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thursday June 5, 2014 vol XXV issue 23 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

northcoastjournal.com

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s t l es7u r oange 1 i t c ele p 7 Stickerbombin’ 8 Crab grass 25 Grill ’em all 32 Tearin’ up the pee patch 37 A million ways to disappoint 46 All charged up


Coach Jeff Giacomini

Coach Scott St. John

Murphy’s Supports

The B-52s

Yes, the boys of summer have returned to Humboldt County… but they aren’t solely donning Crabs jerseys. The county has a new wood bat semi-professional baseball team — the Humboldt B-52s. And they are Humboldt through and through. Comprised mostly of local collegiate athletes, rounded out by a handful of out-of-town players, the team is only a couple months old. Yet the B-52s already boast a 25-player roster — and impressively — a 45-game summer schedule. Interest among local players was heavy and several regional college players saw joining the team as a great excuse to spend the summer in Humboldt. “I was just looking for the opportunity to coach something from the ground up,” says Coach Scott St. John. He was approached by former Crabs players, locals Jeff Giacomini, Zack Smith and Spencer Duggan, about joining the team and St. John jumped at the chance. He’d coached for years locally. Initially, St. John coached for Arcata Little League and gradually moved up the ranks from Babe Ruth, to Arcata High’s junior varsity up to American Legion baseball. Family commitments had St. John sit out about five years, but the chance to work with Giacomini, Smith and Duggan was too enticing. “Spencer kept getting asked by (College of the Redwoods)

kids,” St. John says about early motivation to form the team. Everyone knew interest had reached a tipping point. The B-52s are also bringing in former Crabs southpaw pitcher Drew Bradshaw. But the team is really a chance for lots of community college players to spend the summer honing their skills. Historically, the Humboldt Crabs draw a majority of their players from universities outside the area. The B-52s will field overwhelmingly from local ranks. “Once we got the schedule, it really started looking like something feasible,” St. John says. Two dozen of the B-52s games will be played at the Arcata Ball Park, several of them against Crabs opponents. The Indians, San Francisco Seals, Fontanetti’s Athletics and Alameda Merchants will be extending their stays to square off against the B-52s. Playing at what St. John believes is the best field in Northern California is important to the B-52s’ potential growth. Baseball fans know it well and the amenities are the best. “We really want the community to be involved,” he says about the fan-friendly Arcata Ball Park. “To be successful, we want people to come watch us play.” The team will be rounding out its schedule at McKinleyville High School’s ball field.

But community support isn’t just important for filling the stands. The B-52s are continuing a tradition of local baseball that runs from tee-ball through semi-pro ball. Giacomini, Duggan and Smith’s families have been involved in Humboldt baseball for generations. Sunny Brae Murphy’s Manager Carlos Avelar — a perennial Little League and Babe Ruth coach at Arcata and McKinleyville — captained St. John’s Arcata Little League All-Stars team back in 1982. “I was 12-years old… and he coached me and my brother,” St. John says. Murphy’s support has extended to financial sponsorship of several youth leagues. It’s not about the outfield advertising opportunities for the markets. It’s about making sure local kids have a chance to participate and learn the benefits of teamwork. “They’re great people,” St. John says about the Murphy’s organization. “And I think that they’re under-appreciated for what they do.” But often, St. John’s concerns are more immediate, like grabbing lunch at Murphy’s Westwood Market deli. “I’m there two to three times a week. And Spencer raves about their sandwiches.” Look for the B-52s’ season schedule at humboldtb52s.com. Let’s play ball! By Terrence McNally, Advertising, North Coast Journal

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem Wisteria

6 7 8

Best of Humboldt Ballot Blog Jammin’ Buhne Tribune Mayor Jager’s Merry Massage Brigade

10 Home & Garden Service Directory

11 Week in Weed Bongress

13 Bobarazzi

Around Humboldt County

14 On The Cover

your doorstep ...

21 Art Beat

Breakdancing With the Spirits

22 Arts Alive!

Saturday, June 7, 6-9 p.m.

24 Fortuna First Friday June 6, 5-8 p.m.

24 Trinidad Art Night Friday, June 6, 6-9 p.m. 25 Table Talk Dressed to Grill

26 The Setlist

Rounding the bass

Sustainable Living Exposition Special Insert

28 Music & More!

live entertainment

32 Down and Dirty The June To-Do List

33 Calendar 37 Filmland

Legendary Letdowns

38 Workshops 46 Sudoku & Crossword 46 Field Notes The Bane of Batteries

47 Marketplace 50 Body, Mind & Spirit 51 Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014

3


June 5, 2014 Volume XXV No. 23

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2014 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com news editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman, Jessica McGuinty, Genevieve Schmidt contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com art director/production manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com graphic design/production Amy Barnes, Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Christian Pennington general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Terrence McNally terrence@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions manager Drew Hyland office manager/bookkeeper Carmen England receptionist/classified assistant Michelle Wolff

mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHoNe: 707 442-1400 faX: 707 442-1401

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover: Photo by Grant Scott-Goforth

But I Play One On TV Editor: As one of only three local television commercial producers still working for the television stations creating “something quick and stupid” for an onslaught of local businesses week in and week out for the past 30 years, I take umbrage to college professor Montel Vanderhorck’s insinuation, “that’s how they kind of keep the small guy out” from being able to compete in the local commercial production industry with beautifully crafted jewels of inspired cinematic wonder (“Bye, Folks,” May 29). Hey, perhaps it’s just a better business model. All I know is, the disparaging words about our cheap-ass TV ads has us crying, (sniff, sniff) ... crying all the way to the bank and taking hundreds of happy business owners with us. By the way, independent producers Matt and Rick St. Charles, John Graves, Malcolm DeSoto, Chad Johnson, Aix Battoe and a few others are making great local ads on a regular basis. I’m extremely impressed with their efforts. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have 45 minutes to write, shoot and edit this thing to get it ready to air on your favorite television show. We’ll miss you, Corky! Ross Rowley, Fortuna

Leave the Birds Out of This Editor: I appreciated the informative article on biologist Ron LeValley (“A Birder Takes a Fall,” May 29). However, I must question your choice of headline and characterization of

Wisteria Wisteria’s blooming above the gate with heavy blossoms borne by every shoot and it begins to bend beneath the weight of lavender racemes that hang like fruit. Its wrist-thick vines grip tight the posts and swell within the grape-stake fence gaps, an embrace of many years that’s shaped the vine to fill the narrow gaps between the posts and stakes.  Time shapes us thus to fit the place we choose, rounds us here, bends us thus to fit just so. We hang fast to the things we love and know. And like this gnarled old vine, my life has fused to house and street and little seaside town and they have made me what I am right now. — Barbara Dilworth

Humboldt Crabs Baseball

2014 Season

WEEKLY SCHEDULE Wednesday, June 4 Valley Bears, 7 PM Friday, June 6 Seals Baseball, 7 PM Saturday, June 7 Seals Baseball, 7 PM Sunday, June 8 Seals Baseball, 12:30 PM Tuesday, June 10 Healdsburg Prune Packers, 7 PM www.humboldtcrabs.com

Crabs Ballpark 9th & F Arcata

4 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

WATERSHED RESOURCES CONSULTING Hollie Hall & Associates

Water Use & Rights Permitting Service

FREE PHONE CONSULTATION

Easily file:

• Statements of Water Diversion & Use • Registration of Small Domestic Use

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him as “a birder and environmentalist who knowingly and systematically circumvented federal and tribal governments.” Ron’s legal problems stemmed from his work as a professional consulting biologist and had nothing to do with what he did with his spare time, his hobby. In the future, please spare us from similar headlines such as “Golfer Lands in Rough (in Attempt to Rob Bank)” or “NASCAR Fan Hits Wall (in Domestic Dispute with Spouse).” Tom Leskiw, Eureka

Not So Miserable Editor: Broadway be damned. The talent pool here in the greater Eureka area is stupendous. This coming from a former New York theatre snob. I have seen “Les Miserables” almost a dozen times including New York and Europe and broadcast orchestrations and in three languages. After experiencing tonight the current production at North Coast Repertory Theatre, I say Broadway be damned! The production staff must be applauded for successfully bringing such a huge, epic production into this charming intimate environment. I want to mention a few special names but that would include everyone connected. Simply, and in the interest of column


CARTOON BY TERRY TORGERSON

space in the paper (I can get wordy), I encourage you to see this — it is a haveto. No excuses. It is running through the 21st of June. Richard Eisner, Arcata

Write a letter! Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@ northcoastjournal.com ●

Comment of the Week “Why is it so hard to believe that this guy could be a great biologist and rotten human being at the same time?” — Rita Jacinto on biologist Ron Levalley’s embezzlement sentencing on the Journal’s Facebook page.

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HUMBOLDT GROWN SINCE 1987 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

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NOMINATE

JUNE 2 - JUNE 30

VOTE

PARTY: AUGUST 6

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MAY 1 - MAY 22

www.northcoastjournal.com/BOH2014 Voting closes Monday, June 30 at 5 p.m.

FOOD & DRINK 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Bar to Take a Date: The Speakeasy, The Pearl, Siren Song Tavern Dive Bar: The Shanty, The Alibi, Everett’s Sports Bar: Sidelines, Steve and Dave’s, The Logger Bar, Bar Fly Bartender: Jayme Cohn at Oberon Grill, Kelsie Derusha at The Palm Lounge, Steve at Steve and Dave’s Happy Hour: Rita’s, Applebee’s, Plaza Grill Bloody Mary: The Alibi, The Shanty, AA Bar and Grill Martini: The Pearl, The Speakeasy, Oberon Grill Brewery: Mad River Brewing, Redwood Curtain Brewing Company, Lost Coast Brewery Beer: Great White, Lost Coast Brewery, Tangerine Wheat, Lost Coast Brewery, Steelhead, Mad River Brewing IPA: Eel River Brewery IPA, Mad River Brewing Double IPA, Redwood Curtain Brewing Company Space Oddity Specialty/Seasonal Beer: Raspberry Lambic at Six Rivers Brewery, Tangerine Wheat at Lost Coast Brewery, Bourbon Barrel Vanilla Porter at Mad River Brewing Company Winery: Moonstone Crossing, Fieldbrook Winery, Briceland Vineyards Wine: Riverbend Cellars Firehouse Red, Fieldbrook Winery Babera, Moonstone Crossing Dark as Night Coffee House: Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, Ramone’s , Cafe Brio Coffee Roasters: Humboldt Bay Coffee Company, Old Town Coffee and Chocolates, Muddy Waters Steak: AA Bar and Grill, Oberon Grill, Folie Douce French Fries: The Trailer, Lost Coast Brewery, Arcata Pizza and Deli Hot Dog: Humboldt Hot Dogs, Wolf Dawg, Costco Sugar Fix: Arcata Scoop, Living The Dream, Ramone’s Milkshake: Fresh Freeze, Star’s, Toni’s Donut: Don’s Donuts, Donut Mill, Happy Donuts Sandwich: Hole in The Wall, Central Sandwich, North Coast Co-op Food Truck: Naan of the Above, The Trailer, Speedy Taco Sushi: Tomo, Sushi Spot, Kyoto Asian: Pho Thien Long, Gonsea, Bencharong Thai Mexican: Carmela’s, Rita’s, Chapala’s, Luzmila’s Italian: Abruzzi’s, Mazzotti’s, La Trattoria Vegetarian: Golden Harvest, Wildflower Cafe, Japhy’s

29. Vegan: Wildflower Cafe, Humboldt Healthy Foods, Lost Coast Cafe, Golden Harvest 30. Pizza: Paul’s Live From New York, Babe’s Pizza, Smug’s Pizza 31. Burger: Star’s, Surfside Burger Shack, The Trailer 32. Bakery: Cafe Brio, Ramone’s, Vellutini Baking Company 33. Breakfast: Golden Harvest, Big Blue Cafe, Renata’s Creperie 34. Late Night Food: Toni’s, Arcata Pizza And Deli, Don’s Donuts 35. Hangover Breakfast: The Alibi, Golden Harvest, Toni’s 36. Eatery on a Budget: Japhy’s, Los Bagels, Smug’s Pizza, The Trailer, Taco Faktory 37. Restaurant when money is no object: Larrupin Cafe, Folie Douce, Brick and Fire 38. Eats in SoHum: Cecil’s, The Woodrose, Flavors, Benbow Inn 39. Grocery Store: North Coast Co-op, Eureka Natural Foods, Wildberries

ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT, RECREATION 40. Artist: Duane Flatmo, Sonny Wong, Blake Reagan 41. Tattoo Artist: Henry Kruger, Mike Arneson, Brian Kaneko 42. Festival: Oyster Fest, North County Fair, Kinetic Sculpture Race 43. Karaoke: Blue Lake Casino, Bar Fly, Central Station 44. Band: Dr. Squid, The Hill, Gun Safe, Huckleberry Flint, Naive Melodies 45. Musician: Buddy Reed, Burly Dent, Eric Mueller 46. Club DJ: Pressure Anya, DJ Red, DJ Razor Burns, Stir Fry Willie, DJ Rude Lion 47. Live Music Venue: Arcata Theater Lounge, HumBrews, The Palm Lounge 48. Place to Shoot Pool: Roses’ Billiards, Bar Fly, E&O Bowl, Sal’s Off Broadway 49. Farmer’s Market Vendor: Neukom Family Farm, Shakefork Farms, Flying Blue Dog 50. Golf Course: Beau-Pre, Redwood Curtain Disc, Baywood, Eureka Muni 51. Weekend Getaway: San Francisco, Shelter Cove, Trinity River 52. Swimming Hole: Devil’s Elbow, Kimtu, Swimmers Delight 53. Day Hike: Trinidad Head, Headwaters Forest, Strawberry Rock

SERVICES & STUFF 54. Antiques: Heritage Antiques, Antiques and Goodies, Daisy’s Drygoods 55. Secondhand Store: Hospice Shop Arcata, Angels of Hope , Shipwreck 56. Pawn Shop: Humboldt Bay Trade & Pawn, Eureka Pawn Shop, Bob’s Pawndemonium 57. Head Shop: The Sthil, Pacific Paradise, Humboldt Glassblowers

6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

58. Liquor Store: Myrtlewood Liquors and John’s Fine Cigars, Arcata Liquors, BevMo! 59. Vintage/Used Clothing Store: Little Shop of Hers, Shipwreck, Vintage Avenger 60. Clothing Store, men or women: Hot Knots, Willow and Rags, Shipwreck, Vintage Avenger 61. Children Clothing Store: Recycled Youth, Sassafras, Lots for Tots 62. Shoe Store: Plaza Shoe, Annie’s Shoes, North Soles 63. Jewelry Store: Plaza, Silva’s Fine Jewelry, Ten Window Williams, Holly Yashi 64. Musical Instrument Store: Mantova’s Two Street Music, Wildwood Music, Ferndale Music Company 65. Salon: Bloom, Forever Young, The Trim Scene, Kalos 66. Spa: The Spa at Personal Choice, Essential Elements , Soul to Soul Spa 67. Dentist: Tucker and Tucker, Dr. Benoit, Sr. Angeloff 68. Orthodontist: Dr. Hunt, Dr. Winzler, Dr. Enriquez 69. Optometrist: Vision Center, A to Z Eye Care, McKinleyville Optometric Center 70. Pharmacy: Barnes, Lima’s , Cloney’s 71. Bookstore: Booklegger, Northtown Books, Tin Can Books 72. Mattress Store: Furniture Design Center, Delta Discount Furniture, Arcata Exchange 73. Furniture Store: Living Styles, Arcata Exchange, Furniture Design Center 74. Bicycle Shop: Henderson Center Bicycle, Revolution Bicycles, Adventure’s Edge 75. Sporting Goods Store: Pacific Outfitters, Adventure’s Edge, Sport and Cycle 76. Computer Repair: Cornerstone Computers, Renaissance Computing, Cadny 77. Auto Body: Auto Body Express, Fred’s Auto Body, Quality Body Works, Rainbow Body Shop 78. Auto Repair: Antich Auto, Franklin Service, First Aid for Ailing Autos 79. Tire Shop: Les Schwab, Gosselin Tire, TP Tires 80. Place to Buy a New Car: Mid-City Motor World, Northwood Auto Plaza, Harper Motors 81. Place to Buy a Used Car: Craigslist, Mickey’s , Bob’s Fine Cars, Roy’s Auto Center, Harper Motors, Mid-City Motor World 82. Bank/Credit Union: Coast Central Credit Union, Redwood Capital Bank, Umpqua Bank 83. Plumber: Maple Service, Mad River Plumbing, Cruz Plumbing 84. Construction Company: Alchemy Construction, Barry Smith Construction, Pacific Builders

85. Real Estate Agent: Clyde Akamine, Mikki Cardoza, Sally Conley, Ken Murrell, Michelle Rowland, Stephanie Joy, Sylvia Garlick 86. Hardware/Lumber Store: Pierson’s Building Center, Almquist Lumber, Shafer’s Ace Hardware 87. Nursery/Garden Center: Pierson’s Building Center, Miller Farms Nursery, Mad River Gardens 88. Horticulture Supply Shop: Northcoast Horticulture, Bayside Garden Center, Humboldt Depot 89. Veterinarian: McKinleyville Animal, Sunny Brae Animal Clinic, Healing Spirit Animal Wellness Center 90. Pet Groomer: Doggie Do Pet Salon, Deb’s Bark Avenue, NorCal Pet, Muddy Paws, Myrtle Avenue Pet Center 91. Storage: Humsheds, Rainbow Self Storage, Arcata Bay Self Storage

BONUS ROUND 92. Place to People Watch: Arcata Plaza, Old Town Eureka, Arts Alive Eureka 93. Place to Take a First Date: Moonstone Beach, Palm Lounge, Siren Song Tavern 94. Locally Made Product: Larrupin Sauce, Cypress Grove Chevre, Fire and Light 95. Place to Blow Some Money: Plaza, Blue Lake Casino, Bear River Casino 96. Vista That Never Gets Old: Clam Beach, Strawberry Rock, Trinidad 97. Things to Bitch About in Humboldt: Homeless, Tweakers, Weather 98. HSU Professor: Melinda Myers, Mary Cruz, Christina Accomando 99. CR Professor: Cindy Hopper, Ryan Emanaker, Shannon Sullivan 100. Place to Take Your Dog: Hiller Dog Park, Moonstone Beach, Samoa Beach 101. Medical Marijuana Dispensary: Humboldt Patient Resource Center, The Humboldt Collective, My Closet 102. Marijuana Strain: OG Kush, Girl Scout Cookie, Trainwreck 103. Skateboarding Spot: Ramp Art, Arcata Skate Park, Eureka Skate Park 104. Humboldt Myth/Conspiracy/Urban Legend: Bigfoot, The Booms, Everyone Smokes Weed 105. Public Garden: Humboldt Botanical Gardens, Bayside, Arcata Marsh 106. Villian: Jason Singleton, The Arkley’s 107. Place to Play Hooky: Moonstone Beach, Luffenholtz Beach, The River 108. Place to Let The Kids Run Wild: Bounce-A-Palooza, Sequoia Park, Moonstone Beach 109. Worst Eyesore: The Downtowner, The Jail, Broadway Motels


Blog Jammin’

GOVERNMENT / COURTS

ENVIRONMENT / NATURAL RESOURCES

Apex Directional Drilling, the company that earlier this year abruptly halted work on part of the Martin Slough Interceptor, a massive sewer system upgrade, is suing the City of Eureka for upwards of $6,280,000, according to a complaint filed May 23 in Humboldt County Superior Court. The complaint alleges breach of contract for construction of public work, breach of duty of good faith and fair dealing, breach of warranty and fraudulent concealment. Apex’s argument centers around its claim that the city misrepresented the soils that Apex would be drilling in. Apex says its drillers encountered mainly sand, which prolonged the work and made it more difficult; the company even left its expensive drill steel behind, inside Pine Hill, saying the hole had collapsed around it. The complaint seeks damages plus interest and costs of the suit. In April, after Apex’s accusations became public, city staff declined to discuss in detail Apex’ accusations. But City Engineer Charles Roecklein did offer that the city “worked very hard trying to come up with a reasonable way forward with Apex.” — Heidi Walters

The maker of d-Con®, Reckitt Benckiser, will no longer sell the poison pellets that happy homemakers for years have used to fatally banish unwelcome rodents (and which some marijuana farmers have used to clear their crops of pests, resulting in the deaths of wildlife). New legislation already bans the general, non-permitted use of such poisons in California, beginning July 1, and many retailers have quit restocking their shelves. Now the d-Con® folks have agreed with the EPA to altogether quit selling specific poison baits that cause animals who ingest them to bleed to death within a day unless they receive an anticoagulant such as Vitamin K (as noted in a Wall Street Journal story about the agreement). The company has until 2015 to stop selling the bait. In a news release, the Humane Society’s Nicole Paquette said, “Although under this agreement Reckitt Benckiser is allowed to continue to sell these harmful products until the end of the year, we urge retailers to remove them from store shelves immediately.” — Heidi Walters l

Driller Sues Eureka

Remember those “Eureka Stinks” stickers and T-shirts? Without that pulp mill to befoul the city’s air, there’s less motivation for maligning of the city. Perhaps, with election season sharpening every flaw in the city’s facade, a message like this — reserved, but embracing — truly is radical. Photo by Matthew Stuart.

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7


buhne Tribune

Mayor Jager’s Merry Massage Brigade

D

uring the recent flap over prison realignment, local police departments welcomed the added workload like it was the Ebola virus. Tire tread on the Crown Victorias was wearing dangerously thin, they pleaded. Run them down any further, law enforcement brass warned, and 9-1-1 could go AWOL. And so it goes with unfunded enforcement mandates issued forth from on high. Or does it? In a curious about-face, the city of Eureka is suddenly rolling out the welcome wagon and putting on a fresh pot of Folgers for a certain class of suspects who the boys in blue would — depleted coffers be damned! — be most amenable to policing: Massage therapists. Although officially advertised as the restorative cure-all for bad backs everywhere, “massage therapy” is acknowledged with winking familiarity as the Madison Avenue rebranding of a profession that ranks right up there among the world’s very oldest, if you catch my meaning. The problem is existing legislation deems massage-compliance the province of an obscure capital backwater known as the California Massage Therapy Council. With bureaucrats policing rubdowns from a Sacramento cubicle farm, Eureka’s finest have been about as busy as a dogcatcher in Pyongyang when it comes to keeping the peace behind

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Massageville’s velvet curtain. In other words, what to do if you were the innocent victim of a backrub that went unexpectedly carnal? Don’t call the Eureka Police Department, try Jerry Brown instead. In the minds of Eureka officialdom, John Q. Customer deserves better. An honest massage after church should be available, the thinking goes, without fear of the session transforming into a fullblown episode of Girls Gone Wild. A bill circulating in Sacramento would restore enforcement to locals, placing control over the massage table to the Eureka badge. Keeping tabs on realignment prisoners drew torches and pitchforks. But the fellas will practically have to draw straws when it comes to policing Madam Aphrodite’s Exotic Massage Palace. Putting on its best Eddie Haskell charm offensive, the city council has even taken the unusual step of directing a letter from Mayor Frank Jager in support of the legislation (Assembly Bill 1147, the Massage Therapy Act of 2014). We need this law, Mayor Jager attests, so that local governments can prevent ersatz massage therapists from “engaging in prostitution.” What — Old Town’s Third Street promenade isn’t keeping the boys busy enough? Well, if all goes well, Seaport crime-fighters will soon be deploying their hands-on approach at Eureka’s more than half dozen bordel — ahem — massage therapy offices. At attention, ladies!

Can Crabs Manager Fill Big Shoes?

Saturday marked skipper Tyson Fisher’s inaugural game at the helm of the good ship Humboldt Crabs. Fans delighted in the Crabs’ 10-0 blowout of the Fairfield Indians, most viewing it as a sure omen of Fisher’s winning ways. But winning isn’t everything. With the season barely one week old, the Crabs’ notoriously discerning fans are already raising eyebrows at some of the new guy’s uncouth habits. Sources divulge, for example, that Fisher’s ground crews were seen mowing the grass with indelicate, high-horsepower riding lawnmowers. The Crabs’ previous manager — a man whose interest in grass reportedly was so keen that he grew it during his free time in custom, ventilated

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

greenhouses — insisted that grass be hand-trimmed, its aromatic contents packed carefully into turkey bags. Still other fans — nostalgic for past skippers’ refined approach to America’s pastime — are crying “foul” over Fisher’s failure to assimilate. During Saturday’s game, the rookie manager reportedly was overheard commanding a base runner to “steal” second base, upsetting fans put on edge by a past a past coach’s affinity for embezzlement. Critical fans are hopeful that Fisher can amend his ways prior to this weekend’s three-game set versus the Seals at Arcata Ball Park.

Congrats to the Arcata High Class of 2014!

I would be remiss if I did not begin by telling you what a privilege and an honor it is to have been invited back once again this year as your commencement speaker. As you stride across the stage today to receive your diploma, the first completely original and unique observation I want to make is that yours is not one small step for man, but one giant leap for mankind. Always remember that as you enter college and the workplace, events we experience today actually share many abiding features with those of the past. Choosing which college to attend, for example, can at times feel like an inner civil war — just like the one four-score and seven years ago, when our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation. It was a nation conceived in liberty, and — as I always say — it was a nation dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal, and that a government of the people, by the people, and for the people shall not perish from the earth. Hmm. Wow — it’s amazing, isn’t it, the analogies you can come up with all by yourself? I mean, without Googling, YouTubing or anything. Man, what a trip. Anyway, it also occurs to me that the shifting sands of today’s job market and political landscape are much akin to the Soviet Iron Curtain that once descended across Europe. And as I always say, today’s young people should squarely confront their inner Soviet prime minister and declare, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” Or, expressing the sentiment another way, but still completely in my own

original words, “ich bin ein Berliner.” Moving along here — gotta’ renovate the Downtowner, so I won’t keep you long — but just the other day I had a dream, and when I awoke I had this unique, original and 100 percent authentic personal insight: That one day men will be judged not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. I mean — wow — what a heavy thing to think up all by myself, you know? Finally, as you young men and women of the Arcata High School graduating class of 2014 embark on this great journey called life, I want to leave you with a concept that personally came to me the other day: Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. Because you have nothing to fear but fear itself. Thank you, good luck and please remember me next November.

Perhaps Mensa Can Solve This Riddle?

It is a “news” website, yet it offers regular coverage of no governmental body. Its crimes-and-courts reporting consists of little but verbatim republication of law enforcement press releases. An inordinate amount of its content is produced by an individual known only as “Puff n Tuff.” And it derives the lion’s share of its funding, rumor has it, from a gambling casino. Its very raison d’etre having eluded us average folks, the Lost Cause Outhouse news website laid out its cause for existence last Saturday before the local chapter of Mensa in hopes, one surmises, that an audience flush with pocket protectors could actually divine its mysterious purpose. The confab — presented by Outhouse editor Hank Sims — touched on such topics, as a press release puts it, as “what it is,” and “what it does.” Hmm... At press time, the best answer we can come up with is that “it” provides a sounding board for cranks who aren’t familiar with Craigslist’s Rants and Raves section. If any Mensa member has a better answer, would they kindly elucidate the rest of us? Thanks! l

– Ryan Hurley newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Ryan Hurley is a Eureka-based attorney. Follow him if you dare: @BuhneTribune.


northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014

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ongress decided recently that the Drug Enforcement Administration and federal prosecutors should not go after medical marijuana organizations where they’re legal under state law. The House of Representatives voted May 29 in favor of an amendment that marijuana advocates say will end federal raids on dispensaries in California and other states. Under fear of federal prosecution, Arcata, Eureka and Humboldt County have had moratoriums on new dispensaries in place for several years now. Americans for Safe Access, a medical marijuana advocacy group, praised the House’s decision in a press release. “In addition to ending all pending federal medical marijuana-related criminal prosecutions, advocates argue that current DOJ litigation against dispensary operators and their landlords, like that being waged in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley, must end promptly. Tonight’s vote could also have a positive impact on defendants currently serving mandatory minimum sentences of up to 10 years in prison.” “Could have” is the key phrase there. The amendment is part of a bill that still needs Senate approval and a signature from President Obama, who has already said he will veto the bill based on other flaws that have to do with appropriating federal funding, according to North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman. “The underlying bill it’s attached to has to improve,” said Huffman, who voted in favor of the amendment. Still, he called the vote a watershed moment for the nation’s marijuana policy. “We’re moving rapidly toward something that’s much more coherent and more in sync with states’ rights,” he said. “It just makes no sense to have this dysfunctional federal criminalization overlay.” The bill garnered support from 49 Republicans — a party traditionally averse

to lightening of the nation’s drug laws. In a story titled “Why Republicans are slowly embracing marijuana,” LA Times reporter Evan Halper writes that more than half of the nation’s population now lives in states where medical marijuana is legalized and that posing medical marijuana as a states’ rights issue is swinging Republican acceptance of marijuana into favor. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.), who co-sponsored the bill, was quoted in the Huffington Post as saying, “The heart and soul of the Republican party is that pro-freedom, individual philosophy that Reagan talked about.” With increasing bipartisan support nationally, Huffman said California now needs has to clean up its medical marijuana laws. “Right now the medical marijuana policy framework is a mess,” he said. “Hopefully now with this movement on the federal level they’ll have a little impetus to step it up.” We’ll see. A medical marijuana bill sponsored by San Francisco Assemblyman Tom Ammiano failed to pass the state Assembly just last week. In the week’s “they-still-exist?” news, a feud has apparently broken out between members of rap-butt-rock band and KSLG once-darlings Linkin Park and whateverremains-of-So-Cal gutter-reggae band Sublime. Apparently, while Sublime took the stage at an Arizona festival recently, one of Linkin Park’s security guards allegedly reported a weed stash to the county sheriff’s office, which raided Sublime’s dressing room and confiscated the bud. Linkin Park denied being involved on Twitter, leading to an exchange between the bands’ members that included the epithet “Linkin Nark” (which, OK, that’s pretty good). TMZ and industry rag Metal Injection report that the Linkin Park employee reported the weed to cops because one of the band’s members is allergic to smoke. The Linksters reportedly offered to replace the stuff. l

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Around Humboldt County Photos by Bob Doran northcoastjournal.com/bobarazzi Prolific painter Augustus Clark soaks up the sun in his workspace in Eureka’s C Street Studios on Sunday, June 1, day two of the countywide North Coast Open Studios, which continues this weekend.

At the new Creamery District Art Market held Saturday, May 31, Jackie Dandeneau of the Arcata Playhouse makes way on her Indian pedicab while market coordinator Louis Hoiland looks on.

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13


B

arking dogs, furious constituents, awkward moments and blisters. Door-todoor campaigning through the streets of Humboldt County can be a pain. But what happens on your doorstep and thousands of others like it can also be the difference between winning and losing. And the interactions there — whether caustic or pleasant — can help forge candidates, pushing them to find their voice and preparing them for whatever elected office may throw their way. Humboldt State University politics professor Kathleen Lee says the more local a race, the more important door-to-door campaigning becomes. “The thing about local politics is, it is personal,” she explains, adding that while much campaign focus is put on phone calls, ad buys and shiny mailers, connecting with voters in a one-on-one setting can win votes. “You can sort through your junk mail and just toss it aside. You have caller ID so you can choose not to answer the phone, and you can mute the

Your Doorstep … Where Elections Are Won

It may be dangerous, unpleasant and exhausting, but campaigning door-to-door is a must in Humboldt By North Coast Journal Staff

date showed up at his Fortuna doorstep a couple of decades ago. “He just came to my door and chatted with me,” Downey recalls. “I voted for him just because of that simple thing of him coming to my door.” When Downey first ran for sheriff four years ago, he says he remembered that message and made a point of extensively canvassing neighborhoods in Eureka, McKinleyville and Fortuna. Downey didn’t take a sophisticated approach, he just picked streets and worked one end to the other, knocking on every single door. “It was probably the biggest thing that really helped me define what I wanted to do as sheriff,” he says. “I had to go out and tell people, ‘This is who I am and this is what I want to do as sheriff.’” Richard Salzman, a local politico who’s been involved with scores of local races and worked on Chris Kerrigan’s campaign for 4th District Supervisor this time around, says he thinks door-to-door campaigning has the power to change candidates from political novices to seasoned professionals. “I

ABOVE VIRGINIA BASS TALKS WITH DIXIE AND HOWARD RIEN OUTSIDE THEIR EUREKA HOME. WITH FIVE DAYS UNTIL THE ELECTION, BASS WAS VISITING THE LAST FEW HOMES ON A LIST OF REGISTERED VOTERS. THE RIENS, AS IT TURNED OUT, HAD ALREADY VOTED BY MAIL — FOR BASS. RIGHT CHRIS KERRIGAN KNOCKS ON DOORS NEAR DOWNTOWN EUREKA THE FRIDAY BEFORE ELECTION DAY. THE MID-DAY CANVASSING YIELDED A LOT OF NO-ANSWERS. PHOTOS BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH

commercials. But if you answer the door … and the candidate’s there, you’ll probably take the time to talk to them.” But relating to voters at their doorsteps is more art than science, and takes a certain skill. It pushes many candidates out of their comfort zones and, consequently, many are loath to do it. Local politicos, however, say it is the single most valuable thing a candidate can do. And those who have braved the yapping dogs, grow houses, lonely talkers and everything else that comes with knocking on thousands of doors in Humboldt County say they are better for having done it. “It was a stretch for me personally,” says former 2nd District Supervisor Clif Clendenen, adding he’s not really one for “getting in people’s faces” on political things. “It was the hardest thing to do, for me, but it’s considered one of the most effective things to do in campaigning and it was really valuable.” Humboldt County Sheriff Mike Downey says he’ll always remember when a supervisorial candi-

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

think it’s the most significant thing in the evolution of a candidate,” he says, adding that it forces candidates to hone their message, keep a level head and respond appropriately to any curveballs. It also forces candidates to stop listening to their handlers and hear what voters have to say. “They start to hear what the concerns are and it helps them frame their arguments and their positions as a candidate,” he says. “(Candidates) come back from going doorto-door and they start to talk about an issue and, all of a sudden, they find their voice. They’ve been able to figure out how to apply and convey their values in a constructive and tangible manner.” The one-on-one interactions can also help candidates learn what issues are important to voters. Arcata City Councilman Michael Winkler is a self-described “computer guy” for whom doorto-door campaigning was a stretch. But Winkler says it’s also been hugely valuable. In 2012, Winkler says he was canvassing neighborhoods during his campaign when he saw first-hand how Arcata’s grow


Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District Commissioner Richard Marks may know more about the art of going door-to-door than anyone else in the county. It was a cornerstone in his bid for the commission, as well as past campaigns for state Assembly and county supervisor and his wife’s runs for local school board. Arriving unexpectedly at people’s doors played a big part in Marks’ previous career working for unions. In that role, Marks says he was tasked with meeting employees outside of the work place — often at their homes — to gauge support for unionizing. It’s a role that brought Marks to doorsteps throughout the state and elsewhere. Having trained in the art of doorstep conversations — learning how to evaluate people and relate to them using their body language and verbal cues — and having worked dozens of local campaigns, Marks knows how to squeeze the most out of door-to-door campaigning. Marks, who put his skills to use on 4th District

Supervisor Virginia Bass’s re-election bid, says the first thing is to have a strategy, or else door-to-door will become a massive time investment that yields little return. Voter registration data from the Humboldt County Elections Office can act as a kind of road map, telling you who is registered to vote, his or her party affiliations and how often he or she actually turns up to cast a ballot. Marks suggests a tiered approach: Your first efforts should be to reach your likely supporters, which will help with fundraising and gathering more volunteers; Next, Marks says you should target absentee voters because their ballots arrive well in advance of Election Day; Finally, you go after the folks who vote every election but are undecided in the race. Salzman agrees that having a sound strategy is vital and that it has to be focused on getting as large a return on your time investment as possible. Salzman even quipped that he doesn’t mind hearing that a likely voter has pledged his or her support to his candidate’s challenger because it means the campaign can cross that voter off the list and avoid wasting any more time or money calling, sending mailers or showing back up at his or her door. Sometimes it’s not quite that simple. Kerrigan says he’s visited a lot of homes that have signs from both his campaign and that of his challenger, Bass, in the front yard. Kerrigan says he always asks about the apparent dual allegiance at the door, and hears all kinds of responses. Some are split households, with spouses or cohabitants voting differently. He says he met an elderly couple recently that said they never turned down a campaign sign when it was offered. “It was their way of thanking people who run for office,” Kerrigan says. In addition to learning not to judge a book by its cover, seasoned candidates have picked up some other canvassing strategies. Arcata City Councilwoman Alex Stillman was the first woman to run for and win a seat on the council in 1972, and has canvassed neighborhoods in each of her four bids for office. She says simple tricks, like having a volunteer drop her off at the top of a hill so she can work her way down, can save lots of time. “That’s just strategy stuff,” she says, adding that she was also schooled early on to avoid homes with a Jehovah’s Witness symbol by the door because the religion prohibits its members from voting. “If someone doesn’t vote, that can really take a lot of your time to be talking to them,” she says. “You have to move along.” Sometimes that’s easier said than done, especially after knocking on the door of someone eager to give you an earfull. Clendenen, known for his opposition of continued on next page

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house problem was affecting neighborhoods. He spoke with one woman who told him about the terror she felt as someone tried to cut through her screen door, convinced her home was a grow house. He says another guy chased him off his porch, paranoid that Winkler was a home-invasion robber. Winkler says he was already supporting Arcata’s excessive electricity tax aimed at clamping down on grow houses, but he says going door-todoor reinforced his position and gave him new insight into the problem. “As far as personal experiences, [campaigning door-to-door] is one of the most fulfilling things that I’ve done in my life,” he says. But canvassing neighborhoods is also about winning votes, and can be a tremendously successful strategy when deployed correctly.

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big box stores, says he’ll never forget the tongue lashings he took from some on the issue while on their doorsteps. “Some people, they were just visibly angry,” he says. “Like, ‘You don’t like Walmart,’ like I was against apple pie and mom or something.” It seems everyone who has gone doorto-door on the campaign trail has a few similar stories. “You find people at their most candid at home,” Marks says. But most say folks are generally flattered to have a candidate at their doorstep and even disagreements are conveyed congenially. “I bet even some of the trolls on the blogs are probably pretty nice on their own front porch,” Salzman jokes. But candidates knocking on doors in Humboldt County never know quite what they’ll find on the other side, and all have stories that range from interrupting smoke sessions and stumbling upon nude sunbathers to the truly shocking. Marks, for his part, says he’s walked into uncomfortable situations that have included propositions and, once, even had a man open the door while he was pleasuring himself. “Just horrible,” he recalls, adding that door-todoor canvassing is full of surprises. Salzman recalls one time when he was going door to door in Ohio for Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential bid in a white, blue-collar neighborhood. He says he knocked on one door to find a skinny woman looking like she came directly out of a Dorothea Lange photograph. Salzman says he told the woman he was working with the Obama campaign and the woman

went to fetch her husband. “This guy comes barreling out,” Salzman recalls. “I stepped back off the porch and he just come swinging out the door, sticks his chest way out, arms back, and says, ‘What do you want?’” Salzman says he stammered that he was with the Obama campaign, just an “American citizen out talking to other American citizens doing my patriotic duty by campaigning.” Salzman says he was scared, and pretty much ready to run when the man looked at him sideways. “He says, ‘Yeah, well, I’m voting for the n----- all the way.’” Salzman says he thanked the man and got the hell off his property as quickly as possible. But, walking down the driveway, Salzman said he had an epiphany. “That was the moment I thought, ‘We’re going to win this election,’” he says. “All racism aside, this man could see Obama was the guy that identified with his plight.” It’s that inherent uncertainty that comes with approaching a stranger’s door that makes the whole thing so engaging for some. That’s the case for former 3rd District Supervisor John Woolley, who says he loved going door-to-door, engaging constituents, hearing about their issues and getting new insights into their lives. “To me, it’s kind of like going fishing,” he says. “You don’t know what the next stretch of river will produce.” l The Journal’s Thadeus Greenson, Grant Scott-Goforth and Heidi Walters contributed to this report.

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oney’s influence on elections will never cease to be contentious. Often, campaigns are strapped for cash, particularly in the last days of an election. But other times, a campaign’s fundraising has been so effective that there’s leftover money on the Wednesday after the vote. Where does that unspent money go? California law restricts what money donated to a campaign can be spent

on. Candidates are essentially limited to goods and services necessary to a campaign: Travel, staff, office rentals, advertising — even security systems, if a candidate has received threats verified by law enforcement. Campaign funds for the upcoming June primary election will become surplus, according to the Fair Political Practices Commission, after June 30. That money can then only be spent on outstanding


District Attorney / 4th & 5th Supervisors

Three high-profile campaigns — races for 4th and 5th district supervisor, and district attorney — have dominated conversations surrounding the primary election in Humboldt County. Here’s how the candidates fared when the dust cleared:

4 4 4

Absentee candidate Votes % DistRict AttoRneY Allan Dollison 947 8.63% Elan Firpo 2,381 21.71% Maggie Fleming 7,101 64.75% Arnie Klein 516 4.71% 4tH DistRict sUPeRVisoR Virginia Bass 1,363 61.45% Chris Kerrigan 852 38.41% 5tH DistRict sUPeRVisoR Sharon Latour 698 33.51% Ryan Sundberg 1,381 66.30%

election total %

totAl total

%

727 2,929 5,694 508

7.63% 29.65% 57.65% 5.14%

1,764 5,633 13,308 1,085

8.08% 25.8% 60.96% 4.97%

968 1,192

44.67% 55.01%

2,358 2,055

53.31% 46.46%

A visitor from Washington talks to Virginia Bass after stumbling across her campaign party at the Sea Grill. PHOTO BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH

980 1,269

43.46% 56.27%

1,761 2,782

38.67% 61.09%

Bass All But Re-Elected

Some ProviSional and hand-delivered ballotS uncounted. Source: humboldt county electionS office

4 = passed/winner

State Propostions

California voters weighed in on a pair of propositions at the polls. Proposition 41 sought to authorize $600 million in general obligation bonds to pay for affordable housing to relieve homelessness for veterans and their families, while Proposition 42 sought to require compliance with state public record and open meeting laws and eliminate state reimbursement requirements. Here’s how the vote came down, both in Humboldt County and statewide: PROP

4 4

HumbOldt VOtes

HumbOldt %

statewide VOtes

statewide %

41

13,222

62.65%

1,963,274

65.4%

42

9,569

47.02%

1,780,710

61.5%

sources: Humboldt county elections office and california secretary of state’s office.

campaign debts, professional services or attorneys’ fees from the campaign, refunded to contributors, donated to a charity (as long as the donation won’t benefit the candidate, his or her family or the campaign treasurer), donated to a political party for non-election purposes, or donated to any ballot measure, to a candidate for federal office or any state office outside California. Surplus funds cannot, FPPC rules state, be used for the fundraising candidate’s future campaign. But there is a grace period, between Election Day and June 30, during which a candidate can redesignate funding to another campaign, whether it be to the candidate’s future election bid or another campaign altogether. Chris Kerrigan had raised more than $1,000 before abandoning his bid for Eureka Mayor, filing termination papers for that race and announcing he would run for 4th District supervisor in March, according to campaign finance reports and Eureka City Clerk Pam Powell. With his bid for supervisor apparently lost, Kerrigan could, theoretically, put any money left over from that campaign toward a

run for mayor in November. Days before the election, Kerrigan said he wasn’t “at all” considering running for mayor, since he was focused on the current campaign and confident he would win. He wouldn’t say if “not considering” meant he definitely would not run. Whether Kerrigan even has leftover campaign funding is unclear. His campaign disclosure forms through May 17 show he had $6,000 in cash — a sum that could easily be spent on last minute ad buys. Virginia Bass, the 4th District’s incumbent supervisor, had a more significant ending cash balance of $26,000 in mid-May. College of the Redwoods political science professor Ryan Emenaker said there’s debate about whether losing an election makes a candidate “damaged goods” for a future election. But he thinks name recognition is an important factor, and said Kerrigan’s campaigning for supervisor would be beneficial should he consider a run for mayor. “The jurisdiction overlaps really well,” Emenaker said. “It really is kind of a parallel campaign.” l

V

By Grant Scott-Goforth

irginia Bass’ election party started off with bravado, as one of her advisors declared victory based on the early vote-by-mail returns in her bid to retain her 4th District supervisor seat. Bass herself was outwardly hesitant. As the evening progressed, votes cast for challenger Chris Kerrigan at the polls narrowed Bass’ initially commanding lead. But when election night’s final report came, it appeared the Bass camp’s confidence was warranted. In the final tally, Bass held 53 percent of the vote — a lead of 303 votes. While it’s unclear how many outstanding provisional and vote by mail ballots remain to be counted, it’s almost certain that Bass has won re-election. That result was not entirely unexpected. The Eureka native has been in politics since winning a seat on the Eureka City Council in 2000, going on to serve as mayor and then unseating longtime 4th District Supervisor Bonnie Neely in 2010. She also entered the race with considerable financial backing. By the May 17 campaign finance reporting period, Bass had spent $81,000 — more than twice as much as Kerrigan. The challenger had significant name recognition as well — having been a Eureka council member himself for two terms until 2008. But Kerrigan didn’t announce his candidacy until March 8, the last day he could file. Strong leftie support and Bass-malaise on the part of some Eureka residents doesn’t appear to have been enough to carry Kerrigan to the supervisor’s chamber. What does it all mean for the 4th District and Humboldt County? Bass said before the election that she is excited about business opportunities on the Samoa Peninsula that she says the county is promoting. She wants to attract a variety of industries to the area through

Chris Kerrigan talks to supporters in the Eureka Inn’s Palm Lounge just before election night’s final results came in. PHOTO BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH

pre-permitting and other zoning tactics. She’s been part of a large community group looking for solutions to homelessness and “vagrancy,” and says she wants the county to focus on affordable housing. Bass says the board is scheduled to finish the contentious General Plan Update this year. Her re-election and that of 5th District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg mean the political makeup of the board of supervisors will remain the same. While Bass’ seemingly development-friendly votes and appointments angered some this year, she continues have the 4th District’s support. While the board has pulled back somewhat from looser development guidelines proposed by the county planning commission, there’s still much to do to finalize the general plan. It’s likely Bass’ legacy — along with that of the current board — will be the completion of the document that will guide this county’s development for the next 20-plus years. l continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014

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Ballot Measures

Voters in four areas of Humboldt County faced ballot measures on Election Day. In Kneeland, Measure L sought to impose a $60 to $80 annual property tax on parcels within the district to help the Kneeland Volunteer Fire Department and needed a two-thirds vote to pass. In Hydesville, 55 percent of voters were needed to pass Measure M, a $1 million bond measure to renovate and modernize Hydesville Elementary School and provide students with increased computer access. Voters in the Southern Humboldt Joint Unified School District similarly faced a $10 million bond measure, Measure N, to renovate and repair facilities at seven SoHum school sites, with a 55-percent vote needed for passage. And, finally, a simple majority of Ferndale voters was needed to pass Measure O, which sought to change the city clerk and city treasurer positions from being elected by the public to being appointed by the city council and city manager. Here’s a look at how the measure’s fared on Election Day.

4 Maggie Fleming, pictured left huddling with supporters as results trickled in on election night, took 61 percent of the vote to become the first woman ever elected district attorney in Humboldt County. Photo by Thadeus Greenson

4

An Historic Win

Fleming tromps to become county’s first female DA

4

M

Absentee votes %

eArly votes %

election totAl %

totAl totAl %

0

0%

126

82.89%

0

0%

126

82.89%

M – Hydesville school district bond Needs 55% to pass

118

68.21%

0

0%

79

62.70%

197

65.89%

n – southern Humboldt Joint unified school district bond Needs 55% to pass

235

46.63%

126

46.67%

276

60%

637

51.62%

o – city of Ferndale

108

62.07%

0

0%

123

65.43%

231

63.81%

source: Humboldt county elections office

By Thadeus Greenson

aggie Fleming just made history. Decisively. Fleming, long considered by many to be the frontrunner in the race to become Humboldt County’s next district attorney, charged out to an early lead with the first Election Day results and never looked back, ultimately taking a whopping 61 percent of the vote to become the first woman the county has ever elected to be its top prosecutor. “It’s been so wonderful,” a tired but ebullient Fleming said by phone after midnight Wednesday from a gathering on H Street, where she celebrated with supporters as the votes were tallied, with each report from the elections office cementing the fact that she’d fended off three opponents to avoid a runoff election in November. “We’ve had such nice support from so many volunteers throughout the county and I’m so glad it went this way for them because they worked so hard and

MeAsure/ district l – Kneeland Fire Protection district Needs 2/3 vote to pass

put in so many hours.” The race to become Humboldt’s next DA was considered wide open after sitting District Attorney Paul Gallegos announced in November he wouldn’t seek re-election, leaving no incumbent vying for the post for the first time in recent memory. Ultimately a field of four stepped forward, all of them former prosecutors who worked in Gallegos’ office: Fleming, who spent 17 years as a deputy district attorney (including nine under Gallegos); Arnie Klein, a swashbuckling former prosecutor with decades of experience in courtrooms throughout the state; Allan Dollison, a decorated military veteran and former deputy district attorney; and Elan Firpo, the former high-tech engineer turned prosecutor who is the only candidate currently working under Gallegos. All four hit the campaign trail hard, participating in a total of 14 debates and forums and appearing at events throughout

the county. But Fleming quickly emerged as the candidate to beat in the race, earning endorsements from local officials, retired judges and a host of local attorneys. Law enforcement unions and officers seemed to unite behind her as well to the point that it became the chief criticism of her candidacy, with her opponents charging that she was so favored by cops that it would make it impossible for her to impose the checks and balances the office required. Voters ultimately saw things differently, however, and when the dust settled on election night, Fleming had taken more than 60 percent of the vote in a four-way race, an almost unheard of feat. Firpo finished second, taking 25.8 percent of the vote but trailed Fleming by more than 7,500 votes. Neither Klein nor Dollison managed 10 percent of the vote. While all four candidates pledged to reform the DA’s office — increasing efficiency

and finding revenue to hire new attorneys — Fleming’s background and reserved personality resonated with voters. She raised a staggering $118,000 in total campaign contributions, pulling in donations of $100 or more from some 200 individuals to outraise her three opponents combined. In Fleming’s words, she “got support from every group and every political party, and people who really never would have worked together on any other project.” She said she’s thankful, and will honor voters’ confidence with hard work and dedication. Fleming said she plans to immediately start studying up on the issues and working to get a handle on what the office’s future budget will be. She said she’ll reach out to Gallegos in the coming weeks, hopeful they can work together to make the transition as smooth as possible in January. With a mandate from voters and history behind her, now the heavy lifting begins. l

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above Sharon Latour, knocking on doors, encountered supporter Brenda Pease and dog Suzie. above right Latour campaign volunteer Kate McClain, left, joins Sharon Latour for a final day of bicycle-propelled door-knocking to roust voters. Photos by Heidi Walters

Sundberg Easily Takes 5th By Heidi Walters

I

ncumbent Ryan Sundberg has kept his seat as 5th District Supervisor, taking 61 percent of the vote to fend off challenger Sharon Latour. It’s not surprising. After barely securing his first term in a hotly contested race, Sundberg came back this time as not just the locally-grown guy with friends and family peppering the district, but as a seasoned politico with important endorsements in the bag — including Democratic congressmen Jared Huffman and Mike Thompson. Latour entered late, announcing her candidacy in mid-March as a political

unknown fairly new to Humboldt and newer still to McKinleyville, exhibiting (at first) a gushing tone-deafness toward local issues and history. She did have an impressive CV — four master’s degrees and a PhD; 20 years in the U.S. Air Force, some as an educator; and a second career as a Presbyterian pastor, including stays in Garberville and, more recently, in Arcata. And she learned the issues quickly. But in the end it became a race marked mainly by cordiality. Bored political junkies looked to more exciting races for their fix; Sundberg had this one. Still, to write off Latour’s campaign would be to ignore an intriguing footnote in the recent uprising among some of the county’s Left against what they perceived to be an attempt by a developmentfriendly board to strip the General Plan Update of environmental protections. Latour says members of this group of General Plan digruntleds, including “a northern Humboldt elected official,” asked her to run so the 5th District race would be contested. She won’t identify these recruiters, nor even some of her advisors, calling them

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half-jokingly her “super-secret supporters.” One feared it would hurt her career to be identified, she said, and another reportedly told Latour: “‘I have baggage you probably don’t want to be identified with.” Her co-campaign managers — Hezekiah Allen (her only paid worker) and Catherine Briggs Hanafi — are with the Democratic Central Committee and are also involved in the new Humboldt County Conservation Action committee whose aim is to, as Allen puts it, “create and maintain environmentally and socially progressive majorities on the board of supervisors and city council.” Neither committee recruited Latour, said Allen. Latour called her $15,000 campaign the “American dream of grassroots, independent-minded, don’t owe anybody anything and I can’t be bought.” Monday evening, with Election Day looming, Latour and volunteer Kate McClain donned helmets and pedaled away on bicycles to knock on doors one last time. They hit a precinct Allen had targeted as Latour-

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continued from previous page friendly but with a spotty voter turnout: Some voters had skipped a couple elections, but the precinct overall had voted in the last election for a couple of Sundberg’s challengers, either Patrick Higgins or Patrick Cleary. Riding along in the bird-chirpy spring air, Latour shouted cheery greetings to kids and asked stray adults if they were planning to vote and, if so, she hoped for her, Sharon Latour. A woman on a bicycle chuckled when Latour spun around to show her the “Latour” sticker on the back of her sweatshirt, but said nothing and kept going. “That would be a ‘no,’” Latour muttered good-humoredly under her breath. A woman walking by said yes, she and her five roommates were voting for her. At the doors, Latour met clear supporters, polite evaders, an alarming number of undecideds and people unaware of an election. Some got an abbreviated, “Hi, I’m Sharon Latour and I hope you’ll vote for me tomorrow for 5th District supervisor, here’s a good website,” and were handed her flyer. Others got a jaunty, “Hi, I’m Sharon Latour and I bet you already voted for me!” She said “hi” to flopped cats, admired porch art, chatted about issues and mentioned her five advanced degrees, as well as her military service. “Well this is an educator’s house,” said one

undecided voter, grilling her. She expounded on her credentials. He stuck his hand out to shake and said briskly, “You have my vote.” Latour said she’s an introvert; pestering people unannounced, at dinnertime, made her physically ill. But she was convinced the personal touch was vital. “I think we’re finally sealing the deal with a few votes,” she said. It wasn’t to be. But even in losing, said Latour, she achieved another campaign goal: keeping the discourse civil and about the issues. From her private party — no media invited — late on election night, Latour texted the Journal that she was happy. “We’re very proud of opening a conversation we’ll continue,” she said. After the final election results were posted, Latour, by phone, credited this conversation with already influencing board actions, such as the re-insertion of the stated goal of a regional trail system back into an element of the county General Plan Update. Sundberg did not respond to messages from the Journal. Around midnight at the Silver Lining restaurant, where the Sundberg camp had watched results come in, bartender Kayla Coleman said the mood was happy as the revelers departed. l

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Congress and Legislature

Humboldt County voters were faced Tuesday with 11 candidates vying to represent them in the state Legislature and U.S. Congress. Remember these names, as the top two finishers in each race are moving on to a runoff in November. Here’s a look at how the numbers shook out in each race:

LOCAL REPRESENTATIVES: U.S. CONGRESS

4

Candidate

Humboldt Votes

Dale Mensing - R

6,140 2,206 12,167

Andy Caffrey - D

4

Jared Huffman - D Candidate

Humboldt Votes

1,777 705 10,461 7,215

Derek Knell - D Harry Lehmann - NPP

4 4

Mike McGuire - R Lawrence Wiesner - R

24,426 10,271 71,624

23% 9.7% 67.4%

Districtwide Votes

Humboldt %

8.8% 3.49% 51.78% 35.72%

Districtwide %

14,315 5,773 74,662 35,269

11% 4.4% 57.4% 27.1%

STATE ASSEMBLY Candidate

4

Humboldt Votes

Matt Heath - R Pamela Elizondo - Grn John Lowry - D

4

Jim Wood - D

7,345 2,038 3,247 7,356

Districtwide Votes

Humboldt %

36.68% 10.18% 16.21% 37.73%

Districtwide %

21,503 5.486 12,248 26,991

32.5% 8.3% 18.5% 40.8%

sources: Humboldt county elections office and california secretary of state’s office.

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“PINK SPACE AND THE CHESS GAME WE’LL FINISH SOME TIME” (LEFT) AND “SIDE EFFECTS,” ACRYLIC PAINTINGS ON PAPER BY SHELDON KILLIE

Breakdancing With the Spirits Sheldon Skillie at the Black Faun Gallery By Ken Weiderman artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

A

relative once told painter Sheldon Skillie that if he listened closely to the language, songs and dances of his Native American Haida culture, he would see them reflected in their visual art forms as well. He followed that advice, imbuing the lines of his paintings with the movements of his language. While Skillie’s confident, crisp images undulate upon his paintings like rhythm and melody, he confesses that his work is not necessarily informed by traditional dancing. Instead, he says with a wry grin, “I grew up breakdancing.” And so go the cultural complexities that rest upon the immediate surface of Sheldon Skillie’s paintings. Ancient forms morph into contemporary compositions, carving stories in a modern world that only faintly resembles that of previous generations. However, with the right kind of eyes, Skillie’s images move much deeper than the surface, exposing the intricate ways in which contemporary cultures balance on a knife’s edge between past and present. Opening this weekend at the Black Faun Gallery, Skillie’s first solo show, Letters to my Ancestors, promises “modern movements in ancient motifs.” His description fits the work well. Skillie’s paintings are deeply informed by the strong Pacific Northwest Native imagery of his Haida roots, yet rest on a concrete foundation of graffiti, skateboard ramps and hip-hop beats. Indeed, Skillie is no

stranger to the conflict of traditional life intersecting with the 21st century. Growing up in the sleepy grays of Seattle, Wash., Skillie soaked up the urban scenes. Yet as a Native American, he felt consigned to the fringes, peering into a life that seemed out of reach. At 10, he moved to Ketchikan, Alaska, home to the Haida people and mountains that yawn from pristine fjords and rainforests. “We were of course welcomed with open arms by family,” he recalls, “but I always felt like an outsider.” He wasn’t familiar with the local traditions and his ignorance weighed on him. “I always wanted to participate [in Haida culture] but I never felt entitled to it.” As a member of a highly respected family of artists, he sought to understand as much as he could about Haida narrative imagery. No matter his desire, Skillie felt that he could not tell his family’s stories since he had never learned the sensitive protocols involved. Once again, Skillie found himself on the margins. After a brief stint at Portland State University and numerous odd jobs up and down the West Coast, Skillie was asked to apprentice for Norman Jackson, a working artist back in Ketchikan. The apprenticeship mirrored a more traditional form of education, and “something started to resonate.” Jackson’s experienced guidance gave him confidence. Skillie finally found his visual voice. A decade later, Skillie leans his tall,

slender frame on a table in his Eureka studio. Close-cropped hair peeks out from under a beanie, and his hands fold neatly in front of him. In a slow, confident cadence, Skillie continues explaining his work. “What I’m doing is taking [Haida] art — my understanding of it — and telling the story of this Haida.” However, Skillie feels there are things about today’s world that are impossible to explain through a visual system created thousands of years ago. How does one describe busses that bend in the middle as they roar down the road, or homeless people that sleep in the streets? In the past, Skillie says, Haida culture was so strong that there was no need to speak about fractionalized societies or poor and hungry people. “The traditional iconography doesn’t have any precedent for expressing something like a tribute to people who are lost or on the margins,” he says. So he has to reinvent it. Skillie pulls a gray-scale, acrylic-on-paper piece out from a stack of paintings. It’s inspired by a Native American street artist he knew in Seattle, filled with references to doorways, buildings and city spirits. Titled, “The Last Time I Saw You You Were Weaving Stories Out of the Grass that Grows in the Cracks of the Sidewalk,” the image is composed of four main quadrants. Ovoid forms establish eyes on the lower left, looking across to the shape of a raptor’s beak on the other side. Thin gray streaks slice the beak, repeating across

other parts of the painting like a fading timeline. Lively shapes spring up, growing into mountainous peaks across the top of the work. Dry brush strokes fly from under the heavy form lines, waving in the wind like the grass in the title. Elements of totemic symbols blend with a ‘50s-modern-art nostalgia, while thick lines and the interplay of positive and negative shapes bring to mind graffiti and contemporary graphic design. “I’m taking the signal of the culture that can be expressed through art and running it through modern effects,” he says. Today’s world is complex; the stories can be difficult to tell and even harder to listen to. “I feel like somebody’s got to tell it, though … it’s not all ideal tradition. There are sharp edges everywhere.” In a way, Skillie’s work isn’t so different from his ancestors. Their crests and totems were never exact representations of the natural world. “I think it’s always been a tradition of Haida art to adapt and evolve,” Skillie says. “What I’m doing isn’t new or novel, but just continuing a tradition.” l Sheldon Skillie will have an opening for his new paintings from 6-10 p.m. during Arts! Alive at the Black Faun Gallery, 120 Second St. in Eureka. Black Faun, next door to Mantova’s Two Street Music and half a block from the C Street Studios, is a fairly new, yet essential stop on your Arts! Alive walkabout.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

21


First Saturday Night Arts Alive! Saturday, June 7, 6-9 p.m. Presented by the Humboldt Arts Council and Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are held the first Saturday of each month. Phone (707) 442-9054 or go to www.eurekamainstreet.org for more information or to have an exhibit or performance included.

2. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL at the Morris Graves Museum of Art 636 F St. Performance Rotunda: Jazz by Lizzy and the Moonbeams. William Thonson Gallery: 13th annual Northwest Eye Regional Photography Competition and Exhibition. Homer Balabanis Gallery: Humboldt Artist Gallery featuring representational and abstract paintings, prints, jewelry, photographs and ceramics. Anderson Gallery: “Journeys of the Imagination,” Phyllis Thelen, sculptures. Knight Gallery: “5x7 Art Splurge,” 5x7 creations hung anonymously for sale at the Splurge fundraiser on June 28. Youth Gallery: MGMA Art School, 2013-2014. 3. EUREKA THEATER 612 F St. Performance by Upper Studio Dance Troupe. 4. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. “Season(s).” 5. MEGARA’S SALON 521 Sixth St. Porsha Jett, artwork. 6. DALIANES 522 F St. Mary Martin Harper, monoprints. 7. F ST. FOTO GALLERY at Swanlund’s Camera 527 F St. David Mast and Peter Canclini. 7a. THE LOCAL 517 F St. “Land and Water,” Ray McMillin, photography. 7b. REDWOOD MUSIC MART 511 F St. Live music TBA. 8a. EUREKA STUDIO ARTS 526 Fifth St. “40 Years of Photography: Humboldt and Beyond,” Bill Cody. 9. MIKKIMOVES’ LIVING ROOM GALLERY 805 Seventh St. “Natural Impressions,” Dara Daniels, oil paintings. Music by Jeff Kelly and Chris Parreira. 10. EUREKA SPA AND SALON 601 Fifth St. Complimentary hair chalking, braiding, stress fix ritual. Artist TBA. 11a. BOLLYWOOD INDIAN CUISINE 535 Fifth St. Chrissy Fracker, portraits. 12. HUMBOLDT REPUBLIC 535 Fourth St. Printed clothing, canvas. 13. SEWELL GALLERY FINE ART 423 F St. “Turbulence,” Sarah Whorf, mixed media print collage; Peggy Jane Murray, watercolors. Jazz by Lisa Baney. Beverage service benefits Access Humboldt.

PEGGY JANE MURRAY’S GREAT BLUE HERON (LEFT) AND THE DOG ARTIST (RIGHT) SERIGRAPHS AT SEWELL GALLERY (13).

14. BLACK LIGHTNING MOTORCYCLE CAFÉ 440 F St. Music by Claire Bent, ukulele. 14b. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and Engineering 401 Fifth St. Cicely Ames, portraits. 15. AMIGAS BURRITOS 317 Fifth St. Katherine Ziemer, photography; Vince Cavataio, wave photography. 16. PRIMATE TATU 139 Fifth St. “Old School Art,” Michael Arneson. 18. CHERI BLACKERBY GALLERY and THE STUDIO 272 C St. “Fields,” Eric Lee, Brian Price and Ryan Stoltz, abstract paintings. Art raffle. 18a. C STREET STUDIOS & HALL GALLERY 208 C St. Kevin Rush Bourque, RK Schlueter, Lauren Miller and Lida Penkovel. 18c. SAILOR’S GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo related art, antiques and memorabilia. 18f. THE BLACKFAUN GALLERY 120 Second St. “Letters to My Ancestors,” Sheldon Skillie, acrylic on paper.

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

19. SWEET SEA STUDIO 129 Second St. Photography. 19a. GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St. Ron Thompson, oil paintings. 20. BAR FLY PUB AND GRUB 91 Commercial St. Kathleen Bryson’s private collection; Marnie Schneider, artwork. 21. STEVE AND DAVE’S First and C Streets. Marni Schneider, photography. 21a. REDWOOD CURTAIN 220 First St. Phyllis Geller, photography of Ireland and Wales. Music by Hot Rod, The Mother Vines, Aaron Kimball and Ka-Leaf’s ShadowSword. Donationbased tickets. 22. CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. Kylan Luken, photography. 22a. C.L. LEATHERS 215 Second St. Music by Tamlyn McDonald. 22b. ACCENT GALLERY 223 Second St. Music by Wynsome Winds. 22c. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. “Shéenedra – Gyspsy Sisters,” Nicole Halverson and Danae Kirtley. 23. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. “Anahata Unfolding,” Monica Baird, watercolor, colored pencils and ink. Fiddle tunes by Mon Petit Chou. 24a. BRENDA TUXFORD GALLERY 325 Second St. “Life the Human Form,” life drawing group show. 24c. RUSTIC WEST TRADING CO. 339 Second St. Norm Leverett, leather work; Christine Siverts,

watercolors; Mary Ann Swan, pin art; Cara Rider, mosaics. 25. CIARA’S IRISH SHOP 334 Second St. Natalia Drew, artwork. 25a. CLARKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM 240 E St. 150th anniversary of the Eureka Fire Department. E Street in front of the museum will be closed for display of a historic steam fire engine. 25b. CALIFORNIA MENTOR 317 Third St. The Studio, group exhibition. Jaimal Kordes, live caricatures. Music by Asha Nan. 26. SHIPWRECK 430 Third St. Marcy Bruce’s private collection. 27. CAFÉ NOONER 409 Opera Alley. Artist TBA. Music by John Myers and Jim Silva, acoustic guitar. 28. RAMONE’S 209 E St. Kirk Shelton, paintings. Country music by Gimmick. 29. BOOKLEGGER 402 Second St. Music by Sophia Elizarraras, harpist. 30. TRUCHAS GALLERY/LOS BAGELS 403 Second St. Gigi Floyd, mixed media. 30a. BELLE STARR 405 Second St. Paula Anderson, watercolors. 31. NORTH SOLES 407 Second St. Steve Infantino, acrylics. 33. CORNUCOPIA 425 Snug Alley. Music by Oliver Cory, guitar. 35. F STREET PLAZA Music by Full Gospel Tabernacle Choir. 35a. BAYFRONT RESTAURANT 1 F St. Plaza. Richard Duning, paintings.


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ONE OF THE SCORES OF 5X7 WORKS FROM ARTISTS NEAR AND FAR TO BE AUCTIONED ANONYMOUSLY LATER THIS MONTH AT THE MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM. PREVIEW THEM SATURDAY NIGHT.

35b. LIVING THE DREAM ICE CREAM 1 F St. “North Coast Series,”, Bob and Donna Sellers, mixed media. 38. EUREKA FABRICS 414 Second St. “Opportunity Quilts,” Moonstone Quilt Guild. 39. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Maralyn Rael (of the defunct Old Town Bat Cave), art prints. 39a. YARN 416 Second St. April Lane, photography. 39c. EUREKA BOOKS 426 Second St. WWII aerial propaganda leaflets. The collection consists of both Allied Forces and Axis Alliance leaflets. 40a. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Drew Forsell, botanical photography. Lost Coast Jewelry. 40c. TALISMAN BEADS 214 F St. Tribal Oasis Belly Dancers, performing at 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. 41a. ALIROSE 229 F St. Susan Strope, paintings. 41b. THE WINE SPOT 234 F St. Kathryn Stotler, assemblage collage. 42. OLD TOWN JEWELERS 311 F St. Humboldt Spay and Neuter featuring Elizabeth Hamb, paintings. 43. COCO & CUVEE 531 Third St. Sonny Wong, artwork. 43b. DISCOVERY MUSEUM Corner of F and Third Sts. Kids Alive program drop-off 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Call for reservations 443-9694. 44. AMERICAN INDIAN ART GALLERY 241 F St. Native American artwork. 44a. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 233 F St. The Camera Club. 45. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE 526 Opera Alley. Stephanie Girley, acrylic paintings. Music by Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers.

46. FUNK SHUI 213 F St Amber Van Dunk, and Jill Garinger, mosaic portraits. 46a. OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOLATES 211 F St. Jason Brandi, Humboldt Republic. Music by Soulful Sidekicks. 47. OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING Second and F Sts. Karen Chase Frazee, oil and watercolor paintings, master studies. 50. WOLF DAWG 525 Second St. “Our Coastal Redwoods,” group show by Ecology and Art Education for Youth, Mattole Valley Charter School. Music by John David Young Conspiracy. 50b. HUMBOLDT HARDWARE 531 Second St. Jay Brown, artist. 51. PRAXIS FITNESS 239 G St. Winn Wright, colored pencil drawings. 51a. PARASOL ARTS 211 G St. “It Works,” Sanford Pyron and Laurie Simmons, body wrap booth. 53. ORANGE CUP CORAL SALON 612 Second St. Rob Hampson, oils. 54. PIANTE 620 Second St. “Journeys,” handmade paper sculptures. 54a. STUDIO 124 620 Second St. (Upstairs) Arts Parts. 54b. STUDIO 622 622 Second St. Steven Gray, kaleidoscopes; Jennifer Mackey, textiles and paintings. 55. SMUG’S PIZZA 626 Second St. Brandon Garland, pen and ink. 56. STUDIO S 717 Third St. Open Studio. 57. ADORNI CENTER 1011 Waterfront St. Macy Lamson, mixed media; Robert Walker, photography; Aarion Kimball, mixed media; “Child’s Play,” Maggie Groves-Bradley. ●

June 4 - 28, 2014

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23


continued from previous page

First Friday Fortuna Arts Night Friday, June 6, 5-8 p.m.

The Fortuna Downtown Business Association invites you to a fun-filled night of art, music, refreshments and merchant specials on the first Friday of every month. Enter to win $50 in Fortuna Bucks by picking up a “Passport to Downtown” at a participating business and getting get it stamped at 10 more.

th

16 L NUA

AN

Don’t miss the last weekend!

JUNE 8-9

Grab your OPEN STUDIO GUIDE or go to www.northcoastopenstudios.com for more information

BODY WORKS FITNESS CENTER 1156 Main St. Free fitness day. CORNERSTONE REALTY 1131 Main St. Kay Kanter, artwork. COUNTRY ROSE 1137 Main St. Music by The M Notes. DAKOTA’S DESIGNS 1040 Main St. Dakota Daetwiler, paintings. Work by youth photographers. EEL VALLEY APPLIANCE 1027 Main St. Samples prepared on the store’s grills. FORTUNA ART & OLD THINGS 1026 Main St. Fred Padgett, illustrated insulators and instruments. HEALTHSPORT 1023 Main St. Anita Tavernier, photos, digital art and paintings. HOPPY’S FROYO 1151 Main St. Paper lanterns and pastels by Scotia school students; Jan Carter, murals. L’S KITCHEN 734 10th St. Artist TBA. MCCLEAN FOUNDATION 1336 Main St. Diane Samuelson, photography. MAIN STREET ART GALLERY 1006 Main St. Chuck Bowden, artwork. MARIAN’S BEAUTY SALON 741 11th St. Ashley Bones, jewelry. METHODIST CHURCH 922 N St. Youth open mic. PRECISION INTERMEDIA 1012 Main St. Greg Rumney, historic photos. Music TBA.

LILLIAN BERTZ’S RECYCLED VINTAGE IMAGES ARE FEATURED THIS MONTH AT RARE BIRD.

RAIN ALL DAY BOOKS 1136 Main St. Fortuna Art Council Artist TBA. STREHL’S FAMILY SHOES & REPAIR 1155 Main St. Kathy King, artwork. TACO LOCO 955 Main St. Richard Leamon, paintings. THE HUMBOLDT CORNER 899 Main St. Jed Stoll, glassblowing demonstrations. RARE BIRD 1022 N St. Lillian Bertz, mixed media. ●

Trinidad Art Night Friday, June 6, 6-9 p.m. Upper Trinidad SAUNDER’S PARK (start of Patricks Point Drive) -”Spin Jam” at 6 p.m., fire dancing by Circus of the Elements at 8:45 p.m. TRINIDAD MUSEUM 400 Janis Court “The Trinidad Lighthouse 1871-present.” Harp music by Howdy Emmerson. TRINIDAD TRADING COMPANY 460 Main St. Artist TBA. SAUNDER’S PLAZA EAST Kids fun time table. Music by The Canary and the Vamp, wild banshee flapper music. The Lighthouse Grill 355 Main St. Toni Magyar, Pachamama Jewelry. Free appetizers. Bergeron Winery 359 Main St. Wine Tasting. Artist TBA. Trinidad West BEACHCOMBER CAFE 363 Trinity St. Matt, oil paintings. Music by Michael Fles. OCEAN WAVE HEALING ARTS STUDIO 363 Trinity St. Artist TBA.

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

TRINIDAD SCHOOL 300 Trinity St. Youth and family open mic. All performance genres welcome. Crafting tables. TRINIDAD TOWN HALL 409 Trinity St. Music by Margaret Kellerman on the “Bay Stage.” TRINIDAD ART GALLERY 490 Trinity St. Patricia Sundgren Smith, prints. Music bu JD Jeffries and Moonstone Outreach Project. TRINIDAD EATERY 607 Parker Road. Rick Gustafson, photography; Nancy Pippin, Fimo demonstration. Music by Mark Noyes, For Folks Sake, Sajha Eden, Jerry Thompson and Sandy, Keith and the Lost Dogs. Appetizers by the Eatery. MOONSTONE CROSSING 529 Trinity St. Paintings by students of Michael Hayes. Jazz by Otto Knowbetter. SEASCAPE RESTAURANT AND PIER 1 Bay St. Jim Welsh, oil paintings.


READY TO DIP.

PHOTO BY JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL.

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

Dressed to Grill Dip, marinate and sauce it up By Jada Calypso Brotman

I

’m not an established Grill Person. I don’t watch shows or buy cookbooks about grilling. That said, I am even less of a Washing Pans Person, so when I received a spanking-new Broil Mate, I was overjoyed. Can we just all mentally insert a blurb about how lovely and appropriate grilling is in summer months? It is. There — we all agree. My dad is a charcoal guy. He’s a better cook than I am, so I won’t dispute its merits; I just prefer ease and speed. Hence, propane propane, as Bubbles would say, which we all know is as easy as pushing a button. I like grilling chicken. It is the only time I purchase boneless, skinless breasts. Shrimp are an excellent protein to grill, too, because cooking time is so easy to deduce — they’re done when they turn entirely pink and have a few blackened edges. There are all sorts of excellent marinades, but often I want to cook right now, so I cut to the chase by making a flavorful dipping sauce, like the following great peanut one. It’s a little spicy, so lightly seasoned grilled protein makes a harmonious match. You can cut chicken breasts into strips and skewer them in “S” forms, brush them with oil and sprinkle a little salt, then grill for them for 4 minutes on each side. The same can be done with whole prawns,

peeled or unpeeled. Throw together a cold lentil salad or a cucumber salad with fish sauce and sugar, and rice if you are hungry.

Peanut Sauce via Bruce Cost and Darius Brotman It looks like a lot of ingredients, but it’s mostly stuff you have in the fridge anyway, except for the raw, unsalted, whole Spanish peanuts. You can get those at Asian groceries or online. They really make a difference, but you can use unsalted regular peanuts from the bulk bins if you just can’t wait. Ingredients and method: ½ cup raw unsalted whole Spanish peanuts 1 small, fresh jalapeno pepper 1 small knuckle of peeled ginger 1/3 cup coconut milk 2 teaspoons soy sauce 4 teaspoons fish sauce 1 teaspoon white sugar Juice of half a lime 1 tablespoon peanut oil 1 handful fresh cilantro Fry the peanuts in a little oil until they begin to darken and emit a toasty aroma. Don’t burn them. Put all the ingredients in blender or food processor and whir until saucy. Makes a generous cup.

Pork Ribs Souvlaki Style I know how Greek food can sometimes seem like a one-trick pony. When it comes to charred meats, however, the Greeks are global contenders. Serve this with tzatziki and bread.

Ingredients and method: Pork ribs (baby back are best) ½ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon salt 1 generous grind of black pepper Juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons dried oregano (Greek oregano is best, see “Add to Cart,” April 3) Mix the oil, salt, pepper, lemon juice and oregano and marinate the meat for an hour. Massage the marinade into the meat and grill, poking and turning often, for about 20 minutes or until cooked through.

Tzatziki Tzatziki is so good. Good on bread, good on salad, really good with grilled meat. My father always strains his own yogurt, but I just buy Greek yogurt (sorry, Pop). It is thriftier to strain your own, though. Just dump regular yogurt in a clean dishtowel, bundle it up with a string and hang it up to drip over the sink for an hour.

Ingredients and method: 2 cups yogurt 1 peeled and seeded cucumber, coarsely grated 1 big garlic clove, finely minced 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ teaspoon salt 1 grind of black pepper Squeeze the cucumber shreds over the sink to remove excess water. Add it to other ingredients and mix. Let stand for 15 minutes. Adjust the salt and lemon juice to your taste. ●

THE 2014 COMPLETE RESTAURANT GUIDE

Now on newstands.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

25


THe seTlIst

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

WHO: Chris Jamison WHEN: Friday, June 6 at 9 p.m. WHERE: Six Rivers Brewery TICKETS: TBA

Rounding the bass Drumming up some good times By Jennifer Savage thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

A

h, baseball! What could be more feel-good than sitting in the stands, cheering on the Humboldt Crabs, seeing all the folks you only see in the summertime, wondering if the drunk hecklers behind you are going to spill beer down your back, right there at the Arcata Ball Park, where cowboys and hippies find common ground in rooting for the oldest continuously operated summer collegiate, woodbat, baseball team in the country? Yeah! Musically, we’re looking at a rather slow week, so before we look ahead, let us harken back to last Saturday afternoon, post-Farmers’ Market, sipping Alibi Marys with a stringband: “How do you know when the band sucks? When they start playing ‘Mustang Sally’!” “How do you know when the band really sucks? When they’re still playing it 25 minutes later!”’ “I remember this one green room in this one club had a sign on the wall:

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

‘Please do not play “Miss Ohio,” “In Spite of Ourselves” or “Wagon Wheel.”’” “Ah, ‘Wagon Wheel,’ the Americana ‘Freebird.’” Band members confessed that these jokes sometimes get them into trouble. People think they’re making fun of songs many fans consider sacred. That’s an incorrect assessment. The lesson is, even great songs become cliché when covered to death. Consider yourselves warned, bands of Humboldt. The exception, of course, is the Crab Grass Band. Bust out the “Crazy Train.” We will always support you. In fact, my dear Humboldtians, why not go for two? Baseball and the World Famous Crabgrass Band! Look for the little music note on the Crabs’ schedule and plant yourself in the bleachers accordingly. And now, onward.

Thursday’s boy band bonanza

The Placebo hosts four bands in the Ink Annex beginning at 7 p.m. You’ve


got Astronaut, “a death metal boy band” from the town of Paradise playing self-described “songs of tardigrades and intergalactic cabin fever laced with pummeling walls of sound.” (I feel like these guys are not getting laid.) Also up, Santa Cruz’s Medicine Moon, a two-piece neo-folk prog deal with Grace Slick-ish vocals occasionally drowned out by the band’s deep sludge predilection. Hiss & Hum out of San Francisco lays down the ambient sounds and local band Small Axe rounds out the evening. Placebo members can enjoy it all for $4, everyone else pays $6 and it is, of course, an all-ages event. Please support your local all-ages venue by keeping it drug and alcohol free. Comedians playing music: What could go wrong? Dr. Foxmeat and Matt Redbeard of Savage Henry join Burly Dent from The Hill to perform as the dubiously named Honky Tonk Manor at The Jambalaya. The gig starts at 10 p.m. Please support your local 21-and-over venue by keeping it that way.

Friday’s feeling all the feelings

Americana singer-songwriter Chris Jamison brings contemporary folk to Six Rivers Brewery in McKinleyville. No less an authority than the Austin Chronicle named his fourth album, Sleeping with the T.V. On, one of its Top 10 of 2013, which makes sense given the appealing nature of Jamison’s storytelling and gentle guitar. Fans of Mason Jennings, et al., should enjoy this show. Add a little whiskey — you must be 21 or over — and let the melancholy wash over you at 9 p.m.

squares, man!” says Red.) It’s the Logger Bar, so you already know you cannot attend this show if you have yet to celebrate your 21st birthday.

Sunday’s darlings

LAM! LAM!, the one-woman performance art project of Pink Flag guitarist Betsy Shane, incorporates thoughtful subjects with cheeky dance styling. Her energetic live performances encourage — warning! — audience participation. LAM! LAM!’s latest EP, Caliban, explores nautical themes and the trouble that lurks beneath even the most idyllic of seascapes. Show up with your subconscious desires and expect them to be dragged from the deep before the night is through. In plainer language, LAM!LAM! makes some pretty fun power pop tunes with cutting lyrics a la early ’90s fem rock. Take “Fuck Scene,” for example: “In the dark I don’t know whether to kiss or kill you/you think you’re cool standing there.” Who can’t relate to that? Especially when it’s danceable. This all goes down at Redwood Curtain Brewing Company with local dark disco babes Space Biscuit accompanying.

Etc.

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a highres photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal.com. l

Saturday’s nostalgia trips

Hum Plate Blog WHO: Medicine Moon WHEN: Thursday, June 5 at 7 p.m. WHERE: The Ink Annex TICKETS: $6, $4 members

Devouring Humboldt’s best kept food secrets. photo courtesy of the artist

The mellow week gives way to an utterly reverbalicious gig at the Alibi with the 1960s garage pop of local girl group The Lost Luvs, who join L.A./Seattle act Prophets of Addiction, mascara glam rockers extraordinaire. If you’ve been looking for the next Guns N’ Roses with a splash of 45 Grave, Prophets of Addiction deliver the old-fashioned sleaze-metal you’ve been missing. Show starts at 11 p.m., cover is $5, show is limited to those of legal drinking age. Out at the Logger Bar, DJ Red and DJ Zephyr will deliver the boss tuneage via all-vinyl at Garage Rock Au Go Go starting at 9:30 p.m. (“Because iPods are for

PERFORMANCES: BEST KEPT SECRET WITH THE ALL-STAR ROCKOYSTRA • BAYOU SWAMIS JIM LAHMAN BAND • MOTHERLODE • SAMBA QUENTE • STRIPED PIG STRINGBAND EVENTS: NOON WHISTLE OYSTER CALLING CONTEST • KWPT THE POINT SHUCK N’ SWALLOW CONTEST ATTRACTIONS: AQUACULTURE ALLEY • ARCATA PLAYHOUSE/PLAYHOUSE ARTS • BREAKFAST AT 8AM CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES • FARMERS’ MARKET • HUMBOLDT MADE BLOCK • HUMBOLDT WINE ASSOCIATION • KINETIC KAR SHOW • LOCAL ARTISANS • LOCAL CRAFT BEERS • SCRAP HUMBOLDT/CITY ARTS ALLEY • 30+ FOOD VENDORS FREE SHUTTLE EVERY 15 MINUTES 9:30AM–6:00PM: ARCATA HIGH SCHOOL @ M & 16TH ST. HSU @ 14TH & UNION ST. • SAMOA BLVD./HWY 255 BETWEEN V & K ST INFO AT OYSTERFESTIVAL.NET AND IN THE MAD RIVER UNION OFFICIAL OYSTER FESTIVAL GUIDE AVAILABLE IN JUNE

www.northcoastjournal.com/HumPlate Have a tip? Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014

27


ARCATA + NORTH EUREKA + SOUTH ON NEXT PAGE

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID

3 foods cafe 835 J Street Arcata (707) 822-9474 3foodscafe.com open at 5:30 tues-sun

NEW! Join us for patio hours Tues-Sun 2-6pm

Check out our facebook page for news and specials!

venue

thur 6/5

fri 6/6

sat 6/7

Honky Tonk Manor (bluegrass) 10pm Price TBA

Something for Everyone Showcase 10pm $7

sun 6/8

m-t-w 6/9-11

DGS Sundaze (EDM DJs) 9pm $5

[M] The Getdown (local funk) 9pm [T] Savage Henry Comedy Open Mic 9pm $3 [W] The Whomp (DJs) 9pm $5

The Lost Luvs & Prophets of THE ALIBI Addiction (punk/rock) 11pm $5 744 Ninth St., Arcata 822-3731 NBA Finals Oceans (documentary) NBA Finals 5pm Free w/$5 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 5:45pm Free w/$5 food/bev 7pm $3 food/bev. All Ages 1036 G St., 822-1220 Open Mic Jazz Night [M] Quiz Night 7pm Free BLONDIES 822-3453 7pm Free 7pm Free [T] BeTh IsBell (acoustic rock) 7pm Free 420 E. California Ave., Arcata BLUE LAKE CASINO Karaoke w/KJ Leonard The Getdown (funk/jam) PressureAnya (DJs) Karaoke w/KJ Leonard WAVE LOUNGE 8pm Free 9pm Free 9pm Free 8pm Free 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 Mon Petit Chou (FrenchGood Company (Celtic) CAFE MOKKA Canadian) 8pm Free 8pm Free 495 J St., Arcata 822-2228 BeTh IsBell (acoustic rock) CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 [W] Open Mic w/Jimi Jeff 8pm Free 9pm Free 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO Fusion w/Accurate Productions The Roadmasters (country) Dee Hemingway Band (Rock) Karaoke w/Chris Clay [T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay FIREWATER LOUNGE DJs 9pm Free 9pm Free 9pm Free 8pm Free 8pm Free 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611 Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) [W] Blues Explosion (open jam) CLAM BEACH INN 839-0545 10pm Free 8:30pm Free 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville CRUSH [T] Game Night 5pm Free 1101 H St. #3, Arcata 825-0390 Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam THE FORKS (530) 629-2679 8:30pm 38998 Hwy 299, Willow Creek HUMBOLDT BREWS Nueva Illusion 856 10th St., Arcata 9pm $15 826-2739

JAMBALAYA 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766

It’s here!

®

Fine Wines Fine Wines

Spirits

Beer

Soda

Spirits

Beer

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DOWNTOWN PLAZA 786 9TH STREET ARCATA

2014 WEDDING & PARTY GUIDE NORTHTOWN

(right over the footbridge)

1644 G STREET • ARCATA • 822-1865

FIND IT NOW ON NEWSSTANDS AND AT LOCAL WEDDING & PARTY RETAILERS

HAPPY HOURS Rita’s on Harris

$2 Well Drinks Extremo Happy Hour 4-5pm

& Regular Happy Hour Rita’s on 5th Street $4 Jumbo Margaritas $2 Pints & Full Size Drinks Regular Happy Hour M-Sa 3-5pm

The Kraken RUM

INSIDE VENUES | JEWELRY | GOWNS & TUXEDOES | FLOWERS | BAKERIES AND MORE

Search the complete directory online at northcoastjournal.com/wedding

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Rita’s in Arcata $2 Pints • $3 Margarita M-F 3-5pm

20

$

1.75 Liter

Eureka 1111 5th St • 443-5458 427 W. Harris St • 476-8565 Arcata 855 8th St. Suite 3 • 822-1010

99 2 1 + O N LY

RitasCafe.com


arcata • blue lake •mckinleyville trinidad • willow creek thur 6/5

Blake Ritter (fiddle) 6pm Free

fri 6/6

sat 6/7

Claire Bent (jazz) 7pm Free

Blue Lotus Jazz 7pm Free

The Livingrooms (rock) 9pm Free Patrick Joseph (acoustic) 6pm Free

Garage Rock Au Go-Go (DJs) 9:30pm Free

Submit your events online! Deadline noon Friday

sun 6/8

m-t-w 6/9-11

[W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free [T] Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm Free

Tim Breed (acoustic) 5pm Free Potluck (food) 6pm Free [T} Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm Free [W] Piet Dalmolen (jazz) 6pm Free

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

Open Daily 8am - 2am

Bradley Dean (rock/country) 4pm Free Art Night Afterparty w/SLOTR and Slum Lotus (DJs) 9:15pm $5

[M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rude Lion 9pm $5

REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW 550 South G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222

Chris Jamison (acoustic) 8pm Free

Blase Bonpane (rock) 8pm Free

No Covers (jazz) 8pm Free

ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St., Arcata 826-WINE SIDELINES 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SILVER LINING 839-0304 3561 Boeing Ave., McKinleyville SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave., McK 839-7580 SUSHI SPOT 839-1222 1552 City Center Road, McK. TOBY & JACKS 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

Roots & Culture Reggae 9pm Free Rude Lion Sound (DJ) 10pm $2

Paula Jones & the RLA Trio (jazz) 9pm Free DJ Music 10pm $2

Soul to Soul (DJs) 9pm Free Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free Crosby Tyler (one-man band) 9pm Free

Speed Dating 7pm $25 DJ Itchie Fingaz 9pm Free

Chris Jamison (folk) 9pm $25 DJ Itchie Fingaz (glitch/hip-hop) 9pm Free

DJ Music 10pm Free

LAM! LAM! & No Covers (eclectic) 7pm Free [W] Salsa! (lessons + dance) 9pm $5

Trivia Night 8pm Free

[T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free [M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [T] Sunny Brae Jazz 8pm Free [M] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free [W] Reggae Wednesdayz w/Rude Lion 10pm Free

DINE IN 3575 Janes Rd. • Arcata

ORDERS TO-GO 707-822-4600

Mon-Sat open at 11am • Closed Sunday

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

HUMBOLDT

2014

venue

LARRUPIN 822-4766 1658 Patricks Point Drive, Trinidad LIBATION 761 Eighth St., Arcata 825-7596 LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 677-0077 355 Main St., Trinidad LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWERY 668-5680 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake MOSGO’S 826-1195 2461 Alliance Road, Arcata OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad

clubs, concerts and cafés

You nominated, now the best remain.

VOTE! www.northcoastjournal.com

/BOH2014 Voting closes Monday, June 30 at 5 p.m.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

29


MOVIE TIMES. TRAILERS. REVIEWS. DESKTOP:

northcoastjournal.com/ MovieTimes

MOBILE:

m.northcoastjournal.com

EUREKA + SOUTH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

thur 6/5

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770 BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta CHAPALA CAFÉ 201 Second St., Eureka 443-9514 CUTTEN INN 445-9217 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

INK ANNEX 442-8413 47B w. Third St., Eureka

fri 6/6

Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free Dr. Squid (rock/dance) 9pm Free The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

sat 6/7

sun 6/8

m-t-w 6/9-11

Taxi (rock) 9pm Free The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

Accurate Productions (DJs) 8pm Free

[W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

[T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm Free

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St. 497-6093 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177

ARCATA + NORTH ON PREVIOUS PAGE

Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Irish) 7pm Free

Shuffle Party w/Pressure Anya (DJs) 9pm Free

Pressure Anya (DJs) 11pm Free

Papa Paul (folk) 7pm Free

The M Notes (acoustic) 6pm Free

[M] Electric Gravy (synth) 8:30pm Free [T] Sawyer Family w/Crosby Tyler 9pm Free Seabury Gould’s Open Irish Session 3pm Free [T] Augurs, Xtom Hanx, more (punk) 7pm $6 [W] Wounded Giant, Burning Hash, more (metal) 7pm $5

Astronaut, Medicine Moon (metal, neo-folk) 7pm $6

MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM OF ART 636 F St., Eureka 442-0278

Lizzy & the Moonbeams (jazz) 6pm Free

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600

The Soulful Sidekicks (rock) 7pm Free

PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 THE PLAYROOM 11109 Main St, Fortuna 725-5438 PERSIMMONS GALLERY Francis Vanek Combo (jazz) 1055 Redway Drive, Redway 7pm Free 923-2748 RED LION HOTEL R.J. GRIN’S LOUNGE 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

Happy Hour Mon-Fri, 4-6pm

Rudelion (DJs) 10pm Free

[W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 7pm Free

JSun (DJs) 10pm Free [T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 9pm Free

EZ Money (Americana) 7pm Free Karaoke w/Chris Clay 9pm Free, 21+

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩ G ENTLEMEN ’ S C LUB

Nightly 9pm-3am

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Browse by title, times and theater.

FROM OUR BAR MENU: HUMMUS • FRIED CALAMARI FILET SLIDERS • DEVILED EGGS 301 STYLE • FISH TACOS • ARTISAN CHEESE PLATE • CARTER DOG

www.carterhouse.com

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

JUNE 8-9

HALF OFF COVER, Before 10 p.m.

ALWAYS CONTRACTING NEW DANCERS

Grab your OPEN STUDIO GUIDE or go to www.northcoastopenstudios.com for more information


eureka • fernbridge •ferndale • fortuna garberville • loleta • redway venue

RIVERWOOD INN 943-3333 2828 Ave of the Giants, Phillipsville SCOTIA INN PUB 764-5338 100 Main St., Scotia SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

thur 6/5

clubs, concerts and cafés

fri 6/6

sat 6/7

Chuck Mayfield (rock) 7pm Free

Cheryl and Fennell (rock) 7pm Free

sun 6/8

m-t-w 6/9-11

Falling Rocks (swing) 7pm Free Swan Sunday (eclectic and request) 8:30pm Free

THE SHANTY 444-2053 213 Third St., Eureka THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778

Find live music and more!

Drag Show (benefit) 9:30pm Free

Kingfoot (Americana) 8pm Free

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

Jeff Demark & the LaPatinas 9pm Free Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (booty shakin’ blues) 10pm Free

THE WINE SPOT 497-6236 234 F St., Eureka

[M] Anna Hamilton (blues) 7pm Free [T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [W] No Covers and USGGO (jazz) 7:30pm Free

Michael Dayvid (acoustic) 6pm Free

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

WHO: Prophets of Addiction WHEN: Saturday, June 7 at 11 p.m. WHERE: The Alibi TICKETS: $5

Fresh, farm to table products made same day in house. For Reservations call 268-3852 Open at 5pm Tues.-Sat. 511 2nd Street • Old Town Eureka

lunch to follow

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com

I S ION VCENTER

Providing Eye Care & Eye Wear for over 50 years.

DR. KENNETH KAISER OPTOMETRIST Previously with Eye of the Phoenix

616 H STREET • EUREKA

443-1619

COCKTAIL COMPASS NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM/COCKTAILCOMPASS

100+ BARS 70+ HAPPY HOURS OR

breakfast served exclusively ‘till 2pm

THE

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET • EUREKA MONDAY-SATURDAY 11:30AM-9:00PM

Father’s Day

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

31


Down and Dirty

The June To-Do List By Genevieve Schmidt downanddirty@northcoastjournal.com

Alstroemeria ‘Rock and Roll’ photo by Genevieve Schmidt

T

hough it hardly feels like summer, the half-crazed look of freedom in the eyes of students, college and otherwise, tells a different story. In the garden, the detritus of spring is ready to be cleared away and dead-headed, while summer’s bounty is emerging in the form of early strawberries, artichokes and even a few raspberries. Read on to learn what to do for your garden in June. Plant some glorious Alstroemeria. If you have some money burning a hole in your pocket, run out to the nursery and pick up a Peruvian lily. These florists’ favorites last for about 10 days in a vase, and come in such a wide array of colors that I can always find a new one to spruce up some as yet un-spruced area of my garden. They come in shades of canary yellow, brilliant orange, cherry red, peachy champagne, coral, white and purple. Just make sure you purchase a named variety with a politely clumping habit, as some of the plants merely labeled “pink” or “variegated” are rampant garden thugs. Consider trying the wildly vivid new variety ‘Rock and Roll,’ which has variegated foliage emerging gold and maturing to cream, with flowers in a deep orangey-red. Despite the name, it is as well-behaved as it is fun to look at. Repair dog damage in the lawn. While the usual Humboldt County rains rinse away urine and keep it from killing the lawn, with the warm, dry weather come additional garden tasks: rinsing, raking and seeding. If you can catch dog patches in the lawn quickly and flush them with water, it’s usually not a problem, but if the

acidity from dogs sits on the lawn for any length of time, it will usually create a dead patch. To repair, rake out any dead lawn, apply fresh lawn seed mixed with compost and a sprinkle of horticultural lime to neutralize the acid, and keep the area watered until the seeds have taken root. Fertilize rhododendrons and azaleas around Father’s Day. Acid-loving evergreens should be fertilized three times per year: Valentine’s Day, Father’s Day and again around November. This helps the plants set buds for next year’s bloom, encourages them to hold their foliage longer so the plants stay more full and less leggy, and helps promote healthy leaves and a strong root system. I use a granular organic fertilizer such as Gardner and Bloome for acid-loving plants, and scatter it underneath the entire canopy of the plant, focusing on the outer edges where the foliage stops. Fertilize plants that produce fruit or bloom heavily. Most modern fruits, vegetables and flowers such as roses or peonies have been bred to have ever-larger fruits and blooms. This reproductive cycle takes a toll on plants, so for the plants from which we ask so much, I usually offer the boost of an organic fertilizer application at this time of year to provide a bit of extra support. While native shrubs and ornamentals with unassuming flowers can do without, give everything else a dusting of an all-purpose, slow-releasing granular organic fertilizer for a gentle boost in the coming months. Raise the mowing height to preserve moisture in lawns. One of the simplest ways to save water on your lawn and thus

32 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

keep it green and healthy is to adjust the mower to a height of 3 or 4 inches, usually the tallest setting. By mowing high, the blades of grass can provide shade to the root system and keep it cool and moist. Not only that, but a taller lawn helps keep new weed sprouts from getting a foothold by shading them out. While many people mow their lawn as low as possible, there is absolutely no reason or excuse for such a water- and fertilizer-intensive routine, unless you are running a golf course. That said, don’t take my urging for a taller lawn as an excuse to let things go; it’s important not to cut any more than one third of the grass blades off in each run, or you risk killing the grass. Plant a variety of vegetables. We are in major big-time vegetable gardening season, and I’m guessing you’re joining me in excitedly harvesting the fruits of an early summer season. Now’s the time to plant seeds for greens such as arugula, chard, lettuce and spinach, roots such as carrots and parsnips, as well as dill, beans, sunflowers and basil, and corn inland. You can still plant starts of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage, nightshades such as tomatoes, peppers and eggplant inland or in a hot microclimate, as well as squash and pumpkins of all kinds. But hurry it up — our lack of heat on the coast gives us a lackluster summer growing season, so the sooner you plant your harvestables, the better. Clear up bulb foliage once it has withered. With the beauty of spring bulbs behind us, we are left with their bedraggled remains yellowing and turning

brown. Once the dry husks of foliage let you know that the plants have finished taking back the nutrients from their leaves and storing them in their bulbs, you can clear away the old foliage and start the countdown for next year’s display. Deadhead roses. After that first delicious burst of blooms from your roses, the brown petals clinging to the tip of the stem can be kind of a buzzkill, and leaving the dead flowers can send a signal to your roses that they need not bother blooming again. Cut off any finished flowers to the nearest outward facing leaf with five leaflets, which will stimulate a new flowering stem to grow and prolong your season of color. Catch the HBGF garden tour. The Humboldt Botanical Gardens Foundation puts on a garden tour every two years, and for those of us who pore over the gardening glossies and pin the latest plants on Pinterest, this is a can’t-miss opportunity to see what real gardeners can do here. The gardens represent a variety of styles, and the quirkier places become a talking point for years among Humboldt’s gardening geekerati. The tour is on June 22 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and this year it is centered in the Eureka area. Tickets are available in advance from pretty much every nursery and garden shop from McKinleyville to Fortuna. Hope to see you there! l Genevieve Schmidt is a landscape designer and owns a fine landscape maintenance company in Arcata. Visit her on the web at www.GenevieveSchmidtDesign.com.


Drag shows and saving the environment go together like Larrupin sauce and anything you can drench in Larrupin sauce. At 9:30 p.m., Thursday, June 5, The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence and the Circus of the Elements present the Gender Bender Drag Show (free) at the Siren’s Song Tavern. One dollar from every pint sold will benefit Earth First and the Redwood Forest Defense.

5 thursday Art

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Drawing, painting, mixed-media, sculpting and more. Free.

Theater

Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. The iconic musical about Jean Valjean’s quest for redemption. $18-$20. 442-6278.

Events

Fireman’s Muster. 5:30 p.m. Ray’s Food Place, McKinleyville, 1500 Anna Sparks Way. Watch teams of firefighters compete for a trophy with a bucket brigade and hose-coupling relay as part of Pony Express Days. Free. mckinleyvillechamber.com/pony-express-days. 839-2449.

Food

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Squeezebug plays this week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music.

Meetings

Human Rights Commission. First Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This month’s agenda includes the use of public property and prison conditions. Free. 668-4095. Humboldt County Beekeepers Association. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Agriculture Center, 5630 South Broadway, Eureka. Dick LaForge and Garrett Brinton talk about different styles of keeping bees. $2. 845-3362.

Tired of joining in on rounds of “Row Your Boat” without any credibility? You’re in luck — Saturday, June 7 is National Learn to Row Day. The Humboldt Rowing Association is providing an opportunity to make your sculling dreams come true. Show up at 7 a.m. to learn the basics and then head out onto the bay to try out your sea arms (free and open to anyone 11 years or older). Safety first — those under 18 must be accompanied by an adult.

Outdoors

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Have a drink and enjoy a slow ride around the bay on the Madaket. $10. 445-1910. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Tour the bay with the captain of the Madaket as your guide. Learn about the history and wildlife of Humboldt Bay. $18, $16 seniors and kids under 17, $10 kids under 12, free to kids under 4. 445-1910. Sunset Paddle. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The guided tours focus on the natural and cultural history of the Humboldt Bay. Tours meet two hours before sunset. Please register in advance by the Monday before your paddle date of choice. $40. hbac@humboldt.edu. humboldt.edu/ hbac. 443-4222.

Etc

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

6 friday Art

Arts Fortuna. First Friday of every month. Main Street. Fortuna’s arts night. Free. 845-2038.

Dance

Ballet Heritage. 10 a.m. & 7 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. North Coast Dance presents a celebration of the history of ballet. $15 adults, $12 kids 12 and under. 442-7779.

Put away that Allen wrench and IKEA instruction sheet; it’s time for grown-up furniture that’s built to last. On Saturday and Sunday, June 7 and 8, the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds becomes an empire of ottomans, chairs, patio chairs and more. Furniture Fest features woodworking demonstrations and toy-making activities, and Nature Joe and his animals will be there for the kids on Sunday. This is your opportunity to learn the difference between a davenport and a chesterfield.

Movies

Bringing it Home. 6-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Celebrate Hemp History Week with a screening of this award-winning documentary. Music and demonstrations follow the film. Free. arush5ster@ gmail.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 845-0644. Oceans. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Follow filmmakers Cluzaud and Perrin beneath the ocean waves as they explore the dangers and mysteries of the deep. $3. www.arcatatheatre.com.

Music

Spring Concert. 7-9 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The Arcata High School Concert, Madrigal Choirs and the Arcata-McKinleyville Orchestra present a musical extravaganza featuring a mixture of spiritual, classical, folk and theatre pieces. $5. armack.org. Trinidad Art Night Afterparty. 9:15-11:45 p.m. Ocean Grove Cocktail Lounge, 480 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Community Arts Trinidad presents a dynamic evening with DJs SLOTR and Slum Lotus. $5. trinidadartnights.com.

Theater

The Dixie Swim Club. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. Meet five women, all friends and former teammates on their college swim team. They come together once a year for memories and hijinks. $18, $16 students and seniors. ferndalerep.org. 786-5483. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 5 listing. You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown. 7-9 p.m. Trinity Valley Elementary School, 730 California 96, Willow Creek. Join the Peanuts gang in the fast paced, lighthearted musical, presented by the Dream Quest Youth Drama Club. The cast ranges in age from 7 to 11 years old. $5 adults, $3 youth. dreamquestwillowcreek@hotmail. com. 530-629-3564.

Events

Disability and Senior Expo. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Social service agencies and organizations share information, interactive displays and demonstrations for people with disabilities, seniors, their families and the general public. Free. maryb@tilinet.org. tilinet.org. 445-8404. Farm Fest. 2-7 p.m. A&L Feed, 2308 Central Ave., McKinleyville. More Pony Express fun with live music, games, beekeeping and farming demos, plus animals and experts. Free. mckinleyvillechamber.com/ponyexpress-days. 839-2449. Pony Express Dance. 8 p.m. A&L Feed, 2308 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Kick up your cowboy boots all night long, and don’t forget to enter them in the boot contest. $10. mckinleyvillechamber.com/pony-expressdays. 839-2449.

For Kids

Children’s Clothing Swap. First Friday of every month, 3:30 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Bring your kids’ hand-me-downs to trade for fresh new-to-you’s. Sizes newborn-12, in wearable condition (no holes, stains, etc.). Free. facebook.com/ ChildrensClothingSwapArcata. 985-8084. Friday Fun Skating. 6-8:30 p.m. Eureka Muni, 1120 F Street. Skate with your friends and family. $4 youth, $4.75 adults. 441-9181.

Food

Southern Humboldt Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, pasture-raised meats and eggs, and baked goods from local producers, plus live music and family activities. Free. www.facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket.

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Outdoors

Ballet Heritage CELEBRATING THE HISTORY OF CLASSICAL BALLET & BALLET AMERICANA FRI. JUNE 6 at 10am* & 7pm SAT. JUNE 7 at 7pm SUN. JUNE 8 at 2pm *Exhibition for Local Elementary Schools Only

Ikolo Griffin, Director Nancy Call, Ballet Mistress

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing. Friday Night at the Refuge. 7-8 p.m. Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Enjoy a walk along the trail during the evening hours and William Wood’s presentation “Serengeti — Ecosystem Extraordinaire.” Free. denise_seeger@fws.gov. fws.gov/refuge/humboldt_bay. 733-5406. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing.

Sports

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Rose’s Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $1 off of beers for tournament players. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. rosesbilliards.com. 497-6295. Fast Break Fridays. 7-9 p.m. McKinleyville Recreation Department, 1656 Sutter Road. Open access to the basketball courts for teens 13-17. $1. mckinleyvillecsd.com/parks-recreation. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. The Humboldt Crabs versus Seals Baseball. $8 adults, $6 students and seniors, $4 kids under 12. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

7

There’s no shortage of green metaphors in Humboldt County. There’s the easy go-to of our “green economy,” our pride in the greenery of our gigantic redwoods forests and then there’s our commitment to promoting an eco-friendly, green lifestyle. Get started on that last one this weekend. The Sustainable Living Expo (free) is Plan it Green’s contribution to boosting Humboldt’s eco-friendly reputation. From 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 7, the Arcata Community Center will be bursting with all things sustainable. This year’s theme is “Building Green Communities and Wheels of Change,” so many of the demonstrations and workshops will be geared toward environmentally friendly construction and vehicles. The expo highlights local, green businesses, showcases the newest in electric vehicle technology, and shows you how to reduce your personal environmental impact. Don’t miss the special reception with Humboldt Made at 4 p.m. (snacks, people). Whether you love the planet or you just love expos, it’s not a bad way to spend a Saturday. We live in a beautiful place, folks; let’s learn how to keep it that way. — Dev Richards

Art

Tickets at NCD

442-7779

NorthCoastDance.org

SUNSHINE OUTFITTERS DIGITAL DETOX

Pack Trips to Local Wilderness Areas

saturday

Easy Being Green

sunshineoutfitters.com

North Coast Open Studios. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Countywide. More than 150 Humboldt County artists open their studio doors to share their work and inspirations with the public. Free. contact@northcoastopenstudio.com. northcoastopenstudios.com. 442-8413. Woodworking Open House. 12-6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Learn about Humboldt School of Woodworking classes and meet the instructors. Demonstrations all day. Free. facebook. com/HumboldtWoodworking. 444-2717.

Dance

Amazon. 6 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. Trillium Dance Studios and the Ink People present this spring dance production with guest artists, Samba da Alegria. $13 general, $10 child and senior. info@ TrilliumDance.cm. www.TrilliumDance.com. 822-8408. Ballet Heritage. 7 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. See June 6 listing. Six Rivers Montessori Barn Dance. 7-11 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Dance to music from the Striped Pig String Band and opening act Lyndsey Battle. $10. Hopemorel@gmail.com. sixriversmontessori.org. 599-0806.

Music

“Humboldt Freedom.” 5-10 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. Enjoy a musical moment during Eureka’s Arts Alive. Performances include Hot Rod, Aaron Kimball and Ka-Leaf’s ShadowSword. Brought to you by Artist Freedom Productions. Donations accepted. artsetfree@gmail.com. Lizzy and the Moonbeams. 6-9 p.m. Morris Graves

34 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Fun and original tunes in the genres of jazz, blues, swing, doo-wop, rock and bluegrass. Free. janine@humboldtarts.org. humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

Theater

The Dixie Swim Club. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See June 6 listing. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 5 listing. You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown. 7-9 p.m. Trinity Valley Elementary School, 730 California 96, Willow Creek. See June 6 listing.

Events

Arts Alive. First Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Art, and a heap of it. All around Old Town, Eureka. Free. www. eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054. City-wide Yard Sale. 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Main Street, Fortuna. Browse, pick, hunt and hoard all over town. Free. 407-9494. Furniture Fest. 12-6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Come see woodworking demos, Nature Joe and animals on Sunday and an area for making kids toys and games. Peruse outdoor décor, up-cycle furniture, wood gifts and more. Free. patrickmurphy@ humboldthardware.com. facebook.com/FurnitureFest. 444-2717. OLLI Open House. 1-3 p.m. Humboldt State University Great Hall, 1 Rossow Street, Arcata. Meet the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute faculty and check out summer courses for learners age 50 and better. free. olli@ humboldt.edu. humboldt.edu/olli. 825-5880. Peddler’s Fair. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall,

5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Shop crafts, wares and bric-a-brac. www.facebook.com/ humboldt.grange. 442-6437. Pony Express Festival. 12-4 p.m. Pierson Park, 1608 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. Music from Austin Alley, vendors, barbecue, crafts and activities for the kids. Free. mckinleyvillechamber.com/pony-express-days. 839-2449. Pony Express Parade. 11 a.m. Central Avenue, McKinleyville. An old-fashioned community parade through town with grand marshals Tim and Becky Hooven. Free. mckinleyvillechamber.com/pony-express-days. 839-2449. Sustainable Living Expo. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Explore local green businesses and fuel-efficient, hybrid, alternative fuel and human powered vehicles. Enjoy sustainable living workshops and more. The Humboldt Made reception is at 4 p.m. Free. larry@northcoast. com. www.planitgreenhumboldt.org. 845-7272.

For Kids

Humboldt Lemonade Day. Countywide. Visit stands throughout the county to enjoy lemonade and support our young entrepreneurs. Prices vary by stand. humboldtlemonade@ gmail.com. 822-4616. KEET Kids Club. First Saturday of every month, 12-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Kids aged 2-8 hear a story and create art. Each family leaves with a free book. This month’s book is Mostly Monster by Tammi Sauer. Free. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278 ext. 201. Kid’s Alive. First Saturday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. While the adults enjoys Arts Alive! the little ones can do arts and crafts. Registration begins the previous Saturday. $15 non-members. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Story Time. First Saturday of every month, noon. Willow Creek Library, Highways 299 and 96. Introduce your preschooler to the fun of books. Free.

Food

Arcata Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Free. humfarm. org. 441-9999.

Garden

Native Plant Garden Celebration. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Be part of the ribbon cutting ceremony at 11 a.m., then tour the garden. Free. Michelle.Forys@parks.ca.gov. 677-3109.

Outdoors

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I St. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. rras. org/calendar. Birding Trip. 8:30-11:30 a.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Join Tom Leskiw from the Redwood Region Audubon Society on a walk in search of land and seabirds. Wear sturdy shoes for this walk through forests and over bluffs. Free. rras.org/


calendar.html. 442-5444. Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing. EBird Survey. 8-11 a.m. Shay Park, Corner of Foster Avenue and Alliance Road, Arcata. Rob Fowler surveys birds for up to three hours, counting every species present. Participants will find the survey to be like a birding trip. Waterproof footwear is recommended. Free. 616-9841. Guided Dune Walk. First Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. Lanphere Dunes, Arcata. Meet at Pacific Union School for a tour of the dunes with a Friends of the Dunes naturalist. Free. info@friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing. Hammond Trail Work Day. First Saturday of every month, 9-11 a.m. Hammond Trail, Mad River Bridge, Arcata. Work on a water drainage project, remove graffiti, pick up trash and paint bollards. Dress for work. New volunteers welcome. Contact for meeting place. sbecker@reninet.com. humtrails. 826-0163.

Sports

Grasshopper Peak Redwoods Run. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt Redwoods State Park, 17119 Avenue of the Giants, Weott. A 10.5-mile and 30K trail running race on the hills of Humboldt Redwoods State Park. $30. racedirector@grasshopperpeakredwoodsrun.com. grasshopperpeakredwoodsrun.com. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. See June 6 listing. National Learn to Row Day. 7-10 a.m. Humboldt Bay Rowing Association, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. After a quick introduction to technique you can go out on the bay in an Olympic-style, eight-oared racing shell. Ages 11 and up are welcome. Participants under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a parent. Free. hbra. org. hbra.org.

Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. See June 6 listing.

8 sunday Art

North Coast Open Studios. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Countywide. See June 7 listing. Woodworking Open House. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 7 listing.

Dance

Amazon. 2 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See June 7 listing. Ballet Heritage. 2 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. See June 6 listing.

Music

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 442-0156.

Theater

The Dixie Swim Club. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. See June 6 listing. Les Misérables. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 5 listing. You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown. 2-4 p.m. Trinity Valley Elementary School, 730 California 96, Willow Creek. See June 6 listing.

Trillium Dance Studios & THE INK PEOPLE PRESENT

Amazon SPRING PRODUCTION 2014 CHOREOGRAPHY BY ARTISTIC DIRECTOR ERIN MCKEEVER & TRILLIUM INSTRUCTORS GUEST PERFORMERS SAMBA DA ALEGRIA

HSU’S VAN DUZER THEATER

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SATURDAY

JUNE 7 at 6 P.M.

Toe-ing the Line This weekend’s selection of ballet performances is bound to keep you on your toes (see what I did there?). Two local ballet academies, Trillium Dance Studio and North Coast Dance, are putting their best feet forward and presenting their spring productions. Luckily, both productions run through the entire weekend, so catch both shows and take in tu-tu times the ballet! Trillium Dance Studio presents Amazon at the Van Duzer Theatre on Saturday, June 7 at 6 p.m. and Sunday, June 8 at 2 p.m. ($13, $10 children and seniors). With choreography by Erin McKeever and the Trillium instructors, the show is an eclectic selection of ballet and contemporary performances by each of the dance class levels. North Coast Dance presents Ballet Heritage, a celebration of classic and Americana ballet. The student production plays at the Arkley Center for Performing Arts at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 6, 10 a.m. and 7

&

SUNDAY SUNDAY

JUNE 8 at 2 P.M. P.M.

Purchase tickets online by June 5th: www.TutuTix.com or by phone: (855) 222-2TIX GENERAL SEATING: SEATING: Adults $13, Child/Senior $8 General Seating tickets are also available at Threadbare Dancewear in Arcata & at the door For more info call 822-8408 or info@TrilliumDance.com

A c ompl ete res ou rc e for ki d s of al l ages !

p.m. on Saturday, June 7 and 2 p.m. on Sunday, June 8 ($15, $12 kids 12 and under). This plié-ful performace gives a glimpse of the history of American ballet, featuring performances from “Les Sylphides,” “Stars and Stripes” and more. Tickets are available in advance or at the door of the Arkley Center. — Dev Richards

2014 ONLINE NOW!

Summer Camps and Activity Programs Visual and Performing Arts Nature and Science Sports, Athletics and Adventure

www.northcoastjournal.com/SOF2014

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MOVIE TIMES. TRAILERS. REVIEWS. DESKTOP:

northcoastjournal.com/ MovieTimes

MOBILE:

m.northcoastjournal.com

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Events

Art and Wine in the Park. 12-4 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. Bring a picnic blanket and enjoy local and Californian wine, live music, an arts and crafts market and deep-pit barbecue. $25 with tasting glass, $20 advance, free entry. fbid@sunnyfortuna.com. friendlyfortuna.com. 725-9261. Furniture Fest. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. See June 7 listing. Trinidad Artisan’s Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Local art and crafts, live music and barbecue right next to Murphy’s Market. Free. 834-8720.

Food

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. 503-828-7421. Potluck Dinner. 6 p.m. The Logger Bar, 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Bring a dish to share with friends old and new. Free. www.facebook.com/LoggerBar.

Garden

Rose Show. 1-5 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. The Humboldt Rose Society hosts its 48th annual show of blooms and arrangements, featuring vendors, demonstrations and drawings. Free. egayner@hotmail.com. www.humboldtrose.org. 839-2684.

Outdoors

Family Fun Day Paddles. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Bring all of your friends and family for a paddle along the Eureka Waterfront and explore the marine environment of Humboldt Bay. No experience required and all paddling equipment will be provided. $20 adults. Free for children. hbac@humboldt.edu. humboldt.edu/ hbac. 443-4222. Prairie Creek Hike. 10:30 a.m. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park Visitors Center, Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway, Orick. Sierra Club North Group hosts a moderate 8-mile hike on the Prairie Creek Friendship Ridge Loop. Bring food, water, hiking footwear. No dogs. Meet at the Fern Canyon trailhead. Carpool from the Arcata Safeway parking lot at 9 a.m. Rain cancels. abronkall@yahoo.com. redwood.sierraclub.org/north/index.html. 668-4275.

Sports

Gymkhana. Kjer Road Arena, Kjer Road, McKinleyville. The McKinleyville Rodeo Association presents competitive games on horseback. Free. mckinleyvillechamber. com/pony-express-days. 839-2449. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 12:30 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. See June 6 listing.

Etc

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Tiles, letters and triple-word scores, oh my! 677-9242.

9 monday Browse by title, times and theater.

Dance

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s. Refreshments are served during break. $4. 725-5323.

Music

Humboldt Ukulele Group. Second Monday of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr.

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. A casual gathering of ukulele strummers who have fun and play together for a couple of hours. Beginners welcome and you won’t remain one long! $3. dsander1@arcatanet.com. 839-2816.

Sports

Poets on the Plaza. Second Monday of every month, 8 p.m. Plaza View Room, Eighth and H streets, Arcata. Read/perform your original poetry or hear others. $1.

Etc

Spoken Word

Events

Meditation Party. 6 p.m. Om Shala Yoga Center, 858 10th St., Arcata. Come fill your heart with peace and love. Donation suggested. davidsandercott@gmail. com. 310-663-9879.

Etc

Cribbage Lessons. 5:30-7 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Brush up on your cribbage skills or learn how to play. Free.

10 tuesday Events

HUMbucks Monthly Exchange. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Event to exchange goods and services using HUMbucks, a non-monetary, local exchange system. jugglerseth@ gmail.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 834-9019.

Food

Eureka Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Fresh, local produce direct from the farmer. Free. Lyndsey Battle plays this week. 441-9999. Food for People’s Produce Market. Second Tuesday of every month, 10:30 a.m.-noon Garberville Presbyterian Church, 437 Maple Lane. 12:301:30 p.m. Redway Baptist Church, 553 Redway Dr. All income eligible folks are invited to pick out fresh fruits and vegetables, sample recipes using available produce and learn about CalFresh. Free. hmchugh@ foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople. org. 445-3166. Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. Free. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Pick up produce, baked goods, pottery, dried herbal teas, seeds and dog treats, right across from the Miranda Gardens Resort. Free. www.facebook.com/ Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Fresh fruits, vegetables, ornamental trees and plants, all with a beautiful ocean view. Free. www. facebook.com/Southernhumboldtfarmersmarket.

Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. The Humboldt Crabs versus the Healdsburg Prune Packers. $8 adults, $6 students and seniors, $4 kids under 12. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 444-3161.

11 wednesday For Kids

Playgroup. 10 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Playtime in the museum that provides children and families with great resources. Free. info@discoverymuseum.org. discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Story Time. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

Some Cheese With That Wine All of Humboldt is beautiful this time of year, but there’s no denying the brilliance of the sunshine in Southern Humboldt. These late spring days feel like full-blown summertime in SoHum. Take advantage of the perfect picnic weather on both days this weekend. On Saturday, June 7, Loleta’s Chamber of Commerce presents the Loleta Community Picnic (free) at Loleta Community Park from noon to 3 p.m. The picnic is open to members of the Loleta community and their friends and family. Take this opportunity to call your friends in Loleta and head to the park for food, games, activities and more. On Sunday, June 8, the Fortuna Rotary hosts the annual Art and Wine in the Park (free admission, $25 wine tasting). Fortuna’s Rohner Park transforms into a 21-and-over wonderland of wine and wares. People of all ages can attend the event; however, if you want to sample from more than 20 local and Californian wines, you’ll need a valid ID. The vino venders are joined by more than 50 local artists, as well as live music from local bands. You shouldn’t drink on an empty stomach, so make sure you load up on local oysters, pulled pork and more before you start wandering with your wine. Proceeds from the event will benefit community programs sponsored by the Fortuna Rotary. — Dev Richards


MovieTimes Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Meetings

Broadway Cinema

Conservation Meeting. Second Wednesday of every month, noon. Golden Harvest Café Arcata, 1062 G St. Finalize the Redwood Region Audubon Society’s statement on the impact of marijuana cultivation on wildlife. Free. www.goldenharvestcafe.com. 445-8311.

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 Blended Fri-Wed: (3:30), 9:15; Thu: (3:30) Chef Fri-Thu: (1:05, 3:55), 6:40, 9:25 Edge of Tomorrow Fri-Thu: (2:20, 3:35), 5:15, 8:10, 9 Edge of Tomorrow 3D Fri-Thu: (12:30), 5:55 The Fault in Our Stars Fri-Thu: (11:45a.m., 2:40), 5:35, 8:35 Godzilla Fri-Thu: (2:55), 8:50 Godzilla 3D Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m.), 5:50 Maleficent Fri-Thu: (12:10, 1, 2:50), 5:25, 6:25, 8 Maleficent 3D Fri-Thu: (3:20), 8:45 Million Dollar Arm Fri-Wed: (12:35), 6:15; Thu: (12:35) A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri-Thu: (1:15, 4), 6:45, 9:30 Neighbors Fri-Wed: (11:50a.m., 2:10, 4:45), 7:10, 9:40; Thu: (11:50a.m., 2:10), 9:40 Redwood Highway Fri-Thu: (12:15, 2:35), 5, 7:20 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri-Thu: (12), 6:05, 9:10 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D Fri-Thu: (3)

OutdOOrs

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing.

12

thursday

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. See June 5 listing.

theater

Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See June 5 listing.

FOOd

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. See June 5 listing.

Meetings

Humboldt Grange 501 Potluck. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange Hall, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Grange Women’s Auxiliary meets at 6 p.m., potluck at 6:30 p.m., Grange meeting 7:30 p.m. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. www.facebook.com/humboldt.grange. 443-0045.

OutdOOrs

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See June 5 listing. Sunset Paddle. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. See June 5 listing.

etc

Cribbage Group. Every other Thursday, 6-8 p.m. New Wine Church, 1180 Evergreen Road, Redway. Please bring a board, if possible; refreshments will be served. Free. lizcarey333@icloud.com. 497-8281. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See June 5 listing.

Heads Up… Volunteers are needed for Trinidad’s Fish Fest on Sunday, June 15. If you can help on festival day or before, contact Gail Saunders, 845-5931. Redwood National and State Parks is seeking public opinion about paving 2.6 miles of Bald Hills Road. 465-7300. SCRAP Humboldt is looking for competitors for the Rebel Craft Rumble. 633-8349. The Humboldt Community Breast Health project is selling vacation raffle tickets at the Arcata farmer’s market until June 7. The Six Rivers National Forest is looking for volunteers to spend the summer as campground hosts at one of the four ranger districts. www.volunteer.gov. l

DANCE IT OUT, FELLAS.

Legendary Letdowns



Mill Creek Cinema

Wicked witch and the West By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST. Writer/director/actor/producer/ song-and-dance man Seth MacFarlane, after winning at primetime cartoons, had a surprise hit with his movie debut Ted (2012). This put him in the rare and enviable position of doing whatever he wanted for his sophomore effort, with very little oversight from his studio bosses. Therein lies the problem. The concept is promising: a hard R comedy about the pitfalls and pratfalls of the Old West,

June 5June 13

Thurs June 5 - NBA Finals Doors at 5:45 p.m. All ages Free w/food & Bev Purchase Fri June 6- Ocean Night Films Doors at 6:30 p.m. $3 All ages Sun June 8 - NBA Finals Doors at 5 p.m. All ages Free w/food & Bev Purchase Thurs June 12 - NBA Finals Doors TBA All ages Free w/food & Bev Purchase Fri June 13 - Will Durst’s BoomeRaging: From LSD to OMG Doors at 8 p.m. $15/$10 arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

top-loaded with celebrities and modern language. McFarlane was able to attract Charlize Theron, Liam Neeson, Wes Studi and a host of others to the project, and a Western would seem a near-perfect vehicle for his offbeat, smirking populism. As an early fan of Family Guy with nothing but nice things to say about Ted, I had every reason to think I would like A Million Ways. When it started to go off the rails midway through, I gave it the benefit of the doubt and hoped for the best. When it became clear that yes, this is as good as it’s going to get, I gave myself over to profound disappointment. MacFarlane stars as Albert Stark, a hapless sheep farmer from Old Stump, a dusty Podunk in the Arizona Territory, circa 1882. He lives with his cruel, disgusting parents and, as the movie opens, manages to talk himself out of being summarily cut down in a duel on Main Street. He sees this as resourceful, but his girlfriend (Amanda Seyfried) sees it as a sign of cowardice and gives him the boot. He seeks solace in whiskey and the companionship of his friends Edward and Ruth (Giovanni Ribisi and Sarah Silverman, both making the most of minor material). Amidst his

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Blended Fri-Wed: (3:35), 9:25; Thu: (3:35) Edge of Tomorrow Fri-Thu: (3:45), 9:10 Edge of Tomorrow 3D Fri-Sun: (12:35), 6; Mon-Thu: 6 The Fault in Our Stars Fri-Sun: (11:55a.m., 2:55), 5:50, 8:50; Mon-Thu: (2:55), 5:50, 8:50 Godzilla Fri-Sun: (12:40) Godzilla 3D Fri-Wed: 6:25 Maleficent Fri-Sun: (12:10, 1:10, 2:45), 5:15, 6:35, 7:45; Mon-Thu: (2:45), 5:15, 6:35, 7:45 Maleficent 3D Fri-Thu: (3:25), 8:45 A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri-Sun: (1:15, 4), 6:50, 9:35; Mon-Wed: (4), 6:50, 9:35; Thu: (4), 6:50 Redwood Highway Fri-Sun: (11:50a.m., 2:05, 4:20), 6:40, 9; Mon-Thu: (4:20), 6:40, 9 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri-Sun: (12, 3:05), 6:10; Mon-Wed: (3:05), 6:10; Thu: (3:05) X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D Fri-Thu: 9:15

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Belle Fri: (3:20), 5:50, 8:20; Sat-Sun: (12:50, 3:20), 5:50, 8:20; Mon-Thu: (3:20), 5:50, 8:20 Chef Fri: (3:40), 6:25, 9:10; Sat-Sun: (1, 3:40), 6:25, 9:10; Mon-Thu: (3:40), 6:25, 9:10 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri: (3:10), 6:05, 9; Sat-Sun: (12:15, 3:10), 6:05, 9; Mon-Thu: (3:10), 6:05, 9

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Edge of Tomorrow Fri: (3:55, 5), 6:45, 7:45, 9:25; Sat: (12:30, 2, 3:55, 5), 6:45, 7:45, 9:25; Sun: (12:30, 2, 3:55, 5), 6:45, 7:45; Mon-Thu: (3:55, 5), 6:45, 7:45 The Fault in Our Stars Fri: (3:50), 6:45, 9:35; Sat: (12:45, 3:50), 6:45, 9:35; Sun: (12:45, 3:50), 6:45; Mon-Thu: (3:50), 6:45 Maleficent Fri: (4:35), 7, 9:20; Sat: (12, 2:15, 4:35), 7, 9:20; Sun: (12, 2:15, 4:35), 7; Mon-Thu: (4:35), 7 A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri: (4:05), 7:10, 9:45; Sat: (1:20, 4:05), 7:10, 9:45; Sun: (1:20, 4:05), 7:10; Mon-Thu: (4:05), 7:10 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri: (3:45), 6:40, 9:30; Sat: (12:10, 3:45), 6:40, 9:30; Sun: (12:10, 3:45), 6:40; Mon-Thu: (3:45), 6:40

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Call theater for schedule.

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drunk, Albert befriends Anna (Theron) a gorgeous badass who’s new in town. But Anna is hiding her marriage (which doesn’t really make sense) to a notorious highwayman and murderer named Clinch (Neeson). Things develop much as one might expect them to. As much as I admire how MacFarlane won himself the right to make whatever he wanted, the final product would have benefitted from outside input. It feels rushed, like he and the rest of the creative team couldn’t believe their good fortune and so hustled right past the scriptpolishing stage into scouting locations and designing costumes. To their credit, the Old West details of the piece are pretty spot-on, and everyone must have had a lovely time putting it all together. But the comedy rarely, if ever, rises to the cleverness I’ve come to expect. The plot, too well worn to just call it familiar, lacks any surprise. The “edginess” of the material is defined by the villainous fop (the great Neil Patrick Harris) repeatedly shitting in hats and the word “fuck” in nearly every line of dialogue. Not so edgy, not so funny. R. 116m. MALEFICENT. I’m not sure, but I think I may be both too old and too young for these fairy tale re-imaginings. I’m familiar with most of the source material, but don’t have particularly strong nostalgia for it. This time out, we get Sleeping Beauty from the witch’s point of view. She, Maleficent (Angelina Jolie), rules a magical fairy kingdom adjacent to a human fief. As a girl, she befriends a human boy named Stefan. Time and distance separate them, and in late adolescence he commits an unforgiveable violation. This sets Maleficent on a path of vengeance. In adulthood, she has ensconced herself in darkness, isolating herself from the influence of humans. Stefan (Sharlto Copley) has become a king and sires a daughter. Maleficent curses the daughter (I’ll assume we’re all familiar with this part). However, as the day of reckoning approaches, she and the princess kindle a friendship, and Maleficent begins to regret her previous intonations. But is it too late? This is an atmospheric, good-looking fantasy, if a little heavy on CGI. Jolie, Copley and Elle Fanning, as the princess Aurora, all give convincing, eminently watchable performances. But there is precious little life written into the characters they play. The nascent love story between the young Maleficent and Stefan doesn’t really make any sense, nor does his transition from smitten wastrel to bellicose king. An attempt is made to skew the material toward the dark, but there isn’t

enough to the story or the characters to make that darkness scary. I was surrounded by 4-year-olds as I watched Maleficent, and they were as bored as I was. Maybe more so — they all asked if it was over yet many, many times. PG. 98m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

CHEF. Jon Favreau stars in this foodtruck road movie with Robert Downey Jr. and John Leguizamo. Bring napkins. R. 115m. EDGE OF TOMORROW. Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt as soldiers battling aliens in a post-apocalyptic Groundhog Day loop. PG13. 113m. THE FAULT IN OUR STARS. Beat the rush and start crying now. Adapted from John Green’s novel with Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort as the young, starcrossed lovers. PG13. 126m. REDWOOD HIGHWAY. A low-carbon footprint road movie in which a retired woman takes an 80-mile walk to see the coast again, meeting family and strangers on the way. PG13. 90m.

Continuing

BELLE. Gugu Mbatha-Raw stars as the peculiarly privileged and disenfranchised daughter of a British admiral and a slave in pre-abolition England. PG. 104m. BLENDED. A Sandler-Barrymore romcom in which a mismatched pair of single parents get together for the kids on a tropical vacation. PG13. 117m. GODZILLA. The big guy returns with puny, human co-stars Aaron TaylorJohnson and Ken Watanabe. The effects impress, but there’s too much going on to focus on the lizard and its destructive glory. PG13. 123m. MILLION DOLLAR ARM. John Hamm trades highballs for baseballs in this sweet and well-crafted Disney sports movie about an agent trying to turn young, Indian cricket players into Major League pitching stars. PG. 124m. NEIGHBORS. Suburban parents (Rose Byrne and Seth Rogen) go to war with the frat next door and their oft-shirtless prankster leader (Zac Efron) in this crude but effective comedy R. 97m. X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST. The mutants go time traveling to save the world. Pacing and exposition are rocky, but the action and the cast make an enjoyable distraction. PG13. 131m. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ●

NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL •• THURSDAY, THURSDAY, JUNE JUNE 5, 5, 2014 2014 •• northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 38 NORTH 46

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 7−12. With Amanda Steinebach. Children will have a great time creating with clay. Sat’s., 9:30 a.m.−11 a.m. June 7−July 25 and July 26−Aug. 23 Fee: $75 per class. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0619) FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERMEDIATES. Sat’s., June 21 & 28, 10 a.m.−noon. Tues’s., July 15 & July 22, 1:30−3:30 p.m. In this two day workshop you will learn how to make your own pendants and earrings. With the use of color and dicrohic glass, mosaic butterflies, and decals, Joele Williams will guide you through the process of cutting, designing, and wire wrapping. For inter− mediate students hand etching dicrohic glass will also be introduced. $50/$35 members. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619) HANDBUILDING FOR BEGINNERS & INTERMEDI− ATES. With Otamay Hushing. Join us for fun with handbuilding clay projects. Bring your own ideas or try out some new ones. Thurs., June 26−July 31, 10 a.m.−noon. $185. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619) POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. Tues., June 24−Aug. 26, 7−9 p.m. With Bob Raymond. Learn the basics or perfect your wheel− throwing technique. Ideal for new and continuing students. $185. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619) POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. Wed., June 25−Aug. 27. 3 classes offered: 9− 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.−1:30 p.m., intermediate 2 p.m.−4 p.m. Join Peggy Loudon for this complete intro− duction to basic wheel−throwing and glazing tech− niques. Perfect for beginning and returning students. $185. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619)

Communication

GROWING UP WITHOUT A FATHER EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ. Forty percent of American children will sleep tonight in a home where their fathers don’t live. The impact of that reality will be explored Sun., June 8, 7 p.m. Corner of 13th & Union, Arcata. Lifetree is a Conversation Café. Free. (707) 672−2919. (CMM−0605)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

MEDIA PRODUCTION TRAINING. Access Humboldt offers media production training covering camera work, pre−production, lighting, audio, and studio production. Call 476−1798 or visit www.accesshumboldt.net (DMT−0731)

BEGIN ARGENTINE TANGO. Learn the dance considered by many to be the most interesting and beautiful of all. Meet new people and have a lot of fun! Class is 5 weeks long, starts Wed. June 11, 7:30 p.m. at Redwood Raks. More info, (858) 205−9832 or www.tangodelsol.net. Free Intro class, Fri. June 6, 7−8 p.m. Call for info. (DMT−0605) DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Do you want to know a dance for romantic love songs and ballads? Then our Eureka Nightclub two−step is for you! Try a group Salsa class in Eureka or Arcata. Private lessons also available. We make dancing fun! (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0626) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−0828) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−0626) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Beginning Wkshp: 10 a.m.− noon May 17, $25. Weekly Beginning: Fri’s. 11:30 a.m. −12:30 p.m., May 9−30, $50. Beg/Int, Mon’s 7−8 p.m. Youth Band: Thurs’s. 4:30 p.m.−5:30 p.m. 5/8−5/29, $40. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C, (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0626)

Fitness

DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−0626) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−0724) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0626) PILATES: INCREASE YOUR POTENTIAL THROUGH A MINDFUL MOVEMENT. Arcata Core Pilates offers beginning−advanced group Pilates Mat, reformer, chair, TRX, as well as Private Training Sessions. Our instructors are all certified. The diversity in training and background makes a deep well for clients to draw from. Call 845−8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com, website: arcatacorepilatesstudio.com (F−0626) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0828)


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Home & Garden

TINY HOME WORKSHOP. July 7â&#x2C6;&#x2019;21 (weekdays). Ever want to build a Tiny Home? DIY building experience Building a Tumbleweed Home on a trailer. Learn every step in building an 18 ft tiny home. Email for details, humshane@gmail.com (HGâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0626)

Kids & Teens

14TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURF CAMP. Water enthusiasts of all levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skill necessary for all types of surfing while being immersed in lifeguard water safety, surf etiquette and beach and ocean awareness. Ages: 8â&#x2C6;&#x2019;up. June 23â&#x2C6;&#x2019;27, July 7â&#x2C6;&#x2019;11, July 21â&#x2C6;&#x2019;25, Aug. 4â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8, at Moonstone Beach. Cost: $195, full fourâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;day session. moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com, (707) 822â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5099 (Kâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619) AQUATICS CAMP. Get ready for one of the most wellâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;known summer camps in Humboldt County! Exciting activities, including flatwater kayaking, canoeing, surfing, stand up paddling and sailing! Staff teaches water safety, environmental educaâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; tion and promotes positive group development. Session I: June 23â&#x2C6;&#x2019;27. Session II: July 14â&#x2C6;&#x2019;18 . fee: $285 *enquire about daily rates. Discount Program Fee: $265 for full week when registering participant for more than one camp, or more than one family member! Fee Includes camp staff, transportation, aquatic equipment, daily snacks and food for the camp out beginning with Thurs. dinner. Age Limit: 10 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 14 years old . Contact: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3357. Website: Humboldt.edu/centeractivities. (Kâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619) FREE VBS. Gospel Lightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sonrise National Park VBS. Ages 3â&#x2C6;&#x2019;11 1/2. July 7â&#x2C6;&#x2019;July 11. 9 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;12 p.m. Arcata First Baptist, 1700 Union Street, Arcata. (707) 822â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 0367. Youth and Jr. High Bible Camp Ages 11 1/2â&#x2C6;&#x2019;18. Snacks and Fun are included! (Kâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0626) HUMBOLDT BAY AQUATIC CENTER KIDS CAMP. Session I: July 7â&#x2C6;&#x2019;11. Session II: July 28â&#x2C6;&#x2019;Aug. 1. Come out for a week of exploration and fun on Humboldt Bay! Campers will learn kayaking and water safety skills, as well as a respect for the wonderful marine environment that we have in Humboldt Bay. Activities include general kayak instruction and rescue techniques, Humboldt Bay ecology and history of Old Town Eureka Waterâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; front, and a variety of games and skillâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;building exercises. If you have any questions, contact the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center at (707) 443â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4222. (Kâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619) TEEN STRENGTH & CONDITIONING CAMP. Open to all teen athletes, includes exclusive, individualâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ized training in the areas of plyometrics, speed development, strength development, power development, agility, Olympic lifting and flexibility. Ages 13â&#x2C6;&#x2019;19. Two sessions: June 16â&#x2C6;&#x2019;July 11 and July 14â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Aug. 8 (2 training sessions each day). HSU Student Rec Center. Cost: $80 per session. Contact: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 4519. (Kâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619)

50 and Better

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;1225)

AMENDS: THE TWELVE PRINCIPLES OF FORGIVEâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; NESS. Practicing forgiveness can lead to greater health, a sense of wellâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;being, and healthier relaâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; tionships. Engage in the process of writing, asking questions, shifting perceptions and learning to tell your story from a new perspective. With Sharon Ferrett. Thurs., June 12, 5â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7 p.m. and Sat., June 14, 10 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;2 p.m. OLLI members $50/nonmembers $75. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605) CONSCIOUS LIVING FOR LIFE ENRICHMENT. Through discussion and practice exercises, class participants will focus on how to change ingrained habits to take greater control of their thoughts and actions and live more consciously in the present. With Jane Woodward. Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., June 18â&#x2C6;&#x2019;25, 1 â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4 p.m. OLLI members $45/nonmembers $70. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0612) CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING: AN INTROâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; DUCTION. Explore and develop writing about real stuffâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; profiles of interesting people or places, or moments from your life. With Heal McKnight. Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. and Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,, June 10â&#x2C6;&#x2019;25, 6â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8 p.m. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605) FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS. Offered by Area 1 Agency on Agingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trained HICAP counselors the second Thurs. of every month through Aug. Hourâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Supplementing Medicare, 4â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5 p.m., June 12. On deck: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, July 10, 4â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5 p.m. (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605) HEADWATERS SALMON PASS HIKE. Join Julie Clark for rangerâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;led hike which covers redwood ecology, watershed restoration and the endangered species of the Headwaters Forest Reserve. See the largest intact stand of ancient redwoods within the Reserve on this moderate level hike. Mon., June 16, 10 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1 p.m. OLLI members $10/nonmembers $35. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0612) IMPRESSIONISM FROM THE NATIONAL GALLERY & BEYOND. Focus on the figurative and landscape painting of the major impressionist artists. Paintâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ings from the National Gallery in Washington will be emphasized. With Ron Johnson. Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., June 10â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 17, 6â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8 p.m. OLLI members $45/nonmembers $70. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605) LEARN TO DRAW! Demystify the drawing process by simplifying it into achievable steps. Learn about line, light and shadow, proportion and threeâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; dimensional shapes, the foundation to underâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; standing how to draw anything. With Brent Eviston. Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., and Thursâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., June 24â&#x2C6;&#x2019;July 10, 2â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4 p.m. OLLI members $75/nonmembers $100. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619) LIBRARY SERVICES WORKSHOPS. Join Librarians Katie LaSala and Carly Marino for a tour of the HSU library to learn about its collections, computer lab use, understanding call numbers, finding scholarly articles, using eBooks, navigating the website, and using research guides. Thurs., June 12, 10 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;Noon or Mon., June 16, 2â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4 p.m. Free to OLLI Members. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826 â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880 (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605)

HARNESSING THE POWER WITHIN. Join Andy Anderson to examine selfâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;knowledge, will, and action to create an initial personal assessment. Sat., June 21â&#x2C6;&#x2019;28, 2â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3:30 p.m. OLLI members $15/ nonmembers $40. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880. (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619) LIFE & FILMS OF CHARLIE CHAPLIN. Join Philip Wright to screen and discuss notable films from Charlie Chaplin, considered to be one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of American cinema. Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., June 11â&#x2C6;&#x2019;July 9, 6â&#x2C6;&#x2019;9 p.m. OLLI members $75/nonmembers $100. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605) MAKING CHOCOLATE DIPPED STRAWBERRIES. Learn easy methods to temper chocolate, dip strawberries and decorate. With Chocolatier Sandra Nakashima. Sat., June 21, 9â&#x2C6;&#x2019;10:30 a.m. OLLI members $25/nonmembers $50. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619) ONLINE GENEALOGY LAB. Join Michael Cooley to explore free websites to learn how to best utilize Google as a powerful genealogical resource. Friâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., June 20â&#x2C6;&#x2019;27, 2â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4 p.m. OLLI members $40/nonmemâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; bers $65. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli. (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619) THE JONATHAN LYONS FAMILY IN THE BALD HILLS. 1860s to 1960s. Participate in an historical presentation and discussion of three generations of the Jonathan and Amelia Lyons Family. This course includes a field trip to the Lyonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home place, Elder, in the Bald Hills of Redwood National and State Parks. With Jim Wheeler. Fri., June 13, noonâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;2 p.m. and Sat., June 14, 9 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;4 p.m. OLLI members $75/nonmembers $100. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0612) WRITING ABOUT FOOD. Review a local restaurant, hone food writing vocabulary and share the expeâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; rience of eating in writing. With Evelyn Hampton. Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. and Thursâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., June 10â&#x2C6;&#x2019;19, 10 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;12:30 p.m. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90. OLLI: 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605) YOGA WITH OLLI. Improve balance, strength, flexâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ibility and concentration with yoga for all levels and body types. With Laurie Birdsall. Gentle Yoga on Monâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s., June 9â&#x2C6;&#x2019;30, 1:30â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3 p.m. in Eureka. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90 or Yoga in Fortuna on Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, June 10â&#x2C6;&#x2019;24, 10â&#x2C6;&#x2019;11 a.m. OLLI members $30/ nonmembers $55. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;5880 (Oâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019; 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 10. Call 845â&#x2C6;&#x2019;8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com for more information. (Sâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0626)

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USE YOUR WORDS Hanging out & writing in Trinidad with Stephanie Silvia

Saturday, June 14 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. $60 (707) 677-9323 bknystef@gmail.com

*Based on Diane di Prima workshops

GRAND OPENING June 7 â&#x20AC;˘ 10 a.m.-5 30 p.m.

Exquisite Handmade Stained Glass

RETAIL STAINED GLASS Supplies â&#x20AC;˘ Materials Monthly Classes

Your local stained glass specialists. Open Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 820 N St., Arcata (9th St. Entrance)

(707) 633-6266 â&#x20AC;˘ jsgstudios@gmail.com

continued on next page

www.jsg-studios.com

northcoastjournal.com â&#x20AC;˘ NORTH COAST JOURNAL â&#x20AC;˘ THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

39


legal notices

continued from previous page KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0626) RANGJUNG YESHE GOMDE, A local Tibetan Buddhist retreat center in South Leggett, invites the community to two June seminars. June 13−15, Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche will bring the wisdom of Buddha nature to light with his joyful and insightful teaching style. June 19−22 Phakchok Rinpoche, grandson of Gomde’s founder Tulku Urgyen, will give instruction on Mahamudra, the pinnacle of Tibetan meditation practice, in a way that is accessible for beginners and experienced meditators alike. Both teachers teach in English and have years of experience working with Western students. For info. and registration for these excellent programs call (707) 925−0201 or visit gomdeusa.org (S−0612) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S−0626)

Therapy & Support

A DYNAMIC THERAPY GROUP FOR WOMEN ENTERING OR EXPERIENCING MENAPAUSE. Explore positive approaches to this phase of life. We will be reading and discussing " The Pause", by Lonnie Barbach, Ph. D. Mon. evenings 7−8:30 p.m, $40 per session Starts June 16, − July 21. To register call Tamara Severn, MFT. #49815 (707) 834−3747 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844−442−0711. (T−0626) DIVORCE SUPPORT GROUP. Connect with others and feel less alone. Learn effective coping skills, ways to manager strong emotions, and how to heal and live the life you want. Group meets Wed’s., starting June 18− July 23, 7 p.m− 8:30 p.m. $40 per session. To register, and location call Tamara Severn, MFT, #49815 (707) 834−3747 (T−0512) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon’s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−0626) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana−anonymous.org (T−0731)

HEY, YOU. Submit your art, dance, movie, lecture, meeting, community event, performance, karaoke, open mic, gig and/or comedy show online:

www.northcoastjournal.com

restrictions on the delivery of water and water consumption for public use as will in the Board’s sound discretion conserve the water supply for the greatest public benefit with particular regard to domestic use, sanitation and fire protection; and WHEREAS, WCSD does not have sufficient water storage capacity to forecast into the future whether available water is likely to diminish, which means that it is impractical for WCSD to design and implement a multi−step drought response conservation program; and WHEREAS, WCSD has the ability to monitor water supply and consumption on a weekly or daily basis and is therefore able to observe in close to real time when drought causes water supply to diminish such that water consump− tion threatens to exceed water supply; and WHEREAS, current consumption of water supplied by WCSD on a per household basis averages less than 100 gallons per day, and WCSD customers have, on average, adopted most water conservation measures traditionally included in a water conservation program; and WHEREAS, WCSD long−ago imple− mented a rate structure designed to encourage water conservation; and WHEREAS, given the WCSD’s lack of water storage capacity, should it be observed that water consump− tion threatens to exceed water supply a water supply emergency would exist; and WHEREAS, the remaining, effective means to further conserve water is to adopt in advance, and to imple− ment and enforce, in the event the Board declares a water shortage emergency, those comprehensive water conservation measures that shall be taken should a drought threaten that water supply may be insufficient to meet traditional demand; and WHEREAS, comprehensive water conservation measures taken to avoid a drought−induced supply shortfall will allow the WCSD to delay or avoid imposing water rationing or more drastic measures to restrict or allocate water consumption; and WHEREAS, on May 21, 2014, the WCSD held a public hearing and made appropriate findings of necessity for the adoption of a Water Conservation Program and Water Supply Emergency Ordinance ; and WHEREAS, upon the adoption of a resolution finding and declaring the existence of a drought emergency or water shortage emergency pursuant to California Water Code sections 350 et seq. and sections 71640 et seq., the WCSD shall be authorized to implement the provi− sions of the Water Conservation Program and Water Supply Emer− gency Ordinance hereby established by this Ordinance. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the WCSD, as follows: 1. This Ordinance is effective immediately upon adoption or as otherwise established by State law; and 2. Pursuant to Water Code section 376 and Government Code section 6061, the WCSD shall publish in a newspaper of general circulation this ordinance adopting a water conservation program within 10 days after its adoption; and 3. This Ordinance establishes regu− lations to be implemented during

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0626)

Wellness & Bodywork

CANDLELIGHT HOT STONE YOGA & LIVE SOUND HEALING. At Om Shala Yoga. With Artemisia Shine. Fri., June 6. 1st, 3rd, & 5th Fri’s. monthly. 7:30− 9:30 p.m. $20 drop−in. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825− YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0605) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. Beginning with Herbs. Sept. 17−Nov. 5, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program. Feb.−Nov. 2015, meets one weekend per month with several field trips. Learn in−depth material medica, therapeutics, flower essences, wild foods, formulations and harvesting. Plant Lovers Journey to Costa Rica with Jane Both− well & Rosemary Gladstar. March 19−28, 2015. Let us guide you through the unsurpassed beauty and wondrous diversity of Costa Rica! Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0911) NEW CLIENTS $20 OFF EACH SESSION FOR UP TO THREE SESSIONS!! MyrtletownE Healing Center, 1480 Myrtle Ave, Eureka. A hidden gem on Myrtle in Eureka. Specializing in therapeutic bodywork. We will assist you on your road to recovery, help you work through that chronic pain issue, or give you that full body support with wellness massage. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, abdominal massage, lymph drainage, lomi−lomi and more! You are worth it, call today! 441−9175. Now offering Deeksha − free community meditation. Sundays at 5. (W−0626) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY. Now enrolling. Daytime classes start September 2 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Thera− peutic Massage Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−0626) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Two programs: Traditional Long Form (Wu Style) and T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis. Eight−week term starts June 24. Begin by the third week. Daytime begin− ning classes meet at 1049 C, Samoa Blvd., Arcata (Samoa & K). Upper level classes and Wed. evening beginning class call for location. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Call 822−6508 or e− mail margaretemerson@att.net for summer schedule and fees see www.margaretemerson.com for other details. (W−0626) YOGA ALIGNMENT CAMP: TRANSFORM YOUR PRACTICE. At Om Shala Yoga. With Peggy Profant. Mon.−Fri., June 16−20, 1−3 p.m. Five days to immerse in Anusara alignment principles. Learn for the first time or refresh your skills. $125 or $108 if paid by May 31. 858 10th St. & 890 G St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0605) YOGA. At Om Shala Yoga. 7 days a week, 7:30 a.m.− 7:30 p.m. More than 50 classes to choose from! Summer Special: 10 classes for $99. See website or call for details. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642). www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0605)

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

ADOPTING A WATER CONSERVATION PROGRAM AND WATER SUPPLY EMERGENCY ORDINANCE WHEREAS, article X, section 2 of the California Constitution declares that waters of the State are to be put to beneficial use, that waste, unreasonable use, or unreasonable method of use of water be prevented, and that water be conserved for the public welfare; and WHEREAS, conservation of current water supplies and minimization of the effects of water supply short− ages that are the result of drought are essential to the public health, safety and welfare; and WHEREAS, regulation of the time of certain water use, manner of certain water use, design of rates, method of application of water for certain uses, installation and use of water−saving devices, provide an effective and immediately available means of conserving water; and WHEREAS, California Water Code sections 375 et seq. empower any public entity which supplies water at retail or wholesale to adopt and enforce a water conservation program to reduce the quantity of water used by those within its service area after holding a public hearing and making appropriate findings of necessity for the adop− tion of a water conservation program; and WHEREAS, Water Code section 375, subdivision (c) defines "public entity" to include a city, county, special district, water authority, or any other municipal public corpora− tion or district; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Water Code section 376 and Government Code 6061, the Westhaven Commu− nity Services District ("WCSD") must publish in a newspaper of general circulation any ordinance or resolu− tion adopting a water conservation program within 10 days after its adoption; and WHEREAS, Water Code section 377 establishes that, from the publica− tion of an ordinance or resolution pursuant to section 376 until the repeal of the ordinance or end of the emergency, it is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 30 days in county jail and/or a fine of up to $1,000 for any person to violate a requirement of the water conserva− tion program; and WHEREAS, Water Code sections 350 et seq. empower the WCSD to declare a water service emergency and to adopt such regulations and restrictions on the delivery of water and water consumption for public use as will in the Board’s sound discretion conserve the water supply for the greatest public benefit with particular regard to domestic use, sanitation and fire protection; and WHEREAS, WCSD does not have sufficient water storage capacity to forecast into the future whether available water is likely to diminish, which means that it is impractical for WCSD to design and implement a multi−step drought response conservation program; and

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the WCSD, as follows: 1. This Ordinance is effective immediately upon adoption or as otherwise established by State law; and 2. Pursuant to Water Code section 376 and Government Code section 6061, the WCSD shall publish in a newspaper of general circulation this ordinance adopting a water conservation program within 10 days after its adoption; and 3. This Ordinance establishes regu− lations to be implemented during times of declared water shortages, or declared water shortage emer− gencies; and 4. When the WCSD Board of Directors ("Board" finds that in the preceding week water supply, measured as total source capacity and excluding water in storage in the two open reservoirs, was no more than 110% of total consump− tion in that same preceding week (including any leakage from WCSD’s distribution system), the Board may find that a water shortage emer− gency exists. A water shortage emergency, once declared pursuant to this subparagraph, shall remain in effect until the Board finds that the conditions specified in this para− graph no longer exist. 5. Excepting in the event of a breakage or failure of an impound− ment, pipe line or conduit causing an immediate emergency, any Board declaration of a water shortage emergency shall be made after a public hearing on the declaration of emergency, with notice of the time and place of the hearing published pursuant to Section 6061 of the Government Code at least seven days prior to the date of the hearing in a newspaper printed, published and circulated within Humboldt County, California. Notice of the time and place of the hearing shall also be posted at the bulletin board at the Westhaven Fire Hall. At any hearing conducted pursuant to this paragraph, consumers of WCSD−supplied water shall have an opportunity to be heard to protest against the declaration and to present their respective needs to the Board. 6. For the duration of a declared water shortage emergency, the following mandatory conservation measures shall apply to all WCSD customers: a. Landscape irrigation is prohib− ited unless the General Manager finds that landscape irrigation is necessary for erosion control; or if a state or local Fire Marshal specifies landscape irrigation that is neces− sary for fire protection. b. Washing down hard or paved surfaces, including but not limited to sidewalks, walkways, driveways, parking areas, tennis courts, patios or alleys, is prohibited except when necessary to alleviate safety or sanitary hazards, and then only by use of hand−held bucket or similar container. c. Using water to wash or clean a vehicle, including but not limited to any automobile, truck, van, bus, motorcycle, boat, motor home, or trailer, whether motorized or not, is prohibited, except by use of a hand −held bucket or similar container. d. All water leakage in customers’ water distribution systems shall be repaired within seven (7) days of the declaration of a water shortage emergency. For purposes of this subparagraph, "water leakage" means leakage from any hoses,


use of hand−held bucket or similar container. c. Using water to wash or clean a vehicle, including but not limited to any automobile, truck, van, bus, motorcycle, boat, motor home, or trailer, whether motorized or not, is prohibited, except by use of a hand −held bucket or similar container. d. All water leakage in customers’ water distribution systems shall be repaired within seven (7) days of the declaration of a water shortage emergency. For purposes of this subparagraph, "water leakage" means leakage from any hoses, fittings, valves, faucets, toilets or above− or below−ground pipes. For purposes of this ordinance, "customer" includes the owner of record and the occupant (if distinct from the owner) of the assessor’s parcel to which WCSD supplies water. e. Pursuant to Water Code § 71601(b), the WCSD may conduct an audit of a customer’s water use with the aim to determine whether landscape has been irrigated in violation of this Ordinance or whether the customer has unre− paired leakage in violation of this Ordinance. Audits conducted pursuant to this subparagraph shall be performed in a manner as deter− mined to be appropriate by the General Manager. f. In the event the General Manager determines that there is unrepaired leakage in the customer’s water distribution system, the General Manager shall notify the customer of the exis− tence and (if feasible) the location and flow rate of any leakage. g. If, pursuant to subparagraph 6(f) above, a customer has been noti− fied of unrepaired leakage, then the customer shall repair the leakage within three (3) days unless other arrangements have been made with the General Manager. h. Upon declaration of a water shortage emergency, the WCSD’s leak forgiveness policy is suspended for the duration of the declared water shortage emergency. 7. If the General Manager deter− mines that a customer has violated any of the mandatory water conservation measures in paragraph 6, above, then WCSD shall impose the penalties provided by this para− graph. a. The General Manager shall provide written notice to the customer. The notice shall be dated and shall specify the address, the nature of the violation, list the steps that must be taken to comply with this Ordinance and the name and telephone number of a District staff person from whom additional information can be obtained. In addition, the notice shall advise the customer that suspension of water service to the customer’s property will result from continued non− compliance. These provisions are for a first violation within any consecutive twelve month period. b. If, within seven (7) days, the customer fails to comply with the requirements of the notice the General Manager provided pursuant to subparagraph 7(a) above, then a second violation shall occur and the General Manager shall issue a second notice to the customer containing the information speci− fied in subparagraph 7(a) above. A customer who has committed a second violation shall be fined in an amount not to exceed Fifty Dollars ($50.00), which shall be charged to and billed on the customer’s

consecutive twelve month period. b. If, within seven (7) days, the customer fails to comply with the requirements of the notice the General Manager provided pursuant to subparagraph 7(a) above, then a second violation shall occur and the General Manager shall issue a second notice to the customer containing the information speci− fied in subparagraph 7(a) above. A customer who has committed a second violation shall be fined in an amount not to exceed Fifty Dollars ($50.00), which shall be charged to and billed on the customer’s account. If in the discretion of the General Manager, satisfactory progress is being made on steps to correct the violation, a second notice will not be issued and no further action shall be taken. c. If, within a seven (7) days, the customer fails to comply with the requirements specified in the notice the General Manager provided to the customer pursuant to subpara− graph 7(b) above, a third violation shall occur and the General Manager shall issue a third notice to the customer containing the infor− mation specified in subparagraph 7(b) above. A customer who has committed a third violation shall be fined in an amount not to exceed Two Hundred Dollars ($200.00), which shall be charged to and billed on the water user’s account. The third notice shall also notify the customer that WCSD will suspend water service to the customer’s property within ten (10) calendar days unless the customer is in compliance with the provisions of this Ordinance. Suspension of water service shall conform to the notice requirements and procedures for termination of water service that are established in WCSD Reso− lution 2013−6. Suspension of water service pursuant to this subpara− graph shall remain in effect until the customer is in compliance with the provisions of this Ordinance or until the water supply emergency is no longer in effect, whichever occurs first. d. The General Manager shall have the authority to extend any dead− lines by a period not to exceed 30 days. Passed and adopted this Twenty− First day of May 2014, by the following roll call vote: AYES: Hankin, Moon, Phipps, Smith, Verick NOES: ABSTAIN: ABSENT: /s/ Gregory Smith, President Westhaven Community Services District ATTEST: /s/ Richard Swisher, General Manager and Acting Secre− tary, Westhaven Community Services District 6/5/2014 (14−171)

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ALICE LOUISE RIEDEL CASE NO. PR140154 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, ALICE LOUISE RIEDEL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JANICE CONN AND BARBARA BISHOP In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JANICE CONN AND BARBARA BISHOP Be appointed as personal represen− tative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court

Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: William T. Kay, JR., SBN#59581 Law Office of Will Kay 628 H Street Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 445−2301 May 29, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−179)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BEVERLY B. PARKE AKA BEVERLY BRYANT PARKE CASE NO. PR14139

tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Connie Miller Koshkin Law Firm 1116 Eleventh Street Arcata, CA. 95521 (707) 822−2800 May 23, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Viviana Hollenbeck, Unit # 1105 Nathaniel Toering, Unit # 1169 Terry Lange, Unit ➤# 1170 Logan Bremer, # 1185 legalUnit NOTICES Jennifer Fate Jahnig, Unit #page 1205 continued on next Travis Johnson, Unit # 1622 Calandra Laird, Unit # 1724 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Robin Thornton, Unit # 121 Haven Kozak, Unit # 128 Rick Alton, Unit # 296 Rick Alton, Unit # 357 Rachel Hope, Unit # 413 Ronald Payton, Unit # 435 Lori Sawyer, Unit # 449 The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. B. Bushe’y, Unit # 4211 Kristina Crummett, Unit # 4316 Diaja Jackson, Unit # 6108 Madison Fowler, Unit # 6170 Tashina Surber, Unit # 6182 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immedi− ately following the sale of the above units. Jared Morgart, Unit # 6334 Ry Landen, Unit # 6342 Daniel McGregor, Unit # 6420 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Holly Davidson, Unit # 2234 Frances Pederson, Unit # 5104 Antonette Martinez, Unit # 5112 Sarah Robentalt, Unit # 6228 Shelly Wilde, Unit # 9128 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Rio Savage−Clanton, Unit # 9271 Robert Dixon, Unit # 9542 Orrin Brown, Unit # 9569 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settle− ment between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self− Storage, (707) 443−1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 5th day of June 2014 and 12th day of June 2014

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, BEVERLY B. PARKE, aka BEVERLY BRYANT PARKE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SARA K. PARKE In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SARA K. PARKE 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−166) Be appointed as personal represen− tative to administer the estate of PUBLIC SALE the decedent. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the THE PETITION requests the dece− undersigned intends to sell the dent’s will and codicils, if any, be personal property described below admitted to probate. The will and to enforce a lien imposed on said any codicils are available for exami− property pursuant to Sections 21700 nation in the file kept by court. −21716 of the Business & Professions THE PETITION requests authority to Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, administer the estate under the Section 535 of the Penal Code and Independent Administration of provisions of the civil Code. Estates Act. (This authority will The undersigned will sell at public allow the personal representative to sale by competitive bidding on the take many actions without 18th of June, 2014, at 9:00 AM, on obtaining court approval. Before the premises where said property taking certain very important has been stored and which are actions, however, the personal located at Rainbow Self Storage, at representative will be required to 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County give notice to interested persons of Humboldt the following: unless they have waived notice or Janet Polizzi, Unit # 5006 consented to the proposed action.) Edwin Donahue Jr., Unit # 5310 The independent administration Wayne T. Lawson, Unit # 5433 authority will be granted unless an Susanna Gomez, Unit # 5440 interested person files an objection Wayne T. Lawson, Unit # 5506 to the petition and shows good The following units are located at cause why the court should not 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, grant the authority. County of Humboldt and will be A HEARING on the petition will be sold immediately following the sale held on June 19, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at of the above units. the Superior Court of California, Stephen Barrett, Unit # 2205 County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Angelique Omstead, Unit # 3014 Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. Linda Stewart, Unit # 3115 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of The following units are located at the petition, you should appear at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, the hearing and state your objec− County of Humboldt and will be tions or file written objections with sold immediately following the sale the court before the hearing. Your of the above units. appearance may be in person or by Viviana Hollenbeck, Unit # 1105 your attorney. Nathaniel Toering, Unit # 1169 IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a Terry Lange, Unit # 1170 6/5, 6/12/2014 (14−172) contingent creditor of the dece− Logan Bremer, Unit # 1185 dent, you must file your claim with Jennifer Fate Jahnig, Unit # 1205 the court and mail a copy to the Travis Johnson, Unit # 1622 FBN statements: $55 personal representative appointed Calandra Laird, Unit # 1724 by the court within the later of The following units are located at either (1) four months from the date 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of of first issuance ofnorthcoastjournal.com letters to a • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 5, 2014 Humboldt and will be sold immedi− general personal representative, as ately following the sale of the defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− above units. fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days Robin Thornton, Unit # 121 from the date of mailing or

442-1400

41


hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: July 9, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: May 21, 24, 2014 Filed: May 21, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court

legal notices ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JESUS JACOB FUENTES CASE NO. CV140279 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: JESUS JACOB FUENTES TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JESUS JACOB FUENTES For a decree changing names as follows: Present name JESUS JACOB FUENTES To Proposed Name ERIC JETER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 23, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: May 8, 24, 2014 Filed: May 8, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court 5/15, 5/22. 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−151)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JOSHUA LEE BROWN CASE NO. CV140328 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−173)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 6th of June, 2014, at 11:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at INDIANOLA STORAGE, at 673 Indianola Cutoff, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California. The following units will be sold: Unit # 111 − Abram Stark Misc −Household items Unit # 152 − Anthony Thompson Misc. Household items Unit # 289 − Tahni Morris Misc.− Househole items Unit # 307 − Jackie Campbell Misc. Household items Purchases must be paid for (cash only) and removed at the time of the sale, with the unit left broom clean. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Owner reserves the right to bid. Call 442− 7613 Indianola Storage, Jerry Avila, Bond # 0327592 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−165)

the 17th of June 2014, at 10:00 .AM, on the premises where said prop− erty has been stored and which are located at CUTTEN MINI STORAGE, 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA., County of Humboldt, the following: Katelyn Hanson #126 Louis DeSantis #73 Van Duran #248 Cassidy Hess #79 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Dinette table and chairs, microwave, side table, T.V, computer, clothes, large floor pillow, mattress and box spring, bed frame, head and footboard, dresser, tools plastic bins, boxes and bags (contents unknown). Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA., prior to 10:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at the time of sale. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Cutten Mini Storage (707) 443−2280, Bond # 0336443. Dated this 5th of June 2014 and 12th day of June 2014 6/5, 6/12/2014 (14−175)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00322 The following persons are doing Business as SOL SISTERS BAKING COMPANY, Humboldt, at 39010 Hwy. 299, Willow Creek, CA., 95573, PO Box 1604, Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Jaclyn R. Smith 42175 Hwy 299 Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Marjorie B. Salas 201 Poney Creek Rd. Hawkins Bar, CA. 95563 The business is conducted by A General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 05/15/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jaclyn R. Smith, Co−Owner/ Operator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 16, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

PUBLIC SALE PETITION OF: JOSHUA LEE BROWN Notice is hereby given that the TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: undersigned intends to sell the Petitioner: JOSHUA LEE BROWN personal property described below For a decree changing names as to enforce a lien imposed on said follows: property pursuant to Sections 21700 Present name 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12 (14−156) −21716 of the Business & Professions JOSHUA LEE BROWN Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, To Proposed Name Section 535 of the Penal Code and JOSHUA LEE LEHR provisions of the Civil Code. The THE COURT ORDERS that all @ncj_of_humboldt undersigned will sell at a public persons interested in this matter auction by competitive bidding on appear before this court at the the 17th of June 2014, at 10:00 .AM, hearing indicated below to show on the premises where said prop− cause, if any, why the petition for erty has been stored and which are change of name should not be located at CUTTEN MINI STORAGE, granted. Any person objecting to 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA., the name changes described above County of Humboldt, the following: must file a written objection that Katelyn Hanson #126 includes the reasons for the objec− Louis DeSantis #73 tion at least two court days before Van Duran #248 the matter is scheduled to be heard Cassidy Hess #79 and must appear at the hearing to Items to be sold include, but are show cause why the petition should Journal June 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com not limited to: not beNorth granted. Coast If no written objec− • Thursday, Dinette table and chairs, tion is timely filed, the court may microwave, side table, T.V, grant the petition without a computer, clothes, large floor hearing.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00262

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00286

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00307

The following persons are doing Business as NORTH COAST FROZEN YOGURT, Humboldt, at 1553 City Center Rd., McKinleyville, CA., 95519, PO Box 80, Salyer, CA. 95563 Shawn P. Bolton PO Box 80/ 14 Salyer Ln. Salyer, CA. 95563 Elizabeth A. Bolton PO Box 80/ 14 Salyer Ln. Salyer CA. 95563 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Shawn P. Bolton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 17, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRADE WIND EXCHANGE. Humboldt, at 39032−4 Hwy 299, Willow Creek CA., 95573 Summer C. Adams PO Box 921 71 Gambi Ln. Willow Creek, CA. 95573 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Summer Adams This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 29, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as LIVE2DIVE SCUBA COMPANY, Humboldt, at 1005 J Street, Eureka, CA., 95501 Daniel J. Heinen 1005 J Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Ida D. Heinen 1005 J Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 07/01/2013 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Dan Heinen, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 07, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−169)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00301

5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−147)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00348

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SKIN SENSE, Humboldt, at 75 Country Club Drive, Suite # 4., Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Shauna Hill 611 China Flat Salyer, CA. 95563 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Shauna Hill, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 19, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as BELLE STARR CLOTHING, Humboldt, at 863 H St., Arcata, CA., 95521 Susan K. McIntyre 1812 McFarland St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Eddie A. Morgan 1812 McFarland St., Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Susan McIntyre, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 5, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT MUNCHIES, Humboldt, at 577 Main St., Ferndale, CA. 95536, PO Box 71, Bridgeville, CA. 95526 Kelly R. Valentine 25384 Hwy. 36 Bridgeville, CA. 95526 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 05/13/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Kelly R. Valentine, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 27, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−145)

6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−178)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00330

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00336

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00342

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00359

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SLIDE WELLNESS, Humboldt, at 1136 Main St., #102, Fortuna, CA., 95540 Katharine M. Jackson 1136 Main St., #102 Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/1/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Katharine M. Jackson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 19, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FILIGREE CAKE COOKIES & PASTRIES, Humboldt, at 2585 1/2 Eye Street, Arcata, CA., 95521 Carin M. Sorisio 2585 1/2 Eye St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/14/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Carin Mari Sorosio, Owner, Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as PACIFIC GYPSIES CLOSET, Humboldt, at 2138 Old Arcata Rd., Bayside, CA. 95524 Sophia D. Whillock 2138 Old Arcata Rd. Bayside, CA. 95524 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Sophia Whillock, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 23, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as AXIOM SURVEYING & MAPPING, Humboldt, at 4801 Patricia Dr., Eureka, CA. 95503, PO Box 6759, Eureka, CA. 95502 Philip V. Taylor 4801 Patricia Drive Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 06/01/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Philip V. Taylor, Principal This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 2, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−168)

5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−161)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00332

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00338

6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−174)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00358

The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT POWER AND WATER and HIGH LIFTER PUMP SERVICE, Humboldt, at 1155 Redway Drive, Redway, CA., 95560, PO Box 1640, Redway, CA. 95560 Theodore W. Horner 155 Redway Drive Redway, CA. 95560 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Theodore W. Horner, Jr., Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 20, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing business as HUMBOLDT SPAY/ NEUTER CLINIC, Humboldt, at 3954 A Jacob Avenue Eureka, CA., 95501, PO Box 7236, Eureka, CA. 95502 Humboldt Spay/ Neuter Network 3954 A Jacobs Avenue Eureka CA. 95501 CA. #2574699 The business is conducted by A Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jennifer Raymond, Executive Director This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as VENUS MOTORCYCLES, Humboldt, at 1691 Glendale Dr., McKinleyville, CA. 95519, PO Box 655, Blue Lake, CA. 95525 Suzanne M. Alvernaz 1691 Glendale Dr. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Mandi C. Kindred 725 Ranchoria Rd. Blue Lake, CA. 95525 The business is conducted by A General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 06/01/14 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Suzanne M. Alvernaz, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on June 2, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−163)

6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26/2014 (14−174)

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ABANDONMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00140 The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDT ANIMAL RESCUE TEAM . Humboldt, at 3954 A Jacobs Avenue, Eureka CA., 95501, PO Box 7236, Eureka, CA. 95502 Humboldt Spay/ Neuter Network 3954 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA. 95501 CA. #2574699 The business is conducted by A Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 02/25/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jennifer Raymond This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−162)

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. APN 203-051-039-000. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED SEPTEMBER 16, 2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, or his duly appointed representative. The sale will be made without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said deed of trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness in the property address or other common designation shown herein. Trustor(s): BLACK AND WEBB DEVELOPMENT, A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP, by Richard L. Black and Michael T. Webb, general partners. Deed of Trust recorded October 7, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-24043-5, of official records of Humboldt County, California. Date of Sale: June 25, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. (TEN A.M.) Place of Sale: At the front entrance to the county courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, California. The purported property address of the subject real property, a vacant lot, is 401 Kendall Court, Fortuna, California 95540. Assessor’s Parcel Number 203-051-039-000. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold, and reasonable costs expenses, and advances, at the time of the initial publication of the notice of sale is $73,845.14. The Beneficiary may instruct the Trustee to make a credit bid on behalf of the Beneficiary for less than the amount owing, or to accept an initial cash bid for the less than the amount owing. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser shall be entitled only to a refund of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Beneficiary, or the Trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on the real property offered for sale, you should understand that there are risks in bidding at a trustee auction. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. If you are the highest bidder at the sale, and there are senior liens affecting the property, you are or may be responsible for paying all senior liens before receiving clear title to the property. For the present sale, the Trustee believes, but does not warrant, that there are no senior liens. Prospective bidders must do their own research. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of existing liens affecting the property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. If you wish to learn whether the sale date has been postponed and, if applicable, the date, time, and place of the continued sale, you may call the Trustee at (415) 279-7397 or send an email to georgewynns@ gmail.com. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or occur close to the sale may not be immediately available by telephone or email. The best way to verify postponement is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: May 16, 2014. George S. Wynns, 124 Brewster Street, San Francisco, CA 94110, (415) 279-7397, georgewynns@gmail.com, Trustee for the Beneficiary.

5/22, 5/29, 6/5/14 (14-159)

NOMINATE! HUMBOLDT

2014

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00325

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 5, 2014

43


legal notices NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY AND IMPENDING DEFAULT Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3351, 3352

I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, State of California, certify as follows: That at close of business on June 30, 2014 by operation of law, any real property (unless previously tax-defaulted and not redeemed) that have any delinquent taxes, assessments, or other charges levied for the fiscal year 20132014, and/or any delinquent supplemental taxes levied prior to the fiscal year 2013-2014 shall be declared tax-defaulted. That unless the property is completely redeemed through payment of all unpaid amounts, together with penalties and fees prescribed by law or an installment plan is initiated and maintained; the property will become tax-defaulted and may be subsequently sold at a tax sale in satisfaction of the tax lien. That a detailed list of all properties remaining tax-defaulted at the close of business on June 30, 2014, and not redeemed prior to being submitted for publication, shall be published on or before September 8, 2017. That information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption of tax-defaulted property will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector at 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, California 95501 (707) 476-2450. I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 23rd , 2014. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 29th, June 5th, and June 12th , 2014.

NOTICE OF IMPENDING POWER TO SELL TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY

Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3361, 3362

Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Codes sections 3691 and 3692.4, the following conditions will, by operation of law, subject real property to the Tax Collector’s power to sell. 1) All property for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for five or more years. 2) All property that has a nuisance abatement lien recorded against it and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. 3) Any property that has been identified and requested for purchase by a city, county, city and county, or nonprofit organization to serve the public benefit by providing housing or services directly related to low-income persons and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. The parcels listed herein meet one or more of the criteria listed above and thus, will become subject to the Tax Collector’s power to sell on July 1, 2014, at 12:01 a.m., by operation of law. The Tax Collector’s power to sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed or made subject to an installment plan of redemption initiated as provided by law prior to close of business on the last business day in June. The right to an installment plan terminates on the last business day in June, and after that date the entire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale of the property at public auction. The right of redemption survives the property becoming subject to the power to sell, but it terminates at close of business on the last business day prior to the date of the sale by the Tax Collector. All information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption will be furnished, upon request by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501, (707) 476-2450. The amount to redeem, including all penalties and fees, as of June 2014, is shown opposite the assessment/parcel number and next to the name of the assessee.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Parcel/Assessment Number (APN/ASMT), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the assessor’s office.

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2006, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2005-2006: Assessor’s Assessment No 013-201-006-000 511-091-035-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Matson Jeff, 3440 Harrison Ave/Eureka Tretten Scott, 1379 Pedroni Rd/McKinleyville

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 4,435.93 $ 4,112.46

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2007, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2006-2007: Assessor’s Assessment No 109-042-039-000 110-021-031-000 004-196-007-000 109-331-031-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Cardenas Ruben, 767 Spring Rd/Shelter Cove Etter Franklin R, 379 Hillside Dr/Shelter Cove Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 241 Wabash Ave/ Eureka York Tommy A & Pauline N/Fonseca Keolanalani J & Lehua K K , 554 Parsons Rd/Shelter Cove

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 1,500.71 $ 1,318.34 $ 5,865.94 $ 3,081.81

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2008, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2007-2008: Assessor’s Assessment No 032-034-022-000 109-191-007-000 514-132-005-000 314-141-013-000 522-291-026-000 109-292-024-000 530-061-022-000 081-021-008-000 508-161-011-000 008-232-012-000 109-251-024-000 105-193-008-000 105-193-009-000 105-193-010-000 316-172-019-000 526-062-058-000 503-381-034-000 220-081-013-000

Assessee’s Name & Amount to Redeem Property Address By June 2014 Barnick Richard & Lea A, 351 Sprowl Creek Rd/ $ 7,917.51 Garberville Barnick Richard & Lea A , 133 Eileen Rd/Shelter Cove $ 3,579.93 Bedell Wendell D & Morton Amber $ 1,565.33 Botiller Brian V, 6810 Butler Valley Rd/Kneeland $ 18,617.51 Grable Michael L Sr, 245 Horse Linto Rd/Willow $ 8,051.50 Creek Hopkins Freida J, 635 Upper Pacific Dr/Shelter Cove $ 5,752.81 Lapiers Gary B & Marrollee $ 1,047.50 Leck Dylon, 231 Myers Ave/Myers Flat $ 4,597.07 Lowell Rebecca L, 1774 Ocean Dr/McKinleyville $ 19,650.00 Monda Michael J, 3346 High St/Eureka $ 5,707.49 Perkins Memi C, 29 Thistle Ct/Shelter Cove $ 2,435.93 Schlecht Christopher R $ 4,471.22 Schlecht Christopher R, 560 Front St/Petrolia $ 5,052.49 Schlecht Christopher R $ 2,695.56 Schwed Joel $ 6,763.09 Velasco David $ 1,037.70 Warvi Lois, 512 Ridge Rd/Arcata $ 2,019.78 Wilson Patrick $ 3,599.62

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2009, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009: Assessor’s Assessment No 525-281-012-000 110-071-008-000 216-382-060-000 109-101-025-000 507-091-021-000 109-121-018-000 520-084-013-000 201-252-001-000 108-133-019-000 109-281-020-000 053-153-008-000 053-103-021-000 109-183-017-000 109-183-018-000 111-012-002-000 109-281-037-000 109-321-004-000 109-331-038-000 203-383-019-000

Assessee’s Name & Amount to Redeem Property Address By June 2014 Achamire Eva M C/Achamire Homer D, Cotton $ 3,026.75 Anthony W/Cotton Russell E Acojedo Rogelio P, 274 Willow Glen Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,608.87 Anderson Mark A, 5355 Rancho Sequoia Dr/ $ 3,882.95 Alderpoint Antonelli Mattie F C, 802 Wolverine Way/Shelter $ 2,592.84 Cove Backman Mark W & Susan L, 3058 Alliance Rd/Arcata $ 2,633.50 Bailey Thomas A, 190 Mink Dr/Shelter Cove $ 2,763.58 Baker Rodney A, 48 Hansen St/Orick $ 1,396.25 Barcelos Tracie M, 2810 McDermott St/Alton $ 2,725.51 Barker Hans, 3916 E Chemise Mt Rd/Shelter Cove $ 8,268.10 Barnes Claire, 130 McMains Ct/Shelter Cove $ 3,721.13 Barnett Michael L, 242 1st Ave/Rio Dell $ 9,597.74 Barnett Michael L, 460 2nd Ave/Rio Dell $ 14,797.94 Birchfield Bill & Billie Jo/Birchfield Julie A, 641 Spring $ 1,854.01 Rd/Shelter Cove Birchfield Bill & Billie Jo/ Birchfield Julie A, 651 Spring $ 1,854.01 Rd/Shelter Cove Bleuler Barbara G Tr, 592 Upper Pacific Dr/Shelter $ 3,095.34 Cove Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona $ 2,528.60 Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona, 7875 Shelter $ 2,394.25 Cove Rd/Shelter Cove Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona, 141 Telegraph $ 2,538.17 Creek Rd/Shelter Cove Boyd Perry & Jewel, 3280 Matthew Ln/Fortuna $ 2,102.58

44 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Assessor’s Assessment No 031-181-006-000 005-074-005-000 109-341-035-000 109-341-034-000 109-311-002-000 109-362-007-000 404-031-005-000 522-301-005-000 300-052-002-000 111-061-019-000 110-021-058-000 110-261-039-000 525-291-008-000 110-201-022-000 109-041-023-000 109-211-036-000 002-082-001-000 002-231-004-000 506-051-003-000 506-061-026-000 506-061-027-000 506-112-006-000 506-121-001-000 110-021-002-000 203-092-053-000 515-331-033-000 510-231-029-000 510-081-024-000 214-021-005-000 220-291-002-000 109-211-033-000 529-361-010-000 110-231-038-000 109-362-004-000 053-141-037-000 001-047-008-000 110-071-002-000 111-051-019-000 529-361-030-000 006-311-009-000 110-211-036-000 110-211-037-000 006-073-028-000 205-011-001-000 109-241-018-000 109-311-047-000 110-151-014-000 110-181-017-000 110-211-032-000 534-193-007-000 111-112-006-000 002-231-003-000 109-261-031-000 109-362-028-000 033-011-019-000 300-041-014-000 095-081-022-000 302-071-090-000 081-021-001-000

Assessee’s Name & Amount to Redeem Property Address By June 2014 Branstetter Dennis & Steve & Terri, 667 Herbert $ 8,458.66 St/Ferndale Briggs Janice L & Michelle M, 1920 J Street/Eureka $ 2,031.00 Bukovsky Martin E J & Mellie A, 144 Willow Glen Rd/ $ 2,624.46 Shelter Cove Bukovsky Martin E J & Mellie/ Morgan Melinda, 124 $ 2,705.67 Willow Glen Rd/Shelter Cove Bukovsky Martin E J & Mellie A/ Morgan Melinda, $ 2,743.53 8025 Shelter Cove Rd/Shelter Cove Busters Ventures III LLC Co 45 Dolphin Dr/Shelter $ 13,970.34 Cove Chapman Dallas G $ 845.90 Christie Kevin L, 41 Ash Ln/Willow Creek $ 5,403.87 Cloninger Heidi L, 1940 Holly St/Eureka $ 9,251.24 Coastal Covers II Inc, 21 Fir Ct/Shelter Cove $ 28,563.78 Coastal Covers II Inc, 383 Parsons Rd/Shelter Cove $ 5,056.40 Cook Cassandra M, 174 Forest Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,719.92 Cordova Gilbert & Genevieve $ 6,296.27 Crews Calvin F/Crews John T, Crews Robert L/Crews $ 2,667.51 William C, 2081 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove CS Paradiso Holdings LLC Co, 391 Beach Rd/Shelter $ 3,216.18 Cove CS Paradiso Holdings LLC Co, 107 Otter Ln/Shelter $ 2,545.00 Cove CUE E V LLC, 2010 First St/Eureka $ 12,383.53 CUE E V LLC $ 6,009.01 CUE IV LLC $ 1,685.32 CUE IV LLC $ 1,030.59 CUE IV LLC $ 548.11 CUE IV LLC $ 6,398.91 CUE IV LLC $ 8,529.88 Dean Paul, 7813 Shelter Cove Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,105.82 Dick Eugene F & Bonnie S, 2800 Campton Hts Dr/ $ 4,439.45 Fortuna Dodd Jesse, 67 Berry Rd/Trinidad $ 4,309.88 Eanni Jo E, 2454 Penn Ave/McKinleyville $ 5,355.91 Eanni Joemma, 2771 Central Ave/McKinleyville $ 3,502.94 Enzenbacher Dennis J, 2875 St Hwy 254/Phillipsville $ 6,852.99 Fair Anthony, 5148 Blue Slide Creek Rd/Redway $ 36,180.63 Fink Maureen, 156 Otter Ln/Shelter Cove $ 2,659.33 Floria-Gale Beth E, 448 Ferris Ranch Rd/Orleans $ 12,268.11 Foster Nicholas S, 1709 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,311.99 Foxy Avenue Clips Inc, 27 Dolphin Dr/Shelter Cove $ 13,830.41 Foyster Barry F/Foyster Brian F $ 529.12 Fulton Ronald & Lilly Carolyn F, 821 Summer St/ $ 1,628.51 Eureka Funesto Lamberto & Georgia, 196 Willow Glen Rd/ $ 1,160.21 Shelter Cove Gabinay Elmer H & Angelynne S, 794 Redwood Rd/ $ 5,282.73 Shelter Cove Gale Beth $ 14,314.93 Gauvaln Gwendolyn D, 2495 Hillside Dr/Eureka $ 2,364.87 Gibbs Benjamin E S & Carpenter Seth O, 640 Forest $ 2,634.12 Rd/Shelter Cove Gibbs Benjamin E S & Carpenter Seth O, 268 Burns $ 2,634.12 Ct/Shelter Cove Gomez Ana M & Lyda Kathee/ FDR Family Living $ 20,483.89 Tr/L&M Family Living Tr, 1605 Gates St/Eureka Haberstock Craig R/ Haberstock Annette A/ $ 12,650.12 Haberstock Raymond G Haifa Iyad A, 840 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter Cove $ 3,165.62 Hakimzadeh Debora 247 Otter Ln/Shelter Cove $ 2,853.18 Hakimzadeh Debora, 2409 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,689.41 Hakimzadeh Debora, 1055 Hillside Dr/Whitethorn $ 2,914.53 Hakimzadeh Debora, 290 Burns Ct/Shelter Cove $ 2,441.30 Hart Lani A & Kelley Richard N $ 9,363.45 Hirst William L Jr $ 2,617.91 Hollenbeck Shelley M $ 9,561.19 Holmes Leslie J, 952 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter $ 3,022.12 Cove Hudson Carolyn K Tr $ 2,419.40 Hurd Pearl $ 1,761.67 Jacobsen Michael R & Darlene H, 4265 Excelsior $ 3,270.85 Rd/Eureka Jenkins Danielle $ 2,211.00 Johnson Betty L Tr $ 714.46 Keener Jill, 201 Boy Scout Camp Rd/Myers Flat $ 2,672.89


Assessor’s Assessment No 110-121-007-000 216-133-010-000 016-222-011-000 203-382-012-000 109-331-029-000 212-162-015-000 021-281-005-000 525-261-007-000 204-381-029-000 109-192-041-000 529-032-030-000 109-101-021-000 306-111-007-000 105-162-003-000 109-341-022-000 309-161-002-000 310-051-009-000 310-082-001-000 310-083-003-000 310-083-006-000 310-084-001-000 310-084-002-000 109-241-041-000 217-251-003-000 522-511-013-000 509-132-004-000 109-281-006-000 301-082-055-000 031-151-006-000 509-162-023-000 109-341-027-000 109-141-022-000 201-112-005-000 203-051-044-000 110-151-005-000 110-291-024-000 109-182-041-000 205-031-061-000 205-071-039-000 111-052-050-000 109-061-012-000 109-061-014-000 110-281-023-000 109-051-002-000 010-281-024-000 001-102-005-000 008-144-017-000 215-181-019-000 215-181-015-000 108-221-004-000 002-063-005-000 001-066-002-000 001-066-003-000 005-053-006-000 111-112-013-000 111-161-014-000 111-161-049-000 006-312-008-000 008-143-015-000 107-044-001-000 002-132-008-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Kelly Monica, 299 Pepperwood Dr/Shelter Cove Kercher Sterling & Sandra/Caballero Kevin R, 10373 Alderpoint Rd/Garberville Kneaper Mark A & Linnea M Tr, 2901 Hubbard Ln/ Eureka Knight Barry W Suc Tr, 3121 Matthew Ln/Fortuna Koehler Richard D III, 563 Parsons Rd/Shelter Cove Layman John E, 311 Logan Rd/Miranda Levine Zachary, 1080 8th St #9/Arcata Marshall Jacquelyne J McKay Peter H & Sandra L McLean John 415 Spring Rd/Shelter Cove Meade Dennis Miers Robert E, 758 Wolverine Way/Shelter Cove Nasca Phillip R, 2409 Meadow Ln/Eureka Neikirk Jonathan O, 227 Evergreen Way/Petrolia Nguyen Anh & Dinh, 6929 Shelter Cove Rd/Shelter Cove Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Oblena Leolin D Oliver Jessi ONeill William J Tr, 145 Hillcrest Way/Willow Creek Pallin Manuel A & Irene, 2040 Nelson Rd/ McKinleyville Parrish Bishop P 3rd, 80 Shaller Ct/Shelter Cove Parsons Thomas & Machado Ashley, 310 Higgins Ave/Eureka Perkins Kim , 725 Washington St/Ferndale Phillips Melissa E , 1300 Quail Run Ct/McKinleyville Pirzadeh Dara, 36 Willow Glen Rd/Shelter Cove Porreca Paul V, 1383 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter Cove Premo Francine Etal/Premo Cheryl J/Premo Cyndi L/Premo Diana/ Premo Marchelle/Premo Marlena A, 291 Orchard Ln/Fortuna R & T Black Development/ Gess Cathy L/Gess Jerry J/ Poletski Dama/Poletski Richard A, 489 Kendall Ct/Fortuna Rezapour Gassem & Arellano-Raith Jennie V, 2380 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove Rezapour Gassem, 153 Combs Rd/Shelter Cove Rillamas Carl D & Brenda A, 670 Spring Rd/Shelter Cove Rio Dell Pilar LLC Rio Dell Pilar LLC Roberts Lynn E, 495 Seafoam Rd/Shelter Cove Roberts Lynn E & Sylvia A, 159 Raintree Circle/ Shelter Cove Roberts Lynn E & Sylvia A, 171 Raintree Circle/ Shelter Cove Roberts Mike, 158 Blueridge Rd/Shelter Cove Sakata Michael D & Mildred M Tr, 2122 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter Cove Schrack Heidi A, 3429 E St/Eureka Security National Offices LLC, 311 5th St/Eureka Shelley Tim E & Connie J, 3566 Glen St/Eureka Shiningstar Tara, 550 Harris Creek Rd/Whitethorn Shiningstar Tara, 450 Harris Creek Rd/Whitethorn Smalley Gene H/Smalley Steven P/ Doyle Sandra C Squires Floyd E & Betty J, 1637 3rd St/Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 216 3rd St/Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 218 3rd St/Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 1623 G St/Eureka Stack Paul W & Elenita Stanley Carwin T, 56 Haven Ct/Shelter Cove Stanley Carwin T, 17 Cove View/Shelter Cove Stevens Lois A, 2440 Hillside Dr/Eureka Thomas Corinne E Tr, 3559 Cottage St/Eureka Toews Arlo E & Dylan A, 3000 Cartwright Rd/ Honeydew United Property Holdings LLC, 2223 4th St/Eureka

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 3,853.43 $ 3,515.55 $ 44,954.01 $ 10,662.62 $ 2,099.52 $ 2,074.61 $ 13,378.18 $ 1,903.30 $ 18,100.99 $ 1,957.23 $ 4,420.90 $ 2,523.94 $ 2,479.74 $ 1,857.51 $ 2,886.48 $ 6,367.57 $ 2,551.87 $ 314.44 $ 199.50 $ 380.36 $ 344.17 $ 344.17 $ 5,070.81 $ 7,260.65 $ 29,381.21 $ 3,499.65 $ 2,443.42 $ 1,699.09 $ 8,057.52 $ 6,390.28 $ 3,228.09 $ 3,800.22 $ 4,242.29 $ 6,539.32 $ 1,408.71 $ 2,178.62 $ 3,436.16 $ 41,072.95 $ 105,772.74 $ 8,779.64 $ 2,743.36 $ 2,743.36 $ 3,653.02 $ 2,592.84 $ 32,300.67 $ 14,934.32 $ 2,332.55 $ 17,240.46 $ 3,070.62 $ 32,264.44 $ 6,994.25 $ 9,388.93 $ 2,204.57 $ 11,829.14 $ 5,516.18 $ 1,999.42 $ 2,616.63 $ 3,679.16 $ 3,824.90 $ 15,808.86 $ 251,466.63

Assessor’s Assessment No 210-191-011-000 511-182-006-000 109-131-048-000 216-252-003-000 216-261-058-000 216-252-001-000 216-252-004-000 109-211-017-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Vance Robert, 40400 St Hwy 36/Bridgeville Williams Greg & Rust Garry, 2309 Arthur Rd/ McKinleyville Williamson Peter, 62 Muskrat Circle/Shelter Cove Wyatt Dale & Venus, 360 Main St/Alderpoint Wyatt Dale L & Venus, 298 Sixth St/Alderpoint Wyatt Dale, 335 Third St/Alderpoint Wyatt Dale, 335 4th St/Alderpoint Zandi Abrahim, 21 Teri Ln/Shelter Cove

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 4,842.42 $ 7,046.92 $ 2,947.41 $ 1,471.78 $ 4,708.42 $ 2,698.91 $ 2,106.76 $ 2,680.01

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.,

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 23rd, 2014. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 29th, June 5th, and June 12th , 2014. , 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/2014 (14-167)

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COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Child Welfare Services System Review We are seeking agencies to design and conduct a System Review of Humboldt County Child Welfare Services and participating agencies. This review will combine quantitative and qualitative methodologies to explore questions specific to the unique attributes of the communities within Humboldt County. Please see the website: http://www.co.humboldt.ca.us/rfp/ Or Contact Lisa Rix at Lrix@co.humboldt.ca.us Or (707) 476-4763 Proposals to be received by 5:00 p.m. on July 31, 2014 at the address listed above. Proposals received after this date will not be considered. Faxes will not be accepted. No additional information or documentation will be accepted from proposers after the proposal due date.

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NOTICE OF AGREEMENT TO PURCHASE TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY FOR DELINQUENT TAXES (PURCHASE BY AN ENTITY OTHER THAN A CITY) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, in accordance with the provisions of Division 1, Part 6, Chapter 8 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code (and the written authorization of the State Controller), that an agreement, a copy of which is on file in the office of the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, has been made between the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors and Resort Improvement District No 1 and Shelter Cove Sewer and other Facilities Maintenance District No 1. and approved by the State Controller, whereby Humboldt County will sell to Resort Improvement District No 1 and Shelter Cove Sewer and other Facilities Maintenance District No 1. under the terms set forth in said agreement all of the real property hereinafter described, which is subject to the power of sale by the Tax Collector. The effective date and time of the agreement shall be June 11, 2014 at 5:00 pm. If the property is not redeemed according to law before the effective date and time of the agreement, the right of redemption will cease and the Humboldt County Tax Collector, pursuant to said agreement, will sell said property to Resort Improvement District No 1 and Shelter Cove Sewer and other Facilities Maintenance District No 1. If the property is sold, parties of interest, as defined in Section 4675 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code, have a right to file a claim with the county for any proceeds from the sale that are in excess of the liens and costs required to be paid from the proceeds. If excess proceeds result from the sale, notice will be given to parties of interest pursuant to law. For information as to the amount necessary to redeem or other related issues pertaining to the property described in this notice, contact John Bartholomew Tax Collector of Humboldt County in the State of California.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Parcel Number (APN), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, (if applicable), and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the assessor’s office. The properties that are the subject of this notice are situated in Humboldt County, California, and are described as follows: ITEM NO 1 2 3

ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NUMBER 109-141-014-000 109-141-015-000 109-291-023-000

4

110-121-014-000

5

110-211-046-000

5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14 (14-153)

LAST ASSESSEE NAME Philip M Gunkel Philip M Gunkel Lincoln Trust Co FBO Jeff Ryan Ajmal Sediqe Maryam Salhi Wahid Sediqe Renee M Weaver

I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

HUNGRY? m.northcoastjournal.com Search nearby locations, by neighborhood, type of food, price or even those that feature local ingredients.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County California, on May 16th, 2014 Published in North Coast Journal on May 22nd, May 29th & June 5th, 2014.

5/22, 5/29, 6/5/14 (14-155)

Art & Collectibles Auctions Merchandise Baby Items Miscellaneous Clothing Sporting Goods

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

45


By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

R

ight by the checkout counter of my local drugstore is a display of “heavy duty” zinc-carbon batteries. Nothing remarkable about that, you say. They were around when you were a kid, right? Actually, they were around when your grandparents were kids, having been patented in 1886 and manufactured commercially 12 years later by the forerunner of the Eveready company. Battery technology has improved since then, of course — but not by much. The last real breakthrough, from the point of view of consumers, came with lithium-ion (Li-ion) rechargeable batteries, invented in the 1970s and first sold commercially in the 1990s. And truth be told, Li-ion batteries (a generic phrase referring to a whole class of cells using lithium or its compounds in their anodes) aren’t that much better than zinc-carbon batteries. Plus, their safety record is spotty: Boeing experienced two Li-ion battery fires last year in its new 787 Dreamliner. So why isn’t battery technology following a version of Moore’s Law for storage? Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel Corporation, noted in 1965 that computing power, expressed as the number of transistors in an integrated circuit, had been doubling every two years, with no foreseeable limit to the trend. His prediction (not a law — gravity is a law!) has proved remarkably prescient, as evidenced by the processing speed and memory capacity of today’s digital computers, cameras, smartphones and other electronic gadgets. So what’s with batteries? If they’d been following their own Moore’s Law since the invention of the transistor in 1947, leadacid automobile batteries would be the size and weight of a dime by now. The quick answer is electron size

versus ion size. Ask a physicist, “How big is an electron?” and you’re liable to hear something like, “We don’t really talk much about that.” Electrons have mass and charge — but they are infinitely small. That’s why Moore’s Law works: you’re moving around electrons in an electric circuit, so chip performance is limited by lithography technology, not by the size of electrons. The size (and thus weight) of a battery, on the other hand, is limited by the size of the ions (charged atoms or molecules) that transfer electric charge through a medium (the electrolyte) between the anode and cathode, all of which take up space. So while the capacity of electronics increases exponentially, doubling every couple of years, battery technology improves at glacial speed. The efficiency of lithium ion, the best battery technology available today, has barely doubled over the last 20 years. Battery design is a compromise between many factors, including energy density (how much power can be stored in a given size and weight), cost, safety, rechargability (fast, and over thousands of times) and environmental friendliness. Incremental battery improvements are on the horizon — silicon anodes and lithiumair technology show promise — but we need a revolution or two more before electric cars become commonplace and solar and wind renewable power outpaces fossil fuels. It’s going to take a huge effort to transform the science of energy storage, as those 128-year-old-technology D cells at the drugstore remind us. l Barry Evans’ (barryevans9@yahoo.com) three electrifying Field Notes anthologies await you at Eureka Books, Northtown Books and Booklegger.

46 North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

©2014 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

The Bane of Batteries

URBAN

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

ACROSS 1. Wrestling victories 5. “One of the greatest poetic geniuses in history that married his cousin,” as defined on 33-Across 8. “The life-sized version of Pong,” as defined on 33-Across 14. Neck of the woods 15. Basic education trio 16. Shakespeare’s “Scram!” 17. “Cher 2.0,” as defined on 33-Across 19. Eatery 20. Ref. works sometimes sold with magnifying glasses 21. Snoopy’s hip alter ego 22. Actress Peet 25. Scoundrel 26. “Je vous ____” 27. “____ Theme” (song from “Dr. Zhivago”) 28. Reddi-____ (ice cream topper) 29. French city where Van Gogh painted 30. Man ____ (A.P.’s Horse of the Century) 31. Flubbing it 33. Popular website with

DOWN user-generated (and often humorous) word definitions 39. Veal serving 40. “Interesting ...” 41. “The only instrument that you cannot play a sad song on,” as defined on 33-Across 45. Always, in sonnets 46. In base 8 47. 1847 Herman Melville novel 48. Part of FWIW 49. A flat equivalent 50. “What Taz turns into when he’s mad,” as defined on 33-Across 52. “’Carpe diem’ for stupid people,” as defined on 33-Across 53. Sorrowful, to Chopin 54. “A short dead dude,” as defined on 33-Across 58. One of the Jacksons 59. “Morning Edition” airer 60. Highway toll unit 61. Justice Kagan and others 62. Spanish title given to Stephen King’s “It” 63. Drink with a straw

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO UP AND UP

1. Amigo 2. Roth ____ 3. He calls Homer his “neighborino” 4. “Later!” 5. Gucci rival 6. Assns. 7. Historical period 8. Small drum 9. Pop singer Sands 10. “Turning left in a Chevrolet for 4 hours,” as defined on 33-Across 11. Cooking agent 12. Where to conform, per an expression 13. Some ermines 18. People may get them before going to coll. 21. “The biggest ball near Uranus,” as defined on 33-Across 22. Baseball’s Matty or Moises 23. Bryn ____ College 24. Riyadh resident 25. They may be vicious 28. Email, say

29. Before now 31. End of a professor’s address? 32. Minor complaint 34. USMC barracks boss 35. New York Times columnist Kristof 36. “The Thin Man” canine 37. Backside 38. Puppy’s protest 41. Nursery need 42. Unprincipled 43. Rock named after a Scandinavian country 44. “Drink to me only with thine eyes” poet 46. Nobel Peace Center site 48. Some intellectual property 49. Enter the draft, maybe 51. “Comin’ ____!” 52. Blabbers 54. Compass dir. 55. Prefix with thermal 56. Over the hill 57. Museum funding grp.

HARD #38

www.sudoku.com

The Clarendon Dry Pile has been running almost continuously (other than short interruptions caused by high humidity) since 1840. It’s powered by two dry piles, or batteries, one on each side of a clapper that faintly rings two bells. It operates on miniscule power — not quite perpetual motion, but close to it. Leo Panthera, Wikimedia Commons

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

Field notes


CONTINUED ON next page

Clubs/Orgs

Opportunities

Opportunities

FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS OFFERED BY AREA 1 AGENCY ON AGING’S Trained HICAP counselors the second Thursday of every month through August. Hour−long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Next class: Supplementing Medicare, 4−5 p.m., June 12. On deck: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, July 10, 4−5 p.m.

NEW MEDICAL ONCOLOGY CLINIC ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FULL TIME RN. Must be IV certified or certified oncology nurse. 35−40 hours per week, $35−$40 per hour or nego− tiable depending on experience. Benefits like 401 K and health insurance included after 90 days. Mail resume to 3798 Janes Rd., Ste 10, Arcata, CA 95521.

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Opportunities HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E−0626)

hiring?

classified employment Opportunities default

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Experienced Carpenters (10 needed) Electricians ƒ F/C Bookkeeper Experienced Welder/Fabricator Fund Raiser ƒ Office Assistant Medical Assistant ƒ Diesel Mechanic Janitorial ƒ Medical Receptionist ƒ Controller default

AFRICA, BRAZIL WORK/STUDY! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591−0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN) (E−0101)

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www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

707.445.9641

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CALIFORNIA MENTOR. CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW. Make extra money working from home, GREAT OPPORTUNITY. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3600 tax−free/mo. Bring 4 references. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Sharon today for appt! (707) 442−4500 ext 16! www.camentorfha.com. (E−0626) default

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**Arcata Main Office**

FISCAL ANALYST Assist in development of budgets & grant proposals, analyze revenue & expense, perform various accounting duties. Min 4 yrs exp in administration, accounting, information systems & budget analysis. Req Bachelor’s in Business w/ course work in accounting. F/T (partial yr, 11mo) M-F, Exempt $726.52- $800.98/wk. First Review Date: June 3.

CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH COORDINATOR Support children, families & staff in a preschool/ playgroup setting in observing, consultation & developing behavior plans. Train parents & staff on social/emotional skills development. Require BA or BS degree or higher in Mental Health or related field. P/T (partial yr, 8-wk layoff): 28 hrs/wk (M-F); $17.50$19.30/hr. First Review Date: June 24.

INFORMATION SYSTEMS SPECIALIST Oversee computers & information systems for NCS sites (i.e. phones, copiers, faxes, scanners, printers, audio visual equip). Req 2 yrs exp involving mgmt & maintenance of automated systems including VoIP, Windows Server 2012, Exchange 2010, SQL and VMware. Degree or Cert in Computer Science or related field pref. F/T (yr rd): 40 hrs/wk (M-F); $16.11-$16.91/hr. First Review Date: June 3. Submit Application, Resume & Cover Letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th St, Arcata, CA 95521. For application, job descriptions & more info, visit www.ncsheadstart.org or call 707-822-7206.

**Annual JOB POOL** NCS anticipates a number of Head Start, Early Head Start & State Program job openings for our 2014-2015 program year. Potential positions are throughout Humboldt County & may be year-round or school-year. Anticipated start date: late August/early September

CENTER DIRECTOR CENTER TEACHER FAMILY WORKER HOME VISITOR TEAM TEACHER/TEACHER ASSOCIATE TEACHER COMBO ASSOCIATE TEACHER ASSISTANT TEACHER CLASSROOM ASSISTANT SPECIAL AIDE INTERPRETER (SPANISH) COOK/ASSISTANT COOK HOUSEKEEPER SUBSTITUTES Submit Application to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th St, Arcata, CA 95521. For application, job descriptions & more info, visit www.ncsheadstart.org or call 707-822-7206.

CASE MANAGER - 1 F/T Eureka SITE ADMINISTRATOR - 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL BILLER - 2 F/T Arcata CERTIFIED MEDICAL CODER - 1 F/T Arcata OFFICE MANAGER - 1 F/T Crescent City MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T McKinleyville DENTAL HYGIENIST - 1 F/T Eureka MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Eureka (Spanish language required) REGISTERED NURSE 1 Temp P/T Willow Creek RN CLINIC COORDINATOR (SUPV) 1 F/T Willow Creek FAMILY PRACTICE MD/DO 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T McKinleyville OB-GYN - 1 F/T Arcata Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete and submit our online application

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 5, 2014

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the marketplace Opportunities

Opportunities

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AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE. Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call Aviaâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; tion Institute of Maintenance 888â&#x2C6;&#x2019;242â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3214 (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605)

We are growingâ&#x20AC;Ś Hospice of Humboldt is growing and we have many benefitted positions available in the nursing department:

ď żď&#x20AC;  ď &#x2019;ď &#x17D;ď&#x20AC; ď &#x192;ď Ąď łď Ľď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Ąď Žď Ąď §ď Ľď ˛ď łď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;  ď &#x2020;ď &#x201D;ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď ?ď&#x20AC;­ď &#x2020; ď żď&#x20AC;  ď &#x201D;ď ˛ď Šď Ąď §ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď &#x17D;ď ľď ˛ď łď Ľď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC;  ď&#x201A;žď&#x20AC; ď ´ď Šď ­ď Ľď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x2020;ď&#x20AC;­ď ? ď żď&#x20AC;  ď &#x152;ď &#x2013;ď &#x17D;ď łď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x2020;ď &#x201D;ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď ?ď&#x20AC;­ď &#x2020; ď żď&#x20AC;  ď ?ď Žď&#x20AC;­ď &#x192;ď Ąď Źď Źď&#x20AC; ď &#x17D;ď Šď §ď ¨ď ´ď&#x20AC;  ď &#x201C;ď ¨ď Šď Śď ´ď&#x20AC;Źď&#x20AC; ď ˇď Żď ˛ď Ťď&#x20AC; ď Żď Žď&#x20AC;­ď Łď Ąď Źď Źď&#x20AC;  ď &#x2020;ď&#x20AC;Żď &#x201C;ď&#x20AC;Żď &#x201C;ď&#x20AC; ď Ąď Žď ¤ď&#x20AC; ď ˛ď Ľď Łď Ľď Šď śď Ľď&#x20AC;  IXOOWLPHEHQHÂżWV Come join our staff of caring professionals and work in a great environment. Go to our website www.hospiceofhumboldt.org for more information and to review the job descriptions. Email your letter of interest and resume to: cburton@ hospiceofhumboldt.org Or mail to: Christine Burton, HR Director Hospice of Humboldt 2010 Myrtle Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 441-0105 x308 Hospice of Humboldt is a drug free workplace.

Opportunities

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0724) AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476â&#x2C6;&#x2019;9262. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0619)

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportuniâ&#x2C6;&#x2019; ties. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7039. (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605)

Opportunities

Art & Collectibles

AVON. Earn extra income with a new career! Sell from home, work, online. $15 startup. For information, call: 888â&#x2C6;&#x2019;770â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1075 (Mon.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;Fri., 9 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;7 p.m. & Sat. 9 a.m.â&#x2C6;&#x2019;1 p.m. central.) (Ind Sls Rep) (Eâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;0605)

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COME AND WORK FOR AN ORGANIZATION THAT CARES ABOUT PEOPLE. North Coast Copâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;op is looking for enthusiastic, friendly people who want to make a difference in peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives. We pay competitive wages and offer a great benefits package. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in working for a leading organization in the community please check our website for full job descriptions. www.northcoastcoâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;op.com Applications should be sent to Human Resources 811 I Street, Arcata, CA 95521. Current job openings: IT Technician, Deli Manager, Event Clerk, Cashier, Cook, Baker www.northcoastcoâ&#x2C6;&#x2019;op.com

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HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY TRAINING SPECIALIST (Job #14â&#x2C6;&#x2019;46) F/T position in Academic Personnel Services & Human Resources. Review: 6/11/14. For more info. visit: www.humboldt.edu/jobs or call (707) 826â&#x2C6;&#x2019;3626. HSU is an ADA/Title IX/EOE

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48 North Coast Journal â&#x20AC;˘ Thursday, June 5, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ northcoastjournal.com

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THURS. JUNE 12TH 5:45 PM ď &#x2026;ď łď ´ď Ąď ´ď Ľď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Šď łď Łď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Śď&#x20AC;  ď &#x2C6;ď Żď ľď łď Ľď ¨ď Żď Źď ¤ď&#x20AC; ď ?ď Šď łď Łď&#x20AC;Žď&#x20AC; ď&#x20AC;Ťď&#x20AC;  ď ď ¤ď ¤ď Šď ´ď Šď Żď Žď ł Info & Pictures at

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Auctions

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LABRADOODLE PUPPIES STARTING AT $600. F1B puppies. Chocolate and black with white markings. 8 weeks. (707) 441−4913 jbonnet7136@yahoo.com default

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Sporting Goods

PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, www.taichigardener.com (S−0626)

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−0626)

Cleaning

HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded, #3860. (707) 444−2001 or (707) 502−1600. Top Rated Cleaning Service on Angie’s List in the State. First Time Cleaning 2 hours or more $10 off. (S−0731)

Computer & Internet

SWAIN’S FLAT OUTPOST GARDEN CENTER UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT! ALL NEW INVENTORY!!! SOIL! AMENDEMENTS! FERTILIZERS! ANYTHING UNDER THE SUN! MILE 19 ON HIGHWAY 36 OPEN 9AM−7PM General Store (707) 777−3385 Garden Cnt. (707) 777−3513 outpostgardencenter @gmail.com

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707-840-0600

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  

Home Repair

  

 

  default

Art & Design

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087, 845−3132 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com. (S−0626) MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834. (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−0731)

hiring? CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−0626)

Other Professionals

PROJECTS UNLIMITED Honey−Do’s are my Specialty. Living and Working in Arcata Area Since 1983 Bob Billstrom, Handyman (707) 822−7037 (707) 834−8059 tunesmith89@sbcglobal.net

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A’O’KAY CLOWN & NANI NATURE. Juggling Jesters and Wizards of Play present Perfor− mances for all Ages; A magical adventure with circus games & toys. For info. on our variety of shows and to schedule events & parties please call us at (707) 499−5628. Visit us at circusnature.com (S−0626)

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 444−8507. (M−0626)

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WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com (S−0807)

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      

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Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

@ncj_of_humboldt

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

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707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Garden & Landscape 616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−0703)

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Roofing/Repairs, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 267−0496 sagehomerepair@gmail.com





 

MRS SEW AND SEW. Mending, hemming, alterations. Fast turnaround. In Arcata. Jeans hem $10 (707) 499−3265

northcoastjournal

 

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Sewing & Alterations

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−0626) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nation− ally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−0626)

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 

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−0807)

Other Professionals

CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1−888−420−3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A−0717)

Home Repair

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Garden & Landscape

Auto Service

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Pets & Livestock

classified services

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8 a.m.− 3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n−Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com default

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

IN-HOME SERVICES

445-7715 1-888-849-5728



HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more insured & bonded





Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

444-2273

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, June 5, 2014

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body, mind

&Spirit default

Depressed? Anxious? Relationship issues? Family problems? Just need someone to talk to?

EARTH RITE MASSAGE. Intuitive deep tissue massage from ORR Hotsprings CMT. 1 hour $50, 1 1/2 Hours $75. More information on facebook. Call Rick: (707) 499− 6033. Treat yourself or a loved one to healing touch. (MB−0626)

Counseling services available for individuals, couples and families.

Bonnie M. Carroll, LCSW LCS # 23232

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

1225 Central Ave. Suite 3 McKINLEYVILLE

839-1244

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with Margy Emerson

8-Week Term Starts June 24 • Traditional T’ai Chi • T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

$

80

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

Walk-ins Welcome

Wed & Sat 11-5pm Daytime Beginning Classes meet at K & Samoa, Arcata All others call for location

Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students

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$

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

LOSE WEIGHT & KEEP IT OFF! Up to 30 pounds in 60 days. Once Daily, Maximum Prescription Strength − No Prescription Required! Free Shipping. Call (877) 761−2991 (AAN CAN) (MB−0710)

Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

95

For Schedule and Fees:

  

822-6508 margaretemerson@att.net Additional Info: www.margaretemerson.com

New Patients ONLY

Medical Cannabis Consultants   

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

consciousparentingsolutions.com

YOGA CLASS Eureka Instructor Sara Bane

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years.

Hatha Yoga Friday, 9-10:15 AM A deep & flowing practice that connects your body, breath, & mind $12/drop in, or 5/$50 525 E St., Eureka sacredbodiespilates.com

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Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Call for Walk-in Availability Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by wholelife medical systems co n

fi d e n t i a l &

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passionate om

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

1339 WILLIAMS. 1/1 Duplex, Garbage Paid, Carport, Fenced bkyard. Rent $640. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0605)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 230 WABASH APTS. 2/1 Units near bus lines, Carport, OSRM, Cat OK. Rent $675. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197, www.ppmrentals.com (R−0605) 2303 SUMMER ST. #3. 1/1 Upper Apt, Gas Range, Off−ST Parking, Cat OK. Rent $565. Vac 5/29. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197, www.ppmrentals.com (R−0605)

301 W. DEL NORTE. 2/1.5 Craftsman Home, Porch, W/D Hookups, Pet OK Rent $900 Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0605) IMMACULATE HOME IN THE REDWOODS − ARCATA. Fickle Hill Rd, $2000 per month, $2500 deposit. information at: http://www.americanproprentals .com/category/arcata. Contact: niki@americanproprentals.com (R−0612)

Roommates ALL AREAS − ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online list− ings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R−0717)

Acreage for Sale

Est. 1979

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Medical Cannabis Evaluations

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

 

707.445.4642

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707-822-5244

Houses for Rent



ROLFING SUMMER SPECIAL 50% off first session plus free body analysis! (541) 251−1885. (MB−0626) VIAGRA. 100mg, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement! Discreet Shipping. Save $500. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1−800−404−1271 (AAN CAN) (MB−0626)

Apartments for Rent

758(027,21),71(66

      

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  featuring

Muscle Activation Techniques™:

A systematic approach to strengthen, stabilize and reduce stress at joints and surrounding muscle tissue

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 default

F r Marny E Friedman E ~energy work~ d o M 707-839-5910 iamalso@hotmail.com

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

Gym Memberships Personal Training (707) 822-3018 info@truemotionfitness.com www.truemotionfitness.com 901 O St, Suite B, Arcata

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Clothing Merchandise

816 2ND ST., EUREKA. Studio Rooms with Kitch− enette,Shared Bathrooms, All Utilities Pd., No Pets, $400/Month $600/Sec. Deposit. Call Preston, (707) 444−2199. FURNISHED STUDIO APARTMENT IN EUREKA. All utilities. Dish TV and internet service included. $600 per month, (707) 444−8117. (R−0626) GASSOWAY APTS, MCK. 2/1 Apts, Laundry, Carport, Small Pets, Rent $765, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0605)

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engi− neering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $89,900 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400


classified HOUSING Housing/Properties Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net $895,000

4 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,177 sq ft comfortable Dows Prairie home located on 15 stunning private enchanting acres, dream shop, 2 stall barn w/tack room & loft, Strawberry Creek meanders through.

classified.northcoastjournal.com ■ McKinleyville

East McKinleyville Location for this desirable home in Pillor Estates! With a vaulted ceiling, large living room with fireplace, a formal dining area, tiled countertops in the kitchen, and a big sunken family room, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is ready for new owners. The oversized southwest-facing lot features a patio and side yard access for a boat, small RV or other toy. Priced to sell at $359,000.

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

$235,000

4 bed, 2 bath, 1,772 sq ft Humboldt Hill home on an adventurous gardeners dream lot, waterfall & ponds with mature landscaping, corner lot, RV parking, shop, two wood stoves, craft room. An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

707.83 4.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent #01930997

707.834.7979

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Hayfork Land/Property Hayfork Creek frontage just outside of Hayfork, CA. This property has standing timber & amazing valley views with a pleasant creek swimming hole. Wonderfully secluded, yet close to town, this property has several potential building sites with one developed site and a great dirt road for easy access. Elevation approx. 2300’-3000’.

$439,000

REDU CED P RICE

Bridgeville Land/ Property

Hoopa Land/Property

This property features fir trees, useable flats, valley views and an existing platform. Access is through a low water crossing.

$325,000

Beautiful Hoopa Valley views ready for your enjoyment. Undeveloped land awaiting your personal touch. Water and power are available to the parcel.

$59,900

2120 CAMPTON RD. STE #C – EUREKA, CA 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

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North Coast Journal 06-05-14 Edition