthly stipend. Call Sharon for more information at 707-442-4500 ext 16 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more. default

CITY OF FORTUNA

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS/ CITY ENGINEER $89,312-$108,662/YR, FULL-TIME

Under the administrative direction of the City Manager, to plan, organize, direct, and review the functions and activities of the City’s Public Works Department and Engineering Department to perform a wide variety of functions, and complex engineering assignments, to plan, and administer the development, maintenance and repair of City facilities, parks, trails, open spaces, and roads; be responsible for the design and inspection of Public Work projects, to review and approve subdivision development plans, and perform related work as required. Must be 18 and have valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4 pm Friday, January 18, 2019.

Changing Tides Family Services is RAPIDLY GROWING!! Several new and exciting employment opportunities are available:

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST – $17.43/hour VISITATION SPECIALIST – $14.83/hour PROCESSING SPECIALIST – $12.56/hour MENTAL HEALTH CASE MANAGER – $18/hour These full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays, paid health, dental, vision, 401(k) and life insurance

INTERMITTENT MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST – $18/hour Please see job descriptions on our website for comprehensive list of requirements and detailed list of duties.

For ALL positions candidates: Must be able to pass DOJ/FBI criminal history fingerprint clearance. Application available at www. changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or by calling (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. Changing Tides Family Services is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, national origin, ancestry, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, age, disability, or on any other inappropriate basis in its processes of recruitment, selection, promotion, or other conditions of employment.

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.”

Join our dynamic team and support the UIHS vision!

This week’s featured jobs:

HR Supervisor FT – Arcata

This is a great opportunity for an HR Generalist ready to take the next step. You will assist the HR Director with all functions within human resources with a primary focus on management of benefits programs, leaves of absence, policies, procedures, job descriptions, employee relations, new employee orientation and HR personal files accuracy and integrity. You will be the primary point of contact in the absence of the HR Director, coordinate with the Recruiter, and supervise the HR Administrative Assistant. We are at the start of a review and enhancement of all our HR programs so be ready for a fast paced adventure.

RN/Clinical Nurse FT – Arcata Assist in the day-to-day operations of the clinic by providing appropriate and culturally sensitive care to UIHS clients. Utilizes good teamwork and communication skills to maintain positive relationships. Requires valid CA RN license.

Registered Dental Hygienist PT – Arcata

Provide general preventative dental care designed to preserve teeth and prevent the spread of oral disease. Perform full professional dental oral prophylaxis exam including preliminary exam, charting and preventative education.

Public Health Nurse/ RN FT – Elk Valley

Assist the Public Health Nurse Manager to administer community health care programs that meet the health needs of UIHS. Visit homes to determine and develop plan to meet needs of client and family. Provide needed community nursing services. Requires valid CA RN license.

Van Driver for Elder Nutrition PT – Smith River

Drive bus/van to transport Elders to and from the congregate meal site. Deliver meals to clients in the Title VI Elder Nutrition Program. Assist clients with transportation needs and Title VI program requirements. Perform necessary functions for maintenance of vehicle and records. Requires valid CA driver’s license. Our job application and all of our open opportunities with full job descriptions are on our website unitedindianhealthservices. org/jobs. Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with 42 CFR 136.42 American Indian Preference shall be given.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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open door open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

NOW SEEKING:

Recovery Support Specialist

Specialty Behavioral Health Clinician

Open Door Community Health Centers offers an array of services to our surrounding communities. Our Recovery Support Specialist works one-onone and in groups with patients the help them overcome substance abuse dependencies.

(LCSW/LMFT/Psy.D./Ph.D.)Substance Abuse Treatment experience required NorthCountry Clinic, Arcata

Humboldt County Office of Education

Licensed Vocation Nurse (LVN)/Instructional Assistant 7 Hrs./Day $14.37-$20.85/Hr., DOE Qualifications: Requires graduation from high school, a valid LVN certificate, and passage of the Paraprofessional Exam. Training or experience with children desirable. Position includes prorated medical/dental/vision benefits for employee and family and PERS retirement. The successful candidate will be required to pass a fingerprint clearance with the Department of Justice and show proof of eligibility to work in the United States Applications available at HCOE or online: www.hcoe.org/pers/appinfo.php Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501

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The Recovery Support Specialist facilitates support groups, assists with the integration of the Suboxone Program and Needle Exchange Programs, develops curriculum and educational material for substance abuse programs, and works alongside patients and families to create a specific care plan that fits their schedule. This position requires a hardworking individual who is patient, caring and community minded. California Drug and Alcohol Counselor certification required. Minimum two years experience required. Experience and familiarity with community resources is a bonus! Position Available in: Arcata For details and online applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com default

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS Come join our inter-disciplinary, patient centered end-of-life care team. We offer outstanding benefits, competitive wages, flexible schedule options, and professional growth opportunities.

For details and online applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com

CITIES OF ARCATA, EUREKA & FORTUNA

ENTRY LEVEL–DISPATCHER TEST Are you interested in a career as a Police Dispatcher at one of the above agencies? Attend our next test session at 9 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 29th in Eureka. The “no study needed” test is 3 ½ hours, free of charge and passing scores qualify you for employment opportunities! Visit www.cityofarcata.org for a test reservation form to secure your space. EOE default

For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350 #0991 Survey Specialist

RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $30.19-39.39 2/1/19

#1041 JOM Tutors

RG/PT WEITCHPEC OR EUREKA $13.68/15.22/16.91 OUF

Nurses

#1056 Social Worker

Benefitted 30-40 hrs/wk and Per Diem positions available. Current California RN license and graduation from an accredited nursing program required.

RG/FT EUREKA/KLAMATH $25.12-35.96 1/11/19

Speech Therapist

TEMP KLAMATH UNPAID INTERNSHIP OUF

RG/FT ALL AREAS $25.12-35.96 1/11/19

#1064 Guidance Technician II #070 Law Clerk

Contracted position. Current California Speech Pathology license and at least one year experience in speech therapy in an adult rehabilitation setting required.

#1077 Youth Leadership Advocate

Chaplain

#1078 Cultural Resource Specialist

Temporary 30-40 hrs/wk position providing spiritual care to Hospice patients and their families.

RG/FT KLAMATH $27.15-34.28 1/11/19

For more information or to apply visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org

Community Health Centers

#1074 Construction Manager

RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $30.19-39.39 2/1/19 RG/PT WEITCHPEC $16.91-22.06 1/11/19

RG/FT KLAM/WEITCHPEC $20.72-27.03 1/11/19

#1079 Police Sergeant #1081 Social Worker

RG/FT KLAMATH $25.12-32.78 1/11/19

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

MAINTENANCE WORKER I/II – PARKS DIVISION $2,500 – $3,339 MONTHLY PLUS EXCELLENT BENEFITS The City of Eureka is currently hiring for two Maintenance Worker positions with our Parks Division. One position is full-time and one is regular part-time. These positions perform a variety of semi-skilled labor in the maintenance of City parks, public spaces and infrastructure. Desirable qualifications include a combination of education equivalent to graduation from high school, and at least 1 year of construction, maintenance, or landscaping experience. For a full job description and to apply, please visit our website at www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. EOE Applications will be accepted until 5 pm on Thurs., January 17th, 2019


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  

REGISTERED NURSE

            

VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR/OUTREACH SPECIALIST, LONG TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM, EUREKA Compensation: $16/hour Employment type: Part – time, non – exempt position (28 hours/week, Monday – Thursday) Non – profit organization. Responsibilities include marketing and community outreach activities to promote awareness of Long Term Care Ombudsman Program (LTCOP); recruiting & recognition of volunteers; long term care facilities; and working with residents and families to resolve complaints.

MANAGER, INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE

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Compensation: $23/hour Employment type: Part time – non – exempt

   

positions 32 hours/week Monday – Thursday Responsible for the day – to – day management and supervision of Information and Assistance (I&A), Volunteer Driver Program and other services in Humboldt county. Work with community members, local governmental and non – profit agencies, committees, and boards as appropriate to ensure coordination and provision of responsive and accessible services.

    

HICAP (HEALTH INSURANCE & ADVOCACY PROGRAM) COUNSELOR, EUREKA

  

Compensation: $16/hr Employment type: Part – time,

 

 

                 

non – exempt position (32 hours/week, Monday – Thursday) Non – profit organization. Provide Supplement Plans, Medicare Prescription Drug Plans and long – term care insurance. Must be have excellent computer skills and able to understand and clearly communicate complex information. This position has the possibility of progressing to a management – level position.

TO APPLY 1. 2. 3. 4.

All positions open until filled. Submit: Up – to – date A1AA employment application found on line at www.a1aa.org. Resume Cover letter Three letters of recommendation Email or Mail to: mkraft@a1aa.org, Maggie Kraft, MSW, Executive Director, A1AA, 434 7th Street, Eureka, CA 95501

Planned Parenthood Northern California is seeking a Part-

Time (24 hours per week) Registered Nurse to serve our clients at our Eureka Health Center. The nurse will function as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide patient care in the assigned health center’s surgical abortion program under the supervision of the Nurse Manager. WHY JOIN PLANNED PARENTHOOD NORTHERN CALIFORNIA? • We believe everyone counts and provide care without judgment. • We are committed to a diverse and inclusive environment and proudly embrace the reproductive justice movement. • We practice evidence-based medicine while maintaining responsible business practices, to ensure that we will always be here for our patients. • We remind each other why we are here. Together, our mission and purpose is our driving force to care for people and be of service. BENEFITS • 100% employer-paid base medical plans for single coverage (30+ hours); many other benefits available including dental, vision, life, AD&D, LTD, and FSAs • Generous 403(b) matching contribution • Paid Time Off accrual effective immediately • Eight paid holidays per year; plus an additional floating holiday PERKS • Detailed Onboarding and Training Program: • Extensive training program customized to the needs and experiences of each nurse involving peer to peer training, proctoring, and direct supervision by the nurse manager • Become a valuable advocate and specialist in women’s health and abortion care • Gain background and experience encompassing all methods of contraception and STI screening, treatment, and prevention. • Direct access to Nurse Manager and Medical Services leadership throughout training and employment • Affiliate-wide nurse meetings providing ongoing education, professional development, and peer support • Public Service Loan Forgiveness Employer QUALIFICATIONS • Current California RN or LVN license. • Current ACLS certificate. • Experience in reproductive health care preferred. • Bilingual English/Spanish preferred. • Reliable automobile transportation and a valid CA Driver’s License and insurance preferred. JOB DUTIES • Provide pre-, peri- and post-operative surgical abortion care including emergency management • Create a warm environment for recovery room patients • Educate and counsel patients in birth control options; prescribe contraceptives (RN only) • Assure complete and accurate medical charting • Work closely with non-licensed staff and multidisciplinary team to deliver the highest quality care Planned Parenthood Northern California champions healthy communities and increases access to quality health care, information and reproductive freedom by providing medical services, education, and advocacy. We provide healthcare and education services to 136,000 adults and youth every year at 17 sites located throughout 20 Northern California counties. Planned Parenthood Northern California offers high-quality, affordable health care to all, regardless of income or insurance status. We care. No matter what! Our experienced and caring medical staff gives each client honest information and personal attention. We provide a full range of services including: birth control, breast exams, cancer screenings, medication and surgical abortion, pregnancy testing and counseling, prenatal care, PrEP and nPEP to prevent HIV infection, STD screening and treatment, vasectomy and infertility services, gender-affirming hormone therapy, and more.

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INTERESTED IN A CAREER IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH? A CAREER TO USE YOU LIVED EXPERIENCE AS A TOOL TO SUPPORT OTHERS? LOOKING FOR AN EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO YOUR CAREER AND WELL−BEING? Crestwood Behavioral Health Center is looking for On−Call case managers, recovery coaches, nurses, cooks, housekeepers, AM/PM/NOC shifts to join the Team. This is an incredible opportunity to get psych training and experience, as well as get your foot into our 20−facility California wide organiza− tion. Benefits include sick time accrual & 401 K, and lots of training. Apply at: 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka 707−442−5721

CLAIMS TECHNICIAN Are you an experienced Customer Service professional looking for a change? Start the new year with a new career! State Compensation Insurance Fund has an opening for a Claims Technician in our Administrative Support Unit. We are looking for an enthusiastic individual to join our team. For more information: www.jobs.ca.gov (JC−138696) Submit resumes to: talentacquisition@scif.com We offer an EXCELLENT benefits package! www.statefundca.com default

  

SoHum Health is HIRING Interested applicants are encouraged to visit and apply online at www.SHCHD.org or in person at 733 Cedar Street, Garberville (707) 923-3921

CURRENT JOB OPENINGS

CLINIC MANAGER – REGISTERED NURSE

Full-Time position. Current California RN license and BLS certification required. Work closely with the medical providers and provide leadership and management within the Rural Health Clinic. 8-hour shifts in our outpatient Rural Health Clinic.

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE – CLINIC

Full Time position. Current California LVN license and BLS certification required. Work 8-hour shifts in our outpatient Rural Health Clinic. Advancement opportunities available!

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE

Full Time position. Current LVN license and CPR certification required. Work 12-hour shifts in our 8-bed skilled nursing facility.

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTANT (CNA)

Full Time or Part Time; 12 hour shifts; minimum 2 days a week. Direct Patient Care, activities with the residents/ patients. Must possess CNA Certificate and CPR Certification.

SECURITY WORKER

Per Diem/On-call, relief. Nights required, 7:00 pm – 7:00 am. Security certification preferred.

REFERRAL COORDINATOR

Per Diem position, day shift. Responsible for making patient referral appointments, obtaining necessary authorizations for the appointments, and tracking that the appointments were kept and consultation or other documentation is received by the Clinic. 1 year experience preferred. New hires qualify for benefits as soon as they begin employment! SHCHD minimum wage start at $15.50 per hour featuring an exceptional benefits package, including an employee discount program for services offered at SHCHD.

CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH COORDINATOR, Arcata Support children, families & staff in a preschool/ playgroup setting by observing, providing consultation & develop behavior plans. Train parents & staff on social/emotional skills development. Req. BA or BS degree in Child Mental Health, Child Development, or related field. MSW/LCSW prefer. 4 yrs. exp. in 0-5 children’s prog. F-T (partial yr, 8-wk layoff): 40 hrs/wk (Mon-Fri); $960.98-$1,009.03/per wk. First Review Date: 01/11/2019

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Eureka Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a Toddler prog. 6-12 ECE units prefer or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months exp. working w/ children. P/T 20 hrs/wk $12.15$13.40/hr. Open Until Filled

CLASSROOM ASSISTANT, Eureka Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a Toddler prog. 6-12 ECE units prefer or enrolled in ECE classes & have 6 months exp. working w/ children. P/T 28 hrs/wk $12.15$13.40/hr. Open Until Filled

ASSISTANT TEACHER, Arcata Assist teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children. Min. of 6-12 ECE units & 6 months exp. working w/ children, prefer. P/T 28 hrs/wk. $12.15-$13.40/ hr. Open Until Filled Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

Submit your Calendar Events ONLINE or by E-MAIL @ northcoastjournal.com / calendar@northcoastjournal.com PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

      

             

K’ima:w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

TRIBAL WELLNESS PROJECT COORDINATOR DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5 PM, JANUARY 23, 2019. DIABETES CLERK/DATA COORDINATOR DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5 PM, JANUARY 23, 2019. CERTIFIED DATA ENTRY CLERK DEADLINE TO APPLY IS 5 PM, JANUARY 16, 2019 DIRECTOR OF NURSES - DON SENIOR RADIOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGIST PHARMACY TECHNICIAN PHYSICIAN DENTAL HYGIENIST RN (MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT) RN CARE MANAGER CERTIFIED ALCOHOL AND DRUG COUNSELOR ALL POSITIONS ARE OPEN UNTIL FILLED, UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com


W E

WE WANT YOUR TRADE PAID FOR OR NOT!

G O O D

W A N T Y O U R T R A D E S P U S H P U L L

Sé Habla Español

WE WANT YOUR TRADE PAID FOR OR NOT!

2010 Chevrolet Impala LS

2004 BMW X5 4.4i

2011 Hyundai Sonata GLS

7,995

2016 Hyundai Elantra SE

12,995

16,995

P U L L D R A G T H E M I N

2017 Hyundai Veloster

14,995

$

2010 Toyota Tundra Double Cab

17,995

$

22,995

2016 Nissan Frontier Crew Cab

22,995

$

$

11,995

$

44,429 miles #133739

2015 Toyota Corolla S Plus

2017 Nissan Altima 2.5

15,995

15,995

$

$

29,453 miles #290260

41,568 miles #184309

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan GT

2015 Cadillac ATS

18,995

20,995

$

2WD 113,144 miles #097966

40,404 miles #301586

2017 Chevrolet Sonic LT

Manual 57,810 miles #E012950

40,775 miles #HU309907

$

2016 Honda Accord EX-L

9,995

110,801 miles #TG19431

$

93,933 miles #BH238958

44,659 miles #739958

Y O U R T R A D E S P U S H

8,995

2014 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport ES

$

45,726 miles #672814

23,995

2013 GMC Sierra 2500 HD Extended Cab SLE

25,995

28,995

AWD 24,890 miles #206163

2012 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD

36,995

29,995 50,679 miles #A14552

2016 Toyota Tundra CrewMax Limited

2011 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab Lariat

$

Z71 Off-Road Pkg, Diesel, Crew Cab LTZ, 91,527 miles #208293

37,995

$

4WD 46,960 miles #546670

47,995

C R E D I T E V E R Y O N E

33,995

$

4WD 10,996 miles #148832

B A D

$

2018 Subaru Crosstrek 2.0i Premium 2018 Chevrolet Colorado Crew Cab Work Truck 2017 Ford Expedition EL XLT Sport Utility $

C R E D I T

24,995

$

AWD 38,006 miles #699061

$

W E L C O M E G O O D

2014 Infiniti Q50 S 3.7

AWD 60,041 miles #811276

12,534 miles #034623

I S

11,620 miles #133595

2015 Subaru WRX Limited

V6 4WD 27,193 miles #790365

C R E D I T E V E R Y O N E

7,995

$

125,418 miles #103512

$

$

2017 Toyota Camry SE

7,995

B A D

2008 MINI Convertible Cooper

$

142,999 miles #191334

AWD 133,996 miles #V03234

I N W E W A N T

6,995

2012 Chevy Cruze LT

$

$

D R A G T H E M

C R E D I T

$

V8, 6.0L, 4WD, Z71 Off-Road Pkg 34,853 miles #302804

I S

2016 GMC Yukon Denali

49,995

$

$

Turbo Dsl. 4WD Fox Lift. FX4 Off-Road. 57,726 miles #B88792

4WD, DVD System, Sun Roof, Power 52,232 miles #483562

W E L C O M E

1900 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-5454

See our INVENTORY ONLINE:

www.mckinleyvillechevrolet.com

WE BUY CARS

All advertised prices excludes government fees and taxes, any finance charges, and any emission testing charge. On approved credit. Ad exp. 1-31-19

Hours: 9:00-6:00 & 11-4 Monday–Saturday

Mon-Fri

Sunday

Parts & Service 8-5

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

41


Marketplace

Real Estate Computer & Internet

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Come join Mad River Community Hospital and enjoy the satisfaction of working with a team. Yes, you can be happy at work‌here. If you have to work, why not do so with some of the best in the business. We are looking to hire Gardener, Medical Staff Coordinator, Speech Therapist, RN, Certified Hyperbaric Tech and other positions. Look on our web site for openings: www.madriverhospital.com

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

ď —ď Żď ľď Źď ¤ď€ ď šď Żď ľď€ ď ˛ď Ľď ­ď Żď śď Ľď€ ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď Ťď Ľď Ľď °ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ 

Merchandise

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Home Repair

HEALTHCARE CAREER TRAINING ONLINE. Start a New Career in Medical Billing & Coding. Medical Administrative Assistant. To learn more, call Ultimate Medical Academy. 877 −625−9048 (AAN CAN)

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in busi− ness for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Miscellaneous ALL MEN’S CLOTHING HALF PRICE at the Dream Quest Thrift Store where your shopping dollars support local youth! January 10−16. PLUS...Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednesdays, New Sale Thursdays, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Saturdays. Where your shopping dollars support local youth! (530) 629−3006.

707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Musicians & Instructors

NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

SUFFERING FROM AN ADDIC− TION to Alcohol, Opiates, Prescription PainKillers or other DRUGS? There is hope! Call Today to speak with someone who cares. Call NOW 1−855−266− 8685 (AAN CAN)

Marketplace CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com default

ď ‹ď Žď ‰ď †ď …ď€ ď “ď ˆď ď ’ď ?ď …ď Žď ‰ď Žď ‡ ď ď ’ď ƒď ď ”ď ď ď Źď Źď€ ď •ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď€ ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď€Źď€ ď€¸ď€˛ď€ľď€­ď€ˇď€ˇď€śď€° ď …ď •ď ’ď …ď ‹ď ď€şď€ ď Œď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž ď ˆď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ˇď€šď€¸ď€­ď€śď€°ď€°ď€ł

Ä†Ä—Ä›ÄŠÄžÇŻÄ˜Ä?ĆėĕnjēnjÄ?ĎēČĘ ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

Cleaning

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 default

ď Œď Żď śď Šď Žď §ď€ ď ˆď Ąď Žď ¤ď łď€Źď€ 

ď ‰ď Žď łď ´ď Šď ´ď ľď ´ď Ľď€ ď Żď Śď€ ď ˆď Ľď Ąď Źď Šď Žď §ď€ ď ď ˛ď ´ď ł

Other Professionals ď ‰ď Žď€ ď ˆď ?ď ?ď …ď€ ď “ď …ď ’ď –ď ‰ď ƒď …ď “ ď —ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď šď Żď ľ ď ’ď Ľď §ď Šď łď ´ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Žď ľď ˛ď łď Ľď€ ď łď ľď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ ď ?ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď Ąď Źď€ ď ƒď Ąď ˛ď Ľ ď Œď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď€ ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď Ťď Ľď Ľď °ď Šď Žď § ď ď łď łď Šď łď ´ď Ąď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď ¤ď Ąď Šď Źď šď€  ď Ąď Łď ´ď Šď śď Šď ´ď Šď Ľď ł

ď ‰ď Žď łď ľď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď€Śď€ ď ‚ď Żď Žď ¤ď Ľď ¤ ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Žď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Žď€ ď ƒď Ąď Źď Šď Śď Żď ˛ď Žď Šď Ąď€ ď€  ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Żď śď Ľď ˛ď€ ď€˛ď€°ď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€Ą

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Body, Mind & Spirit

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ď ’ď Ľď łď °ď Šď ´ď Ľď€ ď Łď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď€Śď€ ď ­ď ľď Łď ¨ď€  ď ­ď Żď ˛ď Ľ

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,900, 2 pers. $23,900; 3 pers. $26,900; 4 pers. $29,850; 5 pers. $32,250; 6 pers. $34,650; 7 pers. $37,050; 8 pers. $39,450 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Â?‹˜‡•ČˆŽƒ†‡•ČˆŠ‡ƒ”• ”‹Â?Â?‡”•Čˆ—•–‘Â?”†‡”• ‹…Â?Â’ƒÂ?†”‘’ÂˆÂˆÇŁ

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call Now: 1−800−373−6508 (AAN CAN) LUNG CANCER? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 844−898−7142 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. (AAN CAN)

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ď ”ď Żď Źď Źď€ ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€ ď€ąď€­ď€¸ď€ˇď€ˇď€­ď€šď€śď€´ď€­ď€˛ď€°ď€°ď€ą

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

PERMANENT MAKEUP & MICRONEEDLING Custom Cosmetics is now offering microneedling as well as permanent makeup services for the brows, eyes and lips. Microneedling along with stem cell cytokines reduces fine lines, wrinkles, stretch marks and scars. Younger skin in a few months. Are you interested? Call today for a free no obligation consultation. (831) 295−1995 Www.cosmeticinks.com

Est. 1979

ď ”ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď Żď Žď Źď šď€ ď łď ´ď Ąď ´ď Ľď€ ď Ąď °ď °ď ˛ď Żď śď Ľď ¤ď€  ď ­ď Ąď łď łď Ąď §ď Ľď€ ď łď Łď ¨ď Żď Żď Źď€ ď Šď Žď€  ď€Ťď ˜ď ?ď …ď ’ď ?ď ‡ď —ď€ƒď ’ď żď€ƒď ˆď •ď Œď ‘ď Š

ď „ď ď ™ď€ ď€Śď€ ď Žď ‰ď ‡ď ˆď ”ď€ ď ƒď ?ď •ď ’ď “ď …ď “ ď ?ď ’ď ‰ď –ď ď ”ď …ď€ ď ?ď ’ď ď ƒď ”ď ‰ď ƒď … ď “ď ď •ď Žď ď ?ď Ąď łď łď Ąď §ď Ľď€ ď ƒď Źď Šď Žď Šď Łď€ ď “ď °ď Ľď Łď Šď Ąď Ź ď †ď ˛ď Šď ¤ď Ąď šď łď€ ď€Śď€ ď “ď ľď Žď ¤ď Ąď šď ł ď€¤ď€ľď€°ď€Żď ¨ď Żď ľď ˛

T Jonathon Proctor

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

ď€ˇď€łď€šď€ ď€ąď€˛ď ´ď ¨ď€ ď “ď ´ď€Žď€Źď€ ď †ď Żď ˛ď ´ď ľď Žď Ą ď ˇď ˇď ˇď€Žď Źď Żď śď Šď Žď §ď ¨ď Ąď Žď ¤ď łď Šď Žď łď ´ď Šď ´ď ľď ´ď Ľď€Žď Łď Żď ­

Let’s Be Friends

442-1400 Ă—305 northcoastjournal.com


Katherine Fergus

Charlie Tripodi

Kyla Tripodi

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

707.476.0435

WILLOW CREEK - HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,500,000

NEW LIS

TING!

Rental income property w/3 homes on 3 Acres. Public utilities, close to town, private, tenants in place.

DINSMORE - LAND/PROPERTY - $695,000

±15 Acres riverfront property w/ pond, Interim Permit for 1,210 sf OD & 9,080 sf of ML cultivation space, temporary state permit, home barn, and more!

BAYSIDE – LAND/PROPERTY - $199,000 ±20 Acres w/ views of Arcata Bay, grassland, timber, community services access & mixed zoning. NEW LIS

TING!

HONEYDEW – LAND/PROPERTY - $589,000

±40 Acres with State & County Interim permit for 5,828 OD. Features river frontage, large flat, cabin, yurt, and well.

KNEELAND – LAND/PROPERTY - $925,000

±40 Acres featuring interim permit for 7,500 OD & 2,500 ML, meadows, outbuildings & more!

ELK PRAIRIE VINEYARD - $1,490,000

Established ±20 acre vineyard w/ 3 homes, winery, cellar, tasting room, mature grapes & olive trees.

MCKINLEYVILLE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $589,000 STAMPED PERMIT for 10,000 sf ML. ±10 Ac w/spring, well, water storage, shop, garage, 2/2 house.

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $499,000

±40 Acres featuring State and County interim permit for 10,550 OD, creek frontage, springs, 3 ponds, cabin, & outbuildings!.

Hailey Rohan

ALDERPOINT – LAND/PROPERTY - $795,000

±6 Acre turn key farm w/ State & County Interim permit for 20k OD and 4k ML! Complete with PG&E, community water, pots & greenhouses!

±30 Acre turnkey farm with approved State license & stamped County permit for 6800k ML & 8200 OD, custom home, and creek frontage!.

102 MARIGOLD LANE, WILLOW CREEK - $499,000

Tyla Miller

KETTENPOM – LAND/PROPERTY - $599,000

Trinity Co Permits in process. 4 bed 2 bath house on ±80 Acres w/ PG&E and plenty of privacy. NEW LIS

TING!

FERNDALE – LAND/PROPERTY - $1,250,000

±80 Acres w/ State approved and County stamped permit for 22,000 sq ft ML and 6,400 sq ft OD cultivation space!

3820 THOMAS ROAD, SALMON CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $749,000

±120 acres w/ three cabins nestled in the hills of Salmon Creek w/orchards, water sources, solar, and much more!

REDWOOD VALLEY – HOME ON ACREAGE $429,000

±1.2 Ac w/ creek frontage, 2/1 home, guest cabin, pool & deck, garage/shop, tool shed, orchard.

FERNDALE – LAND/PROPERTY - $385,000

±110 Acres close to Ferndale featuring spring, open meadows, developed flats, & small cabin.

2ND STREET EUREKA – LAND/PROPERTY - $135,000 2 Eureka lots totaling ±.14 acres. With permits paid for 2 commercial buildings and city services, these parcels are ready to go!

PHILLIPSVILLE - LAND/PROPERTY - $495,000

±168 Acres w/ interim permit for 9522 sq ft of ML cultivation space! Water sources, water storage, outbuildings, and much more!

GREENWOOD HEIGHTS – LAND/PROPERTY $550,000

3 bed/3 bath custom home on 3.5 acres w/ vaulted ceilings, fireplace, garage, paved driveway, and shop.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Meet Our Neighbors: Compass Carpentry Shawn Herlihy and Ryan Barlow started Compass Carpentry about 10 years ago after the two met at College of the Redwoods. “Ryan and I met at CR when we were taking some carpentry and construction classes. We both have a passion for remodeling and turning the non-functional into functional. From there, Compass Carpentry was born,” explains Shawn. Shawn, Ryan, and employee Laura Morgan provide Humboldt County with the highest level of expertise, care, and attention to detail when working on a project. “We do all types of carpentry and general contractor jobs, but we really love doing historical projects,” explain Shawn and Ryan. “We have done a lot of work on the outside of the historic Del Arte building and we have worked on many of the Eureka Victorians.” Shawn, originally from the Oakland area, moved to Humboldt to attend Humboldt State. Now married with two children, Shawn enjoys spending his free time with his family. Ryan moved to Humboldt in 2005 from North Carolina to attend college. When he is not at work, he enjoys playing in various local bands. Compass Carpentry is always taking new clients, so whether you are in need of a new addition or have a historical remodel that needs work, give the guys at Compass Carpentry a call at 499-6381 and experience their top level service for yourself.

Clockwise from above: Shawn Herlihy, Ryan Barlow, Dell’Arte restoration before and after.

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

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