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thursday aug. 7, 2014 vol XXV issue 32 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

northcoastjournal.com

north coast

4 It’s called opinion 6 Timber truce 9 Card-carrying wizards 11 Buhne cranks it up 13 Straight dope from the Gray Lady 42 Dogs! Winners! 53 Beautiful maps


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

table of 28 Stage Matters

Thoroughly Postmodern Millie

29 Art Beat 4 Publisher Growth, Change 5 Mailbox 5 Poem The Rain Says

6 News

Un-entered Forest

11 Buhne Tribune

Vote For Prohibition, Or … Just Stay Home

12 Blog Jammin’ 13 Week in Weed high Times

14 On The Cover

Best of Humboldt 2014

24 Bobarazzi

Around Humboldt County

24 Home & Garden Service Directory

25 Down and Dirty

August Gardening To-Do List

Lasting Impressions

30 Arts! Arcata

Friday, Aug. 8, 6-9 p.m.

35 Table Talk

Hum Plate Roundup

36 Music & More!

live entertainment

41 The Setlist

Dance the Night Away

42 Calendar 47 Filmland

Guardians Gets it Right

49 Workshops 53 Field Notes

The mapmaker’s dilemma

54 Sudoku & Crossword 54 Marketplace 58 Body, Mind & Spirit 59 Automotive 62 Real Estate This Week

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

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PublisheR

August 7, 2014 Volume XXV No. 32

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2014 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com news editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com assistant editor/staff writer Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman, Jessica McGuinty, Genevieve Schmidt contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com art director/production manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com graphic design/production Amy Barnes, Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Christian Pennington, Jonathan Webster general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Terrence McNally terrence@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions manager Drew Hyland office manager/bookkeeper Carmen England receptionist/classified assistant Michelle Wolff

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4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

I

’ve been shedding job titles since 2003. The first one was hard to give up — the title of editor. Later, we hired a sales manager and transferred those duties. When I turned 62, five years ago, I started to work part time, mostly supervising department managers two days a week. Our company and staff have continued to grow these past five years. We hired a general manager at the beginning of 2013, Chuck Leishman, who has taken over most of the business operations; a promotionsand-marketing person later that year; and a new sales manager six months ago. Last month when I turned 67, I told the Journal staff I was retiring from day-today operations of the company. I’ll come in when I’m needed. My vegetable garden is loaded and my golf score is improving. (I will remain CEO of the company and retain the title of Journal publisher. Chuck is now publisher of all our magazines, including the exciting new quarterly tourism guide, the Humboldt Insider.) So — are big changes afoot? No. Just growth and change. On a related note, let me attempt to answer Russ Cole of Arcata, who wrote in last week (“Silent Supervisor,” July 31) questioning why 5th District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg does not return phone calls and emails from the Journal reporters. The answer is, I don’t know, but I can guess. Before I do, I’d like to offer Mr. Sundberg equal space to rebut this column in an upcoming paper, a chance to explain his reason himself. (Is 700 words enough?) My guess is he is angry with me personally. Many people, Ryan included, erroneously think I still run the editorial department and supervise news coverage. I do not. My job as CEO is to maintain the financial health of the company. My job as publisher is to have a strong mission statement to guide the editorial team. Other than that, I pitch a story idea when I run across a good one — and so can you. Sometimes my story ideas get reported,

and other times they are rejected. What I do have is my column. I’ve been writing opinion since 1983 (I was editor of the Arcata Union before the Journal). The title of the column has changed over 31 years with my job duties and title. But it’s clearly an opinion column and separate from the news coverage. I expect most readers understand this. I certainly expect all elected politicians to understand the difference. So it’s my opinion when I say that this current board of supervisors — four of five anyway — has been unduly influenced by a cabal of “property rights” activists (called Humboldt Coalition for Property Rights), who happen to have a boatload of money. When I opined last year that someone should run against both Sundberg and 4th District Supervisor Virginia Bass, it was my opinion. When I opine that we will rue the day that this board did not pass the strong, sensible General Plan Update as drafted and approved by the previous Planning Commission after 10 years of public input, it’s my opinion. Sundberg and others may disagree with my opinion, but they would be hard pressed to find fault in our news coverage. Here is a list of topics Sundberg has refused to comment on this year after numerous attempts by our staff writers: pre-election and election results coverage; a key planning commission appointment; Eureka Natural Foods’ interest in moving to McKinleyville; the rise of Airbnb; a fighter injured at a casino event; Mercer Fraser’s Willow Creek batch plant; and the county’s medical marijuana outdoor grow ordinance. These are important stories. We need to hear from all our elected officials and they need to make themselves available. That’s my opinion. l

– Judy Hodgson hodgson@northcoastjournal.com


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CARTOON BY TERRY TORGERSON

Risky Business Editor: Regarding getting help to pay off a mortgage with renting out a property day by day, most people do not realize that the fine print does not allow that to happen (“My House is Your Hotel,” July 17). When one has a mortgage with a governmental agency, it precludes the option to derive income from an agreement under 30 days. I love the concept of VRBO and Airbnb, but until the property is paid off, it may allow the lender to foreclose. As an aside, the fine print also says that the property must be maintained regarding, for example, keeping the lawn cut and windows not broken. But I see some bankowned properties that do not do that. As a result, the communities are hurt. Robert J Lawton, Eureka

Ganging Up Editor: Forgetting the merits of the questions about the county supervisors, Sylvia de Rooy’s claim to ownership of the term “Gang of Four” was well answered by your tagline/ title above her letter: “Took the Words out of My Mao” (July 24). For those who are too young to remember (or perhaps too old), the Gang of Four was a post-Mao group that included Mao’s widow and was on the run from the ruling Chinese authorities, accused of activities these same authorities found distasteful. They were tracked down

The Rain Says I am a magician I shall transform a cobweb into a tiara, I shall vanish the dust, I shall conjure a rainbow, all while maintaining a misdirecting patter — Barbara Dilworth

eventually, and the Chinese state was made safe again. Claiming ownership of the term “gang of four” is about the same as using the words “Chicago Seven” or “Chicago Eight” to make a point. You can say it, you just can’t “own” it. So chill out already. Lance Hardie, Eureka

Comment of the Week “So sad.” — Patricia Charley commenting on Facebook on the Bureau of Reclamation’s decision not to release extra water down the Trinity River.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

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Un-entered Forest Accord nears among tree-sitters, timber company and environmentalists on the Mattole By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

L

ast week, forest activists partially peeled back a barricade, which has been blocking Humboldt Redwood Co.’s main road into its 8,000-acre Mattole watershed timber holdings since early July, to let a group of foresters, environmentalists and some of their own through to examine an area the company wants to log. And then, after the field trip, the activists agreed to keep the access open to allow in ATVs bearing HRC biologists endeavoring to resolve issues in several timber harvest plans the activists are protesting. HRC agreed, in turn, that if it decides to resume operations on the disputed harvest plans at any time (presumably before resolution is reached), it would give the activists a week’s notice. “We’re going to honor the blockade,” says company president and chief forester Mike Jani. The company also tentatively agreed to limit its herbicide use in some places, and on last Wednesday’s field trip a forester even unmarked some big trees that had

been blue-lined to be cut. Most significantly, HRC agreed to begin refining its old-growth policy by establishing a brandnew designation to preserve at least some of an unusual type of forest rarely found in the historically heavily logged region: “un-entered” forest. It’s a major turning point in a situation that has threatened to undermine the green peace that Humboldt Redwood Co. famously forged with forest activists six years ago when it took over Pacific Lumber Co.’s operations following that company’s death and reorganization. At that time, HRC promised tree-sitters who’d been perched in Palco old growth for three years that the company would protect the ancient ones. Like its parent company, Mendocino Redwood Company, HRC then gained sustainability certification from the Forest Stewardship Council. It voluntarily established old-growth restrictions and set aside “high conservation value” areas to protect old growth stands, including about 200 acres in the Mattole. continued on page 8


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continued from page 6 But the activists say the company’s definition of old growth is too narrow. And it is this disagreement that provoked them. In April, they hindered HRC crews cutting a road into one of the harvest areas. They climbed into trees to guard sites. And then they put up the barricade, to which they anchored a tree-sitter platform suspended in air — cut the line, and the tree-sitter plummets. HRC’s old-growth policy aims to protect unharvested old growth stands, as well as old-growth trees in previously harvested stands where the company might cut some younger trees to enhance old-growth characteristics (with thinning, the trees left behind grow bigger, faster). It also protects individual old-growth trees (hardwoods and conifers). It defines old-growth by girth (36-inch diameter for a Doug fir, for instance), age (established before 1800) and other structural characteristics. Much of the preserved old-growth in the Mattole lies in stands of Douglas fir on the north side of Long Ridge — a long mountain with a grassy plateau on top and steep, rolling, wooded sides. Two of the disputed timber harvest plans comprise about 800 acres on the south slope of the same ridge (the third, around 250 acres, is on a ridge next to Humboldt Redwoods State Park). Jani says one of these Long Ridge timber harvest plans calls for tractor logging and cable yarding. The other, because of steep, unstable terrain, calls for some tractor logging and cable yarding but, mostly, for helicopter logging. The south slope is a mosaic of different ages and types of trees, including some old-growth trees scattered about — but not the average of six old-growth trees per acre required by HRC’s existing preservation policy. There are patches of tanoak, of Douglas fir mixed with tanoak and madrone, and of Douglas fir. Some stands are on old Palco clearcuts. And some are those un-entered (unlogged) forests, including densely packed stands of straight Douglas firs around 150 or so years old. One theory is that a fire, or a landslide, swept through and wiped out all but the most-resilient old trees in the forest about 150 years ago, and then the forest grew back. Jani says another likelihood is that these young-old trees grow in areas which, pre-white contact, indigenous people kept open and grassy with routine burning. Regardless, say activists, they’re unique. “We’re saying no logging in un-entered forest, old growth and areas on the borderline of old growth and late seral [forest approaching old-growth],” says Ama Tierney, one of the forest defenders. The forest defenders define “oldgrowth” as trees 150 years old or more

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

with old-growth features such as broken tops and a complex canopy structure, in areas with dead and downed logs and other wildlife habitat features. Members of the Environmental Protection Information Center and the Mattole Restoration Council who’ve joined the discussions and field trips are not as hardline as the activists. “I think there’s room for management in un-entered forests, if it’s done in an ecologically defensible way,” said Natalynne DeLapp, executive director of EPIC. But, DeLapp says, EPIC wants HRC to allow an independent forester to do an audit of the redesigned harvest plan the company seems to be more or less committing to, to ensure that “what they’re going to cut in these un-entered forests is in fact going to result in older, bigger trees” and a resilient forest, DeLapp says. Ali Freedlund, with the Mattole Restoration Council, has been commenting on timber harvest plans since 1996, and she helped HRC finish the watershed analysis started under Palco. The Long Ridge THPs comprise the largest proposed harvest she’s ever seen in the area. But after seeing the proposed harvest areas, she concluded that the timber company had designed, overall, a pretty good cut. Still, the company’s concessions to trying to protect un-entered forests excite her. “That they’re opening a new designation for these kinds of forests is huge,” Freedlund says. “And we have the forest defenders to thank for initiating that.” In the end, all parties might not agree on everything. Jani figures most everyone can agree that the un-entered forests exist and need some kind of special consideration, and that individual old-growth trees should be protected. The forest defenders might stick to their stance of no cutting at all in the un-entered forests, and in what they consider old growth. But Tierney says they want the negotiations to proceed. “We could help with the surveying,” she says. “We could lead people to places we know are un-entered.” Freedlund says it’s amazing, after decades of Palco, to have a timber company willing to engage with its critics like this. And at least, she adds, the land in question isn’t being developed to death. “The amazing thing about Long Ridge is there’s lots of water — a lot of creeks and springs,” Freedlund says. “It’s vigorous. It’s healthy. It really seems wild. If the timber company didn’t own it, what would it be then? We’re already struggling with other areas that are heavily managed in ‘other’ ways. I couldn’t imagine what this area would be like dotted with homesteads or greenhouses.” l


SIDE BY SIDE. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

Houses of Cards The Magic scene gets crowded in Myrtletown By Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com

T

he fantasy worlds of modern fiction are cruel places, made up of vying factions, of loyalties forged, bent and destroyed, of cutthroat competition and nailbiting peril. The voyeurs that would inhabit those imagined worlds sometimes find themselves in similar situations in their real lives: scratching for survival, swearing (or deigning) allegiance, sharpening their skills … well maybe it’s not that heated, but there are rumblings in the small, tight-knit empire that is Humboldt County’s legion of Magic: the Gathering players. It’s a discontent that stems from the recent Myrtletown opening of a business that caters to gamers who dedicate their nights and weekends to the pursuit of Magic. The problem? Nu Games (which has an Arcata store as well), opened directly next door to a competitor: Sports Cards and More. It’s a move that has highlighted a divide between the hardcore and the hobbyist and the loyalties they hold. Why does Magic engender such passion? On its face, the game is simple. Each player begins a game with a deck of cards and 20 life points. Using the cards — which contain a variety of strategic spells — you attempt to knock down the other players’ points before you’re knocked out yourself. But Magic’s storyline, of sorts, and the fantasy elements that make roleplaying video and tabletop games engrossing and personalized, have made it a huge success. Perhaps more importantly, the game

doesn’t have uniform decks: Players can trade and buy their way to more and more powerful cards, giving them the advantage in tournaments that offer yet more powerful and unique cards as prizes. Coupled with a savvy marketing scheme, Magic has become perhaps the most popular fantasy game in history: Its parent company, Wizards of the Coast, bought out the makers of Dungeons and Dragons in 1997 and was a $325 million company by the time Hasbro bought it in 1999. It’s since ruled the tabletop and trading card roleplaying game industry. Shops sell sealed packages of cards right from the manufacturer, but more importantly they sell individual cards whose values rise and fall based on their effectiveness in the game. The constant drive for players to enhance their decks has formed a secondary market and allows a small community like Humboldt County, with 250 Magic players (by one shop owner’s estimate), to support five Magic retailers. “It’s a fantastically fun, strategic game,” said Jesse Williams, who opened Lost Coast Wizards in January to serve a growing demand, he said, for individual cards. “Like baseball cards, the vast majority of cards are worthless,” but cards that perform well in national tournaments (under the careful playing of professional players, of course) can rise in value — sometimes hundreds of dollars.

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continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

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continued from previous page

The competitive, strategic and customizable nature of the game has developed a niche community. And while Magic could easily be played at home among friends, Laura Montagna, owner of Nu Games shops in Arcata and Eureka, has made a business out of hosting gamers and tournaments in addition to selling the cards they seek. “You can certainly play a game with your friends,” she said, but that gets repetitive. “You play poker with your wife, you know each other’s tells.” Form a gathering space, Montagna said, and people will come, from in town, from the far reaches of the county and beyond. Bill Feist has owned Sports Cards and More in Eureka for 14 years, the last eight years at its Myrtle Avenue location. Inside the unassuming exterior, Feist buys and sells a variety of collectible cards, with the store’s focus on the “more” — most of his income comes from the sale of Magic cards. Feist and Montagna have known each other for years — they bought Magic merchandise from the same distributor and used to talk frequently. Feist even shared advice as Montagna sought a Eureka storefront. “I had an opportunity to go in with her but she wanted to control Magic: The Gathering, which is 80 percent of my business.” Feist said. Feist said he warned Montagna to steer clear of Old Town (Magic tournaments take place mostly at night) in favor of a quieter part of Eureka. In July, Nu Games’ Eureka shop landed right next door to Sports Cards and More. Feist isn’t upset, or if he is, he doesn’t let on, about sharing a wall and a landlord with a niche business competitor in such a small market. “I’m not gonna bad mouth her or anything else,” Feist said, adding that he’s reasonably confident that the local Magic community can keep both shops in business. He said he offers lower prices for cards, while Montagna offers space to game. Still, he said, business has been down. “I wish [Montagna] luck. I hope she can afford the rent.” Montagna said her and Feist’s shops are different enough for both to stay afloat. “I decided to open because we were not necessarily competing,” she said. “Bill’s shop — he doesn’t hold events, he doesn’t know the game of Magic.” She says Nu Games, and Magic itself, provides an outlet for teenagers and young men to stay out of trouble and

learn to socialize and compete with etiquette. But Montagna’s decision to open next door to Feist doesn’t sit well with some in the community. Kyle Falbo, who has traveled across the U.S. to compete in Magic tournaments, easing his travel costs by selling Magic cards on Craigslist in communities along the way, is dubious of Montagna’s good intentions. “It would seem to me a very high risk for somebody to start next door to their competitor if they didn’t have some long-term plan to eliminate their competitor,” Falbo said. “And I think that’s what the community is worried about.” Since Montagna opened in Myrtletown, Falbo said he won’t shop there anymore, instead supporting Feist’s Store and Arcata’s Lost Coast Wizards. He took the opportunity to suggest that Nu Games’ tournaments — which he said are run according to the most casual Magic rules (“no cheating,” essentially) and with little officiating — were a “detriment” to the local Magic community. He also suggested that Montagna offered lower value prizes, and charged higher prices, than national standards. Jesse Williams, the latest merchant to wade into the North Coast’s soft-spoken Magic melee, has opened a store that, even compared to Nu Games and Sports Cards and More, seems modest. Lost Coast Wizards opened in a small space on I Street and Samoa Boulevard in Arcata in January. “I kept on hearing a lot of my friends say they wanted more options — especially buying individual cards,” Williams said. He acts as a broker of sorts: Customers task him with finding a particular card to enhance their deck and he’ll network with other locals to find it and arrange a deal. “I can usually find it for them throughout the community,” Williams said. In addition, he focuses on a more competitive brand of Magic tournament, where the stakes are higher. It’s been a “moderate success,” he said. Despite his displeasure with the Nu Games model, Falbo said the North Coast could likely support the five shops that now cater to Magic players (the fifth, North Coast Role Playing, sells decks of Magic cards and hosts occasional tournaments). “The community feeds itself.” But, he said, “It does take good shops, good shop owners, who take care of their players.” l


buhne Tribune

Vote For Prohibition, Or … Just Stay Home

H

ey, you: Do you trust full-grown adults to decide for themselves whether to inhale the smoke produced by setting fire to a leafy plant? You do? Well, if you call the Golden State home and you vote, come November, you’re in for a bummer: The one issue the candidates for governor of both major parties agree on — other than hair styles (think Telly Savalas) and gay marriage (you betcha) — is that the state of California must continue the medieval hysteria of prohibiting cultivation of a dumb plant, while maintaining jackedup black market price incentives for violent foreign drug cartels to push awful, seedladen brick-weed on us. Voters up the coast in Oregon and Alaska will be asked this fall to decide whether to join the state of Washington in legalizing all of the rest of the West Coast. We can know with certainty, meanwhile, that no matter which odd-looking, bald liberal dude gets keys to the statehouse, California will remain a Colombia on the Pacific. As long as the opportunity remains, I suppose we denizens of the Emerald Triangle should make lemonade. If the bankers are right — and if the proliferation of local billboards advertising dirt (of all things) are any indication — cannabis prohibition could be the last, best chance some of us have of putting that spare bedroom to work paying off the mortgage. And while I don’t personally mind if your water-sucking greenhouse complex

is running our rivers dry (people gotta eat before fish), the fact that the national paper of record is now editorializing in favor of ending marijuana prohibition on the federal level doesn’t exactly bode well for career sustainability. Have you ever wondered what this place would look like without its estimated $1 billion annual infusion of black market capital? Come November 2016, we’ll all find out.

Whither Little-Vegas North?

being replaced was Eureka’s first chain restaurant drive-through — but as a kid growing up in the 1970s, it was the only one in the county that I or any of my friends knew of, and it’s funny how resilient images of a tray of fattening, salty food and a little, plastic-wrapped toy can be. Long before disparagement of the golden arches as “corporate death burger” had come into vogue — before “cholesterol” had entered our vocabulary, before Stephen King made all clowns seem sinister — that McDonald’s exuded an intoxicating, Narnia-like mystique. Without the Bayshore Mall or another burger chain offering competition, it occupied Ground Zero of a sort of localized Las Vegas Strip: Within a block or two in either direction were Sharkey’s video game arcade and the funky, creepy Joke Shop novelty store, where a wart-covered old man sold whoopee cushions and handbuzzers over a crude wooden counter. That’s why, a few months ago when I caught sight of the hardhats ripping apart that old red-and-yellow-trimmed building, with its tallow-scented walls, I had to pull off to the side of the road to fight back the bitter tears of nostalgia. It feels weird bringing this up, but even though it’s owned by a soulless, corporate grease-merchant, don’t our shrines of childhood bliss at least deserve a goodbye party?

It’s always struck me as barbaric: the demolition of huge, Las Vegas casinos, only to construct bigger, often tackier gaming facilities on their cleared footprints. Didn’t Old Blue Eyes and the Rat Pack take up a famously debauched residency at the Sands? Weren’t lovers betrothed in holy matrimony at the Stardust, an Elvis impersonator drawling through the wedding vows? These places, these pulverized buildings are a living history, a remnant of our past, destroyed — their tragic ouster fueled by Middle America’s base pirate fantasies. So it is with a sort of Luxor-induced dread these days that I drive past the horrendously bland, add-water-and-stir McDonald’s box going up on Eureka’s Fourth Street. A rowdy, frontier crossroads of the Burger Wars, that little segment of Fourth Street holds some of my earliest TrueISCollege Radio, and fondest memories of a Eureka that’s ACCORDING TO I/O THIS SUPPOSED TOAt Last? It’s been 50 years, give or take, since gone forever. BEtheAMickey KRISD’s AND Humboldt State University began broadI can’t swear that that’sBILL WEEK

– Ryan Hurley newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Ryan Hurley is a Eureka-based attorney. Follow him if you dare: @BuhneTribune.

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casting KHSU, its flagship radio station — a functional, if tepid, source for commercial-free news and music. Locals have come to count on its reliable, NPR-driven format, and for its extended blocks of classical music. But no discerning listener would mistake KHSU for a true college radio station — the kind operated by student DJs with names like “Shady” who sport ironic mustaches and collect 1960s Czech skiffle bands on vinyl. Alas, a new signal has crackled to life on our radio dials: KRFH (Radio Free Humboldt) features student DJs and managers and is blessedly devoid of Ira Glass. Broadcasting since April at 105.1 FM (it’s broadcast online since the mid ’90s), the upstart would appear to be the university’s bid for full-blown college radio legitimacy. Make no mistake, the American College Radio Format is a uniquely obscure species of radio, restricting membership to campus stations that never would deign to air a commercially popular artist. I hope these kids can pull it off, and I will allow a year’s grace period before rendering final judgment. But every time they air tracks by Queen, The Beatles or Bastille, KRFH’s street cred comes tumbling down. l

DRE License# 01438846 HumboldtCountyProperty.com “Making Real Estate Dreams a Reality.” Cell: 707-498-4429

Craftsman home with two parcels totaling 4.7 acres! Sits on 3.4 private acres just 2 miles up Greenwood Heights close to Freshwater School. Features oak floors, cherry cabinets, soapstone counter tops, mahogany trim, and a spacious open floor plan. Detached two car garage has a mother in law unit above it. Custom keypad gate provides additional security and privacy. Adjacent 1.3 acre parcel with it’s own gate and driveway is included in the sale. Build another home for income, a nice shop, or sell the lot to a friend! $699,000

CUSTOM CRAFTSMAN IN GREENWOOD HEIGHTS northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

11


Blog Jammin’ NATURAL RESOURCES

Rio Dell Can Drink Again

STAY CONNECTED www. northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin

northcoastjournal

ncj_of_humboldt

ncjournal

newsletters

Hey, Rio Dell: Stick a glass under that tap, turn it on, fill ’er up and take a nice, long pull. Then maybe take a shower. Go ahead: According to a news release from the city of Rio Dell, the State Water Resources Control Board has lifted its droughtpanic order forbidding the city from drawing water out of the Eel River, issued a month ago. And that means the citywide, dry-times restriction of water use to 50 gallons of water per person per day has also been lifted (See “Rio Dry,” July 31). “Residents of Rio Dell answered the call to conserve water, reducing water use by 56 percent toward the end of July,” says the news release. “Friends of the city donated truckloads of water to keep city landscaping alive, residents with well systems donated water to their neighbors, and local businesses stepped in voluntarily to reduce water use.” Don’t get too sloppy with that water. The city’s still at emergency drought level 3, which means no outdoor watering. The river remains exceedingly low. And who knows what restrictions lie ahead. — Heidi Walters

water. Orcutt and fisheries biologists fear that the extreme drought year and water allocations to the Sacramento River could lead to the same conditions that resulted in the deaths of thousands of fish in 2002. Last year, several Central Valley contractors sued to stop a release of water down the Trinity around the same time, but a Federal Judge in Fresno allowed the flow. But this year, following a visit by President Obama to the Central Valley in February, Orcutt said the Bureau of Reclamation “bowed to political pressure.” “We think it is irresponsible,” he said, “a disservice to the trust responsibilities to tribes.” While Reclamation will release water in the event of a confirmed fish kill, Orcutt said that will be too late. He said biologists are already observing stress signs among fish in the Lower Klamath. Reclamation, for its part, has said not enough water remains in the Trinity River reservoirs to increase flows down the Trinity and that the water pumped into the Sacramento River is being used to cool water and protect fisheries there. North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman penned a letter in response to Reclamation’s decision, saying it “is the latest example of how the federal government fails to plan for drought to the detriment of tribes, fishermen, and

the environment.” “By state law, Trinity River salmon — which begin their upstream migration in the Klamath River — must be protected before water is used to bail out the Central Valley Project,” the letter continued. “When you find yourself in a hole, you’re supposed to stop digging, but Reclamation has dug itself a hole it cannot get out of, and tribes and fishermen may once again pay the price.” — Grant Scott-Goforth l CRIME

Crime in Eureka

The Eureka Police Department is releasing quarterly crime reports of data and trends in order to, as an EPD news release says, “drive a greater awareness of crime and demonstrate [the department’s] desire to work with the community.” Some of the trends noted by the EPD, between January 2013 and June 2014, include a slight downward trend overall in property crime and also a “steady downward trend” in violent crime. Visit www.northcoastjournal.com for incident numbers and graphs of trends, as well as links to the EPD’s more complete data. — Heidi Walters l

l NATURAL RESOURCES

Feds: Want Extra Water? Show Us Dead Fish

An appeal from the Hoopa Tribe for more water down the Trinity River yielded no increase, as the Secretary of the Interior announced at the end of July that extra flows, requested to prevent a potential fish kill on the Klamath, would not be released. Mike Orcutt, Fisheries Director for the Hoopa Tribe, traveled to Washington, D.C. to call for extra

these

you’re gonna

need 12 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Graph courtesy of Eureka Police Department

press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com

music: music@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: classified@northcoastjournal.com


the week in WEed

THE ORIGINAL • SINCE 2002

Welcome Back HSU Students!

Humboldt Clothing has the freshest Humboldt gear and Best Quality Glass in Arcata. Stop in, Say Hi, and see What’s New.

DREW HYLAND

High Times By Grant Scott-Goforth

T

he New York Times sounded like the voice of reason last week with a detailed and convincing six-part editorial series calling for the federal government to legalize marijuana. Repealing the 1970 ban, the Grey Lady’s editors argued, is a states’ rights issue and would ease the unjust application of marijuana enforcement. Science is on the side of marijuana legalization, the paper said, showing that it’s less harmful than alcohol or tobacco. Plus, the public is coming around on marijuana and Colorado and Washington are showing how legalization — and proper regulation — can be achieved. The whole package is well researched and put together, down to the animation of stars on the American flag turning into weed leaves. It’s worth looking up online. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the White House refuted the Times editorial, writing that while the administration agreed that the criminal justice system needs reform, “marijuana legalization is not the silver bullet solution to the issue.” “The Obama Administration approaches substance use as a public health issue, not merely a criminal justice problem,” wrote staff of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. That’s an admirable approach. The right approach. And while the White House

is wise in its concerns about legalization (citing that marijuana use affects the developing brain, affects academic achievement, can be addictive, and is dangerous for roadways), its complaints about rising costs to public health sound hollow in the face of potential savings from the costs of incarcerating marijuana offenders. “The cost to society of alcohol alone is estimated to be more than 15 times the revenue gained by its taxation,” the administration writes. Perhaps, but the point of legalization isn’t simply to collect taxes on the sale of the product. It’s to ease the immense social and financial costs of the prison industrial complex and to dismantle the black market (which has huge public health and safety costs). “Any discussion on the issue should be guided by science and evidence, not ideology and wishful thinking,” the response goes on. “The Obama Administration continues to oppose legalization of marijuana and other illegal drugs because it flies in the face of a public health approach to reducing drug use and its consequences.” But where is that public health approach to drug abuse manifesting itself? California’s prisons are full, and the evidence of underserved and underfunded drug addiction programs paces the streets everywhere. Talk about ideology and wishful thinking. ●

MUNCHIES?

GO TO THERE

Bayshore Mall Eureka (707) 476-0400 987 H ST Arcata (707) 822-3090

m.northcoastjournal.com

www.humboldtclothing.com

or shop online at

MEDICAL MARIJUANA EVALUATIONS

Dr. Peter J. Rogers, M.D. 24 HOUR Patient Verification

$1000 OFF (Expires November 30, 2014)

FREE ID CARD 940 9th Street Arcata, CA 95521 (Arcata Holistic Health Center)

www.greenhillsnaturalhealth.org

Walk-ins Welcome or Schedule an Appointment

(888) 799-7270

Veteran and Senior Discounts! northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

13


I spy with my little eye … thursday aug. 7, 2014 north coast

vol XXV issue 32 •

calif. FREE humboldt county,

Dinner at Brick and Fire and ice cream from Livin’ the Dream!* Be the one to match the most stuff from this week’s cover with the North Coast Journal’s Best of Humboldt 2014 winners and it’s our treat.

northcoastjou

rnal.com

Email your entry to contests@northcoastjournal.com by 5 p.m. Aug. 13, 2014 Rules: Match only one winner per cover photo item (for example, you can’t use the car twice). One entry per person. The entry with the most correct matches wins. In case of a tie, a winner will be drawn at random. *Gift certificates.

6 Are Set

H

umboldt has spoken. But, and you may disagree, we are not a group that agrees on everything, so Humboldt may go on speaking. As feisty as we are about our politics, it’s no surprise we clash over who’s cutting the crispiest fries, where you should take your busted car or who’s the finest tattooist to ink up your sleeves. If you’ve got any spirit at all, you’ll roll your eyes, scratch your head or even rail against some of these winners. You’ll probably agree with a fair number, too. Enjoy the smug satisfaction — you liked them before they won Best Of Humboldt.

Thank you Humboldt!

“Best Restaurant” 2014

FOOD+DRINK BAR TO TAKE A DATE

MARTINI

DIVE BAR

BREWERY

SPORTS BAR

BEER

The Speakeasy (349 of 805 votes) The Shanty (443 of 877 votes) The Logger Bar (309 of 830 votes)

Open for lunch Weekdays,

Dinner everyday. (Closed for both on Tuesdays) midway between Henderson Center & Old Town

1630 F Street, Eureka (707) 268-8959

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

BARTENDER

Steve, at Steve and Dave’s (294 of 705 votes)

HAPPY HOUR

Rita’s (432 of 811 votes)

BLOODY MARY

The Alibi (348 of 710 votes)

The Speakeasy (262 of 647 votes) Lost Coast Brewery (368 of 922 votes) Steelhead, Mad River Brewing Company (422 of 864 votes)

IPA

Double IPA, Mad River Brewing Company (272 of 752 votes)

SPECIALTY BEER

Tangerine Wheat, Lost Coast Brewery (291 of 756 votes)


HAIL MARYS AT THE ALIBI. PHOTO BY TERRENCE MCNALLY

THANKS FOR YOUR VOTE!

Tucker & Tucker DDS Childrens Dentistry

801 Crescent Way Suite #2 Arcata • 822-2711

BEST BLOODY MARY The Alibi (49.01%) Runner Up: AA Bar and Grill Ah, the Bloody Mary. One doesn’t have to be looking for hair of the dog, but the cushioned bartop and dim lighting of the Alibi will aid recovery from the worst debauchery. It’s an anytime drink, honestly. You crave the salt on a sweaty summer day. You crave the rich spice on a cold winter evening. The crimson hued cocktail comes in many forms — 13 alone at the Alibi. But the beauty of the Alibi’s Bloody Mary isn’t just in its many varieties, but in its simplicity. The tomato stock is rich and piquant — easily perked up by the addition of the Alibi Mary’s horseradish or the celery salt-rimmed glass of Mary’s Pucker. You can even get an oyster. Picking your preferred alcohol decides your garnish — or maybe vice-versa — and tenders at the ‘Bi don’t try to Portland it up by putting a subway sandwich on top of your glass. Cheers! — Grant Scott-Goforth

WINERY

SUGAR FIX

ITALIAN

WINE

MILKSHAKE

VEGETARIAN

DOUGHNUT

VEGAN

SANDWICH

PIZZA

Moonstone Crossing (377 of 710 votes) Dark as Night, Moonstone Crossing (299 of 605 votes)

COFFEE HOUSE

Old Town Coffee and Chocolates (365 of 924 votes)

COFFEE ROASTER

Humboldt Bay Coffee Company (325 of 788 votes)

Arcata Scoop (404 of 858 votes) Toni’s (351 of 796 votes) Don’s Donuts (435 of 811 votes) Hole in the Wall (578 of 906 votes)

FOOD TRUCK

Speedy Taco (328 of 734 votes)

Mazzotti’s (349 of 834 votes) Golden Harvest (335 of 780 votes) Wildflower Cafe (316 of 675 votes) Paul’s Live From New York (475 of 863 votes)

BURGER

STEAK

SUSHI

Star’s (450 of 832 votes)

FRENCH FRIES

ASIAN

Ramone’s (340 of 896 votes)

HOT DOG

MEXICAN

Golden Harvest Café (351 of 853 votes)

AA Bar and Grill (427 of 762 votes) Arcata Pizza and Deli (326 of 760 votes) Costco (269 of 699 votes)

Sushi Spot (294 of 852 votes) Pho Thiên Long (460 of 731 votes) Rita’s (417 of 872 votes)

BAKERY

BREAKFAST

continued on page 17 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

15


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

FO

IN OT V R

SB GU

EST BREAKFAST & BEST

VEG

ETA RIA N

Golden Harvest Café 1062 G Street, Arcata • 822-8962 1707 Allard Avenue, Eureka • 442-1610

www.GoldenHarvestCafe.com

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


continued from page 15

FOOD+DRINK continued

BEST DOUGHNUT , Don’’ s Donuts Pizza and Deli

LATE-NIGHT FOOD

Toni’s (365 of 799 votes)

HANGOVER BREAKFAST

The Alibi (315 of 737 votes)

EATERY ON A BUDGET

(53.64%) Runner Up: Happy Donuts

RESTAURANT WHEN MONEY IS NO OBJECT

I’m not ashamed to say it was one of the best birthday gifts ever. I was turning 30-something, and my wonderful wife sidestepped all the societal pressures pushing her toward cream cheese frosting, layered cakes and highfalutin ganache. Instead, I got a doughnut tower, with three beautiful columns reaching for the sky, glaze and crumbs glistening by candlelight. It was awesome. So, it was with great pleasure that I saw Don’s claim the Best Of crown this year. Its buttermilk donut is one of the purest pleasures I’ve ever known — like a delightfully sweet, glazed biscuit. And Don’s deserves an extra nod for business acumen: Its location, just a donut hole’s throw from bar row, begins pumping out the unmistakable fragrance of freshly fried doughnuts at about 1:30 a.m., permeating the streets of downtown Arcata just in time to greet drunks on their way home. I’d say it’s a deliciously bad decision waiting to happen, but there’s really no choice involved.

Los Bagels (251 of 850 votes)

Brick and Fire (350 of 815 votes)

EATS IN SOHUM

Benbow Inn (286 of 557 votes)

GROCERY STORE

North Coast Co-op (372 of 919 votes) continued on next page

Big Turnouts Categories that touch our daily survival needs (possibly in order of importance) garnered the most response. Best Coffee House: 924 votes Best Brewery: 922 votes Best Grocery Store: 919 votes

BEHOLD, DON’S DONUTS. PHOTO BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH

— Thadeus Greenson

BEST HOT DOG Costco (38.48%) Runner Up: Humboldt Hot Dogs OK, you can’t argue with the value. At $1.50 with a soft drink, the hefty hot dog or Polish at Costco (girth is important, too) is the deal to end all processed meat deals. And it’s pretty good — a salty, juicy dog with the zippy tang of nitrates. But unlike, say, an organic Humboldt Hot Dog (only one vote behind!), or a snappy Arcata Ballpark dog, there is no sunshine, no crack of the bat with which to enjoy it. No, you will pump on mustard, grind out some chopped onion from the dispenser and sit at the plastic picnic tables — cruelly reminiscent of amusement parks — and eat your dog under Costco’s fluorescent lights, in the shadow of shrink-wrapped pallets of camping equipment, with passing shoppers regarding you: hunched over the crumpled foil wrapper of Humboldt’s favorite hot dog. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

THE LURID DRAW OF THE COSTCO DOG. PHOTO BY HOLLY HARVEY

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

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continued from previous page

ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT, +RECREATION ARTIST

LIVE MUSIC VENUE

TATTOO ARTIST

PLACE TO SHOOT POOL

FESTIVAL

FARMERS MARKET VENDOR

KARAOKE

GOLF COURSE

BAND

WEEKEND GETAWAY

MUSICIAN

SWIMMING HOLE

CLUB DJ

DAY HIKE

Duane Flatmo (298 of 677 votes)

Arcata Theatre Lounge (272 of 603 votes)

Henry Kruger (172 of 449 votes)

Bar-Fly Pub & Grub (131 of 418 votes)

Kinetic Sculpture Race (418 of 823 votes)

Flying Blue Dog (177 of 478 votes)

Blue Lake Casino (269 of 472 votes)

Beau-Pre (127 of 431 votes)

Dr. Squid (205 of 620 votes)

Trinity River (301 of 691 votes)

Burly Dent (189 of 467 votes)

Swimmer’s Delight (267 of 546 votes)

Pressure Anya (297 of 527 votes)

Trinidad Head (313 of 693 votes)

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Customer Appreciation Fun Day & Night, too! Friday, September 19th

Established 1983

Thanks for voting for us!

• Free Dipped Strawberries • 20% off ALL confections • All 14 oz. bagged coffee beans $7.95 per bag. (limit 4 per customer) • Wear a bikini in and get a FREE Real Tropical Fruit Smoothie All sales limited to stock on hand. One dipped strawberry per customer.

Hot, Cold & Vegetarian Sandwiches ALL SANDWICHES INCLUDE Mustard, Mayonnaise, Lettuce, Tomatoes, Pickles, Red Onions & Jalapeños LOCALLY BAKED BREADS Brio French, Sourdough (roll or sliced), Wheat (roll or sliced), Marble Rye

OPEN EVERY DAY 10 EUREKA 1331 Broadway 443-5362 • fax 443-1342

201 1

AM TO

6

PM

ARCATA 590 G Street 822-7407

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Coffeehouse and Roasting Co.


Best Festival Kinetic Sculpture Race (50.79%) Runner Up: Oyster Fest Was it the fence? Are you still mad? Because Oyster Fest used to own this category. Then again, Kinetic is one tough, splashy competitor, blending humor, art, engineering, feats of physical fitness, rubbernecking and a good deal of welding in one weekend of daredevil parading. And teams do spend months and months building their clever, clunky and sometimes downright iffy contraptions. By land and by sea, giant metal sharks, huge shoes, pirate ships, and foamy spaceships make (or don’t make) the trek from Arcata Plaza, down dunes, across the bay and to the finish line on Ferndale’s Main Street. And that is how you pedal, paddle and push your way to No. 1. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill A crustacean contraption runs the race. Photo by Bob Doran

Services+Stuff Antique Store

Jewelry Store

Secondhand Store

Musical Instrument Store

Daisy’s Dry Goods (203 of 418 votes) Angels of Hope (225 of 601 votes)

Pawn Shop

Holly Yashi (232 of 508 votes) Mantova’s Two Street Music (288 of 597 votes)

Humboldt Bay Trade & Pawn (251 of 426 votes)

Salon

Head Shop

Spa

Humboldt Glassblower (211 of 404 votes)

Liquor Store

The Trim Scene (189 of 488 votes) The Spa at Personal Choice (184 of 419 votes)

Myrtlewood Liquors and John’s Fine Cigars (417 of 635 votes)

Dentist

Vintage/Used Clothing Store

Orthodontist

Clothing Store

Optometrist

Children Clothing Store

Pharmacy

Shoe Store

Bookstore

Little Shop of Hers (225 of 513 votes) Willow and Rags (156 of 467 votes) Lots for Tots (182 of 453 votes) Annie’s Shoes (213 of 482 votes)

Tucker and Tucker (156 of 307 votes) Dr. Hunt (194 of 320 votes) A to Z Eye Care (228 of 403 votes) Lima’s (169 of 450 votes) Booklegger (275 of 618 votes) continued on next page

Thank You for voting us

BEST TIRE SHOP 2014 WE APPRECIATE YOUR TRUST IN US

Thank you Humboldt for voting us the Best of Humboldt spa! Aromatherapy Body Scrub with Vichy Shower Hydro Therapy Tub Balano Therapy Thalasso Therapy Slimming and Toning Body Treatments New Lipo Light Body Toning and Inch Loss Neck Treatments AntiStress Massage Therapies Hot Stone Massage and Facial Treatments Micro Dermabrasion Facial Treatments Micro Current Anti Aging Facial Treatments Acne Specialists Pedicures are our Specialty  Full Service Salon and Color Specialist

Not only is the spa at Personal Choice the 1st Full Service spa in Humboldt County, established in 1983, but our commitment to education towards salon, spa, & skin care technologies sets us apart from others.

Eureka 443-3507 | Fortuna 725-1169 | McKinleyville 839-8986

707-445-2041 • 130 G St. • Eureka, CA

WWW.THESPAATPERSONALCHOICE.COM northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

19


y

a

o .c

(7

m

07 )2

continued from previous page

pr es

50 79 7-

su r e

6

a

n

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

SERVICES+STUFF continued MATTRESS STORE

Arcata Exchange (162 of 390 votes)

FURNITURE STORE

Living Styles (167 of 470 votes)

BICYCLE SHOP

Henderson Center Bicycle (187 of 500 votes)

SPORTING GOODS STORE

Pacific Outfitters (301 of 544 votes)

COMPUTER REPAIR

Renaissance Computing (207 of 420 votes)

AUTO BODY

Quality Body Works (137 of 353 votes)

Thanks, Humboldt for voting us Best Club DJ again!

DJ duo Anya Bunny Slayer and Gabe Pressure combine forces to shake dance floors with monster force. They refuse to be pigeonholed blending world wide sounds including tropical, latino, balkan, middle-eastern, hiphop, and more mixed with some of the newest sounds in electronica & bass music. Their mixes are versatile dance floor fillers. Voted Best Of Humboldt Club DJs 2012, 2013 and 2014.

AUTO REPAIR

Antich Auto (132 of 317 votes)

TIRE SHOP

Les Schwab (244 of 473 votes)

PLACE TO BUY A NEW CAR

Mid-City Motor World (174 of 358 votes)

PLACE TO BUY A USED CAR

Thank you Humboldt County for voting us Best Medical Marijuana Dispensary 2014!

Craigslist (197 of 457 votes)

BANK/CREDIT UNION

Coast Central Credit Union (393 of 610 votes)

PLUMBER

MapleService (159 of 346 votes)

CONSTRUCTION COMPANY

Alchemy Construction (166 of 395 votes)

REAL ESTATE AGENT

Mikki Cardoza (82 of 355 votes)

HARDWARE/LUMBER STORE

The Humboldt County Collective • We provide safe access for medical marijuana patients • Free gift with first purchase • We have over 30 different strains and in a variety of Indica, Sativa and Hybrids • We also carry joints, topicals, concentrates and edibles • Friendly and knowledgeable staff • Our menu is on Weedfinder.com Mention this ad and Opening Hours: M-F: 10:00am-6:00pm S-S: 11:00am-5:00pm

we’ll give you 10% off your purchase!

(707) 442-2420 • 1670 Myrtle Ave Suite B, Eureka

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Pierson’s Building Center (309 of 615 votes)

NURSERY/GARDEN CENTER

Miller Farms Nursery (243 of 603 votes)

HORTICULTURE SUPPLY SHOP

Northcoast Horticulture (176 of 316 votes)

VETERINARIAN

Sunny Brae Animal Clinic (292 of 484 votes)

PET GROOMER

Muddy Paws (110 of 350 votes)

STORAGE

Rainbow Self Storage (196 of 316 votes) continued on page 22

Oooh, That Was Close We had a tie between Humboldt Patient Resource Center and The Humboldt Collective for Best Dispensary, and 20 categories were decided by less than 20 votes. Seven categories came down to fewer than 10 votes, and these nail-biters were settled by just one or two keystrokes: Best Hot Dog Costco: 269 votes Humboldt Hot Dogs: 268 votes Best Auto Repair Antich Auto: 132 votes Franklin’s Service: 131 votes Best Tattoo Artist Henry Kruger: 172 votes Brian Kaneko: 170 votes


Best Liquor Store Myrtlewood Liquors & John’s Fine Cigars (65.67%) Runner Up: Arcata Liquors

Skip the cheap stuff. You’re being judged. Photo by Heidi Walters

So many bottles of booze — single-malt scotches, tequilas, vodkas, Humboldt-made spirits and more — you walk out choice-drunk (but with sober plans to slowly sip your exclusive, single-barrel bourbon tasted, picked and bottled by owner John Baddeley). So many cigars, glowing in their leaf skins inside the walk-in humidor, you suddenly become a smoker. Or maybe you’ve quit that stuff, and rattle instead the doors of the glass case holding “Juicy e-liquid” vials bottled to look (disturbingly) like melted candy mixed with party bubbles. Getting married? The John’s crew will set you up; if the tasting bar in the back of the store is open, you can enjoy a preview. Plus beer! Chocolates! Ice cream! Just be good: The ungulates on the walls (and the little fox) are watching. — Heidi Walters

Best Place to Buy a Used Car Craigslist (43.11%)  Runner Up: Bob’s Fine Cars Some wait for providence to place a good, broken-in steed in their path — for sale on the sidewalk, friend of a friend’s. But most of you head over to Craigslist to discover that 1982 Oldsmobile Regency Brougham or that 1999 Custom Dodge Ram. What’s cool about Craigslist is that you can get distracted into decking your whole life out in a new-old style: Some young silky roosters, free sheep wool, unicorn figurines, a fuel cell (with lab manual) and a “rare quartz crystal pystol” someone from Garberville’s looking to trade “for nice RV/or a diesel” should set you up nice. Pack it all into the tiny trunk of the “1978 MG Midget Project” you settled on, and away you … go?

northcoastjournal

Cars on Craigslist. Better than dating there.

@ncj_of_humboldt

— Heidi Walters northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

21


continued from page 20

BONUS ROUND MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY

PLACE TO PEOPLE WATCH

Arcata Plaza (316 of 744 votes)

Thank You for voting:

Henry Krüger best tattoo artist

PLACE TO TAKE A FIRST DATE

Moonstone Beach (483 of 648 votes)

LOCALLY MADE PRODUCT

MARIJUANA STRAIN

OG Kush (130 of 346 votes)

Cypress Grove Chevre (315 of 761 votes)

PLACE TO BLOW SOME MONEY Plaza (327 of 589 votes)

VISTA THAT NEVER GETS OLD Trinidad (496 of 702 votes)

THING TO BITCH ABOUT IN HUMBOLDT Tweakers (565 of 769 votes)

SKATEBOARDING SPOT

Arcata Skate Park (148 of 327 votes)

MYTH/CONSPIRACY/URBAN LEGEND Bigfoot (293 of 645 votes)

PUBLIC GARDEN

Arcata Marsh (259 of 529 votes)

VILLAIN

HSU PROFESSOR

Jason Singleton (370 of 574 votes)

Melinda Myers (134 of 290 votes)

CR PROFESSOR

PLACE TO PLAY HOOKY

The River (337 of 583 votes)

Ryan Emenaker (99 of 264 votes)

PLACE TO TAKE YOUR DOG

Tie: Humboldt Patient Resource Center and The Humboldt Collective (111 of 284 votes)

PLACE TO LET KIDS RUN WILD

Sequoia Park Zoo (233 of 576 votes)

Samoa Beach (188 of 513 votes)

WORST EYESORE

PHOTO BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH

FEAR AND LOATHING IN HUMBOLDT.

Broadway Motel (311 of 714)

BEST THING TO BITCH ABOUT Tweakers (73.47%) Runner Up: The Homeless Really, Humboldt? What, no bitching about cancer patients and the lower-middle class? I’m afraid voting for tweakers and the homeless as Humboldt County’s best things to bitch about evidences an empathy deficit of staggering proportions. I realize we’re in the throes of a drought and the usually-bitched-about gray skies have been delightfully blue lately, but aren’t there better things to complain about locally than the diseased and woefully less fortunate? For starters, we could direct our griping ire at the depressed state of the local economy, a state government that mandates drug treatment but doesn’t pay for it or the nation’s utter failure of a war on drugs. But, I get it, that’s all complicated stuff. It’s far easier to just decry the symptom and move on. — Thadeus Greenson

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


BEST MYTH Bigfoot (45.23%) Runner Up: Everyone Smokes Weed Of course it’s Bigfoot. Humboldt County’s home to the greatest of all bigfoot relics: the Patterson-Gimlin film (well, it’s a matter of dispute whether the exact site, near Bluff Creek out of Weitchpec, is in Del Norte County, but come on). It’s home to two of Bigfoot’s most prominent and important researchers: James “Bobo” Fay, of Finding Bigfoot fame, and Steven Streufert, owner of Bigfoot Books in Willow Creek, and auteur Bobcat Goldthwait filmed the definitive shaky-cam Sasquatch flick within county lines just a couple years ago. The hirsute humanoid (Bigfoot, not the other guys) is intriguing. It’s thrilling to imagine a sighting, and with our thick woods and steep-sided wilderness, it’s easy to believe that Sasquatch could be out there, staying mostly hidden all these years. There’s just one problem, Humboldt: It’s not a fucking myth.

CLAP IF YOU BELIEVE IN BIGFOOT. FROM THE PATTERSON-GIMLIN FILM

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Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

— Grant Scott-Goforth ●

Landslides Ten winners swept it with 60 percent or more of the vote, but these three came, saw and conquered their categories with over 70 percent. Best Place to Take a First Date: Moonstone Beach (75%) Best Thing to Bitch About in Humboldt: Tweakers (73%) Best Vista That Never Gets Old: Trinidad (71%)

thursday aug. 7, 2014

north coast

t county, calif. FREE vol XXV issue 32 • humbold

ON THE COVER

.com northcoastjournal

CONCEPT – DREW HYLAND AND LYNN JONES. LINOLEUM BLOCK PRINT – LYNN JONES/JUST MY TYPE LETTERPRESS. ART DIRECTION, HOLLY HARVEY. PHOTOGRAPHY, TERRENCE MCNALLY. MODEL, RENEE RIVERS.

4 It’s called opinion 6 Timber

IDENTIFY THE BEST OF HUMBOLDT WINNERS ON THE COVER AND ENTER TO WIN! DETAILS ON PAGE 14. truce 9 Card-carrying wizards

11 Buhne cranks it up 13 Straight

dope from the Gray Lady 42

Dogs! Winners! 53 Beautiful

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

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boBaraZZI

Around Humboldt County Photos by Bob Doran northcoastjournal.com/bobarazzi

RECKLESS REX ATLENZA, LEADER OF THE BREAK DANCE CREW HUMBOLDT ROCKERS, BREAKS A MOVE BACKSTAGE AT REGGAE ON THE RIVER SUNDAY AFTERNOON, AUG. 3.

REGGAE ICON JIMMY CLIFF CLOSES THE SHOW SATURDAY NIGHT, AUG. 2, AT FRENCH’S CAMP, PLAYING REGGAE ON THE RIVER FOR THE THIRD TIME INCLUDING THE 10TH, 20TH AND THIS YEAR’S 30TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL.

JAMIN HAZELAAR, LEAD SINGER OF ROCK/REGGAE BAND THICKER THAN THIEVES, AND DUB/ELECTRONICA ARTIST GAUDI HANG LOOSE AT REGGAE ALL WEEKEND AFTER PLAYING SETS OPENING FRIDAY AND CLOSING THURSDAY RESPECTIVELY. Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

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24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

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Down and Dirty

August Gardening To-Do List CALLUNA 'ROSWITHA.' A BUD-BLOOMING SCOTCH HEATHER FOR LATE-SEASON INTEREST. PHOTO BY DON WALLACE OF SINGING TREE GARDENS NURSERY

By Genevieve Schmidt downanddirty@northcoastjournal.com

W

elcome to August! At the moment, you’re probably still naively excited about every zucchini you harvest, but by the end of the month, don’t be surprised if friends start playing ding-dong-dash. You know you’ve been the victim of this little game when you answer the doorbell only to see a large basket of zucchini and a “friend”

zooming off into the sunset. If you’re playing and you get caught, be sure to feign innocence when wryly thanked. “No, that was someone else, but would you like some of mine? I’ve got plenty!” Bonus points if they’re confused enough to take another bag. Anyway, though using up zucchini seems to be August’s primary task at hand, there are other things to tackle in the garden this month. Buy a spiralizer. If you’re running out of friends and acquaintances with whom to share your excess squash, consider using up your stash and simultaneously cutting

carbs by purchasing a spiralizer. This handy little device turns zucchini and other vegetables into spaghetti- or fettuccineshaped “noodles,” which can be sauteed and eaten just like pasta. Cover the noodles in tomato sauce and meatballs, fresh pesto made with either basil, mint or fennel, or eat them cold with vinaigrette, some Cypress Grove chevre and Sungold cherry tomatoes. Inspiralized.com has tons of recipe suggestions. If you want to see if you even like zucchini noodles before picking up yet another kitchen contraption, you can use a julienne or

vegetable peeler instead, though it’s more time-consuming. Fertilize tired plants. By this time of summer, many plants have finished their first bloom cycle and are starting to look a little ragged around the edges. Now is a great time to use a half dose of all-purpose organic fertilizer on anything that seems to need extra nutrients. Any plant that is due to flower soon or that is still flowering intermittently is a prime candidate for that midsummer nutrient boost, as well as any evergreen shrubs or continued on next page continued on next page

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Down and Dirty

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trees that are looking a little dull. However, avoid fertilizing anything deciduous such as Japanese maples or spirea, as you don’t want plants to become confused and put out new growth just when they should be preparing to lose their leaves. Deadhead lavender. Once those gorgeously bee-filled wands of lavender have gone from a fragrant purple to a dull grayish brown, it’s time to deadhead. English and most hybrid lavenders form a woody bush with a little foliage at the tips, and hold their flowers aloft on top of bare stems. For these types of lavender, use a pair of handheld hedging shears to neatly clip off all of the flowering stems as well as about one inch of foliage. This removes the finished flowers and effectively “pinches” the new growth to encourage the plant to keep a compact habit. Unpruned lavenders can sprawl open in the center, and since they can’t be pruned back to bare wood to regenerate, a lack of maintenance can sound the death knell for your plants. For French (Lavandula dentata) and Spanish (Lavandula stoechas) lavenders, which grow differently, trim off the individual finished blooms with gardening scissors and they will reward you by continuing to flower for the rest of the season. Shop for fall-flowering plants. ‘Autumn Charm’ stonecrop (Sedum ‘Autumn Charm’), dwarf Joe Pye weed, (Eupatorium dubium ‘Little Joe’) and late blooming varieties of Scotch heather (Calluna vulgaris) are all choices you may not yet be familiar with. ‘Autumn Charm’ stonecrop, a cousin to the attractive but overused ‘Autumn Joy,’ has similar attributes but shines with a vivid gold variegation that makes it stand out over a longer period of time. Dwarf Joe Pye weed is a smaller version of the usual Joe Pye weed which is less prone to flopping and only reaches 2 to 3 feet tall. Scotch heathers are in full bloom now, but most varieties wrap things up by the end of August. However, bud-blooming varieties such as ‘Roswitha’ have flowers that never open, and the buds stay colorful much longer. ‘Finale’ is another that carries the season into fall, with blooms lingering as late as early November. Treat yellowed/chlorotic plants with iron chelate. If the new growth on a shrub has pale yellow leaves with green veins, there is a good chance it is deficient in iron. This is a common problem in boxwood, rhododendrons and camellias. A host of problems can be the cause, such as damaged roots, poor drainage, compacted soil and various nutrient imbalances, but if an easy fix isn’t obvious, it’s fine to go ahead and treat the symptoms by giving plants an application of iron chelate in a form such as Ironite (make sure you water it in). Plants should green up within a month.

Prune and deadhead summer-flowering varieties of heather that have finished blooming. Though I don’t usually like to approach plants with the hedging shears, these plants are the perfect candidates because they have tiny, needlelike leaves that don’t appear chopped when hedged — just clip into the plants right underneath the brown, finished blooms. They also respond to pruning with a flush of fresh new growth, so they don’t look sternly pruned for very long. That said, make sure you don’t cut into any bare, woody branches unless you know for sure which variety you are dealing with. Heaths and Irish heaths (Erica and Daboecia, respectively) can tolerate harder pruning if given adequate water and good care, but Scotch heather (Calluna) should never be pruned to bare stems. Remove new flowers on winter squash vines once the plant has set a good number of fruit. This tells the plant to put its energy into the squashes that are already ripening, so that they produce larger fruit and mature faster. Most gardeners know that summer squash blossoms can be eaten, but are unaware that the winter squash flowers are equally appetizing. These delicacies don’t keep long and, like most foods, are delicious when battered and deep-fried. Squash blossoms can also be stuffed with cheese and herbs, then baked, or added to salads for additional color. Keep harvesting in the vegetable garden. Don’t get behind on picking produce such as zucchini, pole beans, peas or cherry tomatoes. Even if you are unable to use all of your harvest right away, it’s better to pick them and send the signal to your plant to continue making more. If you leave these vegetables on the plant, it may stop producing and go dormant earlier than it otherwise would. Continue planting for winter. While it seems counterintuitive to think about fall and winter gardening when the sun is shining, if you wait until the weather is cool, your plants won’t get the strong start they need in order to actually produce food for you in fall and winter. Keep on setting out seeds of arugula, spinach, lettuce, Swiss chard, beets, carrots and radishes, and transplanting starts of cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, kale, collards, kohlrabi and cauliflower. If you are bored of the same-old same-old selections, check local nurseries for variegated versions of kale and collards, and an array of colored cauliflowers including ‘Graffiti Purple,’ ‘Sunset’ and ‘Violet Queen,’ available from Log House Plants. ● Genevieve Schmidt is a landscape designer and owns a fine landscape maintenance company in Arcata. Visit her on the web at www.GenevieveSchmidtDesign.com.


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Thoroughly Postmodern Millie HLOC’s big Roaring Twenties musical By William S. Kowinski stagematters@northcoastjournal.com

Melissa Hinz and Gino Bloomberg in HLOC’s Thoroughly Modern Millie Photo courtesy of Humboldt light opera company

F

rom the opening tableau of a 1920s Manhattan street scene that fills the Van Duzer Theatre stage, the Humboldt Light Opera Company production of Thoroughly Modern Millie has the look, the pace and the pizzazz of Broadway. It has all the elements of a big classic musical: vibrant costumes (by Caroline Allander, Madeline Myers and director Carol Ryder) sparkling choreography with sly Busby Berkeley touches (by Melissa Hinz, assisted by Hannah Mullen Jones), an 18-piece pit orchestra (conducted by Justin Sousa), plus painted backdrops falling and rising while clever set and prop pieces whiz on and off the stage with Jayson Mohatt’s inventive scenic design. Like 1920s Broadway shows in particular, this early 21st century musical has more to do with stars than story. Melissa Hinz as Millie, the Kansas girl who quickly becomes a worldly New Yorker, plays the part with personality, assurance and happy feet. She has the ’20s look, while delivering her lines with the wisecrack intonations of ’30s screwball comedies.

Gino Bloomberg is steady and appealing as her leading man, Katherine Johnson has a couple of show-stopping songs and Linnea Hill, Kevin Richards, Kathleen Ely and Alissa Morey provide nicely comic characterizations, as well as musical moments. The songs span more than a century of music. If “The Speed Test” sounds a lot like Gilbert and Sullivan, that’s because new lyrics are grafted onto an Arthur Sullivan tune. There are a couple of other operetta melodies by Victor Herbert, as well as the title song by Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen for the 1967 Julie Andrews film, which is the source material for this stage musical. (Musicals that started as movies seem quite the North Coast trend these days.) The new songs are by Dick Scanlon (lyrics) and Jeanine Tesori (music). Tesori wrote the music for HLOC’s hit from last summer, Shrek The Musical. The songs are pleasant and forgettable, but the underscoring (presumably by Tesori and whoever did the orchestration) brilliantly evokes the jazz age and old movie soundtracks.

28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

The biggest weakness is plot. The main story is predictable and the secondary story is incoherent. Millie is thoroughly modern because her goal is to marry for money and not for love. So it’s not hard to figure out how that will go, complete with fairy tale touches and last-minute revelations. As for the secondary story, in the movie it involved — of all things in a musical comedy — a white slavery ring targeting orphaned young women and run by sinister Chinese villains. Responding to the racism in this version, the 21st century stage musical kept the Chinese villains but made one of them sympathetic — he falls in love with a victim. The HLOC version completely removes the once common stereotype of funny-talking Chinese and replaces them with Italian villains with heavy accents. Thanks perhaps to The Godfather and those collections of Italian love songs marketed as “Mob Hits,” contemporary culture seems to find it acceptable to stereotype Italians as criminals, however pathetic or buffoonish. The North Coast may be sensitive to its notorious history regarding Chinese residents, but others experienced prejudice here as well. During World War II, Italian-Americans in Arcata were placed under curfew and their movements were restricted. Mostly unacceptable now, stereotyped ethnic humor and ethnic villains were standard elements in American entertainment well into the 20th century. This production tries to lower the temperature by dodging the white slavery aspect and suggesting it’s more of a kidnapping plot. Why kidnappers would target orphans with no one to

pay ransom for them isn’t explained. Still, audiences are more likely to leave with impressions of dazzling dancing stenographers and the dramatic skyscraper-ledge set than with many memories of the story or the songs. Thoroughly Modern Millie is a thoroughly postmodern pastiche meant to revive Roaring Twenties style and evoke the classic singing-and-dancing musical comedy. Except for its more currently fashionable lighting (often dim compared to the tried and true standard of brightly lit musicals), this production delivers. Directed with usual panache by Carol McWhorter Ryder, with musical direction by Katri Pitts and Amy Chalfant, and with an additional cast too large to name individually, Thoroughly Modern Millie continues for through Aug. 17 (Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m.). 822-1318, hloc.org.

Coming Up:

Arcata Plays in the Park begin this weekend. Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Evan Needham, premieres on Friday, Aug. 8 at 7 p.m., and runs Friday and Saturday evenings through Aug. 30 at Arcata’s Redwood Park. Scheherazade, a familyfriendly retelling of Arabian Nights tales (genies, magic carpets, etc), directed by Charlie Heinberg, opens Sunday, Aug. 10 at 2 p.m. and plays every Sunday through Aug. 31. There’s an admission charge for Shakespeare but Scheherazade is free. 822-7091, www.playsinthepark.net. l


Lasting Impressions Libby George back at her press after 30 years

“Poppies in Black and White,” a solarplate intaglio by Libby George. Photo by Ken Weiderman.

By Ken Weiderman artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

P

rintmaking can be a nasty business. Traditional etching uses nitric acid to dissolve an image out of a metal plate. Inks are laden with solvents, and everything is cleaned up with turpentine or acetone. For nearly 500 years, artists have braved toxic chemical cocktails to create etchings, but the results are worth it. Metal plates are sturdy and produce many identical copies with fine etched details and a wide range of lights and darks. But printmaking doesn’t have to be toxic. On a misty Sunday afternoon, I caught up with Libby George, a local artist who has been using a process called solarplate intaglio to create etchings with sunlight, water and non-toxic inks. George is known for her succulent, hazy pastel drawings of buildings and landscapes, but printmaking used to be her thing. For 15 years, George worked at home with her own press and all those scary chemicals. After her two sons were born, she worried that “it was only a matter of time before somebody got into something,” so she threw everything out and switched to pastels. Nearly three decades would pass before George found a safe way to print again. “I love printmaking but I didn’t want

to go back to chemicals,” she explains. About six years ago, George traveled to the Making Art Safely studio school in Santa Fe with help from generous grants. Pastels had gotten repetitive for her, and the solarplate process was enticing. It offered fresh opportunities to explore printing again, along with plenty of room for creative growth. The many steps involved are still challenging George, who relishes continually learning from little mistakes. “These happy accidents you just can’t think of yourself, and they’re better than anything I can think up!” she says, leaning in to giggle as if sharing a secret. Wrapped in an ink-stained, white smock, she swipes a curl of chestnut hair away from her glasses and hops from table to table in her studio to demonstrate each part of the process. “Here’s a solarplate,” she says, handing me a thin orange sheet of photopolymer plastic mounted on metal. The plastic starts out soft, but hardens when exposed to sunlight. To begin, George creates a black and gray image on clear acetate film. Sometimes she’ll draw directly onto it, other times she’ll print scanned drawings from her computer. Window shades pulled tight, she grabs a new plate and places the image over the top of the orange plastic. Humboldt County’s sunlight is notoriously fickle, so George uses a UV light to expose the plas-

tic. Depending on the image, exposure times vary from 10 seconds to a minute. “Every second makes a difference,” she says. The plate is soft, and where the light cannot pass through the acetate film it stays soft. It’s the plate’s ability to accept varying levels of light that makes this process possible, otherwise it would be a simple black and white imprint. Where the acetate film is clear, the solarplate becomes hardest. The darkest parts of the image keep the light off the solarplate, forming the deepest etchings, while in the faintest gray areas, the etched image is just barely there. Once the plate is exposed, George places it in a tap water bath and gently scrubs it with a soft nylon brush for 45 seconds. Those areas that didn’t harden with light exposure get scrubbed away, and her plate is ready for the next step. Turning to her inking table, George scoops up a glob of soy-based lamp-black ink and plops it onto a Plexiglas pad. She runs a brayer across the ink, its 4-inch-wide cylinder spreading the pigment out with a sticky sound. As George rolls the brayer across her new plate, it shoves ink deep into the etched markings. She carefully wipes away any excess from the surface with lintfree tarlatan cloth, then prepares to lay it on expensive paper. If her finger happens to touch the printing surface it will leave a mark. “Every printmaker in the world that comes to your show and looks at your print will know that,” George cautions. With a sly whisper, she says, “You can pretend that it was on purpose but they will know it’s not!” Noticing a stray drop, she wipes the edge of the plate on her smock and lays it carefully on her press. George then slowly turns the crank of her press and everything is fed through. Under intense pressure, any ink left on the solarplate becomes a new layer for her developing image. Most prints are run, or “pulled” through the press at least four times. Different colors and ink applications build up depth in the surface of her works, and the slight variations of each pull ensure that every print is unique. Even though the same plate can create identical prints every time, George searches for the right combination of variables. “I like to pull it and look at it and say, ‘OK, what does this print need?’” Sometimes it’s another pull,

other times a print requires small additions of painted details. Etching, inking and pressing. Minor changes in every step create an array of possibilities. George loves getting lost in the process, musing over happy accidents while the hours fly by. Now that she’s found a safe way to print again, she looks forward to the innumerable paths printmaking allows. Judging by her body of work so far, plenty of surprises await. l Libby George will have a reception for her new show, “Finding That Light” on Saturday, Aug. 9 from 6-9 p.m. at the Upstairs Gallery during Arts Arcata.

Guest Artist

GEORGE VENTURA July 30-Aug 30

The Finest Art for Your Home, Office & Garden www.SewellGallery.com Tues-Sat 10-6pm • Sun Noon-5pm (707) 269-0617 423 F Street, Eureka, CA

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

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northcoastjournal.com

Second Friday Arts! Arcata Friday, Aug. 8, 6-9 p.m.

Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at 30 participating locations in Arcata. Visit www.artsarcata.com for even more information about the event or call (707) 822-4500.

P RO U D LY S U P P O RT S :

PleinAir at the Lost Coast Oct. 1-5, 2014 SHELTER COVE, HISTORIC BENBOW INN & SOUTHERN HUMBOLDT COUNTY

Join us in this inaugural event as Plein Air artists descend on Shelter Cove for a weekend of landscape painting and fun! Along with the fun, there is $5000 in prize money, workshops and art sale. If you are an artist or just want to experience the singular beauty of this magnificent setting, come along and enjoy.

To register: PleinAirAtTheLostCoast.com SPONSORED IN PART BY: Shelter Cove Arts and Recreation Foundation (SCARF), Humboldt Lodging Alliance, Bureau of Land Management and Humboldt Insider Magazine

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

ARCATA ARTISANS 883 H St. Mimi LaPlant, paintings; Diane Sonderegger, ceramic sculpture. ARCATA CITY HALL 736 F St. Artwork by the Ink People. ARCATA EXCHANGE 813 H St. Gigi Floyd, beeswax collages. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Music by Clean Livin’. FIRE ARTS CENTER 520 South C St. Ken McFarland, Mary Egan and Gretchen Immel, ceramics. GARDEN GATE 905 H St. Isobel Milena. Music by Lyndsey Battle. Beverage sales benefit Friends of The Dunes. LIBATION WINE SHOP & BAR 761 Eighth St. Music by Duane Burgess. MOONRISE HERBS 826 G St. Jessica Albee. NATURAL SELECTION 708 Ninth St. Gary Lund, stained glass. NORTH SOLES FOOTWEAR 853 H St. Renee Thompson, mixed media. PACIFIC OUTFITTERS 737 G St. Kilo Camino and Yma Nicolina. Music by Folk Duo. DIANE SONDEREGGER’S PIERCED AND PUDGY “PUNK PLAZA 808 G St. Libby George, pastels. SKUNK” STRIKES A FIERCE POSE AT ARCATA ARTISANS. REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING CO. 550 South G St. “In Color,” Joseph Sandoval, photography. ROCKING HORSE 791 Eighth St. Children’s art. ROOKERY BOOKS 853 H St. Music by Empty GIGI FLOYD’S BEESWAX COLLAGES SHINE AT ARCATA EXCHANGE. Bottle Boys. STOKES, HAMMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 Bayside Road. Gary Bloomfield, drawings; Dave Van De Mark, photography; Mariko Pratt, drawings. UPSTAIRS GALLERY 1063 G St. “Finding that Light,” Libby George, mono prints. ●


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The humble but rich saag paneer. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill.

Glazed, dark and handsome. Photo by Drew hyland.

Loosen your lederhosen for schnitzel and spaetzle. Photo by Jennifer Fumiko Cahill.

Hum Plate Roundup Dining out by the book By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

B

ook club always descends into eating and drinking anyway, so let’s skip to the last page and eat. Here are the Cliff’s Notes to our recent romances, mysteries and adventures.

Tandoori Do-over

Chatter on the wire sent us to Tandoori Bites, the Indian place across from McDonald’s formerly known as the Indian place across from McDonald’s (1735 Fourth St., Eureka). Can a restaurant be haunted? Do the ghosts of bad Yelp reviews and congealed buffet offerings linger? Unlike the hotel in The Shining, the place seems to have shaken off past horrors. The saag paneer, a dark green spinach curry with homemade fresh cheese, comes out in a little silver bowl with fancy handles ($9.99). Always humble, saag paneer is secretly lavish with all the clarified butter and the bunches of spinach cooked down to make a small pot. It’s also a comfort food for those who have nothing to prove in the way of blazing hot spices. (If you haven’t had it before, think of the creamed spinach you’re so happy to see spooned on your plate beside a steak.) This one is creamy with fragrant cardamom, a gradually warming spiciness and just-salty-enough cheese that’s on the firm side, but a nice balance to the nearly pureed spinach. And just like that, the curse is broken.

Fried and Prejudice

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love the apple fritter at Happy Donuts ($2.75, 2916 Central Ave., Eureka). Jane Austen would forgive me. After all, is this not the Mr. Darcy of doughnuts — crusty and intimidating, a little puffed up and with no pleasing sprinkles? But the edges and imperfections of this great lump of a thing are encrusted with glaze and dotted with tiny, juicy bits of apple. It’s not greasy and leaden, either, but browned and crispy. This enormous, landed cousin of the humble doughnut is a breakfast food, a dessert, an afternoon coffee treat and, if necessary, a kind of edible shield behind which you could hide your face if, like a moody hero, you were not feeling social. Sharing is probably wise, given the sheer mass of the fritter, but hangry people are not always wise. I’ll just have a nibble, you think. Then you reach back into the bag and find it half empty. As Austen wrote of falling in love, “I was in the middle before I knew I had begun.”

don’t worry — it’s not nearly as foodcourt as the name suggests. Weiner schnitzel sounds like sausage but is actually a pounded, breaded and fried pork cutlet ($11.25 a la carte). It’s

pinky-thin and tender, with a simple, crisp coating that’s balanced by a squeeze of lemon and a dollop of cranberry preserve. On the side (yes, even a la carte) is more contrast in the form of a warm pile of pickley-sweet red cabbage. The fried potatoes are so perfectly browned and seasoned you will forget Americans put ketchup on them. A black pot full of fried spaetzle with a wooden stand shows up in front of the young man from Berlin at the next table ($7.95). I’ll have what he’s having. Buttery nubs of pasta pan fried with onion, parsley and Gruyére cheese and topped with frizzled onion comes off like a none-toosalty Teutonic mac and cheese. It’s rustic and satisfying with the earthy and aromatic Gruyére. As you dig into your own little cauldron, you might wonder why the Italians spend so much time turning pasta into fancy shapes. The Berliner recommends the Viennese apple streudel, which arrives hot and dusted with powdered sugar — don’t blow on it or you’ll cover everyone at your table ($3.95). The crust is soft and flaky on top, caramelized on the bottom and stuffed in the middle with firm, cinnamon spiced apples. Hell, ja. l

Fo Schnitzel

When Franz Kafka wrote, “So long as you have food in your mouth, you have solved all questions for the time being,” was he talking about the struggle to survive or a good streudel? The Journal received reliable intel regarding the German-Austrian soul food at Stuf’t Potato, namely the weiner schnitzel (3200 S. Broadway, Eureka). If you haven’t been, northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

35


ARCATA + NORTH EUREKA + SOUTH ON NEXT PAGE

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

ABRUZZI 826-2345 780 Seventh St., Arcata THE ALIBI 822-3731 744 Ninth St., Arcata

Open Daily 8am - 2am

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St., 822-1220

thur 8/7

Angel Azul (film) 6:30pm $3

Thoroughly Modern Millie (play) 7:30pm $11, $19

War Moth and Deadman’s Fatbol and CBaker Showcase JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Tale (metal) 10pm Price TBA (funk and DJs) 10pm Price TBA 915 H St., Arcata Blue Lotus Jazz LARRUPIN 822-4766 6pm Free 1658 Patricks Point Drive, Trinidad Claire Bent (jazz) Duncan Burgess (guitar) LIBATION 825-7596 7pm Free 6pm Free 761 Eighth St., Arcata

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HAPPY HOURS Rita’s on Harris

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& Regular Happy Hour Rita’s on 5th Street $4 Jumbo Margaritas $2 Pints & Full Size Drinks Regular Happy Hour M-Sa 3-5pm Rita’s in Arcata $2 Pints • $3 Margarita M-F 3-5pm

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Eureka 1111 5th St • 443-5458 427 W. Harris St • 476-8565 Arcata 855 8th St. Suite 3 • 822-1010

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Ngaio Bealum and Caitlin Gill (comedy) 8pm $10

Open Mic BLONDIES 822-3453 7pm Free 420 E. California Ave., Arcata BLUE LAKE CASINO Karaoke w/KJ Leonard Eyes Anonymous (‘80s) Silver Hammer (Beatles) WAVE LOUNGE 668-9770 8pm Free 9pm Free 9pm Free 777 Casino Way Open Mic w/Jimi Jeff 8pm Karaoke w/Rock Star CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 Free 9pm Free 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO The Roadmasters (Americana) Headshine (reggae) FIREWATER LOUNGE 677-3611 9pm Free 9pm Free 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) CLAM BEACH INN 839-0545 10pm Free 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville CRUSH 825-0390 1101 H St. #3, Arcata Mother Vines and more (rock) Funk Night for the Maasai HUMBOLDT BREWS 826-2739 9pm $10 9:30pm $10 856 10th St., Arcata

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

Spirits

sat 8/9

2 1 + O N LY

RitasCafe.com

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

sun 8/10

m-t-w 8/11-13

Peter Pan (film) 5:30pm $5, All Ages

[W] Sci-Fi Night w/ Revolt of the Zombies 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev, All Ages [M] Quiz Night 7pm Free [T] Pocketful of Posies (rock) 7pm Free

The Lopez (grunge) 11pm $5

HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY 1 Harpst St., Arcata 826-3928

Fine Wines

fri 8/8

After Dark Dance Party (DJs) 9pm $5

Jazz Night 7pm Free Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

[T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free [W] Blues Explosion (open jam) 8:30pm Free [T] Game Night 5pm Free [M] Whitey Morgan and the ‘78s (honky tonk) 9pm $10

Thoroughly Modern Millie (play) 7:30pm $11, $19

Thoroughly Modern Millie (play) 2pm $11, $19

‘80s Night (DJs) 9:30pm Free

DGS Sundaze (EDM DJs) 9pm $5

[T] Comedy Open Mic 9pm $3 [W] The Whomp (DJs) 9pm $5 [W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

RLA Trio (jazz) 7pm Free

[T] Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm Free


venue

LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 677-0077 355 Main St., Trinidad LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake

Submit your events online!

clubs, concerts and cafés

arcata • blue lake •mckinleyville trinidad • willow creek thur 8/7

fri 8/8

Kaptain Kirk’s Kosmic Koncoction 8pm Free

Freestyle Comedy Battle 9pm Free

Deadline noon Friday

sat 8/9

sun 8/10

m-t-w 8/11-13

Tim Breed (acoustic) 5pm Free Potluck (food) 6pm Free

[W]The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 8:30pm Free [T] Barleywine Revue (bluegrass) 6pm Free [W] The Littlest Birds (strings) 6pm Free

MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake MOONSTONE CROSSING TASTING ROOM 845-5492 529 Trinity St., Trinidad MOSGO’S 826-1195 2461 Alliance Road, Arcata OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad PLAZA GRILL 826-0860 780 Seventh St., Arcata REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW 550 South G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222

ARE YOU IN?

Otto Knobetter (jazz) 4pm Free Bradley Dean (rock/country) 4pm Free [M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rude Lion 9pm $5 Thursday Night Shake Up 8pm Free Electric Gravy (synth-pop) 8pm Free

ROBERT GOODMAN WINES Roots & Culture Reggae 9pm Free 937 10th St., Arcata, 826-WINE SIDELINES 822-0919 732 Ninth St., Arcata SILVER LINING 839-0304 3561 Boeing Ave., McKinleyville

Rude Lion Sound (DJ) 10pm $2

SIX RIVERS BREWERY 839-7580 Central Ave., McKinleyville

DJ Itchie Fingaz 9pm Free

USGGO (jazz-funk) 10pm Free DJ Music 10pm $2 Pat Holland (acoustic) 6pm Free Latter Day Bard and Tom Bennett (folk) 9pm Free

Selector Rotten Rocksteady Night (DJ) 9pm Free Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free Doug Fir & the 2x4s (rock) 9pm Free

DJ Itchie Fingaz (glitch/hip-hop) 9pm Free

[W] Salsa! (lessons + dance) 9pm $5

[T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free Trivia Night 8pm Free

[M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [M] Anemones of the State (jazz) 5pm Free [W] Reggae Wednesdayz w/Rude Lion 10pm Free

DJ Music 10pm Free

Lo

un

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SUSHI SPOT 839-1222 1552 City Center Road, McK. TOBY & JACKS 822-4198 764 Ninth St., Arcata

[W] Pints for Non-Profits (Mad River Alliance) 11am Free

at

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LIFESTYLE OUTDOOR FUN PERFECT TRIPS FOOD & DRINK 90-DAY CALENDAR SOUVENIRS

835 J Street Arcata (707) 822-9474 3foodscafe.com open at 5:30 tues-sun Check out our facebook page for news and specials!

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3 foods cafe

TICKETS AVALAIBLE AT ADVENTURE’S EDGE 15 in advance 20 at the door

$ $

Photo by Jordan Manley

pt

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pm

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aT

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2014

HUMBOLDT’S FOUR-SEASON VISITOR GUIDE

RESERVATION DEADLINE FOR THE AUTUMN EDITION IS FRIDAY, AUG. 15

442-1400 X319 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

37


EUREKA + SOUTH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

BAR-FLY PUB 443-3770 91 Commercial St., Eureka BEAR RIVER CASINO 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

thur 8/7 Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

ARCATA + NORTH ON PREVIOUS PAGE

fri 8/8

sat 8/9

Vintage Rock N’ Soul 9pm Free

Ballroom: Nighthawk (rock) 9pm Free Thirsty Bear: Pressure Anya (DJs) 9pm Free

Sounds of Sacco (DJ) 9pm Free

Ngaio Bealum and Caitlin Gill CECIL’S BISTRO 923-7007 (comedy) 8pm Free 773 Redwood Drive, Garberville The Tumbleweeds CHAPALA CAFÉ 443-9514 (cowboy) 6-8pm Free 201 Second St., Eureka CUTTEN INN 445-9217 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka TBA TBA EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 9pm Free 9pm Price TBA 518 Seventh St. 497-6093 Best in Show (film and party) EUREKA THEATER 6pm $5 612 F St., 845-8795 Seabury Gould and Papa Paul (folk) GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 7pm Free 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 Evan Morden (Irish) 7pm Free

Fresh, farm to table products made same day in house. For Reservations call 268-3852 Open at 5pm Tues.-Sat. 511 2nd Street • Old Town Eureka

Pressure Anya (DJs) 10pm Free Lisa Baney (jazz) 7pm Free

4-6pm Tues.-Sun. Daily Specials Lunch • Dinner

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com

10% Discount to HSU and CR Students!

407-3630 • 210 4 Street, Eureka th

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

TBA 9pm Price TBA

[T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm Free [W] Comedy Open Mikey 9pm Free

Open Irish/Celtic Music Session 3pm Free The Drip, Theories and Capital Decay (punk) 7pm $5

[T] Dirty Work, Beta Boys and Shit Rag (metal) 7pm $6

[W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

TBA 9pm Price TBA

[W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 7pm Free

Happy Hour

Humboldt’s first Ethiopian restaurant welcomes you! Come and enjoy the authentic flavor of Ethiopia, and don’t forget about our freshly brewed coffee from Ethiopia and Tanzania!

m-t-w 8/11-13

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

INK ANNEX 442-8413 47B W. Third St., Eureka OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 444-2017 507 Second St., Eureka THE PLAYROOM 725-5438 11109 Main St, Fortuna PERSIMMONS GALLERY 923-2748 1055 Redway Drive, Redway

sun 8/10

Masta Shredda (DJ) 10pm Free Tiana from Hawaii (reggae) 7pm Free

Itchie Fingaz (DJ) 10pm Free [T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 9pm Free [W] Gary Stewart and Friends (folk) 7pm Free


eureka • fernbridge •ferndale • fortuna garberville • loleta • redway venue

thur 8/7

RED LION HOTEL R.J. GRIN’S LOUNGE 445-0844 1929 Fourth St., Eureka SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 Falling Rocks (country/swing) 7pm Free 191 Truesdale St., Eureka THE SHANTY 444-2053 213 Third St., Eureka THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

Hundred Heads and more (rock) 9pm Free

clubs, concerts and cafés

fri 8/8

sat 8/9

Find live music and more!

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

carterhouse.com

sun 8/10

m-t-w 8/11-13

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 9pm Free, 21+

Happy Hour 4-6pm

[M] Ex-Cult, Zig Zags, White Manna and TxExDx (punk/metal) 9pm $5 Tentative Comedy 9pm Free

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 THE WORKS 442-8121 210 C St., Eureka

Happy Otherwise and Blood Orphan (indie rock) 9pm Free Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (booty shakin’ blues) 10pm Free Cyclops & the Owl (surf rock) 6pm Free

[T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [W] No Covers and USGGO (jazz) 7:30pm Free

*LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER

FEATURED

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

WHO: Ex-Cult WHEN: Monday, Aug. 11 at 9 p.m. WHERE: The Shanty TICKETS: $5

½ OFF BAR MENU ITEM: CARTER DOG BAR MENU: TRUFFLE FRIES • BLACK BEAN QUESADILLA 301 GRASSFED SLIDERS • CARTER DOG FRESH FISH TACOS • ARTISAN CHEESE PLATE

The

IN SUNNYBRAE

Grand Opening! Frozen Yogurt

Open Daily 11:00 - 9:00 850 Crescent Way • Arcata

• 8 Flavors • Self Serve • More than 50 toppings • Smoothies • Build your own shakes • Family atmosphere

Sea Grill The finest and freshest local catch

Find us on Facebook!

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 • LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

ORDERS TO GO:

N O R T H

C O A S T

J O U R N A L

COCKTAIL COMPASS

822-2780

Locally owned and operated

100+ BARS 80+ HAPPY HOURS N O RT H COA STJ O U R N A L .CO M / C O C K TA I L C O M PA S S

McKinleyville Shopping Center northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

39


40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


THe seTlIst

Dance the Night Away Dead questions and musical locavores

WHO: War Möth WHEN: Thursday, Aug. 7 at 9:45 p.m.

By Jennifer Savage thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

C

rabs are over. The students are returning. The end of summer draws nigh. In the meantime, we still have sunshine at the river and a bit of nightlife to soothe your soul.

Thursday: All doom, no gloom

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

WHO: The Lopez Do you like heavy metal? War Möth (love WHEN: Saturday, Aug. 9 at 11 p.m. the umlaut, fellows), WHERE: The Alibi featuring locals Wolf TICKETS: $5 Navarro, Sean Ennis, Dan Davis and Kelly Brannon, brings the devil’s music to the Jambalaya — the band would like you to “come and rock!!” Also, Dead Man’s Tale, about which not much is known other than they are also local and also an “exciting heavy rock band.” The doom begins I saw a movie once in which dancing around 9:45 p.m. Be 21-or-over, my lambs. was outlawed because it was, essentially, a sin. Inspired lust and stuff. But the killjoy adults were no match for teenage desire, especially once bad boy Ren McCormack Humboldt Brews celebrates Local Band came to town. Arcata has a lot of rules, Night with surf rockers The Mother Vines, but, thankfully, the powers-that-be will whose sound, at least on the track “Wild allow you to salsa, cha-cha, merengue and Free Country,” inspired agreeable headotherwise get your sexy on via coordinodding by the people who happened to nated hand, foot and, most importantly, be sitting around my living room while I hip movements. Where can you experiwrote this. Also Dead Drift, a band without ence this sensory-heightening fun, you a Facebook or Google profile — apparently ask? At Mazzotti’s, where a new monthly they’re local, what with the aforemenBaile’N Mazzotti’s Latin dancing night altioned “Local Band Night” and all — and lows an opportunity to make the most of the fun, fuzzy Fairy Rings, a band boasting the joint’s rather fabulous wooden dance the approval of Local Artist Cool Guy Jesse floor. Five dollars and an ID stating you are Weidel. Cover’s $5 at the door, show is at least 18 years old will get you in. The 21-and-over and starts at 9 p.m. dancing starts at 9 p.m.

Saturday: Dance for fun, funk for a cause, ‘snot rock’

WHERE: Jambalaya TICKETS: TBA

Up the same way, another event that includes shaking your groove thing — for a cause other than just getting your juices flowing, you hedonist, you. Instrumental Flight is throwing a benefit for the O’Brien School for the Maasai (in Tanzania, natch!) in what is aptly named Funk Night for the Maasai. Your donations — $10 minimum to get in — will help Dave Klawitter get the school’s new music department off the ground. Live music from the Get Down Crew and DJ Rickshaw with The Klaw and a light show by Marmalade Sky at the Jambalaya. Doors at 9:30 p.m., 21-and-over. Tons more info at instrumentalflight.com. And then you’ve got your Pittsburgh “snot rock.” In the form of The Lopez. At the Alibi. You know the drill. (The drill: $5, 11 p.m., 21-and-over.)

Monday: Two kinds of love

You need some goddamn good honky-tonk on a Monday night, yes, you do. Which is why you’re going to suck it up and go out and see Flint, Mich. native Whitey Morgan and the 78’s at Humboldt Brews. Tickets are $10, the outlaw twang

starts at 9 p.m. and yes, 21-and-over. Wait. What? Two serious shows on a Monday night? Oh, Humboldt. The way things work out. All right, here we go. Over at the Shanty, you’ve got Memphis’ Ex-Cult riffing some punk like it’s 1982 and they’re in the garage next door, plus Zig Zags, similarly inclined but out PHOTO of El Lay, local trippers COURTESY OF White Manna and THE ARTIST A-town’s superchill TxExDx. Show starts at 9 p.m. and cover’s $5. It’s the Shanty — be of legal drinking age.

Ever so slightly ahead

In far more gentler options, The Littlest Birds arrive with cello and banjo in hand next Wednesday, Aug. 13, at Mad River Brewery, playing at the perfectly sophisticated time of 6 to 8:30 p.m. Sweet, lovely, old-time Americana tunes. Free. On Thursday, Aug. 14, an all-ages show (hallelujah) takes place courtesy of the dedicated folks at the Placebo with the wailing gothy vocals and elegant drumming of The Spiritual Bat, Megathon Leviathan, the noise-heavy IDTAL and a sort of tragically romantic post-punk offering via The Disaffectionate. Show starts at 7 p.m. in the Ink Annex. No drugs or booze. Cover is $6 members, $8 non.

Etc.

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com.

Friday: Your friends and neighbors

WHO: Littlest Birds WHEN: Wednesday, Aug. 13 at 6 p.m.

WHERE: Mad River Brewery TICKETS: Free

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

41


Remember when teens used to go outside and do stuff? Me neither, but Fortuna does! The Great Race Fortuna ($20 per team, $10 per person) is a citywide, fast-paced, scavenger hunt/goose chase for high school-aged teens (recent grads and entering freshmen included). Play alone or form a team — either way, the race takes off on Wednesday, Aug. 13, at 9 a.m. at the Multi-Generational Center.

7

thursday

ART

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Drawing, painting, mixed-media, sculpting and more. Free.

MOVIES

Best in Show Party and Screening. 6 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Come celebrate the Journal’s Best of Humboldt 2014 issue with cocktails, nibbles and a showing of the dog show mockumentary. $5. www. theeurekatheater.org. Angel Azul. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Ocean Night’s documentary explores the artistic efforts of Jason deCaires Taylor to make artificial coral reefs. $3. www.arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC

Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Dancing in the street. Cajun rock and blues by Tom Rigney. Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054.

THEATER

The Poor of New York. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. A melodrama set in the post-financial collapse of 1857. $18. NCRT@humboldt1. com. www.ncrt.net. 442-6278.

FOR KIDS

Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon. Morris Elementary School, 2395 McKinleyville Ave., McKinleyville. Bring your children ages 0-5 for a chance to play with others. Free. Storytime. 10-10:45 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Stories, songs, fingerplays and more for you and your youngsters. Free. 677-0227.

Some things are just meant to go together: milk and cookies, Nutella and bananas, bugs and beer. On Sunday, Aug. 10, from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m., local expert Pete Haggard will be on-site at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center for the brewsoaked insect hunt, Beer and Bugs ($10). Search for bugs in and around the dune forest, or bring any mystery bugs you might have at home! Pete will help identify the bugs while you enjoy a cold brewski.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Jerry Cottrell plays this week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music. Marty Flashman plays this week.

MEETINGS

Human Rights Commission. First Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This month’s agenda includes the use of public property and prison conditions. Free. 668-4095. Humboldt County Beekeepers Association. First Thursday of every month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Humboldt County Agriculture Department, 5630 South Broadway, Eureka. Brad Woodward talks about queen-rearing for the small beekeeper and using nuc hives in the apiary. $2. humboldtbeekeepers.org. 845-3362.

OUTDOORS

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Have a drink and enjoy a slow ride around the bay on the Madaket. $10. 445-1910. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Tour the bay with the captain of the Madaket as your guide. Learn about the history and wildlife of Humboldt Bay. $18, $16 seniors and kids under 17, $10 kids under 12, free to kids under 4. 445-1910.

SPORTS

Lawn Games. 6 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Come and play bocce, cornhole and more. Free.

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

The 2014 CASA Kid Walk season officially started on Aug. 1, but it deserves a more ceremonious start than the turn of a calendar page. On Friday, Aug. 8, at 6 p.m., CASA will ring in the new season with their Kid Walk Kick Off (free). This miniparade, accompanied by music from Samba na Chuva, starts at Arcata Exchange and winds its way to Robert Goodman Wines for a special reception. You’re probably going to end up walking at some point, so why not walk for a good cause?

ETC

Cribbage Group. Every other Thursday, 6-8 p.m. New Wine Church, 1180 Evergreen Road, Redway. Please bring a board, if possible; refreshments will be served. Free. lizcarey333@icloud.com. 497-8281. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

8 friday ART

Arts! Arcata. Second Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Art, music and more art. Downtown Arcata and surrounding area. Free. info@arcatamainstreet.com. www.arcatamainstreet. com. 822-4500.

DANCE

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Teaching and performing world dance. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. www.stalbansarcata. org. 839-3665.

LECTURE

“Eagles in Your Home.” 7:30-9 p.m. Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road, Arcata. Redwood Region Audubon Society sponsors this talk by local wildlife biologists Sandra Hunt-von Arb and Jim Campbell-Spickler, who discuss the Humboldt Bay Eagle cam. Come fragrance free. Free. www.iws.org/hbe.html. Humboldt History: Unique and Useful. 7 p.m. Depot Museum, 3 Park St., Fortuna. Jerry Rohde presents

photos and facts about Humboldt’s history of making its own products and wares. Free.

THEATER

Midsummer Night’s Dream. 7 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Plays in the Park presents Shakespeare’s magical and mischievous comedy about young lovers, carpenters-turned-actors and fairies. $12 general, $10 advance. cityofarcata.org/departments/ parks-recreation/plays-in-the-park. 822-5951. The Poor of New York. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. Thoroughly Modern Millie. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. New York flappers, Kansas country girls, wannabe mobsters and millionaires in disguise explore being modern in a new American era. $11, $19. www.hloc.org. 822-1318. The Wedding Singer. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. Based on the popular movie, the rom-com musical takes place in Ridgefield, New Jersey in 1985. info@ferndalerep.org. ferndalerep.org. 786-5483.

EVENTS

CASA Kid Walk Kick Off. 6-9 p.m. Robert Goodman Winery, 937 10th St., Arcata. Join CASA Humboldt and Samba na Chuva for a short parade, starting at Arcata Exchange. Then enjoy the party at the winery. Free. chelsea@humboldtcasa.org. www.robertgoodmanwines. com. 443-3197.

FOR KIDS

Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon Morris Elementary School, 2395 McKinleyville Ave., McKinleyville. See Aug. 7 listing.

FOOD

Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, meats, baked goods and more, plus live music and family activities. Free. www.facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket.


No, You’re the Best

OUTDOORS

FOOD

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing.

SPORTS

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Rose’s Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double-elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. rosesbilliards. com. 497-6295. Fast Break Fridays. 7-9 p.m. McKinleyville Recreation Department, 1656 Sutter Road. Open access to the basketball courts for teens 13-17. $1. mckinleyvillecsd.com/ parks-recreation. Friday Fun Skating. 6-8:30 p.m. Eureka Municipal Auditorium, 1120 F St. Skate with your friends and family. $4 youth, $4.75 adults. 441-9181. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

COMEDY

Ngaio Bealum and Caitlin Gill. Cecil’s New Orleans Bistro 773 Redwood Dr., Garberville. 8-11 p.m. Two comedy headliners for the price of one! 502-9656. Free.

9

The Best of Humboldt 2014 issue in your hands is as good an excuse as any to have a little soiree. On Thursday, Aug. 7 at 6 p.m., join the Journal staff at the Eureka Theater for cocktail hour and a screening of Best in Show ($5). It’s a peek at the behind-the-scenes mayhem with a cast of competitive neurotics and delusional obsessives. The movie, that is. Belly up to the art deco bar and order a Salty Dog or a Greyhound (they were good enough for your grandparents — try one) and mingle. Growling? Wolf Dawg will be selling its signature hot dogs in the lobby. At 7 p.m., grab a seat and settle in for the dog show mockumentary starring Parker Posey, John Michael Higgins, Catherine O’Hara, Bob Balaban, Christopher Guest, Jane Lynch and Eugene Levy. Director Guest brings the petty backstage drama, awkward pauses, oversharing and deadpan hilarity of This is Spinal Tap (to which comedies like The Office owe a tremendous debt) to the Mayflower Kennel Club’s dog show and its breeders, owners and judges. If you’ve seen it, it’s been too long. If you haven’t, then this is a matter of cultural literacy. But, like, funny. See you there, Humboldt!

saturday

ART

Arts on the Avenue. Second Saturday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Eagle Prairie Arts District, 406 Wildwood Ave., Rio Dell. Local artists, artisans and music all along the avenue. Free. www.facebook.com/info.epad/info. Open House. 5-8 p.m. Studio 299, 75 The Terrace, Willow Creek. Watercolors by Renate Walker and colorful abstracts by Patricia Reeb are on display this month. Enjoy refreshments, discover local art and build community. Free. www.studio299.tripod.com.

MUSIC

How Can I Keep From Singing? 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. An evening of songs of peace and justice.The proceeds from refreshments will benefit Veterans For Peace. Child friendly. free. office@huuf.org. www.huuf. org. 822-3793. Woofstock and Mutt Strut. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Halvorsen Park, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. A full-day of man’s best friend, live music and dog contests. Proceeds benefit the Sequoia Humane Society. $15 general. info@sequoiahumane.org. woofstock.org. 442-1782.

THEATER

Midsummer Night’s Dream. 7 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. See Aug. 8 listing. The Poor of New York. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. Thoroughly Modern Millie. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer

Arcata Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. The LaPatina Band plays this week. Free. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Dream Quest Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Post Office, 100 Country Club Drive, Willow Creek. Produce from local farms and the Dream Quest garden. Operated by Dream Quest teens. Free. 530-629-3564.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Led by Milt Boyd. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:3011 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. The tour guide this week is Pat Bitton. Free. rras.org/calendar. Center Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Help restore the Friends of the Dunes property by removing invasive plants. Tools and gloves provided, bring water and wear work clothes. info@ friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. Full Moon Rising Cocktail Cruise. 7:30-8:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Aug. Come aboard the Madaket and watch the moon rise 8 listing. as the sun sets. Reservations required. $25. 445-1910. The Wedding Singer. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, Headwaters Storytelling. 3-4 p.m. Headwaters Forest 447 Main St. See Aug. 8 listing. Reserve, End of Elk River Road, six miles off U.S. Highway EVENTS 101, Eureka. Join storyteller and naturalist Paul Woodland Kinetic Carnivale. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Mendocino County for witty, whimsical and wondrous nature stories. Free. Museum, 400 East Commercial St., Willits. A kinetic jdclark@blm.gov. 825-2300. and steampunk festival of art, cars, sculptures, crafts Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market and food vendors. Followed by the Grand Ball. $10, $5, Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. free to kids under 12. Info@KineticCarnivale.com. www. Restoration Day. Feb. 8, 9 a.m. Trinidad Head, Trinidad KineticCarnivale.com. 459-2736. State Beach. Remove invasive plants. Wear sturdy shoes. FOR KIDS Gloves and tools are provided. Meet at the parking lot Babies at the Library. Second Saturday of every month, next to the Trinidad School. Free. Michelle.Forys@parks. 11 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Songs, ca.gov. 677-3109. rhymes and playtime for children aged 3 months to SPORTS 2 years. Free. trihuml@co.humboldt.ca.us. 677-0227. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s PavilFirefighter Fun Day. 12-3 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, ion, 9 Park St. See Aug. 8 listing. Third and E streets, Eureka. Children can learn about fire ETC safety while enjoying games, crafts and activities. Free. Women’s Peace Vigil. Second Saturday of every month, www.clarkemuseum.org. 443-1947. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress Smokey Bear’s 70th Birthday. 4-7 p.m. Six Rivers Nain warm clothing and bring your own chair. No perfume, tional Forest Headquarters, 1330 Bayshore Way, Eureka. please. Free. 269-7044. Stop by and wish him a happy birthday, learn about his history and get a “bear” hug. Don’t forget to bring COMEDY a camera! Free. Ngaio Bealum and Caitlin Gill. Arcata Theatre Lounge Story Time. Every other Saturday, 11 a.m. Rio Dell Li1036 G St. 8-11 p.m. Standup comedy from out of town brary, 715 Wildwood Ave. Join us for stories, songs, and meets a local stage and local performers; hilarity ensues. games for early readers and parents. Free. riohumml@ $10. 502-9656. co.humboldt.ca.us. 764-3333.

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Summer of Woof music.org/Bayside. 442-0156. Concerts on the Plaza. 2:30-5 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Arcata Main Street presents music of many genres such as reggae, funk and rock. Free. www.arcatamainstreet. com.

Theater

Photo by emily dalton, courtesy of sequoia humane society.

Have you been spending the summer sniffing around the same old places and running with your usual pack? Get out and see some other dogs. Take your people to Halvorsen Park for Woofstock on Saturday, Aug. 9 at 10 a.m. ($12). Make puppy eyes and get them to spring for the Mutt Strut parade at 11 a.m. if you want to see and be seen around Old Town while raising some more cash for Sequoia Humane Society ($25, includes Woofstock admission). Show off in the Doggie Fun Zone with a little obstacle course action, then put your nose to the ground for the treasure hunt and splash around the pirate lagoon (no algae!). Of course there will be plenty of food vendors and live music to keep those on two legs happy, too. Competitive? Start practicing for the best trick contest at 2 p.m., because your tired roll-over-and-play-dead move won’t cut it here. Bring your swagger for the tail wagging contest, plant some sloppy ones to win best kiss or twin up with your person for the look-alike competition. And protest all you want in the name of dignity, but deep down you want to win that costume contest. It’s OK. What happens at Woofstock stays at Woofstock.

The Poor of New York. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. Scheherazade. 2 p.m. Redwood Park, top of 14th Street, Arcata. Plays in the Park presents a youth production of a rollicking re-telling of the classic 1001 Arabian Nights. Free. playsinthepark.org. Thoroughly Modern Millie. 2 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See Aug. 8 listing. The Wedding Singer. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See Aug. 8 listing.

Events

Kinetic Carnivale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mendocino County Museum, 400 East Commercial St., Willits. See Aug. 9 listing. Trinidad Artisan’s Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Local art and crafts, live music and barbecue right next to Murphy’s Market. This week features music from The Soulful Sidekicks. Free. 834-8720.

Food

— Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

10

sunday

Lecture

Butterflies of the Tolowa Coast. 1-4 p.m. Lake Earl Wildlife Area, 2591 Old Mill Road, Crescent City. Biologist Gary Falxa gives a short slide presentation on the local butterfly, then leads a walk to a nearby habitat. Free.

Movies

Peter Pan. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Take the second star to the right and straight on til morning. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com.

Music

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevant-

Food Not Bombs. 5 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free.

503-828-7421. Potluck Dinner. 6 p.m. The Logger Bar, 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Bring a dish to share with friends old and new. Free. www.facebook.com/LoggerBar.

Outdoors

Beer and Bugs Workshop. 3-5 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Sample Redwood Curtain microbrews and learn about bugs from local expert Pete Haggard. Bring mystery bugs for identification. Reservations required. $10 non-members, $8 members. info@friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Discovering Arcata Bay Cruise. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Join us as the Madaket sets out for Arcata Bay and enjoy close encounters with the many creatures that call these waters home. Reservations required. $20, $18 seniors and juniors, $12 for children 4 and older, free for children under 4. 445-1910. Full Moon Rising Cocktail Cruise. 7:30-8:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 9 listing.

Redwood Region Audubon Society Birding Trip. Second Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. This two- to three-hour, leisurely walk is an opportunity for people to learn the common birds of Humboldt County. Meet at the Refuge Visitor Center. Free. 822-3613.

Etc

Introductory Bridge. Second Sunday of every month, 1:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 520 Del Norte Street, Eureka. New and old players are all welcome. Start with a lesson and then play a game. Free for July and August. 499-7790. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Tiles, letters and triple-word scores, oh my! 677-9242.

11 monday Dance

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s. Refreshments are served during break. $4. 725-5323.

Music

Humboldt Ukulele Group. Second Monday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of ukulele strummers who have fun and play together for a couple of hours. Beginners welcome and you won’t remain one long! $3. dsander1@arcatanet.com. 839-2816.

Spoken Word

Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/perform your original poetry or hear others. $1.

For Kids

Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon Morris Elementary School, 2395 McKinleyville Ave., McKinleyville. See Aug. 7 listing.

Meetings

Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

Etc

Cribbage Lessons. 5:30-7 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Brush up on your cribbage skills or learn how to play. Free.

12 tuesday Books

Rachel DeWoskin. 7-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. The author reads, signs and takes questions about her new young adult novel Blind. Free. northtownbooks.com. 822-2834.

Events

HUMbucks Monthly Exchange. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Event to exchange goods and ser-

vices using HUMbucks, a non-monetary, local exchange system. jugglerseth@gmail.com. www.baysidegrange. org. 834-9019.

Food

Arcata Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Fresh produce and live music in the afternoon. With live music from Tony Roach. Free. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. Eureka Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Fresh, local produce direct from the farmer. Lyndsey Battle plays this week. Free. 441-9999. Food for People’s Produce Market. Second Tuesday of every month, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Garberville Presbyterian Church, 437 Maple Lane and 12:30-1:30 p.m. Redway Baptist Church, 553 Redway Dr. All income eligible folks are invited to pick out fresh fruits and vegetables, sample recipes using available produce and learn about CalFresh. Free. hmchugh@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.org. 445-3166. Second Tuesday of every month, All income eligible folks are invited to pick out fresh fruits and vegetables, sample recipes using available produce and learn about CalFresh. Free. hmchugh@ foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.org. 445-3166. Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Pick up produce, baked goods and more right across from the Miranda Gardens Resort. Free. www.facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Fresh fruits, vegetables, ornamental trees and plants, all with an ocean view. Free. www.facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket.

Etc

Dedication Ceremony. 10:30 a.m. Yurok Veterans Cemetery, 28263 Bald Hills Road, Orick. The ceremony marks the completion of the Veterans Cemetery. Refreshments follow the ceremony. Free. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 444-3161.

Comedy

Savage Henry’s Comedy Open Mic Night. The Jambalaya 915 H St., Arcata. Second Tuesday of every month, 9 p.m. $3. Join us for an evening of local comics, newbies and maybe even you. joe@savagehenrymagazine.com, 822-4766.

13 wednesday Movies

Revolt of the Zombies. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Sci Fi Pint & Pizza Night with the 1936 sequel to White Zombie is set in Cambodia after WWI. Oldtimey BRAAAIIIINNNNSSS. Free w/$5 food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

Music

Israel Vibration. 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Northern Delights, 7091 State Highway 3, Hayfork. The reggae legends

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

45


Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩ G E N TLEMEN ’ S C L U B

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continued from previous page

2 1 + O N LY

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play an intimate show in the middle of nowhere. $40, $45. www.northerndelightshayfork.com. 530-628-5246.

EVENTS

The Great Race Fortuna. 9 a.m. The MGC, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. High school-aged kids form teams and run, scavenge and solve puzzles all over Fortuna. $20 per team, $10 per person. bchilds@ervmgc.com. 725-3300. Humboldt County Fair Gala and Preview. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. The Ferndale Garden Club kicks off the Humboldt County Fair with live music, wine and hors d’oeuvres. The first 100 guests get a commemorative goblet. $15, $25 for a pair. www.humboldtcountyfair.org. 786-9184 Ferndale Garden Club.

FOR KIDS

Play Groups. 10-11:30 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Kids ages 0-5 and their parents can enjoy circletime, plus free play in the museum. Free. www. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Story Time. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

MEETINGS

FULL BAR & BOTTLE SERVICE

Conservation Meeting. Second Wednesday of every month, noon. Golden Harvest Café Arcata, 1062 G St. Participants discuss various conservation issues of interest with the Redwood Region Audubon Society. Free. www.goldenharvestcafe.com. 445-8311.

OUTDOORS

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing.

COMEDY

Comedy Open Mikey. Palm Lounge, Eureka Inn 518 Seventh St. 9 p.m. Free. Hosted by Nando Molina with beats by Gabe Pressure. 497-6093.

14 thursday ART

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. See Aug. 7 listing.

ALWAYS CONTRACTING NEW DANCERS

BOOKS

Thursday Afternoon Book Club. Second Thursday of every month, 12-1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third Street, Eureka. Fun and lively discussion group focusing on adult fiction and non-fiction. Call ahead for upcoming titles. Free. www.humlib.org. 269-1905.

MUSIC

Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing.

THEATER

The Poor of New York. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing.

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

EVENTS

Humboldt County Fair. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Live and satellite horse racing, mule racing, carnival rides and games, death-defying stunts, live entertainment, exhibits, livestock events and more. $8 general, $3 race admission. humboldtcountyfair.org. 786-9511.

FOR KIDS

Playgroup. 10 a.m.-noon Morris Elementary School, 2395 McKinleyville Ave., McKinleyville. See Aug. 7 listing. Storytime. 10-10:45 a.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. See Aug. 7 listing.

FOOD

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. See Aug. 7 listing.

MEETINGS

Humboldt Grange 501 Potluck. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Grange Women’s Auxiliary meets at 6 p.m., potluck at 6:30 p.m., Grange meeting 7:30 p.m. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 443-0045.

OUTDOORS

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing.

SPORTS

Lawn Games. 6 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. See Aug. 7 listing.

ETC

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See Aug. 7 listing.

Heads Up… NorCal Oasis is accepting entries for its “Not Your Momma’s Talent Show.” Appications are due by August 20. 506-6810. The Eureka Symphony seeks volunteers for a variety of positions and activities in the 2014-15 season. 442-4643. Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center seeks artists and photographers for exhibits in September and beyond. 442-5444. The Jefferson Community Center offers free lunches to anyone under 18 throughout the summer. Lunch is served Monday through Friday from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. 497-6280. Food for People presents its free summer lunch program for children. Call for a list of sites all over the county. 445-3166. The Fig Twig Market in Ferndale is looking for vendors with handcrafted, vintage and up-cycled items for the market in November. figtwigmarket@gmail.com. SCRAP Humboldt is looking for competitors for the Rebel Craft Rumble. 633-8349. l


MovieTimes Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Fri-Tue: (12:05, 3), 6, 9 Get On Up Fri-Tue: (1:55), 5:10, 8:20 Guardians of the Galaxy Fri-Tue: (12:40, 3:35), 6:30, 9:25 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D Fri-Tue: (11:50a.m., 2:40), 5:35, 8:30 Hercules Fri-Mon: (2:20, 4:40), 7:05, 9:30; Tue: (2:20, 4:40), 7:05 How to Train Your Dragon 2 Fri-Tue: (1:05, 3:45) The Hundred-Foot Journey Fri-Tue: (12, 2:55), 5:50, 8:40 Into the Storm Fri-Tue: (12, 2:15, 4:35), 7, 9:20 Lucy Fri-Tue: (12:20, 2:30, 4:50), 7:15, 9:40 Planes: Fire & Rescue Fri-Tue: (12:05, 2:25) The Purge: Anarchy Fri-Tue: 6:15, 8:45 Step Up All In Fri-Tue: (3:55), 9:15 Step Up All In 3D Fri-Tue: (1:15), 6:35 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Fri-Tue: (11:55a.m., 2:45), 6:20 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D Fri-Tue: (12:10), 8:55 Transformers: Age of Extinction Fri-Tue: (4:45), 8:10

 Spoiler: The raccoon is Keyser Soze.

Guardians Gets it Right

Mill Creek Cinema

Brown biopic lacks soul By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY. I’ve admired writer/director James Gunn for years, even if I’m not an outright fan of everything he’s done. He cut his teeth at Troma Studios, way back when, and accidentally catching its Toxic Avenger movies on TV as a child both shaped and scarred me in ways I’ll likely never understand. So I feel like Gunn and I share some minor part of the cinematic journey. More than that, though, I applaud his ability to sustain a career inside the Hollywood machine — with screenplay credits for Dawn of the Dead (2004) and both Scooby Doo movies (2002, 2005) — while maintaining the passion and drive to make his own, edgier projects. Slither (2006) and Super (2010) are indisputably the work of a person with a singular vision: a dark, skewed, challenging perspective on popular entertainment. They are also, both because and in spite of their tendency to induce discomfort, hugely entertaining. To me, Gunn has the ideal resumé to helm a summer blockbuster. I’m just shocked that anybody in Hollywood agrees with me and that the weekend box office has proven us right.

Unlike the rest of the recent, gargantuan Marvel franchise (excepting parts of The Avengers), Guardians is pleasing and successful because it refuses to succumb to seriousness. To be sure, it has within it moments of genuine gravity; it opens with a boy losing his mother to cancer, of all things. On balance, though, the movie is weighted more toward humor and excitement. It’s funny and colorful and atmospheric; kind of like reading a comic book. Immediately after his mother’s death in 1988, the young boy of the opening is presumably abducted by aliens. We next encounter him 26 years later on an abandoned planet in some far-flung corner of the universe. Peter Quill/Starlord (Chris Pratt) has grown into a wise-cracking intergalactic thief, and an unlikely part of a ragged, prickly crew called Ravagers. After he finds and makes off with his prize, an ornate orb of unknown import, things get hairy. Turns out he doublecrossed his Ravager boss Yondo (Michael Rooker), who put a bounty on his head. By the time he makes another planet to sell the orb, cyborg raccoon bounty hunter Rocket (Bradley Cooper) and his tree-man

sidekick Groot (Vin Diesel) are all over him. Likewise Gamora (Zoe Saldana), a green assassin dispatched by the genocidal maniac into whose hands we must hope the orb does not fall. A protracted showdown in a shopping center lands Quill, Rocket, Groot and Gamora in prison. Circumstances bring them together with continued on next page

August 7August 13

Thurs Aug 7 – Ocean Night,

Doors @ 6:30 PM, All ages, $3 donation, Free for OC, Surfrider & Baykeeper members & children 10 & under.

Sat Aug 9 – Stand Up! Comedy

Presents Steel Cage Death Match! Doors @ 8 PM, Show @ 9 PM, $10 advanced @ www.arcatatheater.com, $10 @ door, 18+.

Sun Aug 10 - Peter Pan (1953),

Doors @ 5:30 PM, Movie @ 6 PM, Film is $5, Rated G.

Wed Aug 13 – Sci Fi Night ft. Revolt of the Zombies (1936),

Doors @ 6 p.m. All ages, Free w/food & Bev Purchase.

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Fri-Tue: (12:05, 3), 6, 8:55 Get On Up Fri-Tue: (1:55), 5:15, 8:30 Guardians of the Galaxy Fri-Tue: (12:30, 2:40, 3:20), 6:15, 8:20, 9:10 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D Fri-Tue: (11:50a.m.), 5:30 The Hundred-Foot Journey Fri-Tue: (11:55a.m., 2:50), 5:45, 8:40 Into the Storm Fri-Tue: (12, 2:20, 4:40), 7, 9:20 Lucy Fri-Tue: (12:15, 2:30, 4:50), 7:10, 9:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Fri-Tue: (3:50), 6:25 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D Fri-Tue: (1:15), 9

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Guardians of the Galaxy Fri-Sun: (12:30, 3:20), 6:10, 9; Mon-Thu: (3:20), 6:10, 9 The Hundred-Foot Journey Fri-Sun: (12:55, 3:40), 6:25, 9:10; Mon-Thu: (3:40), 6:25, 9:10 A Most Wanted Man Fri-Sun: (12:20, 3:05), 5:50, 8:35; Mon-Thu: (3:05), 5:50, 8:35

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Guardians of the Galaxy Fri-Sat: (1:15, 2:15, 4:10, 5:10), 7:10, 8, 9:55; Sun-Thu: (1:15, 2:15, 4:10, 5:10), 7:10, 8 Into the Storm Fri-Sat: (12:25, 2:45, 5), 7:05, 9:25; Sun-Thu: (12:25, 2:45, 5), 7:05 Lucy Fri-Sat: (12, 2:15, 4:55), 7:20, 9:40; Sun-Thu: (12, 2:15, 4:55), 7:20 Planes: Fire & Rescue Fri-Thu: (12:05, 2:10) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Fri-Sat: (12, 2:20, 4:45), 7:15, 9:35; Sun-Thu: (12, 2:20, 4:45), 7:15 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D Fri-Thu: (5:15), 7:45

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Call theater for schedule.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

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MOVIE TIMES.

TRAILERS. REVIEWS. DESKTOP: northcoastjournal.com/MovieTimes MOBILE: m.northcoastjournal.com

Browse by title, times and theater.

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

revenge obsessed Drax the Destroyer (Dave Bautista), and the team ends up fighting shoulder to shoulder to, well, guard the galaxy. It’s a little complicated, with a lot of characters and plot thrown at us all at once, and that’s my only complaint. Gunn paces the exposition expertly so we’re not completely overwhelmed, but he may have incorporated too much story for the movie’s own good. But he does it with such immersive art direction and clever dialogue, that I have to forgive that minor trespass. Even if my attention slipped during the more expansive battle sequences, I was still involved in the narrative and compelled by the team dynamic of the protagonists. Guardians of the Galaxy is exciting and good-looking, but most importantly it is fun and funny, a rare combination among recent summer fare. PG13. 121m. GET ON UP. Since James Brown is arguably the most vital, important figure in 20th century American music, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that we’d get a biopic sooner or later. This one is intermittently compelling, well-enough acted and competently made, but it only made me wish I was watching a good documentary, or even a concert movie, instead. Directed by Tate Taylor (The Help, 2011), Get On Up takes a fairly familiar “rags to riches/it’s lonely at the top” narrative structure, then attempts to subvert its conventionality with wild chronological swings and intermittent asides to the camera. They only reinforce the notion that we are watching a fictional movie about a famous figure, not the figure himself. It doesn’t help that Chadwick Boseman, while giving a strong, dynamic performance, is covered in pancake makeup and awkward wigs. (Or that his Georgia accent occasionally slips, but no matter.) I appreciate that Taylor, with screenwriters Jez and John-Henry Butterworth and Steven Baigelman, chose to include the bizarre 1988 incident, wherein a griefstricken, drug-addled Brown accosted a woman for using his toilet. It’s an indicator that the creative team intended this as a sort of warts-and-all portrait of the man. But they settle for a happy ending, leaving behind much of the complexity and moral ambiguity suggested throughout the movie. There are some hard themes and ideas inside Get On Up, but they never get full treatment. The end result feels, in spite of the amazing soundtrack (thanks to “producer” Mick Jagger, who owns the Brown catalog, apparently), stagy and inconsequential. PG13. 138m. — John J. Bennett

Previews TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES. Back into the sewers for more ‘80s kids’ money with a slightly more grotesque set of turtles than the cartoon. With Megan Fox and Will Arnett. PG13. 101m. INTO THE STORM. A town is battered by a series of tornadoes in one day. With Richard Armitage and a profound lack of sharks. PG13. 89m. STEP UP ALL IN. Like Step Up, but all in. Dancers from the previous films (um, not Channing Tatum) throw down in Vegas. PG13. 112m. THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY. Helen Mirren plays a schmancy restaurant owner who wars with the new Indian place across the street in this comic gastro-romance. PG. 122m.

Continuing A MOST WANTED MAN. Missing Philip Seymour Hoffman? See him as an anti-terrorist spymaster pulling strings and laying traps in Hamburg. R. 122m. DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES. Stunning visual effects, intense battles and a story with an emotional authenticity generally unseen in summer blockbusters. PG13. 130m. HERCULES. Even Dwayne Johnson’s lion-topped mug can’t make this predictable ruin come alive. With John Hurt and Ian McShane. PG13. 99m. HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2. Transportive animation and talented voice acting create a world worth revisiting and a story with humor and real drama. PG. 102m. LUCY. Director Luc Besson muddles an interesting idea with half-baked plotting, wasting Scarlett Johansson as a woman dosed with a drug that allows her to access the other 90 percent of her brain. R. 90m. PLANES: FIRE AND RESCUE. Sequel to the animated Cars spin-off, with voice work by Dane Cook and Julie Bowen. PG. 84m. THE PURGE: ANARCHY. Horror sequel about citizens gone wild in a violent American dystopia. PG13. 130m. TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION. Even game actors and fun cameos can’t save the planet from the thin plot and epic running time of the latest Michael Bay disaster. He might have tried more dinosaurs. PG13. 165m. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ●


List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

CREATIVITY WITH YOUR DIGITAL SLR CAMERA. Learn the basics of camera set−up, care and use, and then how to improve your composition and creativity in your photographs. With Mark Larson. Tues./Thurs., Sept. 2−11, 6:30−8:30 p.m. Fee: $145. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (AC−0821) SCRAP HUMBOLDT’S THE (RE)WORKSHOP. Take a Class, rent the space, teach a class, have a birthday party or drop−in and use our tools in our Creative Education Studio. (707) 822−2452 scraphumboldt.org (AC−0911)

Communication

COMMUNICATION AND CONFLICT MANAGE− MENT WORKSHOP. Sat. Sept. 6, 8:45 a.m.− 4:30 p.m. in Eureka. An interactive, one−day workshop designed to promote personal conflict manage− ment through effective communication. Contact Humboldt Mediation Services at (707) 445−2505 or visit www.humboldtmediationservices.org for more info. and to register. Register by August 18 for discounted fees. (CMM− 0814) CREATIVE WRITING. Thurs’s., Sept. 11−Oct. 9, 5:30− 7:30 p.m., $40. Held at Garberville Instructional Site. Explore the benefits of writing in a group. Local writer Stewart Kirby will facilitate this group of writers to develop their own voice, practice, and delve into theme and content. Call College of the Redwoods Community Education 476−4500 to register. (CMM−0807) GARBERVILLE INSTRUCTIONAL SITE REGISTRA− TION FAIR. Wed., Aug 13, 4−7 p.m. 286 Sprowl Creek Rd Garberville. (CMM−0807) default

RADICAL ISLAM EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ. Why Islamic radicals hate America and the West will be discussed, Sun., Aug. 10, 7 p.m. Program, titled "Why Do They Hate Us? Understanding Radical Islam". Lifetree Café is a conversation cafe with free coffee and snacks. Corner of 13th and Union, Arcata. Phone (707) 672−2919. (CMM−0807)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

ACOUSTIC/ELECTRIC BASS LESSONS All ages. Beginning to Intermediate. Theory and Improvisa− tion. Matthew Engleman (707) 633−9185 (DMT0918) DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Try one of our fabulous specialized workshops. Improve your Latin tech− nique, spruce up your arm styling, do the Hustle, explore American Tango, learn fancy dips & endings. Intermediate East and West Coast swing. (707) 464−3638 debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0828) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−0828) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−0925) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Weekly Beginning Class: Fri’s., 11:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m., $50. Beg/Int, continuing students: Mon’s., 7−8 p.m. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C. Call (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0828)

Fitness

DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m. First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−0828) FIND NEW WAYS TO MOVE AT ARCATA CORE PILATES STUDIO. Hoopdance Mon. & Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Classic Burlesque Mon. 6:30 p.m.; Booty Barre Mon. & Wed. 1 p.m.; $5 Community Pilates Mat Tues. 6:30 p.m.; Ballet Booty Tues. & Thurs. 9 a.m.; Release Your Inner Goddess Wed. 6:30 p.m.; Adult Ballet Tues. 6:30 p.m.; Brain Balancing Creative Movement for Kids Sat. 11 a.m. Visit us at 901 8th St., Arcata or call (707) 845−8156 for more info! (F−0828) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−1030)

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0925) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0828)

Food & Drink

COB OVEN WORKSHOP. Fri. Aug. 22 & Sat. Aug. 23. Hands−on instruction, will discuss the use of cob in building, clay plasters, thermal mass/radiant heat cooking, and other techniques associated with building an oven out of mud. Free camping on −site, community, bonfire, breakfast and a wood fired feast! Kids welcomed and encouraged. Contact Tracy Lough for more info. (805) 300−0475

Home & Garden BEGINNING WITH HERBS. See, taste, smell and learn about some of the most commonly used herbs and how to incorporate them into daily life for overall health and well−being. With Candice Brunlinger. Tues., Sept. 2−Nov. 4, 11 a.m.−12:50 p.m. Fee: $75. This sustainable living course is offered by the Campus Center for Appropriate Technology (CCAT) through the HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (G−0821) FALL PLANT IDENTIFICATION. Mon’s., Sept. 8−Oct. 20, 1:30−4 p.m., $80. Learn to identify a wide variety of plants suited to our local area on guided walks around the College of the Redwoods main campus and adjacent Botanical Garden. Call to register. College of the Redwoods Community Education 476−4500. (HG−0807)

Kids & Teens

DANCE SCENE STUDIOS. Excellent instruction in Ballet, Creative Dance, Hip Hop, Belly Dance, Tap, Jazz, Adult Ballet, Senior Ballet. 1011 H St., Eureka, DanceEureka.com, (707) 502−2188. (K−1003) 14TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURF CAMP. Water enthusiasts of all levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skill necessary for all types of surfing while being immersed in lifeguard water safety, surf etiquette and beach and ocean awareness. Ages 8−up, Aug. 11−14, at Moonstone Beach. Cost $160, includes camp t−shirt. moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com, (707) 822−5099. (K−0807)

Languages

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. If you already have some Russian reading, writing and simple conversation ability, this course will broaden your language skills. With Anya Lipnik. Tues./Thurs., Sept. 2−25, 5:30−7:30 p.m. Fee: $100. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended. (LA−0821)

50 and Better

APPRECIATING TODAY’S POETRY I: BECOMING A POET. Learn methods to overcome the daunting blank page, find your unique voice with writing prompts from instructor Pat McCutcheon. All levels of readers and writers welcome. Wed’s., Aug. 27−Sept. 17, 3−5 p.m. OLLI Members $65/non− members $90. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880. (O−0821) BOOK ARTS: BOOK−IN−A−BOX. Create a custom box to encase your handmade book. Learn the basics of making and covering boxes, then create a simple book to showcase. With Michele Olsen. Tues., Aug. 26 and Thurs., Aug. 28, 1−4 p.m. OLLI Members $55/non−members $80. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0821)

FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS. Offered by Area 1 Agency on Aging’s trained HICAP counselors the second Thurs. of every month through Aug. Hour− long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Medicare Basics for Boomers, 4−5 p.m., August 14. On deck: Medicare Plan Finder Class, Sept. 18, 25 and Oct. 2. (O−0807) OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1225)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s., 7:55 a.m. at Northcoast Aikido on F St. (entrance in alley between 8th & 9th, upstairs). Dharma talks are offered twice a month. Call 826−1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s., 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St., room 12. Call 845− 8399 or visit barryevans9@yahoo.com. (S−0925) HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOW− SHIP. We are a diverse congregation welcoming all people. Our mission is to promote personal and spiritual growth as well as a peaceful, sustainable, and socially just world. Come see for yourself on a Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m., Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0904) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0828) KIRTAN AND HEALING MANTRA. With Shemaia Skywater and Friends. At Om Shala Yoga, Fri., Aug. 8, 7:30 p.m.−9 p.m. A beautiful evening of music and chant. $5−15 suggested donation. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642). www.omshalayoga.com. (S−0807) SPIRIT TALK WITH REV. DIANE. All are welcome to join Rev. Diane Decker, Minister of Religious Science, for Science of Mind Spiritual Discussion, Meditation and Affirmative Prayer. Gathering every Mon. 7 p.m − 8:00 p.m., Isis Suite 48, Sunny Brae Center. Donations welcome. (707) 502−9217 (S−0821) SPIRITUAL UNBINDING THROUGH MASSAGE INTERCESSION. With Cora at Myrtletowne Healing Center. Peaceful energy. Kind intuition. Joyous release. Please text or call for information or an appointment (714) 614−2136. (S−0821) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S−0828)

Therapy & Support

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844−442−0711. (T−0828) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana−anonymous.org (T−0228)

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

49


SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0828) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon’s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−0828)

Vocational

CLIA CMA CONTINUING EDUCATION UNIT CLASS. Thurs., Aug. 28, 6−9 p.m., $30. 3 hour CMA continuing education will review and explain what CLIA waived means and identify some common CLIA waived tests used in the physician’s office. Learn to Interpret abnormal lab values for patient education purposes and recognize relevant termi− nology and abbreviations. Call to register, College of the Redwoods Community Education 476−4500. (V−0807) COOL TECH TOOLS FOR ENTREPRENEURS. Series of workshops and coaching for business owners. Runs late Aug.−Nov. Covers internet technologies including social media, website development, online programs like GoogleDocs, Office 365, and more. Offered by North Coast SBDC. Pre−registra− tion required. Full scholarships available. Apply at www.northcoastsbdc.org or call (707) 445−9720. CULTURALLY RELEVANT OUTDOOR EDUCATION. Are you an aspiring educator? Learn to teach three lessons (K−2, 3−5 and 6−8) in inquiry−based outdoor education, centered on the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Instructor: Michelle Forrington. Wed., Aug. 27−Sept. 24, 5−7 p.m. Fee: $50. Offered in partnership with the Discovery Museum. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−0814) LEARN TO SAFE A LIFE...LEARN CPR. Starting in August, Arcata Fire Protection District will offering CPR classes to the public. Adult only CPR and First aid class on third Sat. and an adult, child, infant CPR, AED class in the evening the preceding Tues. Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after a sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Unfortunately, only 32 percent cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander. Approximately, 88 percent of cardiac arrests occur at home therefore, a child, spouse, parent or friend may need you to perform CPR. For more info. or to register for classes Contact Arcata Fire Protection District at (707) 825−2000. (V−0807) SERFSAFE CERTIFICATE. Tues., Sept. 16, 8:30 a.m.−5 p.m., $175. Fees include textbook, food safety and sanitation instruction, demonstrations and certifi− cation examination fee. Register with adequate time to read the textbook before attending class. Call to register 476−4500. (V−0807)

Wellness & Bodywork NEW CLIENTS $20 OFF EACH SESSION FOR UP TO THREE SESSIONS!! Myrtletowne Healing Center, 1480 Myrtle Ave, Eureka. A hidden gem on Myrtle in Eureka. Specializing in therapeutic bodywork. We will assist you on your road to recovery, help you work through that chronic pain issue, or give you that full body support with wellness massage. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, abdominal massage, lymph drainage, lomi−lomi and more! You are worth it, call today! 441−9175. (W−0828)

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Beginning with Herbs. Sept. 17−Nov. 5, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.−Nov. 2015, meets one weekend per month with several field trips. Learn in−depth material medica, therapeutics, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Both− well & Rosemary Gladstar. March 19−28, 2015. Let us guide you through the unsurpassed beauty and wondrous diversity of Costa Rica! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0911) CANDLELIGHT HOT STONE YOGA & LIVE SOUND HEALING. With Artemisia Shine. At Om Shala Yoga. Fri., Aug. 15. 1st, 3rd, & 5th Fri’s. monthly. 7:30 p.m.−9:30 p.m. $20 drop−in. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825 −YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0807) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY. Now enrolling. Daytime classes start September 2 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Thera− peutic Massage Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−0828) HUMBOLDT HERBALS FALL CLASS SERIES. Intrigued by herbal medicine? Join us for this 10 week series of diverse herbal topics, and give yourself a great foundation! Designed for begin− ning to intermediate herb students. Call or email for the full course description. $395 − includes 10 classes, 2 herb walks, detailed handouts and product samples. Classes are Saturdays from 10 to 12:30 in Old Town Eureka, beginning Sept. 6th. (707) 442−3541 emailus@humboldtherbals.com JIN SHIN JYUTSU WITH DENNY DORSETT RN. Gentle, ancient, hands−on help for body and mind. $5 lecture/demonstrations to benefit Humboldt Community Breast Health Project. Thurs.’s, Aug. 28, Sept. 18, 6:30 p.m − 8:30 p.m. At Arcata Wellness Center, 735 12th St., Arcata. No pre−registration. Door prize is a free private session. For info. call (707) 825−0824 (W−1009) SELF HELP WITH JIN SHIN JYUTSU. Learn to apply this gentle, ancient art to yourself for relief of pain, stress & whatever ails you. Come to the Sunday Series in August, taught by certified practi− tioner Denny Dorsett, RN. Aug. 10, 17, 24, & 31, 2−4 p.m. At Arcata Wellness Center, 735 12th St,, Arcata. $10/class, $35/series. (707) 825−0824 for info. (W−0828) SHENG ZHEN HEALING QIGONG. An introduction to a form of Qigong that helps the practitioner experience unconditional love, with movements that may be done while seated. With John Yamas. Wed., Aug. 27−Sept. 10, 7−8:10 p.m. Fee: $35. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (W−0814) YOGA ON THE RIVER RETREAT. With Peggy Profant and Robyn Smith. Aug. 9−11. Sat. afternoon −Mon. afternoon. A sweet camp−out style yoga retreat on the exquisite Salmon river. $170. See website or call for details. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825− YOGA (9642). www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0807)

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Bradford C. Floyd CSB# 136459 Law office of Bradford C. Floyd 819 Seventh Street Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 445−9754 July 21, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JANEEN LAVENIA OHLHEISER, AKA JANEEN OHLHEISER CASE NO. PR140190 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, JANEEN LAVENIA OHLHEISER, AKA JANEEN OHLHEISER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by PADRAIC JASON KLINE In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that PADRAIC JASON KLINE Be appointed as personal represen− tative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on August 14, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section

7/31, 8/7, 8/14/2014 (14−236)

SUMMONS CASE NUMBER: DR140321 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: TESTATE AND INTERSTATE SUCCES− SORS OF ALFRED J. LIPPMAN, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY THROUGH, OR SUCH DECEDENT YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN− TIFF: KATHARINE WHITE Notice! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more infor− mation at the California Courts Online Self−Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self−Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and cost on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. HUMBOLDT COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 825 5TH STREET

Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self−Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and cost on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. HUMBOLDT COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 825 5TH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF NEAL G. LATT, SBN 294409 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M ST. EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442−3758 Dated: June 04, 2014 Clerk, by Kerri L. Keenan, Deputy NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant Filed: June 11, 2013 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 8/7, 8/14, 8/21, 8/28/2014 (14−248)

NOTICE OF HEARING DECEDENT’S ESTATE OR TRUST SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET, EUREKA, CA. 95501 ESTATE OF EDNA CARMO FURTADO CASE NO. PR130028 NOTICE is given that KATHY HUGHES (Cardoza): Personal Repre− sentative has filed a Report of Sale and Petition for Order Confirming Sale of Real Property. THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE CITY OF ARCATA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Lots 9 and 11 in Block 2 of Twin Park Addition to the City of Arcata according to the revised map of said addition on file in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California in Book 11 of Maps, Page 13. APN: 505−094−004−000 2019 Eastern Avenue, Arcata, Cali− fornia, 95521 Terms of Sale: All cash, As is, Without warranties, except as to title. You may refer to the filed docu− ment for more information. (Some documents filed with the court are confidential.) A HEARING on the matter will be held as follows: August 29, 2014, 8:30 a.m., Dept. 2, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, CA. 95501 Attorney for KATHY HUGHES (Cardoza) Stephen G. Watson, SBN.112171 Law Offices of W.G. Watson, Jr. 715 I Street PO Box 1021, Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 444−3071 8/7, 8/14, 8/21/2014 (14−244)

northcoastjournal


PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 20th of August, 2014, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Alvin Backues, Unit # 5019 Margaret Holverson, Unit # 5067 Paul Braden, Unit # 5277 Roger Maxfield, Unit # 5555 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Danny Davis, Unit # 2006 Dawn Matthew, Unit # 2416 Jacklyn Gardenhire, Unit # 3407 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Chris Ayer, Unit # 1116 Dusty Titus, Unit # 1162 Terry Lange, Unit # 1170 Anne Colvine, Unit # 1220 Stanley Hawk, Unit # 1501 Barbara Bareilles, Unit # 1364 Harold Lawrence, Unit # 1516 Robert Los, Unit # 1567 Jeremy Voris, Unit # 1575 Travis Johnson, Unit # 1622 Sheila Bates, Unit # 1660 Earl Carlson, Unit # 1693 Shana Rizzi, Unit # 1696 Mark Hand, Unit # 1767 Jasmine Rafferty, Unit # 1782 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. William Elcan, Unit # 120 Michael Cordary, Unit # 186 Christopher Vandiver, Unit # 230 Bradley Hooper, Unit # 237 Sean Grimes, Unit # 247 Daniel Winger, Unit # 359 Marcus Brower, Unit # 403 Rachel Hope, Unit # 413 Timothy Taylor, Unit # 438 Rachelle Thomas, Unit # 445 The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Amber Casey, Unit # 4116 Alejandro Fuentez, Unit # 4135 Rose Gutierrez−Jimenez, Unit # 4328 Matthew George, Unit # 4363 Shaelyn Rowland, Unit # 4550 Cassidy Quinn, Unit # 4738 Anthony Vella, Unit # 6152 Kristen Price, Unit # 6174 Tashina Surber, Unit # 6182 Carolyn Harvest, Unit # 7029 (Held in Co. Unit) Maria Ordonez, Unit # 7079 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi−

Amber Casey, Unit # 4116 Alejandro Fuentez, Unit # 4135 Rose Gutierrez−Jimenez, Unit # 4328 Matthew George, Unit # 4363 Shaelyn Rowland, Unit # 4550 Cassidy Quinn, Unit # 4738 Anthony Vella, Unit # 6152 Kristen Price, Unit # 6174 Tashina Surber, Unit # 6182 Carolyn Harvest, Unit # 7029 (Held in Co. Unit) Maria Ordonez, Unit # 7079 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Alejandro Fuentez, Unit # 6348 Kathleen Skidmore, Unit # 6358 Roger Martin, Unit # 6406 Faith Soto−Jacobs, Unit # 6440 Chad Betts, Unit # 6449 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Nancy Felix Vega, Unit # 9228 Daniela Martinez, Unit # 9229 Cheryl Lynch, Unit # 9273 Amanda Carlson, Unit # 9317 Sandra Utterback, Unit # 9540 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Barbara Craft, Unit # 2238 Rachel Harrison, Unit # 3145 Catherine Bjorkstrand, Unit # 5129 Catherine Bjorkstrand, Unit # 514 Reid Bolton, Unit # 6211 Lester Jake, Unit # 7113 Diana Barajas, Unit # 7202 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self− Storage, (707) 443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 7th day of August 2014 and 14th day of August 2014 08/7, 8/14/2014 (14−242)

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LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00390

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00393

The following person is doing Busi− ness as OCEAN PEACE DESIGN, Humboldt, at 494 6th Ave., West− haven, CA. 95570 Yohei Shiraishi 494 6th Ave. Westhaven, CA. 95570 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Yohei Shiraishi, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 18, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as STONE COLD CHILLIN, Humboldt, at 3014 Alice Ave., Arcata CA. 95521 Jennie D. Shortt (Thompson) 3014 Alice Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jennie Shortt Thompson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 18, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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RESTAURANTS A-Z Search by food type, region and price. Browse descriptions, photos and menus. www.northcoast journal.com

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE LOAN: PRETTO FILE: PFI-140421 A.P.N.: 314-141-013-000 ANd 314-146-008-000 UNDER DEED OF TRUST YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/31/2013. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE is hereby given that Placer Foreclosure, Inc., as trustee, or successor trustee, or substituted trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by: Brian V. Botiller, An Unmarried Man Recorded 9/10/2013 as Instrument No, 2013-020936-5 in book , page of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California, and pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded 4/11/2014 in Book, Page, as Instrument No. 2014-006406-2 of said Official Records, WILL SELL on 8/27/2014 at On the steps to the front entrance of the County Courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, CA 95501 at 10:30 AM AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the United States), all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State hereinafter described: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. The property address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6810 BUTLER VALLEY ROAD, KORBEL, CA 95550 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $552,253.39 In addition to cash, the trustee will accept a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. In the event tender other than cash is accepted the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee’s Deed until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed, advances thereunder, with interest as provided therein, and the unpaid principal balance of the Note secured by said Deed with interest thereon as provided in said Note, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 888-988-6736 or visit this Internet Web site salestrack.tdsf. com, using the file number assigned to this case PFI-140421. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 7/30/20 14 Placer Foreclosure, Inc., as said Trustee 12190 Herdal Drive, Suite 9 Auburn, California 95603 (530) 888-8411 By: Shannon Winford, Trustee Sale Officer Directions May Be Obtained Pursuant To A Written Request Submitted To The Beneficiary C/O Placer Foreclosure, Inc., 12190 Herdal Dr., Suite 9, Auburn, Ca 95603, Within 10 Days Of The First Publication Of This Notice. Placer Foreclosure, Inc. Is A Debt Collector Attempting To Collect A Debt And Any Information Obtained Will Be Used For That Purpose. TAC: 969681 PUB: 8/07 8/14 8/21/14 8/7, 8/14, 8/21/2014 (14-243)

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

51


legal notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00434

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00443

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00451

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00426

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00472

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00444

The following persons are doing Business as IF, Humboldt, at 514 2nd Street, Eureka, CA. 95501, 258 Hills− dale St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Tanya A. Hudy 258 Hillsdale St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Todd P. Hudy 258 Hillsdale St. Eureka, CA. 95501. The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Tanya Hudy, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 09, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as AID CURRENT, Humboldt, at 1225 Pine St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Matt S. Beard 1225 Pine St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Amie R. Beard 1225 Pine St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Oct. 1, 2013 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Matt Beard, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 16, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as M & M RENTALS, Humboldt, at 106 G St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Daniel L. Marchetti 6188 Marge Court Eureka, CA. 95503 Nancy E. Marchetti 6188 Marge Court Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on July 23, 2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Daniel Marchetti, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 23, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HOLE IN THE WALL− GREAT SANDWICHES, Humboldt, at 1331 Broadway, Eureka, CA. 95501 John J. Forrest 6398 LeeAnn Dr. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 7/1/1991 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ John J. Forrest, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 01, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT FURNITURE, Humboldt, at 1085 K St., Arcata CA. 95521 Susan D. Paul 1403 Chester Ave. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Susan Paul, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 17, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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The following persons are doing Business as EAST MILL CREEK FARMS, Humboldt, at 925 Cham− bers Rd., Petrolia, CA. 95558, PO Box 112, Petrolia, CA. 95558 Drew C. Barber 925 Chambers Rd. Petrolia, CA. 95558 Amanda C. Malachesky 925 Chambers Rd. Petrolia, CA. 95558 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/1/13 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Drew Barber, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 03, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 7/31, 8/7, 8/14, 8/21/2014 (14−241)

The following person is doing Busi− ness as WRANGLETOWN CIDER COMPANY, Humboldt, at 411 Howard Hts. Rd., Eureka, CA. 95503 Patricia A. Knittel 411 Howard Hts. Rd. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 8/1/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Patricia Knittel, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 01, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00476

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00454

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00447

The following person is doing Busi− ness as REDWOOD SHADOWS, Humboldt, at 2501 Monument Rd., Rio Dell, CA. 95562, PO Box 105, Rio Dell, CA. 95562 Beverly L. Chang 2501 Monument Rd.. Rio Dell, CA. 95562 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Beverly Chang, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 01, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT HYDRAULICS, Humboldt, at 13 N. Bayview, Samoa, CA. 95564, PO Box 284, Samoa, CA. 95564 Theodore D. Hertel 13 N. Bayview Samoa, CA. 95564 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Theodore D. Hertel, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 23, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FREEDOM FARM, Humboldt, at 1763 Freshwater Road, Eureka, CA. 95503 Michaela N. Hasler 1763 Freshwater Road Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Michaela Hasler, Owner/ Oper− ator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 18, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SECOND SIGHT TATTOO, Humboldt, at 417 5th. St., Eureka CA. 95501 Damen C. Tesch 2329 Plunkett Bayside, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 4/1/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Damen Tesch, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on July 7, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00427

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52 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00473

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HEY, MCGUINTY! That Facebook creep? Outlaw inlaws? Roommate disaster? Ask: heymcguinty@ northcoastjournal.com THOSE RED CURLS KNOW ALL.


Field notes ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME ANACRUZ MINER NICOLAS MINER CASE NO. CV140443 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: NANCY MINER TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: NANCY MINER for a decree changing names as follows: Present name ANACRUZ MINER NICOLAS MINER to Proposed Name ANACRUZ BERNAL NICOLAS BERNAL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 25, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 09, 2014 Filed: July 09, 2014 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JOSE DANIEL SERDA CASE NO. CV140475 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME ZA MAXX HER CASE NO. CV140483 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: JOSE DANIEL SERDA TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: AURORA I. VALENZUELA for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JOSE DANIEL SERDA to Proposed Name JOSE DANIEL VALENZUELA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: August 25, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 18, 2014 Filed: July 18, 2014 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court

PETITION OF: ZA MAXX HER TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: PANG LO for a decree changing names as follows: Present name ZA MAXX HER to Proposed Name MAXX ZAJ HER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: September 16, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: July 23, 2014 Filed: July 23, 2014 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court

7/31, 8/7, 8/14, 8/21/2014 (14−233)

7/31, 8/7, 8/14, 8/21/2014 (14−238)

7/17, 7/24, 7/31, 8/7/2014 (14−222) default

NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF PRELIMINARY BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2013/2014

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog. Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the preliminary budget of the Arcata Fire Protection District of Humboldt County for the Fiscal year BEGINNING July 1, 2014, has been adopted by the District Board of Directors and is available at the following time and place of inspection by interested taxpayers: Arcata Fire Protection District Headquarters 631 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. That on August 19, 2014, 5:30 p.m. at 631 9th Street, Arcata, CA, the Board of Directors will meet for the purpose of fixing the final budget, and that any taxpayer may appear at the said time and place and be heard regarding the increase, decrease, or omission of any item of the budget, or for the inclusion of additional items. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE ARCATA FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT Sally Lindke Clerk of the Board 7/31, 8/7/2014 (14-239)

BUCKMINSTER FULLER’S DYMAXION WORLD MAP, WHICH CAN BE FOLDED TO MAKE A REGULAR 20-SIDED ICOSAHEDRON (ONE OF THE FIVE “PLATONIC SOLIDS”). VIEW IMAGES OF THE MERCATOR AND HOBO-DYER MAPS AT WWW.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM. IMAGE: ERIC GABA, WIKIPEDIA COMMONS

The Mapmaker’s Dilemma By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

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f you’re over 50, chances are the obligatory world maps hanging in your classrooms were based on the Mercator projection. You probably remember it: Greenland, which is 14 times smaller than Africa, appears to be the same size as the continent. And Europe looks twice as large as South America, instead of half the size, as it really is. Dutchman Gerard Mercator, as smart a businessman as he was a mapmaker, would have been appalled if he knew his map projection was used to educate children in geography, since it was never intended as anything like an accurate depiction of the globe. The English title of his 1569 map (the first world map to use what we now call the Mercator projection) is “A New and Enlarged Description of the Earth with Corrections for Use in Navigation.” Navigation! The Mercator projection was designed to guide seafarers, particularly those venturing from Europe to the New World. Ships’ pilots could simply follow a straight line (technically, a rhumb line) on his map to sail most efficiently from A to B. Mercator, who produced (or copied) many other maps, knew full well its inadequacy when it came to depicting an accurate picture of the Earth. But then, no map can do this. The surface of a round Earth doesn’t translate perfectly onto a flat piece of paper, no matter which way you cut, bend or stretch it. Peel an orange, and you can see the two basic solutions to the dilemma. One is to flatten the peel, tearing it as you go; the other is to imagine the peel as an elastic sheet, and keep it intact by stretching it. The most successful example of the “tearing” method is, in my opinion, Buckminster Fuller’s 1943 Dymaxion map. By approximating the Earth’s spherical shape as a regular 20-sided icosahedron, and by making intelligent decisions about which edges to cut and which to fold, Fuller was able to show the continents as nearly

contiguous. Such a projection is useful in illustrating, for instance, the progress of human migrations out of Africa. By basing the map on an icosahedron, he was also able to keep area distortion to less than 2 percent. On the other hand, the “elastic peel” method of flattening the sphere has been the traditional method of mapmakers throughout history, at least since the Greco-Egyptian geographer Claudius Ptolemy (90-168 AD) created his representation of the known world. My vote for the best of this kind goes to the 2003 Hobo-Dyer cylindrical equal-area projection. This particular projection has zero distortion (“standard parallels”) at 37.5 degrees latitude north and south, with lands closer to the equator shown narrower than they actually are, and with polar regions stretched sideways. It’s about as good a compromise as you can achieve on a rectangular sheet of paper, although it’s hopelessly incorrect as you approach the poles. Back to Mercator. The projection used on his 1569 map is out of fashion these days — if you’re younger than 50, the world map you grew up with as a kid was probably similar to either the Dymaxion or the Hobo-Dyer versions, maybe both. And even navigators, in this age of satellites and GPS, rarely use Mercator’s projection. Still, his invention of “what may be the most influential map in the history of geography,” as Jerry Brotton writes in a new and fascinating book called A History of the World in Twelve Maps, deserves respect. With its Eurocentric bias, the Mercator projection is politically incorrect and it distorts areas something terrible. But it did ensure that navigators could end up where they were aiming for! ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) grew up with British Ordnance Survey inch-to-the-mile maps, the most beautiful maps in the world. They use the Mercator projection.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

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MISSING BORDER COLLIE/ PAPILLION MIX. Bailey has long black fur with white on chest, slight build. Current on vaccina− tions, missing since July 11, 5th and P St. area Eureka, (707) 296− 6808 or (727) 365−8612.

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1. Auto additive with a red oval logo 4. Word after good and bad 7. Sarcastic remarks 13. Thornton Wilder’s “____ Town” 14. Man from Oman 16. Surname in punk rock 17. Prefix with lateral 18. Husband of Octavia 19. Iger’s predecessor at Disney 20. Give ____ of approval 22. Buddy of “The Beverly Hillbillies” 24. Breathalyzer determination, for short 25. Tailbone 27. Absorbs, with “up” 28. “Well, now!”

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CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

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FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS OFFERED BY AREA 1 AGENCY ON AGING’S Trained HICAP counselors the second Thursday of every month through August. Hour−long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Next class: Medicare Basics for Boomers, August 14, 4−5 p.m. On deck: Medicare Plan Finder Class, Sept. 18, 25 and Oct. 2.

Construction Manager Facilitate and coordinate new construction projects of the Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria. Serve as an owner representative interfacing with contractors and coordinating internally with Tribal Government Agencies. Budget and project management. Salary DOE. Tribal preference given per the Indian Self-determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C Section 450 e(B)). To apply and for more information please go to www.bearrivercasino.com/careers or call (707) 733-1900 x 167. default

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

29. Fin de ____ 30. One side in a close encounter 31. Name of three Giants outfielders in 1963 32. Gore and Roker 33. Novelize, e.g. 35. Expels forcibly 36. RR stop 38. ____ kwon do 39. Grandpa on “The Simpsons” 40. Acted bullish? 42. His Twitter bio boasts “I perform random acts of Shaqness” 44. Ringo’s drumming son 47. Dope 48. Butt 49. Borden acquitted of murder in 1893 51. Hillbilly negative 52. Green-lighted

53. Zoo section 54. Wash. neighbor 55. Plant more crops in 57. Org. that runs the annual event Life@50+ 58. Beckon 60. Excite, as an appetite 62. TV network with the slogan “Positively Entertaining” 64. “____ for real?” 65. Rap’s ____ Dogg 66. Weep 67. Take offense at 68. Univ. figures 69. “Stuff like that”

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1. Pittance 2. Rich source of essential fatty acids

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO NuDiTy M A H A S U B S O B I T O C E N T N E P A L E S E S T A D O S L I P I N T O H E L I O N N U K I N G E D L E A S E A G T S A N A E P H K O L Y A S U P E R S I Z E D I M E T A T V Y E A M E R I C A N P I E T Y L E N I N P O E D O E R S A N D S R T A S S O A P A R T I A L N U D I T Y P O L I T I C S U N I T A S I D A R E N O T F I N I T O T O Y S E T E F E S S E S

3. Diana, e.g. 4. “The Kingdom of Sweets Board Game” 5. Iron ____ 6. Whittle (down) 7. Sleazeball 8. Game stoppers 9. Mornings, for short 10. Hillary Clinton’s predecessor 11. Didn’t need instructions 12. Grave 15. What an anchored boat typically does ... and a hint to what’s seen in 3-, 4-, 10- and 35-Down 21. Job: Abbr. 23. Mister ____ (ice cream truck name) 25. Civil War side: Abbr. 26. Marked, in a way

31. Police dept. broadcast 34. Makes up (for) 35. Shows eager anticipation 37. NFL linebacker Manti ____ 40. Subcompact 41. How some pranks are done 43. Chicken ____ king 45. JFK, for one 46. Critical 48. Barely make, as a living 50. Tribe whose sun symbol is on the New Mexico flag 52. Playwright Joe 56. “Come again?” 59. Grease dissolver 61. Amtrak listing, for short 63. JFK’s home

V. EASy #32

O D E T T A

Services Specialists – Information and Assistance and Caregiver Services SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM The Wiyot Tribe Announces sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program. Free meals will be provided to all children who are 18 years of age and younger at Wiyot Tribe 141 Wiyot Tribe Loleta, CA. 95551 Daily from June 16,− Aug. 22, 2014 Snack 9 a.m− 10 a.m Lunch 12 p.m− 1 p.m YOU’RE INVITED! House of Prayer Manila Holiness Church 1820 Peninsula Drive, Manila, (707) 443−5407, Pastor Phillip Stephens. Sunday School, 10 a.m., Sunday Worship, 11 a.m. Sun. Evening Service, 6 p.m. Thurs. Evening Service, 7 p.m.

@ncj_of_humboldt

www.sudoku.com

Opportunities

54 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) (E−0904)

1 part-time (17.5 hr/wk) and 1 full-time (35 hr/wk) positions. Responsible for providing information, referrals, advocacy and other A1AA services to older adults and caregivers. For information: Jeanie Ren at 442-3763, Ext. 209.

Volunteer Driver Program Coordinator 1 part-time (20 hr/wk) position. Responsible for volunteer recruitment and training, intake and administration of transportation requests, and maintenance of database for the Volunteer Driver Program. For information: Maureen McGarry at (707) 442-3763 ext. 218. Positions open until filled. For complete job description and application visit www.a1aa.org

Southern Humboldt Community Healthcare District is now accepting applications for: NURSE MANAGER Full time ER/Acute, BSN, PALS, ACLS & Management experience required. CLINICAL LAB SCIENTIST Full time. Chemistry, hematology, UA, coagulation and blood bank experience required Includes shared call. Housing for shifts provided. L.V.N. Per diem, part time and full time. CA License required. MEDICAL RECoRDS/CLERICAL PoSITIoN 32-40 hours per week. Visit www.shchd.org for more information and to apply Or call (707) 923-3921 ext. 230


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JOURNEYMAN, UTILITY POWER DISTRIBUTION $36тАУ$48/hr. with benefits. Full-time, 40 hrs/week. Minimum qualifications: Must have completed high school or its equivalent. Must have completed an accredited 4 year apprenticeship program and have 4 years Journeyman line experience. Under general supervision, perform experienced level work in the construction and maintenance of overhead and underground electrical lines and electrical distribution system, and perform related duties. Must reside within an hour of the Shelter Cove area within six months. Job application and description available on the DistrictтАЩs website: www.sheltercove-ca.gov. Open until filled. Apply at: Resort Improvement District, 9126 Shelter Cove Rd., Whitethorn, CA 95589. (707) 986-7447. default

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Medical Assistant тАв Caregiver Receptionist тАв Full Charge Bookkeeper Plumber in Training тАв Legal Secretary Accountant тАв Asset Manager Foreclosure Agent тАв Janitorial CALIFORNIA MENTOR. CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW. Make extra money working from home, GREAT OPPORTUNITY. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3600 taxтИТfree/mo. Bring 4 references. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Sharon today for appt! (707) 442тИТ4500 ext 16! www.camentorfha.com. (EтИТ0828)

LICENSED COSMETOLOGIST Busy, high traffic Fortuna salon seeking dependable, motivated CosmeтИТ tologist. No clientele needed just provide your own cutting tools we supply the rest. PartтИТTime w/ hourly compensation. Must be available Fridays, Saturdays & one other week day.

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REDWOOD COAST

EnergyAuthority Program Assistant тАУ Accounting and HR $2,304 - $3,574 monthly (DOE) plus benefits. RCEA is accepting applications for a full-time, experienced Accounts Payable Clerk. Position provides bookkeeping, human resources, and clerical support services to ensure effective and efficient accounting and HR operations. Opportunity for advancement. Open until filled. For job description and application instructions, go to www.redwoodenergy.org/about-us/employment EOE

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NOW HIRING All Departments. Maintenance, food & beverage, housekeeping, front desk. Apply in person or send a resume to rorazem@benbowinn.com. default

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CHILDREN AND FAMILY PROGRAMS COORDINATOR The Children and Family Programs Coordinator works with children (ages 0тИТ5) and pregnant teens (13тИТ17) who are currently experiencing homelessтИТ ness. Under the direction of the Program Manager, the coordinator will organize and facilitate daily educational and extra curricular activities. Quals: BA/S in child development, or related field req.,prior comparable work exp., extended work exp may be subst for some degree req., 1 yrтАЩs exp. working with children ages 0тИТ5 in rec. or ed. setting. http://www.srcharities.org/employment/currentтИТopenings.html default

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open door Community Health Centers

DESKTOP SUPPORT TECHNICIAN 1 F/T Arcata BEHAVIORAL HEALTH INTEGRATED PROVIDER 1 F/T or P/T Willow Creek PRIMARY BEHAVIORAL HEALTH PROVIDER 1 F/T Eureka (Mobile Health Services) LAB ASSISTANT 1 F/T Crescent City DIETICIAN 1 P/T Crescent City MEDICAL BILLER 1 F/T Arcata CERTIFIED MEDICAL CODER 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Crescent City MEDICAL ASSISTANT 2 F/T Arcata, 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T McKinleyville, RN CLINIC COORDINATOR (SUPV) 1 F/T Willow Creek DENTIST 1 P/T or F/T Willow Creek PHYSICIAN-PEDIATRICIAN 1 F/T Crescent, 1 F/T Eureka PHYSICIAN- OB/GYN 1 F/T Arcata FAMILY PRACTICE MD/DO 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T McKinleyville Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete and submit our online application.

northcoastjournal.com тАв North Coast Journal тАв Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

55


classified employment Opportunities County of Humboldt

Opportunities

Opportunities

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Park Caretaker I $2,255тАУ$2,894 Monthly

Under general supervision, performs routine and skilled work in the care and maintenance of parks and facilities, including swimming, camping, and playground areas; performs related work as assigned. Must possess a valid California driverтАЩs license. Must possess sufficient strength and stamina to lift and carry equipment weighing up to 50 pounds. Must be willing to work out of doors in all weather conditions. May require weekend, holiday or other off-shift work. Desired experience: Six months natural resources park maintenance training or experience. Filing deadline: August 22, 2014. Apply online at www.humboldtgov.org/Job-Opportunities. Jobline: (707) 476-2357 AA/EOE County of Humboldt

LegaL Office Business Manager

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Desired education and experience: equivalent to graduation from a four year college or university with major coursework in business or public administration or a closely related field, and three years administrative experience in a legal office or court setting at least one year of which included financial management in a public setting. Filing deadline: August 22, 2014. Apply online at www.humboldtgov.org/Job-Opportunities. Jobline: (707) 476-2357 AA/EOE default

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$4,959тАУ$6,364 Monthly

The current vacancy is with the Probation Department. Performs complex and difficult administrative, budgetary, programmatic and evaluation work in support of multiple function areas of a department. Responsibilities include financial management, budget development, legislation analysis and implementation, preparation of grant applications and contract administration and support staff administration.

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56 NORTH COAST JOURNAL тАв THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 тАв northcoastjournal.com

The North Coast Journal is looking for a hardworking, forward thinking,

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE to be part of our display sales team. Print and digital sales experience a plus. Please email your resume to melissa@northcoastjournal.com


CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Opportunities

Art & Collectibles

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Registration for fall classes begins August 18

100% Employee Owned www.restif.com (707) 822-7500

JDOOHU\ JLIWFHUWLÀFDWHV RSHQVWXGLRVSDFHDYDLODEOH

Email resume to: pamela@restif.com -or- Come into office: 5131 Ericson Way Arcata

(707) 826-1445 520 South G Street across from the marsh Arcata, CA 95521 www.fireartsarcata.com

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AFRICA, BRAZIL WORK/STUDY! Change the lives of others and create a sustainable future. 1, 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply now! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591−0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN) (E−0101) AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE. Get trained as FAA certified Avia− tion Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Mainte− nance 800−725−1563 (AAN CAN) (E−0828)

Art & Design

Computer & Internet

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707-840-0600  ��� 

MOVIE SALE: ALL 1/2 PRICE. AUGUST 7−13. Dream Quest Thrift Store. Plus: Tues. Senior Discount; Fri. Frenzy Sale; Famous Quarter Rack. Where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams, Willow Creek. (530) 629−3006.

classified.northcoast journal.com

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Animal & Pets Cleaning Computer & Internet Financial Garden & Landscape Home Repair Legal

Miscellaneous

Community BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13−18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441−5013, ask for Peggy

Garage & Yard Sale YARD SALE! Sat., Aug, 9, 9 a.m.−2 p.m. Furniture, kitchen, decora− tive, clothing and linens, books and more. 1400 block Chester Ave., Sunny Brae.

 

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot.com (AAN CAN) (M−0807)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E−0831)

PERSONAL ATTENDANT REMI VISTA INC. Provides support services by assisting individuals with developmental disabilities. Must be 21+ with a clean driving record, valid driver’s license, and full use of a vehicle. Must pass a physical, drug test and criminal back− ground check. $9.50/hour. Please email jiverson@remivistainc.org or call (707) 268−8722 for more information.

GREAT DEAL TEMPURPEDIC ADJUSTABLE TWIN EXTRA LONG BED Was $825, reduced to $700 obo. saramills6464@gmail.com

Sporting Goods

Merchandise

NOW HIRING!!

Local 100% employee owned cleaning company accepting applications for employment. Permanent, full time day & night positions available.

Furniture

DISH TV. Starting at $19.99/ month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $32.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! (888) 992 −1957 (AAN CAN) (M−0807)

Exquisite Handmade Stained Glass Specializing in: Liturgical Commercial & Residential MONTHLY CLASSES (707) 633-6266 11 am-5:30 pm jsgstudios@gmail.com www.jsg-studios.com

Auto Service

Art & Design

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1−888−420−3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A−1009)

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   

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−0925)

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−0925)

    

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  default

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Garden & Landscape

Cleaning

ARCATA’S FAVORITE Drop−Off Wash & Fold Quilts & Sleeping Bags Large Capacity Machines 12th & G, Arcata OPEN EVERY DAY 707.825.6802 emeraldcitylaundry.com

Computer & Internet

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20 words and a photo, in full color for only $25 per week. 442-1400 classified@northcoastjournal.com www.northcoastjournal.com

  

820 N St., Arcata (9th St. Entrance)

Pets & Livestock BUY SELL TRADE livestock here!

the MARKETPLACE

ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−1002) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, www.taichigardener.com (S−0828)

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087 (S−0828) MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834. (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−1030)

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

707.825.7100

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



PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

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classified SERVICES Home Repair

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−0807)

PROJECTS UNLIMITED Honey−Do’s are my Specialty. Living and Working in Arcata Area Since 1983 Bob Billstrom, Handyman (707) 822−7037 (707) 834−8059 tunesmith89@sbcglobal.net

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 444−8507. (M−0925) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nation− ally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−0828) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−0828)

body, mind Other Professionals

Other Professionals

EARN $500 A DAY. As Airbrush Media Makeup Artist For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One Week Course. Train & Build Portfolio. 15% OFF TUITION. AwardMakeupSchool.com (818) 980−2119 (AAN CAN) (S−0807)

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NORTH COAST HAULING SERVICES Trash removal, trailer towing Local moves, pick−up/delivery Call (415) 299−4473 (S−1009) PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866−413−6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN) (S−0807)

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Roofing/Repairs, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 267−0496 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

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 

           

RESTAURANTS, MUSIC, EVENTS, MOVIE TIMES, ARTS LISTINGS, BLOGS

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



IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more insured & bonded





Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001

Sewing & Alterations

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MRS. SEW AND SEW Sewing and Alterations in Arcata. Summer special Jeans hem $10 Fast turn around time! Call Nancy (707) 499−3265

EARTH RITE MASSAGE. Intuitive deep tissue massage from ORR Hotsprings CMT. 1 hour $50, 1 1/2 Hours $75. More information on facebook. Call Rick: (707) 499− 6033. Treat yourself or a loved one to healing touch. (MB−0828)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

A’O’KAY CLOWN & NANI NATURE. Juggling Jesters and Wizards of Play present Perfor− mances for all Ages; A magical adventure with circus games & toys. For info. on our variety of shows and to schedule events & parties. Please call us at (707) 499−5628. Visit us at circusnature.com (S−0925)

VIAGRA. 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, Only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet Shipping. Call 1−800−374 −2619 Today! (AAN CAN) (MB−0807)



 



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Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating. Kim Moor, MFT #37499

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HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 707.445.4642

RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

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100+ BARS 70+ HAPPY HOURS

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445-7715 1-888-849-5728

consciousparentingsolutions.com

58 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

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HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8 a.m.− 3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n−Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com

m.northcoast journal.com Bookmark the URL and it’s ready to go, right on your phone.

 

Call 441-1484

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Parent Educator

    

    

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 

Est. 1979

 

ROLFING SUMMER SPECIAL 50% off first session plus free body analysis! (541) 251−1885. (MB−0828)

Diana Nunes Mizer

Other Professionals

&Spirit

Offering Private Training and Small Group Classes in

�฀ Pilates �฀ Yoga �฀ ������฀������฀�����������฀ �����������฀��������� �฀ ���฀������฀�����฀�������฀�� �฀ ���฀������฀������฀���฀ ���������฀�����฀��������฀�� �฀ ����฀������฀�������฀����฀ ���������฀�������฀�� �฀ ������฀������������

www.sacredbodiespilates.com

707-268-0437

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

444-2273


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4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata



707-822-5244

Medical Cannabis Evaluations 

 default

  ¬¬

¬8V¬:HHNO\¬¬%\¬

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 

Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years.

Call for Walk-in Availability Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by wholelife medical systems

  

fi d e n t i a l &

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

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758(027,21),71(66   featuring

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Men, Women, Children Coloring, Perm, Waxing Style Pedicure Spa & Manicures BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR 10% OFF SERVICES

(707) 822-3018 info@truemotionfitness.com www.truemotionfitness.com 901 O St, Suite B, Arcata

2014 WEDDING & PARTY GUIDE

Arcata, CA 95521

Tires, Wheels, Batteries, Wipers, Rubber Mats & More Local Family Owned Since 1939.

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$

80

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

YOUR BUSINESS HERE!

Walk-ins Welcome

Wed & Sat 11-5pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students New Patients ONLY

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  

Medical Cannabis Consultants  

INTERESTED IN THE JOURNAL’S AUTO SECTION? CALL 442-1400 x319



FIND IT ON NEWSSTANDS AND AT LOCAL WEDDING & PARTY RETAILERS

AFFORDABLE RATES & UNBEATABLE EXPOSURE!

Search the complete directory online at northcoastjournal.com/wedding Printed with environmentally friendly UV inks.

CARS. TRUCKS. SUVs. ATVs.

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$

OPEN Tues-Sat 10am-6:30pm Sun 11am-4pm 923 H Street, Arcata (707) 822-2719

(707) 822-5191 1265 Giuntoli Lane

Dianna (707) 498-2733

A systematic approach to strengthen, stabilize and reduce stress at joints and surrounding muscle tissue

Gym Memberships Personal Training

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

classified AUTOMOTIVE

north coast

INSIDE VENUES | JEWELRY | GOWNS & TUXEDOES

| FLOWERS | BAKERIES AND MORE

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014

59


classified automotive

BMW OF HUMBOLDT BAY

1795 Central Avenue, McKinleyville, CA 95519 (707) 839-4269 www.bmwofhumboldtbay.com

60 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014

61


classified HOUSING Housing/Properties

Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County

classified.northcoastjournal.com Apartments for Rent

Homes for Rent

Vacation Rentals

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3131 CALIFORNIA. 3/2 Home w/ office, Wood Stove, Garage, Pet OK. Rent $1500. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0807)

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Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

2275 SUMMIT RIDGE RD. 3/1 Home, W/D Hookups, Carport, Pet OK, Large Yard. Rent $1250. Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197. (R−0807)

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Roommates ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to comple− ment your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN) (R−0122)

$875,000

Custom home on 6 sunny acres off West End Road. End of the road privacy, yet minutes to Arcata and Blue Lake. 3 bd, two ba, plus an office. Home features an open floor plan with clear fir floors and remodeled travertine marble bathrooms. Many skylights, large south facing windows, vaulted ceilings and exposed beams. Forced air and a Lopi wood stove. Large south facing deck. 700 sq. ft. second unit with full bathroom and kitchen. Oversized garage, shed and 20x20 greenhouse. The yard is deer fenced and features 25 mature fruit trees and 25 blueberry bushes with automatic irrigation throughout.

BEACHFRONT VA C AT I O N R E N TA L

romantic 14 secluded acres rustic chic www.oysterbeach.info (707) 834-6555

Samoa Peninsula Eureka, CA

Acreage for Sale

Arcata $619,000

Absolutely wonderful family home on .62 acres in the sun! Beautiful 4 bedroom/2.5 bath home with a large yard featuring a redwood deck, hot tub, garden area, fruit trees, and a play structure for the kids! Majestic towering redwoods add to the country feel of this home. Stunning kitchen has been recently remodeled with granite counter tops, custom African Mahogany cabinets, and a large pantry. Downstairs flooring is gorgeous Patagonian Rosewood. Walking into the home you are greeted with a formal living area with cathedral ceilings and a wood stove. Home has a large PV array for low power bills.

816 2ND ST., EUREKA. Studio Rooms with Kitch− enette, Shared Bathrooms, All Utilities Pd., No Pets, $375−$500 a month. Call Preston, (707) 444−2199.

BLUE LAKE VACATION RENTAL. Sept. 1−Oct. 31, $1000/month. Cozy, furnished, light filled 2 bed, claw foot bath, bountiful garden, hammock up, (707) 498−8981 default

1500 GOLDEN WEST #B. 2/1 Townhouse, Carport, Onsite Laundry, Cat OK. Rent $775. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444− 9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0807)

Homes for Rent 1614 F STREET. 3/2 Home w/den, Garage, W/D Hookups, Backyard. Rent $1250. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0807)

Fieldbrook $499,000

Custom sunny 3 bedroom/2 bath home in the Janes Creek Subdivision. Great private corner lot with southern exposure. Pond behind the home. Garage has been converted to another room (was used as a recording studio). Home has beautiful cedar shake siding and lots of custom touches. Home was built to receive passive solar heat, so energy bills are low. Fenced entry provides additional privacy.

northcoastjournal

Vacation Rentals

Greenwood Heights $699,000

Modern craftsman home with two parcels totaling 4.7 acres! Home sits on 3.4 private acres just 2 miles up Greenwood Heights close to Freshwater School. Secluded and deep in the woods. Immaculate home features oak floors, cherry cabinets, soapstone counter tops, mahogany trim, and a spacious open floor plan. Detached two car garage has a mother in law unit above it. Custom keypad gate provides additional security and privacy. Adjacent 1.3 acre parcel with it’s own gate and driveway is included in the sale.

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engi− neering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $89,900 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

62 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, AUG. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Arcata $449,000

Visit these properties on-line at prudential redwood realty.com

••••••••••••

DRE License# 01438846 HumboldtCountyProperty.com “Making Real Estate Dreams a Reality.”

Cell: 707-498-4429

••••••••••••

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

One of a kind Kneeland Estate! This beautiful custom home nestled on 25 sunny acres boasts expansive views of the city of Eureka, Humboldt Bay, and the Pacific Ocean. The home was completely updated and renovated two years ago. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, plus an office. Features rubber tree flooring, new Milgard windows, and custom touches throughout the home. Detached 1000 sq. ft. shop has 3 garage stalls. Second 800 sq. ft. shop provides even more space for storage or hobbies. There are two 200amp service drops on site. Enjoy playing basketball on the court next to the beautiful redwood decks. New forced air, water system and appliances. Lots of room to garden with a site with power and water. Enjoy warm summer days, sunsets over the Pacific, and your own forest.

Kneeland

••••••••••••


2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net $610,000

Salyer

2 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,688 sq ft home on river front property on the Trinity River, end of road privacy, mountain views, great swimming area, home has covered porch with hot tub, 3 car garage

$198,000

3 bed, 1 bath, 1,150 sq ft Eureka home close to Henderson Center, hardwood & tile floors, vinyl dual pane windows, fireplace, spacious living room, deck, covered patio, & covered RV parking

Eureka

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

$799,000 72 Acres in Sunny

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent

Blue Lake

#01332697

707.834.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent #01930997

707.834.7979

707.476.0435

Del Norte Land/Property

Beautiful house with vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, granite kitchen counter tops and island, lots of windows and a sunroom with forest views. Solar electricity, central heating, Lopi wood stove in the living room and gas stove in the bedroom provide cozy heat without the central heat. It’s a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2078 square ft home built in 2000. House is surrounded by Trex decking and has a solar heated pool with view and relaxing spa. Grape arbor with sweet red and green table grapes. Fruit tree orchard with apples, pears, peaches, plums and more. Two 2,500 gallon spring fed water tanks. 1,000 juvenile redwood trees along with adult oak and fir trees. Large authentic smoke house for your own meat and fish creations. New 25’x 60’x 14’ barn with aluminum siding, shop and wood shed with room for a horse corral. Large enclosed dog run and kennel.

Office

Karen Mann, Realtor

(707) 839-3600 • (707) 499-8891 • BRE#01347366

karen@coastcentralrealty.com • www.coastcentralrealty.com

Beautiful, one of a kind ±190 acre property bordering trees of Mystery and redwood National Park, located just off Highway 101! this unique parcel boasts flat open meadows, power, old growth Spruce and White Fir Forests, and Wilson Creek running through it. Just a short walk from the beach!

$750,000

Weitchpec Shasta Land/Property NEW LISTING! acres just 20 minutes outside redding! this property Land/Property ±80 boasts acres of useable flat

With nice useable flats, a strong year round spring/creek water source, and Unclassified zoning this ±60 acre property is ready for anything! Southern slopping topography, valley views, and a mixture of Oak woodlands and Fir forests make this property very desirable!

space, privacy, a 3 bedroom 2 bathroom home in need of work, and several other out buildings. Call kyla or Charlie at (707) 475-0435 to find out more!

$275,000 $650,000

CUTTEN REALTY

315 P Street – eureka, Ca 95501

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

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20 WILD YEARS! SATURDAY, AUGUST 16T H

13 TH S TREET B ETWEEN G&H 11 AM -3 PM FREE FOR ALL AGES HUMBOLDT MADE DEMOS • TASTINGS & GIVEAWAYS SAMBA NA CHUVA WILD WIENER WALK GAMES & PRIZES THE ATTICS MARIACHIS FACE PAINTING DELL’ARTE • UF08 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE WILD WHEEL OF FORTUNE!

TOP OF THE HILL, G STREET, ARCATA www.wildberries.com

VISA, MC, AMEX, DISCOVER

D E CA D E N C E • D I A N E ’ S SW E E T H E AT •

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

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B B oses

M ’ E n E oki

m R S F by

SAU C E • B E C K ’ S BA K E RY N AT U R A L

MUDDY WATERS • HEAD OVER HEELS • CELEBRATIONS • HENRY’S OLIVES • SEQUOIA HUMANE SOCIETY •

CELEBRATI NG

F R I E N D S O F T H E D U N E S • M A D R I V E R FA R M • F O O D F O R P E O P L E • D I C K TAY LO R • H U M B O L DT H OT

H U M B O L DT M A D E • B O U J I E BA K I N G • SA N C T UA RY F O R E S T • B I E N PA D R E • H S U •

• JUNE 16TH • FA THER’S DAY A •JUNE 16TH • FATHER’S DAY


North Coast Journal 08-07-14 Edition