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thursday oct. 17, 2013 vol XXIV issue 42 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

7 Making Macktown tick 8 A league of their own 20 Welcoming wildlife 23 3 Foods, 2 owners 28 Tiny Universe Boogaloo 32 Dull Machete


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem October and it may have rained

7 News mack lovin’

9

The Week in Weed the high court

10 Blog Jammin’ 14 On The Cover ruins

19 Home & Garden Service Directory

20 Down & Dirty providing water for wildlife

22 McKinleyville Arts Night friday, oct. 18, 6-8 p.m.

23 Table Talk

two new owners for 3 foods cafÉ

24 Music & More! 28 The Hum burying the needle

29 Calendar 32 Filmland phillips thrills, machete is dull

34 Workshops 38 Field Notes embellishing english

39 Sudoku 39 Crossword 39 Marketplace 42 Body, Mind & Spirit 42 Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Oct. 17, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 42

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/news editor Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman graphic design/production Miles Eggleston, Lynn Jones general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Kim Hodges kim@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions manager Drew Hyland office manager Carmen England bookkeeper/receptionist Meadow Gorman maIl/OffIce:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONe: 707 442-1400 faX: 707 442-1401

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Sweasey dam. Photo by Grant Scott-Goforth

Oh, Dan Editor: Wow. I really wish I hadn’t read the recent article about Dan Johnson in the Oct. 10 edition of the Journal (“Meet Dan Johnson”). Before Mr. Johnson’s plagiarism issue unfolded, I knew that he was a local developer, a Rotarian, a soccer coach and generally seemed like a decent enough guy. But now I know that in Mr. Johnson’s world he doesn’t know how to “own” a mistake, he tends to lie, is conveniently forgetful, likes to throw f-bombs when making a point, follows the “tried and true” political strategy of never explaining oneself or admitting guilt and if pressed on an issue goes into “freaking winner” attack mode to divert attention away from oneself and play the victim. A simple sorry followed by acknowledgement of the true speech writer and perhaps how he and his wife were so impressed by the original speech that he chose to use it for his own daughter’s graduation could have sent the current situation down a different road. The only positive that I have garnered from this recent local drama is that while Mr. Johnson may not know the definition of plagiarism, both of my kids who are Arcata High students now know exactly what plagiarism is as well as the embarrassing outcomes that can result from it. Dennis Houghton, Eureka Editor: I first got to meet Dan Johnson as a defenseless seventh-grader at Zane Jr. High in the late 1970s. He and his friends liked to stuff me in a garbage can (popularly known as “canning”) behind the gym on a seemingly regular basis. As a defenseless, smaller kid I could do nothing but scream. They made my life hell. Surprisingly, I was able to reach him on the phone at his office last week, but he conveniently could “not recall” me or the incidents. He seems to not recall a lot. “They talk about bullying in high school... ,” Mr. Johnson said in the Journal’s article. Well he was a bully way before that. Ken Harper, Eureka Editor: Dan Johnson claims not to be a “goddamned politician” but he clearly has what it takes to be one, including a win-at-allcosts attitude, a highly selective memory, a knack for obfuscation, unbridled arrogance, delusions of self-importance, the belief that the rules don’t apply to him and really bad grammar. He kinda reminds me of Dubya, only cruder. I think he should resign from the school board if only because his many talents are being wasted there and could be put to much better use in a higher elected office. Dan for President! Ken Burton, Eureka

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Cartoon by joel mielke

Editor: Dan Johnson gets front page coverage, a good article, both sides of the man. The original families still rule this town, don’t they? What I see is Danco is the name on so many of the new constructions. Danco knows who to talk to in planning and zoning. Danco is working the federally subsidized affordable housing (no wonder the Republicans squawk). Danco is planning big subdivisions that will be what makes us look like Santa Rosa. Yet if a regular guy wants to build a simple little house that will be truly affordable, he will be up against a bureaucracy that will confuse, delay, frustrate and double the cost of his project. This is what the planners should be seriously looking at. My dad built houses in the ‘50s. All that was required was an electrical and a septic permit. I don’t believe the layers of costly requirements we face today have really

improved houses. It means that only the Dan Johnsons can afford to build. So we limit the creativity of our community, and have a severe affordable housing crisis. Jessica Bittner, Bayside Editor: When I was a young lad my grandfather offered some advice that went something like this: “Go ahead and let people think you are stupid. Don’t open your mouth and prove it.” This principle is really just the intersection of human behavior and the laws of probability. I think about this advice far more than anyone should have to. For all the many gifts Carl Johnson gave his grandson to get a jump start on life, young Dan would have been better served by the wisdom of my granddad. Glen Nagy, Arcata

Editor: Your piece about school board member Dan Johnson seems to suggest that his business history, his family and the “fiery glint” in his October and it may have rained once or twice but I have eye can offer human context to been flushed hot in a tee shirt on the Trinidad dock his plagiarism. But here’s the problem: at the blessing of the crab fleet on a Thanksgiving Johnson seems to think he’s the morning We never really know and you wouldn’t one who’s been victimized and think it but the rain comes slowly like fog the grayness bullied. At the end of the armoving quietly steady a snail fog a slug fog that can’t ticle, Johnson asks, “I mean, who really owes who an apology?” overtake summer all at once. Lingering Summer plays The correct answer? You, Dan with us, tantalizing and I told you the blackberries are Johnson, owe David McCullough bursting in their desire to be popped into a wet mouth Jr. an apology. Plagiarism is theft, and the Wellesley High English IN OCTOBER Whatever autumn maidens waving teacher — who is currently on orange woven scarves across the face of the moon leave writing a book based, ironithe bats and owls out and the night grows cool with cally enough, on the speech you their enchantment with their taking of the light but the stole from — deserves a public apology. If the situation had been sun stays in the afternoon it stays screaming riotous reversed, and McCullough had bright in the midst of its retreat to other parts of other stolen your words, he would have worlds. been subject to disciplinary ac— Stephanie Silvia tion. He could have possibly lost


his job. It is doubly ironic that McCullough’s father is a famed historian and writer — in that field, acts of plagiarism can end “Nice shaker where we are in Dow’s careers and destroy reputations. It may be no big deal to Mr. Prairie. Didn’t last long. Never left my Johnson, but it doesn’t follow desk.” that it’s no big deal. — Susan Fox, commenting on last week’s quake Mr. McCullough Jr. will, on the Journal’s Facebook page. at the very least, have a fun bit of curriculum to help his students understand the problems plagiarism can create, “boyweb of lies he told to the NCJ article — ish good looks” notwithstanding. and again, he has no one to blame but Maja K Hanson, Arcata himself. One last note: Dan Johnson may be a Editor: good family man, a smart businessman, a After reading Ryan Burns’ excellent article kind friend, but in his capacity as trustee, on Dan Johnson, there are several relevant the public has trusted him for his sound points that come to mind. First, in spite of judgment and good character. To say the Johnson’s attempts to deflect the plagialeast, Johnson has not shown either in this rism, he’s the only one responsible for using self-created fiasco. If he won’t resign, then David McCullough Jr.’s “You Are Not Special” folks who have the opportunity to vote in speech without crediting the author. the next election should show him the door. He’s also the one who worsened the David Holper, Eureka situation by disappearing from public view for a number of weeks following the event, only to emerge and make a national spectacle of himself by blaming “the selfLast week’s story on the General Plan appointed referees of good and evil.” Update (“Disputed Principles”) stated that When his fellow trustees voted 3-1 that 3rd District Supervisor Mark Lovelace was he resign, he wouldn’t listen to his own colpushing for increased restrictions on releagues on the Northern Humboldt Union source lands. Specifically, he was arguing to High School District board of trustees. And restrict resource land subdivisions. now, he’s gotten caught in a rather sticky •

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884 9th Street, Arcata • (707) 822-2965 northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Above: Jim Bent and his family. From the left: daughter, Melanie; son, Conor; wife, Claire who was the original vocalist in the band and Jim.

Band members from left to right: Ron Perry, Jim Lahman, Jenner Cohune, Jim Bent and Stephen Phines.

Murphy’s Supports Local Talent “The Jim Lahman Band played at my birthday party,” says Jenner Cohune. “They let me sing a song and then asked me to join the band!” Jenner is named in honor of Jenner By The Sea in Sonoma County which, as a side note, was the filming location of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie “The Birds.” But that was back in 1963 and Jenner wasn’t around just yet. The band has gained and lost members over the years and it looks like they now have the perfect mix of talent and they all love Murphy’s Markets! Is Murphy’s the key to musical genius in blues, funk, jazz and rock & roll?

Jim Lahman earned money for his first guitar working as a farm boy. He has been learning and studying the intricacies of the instrument since he was nine years old. Stephen Phines is one of the band’s voices and also plays the allimportant bass in the band. He’s the dude in the hat! He attended school in San Clemente, which is a bit further on down the Pacific coast from Humboldt. Ron Perry is the paramount harmonica man and adds to the band’s vocal sound, says, “I have ridden my bike to Murphy’s all my life. My daughter Rachel works there now.”

Jim Bent, the band’s drummer, says, “I have been shopping at Murphy’s since 1985. Claire, my wife, was the original vocalist in the band.” Claire and Jim also work together in their business, Jim Bent Upholstery. The Jim Lahman Band plays regularly at Shamus T Bones, The Logger Bar, Arts Alive! and all sorts of gigs around town. Keep an eye out for their next performance on Facebook and go take a swing around the dance floor! After picking up groceries at Murphy’s, of course!

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

The Jim Lahman Band

By Colleen Hole, Advertising North Coast Journal


Mack Lovin’

McKinleyville candidates talk pot, cops and growth By Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com

T

he upcoming off-year election is kicking up a bit of dust in McKinleyville, that unincorporated burg of 15,000 where horses, its motto proclaims, have the right of way. Four people are trying to squeeze into three seats on the McKinleyville Community Services District — three incumbents and one retired professor who hope to have a chair when the music stops on Nov. 5. Candidates say the district is facing several issues: a lack of community interest, the board’s thorny attitude, marijuana growers and the long-debated direction of McKinleyville’s growth. Up for re-election are Dennis Mayo, a rancher and the current board president; Bill Wennerholm, a chiropractor who has served on the board for 12 years; and David Couch, a wastewater operator elected in 2009. Running for the first time is George Wheeler, a retired Humboldt State computer information sciences professor. Since McKinleyville has no city government, the services district offers some of the only local control. It delivers water and sewer services to McKinleyville homes and businesses, maintains parks and streetlights, and offers some library services. Other community services, like planning and law enforcement, are handled by the county. Whether the district should expand its powers (it could, with funding) or if the community should become a city have been talking points for years. Put simply: More services require more money. And more money requires residents’ approval of a funding plan — increased property taxes, bond measures or sales taxes. Candidates differ on whether the district’s services should expand — but they all believe that McKinleyville’s voters aren’t keen on raising the costs of living there, even if it meant additional services. Wheeler, who’s running for public office for the first time, wants the services district to build a solar farm to cover the its energy costs and, in the long-term, sell

electricity. “Then we’d be arguing over what to do with the money instead of whether to raise rates again,” he said. Wennerholm, who’s been a services director longer than any other board member, said the district has already evaluated — and rejected — the idea of using solar power because the project didn’t make financial sense. “If you’re going to promise something, at least understand what the board has the ability to deal with,” he said. Wheeler likes the idea of having sheriff’s deputies dedicated to patrolling McKinleyville — which he said could be done for $1.50 a month charged to each McKinleyville home. Give that money to the county, get a couple of cops in exchange. Wheeler hopes the idea will resonate with older voters. But Dennis Mayo said that was a rosy figure. “That much money is only providing the deputies — not the cars or the training or the equipment or the dispatchers or the workman’s comp.” Wennerholm said it would change the policing dynamic of the community as well, possibly leading to less law enforcement response when the dedicated deputies were off duty. “People sit and they figure on their little pads,” he said. “The reality is, it’s 24 hours a day. It’s a lot of overhead and infrastructure which we’re not set up for.” Meanwhile, eyes in McKinleyville are focusing on a new electricity-usage tax in neighboring Arcata, which targets indoor marijuana growers. People in McKinleyville — and other cities and suburbs around the county — fear that the higher costs of growing in Arcata will lead to an exodus, and growers will swarm in elsewhere. So what can be done? Not much, agreed the candidates. It’s up to the county to implement a similar tax in hopes of discouraging growers, who are already a problem for the services district. “McKinleyville probably has more indoor growers than Arcata does,” Wennerholm said. The district has the power to deal with industrial sites that can overburden waste-

water treatment, but no similar recourse for household growers whose nutrients and chemicals can inundate McKinleyville’s wastewater plant. Then there’s the future of McKinleyville’s development. The relationship with county planners has been somewhat strained since the county earmarked some McKinleyville land for affordable housing. “That was really universally unpopular in McKinleyville,” Couch said, but he’s ambivalent about the services district spending the money to create its own planning department. Mayo said the district already plays a role in development. “We can be and are a major part of planning, in that we provide the essential services.” Wheeler took no stand on the financial part of the planning issue, but added that “people in McKinleyville should have the final word on what’s built in McKinleyville.” The services district has somewhat of a prickly reputation. During his 2009 campaign, Couch told the Journal that the board was “rude to people.” That’s being brought up again this year by Wheeler, the non-incumbent. When he came to the board several years ago with concerns about herbicides being used on a nearby lot, Wheeler said, he was met

with a difficult and “draconian” process to get his concerns taken up by the board. With that issue resolved, he wants to attract people to meetings by making them more fun — or at least more accommodating. Even the physical layout of the meetings — the staff with its back to the public, a podium blocking view of the directors — excludes the public, Wheeler said. “It’s not laid at the feet of any specific board member,” he said, it’s just an attitude of the board he’d like to see change. “Open up this circle-the-wagons thing that’s going on.” But Wennerholm said community members aren’t attending board meetings because they’re happy with the way things are going. “When there’s not a squeaky wheel nobody’s looking at it.” Several recent issues — water fluoridation and a community skate park — have brought the public to district meetings in decent numbers, but attendance typically hovers around two people. With more projects on the horizon, including a $10 million wastewater treatment plant and creation of a riverside park off North Bank Road, Couch and Wheeler said they’d like to see more participation. ●

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Lonely Crustaceans

Every other team in the Far West League left without warning the Humboldt Crabs By Ryan Burns

ryanburns@northcoastjournal.com

W

as it something we said? The Humboldt Crabs appears to be the only team left in the Far West League after its three collegiate summer league-mates — the Menlo Park Legends, the Neptune Beach Pearl and the Walnut Creek Crawdads — joined the Santa Barbarabased California Collegiate League last week. Crabs officials only found out about the mass exodus by reading the news on the other teams’ Facebook pages, said Vikki Rossi, the Crabs’ acting president. There were follow-up emails from the organizations, at least, so the Crabbies aren’t being completely shunned. Rossi said she doesn’t know why the teams switched leagues, but she doesn’t expect it to hurt the Crabs’ 2014 season. Schedules had already been set for the organization’s 70th anniversary season, and the Legends, Pearl and Crawdads — among other regular opponents — have all agreed to come play again at the Arcata Ball Park. “Our plan most likely is to either play independent this year or inquire about other leagues we might be able to join,” Rossi said. But while the Crabs are scrambling to come up with a new game plan, it appears

that its adversaries had this move slated for a while. Pat Burns, the commissioner of the California Collegiate League, said the three Bay Area teams contacted him more than two months ago, immediately after the season ended. “They called me and were very serious about their interest in joining the CCL and made a good-faith deposit in both monies and verbal commitments,” Burns said. The teams will join the Pacific Union Financial Capitalists (now there’s an American team name) to create a new division within the now 12team league. The Crabs organization had its share of troubles this year, including a bat-throwing incident that became a viral video, the post-season marijuana-related arrest of manager Matt Nutter and complaints about increasingly rowdy home crowds. But former Crabs President Matthew Filar said he doesn’t think those issues drove the rest of the league away. “Over the years fans have gotten a little bit louder,” he acknowledged. Most teams say they enjoy some good heckling as long as it doesn’t get personal, Filar added. After all, players’ moms are often in the crowd. But Filar said it can get out of hand. “We’re gonna try to convince them to tone it

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8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

down a little bit this [next] year ... post some rules of conduct and reminders.” If the team opts to play independently next year, as the Marysville Gold Sox have done for some time, Filar said the only noticeable differences for fans will be that they won’t get to compare Crabs’ stats with league rivals and the team won’t compete in a league championship tournament. However, Filar said the team management would likely organize an invitational tournament at the end of the season. Rossi, the team’s acting president, agreed that fans have nothing to fear. “We’re still gonna have a darn good year of baseball,” she said. “There’s no doubt about it in my mind.” The team’s first game is scheduled for May 31, a bit earlier than in past years. It’s not clear what will become of the Far West League. Rossi added that two other teams had recently agreed to join the league, but given the latest developments she’s not sure whether they’re still interested. She declined to identify the two teams. Meanwhile, the commissioner of the California Collegiate League thinks there may be room in his league for some crustaceans. The newly christened “North

Division” is just a working title, said Burns, “until we can somehow incorporate Humboldt and Marysville into the mix, because those are two really good operations that need to be in the California summer-ball mix. No matter how you mix it up they have to be there.” Joining a statewide league would likely require the Crabs to travel for away games, something that the organization has historically been reluctant to do because of the cost and logistical hardship of such long journeys. Between hotel rooms, a chartered bus and other expenses, a fourday team road trip can run about $12,000, according to Filar. The organization currently offers modest financial incentives to other teams to come play in Arcata. Still, Burns thinks California’s summer collegiate teams should be unified into a single league. “You would think at some point we all need to get on the same page and compete for a state title if we really want to give the players the best opportunity,” he said. “I think everybody understands that.” Maybe. On the other hand, Arcata summers wouldn’t be the same without Crabbies home games every weekend. For the team’s upcoming 70th season, at least, that’s where they’ll stay. ●


the week in WEed

The High Court By Ryan Burns

Y

ou could argue that nine grownups who sit around all day in silky black robes always look ridiculous, but the U.S. Supreme Court looked especially foolish last week when it decided not to hear an appeal of the federal government’s classification of marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug — that is, a substance with no currently accepted medical use and with more potential for abuse than cocaine or meth. This in a country where 20 states and the nation’s capital have legalized medical cannabis, and despite more than 200 peer-reviewed scientific studies that have shown marijuana to be both safe and effective in relieving pain, nausea and the side effects of chemotherapy, among other applications. The San Francisco-based group Americans for Safe Access kindly asked the Drug Enforcement Administration to reclassify weed 11 years ago, and the agency took nine years to say “no.” In January, the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., took a turn on the silly stage. It admitted that a 1999 report from the esteemed Institute of Medicine “does indeed suggest that marijuana might have medical benefits.” But in its 3-0 ruling the court found that the DEA (cough!) reasonably interpreted the study as a recommendation for more studies. Exhibiting what can only be described as willful blindness the court insisted, “Substantial evidence supports [the DEA’s] conclusion that such studies do not exist.” Riiiight. The truth is that such studies come out all the time, despite federal restrictions that hinder scientific research. For example, a new study published in the American Journal of Medicine found that smoking weed may help regulate blood sugar and prevent Type 2 diabetes. Another study, published in the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology, found that chemical compounds in marijuana show promise in treating multiple sclerosis. And after listening to medical professionals, the state of Maine just passed a law allowing doctors to recommend marijuana as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Evidence abounds for marijuana’s effectiveness in treating everything from rheumatoid arthritis to digestive disorders to sleep apnea, HIV, Alzheimer’s and more. So why would the Supreme Court — a body that’s supposedly guided by reason and evidence — refuse to even consider the federal government’s ostrich-pose on the issue? It gives new meaning to “the highest court in the land.” Elsewhere: • Romania just became the 10th member of the European Union to legalize medical marijuana, and Switzerland just decriminalized possession of pot-for-fun. Also, did you know that growing, selling and consuming weed is entirely legal in, of all places, North Korea? • Denver, meanwhile, is still trying to figure out how to navigate legal weed. After opponents to a proposed marijuana tax started handing out free joints at rallies in Colorado, which legalized weed-for-fun last fall, the mayor of Denver said he’ll propose outlawing handouts of free pot in city parks. And the Denver City Council is considering an ordinance that could land people in jail for up to a year and cost them a $999 fine if they’re caught “openly” using marijuana in public. That would mean potentially getting busted if someone so much as smells your puff. • Are marijuana gardens destroying history? That was the provocative title of an Oct. 10 Times-Standard story by Thadeus Greenson, who examined how the county’s 4,000-plus marijuana farms may be obliterating Native American archaeological sites. A state Fish and Wildlife employee recently noticed shattered artifacts in the dirt of a grow operation. These included an arrowhead that turned out to be more than 1,000 years old. The story quoted him saying that the grow operation damaged a large archaeological site. “Now,” he said, “it’s just kind of a big jumbled mess.” ●

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Blog Jammin’ GOVERNMENT / OUTDOORS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / TUESDAY, OCT. 15 AT 1:12 P.M.

Stone Lagoon Revival

There used to be a sweet little campground at Stone Lagoon that you could boat to — the only one of its kind in Humboldt County, with six hideaway boat-in campsites across the water from the highway. Alas, in March 2011, the cashstrapped state park system closed it. Now a private tour operator, Kayak Zak’s, wants to re-open it, and owner Marna Powell is throwing a big shindig out there this weekend to raise money for the effort. In fact, Powell has been quietly applying private capital, with state park blessings, to revive other tourism amenities at the state-park-run portions of Stone Lagoon. The rustic visitor’s center on the shore was closed a couple of years until Powell took possession of it last June and made it Kayak Zak’s HQ. Powell says the deal was she could run her business there; she says she decided to revive the visitor center, and campground, on her own. The building was in bad shape. Powell booted out the rats, cleaned up the mold, fixed the broken stuff and moved out a bunch of junk that had piled up for years, she says. “You just cannot have a vacant building on the coast,” she says. “It is still a work in progress.” She says there’s lots of reasons the state park dubbed her — a for-profit business — the savior of an abandoned public space.

STONE LAGOON. PHOTO BY KEN MALCOMSON

Mainly, she says, it’s because she “may be the only person with a weird enough background and relationships in the community who could have pulled it off.” Powell’s fundraiser to open the campground is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. this Sunday, Oct. 20, at the Stone Lagoon Visitor Center, 115336 U.S. 101 in Trinidad just north of the Little Red Schoolhouse. Kayak tours, raffles, live music, lovely lagoon. ● EMERGENCY / BY GRANT SCOTTGOFORTH / FRIDAY, OCT. 11 AT 4:17 P.M.

Quake!

Shake, rattle, roll. The USGS site (over which hangs a disclaimer about possible inaccuracies due to the government shutdown) reports a 5.0 quake struck about 30 miles west/northwest of Eureka. It was strong in the Journal office. A slow build to a rolling climax. A few hours later, the USGS map lists the quake as a 4.9 —

hardly worth getting up off the couch for. Blame the error on the furloughs. ● GOVERNMENT / BY RYAN BURNS / FRIDAY, OCT. 11 AT 3:37 P.M.

City Manager Mystery

Eureka City Manager Bill Panos submitted his resignation almost a month ago, and his final day was supposed to be Oct. 4. So why is the city council still talking about him in closed session? There was a city manager performance evaluation scheduled for closed session at the Oct. 1 meeting, with just three days left of his scheduled tenure. (His evaluations have been appearing on closed session agendas as far back as Aug. 20.) Next week’s meeting agenda? There it is again — a performance evaluation for a city manager who has supposedly left the building. What’s the deal? Eureka Mayor Frank Jager says Panos has

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin

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10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

indeed left the building, and the items on next week’s agenda are strictly procedural. Jager says he put the items on the agenda per Councilmember Mike Newman’s request. The first item sounds like it stemmed from concerns Newman had over city council members going directly to the city manager individually, rather than giving him direction as a council. The second — the “performance evaluation” — is related to the search for the next city manager and what attributes the council is looking for, says Jager. ● GOVERNMENT / BY RYAN BURNS / THURSDAY, OCT. 10 AT 3:33 P.M.

Withering NCRA Indictment

Anyone who even casually follows the exploits of the North Coast Railroad Authority has seen a particularly absurd example of government folly — a state agency led by a cabal of evangelical cargo cultists with an unfunded mandate to resurrect an insolvent rail line. In recent years, two members of the agency’s board of directors have tried tactfully but persistently to suggest that the emperor is starkers. One of those, Humboldt County representative Bill Kier, resigned from the agency in May. The other, Marin County representative Bernard H. Meyers, announced yesterday that after six years on the board, he won’t be seeking reappointment. His resignation letter and an accompanying Q-and-A are, in a word, badass. We’ll refrain from publishing all 7,000plus words here, but find links to both documents, all 7,000-plus words, at www. northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin. Be-


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ity of getting funds to cover the damage — all without regard to fiscal prudence. Has minimal transparency or accountability: [S]taff reveals only what it wants to, when and as it wants to. ... The results are, charitably described, disastrous. ... As things now stand, Board members will have a difficult, if not impossible time trying to learn the fate of an agreement, the exact wording of a contract, the structure of the arrangement between NCRA and NWP, etc. except by asking staff for the information. However, staff may not want to furnish the information, either from the press of business or more sinister motives. Now imagine that you are a member of the public and want the same information. ... The Authority has, for too long, hidden its finances from the light of day. The most recent audited financials cover up to June 30, 2011. (Not a typo.) Has a renegade staff that’s willing to defy directives from its own board: Staff provides little, if any, follow-up to matters considered at Board meetings. On one occasion (an [Annie & Mary] trail Resolution), staff undid in the final document what the Board had expressly agreed to. Allows itself to be bilked by its own attorney: When discussing litigation, take into account that the advice you get to settle — or not — comes from someone who may benefit monetarily if you accept the advice. When you sue over the billboards along the Eureka-Arcata highway and

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low you’ll get some choice snippets that give a flavor of Meyers’ indictment. The lawyer and former Novato City Councilmember describes a public agency that: Is on the verge of bankruptcy: In a recent article ... Director [Allan] Hemphill was noted as raising the possibility of the NCRA filing a Chapter 9 bankruptcy. His concern is not inappropriate, and the Board should raise the issue for discussion as soon as possible. Virtually gave away the farm to its private contractor: The keystone agreement between NCRA and [private operator] NWP [Northwestern Pacific Railroad Co.] is the lease of September 2006. Can it be described as anything other than a lopsided, sweetheart deal? It allows NWP to unilaterally extend the lease term for a century, without any additional approval by NCRA. ... How much money does the Lease require NWP pay to the NCRA? Nothing, until NWP has a year in which it makes $5 million in net profits. When might that happen? It depends, but it is very possible to not occur this century. Acts as a black hole for taxpayer money: The lease requires NCRA to acquire and spend public funds without limitation. $68 million (per staff) have been expended to get 62 miles to Windsor; tens of millions will be needed to extend the line to Willits. Then hundreds of millions of dollars are estimated to rehabilitate the Eel River segment, after which further tens of millions are estimated for work in the Eureka area. When, over the lease term there are major storms, fires and earthquakes, NCRA bears the responsibil-

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Blog Jammin’

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discover well after suit is filed that the signs are not on your property, consider whether you should be paying fees to your attorney. Meyers closes by saying the NCRA is in dire need of a top-to-bottom review of its actions and mandate by an impartial entity such as the state auditor and a joint legislative audit committee. And he says that the agency needs to renegotiate its lease with NWP while becoming fully accountable to the public and its board. ● GOVERNMENT / BY HEIDI WALTERS / THURSDAY, OCT. 10 AT 2:39 P.M.

Show us Yer Growler!

Any growler will do, at any brewery — Lost Coast, Six Rivers, Redwood Curtain, you name it — come Jan. 1. That’s when Assemblymember Wes Chesbro’s growler bill goes into effect. A growler (shh, Kiwi!) is a glass beer vessel about 4-pints-hearty, in which beer connoisseurs and picky drunks enjoy refills of fresh-crafted local brews straight from a brewery. Current state law says a growler can only be used in the brewery where it was purchased. Ches’ new law, AB 647 — signed today by Gov. Jerry Brown, says a news release — scraps that old piece of prudery and allows a brewery to refill any growler as long as it slaps a new label on the bottle with its name, and the beer’s name, on it. The new label has to cover any old labels on the bottle. ● GOVERNMENT / BY RYAN BURNS / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9 AT 4:02 P.M.

Guiding Principles Time-Lapse

Arguments at the county government level don’t get much more fundamental or important than the ongoing debate over the guiding principles in Humboldt County’s General Plan Update. In essence it’s an argument about priorities for future land use. In planning for the next 20-odd years do we want to emphasize environmental protections and productive resource lands by focusing development near existing services such as water and sewer? Or should we favor individual property rights, allowing landowners more freedom in choosing where to live and how to be stewards of the land? In last week’s issue we looked at the latest contentious revisions to those guiding principles. To catch up, go to www. northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin to find a list of the original principles, along with new versions drafted by members of the current majority on the Board of Supervisors.

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ASSEMBLYMEMBER WESLEY CHESBRO GRINNIN’ LIKE A FOOL AT TRACK SEVEN BREWING CO. IN SACRAMENTO WHILE GOV. JERRY BROWN SIGNS HIS GROWLER BILL. PHOTO COURTESY OF WESLEY CHESBRO

ENVIRONMENT / NATURAL RESOURCES / BY HEIDI WALTERS / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9 AT 3:42 P.M.

Well, That’s Offputting

White, slimy nodules of tapioca-like substance oozing from your lovely freshcaught salmon. Yick. It’s a find only Walter Bishop would find delightful. Anyway — the Two Rivers Tribune reports that “Chinook salmon caught in the Klamath River were found infested with a white and egg-shaped parasite named Henneguya embedded in their muscle tissues.” The parasite is not harmful to people, the story reports. And how does it get in the fish in the first place? Says the TRT: “While at sea, the fish are subjected to sea lice that attach themselves. The sea lice eat the skin and blood of the fish, breaking their first layer of outer protection, which allows the parasite to enter the body.” The story notes that the lack of cleansing high river flows might have contributed to the spread of the parasites. Although the story doesn’t elaborate, it appears these parasites enter the fish in their freshwater phase, according to a report by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. ● GOVERNMENT / COMMUNITY / BY HEIDI WALTERS / THURSDAY, OCT. 10 AT 2:58 P.M.

Huffman on the Shutdown

What’s Congressman Jared Huffman (DSan Rafael) doing to end the government shutdown? In the last week, he’s taken to Twitter, Facebook and the phones to answer questions about the shutdown. Congressman Huffman can be found at www.twitter.com/RepHuffman and at www.facebook.com/RepHuffman. ●


northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

13


Ruins Abandoned, unused, disintegrating – and starkly beautiful Story and photos by Grant Scott-Goforth

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ictures of decay — abandoned structures slumping to ground, engulfed in flora or proudly, rustily erect — are a trope now, but that’s OK. They’re fascinating. They combine history, our reverence of engineering feats, our fears of death and erasure. We get to rubberneck at a slow moving train wreck — nature and time joining to show just how fleeting humanity’s grip on this world is. It’s ugly. It’s pretty. There’s color and light in all of that entropy. They call it “ruin porn” for a reason. Humboldt County may not have the allure of Detroit, Chernobyl or other vast abandoned areas that have become destinations for amateur and professional explorers and photographers. The “urban exploration” boom that draws people

to the shriveling Salton Sea and the catacombs of Paris is less popular here. But ruined Humboldt has its pilgrims. Their signatures are the overgrown trails to sites, a few seemingly abandoned online forums and the word-of-mouth community of graffiti artists, explorers and hobos. Here’s a small sample of Humboldt’s disused and forgotten structures. Relics of war, industry and community. We found far more than could be printed here. And there’s likely many we overlooked. But live vicariously for a moment and imagine what these places meant to someone, to the community, in the past. And get out and find some secret spots of your own.

Double Vision A rare glassy bay at the mouth of the Eureka Slough — part of the disused and disputed Arcata-Eureka rail easement.

14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


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Balloon Track The abandoned rail cars and engines on the Balloon Track harken to a time when rail connected the Humboldt Bay region to the rest of the nation. Now they’re a favorite for graffiti artists. A tall (and in places, breached) chain link fence surrounds the forlorn vehicles, with rusted wheels and shattered windows. In 2006, Security National purchased the property and removed one of the 13 boxcars abandoned on the land when the rail yard went out of use in the 1980s. A press release said Security National was committed to “turning the Balloon Track into a tremendous asset for Eureka.” Seven years later, several boxcars and four engines remain. In a December 2012 interview with radio station KINS, Security National owner Rob Arkley said he intends to sell them for scrap. “I’m going to go to war to get those out of there,” he said. continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Mad River Train Bridge This steel paean to the county’s former timber and rail industries stands firm, spanning the Mad River. The bridge — rusty and missing many of the wooden ties that support the rails — is still in better shape than the lines that extend from either side. Walk about 1,000 feet up the Mad River from Pump Station No. 4 to find it.

Downtowner Motel The Downtowner sat empty for more than a decade. Kitty-corner from the Eureka Inn, which also spent some years shuttered, the motel was ringed by a barbed wire fence several years ago — an attempt to keep squatters and others out (see the Journal cover article from Sept. 16, 2010, “The Town Downer”). Years of discussion about what to do with the property haven’t produced results yet, but Councilwoman Marian Brady told the Journal last month it’s a priority for her to see the Downtowner Motel restored.

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Vance Avenue Shack Not much left of this shack on Vance Avenue near Samoa — a bayfront property strewn with broken glass and a revolving graffiti tableau.


Humboldt State University Annex There are likely many living Arcatans who were born in the second iteration of the Trinity Hospital. Built in 1944 after the original Trinity Hospital burned down, this one served the area until Mad River Community Hospital was built in 1972. The building, now owned by Humboldt State University and used briefly as the foreign language studies building, has all the hallmarks of a hospital: an amber-hued, diffusely lit chapel, curtain tracks in the ceilings of the old patient rooms and — most ominously — a morgue. HSU facilities director Traci Ferdolage wouldn’t let the Journal enter the basement, which houses the former morgue. When she offers a peek inside, black mold creeps four feet up the corridor walls, and a blitz of musty air rushes forth from the below-ground level. Ferdolage is no stranger to ghost stories. She said an otherwise skeptical contractor recently came to her with concerns about the noises he was hearing while inspecting the building. Campus police found

nothing, but returned when the contractor, growing less dubious of paranormal possibilities, complained again. This time, officers found evidence of a squatter. The building, with numerous ground-level windows, has the same issues with uninvited tenants as any abandoned building, Ferdolage said.

Co-op Building A fading mural on the old Co-op Building, at the foot of E Street in Eureka.

Loleta Tunnel Curving north out of downtown Loleta is the old Northwestern Pacific line, which punches through about 2,000 feet of Table Bluff. While the light of the far entrance is visible from the south end, the mouth of the tunnel is faintly ominous. We trudged into the dark, discovering that the other end is farther than it seems. Looking back at several points, the entrance was still much closer than the end, and the light at the end of the tunnel grew in size much more slowly than we’d expected. It was too dark to see the ground past the first hundred or so feet without artificial light. Lime deposits seeped out of the wet spots on the tunnel walls. Remains of a campfire cozied up with discarded alcohol bottles, clothing and paint cans. A slight, dusty-smelling cool breeze glided through the tunnel, with no echo to speak of. At the center of the tunnel, all was eerily quiet.

Visit www.northcoastjournal.com to see more pictures of decay that didn’t make it into print. And share your pictures of ruins over on our Facebook page — www.facebook.com/northcoastjournal.

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Sweasey Dam The remains of Sweasey Dam sit about five miles upriver from the Mad River Fish Hatchery. If you know the wide gravel bars of the Mad near Blue Lake, it’s hard to imagine that the river runs through a narrow gorge just a few miles upstream. Sweasey Dam was built in 1938 and provided water to Eureka before it was completely filled with debris in 1969. By the end of that year’s winter storm season, there were 2.4 million cubic yards of sand, logs and gravel plugging up the dam, according to an American Society of Civil Engineers report. The dam was dynamited in 1970. Now, only the high walls on the banks of the Mad remain. Twisted pieces of steel and rebar begin to appear in the river as you approach it from downstream.

Spear and Alliance, Arcata Since burning in 2008, the former Emerald — a head shop on the corner of Spear and Alliance in Arcata — has remained empty, charred timbers still visible.

USS Milwaukee Loleta Creamery That icon of Loleta’s skyline is reduced to a cluttering of cracked brick buildings, rusting tanks and “no trespassing”adorned fences overgrown with pampas grass and berry vines. The creamery was shuttered in 2008, but remains a destination for fans of B horror films (Halloween III was filmed at the creamery) and there are rumblings of renovations and repairs (see Heidi Walters’ Sept. 12 cover story, “Main and Loleta”).

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Down and Dirty

Providing Water for Wildlife How not to screw it up By Genevieve Schmidt downanddirty@northcoastjournal.com

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here’s little that irritates me more than going to the garden center and seeing an array of gorgeous, well-made bird baths that are all completely and utterly useless. It seems that the manufacturers of such things have never really researched or even given the most cursory amount of thought to what qualities a bird might actually like to see in a birdbath. It’s the same with ponds. Most commercially available ponds have steep, slick sides which make the water tough to access and limit the pond’s value to wildlife. Since providing water is one of the easiest ways that you can not only benefit wild creatures but attract them into your garden, it seems a no-brainer to take the time to get it right. After all, water isn’t just for drinking. Butterflies get valuable minerals and salts from puddling about in shallow, slightly muddy sections of water. Salamanders and newts, frogs and toads, and even dragonflies use water as shelter and breeding grounds during different parts of their life cycles. Here’s what you need to know to provide the best benefits to wildlife with your water sources.

Gradual edges

Imagine for just a moment being as small as a bird or a frog, and consider how you would get in and out of your pond. Most commercial ponds have straight, slick sides that often have a lip over the top. This makes entry and exit a challenge, and completely eliminates the chance to step into a shallow and splash about while bathing. If you have a pond like this already, consider building up one side so there’s a little beach for birds and others to stand on and take a shallow dip. You could use large rocks and gravel to build up one side so that everyone can tiptoe in. A gently sloped entry starting at a very shallow depth (a quarter to a half inch) and slowly getting deeper is ideal. I mean, you can’t imagine a bird taking a bath in 3-foot-deep water, can you? It’s the same for visitors such as butterflies and dragonflies. Both prefer a shallow area with a few small rocks sticking up above the surface to land on. If you scatter a little bit of sand or mud between the cracks of your rocks, butterflies will not only be able to drink but also will be able to get the nutrient benefits from the minerals in the soil.

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This isn’t an intuitive tip, but birds and insects have such small feet that the texture of most slippery birdbaths and fountains can make the difference between a space that’s usable or a spot they’ll have no choice but to ignore. Birds and pollinators such as bees simply can’t grip onto glass and other smooth surfaces. A roughened texture provides a place for them to grip while they drink and bathe. If you’ve already purchased a fountain or birdbath with an overly smooth texture, try adding rough stones and pebbles to the dish so birds and bees have a place to land and stand. You can even make this decorative by painting a couple

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

the rough texture on the edge of this birdbath provides easy perching. photo by Genevieve schmidt.

of the stones to personalize them. Fern Richardson’s book Small-Space Container Gardens has a great tutorial on how to do just that.

Splashing or trickling

If you love hummingbirds (and who doesn’t?), consider a trickling fountain or a gentle waterfall leading to your pond. Hummingbirds love to drink from small falling streams of water. Even the smallest urban or balcony garden can attract hummingbirds with a dual-tiered fountain and a few plants for the birds to perch on while they scope out the scene. Just make sure the water is more of a trickle than a rushing deluge. Again, imagine yourself the size of a hummingbird and think about the type of natural faucet you’d like to drink from. You don’t want them to feel in danger of being dashed to the rocks!

Hiding places

Though we may think of our garden as a peaceful and benign place, wildlife has to be constantly aware of what predators might be nearby. Ponds should be at least three feet deep in some areas to provide the best chances for frogs and other wildlife to hide and escape predators. Inside your pond, provide some shelves or ledges to nestle under, and at least a few plants to provide cover. Around the edges of the pond, it’s a great idea to put a variety of plants that will gently drape over the side and provide places for wildlife to sun themselves while still being able to leap into the pond at a moment’s notice. I often see frogs eating small garden insects in the vicinity of the pond, and thank goodness. Much as those little bitty flies are an important part of the ecosystem, I’d rather the frogs

eat them than have them end up in my cocktail! Even if you’re just providing a birdbath or fountain, it’s a good idea to make sure there are some trees or shrubs nearby that have an open view to the water source. If birds can land in a safe location and discern whether your cat is lying in wait, they’ll feel much more comfortable having a drink and a splash. This goes for balcony gardens, too. A small Japanese maple in a pot would make the perfect perch from which to scope out the joint.

Don’t forget winter

My last tip is a brief one: Further inland where water may stay frozen all day, don’t forget that birds and other wildlife still need to drink. If you can provide a heated birdbath or other water source through the winter, you’ll be doing a marvelous service for your local wildlife. l The wonderful thing about providing water for wildlife is that even if you’ve already got an existing pond, birdbath or fountain that has some flaws, it’s pretty easy to fix — and it’s well worth it. If you’ve read this far, I’m guessing you don’t go in for the sterile fields of mulch and rock that many people try to pass off as landscaping. Inviting wildlife to share your space is one of the most satisfying elements in any garden. l Genevieve Schmidt has written for Fine Gardening Magazine, Garden Design Magazine, the Christian Science Monitor and other publications. She lives in Arcata, and owns Genevieve Schmidt Landscape Design and Fine Garden Maintenance. A version of this column appeared previously on her blog, northcoastgardening.com.


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MckinleyvilL MckinleyvilLee aRts Night

See the light in Morgin Coonfield’s photo of lanterns at McKinleyville High School’s two-part exhibition.

home & GARDEN

Third Friday McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, Oct. 18, 6-8 p.m.

is presented by members of the McKinleyville business community and is open for all McKinleyville businesses to display the work of local artists. Receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are from 6-8 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Call (707) 834-6460 or visit www.mckinleyvilleartsnight.com for more information. 1. CALIFORNIA REDWOOD COAST-HUMBOLDT COUNTY AIRPORT 3561 Boeing Ave. Works by Robert Benson, Floyd Bettiga, Thomas Klapproth, Jim McVicker, William Pierson, Laura Rose, Stock Schlueter and Stilson Snow. 2. SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave. #D (at the California Redwood Coast Airport). Standup comedy by BA-DUM-CHH with house band Terrapin Breeze. Music by Tim Breed and Johnnie Zee from 6-8 p.m. 3. MCKINLEYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 1300 Murray Road, in the library. “Environment,” mixed media artwork by students focusing on different environments, real or imagined. “Objective Still Lives,” photographs by students that emphasize form. There will be “make-and-take” art projects for all ages, an open ceramics lab, refreshments and music. 4. OLD BLOCKBUSTER BUILDING McKinleyville Shopping Center, City Center Road. “Art from Mending Hearts,” photography, acrylic, pencil,

sculpture and fabric art by survivors of and allies against violence against women. In honor of Domestic Violence Awareness month, the show benefits Humboldt Domestic Violence Services and North Coast Rape Crisis Team. Folk music by Adyn McCabe. 5. MCKINLEYVILLE FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER 1450 Hiller Road. Bring your family out for special activities from 6:30-7:30 p.m. The theme for October is “Spooky Art Night.” For children of all ages. 6. BLAKE’S BOOKS 2005 Central Ave. Mike and Leslie Anderson, nature photography. 7. CHURCH OF THE JOYFUL HEALER 1944 Central Ave. Dan Anderson and Nick Abler, mixed media. Also plaster-gauze masks. Music by Celtic-style folk guitarist Margaret Kellermann. 8. CENTRAL HAIR DESIGNS 1660 Central Ave. Suite B. Sharon Sheets, watercolors. Ali Nessler, scarves. ●

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Two New Owners for 3 Foods Café

jennifer shipman and laura duttweiler with their new baby, 3 foods. photo by jennifer fumiko cahill

By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

I

f you’ve been scrolling through Craigslist in hopes of buying 3 Foods Café in Arcata, you’re too late. New owners Jennifer Shipman and Laura Duttweiler beat you to it, and no, they didn’t buy it online. Escrow closed on Friday, and the place itself will only close (fingers crossed) from Oct. 21 to Oct. 24. Those few days will be a frenzy of renovation, including installing a new kitchen floor, a little painting, electrical work and setting up a new point-ofsale system. Local artist Augustus Clark is also whipping up some artwork for the restaurant, but overall the look will stay the same. “We want to respect the customers,” says Duttweiler. She and Shipman are

aware of the deep attachment some of the regulars have to the restaurant and its menu, so they won’t be turning the place or its menu upside-down. Most of the staff is staying on as well, including chefs Jessica Lovelady, Sean Bockman and Peter Jones, who only came aboard a month and a half ago from Folie Douce. There — you can un-clench your paper now. Shipman and Duttweiler have been thinking about going into business together since they met two years ago. While Duttweiler wasn’t a regular at 3 Foods, she had eaten at the restaurant over the years and heard it was for sale. When the price came down, Shipman says it seemed “like kismet.” The space was part of the appeal, and one long-term goal the women have

is to make the restaurant more family friendly with picnic tables outside and an area for children to play. (Parents: This means you might get to eat with both hands. Non-parents: This means you might have less silverware flying your way.) Duttweiler, also a mom, knows what a draw that can be. Both new owners have been waiting tables at 3 Foods once a week to cover open shifts — nothing new for either of them, since Shipman was a server for 12 years and Duttweiler has been working out front and in back at Cafe Brio since it opened. But the two say that working the floor with the staff has given them insight on how the place runs and what the customers want.

Shipman has already heard pleas to keep the “Dark and Gruesome” salad — it’s her favorite, too, so fans of the big pile of greens need not worry — and the chicken and waffles. For now, the pair is only planning tweaks to the menu, like offering more seasonal specials and doing more local sourcing. Shipman, who has a telecommuting IT job, says the farmers market is one of the reasons she lives here with her husband and daughter. Duttweiler says they’re looking to maintain the character of 3 Foods, and that they “want to do a spin on what’s already going on here. … It’s more like adopting than having a baby.” l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

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Friday Night Special: TBA 6pm Last-minute Men (international) 8pm Free Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm Free Dr. Squid (dance rock) 9pm Free

Cynthia Brando (acoustic) 6pm Free

Jerry Joseph and the BA-DUM-CHH Comedy: Phish: Live Va. Webcast 4:30pm Jackmormons, Jeff Crosby and Anthony Sandoval, FC Sierra Free, Harvest Party w/Rude the Refugees, Heavy Guilt (San Francisco stand-up) 9pm $5 Lion (reggae/dancehall) 9pm $5 (rock) 9pm $5

[T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free [T] Game Night 5pm Free

[T] Spyn Reset, Small Axe (jazz/rock/ hip-hop/dance) 9:30pm $5 [W] Cribbage tournament 6:30pm $5

vineyard

It’s turkey season -

again!

all scissors & TURKEY bags

2O% off

OPEN WEDNESDAY TO SUNDAY NOON-5PM

*Sale prices through The month of OCTOBER

Mon.-Sat. 10am-6pm Sun. 10am-5pm Hwy. 101 between Eureka & Arcata in the Bracut Industrial Park (707) 826-7435

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

(707) 943-3498 11544 DYERVILLE LOOP RD. 2 MILES SOUTH OF MYERS FLAT. FROM AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, TAKE ELK CREEK RD. 4 MILES, STAY TO RIGHT.

Custome r Fa Firecrac vorite: ker Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988


arcata • blue lake •mckinleyville trinidad • willow creek venue

clubs, concerts and cafés

thur 10/17

fri 10/18

sat 10/19

Aesir (rock) 9pm

Potluck w/RA the Rugged Man (rap) 10pm $12

Yogoman Burning Band (dance) w/Free Rain 9pm $12, 21+

JAMBALAYA 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

Brian Post LIBATION (jazz) 7pm Free 761 Eighth St., Arcata 825-7596 Deep Chatham Kindred Spirits (Gypsygrass) LOGGER BAR 668-5000 (bluegrass) 9pm Free 9pm Free 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 6pm Free 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake MOSGO’S 826-1195 2461 Alliance Road, Arcata OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad RAMPART SKATEPARK 700 South G St., Arcata 826-0675 Deep Chatham REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW (bluegrass) 8pm Free 550 South G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222 Blues Night (Lesson) Salsa at 6 REDWOOD RAKS DANCE 8pm $5 6pm $5 824 L St., Arcata 616-6876 Hunter Paye, Chris Parreira DJ Ben (dance) ROBERT GOODMAN WINES (acoustic) 9pm Free 9pm Free 937 10th St., Arcata 826-WINE Rude Lion Sound (DJ) DJ Music SIDELINES 10pm $2 10pm $2 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 BA-DUM-CHH Comedy (locals) SILVER LINING 839-0304 w/Terrapin Breeze 9pm $3 3561 Boeing Ave., McKinleyville Peace of Mind Orchestra Pressure Anya DJ Duo SIX RIVERS BREWERY (funk/pop/rock) 9pm Free (Top 40) 9pm Free Central Ave., McK 839-7580 DJ Itchie Fingaz TOBY & JACKS (glitch/hip-hop) 9pm Free 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198 Reggie Watts VAN DUZER THEATRE, HSU (comedy/music) 8pm $45/$15 1 Harpst St., Arcata 826-3928

Submit your events online! Deadline noon Monday

sun 10/20

m-t-w 10/21-23

Yogoman Burning Band [M] The Getdown (local funk) 7pm (dance) 1-4pm $10, All Ages [T] Todd Clousers w/Steve DGS: Sundaze (EDM DJs) Bernstein (art rock) 9:30pm Free 9pm $5 [W] Red Rose (live EDM) 10pm Free

Jim Silva (soulful acoustic) 7pm Free La Patinas (eclectic) 9pm Free

[T] Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm Free [W] Jeff Landen (guitar) 8:30pm Free [T] The Attics (bluegrass) 6pm Free [W] Jay Dancing Bear (acoustic) 5pm Free [M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rude Lion 9pm $5

Guilded Youth Apparel Release w/DJ D’Vinity 9pm $5 18+ [M] Cribbage tournament 7pm Free Social Dance (country twostep) 6:30pm $10 Brian Post (jazz piano) 9pm Free Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free

Salsa Rueda [M] Swing Night 7pm $5 7pm $8 [T] African Dance/Drum 5:30pm $10 Open Mic w/Chris Parreira [M] Roots & Culture Reggae 9pm Free 7pm sign-up/8pm Free [W] Salsa! (lessons + dance) 9pm $5

Trivia Night 8pm Free DJ Music 10pm Free

[T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free [M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [T] Sunny Brae Jazz 8pm Free [W] Reggae Wednesdayz w/Rude Lion 10pm Free

Fine Wines Fine Wines

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Soda

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DOWNTOWN PLAZA 786 9TH STREET ARCATA

HAPPY HOUR Mon.-Sat. 4-6pm

$2 12 oz. beer $2 OFF Sake $ 1 OFF Small Plates reservations recommended 475 I STREET • ARCATA 822-2241

The Sea Grill Always serving you the finest and freshest of our local catch

NORTHTOWN

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316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

(right over the footbridge)

1644 G STREET • ARCATA • 822-1865

839-4140

1.75 Liter 2 1 + O N LY

www.fieldbrookwinery.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013

25

Soda

P


EUREKA + SOUTH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

ANGELINA INN 281 Fernbridge Drive, Fortuna 725-5200 BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770 BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta CECIL’S BISTRO 923-7007 773 Redwood Drive, Garberville CHAPALA CAFÉ 201 Second St., Eureka 443-9514 CUTTEN INN 445-9217 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St. 497-6093

thur 10/17

ARCATA + NORTH ON PREVIOUS PAGE

fri 10/18

Anna Hammilton (blues) 5pm, Loren & the Roustabouts (country rock) 9pm Free Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

MATEEL COMMUNITY CTR. 59 Rusk Lane, Redway 923-3368 MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM OF ART 636 F St., Eureka 442-0278

sun 10/20

m-t-w 10/21-23 [W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free Joani Rose (jazz) 7:30pm Free The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free [T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm Free

Shugafoot (jazz) 9pm Free

Cliff Dallas and the Death Valley Troubadours (rowdy country), Lonesome Shack (dirty blues) 9pm Free

EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 845-8795 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 LIL’ RED LION 1506 Fifth St., Eureka 444-1344

sat 10/19

Seabury (Irish) 7pm Free

The Wine of Summer w/director and crew Q&A 6:30pm $10

Seabury and Evan (Irish/Beatles) 7pm Free

[W] Cheryl (‘6os tunes) 7pm Free [W] Karaoke 9pm Free

Walshy Fire w/Blessed Coast and Guerilla Takeover (dancehall) 8pm $30/$24, 18

Battle of the Rock Bands: Artists TBA 6:30pm $20

Chali2na, Deploi, Kelly Mak, Bada Bling! Burlesque, Rings Hoop Troupe 8pm $20 Fred Neighbor (jazz) 2pm $5 donation

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

$2

MARTINI*

*LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER

CARTER HOUR Mon-Fri, 4-6pm ½ off bar menu 5-6pm www.carterhouse.com

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


eureka • fernbridge •ferndale • fortuna garberville • loleta • redway venue

thur 10/17

NOCTURNUM 498-7388 206 W. Sixth St., Eureka OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

Club Deliverance w/DJ Zephyr (goth industrial) 10pm $3 Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band (funky blues) 7pm Free

PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017

Masta Shredda (EDM DJ) 10pm Free

Josephine Johnson and Chief PERSIMMONS GALLERY (singer/songwriter and folk) 1055 Redway Drive, Redway 7pm Free 923-2748 RED LION HOTEL R.J. GRIN’S LOUNGE 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844 RIVERWOOD INN 943-3333 2828 Ave of the Giants, Phillipsville

clubs, concerts and cafés

fri 10/18

sat 10/19

Find live music and more! sun 10/20

AWOL One and Dirty Rats (indie hip-hop) 10pm $8

Musaic (international folk) 7pm Free Jsun (DJ) 10pm Free

Fuego w/Pressure Anya DJs (tropical/latin soundclash) 10pm Free [W] Johanna Miray and April Moore (folk/country) 7pm Free

THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778 THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

NCJ Cocktail Compass Available for iPhone and Android phones. Coming soon.

Thai • Lao • Vietnamese corner of 4th & L Eureka • 443-2690

OPEN

5-

at. n.-S o M .• 10 p.m

• We cater, too! •

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 9pm Free, 21+ Cee Cee James (roots rock/blues) 9pm $10

Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (country swing) 7:30pm Free

SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

[W] Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM DJs) 9pm $5 [W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 7pm Free

Crossroads (funk rock) 7pm Free

southeast asian cuisine

m-t-w 10/21-23

[M]T-Bone Shuffle Open Mic Jam w/ Jim Lahman Band 7pm Free Erin Inglish (banjo) 9pm Free All Ages

Gunsafe (face-melt country) 9pm Free All Ages

Shugafoot (jazz) 9pm Free

Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (booty shakin’ blues) 10pm Free

bookmark us:

[M] Troller w/SSLEEPERHOLD, Tabloid, DL Mathias (dark electronic) 9pm $5 [T] Upside Drown & Will Sprott (pop rock) 8pm Free [T] Shugafoot (jazz/blues 7:30pm Free [W] No Covers (jazz duo) 7:30pm Free

m.northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal

Thai food with a Laotian influence 307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

Happy Hour

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

Daily Specials Lunch • Dinner

Featured Artist:

HBG GLASS

All HBG GLASS pieces 15% off for the entire month of October

ARCATA  987 H ST.  707-822-3090 EUREKA  BAYSHORE MALL  707-476-0400 WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

Locally Blown Glass

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

4-6pm Tues.-Sun. with

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013

27


Burying the Needle On all the meters

I

f you thought this was the week you’d stay home and catch up on Trailer Park Boys, you were wrong. So wrong. Eat well and drink plenty of water because you’ve got a lot to do, Humboldt.

Thursday’s blues, hard rock and hiphop (and Watts)

Earl Thomas and Eddie Angel sit down for some “coffee-house style blues” at the Arcata Playhouse. Earl’ll tell stories from the road and Eddie’ll make his acoustic guitar sing. Soulful Jesi Naomi opens the show, which starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 advance, $15 at the door. A 10 on the grownup meter. Aesir, a new local band about which little information exists on the Internet other than that the band covers Zeppelin and Sabbath and does some original “high voltage electrifying rock music,” plays the Jambalaya, around 9 p.m., one supposes. This show is 21 and over. Potentially a 7 on the relivingyour-youth meter. GRiZ’s The Rebel Era Tour featuring Two Fresh and Anvil Smith lands at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. This is a big deal hip-hop show — GRiZ combines passion and skill to make melodies bigger and better and beats funkier and more awesome. Also, saxophone. Very cool. Two Fresh is comprised of twin brothers Kendrik and Sherwyn

WHO: Zach Deputy WHEN: Friday, Oct. 18, 8 p.m. WHERE: Arcata Theatre Lounge TICKETS: $25

Nicholls — get it? — who add kickass drummer Colby Buckler to their stage shows. They’ve compelled audiences to dance at fests across the U.S. and continue ascending up the hip-hop ladder as if summoned from above. Anvil Smith is Russian and reputed to be “nothing short of astounding.” Should be hours of excellence. Doors open at 9:30 p.m. with happy hour food and beverage prices until 10:30 p.m. $20 limited advanced tickets are at People’s Records, DTA, Wildberries and The Works. This show is 21 and over. A 9.5 on the make-you-sweat meter. And, oh yeah, Reggie Watts is at the Van Duzer. The show is sold out, but if you can find a miracle, do it. An easy 10 on the I-saw-him-when meter.

Friday’s soul and funny folk

The Soul Spectacular Tour, in which Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe presents a Ray Charles Boogaloo Dance Party with special guest Zach Deputy and The Cosmic Horns, erupts at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. Quick history: Denson first came to prominence as a member of Lenny Kravitz’s band, then, in 1993, joined DJ Greyboy in creating Greyboy Records and released the legendary acid jazz staple, Freestylin. Out of that collaboration, Denson formed The Greyboy Allstars, which spread “West Coast Boogaloo” worldwide. Denson’s been emphasizing vocals and adding funk, R&B and hip-hop elements all the way to his latest release, Brother’s Keeper, which continues his artistic evolution fusing sounds from rock to funk to Afrobeat. For his part, Deputy serves up soulful rhythm and blues, with flavors of Al Green, Taj Mahal and Stevie Wonder. Doors opens at 8 p.m., cost is $25 with advanced tickets available at Wildberries Marketplace, Peoples Records, The Works and the ATL. $20 limited advanced tickets available at the ATL’s website. 21 and over. An 8 on the date night meter — a 9+ if you get dinner at Tomo or Renata’s first. Singer/songwriter Christine Lavin cracks people up with her smart, funny original songs and giddy stories at the Arcata Playhouse. Fans of witty, insightful, silly folk artists, rejoice! Claudia Russell opens with Bruce Kaplan on mandolin. Russell has shared stages with Dave Carter and Tracy

28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Grammer, Loudon Wainwright III, Kris Kristoffersen, Willie Nelson and then some.  The show is presented in association with Humboldt Folklife Society. Tickets are WHO: Birds of Chicago $15 general and $13 HFS or Playhouse members and are WHEN: Monday, Oct. 21, 8 p.m. available at Wildwood Music, WHERE: Arcata Playhouse Wildberries Marketplace or TICKETS: $15 by reservation at 822-1575. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show time at 8 p.m. A 7.5 on the placeSunday’s funtime for the kiddos where-singles-can-meet-smart-matureDid you miss the note about the all-age women-under-low-pressure-circumstances Yogoman show today? Go back and look. or long-established-couples-not-into-loudMonday’s goth downer, folk upper music-date-night meters, respectively. If the Yogoman show(s) put too much Saturday’s rock, funk, space jams happy into your life, balance things out with Have you seen that show Sons of AnarTroller and Ssleeperhold, two Austin bands chy? Ron Perlman and that hot blond guy? bringing dark electronica to The Siren’s Katey Sagal from Married With Children? It’s Song. Bleak and ominous. Things start at 9 not that great, although compelling enough p.m., cover is $5 and all ages are welcome, as an escapist-evening-soap-opera kinda so punish your bad children by making them thing. Anyway, L.A.-based band Jeff Crosby stay up late on a Monday night listening to & The Refugees have two songs featured in purgatory’s soundscape. A 6 on the blackupcoming episodes. The band is also openeyeliner-early-Halloween meter. ing for Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons Birds of Chicago is a collective based and playing with The Heavy Guilt at Hum around singer/songwriters JT Nero (JT Brews. Tickets are $15, show is 21-and-over, and the Clouds) and Allison Russell (Po’ and things get going around 9 p.m. A 7 on Girl). Nero is “a poet of the everyday and the low-risk-sure-I’ll-have-the-wings-asthe absurd, the lonely, the hopeful and the usual meter. semi-hopeful … He’s got a fractured country Yogoman Burning Band, possibly soul croon, full of doo-wop ghosts and old Humboldt’s most beloved non-Humboldt time religion.” Russell plays banjo, ukulele, band, drops into the Jambalaya. It’s fun! It’s guitar, and clarinet, is a top-shelf whistler energetic! It’s ridiculous! The only people and, most importantly, knows how to use her voice to lift us all up from our munnot having fun at a Yogoman show are, well, dane lives into a purer world. You’ll likely nonexistent! Tickets are $12 — get’em in adleave the 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse show vance — and show starts at 9 p.m. with Free with a bit more grace than you had coming Rain’s post-rock/analog funk. A 10 on the in — and for only $15 at the door. A 10 on never-take-yourself-too-seriously meter. the goddamn-that’s-good-I-want-to-be-aBut wait! That’s not all! You also get a better-person meter. special all-ages family show on Sunday at 1 p.m. Yeah! This one is $10 and, be warned, Tuesday’s art rock will be packed with tiny people full of Art-rocker Todd Clouser plays the unflagging energy. A 10 on the ecstaticJambalaya. His latest record, Man With No Country, was produced by Anton Fier (Pere grateful-exhausted-parents meter. Ubu, Golden Palominos, Lounge Lizards) San Diego’s Earthless features members and is being released on Medeski Martin & of Rocket From the Crypt, OFF! and Howlin’ Wood drummer Billy Martin’s label, Amulet Rain, which means the band’s cosmic jams Records. “Those are pretty major artistic are as heavy and juicy as you’d expect. Along endorsements,” says his promotions guy, with fellow San Diegans and shred rockreasonably. Music starts around 9:30 p.m. ers Joy, Earthless gets stoner spacey at the and show’s 21-and-over. An 8.5 on this Alibi. Depart this planet for a mere $5. Music sounds-interesting-for-musician-types-andstarts late, go early and have drinks. Show’s what-else-you-going-to-do-on-a-Tuesday21-and-over. A 9 on the I’m-40-not-dead night? meter. l meter. photo courtesy of the artist

thehum@northcoastjournal.com

photo courtesy of the artist

By Jennifer Savage


Funny, it sucks to pick up trash in an orange jumpsuit, but it might be awesome to do it in a witch’s hat. Try it out at 1 p.m. on Sunday at the Old Town Monster Walk with the Jah Love Project. Meet up at Halvorsen Park to dress up and clean up.

Somebody from Humboldt wrote, produced and directed a movie! The director’s cut of Maria Matteoli’s The Wine of Summer plays at the Eureka Theater on Saturday at 6:30 p.m. with a Q-and-A after.

ag im

Let’s get ready to rumble. With yarn. The SCRAP Rebel Craft Rumble is on at the Arcata Playhouse at 8 p.m. on Saturday ($10 advance, ec $12 door). Crafting ou rt esy teams will throw down of scra p humboldt with repurposed materials, and proceeds will go to SCRAP’s educational programs. Reduce, reuse, recycle and show no mercy.

17 thursday Lecture

Degree vs. Debt Panel. 6:30 p.m. Native American Forum, HSU, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Elica Aramesh, Jeff Grabinski and local economic analysts discuss graduating with debt and entering the job market. In room 162. Free.

Movies

Two Tars, and Sherlock Jr. 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. A double feature of Laurel and Hardy in Two Tars, and Buster Keaton in Sherlock Jr. The ArMack Orchestra will provide the musical score and sound effects for the films at this fundraiser for student musicians. $5. armack.org. 839-1009. Humboldt Winter Fest. 7 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. A premier viewing of Anthropology, which explores professional snowboarder Nick Visconti’s soul search in the snowboard culture. Door prizes, food and a gift for everyone. $5. david_besanceney@yahoo. com. 845-8875. Local Filmmakers Night. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Eureka High School Lecture Hall, Corner of Humboldt and K streets. Malcolm DeSoto will feature his commercial art works as part of the series. $5.

Silence!

Theater

Our Town. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. The Thornton Wilder classic. brad@ferndalerep.org. 786-5483. Reggie Watts. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Comedian/musician/performance artist Reggie Watts spins out stream-of-consciousness monologues laced with improvised songs using a looping machine. Mature audiences. $45, $15 HSU students. carts@humboldt.edu. 826-3928. Young Frankenstein: The Musical. 7:30 p.m. Gist Hall Theatre, HSU, Arcata. It’s aliiiiive! The Mel Brooks movie takes the musical stage. Contains juvenile and adult humor. $15, $10 students. 826-3928.

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:15-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Every Thursday. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music. The People’s Market. Third Thursday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Food for People free farmers market-style produce distribution for income eligible folks. Free fruits and vegetables, live music, information about CalFresh. Free. 445-3166.

18 friday Art

Arts McKinleyville. Third Friday of every month, 6-8 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Art, food and music at participating McKinleyville businesses. Free. info@ mckinleyvilleartsnight.com. www.mckinleyvilleartsnight.com. 834-6460.

For Kids

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Ink People’s drop-in drawing, painting, mixed-media, sculpting and more for teens. Free. 726-9048. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon Discovery Museum, 517 Third St., Eureka. Stories, crafts, songs and dance for children 3-5. Space is limited, so call ahead. $2.

Food

College of the Redwoods Farmers Market. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Shop produce grown by students at the college’s 38-acre Bianchi Farm in Shively. Market is held in front of the campus bookstore.

Anybody else a little burned out on CG and 3D at the movies? Feel like you’re one Dolby sound check away from a burst eardrum? It might be time for a special effects break. The ArMack Orchestra fundraiser at Arcata High on Thursday at 7 p.m. is just the ticket ($5). The students are showing a double feature of Two Tars and Sherlock Jr. and playing the live soundtrack like it was done in the heyday of silent film. Silent? No color? Yes and yes. And you’re going to love it. Two Tars is about a couple of fellas who get stuck in a traffic jam along with their dates. Road rage simmers to the surface and drivers start vandalizing one another’s cars. Don’t pretend you can’t relate. Sherlock Jr. stars Buster Keaton, who was doing his own stunts before it was cool or properly insured. In this one, he goes amateur detective in the name of love. Pale and deadpan, he takes plunges and pratfalls that would make Jackie Chan wince. That’s some movie magic right there. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Trinidad School Night. 6:30 p.m. Larrupin Café, 1658 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. A dinner and fundraiser for Trinidad School. All entrees include an appetizer board and dessert. Call to preorder tickets. $50. www.larrupin.com. 677-3631.

Meetings

Historic Landmark Committee. 4 p.m. Arcata City Hall, 736 F St. Discussion of proposals and projects.

Outdoors

Great California ShakeOut. 10:17 a.m. Countywide. Drop, cover and hold on for this statewide event for earthquake preparedness. Free. www.shakeout.org.

Etc

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

Dance

World Dance. 8-10 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Teaching and request dancing. Everyone welcome. $3. 839-3665.

Movies

Two Tars, and Sherlock Jr. 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. See Oct. 17 listing.

Music

Christine Lavin. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. The New York singer/songwriter will be joined by Claudia Russell and Bruce Kaplan. $15. info@arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Ray Charles Boogaloo Dance Party. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe presents The Soul Spectacular Tour with special guest Zach Deputy and The Cosmic Horns. 21 and over. $25 door, $20 online. info@ arcatatheatre.com. www.arcatatheatre.com. Walshy Fire with Blessed Coast and Guerilla Takeover. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. The Bass Station Tour featuring dancehall music. $24. gm@kmud.org. www. mateel.org/renthall.html. 923-2513.

Theater

Our Town. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See Oct. 17 listing. Keaton rides shotgun.

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

29


continued from previous page Young Frankenstein: The Musical. 7:30 p.m. Gist Hall Theatre, HSU, Arcata. See Oct. 17 listing.

Events October 25 & 26, 7pm Kimtu Cookhouse $5 Adults $2 Youth

Written by Linda Neely Lucido & Kevin M. Reese Directed by Libby Pinto & Karla Robb.

Tickets available at Dream Quest & at the door.

Assumption Parish Bazaar. 6 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. Join us for family fun and games with something for every age. Be a big winner and take home a box of groceries, a pie or cake, homespun goods, bingo prizes and local artists’ work. 786-9555/786-9708. Blue Lake Harvest Days. 7 p.m. Blue Lake, Off the 299 Exit 5. Join us for two days of fun, including a barn dance with the Striped Pig String Band, pumpkin carving, pony rides, ghost tours, music by Silver Hammer and much more. Free. www.bluelakeartplace.com.

19 saturday Art

Rebel Craft Rumble. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. SCRAP Humboldt presents a live crafting competition with creative reuse challenges. Challengers will vie for the Extreme Ultimate Supreme Craft Master title. $10. reboutique@scraphumboldt.org. 633-8349.

Books

Book Sale. 10 a.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. A large selection of used books and music by Jeff DeMark. 822-5954. Children’s Author Festival. 10 a.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Meet visiting authors at this book sale and signing. Free. www.authorfest.org. On Friday night, when that gorgeous harvest moon is shining in the

Moondance A production of the Dream Quest Drama Club. For more information call (530) 629-3564

night sky, you’ll wish you were out at a barn dance celebrating. And you could be! Blue Lake Harvest Days kick off under Dell’Arte’s big top tent with Colin Vance and the Striped Pig String Band. Just mosey over to the Blue Lake Business Park at 7 p.m. and follow the sound of caller Tony Mates out of Portland. Once you’ve recovered on Saturday, there’s the Mad River Grange Harvest Fest. Kids can carve a pumpkin (BYOP), press some apples, get their faces painted and whip up a scarecrow while you procure some pulled pork and pumpkin pie. Back at the business park, there’ll be artist booths, ghost tours, an interactive mural and pony rides. Pony rides! Ahem. At 3:30 p.m. you can enter the Pumpkin Chuck Contest, which requires no explanation but possibly a good arm. Get back under that tent for the kids’ concert at 4:30 p.m. and the Story Howl at 7 p.m., when local yarn spinners take the stage and get spooky in the moonlight. There’s even room for a tale or two from the crowd if you get inspired. When it’s over, shake off the goosebumps with Beatles tunes from Silver Hammer then roll to the La Patinas gig at the Logger Bar for one last howl at the moon. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Movies

Two Tars, and Sherlock Jr. 2 & 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. See Oct. 17 listing. The Wine of Summer. 6:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Humboldt County native Maria Matteoli will screen her feature-length film, followed by a Q-and-A with the director, members of the cast and crew. $10.

Music

The Battle of the Rock Bands. 6:30 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Bands of all genres will compete for the grand prize of studio recording their album. Bands TBA. www. mateel.org/renthall.html. Brodie Stewart Band. 8 p.m. Blue Lake Casino, 777 Casino Way. High-octane country. $20 General; $15 Members. 668-9770. Russ Liquid with Chrome Sparks ft. sAuce. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Future-vintage, grooveblasting, instrumental DJs. $20. www.worldfamousparty. com.

Theater

Food

Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. EBT, Cal-Fresh and WIC accepted. 672-5224.

Outdoors

Fortuna Greenway and Trail Week. 5-7:30 p.m. City of Fortuna. Help create a plan for the John Campbell Memorial Greenway and Trail by attending any or all of the events, including surveying, workshops and designing the walkway. Free. savis@cifortuna.ca.us. www. friendlyfortuna.com. 725-1407.

Sports

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Roses’ Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $1 off of beers for tournament players. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. rosesbilliards.com. 497-6295.

30 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Our Town. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See Oct. 17 listing. Young Frankenstein: The Musical. 2 & 7:30 p.m. Gist Hall Theatre, HSU, Arcata. See Oct. 17 listing.

Events

Archaeology Day. 12-3 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Speak with local archaeologists, see exhibits, watch demonstrations and participate in hands on activities for all ages. Free. www.clarkemuseum.org. 443-1947. Assumption Parish Bazaar. 6 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. See Oct. 18 listing. Blue Lake Harvest Days. noon. Blue Lake, Off the 299 Exit 5. See Oct. 18 listing. Dow’s Prairie Grange Breakfast and Flea Market. Third Saturday of every month, 9 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange, 3995 Dows Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Enjoy pancakes, eggs and more, or shop for knick knacks, etc. Flea market ends at 4 p.m. $5, $3 for kids. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100.

Oktoberfest. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. Enjoy fun in the park with a Germanstyle dinner, German and local beer and oompah music. All ages. Benefits Fortuna Senior Services. Dinner $20, beer steins $5. admin@fortunasenior.org. friendlyfortuna.com. 726-9203.

For Kids

Fall Festival at Kneeland School. 5 p.m. Kneeland School, 9313 Kneeland Road. There will be games, raffles, pumpkin carving and costume contests, fire safety activities, a haunted hay maze and more! $5. kneeland@ humboldt.k12.ca.us. 442-5472.

Food

Arcata Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts, flowers, live music every week at 10 a.m. The Striped Pig String Band plays this week. Free. humfarm. org. 441-9999. Spaghetti Feed. 5 p.m. Weott Community Center, 175 Lum St. Carbo load with the Weott Volunteer Fire Department before the marathon through the Redwoods on Sunday. $10, kids 6 and under free. 946-1953.

Outdoors

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street (end). Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding! Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. rras. org/calendar.html. Conservation Corps Volunteer Day. 8:30 a.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Join us for dunes restoration work. Continental breakfast, barbecue lunch, tools, and gloves provided. Bring water and wear closed-toe shoes. Free.

Etc

Access Media Center Orientation. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School, Eureka. Learn about resources available at Access Humboldt: recording studio, field equipment, editing stations, cable TV channels, etc. Free. 476-1798.

20 sunday Movies

Hocus Pocus. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Witches, talking cats and teenage love run amok in this 1993 comedy. Rated PG. $5. info@arcatatheatre.com. www.arcatatheatre.com.

Music

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic. org/Bayside. 442-0156. Hip Hop Circus. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Presenting The House of Vibe Experience with Deploi, Kelley Mak and Chali2na of Jurassic Five. Burlesque and carnival performances by Bada Bling! Burlesque and Redwood Rings Hoop Troupe. $20. gm@ kmud.org. www.mateel.org/renthall.html. 923-2513.


Jazz Jam. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Join Fred Neighbor for jazz and swing standards from the ’30s and ’40s, with a mix of Latin, blues and country swing. $5 suggested donation. janine@ humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278. Monster Music Concert. 4 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Hear Halloween favorites on the pipe organ and piano presented by The Sequoia Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. Free. 442-1797.

THEATER

Our Town. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See Oct. 17 listing.

Oompah

The Teutonic hedonists who came up with schadenfreude and the autobahn knew we needed a little something in the fall — a chance to appreciate the season before the big holidays swoop in. They also knew we needed beer. Shake out your lederhosen, volks, it’s Oktoberfest. On Saturday in Rohner Park from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. you can get your oompah on with the Scotia Band’s Pumpernickel and Sauerkraut Band and the Humboldt Accordionaires. Feel free to jam with them on your complimentary kazoo. No other band will ever be OK with that, so carpe kazoo. There’s a raffle, races involving beer barrels and steins, even a pretzel toss, and proceeds go to Fortuna Senior Services. Prepare to skip dinner, as bratwurst, red cabbage, German-style potatoes and apple strudel are all on the menu from noon ‘til 3 p.m. ($20, $10 for kids under 12). Don’t worry, it’s good for you — look at Heidi Klum. Wash it down with a stein of Hofbrau, Warsteiner, Lagunitas, Gordon Biersch or Eel River Blonde Ale. Or Coors Light. This is still America, people. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Young Frankenstein: The Musical. 2 p.m. Gist Hall Theatre, HSU, Arcata. See Oct. 17 listing.

EVENTS

Stone Lagoon Campground Benefit. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Stone Lagoon Visitor Center, 115336 Highway 101, Trinidad. Featuring kayak tours to the campground, live music by Monahan, Martin and Sleep, a raffle and a whole lot of fun, rain or shine. Varies by activity. 498-1130. Celebrating our Health/Festejando Nuestra Salud. 12-4 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. A health fair for Spanish speakers with free food from Rita’s, children’s activities, CalFresh assistance and more. Presented by LatinoNet. Free. www. redwoodacres.com. Old Town Monster Walk. 1 p.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. A costumed walk on the boardwalk to pick up trash and have fun. There will be a photo shoot and all donations go to Six Rivers Planned Parenthood. Free.

FOOD

Breakfast in Bayside. 8 a.m.-noon. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Gourmet breakfast and music by Mon Petit Chou. $8 general; $5 kids and seniors. www. baysidegrange.org. Pancake Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Bridgeville Elementary School, 38717 Kneeland Road. Presented by the Bridgeville Volunteer Fire Company. $5.

GARDEN

Pumpkin Patch Party. 3 p.m. Bayside Gardens, 2074 Old Arcata Road. Free. jbittner@humboldt1.com. 496-0618.

Dream Quest Teen Center, Willow Creek, CA Presented by Dream Quest & Creator Sherry Keys, Horror Decor. 6-9:30pm Admission: $3/Adults, $2 Youth This Haunted House is NOT appropriate for young children.

Does your business have a happy hour?

MEETINGS

Animism International. Third Sunday of every month, 4-6 p.m. North Coast Co-op, Eureka, 25 Fourth St. Meetings are informal and topics of discussion include: the merger of science and spirituality, entheogens in spiritual practice, permaculture and more. Free. AnimismInternational@gmail.com. animisminternational. org. 382-7566.

OUTDOORS

Agate Answers. 1-3 p.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Bring your agate questions to the Agate Beach overlook and discover how you can identify these beautiful rocks. Free. Redwood Region Audubon Society Field Trip. Third Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Eureka Waterfront, Foot of Del Norte Street. Due to safety concerns, the Palco Marsh Walk is temporarily changing locations. Meet leader Ralph Bucher at the Foot of Del Norte St., Eureka to scope birds from the public dock. Attendees will then drive to the base of the Hikshari’ Trail at Truesdale Street and bird along the trail through the Elk River Wildlife Sanctuary. Free. thebook@reninet.com. 499-1247. Sumeg Village Tour. 1 p.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Explore the historic lifestyle of the Yurok people. Meet at the Visitor Center Deck. Rain cancels. Free.

AVAILABLE AT

The Journal’s Cocktail Compass is a FREE app, available for iPhone and Android phones. Coming this fall. • Browse listings of bars and restaurants • Happy Hour countdown timer • Find the current happy hours closest to you • Get routing directions • One-touch location calling

600 E ST. EUREKA (707) 442-9201

KITTEN IN A STEIN. YOU’RE WELCOME.

SPORTS

Humboldt Redwoods Marathon. 9 a.m. Humboldt Redwoods State Park, 17119 Avenue of Giants, Weott. Run along the Avenue of the Giants in the scenic Humboldt Redwoods State Park. $35 for 5K, $60 for half marathon, $70 for marathon. Director@redwoodsmarathon.org. www.redwoodsmarathon.org. 845-6111. Sandlot Baseball. 1 p.m. Sandlot league that’s been around for seven or eight years in Arcata — all skill levels — open invite hardball. Games are every Sunday on the field behind the CHP station in Arcata. 18-plus. Bring glove. universal_justin_2@hotmail.com. 497-9594.

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013

31


continued from previous page

21 monday Dance

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older, with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

Music

Birds of Chicago. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Singer/songwriters JT Nero and Allison Russell. $12 Advance; $15 at the door. 822-1575.

FooD

College of the Redwoods Farmers Market. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. See Oct. 17 listing.

outDoors

Arcata Community Forest Work Day. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Arcata Community Forest, Union Street. Help build and maintain trails. Gloves, tools, food and beverages will be provided. Meet at the lot by Fickle Hill Road. Free. 825-2163.

northcoastjournal

22 tuesday Music

Ukulele Play and Sing Group. 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All genres of music, from “Greensleeves” to “Kansas City,” “Cupid” to “El Paso.” If you can carry a tune and play a stringed instrument, come party! Free. Donations appreciated. veganlady21@yahoo.com.

FooD

Eureka Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Fresh, local produce direct from the farmer. Free. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Farmers’ Market, 10th and Main streets. Fresh, local produce, meats and cheeses. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Farm-fresh produce, etc. www.mirandagardens.com. 672-5224. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. 672-5224.

etc

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 444-3161.

23 wednesday Movies

R.O.T.O.R.. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. The 1988 robot cop movie with beer, pizza and all the jeering you can dish out. Main feature starts at 7:30 p.m. Free with $5 food or beverage purchase. www. arcatatheater.com/.

For KiDs

Carpathian the Gentle Ghoul. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. This spooky good time at Family Literacy Night is appropriate for all ages. Each child receives a free, new book at the night’s end. Free. 445-3655.

Meetings

CARS. TRUCKS. SUVs. ATVs. Tires, Wheels, Batteries, Wipers, Rubber Mats and More Local Family Owned Since 1939. (707) 822-5191 1265 Giuntoli Lane Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt Green Party Monthly Meeting. Fourth Wednesday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Greens Meeting Space, 310 H Street, Arcata. Election reform/ ranked choice voting. Economic reform/public banking. Be a part of the solution. Free. dsilver@greens.org. www. humboldtgreens.org. 267-5342.

outDoors

Sea Scouts. Fourth Wednesday of every month. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. Learn to sail! The Humboldt Bay Sea Scouts are recruiting new members for their co-ed sailing program for ages 14 to 20. $5 a month. 633-8572.

sports

Hardcourt Bike Polo. 6 p.m. Highland Park, 100 Highland Ave., Eureka. Like regular polo, but with bikes on a tennis court. Bring a bike and helmet to join in. Mallets provided. Free. daryl_witmore@yahoo.com. 541-531-6671.

24 thursday Lecture

“Environmental Security and National Security: Are They Compatible?” 5:30 p.m. Gist Hall 218, Laurel Drive, Arcata. Dr. Gwyn Kirk will present this lecture as part of the Sustainable Futures Speaker Series. Free. pjs26@ humboldt.edu. 826-3653.

Music

The Motet with Jelly Bread. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Instrumental house and techno with a blend of soul, funk and Americana rock. $17.50 at the door; $15 in advance. www.arcatatheatre.com.

theater

Our Town. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See Oct. 17 listing. Young Frankenstein: The Musical. 7:30 p.m. Gist Hall Theatre, HSU, Arcata. See Oct. 17 listing.

events

Humboldt County Teen Court Training. 4-6 p.m. Boys and Girls Club Teen Center, 3015 J St., Eureka. Teen Court is a real court administered by teens for teens who have chosen to have their cases heard by their peers. Training is open to teens in grades 8-12.

For KiDs

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. See Oct. 17 listing. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon Discovery Museum, 517 Third St., Eureka. See Oct. 17 listing.

FooD

College of the Redwoods Farmers Market. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. See Oct. 17 listing. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Oct. 17 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:15-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. See Oct. 17 listing.

etc

Heads Up This Week. See Oct. 17 listing. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See Oct. 17 listing.

Heads Up… Information and applications for Artist in Residence are now available at the Westhaven Center for the Arts. Applications due before Nov. 8, 2013. Email wcaexhibits@gmail.com or call Ann at 677-0128. October is Adopt-a-Shelter Dog Month. The Humboldt County Animal Shelter has reduced adoption fees for all adoptable dogs to $35. Call 840-9132 for more information. Arcata’s Historic and Design Review Commission has two vacancies. Commissioners attend two meetings a month, on the second and fourth Wednesday at 4 p.m. Applications for this commission are due by 5 p.m. on Oct. 30, 2013. l

Wutchoodoin’?

submit your events online or by e-mail

northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com Deadline: Noon Thursday the week before publication

Journal • thursday, Thursday, oCt. Oct. 17, 2013 •• northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 32 North Coast JourNal

No

Phillips thrills, Machete is dull filmland

By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS. Director Paul Greengrass has a dead-accurate, razoredged sense of story. One could say he makes action movies (the second and third Bourne installments, Green Zone), but that doesn’t quite get it. He distills the essential elements of large-scale conflict into absorbing, often impossibly intense human dramas. Despite taking on big stories about big subjects, his work always carries an air of intimacy and smallness that amplifies its themes. Captain Phillips uses as vast a canvas as anything on Greengrass’ resume, but he and star Tom Hanks boil it down to the essentials, yielding a deeply involved, compelling study in adversity and vulnerability. Captain Phillips is based on the real-life April 2009 hijacking of the MV MaerskAlabama, an American cargo ship en route from Oman to Kenya. Four very committed Somali pirates (all between the ages of 17 and 19, I’ve lately learned) successfully board the ship, taking Captain Phillips (Hanks) and a couple of the crew hostage. The remaining 20 or so crew members manage to evade capture, eventually shutting down all of the ship’s power systems and nabbing the pirate leader. An attempt to trade him for Phillips goes awry, and the captain ends up sharing the close quarters of a lifeboat with his captors. As this stalemate wears on, the story becomes a study in foils: Phillips, a hardnosed Yankee family man, contrasted against Abduwali Muse (Barkhad Abdi), a slight but ferocious go-getter with warlord bosses breathing down his neck. The U.S. Navy establishes a presence onscene, attempting to negotiate a peaceful resolution as relations within the pirate


MovieTimes zenegger are busting out of the joint. And evidently still working out. Know where your exits are. R. 116m. THE FIFTH ESTATE. Benedict Cumberbatch goes blonde as WikiLeaker Julian Assange. With Daniel Bruhl as his partner in transparency. R. 128m.

Continuing

Andy’s back!

group begin to erode. Phillips tries to reason with Muse, who sees returning to Somalia with his American hostage as the only viable solution. The situation can’t help but end badly for at least one of the parties involved. The resolution is a matter of historical record now, but the movie is so charged, so riveting, that I’d rather not spoil the surprise for those who don’t know how it ends. True to life or not, Captain Phillips is top-shelf action-drama through and through. It bears all of Greengrass’ cinematic fingerprints: a balance of thoughtfully composed static shots and visceral, frenetic handheld camera; a structure of constantly escalating risk; fluid but forceful editing; an exploration of the human ability to adapt to trying circumstances. If you like what he’s done in the past, you’ll enjoy this. But even those who could take or leave his earlier work may well be won over by Hanks’ performance here. I was concerned initially that his movie-stardom would distract from the harsh realism of the story. But he’s Tom Hanks for a reason, and that reason is that he is very, very good at what he does. He may not always choose the most adventurous roles to take on, but in Captain Phillips he gives a truly open, vulnerable, startling performance. The movie satisfies on any number of levels, but Hanks does some career-best work here, and it is captivating. PG13. 134m. MACHETE KILLS. Does anyone else remember the genesis of this character? Machete seemed such a promising prospect when he was just a fake movie trailer in the intermission between Robert Rodriguez’s Planet Terror and Quentin Tarantino’s Death Proof. We were so full of hope back then… Machete debuted in 2010 and immediately revealed that the titular character worked better within the confines of a one-minute trailer. The movie had some fun moments of ultra-violence and gratu-

itous nudity, but its nods to exploitation cinema — without which it would not exist — were too imitative, not inventive enough. Compared to this sequel, though, the first installment seems like a masterwork. Machete Kills opens with our eponymous hero (played by the great Danny Trejo) framed for murder and weapons trafficking. He’s saved from the noose by a red-phone call from the President of the United States (Carlos Estevez, wink), and it’s off to Mexico to deal with an ever-expanding, increasingly disappointing underworld that includes a murderous madam, a revolutionary leader with multiple personalities, a sinister arms manufacturer with a Star Wars fetish, and a host of other incidental characters. (There’s less fun to be had than the description would lead you to believe). Co-writer/director Rodriguez attempts so much with Machete Kills that it was bound to fail. As the wafer-thin plot blows down the road, he piles ever more predictable twists and hastily sketched caricatures. The action set pieces, some of which could have been pretty cool, come and go with inadequate setup and lazy execution. Rodriguez made his name in the business by creating a big effect with modest resources, but here he inverts the formula and it blows up in all our faces. I wanted to like Machete Kills, I really did. And to be fair, it has its moments, but they’re too few and too far between. Tragically — almost unbelievably — this movie is deeply boring. R. 104m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

CARRIE. Prom prank goes awry in a remake of the Stephen King classic. Starring Chloë Grace Moretz and Julianne Moore as the mother and daughter with issues. R. 99m. ESCAPE PLAN. Stallone and Schwar-

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2. The 3-D sequel goes a little Dr. Moreau when food creatures populate an island and hero Flint (Bill Hader) has to stop them. PG. 95m. DON JON. Love makes a man out of playboy Joseph Gordon-Levitt in the touching comedy he also wrote and directed. With Scarlett Johansson. R. 90m. ENOUGH SAID. A woman finds out her wonderful new boyfriend is her friend’s horrible ex. Whoops. Julia Louis-Dreyfus and the late James Gandolfini star. PG13. 93m. GRAVITY. Sandra Bullock and George Clooney are adrift in space. It’s the best of sci-fi with a real human story. PG13. 90m. INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2. Style, story and a satisfying scare in director James Wan’s haunted family follow-up. PG13. 106m. PRISONERS. Wrenching masterpiece with Hugh Jackman as the father of a missing child and and Jake Gyllenhaal as the detective out to find her. R. 146m. RUNNER RUNNER. Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake go 5 o’clock shadow to 5 o’clock shadow and try to stretch a 30-minute plot into a feature film. R. 91m. RUSH. Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Bruhl race neck and neck in Ron Howard’s thrilling popcorn cruncher about the 1976 Formula One racing season. R. 123m. WE’RE THE MILLERS. Implausible drug smuggling comedy wastes the usually funny Jason Sudeikis and Jennifer Anniston. R. 110m. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

Oct. 20 Oct. 24 Sun Oct 20 – Hocus Pocus (1993) Doors 5:35 p.m. $5 Rated PG Mon Oct 21 – Monday Night Football, Doors at 5:15 Free. All ages. Wed Oct 23 – Sci Fi Night ft. R.O.T.O.R. (1988) rated R Doors at 6 p.m. Free . All ages. Thurs Oct 24 – The Motet w/Jelly Bread Doors at 9:30 p.m. $17:50/$15 21+

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 Captain Phillips Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m., 2:50), 5:55, 9 Carrie Fri-Thu: (1:05, 3:40), 6:15, 8:50 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Fri-Thu: (12:05, 2:40), 5:10 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 3D Fri-Thu: 7:40 Don Jon Fri-Thu: (12:55, 3:20), 5:45, 8:10 Enough Said Fri-Thu: (1:25, 3:55), 6:20, 8:45 Escape Plan Fri-Thu: (12:35, 3:30), 6:30, 9:20 The Fifth Estate Fri-Thu: (12, 3), 6, 9:05 Gravity Fri-Thu: (2), 6:45 Gravity 3D Fri-Thu: (12:45, 3:10, 4:20), 5:35, 8, 9:10 Insidious: Chapter 2 Fri-Thu: (1:10), 6:40 Machete Kills Fri-Thu: (1:30, 4:10), 6:50, 9:30 Runner Runner Fri-Thu: (1), 6:05 Rush Fri-Thu: (3:45), 9:15 We’re the Millers Fri-Thu: (3:15), 8:30



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Captain Phillips Fri-Sun: (2:10), 5:20, 8:30; Mon-Thu: 5:20, 8:30 Carrie Fri-Sun: (1:25, 4), 6:35, 9:10; Mon-Thu: (4), 6:35, 9:10 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Fri-Sun: (12:55, 3:20), 5:50, 8:15; Mon-Thu: (3:20), 5:50, 8:15 Don Jon Fri-Thu: (3:50), 9:25 Escape Plan Fri-Sun: (12:45, 3:30), 6:15, 9; Mon-Thu: (3:30), 6:15, 9 Gravity Fri-Sun: (2:20), 9:20; Mon-Thu: 9:20 Gravity 3D Fri-Sun: (12, 4:40), 7; Mon-Thu: (4:40), 7 Machete Kills Fri-Sun: (1:05, 3:40), 6:20, 8:55; Mon-Thu: (3:40), 6:20, 8:55 Prisoners Fri-Sun: (12:25), 6:05; Mon-Thu: 6:05 Runner Runner Fri-Thu: (4:20), 9:35 Rush Fri-Sun: (1:20), 6:40; Mon-Thu: 6:40

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Captain Phillips Fri: 5:35, 8:40; Sat-Sun: (2:30), 5:35, 8:40; Mon-Thu: 5:35, 8:40 The Fifth Estate Fri: 5:45, 8:50; Sat-Sun: (2:40), 5:45, 8:50; Mon-Thu: 5:45, 8:50 Gravity Fri: (4:40), 7, 9:20; Sat-Sun: (2:20, 4:40), 7, 9:20; Mon-Thu: (4:40), 7, 9:20

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Captain Phillips Fri: (3:45), 6:45, 9:45; Sat: (12:30, 3:45), 6:45, 9:45; Sun: (12:30, 3:45), 6:45; Mon-Thu: (3:45), 6:45 Carrie Fri: (4), 6:50, 9:40; Sat: (1, 4), 6:50, 9:40; Sun: (1, 4), 6:50; Mon-Thu: (4), 6:50 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Fri: (4:50), 7:15, 9:30; Sat: (12:10, 2:30, 4:50), 7:15, 9:30; Sun: (12:10, 2:30, 4:50), 7:15; Mon-Thu: (4:50), 7:15 Gravity Fri: (4:45), 7, 9:20; Sat: (12:05, 2:25, 4:45), 7, 9:20; Sun: (12:05, 2:25, 4:45), 7; Mon-Thu: (4:45), 7 Gravity 3D Fri: (5:30), 7:45; Sat-Sun: (12:50, 3:15, 5:30), 7:45; Mon-Thu: (5:30), 7:45 Machete Kills Fri-Sat: 6:55, 9:35; Sun-Thu: 6:55 Runner Runner Fri: (4:15); Sat-Sun: (1:30, 4:15); Mon-Thu: (4:15)

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Lee Daniels’ The Butler Fri-Tue: 7:30; Wed: 6:30; Thu: 7:30

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St. northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013

33


List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE DRAWING. Sat.’s Oct. 26−Nov. 23, 9:30 a.m−12 p.m. Fee: $65. CR Eureka downtown site 525 D St. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (AC−1017) CREATING TUMBLERS & MUGS. Ongoing, weekly the first and third Thurs., 6:30−9 p.m. Free. Create whimsical ceramic mugs for our fundraising events. All ages welcome. Attend 3 workshops and receive a final product free. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−1226) FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR INTERMEDIATES. Learn advanced techniques to bring your fused glass jewelry to the next level. Learn to hand etch dicrohic glass with various design elements. Create pendants & earrings then learn to wire wrap, make your own bails & earring hooks. Workshop offered Sat., Nov 9 & 16, 10 a.m−noon. Fee: $50/$35 mem− bers, $15 materials. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−1107) HANDBUILDING FOR ADVANCED BEGINNERS & INTERMEDIATES. (5 weeks) Join Otamay Hushing for some fun with handbuilding clay projects. Bring your own ideas or try out some new ones. This class has a flexible format to encourage your crea− tivity and build your confidence. Previous clay ex− perience required. Thurs.’s Oct. 24−Nov. 21, 10 a.m− noon. Fee: $90. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata. (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−1024) INTRO. TO GLASS FUSING. One day introductory workshop offered, Sat., Oct. 19, 10−noon. Learn the basics of glass fusing while creating a unique work of art. In this workshop create a 6" square plate or tile. No experience or cutting required. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata. (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−1017)

HOLIDAY PLATTER WORKSHOP. With Trace Galbraith. (2 days) Celebrate the Holidays in style with a beautifully hand crafted glass platter. In this 2− day class you will use a combination of tech− niques and materials to design and create a platter for the winter season. Oct. 23 & 25, 10 a.m−4 p.m. Fee: $120.00 class (plus materials fee depending on size). More info: tgalbraith44@yahoo.com. 520 South G St., Arcata www.fireartsarcata.com. (707) 826−1445 (AC−1017)

INTRO TO ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR CS5. Learn the drawing program used to create logos, technical and free−form illustrations, banners, posters, web graphics and more. With Annie Reid. Tues./Thurs., Nov. 5−19, 6:30−9 p.m. Fee: $135. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMP−1024)

MAKING PHOTOS 1 & 2: Explore how to better use your camera and artistic eye to make more com− pelling photographs. Wed. Oct. 30−Dec. 18. Fee: $85 for each class. CR Eureka downtown site, 525 D St. View more online at www.redwoods.edu, visit the community education link. Call (707) 269−4000 to sign up or with questions. (AC−1017)

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, Oct. 7− Nov. 4, 7−8 p.m. and Fri. mornings, Oct. 11−Nov. 1, 11:30 a.m−12:30 p.m. Fee: $50. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C, Arcata. (707) 407−8998. info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT−1031)

STUDIO LAB FOR BEGINNERS & INTERMEDIATES. Open Lab provides hands on instruction to guide you through the use of the Fire Arts Center’s glass studio. Basic use of tools, materials, & safety will be covered. Lab is intended to further your crea− tive process with fused glass & use the shared space of the open studio effectively. Thurs’s 5:30− 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17−Nov. 7. Fee: 1 day $25, 2 days $ 45, all 4 days $85. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata. (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−1017)

Communication

DYNAMIC WRITING: THE CREATIVE LIFE ADVEN− TURE. A workshop on writing styles, techniques, exercises and publication mechanics with Jesse Austin. Sat., Nov. 2−16, 10 a.m−1 p.m. Fee: $55. Pre− registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMM−1024) MAKING THE MOST OUT OF LIFE EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ. How to make the most out of life will be explored at Lifetree Café on Sun., Oct. 20 at 7 p.m. The program, titled "Make the Most of Your Life: A Perspective That Will Change Your Life... For −ever," features the filmed story of professional guitarist Tony Melendez, who was born without arms. Lifetree is a conversation café located on the corner of Union and 13th St., Arcata. (CMM−1017) MEMOIRS: WRITING YOUR LIFE STORY. Learn to put your memories on paper and share your life stories with family and friends. Tues., Nov. 5−26. Fee: $59. CR Eureka Downtown site, 525 D St., Eureka. Visit online at www.redwoods.edu, click community education link. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (CMM−1017)

Computer

BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS II. This class covers inter −net use and safety, Word Pad, and formatting documents. Tues. & Thurs., Nov. 5−Dec. 5., 1−3 p.m. Fee: $79. Class held at CR Eureka downtown site, 525 D St. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (CMP−1017) INTERMEDIATE MICROSOFT WORD. Go beyond the basics to explore headers and footers, tables, mail merge, clipart, Quick Access tool bar custom− ization, troubleshooting, advanced formatting and more with Ali Ware. Wed./Thurs., Nov. 6−14, 6−8 p.m. Fee: $75. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMP−1024)

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

DANCE WITH DEBBIE: BALLROOM, LATIN & SWING. Have fun learning to dance with a partner through our group or private lessons at North Coast Dance Annex: $40/person/month. Couples & Singles welcome. Private lessons are the best way to learn at your speed. Single person = $40/ hour, Couples = $60/hour. (707) 464−3638 debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−1031) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−1226) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−1226) STUDIO OF DANCE ARTS. We teach all levels of Ballet, Broadway Style Jazz and Irish Step Dance. We are the home of the Irish Company Dancers. (707) 442−0952. (DMT−1031)

Fitness

AIKIDO. Aikido is a beautiful, powerful, yet non− aggressive martial art that provides an effective method for developing our human potential. You will gain center, balance, coordination, flexibility, self−confidence and fluidity as well as insight into deeper meaning in your life. Beginning enrollment is ongoing for both kids and adults! Come observe anytime. The dojo entrance is off the F St. parking lot behind the Arcata Plaza. Adult class every weeknight 6 p.m.; kids Mon, Wed. 4 p.m. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826−9395.(F−1226) DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−1226) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F− 1226)

PILATES: INCREASE YOUR POTENTIAL THOUGH A MINDFUL MOVEMENT. Arcata Core Pilates offers beginning−advanced group Pilates Mat, reformer, chair, TRX, as well as Private Training Sessions. Our instructors are all certified. The diversity in training and background makes a deep well for clients to draw from. Call 845−8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com, website:arcatacorepilatesstudio.com. (F−1226) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. & Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/ $4 Grange members. Every Tues. & Thurs Vector Pool, Aqua Zumba 9:15 a.m. (3289 Edgewood Rd, Eureka). Every Tue. at Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m.& every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy (707) 845−4307. marlajoy.zumba.com (F−1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Dance fitness to Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Mon, Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks World Dance Center in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. $5 class or $50 for 11 class pass. First class free!

Kids & Teens

CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 4−7. With Amanda Steinbach. Children will have a great time creating with clay. Will make one to two pieces per week and each project is designed to bring out their creativity. Sat’s, Sept 21−Oct 19. Fee: $75 per class. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata. (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com (K−1017)

50 and Better

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1226) BEFORE COLUMBUS: WHO ELSE DISCOVERED THE NEW WORLD? With Barry Evans. Today, no one doubts that the Vikings beat Columbus to the New World, but what about other contenders? Explore the latest evidence for when and how humans arr− ived in the Americas. Weds., Oct. 30 & Nov. 6, 2−4 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1024) BORN TO MOVE! REDISCOVERING YOUR INNER EXERCISER. It’s never too late to rediscover the joy of being physical. Instructor Louisa Rogers will share how to start being active and ways to sneak movement into your day. Mon., Oct. 28 & Nov. 4, 2−4 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1024) CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH. With Laurent Clee− newerck. Build on the basics of French and move toward a more conversational level of fluency. Thurs.s, Nov. 7−Dec. 5, 10 a.m.−noon. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1031) DISCOVERING MEXICO: OUR COLORFUL NEIGH− BOR. Louisa Rogers and Barry Evans share how to travel to and around Mexico; the best places for language schools, museums, architecture, arche− ology, markets and more! Tues., Oct. 29 & Nov. 5, 2−4 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1024)


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FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP. With Terry McLaughlin. Discover methods for improving plot, pacing characterization and more through a mix of presentations, activities, and critique sessions. Tues.s, Nov. 5−Dec. 10, 10 a.m−noon. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1031) GENTLE YOGA IN FERNDALE. Increase health and flexibility in body and mind with Laurie Birdsall. All levels welcome. Tues’s and Thurs’s, Oct. 22−Nov. 7 , 10−11 a.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017) GENTLE YOGA. With Patricia Starr. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. Mon.s, Nov. 4−18 or Tue.s, Nov. 5−19, 1:30−3 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1031) NORTH COAST AVIATORS. Delve into the history & development of aviation on the North Coast by local pioneers. With Marc Matteoli. Wed’s, Oct. 23 & 30, 4−6 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli PHOTOGRAPHY 101: BEYOND SNAPSHOTS. Learn helpful techniques to improve photographic skills through lectures, videos, demonstrations, assign− ments and critiques. With Lorraine Miller−Wolf. Tues’s, Oct. 22−Nov. 19, 4−6 p.m.$65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017) SENIOR ACTION COALITION. Use your knowledge and experience to take action on pressing issues affecting older adults. Seniors, boomers welcome. Grassroots, non−partisan, current focus health care. Meetings held third Wed. of every month, 11:30 a.m.−1:30 p.m. at Jefferson School, 1000 B St. For more information, e−mail psa@a1aa.org or call (707) 442−3763. SNOOPING IN SOUTHWESTERN KLAMATH COUNTY. Join Jerry and Gisela Rohde for historical highlights of mill towns, logging camps, the scenic highway, assaults by fire and water. Sat., Nov. 2 & 9, 1−3 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1031) TAI CHI MADE EZ FOR BEGINNERS. Learn a short version of Tai Chi made up of simple, smooth, circular movements designed to stretch, limber, tone and strengthen the body. With Glenda Hesseltine. Mon’s, Oct. 22−Nov. 25, 3−4:30 p.m. $70/ OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017) THE COMING OF THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR. With Donald Murphy. Explore the economic con− trast between the North and South with a focus on the three decades leading up to the start of the Civil War. Thur.s, Nov. 7−Dec. 5, 10 a.m.−noon. $65/ OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1031) THE HISTORY AND MYSTERY OF PI. For 4,000 years, pi, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, has fascinated mathematicians and philosophers. Keeping the math to a minimum, Barry Evans will share the historical significance of pi. Thurs., Oct. 31 & Nov. 7, 2−4 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1024)

HUMBOLDT LINKS TO THE GOLDEN GATE. With Ray Hillman. Study the products of industry, pro− minent individuals, and transportation develop− ments between Humboldt County and the Bay Area. Included is a walking tour in Old Town to examine cast iron architectural elements from San Francisco. Tues., Oct. 29, 6:30−8:30 p.m. & Sat., Nov. 2, 9 a.m.−4 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1024) THE VON HUMBOLDT PROJECT. Get a sneak preview and behind−the−scenes presentation of The Von Humboldt Project, a historical and thea− trical piece created and directed by Michael Fields, producing artistic director of Dell’Arte Interna− tional. Wed., Nov. 6, 5−9:30 p.m. $30/OLLI mem− bers, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1031) TROUBLE IN PARADISE. With Louise Bacon− Ogden. Invite birds to your yard, out−smart squir− rels, raccoons and bears and get some helpful hints on how to place feeders and bird houses. Thurs., Nov. 7, 6−8 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1031) USING GENETICS FOR GENEALOGY RESEARCH. Explore the basic terminology and concepts used by genetic genealogists, explore the realities of the science, common myths and fallacies. With Michael Cooley. Sat., Oct. 19, 1−4 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017) WRITING AS A SPIRITUAL JOURNEY. Allow your writing practice to be an adventure into surprising and unexplored territory. With Bonnie Shand. Tues’s, Oct. 22−Dec. 3, 1−3 p.m. $80/OLLI members, $105/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017)

Spiritual ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s 5:55 p.m., 730 K Street upstairs. Call 845−8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com. (S1226)

WHAT IS YOGA? WITH KAREN HARRIS. At Om Shala Yoga. Oct. 20. Two sections: 1−2:30 p.m & 3− 4:30 p.m. Explore some of the spiritual traditions that have shaped the contemporary practice of asana. $18 per class 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (S−1017)

Sports & Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation, Fri./Sat. 6:30−9:30 p.m, Sun. 2−5 p.m. Halloween Theme Skate: Fri. Oct. 25−Sun. Oct. 27. Dress in costume and receive $1 discount! Zombie Adult Skate: Sun. Oct. 13, 6:30−9:30 p.m. Dress like a Zombie and receive $1 discount! Planning a party? Call 668−5932 for info. Like us on Facebook at "Blue Lake Roller Rink"! (SR−1226)

Therapy & Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−1226)

THE WA: AN ECSTATIC DANCE JOURNEY. With Michael Furniss. At Om Shala Yoga. Fri., Oct. 25, and each 4th Fri. Monthly! 8−9:30 p.m. No experi− ence or "dancing grace" necessary. Move with your own authentic expression of the moment. $10 admission. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (S−1017)

3,(95;6+0.<7 (5++0=0+,@6<9 .(9+,573(5;: :H[6J[ !HT -9,, :WHJLPZSPTP[LK¯ *HSS _ [VYLZLY]L`V\YZWV[ *LU[YHS(]L‹4J2PUSL`]PSSL 4VU:H[![V! TPSSLYMHYTZU\YZLY`JVT

FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496−2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com (TS−1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS ? Confidential help is available. 825−0920 or 845−8973, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−1226)

School Of Education

Vocational

CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, MA, and Jed Mefford, MSW. Fri., Oct. 25, 8:30 a.m−4:30 p.m. Fee: $30, includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre−registration req− uired. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−1017)

Change your life in one year. Become a K-12 teacher in CA • Convenient 1 year programs • School-based fieldwork • Scholarship opportunities

continued on next page

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KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−1226) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S1226)

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Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

Programs starting Fall 2014 First application deadline Feb. 1, 2014 • Elementary Education Train in local schools! • Secondary Education Online coursework! • Special Education Open enrollment! For info, monthly orientation dates and deadlines: humboldt.edu/education or call: (707) 826-5867

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013

35


legal notices

continued from previous page COACHING FOR PERFORMANCE. Encourage staff to tackle new challenges, make decisions and solve problems on their own and discover any easy and effective process for coaching in this half−day workshop with Janet Ruprecht. Fri., Nov. 1, 8:30 a.m −12:30 p.m. Fee: $75 (includes materials). Pre−regis− tration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−1024) OVERCOMING BLOCKS TO SUCCESS AND SALES MADE EASY. Workshop for creating the right mindset for business mastery. Thurs., Oct. 24, 7 p.m. Pre−registration required. Hypnosis for Health 498−4897. (V−1017) VOLUNTEER TRAINING FOR HOSPICE OF HUM− BOLDT. Hospice of Humboldt offers patient care and grief support volunteer training Oct. 26 & 27, 11 a.m.−3 p.m. This eight hour introductory training provides information on how you can become part of the patient care team and bring specialized sup− port to patients and families at a time when care matters the most. For more information, call (707) 445−8443 ext. 355 or visit our website www.hospiceofhumboldt.org.

Wellness & Bodywork

ACCESS CONSCIOUSNESS BARS: ONE DAY WORK SHOP. Sun., Oct. 27, 10 a.m−6 p.m. For more info: www.bars.accessconsciousness.com. Host: Gena Pennington. (707) 822−4948. (W−1024) AYURVEDIC SELF−CARE & COOKING IMMERSION. With Traci Webb. Yoga, Ayurvedic Cooking Lessons & Self−Care, Kirtan, Meditation (Lunch Provided) Feb. 14−16 and/or Feb. 28−March 2. REGISTER: (707) 601−9025 or Online: www.ayurvedicliving.com. (W−0213) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Festival of Herbs. Visiting Teacher Series: Oct. 2013−Apr. 2014. Meets first weekend of each month. Rosemary Gladstar, Candis Cantin and more! Individual classes now available. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program: Feb.− Nov. 2013. For the serious herb student. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442− 8157. (W−1031) ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS PRESENTS COMPLIMEN− TARY EDUCATIONAL CLASSES. Every Weds. 5:30 p.m. Oct. 16: doTERRA Essential Oils Series with Alicia Hashem and Stephanie Pearlston. Oct. 23: Creating Your Self Care Travel Toolkit with Steph− anie Pearlston. Oct. 30: Into to White Lotus Flow with Liz Lux. 1639 Central Ave., Ste. A, McKin− leyville. (707) 839−7772. For more information visit us at www.essentialelementsspa.com (W−1031) INNER ASANA WITH KAREN HARRIS. Tues. Evenings, Oct. 22−Dec. 17, 7−8:15 p.m. Cultivate your mental and emotional strength and suppleness with inner asana, the teachings and practices that are the ancient origin of yoga. $15 drop−in or use your current class pass. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825− YOGA (9642)www.omshalayoga.com (S−1017) INTRODUCTION TO AYURVEDA. With Traci Webb. At Moonrise Herbs. Learn: Constitution, Aroma− therapy, Doshas, Nutrition, Home Remedies, Tues., Jan. 14−28, 6:30−9:15 p.m. Fee: $108. REGISTER: call (707) 601−9025 or online: www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0109)

authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES D. POOVEY CSB # 83955 DAVIS & POOVEY, INC. ATTORNEYS AT LAW 937 SIXTH STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 443−443−6744 SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS WELLNESS CLASSES: YOGA & PILATES. Mon.−Fri. 9:30 a.m & 5:30 p.m. Please see our website for our regular schedule. All class− es include community use of our sauna 30 minutes prior to class. $15 drop−in and discounted passes, with no expiration. 15% discount for Students and Seniors. 1639 Central Ave., Ste. A. McKinleyville. (707) 839−7772. For more info. on services and classes visit www.essentialelementsspa.com or email info@essentialelementsspa.com. (W−1017) NORTHWEST INSTITUTE OF AYURVEDA. 10− MONTH AYURVEDIC WELLNESS PROGRAM. Part 1 of 3−Part CLINICAL AYURVEDIC PRACTITIONER PROGRAM. Nutrition, Yoga, Herbs, Self−Care, Colors, Aromatherapy, Spiritual Philosophy/Sci− ence, Constitutional Assessment, Clinical Intern− ship, 1 weekend/month, Starts March 14, PREREQ: Intro. to Ayur. or Ayur Self−Care. REGISTER: www.ayurvedicliving.com or (707) 601−9025. (W−0313) OCTOBER ROLFING SPECIALS. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer −10 series includes one free session. ALSO call now for free body analysis consultation. (541) 251−1885 (W−1226) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Arcata School of Massage is hosting a free School Information Night on Mon., Nov. 11, 5:30−6:30 p.m. in our classroom at 145 South G St., Suite E, Arcata. Come meet our Director and Principle Instructors, see our classroom, and learn about our 650−hour Therapeutic Massage Certification Program. No registration necessary. Call (707) 822−5223 or visit us online at www.arcatamassage.com. (W−1107) TAI CHI PLUS. Breathwork, acupressure meridian massage, meditation, sound healing included with traditional Tai Chi movement and Qigong practices. Daily, Mon.− Fri., morning, afternoon, and evening classes available in 6 cities, Westhaven, Arcata, Eureka, Ferndale, Fortuna, and McKinleyville. For more info. call Glenda (707) 268−3936 or email gkhesseltine@yahoo.com. See website taichiforeveryone.net (W−1031)

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36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF SUE CAROLE DILLON, AKA SUE C. DILLON CASE NO. PR130282 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SUE CAROLE DILLON, AKA SUE C. DILLON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MICHELE DESPRES LOVE− LESS in the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests MICHELE DESPRES LOVE− LESS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 24, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.

10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−269)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DOUGLAS F. STOCKLY CASE NO. PR130278 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DOUGLAS F. STOCKLY; DOUGLAS FANCIS STOCKLY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DALE A. STOCKLY in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests DALE A. STOCKLY be appointed as personal representa− tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examina− tion in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 25, at 8:30 a.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, Dept. 5. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person

your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: STEPHEN G. WATSON LAW OFFICES OF W.G WATSON, JR. 715 I STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 444−3071 September 16, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/10, 10/17, 10/24 (13−276)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF GENEVA WASSO BELL CASE NO. PR1300000 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GENEVA WASSO BELL, aka GENEVA W. BELL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JANICE L. CONN AND BARBARA L. BISHOP in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JANICE L. CONN AND BARBARA L. BISHOP be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the dece− dent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 24, 2013 12, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: Probate Room: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with


held on October 24, 2013 12, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: Probate Room: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: WILLIAM T. KAY, JR., SBN 59581 LAW OFFICE OF WILL KAY 628 H STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445−2301 September 30, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−270)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BERNICE MABLE LANEY CASE NO. PR130280 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BERNICE MABLE LANEY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JERRY LEE LANEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests JERRY LEE LANEY be appointed as personal representa− tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act.(This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representa− tive will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The indepen− dent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representa− tive will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The indepen− dent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 26, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. EIGHT. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA, CSB #69056 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 445−0804 SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−264)

Notice of Provisional Appointment The filing period for the Kneeland School District Board of Trustees election closed in August 2013, and at that time the incumbent did not file intentions for reelection, there− fore creating a vacancy after the November election. On October 8th, 2013 The Kneeland School Board appointed David Circe. Unless a petition calling for a special elec− tion pursuant to Ed. Code 5091 is filed in the office of the County Superintendent within 30 days of the provisional appointment, it shall become the official appointment and the appointee shall be seated at the organizational meeting in December 2013. 10/17/2013 (13−282)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 23rd of October, 2013, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said prop− erty has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Michael Koster, Unit # 5015 Michael Koster, Unit # 5071 Desmond Beltz Jr., Unit # 5253 Andre Mayo, Unit # 5258 Deja Sousa, Unit # 5301 Thomas Blaquelourde, Unit # 5330 Jeffrey Clark, Unit # 5441 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Domenique Orona, Unit # 2808 Michael Frank, Unit # 3315 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Linda Stewart, Unit # 1112 Logan Bremer, Unit # 1185 Michael Dolan, Unit # 1190 Sarah Curry, Unit # 1232 Stephen Goff, Unit # 1394 Michael Brunner, Unit # 1555 Michael Frank, Unit # 1597 Charles Gannon, Unit # 1666 Deborah Brown, Unit # 1673 Harriet Sanders, Unit # 1731 Chad Bortnem, Unit # 1755 Robert Keating, Unit # 1815 Robert Keating, Unit # 1817 Robert Keating, Unit # 1818 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. David Garwin, Unit # 120 Marcus Brower, Unit # 403 Colette Stolberg, Unit # 476 The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Nicholas Souza, Unit # 4102 Ryan Bieker, Unikt # 4367 Sean Jackson, Unit # 4389 (Held in Co. Unit) Mark Strang, Unit # 4729 John Gehl, Unit # 6020 Deaundray Robinson, Unit # 6141 Ashley WoolisCroft, Unit # 6175 Maria Ordonez, Unit # 7079 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Michael Baughman, Unit # 6315 Jared Morgart, Unit # 6334 Isaac Delgadillo, Unit # 6467 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Brian Zamora, Unit # 9234

Maria Ordonez, Unit # 7079 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Michael Baughman, Unit # 6315 Jared Morgart, Unit # 6334 Isaac Delgadillo, Unit # 6467 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Brian Zamora, Unit # 9234 Tyler Smith, Unit # 9235 Brenda Struth, Unit # 9255 Cassidy Lang, Unit # 9536 Robert Dixon, Unit # 9542 Orrin Brown, Unit # 9569 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Charmaine Stapp, Unit # 3102 Augustus Haggerty II, Unit # 3244 Christopher Martin, Unit 4140 Michael Moorefield, Unit # 4109 Frances Pederson, Unit # 5104 Kevin Donlon, Unit # 6215 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appli− ances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self− Storage, (707) 443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 10th day of October 2013 and 17th day of October 2013 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−271)

PUBLIC SALE

#59 Tara Olivo Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Christmas decora− tions, toys, golf clubs, mirror, dresser, snowboard, hydroponic equipment and supplies, pictures, card table, microwave, luggage, plastic bin, boxes and bags (contents unknown). Purchase must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sing in at 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA. prior to 10:00 A.M on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be moved at the time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Cutten Mini Storage (707) 443−2280, Bond #0336443. Dated this 10th day of October 2013 and 17th day of October 2013 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−280)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00501 The following person is doing busi− ness as CHILDREN’S COTTAGE PRESCHOOL at 1807 Harrison Ave. St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Rose McCutchen 1610 Sunny Ave. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 1/14/2008 /s/ Rose McCutchen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 10, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−266)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00502 The following person is doing busi− ness as CHILDREN’S INFANT TODDLER CENTER at 900 Hodgeson St., Eureka, CA. 95503 Rose McCutchen 1610 Sunny Ave. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 8/5/2013 /s/ Rose McCutchen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 10, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

669 Montgumery Loleta, CA. 95551 Barton R. Garber 669 Montgumery Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 04/19/2013 /s/ Joann Garber This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 03, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−263)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00518 The following persons are doing Business as CAFÉ NOONER TOO! at 2910 E Street, Eureka, CA. 95501, CAFÉ NOONER at 409 Opera Alley, Eureka, CA. 95501 Café Nooner, LLC 2910 E Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 10/1/2013 /s/ Joseph Mark Filgas, Manager/ Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 16, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−253)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00523 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HIGH TIDE PERMACULTURE at 1620 Charles Ave., Arcata, CA. 95521 Daniel Joseph Mar 1620 Charles Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Daniel J. Mar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 16, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−257) −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Section 535 of the Penal Code and STATEMENT 13−00527 provisions of the civil Code. The following person is doing Busi− The undersigned will sell at public ness as KEEPING VIGIL PRESS at sale by competitive bidding on the 995 11th St., Arcata, CA. 95521 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−267) 23rd of October 2013, at 10:00 AM, Susanna Gallisdorfer on the premises where said prop− 995 11th St. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME erty has been stored and which are Arcata, CA. 95521 STATEMENT 13−00486 located at CUTTEN MINI STORAGE, The business is conducted by An The following persons are doing 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA, County Individual business as EUREKA STOVE AND of Humboldt the following units The registrant commenced to FIRESIDE SHOP at 331 7th St., will be sold: transact business under the ficti− Eureka, CA. 95521 #185 Mark Staley tious business name listed above on Joann K. Garber #272 Stephanie Poovey 9/9/2013 669 Montgumery #59 Tara Olivo /s/ Susanna Gallisdorfer Loleta, CA. 95551 Items to be sold include, but are This statement was filed with the Barton R. Garber not limited to: Christmas decora− County Clerk of Humboldt County 669 Montgumery tions, toys, golf clubs, mirror, on Sept. 18, 2013 Loleta, CA. 95551 dresser, snowboard, hydroponic CAROLYN CRNICH The business is conducted by A equipment and supplies, pictures, Humboldt County Clerk Married Couple card table, microwave, luggage, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10,➤ 10/17/2013 (13−259) The registrant commenced to plastic bin, boxes and bags legal NOTICES 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−259) transact business under the ficti− (contents unknown). continued on next page tious business name listed above on Purchase must be paid for at the 04/19/2013 time of the sale in cash only. • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 northcoastjournal.com /s/ Joann Garber Anyone interested in attending the This statement was filed with the auction must sing in at 2341 Fern County Clerk of Humboldt County Street, Eureka, CA. prior to 10:00 on Sept. 03, 2013. A.M on the day of the auction, no

37


The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 9/9/2013 /s/ Susanna Gallisdorfer This statement was filed with the Continued from County Clerk of Humboldt previous page. County on Sept. 18, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−259)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00551

legal notices 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−259)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00531 The following persons are doing Business as SUNSHINE CAFÉ/ COUPLE CUPS at 1603 G St., Arcata, CA. 95521 Sunshine Unlimited LLC. 1603 G St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 9/10/2013 /s/ Serg Mihaylo This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 18, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−258)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00541 The following persons are doing Business as REDWOOD PLANET MEDIA at 1270Haven Ln., Apt. 1, McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Redwood Planet Media 1270 Haven Ln., Apt. 1 McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 5/31/2013 /s/ Alan Peterson, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 24, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−262)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00548 The following person is doing busi− ness as A TOUCH OF SILVER at 2530 Alliance, Arcata, CA. 95521 Ari Perlman 2530 Alliance Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 10/1/13 /s/ Ari Perlman This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 27, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−268)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00542

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEED BOX LANDSCAPE & DESIGN at 1575 Vancil St., Fortuna, CA. 95540 Marisa Fleming 1575 Vancil St. Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 6/1/13 /s/ Marisa Fleming This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 24, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/10, 10/17, 10/24, 10/31 (13−273) 10/10, 10/17, 10/24, 10/31/2013 (13−273)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00564 The following persons are doing business as FRIVOLOUR APPAREL at 118 Gulliksen Dr,, Fortuna, CA. 95540 Felicia Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA. 95540 Scott Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by a Married Couple The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 10/14/2013 /s/ Felicia Thomsson This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Oct. 11, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/17, 10/24, 10/31, 11/7/2013 (13−281

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−559 The following persons are doing Business as MCCUTCHAN DISTRIB− UTORS at 5065 Boyd Rd., Arcata, CA. 95521, 616 Wabash Ave., Eureka, CA. 95501 Timoth Dale McCutchan 616 Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA. 95501 Kristen A. McCutchan 616 Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 11/1/2013 /s/ Timoth Dale McCutchan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Oct. 03, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/10, 10/17, 10/24, 10/31 (13−277)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00551

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JUST MY TYPE LETTER− PRESS & ILLUSTRATION at 40 Buckley Road, Blue Lake, CA. 95525, PO Box 884, Blue Lake, CA. 95525 Lynn Marie Jones 40 Buckley Road Blue Lake, CA. 95525 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Lynn M. Jones This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 27, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/10, 10/17, 10/24, 10/31 (13−272)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 12−00375 The following persons have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name CAFÉ NOONER Too! at 2910 E Street, Eureka, CA. 95501. The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on 6/20/2012 Joseph Mark Filgas 2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville ,CA. 95519 Lorrena Lucille Filgas 2640 Clay Rd.McKinleyville, CA. 95519 This business was conducted by: Individual Husband & Wife /s/ Joseph Mark Filgas / Lorrena Lucille Filgas This state was files with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date Sept. 16, 2013 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26,10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−254)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 11−00608 The following persons have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name CAFÉ NOONER at 409 Opera Alley, Eureka, CA. 95501 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on 10/17/2011 Joseph Mark Filgas 2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville ,CA. 95519 Lorrena Lucille Filgas 2640 Clay Rd.McKinleyville, CA. 95519 This business was conducted by: Individual Husband & Wife /s/ Joseph Mark Filgas / Lorrena Lucille Filgas This state was files with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date Sept. 16, 2013 I Hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as JUST MY TYPE LETTER− PRESS & ILLUSTRATION at 40 The following person is doing Busi− Buckley Road, Blue Lake, CA. 95525, ness as SEED BOX LANDSCAPE & PO Box 884, Blue Lake, CA. 95525 9/26. 10/3. 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−255) DESIGN at 1575 Vancil St., Fortuna, Lynn Marie Jones CA. 95540 40 Buckley Road Marisa Fleming Blue Lake, CA. 95525 1575 Vancil St. Coast Journal • Thursday, The businessOct. is conducted An North 17, 2013by • northcoastjournal.com Fortuna, CA. 95540 Individual The business is conducted by An The registrant commenced to Individual transact business under the ficti− The registrant commenced to tious business name listed above on

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00542

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Field notes

Thatched roofs of an Akha village in northern Thailand. Photo by Sputnikcccp/Wikimedia Commons

Embellishing English By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

O

nce when the world was young — 1978 to be more precise — I headed out alone from the northern Thai city of Chiang Rai, fancying myself an anthropologist on the verge of discovering new peoples in the mythical “Golden Triangle” region. So much for the hubris of youth. Turned out I was walking into a wellestablished tourist trap where even the romantic name “Golden Triangle” (the region in which Thailand, Myanmar and Laos meet) had been bestowed by the US State Department in reference to what had been a thriving opium industry. I did spend a few happy days in the highlands with Akha people, many of whom (following the linguistic conceit of a surprising number of Star Trek aliens) spoke excellent English. The hill-tribe Akha are comparative newcomers to the region. Originally from the Yunnan region of southern China, they migrated south into mainland Southeast Asia (aka Indochina) over a century ago. About 100,000 of them live in the Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai provinces of northern Thailand today. The Akha are often mentioned in popular books on linguistics for their curious use of adjectives, specifically how “very” takes different forms depending on what they’re referring to. Very deep, for instance, is “kha” deep. Very big is “lo” big. In the same vein, and lacking an actual word for “very,” the Akha say “tio” clean, “dù” blue and “d” white for very clean, very blue and very white.

Which isn’t quite as exotic as it may sound at first blush, when you consider the many variants of “very” in English. We routinely and automatically add playful little baroque emphases to many of our most common adjectives. We typically don’t say, “The hitchhiker was very wet,” we say, “He was soaking wet.” After the long hike, I wasn’t “very tired,” I was “dog-tired.” Similarly: bone dry, drop-dead gorgeous, brim full, pug ugly, goddam awful, piping hot, scot-free, feather light, dead quiet, pencil thin, pitch black, snow (lily, pearly) white, brand new, dirt cheap, sky high, freezing cold, crystal clear, fighting fit ... I’m sure you can come up with some of your own. These examples are all the easy one-word add-ons, excluding such fullblooded metaphors we characteristically employ. When’s the last time you said, “She’s very sharp”? Didn’t you really say, “She’s sharp as a tack”? Note that these embellishments don’t really add to the meaning: “very ugly” and “pug ugly” mean pretty much the same thing, the latter being slightly stronger perhaps. It’s just that we all love language — it’s our primary social medium, so we do more than express “just the facts, ma’am” when we want to add emphasis. We’re not just language speakers, we’re language players. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) hopes you didn’t find the above deadly dull.


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DOWN opposite, it ____â&#x20AC;?: Ursula K. Le Guin 35. Huffs 37. Get the ball rolling 39. Karan or Klein 40. Kingdom in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The King and Iâ&#x20AC;? 43. Clear (of) 44. Rushing stat: Abbr. 45. Marquee name, often 46. Decides one will 47. Urban ____ 49. Difficult surfaces for high-heel shoes 53. Approaches 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call it ____â&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re evenâ&#x20AC;?) 57. Like some vaccines 60. Place for Peter Pan? 62. Suffix with Israel 63. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s teach-in organizer: Abbr. 64. 1972 #1 hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;____ Womanâ&#x20AC;? 65. Compass dir. opposite 70-Across 66. Show based at 30 Rock MEDIUM #21

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707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com

ď ?ď Ąď Ťď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Ľď ¸ď ´ď ˛ď Ąď&#x20AC; ď ­ď Żď Žď Ľď šď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;  ď §ď ˛ď Ľď Ąď ´ď&#x20AC; ď Żď °ď °ď Żď ˛ď ´ď ľď Žď Šď ´ď šď&#x20AC;Ž ď &#x201C;ď °ď Ľď Łď Šď Ąď Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x17D;ď Ľď Ľď ¤ď łď&#x20AC; ď ď ¤ď ľď Źď ´ď łď&#x20AC;  ď Źď Šď śď Ľď&#x20AC; ď ˇď Šď ´ď ¨ď&#x20AC; ď šď Żď ľď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď &#x2026;ď Ąď ˛ď Žď&#x20AC; ď ľď °ď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Żď&#x20AC;  ď&#x20AC;¤ď&#x20AC;łď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;śď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Ąď ¸ď&#x20AC;­ď Śď ˛ď Ľď Ľď&#x20AC;Żď ­ď Żď&#x20AC;Ž ď &#x201A;ď ˛ď Šď Žď §ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;´ď&#x20AC; ď ˛ď Ľď Śď Ľď ˛ď Ľď Žď Łď Ľď łď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC;  ď ď °ď °ď Źď Šď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď&#x20AC; ď Żď Žď&#x20AC;­ď łď Šď ´ď Ľď&#x20AC;Ž ď ?ď ľď łď ´ď&#x20AC; ď ¨ď Ąď śď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Ľď ¸ď ´ď ˛ď Ąď&#x20AC;  ď ˘ď Ľď ¤ď ˛ď Żď Żď ­ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x2C6;ď &#x201C;ď&#x20AC;Żď &#x2021;ď &#x2026;ď &#x201E;ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Śď&#x20AC;  ď Łď Źď Ľď Ąď Žď&#x20AC; ď Łď ˛ď Šď ­ď Šď Žď Ąď Źď&#x20AC; ď ˛ď Ľď Łď Żď ˛ď ¤ď&#x20AC;Ž ď &#x192;ď Ąď Źď Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x160;ď Ąď ­ď Šď Ľď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Żď ¤ď Ąď šď&#x20AC; ď Śď Żď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď Ąď °ď °ď ´ď&#x20AC;Ąď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;  ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC;ˇď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC;´ď&#x20AC;´ď&#x20AC;˛ď&#x20AC;­ď&#x20AC;´ď&#x20AC;ľď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC;°ď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Łď&#x20AC;ąď&#x20AC;´ ď ˇď ˇď ˇď&#x20AC;Žď Łď Ąď ­ď Ľď Žď ´ď Żď ˛ď Śď ¨ď Ąď&#x20AC;Žď Łď Żď ­

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the MARKETPLACE Opportunities

Opportunities

Opportunities HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8045. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;1226)

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Art & Collectibles

Art & Collectibles

Clothing

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BSTâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;1226)

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J.B. Fabrication

Custom Welding & Artwork

RN CLINIC COORDINATOR (Supervisor) 1 F/T Willow Creek

MEDICAL RECORDS CLERK 1 F/T Arcata REGISTERED NURSE 1 F/T McKinleyville MEDICAL BILLER 1 F/T Arcata BILLING DEPARTMENT FILE CLERK 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Arcata, 1 F/T Willow Creek

MEDICAL ASSISTANT-PEDIATRICS 1 F/T Eureka DENTAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Eureka Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete our online application.

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Special artwork for home or business. Custom work for your vehicle.

STAFF HERBALIST! Must be a certified herbalist (or equivâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; alent experience) w/ excelâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; lent customer service skills. Retail experience a plus. Send resume, references & letter explaining interest in position. www.humboldtherbals.com

(707) 498-1067

jbcustomfabrication@yahoo.com www.facebook.com/justin.barrington.96

Community BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13â&#x2C6;&#x2019;18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5013, ask for Peggy

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PUBLIC AUCTION

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THURSDAY OCT. 24th 5:45 PM ď &#x2026;ď łď ´ď Ąď ´ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď Śď ľď ˛ď Žď Šď ´ď ľď ˛ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Śď&#x20AC;  ď ¨ď Żď ľď łď Ľď ¨ď Żď Źď ¤ď&#x20AC; ď ­ď Šď łď Łď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Ťď&#x20AC; ď Ąď ¤ď ¤ď Šď ´ď Šď Żď Žď łď&#x20AC;Ž

GRANTS AND CONTRACTS ANALYST Dynamic international organization seeks experienced contract manager to provide oversight of federal and private grants for international programs in media development. Seeking to fill full-time, fully-benefitted Grants and Contracts Analyst position to provide administrative, financial, and contractual analysis and grants management for a diverse international portfolio.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Six Rivers Planned Parenthood seeks CEO to provide strategic vision and leadership to carry out its mission. Will oversee clinical, education and public affairs service delivery and operations management. BA required w/advanced degree preferred, nonâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;profit experience including fund raising, 8â&#x2C6;&#x2019;10 yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relevant work/ managment experience required. Salaryâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; competitive and dependent on prior experience. Excellent benefit package.

Ideal candidate has: â&#x20AC;˘ Significant experience with federal contract, grant, and subgrant management â&#x20AC;˘ Experience in and aptitude for accounting and financial analysis, including grant budgeting â&#x20AC;˘ Experience in proposal, grant, and contract writing and editing â&#x20AC;˘ Experience in procurement of goods and services, including development and evaluation of RFPs/RFQs â&#x20AC;˘ Experience in USG funder regulations For more details and to apply, visit www.internews.org/about/employment No Calls Please. EOE M/F/D/V

To apply: send your resume and cover letter to Joanna Donat, Director of Human Resources, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood at humanresources@srpp.org Position open until filled. www.srpp.org

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The CO-OP is seeking an experienced Bakery Production Manager to ensure the highest level of service possible to North Coast CO-OPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s internal and external customers. This position supervises bakery production operations, including the supervision of ten to twelve staff members. The Production Manager also assists and participates in the presentation, sale and inventory of bakery products at the production level, and provides product for retail areas of both the Arcata and Eureka store. Applicants must have experience in meeting objectives related to sales, margin and labor.

ADVANCE NOTICE

THURS. NOV. 7th 5:45 PM Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

@ncj_of_humboldt

Merchandise KNICKKNACKS & PACKS 1/2 PRICE! Oct. 15â&#x2C6;&#x2019;19. Famous Quarter Rack. Dream Quest Thrift Store: Helpâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ing Youth Realize Their Dreams! (Mâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;1017)

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ď &#x2020;ď &#x152;ď ď &#x201C;ď &#x2C6;ď &#x201A;ď ď &#x192;ď &#x2039;

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ď ?ď Łď ´ď Żď ˘ď Ľď ˛ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď Ąď Źď Ľď&#x20AC;ş

ď &#x201C;ď Ľď Źď Ľď Łď ´ď&#x20AC; ď &#x201C;ď ˇď Ľď Ąď ´ď Ľď ˛ď łď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Śď&#x20AC; ď ?ď ľď ˛ď łď Ľď ł 116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Mon. & Tues.

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We offer a full benefit package including PTO, health, dental and life insurance packages, a 401K with paid match, and many other perks. Please see the full job description at www.northcoastco-op.com. You can forward your resume and application to hr@northcoastco-op.com.

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ northcoastjournal.com

Art & Collectibles Auctions Merchandise Baby Items Miscellaneous Clothing Sporting Goods

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20 words and a photo, in full color for only $25 per week. 442-1400 classified@northcoastjournal.com www.northcoastjournal.com

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ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499−4828. wiesner_eric@yahoo.com

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  

 

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

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Art & Design

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707-840-0600

     default

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    

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−1226) default

EUREKA PEDIATRICS WELCOMES ALAYNE BENASSI, PEDIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER. Alayne joins us after gradu− ating from the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Her interests include general pediatrics, newborns and breastfeeding. She will soon be board certified as an International Lactation Consultant. PLEASE NOTE OUR NEW EUREKA OFFICE HOURS: M−TH: 8:30−7:30 PM FRI 8:30−5:30 PM SAT 9:00−12:00 (707) 445−8416 www.eurekapeds.com

Moving & Storage 616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

Auto Service YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−1226)

Cleaning CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−1226)

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Garden & Landscape ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−1226) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, taichigardener.com (S−1226)

JEANNIE’S CLEANING SERVICE. "Maid for the day" References available Call (707) 921−9424 or (707) 445−2644 jbates5931@yahoo.com $15/hour or by the job (negotiable)

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−1226) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermedi− ate. Seabury Gould 444−8507. (M −1226)

Home Repair

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all pi− ano styles. Juilliard trained, re− mote lessons available. National− ly Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−1226)

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com, (S−1226)

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner−advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: (707) 441−1343 susielarain e@northcoastjournal.com

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 

USEFUL ALEXIS FOR ANY HOME OR OFFICE PROJECT. Computer tech, photographer, graphic designer, writer & more. www.usefulalexis.com (360) 474−7597

Sewing & Alterations

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8a.m− 3p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n− Britches. Kristin360@gmail.com

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2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small. Call 845−3132, 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com

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Legal 

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MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. $300 Federal Tax Credit−Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834− (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−1226)

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Other Professionals

IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more

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RESTAURANTS, MUSIC, EVENTS, MOVIE TIMES, ARTS LISTINGS, BLOGS

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TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001 FD1963

A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amaz− ing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birth− days, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499−5628. (S−1226)

        

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013

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body, mind ACA MEETING. Adult Children of Alcoholics & dysfunctional fami− lies. Meets Wed’s 5:30−6:30 p.m, Room 4 (back of church) at Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. (707) 834−4338

&Spirit BUILD A BETTER ATTITUDE. Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. Accepting new clients to reduce stress/fear, boost confidence/motivation/ self−esteem. (707) 845−3749. www.ManifestPositivity.com (MB−1212) default

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

OCTOBER ROLFING SPECIALS With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer −10 series includes one free session. ALSO call now for free body analysis consultation. (541) 251−1885

   

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Tai chi for everyone ... everywhere! Westhaven to Fortuna

Call Glenda at 268-3936 or email gkhesseltine@yahoo.com for more info.

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Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center

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  HEAT THERAPY

All Renewals Starting At

$

+

80

ENERGY MEDICINE

Walk-ins Welcome

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

  

Parent Educator

photo by Callista Hesseltine

taichiforeveryone.net

Wed & Sat 11-5pm

Open Mon- Sat

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Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students

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

$

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

New Patients ONLY

707-822-5244

95



ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668−5408. astro@salinarain.com, www.salinarain.com. (MB−1226)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, Uni− versity of Metaphysical Sci− ences. Bringing professional− ism to metaphysics. (707) 822 −2111

 

Diana Nunes Mizer

AHH A MASSAGE SPECIALS 50% discount for college students, just $15 for an Hour massage. New Client Special, $20 for an hour massage. Cash or Check, Online booking link on website, or Call. (716) 982−5505 www.ahh−a− massage.massagetherapy.com

CERTIFIED ROLFER ANGELA HART, B.A . Rolfing® Ten Series, Tune−up, injuries, Chronic Pain, Repetitive Motion Injury. (707) 616−3096 (MB−1226)

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  

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Medical Cannabis Consultants  

707.445.4642



consciousparentingsolutions.com

Medical Cannabis Evaluations Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years.

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Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

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



Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

 

Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Est. 1979

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  





 

 

Art & Collectibles Auctions Merchandise Baby Items Miscellaneous Clothing Sporting Goods



 

A HUMBOLDT GEM Two homes on seven private acres

Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems

Call 441-1484



Call for Walk-in Availability

KAREN ORSOLICS

fi d e n t i a l &

co

assionate mp

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

CUSTOM HOME ON FOUR ACRES 6703 Greenwood Heights

“The best move you’ll ever make.” ArcataProperty.com Cell: 707-834-1818 DRE License# 01200980

Main home: 2500 sq. ft., 4 bed, 2 bath Second Unit: 1500 sq. ft., with 2 bed, 2 bath Decking, privacy, custom features Barn with tack room and fenced pasture Call for pricing and details Cell: (707) 498-4429

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

DRE License# 01438846 Cell: 707-498-4429 HumboldtCountyProperty.com “Making Real Estate Dreams a Reality.”

KRIS SUNDEEN

3 bed, 3 full bath Brick hearth fireplace, forced air heat High ceilings, open floor plan, hardwood & tile floors Upstairs master suite, Possible downstairs MIL unit Deck, lawn, redwood views Call for pricing and details. Cell: (707) 834-1818


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Fall Rolfing Special

Apartments for Rent

Comm. Space for Rent

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EUREKA DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE. Available at 7th & I Streets in Eureka. 650 sf. New paint and carpet. Great location. Parking & janitorial included. Call S & W Properties, (707) 499− 6906. (R−1031)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.   3LL;\SL`H*LY[PÄLK   

541-251-1885 default

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

445-7715 1-888-849-5728 HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

444-2273

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA APT BY THE BAY & OLDTOWN. 1 bdm/1ba, no smoking or pets, W/S/G paid. $700 month, $1000 dep. Ref. req. 445−4679 (R−1107)

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2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

PARKING SPACES FOR RENT IN DOWNTOWN EUREKA LOT. S & W Properties. $40 per month per space. Call 443−2246, 499−6906. (R−1024)

$759,000

S&W PROPERTIES LLC. 2,740 sq ft building. Has been used as a charter school. 433 M Street downtown Eureka. (707) 443− 2246 for details. (R−1031)

$228,500

3 bed, 3.5 bath, 3,260 sq ft beautiful, private, quality constructed custom home near Baywood Golf Course, open living/dining room, gorgeous views, dry sauna, Jacuzzi, large office.

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,340 sq ft spacious one owner home on Humboldt Hill, distant ocean views, located on a quiet dead end street, large eat-in kitchen, fireplace, deck, single level w/attached garage.

$210,000

2 bed, 1 bath, 1,032 sq ft cute Eureka home that retains most of it’s 1950’s charm, close to Henderson Center, lots of light, den/home office, large double garage on a spacious corner lot.

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Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

WILDERNESS AREA

Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion. OPEN YEAR ROUND (530) 266-3505 (530) 531-5315

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

707.83 4.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent

707.445.8811 ext.124

#01930997

EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountain Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986−7794, chemisemountainretreat.com

707.834.7979

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

Housing/Properties

classified.northcoastjournal.com Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Redwood Creek Property +/- 177 acres of open rolling meadows with a beautiful 900 sq. ft. two bedroom, one bathroom cabin on Redwood Creek. This property features great privacy, panoramic views, water, and a cozy fireplace. a one of a kind ranch perfect for the hunting enthusiast.

$450,000

Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County ■ FIELDBROOK SUPERB CONSTRUCTION AND EXQUISITE FINISHWORK! This custom home built by Gene Callahan features a rock woodstove from Finland. Sierra Pacific windows, tanoak floors, green granite counters, a unique breakfast nook, and all quality fixtures throughout. On 10 acres with room for horses. MLS#237481 $819,000

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

REDU

CED!

NeW

G!

LIStIN

Rio Dell Land/Property

+/-34 Acres on Blue Slide Road only 1 mile west of Rio Dell, just southeast of the historic town of Ferndale. This site has an attractive view of the Eel River, paved road frontage, easy access to HWY 101, conifer trees and inspiring views, plus Slater Creek runs through the parcel. COC is on file - Get Your Building Permit NOW! Parcel could be annexed into the City of Rio Dell for possible sub-divides. Building sites, river and panoramic views with convenient access, as well as its close proximity to city limits make this an amazing bargain!

$215,000

2120 CamPtON Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 17, 2013

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S.I.N. & Service Night Thursdays 6 pm to Close Let's get the party going! Get $1.50 domestics or $2 well drinks with proof of service industry employment or military service and party the night away with Accurate Productions DJs.

TABLE GAMES GALORE! SO MANY GAMES TO FILL THE LONGER NIGHTS. COME ON UP TO THE HEIGHTS AND PLAY OUR NEW 3 CARD POKER WITH 6 CARD BONUS, BONUS SPIN PROGRESSIVE BLACKJACK & DOUBLE DECK SPANISH 21.

GO, GO, GO ... THIS OCTOBER- RAINBOW HOT SEATS WEDNESDAYS. ON THURDAYS YOU CAN DOUBLE YOUR BUY-IN. GRAB YOUR CALACAS AND HEAD ON UP TO THE HEIGHTS FRI. NOV. 1 FOR DAY OF THE DEAD COSMIC BINGO!


North Coast Journal 10-17-13 Edition