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HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIF. • FREE Thursday May 16, 2019 Vol XXX Issue 20 northcoastjournal.com

‘AN OTTER IDEA’ Bold initiative looks to raise funds and awareness by merging art, science and a massive scavenger hunt By Iridian Casarez


2  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Contents 4 Editor ‘Incredibly Disappointing’

5 Mailbox 5 Poem The Big Dipper

6 News Making Rooms

10 News Got Water?

13

Week in Weed Fleeced by Phylos?

15 NCJ Daily 16 On The Cover ‘An Otter Idea’

20 Home & Garden Service Directory

22 Table Talk The List

23 The Setlist Cap and Gown and Getting Down

24 Music & More! Live Entertainment Grid

28 Calendar 32 Filmland Pouring it On

33 Workshops & Classes 34 Field Notes The Universe: Whodunnit?

34 Sudoku & Crossword 42 Classifieds

May 16, 2019 • Volume XXX Issue 20 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2019 Publisher Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com General Manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com News Editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com Arts & Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Editor/Staff Writer Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com Staff Writer Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com Assistant Special Publications Editor Cassie Curatolo cassie@northcoastjournal.com Contributing Writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Gabrielle Gopinath, Collin Yeo Special Publications Publisher Creative Services Director Lynn Leishman lynn@northcoastjournal.com Production Manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com Art Director Jonathan Webster jonathan@northcoastjournal.com Graphic Design/Production Heidi Beltran, Dave Brown, Miles Eggleston, Jacqueline Langeland, Amy Waldrip ncjads@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Manager Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com Senior Advertising Representative Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com Advertising Marna Batsell marna@northcoastjournal.com Tyler Tibbles tyler@northcoastjournal.com Multimedia Content Producer Zach Lathouris zach@northcoastjournal.com Classified Advertising Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com Bookkeeper Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com Administrative Assistant Sam Leishman sam@northcoastjournal.com Chief Executive Officer Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com

Mail/Office 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

Weeed plays the Outer Space at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 22. Read more on page 23. Courtesy of the artists

On the Cover Photo by Mark Larson

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

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Editor

‘Incredibly Disappointing’ By Thadeus Greenson

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wo days and 600 miles apart, a pair of governing bodies held very different conversations about the need for local input into development decisions that will impact Humboldt County for decades to come. It was a bit jarring. First, on May 7, the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors had a testy exchange over a seemingly reasonable request from Fifth District Supervisor Steve Madrone that the board send a letter to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), asking that it request that the California Coastal Commission delay a hearing on a controversial hotel project near Trinidad by two months so local residents can provide input. Two days later, the commission — an agency with a big-government reputation for taking a top-down approach — stressed the importance of making sure larger projects are heard in the communities that will house them. Madrone’s request comes as the Coastal Commission is preparing to hold a hearing on Trinidad Rancheria’s proposed project to build a five-story hotel next to its casino on Scenic Drive. Because the Rancheria is a sovereign nation, it’s ultimately up to the BIA to approve the project. But as a part of the BIA’s process, the federal agency asks the commission to offer an “objection” or “concurrence” as to whether it would comply with the California Coastal Act. The matter is scheduled to come before the commission next month at its San Diego meeting — which falls just two months before the commission meets in Eureka. Responding to requests from constituents, Madrone asked the board to send the letter to BIA, saying it was an issue of good governance and transparency to allow local residents to address the commission without having to drive 750 miles south. Three-fifths of the board pushed back. Hard. And that’s a bit perplexing. Supervisor Virginia Bass said every jurisdiction in the state has important issues coming before the commission and it’s not up to the board to opine on which projects the commission hears and when. Supervisor Estelle Fennell said, as she understands it, BIA won’t grant the request anyway, adding she has confidence the commission will thoroughly vet the project. Supervisor Rex Bohn echoed the concerns of Rancheria representatives, saying the two-month delay could cause additional expenses and impact project financing. But these reasons seem thin. After all, the board has not been shy about weighing in on the processes of other governing agencies. A couple of years ago, it urged the commission to support an application to expand oyster farming in Humboldt Bay. Heck, earlier in the

May 7 meeting, the board debated a resolution calling on the state to abandon plans for a high-speed rail and approved sending a letter to the California State University system urging it to reverse Humboldt State University’s gutting of KHSU-FM, in part, to close its budget deficit. So the board clearly has no philosophical issues with weighing in on other entities’ processes, disregarding their financial concerns and advocating the interests of its constituents. But when Madrone and Supervisor Mike Wilson pushed back, with Wilson saying he didn’t understand the controversy and Madrone saying he was simply asking that the board defer to his knowledge of his constituents and support a request that’s tremendously important to some of them, things escalated. Bass said she felt blackmailed and Bohn told Madrone: “Respect is earned, not given and I hope you know that.” The strangely terse exchange only seemed weirder when, two days later, California Coastal Commission Executive Director Jack Ainsworth described Caltrans’ pushback to postponing a hearing on its U.S. Highway 101 safety corridor improvement project two months until the commission meets in Eureka as “incredibly disappointing” and stressed the importance of holding local hearings for “these larger projects.” Now the BIA clearly has a difficult decision ahead — one that will attempt to balance the desire of a sovereign nation for an economic development project against concerns over that project’s impact on the environment and coastal resources of the surrounding area. But we hope our elected officials would advocate at every step for more — not fewer — opportunities for their constituents to be heard on the issue. We are not clear why Bohn, Bass and Fennell wouldn’t support Madrone’s request because, honestly, their stated reasons don’t make sense. Maybe they are putting vague concerns about the costs of the delay to the Rancheria over the value of ensuring locals feel heard on a project that could alter one of Humboldt County’s most famous viewscapes, which would be disappointing. Or perhaps they feel more allegiance to the project’s proponents than to the rest of us. After all, their former colleague, Ryan Sundberg, is working as the interim general manager of the Rancheria’s casino and David Tyson, Bohn’s close friend who worked with Bass as city manager when she was a Eureka city councilmember and mayor, is serving as the interim CEO of the Rancheria’s economic development arm and the public face of the project. If that’s the case, well, that really would be incredibly disappointing. l


Mailbox

‘A Manufactured Divide’ Editor: On behalf of the Ladies of the CAB, along with the supportive listening community, thank you Humboldt State University journalism department for speaking out on behalf of KHSU (“KHSU Dismantling Rebuked, KEET Board to Discuss Possible Radio Venture,” posted online April 17). Your statement of support sheds light on a manufactured divide between the journalism department and KHSU, a diverse hybrid community radio station. Issues that the university administration have alluded to appear to stem from leadership that lent itself to separation rather than collaboration within the community of the university and the greater community served. Here’s to celebrating the unity in community. Jana Kirk-Levine, Eureka

headlined, “The Graduates.” I really would like to clarify some things about my painting titled, “Red Scare: US Involvement in the Indonesian Genocide of 1965.” I would like to make clear that the two central figures are not children and they are not standing in rags or in trash as described in the past article. These two figures are the remembrance of the people who died in the genocide

and they are standing on the expansive Indonesian archipelago. The flower motif in the background is done in wax with the use of a traditional Indonesian batik stamp. The red fan the main figure is holding symbolizes the red scare that swept through Asia as the U.S. sought to stamp out communism by backing and supporting the oppressive, militant leaders. I encourage readers to watch the

films by Joshua Oppenheimer, The Act of Killing and The Look of Silence, that inspired this painting. I have addressed this issue with the author and I still encourage her to edit the online version as well as to see the Graduate Art Show at HSU in person. Naomi Rose Doherty, Eureka

Continued on next page »

Setting the Record Straight Editor: In last week’s Journal, some misinformation was printed in the article

The Big Dipper Dangles above the coastline Where countless stars and waves Welcome me home. One of these stars Is extremely rare Having immigrated From a Dwarf Galaxy Far, far away… All of the waves come From foreign lands Much closer to home. — Kirk Gothier

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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Mailbox

News

Continued from previous page

Making Rooms

Council approves hotel project at former Eureka Chamber of Commerce site By Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com

T Terry Torgerson

‘Two Different Games’ Editor: Sherman, buried in your diatribe against Franklin Graham, you alluded to but for the Electoral College system of electing a U.S. president, we would be experiencing our first female president (Mailbox, May 9). The game played was Electoral College, not Popular Vote — two different games. To attempt to rationalize Hilary’s loss by claiming victory by popular vote is like you and I playing the game of Clue, you lose, and you try to rationalize your loss by applying the rules of Monopoly. Those of us who understand the rule,

shake our head every time someone, in their ignorance, tries to apply the rules of Monopoly to a different game. Next time, Sherman, do not forget to bring your rulebook. Charlie Giannini, Fortuna

Write a Letter! Please make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. The deadline to have a letter considered for the upcoming edition is 10 a.m. Monday. l

he former Eureka Chamber of Commerce building and its surrounding property are slated to become the site of a new “upscale” 83-room hotel after the city council voted unanimously last week to accept a $435,000 bid for the parcel. The project by SJN Hospitality — which built the Holiday Inn Express & Suites in Eureka a few years ago — was recommended by staff over a proposal by Alcohol Drug Care Services to use the current structure for a 16-bed crisis and sobering center. The single-story, 1950s-era building located on 1 acre that sits at the corner of Broadway and Hawthorne Street served as the chamber’s headquarters for decades, but last year the business organization asked to be let out of its long-term lease after the city discontinued its contract with the chamber to run a visitors center at the site. While the city owns the property, the chamber paid for the construction and maintenance of the building under a 1957 agreement that had ownership reverting to the city in 2033, when the chamber’s lease was slated to end. Last summer, the council agreed to pay the chamber $100,000 as “compensation” for the remainder of the lease and allow the chamber to move and create a business incubator facility in the downtown area. That, in turn, allows the city to sell the property outright. In February, a request for proposals was circulated for the property resulting in two responses: the hotel development and the treatment center. Rob Holmlund, the city’s director of

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developmental services, says the SJN project was the one that most closely aligned with the RFP requisites, which included the ability to “purchase and develop the property beyond its existing condition,” and generate tax revenue. Noting that the city is working to find another location for the treatment center proposed by ADCS, which currently runs the 56-bed Waterfront Recovery Services treatment program at the former Multiple Assistance Center and oversees 39 units of transitional housing at the Serenity Inn, Holmlund says funding has not been secured for the operations of the proposed project, and ADCS wasn’t looking to purchase the property or pay a lease. Holmlund tells the Journal the hotel option is the “best fiscal opportunity for the city, as well as for doing aesthetic improvements” along the busy main street. In the General Plan update, the Broadway corridor “is envisioned to increase in density with taller buildings, and become a beautiful and well-coordinated entry-way into the City and a key retail and service-commercial corridor.” According to SJN Hospitality’s proposal, the developer has a purchase agreement for a property behind the Broadway site and plans to build a four-story hotel on the combined 29,000-square-foot lot that would generate “millions of dollars in TOT over the life of the property,” referring to the transitory occupancy tax levied on hotel rooms. “The public benefit of the development is plentiful. A significant beautification of Broadway will occur with the addition of the project,” the proposal to the city states.

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“Local residents along with their family and friends will have the opportunity to stay in a modern upscale hotel within Eureka during holidays, events and weddings occurring throughout the year.” While the city redacted SJN’s projections on how much the take would be on an annual basis contained in documents provided to the Journal — deeming it “proprietary” information — a 2018 economic analysis looking at development options for the waterfront lots between C and F streets gives some indication of possible numbers. The report looked at three scenarios that included the potential of a mid-to-upscale, 100-room hotel and estimated such a development would generate around $430,000 a year in TOT. Also addressed in the report was the impact a new hotel would have on existing establishments, a question raised at the May 7 meeting by Councilmember Leslie Castellano, who asked whether the development proposed for the former chamber site would “compromise established hotels.” Holmlund replied that he didn’t “predict that this would be a problem” and that “occupancy is healthy, it’s good.” When Councilmember Natalie Arroyo noted she had heard indications that the hotel would be more of a long-term stay option for travelling professionals, Holmlund said the developer is interested in that type of facility. This could impact the TOT revenue potential for the project, as the tax can only be levied for the first 30 days of a person’s hotel stay. According to the waterfront economic analysis, SJN’s Holiday Inn Express & Suites was the first new hotel on the Eureka scene in 15 years and the addition of 100 rooms was absorbed without resulting in “a decline in overall occupancy or average room rates” at other similarly situated establishments. Using data compiled by a lodging analytics firm, the report states that there are around 680 mid-to-upper-mid class hotel rooms in Eureka but notes that not all establishments were accounted for. Most of those missing from the count did not fit into the same classification, with many of the 400 or so other rooms in the city “in use as more permanent housing rather than being available for overnight lodging.” The analysis also notes that another new mid-to-upper scale hotel — such as the one proposed for the Broadway property — would likely result in a similar situation, but any more than that could saturate the market, resulting in a negative impact. “With only modest growth in area population and employment anticipated in the coming years, new hotel room demand would largely have to come from expanding the number of tourists attracted to the local area,” the report states. “It is likely that the level of tourism attraction that would be necessary to support 29 to 44 percent growth in local room demand would require a concerted long-term promotion effort.

“Given these factors, while there may be market potential for one upscale hotel in Eureka, this may be the limit to what can be supported by demand, at least in the near term,” it continues, going on to state that a “cautious approach would be to delay the development of more than one hotel, with further market evaluation after the first hotel has been in operation for a period of one or more years.” The city is, in fact, looking at a new promotion effort — and a new promotor — after deciding in February to take the $370,000 allotted for marketing each year out to bid, ending its decades-long funding relationship with the Eureka-Humboldt Visitors Bureau. Much like the chamber’s exit from serving

as the city’s outreach arm to tourists, for decades the bureau had provided marketing services for the city with an approach that focused heavily on the region’s redwood trees as a global draw. “Staff proposes that Eureka deliberately and strategically shift its funding and destination marketing efforts toward a marketing strategy that concentrates specifically on Eureka while simultaneously expanding the target audience to include local/regional residents and the local business community,” a February staff report on the issue states. “A primary mission of the city’s new strategy is to promote the city of Eureka not only as a desirable destination but also an amazing place to live.”

While the bureau submitted a proposal, it did not make the list of three finalists selected by staff to provide the city’s marketing services that was released last month, which included Eddy Alexander of Roanoke, Virginia, Humboldt Made of Eureka and MC2 Design Group, of Chico. A final recommendation from a review panel, made up of “city staff and local business representatives,” is slated to go before the council May 21. l Kimberly Wear is the Journal’s assistant editor. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 323, or kim@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @kimberly_wear.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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he planned 100-room Trinidad Rancheria hotel at Cher-Ae Heights Casino appears stalled at the state level because of an inability to come up with a definite source of drinking water for the facility. Located on the bluffs of Scenic Drive, a mile south of city limits, the planned hotel is outside of Trinidad’s water service area, which is designated by the city’s General Plan. The city is in the process of studying its own limited water supply from Luffenholz Creek and does not yet know if there would be enough water to accommodate the hotel in addition to all present and future users within the existing service areas, especially during drought years.  Approval for the hotel is currently being considered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) but it won’t move forward until it receives “concurrence” from the California Coastal Commission that the project will not violate the California Coastal Act, which requires that developments in the coastal zone have a definite source of drinking water.  California Coastal Commission staff has found other problems with the plans for the five-story building, as well, including incongruity with the pristine ocean views around Trinidad Head, possible issues with wastewater disposal and its location upon an unstable bluff top. Coastal Commission staff has recommended it object to the project.  Although the commission was initially scheduled to hear the project in April, the BIA — acting on behalf of the Trinidad Rancheria — requested it delay holding a public hearing on the project to allow the Rancheria to provide additional information. The Coastal Commission responded by re-scheduling the project hearing from April to June, when it will meet in San Diego. At the May 7 meeting of the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, Fifth District Supervisor Steve Madrone made a motion asking the board to write a letter to the BIA requesting that the Coastal Commission’s hearing on the hotel be further delayed to its August meeting in Eureka. That would give locals the opportunity to attend the meeting and provide input on

the hotel plans without traveling 750 miles south. “We’re not here today to discuss the project,” Madrone said. “We’re simply talking about a public process and asking that something so important be held locally.”  Three representatives of the Trinidad Rancheria then spoke, urging the board not to request any further delays.  “The tribe’s critical pathway to bring information before the Coastal Commission in June is crucial to the economic success of the project,” said Trinidad Rancheria CEO Jacque Hostler-Carmesin. “We cannot delay this project.” David Tyson, interim CEO for the Trinidad Rancheria Economic Development Corporation, said the Rancheria had made a long-term effort to be transparent. “It’s important that this project move forward,” he said. “Time kills deals and, in this case, time is money. The tribe is spending a great deal of its money in answering these questions and moving forward with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Coastal Commission. It’s imperative that this be on the June meeting. Funding [for the project] is determined by that outcome. Loan guarantees are determined by that outcome.”  Tribal member Shirley Laos said there had already been plenty of opportunities for public comment and she did not understand why the Rancheria should have to endure further delays.  Kent Sawatsky, who is not a tribal member, said that he wants the meeting to be held locally and that he could not attend a meeting that was hundreds of miles away.  “This is a major issue,” he said. “If it were held down there, only one or two people would go down there. But if it were held locally, 30 or 40 people might attend. We’re all entitled to public participation. This is just a two-month delay on a project that has been going for 12 years.” He wondered if the Rancheria was “location shopping to have this meeting where we cannot participate.”  Madrone noted that when the project was publicized by the Rancheria several years ago, the plans were for a two-story hotel but have since evolved into a


An artistic rendering of the proposed hotel project at CherAe Heights Casino off Scenic Drive south of Trinidad. Submitted

five-story hotel. “I don’t know why one would not support a request to have the hearing locally and have the ability of the community to engage” he said. “We’re talking about a two-month delay when, in fact, over the past couple of months, the Rancheria themselves and the BIA have requested several delays when they submitted inadequate information for the project. ... The Coastal Commission staff was recommending denial of the project because of inadequate information, particularly about water, landslides, traffic and other impacts.” Although Third District Supervisor Mike Wilson thought Madrone’s request was reasonable, the other three supervisors did not. Second District Supervisor Estelle Fennell expressed her support for the tribe’s concerns and her confidence that the Coastal Commission would examine all the evidence rigorously. Fourth District Supervisor Virginia Bass said she did not think it was appropriate for the board as a whole to request a delay but that Madrone, as an individual supervisor, was welcome to do so. A long and increasingly heated argument ensued, with the words “disrespect,” “frustration,” and “blackmail” thrown around. At one point, Madrone asked if there is some reason his fellow supervisors “don’t want this project to be viewed by the community.” But after 15 minutes of discussion, he

rescinded his motion. (Madrone later told the Journal he sent the BIA a letter as an individual after the meeting.) The following evening, on May 8, the Trinidad City Council heard a highly technical report from City Engineer Steve Allen on the capacity of the city’s water treatment plant. The study, however, shed little light on whether the city could serve the hotel with water. The report was limited to how many gallons of purified water per day the water treatment plant is capable of providing under current conditions. The report noted that the treatment plant does produce enough water to supply the city’s current residents and even produces a surplus. However, Allen emphasized that there were many questions the study did not address, including how many additional customers the city could serve. Further studies are needed to answer these questions, he said. Trinidad’s priorities for water usage are spelled out in its General Plan and its top priority is serving all customers, existing and future, within the boundaries of its water service area. The state’s recent passage of a law permitting a secondary dwelling unit on most parcels could add considerable density to the town’s popu-

lation. The city planner is currently working on a study to analyze the water demand that could result from the potential buildout. In addition, state law requires that a certain amount of water be left in the stream to serve fish and wildlife. This means that in a drought year, the city might have to cut back on supplying water to existing residents to meet these flow requirements. Moreover, other landholders with properties outside city limits but that adjoin Luffenholz Creek already hold riparian rights on the creek’s water, and these potential appropriations must be honored as well — if there is enough water to do so. Fourth on the priority list are existing visitor-serving facilities along Patrick Point Drive, a mandate created by regulations of the California Coastal Commission.  According to the report, “There is no known documentation indicating that the creek flow has previously decreased to the point that the city’s intake rate needed to be reduced. However, periods of drought, long-term changes in the climate and increased extractions in the upstream watershed could result in restrictions in the future. It is important for the city to remain mindful of these future potential changes in creek flow and not over commit

the water supply, which could become restricted due to low flow in the creek at some point.” 
The report aroused a lot of comment, both from the audience and council members. Several were quick to point out that simply having a surplus was meaningless without knowing how much of the surplus was likely to be needed in the future. Eventually, the council agreed that more studies are needed before making any kind of decision about future commitments of the town’s water supply. l Editor’s note: In the interest of full disclosure, Elaine Weinreb, who reported and wrote this piece, addressed the Trinidad City Council and wrote a letter to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 2017 alerting both to the fact that while Environmental Assessment quantified the economic impact the proposed change would have on the county of Humboldt, it offered no such analysis on the impacts to Trinidad, an incorporated city. In both instances, she did not advocate for or against the proposal but argued the Environmental Assessment should accurately address the project’s potential impacts. This story was originally posted online May 10.

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12  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

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Week in Weed

Fleeced by Phylos? By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

A

bout two years ago, we wrote in these pages about the looming battle over cannabis genetics and the effort of deep-pocketed companies to register utility patents — the strongest intellectual-property protection available for field crops in the United States, one that essentially treats them like works of art — for cannabis (“Who Owns Your Pot?” Aug. 31, 2017). And we noted there was an effort to push back, led in part by a Portland scientist by the name of Mowgli Holmes, who created a system that allowed growers to register their strain genetics into the public domain. “But farmers are suspicious,” we wrote, “fearing Holmes intends to steal the genetics for himself.” To some, those words — and the underlying fears — now seem prophetic. The cannabis industry was rocked a couple of weeks ago by news that Phylos Bioscience, Holmes’ Portland-based cannabis testing company, is launching an in-house breeding program. After the announcement, a video began circulating of Holmes pitching a room full of potential investors at the Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference, telling them that the vast amount of genetic data his company has collected makes it uniquely suited to breed “optimized plants” that are resistant to molds and mildew or primed to grow in a certain climate or region. What’s rubbing farmers the wrong way is that Holmes pitched Phylos’ services as a way for farmers to get their unique strains genetically tested to protect against predatory patenting, even giving them the option of registering them in the public domain, which would leave them open to use by anyone. Phylos billed its testing service, in part, as a way to fight the proverbial Monsantos circling around the cannabis industry, launching the Open Cannabis Project, a now independent entity that announced last week that it will be closing by the end of the month amid the fallout from Phylos’ announcement. “Our story has been a key part of shaping their public image as altruistic and science-loving protectors of the cultivation community,” the project’s eight-member board wrote in an open letter announcing the move. “OCP started as a project of Phylos to ‘protect’ heirloom varieties from overbroad patents as cannabis transitions into a legal market.” The fact that Phylos, which has spent years mapping cannabis genetics and doing

other testing for farmers, is getting into the breeding game opened the flood gates of worry and speculation in the industry. “The concern that a lot of people are advancing [on Instagram] is that they mistakenly think that their genetics have been stolen and that’s not what is going on. I think it’s worse,” Michael Backes, author of Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana, told www.futurecannabisproject. com. “They’ve basically charged people to genetically fingerprint their cultivars, and they’re mining that data to find markers to form the basis of a breeding program so that they can compete against the people who paid them to sequence their genetics. It’s like a leech operating a blood bank. … It’s as if 23andMe got into the designer baby business.” Further infuriating some in the industry is that while thousands of farmers submitted samples to Phylos with the idea that the genetic sequencing would enter the public domain for all to see, thousands of others opted not to go public with theirs, trusting the company as a custodian of their proprietary data. It now appears Holmes and Phylos intend to use that data for their own gain in a scheme Backes likened to “surveillance capitalism.” To Backes’ point, Phylos reportedly doesn’t have the live tissue samples it would need to recreate specific strains. But what it does have is a database of thousands of genetic sequences that it can use to identify which markers cause specific traits. But some in the industry aren’t too freaked out by the prospect of Phylos getting into breeding. Nat Pennington, the CEO of Humboldt Seed Co. and a board member for the Open Cannabis Project, was sharply critical of the way Phylos has conducted itself but he was also fairly quick to discount the threat. From watching Holmes’ presentation, Pennington said it’s clear he’s focusing on breeding for mass consumption, honing in on the genetic markers that will make a fast-growing, mildew and drought resistant strain. “It’s like the Early Girl Tomato — unbelievably easy to grow, disease resistant but it doesn’t taste like a tomato,” he said. “A lot of what (Holmes) is saying to these investors speaks to that tomato, not the one at the farmers market.” Humboldt County’s future, Pennington said, is and always has been in growing the best unique and high-quality cannabis in the world. He doesn’t expect anything Phylos does to change or threaten that. l

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14  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


From NCJ Daily

Coastal Commission Looks to Delay Safety Corridor Hearing

T

he California Coastal Commission requested May 9 that its staff shelve plans to hold a June hearing on Caltrans’ proposed plans to overhaul the Safety Corridor on U.S. Highway 101 between Eureka and Arcata and, instead, to agendize the hearing for the commission’s August meeting in Eureka. “To staff, without a doubt, this project is incredibly important if anyone has ever been in that neighborhood,” Commissioner Donne Brownsey said. “That is just the lifeblood of moving around in those communities. … If there is not meaningful community consultation, it is just going to be a terrible situation.” Shortly after the vote, Caltrans issued a brief statement indicating it hopes the two-month delay in getting the project before the commission won’t impact the agency’s construction timeline. “If the Commission were to delay their meeting on this subject until August the goal of beginning construction by summer 2020 is likely still reachable but it will certainly cut things close,” reads the statement. The commission’s vote to recommend staff postpone the hearing came after it received a number of letters from North Coast individuals and organizations requesting the move. Surfrider Foundation California Policy Manager Jennifer Savage also addressed the commission during its public comment period. Savage said the project — which seeks to spend roughly $35 million to build a new interchange at Indianola Road, replace the Jacoby Creek Bridge, add a stoplight at Airport Road and close all other medians on the roughly 7-mile stretch of highway

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— is complex and decades in the making. “Our community really deserves a chance to weigh in,” Savage said, before charging that Caltrans’ plans have so far failed to analyze the impacts construction will cause to alternate routes, like Old Arcata Road and State Route 255 through the Samoa Peninsula. Savage also criticized the project’s review for not addressing projected sea level rise, and charged that Caltrans’ public engagement efforts have been inadequate. CCC North Coast District Manager Bob Merrill told the commission that staff has repeatedly expressed its “strong preference” that the issue be heard in August in Eureka, but that Caltrans is concerned that holding the hearing after the June 30 close of the fiscal year could jeopardize funding allocated for the project. But even aside from concerns about making sure North Coast residents have the opportunity to offer public testimony without travelling 750 miles to San Diego, Merrill said the project was not on track to be heard next month. “Frankly, at this point, it’s very doubtful the project will be really ready for consideration at the June meeting,” Merrill said, adding that Caltrans’ application is still missing “key” information, including a “viable mitigation plan.” One of the commissioners asked if this project has been in planning for more than a decade, why it’s seemingly being rushed to a hearing. Caltrans Division of Environmental Analysis Assistant Division Chief Jeremy Ketchum said the agency has been conducting outreach efforts dating back to 2001. “There hasn’t been a lack of engagement,” he said flatly, adding that the agen-

County Counsel Sues County: Humboldt County’s head attorney has filed a civil lawsuit against two fellow top administrators, an outside attorney and her Bay Area-based law firm, alleging they conspired against him when he tried to expose excessive billing practices. Jeffrey Blanck, who has been on paid administrative leave since March, is asking for unspecified damages for emotional distress and economic harm in the suit, which was filed April 25. A county spokesperson declined to comment on the suit. POSTED: 05.08.19

northcoastjournal.com/ncjdaily

northcoastjournal

A Dance and a Dip

cy held an April 23 public meeting to take feedback from the North Coast community. But that meeting came at the direction of the coastal commission, and many charged it was inadequate, provided limited information and didn’t detail the agency’s plans. One coastal commissioner asked Ketchum where people could go to get deLongtime Redwood Coast Music Festival attendee Jace tailed, up-to-date Baldosser, of Blue Lake, ended a May 10 dance at the Adorni information on the project. Ketchum Center with a fancy move with Brett Young, of Monterey, said there’s a projCalifornia. See more photo of the long weekend of music and ect webpage. But dancing at www.northcoastjournal.com. Posted: 05.14.19.  Photo by Mark Larson a quick perusal of the page indicates the bulk of the documents are years-old. And a fact City Motors, California Redwood, Bracut, sheet on the page describes the project in and Bayside Cutoff will be closed.” only the briefest of terms: Other aspects of the project “Since May 2002, a Safety Corridor has site appear as though they have not been been in place on Route 101 between Eureupdated in a decade. ka and Arcata as an interim improvement After the commission made the until a more permanent solution could be unanimous request that staff reschedule designed and constructed. In December the hearing, CCC Executive Director Jack 2011, a phased plan received approval by Ainsworth described the situation as the Humboldt County Association of “incredibly disappointing,” saying it is not Governments, the project sponsor. The how the commission’s relationship with first phase of improvements includes a Caltrans “should be working,” stressing the half-signal at Airport Road and a northimportance of local hearings for “these bound grade separation at Indianola Road. larger projects.” l All other median openings including Mid — By Thadeus Greenson

HSU’s Gist Hall Closed: The Humboldt State University building was closed May 10 after employees discovered what could be disturbed asbestos, forcing the university to move a host of final exams scheduled for the week of May 13 to new buildings on campus. “All classes and other activities in Gist Hall have been suspended,” HSU said in a release. “There is no access to offices or other spaces. Services and other programs in the building are being relocated…” POSTED: 05.10.19

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

‘Schuck Yeah’: Left on the outside looking in after Arcata Bay Oyster Festival organizer Arcata Main Street inked an exclusive and controversial deal to have Crescent City’s SeaQuake Brewing provide beer for the festival, local brewing companies are banding together and putting on an alternate event. Scheduled for 1 to 5 p.m. on June 15, the same day as Oyster Fest, six local breweries will hold an event to showcase local beer and oysters at the Eel River Brewing Co. in Fortuna. POSTED: 05.13.19

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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On the Cover

fter a long hike in England’s Dartmoor National Park, Jeff Black and his wife stopped at Wayside Cafe. As they were sitting, drinking tea, they noticed scores of people coming in and out to take selfies with an otter sculpture. Out of curiosity, they approached the sculpture and learned there were 99 others scattered throughout England as part of a scavenger hunt to promote the park’s Moor Otters Art Initiative. The 3-foot sculpture was painted bright green with pink and blue flowers and wetland plants covering most of its body. Black was in awe. “It captured my interest; it was like the otter’s head was emerging from the plants,” he said. “It was elegant and charismatic, standing on its hind legs, proud.” Black and his wife joined the hunt and spent the next week searching for otter sculptures around Dartmoor National Park. They ultimately found 30 and submitted their check-list brochure to be entered in a raffle. But others, Black said, had taken the hunt even further, finding all 100. Black, a Humboldt State University wildlife professor who has overseen the River Otter Citizen Science Project since 1999, had just published the project’s first 17 years of data in a scientific journal. “Very few people look at those things,” he said jokingly, adding that while in England he had a revelation to bring a similar project to five counties across the North Coast with the aim of raising awareness of — and funds for — his otter project. “I was in reflection mode when I was on vacation in England, thinking, ‘After 20 years [of the River Otter Citizen Science Project], how long am I going to continue this? Five years? Ten? Twenty? What am I going to do next?’ And while I was in reflection mode, I stumbled on the Dartmoor otter project,” Black said. “We [had participated in the scavenger hunt] for a week when I thought, ‘Right! That’s what I’ll do.’”

‘AN OTTER IDEA’

A

Bold initiative looks to raise funds and awareness by merging art, science and a massive scavenger hunt

Excited that he’d found a creative

By Iridian Casarez

iridian@northcoastjournal.com “Bunty”

Iridian Casarez

16  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

way to promote the River Otter Citizen Science Project, raise awareness about otters and their watersheds, and raise funds for monitoring and restoration efforts, Black took to telling people he’d had “an otter idea.” Now with the help of HSU, Black’s plan is hitting stride and the North Coast Otter Public Art Initiative will be in full swing, with education initiatives and cute otter art on display in businesses throughout the area. Black is now looking for sponsors and hosts. Sponsors will finance an otter sculpture, paying about $750, with $150


going to the otter artist for supplies and materials. When all 100 otters are finished, they will each be placed in a business that will “host” it for the summer. Sponsors and hosts are different, Black stressed, explaining that sponsors will pay for the sculpture and stipend, and then, when the otter is finished, a small plaque with the sponsor’s name will be attached to the otter. Hosts, on the other hand, will pay $500 to have an otter sculpture placed in their business, which Black said will attract more foot traffic from those participating in the scavenger hunt. At the end of next summer, all the otters will be auctioned off. Host businesses will not keep the otters unless they buy them for the upfront price of $5,000 ­— the “adoption option,” which keeps their desired otters out of the auction catalog. The 100 otter sculptures will be placed in businesses in Humboldt, Mendocino, Siskiyou, Del Norte and Trinity counties. People will then be encouraged to track them all down as a part of a scavenger hunt that will award prizes to those who find the highest number of the colorful sculptures. The Moor Otters Art Initiative saw all 100 of its sculptures auctioned off and Black purchased “Bunty,” his first choice of the 10 otter sculptures he was hoping to buy. Bunty was the work of Maria Burns, a natural history illustrator based in England, who spent two weeks painting him and told Black she was excited her otter would be used to set up a California initiative. Bunty is blue with Cirl buntings — “a rare species of bird that were successfully brought back from the brink of extinction in Dartmoor,” according to Burns — covering his body. “I was amazed to find out that my otter was travelling to California (and a little jealous of him!)” Burns wrote in an email to the Journal. “I was even more delighted when professor Jeff Black contacted me to let me know he was using my otter to set up a whole new arts initiative. It is a lovely feeling to feel that my work is

“I was amazed to find out that my otter was travelling to California.”

Continued on next page »

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On the Cover Continued from previous page

being used to inspire other artists and also raise awareness of Jeff’s important otter studies. I couldn’t have asked for a better home for him.” Black now uses Bunty to promote and recruit sponsors and hosts for the initiative, toting him to city council meetings, coffee shops and the Arcata Wildlife Sanctuary. The initiative, Black said, is an environmental education outreach program that includes an elementary school component and will teach the community about clean water and healthy habitats “where we live and play.” Black showed Bunty off to the Eureka City Council on March 19, asking the city to sponsor and host 10 otters. Rob Holmlund, the city’s director of development services, found enough funding for four but Black still hopes he can inspire the council to find the money to sponsor the other six. The city’s otters align with its Strategic Art Plan to promote and incentivize visiting Eureka, Holmlund said. The otters will be placed in Eureka’s Cultural Art District in Old Town — the Eureka Visitor Center will host one and city will hold a contest to place the other three in local businesses. “The North Coast’s only art district should have a strong representation and concentration in the otter project,” Holmlund said.

Black’s effort to recruit sponsors

and hosts is off to a good start, he said, with organizations and businesses like the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Los Bagels, Coast Central Credit Union, the McLean Foundation, 2nd Street Gallery in Crescent City and the Arcata Animal Hospital signing on to be sponsors, hosts or, in some cases, both. Arcata Animal Hospital is taking that a step further, pledging to sponsor, host and purchase an otter sculpture. “I absolutely love otters,” said Joy Fox Beaudet, the hospital’s head veterinarian. “They’re amazing little creatures that are fun to watch.” One day, while Fox-Beaudet was sitting near a river by herself, she said a family of four otters came near her. She said she felt excited but scared to move and recalled it as the “most magical moment of my life so far.” She read about Black’s initiative in the Times-Standard and immediately wanted to be a part of it. She attended one of Black’s presentations and spoke to him about participating. She said she is looking forward to hosting an otter that incorporates a wildlife phenomenon, jokingly adding that they need to be careful of placing

18  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

a life-like otter in the hospital’s office, as visiting animals might growl at it. “I’m excited. This is a fun and exciting thing for people to be a part of and a great way for the hospital to be a part of the community,” Fox-Beaudet said. For nearly 20 years, Black has run the River Otter Citizen Science Project out of HSU’s Wildlife Department. The project asks community members — citizen scientists — to record and submit basic information about otter sightings. Using that information, wildlife students and Black conduct more studies on river otters in the North Coast. As an undergraduate at HSU, Alana Chin, formerly Alana Oldman, worked on a river otter study that was published in


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

“It is a lovely feeling to feel that my work is being used to inspire other artists and also raise awareness of Jeff’s important otter studies. I couldn’t have asked for a better home for him.” Maria Burns painting “Bunty.” Sumbmitted

2009. In an interview with the Journal, Chin, who now studies trees at the University of California at Davis, said it was her first independent research experience. She and Black had wanted to learn how river otters on the North Coast use latrines (areas where otters urinate and defecate). They posed the question: “Do river otters use latrines as a form of official communication or for territorial purposes?” What they found was that (at least on the North Coast) river otters aren’t territorial, as previously stated in other papers. Chin and Black leaned heavily on the River Otter Citizen Science Project for their study, using it to determine the locations of latrines. They then took feces

from local and foreign latrines and put it in various locations on top of dispersed sand to identify territorial behavior, expecting to see the otters exhibiting marking behavior “just like a dog peeing on top of another dog’s urine,” Chin said. But instead, the otters smelled the feces and rolled around in it, using it as a form of communication. Chin said the study wouldn’t have been possible without the citizen project sending in information about sightings, as she and Black wouldn’t have been able to gather the data on their own. “It’s time-consuming,” Chin said. “[Using citizen scientists] changed the ability to

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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Home & Garden

On the Cover Continued from previous page

gather information.” Black said the concept allows scientists to sift through big data sets without having to fund the effort to collect them. “I try not to ask too much [from citizen scientists], just relevant information like location, what otters are doing and how many there are,” Black said. Recently, Chin and Black worked on analyzing the behaviors of otters with the first 15 years of the River Otter Citizen Science Project data. They both went through 3,880 entries by hand, gathering important information regarding behavior like group sizes in the presence of pups (baby otters) and how group size might affect the way otters forage for food. Chin and Black couldn’t have completed either study without the information gathered by volunteer citizen scientists, she added. According to Black, there have been roughly 6,000 entries in the project’s nearly 20-year span. Chin said she hopes the research paper will be published before the Otter Art Initiative next summer. In addition to the value it brings to research, Chin said citizen science is also a great way to engage the public and teach the importance of clean water and habitats. Alan Peterson, a photographer, videographer and volunteer otter spotter, said he started reporting sightings to Black’s project in 2016. “I love spending time with otters and interacting with them,” said Peterson, who’s also working on a film about otters, which he hopes to release before the initiative takes off next summer. “They swim up to me and do their thing; I’ve had a dozen encounters.” Seeing the way such projects can provide scientists with valuable data while also helping the public understand and appreciate nature, Chin said she has launched her own river otter citizen scientist project through American River College in Sacramento. It was inspired by Black, she said. “It’s sort of my hobby,” she said.

wonder while attempting to describe how we interpret the world. Libby Maynard of the Ink People Center for the Arts is working closely with Black, aiding in the search for local artists to participate in the initiative, which Maynard said will be part of Ink People’s North Coast Open Studios DreamMaker projects. A call for artists will be sent out next month and artists will be asked to submit sketches of their proposed sculptures. Black emphasized that there are no content limitations and said he is also seeking Native artists who are connected to rivers and watersheds in the area. Maynard said it’s a great opportunity. “It combines art and science, and their creative process is the same, so it’s just natural for them to come together,” she said. One local artist is already excited to be involved. Black approached Shawn Gould, a Humboldt County nature and wildlife painter who began illustrating science and natural history subjects 10 years ago for the National Geographic Society, Smithsonian Institute and National Audubon Society before deciding to focus exclusively on painting. “I’m thrilled; it’s going to be a lot of fun,” Gould said. “I saw the otter sculpture from England. It looked great and I got excited to be a part of [the initiative].” Gould is still brainstorming what he will paint on his otter sculpture — maybe birds or aquatic animals, but he hasn’t nailed it down yet. Painting a sculpture is new territory for Gould, as he so far has only painted flat surfaces. “It’s going to be a process of discovery,” Gould said. “I’ve never painted a sculpture and especially of that size. It’s going to be a learning process, always.” In addition to raising awareness and creating a lot of whimsical otter art, England’s Moor Otters Art Initiative raised a bunch of money. With the average winning auction bid for a sculpture coming in at $1,500 and all 100 otters sold, the project raised at least $150,000. Black said artists will decide if they want to take a 10 percent commission from their otter’s auction bid. Black hopes the local initiative raises the same amount or more. Black specifically wants to devote some of the funds back to the watersheds in the form of internships for HSU students and would

“A celebration of life and otters - - it’s something joyful to grasp onto next summer.”

While most see artists and scien-

tists as operating in different spectrums, Black believes they are actually cut from the same cloth — filled with a sense of

20  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


Follow her on Twitter @IridianCasarez.

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Otters seen from the Trinidad pier. Mark Larson also like to support watershed projects from nonprofit organizations, like the Mad River Alliance. Black is also looking to combine the Otter Art Initiative with Eco Day in the spring of 2020, tapping initiative leaders to raise awareness by going to local elementary schools to talk about otters and make otter art. The initiative will also create a junior ranger program during the summer, where kids will be able to pick up Otter Art Initiative activity books from areas like the Arcata Marsh Sanctuary or the Humboldt Bay Nature and Wildlife Refuge,

complete them and return them for an official Otter Spotter badge. Black is invigorated, excited about the merging of science and art, saying he wants to keep the River Otter Citizen Science Project going for as long as possible. “This is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate what we have,” he said. “A celebration of life and otters — it’s something joyful to grasp onto next summer.” l Iridian Casarez is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 317, or iridian@northcoastjournal.com.

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Table Talk

The List

The quest to eat at (almost) every restaurant in Humboldt By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

K

en Burton and Cindy Moyer are on a mission. Again. For the second time, they are making their way through an alphabetical list of restaurants in Humboldt County — the Journal’s online A-Z Restaurant Guide, in fact — and eating at every single one within an hour’s drive. Yes, in alphabetical order. The first time it took around seven years. Right now they’re deep in the Ls and taking a break while Burton is out of town. The reaction they get when they tell people about their quest is typically, they say, either that it sounds like a great idea or they’re nuts. Mostly a bit of both. The rules are simple but draconian in their way. The friends get together weekly, barring trips out of town, and, starting with the AA Bar and Grill, alternate responsibility for arranging a visit to each restaurant. Only the person planning the trip knows where they’re going (which requires careful scrolling) and, unless a shop is closed, there’s no skipping. Even if they aren’t in the mood for Thai that day. Not even if they know a particular café is objectively awful. Despite the geographic limitations that unfortunately eliminate much of Southern Humboldt, Burton admits sometimes the food is not worth the trip. For him, it’s no big deal. “I mean, it’s a meal, it’s not going to kill us,” says Burton. “And I like to give places a second chance. And a third chance and fourth chance if we live long enough.” It was Moyer’s idea to not hit every outpost of a given fast food chain, despite Burton’s protest that each Subway, for example, is a little different. “One will be sufficient,” she says. Burton, who has written outdoor and other articles for the Journal, is an ornithologist and, unsurprisingly, an avid birder. Over the phone from Roseburg, Oregon, he explains his current project, a study for Oregon State University, documenting creatures and plants at sites affected by logging and wildfire. “Biological field work

ster an Web

y Jonath Image b

inevitably involves documenting what’s out there,” he says, adding that it does make him consider his proclivity toward cataloguing and “if our restaurant game somehow fits into my overall nature.” Asked about the possible connection to his hobby, Burton says with some amusement, “I’ve always been a list maker and a list keeper. ... Birding lends itself to the list-keeping personality. Eating out based on a list that somebody else created fits pretty well into that mindset, too.” “Ken’s crazy alphabetical eating … it’s a very Ken thing. ... He’s very systematic in many ways,” says Moyer, who adds that Burton’s alphabetical plowing through his Netflix queue throws off the streaming service’s algorithmic recommendations. Moyer is the chair of Humboldt State University’s music department, teaching violin, viola and music theory. She speaks quickly and laughs often over the phone. “I used to joke that his tombstone would say ‘We made it to M,’” she says with a chuckle. She knew Burton through music (he plays percussion) and birding, and the two were already going through a hiking book hike by hike when she got invited along on the first Humboldt restaurant journey “somewhere in the Bs.” (That was around 12 years ago, just before a married couple he was touring with fell off.) Back then they were eating their way through a hard copy of the Yellow Pages. “I actually started this game with a girlfriend in Indiana a couple decades ago and we never got past the letter N,”

22  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

says Burton, who had to move before completing the list. “I think it just comes back to my nature. For one thing I hate making decisions. I do a lot of things in life by coming up with a system that decides things for me. … We were in a relationship and it certainly saved a lot of time arguing about where to go.” Even on his own, Burton has explored local food scenes systematically in other places he’s lived, though in a smaller radius. “I am about as far from a food snob as one can possibly be. I’m an opportunist and will eat just about anything,” says Burton, who thinks living in lots of places — Kenya, Indonesia and Canada among them — may have made him unfussy. “A lot of times I feel like eating is just taking time away from doing other things. And yet I’m doing this. I’m just a bundle of contradictions. What can I say?” Moyer, on the other hand, cares about food and is “scheming with friends to get into French Laundry someday.” The draw for her is more about how the alphabetical approach takes her to places she wouldn’t have otherwise gone, offering the occasional surprise, like the Indian Tacos at Blue Lake Casino’s snack bar. She also echoed a sentiment Burton expressed: “It is a regular excuse to meet up with a friend, which is good.” This time around, Moyer is documenting the journey on her Facebook page. Each stop gets a snapshot by the establishment’s door or sign, and another with either Moyer or Burton at the table with

food. The photos are cheerful but perfunctory — there’s no posing, no flattering filters and nothing approaching food porn in sight. The captions are equally straightforward, with Moyer noting minimal details, like the surprise of a red chile verde, the chilly temperature of a dining room or that Burton said his mole was excellent. It’s a far cry from the never-ending highlight reel of styled food and glamorous good times on Instagram, and the dramatic effusions and vitriol of Yelp. The duo’s posts (visible only to friends) are almost radical in their tight-lipped mundanity. In more than a dozen years eating around Humboldt, they’ve come to similarly modest conclusions: Overall, the food scene in the county is improving, though more expensive, with more mid-range options and a little more ethnic diversity. Fortuna turns out to be a food scene to watch and La Patria Mariscos and Grill in Eureka is among their surprise favorites. Neither of them remembers exactly what they ordered at most places but that’s not really the point. “It’s fun,” says Moyer, “I wouldn’t be doing it if it wasn’t fun.” Even the bad meals? She laughs. “Well, when you decide to do everything, you do everything.” l Jennifer Fumiko Cahill is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.


Setlist

Cap and Gown and Getting Down Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

By Collin Yeo

I

music@northcoastjournal.com t’s time for the big walk this weekend and no, I’m not talking about the trip into the Pacific Ocean that I’ve got booked for sometime in the next 40 years in lieu of a functioning retirement plan because the world is dying and the previous generations have destroyed the notion of upward economic mobility. I am talking instead about a much more optimistic and beautiful walk, specifically the one which ends with a freshly minted college graduate and a diploma. My roommate is consummating his first major education achievement this Saturday at the Redwood Bowl — congratulations, Shea! — and we are throwing a big deck BBBQ at my house in celebration. (As a nod to The Simpsons, the extra B in BBBQ is for BYOB because we are a household of students and working class proles, after all.) Anyway, congratulations to all of the graduates and their families. What follows in this column are some very good suggestions on how to celebrate your new spawning into adulthood. Gift of Gab from Blackalicious is in town! How swell is that? We also have indie heroes, electronic space invaders, psychedelic warlocks and war-ladies, and a fine trio on Sub Pop records called Moaning to help bring us into the quiet salad days of summer. So please disregard my moaning, it’s mostly gallows humor, and instead focus on my literary hero Bertie Wooster’s favorite Robert Browning poem, “Pippa’s Song”: The year’s at the spring, And day’s at the morn; Morning’s at seven; The hill-side’s dew-pearl’d; The Lark’s on the wing; The snail’s on the thorn; God’s in His heaven — All’s right with the world! Have a nice week.

Thursday It’s that time of year when the students graduate and the streets and motels become briefly congested. It’s also the time of year when you can enjoy free senior recitals from the talented music department at Humboldt State University. Tonight at 8 p.m. Fulkerson Hall will host the recital of Eric Tolfa, a talented young man who will be performing original pieces as well as pieces from other artists from around the world. The instruments involved include marimba, bass clarinet and trumpet and the first movement of Mr. Tolfa’s original duet for flute and piano, “Into The Void,” is featured in the program.

Friday

Gift of Gab is the lyrical half of talented Sacramento hip hop duo Blackalicious. Tonight he is appearing in a locals-heavy show at the Jam at 9 p.m. ($20, $15 advance). I’ve seen Blackalicious a few times in Humboldt and have always walked away with a high opinion. One needs only to look up the now-viral track “Alphabet Aerobics” to see what I am talking about. Included in tonight’s lineup is Little Kid Lost with B. Swizlo, Hiway, DJ Just One, Nac One and my homie Big Jay, aka DJ Goldylocks. Live art will be provided by Julia Finkelstein and there will a free all-ages meet and greet with the headliner at the Fatbol Store at 6 p.m.

Saturday

Barbara Manning was a mainstay of the West Coast lo-fi indie rock scene in the ’80s and ’90s, having released many albums during that time on labels of note like Matador, K Records and Teenbeat. Her now-defunct bands World of Pooh and SF Seals paved the way for the sort of twee sports-referencing songs that later labelmates Belle and Sebastian would take to the bank many times over. Tonight she is playing Siren’s Song at 9 p.m., appearing on a perfect bill made of bands who have followed in the wake of her considerable musical influence. Those groups are Blood Hunny and Monster Women, two formidable champions in the lineage of local indie songsters ($5).

Sunday

Moaning is a trio from Los Angeles that traffics in the kind of post-punk urgency that made Placebo and Interpol household names two decades ago. And even though that aesthetic often presents itself with the brutalist architecture of terminally serious band photos — thank you Ian Curtis and the rest of Joy Division — I am a complete and total sucker for the form. The band’s music totally blasts too, so tonight’s 7 p.m. show at the Outer Space should be a special one ($7-$20 sliding scale). Local dreamweavers mister moonbeam and Spirit Notes should provide plenty of pineal provender for all assembled lovers and dreamers.

Monday

The always fantastic Opossum Sun Trail celebrates its return from a minitour — tour-ette? — with a hometown CD release party for its newest offering,

Strontium Highway, at the Miniplex tonight at 9 p.m. ($5). Come join my pal Dieter and co. and score a record or a cactus skull from the merch table during a night of utter lone range-trippin’ fun. Along for this stardust-y ride is the superb sound machine known as D3D and globe hoppin’ local journeymen cosmonauts White Manna. Don’t be shy, get in the mix.

Tuesday

I caught Tristan Norton gigging with Lovebush last Friday and I can say that the man can really play guitar masterfully and with taste. Catch him tonight at a solo cover-free gig at the Creamery Building at 6 p.m. to hear him work through a repertoire of blues, folk, jazz and various American tunes.

Wednesday It’s Whomp Whomp Wednesday at the Jam again tonight at 9:30 p.m. ($10). Come enjoy an evening dedicated to the deepest of grooves possible in the bassheavy world of electronic dance music. Tonight’s celebrants are Hullabalo0, Masta Shredda, Pägån and OrangeKhemist. If a club-sized dose of bespoke electric pandemonium is attractive to you, come and get some. The Outer Space hosts an interesting Pacific Northwest hybrid punk show tonight at 7 p.m. Memory Boys are from Langley, Washington, and play minor-key punk songs fitting for the often gloomy rainscape of Whidbey Island. WEEED is a quintet from Portland, Oregon, that specializes in experimental sound jams played on all sorts of instruments, from strings to synths to flutes. Imagine Nirvana but instead of the grunge band, the actual state of nirvana. Opening the evening will be local digital/analog mutants CV and, like most Space shows these days, admission is a sliding scale of $7-$20. Come and get it. l

live jazz, small bites & craft cocktails

THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS in the basement of the jacoby storehouse

780 7th st. ARCATA

THIS IS WHAT LUNCH LOOKS LIKE AT LE MONDE!

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. Collin Yeo thinks that any politician looking for a middle ground compromise on climate change is a monster imbued with enough cynical nihilism to startle even Friedrich Nietzsche. He lives in Arcata, or as it will be called in 75 years, Waterworld.

C U LT U R E D C U I S I N E 2 8 5 0 F S T , E U R E K A | 7 0 7. 7 9 8 . 6 4 9 9 Tues-Thurs 5pm - 9pm

Fri-Sat 5pm - 10pm

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

23


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

Open Daily 8am - 2am

THUR 5/16

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. 822-1220

C I T N E H AUTALIAN IT ENU M

THE BASEMENT 780 Seventh St. 826-2345

Blue Lotus (jazz) 8pm Free

BLONDIES FOOD AND DRINK 420 E. California Ave., Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Front Ear (jazz) 9pm Free

Paula Jones Band (vocals, jazz) 9pm Free

Dr. Squid (hits) 9pm Free

CENTRAL STATION SPORTS BAR 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-2013

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611 CLAM BEACH TAVERN 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-0545 FIELDBROOK MARKET 4636 Fieldbrook Road 633-6097

Lone Star Junction (outlaw country) 9pm Free

M-T-W 5/20-5/22

NBA Playoff 2019 – Finals 5pm Alice in Wonderland ((1951) [M] Free w/$5 Food/Bev purchase [W] (film) NBA Playoff 2019 – Finals 5pm Free 6pm $5 w/$5 Food/Bev purchase

Elderberry Rust String Band 8pm

Jazz Jam 6pm Free

Taxi (rock) 9pm Free

Karaoke 8pm Free

[W] Karaoke w/Rockstar Dr. Squid (hits) 9pm Free

Jazz Noir 6pm Free

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739

Trivia Night - Game of Thrones 6pm

ALL MONTH LONG

Fresh Seafood & Steaks Drink Specials & Full Bar Student & Senior Discounts Free WiFi Spot

MIX AND MATCH APPAREL DEALS BUY ANY 2 SAVE 15% DOES NOT APPLY TO CLEARANCE ITEMS DOES NOT INCLUDE HEADWEAR OR ACCESSORIES

(707) 822-3090 987 H St, Arcata

www.humboldtclothing.com

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free

The Living Rooms (Americana) 7:30pm Free

[M] Steve Lloyd (acoustic) 6-9pm Free [W] Pool Tournament & Game Night 7pm Free [T] Trivia Tuesday 6-8pm Free All ages

DJ Rickshaw/The Bustop 10pm Free

[W] Salsa Dancing with DJ Pachanguero 8:30pm Free

Legends of the Mind (jazz, blues) 6pm Free

THE GRIFFIN 937 10th St., Arcata 825-1755

(707) 476-0400 Bayshore Mall, Eureka

SUN 5/19

Squeezebug (accordion, guitar) Good Company (Celtic) 8pm 8pm Free Free

Excellent Wine & Spirits

mazzottis.com www.facebook.com/Mazzottis

SAT 5/18

Open Mic 7pm

Organic Products

773 8th St. Arcata 822-1900

FRI 5/17

NBA Playoff 2019 – Finals 5pm Free w/$5 Food/Bev purchase

CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata 822-2228

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

ARCATA & NORTH

Anna Hamilton (blues) 6pm Free

Soul Party #24 9pm $5


Arcata • Blue Lake •McKinleyville • Trinidad • Willow Creek VENUE THE JAM 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

THUR 5/16

Tropicali North w/ Cassidy Blaze, D’Vinity G. Davis, Gabe Pressure 9:30pm $10

LARRUPIN CAFE 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad 677-0230 LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake 668-5000

SAT 5/18

Gift of Gab w/Hiway, Nac Object Heavy w/Dan and the One, Little Kidd Lost, DJ Just Americans One, DJ Goldylocks 9pm $20 9pm TBA

Tyger Byle (prog-jug band) 9pm Free

Kaptain Kirk (eclectic) 9pm

Live Music TBA 6pm Free

The Jim Lahman Band (rock, blues, jazz) 6pm Free

Goat Karaoke 9pm Free

NORTHTOWN COFFEE 1603 G St., Arcata 633-6187

Open Mic 7pm Free

OCEAN GROVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 480 Patrick’s Point Dr., Trinidad 677-3543 REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWERY Buddy Reed & The Rip-It-Ups 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7224 (blues) 8pm Free

Deep Groove Society 10pm $5

M-T-W 5/20-5/22

[T] Top Grade Tuesdays Dancehall Reggae w/DJ RealYouth, Cassidy Blaze 10pm $5 [W] Trivia Night 6pm, Whomp Whomp Wednesdays 10pm TBA

[T] Live Music TBA 6pm Free

The Getdown with DJM 9:30pm Free

Goat Karaoke 9pm Free

[M] White Manna, Opossum Sun Trail, D3D 9pm $5 [T] Sonido Pachanguero 9pm

Three Chords And The Truth Songwriter Showcase 5-7pm Free

Two Mic Sundays (comedy) 5pm Free

[T] Spoken Word Open Mic 6-8pm Free [M] Rudelion DanceHall Mondayz 8pm $5 [M] Shuffleboard Tournament 7pm

The Lost Dogs (blues, R&B) 8pm Free

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville 839-7580

Husky Burnette (dirty blues, rock n roll) 8pm Free

SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919

DJ Dance Party 10pm

DJ Dance Party 10pm

DJ Music 10pm

TOBY AND JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

DJ Dance Party TBA

Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

Dance Party w/DJ Masta Shredda TBA

WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS 677-9493 501 S. Westhaven Drive

SUN 5/19

Tim Randles Jazz Piano 6-9pm Free

The Compost Mountain Boys MAD RIVER BREWING CO. (bluegrass) 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-4151 6pm Free THE MINIPLEX 401 I St., Arcata 630-5000

FRI 5/17

Eureka and South on next page

Anna Hamilton (blues, rock Three Legged Dog (bluegrass) and roll) 8pm Free 8pm Free

Trivia Night 8pm

[M] Karaoke with DJ Marv 8pm [T] Sunny Brae Jazz Collective 7:30pm Free

[W] Old School Hip Hop w/DJ Hal TBA

Third Friday Jazz: The RLA Trio w/James Zeller 7pm $10-$20 sliding scale

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

25


Live Entertainment Grid

Music & More VENUE

THUR 5/16

EUREKA & SOUTH

Arcata and North on previous page

Eureka • Fernbridge • Ferndale • Fortuna • Garberville • Loleta • Redway FRI 5/17

SAT 5/18

ARTS & DRAFTS 422 First St., Eureka 798-6329

NightHawk (classic rock) 9pm Free

A Caribbean Bistro

20% OFF our TEPPANYAKI menu

lunch time special only every day from 11 am - 3 pm reservations recommended

one f street, eureka ca  • 707.443.7489

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

[T] Karaoke [W] Open Mic/Jam session 7pm Free

Dominic Romano (acoustic) 6-8pm Free

CHAPALA CAFE 320 Main St., Fortuna 725-3700 DOUBLE D STEAK & SEAFOOD 320 Main St., Fortuna 725-3700 EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., Eureka 442-2970

Uptown Kings (jump blues) 9pm Free

Pool Tourney 8pm

BRASS RAIL BAR & GRILL 3188 Redwood Dr., Redway 923-3188

M-T-W 5/20-5/22 [T] Craft Singles: A Cheesy Trivia Night 6-8pm Free [W] Onesie Wednesday TBA

Karaoke 5-10pm

BEAR RIVER CASINO RESORT 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

613 3rd St, Eureka (707) 798-6300 www.atasteofbim.org

SUN 5/19

Anna Hamilton (blues, humor) 6-9pm Free Science on Screen: Jurassic Park (1993) 7pm $5 Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Irish/Celtic) 5:30pm Free

Michael Dayvid (guitar) 6-9pm Free

Chuck Mayville (classics) 6-9pm Free

Live Music Fridays 6pm Free, Comedy Night 9pm

GYPPO ALE MILL 986-7700 1661 Upper Pacific Dr., Shelter Cove HUMBOLDT CIDER CO. GARDEN 3750 Harris St., Eureka 798-6023

John Swanson (saxophone) 4-7pm Free [W] Trivia Night Game of Thrones Seasons 1-4 6-8pm [W] Brian Post and Friends Jazz Trio 7pm Free

MADRONE BRICK FIRE PIZZA AND TAPHOUSE 421 Third St., Eureka 273-5129 NORTH OF FOURTH 207 Third St., Eureka 798-6303 OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Open Mic with Mike Anderson 6:30pm Free

Friday Night Improv Show 7pm Free

[M] Improv Show 6pm Free

and Happy hour 4PM-6PM

HAPPY HOUR 4-5:30pm daily lunch specialS 11AM-2PM M-F Happy Hour 4PM-6PM Pizza by the slice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4 cup / Bowl of soup & Side salad . . $5 / $7 wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5

Draft beer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1 OFF Single Topping Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . $8 Two Topping Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10

& More

& More!

421 3rd st Eureka Open Mon 4pm-9pm T-Th 11AM-9pm Fri 11AM-11Pm Sat 12-11pm Sun 10-8pm

5

$ 00

MARTINIS,

MANHATTANS AND WINE

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka 707.444.8062

carterhouse.com

623 Fernbridge Dr., Fortuna 707-786-3900 Open Daily 8am-2pm, Closed Tuesdays Wednesday dinners 4-7pm

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

1-Medium 1-Topping Pizza ONLY $5.99 * BRING IN THIS AD *

600 F Street 432 S. Fortuna Blvd. ARCATA FORTUNA (707) 822-9990 (707) 725-9990

Order Online westsidepizza.com


Lone Star Junction plays the Firewater Lounge at Cher-Ae Heights Casino on Friday, May 17 at 9 p.m. (free).

VENUE

PALM LOUNGE - EUREKA INN, 518 Seventh St., Eureka 497-6093 PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

THUR 5/16

FRI 5/17

Indigo - The Color of Jazz 7-11pm Free

Buddy Reed, Blues Legend 8pm DJ D’Vinity (hip-hop, dance remixes, trap) 10pm Free

PHATSY KLINE’S PARLOR LOUNGE 139 Second St., Eureka 444-3344

Laidback Lounge 6pm Free

SAVAGE HENRY COMEDY CLUB 415 Fifth St., Eureka 845-8864 THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

The Weedies Tour 9pm $15

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 STONE JUNCTION BAR 923-2562 Upstate Thursdays w/DJs G. 744 Redway Dr., Garberville Davis, Just One 9pm Free VICTORIAN INN RESTAURANT 400 Ocean Ave., Ferndale 786-4950 VISTA DEL MAR 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka

SAT 5/18

SUN 5/19

Live Jazz and Blues 8:30pm Free

707.444.3318 M-Sat 12-8pm 2120 4th STREET • EUREKA

DJ Statik (Hip-hop, trap) 10pm Free

Takeover w/ The Elderberry Rust Stringband Caturday Night Gmniite (folk, bluegrass, blues) (dubstep, bass) 8pm 8pm Bad Girls Comedy 9pm $10

M-T-W 5/20-5/22

Jessica Grant 9pm $10 Barbara Manning, The Monster Women, Blood Hunny 9pm $5

Two Mic Sundays 9pm Free

[M] Monday Phundays! Karaoke! 7pm Free [T] Phat Tuesdays 7:30pm Free [W] Jazz with Bill Allison & Friends 6-10pm Free [M] Monday Night Pod 7-11pm Free [T] Trivia Tuesdays 9pm $5 [W] Diversity & Debauchery 7pm Free [T] Opera Alley Cats 7:30pm [W] Buddy Reed and the Rip it Ups (blues) 7:30pm Free [M] Pool Tournament 8:30pm $10 buy-in

Jeffrey Smoller (solo guitar) 6pm Free [T] Blues Tuesdays 7pm Free [W] Karaoke 9pm Free

The

Sea Grill CRAFT COCKTAILS SUMMER SPECIAL WILD CAUGHT ALASKAN HALIBUT 316 E st • OLD TOWN EUREKA • 443-7187 D I N N E R : M O N D AY- S A T U R D AY 5 - 9 pm

HAPPY HOUR 4-6

W W W. S E A G R I L L E U R E K A . C O M

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


Calendar May 16 – 23, 2019

16 Thursday ART

Gabby Jesus. Sumbitted

Submitted

April Moore and Ranch Party. Submitted.

Women have the mic and the floor at Savage Henry Comedy Club on Friday, May 17 when Eugene, Oregon’s Bad Girls Comedy tour rolls through Eureka. Catch Cienna Jade, Jane Malone and Gabby Jesus ripping it up from 9 to 11 p.m. Local comedian Jessica Grant opens and Josh Barnes hosts ($10).

There’s something cool going down in Mack Town. The McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum — a limited-run, community-built art and history museum featuring art, photos and memorabilia — opens Friday, May 17 from 6 to 9 p.m. with a reception featuring music, raffles, photobooth and more (free). See what treasures the town has turned up over by the totem pole in the McKinleyville Shopping Center, where the exhibit will run May 18-June 9.

There’ll be swinging and swaying and records playing and dancing in the street. It’s KMUD’s annual Block Party, happening Saturday, May 18 from noon to dusk at the KMUD Studio (free). The street will be closed at 1144 Redway Drive so people can peruse the CD and vinyl sale, groove to live music, eat, drink, play and celebrate community radio. Check www. kmud.org for possible rainy day location change.

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. Chip in for the live model and hone your artistic skills. Go into the courtyard on C Street to the room on the right. $5. 442-0309. Healing Sketchbook Workshop. Third Thursday of every month, 5-6 p.m. Outer Space, 1100 M St., Arcata. Conversations About Power will hold a workshop focusing on mixed-media sketchbook techniques. All levels welcome. Bring sketchbook and art supplies. Some art supplies available. Free, donations appreciated. ConversationsAboutPower@gmail.com. www.conversationsaboutpower. com. 442-8413.

COMEDY The Weedies Tour. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Abdullah Saeed and Johnny Pemberton. With DJ Douggpound. Dr. Foxmeat opens. Alec Cole hosts. $15. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Contemporary partner dance with an improvised, lead-follow approach. A 7 p.m. lesson, 8 p.m. dancing. $5, first time free. www. redwoodraks.com.

MOVIES Science on Screen: Jurassic Park (1993). 7 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. This series pairs feature films with experts in the fields of science, tech, engineering and mathematics. This film’s discussion features how to clone a dinosaur w/Samantha del Campo, who reveals the science behind the gene-editing technology used in Jurassic Park. $5. www.theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of strummers. Beginners welcome. $3. dsander1@arcatanet. com. 839-2816.

THEATER

Queen Up

Photo by Mark McKenna

Reigning over the Kinetic Grand Championship Race is some serious business. And this year is some really big business as it’s the 50th anniversary of the whole dang thing. Thankfully, there’s a fitting vetting each year to determine who’s right to rule (settle down, Cersei), presented by the Kinetic Universe. The Rutabaga Ball 2019, the Kinetic Grand Championship’s crowned counterpart, takes place this Saturday, May 18 at 7 p.m. at Bayside Community Hall ($15 or $12 if you bring your own reusable cup). The three-round pageant (representing the three days of the kinetic race) determines who will be the new Rutabaga Queen — the queen bee of the ball and the royalty that reigns over the 2019 Kinetic Grand Championship Race. There’s no age or gender requirement to run — the only rule to rule is that fun is the law of the land and must be enforced. And bribery gets you everywhere. Past and forever queens do the judging (girl, we know) as contestants compete in a Ball Gown Round, a “Water-Crossing” Round (inside the hall) and a Talent Round. Contestants vying for the glorious title include Mystical Wildflower Protector of the Lost Coast, Betty Crafter and Deer to Heart Kinetic Glory. Guests can get down to the funky, soulful tunes of Claire Bent and Citizen Funk, and snack on tasty treats and libations at the Queens’ Bar sponsored by Lost Coast Brewery. Reign on, queens. – Kali Cozyris

Hats Off

Photo by Mark Larson

Oh, the pomp. Oh, the circumstance. The kids have done it again. Another year comes to a close and with it, hundreds of freshly inspired minds leave the halls and hallowed grounds of higher education, setting off to make their mark on the world. Our two bastions of higher ed send off their classes of 2019 with handshakes, photo snaps and scarce dry eyes at their respective ceremonies. “Down South” at College of the Redwoods, the 2019 Commencement takes place Saturday, May 18 starting at 11 a.m. in the College of the Redwoods Gymnasium. The 2019 RN Graduates Pinning Ceremony takes place in the gym later that day at 2 p.m. Humboldt State University salutes its graduating class on Saturday as well with the HSU 2019 Commencement starting at Redwood Bowl at 8:30 a.m., with the College of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences. Then at noon, the College of Natural Resources and Sciences graduates walk, and at 3 p.m., it’s the College of Professional Studies. Bring a hat or umbrella because it’s raining caps at the very least. Rain or shine, all weekend long, there’s a party for the grads and their families on the Arcata Plaza — now with extra dance space. The HSU Graduation Weekend Celebration goes from 4 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 17 and all day Saturday, May 18, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. with bands, entertainment, fun activities for the fam and the farmers market on Saturday. – Kali Cozyris

28  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Featuring culminating works by the graduating MFA class. Pay what you can. www.dellarte.com. Prodigal Son. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. An explosive portrait of a young man on the verge of either salvation or destruction. Written by John Patrick Shanley and directed by Roman Sanchez. $10-$20. www.redwoodcurtain.com. 443-7688. Shattering Silence. 10 a.m. & 7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Inspired by the students’ energy in questioning the silences that contribute to injustice. Performed by the NPA Young Actors Guild, Freshman/Sophomore Cast. Directed by Jean Heard Bazemore. $12, $10 students/seniors. aking@northcoastprep.org. www.northcoastprep.org/young-actors-guild/. 825-1186.

FOR KIDS Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories with the little ones. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227.

FOOD Intro to Fine Chocolate Tasting. 7-8:30 p.m. Dick Taylor Chocolate Factory, 4 West Fourth St., Eureka. Study the history and cultivation of cacao, how it’s crafted into chocolate and how fine chocolate is distinguished from industrial chocolate. Blind chocolate tasting of eight different chocolate bars. $25. info@dtchocolate. com. 798-6010.


GARDEN Free Admission Day at the Garden. Third Thursday of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, North Entrance, Eureka. Humboldt Botanical Garden features rare species, native plants and Mediterranean climate landscapes in a beautiful setting. The 44.5 acre site contains over seven acres of developed formal garden, multiple trails and a 100-foot diameter earth sculpture. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139.

MEETINGS Humboldt 350. 6-8 p.m. El Chipotle Restaurant, 850 Crescent Way, Sunny Brae. Everyone concerned about the effects of global climate change and ready to take action to attend the monthly meeting of this international grassroots organization. www.350.org. 223-0382.

OUTDOORS Eureka Bike to Work Day Rally. Noon. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. A chance for cyclists to gather and celebrate the bicycle as a legitimate mode of transportation. Prizes, contests, snacks. Stop at the Eureka North Coast Co-op to “energize” to start the day (7-9 a.m.) and tune-up. Free.

SPORTS NBA Playoffs - Western Conference Finals. 5 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See website for more details and updates as they come. Free w/$5 minimum purchase on food/bev.. www.arcatatheatre.com.

ETC Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. New members welcome. Anyone with sewing or quilting experience or who wants to learn. Free. Open Mic Thursdays at Peace Cafe. 7-9 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Poets, troubadours, essayists, vocalists and speakers perform. Light refreshments. Donations accepted. www. gracegoodshepherd.org. Public Hearing. 5 p.m. Redwood Community Action Agency, 904 G St., Eureka. Members of the Humboldt community are invited to attend and to make recommendations to RCAA’s board of directors regarding meeting the needs of the county’s low-income residents for the agency’s biennial Community Action Plan 2020-2021. 269-2022. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Put your deck to the test. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

17 Friday ART

Community Art Night. Third Friday of every month. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Family friendly, all ages welcome. All supplies are provided. Free. www. ervmgc.com. Drop-in Volunteering. 1-6 p.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St., Suite D, Arcata. Drop-in volunteering every Friday to help the creative reuse nonprofit. Free. volunteer@ scraphumboldt.org. www.scraphumboldt.org. 822-2452. McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum. 6-9 p.m. McKinleyville Shopping Center, Central Avenue. A limited-run, community-built art and history museum. Opening night includes a reception, live music, raffles and more. Free. kelleybrookgarrett@gmail.com. 497-4376.

COMEDY Bad Girls Comedy. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Eugene Oregon’s Bad Girls Comedy tour comes through the club featuring Cienna Jade, Jane Malone and Gabby Jesus. Jessica Grant opens and Josh

Barnes hosts. $10. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864. Comedy Night. 9 p.m. Gyppo Ale Mill, 1661 Upper Pacific Drive, Shelter Cove. Comedian Rio Hillman brings Midwestern charm and a knack for finding humor in the stress of everyday life. www.gyppo.com. Friday Night Improv Show. 7-9:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games with audience suggestions. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www. oldtowncoffeeeureka.com. 497-9039.

LECTURE South Georgia Island. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Andrea Tuttle presents South Georgia Island: What does a small, distant island have to do with the Arcata Marsh? This talk will tell the story of overhunted seals, Norwegian whalers, invasive reindeer and rats and the conservation efforts to restore the wild reserve. Free.

MUSIC Eureka Symphony: Memorable Memories. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Libby Larsen’s Deep Summer Music, Variations on a Rococo Theme Op. 33 by Tchaikovsky with soloist, Garrick Woods, Tchaikovsky’s powerful Symphony No. 5. $19-$49. Gift of Gab. 9 p.m.-1:45 a.m. The Jam, 915 H St., Arcata. Gift of Gab with Hiway, Nac One, Little Kidd Lost, DJ Just One and DJ Goldylocks. Live art by Jullia Finkelstein. 21+ over show. Meet and greet with Gift of Gab on May 17 at Fatbol store 6-8 p.m., all ages. $20, $15 advance,. www. jambalayaarcata.com. 822-4766. HSU Graduation Recital. 4-5 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The Humboldt State University Department of Music’s graduating seniors present the 2019 Graduation Recital. Free. mus@humboldt.edu. www.music.humboldt.edu. 826-3928. Third Friday Jazz: The RLA Trio w/James Zeller. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Trombonist/vocalist James Zeller has performed with The Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, The Village Vanguard Orchestra, Slide Hampton, Joe Chambers and The Jimmy Heath Orchestra. Refreshments available. $10-20 sliding scale.

THEATER 2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 16 listing. Cabaret. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. American author Cliff Bradshaw discovers the seedy underbelly of 1931 Berlin with Sally Bowles, a British dancer at the Kit Kat Klub, amid the rise of Nazi party. Winner of 15 Tony awards. $16-$18. www.ncrt.net. Mamma Mia!. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. A musical about a mother, her daughter and three potential fathers, plus ABBA’s greatest hits. Appropriate for ages 14+. $18-$10. www.ferndalerep.org. Prodigal Son. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See May 16 listing. Shattering Silence. 7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. See May 16 listing.

EVENTS Creamery District Night Market. 5-9 p.m. Creamery District, 1251 Ninth St., Arcata. Night market with local artists, businesses, music and food. Free. creameryinfo@ gmail.com. HSU Graduation Weekend Celebration. 4-8 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Live music, family fun and communities coming together to relax and enjoy the splendor of downtown Arcata Merchants and the North Coast Growers Association Farmers Market. arcatamainstreet@gmail.com. 822-4500.

FOR KIDS Baby Read & Grow. Third Friday of every month, 11-11:45 a.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Babies and their families are invited to share songs, finger plays and short stories at this early literacy event. Free. jlancaster@co.humboldt.ca.us. www.humlib.org. 269-1910. Preschool Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. Volunteer storytellers read to children ages 4 and under, sometimes with songs and puppets. Free. 725-3460. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 5-6 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn good sportsmanship and safety for kids of all ages. Friday and Sunday practices followed by racing. $2 practice, $5 ribbon race, $8 medal race, $11 trophy race. redwoodempirebmx1992@gmail.com. 845-0094. Zumba Kids and Kids Jr.. 6-7 p.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. Every Friday night, instructor Vanessa Maloney. Open to kids ages 5 and up. $8, $5 prepay. ecooper@ervmgc.com. www.ervmgc.com. 725-3300.

Breakfast Served All Day Coffee & Espresso Lunch & Specialty Dishes

FOOD Hope Center Wellness Connection BBQ. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Carson Park, H and Buhne streets, Eureka. Part of Mental Health Awareness Month. Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local produce, pasture-raised meats, baked goods, plant starts, crafts and more. Live music and food vendors.

ETC A Call to Yarns. Noon-1 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Knit. Chat. Relax. Free. sparsons@co.humboldt.ca.us. 822-5954. Solidarity Fridays. 5-6 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Join Veterans for Peace and the North Coast People’s Alliance for a peaceful protest on the courthouse lawn. www.northcoastpeoplesalliance.org.

MIDDLE OF G ST. ARCATA PLAZA 707.826.7578

Sun - Thurs 8am-3pm Fri. & Sat. 7am-3pm

18 Saturday ART

McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. McKinleyville Shopping Center, Central Avenue. See May 17 listing.

COMEDY Jessica Grant. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. The Humboldt comic does an hour headlining set. Josh Barnes opens and Trevor Lockwood hosts. $10. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www. savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Argentine Tango. 1 & 2:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Authentic tango taught by Alejandro Barrientos and Rosalia Gasso from Argentina. Private sessions available. Inquire for dates. 1 workshop $30, 2 for $50, all 3 for $70. kvon@att.net. www.redwoodraks.com. 445-0484.

MOVIES Small Foot. 2-3:30 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Animated PG musical about a group of yetis who prove the existence of humans. Free. 822-5954.

MUSIC Eureka Symphony: Memorable Memories. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. See May 17 listing. Fun with Music Storytime. 11-11:30 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Have fun with shaker eggs, rhythm sticks, scarves and, of course, a good book read aloud by Ms. Sue. Free. Sponsored by Friends of Arcata Library. 822-5954. Continued on next page »

M-F 8am-3pm | Sat & Sun 9am-3pm 307 2nd St. Eureka 707.798.6083

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

29


McKenna Faith Concert to Benefit Mckinleyville FFA. 6-9 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Country music singer/songwriter and recording artist. Family friendly event. All ages. $35, $25 advance, free for children under 5. squareup.com/store/trebleent/. 497-9934.

2019 Kinetic Grand Championship Race. Special musical guests Claire Bent and Citizen Funk. $15 or $12 with your own reusable cup. www.kineticgrandchampionship.com. Steam Up Rides. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fort Humboldt State Historic Park, 3431 Fort Ave., Eureka. Take a ride on the historic 1884 Falk local logging locomotive.

THEATER

FOR KIDS

2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 16 listing. Cabaret. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 17 listing. Cabaret Eureka Heritage Society Benefit Performance. 8-10:30 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Join the Eureka Heritage Society for a special evening of music and fun with this production. All proceeds benefit the society. Reception follows. $20. eurekaheritagesociety@gmail.com. www.ncrt.net. 445-8775. Mamma Mia!. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 17 listing. Prodigal Son. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See May 16 listing.

EVENTS Be Well Self Care Fair. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Yoga, meditation workshops, chair massage and crafting programs. Plus informational tables to help connect patrons to information and services. Children and families activities include storytime yoga and meditation for children. www.humlib.org. College of the Redwoods 2019 Commencement. 11 a.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Firewise Community Fair and Youth Ecology Day. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Veterans Park, 100 Kimtu Road, Willow Creek. Learn about wildfire and fire/emergency preparedness plus home ignition prevention. Fire agencies from Trinity and Humboldt counties will be participating along with informational booths on fire preparedness measures and fire prevention techniques. Live music, youth treasure hunt, free bike helmets. Free admission. HSU 2019 Commencement. 8:30 a.m. Redwood Bowl, Humboldt State University, Arcata. College of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences at 8:30 a.m., College of Natural Resources and Sciences at noon, College of Professional Studies at 3 p.m. HSU Graduation Weekend Celebration. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. See May 17 listing. KMUD Block Party. Noon-9 p.m. KMUD Studio, 1144 Redway Drive, Redway. All-day musical and family celebration with Object Heavy, Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups, April Moore and Ranch Party, and Kai Clark. Food, beer, wine, mixed and soft drinks, bake sale, CD and vinyl sale, kids’ fun zone, KMUD T-shirts and hats and handcrafted wares by local artisans. Check www. kmud.org for possible rainy day location change. Free. development@kmud.org. 923-2513. Life’s Last Gift. 9:30 a.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. An inter-faith and multi-generational conversation exploring end of life. The workshop will begin by viewing the movie CoCo at 9:30 a.m., followed by a facilitated discussion and lunch. There will be a parents/adult program beginning at 12:30 p.m., while children’s activities and childcare will be provided. $25 donation per family is requested, but no one will be turned away. www.huuf.org. 822-3793. Old School Classics Car and Bike Show. 9 p.m. Timber Ridge McKinleyville, 1400 Nursery Road. Enter your wheels for a chance to win a trophy. Barbecue and drinks, raffle, vendors, music, kids’ activities. Trophies will be awarded to the winners in show category. Free entry. Rutabaga Ball. 7 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. A three-round pageant to determine who will be the new Rutabaga Queen to reign in glory over the

Nature Story Time. 2-3 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join Friends of the Dunes naturalist Vanessa Muñoz for Nature Story Time. Geared for ages 3-6, Nature Story Time focuses on local wildlife and is paired with a simple craft project, props and fun movement activities. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. www.friendsofthedunes.org/calendar. 444-1397. Storytime. 11:30 a.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Stories for children and their parents. Free. Storytime and Crafts. 11:30 a.m. Blue Lake Library, 111 Greenwood Ave. Followed by crafts at noon. Now with a Spanish and English story every first and third Saturday. Free. blkhuml@co.Humboldt.ca.us. 668-4207.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Live music from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Music by Latin Peppers. Breakfast and Flea Market. Third Saturday of every month, 8:30 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Enjoy pancakes, eggs and browsing knickknacks. Flea market ends at 3 p.m. $5, $3 for kids, first responders eat free. dowsgrange@gmail. com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

MEETINGS Humboldt Embroiders’ Guild. 11 a.m. Scrapper’s Edge, 728 4th St., Eureka. This month’s project will feature Hardanger to stitch. Supplies and instruction provided at no charge. For further information call 822-6723 or lael14@suddenlink.net. www.scrappersedge.net. Photoshop User Group. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. Prosperity Center, 520 E St., Eureka. Adobe Photoshop or LightRoom beginners and power users gather to swap ideas and techniques. Informal lunch usually follows. Free. wrishel@gmail.com. www.eurekaphotoshop.com. 510-410-3310.

OUTDOORS Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. Meet leader Elliott Dabill at the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute walk focusing on the plants, history and/ or ecology of the Marsh. Loaner binoculars available with photo ID. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Bird Walk. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and meet in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Grassland Reclamation: Birds, Butterflies and Wildflowers. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sanctuary Forest Office, 315 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. The Fool’s Farm in Salmon Creek hosts a tour/workshop of its 5-acre grassland reclamation site. Led by Kyle Keegan and Matt Cocking. Bring hiking shoes, hat, water and a lunch; binoculars are encouraged. The hike will be moderate with some steep hill climbs. Meet at 9 a.m. at Shop Smart in Redway to carpool. Free. owlsperch@asis.com. sanctuaryforest.org/ event/grassland-reclamation-birds-butterflies-wildflowers/. 943-1504. Opening Day on the Bay. 1-5:30 p.m. Madaket, 1 C Street, Eureka. The Humboldt Bay Maritime Museums’ harbor cruise boat Madaket begins the 2019 cruise season with a full schedule of regular and special event cruises that run through the 7th of October. $12-$80.

30  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

humboldtbaymaritimemuseum@yahoo.com. bookeo. com/madaketcruises. 445-1910. Waterfront Trail Volunteer Day. 9 a.m. Blue Ox Historic Village, 1 X St., Eureka. Help remove trash and do other maintenance related activities. Bring your own water and gloves. Some gloves provided. Meet at the foot of X Street by the Blue Ox at 9 a.m. at the section between the Adorni Center and Tydd street. Rain or shine. Free. Yellow-Legged Frog Egg Count. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Benbow Lake State Recreation Area, 1600 U.S. Highway 101. Enjoy a morning on the South Fork Eel River and learn about yellow-legged frogs from Sarah Kupferberg. Wear river shoes and be ready to wade. Sunglasses and sunscreen recommended. Free. walker101wise@gmail.com. www. eelriverrecovery.org. 502-8170.

ETC From Surviving to Thriving. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Sequoia Conference Center, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. An event focused on supporting youth and families impacted by trauma. Lunch provided. Free. helloevolveyouthservices@gmail.com. www.eventbrite.com/e/from-surviving-to-thriving-tickets-60435791078. 825-1173. Town Hall on Housing. 2:30 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. True North Organizing Network hosts, “The Changing Face of Transitional Housing: Moving Toward Solutions.” Childcare provided. Community members are encouraged to continue the conversation at the conclusion of the meeting. Women’s Peace Vigil. Noon-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress in warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044. Yu-Gi-Oh! Standard League. 1-4 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and claim your prizes. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358.

19 Sunday ART

McKinleyville Community Pop-up Museum. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. McKinleyville Shopping Center, Central Avenue. See May 17 listing.

COMEDY Two Mic Sundays. 5 p.m. Northtown Coffee, 1603 G St., Arcata. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. At Northtown Coffee at 5 p.m. and Savage Henry Comedy Club at 9 p.m. Free. editor@ savagahenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine. com. 845-8864.

DANCE Argentine Tango. 1 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See May 18 listing.

MOVIES Alice in Wonderland (1951). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Down the rabbit hole. $5. www. arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC Arcata Interfaith Gospel Choir Community Prayer Breakfast. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Silent auction, raffle and continental breakfast at 9:30 a.m. Music at 10 a.m. Aretha Franklin tribute group The Sweet Inspiration Band will open the show. $18, $15 advance, free for kids 5 and under. aigchoir@gmail.com. www.arcatainterfaithgospelchoir.org. 633-8781. Bayside Community Hall Music Project. 6-8 p.m. Bayside Community Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Bandemonium, community activist street band, from 6-8 p.m. Bring wind instruments and drums. Free. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 499-8516. The Children’s Concert Chorus. 2:30 p.m. The Sanctuary,

1301 J St., Arcata. A benefit for the World Concert Children’s Fund for children survivors of natural catastrophes with special guests The Redwood Coast Women’s Chorus. $10. www.redwoodcoastchildrenschorus.net. Moaning, mister moonbeam, Spirit Notes. 7-10 p.m. Outer Space, 1100 M St., Arcata. All ages. Post-punk trio. $7-$20. Mozart & Mendelssohn in May. 3-5 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. A Company of Voices performs Mozart’s Missa Brevis in G, accompanied by guest instrumentalists, Mendelssohn’s Song Cycle of Spring (Der erste Frühlingstag) and a variety of a cappella selections from three centuries. $15. Song Village: Hosted by Seabury Gould. 1 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Folk songs and songs conducive to group singing. Fun and uplifting. Wine and Jazz. Third Sunday of every month, 3-5 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Sip and listen. After every performance, audience members with instruments can jam with the band. Music by Bill Allison and the Humboldt Jazz Silverbacks $5, $2 students/seniors, free to HAC members and children 17 and under. alex@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts. org. 442-0278.

THEATER 2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 16 listing. Cabaret. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 17 listing. Mamma Mia!. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theatre, 447 Main St. See May 17 listing. The Reps Auditions. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Ferndale Repertory Theatre and North Coast Repertory Theatre will hold joint auditions for their 2019-2020 seasons. Audition for all eleven productions in just an hour and five minutes. For more information and to fill out the online application, go to www.ncrt.net/ the-reps-audition. www.ncrt.net.

EVENTS Holistic Health Fair. Noon-5 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Join WCA for a potluck gathering of healers. Talk from 2-3 p.m. by Roy King entitled “Alternative and Holistic ways to treat Anxiety, Stress and Trauma.” Bring potluck luncheon/snacks or drinks to share, wear comfortable clothes and walking shoes. Free.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. 12:30-2 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. For ages 4 and up. Free w/museum admission. www.discovery-museum.org. Redwood Empire BMX - BMX Practice/Racing. 1-2:30 p.m. Redwood Empire BMX, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See May 17 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Pancake Breakfast. Third Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Mattole Grange, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. All the homemade pancakes you can eat, organic oatmeal, local fresh eggs and sausage, and more. $8, $3. evenson@ igc.org. 629-3421.

GARDEN Southern Humboldt Garden Club’s 68th Annual Flower Show. 1-5 p.m. Agnes J. Johnson Elementary School, 73 School Road, Weott. A judged show of single blooms and flower arrangements grown and submitted by local gardeners. Cash prizes awarded. Light refreshments. Plant and other vendors will be present. Free admission. 946-2248.

MEETINGS Redwood Coast Woodturners. 1 p.m. Almquist Lumber


Company, 5301 Boyd Road, Arcata. Robert Lelonde demonstrates how to make small hollow forms. Showand-tell and wood auction. Yearly membership is $25 or $35 per family. $25. pajhum42@gmail.com.. 633-8147.

OUTDOORS Art & Nature at the Refuge. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Free art and nature activities for everyone. All materials provided. Drop in. Rain or shine. Free. denise_seeger@ fws.gov. www.fws.gov/refuge/humboldt_bay/. 733-5406. Bike to Swedish Pancakes. 9 a.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Meet Rick Knapp, President of the Humboldt Bay Bicycle Commuters Association, and fellow bicyclists at the Gazebo for a ride to the Moose Lodge for Swedish pancakes. Rain cancels the event, but not the pancakes. For further information, call Rick at 499-5918. $8 at door for pancakes.

SPORTS Motocross Racing. Redwood Acres Racetrack, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See www.redwoodacresevents.com for times, prices.

ETC Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-5 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your cards to play or learn. Free. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline. com. 497-6358.

20 Monday COMEDY

Improv Show. 6-7:45 p.m. Old Town Coffee & Chocolates, 211 F St., Eureka. Watch or play fun improv games. Audience suggestions taken for scenes, plays, films, songs and more. Clean comedy. All ages welcome. Free. damionpanther@gmail.com. www.oldtowncoffeeeureka. com. 497-9039. Monday Night Pod. 7-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Live recordings of podcasts on the Savage Henry Podcast Network. Usually two recordings 7 and 9 p.m. Free. editor@savagehenrymagazine.com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Baile Terapia. 7-8 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Paso a Paso host dance therapy. Free. jorge. matias@stjoe.org. 441-4477.

MUSIC

with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

SPORTS NBA Playoffs - Western Conference Finals: Game 4. 5 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See website for more details and updates as they come. Free w/$5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

21 Tuesday COMEDY

Trivia Tuesdays. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Teams of three. Three rounds. Real prizes. $5 team entry fee. editor@savagehenrymagazine. com. www.savagehenrymagazine.com. 845-8864.

DANCE Let’s Dance. 7-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Live music. All ages. $5. www. facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 725-5323.

THEATER The Reps Auditions. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 19 listing.

EVENTS Green New Deal Town Hall. 7:30-9 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Join climate activists Sunrise Humboldt and other community members to learn more about the Green New Deal and what it means for the community. Potluck dinner at 5:30 p.m. Free, donations appreciated. anemolie@gmail.com. 834-1325. Miranda Street Fair. 2-9 p.m. Avenue of the Giants (Rio Dell), Dyerville Bridge. The whole town invites you to socialize on the Avenue of the Giants and explore the Big Little Town.

FOR KIDS Family Storytime. 10:30-11 a.m. Fortuna Library, 753 14th St. A rotating group of storytellers entertain children ages 2-6 and parents at Fortuna Library. Free. www. humlib.org. 725-3460.

FOOD Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. sohumfm@yahoo.com. 943-3025. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers and premium plant starts.

Humboldt Harmonaires. 7-9:30 p.m. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. Sing four-part men’s a cappella barbershop harmony, no experience needed. All voice levels and ages welcome. In the EHS band room located in the rear with parking at Del Norte and J streets. Free. SrJoePapa@ gmail.com. 834-0909. Join the Scotia Band. 7:30-9 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Woodwind, brass and percussion musicians (intermediate level and above) of all ages are invited. The band rehearses Monday evenings in the Fortuna High Band Room and performs publicly throughout the year. Free. thescotiaband@yahoo.com. www.scotiaband2. org. 599-4872. McKinleyville Community Choir Practice. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. All voices welcome, with a particular call for male voices. Opportunities for solos and ensemble groups. $50 registration fee w/scholarships available. 839-2276.

MEETINGS

THEATER

ETC

The Reps Auditions. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 19 listing.

MEETINGS Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work

Humboldt Cribbers. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Humboldt Cribbage Club plays weekly. Seven games in summer and nine games during the season. $8. grasshopper60@aol.com. 444-3161. Nordic Aquafarms Community Meeting. 5:30-7 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Nordic Aquafarms Commercial Director Marianne Naess presents an overview of the Norway-based company’s plans for a land-based fish farm on the Samoa Peninsula. Open forum for questions. Refreshments. Free. lynette@ nordichumboldt.com. Soroptimist of McKinleyville. Third Tuesday of every month, 5:45 p.m. Luzmila’s, McKinleyville, 1751 Central Ave. Monthly general meeting of a local volunteer organization working to improve the lives of women and girls. Free. aprilsousa13@gmail.com. www.facebook. com/208188105867679. Bingo. 6 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Speed bingo, early and regular games. Doors open at 5 p.m. Games $1-$10. Board Game Night. 6-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Choose from a variety of games or bring your

own. All ages. Free. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Ferndale Cribbage. 10 a.m. Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 425 Shaw Ave., Ferndale. Cards and pegs. Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See May 16 listing. Pokémon Trade and Play. 3-6 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See May 19 listing. Queer Focus Group. 5:30-7:30 p.m. The RAVEN Project, 523 T St., Eureka. The Humboldt County Transition Age Youth Collaboration will be collecting information from young people in the community to develop policy recommendations that will change the outcomes for LGBTQ+ transition age youth in Humboldt County. Participants must be 16 years old.

- Authentic mexican food -

Crazy G ood!

22 Wednesday MUSIC

Sweet Harmony Women’s Chorus. 6-8 p.m. Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St. All-female barbershop-style chorus that sings a variety of music in four-part, a cappella harmonies. Accepting new members. Ability to read music not required. barbershophumboldt@gmail.com. (802) 490-9455, 601-8219.

shrimp tacos

THEATER The Reps Auditions. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 19 listing.

MEETINGS Health Care for All/Physicians for a National Health Program. Fourth Wednesday of every month, 5-6 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Learn about the benefits and cost savings of a single-payer healthcare system for California. Free. healthcareforallhumboldt@gmail.com. (805) 844-6655.

www.tacoloco.com

hours Mon-Fri 10-9 • sat 11-9 • Closed Sun

location 955 Main St., Fortuna • (707) 725-5546

SPORTS NBA Playoffs - Western Conference Finals: Game 5. 5 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See website for more details and updates as they come. Free w/$5 min. food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

ETC Casual Magic. 4-9 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. Bring your decks and connect with the local Magic community. Beginners welcome. Door prizes and drawings. $5. nugamesonline@gmail.com. www.nugamesonline.com. 497-6358. Family Night. 4-7 p.m. Blood Bank, 2524 Harrison Ave, Eureka. The Blood Bank will make dinner and watch the kids while you donate. Free. recruit@nccbb.org. www. nccbb.org. 443-8004.

THE BEST DRINK SPECIALS IN TOWN! EARLY BIRD HAPPY HOUR 5-6pm Bar Specials Small Plates $5

LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR 9-11pm Thurs. - Sat. at the bar

23 Thursday ART

Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery, 272 C St., Eureka. See May 16 listing.

BOOKS A Novel Idea Book Group: The Fifth Season. 6-7:30 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. N.K. Jemisin’s first title in The Broken Earth Trilogy. Free. 822-5954.

DANCE Redwood Fusion Partner Dance. 7-10 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See May 16 listing.

LECTURE On the Road to Climate Action. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Friends of the Dunes and the Northcoast Environmental Center co-host Shahir Masri (air pollution scientist from Continued on next page »

OPEN SUN-THURS 5-9 PM FRI & SAT 5-9:30 PM · 707.826.0860

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

31


Calendar

Filmland

Continued from previous page

UC Irvine) and Athina Simolaris (educator). Basic climate science will be addressed, as will information about impacts and solutions. Free. roadforaction@gmail.com. www.shahirmasri.com/book.html.

THEATER 2019 Thesis Festival. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 16 listing. A Night On Broadway. 6:30-9 p.m. The Historic Eagle House, 139 Second St., Eureka. AllStar Theatre Arts presents A Night On Broadway featuring performances by Allstar teams and soloists. Dessert auction, raffle prizes and Sound of Music giveaways. $10, $8 advance.

EVENTS Written Off. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Communities Against Abuse of Prescription Drugs presents this screening of the documentary about the realities and dangers of opioid misuse. Free. www. arcatatheatre.com.

FOR KIDS Lego Club. Every other Thursday, 3-4:30 p.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. For ages 5 and up. Free. trihuml@ co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Trinidad Library Toddler Storytime. 10-11 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See May 16 listing.

MEETINGS Toastmasters. Fourth Thursday of every month, noon. Redwood Sciences Laboratory, 1700 Bayview St., Arcata. Give and receive feedback and learn to speak with confidence. Second and fourth Thursdays. Visitors welcome.

ETC Katie’s Krafters. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Arcata Senior Dining Center, 321 Community Park Way. See May 16 listing. Open Mic Thursdays at Peace Cafe. 7-9 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See May 16 listing. Standard Magic Tournament. 6-10 p.m. NuGames Eureka, 1662 Myrtle Ave. #A. See May 16 listing. Travel Safety Presentation. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Fortuna Volunteer Fire Department, 320 South Fortuna Blvd. Whether you are traveling across the state or out of the country, before you travel this summer learn how to stay safe. Presented by the Fortuna, Eureka and Arcata Police Departments and the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office.

Heads Up The Kinetic Grand Championship 50th Kinetic Sculpture Race is looking for volunteers of all ages and abilities this Memorial Day Weekend. Visit www. KineticGrandChampionship.com/Volunteers or leave a message at 733-3841. The Bureau of Fantastical Spectacles and Arcata Main Street are seeking vendors, performers and nonprofits for the June 30 Fairy Festival on the Arcata Plaza. For more information, visit www.arcatafairyfestival.com or phone 822-4500. Arcata Main Street is seeking vendors and nonprofits for Oyster Festival. For more information, visit www. arcatamainstreet.com or call 822-4500. The Summer Arts and Music Festival in Benbow is now accepting vendor/music applications. Vendors, go to www.mateel.org/vendors and select Summer Arts & Music Festival. Bands and performing artists submit EPK materials for consideration to bands@mateel.org or complete the application at www.mateel.org/june-12nd-summer-arts-music-festival. Faben Artist Fund now accepting applications. Grant guidelines are posted at www.humboldtarts.org. Email Jemima@humboldtarts.org or 442-0278, ext. 205. l

Pouring it On The Hustle and Wine Country By John J. Bennett

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

THE HUSTLE. Just as, after two consecutive days of memory-redacting sunshine, the coastal fog must re-mount its sullen siege, so, too, returns the torpor of the average, mainstream American movie comedy in the wake of one that is timely, pointed and actually funny. I don’t usually like to let the movies I’ve seen in recent weeks cast a shadow over current offerings but in the case of Long Shot I can’t help it, nor do I care to. Flatlined as the excitement level of cinema-at-large has become, there are frequent enough surprises to keep me coming back. But Hollywood’s ongoing crisis of imagination has impacted comedy more deeply than perhaps any other genre. Because comedy requires sustained inspiration and energy from the germ of the idea to the final edit, it is deceptively difficult to do well. And so, more often than not it is either done rather poorly or not at all; this is the new normal. Long Shot almost made me forget that — The Hustle will not let me. The Hustle is set up as a gender-role reversing remake of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), for which I hold some fond memories but do not consider canonical. (I wonder how many in the audience will have even seen it.) We’re first introduced to Penny (Rebel Wilson), an Australian ex-pat pulling inventive but simplistic dating-app scams in America. She gets a wild hair to fly to France, though, where she crosses paths with Josephine Chesterfield (Anne Hathaway), a grifter of a very different stripe but a grifter nonetheless. Penny forcefully inserts herself into Josephine’s coolly mannered existence, ostensibly to study at the feet of the master. Together, through a series of hackneyed scenarios, they manage to separate some arch stereotypes from a significant amount of jewelry. Then they fall to in-fighting and decide to select a mark and see who can first unburden him of half a million dollars. Pacing is a problem here (well, it’s really almost all problems) — the narrative moves

32  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Counting on white women to come through at the polls in 2020. Wine Country

from telegraphed set-up to unsatisfying punchline over and over again, so that it plays more like a series of backfiring sketches than a continuous story. There are occasional attempts to visually elevate the material but they just stand out all the more against the planar dullness of the whole thing. (It’s set in a sparkling town in the Côte d’Azur and manages to suck the charm out of even that most charming of locales.) And what should be a playful duel of foils (Wilson and Hathaway certainly each have the chops to pull that off) becomes a predictable hash of slapstick tumbles and scatological asides against the ersatz sophistication of the evening gown set (no prize for guessing who manages each part). The Hustle is generally unfunny. It fails on a number of technical and structural levels, and it underserves its capable, likable stars. More troubling, though, is that in its ostensible feminist re-imagining of this story, it only reinforces old-fashioned gendered norms. The protagonists, powerful women using their wits to level the playing field, are brought to their knees by a puppy-dog tech wiz (Alex Sharp), whose act has one of them falling in love and the other nearly snarling in a slinky silk nightgown. It’s problematic and perhaps unintentionally so, which creates its own set issues and highlights the shortcomings of The Hustle as a whole. Insufficient attention was paid throughout, resulting in a movie that actively works against its own potential. PG13. 94M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. WINE COUNTRY. In brief: Amy Poehler directs a script by Liz Cackowski and Emily Spivey (both of whom boast sterling comedy writing CVs) and the thing stars Poehler, Rachel Dratch, Maya Rudolph, Ana Gasteyer, Paula Pell and Spivey, with Tina Fey and Jason Schwartzman in supporting roles. I thought the same thing you (hopefully) are:

How could this miss?! Well, let me tell you. Perhaps I shouldn’t have expected a movie created by and starring a whole crew of comedic geniuses to be funny. But I did, and was a little disappointed. Because Wine Country is less about the jokes than it is about the feelings, and in that focus it loses sight of both. There are some mid-sized laughs and a few salient insights, but the movie attempts to be both an ensemble comedy and an intimate examination of the lives of women of a certain age. While admirable in intent, the execution doesn’t serve either thematic thread fully. The story demands that we feel invested in the characters and, while the cast do fine work with them, there isn’t enough time or space in the narrative for them to really live on screen. Instead of character arcs, we get a series of moments in time that, while certainly helping to illuminate the lives of which they are a part, often feel more distancing than connective. Admittedly, Wine Country isn’t really meant for me but I wanted to love it and am instead left with an after-effect of inessential pleasantness. R. 103M. NETFLIX. — John J. Bennett See showtimes at www.northcoastjournal.com or call: Broadway Cinema 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre 725-2121; Mill Creek Cinema 8393456; Minor Theatre 822-3456; Richards’ Goat Miniplex 630-5000.

Previews

THE 20TH ANIMATION SHOW OF SHOWS. Fifteen short animated films from around the world. NR. 98M. MINOR. ASK DR. RUTH. Documentary about the 90-year-old sex therapist, Holocaust survivor and petite suit icon. NR. 100M. MINOR.


A DOG’S JOURNEY. Oh, so now reincarnated pets are a good thing? Starring Josh Gad, Dennis Quaid and Kathryn Prescott. PG. 108M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 - PARABELLUM. Keanu Reeves in a suit on horseback dispatching bad guys and also Angelica Houston and Halle Berry. If you need more than that, maybe you can’t be happy. R. 130M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. THE PRINCESS BRIDE (1987). Spoiler: This is a kissing story. PG. 98M. BROADWAY. THE SUN IS ALSO A STAR. Romance about a young woman (Yara Shahidi) who’s about to be deported with her family when she meets a charming stranger (Charles Melton) on the street in New York. PG13. 100M. BROADWAY.

Continuing

AMAZING GRACE. A documentary with footage of Aretha Franklin singing with a choir in Watts in 1972. G. 89M. MINOR. AVENGERS: ENDGAME. Joe and Anthony Russo’s vast, multi-faceted, three-hour finale is a project management master-class with tragedy, triumph and leavening comedy. Compelling and committed performances are hampered by the requisite epic climactic battle and antiseptic aesthetic. PG13. 181M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. HAIL SATAN? Documentary on the Satanic Temple, religious freedom, the separation of church and state, and serving looks in black leather. R. 95M. MINIPLEX. THE INTRUDER. A couple (Michael Ealy, Meagan Good) buy a house from a man (Dennis Quaid) who turns stalker when he can’t let go of it. Zombies are over — it’s 2019 and horror is all about real estate now. PG13. 102M. BROADWAY. LONG SHOT. Charlize Theron and Seth Rogan in a smart, unexpectedly accomplished and entertaining rom-com about a presidential candidate and her idealistic speech writer. R. 125M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. POKÉMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU. Ryan Reynolds voices the cuddly CGI creature, thus precluding a Deadpool crossover. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. POMS. Diane Keaton, Jacki Weaver and Pam Grier star as retirement home residents who form a cheerleading squad. PG13. 90M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. TOLKEIN. Biopic focusing on the fantasy author’s (Nicholas Hoult) early days at school, wartime service and inspirations. With Lily Collins. PG13. 94M. BROADWAY. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill l

Workshops & Classes

FREE GED/HISET PREPARATION Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620)

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts POTTERY AND GLASS CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: Summer Session June 24 − August 31. Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826− 1445. Sign up starts May 20 (A−0606) WOOD FIRED CERAMICS Jun 4 − Jul 9. Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (A−0516)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BALLET CLASSES WITH NANCY CALL: Interme− diate/Advanced Level. Mondays 10:30am−noon at Trillium Dance Studios, Arcata n−call@sbcglobal.net (D−0516) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707)845−8167. (DMT−0530)

POTTERY AND GLASS CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: Summer Session June 24 − August 31. Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826− 1445. Sign up starts May 20 (O−0606)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442− 4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−0425) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−0530)

Therapy & Support

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA Learn a Brazilian martial art which is a rich combination of dance, acro− batics, self−defense, and music! Monday/ Wednesday − Kids 4:30−5:30, Adults 4:30−6:30 Summer Special!!! 8 Classes for $20 at Redwood Raks World Dance Studio in Arcata, 824 L Street humboldtcapoeira.org

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844 442−0711. (T−0530)

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, OLD CREAMERY IN ARCATA. Belly Dance, Swing, Tango, Hip Hop, Zumba, African, Samba, Capoeira and more for all ages. (707) 616−6876 www.redwoodraks.com (D−0425)

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 707−825− 0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com (T−0530)

STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s. 10:30a.m.−11:30a.m., Level 2 Beginners Class Fri’s. 11:30a.m.−12:30 p.m. Beginners Mon’s 7:00p.m. −8:00p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0502)

Fitness SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids & adults, child care, fitness gym & more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0502)

Kids & Teens POTTERY AND GLASS CLASSES AT FIRE ARTS: Summer Session June 24 − August 31. Full schedule of classes @ fireartsarcata.com or call 707−826− 1445. Sign up starts May 20 (K−0606)

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−0530)

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Feeling hopeless? Free, non−religious, drop−in peer group for people experiencing depression/anxiety. UMCJH 144 Central Ave, McK 839−5691 (T−0808)

SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana −anonymous.org (T−0425)

Vocational COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL SERVICES June 4 − Aug 13. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0516) FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707− 476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE BEGINNING LITERACY CLASS Call College of The Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASS Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education at 707−476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620)

FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS WITH DISABILI− TIES Call College of the Redwoods Adult Educa− tion at 70−7476−4520 for more information or come to class to register. (V−0620) GED TESTING Earn your GED. Call Workforce and Community Education for more information or to schedule your appointment at (707) 476−4500. (V−0516) LEADERSHIP WORKSHOPS Jun 7 − Jun 28. Attend all four workshops for a reduced rate! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (W−0516) LOAN DOCUMENT SIGNING Jun 25. One day training! Call CR Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0516) NOTARY Jun 26. One day training! Call CR Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0516) OFFICE SPECIALIST May 28 − June 10. Call Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0516) TRUCK DRIVING INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS Attend one on May 28, 30 or Jun 4. Call CR Work− force and Community Education for more infor− mation at (707) 476−4500. (V−0516) REAL ESTATE CORRESPONDENCE Become a Real Estate Agent. Start anytime! Call Workforce and Community Education for more information at (707) 476−4500. (V−0516)

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDA AWESOMENESS! WITH TRACI WEBB. AYURVEDA PULSE IMMERSION: Aug. 16−18. Learn the most powerfu ayurvedic tool to heal yourself & discover your client’s deeper bodily & emotional needs, $299 by 8/1 ($375 after). AROMATHERAPY TRAINING IMMERSIONS & ESSENTIAL OIL DISTIL− LATION start your aromatic career & lifestyle, heal yourself & others, create your own aromatic prod− ucts, lots of take−homes! Sept. 7−8, 14−15 & 21−22. Topics Vary. Take 1, 2, or all 3 weekends for certifi− cate. AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & FALL DETOX (’Ultimate Rejuvenation Therapies’ Module): Oct. 9−13. Bring on the Bliss! Deadline: 9/ 30. REGISTER: www.ayurvedicliving.com (707) 601− 9025 (W−0815) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER CLASSES WITH JANE BOTHWELL. Beginning with Herbs. Sept 18 − Nov 6, 2019, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10−Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb − Nov 2020. Meets one weekend per month with three camping trips. Learn in−depth material medica, plant identification, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0829) UPCOMING MASSAGE CLASSES AT LOVING HANDS INSTITUTE OF HEALING ARTS Acupres− sure: June 2−July 2 Mon−Thurs 10am−2pm 72 contact hours $940 Reflexology June 27−29 Thurs & Fri 5:30−9:30pm and Sat 9:30−6pm 16 contact hours $250 call 725−9627 and ask for Hilary to sign− up! (W−0620)

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Thursday,May May16, 16,2019 2019• •NORTH NORTHCOAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL  

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The 13.7 billion-year history of the universe summarized in this diagram can’t be reconciled with the Standard Model of particle physics. (WMAP is NASA’s Wilkinson Microwave Anistropy Probe, launched in 2001, which has helped nail down our current cosmological model.)

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The Universe: Whodunnit?

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61 ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

47. Hosp. designation 48. Freelancer’s encl. 49. Delights 51. High point 52. Airport alternative to JFK or LGA 53. Students take them in class 54. Words after a digression (or, with the exception of this answer’s final letter, a remark on this puzzle’s completed grid) 56. Wintry temps 57. Throng 58. Slightly 59. “____ are ...” 60. Really impresses 61. Barclays Center hoopsters

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TOWHO TO DO LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO AI M L A T E C A R O L S N U P J C T S S P F D A R Y U N H U O H N E S D O U MU A T AI V O O S N A R R A Y S D M EI R L S E O N W EA D N O W R I Q I O I N H H I R T A T H OW R T E A S A A O K T Y S O E D O E M E E K M CI U TT H T E O S S O O E O G U E S C H SI H I E R J SI M N E A T K A S E P N E N A E O J O E S I TL OL M E M D Y C D O O C R K S R E O Y B I N A E D O R N O E Z N O S Y P E XL A M K T E V A E T S R E TS E LS D A S RA M T LS L O A R S I A T B O T R H E S P H D O O H O O O G P O E S C T O H O E R E T A T R N N A N E D O A C D S AA R I TA P TI O L I S T T A E R M R I T C H O D C H TD AE N V W E S L O D D E Y S E S Y O E U SI N AE LS E S E E

DOWN

28. Cum ____ 29. Corp. shake-up 31. Exams with analytical reasoning parts: Abbr. 33. Naive 34. Big tournaments for university teams, informally 35. Sicken 38. Chews on, as a bone 39. They get you in 40. Not against trying 41. Like many Madonnas 42. Gave a keynote, say 43. Gets on 44. Overdo it in the sun 47. Caterpillar rival 50. Hamiltons 51. “What a relief!” 54. “Huh?” 55. Looking sickly

1. Bristles 2. Devoted follower 3. Keeps charging shots, say 4. Cleaning cloth 5. “Quantum Healing” author Chopra 6. Firm group: Abbr. 7. Actresses Saldana and Kazan 8. Finish 9. Allay 10. Haul (around) 11. 1991 Geena Davis title role 12. Add zest to 15. Cattle drive participant 17. “Semper Fidelis” org. 21. Fix, as a computer program 24. Tony Gwynn, throughout his career 27. Rich tapestry

© Puzzles by Pappocom

1 9 www.sudoku.com

Bell slogan) 24. Energy 25. Music genre 26. Battle cry 28. An Op-Ed piece written in defense of management, presumably? 30. Snookums 31. Nader’s 2000 running mate 32. One who takes a scalpel to a common cereal ingredient? 36. It comes with all the bells and whistles 37. Prego competitor 40. What a person is in after making a surprising discovery? 43. Rifles with tiny shots 45. Course listing 46. “Viva ____ Vegas!”

38

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1. “Tootsie” Oscar nominee 5. Stupefy 9. Educated guesses: Abbr. 13. Only country whose capital starts with “Q”: Abbr. 14. School recalled in Orwell’s “Such, Such Were the Joys” 15. Hidden store 16. Give a Kennedy a French kiss? 18. Milo of “The Verdict” 19. Mercedes models 20. 1974 Sutherland/ Gould spoof 21. Harps (on) 22. R&B singer with the hit “It’s All About Me” 23. “Live ____” (Taco

Image by NASA

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NAME WAS I WHERE

C G EA TI E RA M A O K S AC TO W T EB SO TY

Field Notes

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27

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ACROSS

11

18

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©2019 DAVID DAVID LEVINSON LEVINSON WILK WILK ©2015

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EASY#48 #3 HARD

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34  North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

6

9

By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

C

osmology is essentially a whodunnit but, unlike your typical 600-page detective yarn, this story doesn’t unfold clue by clue until the denouement in last few pages. The puzzle — basically, “How the hell can we explain our presence here?” — is more cryptic than ever. For all the thousands of brilliant minds working on the problem and despite deep-space observations and investigations into the tiniest atomic particles, we’re stuck. Notwithstanding all that science has revealed to us in the last 200-odd years, we’re still essentially blind, deaf and a mystery unto ourselves. By rights, we shouldn’t be here. Three models of the universe are victims of their own success: • Einstein’s 1915 General Theory of Relativity (“mass tells space-time how to curve and space-time tells mass how to move”) gives us gravity. It has passed every test (hundreds!) with flying colors. • The Standard Model of particle physics is based on quantum field theory, which took 40 years to assemble starting in the 1960s; it’s been tested to better than 10 parts in a billion. Finding the Higgs boson in 2013 only confirmed what we already knew. • The 100-year-old Big Bang scenario — we live in an evolving, expanding universe that began in an incredibly hot and dense state nearly 14 billion years ago — fits all our observations. Three self-consistent models, tested down to the finest details … except they’re mutually inconsistent. Nothing works to bring them into agreement. We need a bigger picture, a “Eureka moment,” to get us out of the doldrums in which we’ve been drifting for the past few decades. At this point, such a moment appears unlikely. To illustrate the extent of our ignorance, take the most obvious example: time. You’ll agree, I think, that past and future are different in every way — that is, time has an “arrow.” Cosmologists explain this by saying that the past is low entropy, an “unnatural”

ordered state (imagine all the air molecules in a room clustered into a small, dense ball); the future is high entropy: disorderly (as with air molecules spread randomly throughout the room). We’re now 14 billion years into randomness (fortunately, we live close to a low-entropy star that keeps us organized). Eventually, all the ordered bits of the universe will mush into a high-entropy featureless emptiness. The arrow of time, then, derives from the extremely low entropy state that the universe was in 14 billion years ago. The problem in trying to reconcile this with the Standard Model is that the laws of physics are indifferent for past and future. And — the crux of the whodunnit — nothing in the three models I outlined above explains how our ordered low-entropy early universe came about in the first place. Hence all the current wild speculation about multiuniverses (ours is one of an infinite number of universes); many worlds (all possible alternate histories and futures are real); the anthropic principle (we’re here, living in this life-friendly universe because we’re here); simulations (we’re self-aware bots created by a bored teenager on an iPhone 1000); Boltzmann brains (your self-awareness is a statistical fluke due to random fluctuations, nothing to do with evolution); multidimensionality (unseen dimensions exist beyond the four walls of our spacetime); etc. At this point, we have no way of checking such crazy ideas and perhaps never will. In the past we always had some sense which way to turn, where to find answers — or at least how to look for anomalies in our present theories. Today, that doesn’t seem to be the case. We have three beautiful and elegant models, each spectacularly successful, but with no clue how we might reconcile them. Welcome to stuck. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) can’t get over the fact that the 3-pound lumps of jelly we call “brains” can even conceive of this stuff.


Legal Notices

Continued on next page »

NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY AND IMPENDING DEFAULT Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3351, 3352 I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, State of California, certify as follows: That at close of business on June 30, 2019 by operation of law, any real property (unless previously tax-defaulted and not redeemed) that have any delinquent taxes, assessments, or other charges levied for the fiscal year 2018-19, and/or any delinquent supplemental taxes levied prior to the fiscal year 2018-19 shall be declared tax-defaulted. That unless the tax defaulted property is completely redeemed through payment of all unpaid amounts, together with penalties and fees prescribed by law or an installment plan is initiated and maintained; the property may be sold subsequently at a tax sale to satisfy the tax lien. That a detailed list of all properties remaining tax-defaulted at the close of business on June 30, 2019, and not redeemed prior to being submitted for publication, shall be published on or before September 8, 2019 That information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption of tax-defaulted property will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector at 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, California 95501 (707)476-2450. I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 13th, 2019. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 16th, May 23rd, & May 30th, 2019.

NOTICE OF IMPENDING POWER TO SELL TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3361, 3362 Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Code 3691 and 3692.4, the following conditions will, by operation of law, subject real property to the Tax Collector’s power to sell. 1) All property for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for five or more years. Note: The power to sell schedule for nonresidential commercial property is three or more years of tax-defaulted status, unless the county adopts, by ordinance or resolution, the five-year tax default schedule. 2) All property that has a nuisance abatement lien recorded against it and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. 3) Any property that has been identified and requested for purchase by a city, county, city and county or nonprofit organization to serve the public benefit by providing housing or services directly related to low-income persons and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. The parcels listed herein meet one or more of the criteria listed above and thus, will become subject to the Tax Collector’s power to sell on July 1, 2019, at 12:01 a.m., by operation of law. The Tax Collector’s power to sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed or made subject to an installment plan of redemption initiated as provided by law prior to close of business on the last business day in June. The right to an installment plan terminates on the last business day in June, and after that date the entire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale of the property at public auction. The right of redemption survives the property becoming subject to the power to sell, but it terminates at close of business on the last business day prior to the date of the sale by the Tax Collector. All information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501, (707)476-2450. The amount to redeem, including all penalties and fees, as of June 2019, is shown opposite the assessment/parcel number and next to the name of the assessee.

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2010, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2009-2010: ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 021-121-002-000 109-292-057-000 503-211-032-000 503-211-034-000 507-271-023-000 507-282-004-000 507-283-009-000 512-151-077-000 513-141-001-000 506-171-001-000

The Assessor’s Parcel/Assessment Number (APN/ASMT), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the Assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The Assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the Assessor’s office.

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $439.49 $1,195.82 $11,931.79 $317.43

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 004-012-004-000 200-264-001-000 220-191-029-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Fulton Gary O 924 Pine St, Eureka Rose Virginia K 203 Hansen Dr, Fortuna Whitmire Chad B & Jessica Berry Laura L 12600 Briceland-Thorn Rd, Whitethorn

109-341-010-000 218-021-008-000 313-203-021-000 313-241-014-000 505-182-002-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Tripp Robert W 3004 M St, Eureka Retherford T L & Z L 7077 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Maher Thomas J 574 Road C Rd, Garberville Goodman Robert H Jr & Brenna K D Goodman Robert H & Brenna K 7184 Fickle Hill Rd, Arcata Goodman Robert H Jr & Brenna K D No Situs, Arcata Santos Harla L & Mark D 1985 Zehndner Ave, Arcata

111-031-012-000 111-063-032-000 210-162-005-000

$4,299.42

303-091-098-000

$1,081.25

303-151-002-000

$8,379.18

303-151-003-000

$4,709.76

303-151-004-000

$6,263.08

303-191-048-000

$35,816.40

306-026-011-000 314-152-002-000 316-233-014-000

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $1,459.31

511-390-009-000

$5,923.27

526-101-015-000

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $11,220.47 $2,240.83 $6,543.92 $13,768.03

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 004-014-003-000 004-056-013-000 005-012-001-000 008-181-003-000 009-252-006-000 011-202-008-000

$2,327.37

015-131-016-000

$1,752.01

017-012-017-000

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2013, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2012-2013:

007-112-001-000 012-103-015-000

021-144-002-000 053-151-019-000 100-212-026-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Thompson Ray & Darline Annis Jean, Bannister Coleman R Linden Amy, Millis Jack B & Tom Thompson Ethel 1134 3rd St, Eureka Kirkpatrick Edward L No Situs, Eureka Kirk Eric V & Kirk-Levine Jana L 3551 N St, Eureka Thompson Raymond F & Darline M 1154 Vista Dr, Eureka Good Wine LLC 937 10th St, Arcata Smither Alvin D & Michelle A 353 1st Ave, Rio Dell Walworth Parker 1483 Rose Ave, Ferndale

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $2,585.34 $2,585.34 $1,982.96 $7,206.44 $6,296.13 $2,902.79 $16,367.72 $39,185.93 $19,697.86 $19,697.86 $14,392.65 $10,886.48 $35,972.23 $12,086.53 $9,526.37 $4,602.33

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2014, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2013-2014:

018-332-007-000

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 001-173-003-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS De-Martin Laura M 1602 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove De-Martin Laura M 1574 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove De-Martin Laura M 8642 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Fagundes Anthony E & Laura S Tarrant Russell V & Sharon K D 426 Parkview Rd, Shelter Cove Parvanov Vincent No Situs, Eureka Dillon Vicky 3510 Elk Ridge Rd, Redway Hunt Jamie S No Situs, Eureka Forster-Gill Inc Cr No Situs, Eureka Forster-Gill Inc Cr No Situs, Eureka Forster-Gill Inc Cr No Situs, Eureka Forster Gill Inc Cr No Situs, Eureka Banfill Shawlyn E & Flannery Richard A 420 Railroad Ave, Fields Landing Fulton Betty Joe Fulton Betty Joe 2017 Rev Family Trust 10641 Kneeland Rd, Kneeland Ochoa Aaron G No Situs Harmon Roger 4217 Douglas Ave, McKinleyville Andreoli Andrew L & Tamara L No Situs, Hoopa

$11,976.69

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2012, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2011-2012: ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 011-183-003-000

110-251-009-000

220-301-006-000

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2011, FOR TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR FISCAL TAX YEAR 2010-2011:

018-341-003-000

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L Christie John F No Situs, Arcata Bastian Bradley S 141 Eel Ct, Shelter Cove Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L Christie John F No Situs, Arcata Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L Christie John F No Situs, Arcata Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L No Situs, Arcata Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L No Situs Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L 6226 Wymore Rd, Arcata Christie John F & Betty L Tr 75 Anker Rd, Fieldbrook Daly Richard, Christie Family Trust Estate of John F Christie 725 Crannell Rd, Trinidad Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L 295 Jackson Ranch Rd, Arcata

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 110-251-007-000

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $5,033.71

025-161-008-000 033-031-019-000 033-051-018-000 052-011-002-000

$3,452.45

053-152-009-000

$9,105.07

053-161-010-000

$6,675.12

053-161-019-000

$47,772.85

053-161-021-000

$11,550.50

077-141-022-000

$7,997.38

108-033-026-000

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Manos Lawrence P 117 W Grant St, Eureka Smoker Sarah M, Marvin E Jr & Jason 615 W Del Norte St, Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J 805 H St, Eureka Olsen Norman S Jr & Joanne 3136 Oregon St, Eureka Jones Jessie M 3212 California St, Eureka Goff Janet L 1105 Hodgson St, Eureka Davis Robert E & Wendy K 1920 Hayden Ln, Eureka Scott John 3195 Montgomery St, Eureka Anderson Mark 4355 Ridgecrest Dr, Eureka Tellez Thomas A No Situs, Blue Lake Baassiri Giovanni O 60 Pepperwood Circle, Garberville Baassiri Giovanni O No Situs, Garberville Mcwhorter Kralicek Collyn L 510 Woodland Dr, Rio Dell Pollard Ralph D & Harriett F 216 1st Ave, Rio Dell Rio Dell Farmers Market LLC Co 108 Wildwood Ave, Rio Dell Rio Dell Farmers Market LLC Co No Situs, Rio Dell Rio Dell Farmers Market LLC Co 116 Wildwood Ave, Rio Dell Aquarian Rachael 143 Apple Ln, Redway Parker Leonard D 1120 Windy Ridge Ln, Ettersburg

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $13713.90 $2454.14 $201,816.42 $5262.35 $3893.13 $6060.55 $1401.93 $9837.61 $33,257.39 $22,562.29 $6,056.19 $3647.18 $7343.31 $2380.31 $1701.28 $492.91 $6943.48 $25,762.13 $25891.44

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

35


Legal Notices ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 109-041-001-000 109-041-003-000 109-042-004-000 109-081-049-000 109-081-053-000 109-151-025-000 109-161-038-000 109-183-026-000 109-221-017-000 109-231-020-000 109-251-004-000 109-251-024-000 109-291-002-000 109-302-052-000 109-311-027-000 109-321-003-000 109-351-019-000 109-351-055-000 110-021-024-000 110-041-010-000 110-041-011-000 110-041-018-000 110-051-015-000 110-121-033-000 110-251-026-000 110-261-045-000 111-021-002-000

Continued from previous page

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Dollarhide Kimberly 2344 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Dollarhide Kimberly 2320 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Silverado 10 Inc Cr 438 Beach Rd, Shelter Cove Peter Richard 173 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove Auyong Victor C G 172 Puma Dr, Shelter Cove Caceros Gracelyn I 1303 Telegraph Creek Rd, Shelter Cove Hand Roger D & Cathy Marchant Judith & Atkinson Carol 51 Whale Point Ct, Shelter Cove Silverado 10 Inc Cr 735 Spring Rd, Shelter Cove Exley Jesse R 138 Horseshoe Ct, Shelter Cove Fontanez-Pilon Irene & Flores Darlene 151 Lindley Loop, Shelter Cove Carrillo Phillip D 221 Oak Dr, Shelter Cove Perkins Memi C 29 Thistle Ct, Shelter Cove Tan Sherwin 341 Humboldt Loop Rd, Shelter Cove Lepenske Trevor 56 Beach Rd, Shelter Cove Piazza Michael E & Alison K 38 Beaver Ct, Shelter Cove Perlman Harold & Robbin L 7901 Shelter Cove Ct, Shelter Cove Fisher Frank P & Lupe 701 Upper Pacific Dr, Shelter Cove McDaniel Darrell A 288 Dolphin Dr, Shelter Cove Chakos Chris & Berg Lisa 7523 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Taylor Justine 98 Warden Ct, Shelter Cove Taylor Justine 99 Warden Ct, Shelter Cove E L & Associates Inc 146 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Lum Stanley 2963 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Reid Arlin & Denise 567 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Lindauer Robert 1585 Toth Rd, Shelter Cove Carrillo Phillip D 30 Forest Rd, Shelter Cove Heater Derrick L No Situs, Shelter Cove

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $3216.12

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 111-031-001-000

$ 3844.65

111-071-039-000

$4368.94

111-141-016-000

$2452.70

111-151-010-000

$1121.60

111-161-002-000

$2298.61

111-202-034-000

$5000.13

201-151-001-000

$4368.94 $3,003.39 $2403.29 $1456.32 $2863.25 $2499.70 $1597.05 $2848.46

201-232-001-000 202-102-008-000 205-271-022-000 206-091-016-000 207-161-002-000 207-161-010-000 208-071-030-000

$2342.94

209-241-001-000 209-241-002-000

$3848.53

211-276-005-000

$25274.09 $3170.08 $9540.34 $3544.15 $2121.64 $2522.65

212-041-001-000 212-192-001-000 214-201-033-000 214-211-003-000 214-211-006-000 216-023-011-000

$1685.84 $2646.87

216-322-003-000

$2515.73

216-382-028-000

$2558.28

216-391-008-000 217-163-001-000

INTRODUCING

217-241-006-000 218-051-003-000

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218-091-001-000 216-382-060-000 220-261-074-000 223-043-002-000 300-093-014-000 301-061-028-000 303-071-029-000

36  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Perlman Harold & Robbin L 8484 Shelter Cove Rd, Shelter Cove Lai Richard & Anthony 15 Salmon Ct, Shelter Cove Tine Richard J & Lisa A 50 Buckhorn Ct, Shelter Cove Puccio Dayami G 39 High Ct, Shelter Cove Green Aaron A & Nancy A 143 Landis Rd, Shelter Cove Colette Otto 176 Fawn Dr, Shelter Cove Khatua Chidananda No Situs, Shelter Cove Cruz Casey J & Desirae H 2606 Old State Hwy, Alton Macy Ty K & Mary M No Situs, Fortuna Combs Stephen K 31835 Ave Of the Giants, Scotia Lange Brenda J 190 Wilder Rd, Carlotta Agnew Ivan L & Beryl H Talsma Charles j & Blanche C No Situs, Carlotta Agnew Ivan L & Beryl H Talsma Charles J & Blanche C No Situs, Carlotta Johnson Dennis L 46255 St Hwy 36, Dinsmore Collenberg David A Collenberg David A No Situs, Pepperwood Trent Family Trust Trent Christopher W & Robin A 601 McCann Rd, McCann Van Den Branden Eric No Situs, Miranda Creech Edward E 98 Forest Grove Ln, Miranda Toborg Henry R & Levine Sharon M No Situs, Phillipsville Skillern Kisha No Situs, Phillipsville Skillern Kisha No Situs, Phillipsville Lasbury Chaytawn P & Contreras James C Branham Jody V & Sherainian Beccky 8911 Bell Springs Rd, Harris Glovin Amy J 6516 Bell Springs Rd, Harris Rodriguez Vicente 5100 Rancho Sequoia Dr, Alderpoint Green Martha F & Ponce Augustine Jr 2650 Rancho Sequoia Dr, Alderpoint Phelps Jesse & Bellach Tyson No Situs, Myers Flat Silva George F Jr No Situs, Blocksburg Kozak Anthony J 1657 Road A, Garberville Morse Charles F III Morse Charles F III Living Trust 810 Road M Rd, Garberville Anderson Mark A 5355 Rancho Sequoia Dr, Alderpoint Lines John M 1745 Perry Meadow Ln, Redway Cowling Kathleen No Situs, Garberville Arias Adalberto D 2050 Simmons Rd, Eureka Goff Timothy C S & Janet L 4611 Meyers Ave, Eureka Gustafson Kent 2014 Hazelwood Ln, Eureka

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $2328.38

ASSESSOR’S ASSESSMENT NO. 306-381-051-000

$4016.83

306-381-054-000

$3823.16

306-381-060-000

$9413.28

306-381-061-000

$881.55

306-381-062-000

$1352.64

306-381-063-000

$1224.75

306-381-064-000

$22661.55

306-381-065-000

$3093.98

400-031-027-000

$3817.56

500-041-014-000

$10122.76

503-031-001-000

$174.00

508-291-047-000

$174.00

511-131-058-000 511-301-005-000

$1012.25

513-151-032-000

$852.96 $852.96

513-190-014-000

$16785.60

516-111-028-000 522-332-004-000

$3661.76

522-351-003-000

$2022.22 $2885.41 $1335.86 $660.51 $20,806.25 $8496.59 $9038.95 $2220.74

522-391-017-000 526-291-010-000 529-171-042-000 531-085-012-000 532-055-009-000 534-141-021-000 215-300-006-000 215-300-007-000

$8351.06

301-082-079-000

$1434.12

005-053-005-000

$16307.70

510-281-034-000

$10928.39

011-191-006-000

$8347.53 $15948.66

ASSESSEE’S NAME & PROPERTY ADDRESS Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka Humboldt Hill Development LLC No Situs, Eureka James Darrell D 1969 Peerless Ave, Arcata Boberg Daniel 44 Wagon Jack Ln, Arcata Miller Dietrich B 1472 Chester Ave, Arcata Cain Jerry A & Cammi M 897 Knowles Ct, McKinleyville Barbagallo Alan A & Rita T 1625 Letz Ln, McKinleyville Christie Raymond F & Jennifer L 1371 Clam Beach Rd, McKinleyville Christie Ray & Jennifer L 5466 Dows Prairie Rd #A, McKinleyville Roberts Rick D & Susan J 1122 Ox Ln, Trinidad OBriain Jordan 221 Glenwood Dr, Blue Lake Huff Gale J 149 The Terrace, Willow Creek Hames Elmer J Hames Elmer J Living Trust 520 Delaney Dr, Willow Creek Trinity Enterprises Inc 315 Moccasin Dr, Willow Creek Catron Dorothy L No Situs, Hoopa Hamlin Ellen E Gault Alta E Estate of Gault Alta E Rev Trust of 2018 No Situs, Orleans Fryer Nicole R No Situs, Hoopa Graves Garland A No Situs, Orick Erickson Robert P No Situs, Orleans Bremer Lonny D & Pyle Richard A 16388 Briceland-Thorne Rd, Whitethorn Bremer Lonny D & Pyle Richard A 16400 Briceland-Thorne Rd, Whitethorn Smith Amber R & Paul R 4889 Starlund Ct, Eureka Chase Richard 1615 G St, Eureka Bazan-Suarez Jaime & Stein Lisa 985 Railroad Dr, McKinleyville Blank Christopher C & Carolyn Y 3332 K St, Eureka

AMT TO REDEEM BY JUNE 2019 $3497.02 $3306.50 $3446.31 $3319.35 $8563.00 $3649.25 $4131.85 $4652.46 $10132.13 $3385.21 $8975.20 $9191.40 $11166.44 $9649.20 $7679.30 $38131.20 $4739.90 $3301.56 $9685.09 $256.47 $1754.85 $721.69 $28,946.02 $820.88 $3754.75 $382.98 $1963.78 $146.47 $13459.24 $1701.67 $5458.86

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

$423.61 $3714.91 $6367.52 $4486.96

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 13th, 2019. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 16th, May 23rd, & May30th, 2019.


NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF J. WARREN HOCKADAY CASE NO. PR190088 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of J. WARREN HOCKADAY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner LISA K. HOCK− ADAY In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that LISA K. HOCKADAY be appointed as personal representative to admin− ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 6, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: William T. Kay, Jr. 628 H Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−445−2301 Filed: May 13, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−156)

or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: William T. Kay, Jr. 628 H Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−445−2301 Filed: May 13, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−156)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MICHAEL J. CONLEE CASE NO. PR180243 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MICHAEL J. CONLEE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner ABBIE L. WERTZ In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that ABBIE L. WERTZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 22, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for

affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. PETITIONER: Abbie L. Wertz 2231 Union Street Eureka, CA 95501 Filed: October 15, 2018 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/25, 5/2, 5/9 (19−128)

T.S. No.: 19-22131 A.P.N.: 203291-070 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 3/29/2012. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably esti− mated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor: SHEYNE DEMELLO AND MELISSA DEMELLO, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: Carrington Foreclosure Services, LLC Recorded 3/30/2012 as Instru− ment No. 2012−8152−13 in book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, Described as follows: "AS FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST" Date of Sale: 6/7/2019 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: At the front entrance to the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $222,229.67 (Estimated) Street Address or other common designa− tion of real property: 1522 NELEEN DR FORTUNA, CA 95540 A.P.N.: 203 −291−070 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incor− rectness of the street address or

resources, you should be aware 6/7/2019 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: that the same lender may hold At the front entrance to the more than one mortgage or deed County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale Eureka, CA 95501 Amount of Continued on next page » date shown on this notice of sale unpaid balance and other charges: may be postponed one or more $222,229.67 (Estimated) Street times by the mortgagee, benefi− PUBLISHED NOTICE OF Address or other common designa− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL tion of real property: 1522 NELEEN to Section 2924g of the California FORFEITURE DR FORTUNA, CA 95540 A.P.N.: 203 Civil Code. The law requires that On June 5th, 2014, Agents from the −291−070 The undersigned Trustee information about trustee sale Humboldt County Drug Task Force disclaims any liability for any incor− postponements be made available seized property for forfeiture in rectness of the street address or to you and to the public, as a cour− connection with controlled other common designation, if any, tesy to those not present at the substance violations, to wit, Section shown above. If no street address sale. If you wish to learn whether 11378 of the Health and Safety Code or other common designation is your sale date has been postponed, of California from the 1200 Block of shown, directions to the location of and, if applicable, the rescheduled G Street in Eureka, California. The the property may be obtained by time and date for the sale of this seized property is described as: sending a written request to the property, you may call (800) 758− $34,870.00 US currency and Control beneficiary within 10 days of the 8052 or visit this Internet Web site Number 14−F−42 has been assigned date of first publication of this www.Xome.com, using the file to this case. Use this number to Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is number assigned to this case 19− identify the property in any corre− unable to convey title for any 22131. Information about postpone− spondence with the Office of the reason, the successful bidder’s sole ments that are very short in dura− Humboldt County District and exclusive remedy shall be the tion or that occur close in time to Attorney. return of monies paid to the the scheduled sale may not imme− If your claim is not timely filed, the Trustee, and the successful bidder diately be reflected in the tele− Humboldt County District Attorney shall have no further recourse. If phone information or on the will declare the property described the sale is set aside for any reason, Internet Web site. The best way to in this notice to be forfeited to the the Purchaser at the sale shall be verify postponement information is State and it will be disposed of as entitled only to a return of the to attend the scheduled sale. Date: provided in Health and Safety Code deposit paid. The Purchaser shall 05/07/2019 Carrington Foreclosure Section 11489. have no further recourse against Services, LLC 1500 South Douglass the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−141) Road, Suite 150 Anaheim, CA 92806 the Mortgagees Attorney. If you Automated Sale Information: (800) PUBLISHED NOTICE OF have previously been discharged 758−8052 or www.Xome.com for SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL through bankruptcy, you may have NON−SALE information: 888−313− FORFEITURE been released of personal liability 1969 Vanessa Gomez, Trustee Sale On March 15th, 2019, Agents from for this loan in which case this Specialist the Humboldt County Drug Task letter is intended to exercise the 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−150) Force seized property for forfeiture note holder’s rights against the real in connection with controlled property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT PUBLISHED NOTICE OF substance violations, to wit, Section FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL 11378 of the Health and Safety Code A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING FORFEITURE of California from 531 South TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF On February 10th, 2019, Agents from Fortuna Boulevard in Fortuna, Cali− THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE the Humboldt County Drug Task fornia. The seized property is NOTE. ANY INFORMATION Force seized property for forfeiture described as: $4,800.00 US currency OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO in connection with controlled and Control Number 19−F−05 has THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL substance violations, to wit, Section been assigned to this case. Use this BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As 11351 of the Health and Safety Code number to identify the property in required by law, you are hereby of California from Hookton Road, any correspondence with the notified that a negative credit Loleta, California. The seized prop− Office of the Humboldt County report reflecting on your credit erty is described as: $6,349.00 US District Attorney. currency and Control Number 19−F− record may be submitted to a If your claim is not timely filed, the 03 has been assigned to this case. credit report agency if you fail to Use this number to identify the Humboldt County District Attorney fulfill the terms of your credit obli− property in any correspondence will declare the property described gations. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL with the Office of the Humboldt in this notice to be forfeited to the BIDDERS: If you are considering County District Attorney. If your State and it will be disposed of as bidding on this property lien, you claim is not timely filed, the provided in Health and Safety Code should understand that there are Humboldt County District Attorney Section 11489. risks involved in bidding at a trustee will declare the property described auction. You will be bidding on a 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−139) in this notice to be forfeited to the lien, not on the property itself. State and it will be disposed of as Placing the highest bid at a trustee PUBLISHED NOTICE OF provided in Health and Safety Code auction does not automatically SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL Section 11489. entitle you to free and clear owner− FORFEITURE 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−137) ship of the property. You should On March 16th, 2019, Agents from also be aware that the lien being the Humboldt County Drug Task auctioned off may be a junior lien. Force seized property for forfeiture PUBLISHED NOTICE OF If you are the highest bidder at the in connection with controlled SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL auction, you are or may be respon− substance violations, to wit, Section FORFEITURE sible for paying off all liens senior 11378 of the Health and Safety Code On July 19th,2018, Agents from the to the lien being auctioned off, of California from Summer Street in Humboldt County Drug Task Force before you can receive clear title to Eureka, California. The seized prop− seized property for forfeiture in the property. You are encouraged erty is described as: $8,686.00 US connection with controlled to investigate the existence, currency and Control Number 19−F− substance violations, to wit, Section priority, and size of outstanding 04 has been assigned to this case. 11352 of the Health and Safety Code liens that may exist on this prop− Use this number to identify the of California from the 1200 Block of erty by contacting the county property in any correspondence J Street in Eureka, California. The recorder’s office or a title insurance with the Office of the Humboldt seized property is described as: company, either of which may County District Attorney. $2,700.00 US currency and Control charge you a fee for this informa− If your claim is not timely filed, the Number 18−F−18 has been assigned tion. If you consult either of these Humboldt County District Attorney to this case. Use this number to resources, you should be aware will declare the property described identify the property in any corre− that the same lender may hold in this notice to be forfeited to the spondence with the Office of the more than one mortgage or deed State and it will be disposed of as Humboldt County District of trust on the property. NOTICE provided in Health and Safety Code Attorney. TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale Section 11489. 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−140) date shown on this notice of sale 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−138) may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, benefi− ciary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL  Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a cour−

37


Legal Notices

Continued from previous page

NOTICE INVITING BIDS 1. Bid Submission. The City of Fortuna (“City”) will accept sealed bids for its Countywide Accelerated Cure Slurry Project 2019 (“Project”), by or before June 13, 2019, at 2:00 p.m., at its City Hall office, located at 621 11th Street, Fortuna California, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. 2. Project Information. 2.1 Location and Description. The Project is located at various locations throughout the County of Humboldt and is described as follows: The work to be performed consists, in general, of mobilization, traffic control, preparation for and installation of accelerated cure slurry seal, removal of existing thermoplastic striping and installation of new thermoplastic striping and reflectors at various locations throughout the Cities and County of Humboldt. 2.2Time for Completion. The Project must be completed within 45 calendar days from the start date set forth in the Notice to Proceed. City anticipates that the Work will begin on or about July 30, 1019, but the anticipated start date is provided solely for convenience and is neither certain nor binding. 3. License and Registration Requirements. 3.1 License. This Project requires a valid California contractor’s license for the following classification(s): Earthwork and Paving. 3.2 DIR Registration. City may not accept a Bid Proposal from or enter into the Contract with a bidder, without proof that the bidder is registered with the California Department of Industrial Relations (“DIR”) to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5, subject to limited legal exceptions. 4. Contract Documents. The plans, specifications, bid forms and contract documents for the Project, and any addenda thereto (“Contract Documents”) may be downloaded from City’s website located at: http://www. friendlyfortuna.com. A printed copy of the Contract Documents may be obtained from Kevin Carter, Deputy Director of Public Works, at kcarter@ci.fortuna.ca.us. 5. Bid Security. The Bid Proposal must be accompanied by bid security of ten percent of the maximum bid amount, in the form of a cashier’s or certified check made payable to City, or a bid bond executed by a surety licensed to do business in the State of California on the Bid Bond form included with the Contract Documents. The bid security must guarantee that within ten days after City issues the Notice of Potential Award, the successful bidder will execute the Contract and submit the payment and performance bonds, insurance certificates and endorsements, and any other submittals required by the Contract Documents and as specified in the Notice of Potential Award. 6. Prevailing Wage Requirements. 6.1 General. Pursuant to California Labor Code § 1720 et seq., this Project is subject to the prevailing wage requirements applicable to the locality in which the Work is to be performed for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to perform the Work, including employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, apprenticeship and similar purposes. 6.2Rates. These prevailing rates are on file with the City and are available online at http://www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR. Each Contractor and Subcontractor must pay no less than the specified rates to all workers employed to work on the Project. The schedule of per diem wages is based upon a working day of eight hours. The rate for holiday and overtime work must be at least time and one-half. 6.3 Compliance. The Contract will be subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the DIR, under Labor Code § 1771.4. 7. Performance and Payment Bonds. The successful bidder will be required to provide performance and payment bonds, each for 100% of the Contract Price, as further specified in the Contract Documents. 8. Substitution of Securities. Substitution of appropriate securities in lieu of retention amounts from progress payments is permitted under Public Contract Code § 22300. 9. Subcontractor List. Each Subcontractor must be registered with the DIR to perform work on public projects. Each bidder must submit a completed Subcontractor List form with its Bid Proposal, including the name, location of the place of business, California contractor license number, DIR registration number, and percentage of the Work to be performed (based on the base bid price) for each Subcontractor that will perform Work or service or fabricate or install Work for the prime contractor in excess of one-half of 1% of the bid price, using the Subcontractor List form included with the Contract Documents. 10. Instructions to Bidders. All bidders should carefully review the Instructions to Bidders for more detailed information before submitting a Bid Proposal. The definitions provided in Article 1 of the General Conditions apply to all of the Contract Documents, as defined therein, including this Notice Inviting Bids. By: ___________________________________ Date: ________________ Siana Emmons, City Clerk Publication Date: May 16, 2019

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Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office. The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00242

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00258

The following person is doing Busi− ness as BAMBOOZLE

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SURPLUS TRANSPORT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEW GRANT PRINTS

Humboldt 2220 #A Baldwin St Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 212 X St Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 3610 Pryor Ct. #B Fortuna, CA 95540

Patricia Saunders 2220 #A Baldwin St Arcata, CA 95521

John F Ludington 420 3rd St #31 Eureka, CA 95501

Alec N Dale 1754 I St Eureka, CA 95501

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Patricia Saunders, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 12, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s John Ludington, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 18, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by bs, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Alec Dale, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 23, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

4/25, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−124)

4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−127)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00266

5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−113)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00269

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00246

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00265

The following person is doing Busi− ness as EMERALD FOREST RV AND CAMP− GROUND/TRINIDAD EXTENDED STAY RV PARK

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HOUSES OF MUSIC

The following person is doing Busi− ness as GLOBE PROPERTIES

Humboldt 1947 Eubanks Rd Garberville, CA 95542 P.O. Box 55 Whitethorn, CA 95589 Brody F. Fales 1947 Eubanks Rd Whitehorn, CA 95589

Humboldt 423 First Street Eureka, CA 95501 P.O. Box 952 Eureka, CA 95502

Humboldt 753 Patricks Point Dr Trinidad, CA 95570 Trinidad RV Investors, LP CA 201909800505 3511 Del Paso Road, Suite 160/147 Sacramento, CA 95834 The business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Elias Weiner, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 15, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS 310 F STREET, by sm, Humboldt County Clerk EUREKA, CA5/2,95501 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−132) (707) 442-1400 FAX (707) 442-1401

1947 Eubanks Rd Whitehorn, CA 95589 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brody Fales, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 23, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−112)

Globe Imports Ltd, Inc. CA 496208 423 First Street Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Robert P. Maxon, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 24, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−132)


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00277

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00280

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00286

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00295

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JONAH MADE IT

The following person is doing Busi− ness as CHINILU SYSTEMS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as 707 PRO−CLEANERS

The following person is doing Busi− ness as DANDARS BOARDGAMES AND BOOKS

Humboldt 316 W Grant Eureka, CA 95501

Humboldt 4497 Excelsior Rd Eureka, C 95503

Jonah W Simmons 316 W Grant Eureka, CA 95501

George H Mitchell 4497 Excelsior Rd Eureka, CA 95503 Marina T Mitchell 4497 Excelsior Rd Eureka, CA 95503

Humboldt 115 Samoa Blvd #20 Arcata, CA 95521 P.O. Box 531 Bayside, CA 95524

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jonah Simmons, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 30, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−149)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00278 The following person is doing Busi− ness as DONOVAN CAMP

The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s George H Mitchell, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 1, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−144)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00284 The following person is doing Busi− ness as WOODY RIDGE FARMS

Humboldt 1231 T St Eureka, CA Donovan V Camp 1231 T St Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Donovan Camp, Owner/Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 30, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−143)

LE GAL S ? 4 4 2 -1 4 0 0 ×3 1 4

Humboldt 1901 Old Briceland Rd Garberville, CA 95542 PO Box 231 Garberville, CA 95542 Woody Ridge Farm LLC California 201620710158 1901 Old Briceland Road Garberville, CA 95542 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s David Dickinson, Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 3, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by kt, Humboldt County Clerk 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−142)

Deanna Rogers The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Deanna Rogers, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 3, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (19−145)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 19−00293 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MOONSTONE IMAGES / KC TRAVEL Humboldt 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA 95570 Chantele J leatherwood 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA 95570 Stephen K Leatherwood 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Chantele Leatherwood, Co− Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 7, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by bs, Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−151)

Humboldt 1264 Giuntoli Lane Suite A Daniel A Gilkey Jr 1891 Wavecrest Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 Doranna R Benker Gilkey 1891 Wavecrest Ave McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Daniel A Gilkey Jr, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 8, 2019 KELLY E. SANDERS by sm, Humboldt County Clerk

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. R-1400598 The following person have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name TASTY TACOS AND MORE Humboldt 3943 Walnut Drive − Suite A Eureka, CA 95503 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on September 9, 2009 Rosa C Devere 3943 Walnut Drive − Suite A Eureka, CA 95503 This business was conducted by: An Individual /s/ Rosa C. DeVere This state was filed with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date May 7, 2019 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office s/ sc, Deputy Clerk Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−154)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARIA De JESUS PIMENTEL CASE NO. PR190094

your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with ona next page theContinued court and mail copy to the » personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Kenneth M. Bareilles Attorney at Law 533 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 707−443−0338 (office) 707−443−0923 (Home) Filed: April 29, 2019 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−133) who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR MARIA De JESUS PIMENTEL CHANGE OF NAME GREGORY 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−148) A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been ALLAN CHAFFIN CASE NO. filed by Petitioner JAVIER CV190340 SUPERIOR COURT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME PIMENTAL OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF STATEMENT 19−00302 In the Superior Court of California, HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. The following person is doing Busi− County of Humboldt. The petition EUREKA, CA. 95501 ness as for probate requests that JAVIER PETITION OF: ROOF RESTORATION & EXTE− PIMENTAL be appointed as GREGORY ALLAN CHAFFIN RIORS personal representative to admin− for a decree changing names as ister the estate of the decedent. follows: Humboldt THE PETITION requests authority to Present name 4591 Kjer Rd administer the estate under the GREGORY ALLAN CHAFFIN McKinleyville, CA 95519 Independent Administration of to Proposed Name Estates Act. (This authority will GREGORY ALLAN LINDBERG Corradini LLC allow the personal representative THE COURT ORDERS that all CA 201912610095 to take many actions without persons interested in this matter 4591 Kjer Rd obtaining court approval. Before appear before this court at the McKinleyville, CA 95519 taking certain very important hearing indicated below to show actions, however, the personal cause, if any, why the petition for The business is conducted by a representative will be required to change of name should not be Limited Liability Company. give notice to interested persons granted. Any person objecting to The date registrant commenced to unless they have waived notice or the name changes described above transact business under the ficti− consented to the proposed action.) must file a written objection that tious business name or name listed The independent administration includes the reasons for the objec− above on Not Applicable authority will be granted unless an tion at least two court days before I declare the all information in this interested person files an objection the matter is scheduled to be heard statement is true and correct. to the petition and shows good and must appear at the hearing to A registrant who declares as true cause why the court should not show cause why the petition should any material matter pursuant to grant the authority. not be granted. If no written objec− Section 17913 of the Business and A HEARING on the petition will be tion is timely filed, the court may Professions Code that the regis− held on May 23, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at grant the petition without a trant knows to be false is guilty of a the Superior Court of California, hearing. misdemeanor punishable by a fine County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth NOTICE OF HEARING not to exceed one thousand dollars Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. Date: June 7, 2019 ($1,000). IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 /s Carlos Coradines Flores, CEO the petition, you should appear at SUPERIOR COURT This statement was filed with the the hearing and state your objec− OF CALIFORNIA, County Clerk of Humboldt County tions or file written objections with COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT on May 10, 2019 the court before the hearing. Your 825 FIFTH STREET KELLY E. SANDERS appearance may be in person or by EUREKA, CA 95501 by sc, Humboldt County Clerk your attorney. Date: June 7, 2019 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−155) IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a Filed: June 7, 2019 contingent creditor of the dece− /s/ William H dent, you must file your claim with Judge of the Superior Court the court and mail a copy to the 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−135) personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2to 019a • NORTH COAST JOURNAL  date of first issuance of letters general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali−

39


Legal Notices ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JAMES MCLAIN PAIGE HARMONYGREGG CASE NO. CV190384 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JAMES MCLAIN PAIGE HARMONY−GREGG for a decree changing names as follows: Present name CHANEL ROSE MCLAIN to Proposed Name CHANEL ROSE GREGG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 21, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: May 3, 2019 Filed: May 3, 2019 /s/ Kelly S Neel Judge of the Superior Court 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (19−152)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JENNA LEE CHAFFIN CASE NO. CV190342 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501

and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may Continued from previous grant the petition without a page hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 7, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 7, 2019 Filed: June 7, 2019 /s/ William H Judge of the Superior Court 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−134)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JENNA LEE CHAFFIN CASE NO. CV190342 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: JENNA LEE CHAFFIN for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JENNA LEE CHAFFIN to Proposed Name JENNA LEE LINDBERG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 7, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 7, 2019 Filed: June 7, 2019 /s/ William H Judge of the Superior Court

appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 7, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: June 7, 2019 Filed: June 7, 2019 /s/ William H Judge of the Superior Court 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−136)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME RYAN CURTIS REQUEJO CASE NO. CV190319 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: RYAN CURTIS REQUEJO for a decree changing names as follows: Present name RYAN CURTIS REQUEJO to Proposed Name RYAN CURTIS MUIR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 31, 2019 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: May 31, 2019 Filed: Mary 31, 2019 /s/ Kelly L. Neel Judge of the Superior Court

PETITION OF: JENNA LEE CHAFFIN 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23 (19−134) for a decree changing names as follows: ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR Present name CHANGE OF NAME LAURA JENNA LEE CHAFFIN ELIZABETH LEE-CHAFFIN CASE to Proposed Name NO. CV190341 SUPERIOR JENNA LEE LINDBERG COURT OF CALIFORNIA, THE COURT ORDERS that all COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 persons interested in this matter FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 appear before this court at the PETITION OF: hearing indicated below to show LAURA ELIZABETH LEE−CHAFFIN 4/25, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16 (19−125) cause, if any, why the petition for for a decree changing names as change of name should not be follows: granted. Any person objecting to Present name the name changes described above LAURA ELIZABETH LEE−CHAFFIN must file a written objection that to Proposed Name includes the reasons for the objec− LAURA ELIZABETH LEE LINDBERG County Public Notices tion at least two court days before THE COURT ORDERS that all Fictitious Business the matter is scheduled to be heard persons interested in this matter and must appear at the hearing to Petition to appear before this court at the show cause why the petition should Administer Estate hearing indicated below to show not be granted. If no written objec− Trustee Sale cause, if any, why the petition for tion is timely filed, the court may Other Public Notices change of name should not be grant the petition without a granted. Any person objecting to hearing. 442-1400 ×314 the name changes described above NOTICE OF HEARING must file a written objection that Date: June 7, 2019 includes the reasons for the objec− Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 tion at leastMay two16, court before   NORTH 2019days • northcoastjournal.com SUPERIOR COURTCOAST JOURNAL • Thursday, the matter is scheduled to be heard OF CALIFORNIA, and must appear at the hearing to COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT show cause why the petition should 825 FIFTH STREET

LEGALS?

40

Employment

K’ima:w Medical Center

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262.

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

• • • EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in educa− tion in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportunities. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039.

Body, Mind & Spirit HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

Loving Hands Institute of Healing Arts

Est. 1979

State-licensed school of Massage Therapy Private Practice Finnish Sauna 725-9627

739 12th St. Fortuna

www.lovinghandsinstitute.com

• • • • • •

Community Health Representative (CHR), FT/Regular ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, May 21, 2019. Billing Office Manager, FT/Temporary ($18.77-24.40 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, May 21, 2019. Medical Biller (Patient Accounts Clerk I), FT/Regular ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, May 21, 2019. Medical Biller (Patient Accounts Clerk I), FT/Temporary ($13.75-17.87 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, May 21, 2019. Paramedic, FT/Regular ($12.00-15.00 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, May 16, 2019. Emergency Medical Technician-1, PT/Temporary and On-Call available, ($10.15-12.00 per hr DOE). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, May 16, 2019. Director of Nurses - DON, FT/Regular ($83,688-108,678 per yr DOE) Physician FT, Contract ($190,000240,000 per yr DOE) Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor, FT/ Regular ($39,600-51,500 per yr DOE)

All positions are open until filled, unless otherwise specified For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Employment Opportunities with Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation • • • • • •

DV/SA Prevention Specialist – Full Time Family Services Program Specialist – Full Time Natural Resources Director – Full Time Head Start Classroom Aide- Part-time (Substitute) Tribal Preschool Teacher- Full Time Guest Services Coordinator- Howonquet Village & Resort -Seasonal • Complete job descriptions can be found @ www.tolowa-nsn.gov/employment For more information please contact: Bonnie Slette Interim Human Resources Director Tolowa Dee-niʼ Nation 140 Rowdy Creek Rd, Smith River, CA 95567 707-487-9255 ext 1215 Bonnie.slette@tolowa.com


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open door

The City of Rio Dell Is now accepting applications for

NOW SEEKING:

($29,919 - $37,750 + Benefits)

 

Community Health Centers

Data and Reporting Analyst Open Door is developing its business intelligence capacity and is looking for team members who are passionate about transforming data and analytics into actionable information to support our patient centered mission. The Analyst provides and enhances a number of routine and ad hoc reports, develops and maintains dashboard summaries and supports training to users of business intelligence products. The Analyst will coordinate reporting efforts and facilitate data source development by proactively communicating across user groups to identify patterns, trends, problems or opportunities for improvements and efficiencies. The Analyst will demonstrate strong problem solving and analytical skills with an emphasis on team driven collaboration. 

Provides customer service to the public and complex support to the Finance Department. Position is time limited: June through September. This is a great way to get experience and earn a reference.

Position, entails reconciliation & coordinating of

Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue in Rio Dell, online at www.cityofriodell. ca.gov (bottom of the webpage) or call (707)7643532. Applications are due by Friday, May 24, 2019 at 5:00pm for first review.

APPLY TODAY!

opendoorhealth.com

YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350 #0991 Survey Specialist RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $30.19-39.39 OUF

#1041 JOM Tutors RG/FT WEAVERVILLE $30.19-39.39 OUF

#1078 Cultural Resource Specialist RG/FT KLAMATH $20.72-27.03 5/17/19

#1084 Outreach Counselor RG/FT KLAMATH $22.84-29.80 5/17/19

®

Contact a local recruiter: Adriana Barkhurst adriana.barkhurst.p1x2@statefarm.com 916-342-9383

#1086 Archive Technician #1092 HS Site Supervisor #1099 Admin Assistant II EDU RG/FT KLAMATH $16.91-22.06 5/17/19

#51 Fisheries Technician I(10) SEA/FT KLAMATH $13.68-19.86 5/17/19

#52 Interns (28) High School & College #56 Head Start Manager RG/FT KLAMATH $47,507-61,986 5/31/19

#58 Social Worker(2) State Farm, Bloomington, IL

Hiring?

#60 Wildland Fire Tech I/II TP/FT WEITCHPEC $13.68/15.22 5/17/19

#61 Engine Boss Post your job opportunities here. 442-1400 • northcoastjournal.com

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YUROK TRIBE JOB OPENINGS For information www.yuroktribe.org, hr@yuroktribe.nsn.us or 707-482-1350 Finance Director ANNUAL SALARY $88,608-115,613 Under administrative direction of the Executive Office and Tribal Council, plans, organizes and directs the activities and programs of the Fiscal Department. Provide professional assistance to management staff and Council on financial, procurement, risk management including insurance, investments, accounting, relevant policy development, and associated matters. EDUCATION EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT: A minimum of a BS and CPA/CMA. 10 years demonstrated knowledge of governmental and/or nonprofit accounting practices, preferably in a tribal government setting. Must have 5 years of experience in supervision. An MBA is a plus. Must be a seasoned and mature leader, with at least 12-15 years of broad finance experience in auditing, followed by experience gathering and evaluating financial information and making actionable recommendations to senior leadership.

TEMP YUROK TRIBE $15.22/16.91 5/17/19

RG/FT KLAMATH $25.12/27.56 5/24/19 1801187

Hours: Full Time Benefitted Location: HSU Campus, Arcata Deadline: May 28, 2019 • 5pm

RG/FT KLAMATH $15.22-19.03 5/17/19 RG/FT KLAMATH $21.23-27.70 5/24/19

Run a local business and be part of something that matters. Join the community of good neighbors as a State Farm agent. Visit statefarm.com/careers today.

Wage: $25-35.55/hr. DOE

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#1074 Construction Manager

Join the ambitious and caring.

county service region in Northern California.

For details visit: https://hraps.humboldt.edu/other-employment

RG/PT ALL AREAS $15.22-22.06 OUF default

reporting for State/Federal funders across a 36

Position is open until filled.

Positions Available in: Arcata For details and online applications, visit:

Financial Grant Analyst

TP/FT WEITCHPEC $22.84/25.12 5/17/19

EXCELLENT BENEFIT PACKAGE: VACATION: 12 days per year to start, Sick leave: 1 day per month with no limit, and 16 holidays. Insurance: Federal Employee Health Benefit, Life, Ameritas dental and vision (100% paid for employee and 70% paid for dependents). Retirement: 401(k) (3% match by employer). For more information go to www.yuroktribe.org or call (707) 482-1350 ext. 1376

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

41


Employment

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     

Looking for fun and friendly people to fill a variety of positions.

CURRENT JOB OPPORTUNITIES: Dishwasher, Line Cook, Server & Housekeeper Visit www.bluelakecasino.com to apply, see additional job listings and learn more about our company. default

           default

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                

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       

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   

 

    

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    

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       . default

                 

42  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

“Healthy mind, body and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community.”

New opportunities at United Indian Health Services! Help us continue toward our vision- A healthy mind, body, and spirit for generations of our American Indian Community. One way we work toward this goal is by being an integrated health organization. Our divisions include: Medical, Dental, Behavioral Health, Vision and Community Health and Wellness. We strive to bring members of the community together so they can not only be unified in ensuring the best care is provided to their families, but also help in preserving Native culture through education, community outreach, and medicine. UIHS offers an excellent work life balance. Our clinic is open Monday through Friday, from 8 am-5 pm. Fulltime employees enjoy 3 weeks of paid time off per year, as well as 11 paid Holidays. Other benefits include: comprehensive health care plans for individuals and families, 4% matched retirement plans, and loan repayment programs.

Current employment opportunities:

Substance Abuse Counselor (FT) Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Prevention (FT) Clinical Nurse- RN (FT) Health Promotion & Education Specialist (FT) Our job application and all of our open opportunities with full job descriptions are on our website unitedindianhealthservices.org/jobs Email application, cover letter and resume to UIHS-Recruiting@crihb.org Serving the Native American Community since 1970. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given.


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CAREGIVERS NEEDED NOW! Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200−$4000+ a month. Call Sharon for more information at 707−442−4500 ext 16 or visit www.mentorswanted.com to learn more.

CITY OF FORTUNA

CHIEF TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR

CRESTWOOD BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER is looking for a licensed art, dance, music, recreation, or occupational therapist to oversee the Recreation program at our mental health residential facility. Please contact Campus Administrator Robert Pitts for more details about this wonderful opportunity − 707−442−5721 x11060 or email at rpitts@cbhi.net

59,153 - $71,968/yr, Full-Time

$

Under the general direction of the Director of Public Works, to supervise and perform a variety of administrative, operational, control, and maintenance functions in the City’s water and wastewater treatment and pumping systems; supervise and perform laboratory testing and sample collection; supervise and perform a variety of work at all levels in the maintenance, repair, and construction of water and wastewater treatment and pumping systems. High School diploma or GED required. Possession of Grade III Wastewater Operator certificate (or higher) from SWRCB is desired, Grade II Water Treatment Operator certificate (or higher) from SWRCB is required at time of hire. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, 725-7600. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm Friday, June 7, 2019.

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Join the team!                    

UNDERWRITING REPRESENTATIVE Community radio station KMUD seeks an Underwriting Representative. Hours: 24−32/week Pay Scale: Hourly wage + commission Must possess passion for generating new business, and be profi− cient on both Windows and Mac computers, excel and billing soft− ware. Full job description at kmud.org Submit resume to hiring@kmud.org Deadline: Friday, May 17th kmud.org default

   

     

 ASSOCIATE TEACHER, Willow Creek     

The Executive Operations Assistant position is responsible for Administrative, Volunteer and Event Support. This position is under the direction of the Executive Director and acts as the support staff member for all functions in the Sequoia Park Zoo Foundation Office. QUALIFICATIONS: • Excellent writing and verbal communication skills • Must be detail-oriented with excellent organizational and multi-tasking abilities • Experience using Word, Excel, Google calendars, Outlook and general database management • Ability to work on several projects simultaneously and deliver to deadlines • Ability to work weekends and evenings for special events • Personal vehicle and valid driver’s license required Full job description can be found at: sequoiaparkzoo.net COMPENSATION: This is a 30 hours/per week position with potential for full time, beginning salary $15.00-$17.00 an hour. TO APPLY: Please email cover letter and resume to leigh@sequoiaparkzoo.net or by mail to Sequoia Park Zoo Foundation, ATTN: Leigh Pierre-Oetker P.O. Box 123, Cutten, CA 95534

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THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL IS SEEKING

DISTRIBUTION DRIVERS

TEMPORARY  ASSISTANT, Eureka           

Wednesday afternoon/ Thursday morning routes in

Arcata • Fortuna/Ferndale Willow Creek/Hoopa Must be personable, have a reliable vehicle, clean driving record and insurance. News box repair skills a plus.

Contact Melissa

707.442.1400 melissa@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

43


(707) 443-4861

7th & D Street,

Eureka

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YOUR ONLY FULL SERVICE GM DEALERSHIP ON THE NORTH COAST WWW.NORTHWOODCHEVY.COM 44  NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com


WE WANT YOUR TRADE PAID FOR OR NOT!

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2015 Cadillac ATS

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2018 Cadillac CTS 3.6 Premium Luxury

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See our INVENTORY ONLINE: www.mckinleyvillechevrolet.com

WE BUY CARS

All advertised prices excludes government fees and taxes, any finance charges, and any emission testing charge. On approved credit. Ad exp. 5-31-19

Hours: 9AM-6PM & 11AM-4PM Monday–Saturday

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Sunday

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

45


Marketplace Clothing THE COSTUME BOX Costume Rental & Sales Ben Nye Make−up, Wigs Festival, Unique Sale Rack Dress−up Party Venue 202 T St. Eureka 443−5200

Merchandise NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN)

Miscellaneous A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1−855−993−2495 (AAN CAN)

Real Estate

Continued from page 43

AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE − Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assis− tance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800−725−1563 (AAN CAN) CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1−866−535− 9689 (AAN CAN) CELLO, BOW AND CASE FOR SALE. Cello−−Roman Teller (German) 1971. Bow−− Morgan Anderson, 1985. Case−−BAM Classic, 2010. Great buy on set of all three −−$5000. 707−273−5075.

Employment

Full-Time Positions Available Registered Dental Assistant • This position performs a variety of back office duties, including chair side assisting, sterilization, x-rays and child sealants. Applicants must be able to work in a fast-paced environment that requires managing multiple tasks simultaneously.

DO YOU OWE MORE THAN $5000 iin tax debt? Call Wells & Associates INC. We solve ALL Tax Problems! Personal, Busi− ness, IRS, State and Local. "Decades of experience"! Our clients have saved over $150 Million Dollars! Call NOW for a free consultation. 1−855−725− 5414. (AAN CAN) KILL ROACHES−GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets, Sprays, Traps, Concentrate. MOST EFFECTIVE! Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN) OXYGEN − ANYTIME. ANYWHERE. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All−New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 877−459−1660 (AAN CAN) LINEN SALE: SHEETS, BLAN− KETS, PILLOWS, CURTAINS, RUGS, TALBECLOTHS & TOWELS ALL 50% OFF Plus: Monday Munchies, Senior Discount Tuesdays, Spin’n’Win Wednesdays, New Sale Thursdays, Friday Frenzy & Secret Sale Satur− days. Where your shopping dollars support local youth! Dream Quest Thrift Store May 9−15. (530) 629−3006.

WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com default

$

199,000

Time to own some country property? (North Hoopa) Many new fruit and nut trees, many varieties of perennial flowers, gardens galore and best of all, an approx. acre fully fenced and on Mill Creek for that summer dip. Sun, soil and water... a recipe for fresh food. Private and the sound of the creek to quiet the soul. Two dwellings (one rented) each with 1 bedroom and 1 bathroom. Just off Hwy 96 at the north end of Hoopa and near the Trinity River. Contact Ottavio 707-677-3125 or Kahish 707-845-5703

Auto Service

Housing default

ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie 839−1518.

Medical Assistant • Fun, friendly and fast-paced clinic needs a fulltime Medical Assistant. Successful candidates will have good computer skills and be able to work in a team environment with patients who have a variety of healthcare needs. Will train those motivated to learn. Must have at least one year of experience working in a healthcare environment. Experienced, Certified Medical Assistant or • Phlebotomy Tech preferred.

F O R SA L E BY OWNER

Computer & Internet

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,900, 2 pers. $23,900; 3 pers. $26,900; 4 pers. $29,850; 5 pers. $32,250; 6 pers. $34,650; 7 pers. $37,050; 8 pers. $39,450 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Musicians & Instructors

           



BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419.

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

RRHC is an EOE and offers a flexible schedule, 4-day work week, competitive compensation. Health benefits, paidtime off and retirement match available for full and part-time employees. Applications are available on our website www.rrhc.org or 101 West Coast Rd, Redway or email to btaylor@rrhc.org for RDA and awallan@rrhc.org for MA.

Other Professionals default

CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys, Festivals, Events & Parties (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

Let’s Be Friends

707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

Serve your community while engulfing yourself in the stunning, natural beauty of Southern Humboldt County in Northern California.

YOUR AD HERE

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • northcoastjournal.com

Hiring?

442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Other Professionals OFFICIANT Celebrating Life’s Important Moments WEDDINGS, ELOPEMENTS CELEBRATIONS OF LIFE Denise L. Ryles, Officiant 707−443−5200

    

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Kyla Tripodi

Katherine Fergus

Owner/ Land Agent

Owner/Broker

Realtor

Realtor

Realtor

BRE #01930997

BRE #01956733

BRE #01919487

BRE #02044086

BRE #01332697

707.834.7979

707.601.1331

707.362.6504

530.784.3581

Charlie Tripodi

707.476.0435

GARBERVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $149,000

5419 WALNUT DRIVE, CUTTEN - $369,000

TING!

4 bedroom, 2 ½ bathroom home featuring glass front gas fireplace, 2 car garage (with work bench), RV parking, and more!

HARRIS – LAND/PROPERTY - $2,590,000

HAWKINS BAR – LAND/PROPERTY - $119,000

±1.45 Acres in Trinity Village. Stunning views w/flat building sites. OWC with 50% down.

TING!

±120 Remote acres 2 mi from Honeydew store. Newer manufactured home, year-round creek, timber, and flats. Needs development.

DINSMORE – HOME ON ACREAGE - $499,000

±15 Acre riverfront w/ pond, 2 /2 home, 2/1 guest cabin, patio, shop, gardens & greenhouse.

HONEYDEW – LAND/PROPERTY - $395,000

±159 Acres located in Panther Gap area with developed water system, and existing flats.

INDIAN ISLAND – LAND/PROPERTY - $99,000

±120 acres w/ three cabins nestled in the hills of Salmon Creek w/orchards, water sources, solar, and much more!

±160 Acres surrounded by NFS land w/ meadows, a mix of oak and fir timber, cabin & outbuildings, pre-existing ag infrastructure.

NEW LIS

HONEYDEW – HOME ON ACREAGE - $895,000

SALMON CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $749,000

RUTH – LAND/PROPERTY - $250,000

916.798.2107

±40 Acre remote parcel with interim permit for 9,606 of mixed light cultivation, cabin, green houses, and more!

Huge development potential on ±7.2 Ac near HSU and Arcata Community Forest w/ access to comm. services.

±2.6 Acre parcel w/ useable flats ideal for building your dream home!

BRE # 02084041

SHOWERS PASS – LAND/PROPERTY - $479,000

ARCATA – LAND/PROPERTY - $699,000

WESTHAVEN – LAND/PROPERTY - $235,000

Realtor/ Commercial Specialist

±160 Acres on 3 parcels w/ permitted cultivation space, RRR space, multiple homes, outbuildings, wells, water tanks, and much more!

±6 acre turn key farm w/State & County Interim permit for 20k OD and 4k ML! Complete with PG&E, community water, pots & greenhouses!

±80 acres w/State approved and County stamped permit for 19,370 sq ft ML and 6,400 sq ft OD cultivation space!

Mike Willcutt

±160 Acres of private land with beautiful views, timber, creek access, and conveniently located off Forest Service Road.

ALDERPOINT – LAND/PROPERTY - $719,000

FERNDALE – LAND/PROPERTY - $1,100,000

Hailey Rohan

HYAMPOM – LAND/PROPERTY - $220,000

±3.66 acres above the golf course in Benbow. Community water at building site and power very close as well. NEW LIS

Tyla Miller

Unique property with a one bedroom cabin. Boat accessible only. Property has no utilities.

BRIDGEVILLE – LAND/PROPERTY - $499,000

±40 Acre remote parcel with interim permit for 9,606 of mixed light cultivation, cabin, green houses, and more! NEW LIS

TING!

HONEYDEW – LAND/PROPERTY - $225,000

22 Acre Honeydew treasure! Interim cultivation permit exp 12/31/18. RRR app for 20K sf, initiated in 2016.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, May 16, 2019 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL 

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