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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday Oct. 20, 2016 Vol XXVII Issue 42 northcoastjournal.com

For decades, green paint and a leaking roof housed Garberville’s heart. In May, it stopped. By John Hardin

7 Abduction in Niger 9 Prop 64 face-off 20 How do you like them apples?


2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 4 6

Mailbox Poem We Who Wander

7

News McKinleyville Man Abducted in Niger

9

Week in Weed Proposition 64: Two Perspectives

12 13

NCJ Daily On The Cover Closed

20

Table Talk Apples Made Savory

22

Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

28

The Setlist The Trip

29 34

Calendar Filmland In the Red

35 Workshops & Classes 40 Humbug Little Monsters

41 41

Sudoku & Crossword Classifieds

Oct. 20, 2016 • Volume XXVII Issue 42 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2016

Publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, Andy Powell, Genevieve Schmidt Art Director/Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Maddy Rueda, Erik Salholm, Jonathan Webster ncjads@northcoastjournal.com

Serious Felonies Culivation/Drug Possession DUI/DMV Hearings Collective/Cooperative Agreements Cannabis Business Compliance Domestic Violence Pre-Arrest Counseling

FREE CONSULTATION For Defense Work Only 732 5th Street, Suite C Eureka, CA 95501 info@humboldtjustice.com www.humboldtjustice.com

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Advertising Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Assistant Maddy Rueda maddy@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Joe Ramsay joe@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Office Manager/Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

To Legalize or not to legalize? Read more on page 9. Thinkstock

On the Cover Illustration by Holly Harvey

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

3


Mailbox

Appalachian v. Appellation Editor: Always great to read the NCJ and Thadeus Greenson is a favorite. In “Props and Measures: Cannabis Industry Split on Prop. 64” (Oct. 6), he reports: “(Jason Kinney) said the legislation includes provisions for Appalachian designations and other things designed to support a ‘craft industry.’” I doubt that Mr. Kinney was referring to “Appalachian” but instead to appellation, referring to herb produced within a geographical area. Perhaps one day we will have our own “Appellation Trails” where tourists can travel the “Willow Creek to Weitchpec Wonder Tour” or the “Mattole to Miranda Miracle Miles,” much as cognoscenti tour the wine regions of Napa and other counties. Timothy Crlenjak, Eureka

the 1906 quake, which shook that region violently, is the cause, not storms. Bob McPherson, Bayside

‘Bamboozled’ Editor: Regarding “The Art of the Deal” (Oct. 6), it’s all true. It bears repeating until the rest of our citizens figure out how much they are being bamboozled. I followed your article until you mentioned the “small arsenal.” Huh? What? I missed the connection. I think I understand, but not really. Some days I’m a little more dense than others. Keep up the terrific reporting. I really enjoy seeing big, informative articles, especially from such a small newspaper … and it’s free to boot. Gura Lashlee, McKinleyville

A Faulty Hypothesis

Vote Allison!

Editor: Barry Evans article “Candelabra Trees” (Oct. 13) was much appreciated, although I would like to put forth an alternative hypothesis as to the trees’ origin. In his article, Evans quotes an explanation from the Save the Redwoods/Shady Dell web page in which Emily Burns suggests the trees were the result of strong winds and salty air, being near the coast. I am skeptical of the explanation that strong winds should effect trees on the ridges more than down by the coast. I would suggest that seismic shaking is the cause, for the trees are very near the northern end of the San Andreas fault. There is a group of redwood trees by Fort Ross that survived several earthquakes that occurred along the San Andreas fault, all with broken tops. Seismic shaking tends to break the tops out of the tall trees, whereas storms tend to blow whole trees over, in my opinion. Just a thought, maybe

Editor: Eureka is getting excited as word is getting around town about city council candidate Austin Allison. When you hear Austin speak, his upbeat 21st century outlook is refreshing and his enthusiasm pours out as he shares his vision for working people in creating living wages, improving infrastructure that encourages lifelong residency and attracts the professionals Eureka lacks, including physicians. Not only is Austin a medical professional at St. Joseph Hospital, he is a union organizer who has helped get 300 local families off welfare and onto a living wage at St. Joseph. Austin plans to support expansion of small businesses and entice computer technology companies into Eureka by providing the addition of one back-up line to ensure service 24/7 to businesses like St Joseph Hospital that relies on vital computer data for patient care. When you vote for Austin Allison, you

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

Terry Torgerson

vote for a man with a can-do attitude. Joan Dixon, Bayside

It’s Up to Us, Eureka Editor: I’ve been reading the various statements and literature put out by Mr. Fullerton and Mr. Allison in their contest for the vacant seat on the Eureka City Council. Mr. Fullerton lists his major asset as his

decades of involvement in city government and civic affairs and promises to bring that wealth of experience to bear on solving the problems we currently face. At the same time, however, he asserts that these problems are a result of decades of government indifference; they have been ignored for too long. But as a good CPA, Mr. Fullerton should recognize that every asset has an off-setting liability. In this case, the liability is his


FORTUNA involvement in the self-same indifference to the problems that he lays at the feet of past city governance, i.e the asset that he claims to qualify him to find new solutions. Mr. Allison is new to the arena, so his asset is a fresh perspective and a lack of connections to the network of “business-as-usual” politics. His liability is the lack of experience in how local government actually works. It’s up to us, the electorate, to weigh and balance all such assets versus liabilities, and make a reasoned choice for who we feel would best serve the interests of the community, rather than their personal interests and pocketbooks. Bronco Weseman, Eureka

Vote Integrity! Editor: Many in our county are grudgingly going over to Hillary despite her treachery toward Sanders. Others say that since she is a woman, we should support her. However, Hillary has in fact been treacherous to women. She went along with a president as well as a husband who allegedly raped a woman and exploited a young intern, Monica Lewinsky, and allegedly viciously attacked and threatened the women that he sexually abused/ slept with. Trump, when confronted with his crude remarks, apologized to America for those words, but pointed out what the Clintons had done to women. She had the opportunity right there to apologize to those women, who were in the audience, but she didn’t. Clinton is everything Democrats are against in terms of cronyism, “pay-forplay,” elitist, a war-monger and in bed with Monsanto, the Pharmaceutical Cartel, the pro-GMO crowd, and many other totally politically incorrect entities. Dems, vote with integrity! Jean Damon, McKinleyville

Think of SCOTUS Editor: While registering voters, we hear things like: “I don’t like either candidate;” “I’ll vote third party.” Hillary or Donald will be our next president. If you can’t vote for either, vote for the U.S. Supreme Court. The next president will nominate up to four Supreme Court justices. The Supreme Court of the United States has the ultimate responsibility to review decisions of lower courts. It is the final interpreter of federal constitutional law. Issues at risk with a Trump presidency are: women’s health, LGBT concerns, health care, immigration, affirmative action, voting rights, labor rights, fair pay, equal treatment without discrimination based on race, religion, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation or disability. The Supreme Court has been the catalyst for social progress — or social regression — throughout our country’s history. Ask yourself: Which candidate you want to have the responsibility for nominating Supreme Court justices and filling federal court vacancies? Marcy Foster, Eureka

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Yes on F! Editor: Arcata citizens have supported a Utility Users Tax for the past 23 years. It has made living in Arcata more enjoyable because it supports park upgrades, road repairs and more recreational programs for children and adults. Measure F renews the Utility User Tax (UTT) with no increase to the current rate. It’s an eight-year extension of the existing 3 percent tax you currently see on your PG&E, cable TV, phone and water bills. It’s worth it. I support it. Your vote counts. Thank you. Alex Stillman, Arcata Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

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Mailbox Continued from previous page

Vote V! Editor: Measure V opponents spent thousands on mailers refuting “Rent Control.” Lies of omission abound. They failed to mention “mobile home parks” in regular font regarding the measure because they want you to think it is about all rentals. Statement: Counties are rejecting ordinances. Truth: More than 90 municipalities have such ordinances in effect successfully for decades, including the city and county of Sonoma. Statement: Carson must pay millions after losing a case. Truth: Carson is appealing, paying nothing. Statement: Humboldt doesn’t know longterm impacts. Truth: The county report estimates $6,000, a paltry sum to preserve more than 1,000 affordable housing units! Statement: Studies point to ineffectiveness. Truth: Studies, including Arcata’s, show that ordinances are effective. Humboldt is losing discretionary spending in its local economy now as wealthy park owners suck it from the wallets of thousands of county residents and losing affordability in its mobile home parks. Yes on V! Hilary Mosher, McKinleyville

We Who Wander We’ve been on the road a long time now, Dolly and I. Dolly has lost all her drive, dark circles under her eyes. My clutch is going. I cannot engage. I spin to high revolutions, speak too fast, too much, too brightly and vacantly smiling; explaining to pastors and social workers, glib for those who’ll listen. I am tired of complaining, tired of the telling. I edit, I polish, I lie, I guess what they need me to say, through a haze of hunger Dazed by the requirements of so many states, I work the shifts quick change the gears judge the judging of us... lazy.....crazy.... so many tears for white bread and canned food begged from back rooms. This road’s like a river long and winding. We are carried like flotsam, dumped in a dark eddy; an undercurrent separates. The main stream rushes on, white lines and hot air.

ed inaccurate dates for Adelene Jones’ time on the Blue Lake City Council. Jones served 20 years, from 1988 to 2008. The Journal regrets the error.

Correction The cover story “The Case of the Missing $5 Million” in the Oct. 13, 2016, edition of the Journal contained inaccurate information about the settlement of a class action lawsuit against Skilled Healthcare in 2010. After a jury awarded plaintiffs in the case $677 million, the lawsuit was ultimately settled for $50 million. The Journal regrets the error.

Clarification

In last week’s mailbox (Oct. 6), we ran two of letters questioning some statements we printed from Robert Hager about his wife Kathleen’s I am tempted to say it’s like a river military service in our Sept. 29 but rivers do not flow uphill like this cover story, “The Last Days of and there’s nowhere to wash. the Budget Motel.” This week, the Hagers provided the Journal with papers indicating both — Tamara Jenkinson were honorably discharged. Further, documents provided by the U.S. Army indicate Mrs. Hager’s military occupational Editor: specialty was classifed as “food service home rents, I thought, “Great, a responsive I am the treasurer of the “Yes on Measpecialist,” not Ranger as stated in the Sept. government listening to its residents.” sure V” committee. I was aghast when more 29 story. The Journal regrets any confusion But now that I’ve started reading its conthan $165,000 came into the county to fight sultant’s draft report, I am mystified. caused by the story. the few grandmothers who are trying to The report examines five possible represerve their housing and, thus, live out sponses to rising rents. Instead of describtheir lives in dignity. But in the last week ing the pros and cons of each, something thousands of dollars came into the “No” actually helpful for a city’s decision making, side from park owners who don’t even have it singles out just one alternative for one The Journal will publish letters related a park in Humboldt. description of any possible downside. to local elections through Nov. 3, meaning Since I have gone public with my supThe summary of a different alternative port, my landlord has retaliated and I fear you have until Monday, Oct. 31, at noon was so glowing I followed the footnotes. It what will happen if we lose. I also fear for to get your opinion on local council races turns out the glow comes from a consulting other low income folks who stand to lose or any other election matters into print. firm that represents property owners and more than just dollars. I am dumbfounded Election letters must be no longer than 150 mobile home park owners. It guides them by the amount of money parks must generwords — and we’ll only run one per writer in maximizing returns and getting their ate if the owners can throw so much at the per week. We’ll fit as many as we can into “entitlements.” few that have dared to stand up to protect the print edition and run others online. Get Now this oddly loaded report is being the future of unsubsidized low-income writin’. (Letters responding to the Jouraimed at Measure V. A $160,000 out-of-area nal’s non-election coverage are, as always, housing in Humboldt. Please, vote yes on campaign is holding the propaganda gun. welcome and encouraged, and can run as measure V. Arcata … huh? long as 300 words.) All submissions should Patti Rose, McKinleyville Carrie Peyton Dahlberg, Trinidad include the letter writer’s full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t Editor: print your number). Send them to letters@ I love Arcata. It’s the city that drew my A story in the Oct. 13, 2016, edition of northcoastjournal.com. husband and me to Humboldt. the Journal headlined “Unopposed” includl When Arcata began looking into mobile

Write an Election Letter!

Correction

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com


News

McKinleyville Man Abducted in Niger

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HSU grad has spent decades doing missionary aid work By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

G

unshots rang out in the small ministry said in a statement. town of Abalak in northern Back in Humboldt County, news of Niger shortly after nightfall Woodke’s abduction hit hard. on Oct. 14, leaving two people After graduating from HSU in 1984 dead and a 55-year-old McKinwith a Wildlife degree, Woodke found his leyville man in the hands of unknown passion and started a ministry in Niger, kidnappers. according to Redwood Coast School of Jeffrey Woodke, a graduate of HumMissions, which is run through Arcata First boldt State University with deep ties Baptist Church. A short bio on the school’s to the Arcata First Baptist website indicates missionary Church, has spent much of work in Niger has become a the last three decades doing huge part of his life’s work. “We tried many aid work in Niger. On Oct. “Jeff’s passion in pro14, according to multiple viding humanitarian aid to times to make him news accounts, a gunman those who are amongst the approached his home in poorest in the world, couleave the area as he Abalak on motorcycle and pled with his desire to see shot and killed Woodke’s God’s kingdom advanced in was more exposed bodyguard and a member of a largely Muslim world has the national guard before a played a large part in the than ever, but he Toyota pickup truck pulled life and ministry of (Arcata up. Then, numerous armed First Baptist Church),” the refused, saying he men reportedly ordered site says. Woodke to strip down to his Woodke worked with the wasn’t afraid,” AFP underwear, loaded him into Tuareg and Woodabe peothe truck and sped off. quoted the resident ple, and ran a literacy proNo one has yet claimed gram, among other things, responsibility for the kidaccording to a report in CBN as saying. napping, but Niger Interior News, an online Christian Minister Mohamed Bazoum news outlet. It seems part of told Agence France-Presse (AFP) that Woodke’s ministry involved taking groups Woodke’s abductors were “jihadists or from Humboldt County to the West Afribandits” seeking to sell him to Islamic can country on humanitarian trips. extremists operating in neighboring Mali. On her Facebook page, Christian author Al Qaeda-linked jihadist groups have also Cheryl Ford indicated she was a 15-year been suspected in other kidnappings in member of Arcata First Baptist Church the region. with Woodke and that her family went Witnesses said the Toyota left Woodto Niger under his leadership a couple of ke’s residence heading toward the Malian times. border, about 150 miles away. “The presi“One had to marvel at the man,” Ford dent of the republic is personally followwrote. ing the situation and our forces are fully Woodke returned to HSU and received mobilized to capture them and put an end Continued on next page » to this disastrous affair,” Niger’s interior

@northcoastjournal northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 

7


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News Continued from previous page

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

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a master’s degree in science and environmental systems with a focus on international development in 2003. But it appears he continued to spend the bulk of his time in Niger. At the time of his abduction, Woodke was working through Youth with a Mission, which bills itself as a “global movement of Christians … dedicated to serving Jesus throughout the world.” The group reports that it works in more than 1,100 locations spread across 180 countries, with a staff of more than 1,800. The group’s spokesman, Pete Thompson, issued a statement indicating that Woodke had been working with a locally based aid organization, JEMED. According to the statement, JEMED has been working in the region for more than 25 years with the pastoral Tuareg and Fulani people through an integrated program aimed at helping them adapt to a more “sedentary lifestyle and overcome drought, disease, desertification and lack of access to education.” An Abalak resident told AFP that Woodke was “perfectly integrated” with the local population, speaking the Tuareg’s Tamasheq language fluently as well as Fula and Arabic. The resident said locals had urged Woodke to leave the volatile area, which sits along the porous Malian border and AFP reports is “awash with armed groups.” “We tried many times to make him leave the area as he was more exposed than ever, but he refused, saying he wasn’t afraid,” AFP quoted the resident as saying. North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman issued a statement to the Journal the day after Woodke’s abduction indicating that he is working with the U.S. State Department. “My thoughts are with Jeff Woodke and his loved ones during this extremely trying time,” Huffman said. “It is devastating to see my constituent, who has spent his life dedicated to humanitarian service, be victimized in this way. I am working with State Department officials and will do everything in my power to ensure Jeff’s swift and safe return home.” In her Facebook post, Ford quoted Tracy Rickstrew, who worked at Arcata First Baptist Church and whom Ford identifies as a “former Niger team missionary,” as follows: “Please pray for him and his family. I know his heart would not be for his own life, but for God’s glory in all of this. He is tough and his faith is resolute and we know that there is nowhere on earth that he can go where the Spirit of God is not already with him.” l


Week in Weed

Proposition 64: Two Perspectives Editor’s note: With voters heading to the polls in just a few short weeks to decide the fate of Humboldt County’s biggest, most celebrated and most notorious cash crop, we offer two opposing views on the issue for voters to consider. To be clear, there are many views on Proposition 64. These are just two, offered by people intimately involved with very different aspects of Humboldt County’s marijuana industry. Give them a read, consider them and let us know what you think. And however you lean, make sure to vote Nov. 8.

Vote No for a Safer Community By Steve Watson Proposition 64, the California Marijuana Legalization Initiative, will go before voters on Nov. 8. Proposition 64 permits adult recreational use, commercial cultivation, manufacturing, transportation and sales. We stand united and strongly opposed to Proposition 64. Please join law enforcement associations, educators, and other organizations across the state in emphatically stating, “They got it wrong, again!” Regardless of your stance on legalization, or whether you believe the end of “cannabis prohibition” is inevitable, Proposition 64 is not the answer for California. We believe this special interest-driven initiative is ill-timed, short-sighted and irresponsible. Proposition 64 is patently profit-motivated and puts what many would label “greed weed” before the best interests of the public. Proposition 64 does not protect our children. Young people who smoke today’s highly potent marijuana may be rewiring their brains. The American Academy of Pediatrics opposes legalizing marijuana, noting cannabis can be “very harmful to adolescent health and development.” Research indicates there may be a causal link between marijuana use and an increase in serious mental health issues among children, such as triggering the onset and intensifying the symptoms of schizophrenia. Mental health professionals in Humboldt County have noted a rise in acute disorders among children, which some ascribe to marijuana exposure. According to Garry Eagles, Humboldt County’s superintendent of schools, “In Humboldt and Del Norte counties, roughly 1 in 5 students, or 20.3 percent, is receiving some form of special education support. The participation rate

in our two counties is almost double the state-wide average for special education of 10.4 percent.” Potent edibles attractively packaged like goodies pose a danger to our children. One medical center in Colorado recently reported their hospital has seen a 51 percent increase in the number of children ages 18 and younger being treated in its emergency rooms for marijuana-related conditions over the past two years. A Pueblo hospital recently shared statistics, reporting nearly half of babies born in that hospital during one month tested positive for THC — the main psychoactive component in cannabis. Proposition 64 does not do enough to protect our highways. Stoned drivers are a risk to all drivers. Legalization in other states has resulted in more DUI drivers and a significant increase in deadly crashes. According to recent research released by the American Automobile Association Foundation for Highway Safety, fatal vehicle collisions involving marijuana-impaired drivers have doubled in Washington state since legalization in 2012. Colorado has also seen a spike in marijuana-related traffic fatalities and impaired drivers. Under Proposition 64, California can expect to see the same trend. California currently has no established DUI testing standard for stoned driving and Proposition 64’s proponents failed to include one in their measure. Responsible governance and common sense would prescribe that a DUI testing standard be in place before legalization. Proposition 64 does not do enough to protect the public’s health and welfare. When you consider California’s expansive campaign against Big Tobacco, Proposition 64 appears blatantly hypocritical and counters much of the progress California has made to improve public health. How can you have a public health policy that vilifies tobacco use but implicitly encourages folks to smoke a joint? Post-legalization, some Colorado prosecutors have described seeing an increase in marijuana-connected crime including the last 10 of 15 drug-related murders in Aurora, according to a May 2016 report. But one has to look no further than the cannabis capital of the country, Humboldt County, to recognize the violence inextricably intertwined with the pot trade. Humboldt County’s homicide rate has increased steadily since 2012 with 19 homicides so far this year. The county’s per-capita homicide rate (rate per 100,000 population) over the past two years was nearly double that of the state’s mean rate. Most of these homicides are believed to be drug-related. Ten of 15 cases in 2015

involved drugs, according to the Humboldt County chief deputy coroner, and Sheriff Mike Downey publically attributed “most” of the homicides his office investigated in 2014 to their connection with “marijuana and other drugs.” As the new “Wild West Green Rush” intensifies with legalization, an increase in marijuana-related violent crimes, DUI fatalities and public nuisance complaints can be predicted — negatively impacting public health and safety, quality of life, tourism and businesses. Proposition 64 is the wrong initiative at the wrong time for the wrong motive. We urge patience so Californians can make a more informed and responsible decision. Let’s be smart, wait on legalization and allow time for California to watch and learn from other states’ post-legalization woes. If we were to brand Proposition 64 after a popular cannabis strain, we’d dub it “Trainwreck.” Vote no on 64. Steve Watson is a captain with the Eureka Police Department. His piece was endorsed by Eureka City Schools Superintendent Fred Van Vleck, Humboldt County Sheriff Mike Downey, Humboldt County Chief of Probation William Damiano, Ferndale Police Chief Bret Smith, Eureka Police Chief Andrew Mills, Humboldt County Undersheriff William Honsal and Eureka Police Capt. Brian Stephens.

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Better Than Status Quo, Prop 64 Protects Us All By Kristin Nevedal As a small marijuana farmer and co-founder of the Emerald Growers Association, I’ve devoted most of my working life to ending the inhumane war on marijuana and replacing it with a legal, safe and socially conscious marijuana industry, integral to the history and economy of this region. Now — with Proposition 64 appearing on the ballot this November — California stands at the doorstep of historic change, sending a message across America that no one should ever be arrested for the responsible use or cultivation of a plant that even President Obama has said is no more harmful than alcohol. Change is hard, no matter how righteous the cause. With cannabis, I have friends who fear the transition from an illicit market — without basic legal protections — to a fully regulated one. I respect those concerns. Continued on page 11 »

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Get Informed

1. Choose the Right Strain Not all strains are created equal! When authorized to use medicinal cannabis, the first step is to do some research on what kind of cannabis will work best to alleviate your individual symptoms. Explore a variety of strains. If you are new to cannabis, it may be beneficial to try small amounts of different strains when you are first starting out. This will help you test different strains and different varieties (indicas, sativas, or hybrids) to find your perfect match. Indica strains relieve pain, help with insomnia etc. Hybrids slow anxiety and help you relax while still allowing you to keep moving though your day. Sativa strains get you moving and tend to have a more cerebral effect and be uplifting. 2. Choose the Best Consumption Method There are many different methods of using cannabis, but not all consumption devices or types may be ideal for you. Some forms of intake, such as smoking, can aggravate symptoms instead of delivering the medicine intended to help alleviate them. Tinctures, dabs, medibles, oils, lotions, vaporizers are all different medicating options, discuss intake options with your doctor to see which form is suggested to you. If a particular method is not working for you, try something else. We are always happy to suggest other options that may be better suited for you.

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10  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

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Week in Weed Continued from page 9

But the policy discourse around this issue has too often been poisoned with the same kind of misinformation and fear tactics that have been perpetuated by institutional anti-marijuana forces since the days of Reefer Madness. Here are the facts: Proposition 64 will better protect youth than the current status quo. If the central objective of current prohibition is to keep marijuana out of the hands of children, then it is an abject failure. Marijuana today is widely available. Drug dealers don’t card. Thousands of juveniles every year — mostly in communities of color — are being arrested for non-violent marijuana offenses which create a permanent criminal record. And not a dime of resources is being invested by the system into proven youth prevention programs. Studies have shown that by far the most effective method of curbing underage abuse is not criminalization, but tough age restrictions and public education campaigns as contained in Proposition 64 — similar to alcohol and tobacco, where youth use has hit historical lows. New survey data from the Colorado Department of Public Health shows that the rates of teen marijuana use there have been essentially unchanged since legalization. Even so, Proposition 64 is far stronger than Colorado. It enforces a 21-and-over age limit, bans public consumption, marketing to or near children and youth-attracting edibles, mandates warning labels and childproof packaging and funds county-based youth prevention and treatment programs at an unprecedented level. Proposition 64 is good for the public health. There’s a reason why California’s most trusted health providers — including the California Medical Association, California Nurses Association and California Academy of Preventative Medicine — all support Proposition 64. First, there’s no evidence that moderate use of marijuana poses a risk for healthy adults. Proposition 64 will provide strict testing of marijuana products to ensure that harmful pesticides, molds and other chemicals commonly found in the black market are eliminated from products sold and consumed in California. It also protects medical patients, provides them an exemption on state sales taxes and preserves all of the current medical marijuana rights. And it will keep California at the cutting edge of clinical health research on the benefits and impacts of marijuana. Proposition 64 will allow law enforcement to redirect resources toward combatting serious crimes.

According to the independent Legislative Analyst’s Office, Proposition 64 will immediately allow state and local law enforcement agencies to save “tens of millions” in taxpayer dollars annually — the fiscal benefit of no longer arresting non-violent marijuana offenders. In addition, the measure will provide more than $125 million every year to local law enforcement for increased enforcement of more serious crimes. There is no objective study from other states showing an established link between increased vehicular crash risk and marijuana legalization. Still, Proposition 64 takes meaningful steps to increase highway and traffic safety. With technical assistance from the California Highway Patrol, it empowers experts to establish California’s first statewide standards for the detection and identification of impaired driving due to marijuana — a problem that exists today with or without Proposition 64 — and funds new training and technology for officers in the field. Proposition 64 protects small growers and our region’s economy. With policies that are dear to my heart and the hopes of this entire region, Proposition 64 takes extraordinary steps to protect small growers and other independent businesses. It provides licensing preferences to small businesses operating safely, legally and according to state and local rules. It extends formal microbusiness opportunities and regional appellation resources. It discounts fees and licensing costs for small growers. And it explicitly empowers state regulators to deny a license to prevent “creation or maintenance of unlawful monopoly power.” For the first five years, no single grower will have a license larger than 22,000 square feet. Even then, state regulators can only issue large-scale cultivation licenses if and only if they are deemed in the public interest and do not promote monopolistic behavior. What’s more, any large cultivators will be strictly prohibited from the distribution or retail sales. These amendments were all adopted at the request of small growers. Proposition 64 is thoughtful, comprehensive reform that protects kids, public health and the interests of small growers. With the stakes so high, we owe it to voters to offer facts, not more fearmongering. l Kristin Nevedal is the director of Humboldt Finest Collective, co-founder of the Emerald Growers Association and director of the Patient Focused Certification Program with Americans for Safe Access. She supports Proposition 64, but has no official role with the campaign. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

11


From NCJ Daily

Cajoling Civic Duty

I

f you are among the estimated 75 percent of Humboldt County residents who have been ignoring a jury summons, the Superior Court may come a calling to let you know your time is up. They may even send a deputy. According to a recent press release sent out by the court, jury services staff have resorted to phoning service skippers and are setting up five-day standby lists in order to have enough jurors available for trials. The release says the court could also look at sending deputies to “escort individuals to the courthouse for jury service.” “Steps are now being taken because of the number of jury trials that must be heard,” court CEO Kim Bartleson says. “If jurors are not available, a case could be dismissed.” Duplications in the 176,000 or so names on the master jury list — compiled from voter registration and Department of Motor Vehicle records — are filtered out before potential jurors are randomly selected for a summons, according to Bartleson. Humboldt County has about 80,000 registered voters and a total population of 135,000, according to the U.S. Census. And to be able to serve, jurors must be at least 18, proficient in English and a U.S. citizen who has not been convicted of a felony, although there are some exceptions to the latter. About 200 summons are sent out for an average court day in Humboldt County,

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Bartleson says. The number of potential jurors needed for the selection pool varies depending on the number and type of cases up for trial. But the issue is most people aren’t showing up. “The drop in response rates has been an ongoing problem,” she says. Take Oct. 12, for instance: 600 jurors were summoned and 75 appeared for a response rate of 12.5 percent. That’s down from an average 51 percent jury yield back in 2012, according to data collected by the Judicial Council of California, the policy making body of the California courts. The general goal for response rates is around 40 percent, according to Blaine Corren, a spokesperson with the council. Jury response varies across the state with some California counties boasting rates as high as 87 (Colusa County), while others were as low as 5 percent (Nevada County), according to judicial council data from 2012 and 2013, the most recent available. The statewide average came in at 57 percent. With every batch of summons sent out, a certain number are expected to drop out due to deferments or being excused, as well as simply failing to show. In most cases, a person is considered to have done their yearly service if they are not selected for a jury after one day at the courthouse. — Kimberly Wear POSTED 10.14.16 READ THE FULL STORY ONLINE.

Judge May Exclude Evidence: A federal judge has indicated he may opt to exclude evidence from trial that 22-year-old Thomas McClain had a hearing disability and was legally drunk when he was shot by a Eureka police officer in 2014. McClain’s parents allege their son had his hands up when he was shot, but police claim he was reaching for a weapon in his waistband. POSTED 10.12.16

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

Jasmin Segura (left), with Humboldt Baykeeper, and Surfrider’s Delia Bense Kang tour Marine Terminal II during a grand opening at the old Samoa Pulp Mill property on Oct. 14. Officials hope the new multi-use facility designed to house both research and commercial opportunities in aquaculture, biomass conversion and renewable energy will create “new jobs, clean jobs,” in the words of Harbor Commissioner Richard Marks. POSTED 10.14.16

Photo by Jennifer Savage

Arcatans Concerned: Nearly 100 people flooded Arcata Elementary School to voice safety concerns at an Oct. 13 meeting called after last month’s brazen attack on a young girl walking to school. At the meeting, residents complained of drug houses, day and night car break-ins and an increased boldness on the part of criminals. Officials called on residents to be vigilant and active, and to call the police. POSTED 10.16.16

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Eureka Mulls Butane: As the Journal went to press, the Eureka City Council was slated to discuss a proposed ordinance to limit the sale of butane — increasingly used in volatile hash extraction operations — within city limits. Specifically, the ordinance would restrict vendors from selling more than 600 mL of butane to anyone in a single transaction and prohibit anyone from purchasing more than that amount in a calendar month POSTED 10.18.16

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Comment of the Week

Digitally Speaking Local rainfall totals since July compared to average, after a wet storm doused the region last week, dumping almost 4 inches in Eureka and up to 10 in other parts of the North Coast. POSTED 10.18.16

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

“This is where you can shame the man, where he lives and at the facilities that he is most proud of, and where he claims to be charitable. If you can demonstrate his hypocrisy to those whose opinion he values, then we might get somewhere.” — Richard Salzman, commenting on the Journal’s site about last week’s cover story and calling on people to protest the proposed closures of three local skilled nursing facilities in front of BRIUS CEO Shlomo Rechnitz’s home, temple and offices in Southern California. POSTED 10.13.16


On the Cover

CLOSED

For decades, green paint and a leaking roof housed Garberville’s heart. In May, it stopped. By John Hardin

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

G

old Star Mother Esther Underwood lost her son, John Haynes, the first American soldier from the Garberville area to die in World War II. But from her grief — and her generosity — the John Haynes Memorial Veterns Hall grew and, over the years, the Garberville Vets Hall, as it is more commonly known, became the heart of civic life in the Southern Humboldt community. On May 23, that heart stopped beating when county inspectors discovered unhealthy levels of black mold growing in the walls and ceiling, and ordered the hall closed. When Bud Rogers challenged Estelle Fennell for the 2nd District seat on the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, they faced off in a debate at the Vets Hall in Garberville. When county code enforcement officers brought guns to an inspection on Titlow Hill, SoHum people filled the Vets Hall to capacity to demand an end to those heavy-handed tactics. When the community debated whether to establish a public restroom in Garberville, we argued about it at the hall. Whenever we try to figure out what we will do, as a community, about anything of substance in Southern Humboldt, we discuss it at the Vets Hall. The hall also includes a branch of the Humboldt County Superior Court, a small courtroom where, during certain hours, people can pay traffic tickets or have their cases heard by a judge. Or at least they could up until this spring. According to Hank Torborg, current commander

The Garberville Veterans Hall, once home to holiday meals, classes and community meetings, was shuttered in May after county inspectors found dangerous levels of black mold. Photo by John Hardin of VFW Chapter 6354, which runs the Garberville Vets Hall, a 2nd District supervisor long ago convinced the veterans that they had a better chance of getting their hall approved if they agreed to have a courthouse in the same building. This political arrangement caused some grumbling among vets. However, it is more than 60 miles from Garberville to Eureka. The branch courthouse in Garberville makes it easier for everyone in Southern Humboldt to deal with court matters and, no doubt, made it possible for more of them to make their court dates. Not only that, but if you’ve ever attended a meeting, a workshop or a lecture in Southern Humboldt, or taken a class, or attended a birthday party, a wedding, a reception, a wake or a funeral, chances are it happened at the Vets Hall. If you live here, of course, you know about the community Thanksgiving dinner that takes place at the hall, even if you haven’t spent the holiday there yourself. Thanksgiving at the Vets Hall is a huge, all-volunteer effort with a long history. Throw in Christmas dinner with a visit from Santa, and it’s clear the Vets Hall has become the heart of our community.

It’s simple logistics, really.

Say you teach dog obedience training and you live in Alderpoint, 12 miles east of Garberville, up a steep, curvy mountain road. If you advertise for students, you will get one in Ettersburg (16 miles west of Garberville), another in Myers Flat (15 miles

north), a third in Piercy (20 miles south), and one more student right in Garberville. It only makes sense to meet in Garberville, and the Vets Hall is the most reasonably priced multipurpose space available. As the SoHum community continues to grow, so too has the importance of the Garberville Vets Hall to community life. Torborg, the local VFW commander, knows the story behind the John Haynes Memorial Veterans Hall better than most. The story begins shortly after World War II, when a group of mostly World War I vets got it in their minds to open a new Veterans Hall in Garberville. They had tired of the cold, damp Fireman’s Hall and wanted a place of their own with a kitchen. They started a fundraising campaign and held a steelhead fishing derby. By the mid-1950s, the vets had raised more than $9,000. They approached Underwood about purchasing the property she owned on the corner of Conger and Locust streets in Garberville, but Underwood insisted on donating the land to the cause, meaning the veterans suddenly had the money they needed to begin construction. Underwood deeded the land to the vets, who formed The John Haynes Memorial Building Association. In turn, under a provision of state law that allows the property to be managed publicly, in perpetuity, as a memorial veterans hall, the vets deeded the property to the county. Apparently, the political decision to include a courthouse in the same building led many vets to fear that the county was

trying to take over their hall. This led to a somewhat contentious relationship between the Garberville vets and the county of Humboldt right from the beginning, and the John Haynes Memorial Veterans Hall appears to have been something of a thorn in the county’s side ever since. Meanwhile, other changes were underway in Southern Humboldt. As back-tothe-landers began showing up in greater numbers, they started holding their events, parties and boogies at the old, cold, drafty and damp Fireman’s Hall. Friction between these newcomers and the established townspeople, including many vets, increased as more and more hippies moved into SoHum. Tempers flared and meetings were held, but tensions between the two groups finally exploded one night in 1983 when an arsonist torched the Garberville Fireman’s Hall, burning it to the ground. The fire left the Vets Hall as the only affordable rental in Southern Humboldt. No effort was made to rebuild the Fireman’s Hall. Instead, the back-to-the-landers formed a group called the “Mateel,” for the two watersheds they occupied, the Mattole and the Eel, and commenced their own fundraising campaign to build a hall of their own. These newcomers, still reeling from the violence of the arson but also beginning to feel their oats as the fledgling black market marijuana industry began to grow, vowed to come back stronger than ever. Instead of building an Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

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A county work crew crafted this makeshift water catchment system for a leak in the Vets Hall roof. Photo by John Hardin

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all-purpose hall, the Mateel community opted for a concert venue. They had their reasons. I never went to the old Fireman’s Hall, but I can attest that the Vets Hall, not unlike a lot of multipurpose community buildings, has terrible acoustics and it’s likely the Mateel folks got tired of holding their boogies in awful sounding rooms. Who could blame them, especially in that era of FM stereo, audiophile component systems and half-speed master recordings? So, the Mateel built a great sounding concert hall and installed a top-flight sound system, which stands as a testament to the community’s deep respect and appreciation for the performing arts. There’s only one problem: The Mateel Community Center is just too expensive to rent for dog training, a club meeting or a whole lot of other things that make a community function. The Mateel charges between $800 and $1,000 a day to use the hall, with extra fees for cleaning and use of the lights and sound system. It offers a discount rate for nonprofit organizations, but compared to the $20 to $25 an hour the Vets Hall charged, there’s really no comparison. It is possible to rent just the bottom floor of the Mateel by the hour, but it still costs more than twice as much as the Vets Hall. Even as the Mateel Community Center rose in prominence, the SoHum community became more reliant on the John Haynes Memorial Veterans Hall for

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

everything from seniors exercise classes to circuit-bending workshops for the Southern Humboldt Amateur Radio Club. As the years passed, Vietnam vets succeeded Word War II vets, and the lines between hippie and straight began to soften. To help ease tensions and build community, the vets started hosting a Thanksgiving dinner. Everyone in the community was invited, and everyone was invited to help. The event proved so popular that they decided to do it again for Christmas. Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners at the Vets Hall have been a SoHum tradition for more than 30 years. One year, the vets served more than 300 people for Thanksgiving and every year at least a couple hundred spend the holiday at the hall, this in a town with a total population of around 1,000. Additionally, the vets and the local Kiwanis collect Toys for Tots every year, store the cache of donated toys at the hall and, every Christmas, Santa comes to distribute them.

Meanwhile, the roof has leaked for

as long as anyone can remember. The lack of a service contract with the county led to considerable rancor between Garberville vets and the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors in the ensuing decades, but the vets and the county finally came to an agreement that clearly established who is responsible for the hall’s maintenance on

Sept. 17, 2002. The agreements notes, “The county and Garberville veterans associations have been living, somewhat tenuously, under terms of a 1985 agreement that expired in 1987. The attached agreement is the culmination of years of negotiations, and represents, staff submits, a mutually satisfactory arrangement.” The agreement also tells us: “Veterans, years ago, without county permission, replaced part of the roof at a cost of $7,567. The county in fiscal year 1999-2000 reimbursed the veterans half the amount ($3,784) and offered to reimburse the remaining half ($3,783) on signing of a new agreement.” The new agreement clearly delineates responsibility for maintenance and repair of the hall, listing roof repair and replacement right at the top, under county responsibilities. According to Torborg, the roof leaked at the time the agreement was signed. At this point you are probably wondering what’s the problem with the roof of this building. It stems from the fact that, like a lot of other public buildings of the era, the hall has a flat roof. Back in the late 1950s and through most of the 1960s, people loved clean, modern Bauhaus lines, and those boxy, flat-roofed designs looked so good on paper no one could resist them. Architects sold thousands of sleek, modern-looking, flat-roofed buildings to communities just like ours, and damn near every one of them leaked chronically. The


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Garberville Branch of the Humboldt County Public Library, right around the corner from the Vets Hall, has the same problem. With the agreement of 2002 in place, the veterans turned their focus to the interior of the hall, making several improvements, including a new hardwood floor. Unfortunately, the chronic leaks in the roof have damaged a lot of these improvements. On a recent tour, Torborg pointed out places where water has damaged a tile floor, stained carpeting, shorted out a TV and damaged ceiling tiles, explaining that each of these had been due to different leaks at different times. Each time they noticed a leak, the veterans informed the county of it. Occasionally, the county even sent people to make repairs. According to Torborg, “They’d send somebody out with a bucket of black jack to fix a leak, on a flat roof, where the whole roof needs to be replaced.” One can only deduce, from the county’s own mold report, that the county’s maintenance of the Garberville Vets Hall had been inadequate to the task. One of the county’s repairs has been a fixture in the hall for many years: a 2-foot-by-2-foot shelf mounted overhead and out of reach on the internal wall between the main hall and the kitchen. On the shelf sits a large cooking pot. A hose attached to a bung on the side of the pot leads down the wall and out an open window. It’s hard to say where they found a stock pot with a bung, or the proper hose to fit it, but these are the miracles of Humboldt County procurement. Unfortunately, the wall around that shelf is now infested with black mold, as are several other locations in the hall, including the veterans office ceiling. The smell of mold permeated the building on the recent tour led by Torborg. The cramped office looked like it had been used that day. The desk had papers on it. Plaques hung on the wall near dress uniforms that hung in a row with filing cabinets lining the wall. Clearly the closure had come as a surprise, but a torn away piece of ceiling tile revealed the infestation. Apparently it was someone at the court who asked the county to inspect the hall for mold. The court occupies about one-third of the building exclusively. Mold may have become apparent in the judges’ chambers or the courtroom before anyone noticed it in the hall, but Kathy Wolman, who used the hall for many years with the Feet First dance troupe, said she smelled mold in the Vets Hall and knew the building had a problem long before Continued on next page »

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Return of FLASH FICTION! Email your original story of 99 words or fewer to fiction@northcoastjournal.com between now and 9 a.m. on Oct. 24. Be sure to include your name, address and phone number on your entry (contact info won’t be printed). Send all the stories you want, but save the poems for another competition, please.

Volunteers serve Christmas dinner at the Garbeville Veterans Hall, which regularly drew hundreds of people in the town of about 1,000. Submitted

the inspection proved it. Once the test came back positive for unhealthy levels of black mold in May, the county ordered the building closed and suspended all court activities there until further notice. Suddenly, people from Blocksburg to Shelter Cove and from Pepperwood to Piercy had to scramble to find a workaround. While Garberville itself is a small town, Garberville is “town” — as in, “I’m going to town” — for a huge geographic area with a growing population. The John Haynes Memorial Veterans Hall, despite its problems, served this larger SoHum community so faithfully, in so many capacities, for so long, and with such humility, that most took it for granted. We’re still scrambling.

Angelina Jaquez

still doesn’t know what she’ll do. She runs Unleashed K9 Training Inc., and has come to rely on the hall, where she taught canine socialization, agility and obedience. “For dogs to learn to behave, they need to be in a pack, so it’s important to get everyone together in one place,” she said. She described the difficulty she has had finding another location. “We can’t use the community park, because there are

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

no fenced areas, and because too many people let their dogs run with no leash, no training, no manners, no nothing,” she said. “We tried to find a place in the Meadows Business Park, but nothing worked out there. Nilsen’s Redway Feed Store volunteered to let us use their parking lot, but there’s just too much activity in that parking lot and, in the summer, the pavement is too hot for the dogs’ paws. I’m currently holding classes in one of my students’ yards, but that will only work as long as the weather holds out. I still don’t know what I’m going to do when it starts to rain.” She explained that the outdoor setting doesn’t work very well, as fewer people show up when it’s hot out, which deprives the dogs of the consistency they need for a good training class. Ultimately, she needs an indoor space with air conditioning and floors that are easy to clean. (Carpeted rooms won’t work, as dogs do have accidents on occasion.) “I work a lot with rehab dogs, and dogs that are difficult to deal with, have bite records and other problems,” Jaquez continued. “A lot of these dog owners are at their wits end. Without my class, some of these dogs will probably have to be put down.”

Evelyn King, who teaches an exercise class for seniors in SoHum, said participation in the class has gone down considerably since it had to be moved out of the Garberville Vets Hall. She still teaches, but sometimes has no students show up for her class at the Healy Senior Center in Redway. “One nice thing about the Vets Hall,” Evelyn said, “is that it is so close to the senior housing in Garberville. When we did the class there, the seniors could just walk over to the class, but to get (to Redway) they need a ride.” Other Vets Hall users face similar challenges. When asked, Vets Hall booking manager Amy McClellan rattled off a long list of groups that used the hall every week. There was Feet First Dancers, with classes and rehearsals for ballet, salsa, tap, jazz, hip hop, modern and more. Then there are theater groups, Aikido classes and senior exercise classes. The Family Resource Center in Redway used the hall for parenting classes, and the Garberville Town Square organization used its kitchen to prepare food for events. A host of nonprofits used it to house their annual dinners, fundraisers and celebrations. Then there’s the litany of public meetings held there, not to mention the monthly veterans dinner.


Build to edge the document Home & ofGarden Margins are just a safe area

Continued on next page »

The Southern Humboldt Amateur Radio Club, pictured here, called the Vets Hall home until it closed in May. Photo by John Hardin

“I’ve probably forgotten some things but this should get you started,” McClellan said. Southern Humboldt just doesn’t have that many alternatives. The much smaller Garberville Civic Club can handle about 50 people with a shoehorn, but it’s more out of the way. The struggling Garberville Theater, and the newly opened Redwood Playhouse in the old College of the Redwoods building will work for a performance, or to screen a movie, but you can’t really serve Thanksgiving dinner for 250 people in either of them and they don’t have a kitchen. It’s a conundrum. Many fear the county may opt to demolish the Vets Hall and with it, Garberville’s long holiday tradition.

According to Fennell, the cur-

rent 2nd District supervisor, the county is looking at the situation and trying to decide if the building is worth saving. The 2002 agreement stipulates that it is the county’s responsibility to fix the roof and rebuild the hall if it is destroyed. However, the agreement also states: “In a situation where the building is destroyed, we have included language that we will rebuild as soon as possible, and commit to beginning

reconstruction within a year of destruction. This recognizes that county timelines have constraints.” Those constraints are the reason the roof didn’t get fixed for 15 years. The vets have invested a lot of resources into this building, expecting the county would fulfill its obligation under the agreement. The county’s apparent failure to live up to its promise has hurt the entire community, especially area veterans. The hall closure has disrupted their activities, and threatens their property. For everyone else, it’s going to be a lot harder to find a place to meet, teach a class or have a wedding reception, and there doesn’t appear to be an easy answer. The vets favor fixing the roof and removing the mold, according to Torborg, and the sooner the better. He hopes the problem can be solved in relatively short order if it is handled quickly, before the mold has time to spread. Any other solution will likely leave Southern Humboldt without an affordable hall — and local vets without a place to meet — for the foreseeable future. And there’s more to this than simple inconvenience. Not only is the Vets Hall Continued on next page »

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

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On the Cover

Home & Garden

Continued from previous page

an important part of everyday life in SoHum, it also provides critical infrastructure in times of emergency. A provision in the 2002 agreement states that the hall will serve as a care center or “other emergency facility” during declared disasters or states of emergency. In fact, the Vets Hall has been used as a severe weather shelter on the coldest nights of winter for a long time. For many years, community organizers worked closely with the veterans around homeless issues. Many vets were homeless at the time and Veterans for Peace activists within the Garberville veterans post made the building available to people caught outdoors during nights when the temperatures fell below freezing. This past winter, however, the veterans decided they no longer wanted the hall used as an emergency shelter, citing safety, security and insurance concerns. Since then, community organizers Debra Carey and Paul Encimer have approached Fennell to establish an “extreme weather protocol” to determine emergency conditions under which the hall could be used as an emergency shelter. They say she’s been extremely reluctant to

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exercise the county’s authority under the agreement and there’s currently no shelter for the people who need it in Southern Humboldt. From one grieving mother’s generosity, and the work of three generations of local veterans, came a modest, poorly designed building on Conger Street in Garberville, but the forces that shape this community, and the people who live here, have made the Garberville Vets Hall into the heart of Southern Humboldt life. Meanwhile the forces at play in county government allowed the Garberville Vets Hall to fall into disrepair. Other Veterans Halls in the county need repairs too, but few serve such a vital role for such a large community. Considering the county’s ongoing structural budget deficit, it doesn’t seem likely that the county will make building a new veterans hall in Garberville a priority any time soon. Many wonder if the hall will ever reopen. In the meantime, the Mateel Community Center has agreed to host the vets annual Thanksgiving dinner, ensuring Southern Humboldt’s heart will continue to beat at least a bit longer, however faintly. ●

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Continued from previous page

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18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

Mon - Fri 9 to 5:30

Sat 9 to 5

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851


Continued on next page »

Delta

Treads, risers, handrails, balusters

Mattress & Sofa Outlet

WE CAN ORDER OR MAKE CUSTOM STAIR PARTS TO MATCH ANY WOOD FLOORING STOP IN TO SEE SAMPLES AND DISCUSS OPTIONS AND PRICING

“Your Sit & Sleep Specialists”

Mattresses, sofas, recliners, sectionals, dressers, headboards, dinettes and more 705 4th St, Eureka

707 442-4510

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Sunday, October 30 1-6 PM th

In the Hensel’s ACE Hardware/Housewares Parking Lot: 884 9th St., Arcata • (707) 822-2965

HALLOWEEN BASH First 100 guests to the candy booth get a free trick or treat candy bucket!

YOUR SOURCE FOR THE FINEST HARDWOODS & WOOD WORKING SUPPLIES

5301 Boyd Rd., Arcata Just off Giuntoli Lane at Hwy 299 www.almquistlumber.com (707) 825-8880

Free event Rain or shine

All Ages Haunted House • Carnival Games Music • Face Painting • Pumpkin Painting Candy Walk • candy and treats

costume contest!

Judging and Parade Begins at 4:00 pm PRIZES IN THESE AGE LEVELS

Newborn - 1 year • 2-4 year olds 5-9 year olds • 10-12 year olds Categories: Cutest, Spookiest, Most Creative

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

19


Table Talk

STUF’T POTATO

Apples Made Savory

A European Bistro

Featuring Authentic German/Austrian Cuisine 3200 South Broadway, Suite 8 Eureka • 707-444-6200

Moroccan chicken apple tagine

OPEN Wednesday thru Sunday

By Andrea Juarez

Breakfast: Sat – Sun ONLY 8:00 a.m. to noon

tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

Lunch – 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Dinner – 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. CLOSED Monday – Tuesday

F

www. stuftpotato.com Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

The North Coast’s Complete Restaurant Directory Available on newsstands throughout the county

20  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

all is a glorious time of year. Green leaves turning golden and crimson. Brisk mornings and sunny afternoons. Best of all, apples abound — ready to be picked and eaten. It’s no wonder October is national apple month. For people like moi, who think apples are the perfect fruit, it is paradise. My crisper is filled to the brim with locally grown Gravensteins, Fuji, Mutsu and a gorgeous mystery apple. If you are like the majority of folks, especially in the U.S., you likely only eat apples as a snack or in sweet dishes. This season, consider expanding your horizons and palate and delve into the savory side. The tartness and sweetness brighten many meals. For a burst of flavor and crunch, add them to a sandwich (try ham, sharp cheese, sliced apple and hot pepper jam) or chop up some for a kale or broccoli salad. I also like to cook apples like root vegetables. Stuff empanadas with apples, cheese and caramelized onions. Blend them in soups. Braise them along with meats (a la chicken Normandy). And, sear thick slices to garnish Moroccan chicken stew (recipe below). In Moroccan and North African cookery, fruit such as apples, pears, quinces, apricots, prunes and raisins are frequently added to meat dishes, especially tagines. I developed this recipe years ago and it continues to be a favorite in my house. Those bites of warm, tender apple sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar are a luscious contrast to the rich and slightly spicy stew. One more thing. To make this stew, there’s no need to buy a tagine (the


443-1090 5th & B Streets Eureka

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

Mon.-Thurs. 3pm-9pm

Fri. & Sat. 3pm-10pm

Sweet, tart apples in a spiced chicken stew. Photo by Andrea Juarez

cooking vessel); a Dutch oven or heavy pot will do. Try something new with your apples this season. After dinner, you can still have that apple pie.

Moroccan Chicken and Apple Tagine The sautéed apples are the highlight in this dish. Bring the list of ingredients together easily by prepping and pre-measuring the chicken, spices and vegetables before you start cooking. Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 ½ pounds chicken thighs (skinless and deboned), cut into 2-inch chunks 2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil 1 onion, chopped finely 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon cayenne 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper 2 cups chicken stock 1 15 oz. can chickpeas with liquid 2 teaspoons lemon juice (juice of half a small lemon) 3 large carrots, diced into 2-inch pieces 1 large potato, diced into 1 1/2-inch pieces 2 small zucchini, diced into 2-inches pieces 1 ½ tablespoons butter 3 medium tart apples Cinnamon Sugar 2 sprigs parsley, chopped To make the stew: Generously season the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat a heavy deep skillet or Dutch oven on

medium heat. When the pan is hot, add the oil and brown the chicken but do not cook throughout. Remove chicken and set aside. In the same pot, add the onions and more oil if needed. Stir until the onions become translucent. Next add the garlic, ginger, cinnamon, cayenne, salt and pepper and stir frequently for about 1 minute to allow spices to bloom. Return the chicken to the pot and stir. Add 2 cups water, carrots, potatoes and the can of chickpeas with liquid. Bring contents to a low boil. Cover and reduce heat to simmer. After 40 minutes, add the zucchini and leave it to simmer another 20 minutes or until the meat is cooked throughout and the vegetables are tender but not mushy. Cover and turn off the heat. To prepare the apples: Wash the apples, but do not peel them because the skin will help hold the slices together as they cook. Core and cut the apples into six wedges. In a separate large skillet on medium heat, melt the butter. When the butter starts to bubble, place the apple slices cut-side down in the skillet. Do not cook skin-side down. Sear them until they become slightly golden and caramelized before flipping them with tongs. The apples are done when browned but not falling apart. Remove them from the heat and place them on a plate skin-side down. Sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. Keep the apple slices warm. Serve the stew over couscous. Garnish with chopped parsley and arrange the apples on top. ● Andrea Juarez has additional recipes on her food anthropology blog ForkFingersChopsticks.com.

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

21


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

Open Daily 8am - 2am

VENUE

THE ALIBI 744 Ninth St., 822-3731 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 Ninth St., 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St., 822-1220

THUR 10/20

FRI 10/21

The Humboldt Hip-Hop Showcase 9pm $15, $10 advance

Real Vocal String Quartet 8pm $18, $16

Real Vocal String Quartet 8pm $18, $16

The Craft (film) 8pm $5

Tauk (instrumental rock fusion) 9pm $20, $15 advance

HSU Downtown DJ Night 9pm Free for HSU students

BLONDIES 822-3453 420 E. California Ave., Arcata BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free Open Mic w/Live Music 8pm Free

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

SUN 10/23

(rock and roll) Dr. Squid (dance hits) 9pm Free Triple Junction 9pm Free Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

BluEnglish (classic rock) 9pm Free Exile (pop, country) 8pm $49, $39 Firewater: Pressure Anya (DJs) 9pm Free

The Goonies (film) 8pm $5

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free Frogbite (rockin originals) 7:30pm Free

Walter Rockwell (guitar) 8pm Free Please the Trees, Annie Girl & the Flight (indie rock) 9:30pm $10

M-T-W 10/24-26 [T] Spare Pages Show (spoken word) 7pm $10, $5

Jazz Jam 6pm Free

Silver Hammer (Beatles tribute) 9pm Free

FIELDBROOK MARKET & EATERY 4636 Fieldbrook Road, 839-0521 GRIFFIN 937 10th St. 825-1755

SAT 10/22

Disassturbator, Dead Man’s Tale (punk) 11:30pm $5

Open Mic 7pm Free

CLAM BEACH TAVERN 839-0545 Legends of the Mind (blues, jazz) 6pm Free 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

ARCATA & NORTH [M] Monday Night Football 5:30pm Free w/$5 food/bev [W] Sci Fi Night ft. Death Bed: The Bed That Eats (film) 6pm Free w/$5 food or beverage purchase [M] Trivia Night 7:30pm Free [W] Local Music Showcase 7pm Free [W] DJ D-Funk 9pm Free

[T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [M] Savage Henry Stand up Open Mic 9pm Free [W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free

[W] Salsa 8:30pm Free Melvin Seals & JGB (blues, funk, rock) 9:30pm $30, $25

Melvin Seals & JGB (blues, funk, rock) 9:30pm $30, $25

HAPI HOUR

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Happy Hour 3 pm - 5 pm 761 8th St., Arcata 707-630-5300

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22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

Pints $3 Well Drinks $5 Hot Sake Flasks $6 Martinis Special Hapi Menu OPEN @ 4PM Yakitori • Mini Rainbow Poke Spicy Jalapeno Hamachi Plate ...and MUCH MORE!

ENDS

5:30PM

At the Hotel Arcata 708 8th Street Arcata • (707) 822-1414 • www.tomoarcata.com


THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE

THUR 10/20

FRI 10/21

Eureka and South on next page

SAT 10/22

SUN 10/23

100 Watt Mind, Life During Wartime – a Dubbadubs with Mykal Somer Deep Groove Society THE JAM Peach Purple (rock) Tribute to the Talking Heads and Alter Tones (reggae) SUNDAZE (EDM) 9pm $5 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766 9:30pm TBA 9:30pm TBA 9:30pm TBA LARRUPIN 677-0230 Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad Claire Bent (jazz vocal) Jason Hall Trio Aber Miller LIBATION 7pm Free 6pm Free 7pm Free 761 Eighth St., Arcata 825-7596 JD Jeffries and Devin Paine LIGHTHOUSE GRILL (classics, originals) 355 Main St., Trinidad 677-0077 5pm Free Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) The Beautiful Losers Potluck (food) LOGGER BAR 668-5000 9pm Free 9pm Free 6pm Free 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake The Compost Mountain Boys Home Cookin’ Cadillac Ranch (country rock) MAD RIVER BREWING CO. (bluegrass) (originals and covers) 6pm Free 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-5680 6pm Free 6pm Free

THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

Middle East Film Series 7pm Free

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187 OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad Business Casual REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW (jazz) 8pm Free 550 S G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222 DJ Ray SIDELINES 10pm TBA 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 Thursday Night Bluegrass 8pm Free Central Ave., McKinleyville TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198 WESTHAVEN CENTER ARTS 501 S. Westhaven Drive 677-9493

M-T-W 10/24-26

[T] Savage Henry Comedy 8pm $5 [W] Jazz at the Jam 6:30pm Free The Whomp (DJs) 10pm $5 [W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free [T] Triston Norton (guitar) 7pm Free

FRESH NEW

707 HATS

HAVE ARRIVED! [W] Turtle Races 8pm Free [T] Blue Lotus Jazz (jazz) 6pm Free [W] Randles, Labolle, Amirkhanian (jazz) 6pm Free [T] Sonido Panchanguero (DJ music) 9:30pm Free [T] Human Expression Open Mic 7pm Free [M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rudelion 8pm $5 [M] Shuffle Board Tournament 7pm Free

Open Mic 7pm Free

Jonah Tolchin 8pm Free DJ Ray 10pm TBA

DJ Tim Stubbs 10pm TBA

Masta Shredda 10pm Free

DJ Ray 10pm Free

Third Friday Blues 7pm $5-$10 sliding

Trivia Night 8pm Free Song Village w/Seabury Gould 1pm-3pm Free

[M] Karaoke with DJ Marv 8pm Free [T] Bomba Sonida w/DJ Pressure 10pm Free [W] Reggae w/Iron Fyah 10pm Free

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120 Monda Way Unit C • Blue Lake Turn right at Mad River Brewery onto Taylor, turn right onto Monda Way.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

23


24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com


northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

25


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

Hopper $2 OFF any Bealerl ga mes! during Pro Footb

929 4TH ST. EUREKA • 443-1632 •

uthern cal So eyards in Visit lo V oldt Humb Wineries! & ok acebo s on F Like u

THUR 10/20

BANANA HUT 621 Fifth St., Eureka 443-3447 BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770 BEAR RIVER CASINO HOTEL 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 CALICO’S CAFE 923-2253 808 Redwood Drive, Garberville CHAPALA CAFÉ 201 Second St., Eureka 443-9514 CURLEY’S FULL CIRCLE 460 Main St., Ferndale 786-9696 EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St., 497-6093 EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 442-2970 FERNBRIDGE MARKET RIDGETOP CAFE 786-3900 623 Fernbridge Dr., Fortuna GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 GARBERVILLE THEATER 766 Redwood St. 923-3580 LIL’ RED LION 1506 Fifth St., Eureka 444-1344

Karaoke w/Casey 8pm Free

Comedy Show Surprise 9pm Free

EUREKA & SOUTH

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway FRI 10/21

SAT 10/22

SUN 10/23

Latino Night with DJ Pachanguero 10pm Free Bar-Fly Karaoke DJ Saturdays 10pm Free 9pm Free Backstreet Band (classic rock) Be Happy! The Original 9pm Free Wailers (reggae) 8pm $45, $35 Frisky Brisket Jen Tal and The HuZBand (violin, guitar) 7pm Free (acoustic duo) 6:30pm Free Live Music Live Music 6pm Free 6pm Free Ultra Secret (jazz) 9pm Free

Bandoloko (rock) 9pm Free Va Va Voom’s Frightful Friday Flix: Phantasm Ghouls Night Out (burlesque) (film) 7:30pm $5 8pm $15, $12 advance

M-T-W 10/24-26 [W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

[W] Open Mic Night 7pm Free [M] Maui Monday (Hawaiian music) 7pm Free [T] Anna Banana (blues) 8pm Free [W] Comedy Open Mikey 9pm Free

[M] Open Mic 5:30pm Free Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Irish) 6pm Free

Crested Hens (Celtic) 6pm Free Open Mic 7pm $5 Muppet Hunter, The Tweeners, Disassturbator (hardcore, metal) 8pm $5

Karaoke 9pm Free

and Medicine For the MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER Nahko People w/Hirie Nick Thune (comedy) 9pm $15 59 Rusk Lane 923-3368 8pm $30, $25 advance Led Kaapana and Da Ukulele The Majestic (film) THE OLD STEEPLE Boyz (slack key guitar) 7:30pm $5 246 Berding St. 786-7030 7:30pm $25

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

[T] Open Mic 7pm $5


Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center

TAUK plays the Arcata Theatre Lounge Satruday, Oct. 22 at 9 p.m.

All Renewals Starting At

80

$

Photo courtesy of the artists

VENUE

THUR 10/20

FRI 10/21

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 DJ Pressure Dub Cowboy (DJ music) PEARL LOUNGE (DJ music) 9pm Free 10pm Free 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GALLERY The Latin Peppers (Latin) Sleepy Village (blue 1055 Redway Drive, Redway 7:30pm Free psychedelic rock) 7:30pm Free 923-2748 SHOOTERS OFF BROADWAY 1407 Albee St., Eureka 442-4131 SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

SAT 10/22

SUN 10/23

M-T-W 10/24-26

Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 11-5pm

Selecta Arms (DJ music) 10pm Free

The Eureka Pizza Council Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups THE SPEAKEASY (jazz) 8:30pm Free (blues)9pm Free 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 STONE JUNCTION BAR Upstate Thursdays (DJ music) Eclectronica w/DJs Andreas Irie Rockers (reggae, rock) 744 Redway Dr., Garberville 9pm TBA and Trey 9:30pm TBA 9:30pm TBA 923-2562 TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 444-2244 Jeffrey Smoller VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT (solo guitar) 6pm Free 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

[W] Open mic hosted by Cathryn Guillette 7:30pm Free Sonido Panchanguero 9pm Free Swamp Ritual, Buckshot Possum, Black Plate (metal) 7pm $5

Night Moves at Club Expression (DJ music) 9pm Free

[T] Signals (Latin death-rock) 8pm Free [T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [W] Ultra Secret (jazz) 8pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10

Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students

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MCGREGOR vs ALVAREZ LIGHTWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP

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King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

27


Setlist

The Trip By Andy Powell

thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

S

ome of my luckier friends informed me how awesome this recent Desert Trip Festival was down in the hotlands of California. They shared because they know I’m a music fan and this festival had some of my all time favorites (Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Neil Young, The Rolling Stones, The Who and Roger Waters) but mostly they were just rubbing it in my face that I missed this event of a lifetime. To be honest, I’m not much of a music festival guy — assuming I can afford tickets in the first place — as they tend to be too crowded, sometimes too hot and often too douchey, thanks to, you know, people. But this did get me thinking about what else I could have asked for in a festival lineup. A day or so later, I was at the bank and struck up a conversation about said festival with an employee. We eventually got to speaking about how she was actually on her way down to Sacramento with her 20-something year old daughter to see a concert that weekend. She wasn’t particularly enthused about the headline, but was glad to get to spend time with her daughter. I started to wonder what concerts my daughter would want to see — she’s barely a teenager — when she’s a year or two older, and if she would want her parents to come with her (doubtful). I then started to even wonder if she would even want to see a live concert. I don’t mean to generalize and sound like an old man here — I do — but she and much of her generation interact with music as a digital and oftentimes disposable product (they’re not the first). Music exists now almost exclusively in the realm of YouTube and Spotify for many. Songs and artists provide short-term enjoyment which then disappear after a shelf life of about two weeks to be replaced by the next hit song. I don’t mean to sound too pessimistic about all of this — I do — and I realize these are ageold observations one generation makes about the next, but if one doesn’t build long-term relationships with musicians, songwriters and bands, why would one travel anywhere to hear them play live? Maybe I’m wrong. Maybe she and her friends will get the bug and get into live music the way many of their parents have. Sure, they may not follow a band around Grateful Dead style but maybe they’ll

get hooked on feeling the air vibrate the way their ancestors did. I hope so. And I know when they’re ready, Keith Richards will be ready for them.

Thursday Up in sunny Blue Lake — even through it rains occasionally — you’ll find one of Humboldt’s longer-running bluegrass bands The Compost Mountain Boys plucking away at the Mad River Brewery Tasting room around 6 Real Vocal String Quartet plays Friday, Oct. 21 and Saturday, Oct. 22 at the Arcata Playhouse at 8 p.m. Photo courtesy of the artists p.m. The show is free, but the beer is not. That’s still not a bad deal. In Arcata, a band hailing from Europe (East Bohemia? Prague? I’m by the North Coast Repertory Theater and if you’ve seen Melvin and JGB before, not totally clear) will stop by Humboldt tonight with his trio at 8 p.m. With a vast you know you should probably snatch up a Brews to play some tunes and plant some knowledge of Mississippi Delta blues, trad $30 ticket before this one sells out. trees. With the fitting name Please the jazz, and some hints of rock ’n’ roll, LWK Trees, these folks will no doubt be blown (as the press release abbreviates) is out Did you miss the Real Vocal String away by the ancient beauties we take on the road supporting his recent release Quartet at The Arcata Playhouse last for granted on a daily basis. Supporting of I’m Glad Trouble Don’t Last Always. night? Did you miss Melvin Seals and JGB Robert Plant last year (Plant + Trees?), PTT Sounds a bit bluesy, don’t it? $15 will get at Humboldt Brews? Good news is both will be doing a bit more than just jamming you in to this one. Also at 8 p.m., the Real groups are playing again tonight. Same in Arcata. In each city it plays, the group Vocal String Quartet will be playing two Humboldt time, same Humboldt venue, plants a tree and records the photographic nights at the Arcata Playhouse. A Bay Area and same Humboldt price (see above). evidence on Facebook. The challenge may based quartet — as the name implies — Oyster Bay, New York, groove-jammers be finding space to plant a tree here. PTT that counts classical, jazz, and rock as influTAUK are in town tonight and I’ve been will be supported by Annie Girl and the ences, will be performing songs from its hearing some buzz about the band from Flight around 9:30 p.m. for this $10 show. newest release, Slacker Ridge. The quartet some of my friends in that scene. It’s will also be sneaking in a few Led Zeppelin instrumental rock-fusion of sorts sneaking and Pixies covers, so that should be a real As any of us with kids know, Hallowin some ambient, hip hop and progressive treat from members who have recorded een, ahem, Samhain is right around the rock into the sound. My pal Tomek of with and played with Ella Fitzgerald, Ray corner. Helping us celebrate this old Celtic Helekinetic, who is opening up the show, Charles, Frank Sinatra, Smokey Robinson, end-of-summer holiday are the Crested tells me (if memory serves correct) that Dave Grisman, Billy Joel, Wilco and DonoHens, who will be playing Celtic tunes and TAUK is “kind of a softer STS9 with some van. $18 ticket prices, and if you can’t catch Celtic-inspired originals at Gallagher’s Irish funky shit and jazz touches a la Steely ’em tonight, you’ve got another chance Pub in Eureka at 5:30 p.m. for free. Music Dan.” Sounds cool to me. Doors open Saturday. The Jam in Arcata hosts Life from what we may call the Western Edge at 9 p.m. and $20 will get you in for this During Wartime, which should give you of Western Music will be performed at groovefest at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. Heads fans a tip off. Based out of PortThe Old Steeple in Ferndale tonight at 7:30 land — from what I can tell — this Talking p.m. Led Kaapana and Da Ukelele Boyz Full show listings in the Journal’s Music Heads tribute band is heavily influenced by bring us some feel-good-sand-betweenand More grid, the Calendar and online. Stop Making Sense and occasionally covthe-toes tunes from the Hawaiian islands. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, ers that live album. Will it do so tonight? A master of the slack key guitar, Led has preferably with a high-res photo or two, There’s only one way to find out. Show four Grammy nominations under his belt to music@northcoastjournal.com. time’s around 9 p.m. and cover charge is and will be bringing us some musical sunTBA. Another band pulling a two-night shine this evening. Order a Mai Tai at The Andy Powell is a congenital music lover residency here in Humboldt and smartly Palace before (or after) the show for the and hosts The Night Show on KWPT 100.3 so, may I add, are favorites Melvin Seals full experience. A $30 ticket price for this FM weeknights at 6 p.m. He’s never been and JGB who will be at Humboldt Brews one. Local musical jack-of-all-trades Chris to a proper music festival. around 9:30 p.m. Anyone from the extendParreira tells me that New Orleans-based ed Dead family is always wise to make a musician Luke Winslow-King is stopping l trip through Humboldt when on the road,

Saturday

Friday

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com


Calendar October 20 - October 27, 2016

20 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309.

LECTURE

Courtesy of the author

British author Andrea Wulf visits Humboldt State University on Monday, Oct. 24, to talk about the subject of her award-winning book, The Invention of Nature, German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, whom she calls the “most colorful and captivating man I have ever heard of,” and for whom Humboldt County is named. The author is giving a free talk in the Van Duzer Theatre at 1 p.m. (the 7 p.m. show is sold out).

The Majestic

Ferndale has been the site of a few Hollywood films but perhaps none has showcased so much of the picturesque town as 2001’s The Majestic (although Outbreak had its fair share of recognizable Cream City landmarks). Celebrate the film’s 15-year anniversary with the folks from Ferndale Music Company at a special showing at The Old Steeple, Saturday, Oct. 22 at 7:30 p.m. ($5).

Facebook

Stroll or strut with your kids or your mutt at Humboldt Bay Firefighters’ Bark in the Park, Saturday, Oct. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Sequoia Park ($20 race entry fee). The dog-friendly (dogs must be on leashes and current on vaccinations) 5K run/walk benefits Friends For Life Animal Rescue and features live music, raffles and adoptable and walkable dogs. Dig it!

Steller’s Jays of Redwood National and State Parks. 7 p.m. HSU Natural History Museum, 1242 G St., Arcata. Biologist and film producer Will Goldenberg discusses his study of these commonly seen birds and their effects on the endangered marbled murrelet. Refreshments provided. Donations appreciated. www.humboldt.edu/ natmus. 826-4479. Tiny Houses: A Fad or the Future of Housing? 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. As part of the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series, Lee Pera presents “Tiny Houses: A Fad or the Future of Housing?” Free. envcomm1@humboldt.edu. www.schatzlab.org/ about/publications/speaker_series.html. 826-3653.

MOVIES Middle East Film Series. 7-9 p.m. Richards’ Goat Tavern & Tea Room and Miniplex, 401 I St., Arcata. Film series and discussion with HSU Professor Leena Dallasheh. Featuring Rana’s Wedding (2002). Free. www.richardsgoat.com.

MUSIC

Thinkstock

Submitted

Shake, Señora

The Ghouls Next Door

Love to dance? Love Halloween and/or Dead of the Dead, but can’t wait any longer to twirl your skirts or tailcoats? Then don’t miss USA Dance’s October dance event, a Día de los Muertos-themed evening Saturday, Oct. 22 at Redwood Raks ($10, $5 USA Dance members/seniors/students w/ID). Doors open at 6 p.m. with a merengue dance lesson at 6:30 p.m. followed by Latin dancing until 10 p.m. Swing your sugar and shake your skulls at this Day of the Dead dance party, put on by the Humboldt chapter of USA Dance, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality and the quantity of ballroom dancing in the country. We’ve got a pretty active chapter here that offers frequent events that feature a lesson followed by dancing. Everyone is welcome whether they have dance experience or not, to dance or just spectate. Sometimes it’s a pleasure just to watch the smooth moves of couples on the floor, and October’s evening’s exhibition of lively merengue should be especially fun. Halloween/Day of the Dead dress is encouraged (but not required) and sugar skull face-painting is offered and included with entry fee (although tips are appreciated). So shake, rattle and roll in your best bone suits. — Kali Cozyris

Halloween is a time for dressing up or taking it off — depending on the party. And sometimes it’s about dressing up and taking it off. Get ready for the latter. Va Va Voom Revue is bringing the boo (m) to the Eureka Theater Saturday, Oct. 22 with its scintillating Halloween show, Ghouls Night Out ($25 premiere seats, $15 general). Doors open at 8 p.m. for cocktails and mingling. Get your howl on at 9 p.m. when the house lights go down and the stage lights come up. The show features not only the bewitching ladies of Va Va Voom, but special guests, costume contests (go on, toss on a tassel or two), games, a 50/50 raffle and other vampy fun. Joining the show are the baddest asses in the biz, Grrrlz 2 Men, the dashing Justin Cider and the sultry hip shakers of Tribal Oasis Bellydance. Keeping things smooth all night long is emcee, Mr. Drag King Humboldt himself, Hugh Johnson. And perhaps the best part of the evening? A special calendar sneak peek of Pinups and Pooches, which benefits the Companion Animal Foundation. Mrrow. Advance tickets will save you a few bones ($20 premiere, $12 general). Get them at Good Relations, Annex 39 and Old Growth Tattoo. The event is 21 and over. — Kali Cozyris

Balkan and East European Music Meetup. 7-8:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Come play and sing a variety of international folk music with this community music group. All instruments, voices and levels are welcome. $2. linneaman@gmail.com. 496-6784. The Humboldt Hip-Hop Showcase. 9 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. With host 2Bitt and performers Travii Bandz, Rock Slang, Area 5150, TRexx, Greenlite, Dummie Blocc, West Craven, D-Ray and Pharoah Lavelli. $15, $10 advance. Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816. Nahko and Medicine For the People. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Hirie opens. Doors at 7 p.m. $30, $25 advance. www.mateel.org.

ELECTIONS Pros and Cons for Local Ballot Measures. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. League of Women Voters presents discussion of measures Q, R, S, U and V. Library programs and services are free, and accessible to persons with disabilities; please let us know if you require assistance. Free. www.lwvhc.org/ calendar.html. 444-9252.

FOR KIDS Thursday Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Fortuna Library presents a weekly morning storytime. Free. forhuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.humboldtgov. org/296/Fortuna-Library. 725-3460. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. A unique drop-off program for children ages 3-5. Stories, music, crafts, yoga and snacks. $8, $6 members. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Continued on next page »

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Calendar Continued from previous page

Sunday October 30, 2016 $10-15

12-2pm, doors open 11:30

Bayside Grange

A Benefit for the

Breast and GYN Health Project

Dutch Raffle Prizes! Come in costume!

LECTURE

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. www. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Local, GMO-free produce. Live music. EBT welcome with Market Match up to $10/day for EBT spending. Vouchers available to SSI recipients once per month per market location. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. The People’s Market: Free Produce. Third Thursday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Food for People’s free farmers’ markets style produce markets. All income eligible folks are invited to pick out fresh fruits and vegetables at no cost. Free. hmchugh@foodforpeople.org. www.foodforpeople. org/programs/free-farmers-market-style-produce-distributions. 445-3166.

Elephants–Winning the War on Ivory. 7 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Krissie Clark and Wayne Lotter of PAMS Foundation discuss the intelligent multiagency approach in Tanzania. Reception and craft sale at 6:30pm. In the Flamingo Room. Free. www. sequoiaparkzoo.net. Rivers and Creeks. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Mary Ann Madej talks about the influence of rivers and creeks on the bay and its channels. Sponsored by Friends of the Arcata Marsh. Free. 826-2359. Tanbark, Sheep and Apples. 7 p.m. Ferndale Town Hall, 834 Main St. Early-day Humboldt’s two biggest industries were redwood lumber and canned salmon. Historian Jerry Rohde presents a lecture on Humboldt’s other products. Free.

HOLIDAY EVENTS volu (707) 82 5 - 8 3 4 n 229 teer@ hcb h p . o r 7 Jac ob y Cre e k R

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FOOD

Organic Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Browse organic pumpkin varieties and winter squash. Also, a hay pyramid and concession stand with farm-raised beef hot dogs and pumpkin pie. ADA compliant porta-pots and handicap parking. No dogs, please. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. 822-6017.

MEETINGS Humboldt Green Party Meeting. 7-8:30 p.m. 1659 I St., Arcata, Arcata. Humboldt Greens meetings are open to the public, and all who share Green values are welcome. This is a working meeting. Endorsement of state propositions, local measures and candidates will be considered. The rest of the evening will be devoted to writing letters to the editors of local papers. Free. dsilver@greens.org. www.humboldtgreens.org. 267-5342.

ETC Eelgrass Management Plan Development Workshop. 5-6:30 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Learn about the process and provide input. Free. www. ci.eureka.ca.gov/depts/pw/wharfinger/default.asp. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play cards. 444-3161. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and fiber artists to socialize and work on projects. 442-9276. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358. Fern Cottage Tour. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. Tour the 150-year-old home of pioneers Joseph and Zipporah Russ, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. $10. info@ferncottage. org. www.ferncottage.org. 786-4835.

21 Friday DANCE

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers sponsor teaching and easy dances at 8 p.m. followed by request dancing 9 p.m. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. www.stalbansarcata.org. 839-3665.

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

MOVIES The Craft (1996). 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Four teenage girls wield sorcery and goth lipstick. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com. Frightful Friday Flix: Phantasm: Remastered. 7:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. In Don Coscarelli’s 1979 classic, three boys discover the town mortician is murdering and reanimating residents of their small town. $5. www. theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC Led Kaapana and Da Ukulele Boyz. 7:30 p.m. The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. Hawaii’s master of the slack key guitar. $25. Luke Winslow-King. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Real Vocal String Quartet. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Female San Francisco musicians play pieces influenced by classical, jazz, rock and styles from West Africa, Brazil and rural America. $18, $16 members & students. Third Friday Blues. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. An evening of acoustic/ electric blues. Jim Lahman, Dale Cash and Bill Moehnke will present blues from the turn of the century to today. Dancing encouraged. Refreshments available. $5-10 sliding. 834-2479.

THEATER Peter and the Starcatcher. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. HSU Theatre presents the Tony Award-winning play that upends the century-old story of how a miserable orphan boy becomes the legendary Peter Pan. $10, $8. www2. humboldt.edu/theatre/. 826-3566. The Rocky Horror Show. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. A rock musical sci-fi/ horror spoof full of seduction and sexual confusion. Audience participation and costumes encouraged. For ages 16 and up. $18, $16 students/seniors. www.ferndalerep.org.

EVENTS 29th Annual Science Night. 5-9 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Fun for all ages including demonstrations, hands-on activities, experiments, and lectures — most presented by CR faculty — on many facets of math, science and technology. Free admission. 476-4101. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. NorthCoastPeoplesAlliance.org.


FOR KIDS Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460.

FOOD Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, meats, baked goods and more, plus live music and family activities. Free.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Haunted Mill Tour. 7:30 p.m.-midnight Blue Ox Millworks, 1 X St., Eureka. Take a spooky walk through the ghoul-infested historic site. No children under 13 admitted. $12. hauntedmilltour.com. Organic Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

Halloween dress encouraged but not required. Sugar skulls facepainting, merengue lesson at 6:30. Presented by USA Dance. $10, $5 students/seniors and USA Dance members. www.redwoodraks.com. Va Va Voom’s Ghouls Night Out. 8 p.m.-midnight. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. A Halloween-themed burlesque event with local performers and special guests, a costume contest and 50/50 raffle. Benefits Companion Animal Foundation. Tickets at Good Relations, Old Growth Tattoo, Annex 39 and door. $15, $12 advance. vavavoomburlesque@live.com. www.facebook.com/ vavavoomburlesk/.

MOVIES The Majestic . The Old Steeple, 246 Berding St., Ferndale. A screening of the 2001 movie filmed in Ferndale. Audience members are encouraged to share stories from the filming before and after the film. $5.

MUSIC

Farm Volunteer Fridays. 2-5 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Support the farm while reaping the benefits of growing food. Help plant and harvest and everything in between. Bring gloves and water and leave with fresh produce. Free.

Exile. 8 p.m. Cher-Ae Heights Casino, 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad. The pop/country crossover band’s hits include 1978’s “Kiss You All Over.” $49 premium, $39 general. www.cheraeheightscasino.com. Real Vocal String Quartet. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. See Oct. 21 listing. Tauk. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Heavy instrumental rock fusion. $20, $15 advance. www. arcatatheatre.com.

SPORTS

SPOKEN WORD

OUTDOORS

BMX Friday. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for practice and racing. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

ETC 8th Humboldt Bay Symposium. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. The Humboldt Bay Symposium, held every two years to provide the public an opportunity to hear directly from experts about the latest developments on a variety of timely topics related to Humboldt Bay. $15. www.ci.eureka.ca.gov/depts/pw/ wharfinger/default.asp. Fern Cottage Tour. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Oct. 20 listing.

22 Saturday ART

Art Spark Opening. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Judy Evenson Studio, 93 Fern, Redway. Pop-up art venue featuring exhibiting local artists and Southern Humboldt winemakers. jeven37@gmail.com. 923-2220. The Collectors Sale. 12-5 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. This well-established collection features artwork from local artists as well as from around the world. www.humboldtarts.org.

BOOKS Jonathan Case. 3-5 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. The graphic novelist signs the new edition of Dear Creature, does free quick sketches and speaks about comics and graphic novel creation. Free. www. northtownbooks.com. 822-2834.

DANCE Dia de Muertos Dance. 6-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Day of the Dead/

Eulachon Poetry Reading. 7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Eulachon is a somewhat-quarterly reading series featuring a diverse lineup of poets and musicians. Cintia Santana, Jenny Mary Brown, Daniel Nickerson, and Katy Gurin perform. $10-$20 sliding.

THEATER Peter and the Starcatcher. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 21 listing. The Rocky Horror Show. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See Oct. 21 listing.

EVENTS Bark in The Park. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sequoia Park, 3414 W St., Eureka. Humboldt Bay Firefighters host this dog-friendly 5K run/walk benefitting Friends For Life Animal Rescue. Come with or without a leashed dog with current vaccinations. Live music, raffles. $20 race entry fee. 441-4000. Walk to End Alzheimer’s. 9:30 a.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., the opening ceremony at 9:30 and the 2.7-mile walk on the waterfront and through Old Town Eureka, begins at 10 a.m. with an optional 1-mile loop around Halvorsen Park.

FOR KIDS Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Noon. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Enjoy the film as lead-up to the Humboldt County Library’s Harry Potter Celebration. In the large meeting room. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1915. Story Time For Children of All Abilities. 9-10 a.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. This story time is designed with special needs children in mind, as well as their families and friends but is open to all. In addition to stories there will be sensory play stations available with volunteers to help children have a positive experience. Free. mckhuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www. humboldtgov.org/304/McKinleyville-Library. 839-4459. Story Time with Kathy Frye. Fourth Saturday of every

month, 11-11:30 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Featuring puppets and more designed for children ages 0-5. Free. riohuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.facebook. com/RioDellLibrary/. 764-3333.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Live music.

GARDEN Bayside Gardens Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Bayside Gardens, 2074 Old Arcata Road. Feed the cows, ride the tractor and swap squash recipes just south of the Bayside Post Office. Free admission. jbittner@suddenlink.net. 496-0618.

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Return of FLASH FICTION! Email your original story of 99 words or fewer to fiction@northcoastjournal.com between now and 9 a.m. on Oct. 24. Be sure to include your name, address and phone number on your entry (contact info won’t be printed). Send all the stories you want, but save the poems for another competition, please.

Ghost & Goblins; Spooks Galore!. 7 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. The Lost Coast’s wandering spectre and talespinner Carpathian presents a scary, silly and musical night of chills and chuckles for the entire family. With human companions storyteller Paul Woodland and singer/songwriter Lisa Sharry. Free. carpathian@patientcreatures.com. www.patientcreatures.com. 445-8600. Haunted Mill Tour. 7:30 p.m.-midnight Blue Ox Millworks, 1 X St., Eureka. See Oct. 21 listing. Organic Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Spirits & Spirits. 5-9 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Sip spirits at select stops while local historians and actors bring to life Old Town’s historic past and haunting present. Tours depart from Jack’s Seafood at 5, 6, 7 and 8 p.m. 21 and up. $40, $35 advance. www.eurekamainstreet.org. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet Barbara Reisman for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Walk leader is Christine Keil. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Birding Walk at Freshwater Farms Reserve. 8:30-10:30 a.m. Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Join special guest presenter Rob Fowler (Redwood Region Audubon Society) and Northcoast Regional Land Trust staff Connie Low for a birding tour and discussion around this beautifully restored wild and working landscape. Please park in the parking lot past the farmstand (on right hand side if going south). Severe weather cancels. Free. s.pilkington@ncrlt.org. www. ncrlt.org. 822-2242. Trail Building Volunteer Work Day. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Community Forest, Union Street. Help out with the Humboldt Trails Council’s Volunteer Trail Stewards and the Arcata Environmental Services Department. Please wear a long-sleeve shirt, work pants and boots, and bring rain gear and water. Gloves, tools, snacks and beverages provided. Free. eservices@cityofarcata. org. 825-2163. Continued on next page »

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Calendar Continued from previous page

Volunteer Trail Stewards. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Community Forest, Union Street. Help build the Arcata Ridge Trail. Wear a long sleeve shirt, work pants and boots and bring rain gear and water. Gloves, tools, snacks and beverages. For meeting location call 825-2163 or email eservices@cityofarcata.org. Free.

SPORTS

Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. See Oct. 21 listing.

ETC

8th Humboldt Bay Symposium. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. See Oct. 21 listing. Fern Cottage Tour. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Oct. 20 listing. Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

COMEDY

Mateel Community Center 923-3368, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Nick Thune. 9 p.m. $15. The Seattle native’s absurdist view and deadpan wit has been featured on The Tonight Show, Conan and Late Night. Matt Redbeard hosts and Josh Barnes opens.

23 Sunday

Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 499-8516. Song Village. 1-3 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. A singing gathering hosted by Seabury Gould. Singers are encouraged to bring the songbook “Rise Up Singing” and copies of songs they would like to share. Free.

THEATER Peter and the Starcatcher. 2 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 21 listing. The Rocky Horror Show. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See Oct. 21 listing.

EVENTS Casual Costume Cup and Safety Meeting. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Trim Scene Solutions, 1911 Barnett Court, Redway. This concentrate, flower and costume competition features music by DJ Chalice and a full-length closed loop extraction safety class by Purge Labs. The event is alcohol free. No dogs. $5 donation. Fortuna Community Health & Wellness Fair. 12-4 p.m. River Lodge Conference Center & Commercial Kitchen, 1800 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna. An afternoon of activities and prizes to promote health and engage community in wellness. Karate and gymnastics demos for children, Zumba exercises, massage and relaxation sessions, nutrition education, reading activities, music and games. Free. jjudge@opendoorhealth.com. www.friendlyfortuna.com.

ART

FOR KIDS

Art Spark Opening. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Judy Evenson Studio, 93 Fern, Redway. See Oct. 22 listing. The Collectors Sale. 12-5 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. See Oct. 22 listing.

Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Lego fun for younger and older kids featuring Duplos and more complex pieces. Free with museum admission. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

MOVIES

The Goonies (1985). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Misfit kids search for buried treasure in a subterranean cavern and, incidentally, never say die. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange

SUBMIT your

Calendar Events

FOOD

Food Not Bombs. 5 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. (503) 828-7421. Zydeco Breakfast in Bayside. 8 a.m.-noon. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. This quarter’s gourmet breakfast features live music by the Bayou Swamis. Bring ID for mimosas. $8, $5 kids/seniors, free for ages 80+ and under 2. admin@baysidegrange.org. 822-9998.

GARDEN Bayside Gardens Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Bayside Gardens, 2074 Old Arcata Road. See Oct. 22 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Organic Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

ONLINE or by E-MAIL northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

OUTDOORS Eureka Waterfront Trail Community Cleanup. 10 a.m.-noon. Eureka Waterfront, Foot of Del Norte Street. Preview this new trail and help get it ready for the public. Meet at Del Norte Street pier for sign-in and equipment. Please bring reusable water bottles, gloves and appropriate attire. Lunch provided at the end. Free. ecoeureka@ci.eureka.ca.gov. 441-4248.

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

SPORTS BMX Practice and Racing. 1-3 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Bring your bike for some fun. Wear long sleeves and pants. $2 practice, $11 race. www.facebook.com/RedwoodEmpireBmx. 407-9222.

ETC Family Game Day. 12-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring the family and friends for a day jam-packed with gaming fun. Feel free to bring in your own games. Free. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

24 Monday DANCE

Let’s Dance. 7-10 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Let’s dance to live music including swing standards and roots country. Everyone welcome. Swing Dance Lesson at 6:15, $5. Dancing after lesson free to lesson participants. Tonight dance to the Delta Nationals. $4. www.facebook.com/humboldt. grange. 725-5323.

LECTURE Andrea Wulf. 1 p.m., 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The author of The Invention of Nature talks about visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) and his influence on our understanding of nature. 1 p.m. Free. 7 p.m. (sold out).

HOLIDAY EVENTS Organic Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

MEETINGS Humboldt Bay Bicycle Commuters Association. 6 p.m. Carmela’s, Arcata, 1288 G St. Dinner optional. The agenda to be set by attendees. Email agenda items to the president, Rick Knapp. info@humbike.org. www.carmelasrestaurants.com. Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

OUTDOORS

Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Workshop. 7:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. The Alaska Marine Safety Education Association will conduct an 18-workshop according to U.S. Coast Guard training requirements for drill conductors on documented fishing vessels. Register online or call. $50 for commercial fishermen, $195 for all others. coral@amsea.org. www.amsea.org/eureka-ca-dc—-1024-252016. 907-747-3287.

SPORTS Monday Night Football. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Watch the game on the big screen. Check www.arcatatheater.com to stay updated on game and event details. Free w/$5 food and beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

25 Tuesday MOVIES

October Library Film Series: Lonely Are The Brave. 6:30 p.m. Eureka Main Library, 1313 Third St. Western

starring Kirk Douglas and Gena Rowlands. Hosted by Bob Doran. Free.

MUSIC Spare Pages Show. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. A cutting-edge blend of spoken word and vocals. Azure Antoinette and Emily Rex’s album is up for Grammy Award consideration for Spoken Word Album of the Year. $10, $5 for under 18. 834-1843.

FOR KIDS Arcata Family Resource Center Playgroup. 10 a.m.noon. Arcata Elementary School, 2400 Baldwin St. Playgroup for children 0-5 and their parents and caregivers. 826-1002. Grandparents and Books Storytime. 3-4:30 p.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Children of all ages welcome to afternoon storytime with “grandparent” storyteller Cynthia. Free. forhuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.humboldtgov.org/296/Fortuna-Library. 725-3460. Playgroup. 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Come to the museum for stories, crafts and snacks. Free for children age 0-5 and their caregivers. Free. redwooddiscoverymuseum@gmail.com. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Oct. 23 listing.

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. Free. Old Town Eureka Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. North Coast Growers’ Association farmers markets are GMO-free and all agricultural products are grown or raised within Humboldt County. Live music every week. Free. info@ humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Wildberries Marketplace Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. GMO-free agricultural products from Humboldt County. Live music. EBT always welcome. Monthly vouchers available to SSI recipients. Free. info@humfarm.org. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Organic Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

OUTDOORS Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Workshop. 7:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. See Oct. 24 listing. Slower-Speed Arcata Marsh Tour. Last Tuesday of every month, 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. A tour for attendees with mobility issues and those who are unable to keep up on regular walks. Meet at the first I Street parking lot (in from Samoa) of the Arcata Marsh. Free. 822-3475.

ETC Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games range from $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a large variety of games or bring your own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw St., Ferndale. Cards and pegs.


FALL / WINTER EDITION COMEDY

The Jam 822-4766, 915 H St., Arcata. Savage Henry Comedy Night. 8 p.m. $5. Local and out of town comedians bring the ha-has.

26 Wednesday MOVIES

Sci Fi Night ft. Death Bed: The Bed That Eats (1977). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Decades worth of innocent travelers fall prey to a demonic and hungry piece of furniture in this long-lost cult film. Free w/$5 food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

ELECTIONS Prop 64: Unrolling the Issues. 6-8 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Cannabis scholars, industry leaders and regulators share their knowledge and insights on Proposition 64 and the potential impacts of marijuana legalization in California. Free. avs1@humboldt.edu. www2.humboldt.edu/hiimr/. 826-3142.

FOR KIDS S.P.E.W. Knitting Class. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Part of Humboldt County Library’s Harry Potter Celebration. Hermione knit for the house elves and so can you. Yarn and some needles provided. Please bring size 9, 10 or 10.5 needles if you have them. Class is limited to 10 participants ages 10-16, so please call to reserve. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1915. Storytime. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Organic Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Organic Matters Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

MEETINGS Humboldt Bay Harbor Working Group Luncheon. noon. Samoa Cookhouse, 908 Vance Ave. Thomas K. Mattson, P.E., director of Public Works, provides an overview of the ballot initiative Measure U. RSVP: 441-1974; or by email: luncheon@humboldtworkingport.org $15 BBQ chicken or $11 soup and salad. www. samoacookhouse.net.

ETC

272 C St., Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing.

BOOKS Reyna Grande. 4-5 p.m. Goodwin Forum, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The award-winning novelist and memoirist gives a reading. Part of the HSU English Department’s Visiting Writers Series. Free. englasa@ humboldt.edu. www.literaryhumboldt.org/visiting-writers.html. 826-3758.

DANCE North Coast Dance Membership Gala. 6 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Featuring the Zombie Ballet. $75 (ticket includes NCD membership, Gala Party, Zombie Ballet, Nutcracker ticket with VIP seating). 442-1956.

LECTURE Sustainable Futures: “Where in the Wild?”. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Jason Mark, editor in chief of the Sierra Club’s national magazine and co-founder of an urban farm in San Francisco, presents. Free. envcomm1@humboldt.edu. www.schatzlab.org/about/publications/speaker_series. html. 826-3653.

MOVIES Wandering Reel Traveling Film Festival. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. “Mobilize,” a collection of films about current problems and impacts of human compassion, curiosity and a little mobilized action. Followed by Q&A with festival director Michael Harrington. $12 donation (includes vegetarian meal). 840-6067.

MUSIC Balkan and East European Music Meetup. 7-8:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

SPOKEN WORD Kimock. 8:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Rock. $27, $24 advance. www.arcatatheatre.com.

THEATER ArMack Silent Film Festival. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. Buster Keaton’s The Haunted House (1921) and Charlie Chaplin’s The Adventurer (1917), featuring live sound effects and orchestral soundtrack. Refreshments available by donation. Benefits the orchestra’s travel budget. Oct. 27-29 performances will be in the Arcata High School Fine Arts Center. $5. ed1@ suddenlink.net. 599-5414. Peter and the Starcatcher. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Oct. 21 listing. The Taming of the Shrew(s). Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. An adaptation of Shakepeare’s comic love story between sharp-tongued Katharine and the swaggering Petruchio.

Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. www.nugamesonline@gmail.com. www. nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Community Board Game Night. Last Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Play your favorite games or learn new ones with North Coast Role Playing. Free. oss1ncrp@ northcoast.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 444-2288.

FOR KIDS

COMEDY

FOOD

Thursday Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. See Oct. 20 listing. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing.

Palm Lounge, Eureka Inn 497-6093, 518 Seventh St.. Comedy Open Mikey. 9 p.m. Free. Hosted by Nando Molina with beats by Gabe Pressure.

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Eureka Natural Foods McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Oct. 20 listing.

ART

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery,

Organic Pumpkin Patch. 12-6 p.m. Organic Matters

27 Thursday

Ranch, 6821 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Warren Creek Pumpkin Patch. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Creek Farms, 1264 Warren Creek Road, Arcata. See Oct. 20 listing.

MEETINGS Nurses Night Out. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Hospice of Humboldt, 3327 Timber Fall Court, Eureka. Gather with nursing colleagues and health care professionals in an evening of learning and networking. There will also be a raffle and an tours of the new hospice facility. $20, $15 members, $5 students. 502-5815.

ETC Community Board Game Night. Last Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See Oct. 26 listing. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See Oct. 20 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See Oct. 20 listing. Fern Cottage Tour. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fern Cottage, 2121 Centerville Road, Ferndale. See Oct. 20 listing.

NOW AVAILABLE! ON NEWSSTANDS & ONLINE

HUMBOLDTINSIDER.COM

Heads Up This Week Westhaven Center for the Arts invites artists in all mediums to enter the November-December exhibit of “Small Images.” Enter up to four 14”x14” or smaller works each with a $5 entry fee on Tuesday, Nov. 1, from noon to 2 p.m. All art will be shown as space permits. Email wcaexhibits@gmail. com or call Ann Anderson at 677-0128. The Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir is seeking tenors. No singing experience necessary. Come to rehearsal at the Arcata Presbyterian Church (11th and G streets) on Oct. 20 at 7 p.m. Call 822-4444, email AIGChoir@gmail.com or go to ArcataInterfaithGospelChoir.org. The Westhaven Center for the Arts is accepting applications for Artist-in-Residence for the year 2017. For an application form visit the center, email wcaexhibits@gmail.com or call Ann Anderson at 677-0128. Applications due Nov. 5 and residency begins Jan., 2017. Humboldt Grange #501 sponsors a Craft Fair on Nov. 12. To be a vendor, contact Fern Miller, 2683806. Tables rent for $20 each. The McKinleyville Community Services District announces two regular voting member vacancies and one alternate member vacancy on the Recreation Advisory Committee. Mail letters of application to the MCSD, Attn: Lesley Frisbee, P.O. Box 2037, McKinleyville, CA 95519. Contact the Parks & Recreation Office at 839-9003. North Coast Community Garden Collaborative seeks donated garden supplies, monetary donations and/or volunteers. For more information, contact 269-2071 or debbiep@nrsrcaa.org. Volunteers needed for the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Call 826-2359 or email amic@ cityofarcata.org. Volunteers wanted for Eureka VA clinic. Call 269-7502. ●

LIFESTYLE OUTDOOR FUN PERFECT TRIPS FOOD & DRINK SHOPPING SOUVENIRS 90-DAY CALENDAR REGIONAL MAPS FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CALL: 442-1400 x319

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

33


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Filmland

In the Red !semitwohS dniF

MOVIE TIMES. TRAILERS. REVIEWS.

Browse by title, times and theater.

northcoastjournal.com

Oct 20 - Oct 26

Fri Oct 21 – The Craft (1996), Doors @ 7:30 PM, Movie @ 8 PM, Film is $5, Rated R. Sun Oct 23 – The Goonies (1985), Doors @ 5:30 PM, Movie @ 6 PM, Film is $5, Rated PG. Mon Oct 24 – Monday Night Football, Doors @ 5:20 PM, Game @ 5:30 PM, Texans @ Broncos, All ages, Free w/$5 food & bev purchase. Wed Oct 26 – Sci Fi Night: Death Bed: The Bed That Eats (1977), Doors @ 6 PM All ages, Free w/$5 food & bev purchase.

Sat Oct 22 – TAUK, Doors @ 9 PM, $20 @ Door, $15 adv Tix @ Wildberries/People’s Records/The Works, 21+.

The Accountant and Max Steel By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

THE ACCOUNTANT. Director Gavin O’Connor has been grinding it out now for almost two decades. He made some waves in the burgeoning ’90s indie boom without ever becoming a Big Name Director. His film Warrior (2011), a fight movie with more grit and a wider emotional vocabulary than most prestige dramas, caught my attention. It deserved more acclaim than it received, at least for the towering performances of Tom Hardy, Joel Edgerton and Nick Nolte. O’Connor seemed ready for major mainstream success, capable of coaxing such performances from formidable actors while balancing style and restraint behind the camera. Regardless, O’Connor keeps working (time and circumstance have thus far prevented me from seeing Jane Got a Gun, also released this year) and, with The Accountant, he may finally have a big enough hit on his C.V. to give his name some resonance. Christian Wolff (Ben Affleck) operates a vanilla accounting firm in a strip mall outside of Chicago. He helps struggling farmers avoid foreclosure, lives an unadorned, solitary, ordered life and for relaxation takes target practice at a distance of a mile with a mil-spec Barrett .50-caliber sniper rifle. He’s a tough nut to crack. Tougher still is the Christian Wolff who, using a variety of assumed identities, travels the world as a forensic accountant for the one percent of the one percent, the people who don’t pay taxes and aren’t big on trust. It’s that Wolff who has attracted the attention of legitimate domestic tech firm called Living Robotics, where a talented young accountant (Anna Kendrick) may have discovered some discrepancies in the books. Wolff, or at least one of his aliases, has also come within the purview of Director Ray King (J.K. Simmons) of the U.S. Treasury Department. King enlists/coerces Marybeth Medina (Cynthia Addai-Robinson) to uncover the identity of his shadowy quarry. Wolff ’s work at Living Robotics and Medina’s investigation of him continue apace, and the inevitable dead bodies begin to accumulate. In flashback, we learn more about Wolff ’s unusual upbringing: a military intelligence father who chose not to treat his son’s autism gently but to harden

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

it in the forge of combat training, to focus and re-focus his energy and intellect. Within this narrative is another thread, wherein Wolff is befriended by a mob accountant (Jeffery Tambor) while serving time in federal prison. He learns some valuable lessons about black money, develops perhaps his first meaningful adult friendship and is set on a life-long path of intrigue and vengeance. There are moments in The Accountant when it feels like O’Connor may be trying to keep one too many plates spinning, but in the end he pulls it off with aplomb. The plot twists toward the end aren’t exactly shocking, and feel a little unnecessary. But held against such a well-crafted, wellpaced, well-acted movie, that’s a minor shortcoming. The Accountant delivers on the promise of Warrior, even continuing some of its legacy of challenging family relationships and exploration of violence as expression. While it may lack some of Warrior’s centeredness and narrative intensity, it demonstrates admirable control over a much larger, more complex story and production. This is a popcorn movie, sure, but executed with more care and precision than most. It’s dark, stylish, compelling, touching, even funny in a few places — popcorn elevated. R. 128M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

MAX STEEL. In hindsight, it doesn’t really even make sense that I saw this. But I actually thought that going into a movie with literally no prior knowledge might actually produce a pleasant surprise. And then I watched it and came back to reality. The first indication of trouble was the Mattel logo. I haven’t researched but I’m told by reasonably reliable sources that this is based on a cartoon based on a toy from some years ago that may or may not be the subject of current re-release. Regardless, it shouldn’t be the subject of a major motion picture. Max (Ben Winchell) moves back to the town of his birth with Mom (Maria Bello). Said town is also the site of the industrial accident that claimed the life of Ben’s genius engineer father, Jim (Mike Doyle). Their return causes Max’s body to start producing some exotic, powerful energy that can only be contained by a

silicon-based lifeform named Steel (voiced by Josh Brener, who is the movie’s only saving grace). Soon enough, they are being pursued by gun-toting thugs in black Suburbans and then there’s a noisy climactic battle. Andy Garcia is called upon to recite terrible dialogue and do a lot of screaming. PG13. 92M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. — John J. Bennett For showtimes, see the Journal’s listings at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 8393456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards’ Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

AMERICAN HONEY. A teenage girl (Sasha Lane) hits the road with young, hard-partying crew traveling the country. With Shia LaBeouf, so you know it takes a turn. R. 163M. BROADWAY. BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN. Tyler Perry is back in the wig and glasses as Madea, chaperoning teens and spoofing horror movies. PG13. 103M. BROADWAY. DENIAL. Rachel Weisz plays historian Deborah Lipstadt in her legal battle against Holocaust denier David Irving, who sued her for libel in 1996, forcing her to prove the WWII atrocities actually occured. PG13. 103M. MINOR.

JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK. Tom Cruise clenches his jaw again as the hero from Lee Childs’ series, this time in defense of an old colleague (Cobie Smulders) accused of treason. PG13. 118M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES. Zach Galifianakis and Isla Fisher play a boring


Workshops & Classes

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Communication CONSULTING SKILLS WORKSHOP. Increase your ability to have your expertise utilized as you build effective partnerships. Part of the Leading Organi− zational & Community Change program. Dec. 7−9, $600. Call 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ locc to register. (C−1103)

I was told I could keep my stapler. couple dragged into espionage by their spy neighbors (John Hamm, Gal Gadot). PG13. 101M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

OUIJA: ORIGIN OF EVIL. Do you want evil spirits? Because this is how we get evil spirits. A phony séance gone wrong leads to a possessed teen. PG13. 99M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

PSYCHO. Revival of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 thriller starring Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh. R. 109M. BROADWAY. SPIRITED AWAY. Hayao Miyazaki’s animated adventure about a girl who must find her way home from a magical world of gods, monsters and witches. PG. 125M. MINOR.

Continuing

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, THE TOURING YEARS. Found footage and interviews covering 1963 to 1966. NR. 137M. MINOR.

THE BIRTH OF A NATION. This dramatization of Nat Turner’s uprising strikes too many afterschool special notes in its uneven storytelling. Director/actor Nate Parker fails to humanize his powerful subject or explore Turner’s most difficult moments. R. 120M. BROADWAY. CAFE SOCIETY. Jesse Eisenberg stands in for Woody Allen, mingling with mobsters and starlets in old Hollywood. With Kristen Stewart. R. 112M. MINOR. DEEPWATER HORIZON. Peter Berg’s taut oil rig disaster drama keeps a tight focus on the struggle of its real-life characters in a few crucial hours. PG13. 107M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN. The thriller relies on the twist and leaves plot fragments hanging, but its departure from standard detective narrative is refreshing

and Emily Blunt’s performance carries the suspense. R. 112M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. HELL OR HIGH WATER. A pair of bank-robbing brothers (Chris Pine, Ben Foster) are pursued by a pair of Texas Rangers (Jeff Bridges, Gil Birmingham) in a fine, character-driven film about what poverty does to people. R. 102M. MINOR. KEVIN HART: WHAT NOW? The comedian performs stand-up in a Philadelphia arena. R. 96M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. Some fine performances in this enjoyable remake, particularly from Peter Sarsgaard as the villain and a monstrous Vincent D’Onofrio, as well as strong action sequences. Still, it lags in places and breaks no new ground for the genre. PG13. 133M. FORTUNA. MASTERMINDS. Tame and toothless heist comedy punches a little low and doesn’t get enough dark laughs out of stars Zach Galifianakis and Kristen Wiig. PG13. 94M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA.

MIDDLE SCHOOL: THE WORST YEARS OF MY LIFE. The new kid in school (Griffin Gluck) sets out to break each of its suffocating rules of conduct. R. 112M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK.

MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN. Eva Green stars as headmistress in Tim Burton’s adaptation of the book about children with magical powers. PG13. 127M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR.

STORKS. A retail delivery bird winds up in the baby business trying to get an infant to a family. Or you could just have the talk with your kids. Voices of Jennifer Anniston and Kelsey Grammer. PG. 87M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK.

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill l

DEALING WITH DIFFICULT PEOPLE EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ Practical approaches to resolve relational conflict will be discussed at Lifetree Café on Sunday, October 23 at 7 p.m. The program, titled "Dealing With Difficult People: Secrets for Everyday Life From a Hostage Negotiator,"features a filmed interview with police SWAT commander Rick Arnold, a trained hostage negotiator. During the program, participants will have an opportunity to discuss difficult people in their own lives while brainstorming ways to better interact with them. Lifetree Café is a free conversation cafe located at Campbell Creek Connexion, corner of Union and 13th St., Arcata. Coffee and snacks. Ph: 672 29193th St., Arcata. Coffee and snacks. Ph: 672 2919 (S−1020) GRAPHIC RECORDING. AN EXCITING TECHNIQUE TO MAKE MEETINGS MORE ENGAGING. Learn to write and draw meeting conversations live and large. Sat., Nov. 5. $175 (includes materials). Call 826 −3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/locc to register. (C−1020) DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY BASICS. Get tips to help you understand your camera’s functions and create creative, quality images. Sat., Nov. 12. $150. Call 826 −3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended to register. (A−1103)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Learn to Bachata in our two hour workshop on Wed, Oct 26. Beg and Interme− diate classes in Swing, Latin, & Ballroom dance. We guarantee you will learn to dance! (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (D−1020) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−1006) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, (707) 616− 6876 shoshannaRaks@gmail.com (DMT−1027) WEST AFRICAN DRUM CLASS All Level Commu− nity Class Fridays 6−8pm Held at Organic Matters Ranch Barn 6821 Myrtle Ave, Eureka (Freshwater) Contact Heather 707−834−3610 Extra drums available to borrow or purchase (DMT−1027)

Continued on next page »

PIANO LESSONS FOR BEGINNERS by Judith Louise. Children and adults, learn to read & play music! 707 476−8919. (D−1027) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Beginning Classes Level 1 Fri’s. 10:00−:11:00a.m, Level 2 Fri’s. 11:00−12:00p.m. Intermediate Thu’s., 6:30−7:30p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C. Call (707) 407− 8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−1006)

Fitness NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout. New classes begin the first Mon. of every month. Ages 8 to 80+ Email: northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com or text, or call Justin at 707 601−1657. 1459 M Street, Arcata, northcoastfencing.tripod.com (F−1027) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−1229) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−1027)

Lectures MARKETING WINE IN HUMBOLDT COUNTY (& BEYOND). Explore the business of wine − distribu− tion, brand marketing, and building a loyal customer base − with local industry expert Eliza− beth Hans McCrone. Includes wine tasting and field trip. Part of the From Vine to Table Wine Certificate Program. Nov. 10−12. $265. Call 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended to register. (V−1103)

50 and Better ACTING UP: THE FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING WITH JULIE ECCLES−BENSON. Use improvisation, character development, scene work, and your own life experiences to up your acting skills and explore new acting techniques. Tues., Nov. 1−29 (no class Nov. 22) from 10:30 a.m.−noon. OLLI Members $65/ all others add $25 non−member fee. For more information call OLLI: 826−5880 or visit us online at www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1020) HOW TO WORK WITH THE MIND THROUGH BUDDHIST MEDITATION: PART II WITH KHENPO UGYEN WANGCHUK. Delve deeper into the prac− tice of Buddhist meditation and learn various types of meditation geared toward working with the mind and taming errant emotions. Mon. & Wed., Oct. 31−Nov. 16 from 4−6 p.m. OLLI Members $75/all others add $25 non−member fee. For more information call OLLI: 826−5880 or visit us online at www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1020) IPHONE BASICS: UNDERSTANDING YOUR IPHONE WITH JEFF SCHROEDER. Get to know the functions and features of the Apple iPhone, including how to effectively and efficiently write notes and messages. Tues., Nov. 1 from 5−6:50 p.m. OLLI Members $30/all others add $25 non− member fee. For more information call OLLI: 826− 5880 or visit us online at www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1020)

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

35


Workshops

Continued from previous page

MUSHROOM WALK WITH DICK WILD. Learn how to identify Humboldt’s broad variety of very tasty, beautiful and strange−looking fungi, including poisonous ones! Thurs., Nov. 3 from 5−6:30 p.m. and Sat., Nov. 5, from 9 a.m.−4 p.m. OLLI Members $75/all others add $25 non−member fee. For more information call OLLI: 826−5880 or visit us online at www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1020) OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1006) PROTEST FOLK SONGS THAT HELP DEFINE THE AMERICAN CONSCIOUS WITH LAURA HENNINGS. Discover how folk songs have influ− enced 20th Century history using lyrics, song history and songwriter bios. Tues., Nov. 1−15 from 2 −3:50 p.m. OLLI Members $55/all others add $25 non−member fee. For more information call OLLI: 826−5880 or visit us online at www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−1020) SHUSTER SHOOTS HUMBOLDT COUNTY WITH JERRY & GISELA ROHDE. Look at dozens of Merle Shuster stunning aerial photos of Humboldt County from the 1940s to the 1960s and discover the history they depict. Wed., Nov. 2 from 5−7:30 p.m. OLLI Members $30/all others add $25 non− member fee. For more information call OLLI: 826− 5880 or visit us online at www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1020)

Spiritual ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sunday 7:55 a.m. at Trillium Dance Studio, 855 8th St (next to the Post Office). Dharma talks are offered two Sundays per month at 9:20 a.m. following meditation. EUREKA: Wed’s, 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte St., enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 12.For more information call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. (S−1027) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Practice Tibetan Meditation on Loving−Kindness and Compassion in the Kagyu tradition, followed by a study group. Sun’s., 6 p.m., Community Yoga Center 890 G St., Arcata. Contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068. Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−12/29) NON−RELIGIOUS BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRAC− TICE WITH TOBIN RANGDROL AT ARCATA SCHOOL OF MASSAGE. Tuesdays, 6:30−8:30 p.m. starting September 27. Free. Visit freebuddhism.org or call (707) 407−7300. (S−1020) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S−1027) SPIRITUALITY SUNDAYS AT WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS Join us each Sunday from 9−10 AM for Golden Lion Yoga w/ Marissa Vaudo, a spiritu− ality informed yoga practice with emphasis on breathing and developing calmness. $12/class. Call 499−6917. Also, come to Gaia’s Love for a monthly study and experiential discussion group on Nature Based Spirituality and the healing values of the arts, November 20 from 10−11 AM. Both are held at Westhaven Center for the Arts at 501 S. Westhaven Dr., Westhaven. Contact Roy King at royjking2@hotmail.com or (650) 575−7670.

Therapy & Support ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−1006) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−0209) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−1027) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0929)

Vocational BASIC BUSINESS COMPUTER SKILLS 11/17 & 18, 2016, THURSDAY & FRIDAY 6:00 P.M. − 9:00 P.M. Fee: $150 CR Community Education 525 D street Eureka. Call Community Education for more infor− mation 707−476−4500 (V−1020) NOTARY TRAINING. BECOME A CERTIFIED CALI− FORNIA NOTARY. One−day seminar will build your skills and set you up for success. Mon., Nov. 21. $120. Call 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended to register. (V−1103) OFFICE SPECIALIST 11/1−12/15 M/T/W 1:00 PM − 5:00 PM Fee: $595 (Scholarships available!) Adults 18+ may qualify for a scholarship contact The Job Market! Phone: (707) 441.5627 Call Community Education for more information 707− 476−4500 (V−1020)

Wellness & Bodywork ARCATA CORE PILATES Pilates, Barre, Yoga, TRX, Dance, & Private Instruction. 707−845−8156 located across the street from the North Coast Co−op, 901 8th Street Arcata, CA. arcatacorepilatesstudio.com DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Bothwell & Rosemary Gladstar. November 10−19, 2016. Let us guide you through the unsurpassed beauty and wondrous diversity of Costa Rica! Herbal Adventure to Hawaii. Jan 14−21, 2017, Join Jane and Co. for an unforgettable journey to the Big Island. Ethnobotanical adventures, herbal spa days, meeting Native healers, enjoy a Kava ceremony and other cultural activities, lush beaches, lots of hikes, yoga and more! Beginning with Herbs. Jan 25 − Mar 15, 2017, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−1103) YOGA IN FORTUNA THURS 9:30AM − 10:45AM W/LAURIE BIRDSONG. Multigenerational Center 2280 Newburg Rd. Breathe, stretch, strengthen the body, calm the mind. All levels. $11 drop−in or 6 class pass $57. Scholarships avail. info Laurie 362− 5457 (W−1027)

YOUR CLASS HERE

442-1400 × 305 northcoastjournal.com

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

Legal Notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DONNA LEE HOLLAND CASE NO. PR160291 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, DONNA LEE HOLLAND A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, IAIN HAUKKA In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that IAIN HAUKKA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 17, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Timothy J. Wykle Mathews, Kluck, Walsh & Wykle, LLP 100 M Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−442−3758

an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Timothy J. Wykle Mathews, Kluck, Walsh & Wykle, LLP 100 M Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−442−3758 October 11, 2016 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/20, 10/27, 11/3 (16−258)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF GAIL YVONNE EATON CASE NO. PR160288 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, GAIL YVONNE EATON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Dani Ashley Duley In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Dani Ashley Duley be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 27, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court

attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Thomas B. Hjerpe, Esq. Law Offices of Hjerpe and Collins, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 October 6, 2016 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/13, 10/20, 10/27 (16−251)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ROBERT G. HEISER CASE NO. PR160296 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, ROBERT G. HEISER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, JAMES HEISER In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that JAMES HEISER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on November 10, 2016 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special


personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Stephen G. Watson 715 I street Eureka, CA 95503 707−444−3071 October 14, 2016 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/20, 10/27, 11/3 (16−262)

T.S. No. 042743−CA APN: 511−424−33 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE Pursuant to CA Civil Code 2923.3 IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/5/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 11/8/2016 at 11:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 10/13/2006, as Instrument No. 2006−29668−21, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: DAVID M BUDDE, UNMARRIED MAN WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIERS CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHO− RIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: AT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 825 5TH ST., EUREKA, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: LOT 20 OF TRACT NO. 484, CAMINO WAY SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP THEREOF FILED DECEMBER 18, 1997, IN BOOK 22 OF MAPS, PAGES 22 AND 23, HUMBOLDT COUNTY RECORDS. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1465 CAMINO WAY MCKINLEYVILLE, CA 95519 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust,

WAY MCKINLEYVILLE, CA 95519 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $296,343.70 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under− stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the prop− erty. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (844) 477− 7869 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.STOXPOSTING.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 042743−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (844) 477−

WWW.STOXPOSTING.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 042743−CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (844) 477− 7869 CLEAR RECON CORP. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 10/13, 10/20, 10/27 (16−246)

TS# 16−2289 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED: 8/19/10. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obli− gation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any shown herein. Trustor: Thurman L. Henderson and Amanda D. Lawrence, husband and wife Duly Appointed Trustee: Foreclosure Specialists LLC Recorded 8/30/10 as Instrument No. 2010−18723−4 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, Cali− fornia, Date of Sale: Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 10:30 A.M. Place of Sale: On the steps to the front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 The common designation of the property is purported to be: 1484 Gardenbrook St., McKinleyville, CA 95519 AN UNDIVIDED ONE− HALF INTEREST IN AND TO: Lot 1, as shown on the Map of Tract No. 580 filed in the office of the Humboldt County Recorder in Book 23 of Maps, Pages 147, 148, and 149. APN: 510−101−044 Estimated opening bid: $220,649.66 Beneficiary may elect to open bidding at a lesser amount. The total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is stated above, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself.

amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear owner− ship of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be respon− sible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be post− poned one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at 530−246−2727 or visit this Internet Web site: calforeclosures.biz, using the file number assigned to this case: TS # 16−2289. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 10/4/16 FORECLOSURE SPECIALISTS LLC 1388 Court Street, Ste C Redding, CA 96001 530−246−2727, Toll Free: 844−333−6766, Janelle St. Pierre / Manager Foreclosure Specialists LLC is assisting the Bene− ficiary in collecting a debt. Any and all information obtained may be used for that purpose. TAC: 3766 PUB: 10/13/16, 10/20/16, 10/27/16.

SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− NATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.

may charge you a fee for this infor− mation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may holdContinued more than one or » on mortgage next page deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour− tesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call the trustee’s information line at 530−246−2727 or visit this Internet Web site: calforeclosures.biz, using the file number assigned to this case: TS #16 −2290. Information about post− ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 9/21/16 Foreclosure Specialists LLC 1388 Court Street, Ste C Redding, CA 96001 530−246−2727, Toll Free: 844−333−6766, Janelle St. Pierre / Manager Foreclosure Specialists LLC is assisting the Beneficiary in collecting a debt. Any and all infor− mation obtained may be used for that purpose. TAC: 3745 PUB: 10/ 20/16, 10/27/16, 11/03/16.

A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee, as shown below, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obli− gation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the property address or other common designation, if any shown herein. Trustor: David L. DeMatos and Angela S. DeMatos, husband and wife as Joint Tenancy Duly Appointed Trustee: Foreclo− sure Specialists LLC Recorded 9/18/ 06 as Instrument No. 2006−27099−4 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, Date of Sale: Thursday, November 10, 2016 at 10:30 A.M. Place of Sale: On the steps to the front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 The common designation of the property is purported to be: (16−257) 5423 Cummings Rd., Eureka, CA 95503 APN: 403−043−059 Estimated SUMMONS (Family Law) opening bid: $161,018.45 Beneficiary CASE NUMBER: FL160380 may elect to open bidding at a NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: James F lesser amount. The total amount Jennings secured by said instrument as of You have been sued. Read the the time of initial publication of information below. this notice is stated above, which PETITIONER’S NAME IS: Caroline E. includes the total amount of the Jennings unpaid balance (including accrued You have 30 calendar days after this and unpaid interest) and reasonable Summons and Petition are served estimated costs, expenses and on you to file a Response (form FL− advances at the time of initial 120 or FL−123) at the court and have publication of this notice. NOTICE a copy served on the petitioner. A TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are letter, phone call or court appear− considering bidding on this prop− ance will not protect you. erty lien, you should understand If you do not file your Response on that there are risks involved in time, the court may make orders bidding at a trustee auction. You affecting your marriage or domestic will be bidding on a lien, not on the partnership, your property, and property itself. Placing the highest custody of your children. You may bid at a trustee auction does not be ordered to pay support and automatically entitle you to free attorney fees and costs. and clear ownership of the prop− For legal advice, contact a lawyer erty. You should also be aware that immediately. Get help finding a the lien being auctioned off may be lawyer at the California Courts a junior lien. If you are the highest Online Self−Help Center bidder at the auction, you are or (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the may be responsible for paying off California Legal Services website or all liens senior to the lien being (16−250) by contacting your local county bar auctioned off, before you can association. TS# 16−2290 NOTICE OF receive clear title to the property. NOTICE−RESTRAINING ORDERS TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN You are encouraged to investigate BELOW: DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF the existence, priority, and size of These restraining orders are effec− TRUST DATED: 6/1/08. UNLESS outstanding liens that may exist on tive against both spouses or YOU TAKE ACTION TO this property by contacting the domestic partners until the petition PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT county recorder’s office or a title is dismissed, a judgment is entered, MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC insurance company, either of which or the court makes further orders. SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA− may charge you a fee for this infor− They are enforceable anywhere in NATION OF THE NATURE OF mation. If you consult either of California by any law enforcement THE PROCEEDING AGAINST these resources, you should be officer who has received or seen a YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT aware that the same lender may copy of them. A LAWYER. hold more than one mortgage or FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the A public auction sale to the highest deed of trust on the property. filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee bidder for cash, cashier’s check NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The waiver form. The court may order drawn on a state or national bank, sale date shown on this notice of you to pay back all or part of the check drawn by a state or federal sale may be postponed one or more fees and costs that the court NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, 20,other 2016party. northcoastjournal.com • credit union, or a check drawn by a times by the mortgagee, benefi− waived for youOct. or the state or federal savings and loan ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant 1. The name and address of the association, or savings association, to Section 2924g of the California court are: or savings bank specified in Section

37


They are enforceable anywhere in you should apply for Covered Cali− California by any law enforcement fornia. Covered California can help officer who has received or seen a reduce the cost you pay towards copy of them. high quality affordable health care. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the Continued For more information, visit page from previous filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee www.coveredca.com. Or call waiver form. The court may order Covered California at 1−800−300− FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME you to pay back all or part of the 1506. STATEMENT 16−00593 fees and costs that the court WARNING−IMPORTAN INFORMA− The following person is doing Busi− waived for you or the other party. TION California law provides that, ness as ISIS HEALS, ISIS OSIRIS 1. The name and address of the for purposes of division of property HEALING TEMPLE, ISIS SCROLLS, court are: upon dissolution of a marriage or WHOLISTIC HEARTBEAT Superior Court of California, County domestic partnership or upon legal Humboldt, of Humboldt separation, property acquired by 44 Sunny Brae Center 825 5th Street the parties during marriage or Arcata. CA 95521 Eureka, CA 95501 domestic partnership or upon legal Maya A Cooper 2. The name, address, and tele− separation, property acquired by 1991 Hill Ave phone number of the petitioner’s the parties during marriage or Eureka, CA 95501 attorney, or the petitioner without domestic partnership in joint form an attorney, are: is presumed to be community prop− The business is conducted by An Caroline E. Jennings erty. If either party to this action Individual. 300 H. St should die before the jointly held The date registrant commenced to Arcata, CA 95521 community property is divided, the transact business under the ficti− Date: May 24, 2016 clerk, by Kim language in the deed that charac− tious business name or name listed M. Bartleson/Jackson W., Deputy terizes how title is held (i.e., joint above on Not Applicable STANDARD FAMILY LAW tenancy, tenants in common, or I declare the all information in this RESTRAINING ORDERS community property) will be statement is true and correct. Starting immediately, you and your controlling, and not the community A registrant who declares as true spouse or domestic partner are property presumption. You should any material matter pursuant to restrained from: consult your attorney if you want Section 17913 of the Business and 1. Removing the minor children of the community property presump− Professions Code that the registrant the parties from the state or tion to be written into the recorded knows to be false is guilty of a applying for a new or replacement title to the property. misdemeanor punishable by a fine passport for those minor children SUMMONS (Family Law) not to exceed one thousand dollars without the prior written consent 10/20, 10/27, 11/3, 11/10 (16−263) ($1,000). of the other party or an order of /s Maya Cooper, Owner the court; NOTICE OF SALE This statement was filed with the 2. Cashing, borrowing against, PUBLIC AUCTION County Clerk of Humboldt County canceling, transferring, disposing of, Notice is hereby given that the on or changing the beneficiaries of any undersigned intends to sell the October 6, 2016 insurance or other coverage, personal property described below KELLY E. SANDERS including life, health, automobile, to enforce a lien imposed on said Humboldt County Clerk and disability, held for the benefit property pursuant to Sections 21700 By: aa, Deputy Clerk of the parties and their minor chil− −21716 of the Business & Professions dren; 10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3 (16−254) Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, 3. transferring, encumbering, Section 535 of the Penal Code and FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME hypothecating, concealing, or in any provisions of the Civil Code. The STATEMENT 16−00603 way disposing of any way disposing undersigned will sell at a public The following person is doing Busi− of any property, real or personal, auction by competitive bidding on ness as THE GATHERING PLACE whether community, quasi−commu− the 4th of November 2016, at noon, Humboldt, nity, or separate, without the on the premises where said prop− 2332 Harrison Suite B written consent of the other party erty has been stored and which are Eureka, CA 95501 or an order of the court, except in located at South Bay Mini−Storage, Sheri L. Graham−Whitt the usual course of business or for 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of 2332 Harrison Suite B the necessities of life; and Humboldt, State of California, as Eureka, CA 95501 4. Creating a nonprobate transfer or follows. Items to be sold include modifying a nonprobate transfer in but are not limited to the following: The business is conducted by An a manner that affects the disposi− Unit#402 Glen S Lane − fan, cabi− Individual. tion of property subject to the nets, tables, crutches, leg braces The date registrant commenced to transfer, without the written Unit#417 Ronald Bryant − tool box, transact business under the ficti− consent of the other party or an motorcycle engine, frame, parts, tious business name or name listed order of the court. Before revoca− misc tools, tent above on Not Applicable tion of a nonprobate transfer can Unit#446 Nicole Stewart − lamp, I declare the all information in this take effect or a right of survivorship Tupperware boxes, iron board statement is true and correct. to property can be eliminated, Unit #461 Travis L Morgan − clothes, A registrant who declares as true notice of the change must be filed misc bags any material matter pursuant to and served on the other party. Unit#723 Nicholas Apicello − lawn− Section 17913 of the Business and You must notify each other of any mower, Tupperware containers, Professions Code that the registrant proposed extraordinary expendi− drill, electronics knows to be false is guilty of a tures at least five business days Unit#823 Craig M Bobis − elec− misdemeanor punishable by a fine prior to incurring these extraordi− tronics, misc boxes not to exceed one thousand dollars nary expenditures and account to Unit#855 Cheyenne Lovfald − misc ($1,000). the court for all extraordinary bags − in shop /s Sheri Graham Whitt, Owner expenditures made after these Purchases must be paid for at the This statement was filed with the restraining orders are effective. time of purchase in cash only. All County Clerk of Humboldt County However, you may use community purchased items are sold "as is"and on property, quasi−community prop− must be removed from the October 14, 2016 erty, or your own separate property premises within 24 hours. Sale KELLY E. SANDERS to pay an attorney to help you or to subject to cancellation in the event Humboldt County Clerk pay court costs. of a settlement between owner and By: sc, Deputy Clerk NOTICE−ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE obligated party. Bring a flashlight HEALTH INSURANCE: Do you or 10/20, 10/27, 11/3, 11/10 (16−260) and padlock(s) someone in your household need Dated this 19th day of October and affordable health insurance? If so, 26th day of October 2016. you should apply for Covered Cali− CA BOND NO. 0336118 fornia. Covered California can help (16−256) reduce the cost you pay towards 442-1400 ×305 high quality affordable health care. For more information, visit classified@north www.coveredca.com. Or call @ncj_of_humboldt coastjournal.com Covered California at 1−800−300− 1506. WARNING−IMPORTAN INFORMA− NORTHlaw COAST JOURNAL TION California provides that, • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com for purposes of division of property upon dissolution of a marriage or

Legal Notices

LEGALS?

38

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00565

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00585

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00601

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CULTURED LIFE FOOD Humboldt 550 S. G St Suite 9 Arcata, CA 95521 PO Box 5035 Arcata, CA 95518 Mary K Walker 1121 Walker Pt Rd Bayside, CA 95524

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ACTION COURIER SERVICE Humboldt, 2629 Kelly Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Audrey R Sikorski 2629 Kelly Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Damion I Sikorski 2629 Kelly Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BLONDIES THE BEAUTY SHOP Humboldt 140 Westwood Center Arcata, CA 95521 Sarah C Alvarado 2022 Hazel Wood Ln Eureka, CA 95503 Michael P Alvarado 2022 Hazel Wood Ln Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Paula Sargent, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 22, 2016 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: aa, Deputy Clerk

The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Audrey R Sikorski, Owner/Oper− ator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 3, 2016 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: aa, Deputy Clerk

The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sarah C Alvarado, Co−Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on October 12, 2016 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: aa, Deputy Clerk

10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3 (16−255)

10/20, 10/27, 11/3, 11/10 (16−264)

9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20 (16−240)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00569 The following person is doing Busi− ness as PACIFIC CREST GRANITE Humboldt, 2550 S Broadway Eureka, CA 95501 Sylvia R Crandall 8924 Airport Road Redding, CA 96002 The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Sylvia Crandall, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 23, 2016 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: sc, Deputy Clerk 10/20, 10/27, 11/3, 11/10 (16−259) County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices

United Indian Health Services, Inc.

Request for Proposal (“RFP”) to Provide Independent Audit Services United Indian Health Services, Inc. (“UIHS”) is requesting proposals from independent accounting firms that have experience in providing audit and tax services for nonprofit organizations that operate within the healthcare environment, and more specifically as a Tribal Health Program. UIHS (www.UIHS.org) was founded in 1970 with the mission to provide a broad range of healthcare services primarily to American Indians residing within counties of Humboldt and Del Norte, California. We are soliciting firms interested in receiving a RFP and submitting a proposal to us by early November for consideration. A more complete description of our organization, the services needed, and other pertinent information will be provided in the RFP. Request to receive the RFP should also include a brief statement on the qualifications of your firm, and may be sent to the attention of: Laura Borden Chairperson Audit Committee United Indian Health Services, Inc. 1600 Weeot Way Arcata, CA 95521 Further questions contact david.rosen@crihb.org


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00573

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 16−00576

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FRESH ROOTS HUMBOLDT Humboldt 1538 McCullen Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 Planit Organically Inc. CA 3898763 1538 McCullen Ave Eureka, CA 95503

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SOBER SAINTS Humboldt 335 W. Sonoma St #A Eureka, CA 95501 Matthew D Hehman 335 W. Sonoma St #A Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by A Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Caterina J Kein, Chief Financial Officer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 26, 2016 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: gw, Deputy Clerk

The business is conducted by An Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Matthew Hehman, Owner Oper− ator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on September 27, 2016 KELLY E. SANDERS Humboldt County Clerk By: gw, Deputy Clerk

10/6, 10/13, 10/20, 10/27 (16−247)

10/6, 10/13, 10/20, 10/27 (16−248)

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×305 northcoastjournal.com

NCJ NCJDAILY No longer just a weekly, the Journal covers the news as it happens, with depth and context readers won’t find anywhere else. northcoastjournal.com/NCJDaily

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME HOWARD BAILEY DAY CASE NO. CV160855 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TYISHA SHELLEY CASE NO. CV160854 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALI− FORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

PETITION OF: HOWARD BAILEY DAY TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: HOWARD BAILEY DAY

PETITION OF: TYISHA SHELLEY TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: TYISHA SHELLEY

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name HOWARD BAILEY DAY to Proposed Name GABRIEL HOWARD DAY

for a decree changing names as follows: Present name PRESTON EDWARD PHILLIPS to Proposed Name PRESTON EDWARD SHELLEY

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 21, 2016 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: October 6, 2016 Filed: October 6, 2016 /s/ Dale A. Reinholtsen Judge of the Superior Court

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: November 21, 2016 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: October 6, 2016 Filed: October 6, 2016 /s/ Dale A. Reinholtsen Judge of the Superior Court

10/20, 10/27, 11/3, 11/10 (16−261)

10/13, 10/20, 10/27, 11/3 (16−252)

NOTICE INVITING BIDS 1. Notice is hereby given that the Governing Board of the Peninsula Union School District (“District”), of the County of Humboldt, State of California, will receive sealed bids for the Supply, Install and Commissioning of a Grid-Tied, 9.90 kW, Solar PV System Project (“Project”) up to, but not later than, 3 p.m., on Thursday, November 3, 2016, and will thereafter publicly open and read aloud the bids. All bids shall be received at the office of Greenway Partners, located at 1385 8th Street, in Arcata, California 95521. 2. Each bid shall be completed on the Bid Proposal Form included in the Contract Documents, and must conform and be fully responsive to this invitation, the plans and specifications and all other Contract Documents. Copies of the Contract Documents are available for examination at the office of the Peninsula Union School District, County of Humboldt, California, and may be obtained by licensed contractors for free. 3. Each bid shall be accompanied by cash, a cashier’s or certified check, or a bidder’s bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California as a surety, made payable to the District, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the maximum amount of the bid. The check or bid bond shall be given as a guarantee that the bidder to whom the contract is awarded will execute the Contract Documents and will provide the required payment and performance bonds and insurance certificates within ten (10) days after the notification of the award of the Contract. 4. The successful bidder shall comply with the provisions of the Labor Code pertaining to payment of the generally prevailing rate of wages and apprenticeships or other training programs. The Department of Industrial Relations has made available the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which the work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Contract, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. Copies of these prevailing rates are available to any interested party upon request and are online at http:// www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR. The Contractor and all Subcontractors shall pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the Contract. It is the Contractor’s responsibility to determine any rate change. 5. The schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work shall be at least time and one half. 6. The substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments in accordance with Public Contract Code §22300 is permitted. 7. Pursuant to Public Contract Code §4104, each bid shall include the name and location of the place of business of each subcontractor who shall perform work or service or fabricate or install work for the contactor in excess of one-half of one percent (0.5%) of the bid price. The bid shall describe the type of the work to be performed by each listed subcontractor. 9. Minority, women, and disabled veteran contractors are encouraged to submit bids. This bid is not subject to Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise requirements. 10. The project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the California Department of Industrial Relations. In accordance with SB 854, all bidders, contractors and subcontractors working at the site shall be duly registered with the Department of Industrial Relations at time of bid opening and at all relevant times. Proof of registration shall be provided as to all such contractors prior to the commencement of any work. 11. Each bidder shall possess at the time the bid is awarded the following classification(s) of California State Contractor’s license: Class B (General Building Contractor) or a Class C-46 (Solar Contractor) or a Class C-10 (California Electrical Contractor). 12. Bidders’ Conference. A non-mandatory bidders’ conference will be held at Peninsula Union School District on Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Project site. PENINSULA UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT By: Allison M. Doolan (District Superintendent) DATED: October 1, 2016 Publication Dates: 1) Thurs. October 13, 2016 2) Thurs. October 20, 2016

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

39


HumBug

HumBug

Little Monsters By Anthony Westkamper

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humbug@northcoastjournal.com

2016

A female black widow against a 1-centimeter/1millimeter grid. Photo by Anthony Westkamper

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40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

I spend a lot of my outdoor time looking for and at bugs. Especially ones that are dramatic looking or interesting to photograph, so when I noted a medium-sized spider on the front of the Carlotta post office last month (“Black Widows Found at Carlotta Post Office,” Sept. 30), I got closer, tilted my head to use the reading portion of my bifocals and was surprised to see a tiny red hourglass on the creature’s abdomen. There are several other members of the large comb-footed spider family, theridiidae, that look similar in shape and size to the black widow, but only family latrodectus has the red hourglass on the undersides of their abdomens. It is one of the best diagnostic features. If the red hourglass is there, it is dangerous to humans. Figures vary but it seems there are about 2,000 bites reported in the U.S. per year and very few fatalities. The symptoms, I understand, are particularly unpleasant. I only know one person who’s been bitten. Her health was not particularly robust and she spent several days in the hospital. She reported that it was like having one horrendous body cramp that just didn’t quit for days. The spider gets its ominous name from the female’s habit of eating the male after mating. Recent research indicates that our local species Latrodectus hesperus rarely does this, and such cannibalism may be a consequence of observing them in the laboratory where the male has no escape. An article in Scientific American indicates black widows are toxic if consumed, however several species, including chickens and alligator lizards, seem to eat them with no ill effects. The extremely long-legged cellar spiders are known to eat young widows, as well. Widow spiders are nearly blind and are creatures of their web. If you see one walking on the ground, it is either seeking to get back to its web or looking for a place to make a new one. They spin a deceptively “messy” three-dimensional web which may give them some protection from spider-hunting wasps. They are usually secretive, which leads to a common problem of people getting bit on the rump or genitals in outdoor privies. You sit down, make

vibrations in the web, and she responds by rushing to potential prey and biting.

False Scorpions After moving to the country a little more than 20 years ago, I noticed a tiny, dark critter, no bigger than a newsprint letter “o” scurrying across my counter. I scooped it up and checked it out with a hand lens. It was an animal I had only read about, a book scorpion or pseudoscorpion. After looking a bit I let it go outside. I’ve been on the lookout for them ever since. When I got my new “super macro” lens, I went around snapping pictures of every little thing. When I downloaded some images of a tiny spider, I saw it was in the process of eating one of the strange little beasts. It made for a couple of dramatic and interesting photos but what I really wanted was Pseudoscorpion on 1/8the pseuinch ruled graph paper. doscorpion Photo by Anthony Westkamper itself. The other night at the light trap I noted a tiny dot on the old bedsheet I use as a reflective backdrop. I was surprised to see one of the tiny creatures. This time I took plenty of photos, captured it and took some more before letting it go. I don’t think it was attracted to the lights. They are active hunters so I think it was just exploring. While they are seldom seen, I suspect they’re pretty common, feeding on tiny animals among leaf litter. Although they lack their larger cousin’s tail and stinger, their claws (pedipalps) have tiny venomous bristles on their “thumbs,” so the prey gets crushed, pierced and poisoned in one swift move. They pose zero threat to humans and are considered beneficial since they eat mites, carpet beetles, carpet moth larvae and just about anything else small enough for them to attack. Many species of these tiny arachnids are known to hitch rides on insects and even birds. I really like these little guys. l


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IN YOUR EYES

I G E T I T

T O E P A N

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ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

64. Many an Instagram user 65. “Mr. Belvedere” actress Graff 66. Aspiring atty.’s exam 67. Drunkards 68. Respected tribe member

DOWN

1. Justin Timberlake’s “Cry ____ River” 2. Frequently injured knee part: Abbr. 3. Play-by-play announcer’s partner 4. Cabinet dept. since 1977 5. ____ boom 6. Belly ache? 7. ____ Elaine Johnson (Whoopi Goldberg’s birth name) 8. Jeanne d’Arc, for one: Abbr.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO ESOTERICA S M C A B H E M J O A Y H E R A N A O D X O T I C A R O T U N D O P I C S H A R E S N I N K H A R M O N I C S A A D E L E T O C R I S P O W A S S E L E C T R O N I C A E E V E E I R E N A R R A N N I E R T S O T E R I C A S P A H I M A R E T T Y P E E R S O N A E R O T I C G E T A C L A R D I O D E T E Y E E S A

9. Not many 10. Tim who, in 2007, became the first player to win the Heisman Trophy as a sophomore 11. Where Excalibur was forged 12. Olympic skater Ito 13. Kind of TV 18. ____-mo 21. A ____ (kind of reasoning) 22. “Whatever” 23. Inter ____ 25. Chief Justice Warren 26. Circumference 28. The EPA issues them: Abbr. 32. In a convenient way 33. Long look 34. Gore and Green 35. Moreno of “West Side Story” 37. Letter-shaped

support piece 38. Walked ostentatiously 39. So-called “Wheat Capital of Oklahoma” 42. “Blueberries for ____” (classic children’s book) 43. “Doesn’t bother me” 44. Longtime political family in Albany 45. Land bordering Francia 49. Gem weight 50. Up to now 51. Superbright colors 52. “Despicable Me” supervillain 53. Bone-chilling 57. 1994 Jodie Foster title role 59. Part of TGIF 60. Prefix with realism 61. Opposite of WSW 62. Sun. talk

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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1. Spiked clubs 6. Sch. in the Bay Area 10. Pat (down) 14. Low-cost, in ads 15. After the whistle 16. Wicked 17. It’s turned by means of a hexagonal hole in its head 19. “____ bing!” 20. The Who’s “Baba ____” 21. Golf attire 22. Deface 24. Moth whose larva is destructive to crops 27. Stately trees 29. “____ seeing things?” 30. Actress Long 31. Temporary gap 34. Ann ____, Michigan 36. 1978 Maya Angelou book 40. Automotive

debuts of 1949 41. Tennessee team 43. Cryophobe’s fear 46. Playtex product 47. Where many emerging markets can be found 48. Physical therapist’s concern, perhaps 54. “Good” cholesterol, briefly 55. Figure in a doctor’s office 56. Williams who was Sports Illustrated’s 2015 Sportsperson of the Year 58. Sharif of “Doctor Zhivago” 59. 1986 Peter Gabriel hit ... or where you can find the things that have been circled in 17-, 24-, 36- and 48-Across 63. Chaplin of “Game of Thrones”

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County of Humboldt $3,150 - $4,042/Mo CalPERS Retirement Under general supervision, incumbents perform a variety of duties related to the intake and monitoring of juvenile and/or adult probationers. Excellent career opportunity; training provided. Four years of college in a related field is desirable. CDL req.; must pass a detailed background investigation. AA/EOE Filing deadline: Nov. 14, 2016 Apply online at: www.humboldtgov.org/hr or contact: Human Resources, (707) 476-2349 825 Fifth St., Eureka, CA

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AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE − Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assis− tance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800−725−1563 (AAN CAN)

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Redwoods Rural Health Center seeks a PsychD/LCSW to provide integrated behavioral health services for clients in Redway. Works closely with the on-site medical providers, county case management, and specialty mental health. This is a full-time position with paid time off, employer-sponsored health benefits, and Loan Repayment through the NHSC.

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Production Floats and Sewing Machine Operators

Full-time LVN/RN Candidates must possess a current nursing license, as well as, clinical experience, strong triage skills, computer proficiency, and management abilities. RRHC is an EOE and offers a four-day work week, as well as, competitive compensation and benefit packages. Interested and qualified candidates may apply at: Redwoods Rural Health Center 101 West Coast Rd P.O. Box 769 Redway, CA 95560 download an employment application from www.rrhc.org or contact RRHC at (707) 923-2783.

It’s a very exciting time for Kokatat as we’ve been awarded multiple government contracts! To keep up with the demand, we’re looking to hire approximately 20 new Production Floats & Sewing Machine Operators. Full-Time and Part-Time positions available. No experience required. Looking to fill evening shifts (12pm – 8:30pm) Monday – Friday. We offer free medical insurance to Full-Time Employees, paid sick, vacation & holidays, 401k match, and profit sharing. Applications available at 5350 Ericson Way, Arcata or contact us at (707) 822-7621 for an application. Kotatat is an Equal Opportunity Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Visit our website at www.kokatat.com to learn more about Kokatat. default

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039. (E−0625)

Wanted – Janitorial Cleaner Restif is an Arcata based full service cleaning company. This is your chance to work with an established company (since 1983) on one of our teams. All of our members are valued employees. Shift starts at 5 pm. Must have your own vehicle to drive to and from jobs and a valid Driver’s License. Mileage is reimbursed monthly at $.54/mi. Decent driving record in last three years required. Salary starts @ $10/hr but increases significantly after 4 month trial period. Email resume to pamela@restif.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

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CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW! Earn 1200−3600 a month working from the comfort of your home and receive ongoing support. We are looking for caring people with a spare bedroom to support an adult with special needs. We match adults with disabilities with people like you, in a place they can call home. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 16 or visit www.mentorswanted.com

  PRESIDENT/SUPERINTENDENT Full-time Annual Salary Range: Independently Determined Closing Date: November 30, 2016 For more information www.redwoods.edu/hr

PROGRAM DIRECTOR being sought for MHRC with knowledge and practice in compassionate and trauma−informed care, and well versed in behavioral health practices. Must be a licensed mental health professional or have a baccalaureate degree. Duties include management of budget, personnel, program activities, and docu− mentation. Please contact us for more information at 707−442−5721. www.crestwoodbehavioralhealth.com/location/eurekaca

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

EUREKA CAMPUS

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TEMPORARY DENTIST Work in Dental Assisting Lab, $72.00/hour For more information contact Hillary-reed@redwoods.edu More information about the positions is available through our website. www.redwoods.edu/hr College of the Redwoods 707-476-4140 • hr@redwoods.edu College of the Redwoods is an EO Employer

2930 E St., Eureka, CA 95501

(707) 445.9641

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Accounts Receivable/Admin.Asst. Civil Engineer-Wastewater • Caregivers Customer Service • Lease Administrator PT Bookkeeper • Marketing/Front Office Forester • Construction Design/Estimator Line/Prep Cook • Geotech Engineer • CPA Truck Mechanic • Landscaping • Retail Medical Assistant • Carpenter Equipment Mechanic



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DEL NORTE

Business Technology Communication Studies English Psychology Sociology

sequoiapersonnel.com

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Agriculture–Landscape Biology Chemistry Communications (Speech) Computer Information Systems Counselor – Disabled Students Programs Dental Assisting Librarian Mathematics Nursing – Clinical Sign Language Welding

KLAMATH-TRINITY (HOOPA)

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PART-TIME FACULTY POSITIONS

Art Biological Sciences Business Communication Studies English Mathematics Sign Language Sociology

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT − HUMAN RESOURCES 8 hrs/day, 5 days/wk, year−round position. $3,156 − $4,806/mo. Personnel/HR experience in a school setting highly desirable along with Public Relations/Marketing experience including Social Media and web design. The following documents are required: Eureka City School’s Classified Application, Cover Letter, Resume, 3 Current Letters of Recommendation. Visit our website at for complete application process. Email stemachj@eurekacityschools.org for job description or call 441−3379. Open until filled. www.eurekacityschools.org

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open door Community Health Centers NOW SEEKING:

Training Specialist ZOO EDUCATION COORDINATOR CITY OF EUREKA $2,562 - $3,272 PER MONTH PLUS EXCELLENT BENEFITS The City of Eureka is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Zoo Education Curator at the Sequoia Park Zoo. This position is responsible for developing and delivering educational programs, designing and implementing signage and interpretive displays, training, supervising and coordinating temporary staff and volunteers, organizing school and large group visits. Qualifications are equivalent to; possession of a 4 year degree in Zoology, Education or a related field and 2 years of experience in developing/implementing educational programs, with 1 year of supervisory experience. For a complete job description, and to apply, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Final filing date: 5:00 pm Friday, November 4th. EOE

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

The Training Specialist at Open Door Community Health Centers is a vital role in the development and retention of our workforce. This position helps employees prepare and maintain their skills and knowledge of patient care, electronic records, and Open Door practices. The training specialist requires an individual who is responsible, engaging and able to present to small groups of new and incumbent employees. The ability to accommodate and respond to differing learning styles is a must. Prior teaching/training experience is essential; experience with and knowledge of clinical operations and electronic record systems, including experience in a medical setting preferred. Wage dependent on experience. For details and online applications, visit:

opendoorhealth.com


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CITY OF FORTUNA

Store Manager

POLICE OFFICER $40,502 – 49,210 /YR (INCENTIVES AVAILABLE)

Law enforcement, crime prevention, traffic control, and crime investigation activities; specialized law enforcement assignments; community outreach. Must be 21 years of age at time of hire. Graduation from, or current enrollment in, POST Academy required at time of application. Excellent benefits. Requires valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna. com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, CA 95540, (707) 725-7600. Application deadline extended to 4 pm Monday, October 31, 2016 default

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LOOKING FOR A MEANINGFUL JOB IN YOUR COMMUNITY? To start a career where you feel good about helping out others? We are looking for Onâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;Call team members to supplement our programs, a great opportunity to get your foot in the door with our caring and compassionate company. We are looking for onâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;call LVN/LPTs, Service Coordinators, Rehab Assistants, Cooks, and Housekeepers. Apply in person at Crestwood Behavioral Health Center 2370 Buhne Street, Eureka 707â&#x2C6;&#x2019;442â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5721 Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

HIRING:

SALES REPS Seeking full-time motivated individuals eager to develop and manage sales programs across print, web and mobile platforms.

BASE SALARY + COMMISSION + BENEFITS Apply by emailing your resume to melissa@northcoastjournal.com

North Coast Co-op is seeking an experienced Manager for our Arcata store. Responsible for the operation of large, full-service, Certified Organic Grocery. Supervising a staff of 60+ employees, leads the way in providing exceptional customer service to our 16,000 member owners. Participate in the overall planning and management of the co-op. Exp. in natural foods, understanding and commitment to the cooperative business model and a proven, successful management history. Experience working in a union environment is a plus. Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree preferred plus five years of progressive management exp. or an equivalent combination. We offer a competitive wage package, $55,000$70,000, dependent upon experience, excellent benefits package. Job description and application: www.northcoast. coop/about_us/careers/current_openings.php Please submit resume and letter of interest to HR by 10/21/16 at: hr@northcoastco-op.com default

Kâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;IMA:W MEDICAL CENTER an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions: PHYSICIAN FT/Contracted ($91.34 per hr DOE). Provides medical care and referrals. Open until filled. DENTIST FT/Contracted ($55.86 per hr DOE). Provides dental health care. Open until filled. FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER FT/Contracted ($39.60 per hr DOE). Primary care provider seeing all ages of patients and all medical conditions. Open until filled. CLINICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANT FT/Regular ($15.38 per hr start, KGS 5). Performs a variety of technical and clerical duties includes specimen preparation and collection. This is a temporary position that could be changed to a fulltime, regular position. Minimum Requirements: Licensed Phlebotomist desired ($17.14 per hr start, KGS 6). Deadline to apply is extended to 5pm, October 20, 2016. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PREVENTION COORDINATOR FT/ Regular ($26.44 per hr DOE). Supervise staff and services to domestic violence and sexual assault victims. This is a grant funded position. Open until filled. CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER FT/Contracted ($39.60 per hr start, negotiable). Assists in managing a comprehensive health care delivery organization and supervises select organization programs. Open until filled. MEDICAL ASSISTANT FT/Regular ($15.38 per hr DOE). Provides administrative, clerical and technical support to physician; Certified Medical Assistant desired. Open until filled. LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE FT/Regular ($19.05 per hr DOE). Assists in providing direct nursing care for patients. Open until filled. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE FT/Regular ($33.30 per hr DOE). Assist in the overall management of patients both in clinic and in the field. Open until filled. REGISTERED NURSE OUTREACH/CASE MANAGEMENT FT/ Regular ($33.30 per hr DOE). Assist in the overall management of patients both in clinic and in the field. Open until filled. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: Kâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

northcoastjournal.com â&#x20AC;˘ NORTH COAST JOURNAL â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

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ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Ąď ˛ď §ď Šď Žď łď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Şď ľď łď ´ď&#x20AC; ď Ąď&#x20AC; ď łď Ąď Śď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ą

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476â&#x2C6;&#x2019;9262. ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Ąď ˛ď §ď Šď Žď łď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Şď ľď łď ´ď&#x20AC; ď Ąď&#x20AC; ď łď Ąď Śď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ą default DON~RN~LVN Actively Interviewing Licensed Nurses in Fort Bragg, California We require a nurse with strong clinical assessment and interpersonal skills. This is a great opportunity to work in a high-quality, nursing facility. Multiple Shifts and Extensive Benefits Package.

707-964-6333 or terriem@SOHCFTB.com

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT Nonâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8045.

INTERVIEWING FOR LICENSED AGENT: Competitive compensation, benefits, 3 yrs experience preferred w/retail multiline agency. Email : judy@jdinsurance.com

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Auctions ď &#x192;ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Ąď ´ď ¨ď ˇď Ąď šď łď&#x20AC;  ď &#x2021;ď ˛ď Ąď Žď ´ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201D;ď ľď ´ď Żď ˛ď&#x20AC;Żď &#x192;ď Żď Ąď Łď ¨ď&#x20AC;  ď &#x192;ď &#x192;ď &#x192;ď&#x20AC; ď &#x2020;ď Żď ˛ď ´ď ľď Žď Ą

PROGRAM MANAGER FOR EUREKA DAY CENTER The Program Manager directs the Betty Kwan Chinn Day Center, a multiâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;functional day center that provides dignity services to individâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; uals experiencing homelessâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ness. www.srcharities.org/ employment

ď &#x201D;ď ľď ´ď Żď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď łď ´ď ľď ¤ď Ľď Žď ´ď łď&#x20AC; ď Ąď §ď Ľď łď&#x20AC;  ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;ľď&#x20AC; ď Šď Žď&#x20AC; ď &#x2026;ď &#x152;ď ď&#x20AC; ď Ąď Žď ¤ď&#x20AC; ď ­ď Ąď ´ď ¨ď&#x20AC;  ď łď Ťď Šď Źď Źď łď&#x20AC; ď °ď Źď ľď łď&#x20AC; ď Łď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC;  ď Łď Żď Ąď Łď ¨ď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC;  ď ?ď &#x201D;ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď ¨ď Żď ľď ˛ď Źď šď&#x20AC; ď &#x20AC;ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;¤ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC;ľď&#x20AC;łď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC; 

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Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM

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PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877â&#x2C6;&#x2019;362â&#x2C6;&#x2019;2401

ď ¨ď ˛ď łď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď ­ď Ąď ¸ď&#x20AC; ď ˇď Ľď Ľď Ťď&#x20AC;Ž ď ď °ď °ď Źď šď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ´ď&#x20AC; 

ď ¨ď ´ď ´ď °ď łď&#x20AC;şď&#x20AC;Żď&#x20AC;Żď Şď Żď ¨ď Žď ­ď ľď Šď ˛ď Łď łď&#x20AC;Ž ď ´ď Ľď ¤ď Ťď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;Žď Łď Żď ­ď&#x20AC;Żď ¨ď Šď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC;Ž

335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka â&#x20AC;˘ 443-4851

Humboldt County Office of Education

School Bus Drivers

Entry level or experiencedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;all you need is the DRIVE to succeed! Part-Time, full-time, and substitute positions. Competitive wages & benefits, PERS retirement for all regular positions. FREE training available for CLASS B license and School Bus Driver Certification. Qualifications: Must be 18 years of age or older. Drivers are subject to a medical evaluation, including drug testing. Apply at HCOE or online at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us Reply to: Personnel, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501. default

7OULDYOULIKETOAPPLYYOURSKILLSINAN ESTABLISHEDORGANIZATIONHELPINGLOCALCHILDREN ANDFAMILIES/UREXCITINGWORKPLACEHASFULL  ANDPART TIMEOPENINGS4AKEALOOKATTHEJOB DESCRIPTIONSONOURWEBSITEATď&#x20AC; WWWCHANGINGTIDESFSORG

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ď &#x2020;ď &#x152;ď ď &#x201C;ď &#x2C6;ď &#x201A;ď ď &#x192;ď &#x2039;

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PARENT INVOLVEMENT COORDINATOR ARCATA MAIN OFFICE Position provides an opportunity to work w/ staff, parents & families in growing parenting & leadership skills through a variety of different activities, incl. coordinating Parent Involvement component of HS/ EHS programs & Policy Council. Req. AA or AS in related field (BA/BS prefer) & 3 yrs exp in related field. F/T partial yr: 40 hrs/wk (Exempt) $805.08-$845.84 First Review Date: 10/31/2016

BILINGUAL HOME VISITOR EUREKA

Provides weekly home visits & facilitates parent & child play groups twice a month. Req. AA/AS degree in Early Childhood Education, Psychology, Social Work or related field OR 12 ECE units (incl. core classes) +12 related units. Req. 2 yrs exp. in community service working w/ children & families. Bilingual required. F/T (yr round): 40 hrs/wk; $13.75/hr Open Until Filled

COOKS BLUE LAKE & FORTUNA

Cook positions open at the Blue Lake ctr & Fortuna. Duties include prep meals for toddler & preschool age children in a childcare ctr. Req.exp in food service & volume meal prep. Pref. candidate have training or education in nutrition, menu planning, kitchen safety, sanitation & CACFP (CA Child Care Food Program). Blue Lake 24-28hrs/wk $10.07/hr Fortuna (school yr) 25-28 hrs/wk $10.62/hr Open Until Filled

TEMP CLASSROOM ASSISTANT WILLOW CREEK

Assist center staff in the day-to-day operation of the classroom for a preschool program (implementing & supervising activities). Prefer a min. of 6 ECE units & 6 months exp. working w/ young children P/T 17/hr/wk: $10.07-$11.11 Open Until Filled Positions include vacation, holidays and sick leave benefits. Submit applications to: Northcoast Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For addtl info & application please call 707-822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 â&#x20AC;˘ northcoastjournal.com

CELEBRATE THE DAY... ALL HALLOWEEN STUFF HALF OFF! at the Dream Quest Thrift Store, where something WONDERFUL happens every day. October 20â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 26. (530)629â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3006

Preview Weds. 11 am - 5 pm & Thurs. from 11am to Sale Time

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Anticipated Openings for

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to compleâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ment your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

ď ?ď Łď ´ď Żď ˘ď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď Ąď Źď Ľď&#x20AC;ş

ď &#x2020;ď Ľď Ąď ´ď ľď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC; ď &#x192;ď Żď łď ´ď ľď ­ď Ľď ł 116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Mon. & Tues.

ď&#x201A;&#x201C;ď &#x192;ď Źď Żď ´ď ¨ď Ľď łď&#x20AC; ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď Żď ľď Źď&#x201A;&#x201D;

STRUGGLING WITH DRUGS OR ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment. 800â&#x2C6;&#x2019;978â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 6674 (AAN CAN) HALLOWEEN COSTUMES Party ready costume rentals, professional makeup, wigs and a Thrifty Witch for sale section. Halloween Hours 10/17â&#x2C6;&#x2019;11/1. Monâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;Fri 12â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7pm. Sat & Sun 11â&#x2C6;&#x2019;6pm. Or by appointment. THE COSTUME BOX 202 T St. (2nd &T) Eureka (707) 443â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5200

Join the Hospice of Humboldt team! Our staff work in a great environment and enjoy outstanding benefits, competitive wages and professional growth opportunities. We currently have openings for:

Hospice RNs (full-time, part-time, and per diem)

Medical Social Workers (fulltime and per diem)

Grief Support Counselors (part-time)

IT Support Specialist (part-time) RN - Clinical Manager Director of Nursing Hospice Physician Hospice Shop Clerk (part-time) Visit www.hospiceofhumboldt.org or call 707-445-8443 for more information.


Body, Mind & Spirit Musicians & Instructors

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Bad or good credit? Need help with finances? Car Mortgage School We Can Help! To learn more please call, 1-888-855-6221

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8373. www.ZevLev.com

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7419.

We Get It Done!

50 GLORIOUS YEARS ď łď Šď Žď Łď Ľď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;šď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;´

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1518.

Bob@HumboldtMortgage.net

(707) 445-3027 2037 Harrison Ave., Eureka ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Ąď ˛ď §ď Šď Žď łď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Şď ľď łď ´ď&#x20AC; ď Ąď&#x20AC; ď łď Ąď Śď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ą default

Announcing

A unique gallery and wine tasting experience exhibiting the works of local artists and featuring the wines of Southern Humboldt.

Open 11 am-5pm, October 22, 23, And by appointment. The studio of Judy Evenson 93 Fern Redway jeven37@gmail.com 923-2220

Computer & Internet

PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE $1000 A WEEK MAILING BROCHURES FROM HOME! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportuâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; nity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStation.net (AAN CAN)

ď &#x201E;ď Šď Ąď Žď Ľď&#x20AC; ď &#x201E;ď Šď Łď Ťď Šď Žď łď Żď Žď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď ?ď &#x201E;

Your Business Here YOUR AD HERE

ď &#x152;ď Żď śď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC; ď &#x2C6;ď Ąď Žď ¤ď łď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; 

ď &#x2030;ď Žď łď ´ď Šď ´ď ľď ´ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Żď Śď&#x20AC; ď &#x2C6;ď Ľď Ąď Źď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC; ď ď ˛ď ´ď ł

ď&#x20AC;¨ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;Šď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;ľ

ď Žď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Łď Żď Ąď łď ´ď&#x20AC;­ď ­ď Ľď ¤ď Šď Łď Ąď Źď&#x20AC;Žď Łď Żď ­ 442-1400 Ă&#x2014;305 northcoastjournal.com

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Est. 1979

ď ?ď ď &#x201C;ď &#x201C;ď ď &#x2021;ď &#x2026; ď &#x201D;ď &#x2C6;ď &#x2026;ď &#x2019;ď ď ?ď &#x2122;

Eureka Massage and Wellness

Body, Mind & Spirit

ď ?ď ˛ď Šď śď Ąď ´ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď ?ď ˛ď Ąď Łď ´ď Šď Łď Ľď&#x20AC;Ź ď &#x2C6;ď Żď Źď Šď łď ´ď Šď Łď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Ąď łď łď Ąď §ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď Łď ¨ď Żď Żď Źď&#x20AC;Ź ď &#x192;ď Żď Žď ´ď Šď Žď ľď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC; ď &#x2026;ď ¤ď ľď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď&#x20AC;Ź ď &#x192;ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201D;ď ˛ď Ąď Šď Žď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC; ď Šď Žď&#x20AC;  ď &#x2C6;ď Żď Źď Šď łď ´ď Šď Łď&#x20AC; ď &#x2C6;ď Ľď Ąď Źď ´ď ¨ď&#x20AC; ď &#x2026;ď ¤ď ľď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Ž

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Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5628 www.circusnature.com

F r Marny E Friedman E ~Healing the Heart~ d ~Aligning with Soul~ o M 707-839-5910

2115 1st Street â&#x20AC;˘ Eureka EurekaMassages.com Massage Therapy & Reiki Please call for an appointment. 798-0119

ď ?ď Żď Žď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC;­ď &#x2020;ď ˛ď Šď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC; ď Ąď&#x20AC;Žď ­ď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Żď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC; ď °ď&#x20AC;Žď ­ď&#x20AC;Ž ď &#x201C;ď Ąď ´ď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Żď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ľď&#x20AC;ťď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď ľď Žď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Żď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ľ

ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;ľď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC;šď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;ˇ

ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;łď&#x20AC;šď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;˛ď ´ď ¨ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď ´ď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x2020;ď Żď ˛ď ´ď ľď Žď Ą ď ˇď ˇď ˇď&#x20AC;Žď Źď Żď śď Šď Žď §ď ¨ď Ąď Žď ¤ď łď Šď Žď łď ´ď Šď ´ď ľď ´ď Ľď&#x20AC;Žď Łď Żď ­

classified@north coastjournal.com

Your Ad Here

iamalso@hotmail.com

4 42-1400 Ă&#x2014; 305

Automotive

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IN-HOME SERVICES

ď &#x2014;ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Śď Żď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď šď Żď ľ Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

insured & bonded

Home Repair

ď &#x2C6;ď ľď ­ď ˘ď Żď Źď ¤ď ´ď&#x20AC;

ď &#x192;ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď §ď Šď śď Ľď ˛ď ł

Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001 MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855â&#x2C6;&#x2019;732â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4139 (AAN CAN)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profesâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822â&#x2C6;&#x2019;2111 default

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442â&#x2C6;&#x2019;GLAS (4527), humboldtwindshieldrepair.com

Cleaning

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EDITOR/VIRTUAL ASSISTANT/ WRITING CONSULTANT Jamie Lembeck Price Varies (808) 285â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8091 jfaolan@gmail.com

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Roofing/Repairs, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 382â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8655 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contracâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; tors license. Call 845â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3087

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ď &#x2039;ď &#x17D;ď &#x2030;ď &#x2020;ď &#x2026;ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď &#x2C6;ď ď &#x2019;ď ?ď &#x2026;ď &#x17D;ď &#x2030;ď &#x17D;ď &#x2021; Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Č&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Č&#x2C6;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022; Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022; Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2C6;ÇŁ

Women, finally you have a safe haven in the auto repair industry!! Susan is your auto repair shop Owner/Manager. She will make sure you understand and are well cared forâ&#x20AC;Ś

FALL COOLANT FLUSH

FALL SERVICE SPECIAL

â&#x20AC;˘ Stops Electrolysis and â&#x20AC;˘ Lube, oil and ďŹ lter change (up to 5 qts.) Corrosion â&#x20AC;˘ Check Battery â&#x20AC;˘ Cleans Radiator and hoses â&#x20AC;˘ Courtesy Inspection (check steering, â&#x20AC;˘ Lubricates Water Pump suspension, belts & hoses, fluid level and condition â&#x20AC;˘ Replace Anti-Freeze â&#x20AC;˘ Tire Rotation (If needed â&#x20AC;˘ Courtesy Car + tax Wash

99

$

99

$135 value

39

$

Offers expire Nov. 30, 2016 some restrictions apply, call for details

99 + tax $69 value

Free shuttle service within Eureka. Honest, quality auto and truck repair for nearly 40 years. A woman friendly auto shop.

ď ď &#x2019;ď &#x192;ď ď &#x201D;ď ď&#x20AC;şď&#x20AC; ď ď Źď Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x2022;ď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď &#x2C6;ď Ľď Ąď śď Ľď Ž ď ď ˛ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ąď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Źď Ąď şď Ąď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;ľď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;° ď &#x2026;ď &#x2022;ď &#x2019;ď &#x2026;ď &#x2039;ď ď&#x20AC;şď&#x20AC; ď &#x152;ď Šď ´ď ´ď Źď Ľď&#x20AC; ď &#x160;ď Ąď °ď Ąď Ž ď &#x2C6;ď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď łď Żď Žď&#x20AC; ď &#x192;ď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;šď&#x20AC;¸ď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC;ł

Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x2014;Ä&#x203A;Ä&#x160;Ä&#x17E;ÇŻÄ&#x2DC;Ä?Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x2014;Ä&#x2022;ÇŚÄ&#x201C;ÇŚÄ?Ä&#x17D;Ä&#x201C;Ä&#x152;Ä&#x2DC; ͚Ͳ͚͸ͳ͸nj͚Ͳʹʹ

101 2nd St, Eureka â&#x20AC;˘ 443-4467 â&#x20AC;˘ M-F 7:30-5:30 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat 8-4 northcoastjournal.com â&#x20AC;˘ NORTH COAST JOURNAL â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

45


Automotive

Fall into a great deal at Roy’s!

2010 CHEVROLET AVEO ONLY 83K MILES & GETS 35 MPG HWY! CUSTOM WHEELS, ALPINE STEREO, AFFORDABLE! #39416 ONLY $7,995

2006 TOYOTA TACOMA 4X4 CREW CAB CUSTOM WHEELS, JVC STEREO, TINTED WINDOWS, BEDLINER & TOW PKG! NICE TRUCK! #37016 ONLY $23,995

2014 SUBARU XV CROSSTREK AWD ONE OWNER & LIKE NEW WITH ONLY 26K MILES! WELL EQUIPPED & LOOKS SHARP! #37716 ONLY $23,995

A PA RT I A L LI ST OF OU R CU R R E NT I N V E NTORY OF CA RS, T RU C KS, SU Vs & VA N S CARS

TRUCKS

SUVS & VANS

2010 Chev Camaro SS 6 Spd! Only 32K! #35316 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,995 2011 BMW 528i Beautiful Car! Loaded! #19716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,995 2013 Chev Camaro LT RS Like New! #36616 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995 2013 Acura ILX Only 28K! Loaded! #43916 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,995 2014 Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid Only 22K! #38516 . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,995 2013 Mini Cooper Countryman Loaded! #35016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,995 2013 Chev Volt Hybrid Electric Like New! #34216 . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995 2010 Lexus ES 350 Loaded! Nice Car! #30116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995 2009 Acura TSX Loaded! Only 67K! #23016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995 2013 Chev Volt Hybrid Electric Only 50K! #35816 . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,995 2014 Chev Cruze Diesel 46 MPG HWY! #41016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,995 2014 Hyundai Elantra Only 20K! Like New! #41316 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,995 2012 VW GTI 6 Spd! Looks Sharp! #43116. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,995 2014 Nissan Altima Only 36K! Like New!! #42516 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,995 2011 Ford Mustang V6 Premium 6 Spd! #40016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995 2015 Nissan Versa Note S Like New! #38716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995 2011 VW Jetta SEL PZEV Sunroof! #30316 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995 2012 Nissan Leaf Electric Zero Emissions! #41116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,995 2002 Mercury Grand Marquis Only 75K! #37616 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995 1998 VW Beetle 5 Spd! #38116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,995

2016 Chev Silverado 2500 Diesel Crew Cab #32116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $52,995 2016 Chev Silverado 2500 4x4 Crew Cab #31716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,995 2013 Ford F-150 FX4 SuperCrew Loaded! #08016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $41,995 2011 Chev Silverado 3500HD 4x4 Stake Side! #07716 . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,995 2012 Honda Ridgeline RTL Like New! #29216 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,995 2015 Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 Quad Cab #42216. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30,995 2010 Ford F-250 4x4 Crew Cab! #37116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2012 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 Access Cab #39116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2014 Nissan Frontier 4x4 Crew Cab #24616 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,995 2013 Toyota Tundra Reg Cab Work Truck! #12916 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,995 2007 Toyota Tundra 4x4 Double Cab #40516. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,995 2012 Chev Colorado 4x4 Crew Cab #39716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995 2007 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 Crew Cab #42316 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995 2012 GMC Canyon 4x4 Crew Cab #37216 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995 2008 Chev Avalanche 1500 4x4 Crew Cab #10316 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995 2006 Toyota Tacoma TRD 4x4 Crew Cab #36416 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,995 2011 Chev Silverado 1500 4x4 XCab #42116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,995 2006 GMC Sierra 1500 4x4 XCab Hybrid #52715 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,995 2007 Honda Ridgeline RTL AWD Crew Cab #37416 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995 1999 Ford Ranger XL Only! #41716. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995

2015 Chev Tahoe 4x4 Like New! Loaded! #36116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $43,995 2012 GMC Yukon Denali Hybrid Loaded! #01016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,995 2012 Toyota 4Runner 4x4 Limited Loaded! #33716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,995 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4x4 Loaded! #33216 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,995 2013 GMC Yukon XL SLT 4x4 Loaded! #31516. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,995 2011 Lexus RX 350 AWD Loaded! Only 62K! #53015 . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2010 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4x4 #33816 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,995 2013 Dodge Durango AWD 3rd Row Seating! #38916 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,995 2011 Toyota Highlander AWD 3rd Row Seating! #22316 . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,995 2014 Dodge Journey R/T AWD Like New! #32716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,995 2011 Ford E-250 Cargo Van Only 27K! #43316. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995 2015 Nissan Quest Van 7 Passenger! #36516. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,995 2011 Kia Sportage EX Only 46K! #11616 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,995 2014 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4x4 #12016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,995 2010 GMC Acadia AWD 3rd Row Seating! #27316 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995 2010 Buick Enclave AWD 3rd Row Seating! #39916. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,995 2014 Mazda5 Sport 3rd Row Seating! #23216. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,995 2015 Dodge Grand Caravan 7 Passenger! #40116 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,995 2010 Ford Escape XLT 4x4 Affordable! #18416. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995 2011 Ford Transit Connect XLT Cargo Van #26616 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995

V I E W OU R I N V E NTORY ON LI N E AT

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5th & Broadway Eureka

707-443-3008

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5th & A Street

707-443-7697

All vehicles subject to prior sale. All prices plus tax, license, smog & documentation. Prices good through 11/01/16.

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 • northcoastjournal.com

Eureka


Real Estate default

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 2 pers. $22,800; 3 pers. $25,650; 4 pers. $28,450; 5 pers. $30,750; 6 pers. $33,050; 7 pers. $35,300; 8 pers. $37,600 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

SOUTHERN OREGON Marijuana grow house, dispensary, multi− use property for sale. Great old highway 99 location. Asking $199,000 obo. Call 714−323−2130, Broker 541−292−6962.

Home & garden improvement experts on page 17.

315 P STREET • EUREKA

Let’s Be Friends

707.476.0435

442-1400 ×319 melissa@ northcoastjournal.com

Trusted in Humboldt County since 1948

Oil & Lube Parts Supplies Tire Dealers

call (707) 442-1400 ×319 or email melissa@northcoastjournal.com

Owner/Broker 707.834.7979

Realtor/ Residential Specialist

BRE #01992918

BRE #01332697

707.834.3241

BRE #01930997

BRE# 01956733

Realtor 707.502.9090

707.601.1331

Ferndale Land/ Property $299,000

• Smog, Brake & Lamp Inspections • Factory-Scheduled Maintenance • Complete Drivetrain Service • Lube, Oil & Filter Service • Brakes & Suspension Repair • Computer Wheel Alignments • Air Conditioning Service & Repair • Cooling System Service & Repair

Used Cars Body Repair Service Dealerships

Owner/ Land Agent

±65 One of a kind acres in Maple Creek! This rare, riverfront property features beautiful open meadows, amazing views, a year-round creek, springs, and great access of County roads. Zoning is TPZ.

Automotive

YOUR BUSINESS HERE

Dane Grytness

Maple Creek Land/ Property $695,000

call 442-1400 ×319 or email melissa@northcoastjournal.com

Monday – Friday 8am – 5:30pm www.franklinsservice.com

Katherine Fergus

Briceland Land/ Property $406,250

Realtor Ads • Acreage for Sale & Rent Commercial Property for Sale & Rent • Vacation Rentals

707-822-1975 • 1903 Heindon Rd., Arcata

Kyla Tripodi

±80 Acres in Southern Humboldt! Parcel is heavily wooded and features mixed timber, sloping topography, seasonal creek, and easy access off County roads. Property is in need of development.

YOUR LISTINGS HERE

Free shuttle service

Charlie Tripodi

±9 Acres of completely flat pasture land in the highly desirable Ferndale Valley! Parcel features an AG well producing 150 gpm with 100 amp service, a 5,000 gallon water tank, 60’x80’ building pad for a 40’x60’ pole barn that has already been planned, paid for, and construction has begun. w

Ono Land/Property $98,000 This excellent ±40 acre property provides many potential opportunities with the possibilities for cattle, horses, or hunting. Beautiful gated property with 360 degree ridgetop views, seasonal pond, permitted well, abundant wildlife, secluded, and quiet.

humboldtlandman.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016

47


Sunny Brae

Glendale

Thank You to all our customers for helping make our 45th anniversary celebration a huge success! Congratulations to all our winners in our customer appreciation drawings! A special thank you to all those friends and neighbors that contributed to our celebration and prize packages!

Trinidad

Cutten

Renner Petroleum Muddy Waters Coffee Co. Holly Yashi Jewelry Sunny Brae Animal Clinic Shafers Ace Hardware Beau Pre Golf Course Humboldt Out�itters Strawberry Rock Gallery

Premier Brand Meat Co. Lost Coast Brewery Franz Bakery Coca Cola Lende’s Car Detailing North Coast Mercantile Co., Inc. 7-Up Nicole Henry Designs

Westwood

Murphy’s Markets, 45 years strong Thanks to You!

North Coast Journal 10-20-16 Edition  
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