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thursday june 19, 2014 vol XXV issue 25 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

northcoastjournal.com 8 Deathbed accusations 11 Cross about Blue Cross 12 Oyster fails 20 Another scratchy walk 21 Whiny friends, noisy sex 23 Drive-by produce


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 20 Get Out! Bay Walk

5 Mailbox 6 Poem

Doves Droning

7 Best of Humboldt 2014 Ballot 8 News A Councilman’s ‘Dying Declaration’

10 Buhne Tribune

Flamingo Gulag Archipelago

11 Views

The Insurance Leech

12 Blog Jammin’ 13 Week in Weed PAC a Bowl

14 On The Cover

Good Fire, Bad Fire

17 Home & Garden Service Directory

19 McKinleyville Arts Night June 20, 6-8 p.m.

21 Hey, McGuinty!

Bitchfests and Love Nests

22 Bobarazzi

Around Humboldt County

23 Table Talk Pull Over

26 Music & More!

live entertainment

30 The Setlist

Modest Proposals

32 Calendar 35 Filmland

Double Down

36 Workshops 39 Field Notes

Replicants, Unite!

39 Sudoku 39 Crossword 42 Marketplace 46 Body, Mind & Spirit 46 Real Estate This Week

DRIP IRRIGATION WITH YVONNE COLBURN With all our water prices on the rise and a statewide drought, drip irrigation will save water and dollars. Yvonne will talk about what you need to get started and how to put a system together. It’s easy and even fun! Sat., June 21st 10:30 a.m. FREE! But please call 839-1571 x5 to sign up.

1828 Central Ave. McKinleyville • Mon.-Sat. 8:30 to 5:30, Sun 10 to 4 (Nursery Only) millerfarmsnursery.com northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

3


4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


Humboldt Crabs Baseball

2014 Season

WEEKLY SCHEDULE Wednesday, June 18 Marysville Gold Sox, 7 PM Friday, June 20 Auburn Wildcats, 7 PM Saturday, June 21 Auburn Wildcats, 7 PM, Sunday, June 22 Auburn Wildcats, 12:30 PM Tuesday, June 24 at Walnut Creek Crawdads, 5:30 PM www.humboldtcrabs.com

Crabs Ballpark 9th & F Arcata

Cartoon by Terry Torgerson

At a Ross for Words

In a Knot

Editor: Editor: I’m not even sure what side of the “isI must apologize to Ross Rowley and all sue” you’re taking but clearly somebody the other television commercial producsomewhere doesn’t have any underers in Humboldt County. Having produced standing of how the California Massage my own share of “quick and stupid” local Therapy Council works (“Mayor Jager’s commercials, I have no right to disparage Merry Massage Brigade,” June 5). Prior to the work of others in our industry (“Bye, its creation a few years ago, every city Folks!” May 29). or county had its own regulations for During the interview, I did give kudos massage businesses — and if you moved to the many talented local commercial from city A to city B you’d have to go producers doing fabulous work, but unthrough the entire background check, fortunately those comments didn’t make fingerprinting, etc. again. And again. With it into the article. the CMTC, there is now a uniform licensMr. Rowley is also correct in pointing out ing standard across the state which, yes, that television stations must be doing somedoes prevent having to pay for a local thing right if they are making money and their customers are happy. It is a prudent continued on next page business strategy to package air time with commercial production. In closing, I must thank Mr. Rowley, not only for his insightful comments and tireless contributions to our media community, but also for his assis“Oh boy, high school punk, it was fun in high tance many years ago school, but now I am all grown up, and really to a young College of the Redwoods digital prefer real music and I wish the journals music media student, (whom editor would cover something other then her he’d never met) supplying a reel of CRfriends from high school, really.” related video clips for — Brian Cook, commenting on the return use in a class project. of local band The Cutters. Thank you Ross. Montel Vander Horck III, Eureka

Comment of the Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

5


PLEASE VOTE FOR ME

June 19, 2014 Volume XXV No. 26

North Coast Journal Inc.

continued from previous page

www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2014 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com news editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman, Jessica McGuinty, Genevieve Schmidt contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com art director/production manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com graphic design/production Amy Barnes, Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Christian Pennington general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Terrence McNally terrence@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions manager Drew Hyland office manager/bookkeeper Carmen England receptionist/classified assistant Michelle Wolff

mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHoNe: 707 442-1400 faX: 707 442-1401

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover: Photo by Heidi Walters

permit annually. However it is only a licensing board. Business licenses are still issued locally (and, at least in Eureka, one still has to be signed off annually by EPD to renew that). If any illegal activity occurs in conjunction with a massage business, complaints and investigation are very much in the hands of local law enforcement (just like if you have a driver’s license and do something illegal) and to say that all complaints have to be sent to Sacramento for action is absurd. Yes, criminal complaints should be sent to the CMTC by local authorities so licensing can be dealt with but that’s a different matter. And please drop the “nudge, nudge, wink, wink” comments about massage practitioners — it’s an insulting display of your ignorance. David Schlosser, Eureka

Correction A photo accompanying last week’s Trinidad Fish Festival preview was incorrectly attributed to Jose Quezada of the Times-Standard. l

Doves Droning

  When I was young,   A two-note whistle Did the trick.   Always turning heads, Making eye contact, or not …   Does it ever stop?

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6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

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press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com music: thehum@northcoastjournal.com sales: display@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops: carmen@northcoastjournal.com

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NOMINATE

JUNE 2 - JUNE 30

VOTE

PARTY: AUGUST 6

AWARD

HUMBOLDT

2014

MAY 1 - MAY 22

www.northcoastjournal.com/BOH2014 Voting closes Monday, June 30 at 5 p.m.

FOOD & DRINK 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Bar to Take a Date: The Speakeasy, The Pearl, Siren Song Tavern Dive Bar: The Shanty, The Alibi, Everett’s Sports Bar: Sidelines, Steve and Dave’s, The Logger Bar, Bar Fly Bartender: Jayme Cohn at Oberon Grill, Kelsie Derusha at The Palm Lounge, Steve at Steve and Dave’s Happy Hour: Rita’s, Applebee’s, Plaza Grill Bloody Mary: The Alibi, The Shanty, AA Bar and Grill Martini: The Pearl, The Speakeasy, Oberon Grill Brewery: Mad River Brewing, Redwood Curtain Brewing Company, Lost Coast Brewery Beer: Great White, Lost Coast Brewery, Tangerine Wheat, Lost Coast Brewery, Steelhead, Mad River Brewing IPA: Eel River Brewery IPA, Mad River Brewing Double IPA, Redwood Curtain Brewing Company Space Oddity Specialty/Seasonal Beer: Raspberry Lambic at Six Rivers Brewery, Tangerine Wheat at Lost Coast Brewery, Bourbon Barrel Vanilla Porter at Mad River Brewing Company Winery: Moonstone Crossing, Fieldbrook Winery, Briceland Vineyards Wine: Riverbend Cellars Firehouse Red, Fieldbrook Winery Babera, Moonstone Crossing Dark as Night Coffee House: Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, Ramone’s , Cafe Brio Coffee Roasters: Humboldt Bay Coffee Company, Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, Muddy Waters Steak: AA Bar and Grill, Oberon Grill, Folie Douce French Fries: The Trailer, Lost Coast Brewery, Arcata Pizza and Deli Hot Dog: Humboldt Hot Dogs, Wolf Dawg, Costco Sugar Fix: Arcata Scoop, Living The Dream, Ramone’s Milkshake: Fresh Freeze, Star’s, Toni’s Donut: Don’s Donuts, Donut Mill, Happy Donuts Sandwich: Hole in The Wall, Central Sandwich, North Coast Co-op Food Truck: Naan of the Above, The Trailer, Speedy Taco Sushi: Tomo, Sushi Spot, Kyoto Asian: Pho Thien Long, Gonsea, Bencharong Thai Mexican: Carmela’s, Rita’s, Chapala’s, Luzmila’s Italian: Abruzzi’s, Mazzotti’s, La Trattoria Vegetarian: Golden Harvest, Wildflower Cafe, Japhy’s

29. Vegan: Wildflower Cafe, Humboldt Healthy Foods, Lost Coast Cafe, Golden Harvest 30. Pizza: Paul’s Live From New York, Babe’s Pizza, Smug’s Pizza 31. Burger: Star’s, Surfside Burger Shack, The Trailer 32. Bakery: Cafe Brio, Ramone’s, Vellutini Baking Company 33. Breakfast: Golden Harvest, Big Blue Cafe, Renata’s Creperie 34. Late Night Food: Toni’s, Arcata Pizza And Deli, Don’s Donuts 35. Hangover Breakfast: The Alibi, Golden Harvest, Toni’s 36. Eatery on a Budget: Japhy’s, Los Bagels, Smug’s Pizza, The Trailer, Taco Faktory 37. Restaurant when money is no object: Larrupin Cafe, Folie Douce, Brick and Fire 38. Eats in SoHum: Cecil’s, The Woodrose, Flavors, Benbow Inn 39. Grocery Store: North Coast Co-op, Eureka Natural Foods, Wildberries

ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT, RECREATION 40. Artist: Duane Flatmo, Sonny Wong, Blake Reagan 41. Tattoo Artist: Henry Kruger, Mike Arneson, Brian Kaneko 42. Festival: Oyster Fest, North County Fair, Kinetic Sculpture Race 43. Karaoke: Blue Lake Casino, Bar Fly, Central Station 44. Band: Dr. Squid, The Hill, Gun Safe, Huckleberry Flint, Naive Melodies 45. Musician: Buddy Reed, Burly Dent, Eric Mueller 46. Club DJ: Pressure Anya, DJ Red, DJ Razor Burns, Stir Fry Willie, DJ Rude Lion 47. Live Music Venue: Arcata Theater Lounge, HumBrews, The Palm Lounge 48. Place to Shoot Pool: Roses’ Billiards, Bar Fly, E&O Bowl, Sal’s Off Broadway 49. Farmer’s Market Vendor: Neukom Family Farm, Shakefork Farms, Flying Blue Dog 50. Golf Course: Beau-Pre, Redwood Curtain Disc, Baywood, Eureka Muni 51. Weekend Getaway: San Francisco, Shelter Cove, Trinity River 52. Swimming Hole: Devil’s Elbow, Kimtu, Swimmers Delight 53. Day Hike: Trinidad Head, Headwaters Forest, Strawberry Rock

SERVICES & STUFF 54. Antiques: Heritage Antiques, Antiques and Goodies, Daisy’s Drygoods 55. Secondhand Store: Hospice Shop Arcata, Angels of Hope , Shipwreck 56. Pawn Shop: Humboldt Bay Trade & Pawn, Eureka Pawn Shop, Bob’s Pawndemonium 57. Head Shop: The Sthil, Pacific Paradise, Humboldt Glassblowers

58. Liquor Store: Myrtlewood Liquors and John’s Fine Cigars, Arcata Liquors, BevMo! 59. Vintage/Used Clothing Store: Little Shop of Hers, Shipwreck, Vintage Avenger 60. Clothing Store, men or women: Hot Knots, Willow and Rags, Shipwreck, Vintage Avenger 61. Children Clothing Store: Recycled Youth, Sassafras, Lots for Tots 62. Shoe Store: Plaza Shoe, Annie’s Shoes, North Soles 63. Jewelry Store: Plaza, Silva’s Fine Jewelry, Ten Window Williams, Holly Yashi 64. Musical Instrument Store: Mantova’s Two Street Music, Wildwood Music, Ferndale Music Company 65. Salon: Bloom, Forever Young, The Trim Scene, Kalos 66. Spa: The Spa at Personal Choice, Essential Elements , Soul to Soul Spa 67. Dentist: Tucker and Tucker, Dr. Benoit, Sr. Angeloff 68. Orthodontist: Dr. Hunt, Dr. Winzler, Dr. Enriquez 69. Optometrist: Vision Center, A to Z Eye Care, McKinleyville Optometric Center 70. Pharmacy: Barnes, Lima’s , Cloney’s 71. Bookstore: Booklegger, Northtown Books, Tin Can Books 72. Mattress Store: Furniture Design Center, Delta Discount Furniture, Arcata Exchange 73. Furniture Store: Living Styles, Arcata Exchange, Furniture Design Center 74. Bicycle Shop: Henderson Center Bicycle, Revolution Bicycles, Adventure’s Edge 75. Sporting Goods Store: Pacific Outfitters, Adventure’s Edge, Sport and Cycle 76. Computer Repair: Cornerstone Computers, Renaissance Computing, Cadny 77. Auto Body: Auto Body Express, Fred’s Auto Body, Quality Body Works, Rainbow Body Shop 78. Auto Repair: Antich Auto, Franklin Service, First Aid for Ailing Autos 79. Tire Shop: Les Schwab, Gosselin Tire, TP Tires 80. Place to Buy a New Car: Mid-City Motor World, Northwood Auto Plaza, Harper Motors 81. Place to Buy a Used Car: Craigslist, Mickey’s , Bob’s Fine Cars, Roy’s Auto Center, Harper Motors, Mid-City Motor World 82. Bank/Credit Union: Coast Central Credit Union, Redwood Capital Bank, Umpqua Bank 83. Plumber: Maple Service, Mad River Plumbing, Cruz Plumbing 84. Construction Company: Alchemy Construction, Barry Smith Construction, Pacific Builders

85. Real Estate Agent: Clyde Akamine, Mikki Cardoza, Sally Conley, Ken Murrell, Michelle Rowland, Stephanie Joy, Sylvia Garlick 86. Hardware/Lumber Store: Pierson’s Building Center, Almquist Lumber, Shafer’s Ace Hardware 87. Nursery/Garden Center: Pierson’s Building Center, Miller Farms Nursery, Mad River Gardens 88. Horticulture Supply Shop: Northcoast Horticulture, Bayside Garden Center, Humboldt Depot 89. Veterinarian: McKinleyville Animal, Sunny Brae Animal Clinic, Healing Spirit Animal Wellness Center 90. Pet Groomer: Doggie Do Pet Salon, Deb’s Bark Avenue, NorCal Pet, Muddy Paws, Myrtle Avenue Pet Center 91. Storage: Humsheds, Rainbow Self Storage, Arcata Bay Self Storage

BONUS ROUND 92. Place to People Watch: Arcata Plaza, Old Town Eureka, Arts Alive Eureka 93. Place to Take a First Date: Moonstone Beach, Palm Lounge, Siren Song Tavern 94. Locally Made Product: Larrupin Sauce, Cypress Grove Chevre, Fire and Light 95. Place to Blow Some Money: Plaza, Blue Lake Casino, Bear River Casino 96. Vista That Never Gets Old: Clam Beach, Strawberry Rock, Trinidad 97. Things to Bitch About in Humboldt: Homeless, Tweakers, Weather 98. HSU Professor: Melinda Myers, Mary Cruz, Christina Accomando 99. CR Professor: Cindy Hopper, Ryan Emanaker, Shannon Sullivan 100. Place to Take Your Dog: Hiller Dog Park, Moonstone Beach, Samoa Beach 101. Medical Marijuana Dispensary: Humboldt Patient Resource Center, The Humboldt Collective, My Closet 102. Marijuana Strain: OG Kush, Girl Scout Cookie, Trainwreck 103. Skateboarding Spot: Ramp Art, Arcata Skate Park, Eureka Skate Park 104. Humboldt Myth/Conspiracy/Urban Legend: Bigfoot, The Booms, Everyone Smokes Weed 105. Public Garden: Humboldt Botanical Gardens, Bayside, Arcata Marsh 106. Villian: Jason Singleton, The Arkley’s 107. Place to Play Hooky: Moonstone Beach, Luffenholtz Beach, The River 108. Place to Let The Kids Run Wild: Bounce-A-Palooza, Sequoia Park, Moonstone Beach 109. Worst Eyesore: The Downtowner, The Jail, Broadway Motels

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014

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A Councilman’s ‘Dying Declaration’ In final civic act, Lance Madsen takes aim at Eureka City attorney By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

I

n a sworn declaranotarized it to leave no tion signed less than question that it was written a month before his by Madsen himself and that death, former Eureka the former councilman City Councilman Lance had sworn to its contents. Madsen claims City Attorney Cooper said it was clear to Cyndy Day-Wilson lied to him the matter was very him and tried to get another important to Madsen. “It recity hall department head ally concerned him,” Cooper to do the same in an effort said. “Basically, what he told to cover up her allegedly me is the council should not distributing a confidential be lied to by its employees.” and explosive memo to city Day-Wilson, who took EuCyndy day-wilson employees. reka’s city attorney position photo couresty of City of Eureka The declaration and in September 2011 and also accompanying six-page incurrently serves as counsel vestigative report, both of which Madsen to the Humboldt County Fair Association, apparently made a top priority during did not return numerous messages left the last months of his battle with lung by the Journal seeking comment for this disease, were delivered by certified mail story. to the city on June 5 by Daniel Cooper, Madsen, who resigned his post on the Madsen’s probate attorney. Together, the council in December due to his prolonged documents shed new light on an apparbattle with lung disease, was in hospice ently toxic environment in city hall and a care when he signed the affidavit March 6. rift between members of the city council. He died April 5. They also raise serious questions about A two-time council member who was Day-Wilson’s honesty, ethics and job awarded the city’s first ever Mayor’s Comperformance. munity Service Award of Merit, Madsen “Mr. Madsen requested that I provide was also a former cop and detective, this information to the city council after and it shows in his investigation report. his death so that its present members At issue was the handling of a memo would follow through on the investigapenned by former City Manager Bill Panos tion his declining health prevented him and emailed to city council members from completing,” reads a cover letter on Oct. 4, 2013, Panos’ last day in office to the city from Cooper. “Mr. Madsen’s after just nine months on the job. The request also directed that I allow his famemail was critical of some department ily ‘private time’ to grieve and adjust to his heads, including Day-Wilson, and included passing before this affidavit was delivered suggestions to the council for future planto the city council.” ning, according to Madsen’s report. The In an interview with the Journal, Journal’s request for a copy of the e-mail Cooper said he met with Madsen over the is under city review. course of a couple of months to help him Madsen writes that he was immediately put together a three-page sworn affidavit concerned upon opening the email, which pledging that his six-page investigative was marked as confidential and dubbed report is true and correct. Cooper said a “reorganization blueprint.” Madsen says he never actually read the report, but he stopped reading the document after

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Lance madsen. Photo by Ryan Burns.

its first line: “The information contained in the document is confidential as it involves personnel matters. As such, please use discretion with the information in this email and attached document.” In his declaration, Madsen writes that he had not read the rest of the email or the attached “reorganization blueprint” as of signing the affidavit. But Madsen’s report indicates he began hearing “mutterings about the document” from city employees the week of Oct. 20 and later heard “almost everyone in City Hall was aware of the documents and had knowledge of at least the essence of its contents.” Madsen then began investigating the apparent leak. Through his investigation, Madsen says he was told by Councilwoman Melinda Ciarabellini that she gave a copy of the document to Day-Wilson over concerns it could result in litigation by those named in the “reorganization blueprint,” and because “the city attorney was one of those addressed in the document.” Madsen says he was told by two city hall employees — Personnel Director Gary Bird and former Community Development Director Rob Wall — that they received copies of the document from Day-Wilson. Bird told Madsen, according to the report, that Day-Wilson insisted Panos’ memo was a public document because it had been emailed to the council and consequently didn’t qualify as a “personnel matter.” When Madsen talked to Day-Wilson about Panos’ memo, according to his report, she said she was unsure how it was distributed to City Hall employees, telling him her copy was locked away in Bird’s files, along with a hostile workplace complaint filed on Day-Wilson’s behalf by Councilwoman Linda Atkins. Madsen says he then followed up with Bird, who maintained his story that Day-Wilson gave him and Wall copies, adding that Atkins’

has never filed any hostile workplace complaint on Day-Wilson’s behalf. “He further informed me that Councilperson Atkins had never asked for such a file to be created and only (Day-Wilson) could ask for such a file to be created, which she had not,” Madsen states in his report. Madsen says in the report that he later followed up with Wall, who said that after Madsen’s inquires about the leaked memo, Day-Wilson came into his office “and told him that ‘he had to have her back.’” Wall, according to Madsen’s report, said the city attorney instructed him that if anyone asked about his having seen Panos’ memo he should say that he had walked into Day-Wilson’s office on some other city business while she was not there and that, while waiting for her to return, he’d found a copy of the memo on her desk and read it. “He told (Day-Wilson) that he could not comply with her request as her story was not what happened and it was not the truth,” Madsen says in his report. The former councilman concluded that he’d obviously been lied to, either by the city attorney or by two “long-term and trusted city employees.” Madsen states that he felt Bird and Wall had no motivation for lying to him about the memo, and that he believes Day-Wilson had not only lied to him but had also attempted to get Wall to do the same. “I believe the city attorney’s behavior was/is unethical and is a breach of good faith and of the contract with the council.” “Consider this my dying declaration,” he writes in the report. “I do. … I declare that everything in this document is truthful and correct to the best of my ability and I am aware of the potential ramifications it may have on the person(s) named within and as a practicing Roman Catholic, the impact it would have on my own after life. I do not do this out of any feelings of spite or some unresolved contest but


Eureka City Council

photo courtesy of City of Eureka

solely out of concern for the people of the city of Eureka, its council and its employees.” So where exactly does this leave the city of Eureka? The answer is a bit complicated. University of California Hastings College of Law professor David Levine said the accusations contained in Madsen’s affidavit and report are serious and troubling. If Madsen’s information is true, it seems the city would have little trouble firing Day-Wilson for violating her duties, both by disseminating the confidential document to city employees and then by lying about it. But, Levine said, Madsen’s affidavit likely wouldn’t hold up in a court of law, so the city would have to corroborate Madsen’s claims through an independent investigation in order to protect itself in taking any action against Day-Wilson. Levine said it’s also potentially a matter the California State Bar could pursue as Day-Wilson is alleged to have violated the duties owed to her client, but again, Levine said the bar would have to conduct an independent investigation to corroborate Madsen’s allegations before it could take any action. Madsen makes clear in his affidavit and report that he’s leaving the matter in the council’s hands to “toss,” “act on” or “ignore.” But it’s also clear from Madsen’s report that the council is already somewhat divided on the issue. According to the report, Madsen consulted an attorney specializing in human resources litigation after he felt he could no longer trust Day-Wilson. The attorney suggested the council discuss the matter in closed session. It was agendized, according to Madsen, but never discussed, as “two council persons walked out in defense of the city attorney and in protest over using (an outside attorney).” Madsen does not identify which council members left the meeting. While most cities leave the power to hire and fire a city attorney to the city manager, Eureka’s charter specifies that its attorney works for and serves at the pleasure of the city council. In addition to raising the questions of who lied to whom and what should be done about it, Madsen’s documents also

paint a picture of Eureka City Hall in dysfunction. While Panos — a controversial figure in City Hall for his brief tenure on the North Coast — apparently dubbed his memo a “reorganization blueprint,” Madsen notes that city employees referred to it as his “hit list” and that its contents were apparently alarming enough that they led somebody to place anonymous weekend phone calls to at least two department heads warning them of their inclusion on the list. Reached in his new Wyoming office, Panos largely declined to comment on his final memo to the council other than to say it was intended for council members’ eyes only. Panos said he prepared the document at the council’s request in order to provide an update on his continued efforts to reorganize city government and to suggest a path forward, but said it never should have been distributed to city employees. “None of us should be speaking about it,” he said. “It’s a personnel matter.” The whole situation seems to constitute a bit of a mess for Greg Sparks, Eureka’s new city manager, whose first day on the job was last month. Sparks, who stressed that he is intent on focusing on the future and moving the city forward, said the council is taking Madsen’s information under advisement. “They haven’t directed anything as a result of this,” he said. “Obviously, they view it as an employer-employee issue and it’s probably a little bit of uncharted territory for a council to deal with when you have an affidavit from a deceased former council member. I think the council will be determining a course of action here in the weeks ahead.” For his part, Cooper said Madsen simply wanted the full council to have all the information he’d compiled about the situation. “This was just something that really ate at him,” Cooper said, “and he really felt that, for the city’s benefit in a number of ways, it should be looked into by the council. I don’t think he ever intended his information to be the final word, but enough to spur them to do a real and thorough investigation.” ●

Household Hazardous Waste Just $5 per vehicle*

Collection Events

Arcata:

Saturday, June 21 9 am-2pm 1660 Samoa Blvd. at K St.

Ferndale:

Saturday, July 12 9 am-2 pm Ferndale High School

Mckinleyville:

Saturday, July 26 9 am-2pm Pierson Park

Household Materials Accepted: • Paint, wet only

(put dried paint cans in the trash with lid off)

• Used Oil, Filers & Contaminated Oil • Auto & Garden Products • Pharmaceuticals • Medical Needles (in biohazard container) • Household Cleaners • Mercury Bearing Wastes • Aerosols (w/contents) • Batteries • Fluorescent (10+, $2.50 ea.) • Products Labeled: Caution, Warning, Toxic, Flammable

Items Not Accepted:

• E-waste, appliances, explosives or ammunition

Businesses:

• Call for appointment: 707-441-2005

(Businesses include landlords, religious organizations, schools, non-profits, etc.)

*Disposal Limit: Up to 15 gallons (by container size) or 125 pound limit. Additional fees apply for excess disposal amounts and for City of Fortuna residents: $5/gallon (by container size) or $5/pound

Humboldt Waste Managment Authority

Permanent Household Hazardous Waste Facility 1059 West Hawthore in Eureka

www.hwma.net

Open to Residents 9 am-2 pm, the first Saturday of every month or by appointment on weekdays.

Call 707-441-2005

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

9


buhne Tribune

Flamingo Gulag Archipelago

W

ith summer vacation officially kicking-off for hundreds of North Coast families, area tourist attractions are girding for an influx of eager nature-lovers. Sure to be found atop many itineraries will be the glorious sights and sounds of the Sequoia Park Incarceration Facili – er, the Sequoia Park Zoo. The first thing you’ll notice upon entering the zoo is that each of the graceful, long-legged birds in the Pink Flamingo Exhibit is lovingly tagged and tracked by zoo staff with its own, individually numbered leg band, evoking absolutely no parallel whatsoever to the “numbering” of prison inmates — nor, for that matter, the numbered tattooing of concentration camp victims So don’t even go there, Mr. Aleksan Solzhenitsyn. And no, smarty-pants, that wire fence you see surrounding the entire perimeter of the flamingo pond is not intended to harm the birds in any manner whatsoever! It is there for the birds’ own protection, Sherlock. It is simply installed to ensure that not a single, solitary flamingo — which natively would enjoy a glorious tropical habitat stretching tens of thousands of acres through unbridled, sun-drenched wetlands — will ever escape the gloomy, parking-lot confines of its exhibit. Even

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though said exhibit is slightly smaller than nature would intend, measuring — based on this columnist’s rough calculations — about the size of the continental breakfast bar at the Redding La Quinta Inn. Now then, all that walking around the security perimeter got you hungry? Look no further than the zoo’s Funky Monkey Cafe. There, visitors are invited to lovingly bite into the butchered, seared flesh of any number of our furry and feathered friends. Try a chicken sandwich, then “walkoff” lunch as you take the family over to the petting zoo. There’s really nothing quite like that satisfied, omnipotent feeling of strolling among a barnyard stocked with sheep, goats — and, yes, chickens and hogs — whilst digesting the chicken-bacon club sandwich prepared for you by zoo staff, a mere five minutes hence. But do mind your manners: As the website for the Sequoia Park Concentra — I mean, Zoo — is quick to admonish its guests: “Refrain from chasing or holding barnyard animals (including chickens).” Don’t tell PETA, but handling the chickens is all good if they come wrapped snugly within a hoagie roll and garnished with tomatoes, lettuce and mayo.

Blue Lake Headed For Epic “Fall”? If Santayana’s maxim about history’s doomed repetition holds true, the city fathers of NoHum’s dinky, casinoed outpost should take heed: The riverfront burg appears headed down the same dark corridor trod by Caesar Augustus. True, the decline and fall of the Roman Empire remains something of a whodunit to this day. But beard-scratchers who have studied the matter tend to lay blame with three primary culprits: Bread, circuses and rent-a-cops. The wealthy Roman populace was lulled into complacency by too many MMA-style gladiator fights, basically, and by a governmental decree allowing every citizen a daily loaf of Roman Meal. Well-fed and entertained into a passive stupor, the Roman citizenry contracted-out border defense — a privilege formerly reserved for only gentry and high-government officials — to Barbarians, or mall cops, essentially. The bottom line is that Nero fiddled while the corpulent, robed masses slept

10 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

off a food coma. Well, take some dirt-cheap grub, mix in a couple tough-guy cage fights and hand over peacekeeping duties to the sheriff and — voila! — I’m looking right at you, Blue Lake. It’s no secret that the town’s municipal budget lives and dies on revenue from its behemoth casino (read: circus). A few generations from now, Chinese archeologists will note that Blue Lake eliminated its police department a half-dozen years ago. To facilitate the continued feeding of dollar bills into the Lucky 7 machine unfettered, Humboldt’s green-shirted mall cops — er, deputies — confirmed in a press release last week their ongoing duty of policing the city of Blue Lake. The “bottomless plate” breakfast buffet at Alice’s Restaurant completes the grizzly trifecta.

What OJ and Bodhi Know It was 20 years ago this month that O.J. Simpson’s white Bronco led a crawling stampede of squad cars down Los Angeles’ 405 freeway, captivating a global TV audience in a spectacle that — following the televised Trial of the Century — culminated in the Juice’s acquittal for the alleged fatal knifing of his ex-wife and her beau. Lost amid trial judge Lance Ito’s freakshow media circus was an overlooked O.J. Dream Team defense strategy that carries an eerie echo for the plight of Bodhi Tree, Humboldt’s frizzy-haired homicide suspect. Perhaps even more crucial than Johnnie Cochran’s infamous stunt with the ill-fitting bloody glove, the main reason Orenthal walked was because those closest to the crime scene simply couldn’t talk. It would appear Tree was taking notes. In the days following the Brentwood double-homicide, Robert Kardashian — the late patriarch of everyone’s favorite reality TV siblings — was the closest person on the planet to Simpson, secluding O.J. in his Los Angeles McMansion, where, one imagines, they commiserated over Michelobs. As law enforcement bore down to effect the Heisman Trophy winner’s arrest, Kardashian even was photographed ditching a garment bag that cops believe held the football great’s blood-soaked clothes. Kimye’s dad would certainly have been

subpoenaed to divulge the contents of that bag in Ito’s courtroom, but for a stunning technicality: Sensing his imminent 15 minutes of fame as the prosecution’s star witness, Kardashian — a retired attorney at the time — quickly re-upped his law license so he could pose as one of O.J.’s defense team. Defense attorneys (under virtually all circumstances, anyway) cannot be forced to take the stand against their own clients. Ergo, you literally can get away with murder if you surround yourself with people who won’t — or in Tree’s case, can’t — squeal. It’s no coincidence that the snake pit of corruption that is our nation’s capitol contains vastly more attorneys per square foot than any other locale in the U.S. (Grand jury insurance, anyone?) No, deadbeat Bodhi Tree isn’t mobbed up with attorney buddies. But if the Garberville native ends up walking on his double-homicide rap, he’ll owe his freedom to the reality that crucial witnesses — like Kardashian in O.J.’s case — can’t be compelled to testify. As reported in the Mad River Union, a pair of key witnesses in Tree’s alleged attempt on the life of Eureka’s Rhett August — one being August himself — “don’t remember” or “don’t recall” really much of anything, largely due to the testimonythwarting effects of “heroin-induced memory loss.” In other words, for all the utility of their corroboration, the most vital figures in People vs. Bodhi Tree might just as well be the defendant’s own attorneys. And with the scene of the Arcata double homicide producing no pertinent eye witnesses — they’re either dead or weren’t present for the shootings — and no weapon having ever been located, witness testimony is the only glue holding this thing together in the first place. Tree’s prosecution is expected to go to the jury later this month. Should his speechless-witness gambit work, Tree could be out on the Eureka Municipal Golf Course “searching for the real killer” sometime this July. l

– Ryan Hurley newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Ryan Hurley is a Eureka-based attorney. Follow him if you dare: @BuhneTribune.


views

Humboldt Home

owed us the money. Dumbfounded and dismayed, families wept and raged at our medical billers. One of our employees resigned, partly because she felt she could not continue in a job that was so hurtful to young families. After sending out patient after patient in tears, she decided the bad karma invoked by performing the duties required by the position could not be justified, and moved on to a happier job. When things reach a point where your employees feel like they will face eternal damnation just for doing their job, then the system is broken. Every time the company refuses to pay for a procedure, consultation or a medication, the company gets to keep the money! Every time the company suckers some poor clinic into accepting low rates, the company gets to keep the money. Every time the company “forgets” to pay a claim, the company gets to keep the money! Each time the company raises premiums, the company gets to keep the money! The worse the company behaves, the more money it gets. Are we crazy to tolerate such a system? The Affordable Care Act, despite the best of intentions, has fortified a monster. By mandating that everyone purchase insurance, the industry is stronger and feels emboldened to take even more advantage of patients and healthcare providers. Exponentially larger and more powerful than the agencies assigned to oversee it, the industry finds ways to circumvent and resist restrictions. This leech has gotten firmly latched on to the lifeblood of American medicine and is sucking money and energy out of medical care from all angles. How long are we going to stand for this?

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— Emily Dalton Emily Dalton is a pediatrician at Eureka Pediatrics. She lives in Eureka.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

11


Blog Jammin’ CRIME / EMERGENCY

Jail Death Investigated

Officials are investigating the death of an inmate inside the Humboldt County Correctional Facility. According to a news release from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, at 2:40 p.m. on June 13 Eureka Police arrested 42-year-old Daren Ethan Borges “for being under the influence of alcohol and or drugs” and brought him to the jail. There, says the release, the Eureka resident “was medically cleared by jail staff and was placed into a sobering safety cell by himself.” Jail staff checked on Borges every 15 minutes, according to the release, and “at about 4 p.m., a correctional officer noticed the male was unresponsive and may not be breathing.” After jail staff attempted to revive the inmate, paramedics arrived and at 4:16 p.m. took Borges to the hospital, where a doctor pronounced him dead. An autopsy is scheduled for June 21. — Heidi Walters ● ENVIRONMENT

Sewage Spill Didn’t Spoil Oyster Fest

On the eve of Oyster Fest, the Humboldt Community Services District dropped a bombshell of a press release, alerting the public that a massive sewage spill occurred in the Humboldt Hill area and that some may have flowed into Humboldt Bay, spurring the California Department of Public Health to halt oyster harvests as of June 12. But the spill didn’t impact the festival, as the truckloads of mollusks to be consumed on the Plaza June 13 were all harvested prior to the spill.

Coast Seafood General Manager Greg Dale says the health department rescinded the shellfish harvesting closure after determining the spill wouldn’t impact oyster growing areas of the bay. Water samples taken June 13 confirmed no impact to the farming areas, Dale says, adding that there isn’t much water exchange between the south and north parts of Humboldt Bay due to the way water flows in and out of the bay’s entrance. — Thadeus Greenson ● ENVIRONMENT / NATURAL RESOURCES

EPIC Finds a New Director

The venerable (and not-always-loved) Environmental Protection Information Center is undergoing a “restructuring” that includes the departure of executive director Gary Graham Hughes. Natalynne DeLapp, who has been with EPIC since 2008, most recently as the organization’s development director, took over the executive director position June 15. She said the change in leadership was a unanimous decision by EPIC’s ninemember board of directors. “The decision was made to increase our efficacy and efficiency in order for us to carry out our mission and goals,” she said. EPIC plans to redefine its role in the sixcounty community it serves, DeLapp said, and re-evaluate what areas of the environment most need protections: “Trespass grows on national forest land; fire suppression and how are we going to build a fire resilient forest; the biggest issue, of course, is climate change,” she said. — Grant Scott-Goforth ●

FOOD

Shell Shock

It was a rough room. At both ends of the long table in the window at Mazzotti’s on the Arcata Plaza, judges were bemoaning an entry with over-seasoned and undercooked bread and wondering aloud who would plate up closed clams for a competition. The annual competition for best raw and cooked oyster, as well as non-oyster dish, was four contestants in. Judge and local caterer Brett Shuler, in his white chef’s jacket, a pair of sunglasses on his head, surveyed the plates and shells on the table. “We haven’t had our minds blown yet,” he said. A volunteer swooped in with a tray of Thai oyster shooters with chopped lemongrass, setting off a buzz in the room. Some liked the dainty shot glasses, but the tartness and texture were overpowering for others. Shuler compared eating the bits of lemongrass to “chewing on toenails.” Enormous Pacifics came dressed as baked potatoes, topped with bacon, bleu cheese butter and potato chips, and an elaborate model of the ruins of Atlantis circled a clutch of raw oysters hidden under a quail egg, sea urchin, at least three kinds of fish eggs and flecks of gold leaf. It drew gasps and camera phones. Judge Josh Wiley of Abruzzi called foul on the Atlantis entry (dubbed “Lost Riches Under the Sea”), saying he doubted whether the same dish was being shelled out on the plaza to the commoners. This led to a spirited discussion of the cost per plate. Worse than talk of disqualification was the suspicion of Costco seaweed salad in a non-oyster entry with raw tuna and avocado. Todd Lawson of the Shanty, formerly of Larrupin and Abruzzi, said that while it wasn’t bad, it was “like something you’d get at the airport.”

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING

A raw Goose Point oyster topped with hamachi salad, masago and sesame ginger vinagrette won some of the hardest hearts on the panel, eliciting silence, then the scratching of pencils. Hot on its heels was a barbecued oyster blanketed with a warm and creamy cashew-mint butter, lemon and shiso by the same entrant. Sushi Spot won both the raw and cooked categories with its hamachi and cashew entries, while Kyoto won best non-oyster with its Korean-style Kobe beef skewers. Their duties finished, the judges headed onto the plaza, where the party was picking up with stilt walkers, giant puppets and people lined up for some fresh oysters — maybe with a little garlic and butter. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ● Government

Commission turnover continues

Humboldt County has a new planning commissioner. On June 17, 5th District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg advised the board that he has appointed former long-time Willow Creek Community Services District Manager Steve Paine to the county planning commission to fill the post vacated by his last appointee, Susan Masten, who has resigned after serving for three years. Paine, who served as the WCCSD director from 1999 to 2004 and its manager from 2004 until his retirement in October, said he looks forward to giving Willow Creek a voice on the commission and working to build consensus among its members, encouraging them to set aside differences and find middle ground. —Thadeus Greenson ●

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Fortuna Rodeo • July 14-20

grant@northcoastjournal.com

E

very election cycle the specter of dark money looms, rumors of wealthy cabals silently shaping national and local races flit around the collective, politicsfried consciousness, and boogeymen lobbyists haunt the dreams of regular, down-to-earth voters in every political bloc. But politics is money. That’s just the reality, whether it’s furthering legislation or legislators. And sometimes, even those most distrustful of government say “fuck it” and throw their financial might into the fracas. That’s what’s happening right now around Northern California, as a brandspanking-new political action committee is rallying support from U.S.-OutOf-Humboldters to influence the latest round of state marijuana laws and form a collective voice within their communities. California Cannabis Voice formed on May 30, and organizers quickly raised an astounding $20,000 from 40 attendees at a June 3 meeting at the Harris General Store (located about 15 miles east of Garberville). The PAC, based in San Francisco, is the brainchild of Matt Kumin, an attor-

ney and political organizer who’s been active in civil rights work and medical marijuana policy for decades. With near statewide consensus that California’s medical marijuana policies are a mess, Kumin was inspired when the feds announced last year that they would back off of prosecuting statesanctioned medical marijuana. “Given the last August memo from the Department of Justice, it seemed clear we had to push hard this year to get a sensible regulation in place,” Kumin says. “Timing is everything.” The PAC’s main focus is a senate bill introduced by state Sen. Lou Correa from Santa Ana. Among other things, the bill as currently written would prohibit physicians that recommend marijuana from having a financial interest in marijuana dispensaries, set uniform health and safety standards, give oversight of dispensaries and cultivation to the state Department of Consumer Affairs and give cities and counties the ability to approve or deny medical marijuana licenses for dispensaries and cultivators. The Senate approved the bill unanimously at the end of May, and it’s currently being reviewed by the Assembly.

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PAC a Bowl

Kumin thinks it will pass and be signed by the governor this year — ideally formed with the thoughts of members of the marijuana industry that the PAC is trying to organize. “I’m ready to go and start to influence and try to get lobbying and community input across the state to state legislators,” he says. With local control likely to be given to the cities and counties where dispensaries operate, Kumin says the PAC is organizing local leaders to work within their communities, as well as influence the senate bill through the work of the PAC’s Sacramento lobbyist. And he says money raised at the local events — he’s been reaching out to Mendocino and Trinity county interests as well — will stay within that community. “We’re able to give the power back to the local community — basically empowering local groups to take control and have some influence.” Kumin says California also needs to prepare for recreational legalization — he anticipates it coming to a statewide vote in 2016 — and said the cannabis industry as well as the communities where it thrives need to be active in shaping that legislation. “You have a massive billion dollar industry in this county and because of the criminalization of cannabis they have largely shied away from the political life,” he says. “They’re ready to do what the classic American thing to do is: You get involved in politics, you pay for lobbyists, you pay for organizers. You have a clear and hopefully unified voice in what you’d like to see.” l

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13


Good Fire, Bad Fire As attitudes toward wildfire slowly change, we’re on the cusp of another hot, scary summer By Heidi Walters

W

hen Thomas Willson was little, his grandmother would send him and his two brothers outside each fall to light fires. “She’d give each of us a book of matches and we’d walk up to the top of the ridge then come back down, lighting fires all the way through the hazel brush,” Willson recalls. “There was very little fuel, and so the fire would just creep around.” The next spring, the burned hazel would send up first-year shoots from the fire-purified ground: straight, strong, flexible sticks which, if picked before their buds leafed out, were perfect for Willson’s grandmother Teresa Mitchell’s baskets. Willson, 51, reaches out to break a stem off a bushy hazel. It’s mid-June, and he’s standing on a forested slope just off State Route 169, a narrow, winding dead-end that departs from State Route 96 just past ABOVE FIRES LAST AUGUST MERGED INTO TWO MAJOR COMPLEXES IN THE KLAMATH AND SIX RIVERS NATIONAL FORESTS AND BURNED 37,000 ACRES. THE HUMAN-CAUSED ORLEANS FIRE, ABOVE, WAS ONE OF THEM. PHOTO BY KEN MALCOMSON ON THE COVER THOMAS WILLSON IS VICE PRESIDENT OF THE YUROK CULTURAL FIRE MANAGEMENT COUNCIL, WHICH IS REVIVING TRADITIONAL BURNING PRACTICES ON TRIBAL LAND. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

Weitchpec and follows the Klamath River downstream to the northwest. Though it’s nearing the high 80s, the land here is still quite green because of its coastal influence; just a dozen or so miles inland, around Orleans and Somes Bar, temperatures are nudging closer to 100. A robin chortles nearby, and then a hermit thrush trills. But Willson is listening for the pigeons cooing, farther off. There’s one; used to be more of them when he was a kid, he says. Soft, early summer leafy plants, some popping with bright flowers, flood the ground at Willson’s feet, but the understory is still fairly open. This spot was burned last year. Nearby in these hills are three patches of clean, black-streaked ground and shriveling young trees, burned by deliberate fires this spring. But most of this downriver land west of Weitchpec cuts through a dense overgrown jumble of towering Douglas firs, maples, oaks, madrone, hazel, pepperwood and a brushy undergrowth of saplings and other plants. It’s the same throughout most of this mountainous region, from the Klamath Mountains south to Mendocino and beyond: choked landscapes where decades of fire suppression, development and logging have created kindling forests abutting urban pockets. Limbs, downed trees and duff have piled up. And this summer, two years of drought in, the

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

land is so tinder dry that fire managers are predicting what could be a fire season like nobody’s seen. Efforts are underway to alleviate the high fuel situation with more prescribed burns. In the meantime, communities and agencies are planning for the worst. There’s tons of dry fuel in the woods, a continued drought, and a fire season on our doorstep looking like it could be a mean one. Suppression is still going to be the main tool.

“This spot was all prairie

when I was a kid,” Willson says. And he has a copy of a photo from the 1890s, he adds, that shows even more woods-flanked prairie sweeping from here to a town a mile or so upriver. Willson is a commercial fisherman who also runs a guide service and rents a few cabins at his resort, Spey-Gee (Yurok for “fish hawk”), near here. This is the neighborhood where he and his brothers grew up hunting, collecting mushrooms, fishing, picking and peeling hazel sticks, mining willow roots and lighting fires for Gram. They weren’t supposed to be lighting those fires, according to the law. But they were simply doing what their people, the Yurok, had done here for centuries, treating the land with fire. Fire, applied routinely, burned at low intensity, refresh-

On the web

For an in-depth look at this year’s rainfall, and how it stacks up against the region’s 30-year average, visit www.northcoastjournal.com. ing the hazel and killing weevils that bore into it and made its stems pulpy and weak. It also burned duff and the dropped acorns infested by moth larvae, reducing the hatch of moths that would fly into the tan oak trees to lay eggs and infest more acorns. Fire killed molds and other pests that affected berries and pepperwood nuts and other plants. Fire spurred the growth of bear grass, also used in making baskets. Fire kept forests from getting choked with brush and thickets of scrawny trees, and from taking over the prairies where the elk and deer grazed. And fire made a space around Yurok homes, helping protect them from wildfires. After the “Big Blowup” of 1910 — a two-day, multi-conflagration that burned 3 million acres across Montana, Idaho and Washington and killed 85 people — the fledgling United States Forest Service solidified its fire policy: All fires were to be stomped out, if possible. And native people were banned from conducting their traditional burns; most had stopped by the 1930s. But a few continued to do it until the 1970s, when Willson says the government cracked down on people like his grandmother. “They said they were going to put us in jail if we didn’t quit,” he says. “Then they called it arson.” The land grew choked with overgrowth. The majority of tan oaks acorns became


infested. Douglas firs, some planted for timber, took over prairies. Lately, the Yurok — like other tribes in the nation, including the nearby Karuk — have been bringing back traditional burn practices, working with a mix of state and federal agencies, community groups and private organizations. Last year, the Yurok Tribe did its first official cultural burn in decades. This May and June it did more, with more planned in the future. The Karuk, likewise, have been doing official culture burns. This return to traditional fire management is part of a larger shift happening in wildfire management, away from the full-suppression mentality and toward using prescribed fire as a way to bring the landscape back into a more fire-resilient balance. A century of suppression — a particularly wet century, at that, with massive vegetation growth — has led to tree-choked forests and massive piles of dead fuel on the land. Fires that do take hold — say in a dry year with lots of lightning — tend to grow larger and are harder to control. Some entities are already well on top of the prescribed burning method. Redwood National Park, notably, has been regularly setting prescribed fires in the Bald Hills for more than 20 years to restore the prairies once maintained by native people. But many agencies prescribe fire on a limited basis. They want, and some plan, to do more. The idea of increasing prescribed burns is that, if enough land is burned more regularly, at a lower intensity, there will be less fuel to burn when lightning, or a humancaused spark, strikes. These fuel breaks will make wildfires sweeping in from the backcountry less threatening, and therefore backcountry wildfires won’t need to be battled. They, in turn, would help achieve balance.

In January,

California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency. In some parts of the state the 2013 fire season had never really ended, and by January 2014 even normally watery, lush Humboldt had already seen a couple of fires. In mid-May, Tom Hein, chief of CAL FIRE’s Humboldt-Del Norte unit, declared fire season had officially arrived. It’s typical this time of year in our northwest corner of California to have a high pressure ridge squatting off the Pacific Coast keeping us dry. What’s not so typical, says National Weather Service meteorologist Alex Dodd, out at Woodley Island, is to have a high-pressure ridge hovering persistently out there in the winter. But that’s what we’ve had, with but minor breaks, through the past two winters, he says, and it’s pushed the storm-

bearing jet stream far north of us. Last year ended up being the driest period on record in California. This year looks not much better. While the rest of California is drier, here in northwestern California we’re at 50 percent of our normal rainfall, says Dodd. Eureka, for instance, usually gets around 40 inches of rain in the winter; this year, it’s recorded just under 21 inches. Up in Crescent City, the winter rains brought just 32 inches, far short of the typical 63 inches. Dead fuels — downed trees and large limbs, which burn hot and slow — are at near-record dry levels, says Dodd. Live fuels — living plants, spring growth — are still green, but beginning to dry out. Talk of an El Niño winter is only semi-promising, because it’s uncertain yet if the event will be strong enough to bring wet storms to Northern California, says Dodd. But even if it shapes up to be a strong one, El Niño only affects the winter pattern, not the summer. Right now, there’s no rain in sight. David Markin, fire suppression chief for Six Rivers National Forest’s Orleans/Ukonom Ranger District, says it’s the driest June he’s seen in his 26 fire seasons with the district. As summer progresses, it’s likely only to get drier. Large, hard-to-control fires are the portent. In a letter to personnel in various agencies and community organizations, Klamath National Forest Supervisor Patty Grantham wrote that “most people realize we are in a drought, but I’m not sure how many realize how really serious it is with respect to wildfire potential.” “If current trends continue,” she added, “we may see conditions in Siskiyou County that no one living has ever seen. Makes you stop and think, right?” The Klamath forest is east of the Six Rivers National Forest and north of the Shasta-Trinity; the three meet in the mountains east of Willow Creek and the Hoopa Valley. Grantham urged the recipients of her letter to get the word out to people to “be vigilant and ready for lightning” and especially vigilant about human-caused fires. “As the saying goes, there is zero risk to homes, firefighters, citizens, natural resources, communities, etc., from the fire that never starts,” she wrote. Agencies such as CAL FIRE and its associated community fire safe councils, Six Rivers National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management and local volunteer fire departments are issuing instructions on how to deal with the drought and fire conditions. In the Six Rivers National Forest, for instance, special fire restrictions went into place June 16 to try to continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

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Weitchpec

top Margo Robbins, president of the Yurok Cultural Fire Management Council, and Thomas Willson, vice president, stand in a spot on Yurok land that was treated with fire last year to promote prairie and growth of traditional plants. above A prescription burn this spring created a firesafe zone around Yurok elder Harlan Alvarado’s home on an overgrown slope above the Klamath River. Photos by Heidi Walters

Good Fire, Bad Fire

continued from previous page reduce human-caused fires. They limit campfires to designated fire safe sites (with a permit) and developed recreation sites (no permit needed); limit smoking to enclosed vehicles, buildings and the aforementioned sites; prohibit the use of internal combustion engines except on National Forest System roads or designated trails; prohibit the use of explosives; and require a campfire permit for certain activities such as using lanterns or portable stoves using gas, jellied petroleum or pressurized liquid. CAL FIRE, meanwhile, has hired 125 more firefighters, including 10 for the Humboldt area. And it is working closely with other agencies, including federal

Planning Area Wilderness Area Areas that have seen fire only once in the last 10 years

Willow Creek

Blue Lake

Trinity County 299

Eureka

forest managers, to coordinate wildfire responses. CAL FIRE spokesperson Scott McLean says burning is banned in the summer within the 31 million acres of private land it takes care of. He adds if you’re planning to clear debris around your property, do it in the morning before 10 a.m. while there’s still moisture in the air, and be careful with equipment that could throw a spark. If you have to mow, use a nylon-twine mower. Don’t drive onto dry grass: Your catalytic converter is hot and could ignite it. And if you’re towing, make sure your chain doesn’t drag and cast sparks. Meanwhile, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is busy rewriting its emergency response plans to be more ready for wildfires. It’s not a typical duty, but last year the sheriff ended up sending 12 of-

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

i

er

299

Hoopa

TRINITY ALPS WILDERNESS

Rv

Humboldt County

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ficers to help close roads (including State Route 96) and evacuate residences when a human-caused fire in Orleans grew rapidly out of control. “Late in the evening they sent calls to Arcata police, Humboldt State University police, Eureka police and the Sheriffs’ Office to send officers,” said Sheriff’s Lt. Steve Knight. “All responded lightsand-sirens to assist with the evacuations because at that point life and safety were threatened.” This season, the Sheriff’s Office is retraining its officers on how to deal with wildfire responses, including how not to become victims themselves. It’s also planning to assign an officer to coordinate with fire personnel from the start, and it’s preparing for the possible use of the reverse 911 system to help alert people.

0 Fires 1 Fires 2 Fires 3 Fires 4 Fires 5 Fires

Number of fires in the last 100 years

Dan Kelleher,

a “burn boss” with Firestorm, a company that trains fire management crews, has been in the fire business for 35 years. He’s trained folks all over the country how to fight fires and use prescribed fire to protect landscapes. He spent 150 days in Yosemite in 20052006 helping the park with its prescribed burning program — and anybody griping about how huge that Rim Fire got last year might want to at least acknowledge how it settled down once it reached a prescribed-fire area, he says. “Anybody who does not see prescribed fire as a way to get the earth back to where she needs to be is just not looking hard enough,” Kelleher says. Just about everyone agrees, says Zack Taylor, the fuels chief for Six Rivers Na-

© NORTH COAST JOURNAL. 100-YEAR FIRE MAP COURTESY OF DEER CREEK GIS/WESTERN KLAMATH RESTORATION PARTNERSHIP

MARBLE


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tional Forest. Last fall, in fact, Six Rivers did one of its biggest prescribed burns in a long time, 260 acres of choked understory near Orleans. But there’s still not that much good fire, overall, getting on the Margo Robbins, president of the Yurok ground. Cultural Fire Management Council, is also The trouble has been that prethe Indian Education director at Klamath scription burns require not only the Trinity Joint Unified School District. And, right weather conditions — it can’t like generations of women in her family, she be too dry or too wet — but they is a basket weaver. Here she holds one of her also require resources, including vases. Photo by Heidi Walters crews to do the work, and money to buy equipment. Prescription burns also are subject to the National Environover the country, and sometimes from mental Policy Act (NEPA), and require a other countries, to earn a certification permit — which takes a long time, money, or improve their skills, all while helping a and a slew of specialists, including wildlife community do some good burning and biologists, fisheries biologists, soil scienlearn about becoming fire-adapted. The tists and archeologists to prepare each network also has eight pilot communities application. As well, the would-be firebugs in the country that it’s helping — both have to convince the public that some financially and technically — to further smoke is good smoke. develop techniques and plans for creating CAL FIRE’s McLean says a $152 fee — infire-adapted communities. stituted two years ago and levied on landOne of these pilot communities is the owners in the agency’s state responsibility Orleans/Somes Bar area, which has already areas — will help enable it to do more proved to be a model for how to work with prescribed burns to protect communities. agencies to become fire-safe. Its fire safe The state agency and its fire safe councouncil has aimed to restore a traditional cils, the Forest Service, Department of fire regime ever since it formed, in 2001, the Interior agencies, tribes, community following a big fire in Orleans. groups and Firestorm, which hires out its Last year, a training exchange did own crews in addition to training others, prescribed burns totaling around 500 have been participating in workshops and acres, including areas in Bald Hills, Orleans, fire training exchange programs run by Hayfork and Whiskeytown. Taking part in The Nature Conservancy’s Fire Learning it were people from the Karuk Tribe, the Network. The network coordinates exOrleans/Somes Bar Fire Safe Council and changes around the country to speed up other fire safe councils, the Mid-Klamath the restoration of good fire to grasslands, Watershed Council and the Forest Service. forests and other landscapes and creThere will be another, smaller training ate “fire-adapted communities.” In these exchange this fall just around Orleans, training exchanges, firefighters, would-be which will include some cultural burns to firefighters and others come from all continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

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continued from previous page

produce better grass and acorns. Members of this group are collaborating on a landscape-wide firemanagement strategy for a 1.2 million acre region between Orleans and Bluff Creek up to Seiad Valley, in Siskiyou County, and including the Salmon River and some of the Klamath. The plan, says Will Harling, with the Orleans/Somes Bar Fire Safe Council and Mid-Klamath Watershed Council, looks at where and how often fires have occurred across this region, determines how much fire might have happened in these areas if fires hadn’t been suppressed, and devises prescribed-fire treatments suited to restore that old balance. Almost 50 percent of these 1.2 million acres, notes Harling, hasn’t seen fire in more than 100 years. Some of this vegetation-choked land is near communities. The plan, says Harling, is to do more of the work local fire safe councils have already started: thinning, burning, clearing space around structures and roads, and adding more escape routes. “The Orleans Fire bumped up against some of our fuel treatments, a place where we’d recently been brushing and prescribed burning,” says Harling. “So that was effective.” Another training exchange this fall will focus on burning another 400 acres, mostly around Orleans. The all-encompassing, stakeholdercollaborated plan for that 1.2 million acres, meanwhile, will make the NEPA permitting process go faster, should the group get a big chunk of money to implement it. “Once we get our fuel breaks in place, and the community feels confident, then the forest service will have the leeway to let wildfires burn,” says Harling. “That will be when we’ve arrived.” Until then, they’re pecking away at

“I believe burning is very important culturally and ecologically,” says Yurok elder Harlan Alvarado. a machinist who worked in Nevada 40 years, Alvarado came home in 2007 and now fixes anything and everything for people up and down the river. He also makes rough cuts of traditional paddles for stirring acorn mush, which kids in culture classes then sand and decorate. Photo by Heidi Walters

“There’s still a lot of tribal tension in communities over it,” he says.

Two years ago,

fire-safing the land and their communities. Locals are still jumping into the fray during wildfires, donning their own gear to show the non-local fire crews — a new batch every two weeks — where the best places are to put fuel breaks. Some gains are being made. Last year, for instance, the Karuk Tribe once again rolled burning logs down Offield Mountain — an act that used to be part of the tribe’s annual world renewal ceremonies. “It signified singeing our Mother’s hair — Mother Mountain — so she could mourn for all of those [who passed] during the year,” says Bill Tripp, the tribe’s eco-cultural restoration specialist. It was symbolic, he adds, but it also had a functional purpose: putting good fire on the land to help grow fresh medicines, food and weaving fibers. It’s a major step. After cultural burning was banned, in 1911, says Tripp, those who continued to do it were called “incendiary burners” and, sometimes, were shot for it.

Margo Robbins, 52, wanted to weave a traditional Yurok basket for her new grandbaby. She studied the one her own grandmother Minnie Reed, a renowned basket weaver, had made, and realized she didn’t have enough hazel sticks. She needed 75 4-foot stocks for the frame. She searched downriver but couldn’t find any because there was no place where the hazel had been burned. “I had to buy sticks,” she says. This spring, however, she was able to pick good sticks for her weaving — strong, flexible young shoots, shooting straight from ground burned last year in a prescribed fire the tribe and CAL FIRE crews set. And there should be even more sticks in time — and more acorns, bear grass, open prairie and so on — if the Yurok Tribe’s fledgling cultural burn program grows. After last year’s work, the tribe formed a new committee that’s much like a fire safe council but places special emphasis on cultural burning. The Yurok Cultural Fire Management Council, of which Robbins is president, is now involved with The Nature Conservancy’s Fire Learning Network, and this spring hosted a training exchange that burned around 50 acres in Tom Willson’s neighborhood (including some of his land). Kelleher, the burn boss, was there along with six others from Firestorm, as well as folks from CAL FIRE, For-

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est Service districts in Oregon, Utah and New Mexico, Spain’s Ministry of Forestry (really!), and 11 from the Yurok Tribe. Five Yurok trainees ended up with firefighting jobs with Firestorm, including Willson’s 21-year-old son, Thomas Willson Jr. Willson, who is vice president of the cultural fire management council, says the tribe gets to work with the Nature Conservancy another four years. He expects they’ll double the amount of acreage burned each year in subsequent training exchanges. After that, Willson and Robbins agree, it would be nice if the council evolved into a nonprofit that could better spread the knowledge of prescribed burning, especially for traditional purposes, throughout the community and to young people. “We actually want our kids to take ownership of our lands,” says Willson. “Once they have ownership, they’ll care about it.” And maybe the tribe will someday take sovereign control of its own burn permitting, currently controlled by CAL FIRE. For Willson, who wasted most of his young adulthood on drinking and drugs until his grandmother helped him get sober, this has become his most important work. “The Creator put me here to take care of these lands, and if I don’t take care of them I don’t know what I’m going to tell the Creator when I get to him,” he says. “I’m supposed to make things better in my lifetime for the next seven generations.” l

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y feet felt like tenderized beef and there was still a layer of sweat salt on my forehead. I had several new rips in my hiking pants and ritual scarification from aggressive blackberry canes. But, nine hours and some 16 miles later, we had arrived back where we started. Circumnavigating the northern portion of Humboldt Bay (technically Arcata Bay) on foot was my friend Riley’s idea. His office balcony had long distracted him with a tantalizing panorama from the Arcata Marsh to the bridges between the Samoa Peninsula, Indian Island and Eureka, to the Arcata Redwood Mill and Bracut Industrial Park and everything in between. He had mused about such a journey from the comfort of his desk, but I suspect it wasn’t until I signed on that the prospects got real. What better way to experience this beautiful place than at the speed of 2 miles per hour? We agreed to do our best to walk as close to the water as possible without trespassing on private property. However, there is no trail around the bay. While plans are unfolding for a trail along Highway 101 between Arcata and Eureka, it’s years away. Several braids of the California Coastal Trail have incorporated rather dubious links in their routes around the Humboldt Bay area (e.g., a water crossing from the North Jetty to the South Jetty). We reviewed maps and Google Earth to craft a tentative route, but still concluded that we would be wise to do some actual reconnaissance.

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

After our brief exploratory trip, we added rain pants, work gloves and hand pruners to our survival supplies. We resigned ourselves to crossing Eureka Slough on the highway rather than the railroad, and anticipated with some dread the bridges on State Route 255. The railings on the bridges were as low — and the traffic was as considerable — as we remembered. Walking out of the Arcata Marsh parking lot on South G Street early on the appointed morning, the ethereal fog lifted just enough to reveal the rising sun. The happy chatter of the avian community followed us until we reached the restored wetlands of the McDaniel Slough Restoration and Enhancement Project. We followed the levees through the Mad River Slough and Wildlife Area. This area is not open to the public and, for the most part, the three hours we spent getting to Mad River Slough involved picking our way through thigh-high brush, lupine and blackberries. There were times when we would scramble along the rock riprap that protects the bay side of the levee. As we went west, we encountered massive chunks of industrial concrete and old roadway used to buttress the dikes. We saw some of the remnant flocks of geese, evidence of river otter escapades and, of course, cows who eyed us warily as we passed. When we reached the old railroad bridge crossing the Mad River Slough, we took a break, changed out of

rain pants and put on dry socks and shoes. It hadn’t rained, but it couldn’t have been much wetter if it had. We followed the railroad tracks and Peninsula Drive through Manila before the route, now much easier, returned to the shoreline. At last the sun poked through and quickly scattered the marine layer. “The time has come,” Riley said, “to talk of many things: of shoes, and ships, and sealing-wax, of cabbages and kings.” Among the many attributes of walking is the chance to talk without rushing. And so we did as we admired the unveiling of the bay. Our walk was incredibly quiet, until we reached the bridges to Eureka. So different, I suspect, from the heyday of timber, fishing and the railroads around Humboldt Bay. (By the late 1800s there were some 400 lumber mills on the North Coast.) Riley and I noted the oyster beds, an egret rookery, the reclamation of Indian Island by the Weott people and a tall ship docked near the Adorni Center and teeming with school children. We stopped in Eureka for lunch. There was no mention of walking the extra yards into Old Town for our favorite haunts. My feet said it wasn’t an option. My hiking poles attracted some attention and probably some concern at the Mexican restaurant. In the end, the few other patrons and the staff were more curious (even envious) about our outing. In some ways lunch was counterproductive. On a full stomach, next on the agenda for a tired body is a nap. My body reluctantly commenced the home stretch. We retreated to the railroad right-of-way north of Eureka. Just two years earlier, I had helped organize a grassroots effort to “clear the way” along the tracks, and it was discouraging to discern so little lasting impact. Nature was reclaiming what little the tides were leaving behind. We made good use of our pruning shears and did lots of high stepping over the grasping, tugging blackberries as we hacked our way toward Arcata. Except for the drone of traffic on the safety corridor, there were stretches where you would not have been completely surprised to meet a lion or tiger or bear, oh my. Near the finish line was some of the worst of it. Perhaps it was just that the wild undergrowth impeded the triumphant march to the marsh we’d visualized. A warm bath and some Vitamin I(buprofen) did wonders for my perspective on our adventure. As the days pass and I reflect on our journey, I marvel that all this is right in our backyard. I have even started to wonder, “Why not walk the rest of the way around?” l


Hey, McGUinty!

Bitchfests and Love Nests Welcome to the department of complaints By Jessica McGuinty

H

ey McGuinty!

My best friend has been with her boyfriend for a few years, and for the last year all she’s done is complain about him. He doesn’t abuse her, it’s not that. She’s just always bitching: Either he doesn’t pay her enough attention, or he’s smothering her or he’s annoying the crap out of her talking about his life. She never says anything positive. I try to be a good friend and listen, analyze and provide feedback, but it’s getting tiresome. I tell her she clearly doesn’t want to be with him, but I think fear of being single keeps her from leaving. It’s affecting my willingness to spend time with her since conversations always turn into a bitch-fest about her man. I’m not sure what to do for her anymore. — Frustrated Friend

FRUSTRATED! I’ll never understand people who always want to complain about their partner. Isn’t this the person you welcomed into your life because he or she enhances it? Just griping about him or her shows a huge lack of respect, and I don’t understand staying with someone you no longer respect. I’ve found that often it doesn’t matter what the partner is doing, there are just people who always need drama and something to complain about. You say this behavior is affecting your relationship with your friend, so that’s a good jumping off point for a conversation. You’ve been yanked onto her merrygo-round and you want off. Understandable. You also want to preserve your friendship, so be gentle here. Tell her that all you want is for her to be happy, and that since a majority of your hangout time is spent listing the

ways in which her boyfriend is displeasing her, it’s hard to believe that she is. Maybe she hasn’t evaluated that for herself yet. It’s easy for people to stick with what they know rather than make changes and jump into the unknown. So start there, but then be prepared to offer up some tough love. “Friend, this constant complaining is draining to our friendship because it’s eating up our quality time together and nothing seems to change. I will always be here for you and help you through anything, but for my own sanity and the health of our relationship, I’m going to have to ask you to cease the griping. It’s not serving you or us. If you would be happier without him and decide to break up, I will buy the ice cream and rent the movies, but until then, let’s spend our time talking about something else.” She might not even know how much mental energy she’s spending on negative thoughts about her man, or how much it’s affecting your friendship. Reinforcing that you’ll always be there for her but need the merry-go-round to slow down will hopefully help her see what she’s been missing.

Hey McGuinty!

Last week I was enjoying a delightful afternoon visit from my boyfriend. Emphasis on the afternoon and delight. Then — right in the middle — my phone rang. It was my management company telling me about a noise complaint from my neighbors. A very graphic noise complaint. I apologized and noticed my bathroom window was open. Fast forward to this week and another delightful afternoon. Another phone call. Except this time the window wasn’t open, neither of us were particularly loud and I’m baffled by how my neighbor could even hear us, since our houses aren’t

attached. I barely see my boyfriend as it is, and damn it, I love my afternoon visits! I pay rent here! That nosy neighbor should just get some earplugs, right? — Delights Denied DELIGHTS! Oooo, this is a tricky one. Regardless of the time of day, nobody wants to hear other people, um, being delighted. It doesn’t sound like you woke this neighbor from a nap, but he or she just wanted to go on record as having heard you and not enjoying it. It is curious how that’s possible if your windows were closed and you’re not in an apartment, so it might indeed be that your neighbor is nosier than necessary and has little else to do. Not too delightful, eh? Clearly you deserve privacy since you’re adults in your own home. You also probably don’t want this to continue. I’d suggest cranking up some music, keeping those windows closed and seeing if that stops the noise complaints or shifts the focus to the music. If it’s an option, you could also move your delights to another part of the house — farther away from the overactive ears of that neighbor. ●

Even more McGuinty advice is online at northcoastjournal.com Jessica McGuinty, founder of Jessicurl and master of the joyful laugh, doesn’t really think she has all the answers — but she’ll give it a try. Write her at heymcguinty@ northcoastjournal.com. continued on next page

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boBaraZZI

Around Humboldt County Photos by Bob Doran

Guitarist Aimee Taylor of The Los Luvs cuts loose at the Eureka Inn’s Palm Lounge on a lucky Friday the 13th.

northcoastjournal.com/bobarazzi

The epically bearded Steve Bohner of Alchemy Inc. grills and shucks bivalves from Aqua-Rodeo Farms at Arcata Main Street’s 24th annual Oyster Festival, Saturday, June 14, on the plaza.

Reunited after a decade, The Cutters play a raucous set at the Arcata Playhouse on Thursday, June 12.

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Pull Over

Farm stands around the county honk for service. Photo by Simona Carini.

By Simona Carini

tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

T

rinity River Farm hugs Highway 96 about 2 1/2 miles north of Willow Creek. Its farm stand welcomes visitors with a “Honk for Service” sign out front. The late May sun shone brightly in the cloudless sky when I visited, but the temperature was kept to a pleasant level by a breeze that gently swayed the trees around the stand and neighboring old barn. I knew I would not find produce because the season starts in June, but I had the chance to get some eggs, browse the greenhouses teeming with starters of edible and garden plants, and talk to the farmer, Tom O’Gorman. On a photo collage hanging on the wall opposite the cash register I saw the evolution of the farm stand from the initial structure built in 1971 to now. A farm stand allows a more personal, usually more relaxed interaction with the farmer than the farmers’ market. It’s a shopping option on non-market days and can offer some special treats, like a perfectly ripe item too delicate or not available in large enough quantities to bring to the larger venue. The abundance of some fruit or vegetable — from apples, plums and peaches to tomatoes, green beans and more — inspires me to can or otherwise preserve it for later. Plum preserves or strained roasted tomatoes are my favorite antidote to short, gloomy days. Each farm stand is different in terms of what’s available, hours of operation and duration of the season. When I inquired about plans for the season for the farm stand,

the recurring answer was: It all depends on the weather — the great decider of what gets ripe when and in what amount. Hence, the dates are not set in stone. If you are making a special trip to a farm stand or are interested in a specific item, like raspberries, peaches, sweet corn or your favorite variety of tomato, call ahead. l City of Arcata’s Bayside Park Farm 930 Old Arcata Road 822-7091 www.cityofarcata.org Jayme Buckley Now until the end of October, every Wednesday noon-6 p.m. Vegetables and pick-your-own herbs, flowers and leafy greens. Clendenen’s Cider Works 96 South 12th St., Fortuna 725-2123 www.clendenensciderworks.com Clif Clendenen Early August until February, Monday-Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Many varieties of apples and fresh cider. The Corn Crib Avenue of the Giants, Pepperwood (The corn-yellow stand is about 2 miles down from southbound U.S. 101 Exit 674) 499-0774, facebook.com/famsarvinski Gene and Ginger Sarvinski From late June or early July until November, Tuesday-Sunday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Vegetables, including sweet corn, tomatoes, peppers, summer and winter squashes, peas and green beans.

Flood Plain Produce 31117 Avenue of the Giants, Pepperwood 722-4330, www.facebook.com/pages/ Flood-Plain-Produce Holly and Mel Kreb From mid-July until September, daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Fruit and vegetables, including peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, brassica, lettuce, melons and summer and winter squash. High Oak Farm 105 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn (Even though the address is in Whitethorn, turn toward Shelter Cove at the Shelter Cove Road junction — the road to the farm is just past the junction.) 986-7481 Larry Ogden Open now until late summer, daily 10 a.m. until dark Strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and blueberries. Kneeland Glen Farm Stand 5851 Myrtle Ave., Eureka 496-0459 facebook.com/KneelandGlenFarmstand Kathy Mullen Open daily noon-6 p.m. Produce, eggs, handmade items and cottage-industry foods and crafts from about 20 vendors. McIntosh Farms At the McIntosh Farm County Store 1264 Giuntoli Lane, Arcata 822-0487 From mid-June or early July until November, Monday-Friday 7 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Also at the farm on Seely McIntosh Road, Willow Creek Open from mid-June or early July until October, daily Fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, stone fruit, persimmons and chestnuts. Organic Matters Ranch 6743 Myrtle Ave., Eureka 407-3276 www.facebook.com/pages/OrganicMatters-Ranch Heather Plaza and John Gary Summer dates and hours TBA. Redwood Greens 120466 U.S. 101, Orick Les Terry Open now until October, Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday (possibly Saturday) from 10 a.m. (closing time depends on availability of produce) Vegetables, strawberries and eggs. Redwood Roots Farm Jacoby Creek Road, Bayside (Look for the banner off Old Arcata Road) 826-0261 Janet Czarnecki redwoodrootsfarm.com Open from early June until October, Tuesday and Thursday noon-6 p.m. and Saturday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Vegetables and pick-your-own flowers and strawberries. Saechao Strawberries Eel River Drive, Fortuna (Go south on Eel River Drive from the Kenmar Exit off U.S.

101) 845-3930 Chan Yan Saechao Open now until July, or until the strawberries run out, daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m., depending on the amount of berries. Trinity River Farm 2443 State Route 96, Willow Creek 530-629-3200 Kay Walstad and Tom O’Gorman www.trinityriverfarm.com Open at the farm now until the end of October, daily 8 a.m.-6 p.m. In Willow Creek (across from Renner Petroleum), from the beginning of July (when peach season starts) until October, daily 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Vegetables and fruits, including tomatoes, peaches and figs. l Simona Carini also writes about her adventures in the kitchen on her blog: www.pulcetta.com.

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

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24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

25


ARCATA + NORTH EUREKA + SOUTH ON NEXT PAGE

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

Open Daily 8am - 2am

venue

thur 6/19

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 Ninth St., 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St., 822-1220 BLONDIES 822-3453 420 E. California Ave., Arcata BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata 822-2228 CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Dr., Trinidad 677-3611

fri 6/20 Twilight (film) 7:30pm $5

Open Mic 7pm Free Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

Coming Soon! Frozen Yogurt

Fine Wines Spirits

Beer

Soda

DJs TBA

Spirits

Beer

Premium Tobacco

DOWNTOWN PLAZA 786 9TH STREET ARCATA

• 8 Flavors • Self Serve • More than 50 toppings • Smoothies • Build your own shakes • Family atmosphere

NORTHTOWN

(right over the footbridge)

1644 G STREET • ARCATA • 822-1865

Locally owned and operated

The Kraken RUM

2099

$ McKinleyville Shopping Center

1.75 Liter

NightHawk (rock) 9pm Free

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

m-t-w 6/23-25

[W] Open Mic w/Jimi Jeff 8pm Free Dr. Squid (rock) 9pm Free

Dr. Squid (rock) 9pm Free

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free

Bigfoot Gathering w/Jason Blakemore, Thee-o, et al. Noon $20

CRUSH 1101 H St. #3, Arcata 825-0390 Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam THE FORKS (530) 629-2679 8:30pm 38998 Hwy 299, Willow Creek Soul Night (DJs) HUMBOLDT BREWS 9pm $5 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739 Thumpin’ Thursday w/DJ Red JAMBALAYA 10pm $3 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766 LARRUPIN 822-4766 Blue Lotus Jazz 6pm Free 1658 Patricks Point Dr., Trinidad Claire Bent (jazz) Brian Post and Susie Laraine LIBATION 7pm Free (jazz) 7pm Free 761 Eighth St., Arcata 825-7596

Fine Wines

sun 6/22

Fingal (Celtic) 8pm Free

CLAM BEACH INN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

Natural Vibrations (reggae) 9pm Free

sat 6/21

StevenWeven “Stories, Songs & Circus” 8pm $5 Doug Stanhope (comedy) World Cup Soccer 2:45pm [W] Sci-Fi Night w/White Zombie 8pm $25 Free w/$5 food/bev, All Ages 6pm Free $5 food/bev, All Ages Jazz Night [M] Quiz Night 7pm Free 7pm Free [T] BeTh isBell Band (rock) 7pm Free

2 1 + O N LY

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Soda

Premium Tobacco

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

[T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free [W] Blues Explosion (open jam) 8:30pm Free [T] Game Night 5pm Free

[T] Cribbage Tournament 6:30pm $5 Liquid Kactus (funk) 9pm $5

DGS Sundaze (EDM DJs) 9pm $5

[M] The Getdown (local funk) 9pm [W] The Whomp (DJs) 9pm $5 [W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

Jim Silva (guitar) 7pm Free

[T] Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm Free


arcata • blue lake •mckinleyville trinidad • willow creek venue

LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 677-0077 355 Main St., Trinidad LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake MOSGO’S 826-1195 2461 Alliance Road, Arcata OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW 550 South G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222 ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St., Arcata 826-WINE SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SILVER LINING 839-0304 3561 Boeing Ave., McKinleyville SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave., McK 839-7580 SUSHI SPOT 839-1222 1552 City Center Road, McK. TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198 WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS 677-9493 501 S. Westhaven Drive, Westhaven

thur 6/19 The Decency (TBA) 9pm Free Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 6pm Free

clubs, concerts and cafés fri 6/20

Joe Garceau (acoustic) 5pm Free Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 9pm Free Lao Tzu’s Army (rock) 6pm Free

sat 6/21

Submit your events online! Deadline noon Friday

sun 6/22

JD Jeffries & Michael Stewart (acoustic) 5pm Free Vintage Rock N’ Soul (rock) Potluck (food) 9pm Free 6pm Free The HiLL (honky punk) 6pm Free

m-t-w 6/23-25 [W] Turtle Races 8pm Free [W] Randles, LaBolle & Amirkhan (jazz) 6pm Free

Bradley Dean (rock/country) 4pm Free

3 foods cafe 835 J Street Arcata (707) 822-9474 3foodscafe.com open at 5:30 tues-sun

NEW! Join us for patio hours Tues-Sun 2-6pm [M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rude Lion 9pm $5

Check out our facebook page for news and specials!

Kingfoot (Americana) 8pm Free Roots & Culture Reggae 9pm Free Rude Lion Sound (DJ) 10pm $2

DJ Benjamin Andres 9pm Free DJ Music 10pm $2 JD Jeffries and Michael Stewart (acoustic) 6pm Free

Claire Bent (jazz) 9pm Free Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free

Speed Dating (55+) 7pm $25, DJ Itchie Fingaz 9pm Free

[W] Salsa! (lessons + dance) 9pm $5

Yogoman Burning Band (dance) 2pm $5, $15 DJ Itchie Fingaz (glitch/hip-hop) 9pm Free

DJ Music 10pm Free

[T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free [M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [T] Sunny Brae Jazz 8pm Free [M] Anemones of the State (jazz) 5pm Free [W] Reggae Wednesdayz w/Rude Lion 10pm Free

Buddy Reed and the’ Rip It Ups (blues) 7pm $5, $10

The Faces of Humboldt photo contest

The Journal is looking for your best portraits. Pictures that capture the faces of HUMBOLDT COUNTY.

Photos should be submitted as high-resolution jpgs via email to photocontest@ northcoastjournal.com between May 18 and June 20. Pictures must be the real thing — no photoshop, please — and taken within the entry period. Prize TBA. For more information, visit northcoastjournal.com. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014

27


EUREKA + SOUTH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

Happy Hour 4-6pm Tues.-Sun. Daily Specials Lunch • Dinner

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

thur 6/19

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770 BEAR RIVER CASINO 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

CHAPALA CAFÉ 201 Second St., Eureka 443-9514 CUTTEN INN 445-9217 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka

ARCATA + NORTH ON PREVIOUS PAGE

fri 6/20

sat 6/21

sun 6/22

Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free Thirsty Bear: The Human Jukebox Band (dance) 9pm Free The Roadmasters (country) Ballroom: Randy Linder 9pm Free (CCR covers) 8pm $25 The Tumbleweeds The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

m-t-w 6/23-25 [W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

[T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm Free

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St. 497-6093

Throwback Thursday (DJs) 9pm Free

Pressure Anya Shuffle (DJs) 10pm Free

Bump Foundation (soul/funk) 9pm Free

GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 INK ANNEX 442-8413 47B w. Third St., Eureka OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 PERSIMMONS GALLERY 1055 Redway Drive, Redway 923-2748 RED LION HOTEL R.J. GRIN’S LOUNGE 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844

Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Irish) 7pm Free

Papa Paul (folk) 7pm Free

Michael Dayvid (acoustic) 6pm Free

Son Da One (hip-hop) 7pm Free

JSun (DJ) 10pm Free April Moore Ranch Party (country) 7pm Free

[T] Henchman and The Bored Again (punk/punkabilly) 9pm Free [W] Comedy Open Mikey 9pm

[M] The Rackatees, The Bored Again (punk, psychobilly) 7pm $6 [W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 7pm Free

Musaic (folk) 7pm Free Tropical Soundclash w/ Pressure Anya (DJs) 10pm Free

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 9pm Free, 21+

The Sea Grill Always serving you the finest and freshest of our local catch

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

Fresh, farm to table products made same day in house. For Reservations call 268-3852 Open at 5pm Tues.-Sat. 511 2nd Street • Old Town Eureka

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

A

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Hey, McGuinty! That Facebook creep? Outlaw inlaws? Roommate disaster?

Ask: heymcguinty@ northcoastjournal.com tHose red curls know All.

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET • EUREKA MONDAY-SATURDAY 11:30AM-9:00PM

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thur 6/19

clubs, concerts and cafés

fri 6/20

sat 6/21

sun 6/22

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m-t-w 6/23-25

Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (country) 7pm Free Swan Sunday (eclectic and request) 8:30pm Free

THE SHANTY 444-2053 213 Third St., Eureka THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

Find live music and more!

dataBLEND (EDM) 8pm Free

HAPPY HOURS Rita’s on Harris

Yaquina Bay, Ginger Grae (indie) 9pm Free Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (booty shakin’ blues) 10pm Free

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

NCJ

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[M] Anna Hamilton (blues) 7pm Free [T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [W] No Covers and USGGO (jazz) 7:30pm Free

100+ BARS 70+ HAPPY HOURS

@ncj_of_humboldt

NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM /COCKTAILCOMPASS

northcoastjournal

$2 Well Drinks Extremo Happy Hour 4-5pm

& Regular Happy Hour Rita’s on 5th Street $4 Jumbo Margaritas $2 Pints & Full Size Drinks Regular Happy Hour M-Sa 3-5pm Rita’s in Arcata $2 Pints • $3 Margarita M-F 3-5pm Eureka 1111 5th St • 443-5458 427 W. Harris St • 476-8565 Arcata 855 8th St. Suite 3 • 822-1010

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2 1 + O N LY

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

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BEERS ON draft

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

Happy Hour 4-6pm

*LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER

HALF OFF COVER, Before 10 p.m.

ALWAYS CONTRACTING NEW DANCERS

FROM OUR BAR MENU:

TRUFFLE FRIES • PHILLY CHEESE STEAK • VEGGIE QUESADILLA CARTER DOG • FRESH FISH TACOS ARTISAN CHEESE PLATE www.carterhouse.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014

29


THe seTlIst

Modest Proposals By Jennifer Savage

WHO: Kingfoot WHEN: Friday, June 20 at 8 p.m. WHERE: Redwood Curtain Brewing Company TICKETS: Free

thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Friday

Thursday

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Company, Kingfoot will entertain you with righteous modern American starting at 8 p.m. Free! Not all ages. You could also get your dance on. Not quite for free, but for a mere $5 DJs Jaymorg, Matt’n’Adam, Red and Spaceman Spliff promise to set you up for success with Soul Night #32 at Humboldt Brews. The fun begins at 9 p.m., advance tickets and stylish duds recommended — if you’re doing it right, you will get sweaty! — and this hot booty-shaking action is limited to those 21-and-over.

Sunday

The ever-popular dance-party-bringing Yogoman Burning Band gets all Jamaica/ New Orleans at Six Rivers Brewery with a family show at 2 p.m. Cover is $5 per person or $15 per fam. All ages!

Monday

Keep the momentum going with The Getdown, a local funk jam hosted by DJ Rickshaw, B. Swizlo and Pete Ciotti celebrating those “who’ve artistically enriched Humboldt County.” The rejoicing begins at 9 p.m., 21-and-over.

CenterArts Hot New Season

With all the money you’ve saved from this week’s low-cost options, you’re set to pick something from Center Art’s 2014-2015 line-up, an impressive list that includes Amos Lee, The Avett Brothers and Gregory Porter, plus nonmusical acts David Sedaris, Nick Offerman and Neil deGrasse Tyson (!!!) — the new schedule is hot off the press and can be viewed via HSU’s website.

Etc.

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com.

Tuesday

SoCal psychobilly veterans Henchmen vow to “kick Tuesday night’s ass” at the Palm Lounge right after The Bored Again opens at 9 p.m. Another 21-andover freebie, kids! I mean, not-kids.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

I

t might feel like summer already, what with school getting out and Oyster Fest having happened and your friends lazing at the river (assuming they’re not too sunburned, poor things) while you’re stuck behind a keyboard typing out advice on how they should spend their nights. But technically, this Saturday is the formal ringing-in WHO: Yaquina Bay WHEN: Friday, June 20 of what looks to be a mighty sunshine WHERE: Siren’s Song Tavern TICKETS: Free season. The sun rises at 5:45 a.m., sets at 8:52 p.m. and, in between, perstar DJ Red. Expect the rap classics and the Clam Beach Inn hosts the Bigfoot classic party jams from the ’80s, says Red, Gathering and Summer Solstice. It’ll run plus those from the early ’90s “you forgot you $20, but you’ll get so very much out you love.” Love old school? Be there to of it: DJs galore, fire performances, campindulge starting at 10 p.m. Cover is only $3 ing if you arrive early — score your tickets and only those 21-or-over can thump. at Wildberries or The Works and do not forget your photo ID, because this joint is for those 21-and-over only. Just another indie-folk-pop-rock-altNow, on to the rest of the week/end’s world-music night at Siren’s Song with offerings, all of which are free! Or at least Yaquina Bay, a five-piece from Salem, cheap! (We drew the line at $5.) Ore. that blurs the line of traditional European folk and indie rock. You will witness ukulele, violin and accordion with Do you like free things? Good news — a backbone of drums, bass and keys. Yes, Eureka’s Summer Concert Series kicks off that’s six instruments and only five people Thursday with Rockin’ Down the Highway — how will they do it?! from 6 to 8 p.m. and continues each week, The music wrought for the band’s new same day, same time, different band, album, The Eastern Desert, alternates through Aug. 14. The dancing-in-the-street between dreamy and elegant rocking. opportunity takes place at the C Street Frontman Chris Ward says the album is an Market Square, conveniently located at exploration of his childhood in Oregon: the foot of C Street in Eureka. “The deep attachment and indifference I The free continues at 8 p.m. in the have toward the land in which I grew, the Redwood Curtain Brewing Company over wonderful and terrible memories etched in A-Town with bluegrassers Raising Grain. in to my core.” Sounds promising, musi(Music is free, beer will cost you.) Be 21-orcally and otherwise. Locals Ginger Grae over. and This Weeks Leader also play. More Finish the day with the Jambalaya’s free! Also, all ages. Thumpin’ Third Thursdays with local suBack at Redwood Curtain Brewing

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

(Mostly) low-cost good times

WHO: Henchmen WHEN: Tuesday, June 24 at 9 p.m. WHERE: The Palm Lounge TICKETS: Free


northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

31


More and more big-name comedians are making their way to Humboldt these days. On Saturday, June 21 at 8 p.m., the Arcata Theatre Lounge welcomes Doug Stanhope to the stage ($25). He’s grouchy, ranty and altogether hilarious. Miss it and the laugh’s on you.

19 thursday Art

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Drawing, painting, mixed-media, sculpting and more. Free.

Movies

Traveling the Americas. 6:30 p.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School. Local Filmmakers Night features Ace Aseltine and his adventure films. A question and answer session follows. $5. info@accesshumboldt.net. www.accesshumboldt. net. 476-1798.

Music

Beginning Ukulele Play and Sing. 6-7 p.m. The MultiGenerational Center, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. The ukulele is easy to play and a great way to learn music. This session is for chidren ages 7 and older and an accompanying adult. Free. 616-5791. Humboldt Ukulele Group. Third Thursday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of ukulele strummers who have fun and play together for a couple of hours. Beginners welcome and you won’t remain one long! $3. dsander1@arcatanet.com. 839-2816. Summer Concert Series. Rockin’ Down the Highway plays. 6-8 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Dancing in the street. Free. www.eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054.

Theater

Korbel V: The Secret. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. A comedy about the ill-fated Dugan family in tough economic times. $18, $15 students, $10 kids. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. The iconic musical about Jean Valjean’s quest for redemption. $18-$20. 442-6278.

Events

Best of Humboldt Fair. 10 a.m. Redwood Acres

With the right scheduling mastery, Humboldtians can enjoy baseball nearly every day of the week at the Arcata Ballpark. The Humboldt Crabs dominate the weekends, but the weekdays belong to the Humboldt B52s. You can cheer for the semi-pro, wooden bat league as they take on the Berkovich 24s on Tuesday, June 24 at 7 p.m. ($5). Play ball!

Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Enjoy live music, cruising local arts and crafts, food, brews and wine, plus livestock exhibits, small animals and carnival rides. $11, $5 seniors and kids 6-12, free to kids 5 and under. www. redwoodacres.com. 445-3037. Industrial Technology Fair. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Students from 11 county schools display their craftsmanship in wood, drafting, metals and more. Free. www.redwoodacres.com. CR Open House. 4-8 p.m. College of the Redwoods Garberville Site, 286 Sprowl Creek Road. Tour the newly remodeled building and learn about enrolling in the classes that are offered. Free. 476-4561. CASA Open House. 5:30-7 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Learn more about services for local foster children, summer advocate training, the Kid Walk fundraiser and more. Free. info@humboldtcasa. org. www.humboldtcasa.org. 443-3197.

Food

Food for People’s Produce Market. Third Thursday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. All income eligible folks are invited to pick out fresh fruits and vegetables, sample recipes using available produce, enjoy live music and learn about CalFresh. Free. hmchugh@foodforpeople.org. www. foodforpeople.org. 445-3166. Henderson Center Farmers Market. Boltin’ Basil plays this week. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. Anna Hamilton plays this week. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music.

Outdoors

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Have a drink and enjoy a slow ride around the bay on the Madaket. $10. 445-1910.

32 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Most drive-ins are long gone, but the Humboldt-Del Norte Film Commission is keeping the spirit of non-cineplex movies alive. Grab a blanket, a picnic basket and maybe a chair because it’s time for Movies in the Park at Sequoia Park (free). The screenings all feature movies filmed in Humboldt County. The series kicksoff with M. Night Shyamalan’s After Earth on June 21 at 7 p.m.

Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Tour the bay with the captain of the Madaket as your guide. Learn about the history and wildlife of Humboldt Bay. $18, $16 seniors and kids under 17, $10 kids under 12, free to kids under 4. 445-1910. Sunset Paddle. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The guided tours focus on the natural and cultural history of Humboldt Bay. Tours meet two hours before sunset. Please register in advance by the Monday before your paddle date of choice. $40. hbac@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt. edu/hbac. 443-4222. Trail Stewards Training. Third Thursday of every month, 9 a.m.-noon. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Bring water and wear work clothes. Tools and gloves are provided. Free. info@ friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397.

Sports

Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Playing the Alameda Tritons. $5. www.facebook.com/pages/Humboldt-B-52s-Baseball.

Etc

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

20 friday Art

Arts McKinleyville. Third Friday of every month, 6-8 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Art, food and music at participating McKinleyville businesses. Free. info@mckinleyvilleartsnight. com. www.mckinleyvilleartsnight.com. 834-6460.

Dance

World Dance. 8 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Teaching world dance. $3. shafferpost@yahoo.com. 826-7233.

Movies

Twilight. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Vampires at their sparkliest. $5. www.arcatatheatre.com.

Music

Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups. 7-9 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Bring your dancing shoes and get ready for a night of “lowdown and dirty gut bucket” blues as part of the jazz and blues series. $5-10 silding Scale. buddyreedripitups@ gmail.com. 677-9493.

Theater

The Dixie Swim Club. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. Meet five women, all friends and former teammates on their college swim team. They come together once a year for memories and hijinks. $18, $16 students and seniors. www.ferndalerep. org. 786-5483. Korbel V: The Secret. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 19 listing. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 19 listing.

Events

Best of Humboldt Fair. 10 a.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 19 listing. Industrial Technology Fair. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 19 listing. CASA Open House. 12-1:30 p.m. CASA of Humboldt, 2356 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. See June 19 listing.

Food

Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, meats, baked goods and more, plus live music and family activities. Free. www.facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket.


Garden

Eureka Sequoia Garden Club. 1-2:30 p.m. Eureka Sequoia Garden Club Tour, 1815 O St. Tour the four gardens and see the winners of the “Garden Jewels on Everding Street.” $20 to new members. mgoodwin@northcoast. com. 442-1387.

Meetings

Disaster Preparedness. 7 p.m. Freshwater Grange, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. A 45-minute presentation by the Red Cross followed by community discussion and collective planning for the Freshwater area. Free.

Outdoors

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing.

Sports

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Rose’s Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double-elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $1 off of beers for tournament players. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. www. rosesbilliards.com. 497-6295. Barrels by the Bay. 7 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Saddle up to watch some barrel racing. Covered arena and plenty of seating. Email for sign-up information. Free. barrelsbythebay@ gmail.com. www.victorianferndale.com. Fast Break Fridays. 7-9 p.m. McKinleyville Recreation Department, 1656 Sutter Road. Open access to the basketball courts for teens 13-17. $1. www.mckinleyvillecsd.com/parks-recreation. Friday Fun Skating. 6-8:30 p.m. Eureka Muni, 1120 F St. Skate with your friends and family. $4 youth, $4.75 adults. 441-9181. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. The Humboldt Crabs versus the Auburn Wildcats. $8 adults, $6 students and seniors, $4 kids under 12. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

21 saturday Art

CSSSA Award Ceremony. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. California State Summer School for the Arts honors local high school students. Free. www.humboldtarts.org. Woven Worlds Opening. 1-4 p.m. Mendocino County Museum, 400 East Commercial St., Willits. Reception featuring dancers, traditional foods and more for a permanent exhibit celebrating the Native American heritage of Mendocino County. Free. Info@MendocinoMuseum.org. www.MendocinoMuseum.org. 459-2736.

Dance

USA Dance Tropical Getaway. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Start with a salsa lesson, then enjoy a mix of ballroom, Latin and swing. $10, $5 students and seniors. www.eurekaheritage.org. 464-3638.

Movies

After Earth. 7 p.m. Sequoia Park, 3414 W St., Eureka. Movies in the Park presents music from Deep Groove Society DJs and a screening of a locally-filmed sci-fi movie. Free. 825-7600. Being There. 6 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church Chapel, 15th and G streets, Eureka. Cinema Chat presents the moody, surreal 1979 movie with Peter Sellers and Shirley MacLaine. Free. www.cinemachatforum.wordpress. com. 442-1797.

300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 19 listing. Taken Away. 10:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Dell’Arte graduates return with classic circus skills like hand-balancing, tumbling and balancing, all spun into dramatic storytelling. $12, $10 students, $8 kids. www.dellarte.com.

Events

Best of Humboldt Fair. 10 a.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 19 listing. Dow’s Prairie Grange Breakfast and Flea Market. Third Saturday of every month, 9 a.m. Dows Prairie Grange Hall, 3995 Dows Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Enjoy pancakes, eggs and shopping for knickknacks. Flea market ends at 4 p.m. $5, $3 for kids. dowsgrange@gmail.com. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. 840-0100. Industrial Technology Fair. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 19 listing. Sand Sculpture Festival. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive. Watch builders compete for cash prizes in categories like best in show, realism, humor, fantasy, ingenuity and the judge’s wild card at the annual beach art event from the Friends of the Dunes. Free. www.manilacsd.com/Parks_and_Recreation.htm. 444-1397. Solstice Beach Party. 4-9:30 p.m. Samoa Dunes Recreation Area, 1 Lincoln Road. Animism International presents barbecue, games, drumming, dancing and a ceremony honoring the changing of the seasons. Free. animisminternational@gmail.com. www.animisminternational.org. 382-7566.

Food

Arcata Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Free. www.humfarm. org. 707-441-9999.

Meetings

Turning Points in Grief and Healing. 1-4 p.m. Hospice of Humboldt, 2010 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Explore how the loss of a loved one is often experienced as the end of an era through art. Free. 497-6260 x.103.

Outdoors

Arcata Marsh Tour. Led by Elliot Dabill. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. The tour guide this week is Jude Power. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing. Junior Ranger Family Program. 3-4 p.m. Learn about people, plants and animals of the redwood region. Kids can earn a junior ranger badge. Call for details. Free. 465-7765.

continued on next page

Music

Bigfoot Gathering and Solstice. noon. Clam Beach Inn, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. A day of non-stop music, performers and more, featuring Jason Blakemore, Thee-o and more. $20.

Theater

The Dixie Swim Club. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See June 20 listing. Korbel V: The Secret. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 19 listing. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre,

Best of the Best There are a lot of skilled people making awesome things in Humboldt County. In celebration of our talented citizens, Redwood Acres and Humboldt Made present the Best of Humboldt Fair from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday, June 19 through Saturday, June 21 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, June 22 ($11, $5, $30 multi-day wristbands). Local artists and crafters will fill the home economics building with their wares. Taking in everything the fair has to offer is likely to take you more than one visit, so be prepared to make at least one return trip. The kids will love the carnival and, let’s face it, you’ll probably enjoy it, too. Rides and games are open from noon to 11 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and from noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. In addition to the sounds of the carnival rides, there will be live music from Doug’s Neighbors, the Roadmasters and others on the center stage. Grab some fair food and tour the exotic animals, magicians, rodeo sports, livestock, car races and more. — Dev Richards northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

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Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing. Old-Growth Redwoods Tour. 10-11 a.m. Join a ranger for an hour-long tour through redwoods for a closer look at special aspects of Redwood National and State Parks. Free. 465-7765.

Sports

Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. See June 20 listing. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. See June 20 listing.

Etc

Access Media Center Orientation. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School. Learn about resources available at Access Humboldt: recording studio, field equipment, editing stations, cable TV channels, etc. Free. 707-476-1798.

22

cal specialist Laura Morgan leads this wildlife discovery hike. Free.

Music

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 442-0156. McKinleyville Community Choir. 4-5 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 15th and H streets, Eureka. Six-part harmonies, a tribute to the late folk singer Pete Seeger and more. Free. 442-1797.

Theater

The Dixie Swim Club. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See June 20 listing. Korbel V: The Secret. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 19 listing. Taken Away. 2 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 21 listing.

Events

sunday

Lecture

What’s Bloomin’ in the Dunes?. 1-4 p.m. Lake Earl Wildlife Area, 2591 Old Mill Road, Crescent City. Botani-

Dancin’ in the Streets

Best of Humboldt Fair. 10 a.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 19 listing. Industrial Technology Fair. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 19 listing. Meet the Humboldt Maker Series. This week features Slice of Humboldt Pie. 6 p.m. Humboldt Bay Tourism Center, 205 G St., Eureka. In conjunction with Humboldt Made, the Humboldt Bay Tourism Center is offering an ongoing series about local producers and business owners. Meet the owner, taste samples and learn about a local producer in Humboldt County. Free. www.HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com. Scandinavian Midsummer Festival. 12-4 p.m. Runeberg Hall, Wabash and Union, Eureka. A potluck followed by a flag ceremony and folk dancers at 1 p.m. Dance to the music Lindy Mantova. Bring your own utensils. Donations accepted. 839-2025. Trinidad Artisan’s Market. This week features music from Jesse Manzanita. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Town of Trinidad, Trinidad. Local art and crafts, live music and barbecue right next to Murphy’s Market. Free. 834-8720.

Food

Thursday nights are coming alive in Old Town, Eureka. From June 19 through Aug. 21, the boardwalk at the foot of C Street will be taken over by musicians for Eureka Main Street’s Summer Concert Series (free). An eclectic mix of musicians and bands are scheduled to play every Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The series kicks off on June 19 with some classic rock and roll from Rockin’ Down the Hiway. The month of June is closed out with some country from McKenna Faith on June 26. The summer-long series includes country, rock, funk, jazz, blues and more, so check out the Journal’s weekly calendar or see full line-up at www. eurekamainstreet.org. — Dev Richards

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. 503-828-7421. Potluck Dinner. 6 p.m. The Logger Bar, 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Bring a dish to share with friends old and new. Free. www.facebook.com/LoggerBar.

Garden

Garden Tour. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, adjacent to College of the Redwoods, Eureka. Tour nine gardens in the Eureka area during this benefit for the Humboldt Botanical Garden. $25. www. hbgf.org. 442-5139.

Outdoors

Discovering Arcata Bay Cruise. 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Join us as the Madaket sets out for Arcata Bay and enjoy close encounters with the many creatures that call

34 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

these uncharted waters home. Reservations required. $20 adults; $18 seniors and juniors; $12 for children four and older; Free for children under four. 445-1910. Family Fun Day Paddles. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Bring all of your friends and family for a paddle along the Eureka Waterfront and explore the marine environment of Humboldt Bay. No experience required and all paddling equipment will be provided. $20 adults. Free for children. hbac@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu/ hbac. 443-4222. Old-Growth Redwoods Tour. 10-11 a.m. See June 21 listing.

baked goods and more right across from the Miranda Gardens Resort. Free. www.facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Fresh fruits, vegetables, ornamental trees and plants, all with an ocean view. Free. www.facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket.

Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. See June 20 listing.

Sports

Outdoors

Sports

Slower-Speed Arcata Marsh Tour. Last Tuesday of every month, 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. A tour for attendees with mobility issues and those who are unable to keep up on regular walks. Meet at the I Street parking lot of the Arcata Marsh. Free. 822-3475.

Etc

Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. See June 23 listing.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Tiles, letters and triple-word scores, oh my! 677-9242.

23 monday Dance

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s. Refreshments are served during break. $4. 725-5323.

Events

Meditation Party. 6 p.m. Om Shala Yoga Center, 858 10th St., Arcata. Come fill your heart with peace and love. Donation suggested. davidsandercott@gmail. com. 310-663-9879.

Meetings

Volunteer Orientation. 2:30 p.m. Food for People, 307 W. 14th St., Eureka. Learn to pack and sort food, work with clients, collect donations and cook. panderson@ foodforpeople.org.

Sports

Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Playing the Berkovich 24s. $5. www.facebook.com/pages/Humboldt-B-52s-Baseball.

Etc

Cribbage Lessons. 5:30-7 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Brush up on your cribbage skills or learn how to play. Free.

24 tuesday Food

Eureka Farmers Market. MC Bruce plays this week. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Fresh, local produce direct from the farmer. Free. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Pick up produce,

Etc

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 444-3161.

25 wednesday Books

Lloyd Kahn. 7:30-9 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Join the author for a talk and slideshow based on his new book, “Tiny Homes on the Move: Wheels and Water.” Free. info@northtownbooks.com. 822-2834.

Movies

White Zombie. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Sci-Fi pint and pizza night features a 1932 film in which newlyweds are turned into zombies by a madman. Free with $5 food or beverage purchase. www. arcatatheatre.com.

Theater

Taken Away. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 21 listing.

Events

Quilt Auction and Fabric Sale. 6:30-9 p.m. Azalea Hall, 1620 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Enjoy refreshments, an auction, raffle and more. All proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society Relay For Life. Free. www. mckinleyvillecsd.com/azalea-hall. 476-8128.

For Kids

Playgroup. 10 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Playtime in the museum that provides children and families with resources. Free. info@discovery-museum. org. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Story Time. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

Meetings

Grief Support Group. 6-7:30 p.m. Sequoia Springs Senior Living, 2401 Redwood Way, Fortuna. Meet others to exchange emotional support and ideas on coping with the death of a loved one. Presented by Hospice of Humboldt. Free. 445-8443. Humboldt Green Party Monthly Meeting. Fourth Wednesday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Greens Meeting Space, 310 H St., Arcata. Election reform/ranked choice voting. Economic reform/public banking. Be a part of the solution. Free. dsilver@greens.org. www. humboldtgreens.org. 267-5342.


Castles Made of Sand Theater

Korbel V: The Secret. 8 p.m. Rooney Amphitheater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 19 listing. Taken Away. 10:30 p.m. Dell’Arte’s Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See June 21 listing.

Food They say there are more grains of sand on Earth than there are stars in the sky. Besides, stars are great to gaze at, but you can’t really do much with them. Sand, on the other hand, can be made into art! The 19th Annual Sand Sculpture Festival takes to the beach on Saturday, June 21 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Manila Dunes Recreation Area (free to watch, $10-15 to register). Sand castles are great, but why limit yourself to something so traditional? This is a sand sculpture after all; it’s time to get creative. Put together your own team (at least two participants), grab a few supplies (pastry knife, paint brush, some sort of digging implement, etc.) and ignite that creative spark! You can build pretty much anything you want, but keep it clean — there will be kids roaming around. The categories for prizes include Best of Show, Most Imaginative, Best Youth Sculpture, the Golden Shovel Award and many more. This event is pretty damn popular, so parking can be an issue. Never fear, Friends of the Dunes is providing a free shuttle service from Manila Park to the Manila Community Center from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. You’ll have to walk in the sand for about half a mile to get to the festival proper, so be prepared to carry any weary toddlers. Friends of the Dunes recommends that spectators show up between noon and 2 p.m. for the best view of the sculptures. Here’s sand in yer eye! — Dev Richards

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. See June 19 listing.

Outdoors

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing. Sunset Paddle. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. See June 19 listing.

Sports

Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Playing the Peninsula Mavericks. $5. www.facebook. com/pages/Humboldt-B-52sBaseball.

Etc

Outdoors

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing.

Sports

Humboldt B-52s Baseball. 5:30 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. Double-header with the Berkovich 24s and the Peninsula Mavericks. $5. www. facebook.com/pages/Humboldt-B-52s-Baseball.

26 thursday Art

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. See June 19 listing.

Music

Beginning Ukulele Play and Sing. 6-7 p.m. The Multi-Generational Center, 2280 Newburg Road, Fortuna. See June 19 listing. Summer Concert Series. 6-8 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 19 listing.

Cribbage Group. Every other Thursday, 6-8 p.m. New Wine Church, 1180 Evergreen Road, Redway. Please bring a board, if possible; refreshments will be served. Free. lizcarey333@icloud.com. 497-8281. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See June 19 listing.

Heads Up…

The Jefferson Community Center is offering free lunches to anyone under 18 throughout the summer. Lunch is served Monday through Friday from 12 to 1 p.m. 497-6280. Food for People presents their free summer lunch program for children. Call for a list of sites all over the county. 445-3166. Friends of the Dunes is now accepting applications for their Coastal Connections and Dune Detectives summer camps. 444-1397. The Fig Twig Market in Ferndale is looking for vendors with handcrafted, vintage, up-cycled, shabby chic items for the market in November. figtwigmarket@gmail.com. SCRAP Humboldt is looking for competitors for the Rebel Craft Rumble. 633-8349. Anyone Interested In Performing in or producing uplifting local films is invited to meet up at Old Town Coffee and Chocolates in Eureka at 4 p.m. on Sunday, June 22. Contact Damion Sharpe for details, 497-9039. l

Double Down Jump Street and Dragon sequels win big

Hill and Tatum practice their Oscar speeches.

By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

22 JUMP STREET. I find it hard to believe two years and change have passed since 21 Jump Street pleasantly surprised me with its quick-wittedness, scathingly foul mouth and flashes of emotional authenticity. It left me hopeful that something as unlikely as an ’80s cop show reboot might herald a positive change in the overall quality of Hollywood comedies. Time has done little to support that hope, unfortunately, but at least there is 22 Jump Street, that rare sequel that manages to outdo the original. I should warn you in the same breath that 22 thrives on the same witty crassness that, for me, made 21 work. So if it didn’t work for you the first time around, don’t expect anything about this one to change your mind. After an opening-sequence attempt at a different style of undercover police work fails spectacularly, officers Jenko (Channing Tatum) and Schmidt (Jonah Hill) find themselves back on Jump Street, under the withering gaze of Captain Dickson (Ice Cube). The headquarters have moved across the street since their last assignment, naturally. And an increased budget has provided them with a high-tech command center, lots of sweet new gadgets and, as he is quick to point out, a big-ass raise for the captain. The scenario stays the same this time out: Jenko and Schmidt are to go undercov-

er as college students, locate the source of a new designer drug called Whyphy and solve the drug-related death of a student. Jenko fits in immediately in the football and fraternity scene. Schmidt struggles in his absence until he befriends a beautiful art major (Amber Stevens). Separation strains the partnership, with Jenko drawn steadily toward the world of potential scholarships and non-stop partying by new soul mate/teammate Zook (Wyatt Russell). As in 21, the plot’s not really the thing. Actually, the fact that it hews so closely to the structure of the first one provides opportunities for a slew of self-referential humor, and almost all of it works. continued on next page June 20June 25

Fri. June 20 - Twilight (2008), Doors at 7:30 pm, Movie at 8:00 pm. $5. Rated PG-13. Sat June 21 - Savage Henry and Arcata Theatre Lounge Present Doug Stanhope, Doors at 8 pm. $25 Tickets in advance. 18 + Sun June 22 - World Cup Soccer. All Ages. Free w/Food & Bev Purchase. Doors at 2:45 pm. Game at 3 pm. Wed June 25 - Sci Fi Night ft. White Zombie (1932). Doors at 6 pm. All Ages. Free w/$5 min. Food & Bev Purchase. arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

35


MovieTimes Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 22 Jump Street Fri-Thu: (1, 3:45), 6:30, 8, 9:15 Chef Fri-Wed: (12:10, 2:55), 5:40, 8:25; Thu: (12:10, 2:55), 5:40 Edge of Tomorrow Fri-Thu: (3:35), 8:55 Edge of Tomorrow 3D Fri-Thu: (12:30), 5:55 The Fault in Our Stars Fri-Thu: (11:45a.m., 2:40), 5:35, 8:40 How to Train Your Dragon 2 Fri-Thu: (11:50a.m., 12:50, 2:25), 5, 6, 7:35 How to Train Your Dragon 2 3D Fri-Thu: (3:25), 8:35 Jersey Boys Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m., 3), 6:05, 9:10 Maleficent Fri-Thu: (12:15, 1:05, 2:50), 5:25, 6:25 Maleficent 3D Fri-Wed: (3:20), 8:45; Thu: (3:20) A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri-Thu: (1:50), 7 Neighbors Fri-Thu: (4:35), 9:45 Think Like A Man Too Fri-Thu: (1:35, 4:15), 6:55, 9:35 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri-Thu: (2:15), 5:20, 8:20



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 22 Jump Street Fri-Thu: (1:15, 4), 6:45, 9:30 Edge of Tomorrow Fri-Thu: (3:45), 9:10 Edge of Tomorrow 3D Fri-Thu: (12:30), 6:10 The Fault in Our Stars Fri-Thu: (12, 2:55), 5:50, 8:45 How to Train Your Dragon 2 Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m., 12:55, 2:30, 3:25), 5:05, 6, 7:40 How to Train Your Dragon 2 3D Fri-Thu: 8:30 Jersey Boys Fri-Thu: (11:50a.m., 2:50), 5:55, 9 Maleficent Fri-Thu: (1, 3:15), 6:30 Maleficent 3D Fri-Wed: 8:50 A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri-Wed: (3:35), 9:20; Thu: (3:35) X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri-Thu: (12:35), 6:20

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Chef Fri: (3:40), 6:20, 9; Sat-Sun: (1, 3:40), 6:20, 9; Mon-Wed: (3:40), 6:20, 9; Thu: (3:40), 6:20 Ida Fri: (3:50), 5:55, 8; Sat-Sun: (1:40, 3:50), 5:55, 8; Mon-Thu: (3:50), 5:55, 8 The Rover Fri: (4:15), 6:45, 9:15; Sat-Sun: (1:50, 4:15), 6:45, 9:15; Mon-Thu: (4:15), 6:45, 9:15

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 22 Jump Street Fri-Sat: (12, 2:40, 5:20), 6:55, 8, 9:40; Sun-Thu: (12, 2:40, 5:20), 6:55, 8 Edge of Tomorrow Fri-Sat: (12:30, 3:55), 6:45, 9:25; Sun-Thu: (12:30, 3:55), 6:45 The Fault in Our Stars Fri-Sat: (12:45, 3:50), 6:45, 9:35; Sun-Thu: (12:45, 3:50), 6:45 How to Train Your Dragon 2 Fri-Sat: (1:45, 4:40), 7:15, 9:35; Sun-Thu: (1:45, 4:40), 7:15 How to Train Your Dragon 2 3D Fri-Thu: (12:45, 3:40) Maleficent Fri-Sat: (12, 2:15, 4:35), 7, 9:20; Sun-Thu: (12, 2:15, 4:35), 7

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Call theater for schedule.

continued from previous page

Somehow, the filmmakers have managed to make recycled material the source of a movie-length joke. This enables them to expand and deepen the irony and post-modernism of the first installment with crazy abandon. The result is a movie that retains its predecessor’s tone and cadence, but produces more laughs per minute, with an even greater degree of awareness and a harder edge. From a studio’s perspective, R-rated comedies can be a risky proposition: That’s a whole lot of tickets kids can’t buy. I like the fact that movies like this one — movies that refuse to tone down the jokes, that rely on mature humor — are finding their way into the light of day. Obviously this isn’t a grand cinematic achievement for the ages, but as it’s been proven time and again, movie comedy is a difficult, unforgiving medium. And in that regard, 22 Jump Street is a resounding success. R. 112m. HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2. Having gone into this one uninitiated, I had no expectations. Well, I expected to see Vikings flying around on dragons, and I did. More to the point, I was pleasantly surprised by the darkness and honesty of the story, the quality of the casting and the depth and detail of the visuals. I’ve been disappointed by animated movies lately, so this was doubly enjoyable. Some time after the events of How to Train Your Dragon, heroic young Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) explores the world beyond the island of Berk, actively avoiding the fact that his father Stoick (Gerard Butler) plans to anoint him as the clan’s next chief. In his travels he discovers first a band of rogue dragon-catchers, then an island dragon sanctuary tended by his mother, Valka (Cate Blanchett), long thought dead. This leads in turn to a conflict with a scarred and scary seafarer named Drago Bludvist (Djimon Hounsou) who has plans for vengeance and total dragon domination. Unlike most major animated releases, Dragon 2 boasts a cast of stars who appear to have been selected for their talent as vocal actors, rather than their marquee status. The plot takes us into some hard, dark places, and has valuable things to say about pain, commitment and growing up. The action sequences are huge and immersive, each frame filled with sometimes overwhelming detail. The movie does what I always hope animation will: It creates a richly envisioned, impossible other world that we get to live in for a while. And it accomplishes this with style, a sense of humor and an appropriate amount of gravity. PG. 102m. — John J. Bennett

North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal • THURSDAY, Thursday, JUNE June 19, 2014 ••northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 36 NORTH

Previews

JERSEY BOYS. Based on the true story of falsetto legend Frankie Valli, Clint Eastwood’s film version of the Broadway hit follows the rise of the neighborhood mooks who become The Four Seasons. R. 134m. THE ROVER. Guy Pearce goes low-key Mad Max, dragging Robert Pattinson all over the post-apocalyptic outback in search of a stolen car. R. 102m. THINK LIKE A MAN TOO. Bachelor and bachelorette party shenanigans in Vegas with Michael Ealy, Gabrielle Union and motor-mouth Kevin Hart. R. 100m.

Continuing

CHEF. Jon Favreau stars in this well done food-truck road movie that cuts through professional kitchen bravado to real humanity and warmth. With Robert Downey Jr. and John Leguizamo. Bring napkins. R. 115m. EDGE OF TOMORROW. Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt as soldiers battling aliens in a post-apocalyptic Groundhog Day loop. Clever, slick and utterly forgettable. PG13. 113m. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS. Beat the rush and start crying now. Adapted from John Green’s novel with excellent performances from Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort as the young, star-crossed lovers. PG13. 126m. GODZILLA. The big guy returns with puny, human co-stars Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Ken Watanabe. The effects impress, but there’s too much going on to focus on the lizard and its destructive glory. PG13. 123m. IDA. A young woman about to become a nun delves into her true identity and her family’s history during the Holocaust. PG13. 80m. MALEFICENT. An atmospheric, goodlooking fantasy with a sharpened Angelina Jolie as the fairytale party crasher from Sleeping Beauty. Heavy on CGI, light on character and not quite scary enough. PG. 98m. A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST. And none of them live up to the MacFarlane brand or the rest of the topshelf cast (Charlize Theron, Liam Neeson and Neil Patrick Harris) in this Western comedy. R. 116m. NEIGHBORS. Suburban parents (Rose Byrne and Seth Rogen) go to war with the frat next door and their oft-shirtless prankster leader (Zac Efron) in this crude but effective comedy R. 97m. X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST. The mutants go time traveling to save the world. Pacing and exposition are rocky, but the action and the cast make an enjoyable distraction. PG13. 131m. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ●

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts BEGINNING/INTERMEDIATE DRAWING: July 5− August 9, Sat’s., 10 a.m.−12 p.m. Fee: $65. College of the Redwoods Community Education, 525 D Street, Eureka. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (AC−0619) CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 7−12. With Amanda Steinebach. Children will have a great time creating with clay. Sat’s., 9:30 a.m.−11 a.m. June 7−July 25 and July 26−Aug. 23 Fee: $75 per class. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0619) CREATING TUMBLERS & MUGS. 1st & 3rd Thurs., 6:30−8:30 p.m. Free. Members & Friends of Fire Arts. Join Fire Arts members for an evening creating whimsical ceramic mugs & tumblers. All ages welcome. Attend 3 workshops, receive a final product free! Limited 8 students per class. Call a day ahead to reserve space. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0619) FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERMEDIATES. Sat’s., June 21 & 28, 10 a.m.−noon. Tues’s., July 15 & July 22, 1:30−3:30 p.m. In this two day workshop you will learn how to make your own pendants and earrings. With the use of color and dicrohic glass, mosaic butterflies, and decals, Joele Williams will guide you through the process of cutting, designing, and wire wrapping. For inter− mediate students hand etching dicrohic glass will also be introduced. $50/$35 members. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619) HANDBUILDING FOR BEGINNERS & INTERMEDI− ATES. With Otamay Hushing. Join us for fun with handbuilding clay projects. Bring your own ideas or try out some new ones. Thurs., June 26−July 31, 10 a.m.−noon. $185. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619) POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. Tues., June 24−Aug. 26, 7−9 p.m. With Bob Raymond. Learn the basics or perfect your wheel− throwing technique. Ideal for new and continuing students. $185. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619) POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. Wed., June 25−Aug. 27. 3 classes offered: 9− 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.−1:30 p.m., intermediate 2 p.m.−4 p.m. Join Peggy Loudon for this complete intro− duction to basic wheel−throwing and glazing tech− niques. Perfect for beginning and returning students. $185. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619)


SCRAP HUMBOLDT’S THE (RE)WORKSHOP. Take a Class, rent the space, teach a class, have a birthday party or drop−in and use our tools in our Creative Education Studio. (707) 822−2452 scraphumboldt.org (AC−0911) SUMMER BOTANICAL DRAWING. July 5−August 9, Sat’s., 9:30 a.m.−12 p.m. Fee: $110, College of the Redwoods Main Campus. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (AC−0619)

Communication

HELP FOR DIVIDED FAMILIES OFFERED AT LIFE− TREE CAFÉ. How families experiencing conflict and division can heal will be discussed Sun., June 22, 7 p.m. Corner of 13th & Union, Arcata. Lifetree is a Conversation Cafe. Free. (707) 672−2919. (CMM−0619)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film BE INSPIRED PLAYSHOP. At Redwood Raks, $10− $20 (sliding scale), 5 p.m.−7 p.m., June 21, and each 3rd Sat. monthly. Explore through games, move− ment, play & laughter. Call Damion at 497−9039 for more info. (DMT−0619) DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Try one of our fabulous specialized workshops. Improve your Latin tech− nique, spruce up your arm styling, do the Hustle, explore American Tango, learn fancy dips & endings. Intermediate East and West Coast swing. (707) 464−3638 debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0626) MEDIA PRODUCTION TRAINING. Access Humboldt offers media production training covering camera work, pre−production, lighting, audio, and studio production. Call 476−1798 or visit www.accesshumboldt.net (DMT−0731) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−0828) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−0626) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Beginning Wkshp: 10 a.m.− noon May 17, $25. Weekly Beginning: Fri’s. 11:30 a.m. −12:30 p.m., May 9−30, $50. Beg/Int, Mon’s 7−8 p.m. Youth Band: Thurs’s. 4:30 p.m.−5:30 p.m. 5/8−5/29, $40. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C, (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0626)

Fitness

DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−0626) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−0724)

PILATES: INCREASE YOUR POTENTIAL THROUGH A MINDFUL MOVEMENT. Arcata Core Pilates offers beginning−advanced group Pilates Mat, reformer, chair, TRX, as well as Private Training Sessions. Our instructors are all certified. The diversity in training and background makes a deep well for clients to draw from. Call 845−8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com, website: arcatacorepilatesstudio.com (F−0626) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0626) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0828)

Home & Garden

TINY HOME WORKSHOP. July 7−21 (weekdays). Ever want to build a Tiny Home? DIY building experience Building a Tumbleweed Home on a trailer. Learn every step in building an 18 ft tiny home. Email for details, humshane@gmail.com (HG−0626)

Kids & Teens

14TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURF CAMP. Water enthusiasts of all levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skill necessary for all types of surfing while being immersed in lifeguard water safety, surf etiquette and beach and ocean awareness. Ages: 8−up. June 23−27, July 7−11, July 21−25, Aug. 4−8, at Moonstone Beach. Cost: $195, full four−day session. moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com, (707) 822−5099 (K−0619) AQUATICS CAMP. Get ready for one of the most well−known summer camps in Humboldt County! Exciting activities, including flatwater kayaking, canoeing, surfing, stand up paddling and sailing! Staff teaches water safety, environmental educa− tion and promotes positive group development. Session I: June 23−27. Session II: July 14−18 . fee: $285 *enquire about daily rates. Discount Program Fee: $265 for full week when registering participant for more than one camp, or more than one family member! Fee Includes camp staff, transportation, aquatic equipment, daily snacks and food for the camp out beginning with Thurs. dinner. Age Limit: 10 − 14 years old . Contact: 826−3357. Website: Humboldt.edu/centeractivities. (K−0619) HUMBOLDT BAY AQUATIC CENTER KIDS CAMP. Session I: July 7−11. Session II: July 28−Aug. 1. Come out for a week of exploration and fun on Humboldt Bay! Campers will learn kayaking and water safety skills, as well as a respect for the wonderful marine environment that we have in Humboldt Bay. Activities include general kayak instruction and rescue techniques, Humboldt Bay ecology and history of Old Town Eureka Water− front, and a variety of games and skill−building exercises. If you have any questions, contact the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center at (707) 443−4222. (K−0619)

FREE VBS. Gospel Light’s Sonrise National Park VBS. Ages 3−11 1/2. July 7−July 11. 9 a.m.−12 p.m. Arcata First Baptist, 1700 Union Street, Arcata. (707) 822− 0367. Youth and Jr. High Bible Camp Ages 11 1/2−18. Snacks and Fun are included! (K−0626)

TEEN STRENGTH & CONDITIONING CAMP. Open to all teen athletes, includes exclusive, individual− ized training in the areas of plyometrics, speed development, strength development, power development, agility, Olympic lifting and flexibility. Ages 13−19. Two sessions: June 16−July 11 and July 14− Aug. 8 (2 training sessions each day). HSU Student Rec Center. Cost: $80 per session. Contact: 826− 4519. (K−0619)

MUSEUM ART SCHOOL. Summer Art Camps for kids ages 5−12 at the Morris Graves Museum of Art. One week sessions: June 23−27, July 7−12, Aug. 4−8. Level 1: 9:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m. Level 2: 1:30−4:30 p.m. $90 for members, $85 for nonmembers. Call (707) 442−0278 ext. 202, or www.humboldtarts.org to register. (K−0619)

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1225)

SUMMER READING CLUB PROGRAMS. Based on the theme of "Paws to Read," there will be a series of programs during hte summer including stories, activities, and crafts. Wed’s., beginning June 18 and ending on August 6, 1:30 p.m., The Main Library, 1313 3rd St., Eureka. Free. For further inforamtion, please call JoAnn Bauer at (707) 269−1927 or visit our website at www.humlib.org.

ATTRACTING BEES, BUTTERFLIES & SONGBIRDS TO YOUR GARDEN. Take an outing with Terry Kramer to the Humboldt Botanical Garden and learn how to entice bees, butterflies and song birds to your garden. Fri., June 27, 10 a.m.−Noon. OLLI members $30/nonmembers $55. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0626)

SUMMER READING CLUB. The theme this year is "Paws to Read." Participants can sign up and play the game by reading library books Preschoolers can also participate by listening to books read aloud. The SRC begins as soon as school lets out for the summer. At the Main Library in Eureka the game begins on Fri., June 13, 1313 3rd St, Eureka. Check with your nearest Branch Library for their beginning date. There are ten Branches located throughout Humboldt County. The game can also be played while visiting the Bookmobile. Free. Call JoAnn Bauer at (707) 269−1927 or visit our website at www.humlib.org for more info. (K−0731)

FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS. Offered by Area 1 Agency on Aging’s trained HICAP counselors the second Thurs. of every month through Aug. Hour− long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, 4−5 p.m., July 10. On deck: Medicare Basic for Boomers, August 14, 4−5 p.m. (O−0703) continued on next page

A complete resource for kids of all ages! Summer Camps & Activity Programs Visual & Performing Arts

2014

Nature & Science Sports, Athletics & Adventure

ONLINE NOW

www.northcoastjournal.com/SOF2014

Trillium Dance Studios Summer Dance

Week 1: July 28 - Aug. 1 Week 2: Aug. 4 - Aug. 8

Camp

2014

Ballet, Pointe, Latin Dance, Contemporary, Modern, Jazz, Hip Hop, Tap & Pilates plus a choreography workshop culminating in a performance!

Erin McKeever, Kelly Gordon, Islay Dillon-Ogden & Guest Instructors All levels, ages 4 & up • $8 reg. fee plus camp tuition • Drop-ins welcome

New Location!

855 8th STREET, ARCATA

Call 822-8408 or email info@ TrilliumDance.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014

37


continued from previous page HARNESSING THE POWER WITHIN. Join Andy Anderson to examine self−knowledge, will, and action to create an initial personal assessment. Sat., June 21−28, 2−3:30 p.m. OLLI members $15/ nonmembers $40. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880. (O−0619) LEARN TO DRAW! Demystify the drawing process by simplifying it into achievable steps. Learn about line, light and shadow, proportion and three− dimensional shapes, the foundation to under− standing how to draw anything. With Brent Eviston. Tues’s., and Thurs’s., June 24−July 10, 2−4 p.m. OLLI members $75/nonmembers $100. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0619) MAKING CHOCOLATE DIPPED STRAWBERRIES. Learn easy methods to temper chocolate, dip strawberries and decorate. With Chocolatier Sandra Nakashima. Sat., June 21, 9−10:30 a.m. OLLI members $25/nonmembers $50. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0619) MAKING THE BIBLE. The Complex History of a Sacred Text. Trace the Old and New Testaments including lost originals and imperfect copies. With Laurent Cleenewerck. Tues’S., July 1−22, 10 a.m.− Noon. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0626) OKAY, LET’S SEE THE MCKAY! #2. Join Jerry and Gisela Rohde for a presentation featuring maps, photos and stories. Tour the company’s mill sites, abandoned railroad grade, McKay Ranch and the redwood−paneled Burns House, the striking summer home of the owners of McKay & Co. Thurs., June 26, 6−8 p.m. and (Saturday field trip sold out − second field trip date added) Sun., June 29, 1−4 p.m. OLLI members $60/nonmembers $85. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0626) ONLINE GENEALOGY LAB. Join Michael Cooley to explore free websites to learn how to best utilize Google as a powerful genealogical resource. Fri’s., June 20−27, 2−4 p.m. OLLI members $40/nonmem− bers $65. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0619) QUANTUM PHYSICS & MYSTICISM. Join Laurent Cleenewerck to discuss several key concepts in modern physics: relativity, speed of light, double− slit experiment, non−locality, holograms and their implications in terms of mystical consciousness. Mon’s., July 7−21, 10 a.m.−Noon. OLLI members $55/ nonmembers $80. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880. (O−0703) THE PLANTAGENET KINGS OF ENGLAND. Explore one of the world’s most fabled royal families−its successes, failures, storied events and its tangled genealogical ties. With Michael Cooley. Wed., July 2, 2−5 p.m. OLLI members $30/nonmembers $55. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0626) YOGA WITH OLLI. Improve balance, strength, flex− ibility and concentration with yoga for all levels and body types. With Laurie Birdsall. Gentle Yoga on Mon’s., July 7−28, 1:30−3 p.m. in Eureka. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90. Or Yoga in Fortuna on Tues’s., July 1−22, 10−11 a.m. OLLI members $40/nonmembers $65. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (O−0626)

Spiritual

SHANTIDEVA’S GUIDE TO PATIENT FORBEAR− ANCE, A BUDDHIST TEACHING BY TULKU TENZIN RIGSANG. Tulku Rigsang will comment on the sixth chapter on patience from Shantideva’s classic work, "The Way of the Bodhisattva," providing profound, heart opening, and practical advice on the cultivation of patience; the direct antidote to anger, frustration, aggression, and aversion. Sat., June 28, 10 a.m.−12 p.m. and 2 p.m.−5 p.m. & Sun., 29, 9 a.m.−12 p.m. and 2 p.m.−4 p.m. At the Humboldt Area Foundation, 363 Indianola RD, Bayside. Email Caroline Redfield at Carolineredfield@yahoo.com or call (707) 601−3852. Suggested donation $75 for the week−end. All welcome. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. Hosted by Arcata Sangha. ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 10. Call 845−8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com for more information. (S−0626) FEARLESS HAPPINESS Wed., June 25th, 6:30−8 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, Emmerson Room, 363 Indianola Rd., Bayside. Phakchok Rinpoche, a Tibetan Buddhist teacher, will speak from the heart on sustaining unshakeable happiness and a kind, yet fearless dignity. Rinpoche will teach us how to navigate the obstacles that impede our ability to master our own minds. Cost: Donation, information@gomdeusa.org, 925−0201. (S−0619) HUMBOLDT UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOW− SHIP. We are a diverse congregation welcoming all people. Our mission is to promote personal and spiritual growth as well as a peaceful, sustainable, and socially just world. Come see for yourself on a Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m., Fellowship Way, off Jacoby Creek Rd., Bayside. (707) 822−3793, www.huuf.org. (S−0904) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0626) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S−0626)

Therapy & Support

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844−442−0711. (T−0626) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon’s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−0626) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana−anonymous.org (T−0731)

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0626)

Vocational

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS FOR CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANTS: CARDIOVASCULAR. June 26, Thurs. Fee: $30. College of the Redwoods, 333 6th St., Suite B, Eureka. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (V−0619) CPR FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS. July 15, Tues., 1 −5 p.m. Fee: $35. July 23, Wed., 9−1 p.m. Fee: $35. College of the Redwoods Main Campus. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (V−0619) FAST & EASY PRACTICAL SPANISH FOR EDUCA− TORS. July 7−July 31, M/W/TH, 3−5 P.M. Fee: $155, College of the Redwoods Community Education, 525 D St., Eureka. Call (707) 269−4000 to register (V−0619) INJECTIONS. June 28, Sat. Fee: $100. College of the Redwoods Community Education, 525 D Street, Eureka. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (V−0619) VENIPUNCTURE. June 29, Sun. Fee: $100. College of the Redwoods Community Education, 525 D Street, Eureka. Call (707) 269−4000 to register. (V−0619)

Wellness & Bodywork

108 SUN SALUTATIONS FUNDRAISER FOR LOST COAST KIDS CAMP. Sat., June 21, 9 a.m. at Mattole Valley Community Center in Petrolia with Rupali Brown OR 12 p.m. at Om Shala Yoga with Peggy Profant. $20 suggested donation. All proceeds support local children to attend camp this summer. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com, www.lostcoastcamp.org. (W−0619) MYRTLETOWNE HEALING CENTER PRESENTS! Ladies who walk with the Spirit of Healing, Summer Solstice Celebration OPEN HOUSE. Come join us for Free Chair Massage, Essential Oil sampling, Raw Chocolates, and Free Reiki Session Gift Certificates for all who attend! Sat., June 21, 7− 9 p.m., 1480 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, (707) 441−9175. (W−0626)

CANDLELIGHT HOT STONE YOGA & LIVE SOUND HEALING. At Om Shala Yoga. With Artemisia Shine. Fri., June 20. 1st, 3rd, & 5th Fri’s. monthly, 7:30−9:30 p.m. $20 drop−in. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825 −YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0619) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Beginning with Herbs. Sept. 17−Nov. 5, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.−Nov. 2015, meets one weekend per month with several field trips. Learn in−depth material medica, therapeutics, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Both− well & Rosemary Gladstar. March 19−28, 2015. Let us guide you through the unsurpassed beauty and wondrous diversity of Costa Rica! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0911) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY. Now enrolling. Daytime classes start September 2 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Thera− peutic Massage Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−0626) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Two programs: Traditional Long Form (Wu Style) and T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis. Eight−week term starts June 24. Begin by the third week. Daytime begin− ning classes meet at 1049 C, Samoa Blvd., Arcata (Samoa & K). Upper level classes and Wed. evening beginning class call for location. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Call 822−6508 or e− mail margaretemerson@att.net for summer schedule and fees see www.margaretemerson.com for other details. (W−0626) YOGA. At Om Shala Yoga. 7 days a week, 7:30 a.m.− 7:30 p.m. More than 50 classes to choose from! Summer Special: 10 classes for $99. Extended through the SOLSTICE! See website or call for details. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642). www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0605)


1

Replicants, Unite! fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

T

wo reality-bending episodes of Star Trek: the Next Generation are standouts for me. In the final scene of “Ship in a Bottle,” a glowing cube not much larger than a pack of cigarettes contains an entire universe for two digital beings (unaware that they are simulations) to explore. In “The Inner Light,” Kamin wakes from a dream in which he was Jean-Luc Picard, captain of a starship — only to discover much later that it was no dream. Questioning the truth of existence goes back a lot longer than Star Trek, of course. Over 2,000 years ago, the Chinese monk Zhuangzi awoke from a dream in which he was a butterfly. It left him unsure whether he really was a butterfly now dreaming he was a man. French philosopher Rene Descartes wondered if a demon was feeding him fake sensations that he took for the real thing — anticipating the vat-world of the Matrix movies by nearly 400 years. Harrison Ford’s character in Blade Runner could never be sure if he was real or an exquisitely fashioned machine. More recently, did the top topple in the final scene of Inception? And for that matter, I bet your dream-self was unaware it was a product of your sleeping brain last night. Are you awake now? Are you real or a simulation? How do you know? Take the possibility that we’re the digital creations of a future generation of humans interested in running computerized “ancestor simulations.” Failing a spoiler (perhaps a pop-up saying, “You are a simulation, call this number for more information!”) we would be no more capable of knowing the truth than ants in an ant farm. In fact, according to one line of thinking, it’s highly unlikely that we’re not simulations. Here’s why. From a technical viewpoint,

creating a simulated brain in the future doesn’t seem to be that much of a stretch. The conscious experience of being alive appears to “emerge” from brains consisting of a few hundred billion interconnected neurons humming along at around a million billion operations per second. That’s beyond the capability of today’s computers, but surely feasible in the future. Assuming we manage to survive as a species, future generations will have the power (using a trivial amount of their computing capability) to fashion simulated worlds, not too dissimilar from the creation game SimCity and its variants, only far, far more sophisticated, populated with digital beings unaware of their artificiality. Just as a SimCity player can create limitless scenarios, our descendants will be able to do the same, such that virtual worlds will vastly outnumber real worlds. That means the odds that we’re simulations living in a simulated world are way higher than the “real world” alternative. Supposing you were convinced you that you were most likely a digital simulation — what would you do differently? My guess is, not much. Consider that millions of Buddhists and Hindus believe that appearances are unreal, yet nonetheless they eat, pray and love as others do. Simulated or not, conscious beings still feel pain and pride, anxiety and ecstasy. The way I see it is this: I am unaware of why I act and speak as I do. Neuroscience assures me that it’s “me,” my unconscious, that informs my feelings, words and deeds, but it might as well be some teenager in the year 2114 playing on her smartphone (watching my clumsy speculations) that give rise to the sensation of being me. And you know what? I don’t care. Life is sweet. Thanks, kid! l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) has never been the same since reading Ray Bradbury’s The Veldt at age 12.

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ACROSS 1. “Shame on you!” 4. Smucker’s products 8. Veteran 14. 2016 Olympics host 15. “Splendor in the Grass” director Kazan 16. One of about 100 billion in the human brain 17. Suffix with cash 18. Chris of Hollywood 19. Things holding up the works? 20. Smash a noted graffiti artist’s work to pieces? 23. The “E” in Q.E.D. 24. “Maus” cartoonist Spiegelman 25. Prefix with dermis 27. Place where the livestock are constantly fidgeting? 32. Rosa, por ejemplo 33. Speak Persian? 34. Goes public 35. “You won’t be getting any more religious

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BANKSY DOWN dissent from me”? 40. Six-time All Star third baseman Nettles 41. Man, in Roma 42. Reagle of the crossword documentary “Wordplay” 43. Had too much to drink? 48. ____ Mahal 49. “Am ____ your way?” 50. Milky gem 52. Pries on behalf of others? 58. South Carolina’s ____ Beach 59. Faller in the fall 60. ____ mission 61. Neologist 62. Chichen ____ (Mayan ruins) 63. Permit 64. Carsick, say 65. Level 66. ‘60s campus org.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS AIRPORT C A S E A M B I O L A H S E T R E E N C I N A T M O A N G D A N S I R G I N B U D G E T S A I R A E M U E L T A E N T E R P R I S L A N A A S E U N I T E D A L A M O A N N E A P E D S O U T H W E S T D O L L A K I M O A T O L D A T T H E A I R P O R F E L I P E M E G A Y O T A I L O R I R O N D I C R U S T Y T O R T S T R E V V E D

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©2014 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

By Barry Evans

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1. Chief concern? 2. GMC truck 3. Seoul man 4. Soda ____ 5. Bushels 6. Wisc. neighbor 7. Alcoholic beverage served in a masu 8. Like macho push-ups 9. Inclined 10. Nightfall 11. Takes advance orders for 12. Pudgy 13. Slip-____ (some shoes) 21. “The Good Wife” fig. 22. Forbid 26. Org. that tweeted “Want to do your own #taxes?” 28. Far from self-effacing 29. Up to now 30. Rock’s ____ Fighters 31. Ghastly 32. ATM user’s annoyance 34. “Star Trek: T.N.G.” role 35. “Understood”

36. Homer’s wife’s given first name 37. Vinaigrette ingredient 38. Sexy 39. Lifesaver, briefly 40. World clock std. 43. Sunday best 44. Producer whose last name is an anagram of a hit U2 song he produced 45. Long-running PBS documentary film series 46. Thread holders 47. Spun, as a story 49. Some vacation spots 51. They test reasoning skills: Abbr 53. Italian peak 54. Thin opening 55. Hairy legend 56. Throw for a loop 57. Miles off 58. 1974 John Wayne crime drama

EASY #34

B O K D E A

R E T U R N

www.sudoku.com

It’s hard to say who’s real and who’s not in the sci-fi classic Blade Runner, based on Philip K. Dick’s novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

Field notes

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

39


under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Joshua R. Kaufman, CSB# 225987 Stokes, Hamer, Kaufman & Kirk, LLC 381 Bayside Road Arcata, CA. 95521 (707) 822−1771 June 12, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOYCE MARIE FULLER CASE NO. PR140137

tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Joshua R. Kaufman, CSB# 225987 Stokes, Hamer, Kaufman & Kirk, LLC 381 Bayside Road Arcata, CA. 95521 (707) 822−1771 June 12, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, JOYCE MARIE FULLER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by PATRICIA ANN JOHNSON In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that PATRICIA ANN 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−192) JOHNSON Be appointed as personal represen− tative to administer the estate of AMENDED the decedent. NOTICE OF PETITION THE PETITION requests the dece− TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF dent’s will and codicils, if any, be PAULA FITZGERALD YOON admitted to probate. The will and CASE NO. PR140138 any codicils are available for exami− To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, nation in the file kept by court. contingent creditors and persons THE PETITION requests authority to who may otherwise be interested in administer the estate under the the will or estate, or both, PAULA Independent Administration of FITZGERALD Estates Act. (This authority will A PETITION FOR PROBATE has allow the personal representative to been filed by ROBERT FITZGERALD take many actions without In the Superior Court of California, obtaining court approval. Before County of Humboldt. taking certain very important THE PETITION FOR PROBATE 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−191) actions, however, the personal requests that ROBERT FITZGERALD representative will be required to Be appointed as personal represen− give notice to interested persons NOTICE OF PETITION tative to administer the estate of unless they have waived notice or TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF the decedent. consented to the proposed action.) ALICE LOUISE RIEDEL THE PETITION requests the dece− The independent administration CASE NO. PR140154 dent’s will and codicils, if any, be authority will be granted unless an admitted to probate. The will and To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, interested person files an objection any codicils are available for exami− contingent creditors and persons to the petition and shows good nation in the file kept by court. who may otherwise be interested in cause why the court should not THE PETITION requests authority to the will or estate, or both, ALICE grant the authority. administer the estate under the LOUISE RIEDEL A HEARING on the petition will be Independent Administration of A PETITION FOR PROBATE has held on July 10, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Estates Act. (This authority will been filed by JANICE CONN AND the Superior Court of California, allow the personal representative to BARBARA BISHOP County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth take many actions without In the Superior Court of California, Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. obtaining court approval. Before County of Humboldt. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of taking certain very important THE PETITION FOR PROBATE the petition, you should appear at actions, however, the personal requests that JANICE CONN AND the hearing and state your objec− representative will be required to BARBARA BISHOP tions or file written objections with give notice to interested persons Be appointed as personal represen− the court before the hearing. Your unless they have waived notice or tative to administer the estate of appearance may be in person or by consented to the proposed action.) the decedent. your attorney. The independent administration THE PETITION requests the dece− IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a authority will be granted unless an dent’s will and codicils, if any, be contingent creditor of the dece− interested person files an objection admitted to probate. The will and dent, you must file your claim with to the petition and shows good any codicils are available for exami− the court and mail a copy to the cause why the court should not nation in the file kept by court. personal representative appointed grant the authority. THE PETITION requests authority to by the court within the later of A HEARING on the petition will be administer the estate under the either (1) four months from the date held on July 10, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Independent Administration of of first issuance of letters to a the Superior Court of California, Estates Act. (This authority will general personal representative, as County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth allow the personal representative to defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. take many actions without fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of obtaining court approval. Before from the date of mailing or the petition, you should appear at taking certain very important personal delivery to you of a notice the hearing and state your objec− actions, however, the personal under section 9052 of the California tions or file written objections with representative will be required to Probate Code. Other California the court before the hearing. Your give notice to interested persons statutes and legal authority may appearance may be in person or by unless they have waived notice or affect your rights as a creditor. You your attorney. consented to the proposed action.) may want to consult with an IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a The independent administration attorney knowledgeable in Cali− contingent creditor of the dece− authority will be granted unless an fornia law. dent, you must file your claim with interested person files an objection YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court and mail a copy to the to the petition and shows good the court. If you are a person inter− personal representative appointed cause why the court should not ested in the estate, you may file by the court within the later of grant the authority. with the court a Request for Special either (1) four months from the date A HEARING on the petition will be NoticeNorth (form DE−154) of the filing of • Thursday, Coast Journal June 19, 2014to a• northcoastjournal.com of first issuance of letters held on June 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at an inventory and appraisal of estate general personal representative, as the Superior Court of California, assets or of any petition or account defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth as provided in Probate Code section fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. 1250. A Request for Special Notice

40

representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: William T. Kay, JR., SBN#59581 Law Office of Will Kay 628 H Street Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 445−2301 May 29, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−179)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOYCE SWANLUND CASE NO. PR140153 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, JOYCE SWANLUND A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JOHN B. FULLERTON In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JOHN B. FULLERTON Be appointed as personal represen− tative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal

tative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Donald W. Bicknell, CSB #83266 Law Office of Donald W. Bicknell 732 5th Street, Suite H Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 443−0878 June 02, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/12, 6/19, 6/26 (14−183)

ABANDONMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00140 The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDT ANIMAL RESCUE TEAM . Humboldt, at 3954 A Jacobs Avenue, Eureka CA., 95501, PO Box 7236, Eureka, CA. 95502 Humboldt Spay/ Neuter Network 3954 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA. 95501 CA. #2574699 The business is conducted by A Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti−

ABANDONMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00140 The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDT ANIMAL RESCUE TEAM . Humboldt, at 3954 A Jacobs Avenue, Eureka CA., 95501, PO Box 7236, Eureka, CA. 95502 Humboldt Spay/ Neuter Network 3954 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA. 95501 CA. #2574699 The business is conducted by A Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 02/25/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jennifer Raymond This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−162)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00286 The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRADE WIND EXCHANGE. Humboldt, at 39032−4 Hwy 299, Willow Creek CA., 95573 Summer C. Adams PO Box 921 71 Gambi Ln. Willow Creek, CA. 95573 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Summer Adams This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 29, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−169)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00325 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SLIDE WELLNESS, Humboldt, at 1136 Main St., #102, Fortuna, CA., 95540 Katharine M. Jackson 1136 Main St., #102 Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/1/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Katharine M. Jackson, Owner


Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/1/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Katharine M. Jackson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 19, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−170)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00330 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SKIN SENSE, Humboldt, at 75 Country Club Drive, Suite # 4., Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Shauna Hill 611 China Flat Salyer, CA. 95563 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Shauna Hill, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 19, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−176)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00333 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FN DISTRIBUTORS, Humboldt, at 1634 7th Street, Eureka, CA., 95501, PO Box 4591, Arcata, CA. 95518, Adina Leone 1634 7th St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/20/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Adina Leone, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 20, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−181)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00336

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00332 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT POWER AND WATER and HIGH LIFTER PUMP SERVICE, Humboldt, at 1155 Redway Drive, Redway, CA., 95560, PO Box 1640, Redway, CA. 95560 Theodore W. Horner 155 Redway Drive Redway, CA. 95560 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Theodore W. Horner, Jr., Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 20, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−160)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00334 The following persons are doing Business as PALEO PACKS, Humboldt, at 1725 Tomlinson., Eureka, CA. 95503, 1381 Carson Woods, Fortuna, CA. 95540 Ernie R. Albers, Jr. Carrie S. Albers 1381 Carson Woods Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by a Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 05/06/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Ernest R. Albers, Jr., Co−owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−185)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00336 The following person is doing Busi− ness as FILIGREE CAKE COOKIES & PASTRIES, Humboldt, at 2585 1/2 Eye Street, Arcata, CA., 95521 Carin M. Sorisio 2585 1/2 Eye St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/14/2014

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FILIGREE CAKE COOKIES & PASTRIES, Humboldt, at 2585 1/2 Eye Street, Arcata, CA., 95521 Carin M. Sorisio 2585 1/2 Eye St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/14/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Carin Mari Sorosio, Owner, Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−161)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00338 The following persons are doing business as HUMBOLDT SPAY/ NEUTER CLINIC, Humboldt, at 3954 A Jacob Avenue Eureka, CA., 95501, PO Box 7236, Eureka, CA. 95502 Humboldt Spay/ Neuter Network 3954 A Jacobs Avenue Eureka CA. 95501 CA. #2574699 The business is conducted by A Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jennifer Raymond, Executive Director This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−163)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00342 The following person is doing Busi− ness as PACIFIC GYPSIES CLOSET, Humboldt, at 2138 Old Arcata Rd., Bayside, CA. 95524 Sophia D. Whillock 2138 Old Arcata Rd. Bayside, CA. 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars

Bayside, CA. 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Sophia Whillock, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 23, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−168)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00347 The following persons are doing Business as MOONSTONE IMAGES − CHANTELE LEATHERWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY, Humboldt, at 656 Ferncrest, Trinidad, CA. 95570, Chantele J. Leatherwood 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA. 95570 Stephen K. Leatherwood 656 Ferncrest Trinidad, CA. 95570 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 4/1/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Chantele Leatherwood, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 27, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10/2014 (14−190)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00358

tious business name or name listed above on 06/01/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Suzanne M. Alvernaz, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 2, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−174)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00348 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT MUNCHIES, Humboldt, at 577 Main St., Ferndale, CA. 95536, PO Box 71, Bridgeville, CA. 95526 Kelly R. Valentine 25384 Hwy. 36 Bridgeville, CA. 95526 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 05/13/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Kelly R. Valentine, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 27, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−178)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00329 The following person is doing Busi− ness as CHEF FOR YOU, Humboldt, at 16 Pinecrest Dr., Fortuna , CA. 95540, Robin D. Clarke Hemp Café, LLC 16 Pinecrest Dr. Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Robin D. Clarke, Manager (Officer) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 19, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

legal NOTICES continued on next page

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00356 The following person is doing Busi− ness as GRAPHIC HEART DESIGN , Humboldt, at 1385 8th Street, Suite 105, Arcata, CA. 95521, Shannon C. Wisham 1961 Grange Rd. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 9/1/11 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Shannon Wisham, Creative Director/ Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 30, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−184)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00359 The following person is doing Busi− ness as AXIOM SURVEYING & MAPPING, Humboldt, at 4801 Patricia Dr., Eureka, CA. 95503, PO Box 6759, Eureka, CA. 95502 Philip V. Taylor 4801 Patricia Drive Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 06/01/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Philip V. Taylor, Principal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 2, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as VENUS MOTORCYCLES, Humboldt, at 1691 Glendale Dr., McKinleyville, CA. 95519, PO Box 655, Blue Lake, CA. 95525 Suzanne M. Alvernaz 1691 Glendale Dr. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Mandi C. Kindred 725 Ranchoria Rd. Blue Lake, CA. 95525 The business is conducted by A 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−174) General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME tious business name or name listed STATEMENT 14−00365 above on 06/01/14 The following person is doing Busi− I declare the all information in this ness as MIRADOR GLASS, statement is true and correct. Humboldt, at 1590 Nursery Way, A registrant who declares as true Suite 5, McKinleyville, CA. 95519, any material matter pursuant to Bryan D. Raskin Section 17913 of the Business and 970 Greenwood Heights Professions Code that the registrant Kneeland, CA. 95549 knows to be false is guilty of a The business is conducted by An 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−188) misdemeanor punishable by a fine Individual not to exceed one thousand dollars The date registrant commenced to ($1,000). businessJune under19,the2014 ficti− • Thursday, northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal transact /s/ Suzanne M. Alvernaz, Owner tious business name or name listed This statement was filed with the above on n/a County Clerk of Humboldt County I declare the all information in this on June 2, 2014 statement is true and correct.

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STATEMENT 14−00365 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MIRADOR GLASS, Humboldt, at 1590 Nursery Way, Suite 5, McKinleyville, CA. 95519, Bryan D. Raskin 970 Greenwood Heights Kneeland, CA. 95549 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Bryan Raskin This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 04, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 06/09/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Marichu B. Cox, Owner/Oper− ator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 09, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

classified employment

legal notices

6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−182)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00368 The following persons are doing Business as JM Photography, Humboldt, at 1767 Mygina Ave., McKinleyville, CA. 95519, PO Box 963, Blue Lake, CA. 95525 James M. Carlson Melissa M. Carlson 1767 Mygina Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by a Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 6/1/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ James Carlson, Owner/Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 6, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/2014 (14−186)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00372

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JOSHUA LEE BROWN CASE NO. CV140328 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

The following persons are doing Business as HARMONIC BOTANI− CALS, Humboldt, at 2619 Terrace Ave., Arcata, CA. 95521, PO Box 374, Arcata, CA. 95518 Suzanne M. Nye 393 Westgate Trinidad, CA. 95570 Gillian E. Kazala 2619 Terrace Ave. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by A General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Suzanne Nye, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 11, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

PETITION OF: JOSHUA LEE BROWN TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JOSHUA LEE BROWN For a decree changing names as follows: Present name JOSHUA LEE BROWN To Proposed Name JOSHUA LEE LEHR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 9, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: May 21, 24, 2014 Filed: May 21, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court

6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10/2014 (14−189)

6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−173)

6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10/2014 (14−187)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00378

Opportunities

FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS OFFERED BY AREA 1 AGENCY ON AGING’S Trained HICAP counselors the second Thursday of every month through August. Hour−long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Next class: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, 4−5 p.m., July 10. On deck: Medicare Basics for Boomers, August 14, 4−5 p.m.

COME AND WORK FOR AN ORGANIZATION THAT CARES ABOUT PEOPLE. North Coast Co−op is looking for enthusiastic, friendly people who want to make a difference in people’s lives. We pay competitive wages and offer a great benefits package. If you’re interested in working for a leading organization in the community please check our website for full job descriptions. www.northcoastco−op.com Applications should be sent to Human Resources 811 I Street, Arcata, CA 95521. Current job openings: Bakery Manager, Prepared Foods Manager www.northcoastco−op.com

Opportunities $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) (E−0724)

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2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

707.445.9641 2IðFH&OHUN÷&DUSHQWHUV÷/DERUHUV 5HVLGHQWLDO6LGLQJ,QVWDOODWLRQ $GPLQLVWUDWLYH$VVLVWDQW :HOGHU÷5HVLGHQWLDO+RXVHNHHSLQJ 6DOHV÷$XWRGLHVHO0HFKDQLF /6,7÷-DQLWRULDO÷'DWD(QWU\ )RRG6HUYLFH÷+5&RRUGLQDWRU -RXUQH\PDQ(OHFWULFLDQ 'HYHORSPHQW'LUHFWRU÷&DUHJLYHU 6KLSSLQJ5HFHLYLQJ'HOLYHU\&OHUN

AFRICA, BRAZIL WORK/STUDY! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591−0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN) (E−0101) AIRLINE JOBS START HERE. Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qual− ified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Avia− tion Institute of Maintenance 844−210−3935 (AAN CAN) (E−0626)

www.sequoiapersonnel.com

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COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

x     

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Child Welfare Services System Review

We are seeking agencies to design and conduct a System Review The following person is doing Busi− of Humboldt County Child Welfare Services and participating agencies. ness as MASSAGE BY CHU, This review will combine quantitative and qualitative methodologies Humboldt, at 902 S. Fortuna Blvd., to explore questions specific to the unique attributes of the Fortuna, CA. 95540, mailing address communities within Humboldt County. 836 Maxwell St., Fortuna, CA. 95540 Marichu B. Cox Please see the website: http://www.co.humboldt.ca.us/rfp/ 836 Maxwell St. Or Fortuna, CA. 95540 Contact Lisa Rix at The business is conducted by An Lrix@co.humboldt.ca.us Individual Or The date registrant commenced to (707) 476-4763 transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed Proposals to be received by 5:00 p.m. on July 31, 2014 above on 06/09/14 at the address listed above. Proposals received after this date I declare the all information in this will not be considered. Faxes will not be accepted. No additional statement is true and correct. information or documentation will be accepted from A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to proposers after the proposal due date. Section 17913 of the Business and 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14 (14-153) Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine Journal notNorth to exceedCoast one thousand dollars• Thursday, June 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com ($1,000). /s/ Marichu B. Cox, Owner/Oper− ator This statement was filed with the

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Clubs/Orgs

We are seeking applicants for the following positions:

COOK 1 COOK 2 LEAD FOOD SERVICE WORKER 1 Full-time positions with benefits For job descriptions and application procedure, visit: http://tinyurl.com/ aoh9ylp Close: June 30, 2014, 4pm

x      x      

Equal opportunity employer

Bring resume and cover letter to 217 E St., Eureka and fill out application


Opportunities

Opportunities

CONTINUED ON next page

Opportunities

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CALIFORNIA MENTOR. CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW. Make extra money working from home, GREAT OPPORTUNITY. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3600 tax−free/mo. Bring 4 references. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Sharon today for appt! (707) 442−4500 ext 16! www.camentorfha.com. (E−0626)

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We are growing…

  

 

Hospice of Humboldt is growing and we have many benefitted positions available in the nursing department:

            IXOOWLPHEHQH¿WV Come join our staff of caring professionals and work in a great environment. Go to our website www.hospiceofhumboldt.org for more information and to review the job descriptions. Email your letter of interest and resume to: cburton@ hospiceofhumboldt.org Or mail to: Christine Burton, HR Director Hospice of Humboldt 2010 Myrtle Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 441-0105 x308 Hospice of Humboldt is a drug free workplace.



 

 





 

 

 

 

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**Annual JOB POOL** NCS anticipates a number of Head Start, Early Head Start & State Program job openings for our 20142015 program year. Potential positions are throughout Humboldt & Del Norte Counties and may be year-round or school-year. Anticipated start date: Late August/early September

CENTER DIRECTOR CENTER TEACHER (Humboldt) FAMILY WORKER HOME VISITOR TEAM TEACHER/TEACHER ASSOCIATE TEACHER COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER (Humboldt) ASSISTANT TEACHER CLASSROOM ASSISTANT SPECIAL AIDE INTERPRETER (Spanish) COOK/ASSISTANT COOK HOUSEKEEPER SUBSTITUTES

Submit Application to: NCS 1266 9th St., Arcata, CA 95521 or NCS Del Norte Office 475 7th St., Crescent City, CA 95531 For application, job descriptions & more info, visit www.ncsheadstart.org or call 707-822-7206 or 707-464-6936 (Del Norte)

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K’ima:w Medical Center,

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

Billing Office Manager, FT/Regular Coordinates and supervises the overall functions of all KMC patient billing, cashiering, patient accounts file maintenance, and credit and collection of patient bills; reconciles accounts receivable and balances to general ledger control accounts as directed; directs the implementation of administration/approved billing, and collection policies. Minimum requirements: Bachelor’s degree (B.S.) in Business or related field is desired, from fouryear college or university; however, experience in hospital patient accounting will be considered in lieu of college degree (5 years minimum experience); or equivalent combination of education and experience; Certification desired in one of the following certifications: Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS); Certified Professional Coder (CPC); Certified in Health Compliance (CHC); Certified Revenue Cycle Representative Program (CRCR); Certified Healthcare Financial Professional (CHFP); Fellow American College of Healthcare Executives (FACHE); or Fellow of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (FHFMA). Deadline to apply is extended to 5 PM, June 27, 2014.

Nurse Manager, FT/Regular Coordinates clinical nursing care, provides clinical nursing care, responsible for setting the standards for clinical nursing care by maintaining up-to-date nursing policies, procedures and protocols. Minimum Requirements: CA RN Licensure; Bachelor degree preferred; two years management experience preferred. Open until filled.

Child and Family Services Elder Case Worker, FT/Regular Assists in needs assessment and development of appropriate case plan, initiates referrals, and support services to high risk elders; prepares status reports including recommendations to courts and agencies; may be required to review and case manage non-elder cases; and, assists in investigation of actual cases of elder abuse as required by law. Minimum Requirements: Bachelor degree; degree in Psychology, Behavioral Sciences, Social Work, Social Services or related field desired; knowledge of federal, state, tribal and local laws, regulations, statutes and ordinances; and, knowledgeable about the Indian Child Welfare Act. Open until filled. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 19, 2014

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Opportunities

Opportunities

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262. (E−0619)

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO Part-Time Positions: Line/Prep Cook Prep Cook/Dishwasher Table Games Dealer/Dual Rate Valet Surveillance Officer

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Kitchen Janitor

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14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

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EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportuni− ties. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039. (E−0703)

MEDICAL BILLER - 2 F/T Arcata CERTIFIED MEDICAL CODER - 1 F/T Arcata

ď ˆď •ď ?ď ‚ď ?ď Œď „ď ” ď “ď •ď ?ď …ď ’ď ‰ď ?ď ’ď€ ď ƒď ?ď •ď ’ď ”

REGISTERED NURSE 1 Temp P/T Willow Creek RN CLINIC COORDINATOR (SUPV) 1 F/T Willow Creek FAMILY PRACTICE MD/DO 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T McKinleyville OB-GYN - 1 F/T Arcata Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete and submit our online application

Full-time position with benefits http://tinyurl.com/aoh9ylp

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First review June 30, 2014

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PLACE YOUR PET AD!

ď ď Žď ´ď Šď ąď ľď Ľď łď€ ď€Śď€ ď ?ď Żď ˛ď Ľď€ 

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For more information, visit:

Deadline:

Sporting Goods Community

FURNITURE SALE: JUNE 17−21 Dream Quest Thrift Store. Friday Frenzy Sale. Quarter Rack. Where your shopping dollars help local youth realize their dreams, Willow Creek. (530) 629−3006.

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ď ˆď •ď ?ď ‚ď ?ď Œď „ď ” ď “ď •ď ?ď …ď ’ď ‰ď ?ď ’ď€ ď ƒď ?ď •ď ’ď ”

ď ď °ď °ď Źď Šď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď łď€ ď Ąď ˛ď Ľď€ ď ˘ď Ľď Šď Žď §ď€  ď Ąď Łď Łď Ľď °ď ´ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď Śď Żď ˛ď€ 

ď ƒď Żď ľď ˛ď ´ď€ ď Œď Ľď §ď Ąď Źď€  ď ?ď ˛ď Żď Łď Ľď łď łď€ ď ƒď Źď Ľď ˛ď Ťď€ ď ‰

ď€¤ď€˛ď€°ď€¸ď€łď€Žď€´ď€ˇď€ ď ´ď Żď€  PREHQHĂ€WV ď †ď ‚ď ‰ď€Żď „ď ?ď Šď€Żď ‚ď Ąď Łď Ťď §ď ˛ď Żď ľď Žď ¤

ď ď °ď °ď Źď Šď Łď Ąď ´ď Šď Żď Žď łď€ ď Ąď Łď Łď Ľď °ď ´ď Ľď ¤ď€ ď ´ď ¨ď ˛ď Żď ľď §ď ¨ď€ 



ď ‰ď Žď Śď Żď€şď€ ď€¨ď€ˇď€°ď€ˇď€Šď€ ď€˛ď€śď€šď€­ď€ąď€˛ď€´ď€ľ ď ˆď ’ď €ď ¨ď ľď ­ď ˘ď Żď Źď ¤ď ´ď Łď Żď ľď ˛ď ´ď€Žď Łď Ąď€Žď §ď Żď ś ď Žď Ąď Žď Łď šď łď €ď ¨ď ľď ­ď ˘ď Żď Źď ¤ď ´ď Łď Żď ľď ˛ď ´ď€Žď Łď Ąď€Žď §ď Żď ś

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

ď€Źď ‘ď ‡ď ’ď ’ď •ď€ƒď€ľď „ď ‘ď Šď ˆ ď€Şď ˜ď ‘ď –ď€ƒď€‰ď€ƒď€¤ď ?ď ?ď ’ ď€Şď ˜ď ‘ď€ƒď€ľď ˆď ‘ď —ď „ď ?ď –

 

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KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/ Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot.com (AAN CAN) (M−0710) LARGE BOOK SALE AND YARD SALE. Antiquarian and current books. 839 Spring St, Arcata, Sat., June 21, 9 a.m.−4 p.m.

HAPPY HOUR FINDER • FREE DOWNLOAD OR

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BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13−18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441−5013, ask for Peggy

ď ‰ď Žď Śď Żď€şď€ ď€¨ď€ˇď€°ď€ˇď€Šď€ ď€˛ď€śď€šď€­ď€ąď€˛ď€´ď€ľ ď ˆď ’ď €ď ¨ď ľď ­ď ˘ď Żď Źď ¤ď ´ď Łď Żď ľď ˛ď ´ď€Žď Łď Ąď€Žď §ď Żď ś ď Žď Ąď Žď Łď šď łď €ď ¨ď ľď ­ď ˘ď Żď Źď ¤ď ´ď Łď Żď ľď ˛ď ´ď€Žď Łď Ąď€Žď §ď Żď ś

PERSONAL ATTENDANT REMI VISTA INC. Provides support services by assisting individuals with developmental disabilities. Must be 21+ with a clean driving record, valid driver’s license, and full use of a vehicle. Must pass a physical, drug test and criminal back− ground check. $9.50/hour. Please email swillie@remivistainc.org or call (707) 268−8722 for more information.

IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

BOVANESE PUPPIES $1,500 Bolognese x Havanese Brilliant & playful. 825−6658 sunnybraefarm.com

Merchandise

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20 words and a photo,

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MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T McKinleyville MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Eureka (Spanish language required)

Center Activities University Center, HSU

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OFFICE MANAGER - 1 F/T Crescent City

DENTAL HYGIENIST - 1 F/T Eureka

SEASONAL LABORER McKinleyville CSD is seeking a Seasonal Laborer in the Operations Department. Must possess valid CA Class C DL. Starting salary $11.42/hr. This is a temporary full time position. Application at mckinleyvillecsd.com or 1656 Sutter Rd. McK. Deadline 6/27/14

Pets & Livestock

Program Supervisor

ď€¤ď€˛ď€šď€°ď€¸ď€Žď€ľď€łď€ ď€­ď€ ď€¤ď€łď€ľď€´ď€šď€Žď€¸ď€ˇď€Żď ­ď Żď€  EHQHĂ€WV ď †ď ‚ď ‰ď€Żď „ď ?ď Šď€Żď ‚ď Ąď Łď Ťď §ď ˛ď Żď ľď Žď ¤

SITE ADMINISTRATOR - 1 F/T Arcata

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E−0626)

Art & Collectibles

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CASE MANAGER - 1 F/T Eureka

Opportunities

NCJ Cocktail Compass

www.northcoastjournal.com

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com


CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Computer & Internet

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1−888−420−3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A−0717)

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YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−0626)

Cleaning CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−0626) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded, #3860. (707) 444−2001 or (707) 502−1600. Top Rated Cleaning Service on Angie’s List in the State. First Time Cleaning 2 hours or more $10 off. (S−0731)

JEANNIE’S CLEANING SERVICE. "Maid for the day" References available Call (707) 921−9424 or (707) 445−2644 jbates5931@att.net $20/hour or by the job (negotiable)

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

northcoastjournal

Garden & Landscape ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−0703) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, www.taichigardener.com (S−0626)

707-840-0600

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

PROJECTS UNLIMITED Honey−Do’s are my Specialty. Living and Working in Arcata Area Since 1983 Bob Billstrom, Handyman (707) 822−7037 (707) 834−8059 tunesmith89@sbcglobal.net

Other Professionals

SWAIN’S FLAT OUTPOST GARDEN CENTER UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT! ALL NEW INVENTORY!!! SOIL! AMENDEMENTS! FERTILIZERS! ANYTHING UNDER THE SUN! MILE 19 ON HIGHWAY 36 OPEN 9AM−7PM General Store (707) 777−3385 Garden Cnt. (707) 777−3513 outpostgardencenter @gmail.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087, 845−3132 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com. (S−0626)

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 444−8507. (M−0626) default

PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nation− ally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−0626)

IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−0626) default

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866−413−6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN) (S−0710)

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WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

Other Professionals

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Roofing/Repairs, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 267−0496 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

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A’O’KAY CLOWN & NANI NATURE. Juggling Jesters and Wizards of Play present Perfor− mances for all Ages; A magical adventure with circus games & toys. For info. on our variety of shows and to schedule events & parties please call us at (707) 499−5628. Visit us at circusnature.com (S−0626)

Other Professionals default

MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834. (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−0731)

Musicians & Instructors

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 

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−0807)

Computer & Internet

  

Home Repair



Auto Service

classified SERVICES



   

Sewing & Alterations MRS. SEW AND SEW Sewing and Alterations in Arcata. Summer special Jeans hem $10 Fast turn around time! Call Nancy (707) 499−3265

insured & bonded





Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001 default

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        

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8 a.m.− 3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n−Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog. Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014

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body, mind

&Spirit default

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YOGA CLASS Eureka Instructor Sara Bane EARTH RITE MASSAGE. Intuitive deep tissue massage from ORR Hotsprings CMT. 1 hour $50, 1 1/2 Hours $75. More information on facebook. Call Rick: (707) 499− 6033. Treat yourself or a loved one to healing touch. (MB−0626)

Hatha Yoga Friday, 9-10:15 AM A deep & flowing practice that connects your body, breath, & mind $12/drop in, or 5/$50 525 E St., Eureka sacredbodiespilates.com



Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$

80



Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

Walk-ins Welcome



Wed & Sat 11-5pm

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HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111





Est. 1979

LOSE UP TO 60 POUNDS IN 60 DAYS! Once daily appetite suppressant burns fat and boosts energy for healthy weight loss. 60 day supply−$59.95. Call (877) 761−2991 (AAN CAN) (MB−0710) ROLFING SUMMER SPECIAL 50% off first session plus free body analysis! (541) 251−1885. (MB−0626) default

758(027,21),71(66   featuring

Muscle Activation Techniques™:

A systematic approach to strengthen, stabilize and reduce stress at joints and surrounding muscle tissue

Gym Memberships Personal Training (707) 822-3018 info@truemotionfitness.com www.truemotionfitness.com 901 O St, Suite B, Arcata default

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

        



 

F r Marny E Friedman E ~energy work~ d o M 707-839-5910

$

8-Week Term Starts June 24 • Traditional T’ai Chi • T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

839-1244

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

For Schedule and Fees:

margaretemerson@att.net

HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

Additional Info: www.margaretemerson.com

RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

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445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

1-800-273-TALK

1339 WILLIAMS. 1/1 Duplex, Garbage Paid, Carport, Fenced bkyard. Rent $640. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0619) GASSOWAY APTS, MCK. 2/1 Apts, Laundry, Carport, Small Pets, Rent $750, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0619)

Roommates ALL AREAS − ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online list− ings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R−0717)



816 2ND ST., EUREKA. Studio Rooms with Kitch− enette, Shared Bathrooms, All Utilities Pd., No Pets, $400/Month $600/Sec. Deposit. Call Preston, (707) 444−2199.

Acreage for Sale

1140 E ST. Studio Apts, Laundry, Cat & Sec 8 OK, OSRM. Rent $540 Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197, www.ppmrentals.com (R−0619) 2266 REDWOOD #B. 2/1 Dwnstrs Apt in Sunny Cutten, Laundry, Cat OK. Rent $760 Vac Now. . Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0619) FURNISHED STUDIO APARTMENT IN EUREKA. All utilities. Dish TV and internet service included. $600 per month, (707) 444−8117. (R−0626)

SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems?

LCS # 23232

230 WABASH APTS. 2/1 Units near bus lines, Carport, OSRM, Cat OK. Rent $675. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197, www.ppmrentals.com (R−0619)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Medical Cannabis Consultants  

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Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW

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  

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Daytime Beginning Classes meet at K & Samoa, Arcata All others call for location

New Patients ONLY

Apartments for Rent

95

iamalso@hotmail.com

Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

707.445.4642

with Margy Emerson

822-6508 default

Just need someone to talk to?

consciousparentingsolutions.com

Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students

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Apartments for Rent

444-2273

2014 WEDDING & PARTY GUIDE

FIND IT ON NEWSSTANDS AND AT LOCAL WEDDING & PARTY RETAILERS

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

A complete resource for kids of all ages!

Summer Camps & Activity Programs Visual & Performing Arts Nature & Science Sports, Athletics & Adventure

Search the complete directory online at northcoastjournal.com/wedding Printed with environmentally friendly UV inks.

2014

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engi− neering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $89,900 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

ONLINE NOW

INSIDE VENUES | JEWELRY | GOWNS & TUXEDOES

| FLOWERS | BAKERIES AND MORE

www.northcoastjournal.com/SOF2014


classified HOUSING Housing/Properties Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net $449,900

4 bed, 3 bath, 2,800 sq ft beautiful Eureka home, end of street with large deck overlooking a greenbelt, quality throughout, oak floors, granite kitchen counters, accessible storage, three car garage

classified.northcoastjournal.com ■ Eureka

G!

Looking for rental income? These Eureka units are located on a corner lot and consist of one studio apartment, 2 onebedroom apartments and 1 two-bedroom unit. Refrigerators and ranges included in the sale. Very good rental history. Convenient Eureka location. Call for an appointment today $295,000. MLS# 240651

NEW LISTIN

$239,000

2 bed, 1 bath, 940 sq ft Fortuna home on large lot with private yard, established fruit trees, property borders a small creek, this home was designed and built to add an addition if needed

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

$799,000 72 Acres in Sunny

Blue Lake

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

707.83 4.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent #01930997

707.834.7979

707.476.0435

Redwood Creek Land/Property Beautiful house with vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, granite kitchen counter tops and island, lots of windows and a sunroom with forest views. Solar electricity, central heating, Lopi wood stove in the living room and gas stove in the bedroom provide cozy heat without the central heat. It’s a 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2078 square ft home built in 2000. House is surrounded by Trex decking and has a solar heated pool with view and relaxing spa. Grape arbor with sweet red and green table grapes. Fruit tree orchard with apples, pears, peaches, plums and more. Two 2,500 gallon spring fed water tanks. 1,000 juvenile redwood trees along with adult oak and fir trees. Large authentic smoke house for your own meat and fish creations. New 25’x 60’x 14’ barn with aluminum siding, shop and wood shed with room for a horse corral. Large enclosed dog run and kennel.

±34 acres only 30 minutes from arcata on Chezem Road. Become part of the Redwood Valley community with this amazing property. enjoy your summers on over ¼ mile Redwood Creek frontage, and a fantastic swimming hole. private road access, low elevation, and power to the property make this a dream.

$324,000

Weitchpec Eureka Single Family Home the best of the old world with the new! this two bedroom home Land/Property enjoy elegantly combines original craftsman style with top of the line upgrades. ±40 acres with Cappell Road running through the property. property features great access, seasonal springs, developed building sites and river frontage!

$114,000

Office

Karen Mann, Realtor

(707) 839-3900 • (707) 499-8891 • BRE#01347366

karen@coastcentralrealty.com • www.coastcentralrealty.com

Recently remodeled the main home features beautiful original hardwood flooring throughout, revamped original windows, upgraded plumbing and wiring, and new forced air heating. a gourmet kitchen with all new stainless appliances, including a professional Italian-made Bertazzoni stove! the second one bedroom unit has also been recently remodeled and includes the original claw-foot tub/shower, new appliances, gas ’’woodstove’’, and a separate spacious laundry room. this home has a detached two car garage with alley access and an art studio space. Set in a quiet neighborhood near Henderson Center, shopping, and hospitals this home is the total package.

$359,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 19, 2014

47


Drilling for glory at Arcata Plaza start (top) and crossing Humboldt Bay (bottom).

The Tempus Fugitives team, in all its glory.

Murphy’s Salutes

At Slippery Slope (top) and Tempus Pilot MJ Mazurek (bottom).

Tempus Fugitives “We were aiming for world domination,” says Tempus Fugitives’ Sarah Smith. And she’s pretty much achieved that goal. Last month, the Tempus vehicle “Drilling for Glory” took the Kinetic Sculpture Race championship over Memorial Weekend. Again. In 2011, Tempus won the KSR flying high on its “Time Machine.” Then TF went on to kinetic glory at Corvallis’ race in 2012 and Klamath Falls in 2013. “We never really thought we’d be that fast,” says James Smith, Sarah’s kinetic - as well as life partner. “We just tried to build a really efficient machine, but one that supports big art. Tempus generally goes with steampunk-inspired art with literary allusions (like last year’s Kafkaesque “Apocalyptic Cockroach”). This year, Tempus returned back to the classic drill vehicle made famous through such cartoon cars as Dick Dastardly and Muttley’s #00 Double Zero – the Mean Machine with the drill nose. Tempus likes being the bad guys. And the Drilling for Glory

machine is to drill through the earth crust in search of the fabled Hobartium – the source of kinetic glory. The nod to Kinetic Sculpture progenitor Hobart Brown won over a lot of kinetic veterans. Futuristic design, speed and fun… while maintaining KSR’s roots probably had a lot to do with Tempus also winning this year’s Racer Award, chosen by fellow teams. “These guys are a total bore...they bore thru everything...including the awards!” jokes perennial racer Duane Flatmo about his competitors and their drill design. “ They’re a kickass team with all the elements to pull off such a victory.” Acclaim besides, Tempus relied on a solid chassis and over-six years of mechanical tinkering. But even more important was the crew - 13 hearty souls of hard workers. The team is comprised of the Smiths, pilots Jon Nickelson, Jacob Bailey, MJ Mazurek and all the pit crew Jessica and Dan Davis, Sandra Levinson, David Franklin, Logan Rose, Joe Labani, Tom Kirk and Michelle McKenzie.

“We looks for people who are good at showing up, having a great attitude, mechanical inclination and a willingness to sing and dance whimsically,” says James. You don’t have to be able to do all those things, but you need to do most.” Everyone has their own skills and assets,” says Pit Mistress Sarah, who’s charged with keeping everyone in line. All those bodies demand fuel… particularly the pilots in moving machine down the road, sand and water. And every year, Tempus Fugitives turns to Murphy’s to get them going. “Pretty much all of our team’s food for kinetic weekend comes from Murphy’s including the ingredients for Chef Dan’s famous Kahlua pork tacos,” says Tempus’s Jessica Davis (tacos that James refers to as “grubbin.’”) “Murphy’s has the best meat department in the county and we wouldn’t go anywhere else for our pork.” So what can kinetic fans expect from the Fugitives next year? James says the team is full of bad ideas. By Terrence McNally, Advertising, North Coast Journal

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood


North Coast Journal 06-19-14 Edition