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istresses ns of usic, drama nd historic

6 A long time coming 8 And a long time gone 16 Mmmm, cocktails 18 Arcata has art! 20 The greenest week 34 This gore’s for you

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem Visiting the Cemetery in April

6 News The Long and Short of it

8 Blog Jammin’ 10 On The Cover Re-Imagining CR

16 The Drunken Botanist Summer Cocktail Crops

17 Art Beat Assembling a Reality

18 Arts! Arcata friday, april 12, 6-9 pm

19 Arts on the Avenue Rio dell, saturday, april 13, 5-8 pm

19 In Review a dance performance

20 The Hum Green Fire

22 Music & More!

27 Week of the Young Child Calendar April 13–21, 2013

28 Home & Garden Service Directory

29 Calendar 34 Filmland Fresh Bloodbath

36 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

36 Workshops 39 Field Notes The Fourth Quadrant

41 Sudoku 41 Crossword 42 Marketplace 46 Body, Mind & Spirit 47 Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

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April 11, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 00

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

Who is HumCPR? Editor: Hurrah and thank you for Ryan Burns’ superb article (“HumCPR Rising,” March 28) that finally answers the question, “What is the real objective of this organization?” I think the Journal’s timing is spot on. If this expose had appeared before these two HumCPR foxes were appointed to the Planning Commission hen house, the article might have received scant notice and been forgotten shortly thereafter. Now the details of HumCPR’s origins, together with the real estate stakes held by Mr. Ulansey and Mr. Morris, and the risk they pose to a General Plan that preserves Humboldt County for all of us (not just developers and realtors), should inspire every voter to watch the actions of the Planning Commission and the General Plan Update very, very closely. In his pre-Planning Commission days, when he launched his periodic brickbats at the Planning Department or the Board of Supervisors, Mr. Ulansey struck me as a Humboldt County character with a flair for the dramatic … a modern-day Don Quixote jousting the windmills of government.  Now — thanks to your article — we know there’s an agenda: make the General Plan as weak, watered down and as pro-unfettered-development as possible. We may have to tolerate shadow advocacy firms involved with our federal government, and a nihilist attitude in the Republican House: “We don’t need no stinkin’ [fill in the agency or organization of choice: EPA, OSHA, Consumer Finance Protection Bureau, CPB, NPR]!”  We don’t have to — we should not have to — tolerate this same attitude, evasiveness, and deception in Humboldt County. Thanks for asking the real Lee Ulansky, Bob Morris (and Supervisor Estelle Fennell, whose evasiveness is particularly reprehensible) to stand up. All of Humboldt County should insist they do so. Duncan B. MacLaren, Fieldbrook

on the cover:

Photo of Kjeld Lyth by Heidi Walters.

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Editor: legions of economically and socially desIt is reassuring to note Humboldt perate youth crowding America’s suburbs County maintains the American tradition and cities who can’t afford land. The kids ”that government of the wealthy people, are thrilled — low cost. It’s beautiful. And by the wealthy people, for the wealthy it’s a pot farm! Wow, dream come true, people has not perished from the earth.” right. So the kids get out there and sign Tim Kilburn, Eureka  some contracts and build their hut and   start growing their weed. Sooner or later Editor: the landowners have a bunch of pot tenSometimes companies that own resource land can lease or sell a permit to build a   house. A mining Samuel Drenteln visits cemeteries company might because the dead are easy to get along with. own many acres of mineral-rich Their ineffable presence is comforting. land which Especially at nightfall, in the rain, is also scecemeteries have a dreamlike quality of inconsequence and unreason — nic. They might like life. want to make extra money At dusk, by selling surthe tombstones appear to reach all the way to the horizon face developand girdle the earth. ment rights of small parcels to Samuel sees them as his personal recessional, vacationers or the ebbing away of his superfluous existence. kids with rural Some of the black granite memorials remind him of molars: dreams who tombstones are gawking teeth in skulls, don’t see the scam. Owner black cavity windows in bone white houses, finance. No or vacant eye sockets. utilities? No Wet slate walkways crisscross the cemetery in a fixed grid problem. Offresembling rigor mortis. grid! Transplant Obsidian shadows stalk the sublunary landscape. this scenario to He likes to take lovers to cemeteries. Humboldt. PerThe presence of the dead makes lovemaking more poignant, haps TPZ land. Someone owns especially in spring, the major parwhen April flowers perish before your eyes. cel and has the Coupling is as evanescent as cherry blossoms; timber harvest it too is dreamlike, unreasoning. plan. Since a dwelling is perIn a cemetery, even love can be deadening. haps “principalMaybe that’s what an April visit to the cemetery is for: ly permitted,” rehearsal for the long run. they lease the Hence the claim, right to build a hut with no April is the cruelest month. utilities. Whom do they lease — Paul Mann it to? To the

Visiting the Cemetery in April

Editor: Since the Journal’s high-piled righteousness dwarfs mere fairness, I can’t share many of my thoughts on Ryan Burn’s odd article about HumCPR, which implied that fundraising and candidate-recruiting is immoral if done by anyone but Mark Lovelace. (Where did you come from, Clif Clendenen?) Oh well. I’ll use my 300 words to play Marcy Burstiner, explaining one of Ryan’s techniques on frequent display, for the amusement of readers. It’s called the dog whistle. Dog whistles in politics are manipulative coded messages, perceived by the target market but unnoticed by many others, originally used for race-baiting in the South. Ryan works his whistle hard, delivering his first blow in his headline: HumCPR isn’t a citizen’s group, it’s a corporation. So Lovelace et al’s 501(c)(3) corporations — which secretly (“below the radar”) got paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to inflict policy excesses upon rural Humboldt by other, out-ofstate corporations — are transparent corporations now? Pretty subtle stuff, from a paper published by an untransparent corporation. You might think only the most unthinking, blinkered zealots could take such silly labeling seriously. But that’s who Ryan’s high-pitching to. Speaking of gratuitous insults — not just of Journal readers, using false stereotypes — as Ryan knows but readers wouldn’t, it’s because I’ve worked several jobs for so long that I can advocate for responsible ag practices and watershed protections in our county’s biggest industry. While I don’t expect fairness from a hatchet job, identifying me purely as a HumCPR-supporting pot farmer (in journalistic quotes, as if secondhand stigma’s less cheesy than a direct dog whistle) illustrates fun facts: Karl Rove-style politics of division targeted at conservatives

 

Money, Oh Money

  Editor: Seems ironic that the 40 Days of Prayer campaign that you Blog Jammed about (“Local Planned Parenthood Labeled ‘The Worst,’” April 4) accused Planned Parenthood of being “driven” by money. PPs response to the campaign? A fundraiser. Dave Barry, Eureka  

Save SIT... SLEEP...

Stop Cutting Health Care

  Editor: “RNs picketing for patient care,” “safe staffing now,” “some cuts don’t heal” — these words haunt me. I have been complaining about this for years (“Picketing for Help,” March 21). The core of this issue goes back to March 16, 2011, when AB 97 passed the state Legislature. The bill created a 10 percent reduction on almost all Medi-Cal health services, then this cut was back-dated 2½ years! This bill also acknowledged two previous rate reductions the Legislature had just approved. One rate cut piled on top of another. This bill also eliminated several MediCal services, including Adult Day Health Care, over-the-counter nutrition products and over-the-counter cough and cold products. It also created a “soft cap” on the number of physician and clinic visits to just seven visits per patient per year. The purpose of this was to save $1.5 billion per year on the backs of the most vulnerable poor and disabled in California. Hospitals and medical facilities have been closing, and physicians and medical personnel have been leaving rural communities and the state itself because of these continuous reductions. All these cuts come at a time when costs are skyrocketing. Every time the state needs to cut the budget, it cuts health care. Michael Speers, McKinleyville

Write a letter! Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com. l

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Journal Trickery?

don’t work here — yet Rove’s techniques are recycled by so-called Progressives, befuddling their own supporters. How flattering! National Republicans proved this drives sensible people away from real concerns, but if you’re out of …   Charley Custer, Redway

ant farms. They get high payments for the “development rights.” They are making a lot of money — with zero risk. If the feds come, the landowner, or corporation, had of course no knowledge of anything. It might be an investment machine with such a high rate of return that it could attract national or even international anonymous investors.  All the pot income with none of the risk. Perhaps the thing Bob McKee did wrong was to actually sell the parcels of the subdivided Tooby Ranch. If he had been able to sell or lease just the right to conduct a principally permitted activity — building a hut — there would be no lawsuit.  I think we know whose interests HumCPR is serving.  Virginia Damron, Manila    

4th Street U.S. 101 South

5th Street

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

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The Long and Short of it

Final payments could be made soon in 50-year-old lawsuit By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

T

his month, a federal claims court judge approved a settlement agreement that may finally lay to rest the interminably long Jessie Short case, in which thousands of mainly Yurok Tribe members are owed money stemming from a 50-year-old lawsuit. Now, almost all that’s left is the checkcutting — but that will come after attorneys finish sifting through hundreds of bankers’ boxes to verify who has or hasn’t been paid yet, says Yurok Tribal Attorney

John Corbett. Among those still owed are Humboldt County Supervisor Ryan Sundberg and other heirs of folks who died waiting for their checks. The settlement OK’d by the judge on April 3 was between Citibank and the plaintiffs in “Jessie Short, et al, v. The United States,” over a dispute that arose sometime in the last decade (we’ll get to that in a bit). But the case itself was filed in 1963 by Jessie Short, a Yurok Indian, and several thousand other primarily Yurok people who said they

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

had been denied their share of revenues from timber sales from the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation. At the time, the Yurok people had shared the reservation with the Hupa people — in fact, the reservation was 70 percent Yurok and 30 percent Hupa, according to legal documents in the case. The Hupa lived on what was called the Hoopa Square, the Hupa’s original, 12-square-mile reservation established in 1864, where all the timber was cut. The Yurok primarily lived on a strip of land, a mile wide on each side of the Klamath River, which extended from the square to the ocean and had been added to the Hoopa Valley Reservation in 1891. That strip of land was called “the addition.” Since 1955, the federal government had been making annual timber payments to each person officially enrolled as a member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe — an organization that had formed in 1950 and excluded people who lived on the addition. Those addition dwellers were Jessie Short and his fellow plaintiffs. In 1988, under the Hoopa-Yurok Settlement Agreement, the square and the addition were separated legally from each other into two reservations, and the Yurok Tribe formed its own government. It wasn’t until 1993 that the Short lawsuit was finally — sort of finally — settled, says

Corbett, with about 2,000 plaintiffs being awarded damages and interest. A judgment trust was created, and since then checks trickled out to the plaintiffs or their heirs. There have been 42 disbursements of payments so far. Now three more payment distributions are left. About $1.5 million — the 43rd and 44th — will be divvied up among people who have only received one of their two promised checks so far. And $1.9 million— the 45th — will be divided among people who were supposed to receive checks back in 1996 and 1997 but said they never got them. That’s the Citibank dispute — the bank says it distributed the checks. But it couldn’t produce proof of canceled checks, says Corbett. The bank agreed to settle. Because there’s not enough money left in the trust — the 1996 and 1997 funds are gone — the beneficiaries will share about half of what had been owed them, comprised of what’s left in the fund plus $1 million thrown into the pot by Citibank “to cover any alleged wrongdoing in recordkeeping in its actions as trustee,” says Corbett. It’s one of the longest running cases in federal claims court. The plaintiffs have had several different attorneys. Corbett’s only been on the case three years. In the recent legal notice to yet-to-be paid beneficiaries,

explaining that a judge would soon hear their case, he signed off by telling them that their “50 years of patience” was much appreciated. The number of people who will get paid, and therefore what they’ll receive, is still being determined. “We’re still going through boxes of bank records and having people come up to us saying, ‘No, I was paid already,’” Corbett said. Among the certain payees will be Ryan Sundberg and his mom, Cheryl SundbergGrooms. Sundberg-Grooms’ husband at the time, Marshall (Ryan Sundberg’s dad), was one of the original plaintiffs in the case. He died in 1990, before any checks had been sent out. “I remember my parents talking about it,” Sundberg said. “It was always a long-running joke. My dad would say, ‘Well, when I get my Indian money …’ It took so long, it was forever — years and years.” Sundberg said he thinks he and his mom will each get about $1,000. He doesn’t know what happened back in 1996 and 1997, except that after his dad died, he said, things got chaotic. Some checks went out to his siblings, he said, because they’ve been paid. And he was just a kid. He said his mom, hearing she had a check coming, called it “a nice surprise.” l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

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Blog Jammin’

THIS 300-YEAROLD REDWOOD WAS FELLED BY THIEVES ACCORDING TO A PARKS SPOKESPERSON. SUBMITTED PHOTO

MEDICAL, UNIONS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / APRIL 9, 10:40 A.M.

Nurses Set Stage for Possible Strike St. Joseph Hospital nurses voted last week to authorize a strike — but that doesn’t mean they’re about to strike. It means they’ve handed their nurse representatives a big cudgel to raise high in threat above the bargaining table where they’ve sat for weeks haggling with hospital administration over their new contract. “It’s used as a tool to move things along at the table,” said registered nurse Kathryn Donahue. “If the issues are not addressed to our satisfaction, the nurses at the table can give a 10-day notice of a strike.” Donahue is the local shop steward for the California Nurses Association, one of the unions that represents nurses within the St. Joseph Hospital System. Last month, hundreds of nurses picketed outside several St. Joseph hospitals in northern California, calling attention to

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

a slew of issues they have with staffing, which they allege compromises patient safety. Donahue said 75 percent of the bargaining unit — the nurses represented by the union — voted last week, and 98 percent of them voted “yes” to authorizing the strike. There are no bargaining dates this month; the two sides meet next in May, when there are six dates set for negotiations. So, said Donahue, May is probably the soonest that anything will happen. ● CRIME, ENVIRONMENT, REDWOODS / BY RYAN BURNS / APRIL 5, 5:21 P.M.

A-holes Saw Down Redwood So They Can Steal a Burl That’s right: Some depraved reprobate(s) chopped down a 300-yearold natural wonder so they could hack part of it off, chainsaw it into a bear shape and hawk it to tourists on Highway 101.

MARIJUANA / BY RYAN BURNS / APRIL 4, 12:49 P.M.

Marijuana’s Tipping Point? For the first time in 44 years of polling on the issue (and no doubt a lot longer than that), a majority of Americans think that Humboldt County’s No. 1 cash crop oughta be legal, according to a national survey released today by the Pew Research Center. Public opinion has been headed this way for a while. Even so, these results are fairly eyebrow-raising. They show a dramatic and rapid shift in attitudes about the “devil weed.” Support for legalization has jumped by 11 percentage points since

Don’t piss’em off

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

2010, the year that Californians (and HumCo voters alike) shot down Prop. 19. Way more people (48 percent) now say they’ve tried marijuana compared to a decade ago (38 percent). Only 38 percent of people consider pot a “gateway” to harder drugs, compared to 60 percent in 1977. And fewer than one in three people think marijuana use is immoral, compared to half of folks in 2006. And perhaps most ominous for drug war hardliners (we’re looking at you, Melinda Haag) is this dank nugget: Substantial majorities of both Republicans (67%) and Democrats (71%) also say federal enforcement of marijuana laws is not worth the cost. This sea change in public opinion is looking more and more like an unstoppable force, and it’s colliding with the immovable object of federal drug schedules. Something’s gotta give. ●

READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

This happened up in Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park last month, and the nefarious deed has understandably unleashed the righteous wrath of local park rangers. In a press release issued today, a spokesperson for Redwood National and State Parks compared the crime to stealing part of the Statue of Liberty’s crown or defiling the gravestones at Gettysburg. A $500 reward is being offered for info that helps nab these scumbags. Read the press release on our website.

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013

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Re-Imagining CR

State’s new mission distresses fans of music, drama and historic preservation

ON THE COVER KJELD LYTH, CR DRAMA INSTRUCTOR, PARTS BACKSTAGE CURTAINS TO REVEAL A WALL. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

K

jeld Lyth flicked on the main lights inside College of the Redwoods’ new multi-million dollar Performing Arts Theater and strode agitatedly in, pointing out annoyances: noisily flushing toilets in the bathrooms that might disrupt quieter theatrical moments; loud fans in the back of the theater, which could make hearing difficult from the rear rows; large pockets of darkness where the spotty audience lighting failed to penetrate. Lyth hit some switches and brilliant rows of colorful lights beamed down on the stage. There are 119 of the beauties and each one cost $261 — Broadway could do no better, Lyth said. He did not look pleased. He swept around and walked to the back of the stage, parting the black curtain in the middle to reveal, inches away, a stark, white wall. There should be a space there, not a wall, he said — space for dressing rooms, for building and storing sets, for moving set pieces around during a performance, for actors to hang out when they’re not on stage or to move unseen across the stage to reposition during a performance. To reach the dressing room — for there is a small one, behind the wall — performers would have to exit side stage and double back. “If ever there was a conflict between design and function, this is an example,” Lyth said. Then he pointed at the bulky, boxy lectern planted stage right. “All

By Heidi Walters they ever intended with the new space,” he accused, “was to have it be a multipurpose facility for special guest speakers and PowerPoint presentations.” With extravagant stage lights, he added. You might forgive Lyth, who’s the college’s only on-faculty drama instructor — although part-time, at that — for sounding frustrated. In early February, he and other faculty learned that their programs might suffer reductions. A month later it was official: In a March 15 news release, the college administration announced it was reducing some course offerings so it could add others. It cited financial challenges and a mandate from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office to focus on “three core missions — degree transfer, career technical education and basic skills programs in English and math.” Additions, beginning with the summer and fall semesters, would occur not just in math and Enghlish, but in such subjects as speech, biology, sociology, psychology and Native American studies. Among the trims would be sections or courses in foreign language (French, German and Japanese), construction technology — including within the popular and unique Historic Preservation and Restoration Technology program — and anthropology.

Also, the music program would be hit hard, losing half of its offerings — mostly performance classes, including concert band, jazz ensemble, wind ensemble, chorale and opera production. (Core music courses needed by music majors to transfer to a four-year university would not be cut.) And the entire drama program would be closed, at least for now. When the administration announced the cuts — calling them suspensions, implying some could be revitalized later — it noted that some of these classes might be offered instead as community education courses. Those courses can’t be taken for credit, and students’ fees pay the instructors’ wages. Lyth doubted his non-degree program would be brought back. “They’ve thrown me and the program under the bus — the whole thing,” he said, standing in the new theater on a recent late-March morning. Lyth is slender, and his simple, dark clothes and thin beard, sideburns and moustache lend him a dignified-swashbuckler air. He’s been with the drama program for 34 years, and is the principal instruc-

tor, although several non-faculty instructors have taught courses over the years as well. He and Ed Macan, chair of the music and drama programs, question the administration’s methods for choosing which courses and programs to reduce — methods that involved looking at course enrollment figures and financial viability, but also at whether courses and programs suited the new priorities of the California Community College Chancellor’s Office. Were drama and music performance not important? Because, they said, they certainly weren’t a financial burden. Macan, the lone full-time tenured music faculty member, had crunched some numbers and determined that from 2006 through 2012, with the exception of one year, enrollment in the music courses being cut was high enough to generate two times the amount of money that the college spent on them. That’s a 110 percent profit-to expense margin, he wrote in a document he gave the administration in defense of sustaining music and drama. “Drama, meanwhile, generated an incredible 202 percent profit/expense margin,”

THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER ON THE EUREKA CAMPUS OF COLLEGE OF THE REDWOODS. PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

So far there have been several musical performances, a play, a police academy graduation, and some lectures and meetings in CR’s new theater. Kjeld Lyth (right), CR’s principal drama instructor, worries the theater will be used mostly for non-performance events; the college says this isn’t so. photos by hieidi walters

Macan wrote. Later in the document he economic downturn. It said Prop. 30 funds noted that profits made by the drama put $200 million back in the collective production class had, for 11 years, been colleges’ coffers, but that was hardly used to pay for the next year’s theaterienough to fix their deficits. The severe cal production. decline in money from the state hasn’t Macan also determined that both been offset much by practically doubling programs had high retention rates over student fees, either, said the report. Colthe past eight years — almost always leges have had to slash courses and staff above 87 percent. And he suggested that and increase class sizes. For-credit classes eliminating performance classes might kill were cut in many disciplines, with fine a person’s incentive to arts, education, physisign up for the degree cal education, music courses. Both he and and dance programs Lyth consider the suffering the most, the reduction in music and report said. Non-credit drama courses as, as courses - especially Macan wrote, “part of ones directed at older a larger assault at the students — were pronational level against portionally cut even the traditional liberal more. The number of arts model.” students signing up for The latest reduccollege had hit a 20tions were part of year low, with fewer trend already begun new, fresh-from-high at CR: Some drama school students, the and music courses had report said. And gradubeen reduced or even ation rates were dreary. eliminated over the At College of the CR President Kathryn Smith prior two years. Redwoods — which photo courtesy of college of the redwoods “They think classes has campuses in Eureka like drama and music and Crescent City and are simply superfluous,” Lyth said. instruction sites in Hoopa, Garberville and Well, they’re not entirely wrong — but Fort Bragg — enrollment has mirrored the the blame for that attitude more rightly statewide trend. And, state funding has might fall on the chancellor’s office and declined — the college is getting 13 perthe governor — or on the general dismal cent less for the 2012-13 school year than state of the state’s financial and acait received in 2008-09, said the college’s demic affairs. marketing and communications director, Paul DeMark. the economy began State funding is tied to what’s called sliding south in 2008, the state has been FTES — full-time equivalent student. giving community colleges less money. In The number of FTESs is calculated by a report published last month, the Public dividing the total number of credits that Policy Institute of California said that all students have signed up for by a full between 2008 and 2012, the state cut course load of 30 credits per school year. more than $1.5 billion from community The state pays community colleges per colleges — far more than during any past FTES — currently $4,564 each. At CR,

Ever since

those full-time equivalents have gone up and down in the past decade, but sometimes hovered close to 6,000: 5,700 in 2001-2002; 5,592 in in 2008-09 and 5,967 in 2009-10. By 2011-12, though, there were 4,709. The enrollment upswing a few years ago, under then-president Jeff Marsee, is one of the things that hurt College of the Redwoods, said current president Kathryn Smith in a recent phone interview at which DeMark also was present. Smith became president in May 2012. “It was bad timing,” she said, careful not to place blame on any one person. “We did have a decline in enrollment, and the board asked the president at the time to increase enrollment. Generally, if your enrollment goes up, you get paid more money. But as the college was growing enrollment, state finances were declining. And the state quit paying for those extra students.” That’s when the college began dipping into its reserves to pay for the extra faculty hired to teach the extra students, Smith said. And it began cutting courses and course sections. That led to many students being put on wait lists to get into classes, especially math and English. Meanwhile, operating expenses keep rising — salaries and health benefits having the biggest impact, but also utilities. Many of these are costs, said Smith, the college has no control over. Faculty and classified staff get automatic annual raises, for instance, according to their union-negotiated contracts. To add to the college’s duress, for several years now it has been under threat of losing its accreditation; this spring it narrowly kept it. Some of the issues have been whether the college is adequately assessing how students are doing and using the information to improve their “outcomes” — a big worry in a state with declining college success rates — continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

11

continued from previous page and whether the college’s institutional structure is efficient, cohesive and able to support the institution financially into the future. DeMark said the college has had to hire a special trustee and accreditation and financial consultants, adding to costs (he wasn’t immediately able to specify how much).

These financial troubles

affect students the most, of course. In 2010, the state community colleges’ Board of Governors convened a task force to figure out how to fix the problems facing community colleges, so they could improve student success. That led to the Student Success Act of 2012, passed by the Legislature in August 2012 and signed by Gov. Jerry Brown that September. It required community colleges to focus more resources on students with specific career- or higher-education goals, and to counsel new students, forming an education plan for each of them. The aim is to help more students finish college, and more quickly. The act also puts the brakes on funding classes with high “repeatability” — ones people tend to take for

right The cast of Moliere’s “The Misanthrope,” produced at CR in 2009. photo courtesy of college of the redwoods

middle Rueben Diaz, a part-time guitar instructor at CR, shows his students some licks. photo by Paul DeMark/ courtesy of college of the redwoods

fun and repeat often. These are often called “lifelong learning” classes. Under the act, the state will no longer include multiple-repeats of certain courses in its FTES calculations. That means no money for those multiple repeats, which occur especially in physical education, performing and fine arts courses. “Our revised mission is basic skills — reading, writing and math, for students who are unprepared coming out of high school — and on career technical education, and on transfer classes — those classes for your degree that you’re hoping to transfer to four-year schools,” Smith said. The Chancellor’s Office was pushing these priorities even before the

12 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Student Success Task Force issued its recommendations, she added. “They have taken the lifelong learning prong out of the mission.” She said this push is part of a national movement to re-vision how community colleges are funded, stemming in part from frustration that some people, for example, were repeating physical education courses to avoid paying health club fees. “Taxpayers were subsidizing them, because student fees don’t cover the full cost of the class,” Smith said. “And at some community colleges, classes were basically high school football practice.” The new focus, Smith reiterated, is aimed at helping get people more quickly

“out into the workforce so they can contribute to the economy of the state of California.” Smith said there would be no official reprimands from the Chancellor’s Office — or the accreditation folks — for not following the priorities detailed in law. But, she said, it is possible that if the college doesn’t use state funds to build up its course offerings in the priority classes, students waiting to get into them might give up — thereby affecting student learning outcomes. That could cause a big public outcry, she said, which might bring the accreditation folks back to sniff around again. California community colleges have

left Beginning and intermediate piano are among the core music courses that will continue to be taught at CR.

long been multifaceted institutions. Under the 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education, they were supposed to be where anybody over 18 could access education. Courses were free, requirements minimal. Even now, with course fees in place and rising, it’s generally cheaper to go to community college to get the basics out of the way before entering a spendier four-year university. And, yes, community colleges were intended to help get people into the workforce. But they also have long been where the community can go for personal enrichment — to take a painting or a Pilates class, for instance, or play in a band. Now that’s changing.

percent pay cut that could save the college $1.6 million annually, Smith said. The college’s trustees eliminated their monthly $240 stipend and have begun contributing $295 a month to their health benefits plan. The college is looking to lease out for office space around 15,000 square feet of old campus structures, some declared seisphoto by mically unfit to hold students. heidi walters These include the old adminis  tration building, the old Forum and Theater, the old library, and the old life science and physical science buildings on meet the mission-change directives, Colthe Eureka campus, and some space on lege of the Redwoods has come up with a the Mendocino and Garberville campuses. combination of solutions, Smith said. This move could bring in at least $200,000 It has eliminated 39 staff and managein annual revenue, said Smith. ment (not faculty) positions; of those, 23 Now, the college is negotiating with resigned or retired and 16 were laid off. the staff and faculty unions to get them In July, two senior-level positions will be to agree to another 8-9 percent salary cut — the vice president of instruction, a cut. Down the road, Smith said she’d like district-wide position; and the Mendocino to see a discussion about getting them to dean’s position. In addition, DeMark said, pay some of their health benefits. the dean of academics has recently reAnd, it’s making those course offering signed to take another job elsewhere and changes. The college took two approachmight not be replaced. es to deciding what courses and programs This year, all staff, managers and faculty to reduce — or “suspend,” in some cases, have taken a payroll reduction equivauntil times get better and/or the college lent to two days off a month, around a 9

To tackle its deficit

decides whether they’re needed. First, after Smith and college trustees conferred, they weeded out courses or programs with low enrollment that aren’t paying for themselves — the state allocates funds based on enrollment. These included some construction technology, fire technology, business technology and anthropology classes. Second, they cut courses or programs that didn’t fit the Chancellor’s Office mandate to focus on basics, even if, like drama and music performance, they were well-enrolled, had high completion rates and made more money than was spent on them. Community members who want to be in a band or a theater company have other options, she said — theater and music groups in town they can join. “But if you want an English class, you have no other option but college,” she said. “When you have limited resources you have to focus on the basics.” She agreed with Macan’s contention that the music and drama courses being suspended for this year have made money for the college, although she said she hadn’t examined Macan’s figures in detail. It doesn’t matter, she said. The continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

13

continued from previous page

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showed up for a Board of Trustees meeting on April 2 at the College of the Redwoods’ main Eureka campus. During the public comment period, several were concerned about athletics

cuts. And many were upset over hits to the music performance classes and to the historic preservation and restoration technology program — one of those not considered to be pulling its enrollment and financial weight. Alex Stillman, an Arcata City Councilmember, said she helped found the historic preservation program 17 years ago because Eureka has so much intact historical housing. The program is the only one of its kind on the West Coast. A music student who wanted to enter Humboldt State as a junior said she would need the music performance courses at the college to get in. (Smith has said CR is working on this issue and will find a way to fix it.) Bill Ryder, a musician who trained at College of the Redwoods and then Humboldt State, said his career led him to gigs singing in New York City and other places. Now he is a piano tuner locally, and he is married to Carol Ryder (one of the nonfaculty drama instructors now out of a job, who has directed dozens of musical theater pieces at the old Forum Theater on campus). “Community bands and choirs don’t have technique programs,” Bill Ryder said. “College of the Redwoods does. We live in an isolated area. We don’t need ‘enrichment classes’ for our community. We need music education classes for our youth.” In the weeks before the meeting, Macan, the music professor and chair of drama and music, had had an e-mail exchange with President Smith in which he questioned the reasoning behind the reductions in music offerings. He suggested that taking the occasional music course might be just what makes college tolerable for some students pursuing other degrees. Offering only basics, he wrote, means “embracing a neo-feudal social vision in which our ‘drones’ will be remediated in

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state limits how many full-time equivalent students it will fund, and she’s not willing to devote resources to offering non-priority courses. “If I have $3,000 and my choice is to put it into a music class that makes money, or into an English class that also makes money — even if it isn’t as much — I’m choosing the English class because it meets the Chancellor’s priorities,” she said. DeMark also noted that in the past, other classes have gone from being forcredit to community education courses. “Phlebotomy used to be taught at College of the Redwoods,” he said. “It was turned into community ed. Medical assisting also went that route. And smog certification.” For now, many courses being cut or shifted to community education remain in the catalog because they might one day be returned to full status. The college can add or drop courses each year, Smith said, to adjust to changing enrollment and budget scenarios. The college’s hope is, once it adds more sections of English, math and other basics — and hires instructors for them with money diverted from the eliminated courses — enrollment will grow as all those students-in-waiting get in to their desired classes. Revenues will go up. (But even then, said Smith, it might not be enough, in which case yet more reorganizing will be in order.) Even if enrollment doesn’t rise dramatically and the money doesn’t roll in, at least the college will be helping students toward their degrees and transfers, Smith said.

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ties, Lyth allowed. It’s got a bigger stage than the old one. And, back in 2009, he had a chance to consult briefly with the architects and he asked for a loading dock to be added to the design. It was done. So that was nice. But his other suggestions — especially his request for more backstage space — were ignored, he said. The new theater opened last August. It is part of a larger project, completed in May, including a student services/administration building. The entire project cost $19.3 million — $16.1 million came from the state and the rest, $3.2 million, from the Measure Q bond passed by local voters in 2004, said DeMark, the college spokesperson. The theater’s cost was not separated out, he said, adding that architects did take input from faculty. Then-president Jeff Marsee signed off on the final design. DeMark said the new theater is supposed to serve the same purposes as the old one, a place for lectures, meetings, events, concerts and drama productions, which will continue even if some performers are taking community education classes instead of classes for credit. So far it has been a venue for jazz and concert band performances, and for a high school play. l

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high school math and English, taught vocational skills and given a very narrow core of transferable G.E. courses.” Lyth, the drama instructor, likewise insists his program is important to the community. “In the 34 years I’ve been at College of the Redwoods, I’ve had hundreds of students from local high schools,” he said one day last month, while standing inside the old Forum Theater. “They come to me and get further training, then these local kids go out into the community and perform in all the local theaters. And they go to Humboldt State, too. It’s had a huge impact for such a tiny, tiny program.” He returned to his theme about the extravagance of the new theater — and its purpose. The old Forum Theater has just 20 stage lights — and that, he said, worked fine for him. Stacks of plywood leaned against a backstage wall — setbuilding material, which Lyth has paid for out of his own pocket. A scrap of bright blue feather lay on the dark stage floor, amid a general faint sheen of dropped glitter. The new theater has some good quali-

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

15

The drunken botanist

WATERMELON, TEQUILA, ORANGE LIQUEUR AND LIME BLEND BEAUTIFULLY.

PHOTO BY AMY STEWART

Summer Cocktail Crops By Amy Stewart

amystewart@northcoastjournal.com

O

K, it’s not summer yet, but if you’re starting plants from seed, now’s a good time to get going. These should all be planted in early June, or as soon as the last of the chilly spring weather is past. If possible, shelter them from the strong winds we sometimes get in early summer. Here are my must-have cocktail plants for the summer: Tomato: The tomato to grow in a cocktail garden, in my opinion, is a small and flavorful cherry tomato that you can muddle into a drink and use a garnish. Cherry tomatoes also happen to be a

little bit more tolerant of cooler temperatures, and they do better in containers and hanging baskets. You’ll be seeing more and more grafted tomatoes in garden centers this year, and if you haven’t tried one yet, I highly recommend that you do. The idea behind grafted vegetables is that a flavorful but somewhat finicky tomato can be grafted onto a sturdier tomato rootstock to help it resist disease and produce more fruit. This is the same reason that many fruit trees and roses are grafted rather than grown on their own roots. My favorites are “Sungold,” which reli-

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ably produces lots of sweet, orange fruit, and the very abundant red “Sweet 100” and “Sweet Million.” “Red Currant” is a variety that does exceptionally well in containers, and the small fruit really does have a powerful tomato flavor. If you’re going to be growing them in containers, be sure to use a potting soil that contains coco fiber to help hold in moisture. Ask at the garden center about this — it will have at least one soil made especially for containers and hanging baskets. Give them a healthy dose of an organic dry fertilizer formulated for fruits and vegetables, and plan on watering regularly. And if you decide to try hanging baskets or one of those upside down tomato planters, be sure you have a freakishly strong hook that is heavily anchored to a good support beam. The plants get incredibly heavy as the season goes on, especially when you water them, so make sure the supports are seriously overbuilt. Here’s a trick with tomatoes: When you put the plant in the ground, snip off the lowest set of leaves and submerge the plant a little deeper, so that part of the stem is buried as well. The stem will take root and contribute to a stronger root system. (Don’t do this if you’re growing a grafted tomato: in that case, the graft needs to be visible above ground.) I have never found the flavors of tomatoes to be very stable in infused vodkas. If you want to mix up a batch of tomatoflavored cocktails, my suggestion is to chop or mash the tomatoes with vodka and let it sit for a few hours at the most. You won’t get much additional benefit beyond that. Peppers: As with tomatoes, the trick to growing peppers for cocktails is to choose a variety that is small enough to fit in the glass as a garnish. It’s also important you actually like the pepper; there’s no point growing hot peppers if you can’t stand spicy cocktails. A good variety to try is “Peguis,” a heavy producer of large, green jalapeño-style peppers. For sweet peppers I like “Cherry Pick,” a small, round, red pepper that matures early, making it a good option for our cool summers. In any case, give peppers full sun and protection from the wind. If the summer gets off to a slow start, you might even consider giving them a little shelter behind a cold frame. Even using an old glass window as a lean-to above the pepper plant can give it a little extra shelter and warmth. Like tomatoes, they need rich soil amended with plenty of compost, a granular organic fertilizer formulated for vegetables, and regular water. Uneven watering in temperature swings can stress the plant out and keep it from blooming or producing fruit. I use slices of peppers in a lot of vodka, gin and tequila drinks, and I’ve found the flavor to be pretty stable in infused vodkas. Don’t go overboard with the heat, however.

Even if you love spicy drinks is much as I do, a blindingly hot infused vodka can just be overpowering. Dial it back a little, and if you like, add fresh hot peppers when you make the drink. Tomatillo: I love tomatillos in cocktails because they add such a bright, citrusy flavor. Grow them as you would tomatoes, giving them plenty of sun, rich soil, regular water and a granular organic fertilizer formulated for vegetables. There’s really just one difference: To get fruit, you need two tomatillo plants. The purple tomatillos look great on the vine, but that purple color can get a little muddy in cocktails. I actually prefer green varieties like “Toma Verde.” There’s also a yellow variety called “Pineapple” that is so sweet that you can make jam out of it. They blend very well with tequila; a tomatillo margarita is a wonderful thing. Melon: If you’re growing melons specifically for a cocktail garden, it really makes sense to look for small-fruited varieties. Better to have a steady supply of small melons on hand than two or three jumbo fruits that took all season to ripen. There’s a beautiful heirloom watermelon called “Small Shining Light” that tolerates short, cool growing seasons and produces 10-inch fruit. “Sugar Baby” is another small, iceboxstyle watermelon you might try. I also like “Minnesota Midget,” a miniature cantaloupe bred to tolerate short seasons. No matter what variety you grow, remember to give them at least 4 to 5 feet of growing room in every direction, and to plant them on top of a mound of rich soil amended with plenty of compost. I love melons in tequila and rum drinks, but I’m sure you’ll find a use for them in vodka and gin drinks as well. Melon-infused vodka is a wonderful thing, but the flavors don’t stay stable for long, so mix up a small batch that you can use within a month or so. ●

Agave y Sandia Ingredients

1.5 oz 100 percent agave tequila .5 oz Combier or another orange liqueur 4-5 chunks fresh watermelon ¼ fresh lime 3-4 sprigs “Margarita” spearmint or rosemary Optional: fresh jalapeño slice

Method:

Reserve a chunk of watermelon or herb sprig for garnish. Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker and crush with a muddler or wooden spoon, being sure to release all the watermelon juice. Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Add garnish.

northcoastjournal.com

Assembling a Reality Digital printmaker explores precision in debut show By Ken Weiderman

A

man stands with a hammer in his right hand, arms casually slung at his sides. His jacket, a deep gray-black, blooms with bulgy pockets. Behind him, a mountain of sunflower yellow rises up just past shoulder height to a peak haloed with soft cinnamon, olive and foggy gray. His gaze is focused into the distance, calm and intense. Steve Coppin’s digital print, “When the Day’s Work is Done,” exudes that 5 o’clock feeling. The common person is Coppin’s muse, and this man has the glow of hard work, successfully concluded. The shadows on his jacket move effortlessly from dark to light. The line work is immaculate, going thick to thin and back again with the accuracy of a master calligrapher. The magnifying glass precision and compasssmooth curves suggest that this print was not created entirely by hand. Since 1997, Coppin has exclusively used computers to create his art. He is a digital printmaker. His work lives entirely on the computer until the instant pigment is sprayed onto smooth, 300-weight rag paper by his Epson Stylus 4880 eightcolor printer. He’s been at it a long time, and now, 40 years after graduating from Humboldt State University’s art program, he is finally making his artistic debut at the Upstairs Art Gallery during Arts! Arcata this Friday. The 18 prints in his show are a lesson in contrast. Angular elements crash into the soft corners of a woman’s arm. The firm, clean contours of an auto hood are held hostage by the complexity of a fireman’s respirator. Relaxed black hoodies and bulging white T-shirts in one print sit comfortably next to another with business suits sharp enough to cut. A Humboldt native, Coppin initially thought engineering was his calling. The boredom of drafting class changed his mind. “It was all guys and everybody was quiet. [We just] sat there for an hour.” It was the early 1970s and Coppin had just returned from two years in the Army. He needed something more exciting, livelier, so he turned to art. With a glint in his eye and a touch of boyish charm, he recalls,

ABOVE, “FIREFIGHTER,” AND LEFT, “SELLING FLOWERS,” DIGITAL PRINTS BY STEVE COPPIN. A RECEPTION FOR THE ARTIST TAKES PLACE FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 6-9 P.M. AT THE UMPQUA BANK UPSTAIRS GALLERY.

“In the art classes there were women, and it was loud and noisy and just a lot more fun!” He’s never looked back. Armed with his art degree and an airbrush, he ended up in Seattle in 1981 with an excellent agent and a keen sense of design. Coppin settled in as a freelance illustrator, creating ads for high-profile clients in the bustling boardrooms of companies like Microsoft and Toyota. After 25 years in advertising, Coppin returned to Humboldt in 2007, “mostly retired,” and eventually settled into a slategray house in Eureka, next door to the one he grew up in. We met there on a foggy afternoon late last month, and nestled into overstuffed red leather chairs. Originals from his advertising days and fine art prints adorned taupe walls. Old-fashioned metal tractors from his boyhood sat stoutly in a glass-fronted armoire. As Coppin talked about why he creates portraits, he wove a big hand through his silver hair, his squinted eyes creasing his temples. “I was never very good at [drawing] people,” he confessed. “I love artists who do people well, so I’ve tried to concentrate on that.” Concentrate he has. Coppin works tirelessly, sometime 10 hours a day, five or six days a week. It’s obvious he’s enjoying making work for himself now, not for clients. He went on: “When I came back from Seattle … I probably went a year or longer before I could do anything I was happy with.” Now, with a new body of work and a fresh style, Coppin is ready to show it off. Since his freelance days, he’s wanted

to do a series of “people working different jobs. It doesn’t have to be somebody special. Just ordinary people doing ordinary things can be interesting.” Many of his distinctive portraits spotlight athletes, builders, farmers, tourists and even banal morning routines. Coppin’s process is borne out of a love for shape. Maybe it’s that small triangle that forms when a woman’s arm is set akimbo. Sometimes it’s the way two hands rest, reflected on the surface of a table. In fact, the shape is so important that little else matters. Those hands? They’re from a stock photograph. That eye? From an advertisement. Each part is simply a building block for an ideal composition that starts in Coppin’s mind and sometimes is roughed out freehand, using soft lead pencil on paper. Next, he says, “I use photographs a lot. I’ve got a big selection of people and faces, and I’ll go through them and combine parts. Sometimes I’ll put a different head on a different figure.” An eye here, a hand there; perhaps a jacket pulled from a manufacturer’s catalog. Coppin has literally hundreds of reference images. Once he finds the proper source, Coppin uses Adobe Illustrator to layer it over his sketch. Commanding a Wacom digital drawing pad, his favorite stylus becomes a scalpel, stripping away the intricate real-life details and leaving only those lines necessary to reveal his subject. Clearly enjoying demonstrating his technique, Coppin stares intently into his 27 inch screen, the shape of an eye filling it entirely. He leans in, squinting and breathing out slowly. In front of him lines appear from quiet taps, strokes and clicks made on the tablet below his

right wrist. As Bob Dylan warbles in the background what was once a digital photograph transforms into a unique drawing, precisely crafted in his exacting, minimalist style. With the eye details taken care of, Coppin closes the source image (saving it for later reference if needed) and begins stitching another image into the drawing. The result is essentially a quilted portrait, expertly assembled from pieced-together parts. All that might change though. Coppin has just bought a camera and plans to start photographing models. One of his prints offers a hint of the future. “Firefigher,” placed squarely in the middle of the exhibit by gallery curator Suk Choo Kim, is the only print that came entirely from one photograph. Every detail is carefully rendered. The myriad shapes and textures mirror the minimalist style of the other prints, yet retain a photographic quality. The spiky shapes and half-dozen grays that make up the fireman’s helmet buckle must have taken at least three to four hours. It’s a tour-de-force in digital imagery; a pure declaration of skill as well as an homage to the profession of firefighting. Whatever his next path, it’s sure to involve working with computers. Coppin is a man in search of scientific precision. “You can’t just do it by hand,” he declares, pointing at a fast stroke of icy white elegantly positioned over one of his portraits. “It’d be really tough to do that perfectly” without using a computer. That crafty glint comes back to his eyes, and he looks over the top of his glasses. With a computer, “you can always mess with something. There’s no excuse for not making it perfect.” ●

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013

17

Second Friday Arts! Arcata Friday, April 12, 6-9 p.m.

Arts! Arcata is Arcata Main Street’s monthly celebration of visual and performing arts, held at more than 30 participating locations in Arcata. Visit www.artsarcata.com for even more information about the event or call (707) 822-4500. ABRUZZI 780 Seventh St. Live music ARCATA ARTISANS COOPERATIVE 883 H St. Patricia Sennott, monotypes and watercolors; Diane Sonderegger, whimsical ceramics; Marsha Mello, intaglio prints. Wine served to benefit the Humboldt Community Breast Health Project. ARCATA CITY HALL*736 F St. Angie Valetutto, photography from Denver, New York City and San Francisco. ARCATA EXCHANGE 813 H St. Celtic art by Ian Herriott. Live music by George Epperson and friends. Wine served to benefit Trails Trust of Humboldt. ARCATA HOLISTIC HEALTH CENTER 940 Ninth St. Nurelle Harrigan, oil paintings. ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Alex and Allyson Grey talk about their work in a 6 p.m. demonstration lecture. $5, all ages. ARCATA PLAZA “All the Colors” on hand drums, “Five Hands” dance team and live painting by Judy Nunes. BUBBLES 1031 H St. Clean Livin’ bluegrass band. CAFÉ BRIO 791 G St. Art by Sarah Lesher and Michael Kahan. CREATIVE REUSE CENTER 101 H St., Suite D. Artwork by Karen L. Kintz, re-boutique artisans and opening party. FIRE ARTS CENTER 520 South G St. #A Spring pottery sale. THE GARDEN GATE 905 H St. Stefan Elliott, oil paintings; the Striped Pig Stringband performs. Wine served to benefit Friends of the Dunes. HUMBREWS 856 10th St. Megan Sandstorm, paintings. LIBATION 761 Eighth St. Sara Starr, watercolors and tiles. Guitarist Duncan Burgess performs.

Small and whimsical raku pieces, including “Working Dogs,” by DIANE SONDEREGGER are featured in April at the ARCATA ARTISANS COOPERATIVE, 833 H St. PHOTOS BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

MAZZOTTI’S 773 Eighth St. Jen Mackey, mixed media. MINOR THEATRE 1001 H St. Work by HSU beginning graphic design students. MOORE’S SLEEPWORLD 876 G St. Sanford Pyron, oil paintings. NATURAL SELECTION 708 Ninth St. Toni Magyar, paintings. NORTH SOLES FOOTWEAR 853 H St. Susan Cooper, silk scarves. OM SHALA YOGA 858 10th St. Ricio Cristal, digital photography and collages. PACIFIC OUTFITTERS 876 G St. Rosalie Thomson, mixed media, Humboldt State music department members performing. PLAZA 808 G St. Ben Schedler, photography. Wine served to benefit the Historical Sites Society of Arcata. REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING COMPANY 550 S G St. E.R. Hedstrom, “Things In Jars and Other Curios,” ink and watercolors. Music by Dogbone.

northcoastjournal.com

performance dance On the Edge of Your Feet

“Stiletto,” in oil on canvas, is among STEFAN ELLIOTT’s paintings of monumental people and animals straddling freeway-scapes. His “Concrete Patterns of Life” show is at the GARDEN GATE, 905 H St., for this month’s Arts Arcata.

ROBERT GOODMAN WINERY 937 10th St. Yuma Lynch, landscape paintings. THE ROCKING HORSE 791 Eighth St. Children’s art from Arcata Elementary School. UPSTAIRS ART GALLERY 1063 G St. Steve Coppin, digital prints. *These venues are open only during regular hours ●

Arts on the Avenue Second Saturday in Rio Dell, 5 to 8 p.m., April 13, at three venues on Wildwood Avenue. The main festivities are at 406 Wildwood Ave., with art plus a 6:30 p.m illustrated historical talk by Jerry Rohde. Additional art is on display in the Wildwood Gallery inside the Rio Dell Pizza Factory, at 195 Wildwood Ave., and in Second Chance Antiques, 117 Wildwood Ave. ●

This year’s choreography concert by HSU dance majors neatly balances technical ensemble work with emotionally immersive solo and duet pieces. The evening is a given for modern dance lovers, but the inclusion of work by theatre-based choreographers Keili Marble and Lizzie Chapman should also make this an appealing event for those who enjoy The Vagina Monologues or The Last Five Years. The university’s annual spring dance showcase, which continues this weekend, includes seven group pieces, three solos and one duet. Last Friday night, the most realized ensemble dance work was arguably in the show opener, Carrie Walpole’s “As One,” which addresses women’s roles and power. (Think Hunger Games without despair, performed to movie music by Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails.) Those with a taste for the edgy may prefer instructor Laura Muñoz’s “Living with Thirst,” in which five disturbed ragdolls are repeatedly crushed by an unseen maleficence, or Kelly-May Roberts’ exploration of evil (or is it anxiety?) in “Best Kept Secret.” The latter uses voice-overs, stage fog, mildly strobing lights and a case of nervous hives to evoke hidden emotional realms. But don’t fret — “Vibora” is here to oscillate your fears away, as dancers become soundwaves inside the soothing melodies of Ian Taylor. Solo work is critical to the strength of this production, with each of the three soloists entering unique territories, untouched by the others. Walpole presents a sinuously emotive solo danced to “This Bitter Earth / On the Nature of Daylight” — bringing a welcome dose of lyricism to the otherwise modern feel. Dani Gutierrez owns enough gravity to hold the rest of the show in orbit; if there’s a superhero hidden in the cast, she’s likely your woman. Her piece is vaguely reminiscent of an Olympic ice skating routine: cohesive and highly charged. Actor/dancer Keili Marble tackles body-loathing in a gutsy exposition of her own flesh, with a little help from Tina Fey and an astute use of stage space. One piece lifted the bar of the evening well above student work: choreographer Lizzie Chapman’s duet, “Innermost Secrets.” This relational diagram of early love and acute vulnerability collapsed distance and time. In three seconds, Walter Fogler became more emotionally engaged than most dancers manage over an entire run, his face as expressive as his feet. Kara Ajetunmobi met his energy with depth, hesitance and tensile strength, creating an unusually beautiful moment between them. Kudos to Greta Stockwell for flawless illumination; dance lovers will appreciate light design that reinforces movement across the stage so clearly. As in past years for this annual show, music selection continues to challenge performers (and audience); that said, some choices were particularly effective. Hear and see it for yourself, Thursday to Saturday, April 18-20, 7:30 p.m. at HSU’s Van Duzer Theatre. Tickets: 826-3928 — Maia Cheli-Colando

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19

• THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNALnorthcoastjournal.com • North Coas

Dark Star Orchestra Monday at the Eureka Theater. photo by Bob Minkin

Green Fire

Humboldt Green Week, Humboldt Fire, The Skatalites, Dark Star Orchestra, fifth of World Famous and an EPIC gala By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

S

o, we’re heading into another Humboldt Green Week. The now-annual celebration heralds the coming of spring and all things green and growing as we approach the stoner holiday 4/20 (April 20), a week from Saturday, and Earth Day, April 22. (It’s a long week.) It’s a collection of loosely related events promoted by a loose assemblage of businesses and nonprofits, some working on ecological issues, some serving the burgeoning indoor/outdoor growing industry, some just music promoters whose patrons like stony, earthy music. As the organizers put it, Green Week “celebrates Humboldt’s passion for gardening, the arts and live music,” any kind of music, from electronica and soul to jambands, reggae and African dance. It begins this weekend with the second annual Humboldt Garden Expo, Saturday and Sunday afternoons (noon to 5 p.m.) at Blue Lake Casino, where you’ll find the latest supplies for whatever it is you want to grow. There’s a parallel Family Arts Day Saturday at the Morris Graves Museum of Art, with kids doing projects with recycled and re-used materials.

20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Then Saturday night Jamaica’s legendary The Skatalites play a Green Week show at the Jambalaya. The Skatalites are the prototypical ska band, the guys who invented the hiccupping genre a long, long time ago — in the early ’60s. At this point most of the original line-up is dead or retired. The exception is Lester Sterling, now 76, a trumpet/sax player who has been playing music professionally since 1957. He helped form The Skatalites in 1964 and was part of the reformation in 1984 when Britain’s two-tone movement renewed interest in ska. The band, still going strong with mostly younger players, just released a new album, Walk With Me. Since DJ Gabe Pressure is a major fan, you know he’ll be there to spin some classic ska 45s, even though Pressure Anya has a second gig that night at the Ritz, part of a whole weekend of shows celebrating Anya‘s birthday. There are a lot more Green Week events this weekend, including tours of Humboldt Regeneration Brewery, a Friends of the Dunes “Get Outside” gear sale on Sunday, and an afternoon of dance with Mami Wata West African Dancers at the Graves, also on Sunday. (See www.

humboldtgreenweek for a full schedule.) And there are more big Green shows next weekend (see next week’s Hum). The other major Green concert this coming week is a Passion show with Dark Star Orchestra on Monday at the Eureka Theater. DSO is the quintessential Grateful Dead tribute, a road tested machine that’s been touring since 1997 with a specific concept. Don’t expect the Dead’s “hits.” As explained on the DSO website, “On any given night the band will perform a show based on a set list from the Grateful Dead’s 30 years of extensive touring,” using that as a launching pad for Deadstyle jams. The show is early (7:30 p.m.), which leaves time for an official afterparty at the Red Fox with funky electrojammers Moo-Got-2. Not officially affiliated with Green Week, but along the same lines: Thursday’s third annual Humboldt Fire Pin-Up Party at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. The local rolling paper company always throws a great bash. This one is a fundraiser for the Humboldt Music Project featuring Snarky Puppy, a very cool jazz/funk/world music collective out of Dallas/Brooklyn with a big sound. Gregg Moore of the Humboldt Music Academy has arranged an afternoon session for interested music types: Show up for sound-check at 4:30 p.m. and a few band members (presumably including founder/bassist Michael League) will explain how the Snarky fusion of genres works. Adding to the fun that night: music by local world music combo Vidagua, dancing by Beat Vixens, juggler Steven Weven‘s Humboldt Fire Rolling Contest, a photo booth, an auction and raffle, and the Humboldt Fire Pinup Girls dressed in 1940s-era attire (the whole party has a ’40s theme). The Humboldt Fire Girls will also be on hand for EPIC’s Spring Gala Saturday at the Arcata Community Center, the annual bash supporting the local green warriors. It starts with a New Orleans-style feast with jambalaya, collard greens and the like (along with appropriate cocktails), but if you’re on a budget you can skip dinner and just come for the (really good) music. The headliner, Petunia and The Vipers, is a truly fine honky tonk combo out of Canada. Anyone remember the late Ray Condo and his Ricochets? The Vipers are some of the same guys, but with Petunia (a dude) out front yodeling and channeling Jimmie Rodgers, Elvis and Woody Guthrie. Sharing the bill: Sour Mash Hug Band, a quartet from San Francisco, now based out of New Orleans, with a red hot mix of ragtime, gypsy jazz, klezmer and jug band music. Epic fun all around.        Mochipet, the EDM producer in the cute dino suit, returns to Humboldt Thursday for a different sort of show at Nocturnum. He explains, “The new live show is an ever expanding project I

started working on this year. I basically got tired of doing the Ableton Live/DJ thing that’s become so prevalent today, so I started incorporating more instruments, visual projections and other secret gadgets to my set.” He’s touring with Zoogma, an improvising EDM-meets-rock quartet; Selector Science opens. Same Thursday at the Jambalaya, Sound Culture 004 brings more electro-beats with Hellfire Machina, Zaggasaurus, Piper and Astro Tarot filling the dance floor. World Famous party-master Matty Roberts marks the fifth anniversary of World Famous Productions Friday with a really big show at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. It starts during Arts Arcata (6 p.m.) with an art talk by mystic visionary artist Alex Grey and his wife Allyson. Later it’s a blast of electronica by some WFP faves, EPROM, Andreilien, B. Bravo and The Starship Connection, with Alex and Allyson back for live art, visuals by Johnathan Singer, lights by Beams, ambiance by Ambird and bass-heavy sound by Basscraft. In between there’s an exclusive catered dinner/meet ‘n’ greet where you can hang with the whole crew; check www.worldfamousparty.com for details. Soulful Humboldt expat Berel Alexander returns for a live recording session at the Red Fox Thursday backed by cellist Mike Lee and keys king B-Swizlo among others. Berel’s buddies Jesi Naomi and The BoomKats open. The ComiX Trip Tea Party on Friday at HSU’s Campus Center for Appropriate Technology is another fundraiser, for the in-progress ComiX Trip movie with comedians, Knee High Puppet Co. and music by Green & Lilac, Lyndsey Battle and Ka’le Dreams, plus a bit of ComiX Trip. Friday is Arts Arcata night, which means some of the usual suspects all over town. Around the time the art walk wraps up (9ish) you can catch the amazing Senegalese kora player Youssoupha Sidibe and his band The Mystic Rhythms at Om Shala Yoga above Humboldt Brews. HSU’s various jazz combos play two concerts Friday night in Fulkerson Recital Hall, first up (at 7 p.m.) three bands: The No-Chordtet, Twice Around The Thing and Matt Engleman’s Musical Man Family Friendly Gang Band. Part two (at 9 p.m.) has two bands: The Hip Replacements and La Musique Diabolique. You can also hear La Musique Diabolique on Saturday at the Arcata Library, where the gypsy jazzers play for a jazzy book sale. Ready for some wild ass country-ish rock? Brett The Truck plays a rare full band show Saturday night at the Logger Bar with Gunsafe opening. Saturday is also the launch of what may be the greenest thing around, the Arcata Farmers’ Market. Opening day music comes from Cajun faves The Bayou Swamis. Laissez les bon temps roulette! l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

21

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Absynth Quintet WhiteWater Ramble 9:30pm $10

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Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

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EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093 EUREKA THEATER 612 F St. FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852 HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739 HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

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ComiX Trip Tea Party Fundraiser 7pm $5

On The Edge of Your Feet 7:30p $8/$10

JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata

Hellfire Machina, Astro Tarot 10pm

Flashback Fridays w/ Pressure Anya DJs 10pm

The Skatalites w/ Elephant Dub Squad 9pm

LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596

HSU Jazz & Classical Guitar Players 7pm Duncan Burgess (guitar) art by Sara Starr

Tim Randles Jazz Band 7pm

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DJ Lost (dance music) 10pm

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Karaoke Night 9pm-1am 21+

RED LION 1929 4th Ave. Eureka Beer and Cheese Pairing with Cypress Grove

Arts Arcata feat. Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm

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22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

Week of the Young Child Calendar of Events in Humboldt County

April 13–21, 2013 THE WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD™ IS AN ANNUAL CELEBRATION SPONSORED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN (NAEYC).

Saturday, April 13

Eureka: “Cub Club – Animal Babies!” 9am-Noon. $25. Hands-on activities, stories, games, theater and art for 5-7 year olds. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., 441-4217. Eureka: Meet CLIFFORD the BIG RED DOG, Noon-2pm. Free. Arts, crafts, and games. Tailwaggers Thrift Shop parking lot, 2904 F St., 445-0813. Rio Dell: Storytime and Nursery Rhymes, 11-11:30am. Rio Dell Branch Library, 715 Wildwood Ave., 764-3333.

Monday, April 15

Arcata: Playgroup at Arcata Play Center, 10am-Noon. No fee, suggested $3 donation. D Street Neighborhood Center, 14th & D Streets, 822-7091. Eureka: Playgroup at F.U.N. Play Center, 9am-11:30am. Crafts, circle time, snack. No fee, suggested $3 donation. Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, 441-4244. Manila: Parents in Partnership, 5-7pm. Parent support group, childcare, activities and dinner. Donations accepted. Manila TWV Family Resource Center, Rm H. Manila Dunes Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive, 444-9771. McKinleyville: Play Group, 10am-12:30pm. No fee, suggested $3 donation. McKinleyville Activity Center, 1705 Gwin Road, 839-9003. Willow Creek: Playgroup-Playschool, 9-11:30am. Trinity Valley Elementary School, next to gym, (530) 629-3141.

Tuesday, April 16

Arcata: Playgroup at Arcata Tiny Tots Playgroup, 9-11am. No fee, bring snacks. Arcata United Methodist Church, 1761 11th St., 822-1963. Blue Lake: Playgroup, 10am-Noon. No fee, donations accepted. Prasch Hall (skating rink)/Perigot Park, 312 South Railroad Ave., 668-4281. Bridgeville: Playgroup, 1-3pm. No fee, donations accepted. Bridgeville School (Head Start Rm), 38717 Kneeland Road, 777-1775. Ferndale: Pajama Story Hour with bedtime stories, 7-7:45pm. Ferndale Branch Library, 807 Main St., 786-9559. Fortuna: Storytime with Umpqua staff, 10:30am. Fortuna Branch Library, 753 14th St., 725-3460 or 725-2070. Hoopa: Family Math Night, 5-7pm. Dinner provided. Free. Ages 0 to eighth grade and families. Hoopa Elementary School, Hwy 96, (530) 625-5600. Hoopa: First Five Playgroup, 5-6:30pm. No fee. Two Rivers Community Day School, Rm 4, Hwy 96, (530) 625-5685. McKinleyville: Playgroup, 10am-12:30pm. No fee, suggested $3 donation. McKinleyville Activity Center, 1705 Gwin Road, 839-9003. Miranda: Playgroup, 10-11:30am. Free activities and snack. South Fork, East Campus Room. 923-1147. Shelter Cove Playgroup, 10am-Noon. Free activities and snack. Community Center, Suite B, 923-1147.

Friday, April 19

& oPen HoUSe thurs., April 11 • 5:30pm Childcare Available Special offerings:

Home School In House Meal Program Spanish • 4-H Animal Program Handwork • Music • P.E. Kindergarten Half or Full Day

Mattole Valley Charter School

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Eureka: Library Storytime, 10am, All ages. Eureka Main Library, 1313 3rd St., 269-1900. Eureka: Friends of Young Child Annual Awards, 6:30-8pm. Free. Recognition of unsung heroes in the children’s services field. Light snacks, desserts, punch, entertainment provided. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St., 445-4383. Sponsored by Humboldt Association for the Education of Young Children. Fortuna: Preschool Storytime, 10:30-11am. Fortuna Branch Library, 753 14th St., 725-3460 or 725-2070. Fortuna: CLIFFORD the BIG RED DOG, 6:30-8:30pm. Free. Arts, crafts, and games. Multi-Generational Center, 2280 Newberg Road, 445-0813. McKinleyville: Playgroup, 10am-12:30pm. No fee, suggested $3 donation. McKinleyville Activity Center, 1705 Gwin Road, 839-9003. Rio Dell: Playgroup, 10am-Noon. No fee. Rio Dell Early Head Start Building, 95 Center St., 764-5239. Willow Creek: Playgroup, 10am-12:30pm. No fee. Trinity Valley Elementary School, Rm 15, (530) 629-3141.

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Arcata: Storytime, 11am. Arcata Branch Library in the meeting rm, 500 7th Street, 822-5954. Arcata: Playgroup at Arcata Play Center, 10am-Noon. No fee, suggested $3 donation. D Street Neighborhood Center, 14th & D Sts., 822-7091. Casterlin: Playgroup, 11am-1pm. No fee. Activities and snacks. Casterlin School, Rm 5, 24790 Alderpoint Road, Blocksburg. 923-1147. Eureka: Discovery Museum Playgroup, 10am-11am. No fee. 517 Third Street, 443-9694 Eureka: Playgroup at F.U.N. Play Center, 9-11:30am. Crafts, circle time and snacks. No fee, donations accepted. Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, 441-4244. Eureka: Family Literacy Night, 6:30-8:30pm. Humboldt Literacy Project and Humboldt County Library. Eureka Main Library, 1313 3rd St., 269-1900. Garberville: Children’s Storytime, 1-2pm. Garberville Branch Library, 715 Cedar St., 923-2230. Hoopa: Meet CLIFFORD the BIG RED DOG, 1-2pm. Free. Arts, crafts, and games. Gymnasium at Hoopa Tribal Neighborhood Facility, Hwy 96, 445-0813 or (530) 625-5685.

Thursday, April 18

FALL 2013

Child Development Lab at Humboldt State University has openings for children 2 years 9 months up to 5 years in age. We are a unique, nationally accredited preschool program offering a rich variety of learning experiences for children. For further information and enrollment materials please contact 707-826-3475.

on o ri ng P

Arcata: Playgroup at Arcata Play Center, 10am-Noon. No fee, suggested $3 donation. D Street Neighborhood Center, 14th & D Streets, 822-7091. Arcata: HSU Museum of Natural History, 10am-5pm. Tues. through Sat. Adults $3, child, student, senior $2. 1315 G St., 826-4479. Fortuna: Grandparents and Books, 3-4:30pm. Fortuna Branch Library, 753 14th St., 725-3460 or 725-2070. Hoopa: First Five Playgroup, 10-Noon. No fee. Two Rivers Community Day School, Rm 4, Hwy 96, (530) 625-5685. Redway: Meet CLIFFORD the BIG RED DOG, 10-11:30 am. Free. Arts, crafts and games. Redway Elementary School, Multipurpose Rm. 445-0813. Redway: Fun and Games Class, 10-11am. Redway School gym, 344 Humboldt Ave., 923-1147. Trinidad: Tots Playgroup, 9-11:30am. No fee, suggested donation $1/hour. Trinidad Town Hall, 834-8720. Willow Creek: Playgroup-Playschool, 9-11:30am. Trinity Valley Elementary School, room next to gym, (530) 629-3141.

Hoopa: Share A Story, 4-5pm. Stories, activities and crafts. Each family receives a book. Hoopa Branch Library: Kim Yerton Memorial Library, Loop Road and Orchard Street, 530) 625-5082. McKinleyville: Storytime, 1pm. McKinleyville Branch Library, 1606 Pickett Road, 839-4459. Willow Creek: Playgroup-Playschool, 9-11:30am. Trinity Valley Elementary School, next to gym, (530) 629-3141. Willow Creek: Meet CLIFFORD the BIG RED DOG, 9:30-11:30am. Free. Arts, crafts, and games. Trinity Valley Elementary School, multipurpose room, 445-0813.

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Saturday, April 20

Crescent City: Youth and Family Fair. Meet CLIFFORD the BIG RED DOG, 11am-2pm. Free. Arts, crafts, and games. Del Norte Fair grounds, 445-0813. Hoopa: Earth Day – First Five Hoopa Play Group, 1pm, Hoopa Community Garden near Two Rivers Community Day School, Hwy 96, (530) 625-5685.

Sunday, April 21

Eureka: Sequoia Park Zoo FREE DAY 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 3414 W St, 441-4263.

special pullout section

May 9, 2013 edition

Send us your list of events by April 18! calendar@northcoastjournal.com

mattolevalley.com • (707) 629-3634

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013

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The Eureka Chamber Music Series presents THE AMPHION QUARTET in concert Friday at Calvary Lutheran Church. The award-winning ensemble’s program includes works by Franz Schubert and Edvard Grieg, an adaptation of an unfinished Schubert work by Bruce Adolphe and Leos Janacek’s stunning String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters.”

The tall ships LADY WASHINGTON and HAWAIIAN CHIEFTAIN sail into Humboldt Bay and dock at the Adorni Center this week. The ships present sailing and dockside education programs to local students, walk-on tours starting Saturday and public sailing excursions. Plus, they engage in mock battle.

San Francisco-based all-female quartet BLAME SALLY returns to the Arcata Playhouse Tuesday on a CD release tour for the new album, Speeding Ticket and a Valentine.

11 thursday EVENTS

Humboldt Fire Pin Up Party 3. 10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A 1940s themed costume party featuring Snarky Puppy, Vidagua, Beat Vixens and comedy by Sherae O’Shaughnessy. $25/$20 in advance. www. arcatatheater.com.

THEATER

It Was A Dark and Stormy Night. 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. Arcata High Drama Department presents a classic who-done-it mystery. josharbaugh1@ gmail.com. Into the Woods Junior. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High School Auditorium, 1300 Murray Road. The Brothers Grimm go Broadway in a musical fairy tale mash-up. 839-1549. Marx in Soho. 7 p.m. Native Forum, BSS Building, HSU. Bob Weick portrays Karl Marx in a play by historian Howard Zinn.

DANCE

On the Edge of Your Feet: HSU Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Modern dance pieces by dance studies students and faculty choreographers. Sharon Butcher, artistic director. $10/$8 students and seniors. hsustage.blogspot.com. See review page 19. 826-3928.

ETC.

Mad River Water Use Options. 5:30-7 p.m. BSS Room 166, HSU. Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District General Manager Carol Rische and civil engineer Sheri Woo discuss water use options to protect water rights, rates and the long term health of the Mad River watershed. www. schatzlab.org. 826-4345. Humboldt Inventors’ Club. 6:30-8 p.m. Eureka. Meadows Community Center between Myrtle and Harris, across from Myrtletown Market. Topics include provisional patents, patent search, marketability. joetwohig@ gmail.com. 267-0775. Humboldt Handweavers and Spinners Guild. 7 p.m.

Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Kathleen Sartorius on making items using shells, pine nuts and other local materials. Journey into the Soul of the Torah. 7-8 p.m. Chabad Center, 453 Bayside Court #E. Torah studies with Rabbi Eliyahu Cowen, introductory session free. JewishHumboldt.com/torahstudies. 633-8770.

12 friday THEATER

The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. North Coast Repertory Theatre presents William Shakespeare’s classic work. $15/$12 students and seniors. ncrt.net. 442-6278. Into the Woods Junior. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High. See April 11 listing.

MUSIC

World Famous Fifth Aniversary. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. All ages art talk by Alex and Allyson Grey at 6 p.m. EDM at 9:30 p.m. (21+) with EPROM, Andrelien, B Bravo and the Starship Connection. $30. worldfamousparty.com. Humboldt Talent Showcase. 6-10 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 510 S. Westhaven Drive, Trinidad. Open mic night hosted by Joe Garceau. $5/$10 sliding scale. 616-5327. The Comix Trip Mad Hatter Tea Party. 7 p.m. Campus Center for Appropriate Technology, HSU. Benefit for The Comix Trip movie with music by Green & Lilac, Lyndsey Battle, Ka’le Dreams, stand-up comedy by

continued on page 31

Hug a Poet Today California Poets in the Schools, which puts poets-in-residence in schools for short or long-term stints, was founded in 1964 — the same year many other wondrous things happened, including passage of the national Civil Rights and Wilderness acts. Hm, maybe there’s some synergy in those coincidences. A program, you might say, was created to haul poets out of the howling wilderness and grant them a level standing in the world — to pop them proudly into classrooms to lead agile, sensitive young minds through the paces of poetic expression. Yeah, well, sounds good. But today’s poets in the schools still need money to do all this equal-opportunity poetic coaching of, according to the program’s wesbite, some 25,000 students annually “in hundreds of public and private schools, juvenile halls, after-school programs, hospitals, and other community settings.”

Julie Hochfeld, a local poet participant, says the program has been in Humboldt County for 30 years, and today reaches 1,000 students. Poets in the schools are funded with a mixture of federal, state and private contributions. That last bit’s where you — reader, word-lover, idea-seeker — come in. Every year, the local poets-in-residence apply for matching state grants. And then they gather up the match from kind-hearted, poetloving citizens. Friday, April 12, at 7 p.m., Hochfeld joins fellow poets Jerry Martien, Celia Homesley, Daryl Chinn, Dan Brewer and Dan Zev Levinson in a poetry reading at Northtown Books, 957 H St., in Arcata. Yep, it’s a benefit for California Poets in the Schools. There’s no charge, but donations are encouraged. — Heidi Walters

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continued from page 29 Anderson, Knee High Puppet Co., and The Comix Trip. $5/$15 sliding scale. HSU Jazz Combos. 7 and 9 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Five groups in two different shows, playing in a variety of jazz styles. $7/$3 students and seniors. hsumusic.blogspot.com. 826-3928. The Amphion Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Calvary Lutheran Church, 716 South Ave., Eureka. Eureka Chamber Music Series presents the award-winning quartet performing work by Schubert, Grieg and Janacek. $30/$5 students. eurekachambermusic.org. Melodies for the Masses. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Apprentice Entertainment teen event with UFO8, The Echidnas, Klez Encounters of the Fez Kind, magic tricks, etc. $5. 822-1575.

DANCE

On the Edge of Your Feet: HSU Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 11 listing.

SPOKEN WORD

California Poets in the Schools Reading. 7 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Humboldt poets Jerry Martien, Celia Homesley, Daryl Chinn, Dan Brewer, Julie Hochfeld and Dan Zev Levinson read their work in support of California Poets in the Schools. cpits.org.

BOOKS

Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Spring cleaning: books at half the usual low prices. Friday for Friends of the Library members only, join on site. co.humboldt.ca.us/library/branches/eureka. 269-1900.

ETC.

The Heart of Change. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The Link, 1385 Eighth St., Arcata. Free workshop, an introduction to successful change management, creating positive change within an organization. www.the-link.us/events. 822-0597. Humboldt Sponsors Award Day. 3 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Humboldt Sponsors presents $94,800 in grants to benefit Humboldt County youth organizations. Mattole Valley Charter School Open House. 5:30-7:30 p.m. 2120 Capton Road, Suite H, Eureka. Find out if the charter school can provide the educational experience your child needs. www.mattolevalley.com. 476-8406. Meet the Doulas. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Om Shala Yoga Center, 858 10th St., Arcata. Expectant families meet local doulas and hear about services they offer. omshalayoga.com/ meet-the-doulas. 822-2663. Landscapes and Wildlife of Ethiopia. 7:30 p.m. Humboldt County Office of Education, 901 Myrtle Ave., Eureka. Audubon Society slide show talk by Jude Power and Ken Burton on birds and landscape of Ethiopia.

13 saturday EVENTS

Arcata Plaza Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores delight: homegrown produce and meat, plants, flowers, food court, Cajun music by The Bayou Swamis at 10 a.m. Tall Ships. 4 p.m. Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain are back in town. www.historicalseaport.org. 800-200-5239.

Stayin Alive Saturday: Health and Preparedness. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Disco themed Red Cross preparedness fair with first aid, CPR training, fires safety, etc. 443-4521. Sheri Whitt: Funeral Consumer Alliance. 1-3 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Grief counselor Sheri Whitt speaks at annual Funeral Consumer Alliance meeting. 223-6867. Timber Heritage Roadhouse Rendezvous. 5 p.m. Fortuna River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive. Dinner benefit for Timber Heritgae Association. $50/$400 table of eight. timberheritage.org. 443-2957. EPIC Spring Gala with Petunia and the Vipers. 8 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. EPIC benefit features honky tonk heroes Petunia and the Vipers and a jugband, Sour Mash Hug Band. Come early for dinner at 6 p.m. $15 music only/$40 with dinner. wildcalifornia.org.

THEATER

Cirque Du Shwazee. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Giant puppets, stilt walkers, clown variety show plus dancing to the College of the Redwoods Swing Band. Benefit for Playhouse youth programs. $15/$10 kids. amytetzlaff@hotmail.com. 822-1575. Murder Mystery Party. 8 p.m., Hotel Arcata, 708 Ninth St. Interactive murder mystery with a “totally ‘80s slumber party” theme. The daughters of a mob boss invite friends and enemies to a co-ed sleepover. Someone will die before dessert. $15, $10 students. 223-4127. Murderbydessert.com Into the Woods Junior. 7 p.m. McKinleyville High. See April 11 listing. The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. See April 12 listing.

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Death We’re all hurtling toward death, every minute of every day. Some Buddhists teach that fully grasping our transience, knowing we could go in an instant, is one key to living fully in each of our fleeting moments. At the end of all those moments, though, the people we love will have to deal with life after we’re gone. And for that, the Funeral Consumer Alliance of Humboldt wants to help with everything from advance directives to advice on grieving. The group’s annual meeting, on Saturday afternoon in Bayside, features a talk by Sherri Whitt, a licensed marriage and family therapist who has helped many people deal with losses in their lives. “Not only is grief something that is survivable, but it can sometimes even be transformational in a positive way,” Whitt says. Everyone comes at loss differently, she says, but it can often help to lean on others for support, rather than grieving in isolation. And people shouldn’t necessarily expect to “get over it,” at least in the sense that “there will come a time when they no longer feel pain about that death and it will just be OK. There is a lot of time when that is true, but particularly with significant losses, there are always those tender moments that might arise.” The Funeral Consumer Alliance meets from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 13, at the Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. — Carrie Peyton Dahlberg

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Arcata Friends of the Library Book Sale. 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Library, 500 Seventh St. Book sale with a jazz theme: Jazz storytime 11 a.m. Live gypsy jazz by La Musique Diabolique 11:45 a.m.

LECTURE

MUSIC

Silk Road Junction 101. 7:30 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. Sarah McClimon and Rahman Adbur explore rhythms and melodies of Asia and the United States. $10/$8 students and seniors. fortunaconcertseries.com. 682-6092. Eureka Symphony Spring Youth Concert. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. Program includes classics from Greig and Saint-Saens, Harry Potter film music, and concerto performances by winners of Eureka Symphony Youth Competition: Olivia Gerving on violin, Matthew LaBelle on trumpet, and Owen Reiss on piano. $19/$9 students and seniors. www.eurekasymphony. com. 442-1956.

DANCE

On the Edge of Your Feet . 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 11 listing.

ART

Left Over Stitches: Fiber Craft Exchange. 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Eureka Women’s Club, 1531 J St. Buy or sell excess sewing and crafting supplies, fabric, patterns, yarn, buttons, thread, etc. www.origindesignlab.com. 822-3041.

OUTDOORS

Birding on the Arcata Marsh. 8:30 a.m. Meet at South I Street parking lot. Audubon field trip led by Larry Karsteadt rain or shine. Bring binoculars for birding. Janes Creek Meadows Work Day. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet at corner of St. Louis Road and Janes Creek Meadows Drive to help battle Janes Creek invasives. Plants of Headwaters Forest. 10 a.m.-noon. Elk River Trailhead parking lot of Elk River Road. BLM botanist Jennifer Wheeler leads an easy plant identification walk into Headwaters Forest, co-sponsored by California Native Plant Society. E-mail LevineL@northcoast.com. Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Elliott Dabill leads free 90-minute tour of the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary. 826-2359. Perch’n on the Peninsula. 4 p.m. Peninsula School, 909 Vance Ave. Oyster/fish fry and surfperch fishing tournament fundraiser benefits Samoa Peninsula Fire District. $20 to register for tournament, 6-9 a.m. at school or call for details. $5. 499-7088. Earth Day Park Cleanup Registration Deadline. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Volunteer in advance for Earth Day. calparks.org/earthday. 888-987-2757.

BOOKS

Friends of the Eureka Library Spring Book Sale. 10 a.m.2:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library. See April 12 listing.

CAP’N ZACH’S CRAB HOUSE

Rio Dell and Scotia Long Ago. 6:30-8 p.m. Rio Dell Community. Illustrated talk by historian Jerry Rodhe in conjunction with monthly Eagle Prairie Arts District Art Walk (5-8 p.m.). www.facebook.com/info.epad.

FOR KIDS

Boys and Girls Club 75th Anniversary. Teen Center, Harris and J streets, Eureka. Open house with bounce house, challenge course, nachos buffet, face painting, music by DJ L Boogie. Family Arts Day with Polly the Pink Panda. 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Polly the Pink Panda from Trinity Ballet Academy kicks off an afternoon of ballet and art. $5. 442-0278.

14 sunday WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD

April 14-20. Annual celebration sponsored by National Association for the Education of Young Children. See full listings of local activities for kids on page 27.

EVENTS

Creative Transformation of Space Into Place. 1-7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. All day workshop on rebuilding neighborhoods wiith Mark Lakeman, cofounder of Portland’s City Repair Project. E-mail andrea.lanctot@ gmail.com. 599-0632.

THEATER

The Tempest matinee. 2 p.m. North Coast Rep. See April 12 listing. Into the Woods Junior matinee. 2 p.m. McKinleyville High. See April 11 listing.

MUSIC

Twiztids Abominationz 2013 Tour. 7 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Horrorcore hip hop by Twizted, (Hed) P.E., Potluck, Liquid Assassin and Lower Level. $25. www.twiztid.com. 923-3368. Eureka Symphony Spring Youth Concert. 8 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts. See April 13 listing.

DANCE

Mami Wata West African Dance Troupe. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Humboldt Arts Council presents an afternoon of West African dance in association with Humboldt Green Week. $5. /www.facebook. com/HACMGMA. 442-0278.

OUTDOORS

Humboldt Bay Wildlife Refuge Field Trip. 9 a.m. Hum-

boldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Leisurely two- to three-hour trip intended for those wanting to learn birds of the Humboldt Bay area. 822-3613. Outdoor Gear Sale. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Friends of the Dunes benefit includes a used outdoor gear sale, music by The Spin Drifters, food, beer, games and a guided nature walk. $1. www.friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Conifers on Campus. 1-3 p.m. Meet by HSU greenhouse. Guided walk with Dennis Walker, who created the remarkable conifers collection at HSU.

FOOD

Mad River Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Mad River Grange, 110 Hatchery Road, Blue Lake. The usual: eggs, ham or sausage, toast or pancakes. $4/$2 kids 6-12. 668-1906.

FOR KIDS

Art2-D2’s guide to Folding and Doodling Event. 2 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. A kids arts and crafts event centered around the new book, part of the Origami Yoda Star Wars series. 822-2834.

ETC.

Tall Ships. Adorni Recreation Center. Adventure Sail on Hawaiian Chieftain, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. $39. Free Intro to Argentine Tango. 7-8 p.m. Veterans Memorial Building, 1018 H St., Eureka. tangodelsol.net. 858-205-9832.

15 monday EVENTS

Tall Ships. 4 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center. See April 13 listing.

MUSIC

Dark Star Orchestra. 8 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. The ultimate Grateful Dead tribute, in association with Humboldt Green Week. $30. passionpresents.com.

16

tuesday

EVENTS

Tall Ships. 4 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center. See April 13 listing.

MUSIC

Blame Sally. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. San Francisco-based all-female folk-rock band returns. $15/$13 students and seniors. 822-1575.

ART

CR Student Exhibition “Chimera.” 4-7 p.m. College of the

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Apr. 13 - 17

Sun Apr 14 - 9 (2009) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG-13 Mon Apr 15 - Banff Mountain Film Festival Doors at 6 p.m. $20/$15/$10 All ages Tues Apr 16 - Banff Mountain Film Festival Doors at 6 p.m. $20/$15/$10 All ages Wed Apr 17 - Sci Fi Night ft. Ganjasaurus Rex (1987) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free

(707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET • EUREKA MONDAY-SATURDAY 11:30AM-9:00PM

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

continued from previous page

MOVIES

It Was A Dark and Stormy Night. 7 p.m. Arcata High School. See April 11 listing. The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. See April 12 listing.

ETC.

E-LIXXER: A Night Of Electronic Music. 7 p.m.-midnight. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Night of electronic music with Købé, TAEO, ONHELL, Photon and Cestladore. vjg9@ humboldt.edu. Midnite. 10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Bonus presents St. Croix’s premier roots reggae band for Green Week, sponsored by NHS. Stevie Culture opens. $30/$28 advance. www.bonusman.info.

Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. jesse-wiedel@ redwoods.edu. The Lady from Shanghai. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Based on the Book film series presents the Orson Welles crime classic with Rita Hayworth as a beautiful femme fatale. Host: Phillip Wright. Doula! The Ultimate Birth Companion. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Om Shala Yoga Center, 858 10th St., Arcata. Film shows doula-supported births in close-up detail, followed by discussion. $5. 822-2663.

MUSIC

Cutten Walkability Assessment. 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Winship Middle School, 2500 Cypress, Eureka. Intended to help community members address traffic safety concerns near three Cutten schools: Winship, Glen Paul School and Cutten Elementary. Call for details: 269-2062.

MOVIES

17 wednesday MOVIES

Humboldt Film Festival Day One: Experimental and Animation. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The oldest studentrun film festival around begins with a program of animation and experimental films. $5. www.hsufilmfestival.com. Ganjasaurus Rex. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. SCi-fi Pint ‘n Pizza night features a made-in-Humboldt tale of pot growers, CAMP and a prehistoric pot. 822-1220.

ETC.

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

calendar

Sat Apr 13 - Fortunate Youth, Inna Vision Doors at 9:30 p.m. $12/$10 21+

Senior Action Coalition. 11:30 a.m. Jefferson School, 1000 B St., Eureka. Potluck lunch gathering to work on issues of importance to the aging. Monthly Grange Meeting. 6 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Get your community involvement on. E-mail dowsgrange@gmail. com. 840-0100. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Help pass an ordinance requiring Eureka employers with 25 or more workers to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Women’s Healing Alternatives. 7-8:30 p.m. Moonrise Herbs, 826 G St., Arcata. www.gailkennylifecoach.com. 677-0515. Tall Ships. 4 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center. Evening sail on Lady Washington, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. $29.

18 thursday AND

OPEN 365 DAYS

EVENTS Godwit Days. Field trips for the annual birding festival begin today. Check www.godwitdays.org foir details.

THEATER

Large phó $799 443-6812 • 5AM-9:30PM 2916 Central at Henderson, Eureka www.HappyDonutsAsianFood.com

Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind: 30 NeoFuturists Plays. 7:30 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium, 1915 J St. The EHS Players present 30 plays in under one hour. ehsplayers.com. 441-2508. A Harvest of Stones. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Tragic, poetic story of a farmer struggling to hold onto his land in the face of drought, debt and ecological disaster, presented by Dell’Arte second-year MFA students. E-mail meghan@dellarte.com. 668-5663.

NORTH Coast COAST JourNal JOURNAL •• thursday, THURSDAY, april APRIL 11, 11, 2013 2013 •• northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 34 North

Humboldt Film Festival Day Two: Documentaries. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The oldest student-run film festival around continues with a program of documentary films. $5. 826-4113.

LECTURE

Human Dimensions in Environmental Management. 5:30-7 p.m. BSS Room 166, HSU. Sustainable Futures Series presents Laurie Richmond on how natural resource dependent communities navigate political and ecological change. humboldt.edu/envcomm/speaker_series. 826-3653. An Adventure in Ghana. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Louisa Rogers discusses her time in rural Ghana, sponsored by Agricultural Cooperative Development International/Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance, training tractor owners on business development. co.humboldt.ca.us/library/events. Three Dimensional Universes. 7:30 p.m. Science B Room 135, HSU. Kieval Lecture with mathematician Abigail Thompson of UC Davis on three-dimensional universes and knot theory.

MEETINGS

Redwood Region Audubon Society. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Discuss local and biggerpicture conservation topics with others interested in environmental issues. ●

Do you tweet obsessively? So do we. Follow us. @ncj_of_humboldt

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

JaNe levy gives us her “uh-oh” faCe iN Evil DEad.

By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com  

Reviews

EVIL DEAD opens hard: A young girl  wanders a forlorn landscape until two  hillbillies throw a sack over her head and  haul her into a basement filled with dead  cats. A shifty witch intones spells from a  sinister book. The girl’s actually harboring a demon; the only way to free her is  cleansing fire. So her father sets her alight,  tells her he loves her as the evil inhabitant  cackles and howls, then blows her head  off with a shotgun. Smash cut to the main  title sequence. It’s a fitting beginning to a movie  that attempts to retell one of the most  revered stories in horror cinema. It would  have been foolhardy, if not impossible,  to try to out-camp Sam Raimi’s 1981 cult  touchstone The Evil Dead (followed by  1987’s Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn and  1992’s Army of Darkness). Rather than  attempting to re-make Raimi’s creation,  writer-director Fede Alvarez (with help  from co-writers Rodo Sayagues and an  unbilled Diablo Cody) has made a clever  homage that successfully honors and  updates the source material. After the mildly shocking, darkly comic  (it is funny, trust me) opening, the narrative moves into familiar territory: a group  of young people gathering at a remote  cabin in the woods. They’ve gotten together to try to help Mia (Jane Levy) kick  her dope habit with a cold turkey weekend. The accomplices include her brother  David (Shiloh Fernandez) and his girlfriend  Natalie (Elizabeth Blackmore), plus high  school teacher Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci) and  his companion Olivia (Jessica Lucas). Just as Mia’s withdrawal symptoms begin to play tricks on her, genuinely weird  things start happening in and around the  cabin. In the cabin’s basement the gang  discovers the aforementioned dead cats, 

Fresh Bloodbath

many it will be impossible to watch. I can sympathize; it took me a while to settle in and enjoy myself. But ultimately I did, very much. (Incidentally, Sam Raimi and Bruce Campbell like it too: they executive-produced). R. 91m. JURASSIC PARK 3D. I rarely revisit mid-period Steven Spielberg stuff. I can go back and easily enjoy his early work, and in the past decade he’s made some of the best movies of his career. In the mid-1990s, though, he was starting to outgrow his affable-storyteller mode, and I was starting to outgrow him. Jurassic Park was the last gasp, for a while, of my infatuation with the simple pleasures of Spielberg movies. I was engrossed by Michael Crichton’s book, and the movie is a better-than-average adaptation. But within months I, like so many others, had seen Pulp Fiction and unceremoniously turned my back on movies as accessible as Spielberg’s. I realize now the folly and pretension of that attitude: Spielberg is a craftsman to rival anybody who’s ever made movies. As an angsty, wannabe-arthouse teenager, I didn’t have any business pontificating on my misperceptions of simplicity in the guy’s work. Twenty years later, I can see Jurassic Park differently. Granted, I had to use 3D glasses, which neither add nor detract from the effect. More to the point, I now appreciate Spielberg’s ability to tell stories with a youthful sense of wonder and fun. When he made this movie, he was already over two decades in as a director, and yet it has all the energy and surprise of Duel, even Raiders. It’s not his best work, but it has aged surprisingly well. PG13. 127m. — John J. Bennett

Evil returns in an ultraviolent homage to a camp-horror classic shotgun and sinister book, which, bound in human flesh, is now shrouded in garbage bags and barbed wire. Mia’s freakout escalates, her flight attempt fails, and as night falls on the cabin things get very bad very quickly. Horror, especially of the torture-porn sub-genre, isn’t really my thing. I don’t mind viscera and buckets of blood, but I need them to be in service of a solid story, hopefully with a sense of humor. Evil Dead has both, but it’s also unabashedly of the new school of ultraviolent horror movie-making. For that, and for the fact that I love the originals so much, this was a bit of a hard sell for me. My preconceptions were in the way. And once the nasty business in the cabin gets going, it escalates unrelentingly. At one point, for example, a possessed girl bisects her own tongue with a box-cutter — not for the faint of heart. But as I watched, it all started to make sense. Alvarez and company approached this remake in a smart, sensible way. They obviously revere the originals and knew they could never replace them. Ditto the bizarrely commanding screen presence of Bruce Campbell, who played the now legendary protagonist Ash. So instead, they made the story the main character, relying on it — and their admittedly inventive lacerations and dismemberments — to keep our eyes on the screen. They bring a new but familiar sense of humor to the proceedings, making us laugh uncomfortably even as we’re squirming away, trying not to watch but doing it anyway. And, in a deeply satisfying act of homage, they’ve retained some of the canonical elements of Raimi’s creation. Mia tries to escape in a station wagon, there’s an evil hand in play, the camera careens crazily through the woods, and a chainsaw becomes very important late in the movie. I should probably reiterate that this thing is an absolute bloodbath, and for

Previews

42. This Jackie Robinson biopic, written and directed by Brian Helgeland (A Knight’s Tale), follows the historic signing of the first black man to play in the major leagues. PG13. 88m. SCARY MOVIE V. With both Lindsay Lohan and Charlie Sheen onboard, I’m gonna go out on a limb here and predict bad things for this fifth installment of the depressingly anti-funny parody franchise. PG13. 85m. GINGER & ROSA. Bravo to Coming Attractions for bringing a couple of woman-directed art house movies (with young, female protagonists) to the Minor this week. In this one, director Sally Potter (Orlando) returns with a tale of two teenage girls coming of age amid the social,

political and sexual upheaval of late-1960s London. PG13. 89m. LORE. From Australian writer-director Cate Shortland, this film follows a teenage girl leading her young siblings across Germany after the death of Hitler. Forced to rely on a stranger, the girl must confront the ideologies of her Nazi-sympathizer parents. Not rated. 108m. On Sunday, the Arcata Theatre Lounge will show the dark, animated 2009 adventure 9, about a rag doll that awakens in a post-apocalyptic future. PG13. 79m. The adventures get brighter on Monday and Tuesday with the Banff Mountain Film Festival, which highlights extreme adventure sports such as rock climbing, skiing, mountain-bike riding and base jumping in gorgeous natural environments. Doors at 6 p.m., movies at 7 both nights. Ganjasaurus Rex, the 1987 low-budget, pro-weed monster movie shot here in Humboldt County, will show at next Wednesday’s Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night. 6 p.m. The student-run Humboldt Film Festival kicks off at 7 p.m. next Wednesday with an evening of animated and experimental films at HSU’s Van Duzer Theatre. Check our Calendar section for details.

Continuing

ADMISSION. A Princeton admissions officer (Tina Fey) meets a free-spirit high school administrator (Paul Rudd) in this pleasant, predictable rom-com PG13. 117m. THE CROODS. A prehistoric family must look for a new cave in this likeable animated comedy featuring the voices of Nic Cage and Emma Stone. PG. 96m. ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH. A nerdy, risk-averse alien must save his heroic astronaut brother in this poorly reviewed CGI cartoon comedy. PG. 89m. G.I. JOE: RETALIATION. Bruce Willis, “The Rock” and Channing Tatum play guys with big muscles and guns. They shoot stuff. PG13. 99m. THE HOST. Alien body-snatchers complicate another boring teenage love triangle from Stephanie Meyer, author of the Twilight series. PG13. 125m. OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN. White House action-thriller with a Secret Service agent (Gerard Butler) protecting the president (Aaron Eckhart) from evil Koreans. Yawn. R. 100m. OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL. James Franco stars as the young wizard-to-be in this visually rich but ultimately hollow prequel. PG. 130m. SPRING BREAKERS. Bratty provocateur Harmony Korine (Gummo, Trash Humpers) puts former tween starlets in bikinis and sets them loose in a trippy nightmare of guns and drugs in south Florida. R. 94m. — Ryan Burns

Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 4/12-4/18 unless otherwise noted.

42 11:50, 2:50, 5:50, 8:50 SCARY MOVIE 5 12:20, 2:35, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35 EVIL DEAD 11:55, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30 JURASSIC PARK 3D 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 SPRING BREAKERS 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40 THE HOST 12:30, 3:25, 6:25, 9:15 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 12:05, 2:45, 5:30, 8:20 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:35, 3:30, 6:20, 9:10 THE CROODS 3D 12:45, 6:15 THE CROODS 2D 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:45 ADMISSION 3:20, 8:55 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D 12:15, 5:55 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 3D 3:15, 8:45

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville *= FRI-SUN Times are for 4/12-4/18 unless otherwise noted.

THE HOST 12:20*, 3:15, 6:10, 9:10 (except 4/18) 42 12:10*, 3:05, 6:05, 9:05 SCARY MOVIE 5 12:25*, 2:40, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 EVIL DEAD 12:05*, 2:20*, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 JURASSIC PARK 3D 12:00*, 3:00, 6:00, 8:55 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 1:05*, 6:35 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 3:50, 9:20 THE CROODS 3D 12:45*, 6:20 THE CROODS 2D 2:50, 8:15 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D 11:55*, 5:20 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 3D 3:20, 8:50

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

* = SAT.-SUN. ONLY 1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 4/12-4/18 unless otherwise noted.

GINGER AND ROSA LORE Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D

2:20*, 4:35, 6:50, 9:10 1:10*, 3:45, 6:20, 8:55 12:40*, 3:20, 6:00, 8:40

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 * = SAT.-SUN. ONLY 1241 Main Street, Fortuna ** = FRI.-SAT. ONLY Times are for 4/12-4/18 unless otherwise noted.

42 SCARY MOVIE 5 EVIL DEAD JURASSIC PARK 3D GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D THE CROODS

12:50*, 3:50, 6:40, 9:25** 12:15*, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:35** 1:10*, 4:10, 7:20, 9:30** 1:00*, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40** 1:30*, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40** 12:00*, 2:15*, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10**

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH

4/12-4/18: 7:30 EXCEPT 4/17: 6:30

Call for Saturday benefit.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 11, 2013

35

North Coast Academy

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

For the Love of Color: Gina Wilde, Alchemy Yarns

April 27th, 11am to 6 pm

Learn techniques for working with dynamic color from the creative color artist behind fabulous Alchemy yarns. Find your own dazzling color palette through fun, fast and enlightening color exercises and create a gorgeous ascot scarf during class. Choose from an outrageously colorful and decadent treasure trove of Alchemy stash and create a unique palette with Gina for your future projects. Cost $115.00 + materials

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts ADULT CERAMICS. Get your creative juices flowing by learning & practicing ceramics! Basic hand building & pinch pottery for 18 & up. Mon.s & Wed.s, 6:30-8 p.m., starting 4/15. At Ryan Center. $65 fee includes materials. Register online at www.eurekarecreation. com or call 441-4244 for more info. (AC-0411) GLASS FUSING, DESIGNING PART SHEETS, ART GLASS & IMAGERY. $60/$40 members (materials cost depends on size of project made). Wed., May 1, 5:30-8:30 p.m. or Thurs., May 2, 1-4 p.m. Follow up to surface design and Part Sheets workshops, and will focus on incorporating previously made art glass into distinctive and dynamic fused work. Intermediate class, requires glass fusing background. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata. com. (AC-0425) GLASS FUSING, LUNCHEON PLATES & SERVING PLATTER. $125.00/$ 105 members (materials fees $60 and up). Tues./Thurs., May 7 & 9, 5:30–8:30 p.m. or Wed./Fri., May 8 &10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Create a unique luncheon set, including two 6” luncheon plates and a matching 10” serving platter in this two day workshop. Intermediate workshop, requires glass fusing background. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0425) HAND BUILDING. $ 90 (5 weeks). With Otamay Hushing. Thurs.s, 10 a.m.-Noon, May 9-June 6. Flexible format to encourage creativity. Focus on basic techniques with slabs and coils as applied to a variety of projects. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0425)

Communication

EATING DISORDERS. How to cope with eating disorders and other problems rooted in trauma discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., April 14, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-0411)

Computers

watch for the

special pullout section

May 9, 2013 edition

Send us your list of events by April 18! calendar@northcoastjournal.com

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ADOBE CS5 PROJECT WORKSHOP. Get individualized instruction as you create a project of your choice, from start to finish, using one or more of the Adobe applications Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign or Dreamweaver. Create that newsletter, logo, website or digital art projects with guidance from an experienced designer. With Annie Reid. Thurs., April 25-May 9, 6:30-9 p.m. and Sat., April 27 and May 4, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $175. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (C-0418) MICROSOFT EXCEL. Learn the power and capabilities of this spreadsheet software. Create workbooks and design worksheets utilizing formulas and functions such as sum, average, max, min and count. With Joan Dvorak. Mon., April 22-May 13, 6-8 p.m. $75. Preregistration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0411)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1226)

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, May 6-27, 7-8 p.m., Pan Arts Network,1049 Samoa Blvd, Suite C. $50, (707) 407-8998, info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT- 0502) INNER CLOWN TUNE-UP! with Lin-Z Clifford & Damiian Lang. At Om Shala Yoga. Sun., April 14, 1-4 p.m. $30 by April 10th / $40 after. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (DMT-0411) DANCE WITH BRUCE & CAREY HART. Swing, Fox Trot, Waltz, Latin, Western Swing and more! Five-week classes beginning Tues., April 16, Jacoby Creek School and Thurs., April 18, Cutten Elementary School. Beginners: 6:30 p.m., Intermediates: 8 p.m. $30/singles, $50/ couples, $20/high school students or younger. For more information call 839-1792. (DMT-0411) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Group & private lessons in ballroom, Latin, swing, & club dance in Humboldt county. We make dancing fun! www.dancewithdebbie.biz, (707) 464-3638 and on Facebook. (DMT-1226) FREE INTRO TO ARGENTINE TANGO. For absolute beginners. Sat., April 13th, 7p.m., Arcata. Experience the most interesting and beautiful dance of all for free! You’ll learn the basics, meet new people and have lots of fun! Partner not required but suggested. More information, www.tangodelsol.net or (858) 205-9832 (DMT-0411) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT-1226) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-0606) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-0606)

Fitness

BOOTY LUV. A FUN-ctional combo of yoga, Pilates, barre, kickboxing and a bit of dirty dancing. Sat., April 27, 12:30-3:30 p.m. $40/$35 for students. Reservations required. Arcata Core Pilates, 901 8th St., Arcata. (707) 845-8156, arcatacorepilates.com (F-0418) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session Feb. 1-June 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-0606) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1226)

NIA-DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6-7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Wed.s, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. $5 dropin, $50/12 classes (707) 441-9102 (F-1226)

ZOOFARI ADVENTURES SUMMER CAMPS. At Sequoia Park Zoo. For 5-11 year olds. Join us for a wild adventure at the zoo. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo.net for info. (K-0411)

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1226)

LITTLE KICKERS SOCCER. Ball control, dribbling & passing skills are emphasized through engaging games & activities. Ages 4-7 years, Municipal Auditorium 1120 F St., Eureka. Fri.s, starting 4/12, 11-11:45am. $30. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0411)

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0606) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1226) INTRO TO WOMEN’S FENCING. May 2-30. $75. Pre-registration required. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (SR-0425)

Home & Garden

FRUIT TREE SELECTION & ORCHARD MAINTENANCE ON THE NORTH COAST. Learn to take care of fruit trees, including selecting, pruning, thinning, pest management and soil maintenance. This course will cover apple, pear and other fruiting tree varieties suited for the North Coast. Includes a fieldtrip to an orchard. With Peter Haggard. Tues. and Thurs., April 23 and 25, 6-8 p.m. and Sun., April 28, 1-3 p.m. $60. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (HG-0411)

Kids & Teens

TINY TUTUS BEGINNING BALLET I. Ballerinas ages 4-7 will learn ballet’s basic steps and beginning dance positions. John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Tues.s, 6-6:45 p.m., beginning 4/16. $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0411)

MUSIC & MOVEMENT. Encourage children to use their imagination as they develop motor skills, body awareness & natural movement. Ages 1½-2½, John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Sat.s, beginning 4/20, 9:30-10:15 a.m. $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0411) CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7-12. $80 (Two 5 week classes offered). May 6-June 3 & May 7-June 4. Mon., 4-6 p.m., Tues., 4-6 p.m. With Bob Raymond. Adventures with clay; Learn various hand building and wheel-throwing techniques. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (K-0425) PAGEANT ON THE PLAZA. This summer the Arcata Playhouse is offering a two-week adventure in the creation of outdoor spectacle and performance. Week one includes classes in Movement, Music, Stilts, Puppetry. Week two create a show! July 8-20, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Ages 9 - 16, $300 Call 822-1575 to register today! (K-0627) SUMMER THEATER WORKSHOPS AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE! June 24-28, 2 classes for kids ages 7-9, 9 a.m-Noon. Fantastic Fairy Tales. 12:30-3:30 p.m., Clowning for Kids. 2 classes for kids ages 10-14. 9 a.m -Noon, Commedia and Mask Performance. 12:30-3:30 p.m. Improv in Action. $100 for one class, $75 for a second class. More info and registration at 822-1575! (K-0620) CHINESE CULTURE CAMP. Humboldt County Chinese School presents Chinese Culture Camp on Sat., April 13, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Cutten Elementary School. Activities include language, martial arts, cooking, calligraphy and more. Open to grades K-8. $30 per person. Call Bernie at 445-1781 for more info or email hccslevy@yahoo.com. (K-0411) YOUNG WRITERS CONFERENCE Redwood Writing Project, Annual Young Writers conference, Sat. April 13, 8:30 am.-3 p.m, HSU Campus, Founders Hall Students 4th-9th graders, fee $40, scholarships available. 826-5109, www.redwoodwp.org (K-0411) ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1226)

Lectures

WEALTH BUILDING INVESTMENT STRATEGIES. Free Seminar! Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Wed., May 8, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP at (707) 443-2741 or online at www.premieradvisor.com. (L-0502)

THE GROW IT & KNOW IT EVENT. Presented by 707 Cannabis & Hosted by Area 101 on April 13, at Area 101, 54895 Hwy. 101, Laytonville. Everything you ever wanted to know and about growing, breeding, CBD,therapeutics, cooking with and consuming cannabis from NorCal’s premiere Cannabis educator. 10-11:30 a.m: “Grow like the Pro’s” Learn proven techniques from master cultivator Kevin Jodrey, 11:30 a.m- 1 p.m: Therapeutic Uses of Cannabinoids” seminar, with details on raw vs. heated cannabis & the latest in reach with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist.12p.m: “Live Cannabis Juicing Demo”, learn of the best cannabis juicing techniques with 707 Cannabis College experts. 2-3 p.m: The Endocannabinoid System”, seminar. How cannabis produces effects, eating vs. inhaling , plus reliable results using cannabis with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 3-4 p.m : “Cultivation Optimization” seminar. Learn about cannabis physiology, how to achieve rapid high-CBD isolation , plus THC & CBD potency maximization using vegetative stage testing with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 4-5 p.m: Cannabis Ingestibles”, seminar. How to calculate dosages, activate cannabinoids & produce a consistent product with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. Full-day $85 advance/$95 at door, $50 1/2 day, lunch provided. For more info or to purchase advanced tickets email info@707cannabiscollege.com or call (707) 672-9860 (L-0411)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1226) SENIOR ACTION COALITION. Use your knowledge and experience to take action on pressing issues affecting older adults. Seniors, boomers welcome. Grassroots, non-partisan, current focus health care. Meetings held third Wed. of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Jefferson School, 1000 B St. For more information, e-mail psa@a1aa.org or call (707) 442-3763. (O-0411) WHAT’S AFLOAT IN HUMBOLDT BAY? Learn about trawlers, trollers, former govt./naval craft, pleasure boats, the oyster fleet and more of the vessels moored in the bay’s two major marinas. With Ray Hillman. Fri., May 3 5:30-8:30 p.m. and a fieldtrip on Sat., May 4, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0425) THE ARMCHAIR TRAVELER. Back of the Bay Byways. Sit back for three virtual tours of the “back of the bay:” Warren Creek, Walker Point and Table Bluff. Discover abandoned water lines, secluded shipping ports and logging sites. With Jerry and Gisela Rohde. Sat., April 20, 1-3 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0411)

Pets/Animals

BEGINNING DOG AGILITY. New class session starting April 16 in Fortuna. Join the fun for an introduction to the exciting sport of dog agility. 707-725-6416, Longears4ever@aol.com (P-0411)

Spiritual

KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direction of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442-7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www. kdkarcatagroup.org (S-0502) continued on next page

PRESENTS

THE GROW IT & KNOW IT

EVENT

APRIL 13, 2013 AT AREA 101 54895 HWY 101 LAYTONVILLE, CA

“Everything you ever wanted to know about GROWING, BREEDING, CBD, THERAPEUTICS, COOKING with and CONSUMING cannabis from NorCal’s premiere Cannabis educators”

Topics starting at 10am M Grow Like the Pros with Kevin Jodrey M Therapeutic Uses of Cannabinoids Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Live Cannabis Juicing Demonstration 707 Cannabis’ Donna King M The Endocannabinoid System Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Cultivation Optimization Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Cannabis Ingestibles Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller TICKETS: $85 IN ADVANCE, $95 AT THE DOOR FULL-DAY; $50 FOR ½ DAY; LUNCH PROVIDED

For more info or to buy advance tickets: info@707cannabiscollege.com or 707 672-9860

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013

37

continued from previous page FREE COMMUNITY POTLUCK & KIRTAN AT OM SHALA YOGA. With Seabury Gould. Sat., April 13, 6-9 p.m. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (S-0411) INTRO TO YOUR ASTROLOGICAL BIRTH CHART. Workshop in Arcata, Sun., April 14, 1-5 p.m. For more information: www.danaquillman.com or call 8225247. (S-0411) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442-4240 www.tarotofbecoming. com (S-0228) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-0606)

Sports/Recreation

TENNIS CLASSES & LESSONS. Classes & Lessons for all Ages & Abilities taught by a certified USPTA Pro. Find out more at www.humboldttennisclub.com or call (707) 616-4781. (SR-0418) SENIOR SOFTBALL. 50’s and 60’s plus league needs players. Must be at least 49 to play. www.humboldtseniorsoftball.com Call Brad Golding (707) 982-3223 (SR-0502) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1226)

Therapy/Support

ESSURE SUPPORT GROUP. For women who have had Essure and are experiencing a decline in health, you are not alone. Offering support and resources. Tamara, (707) 498-9447. (TS-0425) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk-in support group for anyone suffering from depression. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m -7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839-5691. (T-1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1226)

Wellness/Bodywork

FIRST DEGREE REIKI CLASS. In this one day class participants receive first degree Reiki attunements, information about the history and practice of Reiki, and practice giving and receiving Reiki treatments. Visit www.humboldtreikilady.com for more info and registration. New classes each month at Sun Yi’s Academy in Arcata. Next class 4/20 Noon-4 p.m. $100 (W-0411) FORREST YOGA WORKSHOPS, ANATOMY & HANDSON ASSISTING. With nationally renowned visiting instructor, Brian Campbell. At Om Shala Yoga. April 19-21. Extremely valuable for ALL yoga teachers, students, body workers and anyone involved with manual or movement therapies. Yoga instructors receive 20% discount. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (W-0411) TOP 5 SIGNS HYPNOSIS CAN HELP. Doctors, therapists, other healers often refer to specialists. Learn to recognize when hypnosis is indicated. April 16, 12:15-12:45 p.m. (brief overview) or April 20, 10 a.m.-Noon (full class). Both at Arcata Chamber of Commerce. Details/ registration at HumboldtHypnosis.com/counselorclass or call Dave Berman, C.Ht. at 707-845-3749. Open to general public. (W-0411) CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE. Explore Chinese herbal medicine: basic concepts, common herbs used, and how it differs from western herbal medicine. Learn to prepare a tea from raw herbs. With Lupine Wread. Thurs., April 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt. edu/extended (W-0411) FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (W-1226) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Intermediate Herbology with Jane Bothwell, April 17- June 12, Wed. evenings, 7-9 p.m., next to Humboldt Herbals in Eureka. Delve deeper into the healing power of plants. $365.00. Wild Foods Class & Banquet with Jane Bothwell. Saturday, May 4, 10am-3pm. Come discover the abundance of wild edibles that surround you! $65. (707) 442-8157, www.dandelionherb.com (W-0411) AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & CLEANSING RETREATS. With Traci Webb and Myrica Morningstar, Training meets five weekends (Fri-Sun). May 17-July 14. Learn over 16 Ayurvedic Massages and Herbal Body Therapies for Career Enhancement and Self-Healing (Deadline: April 17). Group & Personal Cleansing Retreats: July 17-Aug. 11. Call for details. NCBTMB Approved CE Provider. REGISTER: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: www.ayurvedicliving.com, info@ayurvedicliving. com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0411)

CAREGIVER TRAINING. Area 1 Agency on Aging offers FREE 42-hour course in Eureka. Prepare for new career, take better care of loved ones, request employment referrals. Sessions held Tues.s and Thurs.s, 6-9 p.m., May 7-June 4, 2013. Homework due at first session. Call Caregiver Services at (707) 443-4363 to schedule registration. (V-0502)

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1226)

CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, M.A., and Carolyn Albee, M.A. Fri., April 19, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $30 fee includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (V-0411)

START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin June, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1226) ●

Vocational

NORTHCoast COASTJournal JOURNAL••Thursday, THURSDAY, April APRIL 11, 2013 ••northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com 38 38North

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/10/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. T.S. No.: 2012F007 A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranted, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession , or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principle sum of the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: Lisa St. John Duly Appointed Trustee: Professional Trust Deed Services Recorded 10/20/2008 as Instrument No. 2008-24846-5 in book –, page – of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California. Date of Sale: 5/2/2013 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: In the main lobby of Ming Tree Realtors, 509 J Street, Suite #1, Eureka, CA 95501 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $230,581.50 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 2310 Fischer Lane Eureka, CA 95503 A.P.N.: #305-271-007 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this

property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 707-268-1205, using the file number assigned to the this case 2012F007. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 4/8/2013 Professional Trust Deed Services P.O. Box 115 Eureka, California 95502 Sale Line: (707) 268-1205 s/: Karen Mesa, Agent 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-114)

PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700-21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 17th of April, 2013, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt

the following: Heather Yates, Unit # 5019 Theresa Bering, Unit # 5307 Jeremy Brisco, Unit # 5464 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Paul McNeill, Unit # 2305 Linda Stewart, Unit # 3115 Jimmy Evanow, Uniot # 3408 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Dusty Rucker, Unit # 1156 Matthew Basham, Unit # 1217 Joann Sovereign, Unit # 1231 Marvin Jerke, Unit # 1307 Pamela Rusk, Unit # 1511 Angela Mixon, Unit # 1794 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Michael Taylor, Unit # 435 (Held in Co. Unit) The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Lise Kaufman Erbe, Unit # 4308 Jacob Swagert, Unit # 4309 Paul Billups, Unit # 4317 Frantz Cadet, Unit # 4382 Spencer Barrett, Unit # 4550 Janice Harmon, Unit # 6006 Melissa Taylor, Unit # 6152 Randy Vitelli, Unit # 6180 Tashina Surber, Unit # 6182 Hugh Sheeks, Unit # 6195 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Richard Jones, Unit # 6348 Kenneth Hunt, Unit # 6354 Amanda Owejan, Unit # 6449 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Jesse Vandenplas, Unit # 9235 Felicia Lilly, Unit #9238 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Devin Boyce, Unit # 1117 Allan Flores, Unit # 3273 Frances Pederson, Unit # 4117 Harmony Doughtery, Unit # 5126 Gary Chisholm, Unit # 6114 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appliances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day

Humboldt Bay Tourism Center is Humboldt County’s newest and most innovative Visitor Services Agency. Seeking Services & Partnership to represent Humboldt County on the Redwood Coast. Go to www.HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com for detailed Proposal. Submit your bids on or before May 1, 2013 by 5pm. For all submissions please address questions from web-site (and any other Proposal information) in an email to our Lead Concierge Liz Valls at Liz@hbtc.info 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-112) of the auction, no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self-Storage, 707-443-1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 4th day of April 2013 and 11th day of April 2013

Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Martin McLean. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

4/4, 4/11/13 (13-99)

4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-103)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00205

The following persons are doing business as WOODFOOT SURFCRAFT at 3144 C St., Eureka, CA 95503. Lucas David Davisthornton 3144 C St. Eureka, CA 95503 Gretchen Arina Anderson 3144 C St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/1/2012. /s Gretchen Arina Anderson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 2, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/2013 (13-107)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00207

The following person is doing business as BLACK LIGHTNING MOTORCYCLE CAFE at 440 F St., Eureka, CA 95501. Jeffrey S. Hesseltine 420 Tanglewood Rd. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/1/2013. /s Jeffrey S. Hesseltine. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 2, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/2013 (13-109)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00169

The following person is doing business as MUSIC FOR MUSIC at 12859 Torrey Pines, Auburn, CA 95602. Martin Francis McLean 6360 ½ Longview Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00187

The following person is doing business as FANCY THAT! FINE CATERING at 1675 Hannah Ct., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Michelle Mei-Ling Foster 1675 Hannah Ct. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/26/13. /s Michelle Foster. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 26, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-102)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00193

The following persons are doing business as BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR at 76 Country Club Dr., Suite A, Willow Creek, CA 95573, P.O. Box 541, Willow Creek, CA 95573. Ready Davis 920 Newman Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Christopher Todd Hern 926 Newman Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/2011. /s Ready Davis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 28, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-101)

  FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00143

The following person is doing business as NOTHING BETTER… LAWN & MAINTENANCE at 3172 Matthew Lane, Fortuna, CA 95540. Jessie Ray Genaro

3172 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessie Genaro. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                 

Field notes

3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-97)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00145

The following persons are doing business as MAD RIVER BREWING COMPANY at 195 Taylor Way, Blue Lake, CA 95525, P.O. Box 767, Blue Lake, CA 95525. Mad River Brewing Co., Inc. 195 Taylor Way Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s James Crowell, Director. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                  3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-91)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00148

The following persons are doing business as THE JOURNEY at 95 Belleview Avenue, Rio Dell, CA 95562, P.O. Box 236, Rio Dell, CA 95562. Assemby of God of Rio Dell 95 Belleview Avenue Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jeff Miller, President/Pastor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 7, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk  3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-90)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00168

The following person is doing business as OLD TOWN CARRIAGE CO. at 2nd & F Street, Eureka, CA 95502, 374 Columbia St., Brooklyn, NY 11231. Brendan Fearon 374 Columbia St. Brooklyn, NY 11231 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/25/13. /s Brendan Fearon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                        3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-84)

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

The Fourth Quadrant

BARRY EVANS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

T

exting as a form of communication is barely 20 years old, although at least one texting term goes back nearly a century, to 1917, when Admiral John Fisher wrote Winston Churchill (then minister of munitions), “I hear that a new order of Knighthood is on the tapis. OMG! (Oh My God!) Shower it on the Admiralty. (“On the tapis” was once newspeak for “on the table.”) We’ve come a long way since then. No one actually spells out OMG anymore, or, for that matter, LOL, IMHO, FYI or BFF, all of which were legitimized by inclusion into the venerable OED (sorry, that’s Oxford English Dictionary) a couple of years ago. Consider that every year, some 10 trillion text messages are sent — that’s 300,000 every second! Or that 95 percent of young adults (18-24) in the United States send more than 100 text messages daily. Does this represent the instant birth of a new language? Or are we simply filling the missing “fourth quadrant” of our linguistic abilities? In a recent TEDx talk, linguist John McWhorter invites us to consider a simple two-by-two language matrix:  Formal spoken is oratory, in the “ask not what your country can do for you” style, typically around 30 to 50 words per sentence.  Infomal spoken is what we do every day, complete with our ums and ahs, interruptions and half-finished phrases, at about eight words per sentence. “He was all like it’s not my problem anyway.” “Yeah,

but did he end up paying the …” “Um, well, not really.”  Formal written is what I strive for in this column. It’s how letter writers (remember letters?) write. It’s the stuff of school essays and book reports and, well, writing.  Informal written, in McWhorter’s view, was an empty box until the rise of texting as an abbreviated form of writing that mimics speech. That is, writing how we speak, with our thumbs doing the work our mouths used to. Not that all language, even formal, couldn’t be shortened while still maintaining the full meaning: “4scr+7 yrs ago r 4fthrs brot 4th>ths contnt a nu n8n, cncvd n lbrty + dedc8d 2 th prpstn tht allmen r cre8d =” Me, I’m all for it. I love the imagination of young people as they create what seems to be a new language. Or, languages. In Germany, Gute Nacht (good night) becomes gn8 (8 = acht). In Japan, where 3 is “san” and 9 is “kyu”, thank you is texted as 39. French Quoi de neuf? (What’s new?) texts as koi29 (deux-neuf). Here’s m.02. If all this is just 2m2h and tmi 4u, it’s prbly 2l8 2 wry abt, snc txtng is now, a3, bau, cwot 2 cmplain, so goi. Th bst i cn rcmnd is 2 join AAAAA.* Gd lk! * American Association Against Acronym Abuse ● Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) sees parallels between texting and Gutenberg’s democratization of writing with the invention of printing.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

39

continued from previous page. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00172

The following persons are doing business as GRUMPY GOAT WINGERY at 1902 C Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Peter Thomas Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Christine Michelle Gorshe-Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/13. /s Peter Olsen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                         3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-87)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00175

The following person is doing business as LOTS OF PEPPER at 4100 Union St., Eureka, CA 95503. Christina Lewis 4100 Union St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Christina Lewis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk           3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-96)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00135

The following person is doing business as I AM…SOCIAL JUSTICE, I AM…SAFE ZONE, SHEBANGO at 966 Lloyd Street, Eureka, CA 95503. Jessica Pettitt 966 Lloyd Street Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessica K. Pettitt. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 1, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk             3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-78)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00126

The following person is doing business as THE WOODEN SWING SET STOP .COM at 368 Spruce St., Eureka, CA 95503. Daniel Jacob Dixon 368 Spruce St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/25/13. /s Daniel Jacob Dixon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 25, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                       3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-86)

 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00147

The following person is doing business as FOREVER YOUNG BABY/ CHILDREN ESSENTIALS at 1034 Riverside Dr., Rio Dell, CA 95562. Heather R. Watkins 1034 Riverside Dr. Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Heather R. Watkins. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                       3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-85)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 11-00116

The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: KIDLICIOUS, 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd., Suite J, Fortuna, CA 95540. The fictitious business name was filed in Humboldt County on 2/17/2011. Scott Keith Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 Felicia Gabrielle Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business was conducted by Individual Husband & Wife. /s/ Scott Thomsson/Felicia Thomsson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 11, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/13 (13-79)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130220 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: JESSE DOTY TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JESSE DOTY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JESSE DOTY to Proposed Name JESSE JAMES DOTY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person

objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 16, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: April 4, 2013 Filed: April 4, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/2013 (13-113)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130201 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. to Proposed Name DANNY JOSEPH WHITE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 14, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 25, 2013 Filed: March 25, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-98)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130167 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL for a decree changing names as follows: Present name PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL to Proposed Name PAMELA DENISE WARWICK THE COURT ORDERS that all

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 9, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 21, 2013 Filed: March 21, 2013 /s/ R.E. KOSSOW Judge of the Superior Court 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-95)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130166 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: XIONG YANG TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: XIONG YANG for a decree changing names as follows: Present name XIONG YANG to Proposed Name XY SONG ROYAL YAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 26, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 8, 2013 Filed: March 8, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-82)

  NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ROSANNA CARR, CASE NO. PR130115

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ROSANNA CARR A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by TAJ FRYE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that TAJ FRYE appointed as

personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-0804 April 5, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-110)

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOSHUA D. ANDERSON, CASE NO. PR130093

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSHUA D. ANDERSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MICHELLE L. ANDERSON AND KATHLEEN REGLI in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that KATHLEEN REGLI be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination

in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: BRADFORD C. FLOYD SBN 136459 LAW OFFICE OF BRADFORD C. FLOYD 819 SEVENTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-9754 March 29, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-106)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DENNIS A. MORGAN aka DENNIS ALBERT MORGAN AND DENNIS MORGAN, CASE NO. PR130111

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DENNIS A. MORGAN, ALSO KNOWN AS DENNIS ALBERT MORGAN AND DENNIS MORGAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DOREN ANTHONY MORGAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DOROTHY L. KLUCK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LAURENCE A. KLUCK in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LAURENCE A. KLUCK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or

3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-92)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KENNETH L. JENSEN CASE NO. PR130088

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KENNETH LEE JENSEN, KENNETH L. JESEN OR KEN L. JENSEN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ERIC N. JENSEN AND CHRIS P. JENSEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, EUREKA. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests ERIC N. JENSEN AND CHRIS P. JENSEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of

3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-93)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOHN CURTIS MASON aka JOHN C. MASON, CASE NO. PR130106

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN CURTIS MASON aka JOHN C. MASON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JENNIFER MASON in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt.

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS 1. Joint 7. Perky spokeswoman in Progressive Insurance ads 10. Beehive St. capital 13. Franklin born when Franklin D. Roosevelt was president 14. Parched 15. Viking ship need 16. Columbus, by birth 17. Full or twin, e.g. 18. Wedded 19. USMC truant 20. “Why, uncle, ____ shame”: Romeo and Juliet 22. Beefy entree 23. Cooking fat 24. “____ right?”

25. ____ Tzu 27. Wearer of una corona 28. NFL three-pointers 29. Bobby-____ (1940s teenagers) 32. Lash ____ (attack) 34. Where a young girl lost her whey? 35. Hot: Fr. 38. Go on and on 40. Kept for future use 41. Sean Penn film whose title is taken from “Green Eggs and Ham” 43. Like some checking accounts 45. Refrain from the Buster Poindexter song “Hot Hot Hot” 46. “____ Calling” (2000s TV drama) 47. Pro ____ (for now) 50. Can. province 51. Veep before Al

52. Sch. with a Berkeley campus 54. Head line? 56. Fashion designer Vera 57. Zilch 58. Important time 59. [It’s gone!] 61. How a performer named Patty O. Furniture or Ivana B. Astar dresses, perhaps 63. Make some calls 64. Frequently 65. “Little Shop of Horrors” demand 66. Yoga equipment 67. Adobe file format 68. More to the point

DOWN 1. Katey of “Married ... With Children” 2. Antebellum 3. Poe’s “rare and radiant maiden” 4. “Ouch! You’re ignoring my request for a relaxing massage!”? 5. Govt. mortgage agency 6. Cool off the 27th U.S. president? 7. Cold, to Conchita 8. 2012 Lindsay Lohan TV movie “____ & Dick” 9. Lyrical tribute 10. Load carried by a chimneysweep? 11. Swim meet assignment 12. All hands on deck?

14. Reason why the manager couldn’t get a logical response from his aide? 21. Out cry? 22. Popular 2000s HBO series ... and this puzzle’s theme 25. Air France flier until 2003 26. Medical drama set at the PrincetonPlainsboro Teaching Hospital 30. Yank’s foe 31. Teen’s room, to many a parent 33. 1976 Democratic presidential candidate Mo 35. AFL-____ 36. Actor Linden or Holbrook 37. What churchgoers used on their

whitewater trip? 39. It’s a mosque read 42. ____ school 44. What any kid wants on Christmas morning? 48. Hallmark.com offerings 49. Emma Bovary’s title 53. Tavern selection 54. Salon treatment 55. Environs 56. Bark 59. Mushy food 60. ____ school 62. Once called, in wedding notices

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

VERY EASY #20

www.sudoku.com

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DOROTHY L. KLUCK CASE NO. PR130104

Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 11, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. CR08. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of the notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JONATHAN M. MCGEE, ESQ. SBN 271008 MCGEE LAW FIMR, LLC. 5635 N. SCOTTSDALE ROAD, SUITE 170 SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA 85250 (480) 729-6208 JMM@MCGEELAWAZ.COM MARCH 12, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

Solution, tips and computer program at

4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-105)

consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of the notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LAURENCE A. KLUCK # 123791 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP. 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 MARCH 21, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

requests that DOREN ANTHONY MORGAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided  in Probate Code 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 March 28, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

41

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF SUSAN THOMPSON, CASE NO. PR130097

CONTINUED FROM PREvIOUS PAgE. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JENNIFER MASON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES, SBN#67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 March 22, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-94)

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SUSAN THOMPSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SARAH BANNING in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SARAH BANNING be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 March 19, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-88)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILLIAM P. BACHELER, JR., A/K/A WILLIAM BACHELER, A/K/A BILL BACHELER, A/K/A BILL BACHELER, JR., CASE NO. PR130096

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM P. BACHELER, JR., a/k/a WILLIAM BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, JR. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SHAWNA R. BRISCO in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SHAWNA A. BRISCO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES D. POOVEY 83955 937 SIXTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-6744

North Coast JourNal • thursday, april 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 42 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

March 18, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-89)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KELLI ELIZABETH MCFARLAND, CASE NO. PR130114

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KELLI ELIZABETH MCFARLAND A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ERIN ELLEN MCFARLAND ORTIZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ERIN ELLEN MCFARLAND ORTIZ appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-0804 April 3, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-111)

Employment County of Humboldt

SENIOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR $3073 - $3942 mo. plus benefits

Provides substance abuse counseling to individuals, groups and families in an out-patient setting; facilitates support groups; participates in substance abuse prevention and education programs; directs the work of other staff. Must have two years of experience providing drug and alcohol counseling and education services and possess certification as an Alcohol and Drug Counselor by an organization approved by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Valid California driver’s license required. Applicants must pass a background investigation. Filing deadline: Thursday, April 25, 2013. For application come to Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs Jobline: (707) 476-2357. AA/EOE.

Senior GL Accountant  Accounting Supervisor Controller  Budget Analyst  Medical Records Tech Medical Ins. Billing Clerk  Food Services Worker NATE Certified Heating Tech  Geotechnical Engineer Communications Coordinator  Certified Plumber General Manager -Media Insurance Agent Licensed California Class B Driver/Labor  Technical Writer

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 1 F/T Arcata REGISTERED NURSE 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Willow Creek LEAD MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka (Peds) MEDICAL ASSISTANT 2 F/T Arcata, 1 F/T Eureka (Pediatrics), 1 F/T Crescent City REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 P/T Crescent City,

2 P/T Willow Creek

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Eureka (Peds),

1 F/T-Temp McKinleyville

DENTAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Willow Creek

(32-40 hours/week)

TEEN CLINIC ADVOCATES (must be in high school) P/T Crescent City, McKinleyville, Arcata, Willow Creek

Call (707) 826-8633 ext 5140 Visit www.opendoorhealth.com

CONTINUED ON next page

the Employment

Has the following positions available:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Temp Office Assistant Experienced Receptionist Loan Officer • AP/AR • Controller Home Repair Specialist • Maintenance Worker Caregiver • Laborers $9 - $10/hour

ASSISTANT PROGRAM MANAGER

for Youth Service Bureau shelter. FT, $14.50-16/hr. DOE plus benefits. Deadline 4/15 EOE

Go to www.rcaa.org or RCAA 904 G St., Eureka for full job description, requirements & application.

SEEKING

JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN Please Employment Opportunities

review application and apply on our website. Cher-Ae Heights Casino *Gift Shop, PT (Candy Cart)

*Server, PT www.McKeeverEnergy.com

*Busser/Host, PT *Cage Cashier, PT *Vault Attendant, PT *Janitor, PT *Bingo Admit Clerk, PT

CONCIERGE TEAM MEMBER

Do you have extensive knowledge of local area attractions, rails, parks, lodging & dining? Interested in registering guests for our many tours and itineraries with speed and efficiency? Must be above 21 years old. Must provide California Food Handler Card and CPR/ First Aid cert. for employment within 30 days. 15-28 hrs a week $10 per hour plus gratuity.EOE/M/ F/D/V See website for more information.

www.HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com

Share your talent for fun and excitement. General Manager

Position is responsible for entire operation of Casino, and ensuring profitability through effective management marketing, sales, finance, labor management, accounting, budgeting and other operations functions. Must have at least 7 years casino management experience with at least 4 of those in an executive level. At least 5 years experience as a s Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria. Employments available in General Manager preferred. Bachelors Applications Degree in Business es / Seascape / Cher-Ae Administration Heights Casinoorora our website at www.cheraeheightscasino. related field preferred or equivalent eights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing. combination education experience. Qualifications and pay ratesof vary. For moreand information please inquire in 4-5-2013 person at 27 Bear River Dr. Loleta, CA, email nicoelbuehrer@brb-nsn. For application information go toviawww.bearrivercasino.com, gov, via website bearrivercasino.com or via telephone (707)733-1900 call (707) 733-1900, x.167 or email nicoelbuehrer@brb-nsn.gov. ext.167

CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO PART-TIME POSITIONS Gift Shop (Candy Cart) Server Busser/Host Cage Cashier Vault Attendant Janitor Bingo Admit Clerk FULL-TIME POSITIONS Line Cook

Executive Director of Tribal Operations Position directs and oversees organization’s operational activities including office management, procurement, legal, fiscal, and much more. Must have experience leading and directing the work of several teams, excellent management and team building skills and interpersonal skills. Must have at least 5 years experience in a lead role and 5 years as a supervisor. Experience in tribal government preferred. Must have Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. For application information please call (707) 733-1900, x.167 or email nicoelbuehrer@brb-nsn.gov.

place your ad hiring? ONLINE @www.northcoastjournal.com

Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employments Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/ Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

FACILITY SITE REVIEW NURSE. Temp to Hire. Completes Part C Site reviews for PCP’s. Includes assessment of physical accessibility. Communicates performance scores. Develops action plans as necessary. Current CA RN license. Work from home with frequent travel to Northern CA Rural Counties. For complete job description or to apply visit www.partnershiphp.org. AA/ EOE (E-0411)

TASTING ROOM TEAM MEMBER Are you a dynamic, personable individual who can entertain and serve guests in our Tasting Room Bar? Must be above 21 years old and have prior bartending or tasting room experience. Must provide Califronia Food Handler Card and CPR/ First Aid cert. for employment within 30 days. 15-28 hrs a week $10 per hour plus gratuity.EOE/M/ F/D/V

See website for more information.

www.HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com

AIRLINE CAREERS. begin here - Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1-888-242-3214. (E-0411) ELECTRICIAN, INDUSTRIAL. Minimum 3 years industrial electrical experience required. Must know 480V 3-phase motors, PLCs and motor control circuits. Must have all necessary tools and be able to work swing shift, weekend and holidays. Excellent wage and benefit package. Accepting applications Mon. to Fri. between 8-11 a.m. and Noon-4:30 p.m. at Sierra Pacific Industries, 2593 New Navy Base Road, Arcata. We are a drug and tobacco free work place and a verifiable Social Security Number is required. EOE (E-0411) OPENINGS AVAILABLE. Part Time & On-Call Case Managers, Mental Health Aides, Dietary Aides, Housekeepers. Needed for Mental Health Rehabilitation Center. Apply at Crestwood Behavioral Health, 2370 Buhne St, Eureka. (E-0425) PHLEBOTOMIST/LAB ASSISTANT. Greet patients, collect and prepare specimens, place orders with reference lab, provide clerical support for lab. Current CA CPT cert. required. Full time with benefits. Jerold Phelps Community Hospital, Garberville. www.shchd.org. (E-0418)

CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt! 707-442-4500 #14 www.camentorfha.com

INBOUND PHONE SALES/TECHNICAL SUPPORT. Inbound phone sales and technical support. Position requires accurate keyboarding skills, strong written and oral communication via email/phone. Interpersonal and organizational skills a must. Ability to work independently and in a professional manner. Position requires excellent attendance. Working knowledge of Excel and Word. Bilingual a plus. Benefits for full time employees include: paid vacation and holidays. After completion of waiting period, medical insurance and elective supplementary insurances available. Applications available online @ ccrane.com or C. Crane Company, Inc. 558 10th Street, Fortuna CA 95540. Deadline: 4/19/13. We are an equal opportunity employer. (E-0411) CARDIAC SONOGRAPHER FOR HIRE. Available July 1. Bachelor of Science. Board Certified. Resume available. mimi_dills@yahoo.com (E-0530) CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW. Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442-4500 #14, www. camentorfha.com (E-1226) DRIVERS. CAE Transport. Weekdays/Sat.s, various day shifts. 21+ & clean driving record. Print application at www.cityambulance. com, send WITH COVER LETTER to personnel@cityambulance. com or 135 W. 7th St., Eureka, CA 95501. (E-0425) AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite 209, Eureka. (707) 476-9262. (E-0411)

Rentals EUREKA 2BD/1BA TOWNHOUSE. 631 L St. Garbage Pd. Enclosed patio, off street parking. Rent $795, Vac 04/26. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0411) EUREKA 2BD/1BA VICTORIAN HOUSE. 1015 I St. W/S Pd. Upgraded kitchen, fireplace, hookups, w/c pet. Rent $1100, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0411) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2275 Summit Ridge Rd., Humboldt Hill. Recently remodeled, hook-ups, yard, carport, w/c pet. Rent $1150, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0411) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 309 E St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. Onsite laundry, w/c cat. Rent $495. Vac 04/20. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 4449197. (R-0411) CHARMING DUPLEX ON 1 ACRE. With indoor jacuzzi tub, large deck, beautiful views of meadow and Redwood forest. $800/ month. Some utilities included. 442-0952 (R-0418) ARCATA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 840 D St. Centrally located. Fireplace, private patio, off street parking. Rent $995, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0411) FORTUNA NEWER 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 2999 Rainbow Ln. Garbage Pd. Washer/Dryer included. Rent $975. Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0411)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 CONTINUED ON next page

Redwood Community Action Agency

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. 442-8001. (E-1226)

Now Hiring:

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 11, 2013

43

the Real Estate

EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 4434811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE-0425) REDUCED ! WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1226)

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Buy/Sell/Trade

Auto 2006 BUICK LUCERNE CX. V6, 4 door, sunroof, excellent condition. Selling due to illness. $10k obo, (707) 488-2535 or 839-5432. (A-0411) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-0606)

TEMPUR-PEDIC FOR SALE. California King Tempur-Pedic mattress and box springs. This is the BellaSonna model and is about two years old. Entire set is in like new condition. This mattress is medium to firm support. Originally sold for approx. $5,000, selling for $2,000. Injuries from a recent accident are forcing us into a softer mattress. Text message to 845-4698 only. Available to view in the evenings. (BST-1226)

Lodging/Travel EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountian Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986-7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L-0502)

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629-3540. krchase@yahoo. com. (BST-1226)

ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES SHOW. April 13, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., April 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Redwood Acres, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Admission $1. (BST-0411) PURSES & LINEN 1/2 PRICE! Blankets, Sheets, Towels, Curtains, Tablecloths, Placemats, Napkins & More. April 9-13. Plus…Blue Tagged Clothing only 25¢ each! Dream Quest Thrift Store - Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. (BST-0411) REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945. (BST-0411) BOHEMIAN MERMAID SHOP! Hand-dyed natural clothing. Fun styles that fit women! Kidwear, local jewelry and art. 6th & F, Eureka. www.Bohemian-Mermaid.com and Facebook. (BST-0411) NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM You’ll find searchable back issues, articles, workshops & classes, the calendar, the Menu of Menus, the Wedding Guide...

le garage sa ›

Rummage

SALE KITS • $7

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

3 APRIL AUCTIONS THURS. APRIL 11TH 5:45 PM

Buy/Sell/Trade

996 1 1th s t.

April 12, noon-9pm April 13-14, 9am-4pm

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Yard Sale this way

Spring & Garden SALE

Business Rentals DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE. Available at 7th & I Streets in Eureka. 650 sf. New paint and carpet. Great location. Parking & janitorial included. Call S & W Properties, (707) 499-6906. (BR-0502) DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1226)

Services

19th Annual

Sheriff’s surplus incl. 20 bikes, Honda dirt bike + automotive & construction lots, gun safe, solar panels, kayak & misc. BIG SALE!

Monday, April 15th

THURS. APRIL 18TH 5:45 PM

1 SALE

$ 00

t’s New W335hEaStreet, Eureka 445-8079

FLASHBACK 116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Sun &Tues.

Estate furniture & household misc. incl. lots of collectibles: Star Wars, Mickey Mouse, Dept. 56, baseball cards. Lg. train lot, chain saw & other tools, Gilbert Williams original & lim. edit. art. Don’t miss this Sale!

FUTURE THURSDAY THAUCTION: APRIL 25 Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

SELECT PURSES, SHOES AND LEFTOVER MARCHES SALE OF HATS/TIES & SCARVES

“Clothes with Soul”

on Page 47

Pets ALPACAS! Beautiful, well bred alpacas, lovely fiber, many colors to choose from. And yes, we do have babies! Call Nancy, 786-4853. (P-0411) AKC GERMAN SHEPHERDS. Quality German lines. www.shermanranch.us, 541-281-6829. (P-0418) SEARCHING FOR SCOOTER LOST. Jan. 29 in BlueLake. Small black fixed male with curly tail.white spot middle of tail,also white belly & lower legs Heeler mutt mix, blue collar very cute,very friendly, very missed ! 502-6534 leave message. (P-0411)

P R ES A CAN ARIO P U P P I ES Great for farm or ranch. Good family dog. Very loyal. Both parents on site. Ready to meet their new pack! (732) 581-2862. NorHum. $1000.

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

Come on in!

Swains Flat OUtpost Garden Center General Store 707-777-3385

Garden Center 707-777-3513

State Hwy 36 • Milemarker 19.5 • Carlotta • Open 9-6

44 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677-3364. (S-0606) BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR HAS MOVED. 76 Country Club Dr., next to Farmer Brown’s Supply. (530) 629-4067. (S-0516) STITCHES-N-BRITCHES IN MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502-5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitchesn-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail. com (S-0502) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating-$300 Federal Tax Credit-CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail.com, (707) 502-1289 (S-0627) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. $199/hr. (707) 8439599 redwoodcoasthelicopters@ gmail.com, www.redwoodcoasthelicopters.com (S-0627) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call. Contact 2guysandatrucksmk777@gmail.com, (707) 845-3087. (S-0425) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1226) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 8258074, taichigardener.com (S-0606) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155. (S-1226) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-822-7819. (S-0606) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-0606) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www. ZevLev.com. (S-1226)

Services

FINANCIAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL TAX SERVICE

Fees range from $30 - $80

STOP PAYING TOO MUCH TO FILE YOUR TAXES We offer: No out of pocket fees, Direct Deposit

Walk-ins Welcome 350 E St., Suite 207 (4th and E St.) Eureka • (707) 832-4292

File, and make appointment at dallascapital.net

707-267-8759 www.katherinealmy.com

DALLAS CAPITAL

Katherine Almy Call for quote

Bookkeeping service and consultation.

Full payroll service including: • payroll computation • payroll tax deposits and reports • free direct deposit

at

Music

Community

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-0606) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-0606)

BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-1226)

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT:

kath.almy@gmail.com

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y

Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

Legal Services

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

Greg Rael

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

do you have a project or idea you would like to build? contact peter portugal (707) 599-2158

707.825.7100

Sales

Service

Solutions

over 48 years professional experience in invention design - engineering - art - and fabrication in metal wood - fiberglass - plastic

1026 Third Street Eureka

(707) 445-9666

let’s make something great together

Music FD1963

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old Rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. 832-7419. (M-0509) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-0606) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0523)

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Community EATING DISORDERS. How to cope with eating disorders and other problems rooted in trauma discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., April 14, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0411) SENIOR ACTION COALITION. Use your knowledge and experience to take action on pressing issues affecting older adults. Seniors, boomers welcome. Grassroots, non-partisan, current focus health care. Meetings held third Wed. of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Jefferson School, 1000 B St. For more information, e-mail psa@ a1aa.org or call (707) 442-3763. (C-0411) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1226)

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

sHelter HousinG for YoutH Crisis Hotline

444-2273

Looking for a romantic getaway? The Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt & online at

northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013

45

&Spirit

body, mind

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

transformation consciousness expansion to enhance overall well-being

Energy Life Center

~energy work~

HEAT THERAPY

Marny Friedman

+

ENERGY MEDICINE Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

707-839-5910

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH. From the inside out with Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. 707-845-3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com. (MB-0511) NEED MORE CALM, LESS CRAZY? Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. Accepting new clients to reduce stress, anxiety, panic, phobias. (707) 845-3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com. (MB-0411) CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED ESTHETICIAN. Organic facials, waxing & aromatherapy massage. Mention this ad and receive 25% off. Located at Beau Monde Salon in Arcata. (707) 953-7619 (MB-0523) FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (MB-1226) GET WIRED FOR JOY! Learn simple, practical, neurosciencebased tools in a small, supportive group. Rewire stress circuits for better self-regulation, promoting vitality and joy, with Nancy Borge-Riis, LMFT, Certified Emotional Brain Trainer. 707.839.7920 and borgeriis@sbcglobal.net (MB-0418) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1226)

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-0606) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (MB-1226) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1226)

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 1-5

725-9627

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

739 12th St., Fortuna

HAS MOVED! Jessica Baker, Licensed Acupuncturist, Herbalist & Instructor 607 F Street in Arcata

Come find your happy place.

Services include Acupuncture, Facial Rejuvenation, Nutritional/Herbal Consultations and Classes

(707) 822-4300 FIGHT FLUS AND COLDS. doTERRA essential oils. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 4987749, www.californiadoterra. com, maureen@californiadoterra.com (MB-0516) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@salinarain.com, www. salinarain.com. (MB-0606) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1226) YOUR next client may be a Journal reader. Offer your health services here in the Marketplace. 442-1400.

Place your ad online! 46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

TAI CHI FOR EVERYONE with Glenda Hesseltine

268-3936

www.taichiforeveryone.net

Take your MoM to go! Keep a copy at home, in your car, at work or check out the online version on your mobile device. It’s always available at www.northcoastjournal.com

home & garden

service directory

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

service directo

GIT & YER VALSSAGE! home garden Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage. Gift Certificates Available

(707)& 599-5639 home garden

service directory

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

see page 28

home & garden

service directory

service directory

www.northcoastjournal.com

■ BLUE LAKE

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

real estate

this week

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

RemOdeled CuStOm HOme In Blue lake aRea! Aprx. 2440sf, 3bed/2 ba plus 2 half-baths, a den with built-ins, an office and sauna all on 1 sunny acre; New countertops, cabinets, and island; Fruit trees, greenhouse, and 2 storage sheds. A must see! mls#236352 $499,000

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

FIND HOME IMPROVEMENT EXPERTS

$350,000

this week

4 bed, 3 bath, remodeled Blue Lake home, expansive second story addition consisting of the master suite, beautifully tiled master bath with Jaccuzzi tub, office space and walk-in closet

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

$275,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1806 sq ft great starter home in sunny Blue Lake, detached garage with shop with the possibility of a second unit, plenty of room to garden and enjoy the sun

$274,900

home & garden Starting on Page 28

3 bed, 1 bath, 1,160 sq ft renovated home done with pride, a must see, downtown Eureka location with private yard, new plumbing, electrical, roof, seamless gutters, and dual pane windows

real estate

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

“WE WORK FOR YOU.”

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Our Real Estate Loan Rates

G!

IStIn

L neW

Smith River Land/Property +/-40 acres located in Smith River in del

Funded through C.U. Members Mortgages 30 Year Fixed Rate

15 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 3.500%  APR - 3.681%

Rate - 2.750%  APR - 3.070%

10 Year Fixed Rate

5 Year Adjustable Rate

Rate - 2.500%  APR - 2.965%

Rate - 2.625%  APR - 5.093%

F.H.A

V.A.

FHA 30 Year Rate

Federal VA 30 Year Fixed Rate

Rate - 3.375%  APR - 3.755% *These rates are subject to change daily. Subject to C.U. Members Mortgage Disclaimers. Up to $417,000.00

Rate - 3.250%  APR - 4.331%

1270 GIUNTOLI LANE, ARCATA or 707-822-5902 northernredwoodfcu.org

norte County. this rare property features a small cabin, finished treehouse, orchard, developed gardening areas, year round creek, pond, and excellent Southern exposure.

$225,000

Legget Land/ Property

+/-40 acres located in northern mendocino county. this property boasts large year round springs, timber, open meadows, picturesque views, year round access and gently sloping topography.

$249,000

Willow Creek Land/Property

+/-250 acres in trinity County, just 20 minutes outside of Willow Creek. this wooded property features year round water, timber, year round access and several potential building sites with breathtaking views. elevation approximately 2,500 ft. owner will carry.

$450,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013

47

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North Coast Journal 04-11-12 Edition