Issuu on Google+

-

7 TV tell all 8 Creepy and creepier 9 Those darn dune stakes 18 Barry vs DSM 26 The twins and the golden egg 32 Zombies, meh


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem you are my apple skin

7 Views inside keet

8

Media Maven this column is classified

9 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover Marimba!

17 Home & Garden Service Directory

18 Field Notes Psych Bible, part 2

25 Stage Matters Double trouble

26 The Hum celebrating summer

28 Music & More! 30 Calendar 32 Filmland MONSTERS AND MONSTER DISAPPOINTMENTS

34 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

34 Workshops 37 Sudoku 37 Crossword 39 Marketplace 42 Body, Mind & Spirit 43 Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

3


Rogue Test Razed Editor: On Monday, June 17, I accompanied my husband Uri and some friends out to the Manila dunes. As an avid beachcomber and photographer, I’ve been asked to document the progress of the dune rebuilding experiment (“Rogue Dune Experiment,” June 20). This simple and unobtrusive procedure is successfully being used on the East Coast, which is still reeling from the effects of Superstorm Sandy. On Sunday, June 23, we hiked out to the test site and were shocked to find that someone had pulled up the wooden slats that had been positioned in the dunes to

catch blowing sand. Really? Is this experiment so threatening that someone has to vandalize it? After seeing the effects of the beach grass pulling, and the moving dunes swallowing up dune forests and wetlands, I applaud the bold and simple effort being made to regain the dunes that protect our coastline and the infrastructure behind it. Beach grass stabilizes the dunes, helping them grow higher and protect the homes, schools, roads, water and power lines just inland from the shore. It has also created wetlands and forests behind those dunes, a unique environment I enjoy walking in. The beach grass pullers want to see the dunes change shape and migrate inland, hoping to increase habitat for threatened bird and plant species. But who is monitoring the dune wetlands and forests, and the species living there now threatened by moving sand? I hope these two differing viewpoints can reach an agreement beneficial to both the people and the wildlife living behind the dunes. In the meantime, let’s please leave the wooden slats in place, and watch and learn something in the process. Chris Pratt, Arcata

you are my apple skin you are my sweet my apple skin you are my sun my summer wind you were my apple my apple skin a green blue river running over our young ardor your hands your apple wooded melodies pollen from the oak table top dusting my golden shoulders, my apple cheeks your songs my April wind across the cotton bedsheets sweaty flanks my horse mane a sour glass of lemonade with ice withholding those butterfly caresses (I wanted your song) your song singing summer lilac and hyacinth stems in blue bottles on the kitchen sill we were wolf paws in the snow wolf noses in the vanilla bean bright apples on the tree boughs in the August breeze

— Stephanie Silvia

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

More Supes Disputes

Editor: We are happy to agree with Publisher Judy Hodgson’s statement: “Boards of Supervisors come and go. Public policy is made and remade.” We were less impressed with the remaining portion of your editorial (Publisher, June 13). We supported four of the five members duly elected to the current board, and we continue to support them. You are so angered at some straw vote taken in general plan deliberations — yet such refining/revising is the prerogative of every board. We don’t see a need to become so incensed with a board trying to make some sense out of a 12-year draft general plan preparation exercise. This is precisely


the time language negotiations get on the table so that the document can be adopted. Getting a general plan adopted after so much public involvement is going to be a dance where no group will get all it wants. We hope this doesn’t come as a shock to you, but it’s a political process. We support your idea of people discussing issues and thereby becoming more involved. We dislike the hit-piece style of how you represent your perspectives as fact and irreversible gospel, and vilifying others while trying to round up support for your goals. The board meeting we saw had about 40 people speak, and all of them were respectful in providing their testimony. We wish the Journal had been respectful as well. Lora and Joel Canzoneri, Arcata Editor: Having reviewed all the letters, and your editorial of the past two weeks about the recent action by the Board of Supervisors in regard to the General Plan, I thought I would weigh in on the subject. Although it’s like blowing into the wind in your publication, I have to fully agree with Jessica Bittner’s letter supporting the changes the board made. There were reasons why the voters elected the current board, and the General Plan mess is one of them. To infer that these board members are in the bag, or incompetent, is uncalled for mudslinging. I believe that what they did was long overdue and had been fully vetted in the many public hearings in the past, ergo no more public whining was necessary. Now, enough talk, let’s get on with the update! Gerald Spellenberg, McKinleyville Editor: It was shocking to see the disregard for public process and for the efforts of the Planning Commission, the attendees at years of Planning Commission meetings, and the work of the Planning Department staff demonstrated by the Board of Supervisors in the straw poll vote taken on the “revised” General Plan Guiding Principles.  How is it even possible that a vote of such importance could be announced with merely three days’ notice? How is it possible that these “revised” principles could be cooked-up behind closed doors and then sprung on the public in such a manner?  These are not minor edits but are major revisions, particularly eliminating all

reference to protecting forests and farmland from further subdivision. In addition, the board voted to remove a key principle that spoke to the importance of including actionable plans for funding critical infrastructure needs. As a member of the board of the Weott Community Services District I can tell you that our outdated and grossly underfunded water and sewer systems in our community and other small communities like ours are in desperate financial straits. For these reasons and many others, the board must reconsider the decision to adopt revised General Plan Guiding Principles to allow sufficient time for public participation and to remedy these and other gross omissions.  Barbara Kennedy, Weott

You deserve it.

Bug Spray Not OK Editor: We get a free copy of the Journal every week because it is paid for by advertisers. So, when I see an ad for Bayer Crop Science Complete Insect Killer for a mere $8.99 at Ace “The Helpful Place” (June 13), I am both saddened and horrified. Bayer’s Complete Insect Killer’s main ingredient is Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid which has been implicated in bee death. How is this helpful? Good people put trust in your advertisers and want to support them because they enable the North Coast Journal to exist. We need that trust to be upheld. Therefore, I would like to suggest that the Journal review advertising guidelines and consider refusing advertising for toxic and dangerous products which harm us all. What do you think? Carol Moné, Trinidad

We have it.

Plans, Materials, Advice & Free estimates, too. At your place or ours.

WEEKLY SALE SPECIALS

Preserva-Wood® Clear, Sequoia, Redwood, Cedar/Fir. 201 Series. Available in 1 or 5 Gal.

Superdeck

Exterior Transparent Stain DB1900 Series Available in 1 or 5 Gal.

Waiting for a Ruling Editor: What we really want to know is, what is going to happen to the parcels that were sold? (Blog Jammin’, June 13.) Will the county issue deeds to the new owners or do they all have to return their purchases to McKee? Does McKee have to remove the new buildings and bulldoze the new roads he put in? Thank you. Jonathan Hooper, McKinleyville

Lattice 4’ x 8’ in redwood and plastic on sale

Trex Sanctio n Shell ed

Trex Decking

How Outdoor Living SHOULD Feel! Composite Decking. 3 Colors. 25 Year Limited Residential Warranty

Serving Humboldt County since 1946

Write a letter!

Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. l

Mon - Sat 7:30 am - 5:30 pm. - Sun 9 am - 3:30 pm

1784 Smith Lane - Fortuna - 725-5111 www.forbusco.com

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

5


Top left: Calista and Richard in Key West at the Fort Zachary Taylor State Historic Site. Bottom left: Calista and Richard enjoying lobster rolls in Rhode Island.

Meet our neighbors

Right: Calista and Richard on a bridge over the Seine in Paris.

Calista Sullivan and Richard Sanborn, Murphy’s Shoppers San Diego became a bit hectic for Richard and Calista, so they swapped that life for a tranquil half-acre in Bayside. Richard designed their home with a large deck overlooking fields and woods. They moved in Thanksgiving Day 1987. Murphy’s roasted that first Thanksgiving turkey for them and they’ve been faithful customers ever since. Several times a year, Calista and Richard get the urge to travel. San Francisco, the Oregon Coast, the Rockies, New York City, New England and laid-back Key West, Florida are their favorite U.S. destinations. In Key West, Richard and Calista suggest a great place to visit is The Fort Zachary Taylor State Historic Site built in the mid-1800s.

When they visit Europe, they love Paris and London. During a recent ten-day stay in Paris they found an apartment near the Eiffel Tower. Right down the street were all the necessities: a fruit and vegetable seller, coffeehouse, butcher, bakery and two restaurants. They enjoyed companionable walks through town each day and shopped for fresh food which they prepared in their kitchen. Of course, there was always time to stop for refreshments at a sidewalk café in Paris. Their love of books is another common bond. Calista was a librarian at HSU and the Humboldt County Library. After selling the Arcata landmark, Tin Can Mail Man, Richard began writing fiction.

He has written five novels and is always interested in talking with agents or publishers. Old Arcata Road denizens are familiar with the couple who walks that road almost every morning. That’s Richard and Calista! They have tallied up 13,000 miles or so in the past 22 years on that route, just a two mile trip at a time. At home in Bayside, just like in Paris, Richard and Calista can walk down the street, find local fresh fruits and vegetables, a steaming cup of coffee, baked goods, hot food to go and a personal meat market that’ll roast a chicken just for them... or for you! And it is all at your friendly neighborhood Murphy’s Market. By Colleen Hole, Advertising, North Coast Journal

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


views

Inside KEET By Matt Knight

A

s a KEET volunteer of over 15 years and employee for just under three years, I read your article (“KEET at the Crossroads,” June 20) with interest. I left the station in October of 2012 under circumstances which were both puzzling and sad. I loved my job at KEET. Probably too much for my own good. So what I am about to relate could be characterized as sour grapes. That said, I am a true believer in the station and in public broadcasting. However, going from volunteer to employee was an eye-opening experience. Senior staff seemed more focused on running out the clock than advancing KEET’s mission. In my opinion, KEET’s leadership almost completely lacked (and lacks) the energy, motivation and insight for the many challenges ahead. Leaders at KEET have adopted a deer-in-the-headlights approach to the onrushing media sea change and financial crunch. With predictable results. Mr. Schoenherr pegged Corporation for Public Broadcasting support at 46 percent in a February 2011 San Francisco Chronicle article. Perhaps the one-time gift of $200,000 has brought that down to one-third of the annual 2012 budget, the amount he mentions in your article. But this is an event not likely to be repeated and not a basis for a solid financial future. He says a merger is unlikely. He doesn’t say that the station may have very little choice in the matter. Even more troubling, it seemed very much like the people who cared the most were treated the worst. Many of us joked about “working on the plantation.” That was very much the prevailing attitude of superiors. Staff meetings were rarely held. When they were, the word was often put out beforehand that certain topics were off the table. New ideas were discouraged or given short-shrift. Fundraising goals were never openly stated and presumably never met. With the possible exception of the two most high-profile events, the director of development and the general manager were rarely present at fundraising activities. For such a small station, all hands must be on deck to be effective. This was almost never the case, in my experience.

“A mind needs books as a sword needs a whetstone, if it is to keep its edge.” - George R.R. Martin

Used Books

A callous disregard also extended to station volunteers. Certain long-time volunteers and community members were deemed “unsuitable” and simply never asked back to fundraising events. Others were more directly disrespected and devalued. As a result, it became difficult to recruit them for fundraising activities. This led to the curtailing of the twiceyearly local pledge nights — down from seven to 10 days in the past to as little as three days today. It was decided that it was simply easier (less work) to put up the national fundraising feeds than to find and schedule community members. This was a crucial misstep. The station was simply left to the mercy of government for major support, making the least effort possible to be involved in or relevant to the community it supposedly serves. The station’s local productions were (and continue to be) among its bright spots. But even these were a challenge to mount as senior staff seemed openly hostile to them. I was told by the station’s engineer that they were “more trouble than they are worth.” In one case, the former outreach director was reprimanded for buying food for the hardworking volunteer crew of North Coast Sessions. Yes, some great local television got made — of which the station can be very proud. But only in spite of itself. Also plaguing the station was (and is) a singular lack of oversight. I found KEET’s board of directors to be both lazy and inattentive, meeting once a month to swallow wholesale whatever platitudes were served up by senior staff. They set fundraising goals which they did not meet and which once unmet were simply abandoned. The board did not behave like a body charged with making hard decisions. There is no better evidence of its poor stewardship than the mess the station finds itself in now. Even so, I would urge your readers to continue to support KEET. It is a treasured resource and one that would be sorely missed. However, such support should be made conditional on the replacement of KEET’s tired leadership and the deadwood on its board. KEET needs people who are ready, willing and able to it into the future. Otherwise, it seems unlikely there will be one. l

• New Books

Special orders welcome for new books!

402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

GOT iPad? Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. See store for details.

NEW Special Financing Available

On the Plaza • 707-825-7100

ALL BIKES & KAYAKS Now ON SALE THROUGH JULY

650 10th St., Arcata • 822-4673 • 125 West 5th St., Eurka • 445-1711 OPEN DAILY MON-SAT: 9-6, SUN: 10-5 • ADVENTURESEDGE.COM northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

7


June 27, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 26

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/news editor Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com editorial intern Emily Hamann emily@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Alana Chenevert, Miles Eggleston, Drew Hyland, Lynn Jones production assistant Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England bookkeeper/receptionist Meadow Gorman mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Photo courtesy of Marimba One. Marimba played by Katarzyna My´cka.

This Column is Classified

I

am creeped out. No, I didn’t go see “World War Z.” Instead, I read in the New York Times how the guy responsible for protecting the privacy of a billion Facebook users left Facebook in 2010 for the National Security Agency. But that’s only part of what’s creeping me out. And it’s not Edward Snowden’s blowout that the government taps our phone texts and contacts and whatnot. My general reaction to that story has been: “Well, yeah?” I assumed that the government or my bosses snoop into my records and tap my phones. These days, I picture Calstate Chancellor Timothy White clicking through my emails. So news of the NSA’s Prism program had the same effect on me that I imagine the Pentagon Papers would have had back in 1971, had I not been too busy reading “Dick and Jane”: Really, our government has lied to us about Vietnam? What creeps me out is that this massive national peeping into our personal data comes even as our California lawmakers try to keep us from poking around government data, which we have had a right to since 1968, through the California Public Records Act. They tried to attach to passage of the state budget a sneaky measure that would weaken the public records act. Gov. Jerry Brown says it would save tens of millions of dollars. But in a $97 billion state budget, that savings is chump change. And after years of astronomical deficits, we are awash with money. As I write this column, I don’t know how this will shake out. An outcry may stop the proposed changes. This is part of what might be a national trend. According to the Sacramento Bee, back in 2011, Utah passed a law that would keep out of public hands emails, text messages and other communications by public officials. After a public outcry lawmakers repealed the measure. Why now? The same reason that government peeping into my personal info only now makes me nervous: It isn’t the data one collects that’s the problem; it is what one can now do with data collected.

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

One of the proposed changes to the CPRA would allow local agencies to give out information on paper only — which would make it difficult to analyze data. I love Microsoft Excel. You import data into it, sort it, find the right Excel formula, and suddenly wonderful patterns appear: what money has been spent on what; where campaign money came from; which people public officials mix with in social circles. With Google Spreadsheets, you can share and pool data with other people. So now ordinary citizens can do sophisticated investigations into how government works. And that creeps out folks who work in government. This, too, is why the more I learn about the NSA’s Prism program, the more creeped out I become. It isn’t that they snoop. It is that they massively snoop. And now they can dump all that data into powerful software that can sort it much better than Excel, find the right formulas and find all kinds of suspicious connections — Marcy Burstiner, a college professor, trains impressionable youth. She has a sizeable number of Chinese international students and past connections with Saudi Arabians, Lebanese, Pakistanis, disgruntled American veterans, environmental extremists, feminazi lesbians and fruititarian freegans, and she once spent three months in Malaysia — a Muslim country. And her TiVo records show she watches a disturbing number of Nazi and zombie movies and has at her bedside Julian Barnes’ Sense of an Ending (which sounds apocalyptic, doesn’t it?). OMG! I’m a terrorist and I never even knew it! Imagine if back in the 1950s, Sen. Joseph McCarthy had access to all this data and powerful databases to sort it. Imagine if the House Committee on Un-American Activities had it. I’d be so blacklisted. We live in a time when our president justifies preemptive unmanned drone assassinations of American citizens. We have an American prison in an Air Force base on Cuba filled with people imprisoned for years without trial. We are currently using unmanned drones to patrol the U.S.-Mexi-

can border to stop illegal crossings. And all the checks and balances our democracy was designed around are melting. Instead of an executive branch checked by a legislative branch checked by a judiciary, we have our legislators endorsing the actions of the president, which are then given the stamp of constitutionality by the U.S. Supreme Court. And the Fourth Estate? Corporations have systematically bought up our news organizations and decimated the press. The only protection we have left is the ability as individual citizens working collectively to monitor the actions of our government and call out our leaders when they do something too creepy. This is why people like Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden feel compelled to put their own freedoms in jeopardy to leak information. Too many of the documents Snowden leaked shouldn’t have been classified in the first place. And, by the way, how much of Manning’s trial, which is going on now, have you heard about through the news media? It isn’t the snooping that creeps me out. It is the combined penetration into all our information at the same time that the government tries hard to keep its own information out of our hands. I want the right to classify my own data. My iPhoto files? Classified. My Gmail account? Top Secret. My iTunes library? Fuhgeddaboudit. Meanwhile, NSA, do me a favor. I set up a Gmail account, and I can’t for the life of me remember the password I used. Can you dig it up and text it to me? You’ve got my number.

– Marcy Burstiner mib3@humboldt.edu Marcy Burstiner is chair of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at Humboldt State University. If the NSA is really poking through her files, she pities the peon assigned the task and gives him this advice: Stick to the years ’86-88. All the interesting stuff happened back then.


Blog Jammin’ Stake-out

continued on next page

Wicker & Rattan Furniture

Showroom at the corner of 6th & I in Arcata

845-9148

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

The wooden stakes planted in the Manila dunes are gone again, spurned as an unsanctioned environmental experiment. The Manila Community Services District removed them today, and is storing the slats at its office if someone wants to pick them up. According to Steve Werner, a Humboldt County building and planning supervisor, the district had to either amend its existing permit to include the stakes or else remove them from the beach. Werner said the installation of the stakes was “surprising to see without district authorization.” The Manila Community Services District owns the land and already has a permit for dune restoration, but that permit doesn’t include the rogue stake experiment, which went in without any official approval. “I didn’t see a need for a permit. We’re just repairing,” said Uri Driscoll, who compared his group’s stake installation to children building in the sand. Now that he has learned the county sees it differently, he plans to investigate a little more. On June 17, Driscoll and his ad hoc

team, Bill Weigle, Dennis Mayo and Ray Reel, pounded in the sticks to try to rebuild what they consider a “blowout,” an unstable depression in the dunes (“Rogue Dune Experiment,” June 20). They were hoping to repeat the success of similar actions on the East Coast and in Oregon. It’s their contention that the removal of European beach grass by the Friends of the Dunes, under the auspices of the county and the Manila district, has damaged the dunes. Friends of the Dunes Executive Director Carol Vander Meer conceded that stakes might be something to try in the future, but she stressed the need for careful consideration and input from the scientific community first. She pointed out, “What some people might call a blowout might be a natural area of movement that might allow new plants to come in. From an ecologist’s point of view, we need some areas like that.” Someone first removed the stakes over the weekend, but no one claimed responsibility. Driscoll and Reel wasted no time re-planting them, adding a sign that read, “Dune repair in progress. Please do not disturb.”

THE

BY JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL / JUNE 25 AT 1:38 P.M.

Zamora’s

I S ION VCENTER

Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years.

616 H STREET • EUREKA

443-1619

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

9


Blog Jammin’

Fortuna Rodeo • July 15-21

continued from previous page

Don’t wait in line, Go online!

open door

Welcomes Dr. Catherine Poterack to the Eureka Health and Wellness Center as the Director of Open Door’s new same day pediatric service Kids Express.

“I love being a pediatrician. When families entrust me with the well being of their children, it is an honor and a responsibility that I take very seriously. Being the proud parent of three dynamic kids, I know the challenges and the rewards from the inside track. ”

ROGER SANDERSON

www.fortunarodeo.com

Go to www.FortunaRodeo.com to buy tickets for any rodeo event, including the Barbecue, Cowboy Mixer and admission to all three days of rodeo events. Register for ATV events online, even buy Fortuna Rodeo hats and posters! Available until 5 p.m. Thursday July 11th.

For More Information Call Kids Express at (707) 269-7057 or Eureka Health and Wellness at (707) 441-1624 www.opendoorhealth.com

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ROGUE STAKES IN THE DUNES. PHOTO BY CHRIS DRISCOLL.

Coastal Commission District Manager Bob Merrill said his office has contacted the commission’s enforcement staff in San Francisco about the issue. While the area is not in a zone where the Coastal Commission issues permits, Merrill wanted to keep the San Francisco office in the loop. John Woolley, a Manila Community Services District board member, said that any plan for the dunes “should be first examined as a proposal, which we’ve never received.” Even if the district wanted to

add the stakes to its permit, the slats could not go in until the permit was amended and approved. Driscoll was surprised to learn the stakes had been removed again. He said that the Manila Community Services District needs “to address the fact that they created a topographical change in the dune,” and that, “We’re hoping to have a collaboration ... and bring the dune back to its original height and shape.” ●


FUZZINESS.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SEQUOIA PARK ZOO.

Greg Rael Law Offices

READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

www.north coastjournal .com/blogthing

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976

LOCAL WINE FLIGHTS

1026 Third Street, Eureka

(707) 445-9666

FRIVOLITY / BY EMILY HAMANN / WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 AT 3:03 P.M.

Featuring a 6 wine flight, curated by the Humboldt Wine Association & 3 wines from local tasting rooms

Bundle of Joy

Aw. It was a very special Father’s Day for one local couple, Sumo and Stella Luna, who welcomed their first child into the world on Sunday. And this was a furry one. Stella Luna and Sumo are the red pandas at the Sequoia Park Zoo. The 4-ounce girl cub was the first red panda born at zoo, and zoo staff have been preparing for her arrival since shortly after mom and dad were introduced on Valentine’s Day. Zoo visitors can’t see the cub right now, but a video feed of the inside of the red panda’s den should be coming in the next two to three weeks. The zoo’s press release can be viewed on the Journal’s website.

BRICELAND VINEYARDS WINERY • ELK PRAIRIE VINEYARD FIELDBROOK WINERY • LOST COAST VINEYARD MONUMENT MOUNTAIN VINEYARD • MOONSTONE CROSSING RIVERBEND CELLARS • ROBERT GOODMAN WINERY ROSINA VINEYARD

WILL BE CLOSED FOR THE HOLIDAY

CARS. TRUCKS. SUVs. ATVs.

THURSDAY, JULY 4 . TH

Please submit your copy by 5 PM FRIDAY, JULY 5TH for the July 11th issue.

Tires, Wheels, Batteries, Wipers and More Locally owned since 1933.

CONCIERGE • TOURS • TASTING Wednesday - Sunday, Noon - 9 p.m.

(707) 822-5191

2nd & G Streets, Old Town Eureka

1265 Giuntoli Lane Arcata, CA 95521

HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

11


Marimba!

Humboldt has front row seats for a music fest celebrating an overgrown xylophone By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

W

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARIMBA ONE

hen Nancy Zeltsman meets someone, on an airplane, for example, and says that she’s a marimba player, “the next question is always, ‘What’s that?’” She usually answers that it’s like a giant bass xylophone, since everyone is at least familiar with the toy version, even if the reference only calls to mind “the music behind the dancing skeletons” in cartoons. Probably you’ve heard it as the default ringtone of an iPhone, the music between stories on NPR, on Jimmy Buffet’s “Margaritaville” or the Rolling Stones’ classic “Under My Thumb.” Somewhere around the age of 8, Zeltsman, who began playing piano at age 5, had a small revelation. “I’m a musician,” she thought, “but I’m just not sure the piano is my instrument.” Later, as a teenager, she was “hooked” on the tympany and xylophone, but it was the rosewood keys of the marimba that won her heart. “There’s just something seductive about the fact that you can make this very rich, warm tone from a resonating piece of wood,” she says. Zeltsman suspects that this sound,

AT 8½ FEET, IT TAKES TWO PEOPLE TO SET UP A MARIMBA ONE CONCERT MARIMBA. PHOTO BY KIMBERLY HODGES

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

the natural ring of once living wood, is what draws so many people in, including the musicians attending the marimba festival that bears her name. This year, the marimba world converges on the HSU campus for the Zeltsman Marimba Festival. This is the first time the 11-year-old festival, which has taken place in Los Angeles, Boston and Amsterdam, is happening here. The festival runs June 30 through July 13, with eight nights of concerts for the public and master classes taught by an international faculty of marimba all-stars for musicians. Arcata is already hallowed ground for marimbists, as it is home to Marimba One, maker of this somewhat mysterious instrument that is at once rhythm and melody, ancient and high-tech. If you’ve ever looked at the inside of a piano, you’ve seen how the keys control soft little felt hammers that strike the taut strings to sound the notes. To play the marimba is to move inside that space, holding the mallets in your hands and hitting the rosewood slats directly, controlling the force, angle and speed of each strike. “It means we can actually do a lot more sophisticated types of strokes,” says Zeltsman. “That’s how you can really be more expressive.” She feels the instrument is capable of “a bigger range of sound quality and color” than a piano, with more ways for an individual musician to create a unique sound, even though fewer notes are ringing at once. You could be forgiven for mistaking the

marimba for a xylophone. The basic principal is the same: hitting slats of different sizes to produce notes. But the marimba’s double row of wooden bars creates a completely different sound, warm, rich and natural, as opposed to the metallic chime of a xylophone. It also has the range and fullness of a guitar. Below each of the marimba’s bars is a resonator tube that acts to enlarge the sound and, well, resonate, just as the body of a guitar or a piano does. Like the guitar and the piano, the marimba lends itself to solo performance, both rhythmic and melodic, capable of a broad range of moods from playful to haunting. Zeltsman can’t help dancing a little with her marimba. In a video posted on her website, she darts back and forth over the keys with two mallets crossed in each hand, swaying her shoulders and smiling as she taps out a whimsical passage accompanied by clarinet. The marimba is 8 ½ feet long, and unlike the piano, your fingers aren’t in contact with the keys, and you can’t sit. While most players don’t focus on how their bodies move, Zeltsman points out that playing requires “big physical gestures” that are part of the sound and the experience of playing. To hit the bars and hit them just so involves the whole body, shifting weight, changing posture, reaching out and pulling in. The concert portion of the festival will give participants and the rest of us a chance to see and hear players who Zeltsman says have “really explored the instrument.” A few of the ensemble pieces in the concert series will also feature master class participants who have been coached by faculty members. Two to three headliners are scheduled each night for the sake of variety — of which there is a great deal. Opening night, June 30, for example, features California native and former principal percussionist of the San Francisco Symphony, Jack


Humboldt Crabs Baseball

2013 Season

Van Geem, whom Zeltsman calls one of marimba’s “best kept secrets.” The same evening, Beverly Johnston from Canada will perform one piece on marimba and flower pots. Actual flower pots. Another piece will have Johnston doing a little rapping. That’s just the first night. Zeltsman is as excited for the performances as anyone, saying, “I am personally fascinated by everybody on the faculty, so I’m kind of dying to hear all of them.”

At least seven

of the instruments to be played at the Zeltsman Marimba Festival were made by Marimba One, in an industrial building at the end of O Street in Arcata. Company owner Ron Samuels has a sleepy-eyed smile as he ambles around the factory floor in flip flops and a wool sweater. “I’m not OSHA safe today,” he says, shrugging at his footwear. The same deep marimba sound that lured Nancy Zeltsman into playing gave Samuels the itch to build one. After that, “to satisfy my addiction I had to start selling them,” he says with a soft chuckle. Some of his earlier models went back to the instrument’s African roots, using gourds, a few bundles of which still hang from the ceiling in nets above the shop. Founded in 1986, Marimba One now employs roughly 25 people and is widely recognized as one of the top American marimba manufacturers, alongside companies like Malletech, Musser and Demorrow. All around the cavernous warehouse space are pallets and shelves of rosewood bars, stacked like gold bullion. The sawdust in the air is less sharp-smelling than in a typical woodshop, and the floor is constantly being swept. Samuels explains that Marimba One almost exclusively uses rosewood, the preferred material for marimbas, because of its “naturally musical” qualities. The exception is a one-of-a-kind showpiece with a frame of ziricote, a rare wood found in Mexico and Guatemala that has a beautiful swirling grain, to be unveiled at the Zeltsman Marimba Festival. Samuels regularly travels to Central America to buy the high-quality rosewood, inspecting trees and planks before having them milled and shipped back to Arcata for air and kiln drying.

Honduran rosewood is rare, only growing in Mexico, Guatemala and Belize. The tree is not on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of endangered species, but those in the marimba business are concerned about its future. Some companies are trying out synthetic materials or alternative woods, like padouk, which work, but don’t make quite the same sound. Marimba One is talking with Vice Mayor Mark Wheetley and the Arcata City Council about the possibility of establishing a sister forest in Belize modeled after the Arcata Community Forest. Samuels and his team are also researching ways to best use their scrap materials, so they waste as little as possible. Despite the distance from the forests of Central America, Samuels built Marimba One in Humboldt because “it’s nice here. People love it here.” He says he prefers working with people who are happy to be where they are, a relaxed contentment he’s not sure he could find somewhere like Los Angeles. Samuels himself left the Los Angeles area to attend HSU and fell in love with the area. Humboldt County’s steady climate is also good for marimba making. Fairly constant humidity is optimal for wood, and the North Coast doesn’t have the same wild variations in temperature that can wreak havoc with tuning on the East Coast. Even so, the concrete shop floor at Marimba One is heated to keep a constant temperature, and its storage warehouse around the corner is downright balmy. Josh Stumps, the head of acoustical research, is wearing safety glasses and working a band saw, carving arches into the undersides of bars, roughing out notes to be fine-tuned later. Behind him are broad slats of wood with names written on them in chalk: “Ghost,” “Pyite” and “Caspian.” The boards are named by the men who work on them to ensure that each marimba’s frame comes from a continuous piece of wood. Extra pieces are kept aside on the off chance that a frame will need to be repaired. Master tuner Brian Stern works off to the side of the shop in a small, low-ceilinged room that feels a bit like a humidor. Shelves of cocoa-colored bars cover two continued on next page

WEEKLY SCHEDULE Wednesday, June 26 Marysville Gold Sox 7 pm Friday, June 28 Redding Colt .45s 7 pm Saturday, June 29 Redding Colt .45s 7 pm Sunday, June 30 Redding Colt .45s 12:30 pm www.humboldtcrabs.com

Crabs Ballpark 9th & F Arcata

Beverly Johnston from Canada will perform one piece on marimba and flower pots. Actual flower pots.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

13


continued from previous page walls, each shelf faintly marked by a musical note. Spider, a husky mix, rests her chin on her paws in the corner. Stern picks up a bar and taps it with a mallet in front of two sawdust-covered microphones. The mics are hooked up to a strobe tuner, a retro sci-fi machine with spinning dials that whir into a visible checkerboard pattern when the correct pitch is achieved. If the pitch is off, Stern uses the drum sander directly below the tuner to shave off a little more from the arch on the underside of the bar. Knowing how much to sand and from what part of the arch is something that takes years of practice. This is where the technological exactitude ends and a well-trained ear takes over. To “voice” a marimba according to the musician’s desires, Stern listens to the bars, their strong or weak overtones, the “brightness” or “darkness” of their sounds and the evenness and clarity of their ringing due to natural variations in the wood. The assembled marimba needs to have a consistent tonal quality among the keys, a unified palette of notes. To a layperson, the process can seem a bit mysterious. To a marimbist, however, the nuances of sound are vital, and worth a high price. A marimba made with the cream of the rosewood crop will cost thousands more than Marimba One’s

standard model, which runs about $13,000. Premium voicing and other customization can bring the price tag to around $25,000. The marimba, specifically its keyboard, is delicate. Poor storage and poor playing can both damage an instrument and its sound. About a decade ago, a high school sent in for tuning a marimba so out of whack that Samuels called up the music department to ask what had happened. He was told the students had been allowed to “have at it,” hammering away at random and leaving the instrument “confused.” On the other hand, when world-renowned marimbist Katarzyna Myćka sent her instrument in for tuning, the Marimba One tuners were surprised to find it sounding even better than when they first built it. Samuels and his crew believe that a

marimba’s sound can be enhanced by a truly gifted musician who is consistently hitting “the sweet spot” on the keys, allowing it to “open up” like the seasoned violin of a master. When asked how this kind of change in the sound of the bars is possible, Samuels, who has been building marimbas since the mid-1980s, smiles, touches his chin and answers, “I really don’t know.” Leigh Howard Stevens, owner of rival company Malletech in New Jersey and founder of the annual Leigh Howard Stevens Marimba Seminar, is a bit less romantic on the subject. Stevens feels that some of the talk about tonal distinctions of marimRon Samuels demonstrates the musical bas can verge on “marketing smoke tone of a rosewood bar. photo by Kimberly Hodges and mirrors.” He is also quick to point out the advantages of Malletech’s patented adjustable damage a skilled player inflicts. When a tuning. Still, he acknowlmusician cares for a marimba properly edges, “Ron Samuels makes — storing it at the proper temperature, a beautiful instrument.” not striking so hard as to crack the wood Stevens attributes the im— the instrument can “age gracefully,” provements in a well-played Stevens says. Over time, the wood “shelf marimba to the lack of key hardens,” losing more moisture and producing a better sound. The science of the resonators, the tubes that sit below each key like an inverted pipe organ, is more exact. Varying lengths of pipe (longer, then shorter, then longer) form an Scurve along the bottom of the instrument. Each pipe is plugged with a

above and left the inner workings of a marimba. right the frames are hinged to fold for shipping. photos by Kimberly Hodges

14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


Bella Italia Restaurant “This is THE best pasta in town!” -Barry J., Eureka OpEn 7 days a wEEk 312 w. washington st., Eureka (just off Broadway, by Leon’s Car Care) ORdERs TO GO 707-443-3070

above marked boards for marimba frames. above right carved keys awaiting finetuning. right master tuner brian stern at the strobe tuner. photos by Kimberly Hodges

stopper at a specific level to amplify its corresponding key. This is Marimba One’s signature Basso Bravo design, developed by Samuels and Stumps. The design allows their marimbas to play 5 ½ octaves rather than the standard five. Like Spinal Tap’s amp, their marimbas go to 11. The extended range is particularly useful for playing pieces originally written for violin, and it broadens the possibilities for the marimba as a concert instrument. It’s a major selling point, and its secrets are guarded jealously. In fact, Samuels does not allow the taking of photos in the resonator section of the shop. Marketing Director Nicole Riggs, a French woman with sunny freckles and a wave of red hair, apologizes for the secrecy. The marimba industry “is a strange world,” she says.

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

“It’s small, but the competition is fierce.” Though some of Marimba One’s designs are patented, she says they have been copied and replicated by rivals. Eight marimbas are boxed up for shipping at the moment, but she will not divulge how many the company builds or sells yearly. Riggs is even reluctant to share the full names of her tuners. She gives a small laugh and says that there are “very few in the world, and we treasure them.” As she sweeps briskly up the stairs, Riggs warns that photos are not allowed in the mallet shop either. According to the website, Arias Ruiz is “Boss of the Mallet World,” an enviable title. “I’m more like a king,” he jokes. Arias is a young man with black-framed glasses, and he spends much of his time in front of a machine that looks like it came from Tim Burton’s garage. There are what look like bike chains, chunky gears and two strands of yard being wound onto the top of a wooden

stick. “It’s kind of a Frankenstein in a way,” he says. The winder is a mix of high and low tech, conceived of by local engineering guru Frank Jolly and developed by Samuels and Steve Cole. Cole, who sports a white handlebar mustache that is in itself a feat of engineering, is a former Yakima engineer. He and Samuels met while shoveling manure at Freshwater stables, and eventually Samuels convinced Cole to help with the more complex problem of winding mallet heads with two strands instead of the usual one. The unique double-winding system is another industry secret. When Arias is asked how many mallets he winds in a day, Riggs quickly says that he cannot divulge the number. A box of at least two dozen sits on the table beside the machine. Arias, who is a drummer, says that the intricate weaving creates more variables for adjusting the sound they make. He shows off some colorful samples, slightly egg-shaped ones in navy and turquoise, and orange and gray ones that have a yin-yang swirl at the top. Riggs smiles and says they are fine to photocontinued on next page

822-2227

ragon Golden D ll Ro

Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

15


continued from previous page graph — just not near the winder. While he can hardly resist playing a few notes when there’s an assembled marimba on the floor, Arias is no marimbist. It’s hard to believe there isn’t a closet player among them, but nobody in the shop will admit to really playing the marimba, even Samuels. It could just be that working with pros like Zeltsman and Myćka on the design and tuning of instruments over the years has made everyone humble. Samuels is president of the board of trustees for the Zeltsman Marimba Festival, and Zeltsman endorses his products, so he’s thrilled that the festival is being held in Arcata, and he’s planning tours of the factory for visiting musicians.

When Zeltsman,

who’s been playing professionally for more than 30 years, decided to make a career of the marimba, it was an unusual path. Most orchestras still don’t have a dedicated marimbist. If anything, they have a percussionist who handles a number of instruments, one of which might be the marimba. In fact, relatively few pieces had been written specifically for the marimba back then. It has only existed as a concert instrument since the 1970s, despite its being, according to Zeltsman, “truly one of the most viable solo instruments.” As a specialty, the instrument offered uncharted territory, a challenge too exciting for a young musician to resist. These days, Nancy Zeltsman is a chair at the Boston Conservatory and the Berklee College of Music, both positions that were created for her in 1993 to teach marimba as a specialty within their percussion departments. While the marimba is gaining in popularity, such an emphasis on the instrument in a music department is still fairly rare. There is also still a dearth of music for the instrument. For about a decade, Zeltsman paired with a violinist and “basically created a repertoire for violin and marimba because there wasn’t any music written for that,” she recalls. Most recently, she has been doing the same with a clarinetist. Her work expanding the catalog of music for marimba has been a “huge service” to the instrument, according to Dr. Marc Woolridge, professor of music at Indiana Wesleyan University,

Concert Schedule All performances $10, $7 for students and seniors Sunday, June 30, 8 p.m. “Marimba Mix” Jack Van Geem, Beverley Johnston and the Joint Venture Percussion Duo Arcata Playhouse 1251 Ninth St., Arcata Wednesday, July 3, 8 p.m. “Expressive Complexity” Pedro Carneiro and Mike Truesdell HSU, Native Forum, Behavioral and Social Sciences Building, Arcata Friday, July 5, 8 p.m. “Moods & Grooves” Nancy Zeltsman and Fumito Nunoya Arcata Playhouse Saturday, July 6, 8 p.m. “Jazz and More” Christos Rafalides, Petros Klampanis, and other faculty and participants Arcata Playhouse Monday, July 8, 8 p.m. “Participants Concert” HSU, Native Forum Thursday, July 11, 8 p.m. “East and West” Due East (Greg Beyer and Erin Lesser) and other faculty and participants HSU, Native Forum Friday, July 12, 8 p.m. “North and South” Javier Nandayapa and other faculty and participants HSU, Native Forum Saturday, July 13, 1-5 p.m. “Participants Marathon Concert” HSU, Native Forum

who is unaffiliated with her festival. He calls Zeltsman “a phenomenal player,” and predicts that for Humboldt audiences, Zeltsman and Marimba One are going to make an “unbeatable” combination. Most of the time, marimbists are alone in the back of an orchestra. Zeltsman’s festival was born from her desire to create an event where marimba players could connect, “focus on musicianship” and share ideas about how to expand the marimba repertoire. “One of my little dreams,” she says, “is to elevate the instrument as a concert instrument.” According to Zeltsman, more than 360 people have

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

samuels and zeltsman at a marimba one. photo courtesy of Marimba One

participated in the festivals since 2001. Now, “a lot of them are starting to kind of make careers as marimba soloists or teachers … and a lot of them have gone on to study with teachers on the other side of the world that they met at the marimba festival.” In comparison to his own seminar, Stevens says the Zeltsman Marimba Festival is “more of a happening,” since the Leigh Howard Stevens Seminar is more strictly focused on technique and the method of playing he himself developed. At his annual seminars, “students know they’re going to get hammered,” he adds, laughing. “They probably have more fun at Nancy’s.” Humboldt native Tyler Hunt is looking forward to the festival for the very reasons Zeltsman started it: the prospect of working with musicians and teachers from all over the world. Plus, “it’s kind of cool it’ll be here in my hometown,” he says over the phone. The festival is “a whole melting pot of teachers and experience,” he says. Hunt, 26, graduated from HSU with a degree in percussion performance, a field he will pursue further in the master’s program at California State University at Long Beach. He says he plays “a little

bit of everything” but finds the marimba alluring for its “powerful combination of the melodic and harmonic … [and its] percussive element.” Like Zeltsman, he’s also excited about the new ground yet to be broken with the marimba. “People don’t know what its potential as a concert instrument is.” Hunt will attend the master classes and also perform in the participants’ concert. Since marimbas are a bit large and expensive for a grad student, he’ll be using one that HSU and local teachers are loaning for the festival. Still, he hopes to own one in the future. Zelstman hasn’t actually seen inside the HSU buildings the festival will be using yet, which makes her only slightly nervous. She says that putting the event together is always “a nail-biter,” but once everything is happening, she enjoys seeing everyone connecting and inspiring one another. “For me the fun of it is once everybody assembles, just kind of standing back and watching it all click,” she says, “I have no idea who’s going to really get lit up by one person or another, but it’s really just a blast to kind of stand back and watch that happen.” l


home & garden

service directory

continued on next page

How Fertile Is Your Soil?

THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL ASSUMES NO LIABILITY FOR SERVICES ADVERTISED. YOU MAY WANT TO VERIFY CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBERS AND PROOF OF INSURANCE FROM THE VENDOR OF YOUR CHOICE.

DIRTY BUSINESS SOIL CONSULTING & ANALYSIS (707) 633-8885 • 1115 11TH ST., ARCATA WWW.DIRTYBUSINESSDIVAS.COM

Your source for the finest hardwoods & woodworking supplies

FSC® 100% Radiata Blue Pine Lumber SUSTAINABLY GROWN & HARVESTED HERE IN FIELDBROOK DRIED AND MILLED HERE AT ALMQUIST LUMBER AVAILABLE IN SIZES FROM 1X4 TO 2X6 Almquist Lumber has been certified by the Forest Stewardship Council™ for more than 10 years. FSC promotes the responsible management of forests worldwide. For more info see www.fsc.org

5301 Boyd Rd., Arcata • Just off Giuntoli Lane at Hwy 299 825-8880 • www.almquistlumber.com

Dry Secure American Steel can tailor your building to your needs, budget and space.

Call Gary at 707-925-6444.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

17


Field notes continued from previous page

Psych Bible, Part 2 By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

Did you know… Biodynamic practices emphasize the interrelationship of plants, soil and animals, as a self-sustaining system and reduce the need for chemical nutrients.  Biology knows best!!!

Beneficial Living Center and Garden Supplies

To learn more about Biodynamic Practices, attend our Biodynamic Composting Workshop on July 3rd, 7pm @ BLC 148 South G St., Arcata • 633-6095 • www.beneficiallivingcenter.com

Sizzling Summer SALE! Natural Response Cal King Mattress Set Laura Ashley Queen Set WAS $1,699 NOW $999

Twins start at $169

Fulls $209 Queens $249

was $2,699

now $1,699

MOORE’S SLEEPWORLD Buy Today Deliver Tonight

Free delivery & set up with $500 or more purchase

www.mooressleepworld.com

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

A

s I wrote last week, a book with the innocent-sounding title “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,” published by the American Psychiatric Association, affects many — perhaps most — lives in America. Fourteen years in the making, the latest revision (DSM-5) received broadside after broadside even before publication last month. Allen Frances, the psychiatrist who spearheaded the previous version, wrote a book-length criticism, “Saving Normal.” Psychotherapist Gary Greenberg is upfront with his distaste, titling his anti-DSM polemic “The Book of Woe.” And the director of the National Institutes for Mental Health recently wrote that the DSM “suffers from a lack of validity.” Sometimes called the “bible of psychiatry,” the DSM relies on a subjective reading of a patient’s symptoms to diagnose the underlying cause of the suffering, which is assumed to have a biological basis (such as, for instance, a deficit of serotonin causing depression). This “disease model” is far from proven, but even if it is valid, the DSM is still deeply flawed, according to its detractors. Criticisms include: Lack of precision: Diagnoses of mental disorders is based on symptoms as reported by the patient and observed by the caregiver. The DSM subjective system of classification results in the “clustering” of diverse individuals into groups who are treated in a similar fashion. Predictably, results are not coherent: Some patients respond well, some badly. Inconsistent Boundaries: In 1968, DSM-II (134 pages) defined the symptoms of 182 mental disorders. Thirty-two years later, DSM-IV-TR listed 365 diagnoses in its 943 pages. The 992-page DSM-5 includes just 157 disorders. The wildly variable number of diagnoses has led critics to accuse the psychiatric association of capriciousness in defining discrete conditions. One particular example has made the headlines recently: Asperger syndrome and autism, previously diagnosed and treated as separate disorders, now come under the same label. Redefining “normal”: As a “consensus document,” the DSM has been notoriously fickle in what’s considered normal, with diagnoses subject to the cultural and political currents of the day. Forty years ago, for instance, at about the same time that the manual reframed homosexuality (no longer abnormal!), it listed hyperactivity and inat-

tentiveness as abnormal. “Attentiondeficit hyperactivity disorder” was born, and now, by DSM criteria, some 20 percent of teenage boys suffer from it. Yet ADHD is so controversial that many researchers in the field claim it to be a non-medical issue, while some even doubt its existence. Conflict of interest: A 2006 study by researchers from the University of Mass and Tufts concluded: “Of the 170 DSM panel members 95 (56 percent) had one or more financial associations with companies in the pharmaceutical industry” and “…one hundred percent of the members of the panels on ‘Mood Disorders’ and ‘Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders’ had financial ties to drug companies.” Promoting pills: Critics claim the DSM has legitimized prescription of an everincreasing number of medications to evermore people, to the point where one in eight of us, including young children, is now on psychotropic medication. In my column The Drugging of America (Sept. 29, 2011), I discussed the flimsiness of evidence for the effectiveness — for most people most of the time — of six common antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs, when compared with inert placebos. With the withdrawal of support by the National Institute of Mental Health, the DSM is probably on its deathbed, but absent alternatives, it’s not going to go away just yet. The future holds promise for what the institute calls the “Research Domain Criteria” project. If emerging research pans out, the project will lead to brain disorders being diagnosed objectively through “biomarkers,” rather than symptoms. One can only hope. As Allen Frances said in a New York Times op-ed last year, “Psychiatric diagnosis is simply too important to be left exclusively in the hands of psychiatrists.” Amen to that. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com), now finds he’s abnormal (according to the DSM), meaning he’s normal like everyone else.


continued on next page

RAFFLE Buy a gallon get one ticket, buy a 2.5 gallon or 5 gallon & get two tickets. At the end of two weeks we will draw a winner for / a 15 gallon prize of Tappin • Root. Starts Tues. June ; 25th and runs through July 9th, drawing will be held July lOth

We are fully .. stocked with greenhouse fans :...-~~~

z4··. lo··

~~~:si~~IT: 36 .. · and

: 4a··

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

19


continued from previous page

20% off

Nectar for the Gods fertilizer thru June

Hwy 101 in the Safety Corridor 707.826.7435 10-6pm M-Sat • Sun 10-5pm

WIN A 2013 YAMAHA GRIZZLY 550 4X4

15 TICKETSBE$NEFIT PROCEEDS

CHOOLS S R U O E V SA

date. Stay tuned for drawing t to win. sen pre be to e hav n’t Do No purchase necessary.

Come to Redway Feed for everything you need and more.

290 Briceland Rd., Redway  Spring Hours 8:30-6:00 SEVEN DAYS  707-923-2765

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


Y O U R

L O C A L L Y

O W N E D

A C E H A R D WA R E

TIME TO

2499

$

Clark + Kensington

Paint + Primer in One Interior Flat (1429828) 100% acrylic. Micro-emulsion technology. Contains ceramic beads for toughness and lasting durability. EGGSHELL INTERIOR PAINT (1430081) $28.99 SATIN WALL & TRIM PAINT (1431451) $29.99 SEMI-GLOSS INTERIOR PAINT (1429867) $30.99

3488

$

Benjamin Moore Interior Eggshell (1388743)

1 Gallon. Highly Durable, washable finish. Set to touch in 30 minutes. INTERIOR EGGSHELL BASE4 (1389204) $34.88

4588

$

PAINT!

SALE

J U N E 2 6 - J U LY 8

2188

$

ACE ROYAL

Latex Interior Flat Wall Paint (1964824) Excellent scrubbability. Exceptional splatter resistance. Washable and stain resistance. Non-yellowing. Non-toxic. LATEX INTERIOR EGGSHELL WALL PAINT (1969146) $24.88 LATEX INTERIOR SATIN WALL PAINT (1964667) $24.88 LATEX SEMI-GLOSS INTERIOR WALL & TRIM (1965425) $25.88

2388

$

Benjamin Moore

ACE ROYAL

1 Gallon. Earth friendly. No smell. Pregnancy safe.

Exceptional resistance to peeling and blistering. Mildew resistant. Non-yellowing. Non-toxic. 25 year durability. 100% Acrylic.

Natura Interior

NATURA INTERIOR FLAT (1384494) $45.88 NATURA INTERIOR EGGSHELL (1384767) $45.88 NATURA INTERIOR SEMI GLOSS (1384908) $45.88

Shield Exterior Flat House Paint (1961648) LATEX SATIN EXTERIOR ULTRA SATIN HOUSE PAINT (1963982) $25.88 LATEX SATIN EXTERIOR ULTRA SATIN HOUSE PAINT (1963685 ) $26.88

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, june 27, 2013

21


HOW TO: SEAL & PROTECT YOUR DRIVEWAY

HOW TO: CLEAN AND WATERPROOF YOUR DECK

1. REMOVE WEEDS & DEBRIS FROM CRACKS IN THE ASPHALT.

1: APPLY THE CLEANING SOLUTION • Use a pump sprayer to apply the cleaning solution to the deck.

2. APPLY THE ASPHALT CLEANER • Ace Blacktop & Concrete Cleaner.

2: SCRUB & RINSE THE DECK • Scrub the deck with a stiff-bristle deck brush.

4. PRESSURE-WASH THE SURFACE AND ALLOW TO DRY 5. APPLY THE ASPHALT CRACK SEALER. • “BLACK JACK” Crack-Stop Driveway Surface Filler 6. SEAL DRIVEWAY • Use a squeegee to spread asphalt sealer in a series of passes parallel to the house. Let dry according to product instructions.

3: RINSE OFF THOROUGHLY • Allow the deck to dry completely. 6: APPLY WOOD STAIN OR WATERPROOF SEALANT

1988

$

BLACK JACK DRIVE KOTE 500 4.75 GALLON (1392059)

89

$

99

BLUE CLEAN ELECTRIC PRESSURE WASHER 1600 PSI EASY TO USE, SAFETY LOCK TRIGGER GUN. EASY TO HANDLE. EASY TO STORE (1408269)

24

$

88

2588

BLACK JACK DRIVE MAXX 700, 5 GALLON $ (1436955)

GOOD QUALITY BLACKTOP FILLER & SEALER. CHOICE OF 5 YEAR (Kote 500) OR 7 YEAR (KOTE 700) FORMULATION. CONTAINS SAND TO HELP FILL CRACKS IN SURFACE.

ACE BLACKTOP & CONCRETE CLEANER 1 GALLON

ACE WOOD ROYAL DECK STAIN - CEDAR GALLON

HEAVY DUTY READY-TO-USE PRODUCT. EFFECTIVE PRODUCT FOR CLEANING OF ASPHALT & CONCRETE. REMOVES GREASE, OIL, DIRT, GASOLINE, HYDRAULIC FLUID. (17431)

OIL-ENRICHED FOR SUPERIOR ADHESION. PRIMER AND STAIN IN ONE. SHOWS THE TEXTURE AND HIDES THE GRAIN. UV, WATER AND MILDEW RESISTANT. (1972538)

1288

$

POWER PAINT SPRAYER PRO 6.8GPH 12INCH WIDE SPRAY PATTERN. INCLUDES ONE GALLON PLASTIC BACKPACK, STURDY STRAP, CLEANING BRUSH & OIL. SAVE PAINTING TIME. GIVES EXCELLENT RESULTS (1365758)

84

$

88

QUIKRETE COMMERCIAL GRADE BLACKTOP PATCH 50LBS

DROPCLOTH 10’ X 20’ 1MIL

2

$ 88

1 MIL THICK 10 FT x 20 FT FOOT, FOR GREAT COVERAGE TO MINIMIZE SPILLS. INEXPENSIVE FOR USE-AND-TOSS PAINTING. (11166)

ACE 5 GALLON PAINT BUCKET

NITRILE GLOVES 100 PACK LARGE

.070” WALL THICKNESS. USE AS A UTILITY PAIL, LID NOT INCLUDED. (1147461)

LATEX FREE. POWDER FREE. TOUGH. TEXTURED TOUCH. (6199699, 6199707)

4

$ 88

7

$ 88

ACE DECK SPRAYER 2.0 GALLON THOMPSON WATERSEAL ADVANCED COVERS 200 SQUARE FEET. PROTECTS SURFACE FROM WATER DAMAGE. CAN ALSO BE USED ON FENCING, BRICK, CONCRETE OR MASONRY (1209741)

25

$

99

INCLUDES TOTAL SPRAY CONTROL SHIELD FOR NO MESS, NO FUSS. INCLUDES THREE NOZZLES- FINE, MEDIUM AND COARSE. 5075% FASTER THAN USING A BRUSH (1008176)

1888

$

DECK SCRUB BRUSH EVERY WHICH WAY DESIGN. 47” BLACK METAL HANDLE. 5 YEAR GUARANTEE. 1-1/4 INCH CRIMPED POLYPROPYLENE NATURAL COLOR BRISTLE (1201417)

8

$ 88

22 North Coast Journal • Thursday, june 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

COLD PATCH SPECIFICALLY FOR PERMANENT REPAIRS TO POTHOLES AND CRACKS OVER 1” WIDE IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT. D.O.T. APPROVED. STAYS PLIABLE IN COLD WEATHER APPLICATIONS. (5401310)

1299

$

DRIVEWAY SEALER APPLICATOR BRUSH 18” WIDE HEAD. 48” VINYL COATED METAL HANDLE. BUILT IN SQUEEGEE. (12468)

7

$ 88

BLACK JACK CRACK-STOP DRIVEWAY SURFACE FILLER FILLS APPROXIMATELY 75 LINEAR FEET OF ¼” CRACKS. ELASTIC RUBBERIZED CRACK FILLER, EXPANDS AND CONTRACTS WITH DRIVEWAY SURFACE. EXCELLENT FLEXIBILITY IN ALL TEMPERATURES. FILLS CRACKS ½” TO ¾” WIDE. (1439645)

9

$ 88

1988

$

BLACK JACK ROOF GUARD 700, 3.6 QUARTS HIGHLY FLEXIBLE ACRYLIC LATEX ROOF COATING. FLEXES UP TO 250% WITH ROOF MOVEMENT. SEALS TO STOP WATER INTRUSION. (1439538)


SAWHORSE 1000 POUND 2 PACK

TSP CLEANER NO RINSE 1/2 GALLON

LIGHTWEIGHT. TRAY OPENS TO HOLD YOUR TOOLS. HEAVY DUTY 1000 POUND LIMIT (2320133)

“ACE” TSP NON-PHOSPHATE, NO-RINSE. CUTS GREASE & GRIME AND DEGLOSSES SURFACES PRIOR TO PAINTING. CLEANS PAINT FROM BRUSHES AND TOOLS. (1214105)

2488

$

9

$ 88

ZINSSER 123 PRIMER SPRAY All purpose and all surface. Effectively hides dark colors and blocks stain. Seals porous surfaces like wood, drywall, cured plaster and brick for better top coat coverage and more even finish. 13 oz. (1368323)

4

$ 99

3PK PAINT ROLLERS 1 COAT

EVERYTHING YOU NEED!

FOR SMOOTH AND SEMI-SMOOTH SURFACES. ULTRA HARD CORE. (1005719)

7

$ 88

ACE PUSH BROOM

DAP ALEX CAULK + CLEAR 10.3OZ WHITE OR CLEAR

18” WIDE HEAD. CHEMICAL & MOISTURE RESISTANT. 60” STEEL TIGHT GRIP HANDLE (12972)

1288

$

FROG TAPE THE ONLY TAPE WITH PAINTBLOCK TECHNOLOGY. SEALS TAPE EDGES FOR RAZOR SHARP LINES. (1392224)

EXCELLENT ADHESION. HIGHLY FLEXIBLE AND DURABLE FOR A WATERPROOF SEAL. PAINTABLE. EASY WATER CLEANUP. (12044,12607)

1

$ 88

7

$ 88 LIQUID NAILS CONSTRUCTION ADHESIVE EASY WATER CLEANUP. HAS EXCELLENT WATER RESISTANCE. LONG TERM HOLDING POWER WHEN SET. (1373224)

2

$ 48

PAINTSTICK 5 PIECE DRAWS PAINT DIRECTLY FROM THE CAN AND HOLDS IT IN THE BRISTLES. WHEN PAINT IS REQUIRED, SIMPLY PUSH ON THE HANDLE. HOLDS UP TO 18OZ. OF PAINT IN ONE FILL. (1259753)

CAULK RATCHET GUN

19

$

88

ALL-STEEL WELDED CONSTRUCTION. FIVE TO ONE THRUST RATIO. FOR 1/10th GALLON CARTRIDGES. (10913)

2

$ 49

SANDING RESPIRATOR BOX OF 10. SANDING (DRYWALL, PARTICLE BOARD, PAINTED SURFACES). 95% FILTRATION EFFICIENCY AGAINST SOLID & LIQUID AEROSOLS. COOL FLOW VALVE FOR EASY BREATHING & COOL DRY COMFORT. (2109080)

1888

$

ACE 4 PIECE BRUSH SET CONTAINS ONE OF EACH: 1” TRIM BRUSH, 3” VARNISH BRUSH, 4” WALL BRUSH, 2” ANGLED SASH BRUSH. USE WITH ALL PAINTS. (1193416)

5

$ 88

GREAT STUFF FOAM 12OZ. ROLLER & TRAY 11 PIECE SET INCLUDES A 9” TRAY. 9” WIDE ROLLER FRAME. TWO 9” WIDE COVERS. 3” WIDE TRIM ROLLER AND FRAME. 1-1/2” TRIM BRUSH. 12” POLE. 2” WIDE FOAM BRUSH. USE WITH ALL PAINTS. (1197292)

9

$ 88 TAPE MASK PRO .94” X 60.1YD TEXTURIZED. EASILY REMOVED FOR UP TO THREE DAYS. RUBBER IMPREGNATED FOR STRENGTH AND DURABILITY. (19236)

2

$ 88

FOR VOIDS LARGER THAN 1”, EXPANDS 60%. 1” EQUAL TO R5 VALUE. FORMS A PERMANENT WEATHER TOUGH SEAL TO MINIMIZE DRAFTS AND INSECT INFESTATION. BONDS TO WOOD, DRYWALL, METAL, MASONRY, GLASS AND MOST PLASTICS. (19077, 13322)

4

$ 48

WINDEX SURFACE CLEANER 32OZ. ATTACHES TO THE GARDEN HOSE. REMOVES SOILS THROUGH SCREENS. CLEANS SURFACES FOR COATING PREPARATION. (1075423)

1099

$

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, june 27, 2013

23


ALL WERNER LADDERS ON SALE ASSORTED STYLES TO FIT ANY NEED

WERNER EXTENSION LADDER 16’ 200 LB CAPACITY (17992) $7888 WERNER EXTENSION LADDER 16’ 225 LB CAPACITY (1062918, 1500339)

14999

$

12888

WERNER EXTENSION LADDER 20’ 20’ ALUMINUM 200 LB CAPACITY (10222)

$

WERNER EXTENSION LADDER 20’ ALUMINUM 225 LB CAPACITY (10226)

$

WERNER EXTENSION LADDER 24’ ALUMINUM 225 LB CAPACITY (10227)

$

WERNER EXTENSION LADDER 28’ ALUMINUM 250 LB HEAVY DUTY (1011493)

$

17999 20999 25888

WORKING EXTENSION LADDER LENGTHS FROM 16FT TO 28FT. MEDIUM TO HEAVY DUTY LADDERS AVAILABLE. MODIFIED I-BEAM SIDE RAILS FOR ADDED STRENGTH. TRACTION TRED FOR STAY PUT SAFETY.

WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 6ft, 225LB CAPACITY

(1020841)

4888

$

9888

WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 6ft, 300LB CAPACITY (17990)

$

WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 8ft, 225LB CAPACITY (1037845)

$

WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 8ft, 300 LB CAPACITY (17991)

$

9888 13880

WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 10ft, 300 LB CAPACITY (1096254) $20888 WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 12ft, 300LB CAPACITY (1096262) $25888 WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 16ft, 225LB CAPACITY (1058262) $16888 WERNER STEPLADDER FOLDING FIBERGLASS 24ft, 250LB CAPACITY (12021)

26999

$

WERNER” FIBERGLASS STEPLADDERS AVAILABLE IN 6FT TO 24FT LENGTHS TO FIT MOST EVERYONES LADDER NEEDS. ORANGE ELECTRICALLY NON-CONDUCTIVE SIDE RAILS FOR SAFETY. INTERNAL STEEL SPREADERS FOR EXTRA STRENGTH. EDGE MOLDED BRACE + FOOT PAD PROVIDES ENHANCED STRENGTH.

5488

WERNER ALUMINIUM STEPLADDER 6ft. 225LB CAPACITY (17989)

$

WERNER ALUMINIUM STEPLADDER 8ft. 250LB CAPACITY (13979)

$

8888

WERNER ALUMINUM 6 & 10 FOOT LENGTHS. PINCH-PROOF SPREADERS. SLIP-RESISTANT STEPS FOR SAFETY. BOTTOM AND TOP STEPS BRACED FOR SAFETY.

Sale: Wednesday, June 26th - Monday, July 8th

HUMBOLDT’S HELPFUL HOME CENTER

839-1587

24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, june 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

442-5734

725-8647

(530) 629-2425


review. But it may aid your enjoyment if you know, especially if the otherwise terrific opening song that sets up the premise is not completely clear. (It’s an original piece that substitutes for the play’s opening scene.) Aside from this (and maybe some audibility and intelligibility issues on opening night), it’s all good. With roots in earlier Greek and Roman plays, The Comedy of Errors was one of Shakespeare’s first comedies, and perhaps the only one that flourishes when played so broadly and at times ironically. Some scenes are missing but much of Shakespeare’s language remains. Michael Fields’ imaginative direction (it has to be one of his best efforts) and the skillful enthusiasm of a fully committed cast of performers provide both the sense and a style to the lines and the action. Daniel Spencer’s set is dominated by doors, which enable as well as signal a farcical treatment. There’s servant-beating in the script, which is successfully treated as clown business. When Antiphola and Dromio as well as other characters are trading witticisms, they play it as vaudeville comics. Yet for all the hilarity, the play deals with issues of identity, and it has real feeling in a surprisingly joyful and not entirely predictable ending of resurrection and reunion. This is probably the most disciplined as well as structured Dell’Arte summer production I’ve seen, revealing familiar skills in a different way, and new possibilities. Schirle is outstanding as the red-headed Antiphola twins. Eldredge and Yorke are convincing twin sprites. Chase McNeill as the husband of Antiphola of Ephesus worked with such visible energy to get across one of his speeches on opening night that the audience applauded. Lynnie Horrigan plays his sister with physical and vocal clarity, becoming the sudden love interest of the visiting

Double Trouble Dell’Arte doing a Shakespeare comedy is no error By William S. Kowinski stagematters@northcoastjournal.com

Joan Schirle as the twin Antipholas and Andrew Eldredge As Dromio in Dell’ Arte’s production of The Comedy of Errors. Photo By Nels Israelson

I

f you go to the brisk, high-spirited, physically witty and generally funny Dell’Arte production of Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors and you aren’t familiar with the play, here’s the premise you need to know: An old man shows up in the marketplace of Ephesus, which is remarkably like the Arcata Plaza. Because he is from a hostile state, he is by law condemned to death. But he tells a sad story about twins — his twin daughters and the twin boys he bought as servants for them, all infants. In a shipwreck years ago, his wife, one daughter and one of the boys were swept away. The survivors who recently set out to search for

their twins are now themselves missing, so he came here to look for them. The Ephesians are moved, but can’t disobey the law. The Duchess allows him until sundown to try to raise the considerable fine and save his life. The rest of the play revolves around the fact that both sets of twins are now in Ephesus: the daughters, both the traveling Antiphola who has just arrived, and the Antiphola who has lived here for years (both played by Joan Schirle) and their twin servants named Dromio (Andrew Eldredge and Jerome Yorke.) Multiple mistaken identities result in the mayhem that ensues. You don’t have to memorize this — it’s summarized in the program so you can

Antiphola. MacNeil and Horrigan gamely and gracefully create characters different from the originals, as a result of Shakespeare’s Antipholus becoming Dell’Arte’s Antiphola, and so they augment the scripted humor with more 2013 comic accents. Zuzka Sabata is the blues-singing old man, and Janessa Johnsrude is the duchess on a bicycle (inspired by a certain ex-mayor of Arcata who showed up at a Farmers Market in spandex bike togs). There are other reminders of the Arcata Plaza ambience as well. The rest of the excellent cast (often in multiple roles) are Pratik Motwani, Anna Gettles, Ruxy Cantir, Emily Newton, Meghan Frank, Moses Norton and Drew Pannebecker, with a comic cameo by Fields. Tim Gray composed the music, with songs also by Zuzka Sabata, Schirle and Lyndsey Battle, plus lyrical assists from William Shakespeare. The always excellent band is Tim Randles, Marla Joy and Mike LaBolle. Michael Foster designed lighting, Lydia Foreman the eye-catching costumes. The Comedy of Errors plays for two more weekends in the outdoor Rooney Amphitheatre, ending July 7. It runs about two hours. Next at the Mad River Festival: the children’s noontime show, IN-Tents, on June 29 and 30, and the Lifetime Achievement Award ceremony and dinner on June 29, honoring Jane Hill. The Red Light in Blue Lake cabaret plays twice, July 5 and 6, and The Submarine Show is onstage July 11-13. Details at www. dellarte.com.

Coming Up: Ferndale Rep isn’t the

only one — North Coast Repertory Theatre also has a “Second Stage” program of limited run plays with modest productions and lower admission charge. The latest example is on the NCRT stage in Eureka this weekend: About Time, a two-character play about aging by East Coast writer Tom Cole, directed by Matt Cole, and starring Toodie Boll and Matt’s father Gene Cole. For high school age and older, it plays Saturday June 29 at 8 p.m. and Sunday June 30 at 2 p.m. 442-NCRT. Redwood Curtain's next show is a modernized French farce, The Heir Apparent, which previews July 5 and opens July 6. l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

25


Celebrating Summer

What does it all mean? Choosing words and music with care By Jennifer Savage thehum@northcoastjournal.com

So much more than ‘quirky folk’

On Thursday night at Hum Brews, for example, a chance to immerse yourself in Shook Twins. Twin sisters Katelyn and Laurie Shook team up with bandmates Kyle Volkman and Niko Daoussis to make what is casually labeled “quirky folk,” a summary that, while accurate, falls short of defining the near-transcendent experience they provide. The harmonizing hypnotizes. The looping machine mesmerizes. The golden egg gleams. Weird? Yes. Central elements of the Shook Twins sound include the aforementioned looping machine and golden egg (really), plus banjo, guitar, upright bass, mandolin, beatbox, glockenspiel, ukulele and djembe. In some hands, all this variety and oddness might be a gimmick, but in Shook Twins’ talented embrace, the whole is far more than the sum of its parts. Music is often described in terms of “lifting,”

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

“rising” or “elevating,” and Shook Twins’ songs evoke that sensation absolutely. Strip away all the bells and whistles, the musicians’ impressive skills, and you have those voices. Singing siblings have an advantage in harmonizing, and twins likely more so — Katelyn and Laurie’s voices blend together, weaving sound until you can’t tell whose is whose. All you know is that the world is awash in beauty and so are you. Near-transcendent? Full-blown rapture. Oh – and they’re funny! Silly stories and goofy song topics account for the “quirky.” But however anyone tries to define the band, Shook Twins will probably

Photo courtesy of Shook Twins.

T

he first few days of summer have brought weather both glorious and wet, a super-moon preening huge and orange above the hills, a slew of solstice celebrations and an ever-increasing roster of music shows for your consideration. It’s a wonderful time to leave the house.

be a little bit more. They’ve shared various stages with Ryan Adams, Mason Jennings, Laura Veirs, Michelle Shocked, JJ Gray and MoFro, Crooked Still and The Head and The Heart, among others. Tickets are only $10, Cyber Camel opens, show starts at 9 p.m., 21-and-over. Listen ahead at http:// www.shooktwins.com or via your Spotify account.


Your new favorite ‘allgirl surf pop band’

Photo courtesy of La Luz.

Saturday night, a few options. First, La Luz and the Monster Women are playing at the Works in Old Town. The four-piece La Luz is described as an “all-girl surf pop

band from Seattle.” Let’s examine that a bit further. That the band consists of four women remains a fact worth noting because all-girl bands remain an exception. If you would like to be reminded that chicks can kick ass at guitar and drums, here’s a fun opportunity. Surf pop! But this is not your average Link-Wray-meets-TheRonettes nostalgia. That’s only the launching pad for a reverb-filled musical stratosphere heavy with sunshine and hooks you can’t resist. Whatever the literal weather is doing Saturday evening, summer will be in full bloom at The Works. La Luz already holds a firm grasp on being one of the Seattle scene’s most favored darlings. Odds are the band will only get bigger. This is a chance to see it (and the always cool Monster Women) in a small venue for only $5. Go here http://laluz.bandcamp. com/ and give a listen. I particularly liked “Sure as Spring.” The show starts at 9 p.m. and is for all ages — a fact I’m compelled to highlight. All ages. All ages! Tell your under-21 friends.

sion that any one of them could gallop in on a horse and right a town’s wrongs. The foresight to include a high-res band photo with the show’s press release! (Yeah, baby!) Think relentless basslines, driving guitars and ’70s rocker lyrics: “My engine’s purring like your kitty with fuel injection/ It’s a 427, chrome steel erection/ The bars are all closed, now it’s time to rally/ I’ll meet you at the end of Camaro Alley.” (Dig the whole track here: http://www.reverbnation.com/drifterkiller.) A recent photo shoot, according to word on the Old Town streets, ended in a debauched tizzy of whiskey and naked women. Pretty sure it started out that way, too. The band promises “a volatile mixture of high energy rock’n’roll injected with doses of psychedelic trips gone wrong, Death Valley at dawn, drag races at night and drug deals gone right.” If you’re looking for trouble, the door is wide, wide open. The free show starts at 9 p.m., and is 21-and-over. Parental discretion is advised.

Hair rockers seeking Humboldt friends

New Liberty out of Ventura, a group dedicated to paying homage to “the bygone era of 1980s Sunset Strip rock in the vein of Guns N’ Roses and Motley Crüe,” is coming to Humboldt on Friday, July 26, on the way to the Burntwoodstock Festival in Oregon on Saturday, July 27, where the band will be headlining. The group is looking for local bands to rock with and maybe a gig. You can find more info on the band at www.newliberty.tv/epk and https:// www.facebook.com/newlibertyrocks.Local bands and talent bookers, have at it!

P.S.

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Happy summer! •

Eureka’s bad boys

On the flip side, manly men Drifter Killer plays Eureka Inn’s Palm Lounge, also Saturday Night. Opening the show is the debut of rowdy, outlaw country outfit Cliff Dallas and the Death Valley Troubadours, which also features Drifter Killer frontman Cliff Dallas – apparently the man can go all night! (Zing!) What makes these men so manly? Their willingness to sweat for you. The impres-

Photo courtesy of Drifter Killer.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

27


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés

“SO GOOD.” North Coast Journal

835 J Street, Arcata • 822-WISH Open For Dinner @ 5:30 pm Tues-Sun

bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731

thur 6/27

fri 6/28

sat 6/29

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Thieves of the American Dream + The Wild Lungs 11pm $5

Blue Lotus Jazz 6-9pm

Anna Hamilton (folk/blues/Americana) 6pm

Announcing the Mickey Hart Band Thursday, September 5!

Bully (2011) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 PG-13

Announcing Low Movie (How To Quit Smoking) Friday, August 10!

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770

Thursday Madness: $8 pitchers 6pm til close. Free pool in back room

Karaoke w/ DJ Dance Music 9pm

Facebook.com/LikeBarFy

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 8pm

The Roadmasters (country) 9pm

Swingin’ Country (country) 9pm

Blue Lake’s Blues Blowout 7pm $20 Hunter & the Dirty Jacks (rock/blues) 9pm

Hunter & the Dirty Jacks (rock/blues from LA) 9pm

ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Friday Night Special w/ Chris Parreira 6pm

CAFE BRIO 791 8th St., Arcata CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 1631 Central, McKinleyville

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 9pm Thirsty Thursday lower beer costs.

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6pm

Shuffle Board and Bumper Pool, and Free Wi-Fi The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6pm

FL: Throwback Thursdays DJ Night w/Accurate Productions 9pm

Tripwire (classic rock & originals) 9pm

Tripwire (classic rock & originals) 9pm

Ladies Night with Pressure Anya 9pm

Blues Jam 9pm

Drifter Killer + Cliff Dallas and the Death Valley Troubadors 9pm

Dinner Tuesday through Saturday 5 to 10 pm Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam 8:30pm

Late Night Menu 10 to Midnight Friday and Saturday

Live Music some weekends

CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Karaoke with Rock Star @ 9pm Sing and Dance the night away!

Barbecue/Open Mic Noon-7pm

ELK COUNTRY RV RESORT & CAMPGROUND Trinidad EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093 FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852 THE FORKS Willow Creek

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 2nd St. Eureka Seabury Gould & Evan Mordan, Ashley dancing 7pm

Pappa Paul 7pm

Pappa Paul 7pm

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739

Shook Twins w/Cyber Camel 9:30pm $10

Hot Buttered Rum 9:30pm $15

Tracorum (rock ‘n’ soul) 9:30pm $10

JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata

Old School Hip Hop Night 10pm

The Itals w/ special guest Triniti 9:30pm

Naive Melodies 9pm

Jill Petricca & Friends 7pm

Blue Lotus Jazz 7pm

2000 Tons of TNT (reggae) 8pm

It’s a bar.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Goodsheild 7th Generation 8pm

The Silver Hammer Band 9pm

Twist of the Python 9pm

LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000

Mac Dre Day 2013 $25/$30

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER Redway MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

Fred & Jr. (swing jazz) 7pm

The Why Nots (blues/rock) 7pm

Melissa Ruth & The Likely Stories (doo-wop twang from Eugene, Or.) 7pm

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm. DJ Lost 10pm

Jenni & Dave and the Sweet Soul Band (sweet soul music) 7 pm

MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd Arcata NOCTURNUM 206 W. 6th St., Eureka OCEAN GROVE 480 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

PERSIMMONS GALLERY 923-2748

Chris McCurdey and Peter Childs 7pm

RED LION 1929 4th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222

Have you tried our Belgian Red yet?

Why not start your weekend with a beer and a dog?

Zumba Toning w/ Ann Youmans 5:30pm

Zumba w/ Mimi 9:30-10:30am Accurate DJs: City Lights 9pm

Vino & Vinyl 9pm

Vinous (gypsy jazz trio) 9pm

Find us on Facebook!

SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St., Eureka 407-3550

Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (honky tonk/country swing ) 7:30-9:30 pm.

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Come in for a great dinner!

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ Music 10pm

REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 9pm 21+

THE RITZ 240 F St. Eureka RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Phantom Wave’s The Haunt 8pm Free

Dr Jay and Cheryl + Space Funk Saturdays 8pm

Savage Henry Comedy Night 9pm

DJ Pressure Anya Duo 9pm

www.sixriversbrewery.com

SB Lounge (electronica duo) 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed Band (blues) 8pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Throwback Thursdays

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696 THE WORKS 310 3rd St Eureka

redwoodraks.com

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St. Eureka SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

Anna Hamilton (blues) 8pm

Jimi Jeff & The Gypsy Band 8pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

TBD 10pm

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am MC Quartet 7pm Free


Shook Twins Thursday at HumBrews

Thai food with a Laotian influence

sun 6/30

mon 7/1

tues 7/2

wed 7/3

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Anna Hamilton (folk/blues/Americana) 6pm

Blue Lotus Jazz 6-9pm

Blue Lotus Jazz 10am-2pm

Lilo & Stitch (2002) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG

Find more information at www.arcatatheatre.com

Find updates from Arcata Theatre Lounge on Facebook!

Sci Fi Night ft. Reptilicus (1962) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free

Closed Sundays

Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Facebook.com/LikeBarFy

Barfly Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Sunday Brunch 9am

Enter to win our Aloha Vacation Giveaway! Quiz Night 7pm

Enter to win our Aloha Vacation Giveaway!

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Prime Rib Dinner Special in Alice’s Steak & Sushi $14.99

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings and $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Sport Sunday $3.00 Well Drinks and $1.00 off all pint draft beers.

Monday Night 9 Ball Tournament 8pm with 1st place prize @$20.00

Speed Channel, ESPN, NFL Network on 5 Flat Screen TVs.

Open Daily 10am - 2am

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-Ball Tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Free Pool $3 Wells

facebook.com/ThePalmLounge

Pint Night $2 Draught Beer 6pm

Electric Gravy (electronica/jazz trio) 8pm Free

SB Lounge (electronica duo) 7pm

Closed Sundays and Mondays

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Excellent daily specials

Great plates to share, North Coast Market Fare

DGS Sundaze 9pm $5

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights The Getdown (funk) 7pm

WINE

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

UNDER THE

STARS

.m.

t fas k a re

ve ser

.m.

a d8

1p to 1

WINE • BEER • FOOD • MUSIC

SATURDAY JUNE 29th

B

Ginger The Social Sidekicks 7pm Fruition (bluegrass/folk) 9:30pm $10

EEL RIVER BREWING CO PRESENTS:

Always great food — and the best cocktails. The Alibi crew cares about you. Please drink responsibly. Restaurant open from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. 744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

TICKETS $5.00 in advance $8.00 at the door at Eel River Bewing Company 1777 Alamar Way in Fortuna

We also have liquor.

It’s a bar.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

HAPPY HOUR from 5-7pm daily. $3 well drinks and beer specials.

More details on Facebook Book your band: 362-6715

Cribbage Tournament! 6:45pm sign-up, 7pm play, $5

TRIVIA NIGHT hosted by Jerry Lee Wallace 8pm

All Age Venue - No Cover www.madriverbrewing.com Open Mic 7pm

Growler Mondays $3 off growler refills Purl & Pour 6:30pm

www.madriverbrewing.com

Nature’s Serving World Food Fast

ticket includes five wine tastings

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com April Moore (country singer) 7pm

Happy Growler Day! Get your growler filled for less $$$

Game Night! Cribbage Tournament 8pm

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is here!

Dry Hop Wednesday! Plus Nature’s Serving!

Breakdance with Reckless Rex 5-7pm $10

Zumba w/ Mimi 9:30-10:30am Karaoke 8pm

West African Dance with Dulce $10 5:30-7pm

Zumba w/ Mimi 9:30-10:30am Breakdancing w/ Jade 4:30-5:30pm

Brian Post (piano) 8pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature cocktail in the bar!

T-Bone Shuffle Open Mic Jam w/ Jim Lahman Band. 7 p.m.

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Compost Mountain Boys 7:30pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Anna Hamilton 7pm Free Bottomless Mimosas! Six Rivers Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ Southern fried chicken

www.sixriversbrewery.com

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

Live music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

No Covers (jazz duo) 7pm

Sunday Sound Selections (DJs) 1 pm

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Now serving beer and wine

Featured Artist:

D-ROCK

All D-Rock glass pieces are 15% off for the entire month of JUNE

ARCATA  987 H ST.  707-822-3090  BAYSHORE MALL  707-476-0400 WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM EUREKA

Locally Blown Glass

Old Time Music Jam 1pm

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM) $5 10pm Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm $5

This is an event for ages 21 & over Need more info? Call ERB at 707-725-BREW or email : media@eelriverbrewing.com

Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

2-for-1 DD lap dances

Cast your vote to determine ERB’s 2013-2014 wine list

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

Like us on Facebook

6pm - 9pm in ERB’s beautiful Beer Garden

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

29


You’d have to be barking mad to miss the LOST COAST KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW. Friday through Sunday, the competition will be ruff, as dogs compete in rally events, obedience and confirmation to find the most paw-fect show dog on the North Coast. Join Red Molly (pictured), Achilles Wheel, Rebirth Brass Band and more for the 18th annual KATE WOLF FESTIVAL, Friday through Sunday in Laytonville. This is no ordinary music festival. In addition to the main stage performers, it features workshops like “Jammin’ 101,” yoga, tai chi and a nightly group campfire. Photo by Annabel Braithwaite. Celebrate the life of Bay Area rapper Mac Dre on Friday at the Mateel Community Center. MAC DRE DAY features performances by Bay Area rappers influenced by Mac Dre, including Husalah, Mac Mall, Mistah FAB and more.

27 thursday MUSIC

Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Open-air music on Eureka’s waterfront. Joel: The Band performing. Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org/node/866.

of naval malfeasance on the shores of Samoa, where the first submarine H-3 was grounded and the USS Milwaukee wrecked while attempting to rescue the sub. Free. www. dowsprairiegrange.org.

The Comedy of Errors. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Dell’Arte presents a local twist on a Shakespearean classic about love, twins and mistaken identity. Directed by Michael Fields, the players turn Shakespeare on his head and present a night of fantastical frivolity. Adults $18; students $15; kids under 12 $10. 668-5663. Between the Lines: An Acrobatic Theater Event. 10:45 p.m. Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Dell’Arte grads show us how they roll in comic and dramatic vignettes featuring circus moves, tumbling and acrobatics. $10; $5 with a ticket for that evening’s Comedy of Errors performance. www. dellarte.com.

The Comedy of Errors. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 27 listing. Between the Lines: An Acrobatic Theater Event. 10:45 p.m. Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 27 listing.

THEATER

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. www.humfarm.org. 707-441-9999. McKinleyville Thursday Farmers Market. 3:15-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music.

ETC

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

28 friday BOOKS

Summer Reading Club at Fortuna Library. 10:30 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Join us for a kid-centered, reading frenzy and kick-off party! The featured guest for this party is puppeteer Sean Powers. The reading club is open to kids of all ages, and includes fun and motivational games centered around reading. Free. 707-269-1910.

LECTURE

High Seas. 6:30 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange, 3995 Dows Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Humboldt’s nautical history explored by local historian Jerry Rohde. He tells the story

THEATER

FOOD

Garberville Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. EBT, Cal-Fresh and WIC accepted. 707-672-5224.

ETC

Lost Coast Kennel Club Dog Show. 8 a.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. The club is hosting its 13th annual All Breed Dog Show. Free. $3 parking fee. www.lostcoastkennelclub.org. 707-845-9142.

29 saturday BOOKS

Friends of the Redwood Libraries Annual Meeting. 1:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Guest speaker Katherine Longshore. Free. eurekafrl.org. 707-443-0028.

MOVIES

Despicable Me. 6 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Come out and support the Boys & Girls Club of the Redwoods and the Eureka Theater as they present a showing of Despicable Me. $5. www.theeurekatheater.org. 442-2970. Movies Under the Mural. 9 p.m. Los Bagels parking lot, 1061 I St., Arcata. Wizard of Oz is the first in a series of outdoor summer movies. BYO blankets and seating. Free.

THEATER

About Time. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. One-weekend Second Stage production of a play about aging, love, mortality and, yes, time. $10. 442-NCRT. The Comedy of Errors. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 27 listing. IN’Tents: A Conservation Comedy for Kids. noon. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Pratik Motwani, Meghan

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Frank and Janessa Johnsrude of Dell’Arte International clown around the campgrounds as park rangers in this family-friendly performance. $5; children $1. Dell’Arte Honors Jane Hill. 4 p.m. Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Co-founder Jane Hill lauded for her contributions to the performing arts. Admission includes dinner, drinks and that evening’s performance of The Comedy of Errors. $50. www.dellarte.com.

will be given an optional form to score the available wines and vote for their favorites. $5 advanced, $8 door. www.eelriverbrewing.com. 707-725-2739.

FOR KIDS

Jefferson Summer Carnival. noon. Jefferson Community

EVENTS

Wine Under the Stars. 6-9 p.m. Eel River Brewing Co., 1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna. Eel River Brewing Company and the North Coast Journal present a night of wine tasting with a twist: All attendees

Hit the Sand, Man You know what they say: Your home is your castle. Nevertheless, this Saturday, June 29, you need to ditch those snug moat-surrounds and get yourself down to Manila Beach Dunes Recreation Area to build yourself a new one — a new castle, that is. Out of sand. Consider it a character-building exercise — because there’s nothing the Friends of the Dunes would like better than to build your character into that of a fun-loving, sand-eating — er, -enjoying — coastal ecosystem supporter. Dun-da-DUN: Yes! It’s time for that nonprofit’s 18th Annual Sand Sculpture Festival! Now, if taking on more shifting real estate isn’t your thing, you can build something else. Try a newt! Or an owl! Or a dreaming mermaid, shark-eating surfer, sinking ship, lily flower, sea turtle, cake, camel, Jabba the Hutt, groceries. Or — because those sand shapes have been done in past contests — make up some new kind of sandpacked monster/beauty/brain-noodler. Invite your friends, make it a genuine (sand)barn raising.

There will be cash prizes — for best of show, most life-like, humor, fantasy, ingenuity, “judge’s wild card” and best youth sculpture (by kids 16 and younger). There is a fee (raises money for Friends of the Dunes) — $7 per team of one to six people ($10 on the day of the festival); $12 for team of seven or more people ($15 on the day of the festival). And there are tips – check out the Friends of the Dunes’ website for the best ways to wrangle that sand (compaction is key, and digging deep and wet). The festival opens at 8 a.m. with registration at the Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive. You can save some bucks by registering before Saturday, online (www. friendsofthedunes.org/sand_sculpture_festival) or at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamp Lane in Manila. Sculpting goes until 2 p.m., when the final judging takes place. And the festival ends at 3 p.m. — Heidi Walters


drink. Kids 18 and under must be with an adult. Sponsored by the Redwood Parks Association and the Tolowa Dunes Stewards. Free. 707-465-6191.

Down with the Kids We’re only a couple of weeks into summer vacation, but the kids are already bouncing off the walls. The fair last weekend has either set their entertainment expectations too high or left them in a post-cotton-candy stupor. Fourth of July festivities are just around the corner, but you’ve got to get through this weekend first … and what if it rains? Don’t worry — you’ve got this. There are plenty of free and cheap events to help you spend quality time like a boss. Summer Reading Camp starts at 10:30 a.m. on Friday at the Fortuna Library with puppeteer Sean Powers. There’ll be a half hour of fun and games focused on reading — probably more focused than your book club, anyway — and the free weekly events run through Aug. 30. On Saturday, release them into the wild for the Sierra Club Parent and Child Fay Slough Wildlife Walk. Barring rain, meet up at the Fay Slough trailhead at 10 a.m. and head out for a free 1.5-mile hike followed by a carousel ride at Harper Motors. That should wear little tykes out Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Games, food, fun, arts and crafts, and entertainment for kids of all ages! Free.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts, flowers, live music every week at 10 a.m. Free. humfarm. org. 707-441-9999. Rethink Your Drink. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Culinary AllSTAR youth from Arcata Elementary and a host of organizations offer recipes of flavored water for sampling at the farmers’ market. Youth can take part in the “Sassy-Water Scavenger Hunt” by searching the farmers’ stalls. Potter the Otter Loves Water book readings will take place every hour. director@humfarm.org. 707-441-9999.

OUTDOORS

Tsunami Debris Monitoring. 10am-noon. Power pole parking lot at Samoa beach. Help the Northcoast Environmental Center monitor for debris and clean the beach. 822-6918. Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide at the Interpretive Center for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 707-826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:30 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center. Redwood Region Audubon Society is sponsoring a free public field trip. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding! Meet leader Joe Ceriani in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Trip ends around 11 a.m. Rocky Gulch Habitat Repair. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Rocky Gulch, Rocky Creek Road, off Old Arcata Road, one mile north of the Indianola cutoff roundabout, Bayside. The California Conservation Corps’ Watershed Stewards Project is hosting a volunteer event to repair the fence along Rocky Gulch. Please bring work boots and work gloves if you have them. Food and water will be provided for volunteers. Ericka. Augustyn@ccc.ca.gov. Sand Sculpture Festival. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive. What’s a day at the beach without a sturdy shovel and a hefty pail? Friends of the Dunes presents the 18th annual Sand Sculpture Festival in Manila. Again, it’s at the beach. Free. www.friendsofthedunes.org/ news/sand_sculpture_festival. 707-444-1397. Sierra Club Parent and Child Fay Sough Wildlife Walk. 10 a.m. Fay Slough Trailhead, Fay Slough, off Highway 101 near Harper Ford, Eureka. The Sierra Club sponsors this

SPORTS

Sandlot Baseball. 1 p.m. Sandlot league that’s been around for seven or eight years in Arcata — all skill levels — open invite hardball. Games are every Sunday on the field behind the CHP station in Arcata. 18-plus. Bring glove. universal_justin_2@hotmail.com. 707-497-9594.

ETC for a while. Cool down after your day in the wild with a showing of Despicable Me at the Eureka Theater on Saturday at 6 p.m. It’s the one with Steve Carell as the supervillain who ends up with three little girls. You remember — he’s got an Eastern-European accent and a horde of canary yellow minions. Your $5 tickets benefit the Boys and Girls Club of the Redwoods — win-win! Follow it up on Sunday at the Arcata Theater Lounge with a 5:30 p.m. screening of Lilo and Stitch, another cartoon tale of redemption, and it’s like you’re at a film festival — like Cannes with really short people. Tickets for that one are also $5. Look at you, the fun parent. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill family-friendly, 1.5-mile hike, followed by a carousel ride at Harper Ford (for the kids; sorry grown-ups). 707-268-8767. Trail Stewards Work Day Arcata. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Community Forest, Union Street. Join the volunteer trail stewards for work day in the Arcata Community Forest. 826-0163.

ETC

Lost Coast Kennel Club Dog Show. 8 a.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See June 28 listing.

Lost Coast Kennel Club Dog Show. 8 a.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. See June 28 listing. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Scrabble. Nothing more, nothing less. 707-677-9242.

1 DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older, with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s50s. $4. 725-5323.

MEETINGS

Brain Disorder Support Group. 6-7 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Support group for those with a friend or family member with a serious brain disorder such as bipolar, schizo-affective disorder, schizophrenia, OCD, PTSD, etc. Free. 707-725-8853. Humboldt Folklife Festival Volunteer Gathering. 6 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. Anyone interested in volunteering at the Humboldt Folklife Festival should attend this informational meeting. Please RSVP. www.madriverbrewing.com. 707-269-2061.

2 tuesday

30 sunday ART

Trinidad Artists’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Murphy’s Market parking lot, Main and View avenues, Trinidad. Art and crafts from local artisans, live music and barbecue. 707-834-8720.

MUSIC

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 707-442-0156. Marimba Mix Concert. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Zeltsman Marimba Festival Faculty concert featuring Jack Van Geem, Beverley Johnston & Joint Venture Percussion Duo. $10 / $7 students, seniors, children. 707-822-1575. Town Hall Music Festival. 1-8 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Blues music all day with vocalist Sajha Eden, pianist Jerry Thompson, hot blues from Eclectica and covers and originals from Blues Arrow. $10 donation at door.

monday

FOOD

Eureka Farmer’s Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Fresh, local produce direct from the farmer. Free. 707-441-9999. Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Farmers’ Market, 10th and Main streets. Fresh, local produce, meats and cheeses. Miranda Farmers’ Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Farm-fresh produce, etc. www.mirandagardens.com. 707-672-5224. Shelter Cove Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. 707-672-5224.

ETC

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. Evening begins with cribbage lessons presented by the Humboldt Cribbers Club. Newcomers welcome. 707-444-3161.

THEATER

About Time. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 29 listing. The Comedy of Errors. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 27 listing. IN’Tents: A Conservation Comedy for Kids. noon. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 29 listing.

FOR KIDS

Wetlands Safari. 1-4 p.m. Lake Earl Wildlife Area, 2591 Old Mill Road, Crescent City. Explore the wetlands with activities like poking around in a pond for frogs and bugs. Suit up with boots and bug repellant, and bring a snack and

3 wednesday

8 TH ANNUAL

BILL NESSLER CAR SHOW & CRUISE Saturday, July 13 : Meet & Greet BBQ and Cruise. 5:30 p.m. at Blue Lake Casino Sunday, July 14: Parade line-up at 9 a.m., car show after parade, judging & awards at 2:30 p.m. Entry Fee: $25 includes 2 BBQ tickets for Meet & Greet

To register call 668-5932 All proceeds go toward Blue Lake Parks & Recreation

MUSIC

Expressive Complexity. 8 p.m. Humboldt State BSS 162, Arcata. Zeltsman Marimba Festival Faculty concert featuring Pedro Carneiro (Portugal) and Mike Truesdell (New York)

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

31


continued from previous page with Beverley Johnston (Canada). $10 adults / $7 students, seniors, children. 707-826-3011. Under the Sea Dance Party. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Fundraiser dance party for the North Star Quest camp, a camp for junior high school girls. $5 and up. 562-964-9213. Voted Best Hamburger in Humboldt County for 23 years!

EVENTS

Family Fun, Barbecue, Live Music and Fireworks. 5:30 p.m. Newburg Park, 2700 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Barbecue and kids activities start at 5:30 p.m. Fireworks and music from the Scotia Band starts after dark, sometime after 9 p.m. Barbecue is $10, $5 for kids.

OUTDOORS

The Sea Grill Always serving you the finest and freshest of our local catch

Guided Nature Walk. First Wednesday of every month, 9 a.m. Richard J. Guadagno Visitor Center, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. This free, 2-mile walk is open to the public and is a great way to familiarize yourself with the flora and fauna of HumCo. Binoculars are available at the visitor’s center. Free. www. fws.gov/refuge/humboldt_bay/. 733-5406.

ETC

Dream Group. Every other Wednesday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, F and Second streets, Eureka. Meet to discuss dreams and their meaning. Free.

4 thursday MUSIC

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

AND

OPEN 365 DAYS 5am to 9:30pm

Large Phó $ 99 7

3 Spring Rolls - $450

443-6812 2916 Central at Henderson, Eureka www.HappyDonutsAsianFood.com

Folklife Singalong. First Thursday of every month, 7-10 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Bring your voice, everything else is provided. Free. 839-7063. Summer Concert Series. 6 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. The Hot Rods, performing. See June 27 listing.

EVENTS

Fourth of July Street Fair, Carnival and Fireworks. Fair 10 a.m.-5 p.m., fireworks at 10 p.m. Second Street between D and F streets, Eureka. Vendor booths, live music, food, crafts, art, classic cars, fire trucks and fireworks. Free. Fourth of July Jubilee Festival. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. More than 60 arts and crafts booths, music, food and a kids zone, featuring games, crafts and face painting. Free. Fourth of July Celebration and Fireworks in Ferndale. Free Firetruck Rides 10 a.m.-noon, Main Street. Parade begins at noon down Main Street. Picnic lunch at 1 p.m. on the Town Green, burger meal $6, hot dog meal $4 with vegetarian options available. “Celebrate America,” Fourth of July show at 3 p.m. at Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m. at Humboldt

North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, JUNE June 27, 27, 2013 2013 • northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 32 NORTH

County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth, St. Free admission, $5 parking. Fireworks. 10 p.m. Benbow Lake State Recreation Area, 1600 Highway 101, Benbow. $8 admission to enter the park.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See June 27 listing. McKinleyville Thursday Farmers’ Market. 3:15-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. See June 27 listing.

MEETINGS

Human Rights Commission Monthly Meeting. First Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This month’s agenda includes continuing discussion of Ordinance 2488, which restricts access to public facilities, as well as the living conditions and available facilities for Humboldt County’s homeless population. Free. 707-668-4095.

ETC

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See June 27 listing.

Heads Up…

Love music? The Humboldt Folklife Society wants your help. It’s looking for volunteers to help out with Annie and Mary Day on July 14 and with the All Day Free Festival on July 20, both part of the Folklife Festival in Blue Lake. It could also use a hand at the Buddy Brown Blues Festival on Aug. 3. For more information contact festival@humboldtfolklife.org. Got books? The Humboldt branch of WILPF (Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom) is seeking donations of good quality paperback books, recent preferred, for its annual book sale held July 4. Good quality recent hardbacks will also be accepted, but please no textbooks. Call 822-5711 for an appointment. The sale benefits the Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship fund which awards an annual scholarship to a group or individual in support of a project related to peace and/or social justice. Be a Mateel Festival Volunteer. The Mateel is looking for volunteers to help with Reggae on the River. There are many different positions needed to be filled by people like you. Contact volunteer coordinator Michele Wood at 923-3368x32 or volunteers@mateel.org. The Arcata City Council is looking for volunteers from the community to serve on the Historic and Design Review Commission, the Historic Landmarks Committee and the Energy Committee. Commission and committee members contribute their time and expertise to advise the Council and staff on different areas of the City’s work. Applications for all vacancies will be accepted until 5 p.m. on Friday, July 12, 2013. ●

It’s Brad Pitt’s rugged good looks against the zombie apocalypse.

By Dev Richards

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

WORLD WAR Z. When Max Brooks’ novel World War Z came out in 2006, the avalanche of zombie-related entertainment was just beginning to gain momentum. Shaun of the Dead had just obtained cult status, Zombieland wasn’t even a twinkle in Woody Harrelson’s eye and The Walking Dead had yet to be adapted for television. Wisely, Paramount Studios quickly scooped up the rights to Brooks’ story; his critically acclaimed book was bound to be a goldmine. Teaming up with Plan B Studios (Brad Pitt’s production company), Paramount began the arduous process of converting the seemingly unadaptable book into something befitting a guaranteed blockbuster. Six years, two scripts and one option renewal later, World War Z finally made its debut on the big screen. You’d think that after all the time, build-up and effort, it would be a masterful, post-apocalyptic un-deadfest; regrettably, the film bears absolutely no resemblance to Brooks’ original brilliance, and generally fails to impress. In its original form, World War Z was a cleverly woven oral history of the great zombie war; more than 20 characters give their individual accounts of the progression of the war, ranging from the incredibly personal to the extremely tactical. The film adaptation tells a typical story of the zombie apocalypse from the viewpoint of one central character: former United Nations employee/action hero, Gerry Lane (Pitt). The zombie outbreak happens in a flash, and spreads incredibly quickly. Lane sacrifices his own safety, using his connections to secure the safety of his family in exchange for his help getting to the root of the zombie outbreak. With his wife and kids stowed away on an overcrowded


Monsters and Monster Disappointments Zombies go global and Pixar goes back to school aircraft carrier, Lane takes off on the sort of adventure only a high budget, disaster film can provide: car chases, rain-drenched foot races, blockade collapses, plane crashes, etc. Even if we sever the connection World War Z has to Brooks’ original story, it fizzles as a zombie film. The writers, Matthew Michael Carnahan (The Kingdom), Drew Goddard (The Cabin in the Woods) and Damon Lindelof (Lost) took Brooks’ title as a basic foundation, and then built a completely different story on top of it. Though they took great effort to create their own story, the end result was nothing more than a bastardized amalgamation of previous zombie movies. The few tropes that the writing team chose to tamper with should have been left alone. Take, for example, the choice to make the zombies run rather than walk. Rather than increase the tension, their speed takes the undead-ness out of their presence. There are few hand-to-hand battles, no grizzly images of zombies feasting on the weak and relatively few close-up shots of the flesh-eating menace. The zombies move in throngs, rushing and stampeding their way through major cities and over large barriers; they easily could have been replaced with swarms of bees for the same effect. Though action-packed, World War Z fails to build tension or surprise. It’s the embodiment of “too little, too late;” even if it had been released at the height of the zombie craze, it would have failed to compare to the originality and spectacle of other films. Hollywood, you’re kicking a dead horse. Leave the zombies to AMC’s The Walking Dead, where they eat the dead horses instead. MONSTERS UNIVERSITY. Even at its least fantastic, Pixar has never really let me down. They re-invented the concept sequels with the Toy Story franchise, and I didn’t hate either of the Cars movies

(despite their overuse of Larry the Cable Guy). So, I didn’t bat an eyelash at their venture into the world of prequels with Monsters University. Years before Mike Wazowski (Billy Crystal) and James “Sully” Sullivan (John Goodman) revolutionized the scare industry in Monsters Inc., they were nothing more than cocky freshmen in the Scare Program at the prestigious Monsters University. Like the multitude of collegiate films before it, Monsters University follows a basic formula: a frat full of unlikely outcasts must excel and outshine the popular frat in a contest of epic proportions. It’s a family friendly frat-fest, full of familiar faces, but it fails to follow in the footsteps of the first film. Monsters University is still better than most full-length, animated features, but it lacks the iconic chutzpah and charm of other Pixar films. Mike and Sully begin their higher education as adversaries, both battling their way to the top of the class. Their overly competitive antics lead to their expulsion from the Scare Program, and their only chance for redemption is winning the university’s annual Scare Games. In order to compete, they have to join a fraternity. Enter the unlikely outcasts. Statistical likelihood aside, the underdogs prevail and everyone learns something valuable and wholesome about themselves. In the realm of children’s movies, there’s really no reason to veer far from the traditional path of the underdog story. The constant cacophony of children’s cackling confirmed the cartoon’s capacity for charisma. A few chuckles and guffaws escaped my mouth, as well. All in all, though, Monsters University left me yearning for adorably heartbreaking character attachments I formed with Monsters Inc. The sweetest and most endearing moments of the first film were the scenes with Mike, Sully and their tod-

MovieTimes dler stowaway, Boo. Monsters University needed more moments of emotional connection like these to truly pull in the adult audience, hold their interest and ensure repeat viewings. Pixar, I still put more faith in you than I do Disney, but you need to get back into true form if you’re going to keep me. With heavy hitters like Illumination Entertainment (Despicable Me) and Blue Sky Studios (Epic), you’re not the biggest fish in the little pond anymore.

Previews

LONE RANGER. Johnny Depp puts a bird on it as Tonto in this film version of the classic TV Western. Armie Hammer co-stars as the man behind the mask in what promises to be a weird buddy movie. NR. 149m. DESPICABLE ME 2. Formerly villainous Gru (Steve Carell) returns with his girls and his hyperactive minions to battle the evil Eduardo. How evil? He’s voiced by Al Pacino. PG. 98m.

Continuing

FAST & FURIOUS 6. The sixth outing has earned the cars-and-crime franchise’s best reviews and biggest box office numbers. Part seven’s on the way! PG13. 130m. MAN OF STEEL. Is the latest Superman re-boot too big to fail? Maybe not. PG13. 140m. NOW YOU SEE ME. A group of magicians rob banks and run from the law in this breezy, enjoyable escape. PG13. 116m. THE PURGE. In near future America, there’s almost zero crime or unemployment because, one night a year, society gets to hunt and kill the deadbeats. Starring Ethan Hawke. R. 85m. STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS. J.J. Abrams injects more action and knowing winks in this second outing in the rebooted series. PG13. 132m. THIS IS THE END. Seth Rogen and friends go out with a bong and a whimper in this uneven stoner’s tale of the apocalypse. R. 107m. l

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 Despicable Me 2 3D Tue: 7 Fast & Furious 6 Fri-Tue: (3:45) The Heat Fri-Tue: (12:10, 1:15, 3, 4:05), 5:50, 6:55, 8:35, 9:40 The Lone Ranger Tue: 7 Man of Steel Fri-Tue: (11:45a.m., 2:45), 9:05 Man of Steel 3D Fri-Tue: 5:55 Monsters University Fri-Tue: (11:50a.m., 12:40, 2:35), 5:20, 6, 8 Monsters University 3D Fri-Tue: (3:20), 8:40 Now You See Me Fri-Tue: (11:55a.m., 2:30), 5:15, 8:10 The Purge Fri-Mon: 6:45 Star Trek Into Darkness Fri-Mon: (12:50), 8:55; Tue: (12:50) This Is The End Fri-Mon: (1:35, 4:10), 6:35, 9:20; Tue: (1:35, 4:10), 9:20 White House Down Fri-Tue: (12:05, 2, 3:10), 5:10, 6:10, 8:15, 9:15 World War Z Fri-Tue: (12, 1, 3:50), 6:40, 9:30 World War Z 3D Fri-Tue: (2:50), 5:40, 8:25



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Despicable Me 2 Tue: 7 The Heat Fri-Tue: (12:30, 3:20), 6:05, 8:50, 9:30 The Lone Ranger Tue: 7 Man of Steel Fri-Mon: (11:55a.m., 2:10), 5:20, 8:40; Tue: (11:55a.m., 2:10) Man of Steel 3D Fri-Tue: (3:15) Monsters University Fri-Tue: (12, 12:55, 2:45), 5:30, 6:35, 8:10 Monsters University 3D Fri-Tue: (3:05), 8:30 Now You See Me Fri-Mon: (1:25), 6:45; Tue: (1:25) This Is The End Fri-Tue: (4:10), 9:25 White House Down Fri-Tue: (11:50a.m., 2:55), 5:55, 6:30, 9 World War Z Fri-Tue: (3:40), 9:15 World War Z 3D Fri-Tue: (12:10), 5:45

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 The Lone Ranger Tue: 8:40 Man of Steel Fri: 5:25, 8:40; Sat-Sun: (2:10), 5:25, 8:40; Mon: 5:25, 8:40; Tue: 5:25 Monsters University Fri: (3:30), 6, 8:30; Sat-Sun: (1, 3:30), 6, 8:30; Mon-Tue: (3:30), 6, 8:30 World War Z Fri: (4), 6:45, 9:30; Sat-Sun: (1:20, 4), 6:45, 9:30; Mon-Tue: (4), 6:45, 9:30

Fortuna Theatre June 28July 7 Fri June 28 - Bully (2011) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 PG-13 Sun June 30 - Lilo & Stitch (2002) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Wed July 3 - Sci Fi Night ft. Reptilicus (1962) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free Sun July 7 - Peter Pan (1953 Animated) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated G

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Despicable Me 2 Tue: 7; Wed-Thu: (2:25), 7, 9:20 Despicable Me 2 3D Wed-Thu: (12, 4:45) The Heat Fri-Thu: (1:10, 3:50), 6:45, 9:30 The Lone Ranger Tue: 7; Wed-Thu: (12:30, 3:30), 6:30, 9:35 Man of Steel Fri-Mon: (12:15, 3:30), 6:40, 9:45 Monsters University Fri-Thu: (1:20, 4:25), 7:05, 9:40 Monsters University 3D Fri-Mon: (12:20, 3:15) White House Down Fri-Thu: (12:30, 3:40), 6:40, 9:35 World War Z Fri-Thu: (1, 4), 6:50, 9:50 World War Z 3D Fri-Mon: 6:10, 8:45

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Epic Fri: 7:30; Sat-Sun: 4, 7:30; Mon-Tue: 7:30; Wed: 6:30; Thu: 7:30

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

33


SEWING CLASSES FROM BASICS, TO PATTERN DRAFTING, TO CORSETS Choose classes from Basics to Tees, Skirts, Corsets, Draping, Pattern Drafting. Full schedule online. Contact us Today! (707) 442−2646. eurekafabrics@me.com, www.eurekafabrics.com (AC−0718) List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

BEGINNING BOTANICAL DRAWING. With Carol Telesky, Sat’s, July 13−Aug 10 & August 24, 10 a.m.−12 p.m. Workshop focuses on learning to observe & draw plants accurately. Students will learn about pencil techniques & how to use different hard & soft pencils as well as pen & ink medium. Final projects will be developed into detailed renderings, will also study compositional layouts. Some art supplies provided, some must be purchased. 6 classes. $10 members/$30 non− members for the series. Held at Humboldt Botan− ical Garden. For more info. call (707) 442−5139, www.hbgf.org (AC−0711) DRINKING & POURING VESSELS. $85. Fri.s, 9:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m., June 28 & July 12 (6 hours Instruc− tion + 5 weeks studio use.) With Bob Raymond. Refine your skills with handled and pouring vessels. Bob will guide your progress and offer suggestions for your success in handles that work and pouring vessels that don’t dribble. Members fee once minimum enrollment is met: $30. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0627) FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR BEGINNERS. 2−day workshop you will learn how to make your own pendants and earrings. With the use of color and dicrohic glass, mosaic butterflies, and decals, Joele Williams will guide you through the process of cutting, drilling, and assembling your creations. Materials included. Tues. & Thurs. July 30, & Aug 1, 5:30 −7:30,,p.m., $45 / $30 members. 520 South G Street, Arcata, (707) 826−1445. www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0725) FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR INTERMEDIATES. Learn advanced techniques to bring your fused glass jewelry to the next level. Learn to hand etch dicrohic glass with various design elements. Create pendants and earrings then learn to wire wrap and make your own bails and earring hooks. Materials included $65 / $50 members. Sat. Aug. 3 & Aug 10, 10 a.m−noon. 520 South G Street, Arcata, (707) 826 −1445. www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0725) PART SHEETS. Glass−fusing workshop will intro− duce participants to the use of stringers, frit, and powder to create small sheets of interesting glass to incorporate into larger works of art. Part sheets will add interesting design elements to your work and stimulate your creativity. $60 / $40 members (materials fees $15 and up). July 15, Mon 10 a.m− 1p.m. 520 South G Street, Arcata, (707) 826−1445. www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−07)

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $180. Thurs.s, 5:30−7:30 p.m., June 27−July 25, (10 weeks). With Peggy Loudon. Complete introduction to basic wheel− throwing and glazing techniques. For all levels. . Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826− 1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0627)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings July 1−29, 7−8 p.m., Pan Arts Network, 1049 Samoa Blvd., Suite C. $50, (707) 407−8998, info@panarts network.com (DMT−0725) DANCE WITH DEBBIE BALLROOM WORKSHOP. 2hr. workshop/ $12 per person in Swing, Latin, Hustle, Arm styling, Dips & Fancy Endings, and More! call (707) 464−3638 or Check calendar at dancewithdebbie@dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0822) EXPLORATIONS IN AFRO−CUBAN DANCE & DRUM. Seven days of intensive workshops exam− ining the folkloric music, songs and dances of the Afro−Cuban people. Internationally−recognized faculty will join local faculty to teach students of all skill levels. July 20−27. Fee for full week: $495 (by July 5). More registration options are available. Participants can register for up to 3 units of optional academic credit. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Educa− tion to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/afrocuban (DMT−0627) MOVIE IN THE PARK. Blue Lake Parks & Recre− ation. Join us for a movie in Perigot Park under the stars on Sun., July 14 at sundown ! Featured movie is Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Free to All ages. Family friendly event: no smoking, no alcohol, no dogs. Bring blankets and short chairs for comfort. Concessions will be available for purchase. Information, call Kara Newman, 668− 5932. (DMT−0711) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−1226) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−1226) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30−7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832−9547, Christina, 498− 0146. (DMT−1226)

Fitness

NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Tech− niques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822−6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F−1226)

AIKIDO. Aikido is a beautiful, powerful, yet non− aggressive martial art that provides an effective method for developing our human potential. You will gain center, balance, coordination, flexibility, self−confidence and fluidity as well as insight into deeper meaning in your life. Beginning enrollment is ongoing for both kids and adults! Come observe anytime. The dojo entrance is off the F St. parking lot behind the Arcata Plaza. Adult class every weeknight 6 p.m.; kids Mon, Wed. 4 p.m. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826−9395.(F−1226) DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−1226) NIA−DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6−7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Wed.s, 5:30−6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. $5 drop−in, $50/12 classes (707) 441−9102. (F− 1226) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−1226) PILATES FOR GARDENERS & FRIENDS OF GARDENERS. With Sharon Vollmers,Sat. July 13, 10− 11 a.m. Bending, lifting, pulling & digging are really hard on the back. Pilates for Gardeners provides simple exercises to strengthen lower back & hip muscles & then stabilize them in the correct posi− tion. Increase your strength, flexibility, posture & mental awareness. Designed for gardeners and includes a take home sheet of exercises. Bring a towel, blanket or mat and water. Class will be held on the lawn. FREE to members/$10 non−members. Sponsored by Arcata Core Pilates Studio. At Humboldt Botanical Garden. For more info. call (707) 442−5139, www.hbgf.org (F−0711) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F− 1226) YOGA FOR GARDENERS & FRIENDS OF GARDENERS. With Patricia Starr, Wed., July 24, 10− 11 a.m. Follow a yoga workout to help increase your strength, flexibility, posture & mental awareness. Routine will be specially designed for gardeners & include a take home sheet of exercises. Bring a towel, blanket or mat & water, held on the lawn at Humboldt Botanical Garden. FREE to members/$10 non−members, sponsored by NorthStar Yoga Center www.northstar−yoga.com. For more info. call (707) 442−5139, www.hbgf.org (F−0718) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. & Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/ $4 Grange members. Every Tues. & Thurs Vector Pool, Aqua Zumba 9:15 a.m. (3289 Edgewood Rd, Eureka). Every Tue. at Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m.& every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy (707) 845−4307. marlajoy.zumba.com (F−1226)


Wisdom of the Earth

Weekend Seminar • July 27 & 28 ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Starting in May, Fri. 4−5 p.m. at Redwood Raks. (F−1226)

Kids & Teens

13TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURFCAMP. Have fun while Safely Learning to Surf and improve all aquatic skills. Includes Jr. Lifesaving. Licensed & Insured, male/female instructors. Ages 8+. $195/ week. Sessions: July 8−12, July 22−26, Aug. 5−9. MoonstoneBeachSurfCamp.com or (707) 822−5099. (K−0704) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn self− confidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit− (707) 822−6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (K−1226) FRIENDS OF THE DUNES COASTAL CONNECTIONS SUMMER CAMP July 15−19, 10 a.m.−4 p.m., ages 8−12. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila.$125 for Friends of the Dunes members, $150 for non−members. Explore beaches, dune, wetlands and coastal forests while learning about the plants and animals that live there through games, crafts, songs and hands−on explo− ration. This camp will emphasize natural diversity and stewardship of our coastal habitats. Scholar− ships are available, and early drop−off and late pick −up options can be arranged. For more information call (707) 444−1397 or visit friendsofthedunes.org. (K−0711)

SUMMER CAMP. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for roller skating, arts and crafts, sports, field trips and more at Camp Perigot for children 5−13 year olds. Mon.−Fri., June 17−Aug.23, 8 a.m.−5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Very affordable and every camper receives a free breakfast and lunch! Full− day or half−day options. Scholarships available. Register today! Find registration materials at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668− 5932, for more information. (K−0815) WHEEL THROWING FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7−12. $80, (Two 5 week classes offered), Tues.s, 3−5 p.m., June 25−July 23 & July 30−Aug. 27. With Bob Raymond. Adventures with clay. Learn basic wheel throwing techniques and make your own bowls! . Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826− 1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (K−0627)

50 and Better

How to use essential oils in massage, acupuncture and energy work Essential oils for personal health and well-being $475; register by 6/27 and save $25

For information: (707)502-4883 sales@northcoastessentials.com 920 Samoa Blvd. • Arcata Cooper Bldg., 2nd floor Suite 221

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1226) FINGERPAINTING ON YOUR IPAD: THE NEXT LEVEL. For those who have taken the first OLLI iPad painting class with Claire Iris Schencke, this class goes further. Sat., July 13, 11 a.m.−3:30 p.m. Fee: $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (0−0704) INTRO TO THE BOOK ARTS: JOURNALING YOUR LIFE. Make a hand−sewn leather−covered journal with 100% cotton paper pages with Michele Olsen. Tuesdays/Thursdays, July 9 and 11, 3−6 p.m. Fee: $80/OLLI members, $105/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0627)

PAGEANT ON THE PLAZA. This summer the Arcata Playhouse is offering a two−week adventure in the creation of outdoor spectacle and performance. Week one includes classes in Movement, Music, Stilts, Puppetry. Week two create a show! July 8− 20, 9 a.m.−3:30 p.m. Ages 9 − 16, $300 Call 822−1575 to register today!

KLAMATH: A RIVER IN CONTROVERSY. Forum on the Klamath River with presentations on history, salmon, engineering (related to dam removal), the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement, and the Native American perspective. Wed., July 10, 10 a.m.− 4 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0627)

PASSPORT TO DANCE (KIDS’ DANCE CAMP) Aug. 5−9, for ages 5−7, Aug. 12−16 for ages 6−13, 1p.m−5 p.m., $99/ Week, Jazz, Hip Hop, Bollywood, Hula, Modern, Yoga, Creative Movement, Theatrical Jazz, Snacks and Crafts! Scholarships Available! Contact North Coast Dance, 426 F Street, Eureka, (707) 442−7779, northcoastdance@sbcglobal.net www.northcoastdance.org (K−0725)

MAKE A MOVIE, TELL YOUR STORY: DIGITAL STORYTELLING. Create a digital story on a computer using one image with your narrative, along with other elements that make this kind of storytelling unique. With Eileen McGee. Wed., July 10−24, 2−5 p.m. Fee: $75/OLLI members, $100/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0627)

SAMOA SOCCER SUMMER CAMP. Varsity Prep. July 23− Aug. 8, 9 sessions. Tues, Wed. Thurs. (3weeks), 1−3 p.m, Samoa. Level: Only to players/ ages who will be trying out for High School (8/12/ 2013 tryouts week) $95. French Pro (PSG) Camp. Aug. 12−16, 9 a.m−3 p.m, 5 days. Level: Elite, dedi− cated players, two age groups (9−11), and (12−15), $270. Registration, location and info at www.fcsamoa.com, mufc06@yahoo.com (K−0718)

RESTORATION AND RENEWAL IN REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS. Field trip to Redwood National and State Parks near Orick to observe watershed restoration, forest restoration, and prescribed fire. With Ranger Jim Wheeler. Sat., July 13, 9 a.m.−5 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0704)

SUMMER INTENSIVE. (open to all local, serious dancers ages 13 & up) July 29−Aug. 2, 10 a.m−6 p.m. with option to dance until 7:15pm $125/week. Ballet Technique, Variations, Pointe Work, Acting for Dancers, Yoga, Pilates, Jazz & Nutrition. Contact North Coast Dance, 426 F Street , Eureka, 442−7779, northcoastdance@sbcglobal.net www.northcoastdance.org (K−0725)

Get Certified in Medicinal Aromatherapy at NorthCoast Essentials

SIMILAR BIRD SPECIES. An interactive class to learn some clues on telling similar species apart, with Louise Bacon−Ogden. Tues., July 9, 2−4 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0627)

Summer Rowing thru August for New & Experienced Rowers! Adult & Youth (12 years+) Humboldt Bay Rowing Association

www.hbra.org 707 845-4752

Passport To Dance Summer Dance Camps

Art of Knitting Noni Flowers with Nora J. Bellows, author of Noni Flowers July 20-21, 11:00 am – 6:00 pm A two-day workshop covering how to make exquisite knitted flowers for embellishing felted or fabric accessories, like hats, purses, or pillows, or for adorning the top of a gift box. Saturday covers foundational techniques used for virtually every flower in her book; Sunday covers how to make more intricate flowers, including wiring and embellishment. Prerequisite knowledge: knit, purl, increase, decrease, work in the round on double pointed needles, tension control, and a rudimentary understanding of gauge. Cost: 225.00 + materials

NOW ENROLLING children ages 5 to 13 (see classes & workshops for details)

starts Aug. 5

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

Hip Hop, Ballroom, Jazz, Bollywood, Hula, Creative Movement, Yoga and Modern

Summer Intensive Program

NOW ENROLLING

open to ALL local dancers!

July 29 to

Aug. 2

Ballet Technique, Variations, Yoga, Acting for Dancers, Jazz

Get the lowdown ONLINE! NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM

Instructors: Nancy Call, Melissa Trauth and Stephanie Kim

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE For more information or registration: 442.7779 • 426 F Street, Eureka www.northcoastdance.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

35


SOUTHERN HUMBOLDT A CENTURY AGO. Cross the Eel River and a hundred years of time to visit southern Humboldt County as it was in the old days. With Jerry and Gisela Rohde. Sat., July 20 and 27, 1−3 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0711) THE HEIR APPARENT: Comedy from Page to Stage − an uproarious farce and David Ives’ modern update of Regnard’s 1708 masterpiece. Weekend seminar and a ticket to the show. Sat./Sun., July 6− 7, 10 a.m.−noon. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O− 0627)

Pets & Animals

BEGINNING BIRDWATCHING. With Louise Bacon− Ogden, Sat., July 20, 11 a.m.−1 p.m. Learn what you need to know to actually GO birdwatching, including picking a field guide, optics, how to dress & hints on finding birds in the field. FREE to members/$10 non−members , held at Humboldt Botanical Garden. For more info. call (707) 442−5139, www.hbgf.org. Sponsored by "Strictly for the Birds" in Old Town Eureka. Visit our Avian Gallery. Learn your Birds! www.rras.org. (P−0718)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6−7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826−1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo.com, or Travis, 616− 5276. www.arcatazengroup.org. (S−1226) BEGIN TO ACTIVELY EXPLORE THE INNER WORLDS OF YOUR OWN BEING. Are you searching for inner peace in today’s fast paced world? You can find the answers to some of life’s deepest questions, experience greater spiritual freedom, conquer your fears, and rise above anger by chanting HU. The sacred sound of HU can help you meet life’s challenges. Come to a Community HU Chant sponsored by Eckankar on Tuesday, July 2, 7−7:30 p.m., Jefferson School, in the Community Room, 1000 B St., Eureka. All are welcome to attend this event free of charge. For information call 444−2536. You can also find local information on Meetup.com. Look for the Past Lives, Dreams and Soul Travel of Eureka/Arcata Group. For free booklet and CD: www.spiritualexperience.org (S− 0627) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−1226) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S1226)

northcoastjournal

Sports & Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./Sat., 6:30−9:30 p.m., Sun. 2−5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30−9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668−5932 or find us on facebook at parks−rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR− 1226) SMITH RIVER WATERSHED JOURNEY: FROM HEADWATERS TO ESTUARY. Sat. June 29, 10:30 a.m− Sun. June 30, 12 p.m. Hiouchi & Crescent City, Tuition $275. Class starts with a South Fork rafting trip learning about the Smith River’s origins and ecology. It continues at Rock Creek Ranch in Hiouchi where we’ll dine, camp and snorkel, observing salmon populations in the Smith. Sunday, we’ll travel to the coast to see where the Smith joins the Pacific and learn about Yontocket Slough restoration efforts. Pre−registra− tion required through Siskiyou Field Institute by calling 541−597−8530 or visiting www.thesfi.org. Tuition includes rafting, camp fee and dinner. (SR− 0627)

Therapy & Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496−2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com (TS−1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845−8973 (TS−1226)

Vocational

NOTARY TRAINING. This one−day seminar for new and renewing notaries provides the practical training needed to pass the comprehensive exam required for all California Notaries. Fri., July 26, 8:30 a.m.−4 p.m. Fee: $149 plus additional for live scan, photo and exam. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended/notary (V−0711)

Wellness & Bodywork

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. High Country Herb Weekend. Aug.1−3. Strengthen plant ID skills and practice ethical wildcrafting techniques. $250. BEGINNING WITH HERBS. Sept.18 −Nov. 6. Eight Wed. evenings plus two herb walks. Learn the basics with many hands−on activities, pre−req to 10 month course. $385.(707) 442−8157. Register online www.dandelionherb.com. (W−0725) FIRE UP & COOL DOWN ON THE 4TH: VINYASA & RESTORATIVE YOGA WORKSHOP. With Christine Fiorentino. At Om Shala Yoga. Thursday, July 4th. 10am−12:30pm. Heat up your life with a spicy vinyasa flow and then float into blissful ease with an ethereal hour of restorative yoga! $20 cost. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−0627) JULY ROLFING SPECIAL. 15% off and a free body analysis with Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer for 25 years. Give yourself the gift of feeling wonderful this summer! (541) 251−1885 (W−0725)

NORTHCoast COASTJournal JOURNAL• •Thursday, THURSDAY,June JUNE27, 27,2013 2013• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 36 36North

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441−9175. (W−1226) REIKI TRAINING. Group and Individual Instruction Available for Children, Teens, and Adults. Attune− ments, Theory, and Practice. New Classes Each Month and Free Drop−In Reiki Treatment every Sunday from 1−3 at Sun Yi’s Academy in Arcata. Visit www.humboldtreikilady.com for more infor− mation or call (707) 845−0238, Christy Robertson, Reiki Master, Teacher. (W−0704) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin January 2014 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−1226) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Three programs: T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis, Traditional Long Form (Wu Style), and The 42 Combined Forms ( all major styles). Eight−week session starts June 25. Begin by the third week. Beginners meet at the martial arts academy in Arcata’s Sunny Brae Shopping Center. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Call 822−6508 for new summer schedule and see www.margaretemerson.com for other details. (W−0627) TUES. & THURS. AFTERNOON MASSAGE WITH DIANE DAVIS. Enhance your Pilates or yoga prac− tice or just unwind and relax with a massage ses− sion at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Nationally certi− fied since 1997, Diane is trained in Hawaiian Lomi Lomi, Myofascial Release, Swedish, Craniosacral, Acupressure and Reiki. Questions? Call (707) 268− 8926 to schedule an appointment. YOGA THERAPY FOR NECK, SHOULDERS & UPPER BACK. With Peggy Profant. At Om Shala Yoga. Tuesday, July 2, 6:45−8:45pm. Learn tools to relieve pain & discomfort and increase range of motion. No experience or flexibility required. $25 cost. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−0627)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−13−00333

classified@northcoastjournal.com

continued from previous page

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SCRAPPER’S EDGE at 728 4th St, Eureka, CA. 95501 Sondra Darlene Kirtley 834 Azalea Ln. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Sondra Kirtley This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 10, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11/2013 (13−167)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00304 The following person is doing busi− ness as WILD WORLD FARMS at 12395 Fickle Hill Rd., Arcata, CA 95521 / PO Box 2, Arcata, CA 95518. Brian P. Zimmerman 12395 Fickle Hill Rd.. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a. /s/ Brian P. Zimmerman. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2011. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11/2013 (13−166)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00325 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT SOAP COMPANY at 7290 Humboldt Hill Rd. Eureka, CA. 95503 Arice Miranda 7290 Humboldt Hill Rd. Eureka CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Arice Miranda This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 4, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4/2013 (13−162)

Curious about legal advertising?

442-1400


legal notices

The following person is doing Busi− ness as ZAMORA’S NEW & USED FURNITURE at 601 I St, Arcata, CA. 95521 Jason Kendall Singleton 1915 S St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Jason K. Singleton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 14, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

6/27, 7/4, 7/11, 7/18/2013 (13−171)

6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11/2013 (13−168)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−13−00312 The following persons are doing Business as RED ROOSTER GARAGE at 1209 Giuntoli Ln., Arcata, CA. 95521 Kandra Hoskovec 500 Seascape Trinidad, CA 95570 Eric Empting 500 Seascape Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 06/01/2013 /s/ Kandra Hoskovec This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 23, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/6, 6/13, 6/20, 6/27/2013 (13−160)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−13−00331 The following person is doing Busi− ness as NORTH COAST MUSIC at 1038 Main St. Fortuna CA. 95540 Aaron L. Souza 2554 Shay Ct. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Aaron Souza This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 6, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4 (13−164)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130375 SUPERIOR COURT COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: ALLAN BARD TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ALLAN BARD for a decree changing names as follows: Present name ALLEN BARD to Proposed Name ALLAN RICHARD DANIEL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 31, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 12, 2013 Filed: June 12, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 6/27, 7/4, 7/11, 7/18/2013 (13−169)

www.northcoastjournal.com

Did you know that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at northcoastjournal.com

PETITION OF: MELELANI NAUIFALEAI HUNTER TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: MELELANI NAUIFALEAI HUNTER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name MELELANI NAUIFALEAI HUNTER to Proposed Name MELELANI NAUIFALEAI SLADE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause, why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 7, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: June 19, 2013 Filed: June 19, 2013 /s/ Thomas P. Breen Judge of the Superior Court 6/27, 7/4, 7/11, 7/18/2013 (13-173)

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF PRELIMINARY BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Preliminary Budget for the Bridgeville Fire Protection District of Humboldt County for the fiscal year BEGINNING July 1, 2013 has been adopted by the District Board of Directors and is available for inspection by interested taxpayers through the District’s mailing address: Bridgeville Fire Protection District PO Box 51 Bridgeville, CA. 95526 That on July 8, August 12, and September 9, 2013 at 5:00 PM, at Bridgeville Community Center, Bridgeville, California, the Board of Directors will meet for the purpose of fixing the final budget, and that any taxpayer may appear at said time and place and be heard regarding the increase, decrease, or omission of any item of the budget, or for the inclusion of additional items. The final budget will be adopted at its September 9, 2013 meeting. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE BRIDGEVILLE FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT. /s/ David A. Vegliano Secretary of the Board

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS 1. They have no use for baseball mitts: Abbr. 4. Cries from the congregation 9. War against infidels 14. Hogwash 15. Near midnight, say 16. Davis of “The Matrix Reloaded” 17. 2000 Laura Linney film 20. Waifs 21. Sport with an apt name, according to its enthusiasts, because it’s a four-letter word 22. Nickname for Francisco 23. Mauna ____ 24. Broadband inits.

27. #10 on AFI’s list of Greatest Movie Quotes of All Time 33. Furniture company named partly for its founder Ingvar Kamprad 34. Plenty mad 35. “I’m no dummy!” 41. Part of YMCA 42. Actress Goldie 43. “Don’t put words in my mouth” 50. Reactions to YouTube videos of kittens 51. Suffix in some pasta names 52. Six: Prefix 54. 2013 Oscar winner for Best Picture 55. “I have yet to hear a man ask

for advice on how to combine marriage and a career” speaker 58. “Let this be our little secret ...” (or where to find all the central words of 17-, 27-, 35- and 43-Across) 62. Slip 63. India’s first prime minister 64. Some records, for short 65. Real bargains 66. They thought C-3PO was a god in “Return of the Jedi” 67. Some GPS lines: Abbr.

DOWN 1. Evaporate 2. “Yippee!” 3. Masonry finish applied when wet 4. Jai ____ 5. Singer Aimee 6. List abridgements: Abbr. 7. Keanu’s role in “The Matrix” 8. Brand created after its founder saw West African women holding babies in cloth slings 9. Globetrotter’s woe 10. “Time ____ the essence” 11. Buying channel on TV 12. Intent 13. Ruby in the movies 18. 800-year Chinese dynasty 19. Palindromic time of day

24. Rice pad? 25. Role in “Hook” 26. Was in front 28. ____-tac-toe 29. Alternate identity letters 30. “Dancing With the Stars” judge Goodman 31. Blues singer McDonald 32. Up to, casually 35. “That smarts!” 36. Cross to bear 37. Navy vessel inits. 38. It’s eliminated on “The Biggest Loser” 39. “Oprah’s Next Chapter” network 40. Yoko from Tokyo 41. R&B singer with the 2003 hit “My

Love Is Like ... Wo” 44. Broadcasters 45. “Picnic” playwright 46. “Walk On By” singer Warwick 47. Like a poor argument 48. Eva of “Hitch” 49. Released (from) 53. “What ____!” 54. Improperly off base, for short 55. TriBeCa neighbor 56. Istanbul native 57. Waters, in Frenglish 58. It’s often made every day 59. “Blood hath been shed ____ now”: Macbeth 60. Carefree syllable 61. Wood used in Voldemort’s wand

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

EASY #23

www.sudoku.com

The following persons are doing Business as EXPRESS LIQUOR AND CIGAR at 421 N, Fortuna, CA 95540, 781 Samoa Blvd., Arcata, CA 95521 Ahmad Corporation PO Box 639. Willow Creek, CA 95573 The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Toheed Ahmad CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 20, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME MELELANI NAUIFALEAI HUNTER CASE NO. CV130386 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 5TH STREET, EUREKA, CA. 95501

Solution, tips and computer program at

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−13−00343

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00353

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

continued on next page ➤

6/27/2013 (13-175)

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

37


legal notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILLARD ROGER BOEDECKER, aka WILLARD ROGER BOEDECKER, SR. aka WILLARD R. BOEDECKER, aka ROGER BOEDECKER CASE NO. PR130182

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLARD ROGER BOEDECKER, aka WILLARD ROGER BOEDECKER, SR. aka WILLARD R. BOEDECKER, aka ROGER BOEDECKER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by WILLARD R. BOEDECKER, JR. in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests WILLARD R. BOEDECKER, JR.be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 11, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may

continued from previous page.

file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: BRADFORD C.FLOYD SBN#136459 LAW OFFICE OF BRADFORD C. FLOYD 819 SEVENTH STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 445-9754 June 06, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4/2013 (13-163)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF TED KLISTON STEVENS CASE NO. PR130188

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: TED KLISTON STEVENS: TED STEVENS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DANIELLE FERGUSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DANIELLE FERGUSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 11, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Ct.. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined

in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: J. BRYCE KENNY SBN#208626 J. BRYCE KENNY ATTORNEY AT LAW 369 8TH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-4431 June 3, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/13, 6/20, 6/27 (13-142)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF SUSAN ATHANAS CASE NO. PR130152

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BETTY GALE, BETTY LOU GALE, BETTY W. GALE, BETTY WEBBER GALE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SUSAN M. ATHANAS in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests SUSAN M. ATHANAS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 11, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California,

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: SUSAN M. ATHANAS 570 PERSHING STREET LOLETA, CA. 95551 (707) 733-5730 June 19, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/27, 7/4, 7/11/2013 (13-170)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF VERNA IRENE RENSHAW CASE NO. PR130195

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: VERNE IRENE RENSHAW A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DIANE KURTZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests DIANE KURTZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal

representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DONALD W. BICKNELL SBN # 83266 LAW OFFICE OF DONALD BICKNELL 732 5TH STREET, SUITE H EUREA, CA. 95501 (707) 443-2429 June 18, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/27, 7/4, 7/11/2013 (13-172)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DOLORES ELWOOD TAYLOR, AKA DOLORES E. TAYLOR CASE NO. PR130198

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DOLORES ELWOOD TAYLOR, AKA DOLORES E. TAYLOR A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JOHN HOMER TAYLOR in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests JOHN HOMER TAYLOR be

appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on July 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES SBN # 67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA. 95521 (707) 822-1771 June 21, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/27, 7/4, 7/11/2013 (13-174)


CONTINUED ON next page

Memorials

BYRON ALEXANDER Join us at The Wine Spot on Sunday June 30, 3pm−7pm. To celebrate a life lived well but not long enough.

Opportunities

Opportunities

Opportunities

Opportunities

R.N. PART TIME. Exp. working w/elderly pref. excellent assessment skills required. No weekends/holidays. App./job desc. may pick−up at Adult Day Health Care of Mad River (707) 822−4866 adhc@madriverhospital.com (E−0711)

default

default

default

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non− medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E− 1226) LIFETOUCH IS LOOKING FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS. No experience needed. Paid training provided, must be available July 29 to August 2 for training in Santa Rosa. Must love children, be available early morn− ings, have CDL and reliable trans− portation. Will need to submit to a background/DMV check upon being hired. Send resume to crea@lifetouch.com (E−0627)

Applications are being accepted for

Courtroom Clerk One year legal exp required $2726 to $3327/mo+ benefits

Opportunities AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECU− RITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka. (707) 476− 9262. (E−0606)

HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT

SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY TECHNICIAN. Humboldt County Office of Education. Reqs. grad. from high school or comparable basic competency; 1 yr. of post− secondary course work in computer science or comparable field; 1 yr. providing end−user support for current desktop and application software or 1 yr. installing, upgrading, trou− bleshooting or repairing personal computers in a network environ− ment. Eligible for PERS retire− ment and Health and Welfare. For further info contact katkinson@humboldt.k12.ca.us or call (707) 445−7039. Classified app available at HCOE or online: www.humboldt.k12.ca.us Reply to: PERSONNEL, HCOE, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501. Apply by July 2, 2013.

default

FBI/DOJ/Background Applications accepted through 7/12/2013 info: 707-269-1245 email: HR@humboldtcourt.ca.gov or go to: www. humboldt.courts.ca.gov

   

             

classified employment Opportunities



14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Office Assistant  Registered Nurse Smog Tech  Breakfast Cook AP/AR  Life/Health Insurance Agent Automotive Service Advisor Carpenter  Electrician

BECOME A MENTOR! California MENTOR is seeking committed people willing to share their home with an adult with developmental disabilities. We are seeking Mentors who have experience with insulin dependent diabetics & live in the McKinleyville/Arcata area. We offer a competitive monthly stipend & 24 hour support. Call Jamie at (707) 442−4500 ext. 14 jamie.mcgovern@thementornetwork.com (E−1226)

default

default

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM WORKER CITY OF FORTUNA PART-TIME. $8.00-$9.69/HOUR

Redwood Prep Charter School & Cuddeback Elementary School District; Must be 18. Requires 2 years of higher education, and/or passage of the Humboldt County Office of Education Paraprofessional Exam. Job description and application available at, Fortuna Parks & Rec, 5 Park Street, (Rohner Park), 725-7620 or friendlyfortuna.com.

���     

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

default

Applications due by August 1, 2013 at 4pm. default



REGISTERED NURSE 1 F/T McKinleyville MEDICAL BILLER 2 F/T Arcata MEDICAL/DENTAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Arcata (requires Spanish Language skills)

MEDICAL ASSISTANT 2 F/T Arcata, 1 TEMP Eureka REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Willow Creek

REFERRAL CLERK/PRIOR AUTHORIZATIONS 1 FT McKinleyville

MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK 1 F/T Crescent Cit We are also seeking the following providers:

FAMILY PRACTICE/INTERNAL MEDICINE MD 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Arcata

PSYCHIATRIST 1 F/T Crescent City LCSW 1 F/T Eureka Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER at your Supermarket of Choice Required qualifications include minimum 5 yrs of diverse experience in all areas of human resources, ability to identify, design and implement comprehensive HR policies and systems, knowledge of employee compensation, benefits, employee relations, HR compliance, recruitment and training programs. Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills, organized and detail oriented, demonstrated objectivity, ability to follow through on commitments, and ability to work as a positive team member and partner with senior management. Full Time Benefited position with a starting salary DOE. Projected start date July 2013. Please submit resumes by mail to: Wildberries Marketplace General Manager 747 13th Street, Arcata CA 95521

                    

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 27, 2013

39


classiďŹ ed employment Opportunities

Opportunities

the MARKETPLACE

Opportunities

Opportunities

default

default

Area 1 Agency on Aging

Clothing

Pets & Livestock

FLASHBACK

Duties include informing the public about Medicare and private health insurance programs and options; providing supervision and support to staff and volunteers in Humboldt County and Del Norte County offices; overseeing recruitment and retention of volunteers; managing program budget and data and; assisting Medicare beneficiaries with direct counseling and informal advocacy involving Medicare billing claims and problems, Medigap plans, Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, and Long-Term Care Insurance. Ability to understand and explain complex information required. HICAP is a program of the Area 1 Agency on Aging.

Office Coordinator Associated Students, HSU F/T position with benefits For more info visit: http://tinyurl.com/ aoh9ylp First review: July 16, 2013 Open until filled

A pre-employment background check is required of all final candidates. Three letters of reference and a completed application package required.

seeking applicants for

ď ?ď ’ď ?ď ‡ď ’ď ď ? ď ď “ď “ď ‰ď “ď ”ď ď Žď ”ď€  ď ”ď ¨ď Šď łď€ ď Śď ľď Źď Źď€­ď ´ď Šď ­ď Ľď€ ď °ď Żď łď Šď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€  ď “ď ˆď •ď ‰ď ’ď •ď ?ď –ď€ƒď Šď ˆď ‘ď ˆď •ď „ď ?ď€ƒď ’ď ‰ďƒ€ď †ď ˆď€ƒ ď –ď ˜ď “ď “ď ’ď •ď —ď€ƒď ‡ď ˜ď —ď Œď ˆď –ď€?ď€ƒď Œď ‘ď †ď ?ď ˜ď ‡ď Œď ‘ď Šď€ƒ ď •ď ’ď ˜ď —ď Œď ‘ď Šď€ƒď “ď ‹ď ’ď ‘ď ˆď€ƒď †ď „ď ?ď ?ď –ď€?ď€ƒ ď §ď ˛ď Ľď Ľď ´ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď ­ď Ľď ­ď ˘ď Ľď ˛ď łď€ ď Żď Śď€  ď —ď ‹ď ˆď€ƒď Šď ˆď ‘ď ˆď •ď „ď ?ď€ƒď “ď ˜ď …ď ?ď Œď †ď€?ď€ƒď šď ’ď •ď ‡ď€ƒ ď “ď •ď ’ď †ď ˆď –ď –ď Œď ‘ď Šď€?ď€ƒď ‡ď „ď —ď „ď€ƒď ˆď ‘ď —ď •ď œď€?ď€ƒ ď „ď ‘ď ‡ď€ƒďƒ€ď ?ď Œď ‘ď Šď€‘ď€ƒď€‡ď€œď€‘ď€—ď€šď€’ď ‹ď •ď€ƒď šď Œď —ď ‹ď€ƒ ď …ď ˆď ‘ď ˆďƒ€ď —ď –ď€‘ď€ƒď€°ď ˜ď –ď —ď€ƒď “ď „ď –ď –ď€ƒď †ď •ď Œď ?ď Œď ‘ď „ď ?ď€ƒď ‹ď Œď –ď —ď ’ď •ď œď€ƒďƒ€ď ‘ď Šď ˆď •ď “ď •ď Œď ‘ď —ď€ƒď †ď ?ď ˆď „ď •ď „ď ‘ď †ď ˆď€‘ ď€¤ď “ď “ď ?ď Œď †ď „ď —ď Œď ’ď ‘ď€ƒď „ď ‘ď ‡ď€ƒď ?ď ’ď …ď€ƒď ‡ď ˆď –ď †ď •ď Œď “ď —ď Œď ’ď ‘ď€ƒď „ď ™ď „ď Œď ?ď „ď …ď ?ď ˆď€ƒď „ď —ď€ƒď€  ď ˇď ˇď ˇď€Žď Łď ¨ď Ąď Žď §ď Šď Žď §ď ´ď Šď ¤ď Ľď łď Śď łď€Žď Żď ˛ď §ď€?ď€ƒď€•ď€•ď€˜ď€œď€ƒď€°ď œď •ď —ď ?ď ˆď€ƒď€¤ď ™ď ˆď€‘ď€?ď€ƒď€¨ď ˜ď •ď ˆď Žď „ď€?ď€ƒď€Śď€¤ď€ƒ ď€œď€˜ď€˜ď€“ď€”ď€?ď€ƒď ’ď •ď€ƒď€¨ď€ˇď€°ď€ˇď€Šď€ ď€´ď€´ď€´ď€­ď€¸ď€˛ď€šď€łď€‘ď€ƒď€łď ?ď ˆď „ď –ď ˆď€ƒď –ď ˜ď …ď ?ď Œď —ď€ƒď ?ď ˆď —ď —ď ˆď •ď€ƒď ’ď ‰ď€ƒď Œď ‘ď —ď ˆď •ď ˆď –ď —ď€?ď€ƒ ď •ď ˆď –ď ˜ď ?ď ˆď€?ď€ƒď „ď ‘ď ‡ď€ƒď „ď “ď “ď ?ď Œď †ď „ď —ď Œď ’ď ‘ď€ƒď —ď ’ď€ƒď€ąď „ď ‘ď ‡ď „ď€ƒď€łď •ď „ď —ď ’ď€ƒď „ď —ď€ƒď —ď ‹ď ˆď€ƒď „ď …ď ’ď ™ď ˆď€ƒ ď „ď ‡ď ‡ď •ď ˆď –ď –ď€ƒď …ď œď€ƒď ?ď Żď Žď ¤ď Ąď šď€Źď€ ď Šď ľď Źď šď€ ď€łď ˛ď ¤ď€ ď Ąď ´ď€ ď€ľď€ ď °ď€Žď ­ď€Žď€ ď …ď ?ď …

DINING OperatIONs supervIsOr HSU Dining Services, full-time position with benefits. For more info visit: http://tinyurl.com/ aoh9ylp or call 707.826.3541 First review: July 16, 2013 Open until filled

ď ?ď Ąď Ťď Ľď€ ď Ľď ¸ď ´ď ˛ď Ąď€ ď ­ď Żď Žď Ľď šď€Źď€ ď€  ď §ď ˛ď Ľď Ąď ´ď€ ď Żď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ď ľď Žď Šď ´ď šď€Ž ď “ď °ď Ľď Łď Šď Ąď Źď€ ď Žď Ľď Ľď ¤ď łď€ ď ď ¤ď ľď Źď ´ď łď€  ď Źď Šď śď Ľď€ ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď€ ď šď Żď ľď€Žď€ ď …ď Ąď ˛ď Žď€ ď ľď °ď€ ď ´ď Żď€  ď€¤ď€łď€Źď€śď€°ď€°ď€ ď ´ď Ąď ¸ď€­ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď€Żď ­ď Żď€Ž ď ‚ď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď€ ď€´ď€ ď ˛ď Ľď Śď Ľď ˛ď Ľď Žď Łď Ľď łď€Žď€  ď ď °ď °ď Źď Šď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď€ ď Żď Žď€­ď łď Šď ´ď Ľď€Ž ď ?ď ľď łď ´ď€ ď ¨ď Ąď śď Ľď€ ď Ľď ¸ď ´ď ˛ď Ąď€  ď ˘ď Ľď ¤ď ˛ď Żď Żď ­ď€Źď€ ď ˆď “ď€Żď ‡ď …ď „ď€ ď€Śď€  ď Łď Źď Ľď Ąď Žď€ ď Łď ˛ď Šď ­ď Šď Žď Ąď Źď€ ď ˛ď Ľď Łď Żď ˛ď ¤ď€Ž ď ƒď Ąď Źď Źď€ ď Šď Ąď ­ď Šď Ľď€ ď ´ď Żď ¤ď Ąď šď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ ď Ąď °ď °ď ´ď€Ąď€ ď€   ď ˇď ˇď ˇď€Žď Łď Ąď ­ď Ľď Žď ´ď Żď ˛ď Śď ¨ď Ąď€Žď Łď Żď ­

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629−3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST−1226)

default

County of Humboldt

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER I

$2,685 - $3,446 mo. plus excellent benefits EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY TRAINING PROVIDED The County of Humboldt is now accepting applications for Correctional Officer I with the Humboldt County Correctional Facility. On the job and classroom training will be provided. We are seeking career minded men and women willing to commit to our agency. Must pass a detailed background investigation and be available to work all shifts. Apply by July 12, 2013. AA/EOE. Apply online at

www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs or contact Humboldt County Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, CA.

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS

Surveillance OfďŹ cer Slot Attendant Crown Club Rep 2- Deli Busser/Host Janitor Prep Cook/Dishwasher Gift Shop Server FULL-TIME POSITIONS

Line Cook Deli Cook Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

“Clothes with Soul�

$19 Rack

for the month of July to Celebrate

t’s New W19hthaBirthday OPEN Tuesday-Saturday 10:30 am - 5 pm 335 E Street, Eureka 445-8079 default

PUBLIC AUCTIONS

    

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

Custom Welding & Artwork

Special artwork for home or business. Custom work for your vehicle. (707) 498-1067

jbcustomfabrication@yahoo.com www.facebook.com/justin.barrington.96

Auto Service

Estate furniture, household misc. + additions incl. vintage Wedgewood gas cook stove, lg. bird cage, willow armchair, “Brasilia� by Broyhill Premier mid-century modern table, chairs & rolling bar cart, & Much More!

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

Art & Design default J.B. Fabrication

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−1226)

THURS. JUNE 27TH 5:45 PM

Estate Furniture & Household Misc. + Additions

IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Mon. & Tues.

Auctions

THURS. JULY 11TH 5:45 PM

default

Sale for June is: Select Denim

ď ƒď ď ’ď …ď€ ď ?ď ’ď ?ď –ď ‰ď „ď …ď ’ď “ď€  ď Žď Ľď Ľď ¤ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Žď ?ď —

Art & Collectibles

Job description and application is available online at www.a1aa.org or available at the Area 1 Agency on Aging at 434 7th Street, Eureka. 707-442-3763. Position open until filled. default

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo,

Promoting Independence for a Lifetime

HICAP (Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program) Manager, full time, exempt.

default

Cleaning

Community 8TH ANNUAL BILL NESSLER CAR SHOW & CRUISE. Saturday, July 13, Meet & Greet BBQ and Cruise beginning at 5:30, Blue Lake Casino, Sunday, July 14, Parade line−up 9 a.m. , car show after parade, judging & awards at 2:30. Entry Fee: $25 includes 2 bbq tickets for meet & greet. Register call 668−5932 All proceeds go toward Blue Lake Parks & Recreation (C−0711)

Merchandise TOYS & SHOES 1/2 PRICE! Plus Pink Tagged Clothes 25¢. June 25−29. Dream Quest Thrift Store: Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams! (5M−0627)

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non−toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. (707) 822−7819. (S−1226) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−1226)

Computer & Internet default

707-840-0600

ď ?ď Ąď Łď Šď Žď ´ď Żď łď ¨ď€  ď °ď Ľď Ąď Łď Ľď€ ď Żď Śď€ ď ­ď Šď Žď ¤ď€  ď łď Šď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď€ąď€šď€šď€łď€Ž ď Šď Šď ­ď€ ď …ď Źď Śď Ľď ˛ď ¤ď Šď Žď Ť ď ˇď ˇď ˇď€Žď ­ď Ąď Łď łď Śď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ­ď Ąď łď łď Ľď łď€Žď Žď Ľď ´


CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Computer & Internet

Home Repair

Musicians & Instructors

default

AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home− a proven technology− reasonably priced−Sunlight Heat− ing−$300 Federal Tax Credit−CA lic. #972834− (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−1226)

default

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

www.katherinealmy.com

Call for quote

Bookkeeping service and consultation. Full payroll service including: • payroll computation • payroll tax deposits and reports • free direct deposit

kath.almy@gmail.com

Garden & Landscape ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−1226)

BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR HAS MOVED. 76 Country Club Dr., next to Farmer Brown’s Supply. (530) 629−4067. (E−0725) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, taichigardener.com (S−1226)

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call (707) 845−3087. 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com, (S−1226)



 

Legal 

Katherine Almy 707-267-8759

default



default

WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com (S−1226)

ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499−4828. wiesner_eric@yahoo.com

default

Financial

Other Professionals

   

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner−advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: (707) 441−1343 susielarain e@northcoastjournal.com default

      

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermedi− ate. Seabury Gould 444−8507. (M −1226) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all pi− ano styles. Juilliard trained, re− mote lessons available. National− ly Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−1226)

  default

Every 2nd Saturday No Cover 9pm-1am

Robert Goodman Winery 937 I St. Arcata Dinner till 10pm

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAIN− MENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. 832−7419. (M−1226)

    

Other Professionals A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amaz− ing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birth− days, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499−5628. (S−1226)

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−1226)

FD1963

 

     

@ncj_of_humboldt

default

IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more insured & bonded





Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001 default

LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677−3364. (SA−829)

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

445-7715 1-888-849-5728 HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

default

445-2881



    

  

Art & Collectibles Auctions Baby Items Clothing Merchandise Miscellaneous Sporting Goods

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

classified.northcoast journal.com

HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/SCENIC TOURS. (707) 843−9599 www.redwoodcoast helicopters.com

default

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

default

Pets & Livestock

Sewing & Alterations

 Enjoy a glass at Robert Goodman Winery or your favorite cocktail, every 2nd Sat for Rocksteady Night w/dj rotten. Lounge atmosphere. Focusing on 60’s ska-rocksteady & early reggae. (707) 497-4407

Other Professionals

classified SERVICES

NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8a.m− 3p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n− Britches. Kristin360@gmail.com

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

444-2273

Shibashi Qi Gong & Tai Chi

Tai Chi For

Everyone

On the Beach Sunday, June 30 1pm at Moonstone weather permitting Call Glenda Hesseltine (707) 268-3936 $5 Love Offering

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

41


body, mind ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668−5408. astro@salinarain.com, www.salinarain.com. (MB−1206) CERTIFIED ROLFER ANGELA HART, B.A . Rolfing® Ten Series, Tune−up, injuries, Chronic Pain, Repetitive Motion Injury. (707) 616−3096 (MB−1121) CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED ESTHETICIAN. Organic facials, waxing & aromatherapy massage. Mention this ad and receive 25% off. Located at Beau Monde Salon in Arcata. (707) 953−7619. (MB−0822) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822−5253

&Spirit default

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wake− field and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do preg− nancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441−9175. (MB−1226)

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE−FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822−1676 (707) 822−5253 rowen_47@yahoo.com (MB−0919)

default

with Margy Emerson Beginners Meet at Martial Arts Academy Sunny Brae Shopping Ctr., Arcata 8-Week Term Starts June 25

3 PROGRAMS:

 Traditional T’ai Chi  T’ai Chi for Back Pain

default

 

and Arthritis 42 Combined Forms For New Summer Schedule:

822-6508 General Info: www.margaretemerson.com

Visit any class free!

Apartments for Rent

Houses for Rent

default

ARCATA CLEAN 1 BEDROOM HOUSE. Recently refurbished. No growing/ illegal drugs/smoking/ pets. References Required. $840/ month plus deposit. (707) 822− 7471. (R−0627)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 ARCATA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 1226−1236 L St. 2 units available. Walking distance from HSU & Plaza W/c cat. Rent $750, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444−9197 (R− 0627)

EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOME. 3415 Albee St. Featuring yard, sunroom, detached garage, and hookups w/c pet. Rent $950, Vac. Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444−9197. (R−0627)

Vacation Rentals EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Moun− tain Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessi− ble. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986−7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L− 1226)

Comm. Space for Rent default

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, Uni− versity of Metaphysical Sci− ences. Bringing professional− ism to metaphysics. (707) 822 −2111

default





Est. 1979

Medical Cannabis Evaluations



 default

July Rolfing Special

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems co n

fi d e n t i a l &

c

passionate om

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

All Renewals Starting At

80

$

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

Walk-ins Welcome

Wed & Sat 11-5pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students

    

Lowest Price Evaluations in HumCo

default

 

  

Medical Cannabis Consultants (707) 407- 0527 508 I Street, Eureka

EUREKA 2BD/1.5BA TOWN− HOUSE. 2610 Fairfield #2. Bay view, common yard, laundry hook−ups, w/c pet. Rent $950, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0627) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1443 5th St., #2. Centrally located, shared yard, on site laundry w/c cat. Rent $625, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0627) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APT. 230 Wabash Ave. #10, Centrally located, common yard, on−site laundry, w/c cat, Sec 8 ok. Rent $675, Vac. 7/08 (R−0627) HUMBOLDT BAY PROPERTIES. Apartments, Rooms, Houses. (707) 443−5228 (R−0711)

(across from HC Court House)

Relax, Restore & Refresh

Your Body Mind & Spirit

1 hr Fabulous Foot Reflexology $25

  

541-251-1885

New Patients ONLY

95

$

   

Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

+

ENERGY MEDICINE

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center



Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years.

Call for Walk-in Availability

HEAT THERAPY

 

 

707-822-5244

 

  

default

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata



default

 KICK BUTTS! Stop smoking now with Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. 707−845−3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com.



TRINIDAD SMALL STUDIO APT. Ocean view of Goddess Rock, quaint & quiet, 1/2 mile from Patrick’s Point State Park, full kitchen, wood floors, no dogs. Must have excellent credit & ref. req., $525 mo., $1050 deposit. (707) 834−0030 (AR−0627)

EUREKA DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE. Available at 7th & I Streets in Eureka. 650 sf. New paint and carpet. Great location. Parking & janitorial included. Call S & W Properties, (707) 499− 6906. (R−0627) OFFICE SPACE OR CLASSROOMS FOR RENT. 4 Rooms available for a non− profit organization: 2 @ 410 sq.ft., 1 @ 450 sq. ft., 1 @580 sq. ft. Good parking, accessibility, in Central Location (F and Sonoma). $1 per sq. ft. plus utilities and janitor. (707) 442−3015, grace520@pacbell.net (R−0613) PARKING SPACES FOR RENT IN DOWNTOWN EUREKA LOT. S & W Properties. $40 per month per space. Call 443−2246, 499−6906. (R−0627)

Call to book your appointment

822-5395 



42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Center For Reflexology & Intuitive Healing Arts Corner of Samoa & I, Arcata

www.reflexologyinstruction.com

northcoastjournal


classified HOUSING Acreage for Sale SELLER FINANCED LAND!!! SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS CALL DANI WEINER, 831−227−4016, DWeiner@ MontalvoHomes.com Montalvo Homes & Estates

home & garden

FIND HOME IMPROVEMENT

EXPERTS

WILLOW CREEK REDUCED ! 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Ap− proved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Prop− erty is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

Starting on Page 17

■ THREE CORNERS LARGE OLDER HOME ON 2 ACRES! Built in 1979 with a newer addition of 2 bedrooms and 1 bath. Sunken livingroom with FP, formal dining room, family room, and a separate utility room. This home needs updating but is very private. There is also a small barn and a tack room. MLS#237838 $345,000

NEW

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

$349,900

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,270 sq ft Fickle Hill log style manufactured home on 12 beautiful acres, set on permanent foundation, wide open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, wood stove, large decks, very private

$308,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,900 sq ft Lundbar Hills home, large living room with an open floor plan in kitchen/dining room & family room, wood stove, gorgeous hardwood floors, small attached sun room

$299,500

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,600 sq ft McKinleyville home with many upgrades, great attention to details w/open family room, formal living room, master bedroom w/walk-in closet open to south facing deck

LISTI

NG!

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Hydesville Beauty Plus Guest Quarters On 17 Acres

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

This fabulous Hydesville home was beautifully renovated, and then served as a Bed & Breakfast for several years. Also perfect for a family home, it has 4 bedrooms upstairs, 2 with their own baths, nice master bedroom downstairs, sewing room, family room, formal living & dining rooms plus an awesome kitchen. Detached 3 car garage w/ guest quarters & full bath above. On 17 acres divided up into 3 separate 5 acre fenced areas plus a separate 1 acre area. RV hook-up. MLS#238110 $649,000

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Bald Hills Land/Property

Beautiful +/-123 acres with mettah Creek running through the property. this parcel has open flats, timber, year round water, amazing views, and plenty of privacy. oWC.

$269,000

Blocksburg Land/Property

3 amazing properties. +/-40, 80, & 160 acre parcels featuring deeded access, year round water and breathtaking valley views.

Broker/Owners Sharon Redd, Lic.# 00590960 Jim Redd Lic.# 00665810 Since 1977

444-9234 www.fourstarrealtor.com www.ranchagent.com

$275,000 - $450,000

Weitchpec Land/Property

neW

LIStIn

G!

+/- 305 acres with miners Creek tributary flowing right through this splendidly wooded parcel. property equipped with a locked gate giving you plenty of privacy. Call Charlie today!

$339,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013

43


Plus, if you're an Emeral d or Platinum member, the prizes get even bigger with a tiered bonus! Detai\~~r:i\IJ!!.Q.i£~~!,U,\!, Players must have earned 10 points on the day of the promotion to qualify.

••••

••

• • Come check out our recent arrivals and try your luck on the newest slots to hit The Heights. From pennies to high limit, Cher-Ae Heights Casino has got the games you want

Limit one prize per player per day.

YOUR NORTH COAST HOT SPOT!!! 8-BALL & 9-BALL TOURNAMENTS/ FREE POOL NIGHTS/ KARAOKE/ OJ NIGHTS/ LIVE BANDS/ HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS DAILY/ GAME KINGS WITH CARDS & KENO/ THE FIREWATER VIP SECTION & SO MUCH MORE!!!

TABLE BONUSES

BINGO BONUSES

JOIN US FRIDAYS IN JUNE AT 7PM. WE WANT YOU TO SPLASH INTO SUMMER WITH A BLACKJACK TOURNAMENT NOT TO BE MISSED. MAKE SURE TO BRING YOUR A-GAME!! SIGN-UPS START ON THURS. AT 4 PM WITH A $20 BUY-IN.

GO/ GO/ G0 ... $1000 DOUBLE ACTION WEDNESDAYS. DOUBLE YOUR BUY-IN THURSDAYS. GET SOME COLD HARD CASH TO BEAT THE SUMMER HEAT ON SAT. JUNE 15 FOR SUMMER CASH SPLASH MARATHON.


North Coast Journal 06-27-13 Edition