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7 Fire prevention fail? 10 Robbie has lawyers, and they can write 22 Soup’s hot 32 So is Shrek 39 Oooo, dogs and horses! 44 Cheapest east-west consultant evah

Top left: Donkey, played by James Gadd, loves his sweets. Bottom left: Shrek, played by Tristin Roberts, likes his food with plenty of onions. Right: Shrek and Donkey always shop at Murphy’s Market.

Meet our neighbors Shrek and Donkey, played by Tristin Roberts and James Gadd

In summertime, Sunny Brae is a hotspot for Humboldt Light Opera Company, as actors, costumers, designers and dancers descend on the home of HLOC Artistic Director Carol Ryder to share their latest contributions to the show. After three hours of facial reconstruction, Shrek and Donkey head down the street to Murphy’s Market for a snack. Ogres like their food savory - with plenty of onions. Donkey, on the other hand, has an inexplicable fascination for sweets. Shrek is played this summer by Humboldt County native Tristin Roberts. He’s spent almost a year preparing for this role, and climbs easily into character as the misunderstood but good-hearted

ogre. Show days for Tristin begin earlier than everyone else’s: first his face must be constructed, then greenified, then warted! Murphy’s is happy to announce that Jacob, who is the son of Sunny Brae’s head clerk, Carolyn Smith, is playing Peter Pan and several other parts, in Shrek. Shrek’s best friend, the Donkey, is played by James Gadd. James completed a music degree at HSU this spring, in which Murphy’s played a small part - our breakfast burritos started him off most mornings before studying! Shrek the Musical features dozens of familiar fairytale creatures, plus flying dragons, flashy dance numbers,

and irreverent romance! It’s a story about learning to love yourself and everybody else, in spite of our quirks and imperfections. The show is directed by Carol Ryder, with choreography by Ciara Cheli-Colando. The orchestra is conducted by Justin Sousa. Sets and special effects are by Jayson Mohatt and Roger Cyr. Shrek the Musical runs weekends through Sunday, August 18 at the Humboldt State Van Duzer Theatre. Evening shows are at 7:30 p.m., Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. Admission is $1119; all seats are reserved. Tickets are available now at hloc.org or by calling 822-1318.

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem sorcery

7 News lessons in the ashes

10 Blog Jammin’ 11 Home & Garden Service Directory

12 On The Cover flash fiction

19 Field Notes rogue neurons

20 Go Local special advertising section

22 Table Talk Summer stock

25 Art Beat Along the way

26 Arts! Arcata

32 Stage Matters star shrek

34 The Hum (almost) all about you

36 Music & More! 39 Calendar 42 In Review a book

42 Filmland double trouble

44 Workshops 48 Crossword 48 Sudoku 50 Marketplace 53 Body, Mind & Spirit 54 Real Estate This Week

Friday, Aug. 9, 6-9 p.m.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013

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Aug. 8, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 32

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/news editor Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Emily Hamann emily@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Alana Chenevert, Miles Eggleston, Lynn Jones, Jonathan Webster general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com Kimberly Hodges kim@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions Drew Hyland office manager Carmen England bookkeeper/receptionist Meadow Gorman mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

• on the cover:

Don’t Bust Here

Editor: Co-op management’s negotiations with its employees are acrimonious because they are guided by a union-busting lawyer (“Co-op Conflict,” Aug. 1). Management has hired Brad Kampus, who represents corporate managements in fighting unions. He attends all Co-op contract negotiations and advises management on taking an anti-employee position, as he advises corporate managers. (The union does not bring its lawyer to every negotiation. Bringing Kampus is thus unnecessary, unfair and confrontational.) Kampus’ web page boasts that he was praised by the Labor Relations Institute. That institute describes itself as “a consulting firm dedicated to maintaining the union-free workplace.” The institute is associated with the neoliberal Heritage Foundation and it supports anti-labor officials such as Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin. Kampus’ law firm is Jackson Lewis in San Francisco. It is notoriously combative against employees. Jackson Lewis offers “How to Stay Union Free” seminars with titles such as “Union Avoidance War Games.” The AFL-CIO has dubbed Jackson Lewis “the devil incarnate” and “the number one union-buster in America.” This firm does not cooperate with working people yet the Co-op hires it to guide negotiations with employees. It guides management to reduce employee benefits after having intensified work pressure by cutting the work force. This neoliberal strategy forces employees to seek public support outside the uncooperative Co-op. The board is silent about all this! The Co-op is using our patronage dollars to pay this anti-union, anti-cooperative, anti-community law firm. This diverts funds from employee benefits, community donations and Co-op operations to Jackson Lewis’ neoliberal activities. Co-op members should demand the general manager explain how much she is paying Kampus for fees and expenses to fly here, stay over and attend every negotiation. Co-op membership should direct her and the board to terminate this nefarious law firm and negotiate cooperatively. Carl Ratner, Trinidad

Flash illustrations by Joel Mielke. Flash lettering and photo illustration by Lynn Jones.

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, aug. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Cartoon by joel mielke

More on That Speech

It now appears that the only lasting consequence of this event is the message it has sent to the young students that Mr. Johnson addressed, and that message has nothing to do with the warm words he mouthed, but rather to the subsequent denouement. They now have learned that plagiarism is no big deal, and if caught, then the only response necessary is a belated, halfhearted (non) apology that

Editor: Marcy Burstiner hit it absolutely correctly in her July 25 column, “Copy That.” Dan Johnson’s action was a disgrace and Marcy pointed out the most important feature that has not been addressed until she hit it on the nail — he was talking to an entirely different audience than the one the real speech was intended for. Then, to make matters worse, Johnson’s apology failed to apologize. He ended his apology by referring to those who objected as “self-appointed referees of good and The white crests of the mountain sea evil” and added that “their intolerance, so readily on are briny conjurations, display, is a far more proan untraceable sorcery of mist and churning vapor, found flaw than mine.” No, lost, Johnson, you just flawed your flaw and you very like us, readily put it on display. in the vanishing moment Dave Rosso, Eureka

 

Editor: Mr. Johnson omitted a footnote. Off with his head!!!! GT Buckley, Eureka Editor: I’m sure the kerfuffle regarding Mr. Johnson’s plagiarism will soon die down, and we’ll be back to business as usual. I spent years in an academic environment, where proven plagiarism was the kiss of death to career prospects, so that likely colors my perceptions.

Sorcery

to time unchronicled and shape unformed. The blue-veined waves compose an eternal return of disappearing amusements, an anarchic minstrelsy that entertains and distracts us until we too, like the surf, are entombed again in the depths from which we issued, eel-like, magical, muck-sheathed and primordial. — Paul Mann

Editor: As stated in the Journal’s article (“Run Out on a Rail,” July 25), the North Coast Railroad Authority’s mission is to “maintain rail service.” Those who sit on that board should be all about fulfilling that mission, with “zeal,” I would think. Nothing against Alex Stillman; she is a fine person. She is also clearly on the “trails” side, and with all due respect, may she stay there, or wherever, but she clearly does not belong on the NCRA board. When it comes to political gamesmanship,

continued on next page

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Editor: This letter is not meant as a panacea or fix-all but might work in the short term for the betterment of this community. Let’s look at history prior to World War II and the Great Depression awhile. FDR incorporated the unemployed in public works projects as the Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corp to provide sidewalks and other infrastructure for various community needs. The pay was about a dollar per day and stuff got built on a shoestring budget. Currently the economy is in “recovery” — ahem — and the number of able-bodied food stamp recipients have expanded. Where are the community leaders that we elected besides infighting and posing? That safety corridor along U.S. 101 is so named for a reason and there is no excuse not to consider railbanking. I propose that this community stop spending five or six digits hiring engineers to ascertain the costs — it is a simple job of manual labor. I propose that a homeless encampment could be temporarily erected and supplied logistics provided through various nonprofits, Salvation Army, etc. There are grant foundations that would support this endeavor to end homelessness (or houselessness). There are returning veterans who may feel a need to transition back into the

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Editor: I was glad to see that citizens have kept the “Dan Johnson fiasco” in center stage, but I was quite annoyed with Art Jones’ letter (“Mailbox,” Aug. 1). He characterizes Johnson’s actions as “innocent omission” and asks who was harmed by it. Well, I don’t believe that Johnson just forgot to cite the source for his speech; I am sure that he just grabbed something that sounded good because he was too busy (read lazy) to come up with something himself and was unwilling to pay someone to write something for him. The harm is in not valuing the students enough to take the time to present something from his own heart and assuming that they were not smart enough to figure out that he was plagiarizing someone’s work. In short, he was dishonoring the students as well as everyone else that was there. The other thing that bothers me is how Jones makes the case that Johnson is “a good person,” serving the community, etc. and that is why we should give the guy a break. This is a good example of how the “good old boys” system works — you have people that commit fraud and other sins that are otherwise protected by their peers and those overseeing them, and thus they go on victimizing. I would think of the high school incident as having peeled back a corner of Johnson’s veneer; there are other incidents that also served to peel back some of the veneer. We need to pay attention to these “exposures” of someone’s real character, and ask more questions. Jean Damon, McKinleyville

we can expect all sides to fight hard and as fair as the rules allow. Such things can break either way, so don’t be a sore loser. True “environmentalists” fully support mass transit in almost all forms, including rails. Trails are nice amenities, but they are not going to serve or save planet Earth. Here behind the Redwood Curtain it is easy to hide from the harsher realities and we tend to think of environmentalism in simplistic terms, however it involves a lot more than cycling, and recycling. If the north-south rail line was still working, we would not now be widening Richardson Grove for truck traffic — think about that for just a minute. One can easily be so busy hugging a tree that they can’t see the forest. I agree that the east-west rail line proposal is ridiculous and costly. Further, not needed if the existing north-south line is restored to service. The cost to restore the north-south line, or to abandon it (with remedial clean-up) is probably about the same, and either will require public subsidy. BTW, mass transit (as with our massive carbon-intensive highway infrastructure) will rarely “pay for itself,” and that was very disingenuous argument, coming from the left. Terry A. Clark, Bayside

denigrates one’s accusers. Oh, and don’t neglect to say what a great person one is, you know, deep down inside. These students are bright, so trust me they get the real message, even if it’s not the one we pretend to send. James “Bronco” Weseman, Eureka

U.S. 101 South

5th Street

Parking behind store northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, aug. 8, 2013

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community and this may work. And how many folks looking at the termination of their unemployment check are willing to participate? Complete this project and you will reduce the need of a safety designation along 101, create tourism and recreational opportunities for the months weather permits, and you might instill a sense of community in those who are willing to participate. Randy Myers, Arcata Editor: The introduction to the Ralph M. Brown Act describes its purpose and intent: “In enacting this chapter, the Legislature finds and declares that the public commissions, boards and councils and the other public agencies in this state exist to aid in the conduct of the people’s business. It is the intent of the law that their actions be taken openly and that their deliberations be conducted openly. The people of this state do not yield their sovereignty to the agencies which serve them. The people, in delegating authority, do not give their public servants the right to decide what is good for the people to know and what is not good for them to know. The people insist on remaining informed so that they may retain control over the instruments they have created.” The “public servants” over the last 59 years have made sure this guard dog has no teeth: No one has ever gone to jail for violating it. If they had, our city councils

and boards of supervisors would be acting very differently. Walt Frazer, Eureka

A Couple of Things

Editor: Jud Ellinwood’s letter in the Aug. 1 issue, (“Train Talk”) hit the nail on the head when he said “Humboldt County wants and deserves better.” There seems to be different, sometimes opposing views, but few on what is best for Humboldt County. Most of us just want things to get better for Humboldt County because we also believe what Ellinwood does. “About that Speech” (“Mailbox,” Aug. 1) elicited strong opinions on both sides. I don’t know Dan Johnson, but college graduate or not, he is a successful businessman and his ethics should have made him realize it is not OK to take credit for something he had no role in creating. Those defending him are not helping him by referring to what he “gives.” More than plagiarism, it is Mr. Johnson’s error in judgment where he felt he could use his position as a speaker to single out his daughter on a day when all graduates earned that celebration. Whether he resigns or not, Mr. Johnson needs to show his remorse through some action and not words elicited because he got caught doing something wrong. John Chiv, Eureka

Thoughts on Solitary

Editor: In response to “Hunger Pangs” (“Mail-

box,” July 25) — a commentary on the hunger strikes in California prisons: It is true that many (not all) of the prisoners locked in long-term solitary confinement have committed terrible crimes. It is true that a number of them have committed the most heinous acts, and through whatever situation and circumstance have permanently lost their humanity. Solitary confinement for more than 15 days is considered torture by the United Nations. Prolonged solitary confinement — especially the specifically brutal conditions at Pelican Bay and other California prisons — is torture by any definition, a most heinous crime itself. It is also ineffective, usually unnecessary, and more expensive to house someone in solitary confinement. The biggest cost, however, is to our own humanity — a terrible thing to lose. Beverly Titus, Eureka Editor: In response to Susan Dodd’s letter regarding the hunger strike at Pelican Bay: “I hope all those guys starve to death.” Really? Wow!! Billie Crowley, Trinidad

Yes, Trees

Editor: I was delighted to see Barry Evans’ Field Notes article (“Trees, Please!” July 4) about street trees in the Journal. He did a wonderful job highlighting many of the benefits of tree-lined urban thoroughfares. Trees also beautify neighborhoods, increase property values, and have been shown to improve safety of pedestrians

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and bicyclists, something we know to be an issue in Eureka. I wanted to take a moment to encourage residents of the greater Eureka area to contact me, or Keep Eureka Beautiful, if they are interested in signing up for the local programs to plant trees. Redwood Community Action Agency and Keep Eureka Beautiful are funded separately to do this work, so there are plenty of opportunities to get trees for low or no cost. Both existing programs help with permits, picking a site for the tree that doesn’t interfere with existing infrastructure, utilities or local ordinances, and reducing costs and planting work for homeowners. We collaborate to make sure that local needs are met wherever feasible. Please get in touch soon if you are interested in finding out more about programs in and near Eureka! I would be happy to walk you through the process and refer you to the program that suits your unique circumstances. I can be reached by email at Natalie@nrsrcaa. org or by phone at 269-2059. Thank you for helping us make Eureka a more pleasant, safe and lovely place to live, work and love life! Natalie Arroyo, Eureka

Write a letter!

Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com l

Emergency crews block Highway 96 near the entrance to Karuk tribal housing in Orleans. PHOTO by Ken Malcomson

Lessons in the Ashes As Orleans blazes smolder, critics say logging profits are undermining fire prevention By Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com

Large fires in and around Orleans last week have sparked new criticism of the Forest Service’s plan to reduce wildland fires in the remote and mountainous community. The Dance Fire burned more than 600 acres before firefighters contained it on Friday. Flames destroyed the home of a tribal elder, as well as two other outbuildings. And the blaze came dangerously close to consuming even more tribal housing. Since then, three fires on nearby Sawyers Bar Road grew to nearly 8,500 acres, with only 11 percent contained as of Tuesday morning. As the firefighting continued, residents and Karuk tribal officials complained that Orleans homes were put in unnecessary danger and some land was needlessly sacrificed to the flames because the Forest Service had allowed logging profits to color its decisions about fire prevention. The Forest Service denies that, countering that it has chosen areas to thin timber because they were the best places to defend the community, not because the lumber there was profitable.

In August 2008, Six Rivers National Forest Supervisor Tyrone Kelley approved a plan to reduce fire danger on public land near Orleans. The plan — designed in collaboration with the Karuk Tribe, fire safety groups, environmentalists and the community — called for logging and clearing dense underbrush so that fires can’t burn as hot, fast and destructively. Under the plan, a handful of pruning and burning techniques were to be used to thin nearly 2,700 acres of forest. About 1,300 of those acres were designated for commercial logging, and the remaining 1,400 were noncommercial. But the plan got off to a troubled start. In 2010 the Karuk Tribe, the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC), the Klamath Forest Alliance and the Klamath Siskiyou Wildlands Center sued the Forest Service, after a logging company hired to thin trees used cable yarding — a logmoving system that uses cables that can damage trees — near a sacred Karuk trail. A court-ordered settlement resolved the dispute in 2011, with an admonishment that the Forest Service must include the tribe in further planning. continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, aug. 8, 2013

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Then, last year, EPIC complained about the Forest Service’s practice of tractor logging. Kimberly Baker, the executive director of the Klamath Forest Alliance and a public land advocate for EPIC, said the tractor logging causes “serious soil damage and compaction” and that EPIC expressed its concerns to the Forest Service. “They have listened to our complaints — and that’s about all I can say. We haven’t necessarily seen a change in tactics but they are more aware of our concerns,” she said. On Friday morning, retired schoolteacher Sue Terence was inside her house with the air purifier on, a half mile from the Butler Fire that sparked overnight last Wednesday. “I can hardly think straight,”

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, aug. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

she said. “The nearest ridge is the only one of three that we can see. Our oxygen level is going down quickly.” Local crews had held the fire to the neighboring watershed, Terence said, and Friday morning state and federal firefighters — fresh from fighting the Dance Fire — had taken over. As crews raced to contain the latest fire in the Salmon River complex, Terence said she worries that the Forest Service’s funding for the fuel reduction plan is tied to its profits from logging. Without strict oversight, she said, logging can actually create conditions that feed future fires. Logging — particularly helicopter salvage logging — has left large amounts of slash and vast fields of dense brush,

Terence said. Logging companies paid for roads and made their profits, she said, and “now we’re facing the costs of the catastrophe that follows.” Still, she added, she understands the Forest Service’s problems. It has the unenviable task of fixing 100 years of poor fire management, and its fuel reduction plan is still in its infancy. The Karuk Tribe and Klamath Watershed Council have been working with residents and communities to thin highrisk areas on private land, Terence said, but fuel reduction on public lands is only lurching forward. The Healthy Forests Restoration Act, signed in 2003, was designed to protect forest communities, but Terence said that in the case of Six

Rivers National Forest, thinning is too concentrated on ridgelines. Bill Tripp, of the Karuk Department of Natural Resources, worries that the fuel removal plan has focused on valuable timberland instead of homes and communities. “I would’ve rather seen the money spent on implementing the priorities in the community wildfire protection plan,” he said. That plan, called the Orleans/Somes Bar Community Wildfire Protection Plan, was developed in 2009 by local fire safe councils, the Karuk Tribe, the Forest Service and others. It lays out guidelines for preventing and fighting fires based on the unique and rugged topography of the Salmon River. But the plan is just a recommendation, which Tripp says the Forest Service ignored when it prioritized which areas to protect. “We need to kind of get people back together and figure out how we’re going to address some of these priorities in the community’s plan and not keep falling back to the economic value the resources provide as the reason for why an area is treated.” Tyrone Kelley, forest supervisor for Six Rivers National Forest, said that’s just not what’s going on. The Forest Service may have had some early clashes with critics over its logging methods, but it has always focused on protection before profits, he said. “It’s a tough piece of ground back there,” Kelley said over the weekend, taking a moment from coordinating with firefighters still trying to get a handle on three newer blazes. Despite “early struggles,” Kelley was optimistic about the progress made on reducing fuels. He thinks that more advanced planning and work with the Karuk tribe to recognize archaeological sites will reduce cultural concerns. While he didn’t have specific figures in front of him, Kelley said only 500 to 700 acres of the project area was timberland. Logging wasn’t an emphasis, Kelley said, and all proceeds from that logging went back into the fuel reduction plan. The focus on ridgelines, he explained, was considered the best defense for Orleans from fires that started out of the area. With a sort of defeated chuckle, Kelley said that wasn’t much good when

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The Dance Fire roars above the Orleans School yard. PHOTO by Ken Malcomson

it came to the Dance Fire, which began inside the community. The cause of the Dance Fire is under investigation, according to the Forest Service. Despite the disagreements, both sides praised each other for expanding lines of communication and a mutual commitment to an end — if not a means. It’s not just prevention tactics that raise concerns among community members. Kimberly Baker said EPIC is concerned about the Forest Service’s practice of bulldozing firebreak lines. She said fire crews cut 200 miles of bulldozer lines in Shasta-Trinity National Forest in 2008. Backburning — when firefighters light smaller, controlled fires to stop a fire’s progress — is also problematic, because it can cause high severity fires that kill trees, Baker said. Tripp, the Karuk resources official, said that with better fuel reduction efforts around Orleans, a Karuk elder may not have lost her home. After meeting with the Forest Service and community members this week, Tripp said he hoped the Dance Fire would serve as a wake-up call that fuel reduction efforts need to increase. It’s time to act now, Terence said, because without quick, dedicated repairs, the last century’s logging damages will fuel more devastating wildfires in Orleans and neighboring towns on the Salmon and Klamath Rivers. l

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Blog Jammin’ BY RYAN BURNS / TUESDAY, AUG. 6 AT 3:10 P.M.

Arkley Lawyers: Back Off, Journal

The letter arrived late last week, printed on the letterhead of Mitchell, Brisso, Delaney & Vrieze, LLP, attorneys at law, and its warning was dire. “The North Coast Journal’s continued attempts to contact Mr. [Rob] Arkley ... border on civil harassment.” Signed by attorney Russell S. Gans, the letter was addressed to Journal Publisher Judy Hodgson. And it meant business. “If this practice continues,” Gans cautioned ominously, “Mr. Arkley will consider all legal protections available to him, including any options to pursue a civil harassment restraining order.” Just what the hell have our writers been doing, you ask? Did we nestle in his hedges, cradling bazooka-sized Nikon lenses? Did we fly to Louisiana and ninja it onto the roof of his palatial estate? Did we take our luggage up to South Fork Mountain waiting for his baby, the eastwest train? Well, no. We did try to call him on the phone, though. We freely admit it. Here’s the deal. Back when this writer was researching a 2012 story comparing corporate bankruptcy rules and attitudes to private bankruptcy, Mr. Arkley issued a decree. Neither he nor his employees at Security National, a real estate holding and servicing corporation, were to have anything to do with us. He informed our publisher that he was having his IT guy block all emails sent by Journal staff. He was done with us. Trouble is, what with our reporting jobs and Arkley’s position as a public figure/ occasional newsmaker, we have, Your Honor, tried to reach him or his associates post-decree. About four times in the last year and a half, as best we can recall — twice to ask about the indefinite closure of the Arkley Center for Performing Arts and twice seeking comment on the end of Economic Fuel, the business competition he funded for eight years. As the letter accuses, we even tried calling him (once) on his unlisted home phone, a number our publisher has had for years. Are we in trouble? Bound for the slammer? Should we throw ourselves on the mercy of the courts? “I just can’t imagine a court would issue a restraining order based on that,” said Jim Ewert, legal counsel for the California Newspaper Publishers Association. We

kinda figured, but we wanted you to hear it from somebody other than us. “He’s a newsworthy figure in the area,” Ewert said of Arkley. “And being a former newspaper owner he should have a better understanding of how a newspaper operates. Newspapers operate by asking questions of people who are newsworthy and who cast a wide net of influence, which he has.” So we can even call people who’d rather we didn’t? According to Ewert, yes. We can. Read the full letter on the Journal’s website. ● BY RYAN BURNS / MONDAY, AUG. 5 AT 5:12 P.M.

EPD Chief Candidate Out

Michael Johnson, the current chief of police in Anderson and a former sergeant with Eureka Police Department, has reportedly withdrawn his candidacy after being (conditionally) offered the job of Eureka’s next chief, according to the Lost Coast Outpost. Seems Johnson was peeved about the city’s indecision, peeved that he couldn’t get a hold of City Manager Bill Panos and peeved about the hiring process, which he called “unprofessional” in a letter to Panos. Panos said that while he can’t comment on specifics, the search for the city’s next police chief “is taking a little longer than we thought. But we’d rather be really thorough in our determination.” So thorough, in fact, that Panos said, “We have in place probably the most comprehensive review/background investigation of police candidates at any time in the city’s history.” He said he’s hoping a decision will be made by Sept. 1 or earlier. ● BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / FRIDAY, AUG. 2 AT 7:46 P.M.

Shakin’

A 4.5 quake just rattled the North Coast about 12 miles off the coast of Eureka. Did you feel it? ● BY RYAN BURNS / FRIDAY, AUG. 2 AT 3:14 P.M.

More Pot, More Damage

On the heels of Wednesday’s discovery of nature-abusing, industrial-scale

SMOKE FROM THE DANCE FIRE IN ORLEANS NEARLY BLOTS OUT THE SUN EARLIER THIS WEEK. PHOTO BY KEN MALCOMSON

marijuana grows, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, along with a handful of other agencies, allegedly discovered more environmental crimes at two pot grows yesterday while serving a pair of search warrants. According to a press release, officers found multiple illegal stream diversions, un-permitted grading and buildings, pollution and (yuck) human waste at a pair of large, adjacent grow operations in Maple Creek. The Sheriff’s Office arrested Roger Miller, 32, and his wife, Amy Miller, 41. The full press release and images are available on the Journal’s website. ● MEDICAL / HEALTH / BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH / FRIDAY, AUG. 2 AT 12:18 P.M.

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Poison, Dead Animals at Marijuana Grow

Humboldt County Sheriff’s deputies and other law enforcement agents found and eradicated a marijuana grow yesterday morning in the Supply Creek Watershed on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation. Along with 8,473 marijuana plants, they found a dead fisher at the site. Fishers are currently being reviewed as candidates for the endangered species list. At a separate event on Monday, agents found 7,521 marijuana plants at a grow site in Willow Creek, along with two dead deer and a dead bird. According to a sheriff’s office press release, deputies and researchers found

Smoke in the Air

Fires in Southern Oregon and Eastern Humboldt County are choking Northern California with smoke. Air quality alerts were issued today for Humboldt, Del Norte and Trinity Counties. The North Coast Air Quality District declared air unhealthy in Willow Creek, Orleans, Forks of Salmon and Burnt Ranch. “People are recommended to restrict any outdoor activity,” the alert reads. It suggests contacting a health care provider for any of the following symptoms: repeated coughing, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, wheezing, chest tightness or pain, palpitations, nausea, unusual fatigue or lightheadedness. Call 1-866-BURN-DAY or visit www.ncuaqmd.org for more air quality information. ●

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

BY EMILY HAMANN / THURSDAY, AUG. 1 AT 3:44 P.M.

SHERIFF MIKE DOWNEY HOLDS THE BODY OF A DEAD FISHER THAT WAS FOUND AT A MARIJUANA GROW WEDNESDAY. PHOTO

PROVIDED BY THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

home & garden the following: 1230 pounds dry fertilizer; 28 pounds liquid concentrated fertilizer; 14 pounds second generation anticoagulant rodenticide bait — enough to kill 2,246 woodrats or gray squirrels or 12 fishers or at least four spotted owls; 32 ounces Carbofuran (banned chemical in United States due to its toxicity to people and wildlife) — one-quarter to one-eighth of a teaspoon is enough to kill a 300- to 400-pound black bear. Deputies also located fresh hot dogs strung from a tree on treble fish hooks, along with two dead deer carcasses and a bird, a Hermit thrush. Officers also witnessed environmental damage to the watershed. A third raid on Thursday turned up even more fertilizers and rodenticides at a grow site near Orleans. ● BY RYAN BURNS / THURSDAY, AUG. 1 AT 3:41 P.M.

Arcata: 17th Hippiest U.S. City

Talk about your dubious honors. A real estate blog called Estately has published a list of U.S. cities that provide “ideal habitat for the next generation of flower children.” And Arcata, our local bastion of hula hoops, sophomore dreadlocks and puppies on ropes, landed at No. 17. But dude, check this out. Even though that’s technically the bottom of the list, we’re actually at the top because the list is in, like, reverse order, man. What crazy sorts of algorithmic super-math went into this socio-municipal hippie study? The post explains: [W]e used a formula based on marijuana availability and legality, number of stores selling hemp, local counter-culture icons, tie-dye availability, hippie festivals, progressive government, intensity of Occupy protests, and a Facebook poll. Right on. So who’s (allegedly) hippier than Arcata? Bloomington, Ind., Berea, Ky., Missoula, Mont., Bisbee, Ariz., Ithaca, N.Y. ... Wait a minute. Kentucky? We got beat by a city in Kentucky? That’s embarrassing! We should consider this a call to, uh, flowers. Time to up our anachronistic counterculture game! Message to every local: Start acting hippier. Because you never know when a real estate blogger may be watching.

commitment to the First Amendment. The draft report also calls for 24-hour access to restrooms at the courthouse. Enacted in March, 2012, Ordinance 2477 limited the hours of protesting on the county courthouse from 6 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., among other restrictions on signs and tables. A subsequent ordinance modified the law, reducing some of the restrictions but keeping in place the ban on staking or hanging signs overnight and setting up temporary shelter. The subcommittee assigned to review the ordinances found that the emergency rules “dealt with issues largely covered by existing laws.” From the draft report: Ongoing public input has led the Humboldt County Human Rights Commission to the conclusion that Humboldt County needs to have a policy statement related to the protection of the First Amendment constitutional rights of the public, while at the same time protecting the rights of all people to a safe and healthy environment. The subcommittee proposed a statement, which included the following statement: It is reasonable to expect that members of the public may regularly use the courthouse grounds, and other county controlled properties, to address their elected officials through public displays, protests or other expressions of free speech. This has historically been the case, usually without incident. The Human Rights Commission will review the report on Thursday at 5 p.m. in conference room A in the Humboldt County Courthouse. It needs approval from the entire Human Rights Commission before it can be presented to the Board of Supervisors. A PDF of the report can be read on the Journal’s website.

service directory continued on page 15

THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL ASSUMES NO LIABILITY FOR SERVICES ADVERTISED. YOU MAY WANT TO VERIFY CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBERS AND PROOF OF INSURANCE FROM THE VENDOR OF YOUR CHOICE.

● GOVERNMENT / BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH / WEDNESDAY, JULY 31 AT 4:07 P.M.

Draft Report: Repeal Emergency Ordinance

A new draft report from the Human Rights Commission calls for the county to repeal its emergency ordinance, which restricted demonstrating in front of the County Courthouse in response to Occupy protests last year. The report, completed this week by a Human Rights Commission subcommittee assigned to focus on the ordinance, recommends that the Board of Supervisors also adopt a policy affirming the county’s

POSTED BY RYAN BURNS / WEDNESDAY, JULY 31 AT 12:49 P.M.

‘Defend Humboldt’

Saw a guy wearing this T-shirt at The Local beer bar in Eureka last night. The man, whose name is Kevin Williford, said he bought it at the Little Red Lion cocktail lounge on Fifth Street. “They had piles of ‘em,” he said. ● AUG. 8, 8, 2013 2013 northcoastjournal.com •• NORTH northcoastjournal.com NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL •• THURSDAY, THURSDAY, AUG.

11

NORTHTOWN BOOKS WINNER

Mistaken Identity

I checked my pocket watch and spit in the dust. The first bullet whizzed overhead. The second hit the fence post. I scrambled behind a tree. “Where’s my wife, Dooley?” screamed the shooter near the woodpile. “I’m not Dooley,” I yelled. “My name’s Dickey.” “Ain’t this Meadow Road?” “Nope, it’s Monday Road.” “I’m from Wyoming chasing the lyin’ rascal my Marie ran off with.” “Mister, I don’t know no Marie.” Deafening silence. He mounted his horse, looked at the cabin, and rode west into the twilight. “You’re right,” I told her as we galloped north. “He’s a bad shot.” — Neil Tarpey Northtown: Unlike most of the other entries, this one actually told a story with a beginning, middle and end. (Also among the favorites of: Blake’s Books, Booklegger and North Coast Journal ) BOOKLEGGER WINNER

Separation

99 Words on 99 Words

We’ve been flashed. You, Humboldt, flashed us with your fiction, conjuring in just 99 words the key elements: character, setting, conflict, plot and theme. Characters: We meet a hungry dragon, a tactless apostle, an inebriated orange glutton. Settings: We visit a Vegas motel, an island cemetery, the Arcata Co-op. Conflict: Between a gunslinging cuckold and his rival. An oyster and a palate. Integrity and success. Plots: A man stumbles, context shifts, God flirts. Themes: Loss, redemption, fleeting connections. Booksellers, those saints, helped judge — Northtown, Booklegger and Blake’s, each awarding a $25 gift certificate for their fave. Thanks, Humboldt, and enjoy. — Ryan Burns

FLASH ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOEL MIELKE. FLASH LETTERING BY LYNN JONES.

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

The man and the woman stood facing each other on the trail, intent in their discussion. Their dog, a McNab, sat by them. The woman’s shoulders were tense, her hands clenched by her sides. The man’s shoulders slumped, and he leaned toward her, hands outspread at his sides. Something was decided: The woman turned abruptly and walked away rapidly south. The man looked after her, then walked slowly and uncertainly north. Their dog stood in the middle of the trail where the couple had been, frozen, looking first south, then north, then south, then north, as their figures diminished. — Andre Lehre Booklegger: Separation has an elegance in its economical description. A potent and painful human scene, using only body language and gestures, which are understood by the conflicted family dog. (Also among the favorites of: Blake’s, NCJ)

NORTH COAST JOURNAL WINNER

Foreclosure

Go to sleep, honey. Tomorrow we’re moving to Aunt Lisa’s. It’ll be fun! I will take a last look, a last listen. I will sit in your dad’s leather chair, and feel the mold of his back on mine. I‘m sorry to leave that chair, but there‘s nowhere it can go. I‘ve called in all the favors I can. I will open my heart to what’s next. As we do. But the seven years of our lives in this house we loved taste like ashes to me now. Ashes. No need to clean. The bank can do that. — Sue Greene NCJ: A poignant scene about relationships — parent and child, borrower and lender, homeowner and home.

NCJ

NORTHTOWN

99 words?

Bling. “The Journal is having a flash fiction contest. The word count is 9.” Said the text, from my girlfriend. Wow, that’s short. I could make a bad joke out of it, by adding three words to the end of Hemingway’s famous, six-word short story. “For sale: baby shoes, never worn. Baby sold separately.” I said out loud to my lazy cat. Bling. “9 or less. The due day is July 24.” Said the second half of the text. The contest was actually 99 words or less. I laughed to myself, as I began to write this. — Matthew Fleming NORTHTOWN

Revelations

BLAKE’S BOOKS WINNER

Signifying Nothing

“Could the senator restate the question?” “Define metadata.” “What Captain Picard did on the holodeck?” “Staff will subpoena this Picard.” “Metadata is data about data content, Wikipedia says.” “The chair will tolerate no wikithings. I’m concerned about privacy. Content in the texting context. The number of e-mails I sent my mist — uh, minister — that’s metadata?” “Yes, senator.” “The number of times I used the word ‘lasciv — ‘Leviticus’?” “The content/data horizon is not always a bright line.” “This is Congress, we don’t expect brightness. Can I sleep peacefully in my own bed?” “As often as you do now.” — Lynne Page

“If you’re lying, nerd, I’ll kill you,” the tall girl yelled to the small, ugly boy on the slope above her. “Look.” He pointed to glyphs incised in rocks and disappeared inside a cave. She paused at the entrance. His flashlight scanned rock carvings. “There’s more inside.” She followed. He ducked behind a rock, covering his ears. He hated this part. Screams ended abruptly. The dragon rested its head by the boy, blood still on its jaws. She was skinny, only feed his friend for a few weeks. But the big bully … Smiling he stroked his new pet. — Stephen Sottong NCJ

Untitled

T’was a bad day for Rainbow. Some Co-op asshole had caught her labeling organic lentils with the bin number for traditional lentils and loudly corrected her. She carried her groceries to her boyfriend’s pickup on H Street — her father’s BMW had rear-ended someone

weeks ago and dad wouldn’t fix it until she chipped in. She climbed into the pickup, nodded at the dreamcatcher, then felt the urge for a Don’s donut. As she flung the pickup’s door back open, a bicyclist rammed her, flying head over heels. “Oh no!” she moaned. The door hinges were, like, totally bent. — Mitch Trachtenberg BLAKE’S

BOOKLEGGER NORTHTOWN

A Small Yellow Cap

I came upon the island cemetery while hiking. Headstones for eight children, drowned when the school ferry went down. What happened on that November day 61 years ago? The foghorn bellowed. Disregarding fatigue, I started rowing back across the wide channel to my campground. The swift current persisted. I realized, “The tide has changed, it’s pushing me out to sea.” The rowing exhausted me. The fog thickened. I spotted a boy’s small yellow cap floating by. But I didn’t notice the jagged rock. After the rowboat sank, I swore I heard a young voice say, “We’re over here, mister.” — Neil Tarpey

BLAKE’S

BOOKLEGGER

Georges

Georges was 18, heading home to Quebec. I was 40, still searching for home. At Lake Louise Hostel, we shared dinner, canoed Lake Moraine. In Banff, we bid au revoir, though we’ve never seen each other again. Nowdays, Georges is a nephrologist; I am comfortably ensconced on my farm, tending cats, chickens, ducks, the land. One eve, I posted on Facebook that I was preparing zucchini-feta fritters with food from the garden. Georges commented, “Isn’t that what you made for me 15 years ago?” Our lives had touched only briefly, dragonflies upon water; still, he remembered our shared meal. — Claire Josefine BLAKE’S

Play

BOOKLEGGER

Ochosi

kitten gets bolder, a regular gonif, brave as the ravens who care not that we’re there. But she won’t let us touch her, looks at us askance as she gobbles our scraps. She won’t survive winter. So we catch her, the old food-beneath-a-box-andstring trick, and take her home. I look at my friend and ask, “Your house or mine?” He has five cats to my three. Ten years later, Ochosi, guardian of the forest, still sleeps with me. — Claire Josefine

She approaches stealthily, filching food behind our backs. We let her. Throughout the weekend, the calico

“What makes you happy?” he asked her abruptly. She looked him in the eyes, then quickly looked down. “Happy?” she asked in a small voice, befitting that of a girl of 10 years. “Yes, happy. You know, what makes you smile, laugh, enjoy yourself? Do you like dolls, books, drawing?” She scoffed. It had been a long time since someone asked her about herself. “I like to play.” she stated. “Play? That’s great!” he exclaimed, desperately. “I like to play with my prey.” The little girl giggled into her hands. — Shirine Azimianaraki continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

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BOOKLEGGER NORTHTOWN

Three Little Words

“It’s political suicide.” “It’s three little words.” “Say them or kiss the election goodbye.” “But I don’t believe.” “You’re a politician. You’ve had practice saying things you don’t believe.” “They’re meaningless. One thing I do know — God doesn’t need my suggestions.” “This audience will be looking for a sign.” “Like Aquarius?” “Cute.” “You’re devout, yet you’re my campaign manager. I’ve got your vote without an incantation.” “I’m special.” “Elitist.” “Realist. Smile and say what you must to get where you can make a difference.” “As long as I’m not too different.” “Just three little words: ‘God bless America.’” — Lynne Page BOOKLEGGER

NCJ

Seven Boxes in the Attic of Our New Home

One box contains Shakespeare’s completed works, wrapped in onion thin paper. One box contains six display cases, each with a blue morpho butterfly pinned to a square of foam. One box has a box inside of a box, but there must have been something inside once. One box has a lavender-colored cashmere throw; we can wrap ourselves in it as we watch television; there’s a note from the sales rep: “Thanx!” One box contains a framed photo of a wrinkle-faced man, his face smothered with birthday cake. One box contains broken stemware — a shame; we drink wine too. — Raul Palma BOOKLEGGER

Plenty

NCJ

“Get eggs.” May Apple was able to work sitting down, frying the eggs along with a lump of sausage the size of a goose

egg. When it was divided between them, they ate by the stove. “They’re gonna put in electric down at the Vance Hotel.” Billy spoke with his mouth full. “Probably burn themselves up.” “I want to see it.” She didn’t know if he meant the electric or the burning. The kerosene lamp threw a carroty halo around his head, as lamplight will do to red hair. “Hold your horses,” she told him. “You’ll see plenty.” — Carla Baku

“Sounds like a perfect evening.” “It was until my mother joined us.” “Ah, the uninvited guest.” “Quite. She’s been dead for 12 years.” — Mark Feldman

BLAKE’S

NORTHTOWN

Drunken Orange

The Untaming of the Shrew

Kate discovered a baby rattlesnake sunning itself on a hot rock in her garden. She brought it into the house and gave it a home. It was the first friend she’d made in her four years of marriage. That evening, when her husband ordered her to fetch his slippers, Kate replied, “Fetch them yourself.” He struck her cheek with a closed fist and roared, “I thought we were through with all that, woman! Now do as you’re told!” Her face stinging with pain, shame, rage and revenge, she muttered, “Of course. Forgive me. I’ll fetch them. Wait here.” — John M. Daniel NORTHTOWN

Veritas

Charles tapped the bell on the counter with his palm. There wasn’t a soul in sight. Suddenly, the back door swung open. In came the winemaker who hefted a white box onto the counter. “I see you got into the Cabernet.” The winemaker nodded at the nearly empty bottle in Charles’ hand. “Drank it for our anniversary the other night,” Charles said, setting it on the counter between them.

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

NCJ

NORTHTOWN

The Last Lunch

NCJ

BOOKLEGGER NORTHTOWN

not a joke. People everywhere are actually eating these things. “Beer, please.” — Maja Hanson

I drank in a bar named after a fish. I was invisible in the background of dangling arms and legs, which had little heart or head. After the bar closed, I staggered toward home alone. I climbed into my beautiful neighbor’s orange tree, like a drunken bear. I ripped oranges in half and drank the juices. I tossed piles of orange peels onto her perfectly cut grass. I’ll clean up the mess in the morning. I woke up in the afternoon. I opened my front door, and found a brown paper grocery bag of oranges on my porch. — Matthew Fleming BLAKE’S

“Give him cold cereal,” said Mom. “He’s not supposed to eat certain foods.” “But he’s 84, dying from cancer,” I protested. She scowled, and left for church. I was flying home tomorrow. “Dad, want a burger?” He smiled like a kid offered cupcakes. I walked him to the table.

BOOKLEGGER

Emergence

“Sixty years you lived with me,” he shouted when she stepped out of the metro. “Sixty years!” I almost didn’t see her, shocked as I was by his accusation. I almost didn’t see her among the whirled faces, but she alone didn’t look, eyes finally focused forward, chin proud, as if she didn’t hear him at all or was too intent on beginning her new life, like a cicada that had just shed. — Edward Mack NCJ

Oyster Festival

“Eat it, go on!” she says. I hesitate. It looks like the innards of that thing my dog brought me at the beach yesterday. “Just try it. I’m not kidding, it’s sublime.” “OK.” I slurp in the slick medicinal mass, tasting ocean, mud and snot — the taste of a bad tumble in the winter waves. “Jesus Mary, I though you said this was good!” The only likeable part was the way it slid past my gag reflex. She’s laughing. I look around. No, it’s

I cut his patty into small pieces. Fed him, slowly. I washed the dirty dishes. Mom returned, sniffed the air. “What did you do?” Dad and I exchanged guilty glances. Ketchup on his shirt exposed our conspiracy. “Phil cooked me a burger,” he confessed. “Rare. Just how I like it.” — Neil Tarpey NCJ

NORTHTOWN

The Blackberries Always Win

Tom had been waging a lifelong war against the Himalayan blackberry vines that encroached on his vegetable garden

continued from page 11 and orchard. He had tried everything: digging the tubers out by hand, diesel sprays, an excavator, and once he had burned the vines down to the ground only to have them back more vigorous than ever the following year. In a final battle, Tom with a loaded spray gun of banned DDT, tripped over a cane and pitched headlong into the briars. The berries were especially large and sweet that fall where his body had composted. — Joe Wixson BOOKLEGGER

NCJ

NORTHTOWN

Hotel St. Francis

Sitting on the bed and sneezing into my hand I get a whiff of week-old underpants. When I lie down on the orange polyester spread a horsefly zaps me repeatedly, honing in on sticky cheeseburger crumbs. I flick the fluorescents in the bathroom; he zooms toward the light and I close the door. Hours later, I see the fly on the sink washing his hands and I squash him with a wad of toilet paper. Back on the bed, it’s very quiet, it’s very cold, after killing the only living thing who knew where I was. — Peter Nash NORTHTOWN

Untitled

Sara stole a glance back at the biker-looking dude that seemed to be following her in the mall parking lot. Terrified, she quickly opened her car door, got in and relocked it. Now the gray-haired man was actually knocking on her window. She could see now he had a patch on his riding leathers that said “Bikers for Jesus” and a silver crucifix on his neck. She rolled the window down a crack and asked him what he wanted. With a smile that reminded her of her father, he held her wallet and said: “you dropped this.” — Joe Wixson BOOKLEGGER NORTHTOWN

Smack

I knew he was a recovering addict when I met him. It didn’t stop me from falling deliriously in love. Within two months we were sharing a home. I often pondered his past. Too afraid to try anything stronger than a whiskey sour, I wanted to know why someone would give up his life for a needle and a full spoon. “What is it like — doing heroin?” I watched as his eyes glazed over and his face went soft.

“Imagine the best orgasm you’ve ever had and multiply it by a thousand.” We never had sex again. — Kristi Patterson NORTHTOWN

Afternoon at the Humboldt County Animal Shelter

BOOKLEGGER

NCJ

NORTHTOWN

How Kind

What story would satisfy a cop at 2 a.m.? “Well, Officer, poison is torture. A quick snap, maybe ... but glue traps are barbaric.” Shabby coat over Disney pajamas, carrying nothing but a terrified mouse in a plastic cube. Psych hold, for sure. A vacant lot of briars. This’ll do. The sable mite makes an Olympic leap into the weeds. Will he be attacked by the resident mouse king? Back home, is there a bubble gum wad of babies, already growing hungry? It’s hard to know what’s kind in the middle of the night in the dark. — Lynne Page BLAKE’S

M FRO ITH K C ! W A T B DU UGS JUS HMAN EW R N KAT S OF ’

100

At the shelter for another Willie. Gentle Giant, chocolate lab, Willie. Now beneath our blueberries. “This way, ma’am.” Keys jingling, cages clanking, lonely dogs barking. A mama lab blinked. Tiny squeaks rose up from her velvety belly. “What’s dat?” My 3-year-old pointed, eyes like silver dollars. “Puppies. Baby dogs.” “Babies?” A dull ache burned my chest. Willie’s picture still on our fridge. Damned glasses always getting smeared. “Mama, did Willie had babies?” “No sweetheart. But he was a baby. A sweet baby.” Headed home, squeaking sounds from the back seat were echoed by joyous giggles. — Mashaw McGuinnis BLAKE’S

continued on next page

BOOKLEGGER

Untitled

Can’t sleep. Worries swirl around in the dark: car acting up again, property taxes due, divorce getting messier. Take a deep breath and count my blessings: friends, a roof over my head, food to eat, books to read, and my health. Fall asleep, at peace. Wake in the early morning dark, an odd noise, plink, plink, plink. The skylight is

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continued from previous page leaking over the foot of my bed and the blankets are sopping. The only sane response is to laugh. There’s still a roof over my head; just no roof over my feet. — Janine Volkmar BLAKE’S

Dog-Eared Pages

I come home at lunch and catch her on the table, several of my books from college opened to various pages. The phone is on speaker, and she’s reading my margin notes aloud to whatever voyeur is listening on the other end. Her look of surprise and shame lasts only fleetingly. She smiles. “What a perceptive student you must have been!” There’s a giggle on the other end of the line. I stifle a growl in my throat. “But what do I know,” she says, “I’m a Chihuahua.” Bitch, I mutter. And slam the door. — Christopher R. Weaver

BOOKLEGGER

NCJ

Strength

We sat there, exhausted. We had been backpacking for months to get to that beach. Then, an unsolicited comment: “I’m stronger than you.” Appalled, I lofted her above my head and labored toward the ocean, ready to teach a cold lesson in simple biomechanics. When the seawater met my waist, I gave the ultimatum. “Who’s stronger!?” As she squirmed and gleefully cackled “ME!” I could see it in her eyes: The relentless determination that had carried us both from ocean to ocean. The fearlessness. She IS stronger than me. I made sure to not get splashed by her entry. — Tyler A. Belarde BLAKE’S

The Next to the Last Supper

Is there any more bread? Eleven faces turned to start at him. What? I just wanted more bread, to go with this wine, he said. — Janine S. Volkmar

continued from previous page

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

NORTHTOWN

Flight

“Having a big party?” the salesgirl had asked, as she took Leena’s last dollar for the helium and balloons. “No. Quite small. But I’m writing the name of each person who can’t be there on a balloon.” The idea had just come to her. “Sweet.” So now the cluster of marked balloons pushed against the apartment ceiling. Except Jem’s. His hovered in a dark corner. Always had to do things his way. Well, no time to stab it. The pills were working. Time for the gas. The ceiling wouldn’t block her flight. Up, up and away. — Lynne Page

the trail. The man was slapping an invisible ball angrily skyward. The woman answered by shaking her head, eyes downcast. Finally, the man strode north alone. The woman stood still, then slowly started south. The dog? It ran north a few feet, stopped, then ran south, stopped, ran north again, stopped, then ran south once more. Finally it froze, trembling, suspended between north and south, between its two worlds, completely lost. — Kate Lehre Editor’s note: Although no judging team singled out this story as a top favorite, we think that is only because it appeared on the judging sheet immediately below another version of the same episode, and the judges weren’t able to see that this one was by a different author. BLAKE’S

Lost Dog

I was taking my usual evening walk when I saw the dog. It was a McNab, rotating her small head between two people stopped in the middle of

Lois

Lois danced around the sofa, gliding and twirling. Harry would have told her to act her age — old poop. A knock interrupted her. A police officer greeted her. “We were wondering about Harry, ma’am.” “So was I,” she said, hands over heart.

“Have you questioned the people from that meth house down the street?” The officer cocked his head. “Why? Harry is a pillar of the community.” Lois shook her head slowly. “Always the ones who fool you.” “We’ll check.” He left. Lois smiled, danced round the sofa again and headed downstairs to finish the new basement wall. — Stephen Sottong BOOKLEGGER

Money and Action

A writer visits a dangerous country. Fiction’s his thing, but fiction won’t sell;

the world wants the world truly. He’s there but can’t find a story. So he gets himself kidnapped to have something to say. He’s in a high-end hotel surrounded by palms, wind teasing the bay, free to leave, but sits with paper and pen and his piña coladas, monitoring each mortal feeling he has. Downstairs, the captors get edgy. They want money, and action. They’ve started books, too, in their rooms. But no one will pay. What next? Torture? Decapitation? Or will he ransom himself, selfredeemed? — Kirk Nesset BOOKLEGGER

NCJ

Dying Deer

We waited in roadside wildflowers, her head in my hands. I didn’t speak and she was soundless, but our eyes found each other and spoke a language we could both understand. My legs folded under me; she lay with three of hers tucked, in animal

perfection, beneath her deerskin torso. Her left hind jerked out from her body in an agonizing angle of misshapen bone, flesh, and fur — my doing. Hardest to look at, easiest to see. Heavily, her muscles relaxed into mine. I’d hit her. I held her. I waited for death to drop into my hands. — Heather Quarles BLAKE’S

Deep DOMA Do-Do

He awoke to a sun-washed view of Las Vegas. The blond-haired prize beside him still slept contentedly. He had pleasurable flashes of Elvis and the rock and roll wedding, of which he had always dreamed. In the exhibit hall for his Dairy Farming Show it had been announced the Supreme Court voted in support. Caught up in a massive Overturning Celebration he was swept

along by all the intoxicating party guys. His smartphone rang. A picture came up of him kissing the blond. “Yes?” he said. “It’s your wife you idiot. Where are you?” — Larry Strattner BLAKE’S

BOOKLEGGER

NCJ

Revelation on the Pont de Bir-Hakeim

As I walked out on the Pont de BirHakeim, I encountered a lone figure fingering the keys of an accordion, which breathed a plaintive song. The sound stirred something in me so beautiful and melancholy that the moon herself strained to listen. He stopped playing long enough to tell me his name which sounded something like “God.” “’God’, comme Dieu??” I burst out laughing. I couldn’t help it; I just never expected to meet him this way. … Then, with a flourish, he handed me his business card. “Call me,” he said. Oh la la, what a flirt! Who knew? — Lisa Pelletier

continued on next page

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Field notes

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ntil the advent of computers a few decades back, the technology du jour gave us metaphors for the brain. As I’ve written before (Field Notes, Dec. 6, 2012), hydraulic and pneumatic systems, steam and internal combustion engines, septic tanks, cotton mills and telephone switchboards have all been tapped for brain metaphors as thinkers try to understand thinking. Since about 1950, however, computers — from basic hardware and software systems to the internet as a whole — have consistently occupied that primetime metaphor spot. One problem with any brain metaphor is scale. Each of these three-pound lumps of gray neural network wetware squished into deep folds and valleys inside our skulls contains about as many neurons as there are stars in the Milky Way. That’s a hundred billion neurons, give or take, each of which has hundreds of connections with its neighbors. We’re not even close to reproducing that sort of complexity even in our most advanced parallel-processing computers. Another problem, the one I want to discuss here, is the one of predictability. Computer neurons, that is, silicon-based input-output switching devices, have no functional leeway. Give any one of them a certain input and it’ll respond with a certain output, day in, day out. If actual neurons were similarly reliable (and boring), how could we explain our flashes of entirely unpredictable inspiration and creativity that seem to come out of nowhere, not to mention our delusions, obsessions, depression, anxiety and all the rest of our fickle inner lives? Why would we experience ourselves as capricious, subject to both genius and craziness, if neurons were simply switches?

In answer to that question, philosopher Dan Dennett has taken brain metaphors to a whole new level. A couple billion years ago, he reminds us, before the dawn of multicellular life, the progenitors of our neurons were independent, self-contained eukaryotic cells (cells with nuclei) that “lived and fended for themselves for about a billion years as free-swimming, free-living little agents.” As they were coopted into the multi-celled clusters that we know as our bodies and brains, most of them made the transition without struggle. So, today they work in harmony, unswervingly and loyally. Most of them. Dennett proposes that a genetic mutation caused some cells, especially those that ended up in our cortical areas, to return to their primitive states, “like what happens when you let sheep or pigs go feral, and they recover their wild talents.” The idea is that on occasion, some neurons rebel, creating fiefdoms that struggle amongst themselves for dominance. When that happens, the normal cooperative democracy of our brain cells gives way to an anarchy of infighting, resulting in the complex gamut of emotion and inspiration that seems to be a hallmark of our species. Could there be any truth to this rogue neuron scenario? At this point, it’s impossible to say one way or another. What Dennett’s proposal does do is to question the assumption that the neurons of a brain are all on the same team. And, as in so much of science, the question may be more important than the answer. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) counted the neurons in his brain and found himself short by a few million. Which didn’t come as a total surprise. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

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want to talk about soup. Some say soup is a cold weather dish, but I think it’s just seasonal. In winter, I make stews; in summer, I make soups. It’s just another way to eat the delightful treats we get at the market around this time. The thing about soup is you can make it with almost anything you have in the fridge, as long as you have stock. Stock is dead easy to make. Here’s what you do: get some chicken parts. Use raw parts; I know it’s tempting to use the rest of that roast chicken carcass, but it just doesn’t taste nice. Go to the store and get what’s on sale — wings, legs and whatever other parts they have — any bits, as long as they appear reasonably consumable and weigh about three-fourths of a pound to 1 ¼ pounds. Of course, finer quality meat makes tastier stock, but do what you can. Using less chicken results in slightly weaker stock. Go ahead and make twice as much if chicken is on sale. Hearts and necks are fine, but liver’s not. If you are making a dinner from the whole chicken, save the neck, wing tips and giblets for stock; they’ll only make about a cup and a half on their own, but you also can save them for a larger pot. Don’t just put fatty skin in. You need bones and meat or the stock will taste like bad, bad Chinese food. If there are bones, bash ‘em with a meat hammer or heavy knife before they go in the pot so the yummy marrow goes in the mix.

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Brown all chicken parts in a deep, heavy bottomed pot with 2 tablespoons of olive oil over a medium flame. You’ll need to let the chicken rest undisturbed for several minutes and gingerly lift a bit to see if it’s coloring. It will take five to eight minutes to get nice and browned. Rotate the chicken. Loosen up all the brown bits with a spoon so they don’t burn.

Throw in half of a chopped onion, a bay leaf, a few sprigs of parsley, maybe half of a celery rib and a carrot. The last two have strong flavors, so go easy. Then pour in at least 6 cups of water, making sure the chicken is well covered. Simmer, DON’T BOIL, for at least 45 minutes and up to two hours. Pour the stock through a strainer. If you’re worried about fat, chill the strained stock and remove the solidified layer of fat with a spoon. Vegetable stock is easy, too, but you can mess up by using strongly flavored herbs and vegetables; I loathe the taste of celery in veggie stock, although many people love it. Cruciferous vegetables can make stock smell bad. Instead, you can save the green ends of leeks and toss one in. Start by coarsely chopping a wellscrubbed potato, two carrots, one onion and five to 10 button mushrooms (not totally necessary). Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a heavy-bottomed pan over medium high heat, and toss in the veggies and three or four cloves of unpeeled garlic. Stir once to coat them in the oil and let them sit for five minutes to brown. Stir them again and brown them for at least five more minutes. The longer you brown, the better. Add a small handful of parsley stems and 6 cups of water. Bring it to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for 45 minutes. Strain and season. Do this often enough so you have stock when you need it. This large batch is enough to serve four. PHEW! We have stock. Now the world of quick soup is open to us! Revel in our freedom to use almost every vegetable languishing in the crisper to quickly make nourishing and delicious soup! ●

Dad’s Fresh Corn Soup The quickest. Serves two. Ingredients and Method: 2 ears fresh corn 1/ cup diced onion 3 1 tablespoon butter ¼ teaspoon curry powder 2 cups stock ¼ cup cream 3 tablespoon tomato puree 1 teaspoon diced green chiles salt Toppings: 2 tablespoons sour cream 2 teaspoons coconut milk ½ teaspoon horseradish chives

Slice kernels off the cobs. Melt the butter in a saucepan and fry the onion. Add curry powder and stock and bring it to a boil. Add the corn, cream, tomato paste and chiles, then simmer for five minutes. Pour half the soup into a blender and blend until smooth. Return the blended soup to the saucepan with the rest of the soup. Serve with toppings.

The Sea Grill

Sweet Potato and Cauliflower Soup This soup can be changed easily depending on what you have. For example, swap the cauliflower with broccoli, and the sweet potato with Yukon gold. It’s just as lovely. Serves two. Ingredients and Method: 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock 1 cup water 1 small sweet potato ½ yellow onion, chopped 1/ head cauliflower, choppe d 3 2 tablespoons butter 1 teaspoon tumeric pinch fresh oregano 1 tablespoon cream salt and pepper In 2 cups of chicken stock, boil one sweet potato chopped into ½ inch cubes. Meanwhile, in another pan, sauté the onion in the butter over medium heat for several minutes until translucent. Add the cauliflower and cook for

another few minutes before adding everything to the stock and sweet potato. Add water until the ingredients are mostly covered. Bring it to a low boil and cook for 5 to 7 minutes. As soon as the sweet potato is tender, add the spices and a minimum of salt. Pour the soup into blender and blend for at least a minute. Return the soup to the pan over medium heat and stir in the cream. Salt and pepper to taste. At this point, a multitude of additions are possible; I like gnocchi and a small handful of finely chopped parsley, which can be cooked in the soup for 3 to 4 minutes until the gnocchi are tender. Shredded chicken or fried tofu are nice additions that make the soup a substantial meal. Frozen peas cooked a minute in the hot soup are also tasty, as are croutons or a spoonful of yogurt.

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northcoastjournal.com

LIDA PENKOVA’S “SKELLIG MICHAEL: ONCE UPON A TIME.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF LIDA PENKOVA.

Along the Way By Ken Weiderman

“S

ometimes I feel pissed,” confesses artist Lida Penkova, “because I do almost nothing else but paint, and I feel that somehow life is escaping me!” It’s not so much that Penkova’s life is escaping her, but that she’s pouring it into her whimsical, worldly and wondrous paintings and prints. “Once you are in this fascination of creating you can’t stop it!” she exclaims, her blue eyes bright beneath a tidy wave of dark hair. Every day, toiling over her latest work, she’s in love with her art and art-making. Born in Czechoslovakia, Lida Penkova was destined to wander. At an early age, she moved to England, and then to Germany. In each country she stayed for lengthy periods, soaking up the sights, the people, the colors. She’s not your typical traveler, consuming cultures for a few days before moving on to the next. Penkova prefers to hang around for a while, experiencing everyday life like going to the market or chatting with a neighbor. Along the way, she attained a psychology degree and ended up in Mexico, where she stayed for 16 years. Working as a psychotherapist in Tepoztlán, Mexico, Penkova found herself entranced by the stories surrounding her small village. She became fascinated with ancient cultures and the ways in which

pull-out A RT sect i on

A RTS ! ARCATA PG 26

their legends continue to infuse our world with “the myth that still defines an echo in everyday life.” Absorbing the art and spirituality surrounding her in Tepoztlán, Penkova listened to “what people tell each other, what they celebrate, what they believe in.” The experiences in Mexico were foundational to her aesthetic sense and narrative sensibility. After moving to the United States, she finally decided that she needed to give her favorite stories form. She decided to become an artist. Fourteen years later, Penkova is a selftaught painter and printmaker. Believing that anyone can be an artist, she wears her self-taught status as a badge of honor. Not weighed down by formal instruction, she doesn’t feel the need to follow any rules about what to paint or how to paint. “Look at my perspectives,” she exclaims, laughing. “Sometimes they are totally screwed! Who cares?” Penkova’s vision drives her, and her untrained hand harmonizes with her subject matter. The unconventional structures of her images help strip away any artistic preconceptions viewers might hold, allowing them to focus on the stories first. Indeed, the unschooled nature of her works lends a kind of sincerity to the stories she paints. Like the indigenous tales she loves, no outside conventions have been imposed

LIDA PENKOVA’S “THE WREN BOYS OF DINGLE.” PHOTO COURTESY OF LIDA PENKOVA.

upon her aesthetic. Penkova’s inspiration comes from her extensive trove of travel memories. An experience will stand out to her, and when she finds an interesting story she learns as much about it as she can. She examines the visual possibilities of the tale, imagining the look of important characters, the expressions on their faces and the spatial relationships. “Then I just go and paint them and see what happens,” she says with an infectious giggle. Although Penkova is honoring the original narrative that inspired her, she’s not interested in an exact representation of the story. These are her impressions of the events — her interpretations of how they might look. For her, “It’s a mixture of fantasy and physical reality.” For example, during a recent trip to Ireland she was captivated by the interplay between modern religion and the lingering elements of paganism. One linocut print, “The Wren Boys of Dingle,” depicts a parade of curious creatures merrily ambling along with musical instruments and funny costumes. A bird with human legs soars over quaint cottages while dolphins and a reclining, floating cat observe, bobbing around in wavy black and white streaks of water. It’s the kind of image that makes you smile as you conjure up an explanation of what it means. As with

many of Penkova’s linocuts, the readily identifiable graphic elements and strong, contrasting lines provide a comforting balance to the mysterious subject matter. Another Irish-inspired print, “Skellig Michael: Once Upon A Time,” is an example of Penkova’s deftness with narrative complexity. It’s a busy image, filled with layers of meaning. Monks are paddling, praying, and plowing, surrounded by mythical creatures and craggy peaks. A few animals reveal the permeable boundaries of her influences. The flat, dappled appearances of a manta ray, flying fish and snake have direct references to the Australian aboriginal art Penkova previously studied. To boil down such complex stories into the confines of a single image requires someone who is truly paying attention. “I feel like I’m the source of something mysterious when I do art,” says Penkova, “I just can’t give it up.” Those thrilling instants when a piece is finally finished are her favorite moments. She says she feels free from the demands of her creative impulses, but her husband laughs knowingly. “In a few hours you’ll be back to starting a new one,” he tells her. To see some of her latest paintings and prints, be sure to visit the Upstairs Gallery in Arcata during the month of August. An Arts! Arcata reception will be held Aug. 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. ●

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

25

Second Friday Arts! Arcata Friday, August 9, 6-9 p.m.

Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at more than 30 participating locations in Arcata. Visit www.artsarcata.com for even more information about the event or call (707) 822-4500.

You can see sites from all over Humboldt County just by wandering around the room at Crush during Arts! Arcata. David Safier’s photographs of landscapes around the North Coast just might have you feeling the wind and smelling the salty ocean air.

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If you look at this painting by Antoinette Magyar too long, you might find yourself getting thirsty. Fortunately, Magyar’s work will be hanging in Libation Wine Shop during Arts! Arcata, so parched observers will find plenty of refreshments, along with live music by Duncan Burgess. On the Plaza • 707-825-7100

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

continued on page 31

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after each painting job is done and then wrapping and storing them for future use. Fold wax paper around the brush and seal it with a rubber band. • Wash latex paints out of a brush with clear warm water. • Clean brushes used with oil-base paints with regular paint cleaner or some type of solvent. Clean rollers in the same basic way as paintbrushes.

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, aug. 8, 2013

27

HOW TO: STAIN A DECK WITH LATEX STAIN

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28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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29

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30 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

www.McKinleyvilleAce.com

northcoastjournal.com

continued from page 26

You can look, but try to resist the urge to pick the flowers in Shirley Nan Ruchong’s paintings. Her work will be at Stokes, Hamer, Kaufman and Kirk, LLP during Arts! Arcata.

ARCATA ARTISANS COOPERATIVE 883 H St. Libby George, paintings. Mimi LaPlant, paintings. Michael Pearce, ceramics. Wine will be served to benefit the Humboldt Community Breast Health Project. ARCATA CITY HALL* 736 F St. Rob Ash, paintings. ARCATA EXCHANGE 813 H St. David Steinhardt, artwork. Live music by Dale Winget. Wine will be served to benefit The Emma Center. ARCATA HOLISTIC HEALTH CENTER 940 Ninth St. TBA ARCATA MARSH INTERPRETIVE CENTER 569 South G St. Louise Bacon Ogden, bird nests. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Live music by Clean Livin’. CAFÉ BRIO 791 G St. TBA CRUSH 1101 H St. #3. David Safier, photography. Live music by Kodiak. FIRE ARTS CENTER 520 South G St. #A. David Jordan, “Curiosities, Mystery and Myth,” sculptures depicting surreal imagery, recreated ancient artworks and curious creations of animal and figurative design. Live music by Todd Krider. THE GARDEN GATE 905 H St. Augustus Clark, paintings. Live music by Mon Petite Chou. Wine will be served to benefit Friends of the Dunes. HUMBOLDT OUTFITTERS 860 G St. TBA HUMBREWS 856 10th St. John Chapman, “Women in Rock,” photography. JACOBY STOREHOUSE 791 Eighth St. Kevin L. Hoover, Legendary Locals of Arcata, book signing. LIBATION 761 Eighth St. Antoinette Magyar, paintings in acrylic and oil. Live music by guitarist Duncan Burgess. LOS BAGELS 1061 I St. Christian Wisner, photography.

From sushi to sandwiches, we’ve got you covered. MAZZOTTI’S 773 Eighth St. Jen Mackey, mixed media. MOORE’S SLEEPWORLD 876 G St. Sanford Pyron, oil paintings. Live music by Don’s Neighbors.  NATURAL SELECTION 708 Ninth St. Yuma Lynch, paintings. NORTH SOLES FOOTWEAR 853 H St. Aiko Mogi and Tomomi Mogi-Barrett, pressed flower art and jewelry. OM SHALA YOGA 858 10th St. TBA PACIFIC OUTFITTERS 876 G St. Rosalie Thompson, mixed media. Live music by Bradley Dean. PLAZA 808 G St. Yvonne Kern, oil on canvas. Wine will be served to benefit Humboldt Surfrider Foundation. REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING COMPANY 550 S G St. Group Show, “Celebrating 40 years of the North Country Fair in Posters.” ROBERT GOODMAN WINERY 937 10th St. TBA STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 Bayside Road. Jon Exley, photography. Shirley Nan Ruchong, oils. Karan Collenberg, copperplate etchings with colored ink. Elizabeth Pâté, sketches. Andrew Hamer, ceramics, wire sculptures and oils. Live music by Wynsome Woods. THE ROCKING HORSE 791 Eighth St. Children’s art. UPSTAIRS ART GALLERY 1063 G St. Lida Penkova, “Cultural Adventures,” linocuts, mixed media. ZAMORA’S NEW AND USED FURNITURE 601 I St. John Indic, Jr., oil paintings. *These venues are open only during regular hours

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013

31 27

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Live magic with Humboldt Light Opera By William S. Kowinski stagematters@northcoastjournal.com

S

hrek was a multimillion-dollar animated movie that spawned a multimillion-dollar Broadway show. Humboldt Light Opera Company doesn’t have access to that level of support. Nevertheless, its production of Shrek The Musical, now on the Van Duzer Theatre stage at HSU in Arcata, is big, bold, fast and assured. It’s also ogre-sized fun. It’s not just that a cast of seemingly thousands fills the stage for the opening number. Before the first act is over we’ve met a Pinocchio whose nose really grows longer when he lies, a Gingerbread Man imprisoned on a pan, and most spectacularly, a huge dazzling lady dragon who sings like disco queen Donna Summer. There are tap-dancing rats in top hats and tails, three blind mice from Motown and an evil lord who sings his song of woe and ambition while taking a bubble bath. With one wonder after another, the high-energy first act is especially exhilarating. The romantic tensions and complications of the second act slow the pace and color the mood, but there’s still plenty to hold the attention of children as well as adults. The story of the musical is pretty much the same as the movie: a fairy tale about an ogre and his donkey sidekick, an evil lord and a princess in a tower. It takes several twists and turns before its happily ever after.

32 North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Most fairy tales work on several levels, and the best shows for children (from Looney Tunes and the Fractured Fairy Tales through Sesame Street and Mathnet) provide nuggets of satire and knowing humor for adults. Shrek on screen was practically a genial deconstruction of the fairy tale princess monomyth, as well as a contemporary moral reconstruction and redefinition. The musical adds to this with the sly satire of playwright David LindsayAbaire’s lyrics, and the collision of bright and evocative musical styles composed by Jeanine Tesori. In addition to the story, even the main voices will seem familiar to young fans of the movie. As Shrek, Tristin Roberts adopts Mike Myers’ slightly Scottish accent, and James Gadd does a credible Eddie Murphy as Donkey. Roberts as Shrek acts the part convincingly, carries the action and sings with authority. But even without animated close-ups, stage Shrek is quickly lovable and never threatening — sympathy for the ogre is easy. For me the revelation of the evening is Gadd as Donkey. Liberated from the constraints of his usual romantic hero roles, he’s fully committed to silliness. He writhes and dances wildly, is infectiously funny and sings better than ever. Hannah Jones is a delightfully complete Princess Fiona, with the traditional virtues of a fairy tale heroine while embodying an anxious contemporary girl whose dreams

for the perfect love match include “our pre-nup will be binding.” As the evil Lord Farquaad, Craig Waldvogel plays his physically difficult role with aplomb and sings it with conviction, so he’s comically intimidating. HLOC productions are known for the quality of singing, but in this show the singing is as uniformly thrilling as in any show I can recall. That’s true of all the singers, notably Cindy Cress as the voice of the dragon, and the two younger versions of Princess Fiona: Haley Cress and Kayla Kossow. The dancers amplify the bright showbiz energy. As choreographed by Ciara Cheli-Colando (who also dances), they include Daphne Endert, Katie Kitchen, Shelly Harris, Katri Pitts, Fiona Ryder, Lily Ryman and Jake Smith. This production also has the great advantage of a skilled 15-piece orchestra (conducted by Justin Sousa) that’s out front in a real orchestra pit, providing the volume and dynamics of a big musical wave that the voices and movement on stage can ride with confident enthusiasm. The magnificent 27-foot-tall dragon created by Roger Cyr is a North Coast stage wonder. Set and lighting design by Jayson Mohatt, costume design by Kathryn Masson and Carol Ryder, makeup and hair design by Carli McFarland, and ogre makeup by Carlene and Rachel Cogliati are all excellent contributions. Even more than usual, director Carol Ryder has orchestrated magic. I’m guessing this production would be an exciting experience for children and a marvelous introduction for first timers to the particular excitement of live theatre. This is the most ambitious HLOC production I’ve seen, and easily among the best. Even at dress rehearsal it was the most fun I’ve had at a musical since HLOC’s Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Shrek the Musical continues at the Van Duzer Theatre for just two more weekends, through Aug. 18.

Coming Up:

Nothing new is opening but it’s a remarkable few weeks for the number of shows running simultaneously on the North Coast. Apart from Shrek the Musical, the musical Victor/Victoria completes its run this weekend (on Aug. 11) at Ferndale Rep, and the comedy The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife plays weekends at North Coast Rep until Aug. 17. Meanwhile, Shakespeare’s As You Like It and Sarah Ruhl’s Late: A Cowboy Song alternate at Redwood Park in Arcata through Sept. 1, produced by Plays in the Park. l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013

33

(Almost) All about You Your week in sing-alongs and how to play By Jennifer Savage thehum@northcoastjournal.com

T Ch

err

yB

los

his week is not exactly overflowing with myriad musical opportunities, but the ones that are out there sound pretty fine.

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This’ll be a fun show, for example: Austin’s Black Irish Texas plays The Logger Bar on Thursday as part of a West Coast tour promoting the band’s latest effort, An Ode to Saint Cecilia. Prior stagemates include Dropkick Murphys, Flogging Molly, Scott H. Biram and Social Distortion, all appropriate given the blend of Celtic punk-twangy Americana served up at a high rate of speed. The Logger Bar is the perfect place to watch mohawked Mark Maughmer II set his fiddle ablaze. Other band members include James “Fitzy” Fitzsimmons on guitar and vocal duties, James Sheeron on drums, Shannon Morino on upright bass — upright bass! — and Chad Fitzsimmons on banjo. Local fave Rooster McClintock opens and the music, promises promoter Ian Hiler, “starts at 8 p.m. sharp.” Pull up blackirishtexas.com to hear some tunes — and learn the words so you can throw back some Jameson and sing along.

34 North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Karaoke wisely

Keeping the singing-along theme going, Arcata Theatre Lounge presents Chris Clay’s Karaoke on Friday. Doors opens at 8 p.m., cost is free with a minimum $5 beverage or food purchase and the evening is all ages — although parental guidance is strongly suggested as some of the more-than 100,000 songs to choose from contain “inappropriate” content. Rock ‘n’ roll, folks! It’s devil music! Some tips for karaoke novices, courtesy of my karaoke-obsessed friends: Pick a song everyone knows because the crowd will be too busy instinctively singing it with you to notice how far away from the original tune you actually are; make up for your lack of singing talent by freeing those inner rock star moves previously only performed in the privacy of your kitchen; do not pick a ballad or a song over three minutes long or one with repeated instrumental gaps; do not attempt Zeppelin, Queen or Frank Zappa — and if you choose a Pink Floyd song then please warn your audience so they can use this time to visit the restroom, order another drink or go pick that thing out of their teeth.

’80s vs ’80s

Also on Friday, and also a perfect opportunity to sing along — or at least lip sync — to your favorite songs, are two versions of 1980s dance parties. In Arcata, at the Jambalaya, you’ll get DJ Red spinning all vinyl, just like in the olden days. Segues will be smooth and back-to-back tracks will make sense, just like when listening to the radio saved your teenage life. Easily the most authentic option, plus Friday is Arts! Arcata night, so you can drift through town and into

the night without driving. Should you be in Eureka, you’ll get an also-fun if more mish-mash of ’80s dance hits at the Palm Lounge, courtesy of the Pressure Anya DJs, who are celebrating the birthdays of The Lost Luvs’ Becky and Rondi. Dressing up encouraged. Hopefully both bars will have specials on wine coolers, too.

Oh, look! Another festival!

What would a summer Saturday in Humboldt be without a festival? This round it’s the Blue Lake Music Festival and Picnic out in Perigot Park. On offer, the usual food, beverages, children’s area, beer and wine, art, wares and dancers, plus music by Motherlode, The Foggy Bottom Boys, Silver Hammer, Blue Rhythm Revue, Doug Fir and the 2x4s, The Movers and the Shakers, Abstract and Seed. Also, barbecue. Bring a couple of blankets, some reuseable picnicware and soak it all in.

Sexy stompin’ shakin’ sounds

Later that night, get dark and different at the Alibi, where one-man band Shake it Like a Caveman promises a tranceinducing experience via the electro blues combo of kick drum, hi hat, slide guitar, harmonica and vocals. Shake it’s Blake

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Walk-ins Welcome Burris hails originally from Tennessee, but has toured often and extensively, racking up rave reviews from Austin to England. Listening to songs over at, what else, shakeitlikeacaveman.com reminded me of early ZZ Top, early Black Keys, a little Tom Petty on the sexy “Bad Girls” track, and some Scott H. Biram but with a more sultry stomp. I’m intrigued. I think you should go. Music’s at 11:30 p.m. and the cover is a whole $2. Dig it.

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If you’ve been wanting to test the theory that anyone can play guitar (or brass, percussion or woodwind), College of the Redwoods offers the opportunity to buy two CR music classes and get one free through new Community Education classes. Each class is $149 –— but being able to pull out the guitar around the campfire and pick out an acoustic version of Soundgarden’s “My Wave” is a lifetime of entertainment gold. For schedules and more information, go to redwoods.edu and click on Community Education or call 269-4000.

Etc.

While we here at the Journal strive to provide the most accurate information, every so often unforeseen circumstances mean a show will be canceled or changed. It’s never a bad idea to double check on websites, Facebook or with a phone call. Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, AUG. 8, 2013

35

entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731 ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575

thur 8/8 Try one of our special Bloody Mary’s Blue Lotus Jazz 6-9pm

fri 8/9

sat 8/10

Find us on Facebook

Shake it Like a Caveman (robot boogie) Doors 10:30pm $2

Anna Hammilton (blues) 5:30pm

Lantern Making Workshop 7pm

Lantern Making Workshop 7pm

Les Blank Films & La Dolce Video DVD Sale Doors 6pm $5 All Ages

ATL Presents: Chris Clay’s Karaoke Doors 8pm FREE All Ages/PG

Low Movie (How To Quit Smoking) Doors 7:30pm $5 All Ages

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770

Thursday Madness: $8 pitchers 6pm til close. Free pool in back room

Juke Box Karaoke 9pm w/ DJ dance music

26 beers on tap.

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm Open Mic 7pm Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm Brad Wilson 6pm FREE

We got game, wanna play?

Enter our $10,000 Progressive Sweepstakes!

Happy Hour EVERY DAY in WAVE $1 off all drinks

Receive dbl. points on your favorite slot machines every Sat. in August!

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake C STREET MARKET SQUARE Eureka CAFE BRIO 791 8th St., Arcata

CAFÉ MOKKA 5th & J St., Arcata CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 1631 Central, McKinleyville

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm Thirsty Thursday = low beer costs

Friday Night Special 6pm FREE Good Company (celtic quartet) 8pm Mon Petit Chou (French Canadian) 8pm Karaoke w/ Rock Star 9pm Shuffle Board, Bumper Pool Sing, Dance and Party tonight! & Free Wi-Fi The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

S.I.N. & Service Night w/Accurate Productions DJs 9pm

Speakeasy Saints (R&B & Soul) 9pm

Speakeasy Saints (R&B & Soul) 9pm

Dirty Thursday w/ Pressure Anya 9pm Dinner Tues-Sat 5-10pm Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam 8:30pm Seabury Gould 7pm Come check out our HUGE selection of beers! Madi Simmons & DJ Gobi 10pm HSU Guitar Group 7pm

‘80s Night Eureka! (Lost Luv’s B-day Bash) 9pm Live Music some weekends! Late night menu 10-midnght Cheryl 7pm Bass Harvest V2 PreParty Fundraiser 9pm $8 DJ Red (‘80s dance party) 10pm Duncan Burgess (guitar) 6-9pm

Charlie Sweet 7pm Saturday Night Special (DJs spin reggae, hip-hop, ska) $5

It’s a bar.

Come have a drink with us!

LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000

Black Irish Texas & Rooster McClintock 8pm

Kingafoot 9pm (modern Americana acoustic)

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Blue Lake Music Festival After Party 9:30pm

MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

Rich McCulley, Anna Maria Rosales & Caitlin Jemma Faber 6pm

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611 CUTTEN INN 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka ELK COUNTRY RV RESORT & CAMPGROUND Trinidad EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093 FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852 THE FORKS Willow Creek GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 2nd St. Eureka HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739 JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka

BBQ & Open Mic 12pm Fresh squeezed cocktails from knowledgable staff. Pizzas, oysters, wine + more.

Tim Randles Jazz Band 7-10pm

SUBMIT YOUR MUSIC + MORE EVENT BY NO Fred & Jr. (swing jazz) 6pm

Cheers to the Leo’s! Strawberry Rock Festival 12pm

MANILA COMMUNITY CNTR Manila MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd Arcata NOCTURNUM 206 W. 6th St., Eureka OCEAN GROVE 480 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GALLERY 923-2748

Buddy Reed (gut bucket blues) 7pm

OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Second Nature Sound 9pm

Michael Curran & more 7pm FREE

Paco Martin 7pm FREE

Anna Hamilton (blues) 8pm

NCF Showcase (folk) 8pm

U.S.G.G.O. (funk) 8pm

Samba 5:30-7pm

More info at www.redwoodraks.com

Karate 9:30-10:30am

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 9pm

RED LION 1929 4th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata

The Soulful Sidekicks (soulful music) 7pm Itchie Fingaz 9pm (hip hop)

Electro Swing Night 10pm

THE RITZ 240 F St. Eureka RIVERWOOD INN 2828 Ave. of Giants ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Vino & Vinyl 9pm w/ Truth 1 & DJ Rickshaw

SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St., Eureka 407-3550 SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919 THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St. Eureka SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580 THE SPEAKEASY BAR 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

Rude Lion: Krunk Hip Hop 10pm $2 Poetry Slam 7:30pm Headshine 9pm Fresh, local, organic ingredients and a crazy selection of beer.

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Throwback Thursdays

No Covers 9pm (jazz improv duo; piano & percussion)

Trivia Night w/ Sherae 9pm + Rocksteady Night w/ DJ Rotten

Happy Hour 3pm Open for Dinner 4pm

Lunch 11:30am-4pm Open for Dinner 4pm Rude Lion: Krunk Hip Hop 10pm $2 John Ludington 9pm Jim Lahman Band 9pm Buddy Reed Band (blues) 10pm DJ Music 10pm

DJ Music 10pm $2

Todd Krider 9:30pm DJ Itchie Fingaz (mashup) 9pm ShugaFoot (jazz/blues) 9:30pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm DJ Music 10pm Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

Happy Birthday Miles Psy Fi! Celebrate at the 4th Annual How the West Was Whomped Wednesday at Nocturnum

½ OFF

TOP SHELF sun 8/11

mon 8/12

tues 8/13

Pilgrim + Wounded Giant (doom + metal) Doors 10:30pm $5 Blue Lotus Jazz 10am-2pm

wed 8/14

Find us on Facebook

Serving breakfast, lunch & dinner

Hoodwinked! (2005) Doors 5:30pm $5 Rated PG

Find out more at www.arcatatheatre.com

Voted Best Local Venue 2011 & 2012NCJ Best Of Humboldt readers poll!

Kitchen open until 1:30am

Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

$5 Wing Night & Free Pool in the back room

Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm FREE

Sunday Brunch 9am

Have a drink in the Thirsty Bear Lounge.

Enter our $25,000 Progressive Sweepstakes!

Book your hotel stay online & save 10%

Karaoke w/ KJ Leonard 8pm

Prime Rib Dinner Special in Alice’s Steak & Sushi $14.99

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

Wild Wing Wed.: Chicken wings & $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Sport Sunday $3.00 Well Drinks $1.00 off all pint draft beers

Monday Night 9-Ball Tournament 8pm with 1st place prize @$20.00

Ladies Night Drink Specials! Speed Channel, ESPN, NFL Network

Open Daily 10am - 2am

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm & 9-Ball Tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournament 8pm

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool & $3 wells

www.thealibi.com Blue Lotus Jazz 6-9pm

Lantern Making Workshop 7pm

Sci Fi Night: Battle of the Worlds (1961)

Doors at 6pm FREE All Ages

Dale Winget (folk/light rock) 6pm Pool tables & air hockey in back!

facebook.com/ThePalmLounge

facebook.com/ThePalmLounge

Closed Sundays & Mondays

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Excellent daily specials

Great plates to share, North Coast Market Fare

Happy Hour 3-6pm Kitchen open until 10pm Sundaze w/ Deep Groove Society 9pm

Find out more at www.humboldtbrews.com The Getdown (local funk) 7pm

Like us on Facebook!

M-Notes 7pm Junior Toots 9:30pm $12/$15 Forrest Day (from Oakland) 9pm

Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

We also have liquor.

It’s a bar.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Potluck 6pm! Bring a dish & share w/ friends new & old! FREE

FREE pool all day!

Cribbage Tournament 6:45 sign up, 7pm play $5

BA-DUM-CHH Comedy Presents (local stand-up) 8pm

Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm

4 For Jazz 6pm

CARTER HOUR

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

Mon-Fri, 4-6pm ½ off bar menu 5-6pm www.carterhouse.com

.m.

Buddy Reed (blues guitar) 7-9pm

Open Irish/Celtic Music Session 3-6pm How the West Was Whomped 9:30pm Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm

Bagels, pastries & of course, chocolate. Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

Now serving beer & wine

OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open Mic 7pm w/ Mike Anderson

Serving food from Five Eleven, right next door!

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com Josephine Johnson 7pm FREE

Happy Growler Day! Get your growler filled for less $$$ Salsa Rueda 7-9pm

Trivia Night 7pm Test your knowledge! Monday Night Swing 7-10pm

ser

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is here! West African Dance 5:30-7pm

Dry Hop Wednesday! Plus Nature’s Serving Popping w/ FluidGirl 6:30-7:30pm

Wine & Cypress Grove Cheese w/ RG Wines Pairing 4-6pm Happy Hour 3pm Dinner 4pm

Karaoke 8pm Igor & the Red Elvises (rockabilly) 9pm

Otto Knobetter (Loungey Singer) 9pm Try one of our signature cocktails. Lunch 11:30am-4pm Open for Dinner 4pm

Roots & Culture Reggae 9pm w/ DJ T Aura T-Bone Shuffle Open Mic Jam w/ Jim Lahman Band 7pm

Apps, small plates, desserts & more. IGA, Porter & Xtra Pale on tap. Happy Hour 3pm Dinner 4pm

Trivia Night 8pm Brunch & mimosas 11:30am-3pm Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 8pm Monday Night Sushi 6pm

Southern Fried Chicken Night 5pm

Anna Hamilton (blues) 7pm

ShugaFoot (jazz/blues) 9:30pm Find The Speakeasy Bar on Facebook!

Liquid Kactus 8pm Chef’s Cut Wednesdays 5pm No Covers (jazz duo) 7pm Specializing in tasty martinis.

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

Always great food — and the best cocktails. The Alibi crew cares about you. Please drink responsibly. Restaurant open from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. 744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

Featured Artist:

GILBERT GLASS

All Gilbert Glass pieces are 15% off for the entire month of August

ARCATA  987 H ST.  707-822-3090  BAYSHORE MALL  707-476-0400 WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM EUREKA

Locally Blown Glass

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

Purl & Pour 6:30pm

.

a.m

Bre

OON ON THE FRIDAY BEFORE PUBLICATION Bavarian-Style Hefeweizen on tap!

ast akf

8 ved

1p to 1

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

BA-DUM-CHH Comedy Open Mic 9pm $3

Thai food with a Laotian influence

37

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Party it up with the animals Saturday during Zootini. Six Rivers Brewery is hosting the bar at the Sequoia Park Zoo, and the drinks menu is full of animal-themed cocktails, from the pink flamingo to the grape ape. The special is a gin, grapefruit and champagne drink called the “Regal Eagle” to honor this year’s theme: the bald eagle. Just don’t get too close to the bonobo enclosure with one of those in your hand.

8 thursday ART

Lantern Making Workshop. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Come build lanterns for Elemental Friday Night of the Creamery Festival! Lanterns can be made by people of all abilities. Children should have an adult to assist them. Free. 822-1575.

MOVIES

La Dolce Video Presents Les Blank. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. La Dolce Video celebrates its fourth anniversary with three films by documentarian Les Blank. Doors and DVD sale starts at 6 p.m. Movies start at 8 p.m. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com. 822-7413.

MUSIC

Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music on Eureka’s waterfront. Brad Wilson Band performs this week. Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org.

SPOKEN WORD

The Siren’s Song Poetry Slam. Second Thursday of every month, 7:30 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. The only local competitive poetry show on the North Coast. Come early to sign up. Open mic in the first half for all those just getting their feet wet. Music and feature by DJ Gobi. $5. areasontolisten@ gmail.com. thesirensongtavern.com. 530-448-9458.

THEATER

Victor/Victoria. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. A penniless soprano named Victoria disguises herself as a man named Victor, who entertains as a female impersonator known as “Victoria” and becomes the toast of Paris. $18, $16 seniors/students. brad@ ferndale-rep.org. 786-5483.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka.

From a glitter snow globe to a windsock made out of plastic bags, the people at SCRAP Humboldt are always crafting up something new. Now you can get in on the action during Crafternoons every Wednesday. Watch SCRAP’s Patti Johnson make something new out of old recycled materials, or follow along for a small fee.

Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. www. humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers’ Market. Every Thursday. 3:15-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music.

MEETINGS

Prison Hunger Strike Solidarity Demonstration. 5-8 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. PARC and Redwood Curtain CopWatch are staging “5 p.m. for the Five Demands,” weekly informational demonstrations in solidarity with the California prisoner hunger strike. Free. parc.office@gmail.com. prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com. 442-7465. Humboldt Rose Society. 7 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. This month’s meeting will feature guest presenter Maria Krenek from the Glenmar Heather Nursery in Eureka. Refreshments provided. Our Pathways to Health Wellness Workshop. 5 p.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. These workshops are designed to help individuals with long term health conditions gain tools to manage their symptoms through health education and peer support. The workshops meet one day a week for six weeks. Anyone living with a chronic health condition can attend, as well as family members and/or caregivers. Space is limited. Call to register or for more workshops near you. Free. michelle@aligningforceshumbolddt.org. ourpathways.org. 445-2806 x4.

ETC

Humboldt Grange 501 Potluck. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Grange Women’s Auxiliary meets at 6 p.m., potluck at 6:30 p.m., Grange meeting 7:30 p.m. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. 443-0045. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

9

Join the local community at a festival for Strawberry Rock — that’s not at Strawberry Rock, or near Trinidad at all, for that matter. Rally around this local landmark at a festival that’s almost 20 miles away at the Manila Community Center. There will be live music, food, art, storytelling and fun. Brought to you by Friends of the Trinidad Forests.

friday

ART

Arts! Arcata. Second Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art. Downtown Arcata and surrounding area. Free. info@arcatamainstreet.com. www.arcatamainstreet. com. 822-4500. Pre-Burn Art Opening. 6 p.m. Mischief Lab, 1041 F St., Arcata. Get a sneak preview of the Mischief Lab’s latest collaboration with International Art’s Mega Crew, Control Tower: a 60-foot tower of laser lights, LED lights and fire cannons. That’s right, fire cannons. Free.

DANCE

World Dance Lesson. 10 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. World dance lessons, brought to you by the Humboldt Folk Dancers. Everyone is welcome. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. 839-3665.

LECTURE

Filming for the California Environmental Legacy Project. 7:30 p.m. Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. This lecture by HSU professor David Scheerer will cover a new series of films about California’s parks. Free.

THEATER

The Allergist’s Wife. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. In Charles Busch’s comedy, a woman on the verge of a breakdown is revived by a visit from an old friend. As You Like It. 7 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Shakespeare’s comedy performed under the trees. $12, $10 pre-sale, $2 off for students and seniors. rec@cityofarcata.org. www.cityofarcata. org/rec. 822-7091. Shrek the Musical. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. The hit 2001 animated film comes to the stage. $11-$19. info@hloc.org. hloc.org. 822-1318.

Victor/Victoria. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Aug. 8 listing.

EVENTS

Picnics on the Plaza. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Bring the kids and a picnic lunch to this weekly event featuring live music, food, friends and fun. This week’s band is Bradley Dean. www.arcatamainstreet. com. 822-4500. Rummage Sale. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Christ The King Church, 1951 McKinleyville Ave., McKinleyville. Annual Christ the King Church rummage sale. Held in the parish center.

FOOD

Garberville Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. EBT, Cal-Fresh and WIC accepted. 672-5224.

OUTDOORS

Humboldt Bay Boat Tours. 9 a.m. Humboldt Baykeeper, 217 E St., Eureka. Humboldt Baykeeper is offering free natural history boat tours of the north Humboldt Bay every weekend through the summer. The boat can accommodate up to five people. Make reservations one week in advance. Free. 268-8897.

10 saturday ART

Arts on the Avenue. Second Saturday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Eagle Prairie Arts District, 406 Wildwood Avenue, Rio Dell. Local artists, artisans and music all along the avenue. Free. https://www.facebook.com/ info.epad/info. August Show and Artist’s Reception. 5 p.m. Studio 299, 75 The Terrace, Willow Creek. This month features local quilters. There will be many beautiful quilts and other

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

39

continued from previous page

material crafted items for sale. Come enjoy the color and vote for your favorite quilt. Help us to make this an annual event. Free. studio299.tripod.com. Lantern Making Workshop. 2 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See Aug. 8 listing. Second Saturday Family Arts Day. 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Participants will work together to make a miniature garden sculpture out of recycled and natural materials. $5 suggested donation. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278 ext. 201.

BOOKS

Book Signing with Kevin Hoover. 1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. The local author will be signing copies of his new title, Legendary Locals of Arcata.

MUSIC

Blue Lake Music Festival and Picnic. 11 a.m. Perigot Park, 312 South Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Live music, barbecue, beer tent, children’s area, art, vendors and dancers. Donations accepted. musiciansforcommunity@gmail. com. www.bluelakemusicfest.com. Strawberry Rock Festival. Noon. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive. Friends of Trinidad Forests is putting on this festival to raise awareness about the issues surrounding Strawberry Rock. Includes music, food, spoken word, storytelling and crafts. Free. www. manilacsd.com.

THEATER

The Allergist’s Wife. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Aug. 9 listing. Shrek the Musical. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See Aug. 9 listing. Victor/Victoria. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Aug. 8 listing.

EVENTS

Zootini. 5-9 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Seventh annual “Zootini” fundraising gala. Live music, dinner, live and silent auctions, zookeeper talks and “Monkey Bar” hosted by Six Rivers Brewery. 21+ only. $60 members, $65 general, $75 at door. www.sequoiaparkzoo.net. Rummage Sale. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Christ The King Church. See Aug. 9 listing. Sumeg Village Day. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. This year Sumeg Day will celebrate Yurok culture both past and present. The day begins with a tour of Sumeg village and a recreation of how the Yurok lived in the past. Free. Woofstock. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. This doggone dog spectacular kicks off with a mutt-strut followed by arts and crafts for the little pups. Proceeds go to Sequoia Humane Society. Food, local beers and raffles. $15. humane@sequoiahumane.org. www.sequoiahumane.org. 442-1782.

FOR KIDS

Bethel Church 2nd Annual Summer Carnival. 11 a.m. Bethel Church, 2734 Hubbard Lane, Eureka. Games and prizes, cotton candy, popcorn and other carnivalesque activities await you. Free. www.bethelchurcheureka. org. 442-3637.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts, flowers, live music every week at 10 a.m. Free. humfarm.org. 441-9999.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:30 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary. Redwood Region Audubon Society is sponsoring a free public field trip. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding! Meet leader Joe Ceriani in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Trip ends around 11 a.m. Free. California State Parks Restoration Day. Second Saturday of every month, 9 a.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. The North Coast Redwoods District of California State Parks invites the public to a restoration work day. Removing invasive non-native plants is a moderate activity and participants are encouraged to wear sturdy shoes for walking off trail. Work locations are less than a half mile hike from the meeting location. Free. Michelle.Forys@ parks.ca.gov. 677-3109. Insects of the Dunes. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join naturalist Pete Haggard as he shares his knowledge of the insects of the dunes. Call to reserve your spot. 444-1397. Nature Writing and Journal Workshop. 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Headwaters Forest Reserve, End of Elk River Road, six miles off Highway 101, Eureka. Join Park Ranger Julie Clark to learn how to make a journal and explore the power of nature with words. This class is limited to 15 people, reservations are required. Free. 825-2300.

SPORTS

Bike Race. 8 a.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Enter the 12 Hours of Humboldt or Six Hours of Humboldt bike race. 12-hour: $60, $45 juniors. Six-hour: $45, $35 junior. 845-3095.

11 sunday ART

Trinidad Artists’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Murphy’s Market parking lot, Main and View avenues, Trinidad. Art and crafts from local artisans, live music and barbecue. 834-8720.

MUSIC

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic. org/Bayside. 442-0156. Open Irish/Celtic Music Session. 3-6 p.m. Mosgo’s, 180 Westwood Court, Arcata. Join Seabury Gould for this monthly meeting of musicians playing Irish and Celtic music. Come and play or just enjoy the music. Free. seaburygould.com. 845-8167.

THEATER

The Allergist’s Wife. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory. See Aug. 9 listing. As You Like It. 2 p.m. Redwood Park. See Aug. 9 listing. Shrek the Musical. 2 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See Aug. 9 listing. Victor/Victoria. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See Aug. 8 listing.

EVENTS

Meet the Humboldt Maker Series. 6 p.m. Humboldt Bay Tourism Center, 205 G Street, Eureka. In conjunction with Humboldt Made, the Humboldt Bay Tourism Center is offering an ongoing series about local

Fair Game

ETC

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Scrabble. Nothing more, nothing less. 677-9242.

12 monday DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older, with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s-’50s. $4. 725-5323.

SPOKEN WORD

Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/perform your original poetry or hear others. $1.

Lantern Making Workshop. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See Aug. 8 listing. Gala Preview. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Gala preview at Flower Hall. Wine, hors d’oeuvres and music. First 100 donors receive a keepsake wine goblet. Hosted by Ferndale Garden Club. Fine arts and photography critiques start across the street at Hindley Hall and Red Barn at 5:30 p.m. Suggested donation $15 for one $25 for two. dorianlowry@suddenlink.net. 786-9185.

MUSIC

Ukulele Play and Sing Group. 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All genres of music, from “Greensleeves” to “Kansas City,” “Cupid” to “El Paso.” If you can carry a tune and play a stringed instrument, come party! Free. Donations appreciated. veganlady21@yahoo.com.

EVENTS

HUMbucks Monthly Exchange. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Event to exchange goods and services using HUMbucks, a non-monetary, local exchange system. jugglerseth@gmail.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 834-9019.

FOOD

Eureka Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Fresh, local produce direct from the farmer. Free. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Farmers’ Market, 10th and Main streets. Fresh, local produce, meats and cheeses. Miranda Farmers’ Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Farm-fresh produce, etc. www.mirandagardens.com. 672-5224.

b Pu

Sandlot Baseball. 1 p.m. Sandlot league that’s been around for seven or eight years in Arcata — all skill levels — open invite hardball. Games are every Sunday on the field behind the CHP station in Arcata. 18-plus. Bring glove. universal_justin_2@hotmail.com. 497-9594.

ART

d

SPORTS

13 tuesday

ze

Guided Nature Walk. Second Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Richard J. Guadagno Visitor Center, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. This free, two-mile walk is open to the public and is a great way to familiarize yourself with the flora and fauna of HumCo. Binoculars are available at the visitor’s center. Free. www.fws.gov/refuge/humboldt_bay. 733-5406. Natural History Walk. 1 p.m. Freshwater Farms Reserve, 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Join Pete Haggard, naturalist and author, and Northcoast Regional Land Trust staff for a nature walk. We will concentrate on insects but also discuss the importance of native plants. Bring live insects, digital images and questions to the walk. Please park parallel to the road, near the barn. Free. d.marshall@ncrlt.org. 822-2242.

Brain Disorder Support Group. 6-7 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Support group for those with a friend or family member with a serious brain disorder such as bipolar, schizo-affective disorder, schizophrenia, OCD, PTSD, etc. Free. 725-8853.

• Learning Centers offer dynamic daily instruction • Independent Study offers choice and flexibility • Personally-tailored programs • MVCS serves students county-wide Online Classes • College Co-Enrollment • Tutoring • Highly Qualified Credentialed Teachers • WASC Accredited H

OUTDOORS

MEETINGS

Charter School

Humboldt County’s most experienced Public Charter School is accepting fall enrollment for TK–12th grades.

i aren nal t Choice Free Perso in

producers and business owners. Each Sunday meet the owner, taste samples and learn about a local producer in Humboldt County. This week features Los Bagels. Free. 800-808-2836 Rummage Sale. 12-3 p.m. Christ The King Church,. See Aug. 9 listing.

Mattole Valley

on o ri ng P

Who doesn’t love a fair? Rides, games, fried food, livestock, crafts and more fried food. For a brief moment, I felt like I’d covered all that with Redwood Acres and the rodeo in Fortuna. But the Humboldt County Fair, now in its 117th year, is the mother of them all. It’s on from Aug. 14-25 at the Ferndale Fairgrounds, and resistance is futile. After all, you’re not going to stay home and miss that sweet cut-grass-in-the-evening smell, the tilt-a-whirl lights coming on at sunset and the joy of walking around and tipping your hat at your neighbors. Nor are you going to skip the races. There are a couple of ways to approach the races. Some bet with elaborate systems on every race, jealously guarding their picks. Other more capricious types choose a name and cross their fingers. Some people just look at it as a chance to wear a fancy hat. That might be the way to go for

the risk-averse, but why not gamble something? Even if you’re not a gambler, put down a few bucks, kiss your ticket for luck and yell like crazy when the horses make their final turn. (Full disclosure: Last year, after two horses dropped out of a race, I bet everything on Divorce Attorney — how is that horse not a money maker? — to win, place or show. It just had to stay out of the last two places. No such luck. Meanwhile, a 2-year old kid next to me picked the trifecta for her mother. You just never know.) If you prefer slower moving livestock, there are barns full of 4-H animals for you to inspect with your thumbs hooked in your pockets. Then you can grab a bag of toasty kettle corn and peruse exhibits and goodies from all over the county. On your way out, if you have any money left over from the carnival games and the races, pick up some jam or a pie and make that county fair feeling last a little longer. – Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

lic Ed uc atio n

Shelter Cove Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. 672-5224.

MEETINGS

Our Pathways to Health. 10 a.m. Arcata Veterans Hall, 1425 J Street. See Aug. 8 listing. Stanford University Physician Assistant Program. 4 p.m. Harry Griffith Hall, HSU, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Presentation on admissions information for Stanford University School of Medicine Physician Assistant Program. Presented by Fred Tovar, director of student affairs and Chantal Lobue, regional coordinator. Meet in room 106. Free. clobue@stanford.edu. 954-1157.

ETC

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. $7. 444-3161.

mattolevalley.com • (707) 629-3634

m.northcoastjournal.com See nearby spots, or search by neighborhood, type of food, price or even those that feature local ingredients. It’s all there.

14 wednesday ART

Crafts + Afternoons = Crafternoons! 3 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St. Suite D, Arcata. What are Crafternoons? Every Wednesday swing into SCRAP and see what our Education Coordinator Patti Johnson is creating in her Craft Lab. Watch her make magic, or stay and join in on the fun. Johnson will be demonstrating how to make a variety of creative reuse projects. $5 to make, free to watch. www.scraphumboldt.org. 633-8349.

EVENTS

Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. No better place to get outdoors and meet your countywide neighbors than at the Humboldt County Fair. Enjoy carnival rides, games and the excitement of horse racing. Plus live entertainment, sheep dog trials, livestock events, interesting exhibits, fair food and the old-fashioned fun of a countywide reunion. $7. www.humboldtcountyfair.org. 786-9511.

MEETINGS

Advance Directive Workshop. 4 p.m. Area 1 Agency on Aging, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Amy Cirincione, Director of social services at Hospice of Humboldt, will explain

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continued from previous page the use of advance directives and why they are vital for end of life planning. The workshop will move stepby-step through California’s four-part Advance Health Care Directive. Also covered is how to express wishes regarding the provision, withholding or withdrawal of treatment that keeps people alive, the provision of pain relief and organ donation. Please call for reservations. Free. lwatson@a1aa.org. 442-3763.

OUTDOORS

Sea Scouts. Second and fourth Wednesday of each month. Second Wednesday of every month. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. Learn to sail! The Humboldt Bay Sea Scouts is recruiting new members for their co-ed sailing program for ages 14 to 20 years old. Sea Scouts combines the fun and adventure of sailing with the intrigue of maritime tradition. Sea Scouts Regatta Wednesday, at 4:30 p.m. on Woodley Island Dock G. $5 a month. 916-612-5831.

15

thursday

ART

Lantern Making Workshop. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, See Aug. 8 listing.

THEATER

The Allergist’s Wife. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Aug. 9 listing.

EVENTS

Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds. See Aug. 14 listing.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center. See Aug. 8 listing. McKinleyville Thursday Farmers’ Market. 3:15-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza. See Aug. 8 listing. The People’s Market. Third Thursday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Food for People free farmers’ market-style produce distribution for income eligible folks. Free fruits and vegetables, live music, information about CalFresh. Free. 445-3166.

MEETINGS

Prison Hunger Strike Solidarity Demonstration. 5-8 p.m. Arcata Plaza. See Aug. 8 listing. Our Pathways to Health Wellness Workshop. 5 p.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. See Aug. 8 listing.

ETC

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery. See Aug. 8 listing.

Heads Up…

Auditions for Ferndale Repertory Theatre’s upcoming productions of The Music Man and Monty Python’s Spamalot will be held on Aug. 30 at 7 p.m. and Aug. 31 at 2 p.m. at the Ferndale Theater, 447 Main St., Ferndale, and on Sept. 5-6 at 6:30 p.m. at the Carson Block Building at Third and G streets, Eureka. Wear dance-ready clothing and have one piece of prepared music to sing. The nomination period is now open for candidates for the Board of Directors of the McKinleyville Community Services District. Paperwork is due by Aug. 9. See co.humboldt.ca.us/election/default.asp for more information. ●

Free Produce in Fortuna. Third Thursday of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Fortuna Community Services, 2331 Rohnerville Road. Food for People distributes fresh fruits and vegetables to income eligible folks and offers info about the CalFresh program. Free. 445-3166.

Off the Leash Your dog loves you, but sometimes it feels like everything is about you: Seeing you out the door, waiting for you to come home, listening to you complain about how someone’s chewed your remote. Let’s not be so self-centered, shall we? Woofstock is back in Halvorsen Park this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ($12). Music from Silver Hammer, Kindred Spirits and Rooster McClintock is sure to soothe the savage beasts, and there’ll be plenty of food, even for people. It’s all put on by the Sequoia Humane Society, a no-kill shelter, by the way. Phew. Your pets can try their paws at dog games like weenie bobbing, bobbing for baubles and a treasure quest. Has Fido fallen in with a bad pack? Watching too much Giggy? Sniff around the K-9 police dog demonstration for some positive role models. Canines who like a little competition might want to enter the contests for best trick, best tail wag, best costume, best kiss or the

WHAT UP, DOG?

PHOTO BY WADE BARRETT PHOTOGRAPHY.

sometimes cute, sometimes disturbing dog/owner lookalike contest. The Mutt Strut walk-a-thon starts at 11 a.m. Get there early to register and put down your $25 (which also covers your entry to Woofstock) and parade your pup along the waterfront to raise money for shelter animals. You can even form a team! Just make sure everybody’s got their tags and shots. And leave the cat at home. – Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

NORTHCoast COASTJournal JOURNAL• •Thursday, THURSDAY,AUG. AUG.8,8,2013 2013• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 42North 42

book Ghana Must Go Taiye Selasi, Penguin Taiye Selasi published her first story ever in 2011. She wrote “The Sex Lives of African Girls” in response to a challenge from the poet Toni Morrison, and it immediately won Selasi praise and a spot in last year’s Best American Short Stories collection. Selasi is the sort of talent described as precocious, only 33 and already considered a rising star. Her debut novel, Ghana Must Go, is first and foremost a family saga, but it is also an immigrant tale and a story of Africa. The title refers to the 1983 expulsion of Ghanaians from Nigeria, symbolically tying the novel’s events to divisive African immigration politics and the migrations of African people. Movement is important to the novel, which traverses Nigeria, Ghana and the East Coast, and its characters appear adrift, connected to many places, but not quite belonging to any. The novel begins with the family’s patriarch, Kweku, dying of a heart attack in his garden. Kweku is an immigrant boy made good, an unparalleled surgeon who sought to establish his family in upper-middle class America. But by the time of his heart attack, the family, according to one character, has become diffuse and lost its center. Kweku’s death becomes cause to reflect on how this came to be, and for drawing together the scattered, loose-knit family. Inevitably, this involves a return to Ghana, a reverse diaspora. The narrative moves not so much in chronological order as by peeling away layers. As we hear from each character in turn, we see them move in the present largely through association with their past, coming ever closer to the novel’s finale, and simultaneously moving closer to the key moments in their lives. This unique, expertly executed structure is one of the novel’s greatest strengths. However precocious a talent Selasi may be, there is no mistaking that this is a debut novel by a young writer, and the author’s inexperience occasionally shows. For example, though Selasi is capable of a breathtaking lyricism that’s hard to resist reading aloud, the quality of the prose is oddly uneven and sometimes plagued by flabbiness. The dialogue can be problematic too, throwing important scenes off-key, only moving the plot forward rather than playing two characters off of one another. And the earth-shattering revelations that the narrative works so meticulously to unwrap sometimes don’t live up to their hype, creating more anticipation than pay-off. Flaws aside, Ghana Must Go is a remarkable debut with a great deal to hold your interest. Keep your eye on Taiye Selasi. — Anthony Correale

Double Trouble If only the 2 Guns were aimed at Smurfs 2 By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

2 GUNS. Mark Wahlberg previously worked with director Baltasar Kormákur on Contraband (2012), which became a surprise hit. This time they’ve enlisted Denzel Washington and a solid supporting cast to make another mildly fun, inconsequential caper picture borrowed from the catalog of Michael Mann. With Contraband I was struck by Kormákur’s liberal use of Mann’s visual style. In 2 Guns he departs from that influence a little but inserts enough tropes and details to suggest he’d just as soon be remaking Heat (1995). 2 Guns opens with Stig (Wahlberg) and Bobby (Washington) casing a sleepy little Texas savings and loan. Then we flash back a week to learn that they intend to rob the bank to get the attention of Sonora cartel head Papi Greco (Edward James Olmos), who stiffed them on a large-scale coke deal. They figure Papi’s got a couple million rat-holed away there, but when they knock over the S and L and find more than 10 times that amount, their troubles start stacking up. Turns out they’re both undercover agents, Stig for U.S. Navy Intelligence, Bobby for the DEA. And the money they stole didn’t belong to Papi after all. This is all revealed in the first act, leaving the bulk of the movie to serve as a loose framework of chase sequences and uninspired gun battles. The conclusion is predictable, the payoff minimal and any sense of menace or danger only materializes when Bill Paxton is onscreen — which is to say not nearly often enough.

MovieTimes have daddy issues, and the ending can’t come soon enough. When the energy and drama should be building, there’s only narrative vacuum. The pratfalls and process shots might be enough to keep little kids entertained, but there isn’t much here for anyone else. PG. 105m.

Denzel is so rich, he farts cash money.

Previews

Performances by charming, consummately watchable actors elevate this slightly, but it remains resolutely middleof-the-road and forgettable, though intermittently entertaining. R. 109m. THE SMURFS 2. There are 10 credited writers, 15 second unit and assistant directors and a cast loaded with surprisingly prominent talent. So if they divide the blame for this artistically pointless exercise in capitalism then no one has to feel especially guilty for what they’ve done to us. Sociopath Gargamel (Hank Azaria) has become a world famous stage magician and taken up residence in the Paris Opera House. He’s manufactured a couple of gray Smurflings called Naughties and is running perilously low on the “Smurf Essence” upon which his spells rely. Meanwhile, in Smurf Village, Smurfette’s (Katy Perry) birthday is marred by her annual nightmares and identity crisis. See, Gargamel actually made Smurfette in his nasty laboratory, and then Papa Smurf (the great Jonathan Winters) cast his own spell to bring her over from the dark side. The dark wizard creates a mystical portal to Smurf village and sends in one of the Naughties to kidnap Smurfette. He intends to exploit her insecurities to extract Papa’s secret formula, which would allow him to create enough Smurf Essence to basically enslave humanity and commit Smurf genocide. In the midst of all these sinister machinations are thrown Patrick Winslow (Neal Patrick Harris) and his family. I guess they assisted in the first movie, too; it doesn’t matter. Everybody runs around Paris, people

Rather than wasting time and money on Hollywood cash-grabs, why not support a great local business that actually embraces film art? This Thursday at Arcata Theater Lounge, La Dolce Video will be celebrating its fourth anniversary. Doors open at 6 p.m. for a blowout DVD sale, leading up to an 8 p.m. screening of three documentaries by late, legendary director Les Blank. From the press release: “The 42 films Les Blank made while partying with America’s quirkiest subcultures earned him a lifetime achievement award from the American Film Institute, amongst other honors. Rich in both anthropological value and an irresistible brand of down-home realness, the documentaries of Blank are marked by intimate glimpses into the lives of passionate people, their kitchens, their heritage, and most importantly, their parties.” We’re lucky to have La Dolce Video, a last bastion of love for cinema, a curated collection of great movies, and the type of small business that is the lifeblood of small-town America. So get out and celebrate their existence. — John J. Bennett On Saturday the ATL has Low Movie (How to Quit Smoking), not actually a “how to” film but rather the complete music video/short film collection of the cult band Low by filmmaker Philip Harder. 65m. 8 p.m. Sunday’s family feature is Hoodwinked (2005), a would-be-clever CGI take on Little Red Riding Hood. PG. 80m. And be your own Mystery Science Theater smartass at next Wednesday’s Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night, headlined by Battle of the Worlds, a 1961 Italian import complete with flying saucers and a “superelectronic brain.” Doors at 6 p.m. ELYSIUM. From South African director Neill Blomkamp (District 9), this sci-fi flick imagines a future where the superwealthy live on a space station while the rabble live on our ruined planet — until they send in Matt Damon, clad in a mechanical exoskeleton. Co-starring Jodie Foster. R. 97m. PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS. A teenager, who happens to be the son of Greek god Poseidon, goes after something called “the Golden Fleece” in this sequel based on the young adult book series. PG. 110m.

WE’RE THE MILLERS. A pot dealer (Jason Sudeikis), a stripper (Jennifer Aniston) and two punk kids pose as an all-American family while they head to Mexico for a drug deal in this gag-filled comedy. R. 100m. PLANES. Couple things you should know: 1. While this is a spin-off of Pixar’s Cars, it’s not made by Pixar. 2. It was originally set to go direct-to-video. But hey, it’s your money. PG. 92m.

Continuing

THE CONJURING. A stylish, old-fashioned creepfest complete with haunted house and exorcism from the director of the first Saw. R. 112m. GROWN UPS 2. Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock and David Spade embarrass themselves and insult your intelligence. PG13. 101m. DESPICABLE ME 2. Reformed villain Gru (Steve Carell) and his cute little peanut minions get recruited by the AntiVillain League in this charming animated comedy. PG. 98m. THE HEAT. Sandra Bullock, as an overachieving FBI agent, and Melissa McCarthy, as a brash, foul-mouthed Boston cop, fight crime in this comedy from the director of Bridesmaids. R. 117m. RED 2. A group of retired CIA operatives get framed as international terrorists and have to fight back. Starring Bruce Willis, Helen Mirren and Anthony Hopkins. PG13. 116m. TURBO. The latest from Dreamworks Animation imagines a garden snail who longs to be fast. Voice talent from Ryan Reynolds, Paul Giamatti and Michael Peña. PG. THE WOLVERINE. Hugh Jackman busts out his pecs, lamb-chops and knuckle blades again as the gruff X-Man. This time he fights ninjas. PG13. 136m. — Ryan Burns

Aug 8Aug 14 Thurs Aug 8 - Les Blank Films & La Dolce Video DVD Sale Doors at 6 p.m. $5 All ages Sat Aug 10 - Low Movie (How To Quit Smoking) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 All ages Sun Aug 11 - Hoodwinked! (2005) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Wed Aug 14 - Sci Fi Night ft. Battle of the Worlds (1961) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 2 Guns Fri-Thu: (1:25, 4:05), 6:45, 9:25 The Conjuring Fri-Thu: 9:10 Despicable Me 2 Fri-Thu: (1:40, 4:10), 6:40 Elysium Fri-Thu: (12:40, 3:25), 6:15, 7:35, 9 Grown Ups 2 Fri-Thu: (1:50), 7:05 The Heat Fri-Thu: (4:20), 9:30 Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters Fri-Thu: (12:50), 6:10 Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters 3D Fri-Thu: (3:30), 8:50 Planes Fri-Thu: (12, 4:40), 7 Planes 3D Fri-Thu: (2:20), 9:10 Red 2 Fri-Thu: (12:10, 2:55), 5:40, 8:30 The Smurfs 2 Fri-Thu: (11:50a.m., 12:30, 2:25, 3:10), 5, 5:50, 8:25 Turbo Fri-Thu: (12:20, 2:45), 5:10 We’re the Millers Fri-Thu: (1, 3:45), 6:30, 7:45, 9:15 The Wolverine 3D Fri-Thu: (3) The Wolverine Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m.), 6, 9:10



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 2 Guns Fri-Thu: (1:30, 4:10), 6:50, 9:30 Despicable Me 2 Fri-Thu: (2:55), 7:50 Elysium Fri-Thu: (1:10, 3:50), 6:35, 9:20 Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters Fri-Thu: (12:45), 6:05 Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters 3D Fri-Thu: (3:30), 8:40 Planes Fri-Thu: (12:55, 3:20), 5:50 Planes 3D Fri-Thu: 8:15 The Smurfs 2 Fri-Thu: (12:20, 3), 5:40, 8:10 Turbo Fri-Thu: (12:30), 5:25 We’re the Millers Fri-Thu: (1, 3:40), 6:20, 9 The Wolverine Fri-Thu: (12:05, 3:05), 6:10, 9:10

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 2 Guns Fri: (3:45), 6:20, 9; Sat-Sun: (1:10, 3:45), 6:20, 9; Mon-Thu: (3:45), 6:20, 9 Elysium Fri: (3:35), 6:10, 8:45; Sat-Sun: (1, 3:35), 6:10, 8:45; Mon-Thu: (3:35), 6:10, 8:45 We’re the Millers Fri: (3:55), 6:35, 9:15; Sat-Sun: (1:20, 3:55), 6:35, 9:15; Mon-Thu: (3:55), 6:35, 9:15

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 2 Guns Fri-Thu: (1, 3:50), 6:55, 9:35 Elysium Fri-Thu: (12:10, 2:35, 5), 7:25, 9:50 Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters Fri-Thu: (1:20, 4:10), 6:45 Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters 3D Fri-Thu: 9:20 Planes Fri-Thu: (12, 2:20, 4:40), 7, 9:15 The Smurfs 2 Fri-Thu: (12:30, 3:30), 6:30, 9 We’re the Millers Fri-Thu: (1:30, 4:25), 7:05, 9:45

Garberville Theatre arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Red 2 Fri-Tue: 7:30; Wed: 6:30; Thu: 7:30

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43

Computer

INTRO TO ADOBE PHOTOSHOP. A fast−paced hands−on exploration of the imaging application for digital camera enthusiasts, designers and other digital media artists. With Annie Reid. Tues./Thurs., Aug. 27−Sept. 10, 6:30−9 p.m. Fee: $135. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMP−0815)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings Aug. 12− 26, 7−8 p.m., Pan Arts Network, 1049 Samoa Blvd., Suite C. $50, (707) 407−8998, info@panarts network.com (DMT−0825)

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

NATURAL COLORS TO DYE FOR WITH LINDA HARTSHORN. Create a full spectrum of color on wool yarn or silk fabric with dyes from plants, minerals, and an insect! Sat.−Sun. Aug. 10−11, 10 a.m− 4 p.m. $150 plus $35 materials. Sproule Studios, Fortuna. (707) 725−9124, www.sproulestudios.com. (AC−0808)

Communication

COPING WITH BETRAYAL EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ. Sun., Aug.11, 7 p.m. Program offers help for those who’ve faced betrayal in a marriage, a friend− ship, or a work setting. Lifetree is a conversation café located on the corner of Union and 13th St., Arcata (CMM−0808) CREATIVE WRITING. Tues.s, Sept. 3−24, CR Community Education 333 6th St. Eureka. $59. Creative Writing class is open to all students of writing, new or seasoned. You just need a desire to express yourself through the written word. Bring your pencil, paper, and your creativity and dive in. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (CMM− 0808) GETTING PAID TO TALK. Thurs., Sept. 12, 6 p.m−9 p.m, CR Community Education 525 D St. Eureka. $29. Ever been told you have a great voice? From audio books and cartoons to documentaries, commercials, and more, this class will introduce you to the growing field of voice over. Today, the range of voices hired has grown dramatically from the days of announcers. Learn what the pros look for, how to prepare, and where to find work in your area! We will discuss industry pros and cons and play samples from working voice professionals. In addition, you will have an opportunity to record a short professional script under the direction of our teacher. This class is lots of fun, realistic, and a great first step for anyone interested in the voice over field. In an effort to ensure a quality class experience, we must limit attendance! Call to register (707) 269−4000 (CMM−0808)

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

CHAKRA NATION HOOPERS. Arcata Core Pilates Studio is now happy to offer Hoop dance classes to their schedule. Classes begin Sept. 2. Learn how to get your hoop on or improve and learn new tricks. Call 845−8156 for more information (DMT− 0829) DANCE WITH DEBBIE BALLROOM WORKSHOP. 2hr. workshop/ $12 per person in Swing, Latin, Hustle, Arm styling, Dips & Fancy Endings, and More! call (707) 464−3638 or Check calendar at dancewithdebbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0822) FALL 2013 CR COMMUNITY EDUCATION MUSIC. Buy 2 CE Music Classes, Get 1 Free Choose from Beginning Band Instruments Brass, Percussion or Woodwinds; Beginning & Intermediate Voice Class; Beginning & Intermediate Guitar; Chorale; Concert Band; & Studio Band. Each class $149. For schedule information visit http://www.redwoods.edu/depar tments/community−ed/PersonalEnrichment.asp. Call (707) 269−4000 for more information or to register by phone. (DMT−0808) HULA FOR HEALTH! drop−in community activity is for ANYONE & will focus on the fluid movements used by Hawaiians for centuries. Hula is the folk dance of the Hawaiian Islands & expresses joy & passion while moving the body. Most Sat’s in Arts & Crafts room at Arcata Community Center , 9− 11ish. $3. Drop−in fee for adults For information: Tina (808) 348−1928 or DeAnna (707) 839−2816. dsander1@arcatanet.com (DMT−0808) KLAMATH RIVER MANDOJAM, AUG. 22 − 25 Weekend of workshops & jamming on the River for all acoustic stringed instruments. (530) 627− 3379, mail@sandybar.com , www.sandybar.com REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−1226) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30−7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832−9547, Christina, 498− 0146. (DMT−1226) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−1226)

Fitness

AIKIDO. Aikido is a beautiful, powerful, yet non− aggressive martial art that provides an effective method for developing our human potential. You will gain center, balance, coordination, flexibility, self−confidence and fluidity as well as insight into deeper meaning in your life. Beginning enrollment is ongoing for both kids and adults! Come observe anytime. The dojo entrance is off the F St. parking lot behind the Arcata Plaza. Adult class every weeknight 6 p.m.; kids Mon, Wed. 4 p.m. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826−9395.(F−1226) DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−1226) NIA−DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6−7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Wed.s, 5:30−6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. $5 drop−in, $50/12 classes (707) 441−9102. (F− 1226) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−1226) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE. Looking for a place to develop reality−based self defense training? Want to expand your skills and gain self confi− dence? Train in Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Kick Boxing, Lau Kune Do Kung Fu, Judo, and Filipino Kali. Group and private lessons available 7 days a week for men, women, and children. All experience and fitness levels welcome. Come and see what you can accomplish at North Coast Self Defense Academy. Located at 820 N St Building # 1 Suite C Arcata. Call (707) 822−6278, Like us on Facebook, www.facebook.com/NorthCoastSelfDe− fenseAcademy or visit web page www.northcoastselfdefenseacademy.com (F−1226) PILATES: INCREASE YOUR POTENTIAL THOUGH A MINDFUL MOVEMENT. Arcata Core Pilates offers beginning−advanced group Pilates Mat, reformer, chair, TRX, as well as Private Training Sessions. Our instructors are all certified. The diversity in training and background makes a deep well for clients to draw from. Call 845−8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com, website:arcatacorepilatesstudio.com. SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F− 1226) TUES. & THURS. AFTERNOON MASSAGE WITH DIANE DAVIS. Enhance your Pilates or yoga prac− tice or just unwind and relax with a massage ses− sion at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Nationally certi− fied since 1997, Diane is trained in Hawaiian Lomi Lomi, Myofascial Release, Swedish, Craniosacral, Acupressure and Reiki. Questions? Call (707) 268− 8926 to schedule an appointment.

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. & Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/ $4 Grange members. Every Tues. & Thurs Vector Pool, Aqua Zumba 9:15 a.m. (3289 Edgewood Rd, Eureka). Every Tue. at Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m.& every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy (707) 845−4307. marlajoy.zumba.com (F−1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Dance fitness to Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Mon, Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks World Dance Center in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. $5 class or $50 for 11 class pass. First class free!

Kids & Teens

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn self− confidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit− (707) 822−6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (K−1226) PASSPORT TO DANCE (KIDS’ DANCE CAMP) Aug. 5−9, for ages 5−7, Aug. 12−16 for ages 6−13, 1p.m−5 p.m., $99/ Week, Jazz, Hip Hop, Bollywood, Hula, Modern, Yoga, Creative Movement, Theatrical Jazz, Snacks and Crafts! Scholarships Available! Contact North Coast Dance, 426 F Street, Eureka, (707) 442−7779, northcoastdance@sbcglobal.net www.northcoastdance.org (K−0725) SUMMER CAMP. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for roller skating, arts and crafts, sports, field trips and more at Camp Perigot for children 5−13 year olds. Mon.−Fri., June 17−Aug.23, 8 a.m.−5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Very affordable and every camper receives a free breakfast and lunch! Full− day or half−day options. Scholarships available. Register today! Find registration materials at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668− 5932, for more information. (K−0815)

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Irrigation Basics WITH

SAMOA SOCCER SUMMER CAMP. French Pro (PSG) Camp. Aug. 12−16, 9 a.m−3 p.m, 5 days. Level: Elite, dedicated players, two age groups (9−11), and (12− 15), $270. Registration, location and info at www.fcsamoa.com, mufc06@yahoo.com (K−0808) SUMMER INTENSIVE. (open to all local, serious dancers ages 13 & up) July 29−Aug. 2, 10 a.m−6 p.m. with option to dance until 7:15pm $125/week. Ballet Technique, Variations, Pointe Work, Acting for Dancers, Yoga, Pilates, Jazz & Nutrition. Contact North Coast Dance, 426 F Street , Eureka, 442−7779, northcoastdance@sbcglobal.net www.northcoastdance.org (K−0725)

Lectures

FREE SEMINAR! UNDERSTANDING THE SCIENCE OF INVESTING. Premier Financial Group welcomes guest speaker, Jay Totten, VP, CFA of Dimensional Fund Advisors to present on Thurs., Aug 22. Live music & refreshments 5 p.m., presentation 6 p.m., Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. A non− sales seminar. RSVP(707) 443−2741 or online at www.premierfinancial.com. (L−0815)

50 and Better

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1226) FALL OLLI OPEN HOUSE. Sat., Aug. 17, 1−3 p.m., Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, Eureka. Learn more about this community of learners age 50 and better. Join OLLI for 2013−2014, or renew your OLLI membership. Meet OLLI faculty and register for fall classes. More information: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0815)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s 5:55 p.m., 730 K Street upstairs. Call 845−8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com. (S1226) default

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     

KIRTAN: DEVOTIONAL SINGING. With Seabury Gould. At Om Shala Yoga. Friday, August 9 (and every 2nd Friday monthly), 7:30−9:00pm. No musical ability or experience necessary. $5−10 sliding scale. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642),www.omshalayoga.com LIGHT ON HATHA: EXPLORING THE THEORY & PRACTICE OF THE HATHAPRADIPIKA. With visiting instructor Seth Powell. At Om Shala Yoga. Sunday, August 25, 11:00am−5:00pm. $30 for students or if paid by Aug 18 / regular price is $40. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S1226)

Sports & Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation, Fri. & Sat. 6:30−9:30p.m, Sun. 2−5 p.m. Theme Skate: Fri. Aug. 30. Dress like a Pirate and receive $1 discount! Adult Skate: Sun. Aug. 11, 6:30−9:30 p.m. Planning a party? Call 668−5932 for info. Like us on Facebook at "Blue Lake Roller Rink"! (SR−1226)

3 Workshops with Master Knitter Lily Chin Sat, Sept 14 & Sun, Sept 15 • Reversible Cables (9/14, 9am -Noon) Learn which stitches, yarns, and needles are ideal for reversible cables,and how to chart them. Make scarves, shawls, afghans where both sides look great! • Alternative Closures (9/14, 2-5 pm) Learn several stylish alternatives beyond buttons and buttonholes for closing up garments. Learn trick and hints and what to avoid. • Reversible Color Knitting (9/15, 11 am-6 pm) Colorwork techniques that make both sides lovely. Covered will be double-knitting, pinstriped brioche or tuck, and several knitpurl combinations.

Call 707.442.9276 for details or www.northcoastknittery.com NORTHCOAST KNITTERY 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS ? Confidential help is available. 825−0920 or 845−8973, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−1226)

Vocational

8 HOUR EPA RRP TRAINING. Fri. Aug. 23, 8 a.m−5 p.m CR Community Education 333 6th St. Eureka. $300. 8 hour EPA mandated class, required in addi− tion to the CA DPH worker and supervisor certifi− cation, qualifies individuals performing renovations in target (pre−1978) housing and child occupied facilities (schools, day care centers, etc.). Course focuses on following the safe work practice requirements, health aspects, regulations,contain− ment, cleaning, and recordkeeping. (707) 269−4000 to register. (V−0808) CERTIFICATE IN FACULTY PREPARATION, TEACH− ING IN HIGHER EDUCATION. Pursuing a teaching career at a community college or university? Break through the competition with a Faculty Prepara− tion Certificate that can enhance your pedagogical knowledge and demonstrate your readiness to teach in a college environment. This online pro− gram offers an introduction to the roles and re− sponsibilities of teaching in higher education and specifically addresses teaching, learning and tech− nology issues in the college classroom. This is a three−semester, 12−unit certificate program that starts July 8. For full course descriptions, deadlines, fees and more information, visit www.humboldt.edu/facultyprep or contact Hum− boldt State University College of eLearning & Ex− tended Education at (707) 826−3731 or extended@humboldt.edu. continued on next page

Therapy & Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−1226)

northcoastjournal

FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496−2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com (TS−1226)

Preschool Openings At HSU CDL

YVONNE COLBURN

   

KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−1226)

Tuition scholarships are now available at the Child Development Lab at Humboldt State University. Openings are for children 2 years 9 months up to 5 years in age. We are a unique, nationally accredited preschool program offering a rich variety of learning experiences for children, supportive relationships with adults and guided development of both independence and strong social skills. For further information and enrollment materials please contact 707-826-3475.

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Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

45

legal notices

continued from previous page

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION

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NOTARY PUBLIC CLASS & EXAM. Fri., Sept. 6, 8 a.m−6 p.m, CR Community Education 333 6th St. Eureka. $105+$40 check to State for exam. Become a California State Notary Public. California needs additional professional notaries! Class will provide new or previously commissioned notaries with the education and skills needed to pass the State proctored examination, detect fraud, and become successful in a career as a notary. There is a growing need for notaries in the expanding finan− cial, real estate, business and law professions. Become a valuable employee or own your own business. Class exceeds the State qualifications for new applicants and notaries that are renewing their commissions. Student will receive a State approved Certificate of Participation for the class in order to take the State proctored notary exami− nation. One−day class that meets the requirements to sit for the State notary exam. Commissioned notaries may take this course six months prior to their commission expiration date. (707) 269−4000 to register. (V−0808) SERVSAFE FOOD PROTECTION PROGRAM. Tues., Sept. 24, 8:30 a.m−5 p.m, CR Community Education 525 D St. Eureka. $175. Comprehensive one−day workshop assists restaurants and other food handling businesses in complying with AB 1978/ Campbell. Fees include textbook, food safety and sanitation instruction, demonstrations and certifi− cation examination fee. Register with adequate time to read the textbook before attending class. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (V−0808) VOLUNTEER TRAINING FOR HOSPICE OF HUM− BOLDT. Hospice of Humboldt offers patient care and grief support volunteer training July 27 & 28, 11 a.m.−3 p.m. This eight hour introductory training provides information on how you can become part of the patient care team and bring specialized sup− port to patients and families at a time when care matters the most. For more information, call (707) 445−8443 ext. 355 or visit our website www.hospiceofhumboldt.org. YOGA IMMERSION & TEACHER TRAINING. With Peggy Profant and guest instructors Karen Harris, Patrick Harestad & Amy Aiello. At Om Shala Yoga. Begins September 2013. Deepen your yoga practice and learn to teach! 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com

Wellness & Bodywork

ARCATA CORE PILATES Is happy to now offer Yoga classes with Sasha Milsis,and Adult Ballet with Katie Kanzler. Call for more information. 845−8156 (W−0829) AUGUST ROLFING SPECIAL. 15% off and a free body analysis with Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer for 25 years. Give yourself the gift of feeling wonderful this summer! (541) 251−1885 (W−0829) YOGA IMMERSION & TEACHER TRAINING. With Peggy Profant and guest instructors Karen Harris, Patrick Harestad & Amy Aiello. At Om Shala Yoga. Begins September 2013. Deepen your yoga practice and learn to teach! 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com

COMPLIMENTARY COMMUNITY PREVENTATIVE CARE CLASSES: Every Wed.’s 5:30 p.m. Aug. 14, (Benefits of Ayurvedic Treatments), 21, (doTerra Essential Oils Series), 28, (Yoga for You−Benefits), Sept. 4, Holistic Health Night (Each month we will explore body systems and symptoms of the body. Complimentary check−ups from our Nurse Practi− tioner and Naturopath Health Practitioner and learn how to find the "root" to systemic "problems".), Sept. 11, doTerra Essential Oils Series (Learn how to incorporate essential oil medicinals into your daily life. Oils used to support your cellular, muscular, and emotional health. Classes will support the system of focus from Holistic Health Night.). 1639 Central Ave., Ste. A, McKin− leyville (707) 839−7772, www.essentialeelementsspa.com (W0808) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Beginning with Herbs, Sept. 18−Nov. 6, eight Wed. evenings at Moonrise Herbs plus two herb walks. Learn the basics with many hands−on activities, pre−req to 10 month course. Festival of Herbs − Visiting Teacher Series Oct. 2013−Apr. 2014. Meets 1st weekend of the month. Rosemary Gladstar, Candis Cantin and more! 10 Month Herbal Studies Program Feb.−Nov. 2013. In−depth materia medica, therapeutics, flower essences, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0912) ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS WELLNESS CLASSES: YOGA & PILATES. Mon.−Fri. 9:30 a.m & 5:30 p.m. Please see our website for our regular schedule. All classes include community use of our sauna 30 minutes prior to class. $15 drop−in and discounted passes, with no expiration. 15% discount for Students and Seniors. 1639 Central Ave., Ste. A. McKinleyville, (707) 839−7772, for more info. on services, or classes visit www.essentialelementsspa.com, or email info@essentialelementsspa.com (W0808) FIELD NOTES. Explore the fields between you and another, and learn how to purposefully dwell in them to facilitate mutual centering and healing. AKA "aura work" or Ortho−Bionomy® Phase 6. Sept. 21−22, Arcata. $275, if registered by Aug 15, Sara Sunstein, (510) 526−5414. www.sarasunstein.com/classes.html, (W0815) SHENG ZHEN HEALING QIGONG. An introduction to a form of Qigong that helps the practitioner experience unconditional love, with movements that may be done while seated. With John Yamas. Tues., Aug. 27−Sept. 10, 7−8:10 p.m. Fee: $35. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (W−0815) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin January 2014 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−1226)

NORTHCoast COASTJournal JOURNAL• •Thursday, THURSDAY,Aug. AUG.8,8,2013 2013• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 46 48North

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE LOAN: COAST CENTRAL/30-640 FILE: PFI-130206 A.P.N: 206-291-006-000 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/28/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that Placer Foreclosure, Inc., as trustee, or successor trustee, or substituted trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by: Ruth Dewey, an unmarried woman Recorded 11/8/2005 as Instrument No. 2005-37907-19 in book page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, and pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded 4/10/2013 in Book, Page, as Instrument No. 2013-008454-3 of said Official Records, WILL SELL on 8/14/2013 at On the steps to the entrance of the County courthouse, 825 5Th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 at 10:30 AM AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said county and State hereafter described: As more fully Described on said Deed of Trust. The property address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 7870 Highway 36, Carlotta, CA 95528 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $100,877.62. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. In the event tender other than cash is accepted the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee’s Deed until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter or right. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed, advances thereunder, with interest as provided therein, and the unpaid balance of the Note secured by said Deed with interest thereon as provided in said Note, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 292 of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-714-480-5690 or visit this Internet Web site www.tacforeclosures.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this case PFI-130206. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 7/18/2013 Placer Foreclosure, Inc., as said Trustee 12190 Herdal Drive, Suite 9, Auburn, California 95603 (530) 888-8411 By: Shannon Winford, Trustee Sale Officer Directions May Be Obtained Pursuant To A Written Request Submitted To The Beneficiary C/O Placer Foreclosure, Inc., 12190 Herdal Dr., Suite 9, Auburn, Ca 95603, Within 10 Days Of The First Publication Of This Notice. Placer Foreclosure, Inc. Is A Debt Collector Attempting To Collect A Debt And Any Information Obtained Will Be Used For That Purpose. TAC: 964707 PUB: 7/25 8/01 8/08/13 7/25, 8/1, 8/8/2013 (13-202)

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will be sold at a public auction by competitive bidding on the 16th of August 2013, at 11:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at INDIANOLA STORAGE, 673 Indianola Cutoff, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, The following unit will be sold. Jeffrey W. Egbert, Sr. Unit #183 Misc. Household items Purchases must be paid for (cash only) and removed at the time of the sale, with the unit left broom clean. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Owner reserves the right to bid. Call 442−7613. Indianola Storage, Jerry Avila, bond # 0327592 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−217)

PUBLIC NOTICE On November 1, 2013, Mad River Radio, Incorporated, filed an appli− cation with the Federal Communi− cations Commission for renewal of license of translator K294AZ, channel 294, 106.7 FM which is licensed to serve Eureka, California. The station transmits from a site located at 1733 Barry Road, Knee− land, California, with an effective radiated power of 250 watts. The station rebroadcasts KMDR, channel 236, licensed to serve McKinleyville, California. Individuals who wish to advise the FCC of facts relating to the renewal application and to whether this station has operated in the public interest should file comments and petitions with the FCC by October 1, 2013, by writing to: FCC, Washington, DC 20554. 8/8, 8/15, 9/5, 9/19, 10/3, 10/17/2013 (13−213)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00363 The following persons are doing business as ABC REALTY at 922 E St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Ina Heartbeat Inc. 922 E St. Eureka, CA. 95501, California The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Jeff Kessenich, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 26, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/25, 8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−199)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00386

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00426

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00397

The following persons are doing business as DEMOGRAPHIX MEDIA at 15040 NE Mason St., Portland, OR. 97230, Multnomah Mailbox Merchants, Inc. 15040 NE Mason St. Portland, OR. 97230, Oregon The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 5/3/2013 /s/ B. Daniel Dutton, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 10, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as CALI GIRLS SALON at 2926 E St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Annette Wilson Hess 6631 Spring St. Fields Landing, CA. 95537 Jamaal Levi 6631 Spring St. Fields Landing, CA. 95537 The business is conducted by Copartners The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 7/25/2013 /s/ Annette Wilson Hess This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 25, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRILLIUM STRATEGIC FUNDRAISING at 3604 Spear Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 Elizabeth Werner Frink 3604 Spear Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 2/01/2013 /s/ Elizabeth Werner Frink This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 12,2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

7/25, 8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−196)

8/1, 8/8, 8/15, 8/22 (13−207)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00387

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00435

The following persons are doing Business ST. JOSEPH HEALTH HOME HEALTH, ST. JOSEPH HOME CARE, ST. JOSEPH HOME CARE HUMBOLDT COUNTY at 151 Sotoyome Street, Santa Rosa, CA. 95405, Attn: Home Health MS1S13, 1165 Mongomery Drive, Santa Rosa, CA. 95405 St. Joseph Home Care Network 151 Sotoyome Street. Santa Rosa, CA. 95405 The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 11/13/2012 /s/ Joseph Roger, Secretary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 10, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as THE MAINSTREAM St. MEDIA PROJECT at 854 9th St., Arcata,B,CA. 95521CA. 95521 Suite Arcata, The Arts of Peace, Inc. 854 9th St., Suite B Arcata CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 1/29/96 /s/ Valerie Reed, Secretary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 1, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

7/18, 7/25, 8/1, 8/8/2013 (13−193)

The following person is doing busi− ness as PEYOTE MOON 450 Mad River Road, Arcata, CA. 95521, PO Box 311, Arcata, CA. 95518 Bridget Lenahan 450 Mad River Road Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 8/1/2013 /s/ Bridget Lenahan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 24, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00388 The following persons are doing Business as MAILBOX MERCHANTS at 15040 NE Mason St. Portland, OR. 97230, Multnomah County Mailbox Merchants, Inc. 15040 NE Mason St. Portland, OR. 97230, Oregon The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 5/1/2004 /s/ B. Daniel Dutton, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 10, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/25, 8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−197)

7/18, 7/25, 8/1, 8/8/2013 (13−192)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00408 The following persons are doing business as HUMBOLDT− DEL NORTE FILM COMMISSION at 1385 8th St. Suite 106. Arcata, CA 95521 Redwood Region Entertainment and Education Liaisons, Inc. 1385 8th St., Suite 106 Arcata, CA 95521, California The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 7/2013. /s/ Cassandra Hesseltine This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/25, 8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−200 )

8/8, 8/15, 8/22, 8/25/2013 (13−212)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−13−00422

8/1, 8/8, 8/15, 8/22/2013 (13−206)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00414 The following person is doing busi− ness as PACHAMAMA JEWELS 115 G St., #18, Arcata, CA. 95521 Maria Prieto 115 G St., #18 Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 7/4/2013 /s/ Maria Prieto This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 22, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/1, 8/8, 8/15, 8/22/2013 (13−205)

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. iMMediate releaSe UIHS is seeking interested Indian Community Members in serving as a potential Candidate to be a member of the UIHS Board of Directors. The potential Candidate must reside in and around the UIHS Service area within one of the following locations: Hoopa, Willow Creek, Weitchpec, Johnson’s and Orleans. All interested Indian Community Members may request a Declaration of Candidacy packet at www.uihs.org or call 707.825.4123. The Declaration of Candidacy forms must be submitted no later than august 30, 2013 to UIHS Election Committee, P.O. Box 731, Arcata, CA 95521.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−1300382

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13−00411

The following person is doing Busi− ness as LICKITY SPLIT POPCYCLES at 3550 G St, Eureka, CA 95503 Paul Lynn Woodland 3550 G St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 7/1/2013 /s/ Paul Woodland This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 09, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing busi− ness as HOOVEN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 1806 H St. Arcata, CA 95521 Elizabeth Pierce Hooven 2144 Buttermilk Lane Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 11/1/2004 /s/ Elizabeth Pierce Hooven This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

7/18, 7/25, 8/1, 8/8/2013 (13−184)

7/25, 8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−204)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13−00401 The following person is doing busi− ness as GRANNY BE JAMMIN at 1007 South Ave., Eureka, CA. 95503 Cynthia G. Hebard 1007 South Ave. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Cynthia G. Hebard This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 16, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/25, 8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−195)

www.northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13−00443 The following persons are doing Business as CRAFTS MAN’S MALL at 2905 Saint Louis Rd. Arcata, CA. 95521 Cal− Kirk Landscaping, Inc. 2905 Saint Louis Rd. Arcata CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Dwight Griesbach, CFO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 5, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 8/8, 8/15, 8/22, 8/29/2013 (13−214)

Did you know that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at northcoastjournal.com

legal NOTICES continued on next page

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME DANIELLE MARIE DEMARTINI MCCOY CASE NO. CV130459 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: DANIELLE MARIE DEMARTINI MCCOY TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: DANIELLE MARIE DEMARTINI MCCOY For a decree changing names as follows: Present name DANIELLE MARIE DEMARTINI MCCOY To Proposed Name DANIELLE MARIE DEMARTINI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 17, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: July 26, 2013 Filed: June 29, 2013 /s/ Garrett W. Olney Judge of the Superior Court 8/8, 8/15, 8/22, 8/29 (13−211)

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 8 2013

47

attorney knowledgeable in Cali− IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a fornia law. contingent creditor of the dece− YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by dent, you must file your claim with the court. If you are a person inter− the court and mail a copy to the ested in the estate, you may file personal representative appointed with the court a Request for Special by the court within the later of Continued from previous Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of either (1) fourpage. months from the date an inventory and appraisal of estate of first issuance of letters to a assets or of any petition or account general personal representative, as as provided in Probate Code section defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− 1250. A Request for Special Notice fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days form is available from the court from the date of mailing or clerk. personal delivery to you of a notice ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: under section 9052 of the California LEON A. KARJOLA, CSB # 69056 Probate Code. Other California ATTORNEY AT LAW statutes and legal authority may 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E affect your rights as a creditor. You EUREKA, CA 95501 may want to consult with an (707) 445−0804 attorney knowledgeable in Cali− July 18, 2013 fornia law. SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may 7/25, 8/1, 8/8/2013 (13−201) file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal NOTICE OF PETITION TO of estate assets or of any petition ADMINISTER ESTATE OF or account as provided in Probate CLARENCE SMITH HOWE, AKA Code section 1250. A Request for CLARENCE S. HOWE, CASE NO. Special Notice form is available PR130223 from the court clerk. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: contingent creditors and persons JOHN R. STOKES, CSB # 67715 who may otherwise be interested in STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, the will or estate, or both, of: LLP CLARENCE SMITH HOWE, aka 381 BAYSIDE ROAD CLARENCE S. HOWE ARCATA, CA 95521 A PETITION FOR PROBATE has (707) 822−1771 been filed by PETER BLANKEMORE July 24, 2013 in the Superior Court of California, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA County of Humboldt. COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT THE PETITION FOR PROBATE 8/1, 8/8, (13−208) 8/15/2013 (13-208) 8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 requests that PETER BLANKMORE be appointed as personal represen− ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE tative to administer the estate of FOR CHANGE OF NAME the decedent. DAVID MICHAEL BLOCH THE PETITION requests the dece− CASE NO. CV130407 dent’s will and codicils, if any, be SUPERIOR COURT OF admitted to probate. The will and CALIFORNIA, any codicils are available for exami− COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT nation in the file kept by court. 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA THE PETITION requests authority 95501 to administer the estate under the PETITION OF: Independent Administration of DAVID MICHAEL BLOCH Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: DAVID MICHAEL BLOCH take many actions without for a decree changing names as obtaining court approval. Before follows: taking certain very important Present name actions, however, the personal DAVID MICHAEL BLOCH representative will be required to to Proposed Name give notice to interested persons DAVID MILES BLOCH unless they have waived notice or THE COURT ORDERS that all consented to the proposed action.) persons interested in this matter The independent administration appear before this court at the authority will be granted unless an hearing indicated below to show interested person files an objection cause, if any, why the petition for to the petition and shows good change of name should not be cause why the court should not granted. Any person objecting to grant the authority. the name changes described above A HEARING on the petition will be must file a written objection that held on August 22, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. includes the reasons for the objec− at the Superior Court of California, tion at least two court days before County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth the matter is scheduled to be heard Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. and must appear at the hearing to IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of show cause, why the petition the petition, you should appear at should not be granted. If no written the hearing and state your objec− objection is timely filed, the court tions or file written objections with may grant the petition without a the court before the hearing. Your hearing. appearance may be in person or by NOTICE OF HEARING your attorney. Date: August 21, 2013 IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a Time: 1:45 p.m. contingent creditor of the dece− The address of the court is: dent, you must file your claim with 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA. Dept. 8 the court and mail a copy to the Date: July 2, 2013 personal representative appointed Filed: July 3, 2013 by the court within the later of /s/ W. Bruce Watson either (1) four months from the date Judge of the Superior Court of first issuance of letters to a 7/18, 7/25, 8/1, 8/8/2013 (13−186) general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JEFFREY RICHARDSON COZAD, CASE NO. PR130218

©2009 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

25. Puzzled comments 26. Glossy alternative 27. Exodus mountain 29. Stops 31. New Hampshire senator who preceded Shaheen 33. City destroyed in Genesis 34. Name on a Chinese menu 35. Rhymester’s supermarket purchase #3 37. Tbsp. or tsp. 40. “... to fetch ____ of water” 41. More difficult to believe 43. Ends 46. She played Annie in “Annie Hall”

47. “Take this job and @#%@#!” 48. Prefix meaning “wrong” 51. Leaning 52. Rhymester’s supermarket purchase #4 56. Best Picture of 1958 57. Rhymester’s supermarket purchase #5 61. Tool for a duel 62. Japanese who won the 1974 Nobel Peace Prize 63. Residents in Anaheim’s “Little Gaza” neighborhood 64. Red states?: Abbr. 65. Round Table honorific 66. 1976 Sally Field TV movie

DOWN

15. Paranormal ability 18. “Get my point?” 21. “That steams me!” 22. Part of PDA: Abbr. 23. Name of 12 popes 24. “I’m ____ mood to argue” 28. ____ of (notwithstanding) 29. Atty. General’s cabinet division 30. Exchange words 32. ____ Bator, Mongolia 33. Choice of sizes: Abbr. 36. Square root of IX 37. Jai ____ 38. Actress Suvari

39. 36-Down: Sp. 40. States of cordiality 42. Public ____ 43. Hints 44. Supplies 45. Hauer of “Blade Runner” 48. Civvies 49. “What’s in ____ me?” 50. Oink spot? 53. “Treasure Island” monogram 54. Barnyard calls 55. LAX guesstimates 58. Terrif 59. “The X-Files” org. 60. High fashion inits.

1. Doofus 2. Tinseltown’s Thurman 3. Uncle ____ 4. He wrote “Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes” 5. Turn on an axis 6. Garbage 7. Edna and others 8. B’way postings 9. Set one’s sights 10. Flinches, e.g. 11. Desert Storm reporter Peter 12. Groups on horseback

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

HARD #55

www.sudoku.com

1. Forces out 6. Some ESPN highlights, in short 9. Speed ____ 13. Menotti opera title character 14. Few and far between 16. Nautical leader? 17. Rhymester’s supermarket purchase #1 19. Where Pres. Obama’s mom was raised 20. Rhymester’s supermarket purchase #2 22. “... blackbirds, baked in ____”

Solution, tips and computer program at

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

legal notices

48 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JEFFREY RICHARDSON COZAD A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by BRET LOPRESTI in the Supe− rior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that BRET LOPRESTI be appointed as personal representa− tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on August 8, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA, CSB # 69056

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will sell at private sale to the highest and best net bidder on the terms and conditions mentioned below and subject to confirmation by the court, on or after 2:00 p.m., August 22, 2013, or in the time thereafter allowed by law, all the right, title and interest of the decedent at the time of death and all other right, title and interest that the estate has acquired in and to the following described real property, in its present condi− tion, without any representation or warranty of any kind, express or implied: 1120 Allard Avenue, Eureka, California 95503. Bids or offers are invited for the property, must be in writing, and will be received at the office of Kaber & Kaber, Attorneys at Law, 730 7th Street, Suite E, Eureka, Cali− fornia (707) 441−1100, at any time after the publication of this notice and before the sale. The right is reserved to reject any and all bids before entry of an order confirming the sale. Terms and conditions of sale: "as is," cash, or part cash and part credit, the terms of such credit to be acceptable to the undersigned and to the court, ten percent (10%) of the amount of the bid to accom− pany the offer by certified check, the balance to be paid upon closing. For further information contact Douglas Kaber, Kaber & Kaber Attorneys at Law, 730 7th Street, Suite E, Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 441−1100. Dated this 24th day of July, 2013. DOUGLAS D. KABER, Attorney for Conservator of the Estate of NIKKI RENELL MOORE, Conservatee

Did you know? that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at northcoastjournal.com

www.northcoastjournal.com

8/1, 8/8, 8/15/2013 (13−210)

Your Journal.

Delivered your way.

Public Advertisement for bids Subject to conditions prescribed by the Mattole Salmon Group (MSG), sealed bids for a fixed-price contract are invited for the following work: Lower Mattole River Habitat Enhancement, under Agreement No. 31779 with the NFWF. description of Work: Mob and de-mob of excavator to work site near Mattole estuary. Widen pre-existing road as necessary, tip a min. of 150, 16-24” diameter fir trees with roots and branches intact. Weigh trees with scale attachment, trim with MSG ground crew to match weight requirement. Deck trees with branches and root-wads. Clear smaller trees for access & pile slash created by the project. Re-contour pits from tree removal and disturbed areas. Work will take place from: September 1, 2013 to September 20, 2013. Procedures: Bidding documents will be available beginning August 8th 2013 @ 12:00pm PDT, and will be issued only by the MSG Contract Manager. Please call 707 499-2732 or email sungnome@mattolesalmon.org to request a bid package. bids must be mailed or hand delivered to: Mattole Salmon Group Attn: Sungnome Madrone PO Box 188 Petrolia, CA 95558 bid deadline: Sealed bids must be received on or before 5:00pm PDT August 19, 2013. Bids not received by this time and date will not be considered. Contractor selected based on best value, bid, qualifications, and knowledge and experience in performing work. Successful bidder will be required to meet MSG insurance requirements- 1,000,000 liability with MSG and land-owner as additional insured, as well as to comply with all applicable regulations in accordance with Agreement No. 31779. 8/8/2013 (13-215)

Is my Fictitious Business Name Statement good forever?

Y

our fictitious business name statement will expire five years from the date it was last filed with the County Clerk. Before it expires, you must refile your fictitious business name statement. Within 30 days from the refiling date, you must begin publishing the statement in the newspaper. If you publish it in the North Coast Journal for the required four weeks, on the last day of publication a “proof of publication” will be sent to the County Clerk to complete the filing process. The cost for running your ficticious business name in the North Coast Journal is a flat $55 fee. Call for the Journal’s reasonable rates and friendly service:

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county, calif. vol XXIV issue 31 • humboldt

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NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SELL REAL PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE PR070151

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7 Uh … cooperating? 9 Your dog

on pot 10 Plagiarism isn’t nice

19 The 17-year twitch 21 Look

close and something disappears

25 Didgeridoo dah 32 Way, way

good

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Opportunities

 

                    

The North Coast Journal is seeking a

Opportunities

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BECOME A MENTOR! California MENTOR is seeking committed people willing to share their home with an adult with developmental disabilities. We are seeking Mentors who have experience with insulin dependent diabetics & live in the McKinleyville/Arcata area. We offer a competitive monthly stipend & 24 hour support. Call Jamie at (707) 442−4500 ext. 14 jamie.mcgovern@thementornetwork.com (E−1226) default

Opportunities

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR CITY OF FORTUNA FULL TIME, $63,385 TO $77,013 PER YEAR, EXCELLENT BENEFITS.

Under administrative direction from the City Manager, responsible for the functions, staff and oversight of the Public Works and Parks & Recreation Departments, Must maintain a valid California Driver’s License throughout employment. Bachelor’s degree in related field is required but an MPA is preferred. Water/ Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator and Water Treatment and Distribution certification is desirable. For complete job description and required job application, contact the City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, CA 95540, (707) 725-7600, or friendlyfortuna.com. Application packets, including a cover letter, required application form, and resume, must be received by 5:00 pm, Friday, September 20, 2013.

     

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WIYOT TRIBE ICWA WORKER The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 was put into place to ensure the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian Tribes and families by the establishment of minimal Federal standards for the removal of Indian Children from their families and the placement of such children in foster or adoptive homes which will reflect the unique values of Indian culture, and by providing for assistance to Indian tribes in the operation of children and family service programs. Qualifications: Must have a Master’s or Bachelor’s degree in Social Work with two years experience in child welfare services. Must be at least 21 years of age and have and maintain a valid driver’s license. Native Preference Policy: Preference given to Native Americans who meet the requirements of the posted position. Email resumes to sarah@wiyot.us or call 733-5055 for more information. default

            

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part-time to fulltime graphic artist Join the best locally owned, what’s happening, award-winning newspaper in Humboldt County. Advertising design & layout experience helpful. Must have knowledge of Indesign & Photoshop. Submit résumé by 8/30/13 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 or email carolyn@northcoastjournal.com

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          

          

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com

2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

50 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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Opportunities

Opportunities

Opportunities

Opportunities

Opportunities

Clothing

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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECU− RITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka. (707) 476−9262. (E−0829)

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non− medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E− 1226)

CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW! Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax−free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on−site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/ GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442− 4500 #14, www.camentorfha.com (E−1226)

BOHEMIAN MERMAID Hand− dyed natural clothing. Fun styles that fit women! Kidwear, local jewelry and art. 6th & F, Eureka. www.Bohemian−Mermaid.com (C0815)

ď ƒď ď ’ď …ď€ ď ?ď ’ď ?ď –ď ‰ď „ď …ď ’ď “ď€  ď Žď Ľď Ľď ¤ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Žď ?ď — ď ?ď Ąď Ťď Ľď€ ď Ľď ¸ď ´ď ˛ď Ąď€ ď ­ď Żď Žď Ľď šď€Źď€ ď€  ď §ď ˛ď Ľď Ąď ´ď€ ď Żď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ď ľď Žď Šď ´ď šď€Ž ď “ď °ď Ľď Łď Šď Ąď Źď€ ď Žď Ľď Ľď ¤ď łď€ ď ď ¤ď ľď Źď ´ď łď€  ď Źď Šď śď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď šď Żď ľď€Žď€ ď …ď Ąď ˛ď Žď€ ď ľď °ď€ ď ´ď Żď€  ď€¤ď€łď€Źď€śď€°ď€°ď€ ď ´ď Ąď ¸ď€­ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€Żď ­ď Żď€Ž ď ‚ď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď€´ď€ ď ˛ď Ľď Śď Ľď ˛ď Ľď Žď Łď Ľď łď€Žď€  ď ď °ď °ď Źď Šď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€ ď Żď Žď€­ď łď Šď ´ď Ľď€Ž ď ?ď ľď łď ´ď€ ď ¨ď Ąď śď Ľď€ ď Ľď ¸ď ´ď ˛ď Ąď€  ď ˘ď Ľď ¤ď ˛ď Żď Żď ­ď€Źď€ ď ˆď “ď€Żď ‡ď …ď „ď€ ď€Śď€  ď Łď Źď Ľď Ąď Žď€ ď Łď ˛ď Šď ­ď Šď Žď Ąď Źď€ ď ˛ď Ľď Łď Żď ˛ď ¤ď€Ž ď ƒď Ąď Źď Źď€ ď Šď Ąď ­ď Šď Ľď€ ď ´ď Żď ¤ď Ąď šď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Ąď °ď °ď ´ď€Ąď€ ď€   ď ˇď ˇď ˇď€Žď Łď Ąď ­ď Ľď Žď ´ď Żď ˛ď Śď ¨ď Ąď€Žď Łď Żď ­

ď ƒď ˆď …ď ’ď€­ď ď …ď€ ď ˆď …ď ‰ď ‡ď ˆď ”ď “ď€ ď ƒď ď “ď ‰ď Žď ? ď ?ď ď ’ď ”ď€­ď ”ď ‰ď ?ď …ď€ ď ?ď ?ď “ď ‰ď ”ď ‰ď ?ď Žď “ ď€śď ˜ď •ď ™ď ˆď Œď ?ď ?ď „ď ‘ď †ď ˆď€ƒď€˛ď ‰ďƒ°ď€ƒď †ď ˆď • ď “ď Źď Żď ´ď€ ď ď ´ď ´ď Ľď Žď ¤ď Ąď Žď ´ ď ƒď ˛ď Żď ˇď Žď€ ď ƒď Źď ľď ˘ď€ ď ’ď Ľď ° ď€˛ď€ ď€­ď€ ď „ď Ľď Źď Š ď ‚ď ľď łď łď Ľď ˛ď€Żď ˆď Żď łď ´ ď Šď Ąď Žď Šď ´ď Żď ˛ ď ?ď ˛ď Ľď °ď€ ď ƒď Żď Żď Ťď€Żď „ď Šď łď ¨ď ˇď Ąď łď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď€  ď ‡ď Šď Śď ´ď€ ď “ď ¨ď Żď ° ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Ľď ˛ ď †ď •ď Œď Œď€­ď ”ď ‰ď ?ď …ď€ ď ?ď ?ď “ď ‰ď ”ď ‰ď ?ď Žď “ ď Œď Šď Žď Ľď€ ď ƒď Żď Żď Ť

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

We Are Hiring 10 Experienced Framing Carpenters!

ď ƒď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď€­ď ď Ľď€ ď ˆď Ľď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď łď€ ď ‰ď Žď ¤ď Šď Ąď Žď€ ď ƒď Żď ­ď ­ď ľď Žď Šď ´ď šď€  ď Żď Śď€ ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď ”ď ˛ď Šď Žď Šď ¤ď Ąď ¤ď€ ď ’ď Ąď Žď Łď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Šď Ąď€  ď …ď ­ď °ď Źď Żď šď ­ď Ľď Žď ´ď łď€ ď ď °ď °ď Źď Šď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď łď€  ď Ąď śď Ąď Šď Źď Ąď ˘ď Źď Ľď€ ď Šď Žď€ ď ˆď ľď ­ď Ąď Žď€ ď ’ď Ľď łď Żď ľď ˛ď Łď Ľď łď€Żď€  ď “ď Ľď Ąď łď Łď Ąď °ď Ľď€Żď ƒď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď€­ď ď Ľď€ ď ˆď Ľď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď łď€ ď ƒď Ąď łď Šď Žď Żď€  ď Żď ˛ď€ ď Żď ľď ˛ď€ ď ˇď Ľď ˘ď łď Šď ´ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ´ď€  ď ˇď ˇď ˇď€Žď Łď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď Ąď Ľď ¨ď Ľď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď łď Łď Ąď łď Šď Žď Żď€Žď Łď Żď ­ď€ 

Part-time position (30 hrs/ week) providing child care and social service referrals, assisting families access child care, and participating in community meetings/events. Requires ability to work evenings and weekends and to pass criminal history fingerprint clearance. $12.15/ hr. Benefits include paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and insurance. Temporary through 6/30/14. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address by Monday, 8/12, 5 p.m. EOE default

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Pay DOE. Call 707.268.1866 Today!

Now Hiring:

Utilities sUperintendent

ď ƒď ¨ď Ľď ˛ď€­ď ď Ľď€ ď ˆď Ľď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď łď€ ď Šď łď€ ď Ąď Žď€ ď Ąď Źď Łď Żď ¨ď Żď Źď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€  ď ¤ď ˛ď ľď §ď€ ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€ ď ˇď Żď ˛ď Ťď °ď Źď Ąď Łď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€  ď ˛ď Ľď ąď ľď Šď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď ´ď Ľď łď ´ď Šď Žď §ď€Ž

RESOURCE AND REFERRAL SPECIALIST

KID’S CLOTHES & COOKWARE 1/2 PRICE. August 6−10. Famous Quarter Rack. Dream Quest Thrift Store− Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams! (M−0808)

CITy oF ForTUnA FULL TIMe, $55,556 To $67,501 Per yeAr, exCeLLenT BeneFITS.

Under the general direction of the Public Works Director, and/or the City Manager, to direct, supervise and perform a variety of administrative, regulatory and maintenance functions, repair and construction of the City’s water and wastewater collection, distribution and storage systems; operation and maintenance of water wells, water booster and sewage lift pump stations; and to do related work as required. Must possess, and maintain a valid Class B California Driver’s License. At time of hire incumbent must possess and maintain at least a valid Grade III Water Distribution (D3) and a valid Grade II Water Treatment (T2) Certificate issued by the California Department of Health Services (DHS). Wastewater Certification is desirable. For complete job description and required job application, contact the City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, CA 95540, (707) 725-7600, or friendlyfortuna.com.

ON−CALL LVN POSITION AVAILABLE. Apply at Crestwood Behavioral Health, 2370 Buhne St, Eureka

Art & Collectibles THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629−3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST−1226)

ď †ď Œď ď “ď ˆď ‚ď ď ƒď ‹

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ď “ď Ąď Źď Ľď€ş ď “ď Ľď Źď Ľď Łď ´ď€  ď “ď ľď ­ď ­ď Ľď ˛ď€  ď ƒď Źď Żď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ł 116 W. Wabash ď š 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Mon. & Tues.

Application packets, including a cover letter, required application form, and resume, must be received by 5:00 pm, Friday, September 6, 2013.

ď‚“ď ƒď Źď Żď ´ď ¨ď Ľď łď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď “ď Żď ľď Źď‚”

Community

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Auctions Share your talent for fun and excitement.

ď ‰ď ”ď€ ď „ď Šď ˛ď Ľď Łď ´ď Żď ˛

LAB LEAD ASSISTANT 1 F/T McKinleyville MEMBER SERVICES SPECIALIST (Spanish Language skills required) 1 F/T Arcata/Eureka

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 1 P/T Crescent City REGISTERED NURSE 2 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Arcata RN Clinic Coordinator 1 F/T Willow Creek MEDICAL BILLER 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Arcata, 1 TEMP (6 months) Crescent City, 1 F/T McKinleyville Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application

ď „ď Šď ˛ď Ľď Łď ´ď łď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď Łď Żď Żď ˛ď ¤ď Šď Žď Ąď ´ď Ľď łď€ ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď Żď śď Ľď ˛ď Ąď Źď Źď€ ď ¤ď Šď ˛ď Ľď Łď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€ ď Żď Śď€ ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď ‚ď Ľď Ąď ˛ď€ ď ’ď Šď śď Ľď ˛ď€  ď ƒď Żď ­ď °ď ľď ´ď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď Žď Ľď ´ď ˇď Żď ˛ď Ťď Šď Žď §ď€ ď ˛ď Ľď ąď ľď Šď ˛ď Ľď ­ď Ľď Žď ´ď łď€Žď€ ď ”ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď °ď Żď łď Šď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€  ď Šď Žď śď Żď Źď śď Ľď łď€ ď Źď Ľď Ąď ¤ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď ¤ď Šď ˛ď Ľď Łď ´ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď ˇď Żď ˛ď Ťď€ ď Żď Śď€ ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď ‰ď Žď Śď Żď ˛ď ­ď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€  ď ”ď Ľď Łď ¨ď Žď Żď Źď Żď §ď šď€ ď łď ´ď Ąď Śď Śď€Źď€ ď Šď łď€ ď ˛ď Ľď łď °ď Żď Žď łď Šď ˘ď Źď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď ­ď Ąď Šď Žď ´ď Ąď Šď Žď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď ­ď Żď Žď Šď ´ď Żď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď€  ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď ¤ď Ľď °ď Ąď ˛ď ´ď ­ď Ľď Žď ´ď€ ď ˘ď ľď ¤ď §ď Ľď ´ď€Žď€ ď ƒď Ąď łď Šď Žď Żď€ ď Ľď ¸ď °ď Ľď ˛ď Šď Ľď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď °ď ˛ď Ľď Śď Ľď ˛ď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€Žď€ ď ?ď ľď łď ´ď€ ď ¨ď Ąď śď Ľď€  ď ‚ď Ąď Łď ¨ď Ľď Źď Żď ˛ď łď€ ď ¤ď Ľď §ď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€ ď Šď Žď€ ď Ąď€ ď ˛ď Ľď Źď Ąď ´ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď Ąď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď Ąď ´ď€ ď Źď Ľď Ąď łď ´ď€ ď€ľď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€ ď Żď Śď€ ď Ľď ¸ď °ď€Žď€ ď Šď Žď€  ď —ď ‹ď ˆď€ƒď Œď ‘ď ‰ď ’ď •ď ?ď „ď —ď Œď ’ď ‘ď€ƒď —ď ˆď †ď ‹ď ‘ď ’ď ?ď ’ď Šď œď€ƒď‚żď ˆď ?ď ‡ď€ƒď „ď ‘ď ‡ď€ƒď ‹ď „ď ™ď ˆď€ƒď ˆď ›ď “ď€‘ď€ƒď šď Œď —ď ‹ď€ƒď –ď ˜ď “ď ˆď •ď ™ď Œď –ď Œď ‘ď Šď€ƒ ď ´ď ˇď Żď€ ď Żď ˛ď€ ď ­ď Żď ˛ď Ľď€ ď °ď Ľď Żď °ď Źď Ľď€Žď€ ď ?ď Ąď Šď ¤ď€ ď śď Ąď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€Źď€ ď€´ď€°ď€ąď Ťď€Źď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď Łď Żď ­ď °ď Ľď ´ď Šď ´ď Šď śď Ľď€  ď Łď Żď ­ď °ď Ľď Žď łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€Žď€ ď ?ď ľď łď ´ď€ ď ˘ď Ľď€ ď€˛ď€ąď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€ ď Żď Źď ¤ď€ ď Żď ˛ď€ ď Żď Źď ¤ď Ľď ˛ď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď Ąď ˘ď Źď Ľď€ ď ´ď Żď€ ď Żď ˘ď ´ď Ąď Šď Žď€ ď Ąď€  ď “ď ´ď Ąď ´ď Ľď€ ď ‹ď Ľď šď€ ď ‡ď Ąď ­ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Œď Šď Łď Ľď Žď łď Ľď€Ž

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BIG AUCTION! WEDS. AUGUST 7TH 5:45 PM

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

ď …ď ¸ď Ľď Łď ľď ´ď Šď śď Ľď€ ď ƒď ¨ď Ľď Ś

ď ’ď Ľď łď °ď Żď Žď łď Šď ˘ď Źď Ľď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Šď Žď śď Ľď Žď ´ď Żď ˛ď šď€ ď Łď Żď Žď ´ď ˛ď Żď Źď€Źď€ ď Śď Żď Żď ¤ď€ ď Łď Żď łď ´ď łď€Źď€ ď Śď Żď Żď ¤ď€ ď łď Ąď Śď Ľď ´ď šď€Źď€ ď Śď Żď Żď ¤ď€  ď ąď ľď Ąď Źď Šď ´ď šď€Źď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď€ ď ­ď Ąď Žď Ąď §ď Ľď ­ď Ľď Žď ´ď€ ď Żď Śď€ ď Ąď Źď Źď€ ď Ťď Šď ´ď Łď ¨ď Ľď Žď€ ď łď ´ď Ąď Śď Śď€Žď€ ď ?ď ľď łď ´ď€ ď ˘ď Ľď€ ď Ąď ˘ď Źď Ľď€ ď ´ď Żď€  ď ­ď ľď Źď ´ď Šď€­ď ´ď Ąď łď Ťď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď€˛ď€Ťď€ ď šď Ľď Ąď ˛ď łď€ ď Ľď ¸ď °ď Ľď ˛ď Šď Ľď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď ˛ď Ľď ąď ľď Šď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€Źď€ ď Łď Ąď ´ď Ľď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď Ľď ¸ď °ď Ľď ˛ď Šď Ľď Žď Łď Ľď€  ď °ď ˛ď Ľď Śď Ľď ˛ď ˛ď Ľď ¤ď€Žď€ ď ?ď Ąď Šď ¤ď€ ď śď Ąď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€Źď€ ď€´ď€°ď€ąď Ťď€Źď€ ď Ąď Žď ¤ď€ ď Łď Żď ­ď °ď Ľď ´ď Šď ´ď Šď śď Ľď€ ď Łď Żď ­ď °ď Ľď Žď łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€Ž Tribal preference given per the Indian Self-determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C Section 450 e(B)). For an application and more information please go to www.bearrivercasino.com or call (707) 733-1900 x 167.

    

hiring?

BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13−18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441−5013, ask for Peggy

Merchandise

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

hiring? hiring?

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

51

the MARKETPLACE Merchandise

Pets default & Livestock

    

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    

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

   

classified SERVICES Pets & Livestock

Auto Service

Garden & Landscape

Musicians & Instructors

LOOK FOR KITTENS AT PETCO. Sat’s 11−3 p.m. Our kittens are always fixed, vaccinated, and deparasited. $66 or $110/pair Non−profit Bless the Beast (707) 444−0408 (to prearrange) (P−1226)

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−1226)

PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, taichigardener.com (S−1226)

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all pi− ano styles. Juilliard trained, re− mote lessons available. National− ly Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−1226)

SDLCR ANIMAL SHELTER. Currently Seeking DONATIONS of any kind that will be helpful with animals, though donations of recycling would be accepted as well. Exact list is available at SDLCR.COM (http:sdlcr.com/ ?page_id=98). We are nowabout3/4 of the way through renovations of shelter, and have run out of money, any monetary donations would be greatly appreciated, tax−deductible receipts will be given. Monetary Donations to the shelter can also do so in exchange for a Gift Certificate REDEEMABLE when the grooming salon opens. Successfully rehomed over 100 animals each year since 2010. please contact Shelter at (530) 646−8532

Cleaning ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non−toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. (707) 822−7819. (S−1226) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−1226) JEANNIE’S HOUSE CLEANING SERVICE. $15/hour or by the Job (negotiable). References avail− able. jbates5931@yahoo.com (707) 445−2644. (S−0829)

Computer & Internet default

707-840-0600

Art & Design

J.B. Fabrication

  

Custom Welding & Artwork

  default

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Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Garden & Landscape

Get the lowdown ONLINE! NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM 52 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home− a proven technology− reasonably priced−Sunlight Heat− ing−$300 Federal Tax Credit−CA lic. #972834− (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−1226) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499−4828. wiesner_eric@yahoo.com

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermedi− ate. Seabury Gould 444−8507. (M −1226)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

Garden & Landscape Home Repair

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−1226)

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     

 

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner−advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: (707) 441−1343 susielarain e@northcoastjournal.com default

    

Special artwork for home or business. Custom work for your vehicle. (707) 498-1067

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087 2guysanda− trucksmk777 @gmail.com, (S−1226)

Legal

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jbcustomfabrication@yahoo.com www.facebook.com/justin.barrington.96

Home Repair

ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−1226)

Moving & Storage 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small. Call 845−3132, 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAIN− MENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. 832−7419. (M−1226)

northcoastjournal.com

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Every 2nd Saturday No Cover 9pm-1am

Robert Goodman Winery 937 I St. Arcata Dinner till 10pm

Enjoy a glass at Robert Goodman Winery or your favorite cocktail, every 2nd Sat for Rocksteady Night w/dj rotten. Lounge atmosphere. Focusing on 60’s ska-rocksteady & early reggae. (707) 497-4407

Other Professionals

Other Professionals default

A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amaz− ing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birth− days, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499−5628. (S−1226)

WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com (S−1226)

IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more insured & bonded





Serving Northern California for over 20 years!

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

        

TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001

Sewing & Alterations LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677−3364. (SA−829)

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ARE YOU A 45−79 YEAR OLD WOMAN WHO DEVELOPED DIABETES WHILE ON LIPITOR? If you used Lipitor between December 1996 and the Present and were diagnosed with diabetes while taking Lipitor, you may be entitled to compensa− tion. Call Charles H. Johnson Law toll−free 1−800−535−5727

&Spirit

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Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

   

Parent Educator

  

FD1963

 

      default

     ���

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STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8a.m− 3p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n− Britches. Kristin360@gmail.com

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

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northcoastjournal

Acreage for Sale Apartments for Rent Commercial Property for Sale Commercial Space for Rent Houses for Rent Realtor Ads Vacation Rentals

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

707-822-5244

Medical Cannabis Evaluations Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years.

Call for Walk-in Availability 707.445.4642 consciousparentingsolutions.com

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Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems

 default

August Rolfing Special

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CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED ESTHETICIAN. Organic facials, waxing & aromatherapy massage. Mention this ad and receive 25% off. Located at Beau Monde Salon in Arcata. (707) 953−7619. (MB−1226)

     default

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Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

CERTIFIED ROLFER ANGELA HART, B.A . Rolfing® Ten Series, Tune−up, injuries, Chronic Pain, Repetitive Motion Injury. (707) 616−3096 (MB−1121)

COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822−5253

 

Diana Nunes Mizer

ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668−5408. astro@salinarain.com, www.salinarain.com. (MB−1206) BUILD A BETTER ATTITUDE. Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. Accepting new clients to reduce stress/fear, boost confidence/ motivation/self−esteem. (707)845−3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com

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body, mind

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 

  

541-251-1885



 Est. 1979

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE−FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 707−822−1676 (MB −0919)



HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, Uni− versity of Metaphysical Sci− ences. Bringing professional− ism to metaphysics. (707) 822 −2111

 

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    

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 

Body

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating. Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

Mind

PL ACE YOUR OWN AD AT: classified.northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013

53

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&Spirit default

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

HEAT THERAPY

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

ENERGY MEDICINE

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

+

Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

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445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

Lifting Spirits Massage Therapy Woman-Centered Massage: Prenatal, Swedish, Therapeutic Massage

House calls available at no extra fee Servicing Trinidad to Eureka

Denise Claus Certified Massage Therapist

(707) 497-4039 default 

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$

80

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

Walk-ins Welcome

Wed & Sat 11-5pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students $

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Medical Cannabis Consultants   

Spirit

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

classified HOUSING Apartments for Rent

Comm. Prop for Sale

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

home & garden

FIND HOME IMPROVEMENT

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

EXPERTS

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA APT BY THE BAY & OLDTOWN. 1 bdm/1ba, no smoking or pets, W/S/G paid. $700 month, $1000 dep. Ref. req. 445−4679 (R−0808)

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1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

444-2273

NEED TO GET THE WORD OUT?

WE CAN HELP!

classified.northcoast journal.com Birthdays Births Celebrations Graduation Homecoming Lost & Found Memorials Obituaries Reunions Wedding Engagements

Vacation Rentals EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Moun− tain Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessi− ble. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986−7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L− 1226)

Comm. Space for Rent EUREKA DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE. Available at 7th & I Streets in Eureka. 650 sf. New paint and carpet. Great location. Parking & janitorial included. Call S & W Properties, (707) 499− 6906. (R−0725) PARKING SPACES FOR RENT IN DOWNTOWN EUREKA LOT. S & W Properties. $40 per month per space. Call 443−2246, 499−6906. (R−0725)

Acreage for Sale WILLOW CREEK REDUCED ! 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Ap− proved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Prop− erty is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

54 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 8, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Acreage for Sale Apartments for Rent Commercial Property for Sale Commercial Space for Rent Houses for Rent Realtor Ads Vacation Rentals

■ FIELDBROOK SUPERB CONSTRUCTION AND EXQUISITE FINISHWORK! This custom home built by Gene Callahan features a rock woodstove from Finland. Sierra Pacific windows, tanoak floors, green granite counters, a unique breakfast nook, and all quality fixtures throughout. On 10 acres with room for horses. MLS#237481 $849,800

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Seeking proposals from qualified parties interested in leasing and operating the historic Scotia Inn, including a Restaurant and Banquet Room for up to 300 Guests, a Pub (with full bar), and 22 Guest Rooms. Very Popular for Banquets and Weddings. Perfect for Chefs or Caterers wanting to take their business to the next level.

AvAilAble JAn. 1, 2014.

Town of Scotia Company, LLC jwarren@townofscotia.com John Warren: (707) 764-4273

STROMBECK PROPERTIES Arcata Apartments Close to HSU! Studios, 1 Bed & 2 Bed Units 960 South G St Arcata, CA 95521 707-822-4557 strombeckprop@yahoo.com www.strombeckprop.com

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

$475,000

$329,900

3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,204 sq ft wonderful home in Hydesville on large lot, nice views, large fruit trees, RV parking for more than one vehicle, double garages, one with 10’ door, hot tub

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,270 sq ft Fickle Hill log style manufactured home on 12 beautiful acres, set on permanent foundation, wide open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, wood stove, large decks, very private

$225,000

4 bed, 1.5 bath, 1,500 sq ft Sunny Brae home being used as a rental, great potential for investment, close to shopping, schools and entertainment, has great rental history

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

707.834.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent

707.445.8811 ext.124

#01930997

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

707.834.7979

Our Real Estate Loan Rates

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Willow Creek Land/Property

+/- 160 acres Supply Creek, this rare property is located 45 minutes from arcata up old three Creeks Road. property boasts a year round creek, great access, timber and breathtaking views. Call today!

Funded through C.U. Members Mortgages 30 Year Fixed Rate Rate - 4.250%  APR - 4.478%

15 Year Fixed Rate Rate - 3.250%  APR - 3.661%

5 Year Adjustable Rate Rate - 3.500%  APR - 3.214% *These rates are subject to change daily. Subject to Community Mortgage Funding Disclaimers.

1270 GIUNTOLI LANE, ARCATA or 707-822-5902 northernredwoodfcu.org

Eureka Land/Property

Re

$335,000

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e! +/- 1.2 acres at 175 Bassford Road. a beautiful undeveloped parcel overlooks elk River Valley and is located just a few minutes from downtown eureka. a builder’s dream property, featuring an open meadow building site and end of the road privacy. Community water and pG&e are available. perc test has been completed and passed.

$125,000

Rio Dell Land/Property

+/- 34 acres on Blue Slide Road only 1 mile west of Rio dell, just southeast of the historic town of Ferndale. this site has an attractive view of the eel River, paved road frontage on Blue Slide Road, easy access to HWY 101, conifer trees and inspiring views, plus Slater Creek runs through the parcel. COC is on file Get Your Building permit noW!

$215,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

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North Coast Journal 08-08-13 Edition