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thursday april4, 2013 vol XXIV issue 14 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

8 Look what our new leaders are up to 10 Warbler down 24 A kid’s Arts Alive 29 Gotta dance 30 Back to Zero 42 The big bad flood


2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


table of 4 Mailbox 6 Poem SPRING

8

From the Publisher POLITICAL REALITY 2013

8

Home & Garden Service Directory

10 Blog Jammin’ 14 On The Cover ON THE LAKE

22 Stage Matters CLASSIC MAGIC

24 Art Beat WHILE ADULTS PLAY ...

25 Arts! Alive saturday, april 6, 6-9 pm

28 Fortuna First Friday friday, april 5, 6-9 pm

Gray Matters Special Insert

29 Gotta Dance DANCING INTO SPRING

30 The Hum SOMETHING FROM NOTHING

32 Music & More! 34 Calendar 37 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

37 In Review a book

38 Filmland DISNEY GIRLS GONE WILD

39 Workshops 42 Field Notes meGAFLOODS: COMING OUR WAY?

45 Sudoku 45 Crossword 46 Marketplace 49 Body, Mind & Spirit 51 Real Estate This Week

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HumCPR Insights Editor: This week’s cover story on HumCPR (“HumCPR Rising,” March 28) was extraordinarily well written — especially given the limited access provided by one of the principal subjects of the story. I was impressed by the way his caution of the interview was presented without belittlement. I stayed up late just to read through the story. I served with Lee Ulansey on the Eureka Planning Commission until my term expired last December. I have to say that he was my favorite fellow commissioner. He and I have divergent views on many issues, but I find Lee to be articulate, thoughtful and, at least on the surface, willing to hear differing points of view from me without a fight. We occasionally altered the other’s position on matters. I found my discussions with Lee to be very engaging and thought-provoking. It will be very interesting to see how he performs at the county level. On a separate note, I have detected a real sea-change in both the nature of stories being covered and the quality of the

writing that appears in the Journal. I wish to commend you for objective reporting and a decrease in sensationalism and foul language for its own sake. (Contrast this with Barry Evans’ current column, which relies on the F word to provide an actual quote representing a smart retort.) I appreciate the work you are doing. Stephen Avis, Eureka Editor: Kudos to the Journal and to Ryan Burns for the most comprehensive analysis of current Humboldt County politics. Terence Marlow, Trinidad Editor: As Ryan Burns pointed out in his interesting article, the concept of property rights involves quite complicated issues. Yet many people who style themselves as property rights champions seem to think it’s pretty cut and dried. Depending on their own political orientation, anyone who disagrees with them is either a socialist or a fascist. On the other hand there really is a school of thought among environmentalists that advocates city life for the vast majority of humans and restriction of population in rural areas. I recognize their excellent reasons for this kind of thinking, but I have many reservations and objec-

tions. I can see how rural residents may see certain government policies — the Williamson Act and TPZ zone regulations — as a slippery slope. This is a fascinating, crucial debate to be having right now. I’d like to ask participants to conduct it fairly. Be honest and aboveboard about your motivations and investments. Respect those on the other side. Articulate your reasons for what you believe. Humboldt County’s newest supervisor has already fallen short of my hopeful expectations. When Anne Lindsay addressed the transportation planning part of the General Plan update with a health impact assessment — linking increased vehicle use to lack of exercise — Estelle Fennell declared herself to be “insulted.” She added that she wanted to see far less of this insulting-ness in “everything that we do in this county.” Instead of simply stating her reasons for disagreement, she seemed to suggest that certain kinds of information should never even be aired in her presence. This is not the rigorous, open-minded discussion we need. I guess it’s instinctive to fly to the fortress walls when our individual interests seem threatened, but we’re all in trouble if we can’t expand our outlook to include the health of the environment. Martha Walden, Westhaven

Bowling Memories Editor: The bowling article (“For the Love of Bowling,” March 21) revived some very old memories. I took a bowling class at Portland State. I told the owner of the bowling alley that I would help take care of the alley if he taught me how to bowl and let me bowl free. He agreed. Months later Portland State held an intramural tournament and some bowling team members entered. I bowled a remarkable 649 (three games) and won by 39 pins. A young woman finished third and had entered because her boyfriend bowled. We became friends and started entering mixed doubles tournaments, winning enough prize money to pay our entry fee and other expenses. We won the last tournament I bowled with her. Very nice sendoff as “Lefty” (nickname) Jan got married the following weekend and moved to St. Louis. We both had entered the singles competition with limited success. Three weeks later I entered a singles tournament in San Francisco, only to bowl worse than bad. This became the reality straw. Sure, I was good but not that good. I saw dollar bills rather than bowling pins, and my college grades were going to hell in a hand basket. I drove to the north end

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of the Golden Gate Bridge, parked and started walking across bridge with bowling ball in hand. After checking for boats below, I tossed ball over the railing. A dramatic end to tournament bowling. I eventually got a new ball and have done recreational bowling only a few times. Amazingly, the fun in bowling started to return. Do I have regrets? Yes. I still chide myself for letting bowling almost disastrously become more important than education. However, I wish I physically could still bowl with friends and once

again enjoy the fun of a great activity. Bruce Haston, Trinidad

Audit CR! Editor: College of the Redwoods is out of touch with the community (“CR Faces the Music,” Blog Jammin, March 14). The cuts of classes and faculty while adding remedial classes at the expense of viable classes are an example of that. The music

program and theater art department have NOT been losing money. In fact, they are putting valuable money resources into the school. So have many of the other classes that are slated to be cut. In the business world, money has to be handled wisely and not cut products and resources. The CR board and administration has and are mishandling their resources. I want Cartoon by joel mielke a financial audit of the school after the last two presidents left. Was everything done legally? Maybe instead a golden handshake, they should have been given the golden boot. The expansion of the pilot programs into other areas took away from the main school. Sell the satellite buildings and cancel leases in little-used outlying areas. Focus on the main campus. Don’t build new buildings and then cut classes. Put money into the existing buildings and existing classes while adding more advanced classes. Don’t cut classes and layoff fac-

ulty. More classes, more students, more money. CR board and administration: Listen to your community. Alvis Lang, Eureka

Kids: Enviro-Disaster Editor: In California you can’t seem to bring your dog anywhere, and everywhere you do, they must be leashed (“Unleashed,” March 7). You can’t tie your dog up on a street and you can’t leave your dog in a car. I guess you have to leave them at home? Do you have to be a landowner to be able to let your dog run? The beach is one of the last refuges for a dog to be free in California, and of course people are going to complain. I don’t like seeing anything captive, so my dog is almost never on a leash. He is completely voice trained and the only thing he likes to chase is his ball. I will admit that I see a lot of people who don’t know how to train their dogs. (If you’re calling your dog and they’re running the other way, you have some work to do.) But how often do you see children acting up? You want to complain about the environmental damage my dog is incurring? How about your children? My dog is my continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013

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April 4, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 14

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

The Lake. Photo courtesy of the Morris Graves Foundation.

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

continued from previous page only child. My longterm girlfriend and I have no urge to reproduce … ever. So next time you’re shaking your head at me and my dog, think about your own environmental impact. The footprint my dog leaves in his entire life will fit in the heel of your child’s first month of life. Sunny Caldwell, McKinleyville

Today’s Lesson: Sharing

does not allocate enough specialized classroom space to the charter school.” The charter school is requiring special education classrooms, art/music classrooms, technology labs and indoor fitness space, also non-teaching space such as administrative offices, multipurpose room, gym space, staff lounge, cafeteria, nurse’s office, parking, playfields, library and kitchen, with a copy room and a teacher/ lunch space, too. I don’t see an empty school when I walk the halls of South School. I see full classrooms, hallways full of kids, and no empty space. Trying to fit another school into this campus is not in the best interest of our children. John Miller, Fortuna

Editor: The Fortuna Elementary School District is currently negotiating with Redwood Preparatory Charter School Editor: for space to house their school (“Charter Many are called to give to the poor School Rift,” Jan. 24). The district’s offer and needy as documented in the oldest was fair: Use of six classrooms; additional manuscript still available to read. Abrafull-size classroom which could be divided ham gave generously to strangers, giving for multiple uses such as administration them food and lodging for as long as they office and individual instruction; shared needed. Likewise, countless others have use of girl’s and boy’s bathrooms; shared given freely, unconditionally to countless use of outdoor recreation field and equipneedy persons for thousands of years. ment; shared use of all parking, and shared So it is curious how a lady giving out use of cafeteria/multi-purpose room. “brown sack lunches” could be considI see some problems next year when ered a “Betty Chin copycat” (“Waiting for parents find out Redwood Preparatory Chinn,” Jan. 3). If the writer had researched school teenagwho she was, ers are sharing it would be restrooms with discovered that Fortuna Elementhis woman has tary kids as been giving out young as 6 years lunches long old. Consider before she knew the confusion of Betty Chinn. Spring in the alreadyIn 2008, The flowers, they bloom packed parking the Homeless area when the Connect Day as the cars go vroom parents of 170 was held, with crushing the yellow buttercups. more children three hot meals, The sun, it shines try to drop off clothes, medical burning all the vines and pick up kids. attention, showWhere are the ers, laundry and and bringing the whole forest down. classes going social services The people they frolic which were in offered to vetcuz’ they’re jobless alcoholics these builderans, children ings before? and the elderly. and that’s the meaning of spring. How much is It was attended this going to by hundreds of — Caleb Kerr (14) cost? I seem to persons from remember the the Eureka area. “Consolidation This effort of Fortuna and involved several Rohnerville church commuSchool Districts” nities and was was to save money and it ended up costheld at the Episcopal Church. Doctors, ing one district quite a bit more. Will this nurses and social workers from several be the same deal? denominations came, donating their exRedwood Prep has actually made a pertise to this high risk population. counter proposal to the district asking for This lady with “brown sack lunches” more space than what was offered. They was a major coordinator to this event. say “The district’s preliminary proposal All followers of God are called to give.

In Praise of Giving

Spring


It is designed to be a selfless act encouraging community thinking and involvement. I would request that a retraction be printed. An apology to all persons of our community who give much of their fixed incomes, visit people in hospitals and prisons, take food to single parents, and selflessly give to charities. But especially an apology is needed to that particular lady who for more years than we can count has been making “brown sack lunches” and giving them to more than 200 people she has personally befriended. Martha S. Meade, Blue Lake

Thanks NCJ, Sorry Isom Editor: I want to thank you for your “Dear School Trustees” editorial (Dec. 13, 2012), which I read and saved. Good thing, too, for once again Jon Isom is beating the parcel tax drum here in Southern Humboldt. Really, Jon, since when do new buildings guarantee an education? Reduce dropout rates? Guarantee my child will be admitted into a university, let alone graduate? Help my child find meaningful employment and a purpose-filled life? Think hard, Jon. It isn’t new buildings which inspire young minds. It is and always has been the staff — those with frozen wages, added duties, and overcrowded classrooms, facing layoff notices during every school budget review. Of course, Jon, you have thousands pillaged for consulting fees, for orchestrating community sell-the-bond campaigns and for transaction fees with every bond series sold. Isom Advisors of Walnut Creek, whose parent company is Urban Futures of Tustin, Calif., must be making killing. In June 2010, Northern Humboldt High School District alone vowed to pay Isom Advisors $70,000 for each bond series sold. More than teachers earn in a year. But what about those on fixed incomes — the seniors, the disabled, the minimum-wage earners, the single parents? Can most of us really afford higher property taxes, which instantly translate to raised rents? What does one sacrifice to pay tax increases — groceries, heat, medicine? Last October, J.N. Sbranti wrote in the Modesto Bee that before assuming a debt, taxpayers should know “how much for how long?” But getting these financial details isn’t always easy, because “Bond promoters typically skip the financial specifics when pitching the benefits of fixing up and building schools. Here’s why: sticker shock.” The cost can be staggering, and “the debt can linger for generations.” Enough is enough. Time to just say, “No!” No to more taxes. No to more debt. Cheri Porter-Keisner, Piercy

Beware the Police State Editor: On Oct. 18, the Journal reported that Project Censored determined the expanding police state tops the list of underreported stories by the mainstream media. The militarization of our police has dramatically increased. Yes, here in Humboldt County. Recently, Carrie Peyton Dahlberg, your editor, was bullied and intimidated for trying to photograph a safe crime scene in a public place. Clearly legal. Kimberly Starr, better known as Verbena, and James Decker, have four small claims lawsuits in process against the EPD and the City of Eureka. The lawsuits are about violating their civil rights during the Occupy Eureka Protests. They were trying to video what they considered overreaction, bullying and intimidation by local law enforcement. The City of Eureka is in the process of selecting a new police chief by July 1. We need to make sure there is more transparency and accountability. The Human Rights Commission is still trying to take out the parts of the “Urgency Ordinance,” passed by the Board of Supervisors, that criminalize dissent. Suppression of dissent keeps people from speaking out. HSU hosted the first “Criminal Justice Dialogue” on March 28-29. This was mostly about how incarceration affects communities and rehabilitation. A good start. How about a series of forums to involve the whole community in dealing with these urgent and important issues? NCJ, we need you! Jim Paquin, McKinleyville

Word Lovin’ Editor: Thanks to Pat Dillman for her comments about word accuracy usage in the NCJ (“Watch Your Words,” Mailbox, March 28). I have noticed numerous inaccurate use of words and even misspellings. Please help these writers to use proper terminology. If in doubt, check it out. Thanks for pressing on to publish this newspaper each week! Have a great day! Peter Mosgofian, Arcata

Write a letter! Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013

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PublisheR

Political Reality 2013

W

e often read in news articles that so-and-so couldn’t be reached for comment. Well, sometimes a reporter just doesn’t try very hard. Sometimes we’re even glad when our phone calls aren’t returned, truth be told. But I want Journal readers to know how hard we tried to get an interview with our new Humboldt County Planning Commissioner Lee Ulansey, the subject of last week’s cover story, “HumCPR Rising.” Staff writer Ryan Burns asked more than a dozen times over a period of weeks. I finally offered to help and gave it my best to convince Ulansey in a personal email exchange. The interview could be taped and posted on our website, we suggested. The answer still came back no. It’s tough to do a story on a person who refuses to be interviewed. Tough, but

not impossible, as Ryan demonstrated. The article has been praised by many — even by a friend of Ulansey’s — as being fair, accurate, insightful and connecting a lot of dots. Ryan listed some questions in his story he would have liked to ask Ulansey, mostly about his personal political organizing (along with O&M Industries owner Rob McBeth) ever since HumCPR was founded in 2007. As Ryan documented, the duo has had a remarkable string of successes, having backed now four of the five members of the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors and four of the five members of the Eureka City Council. I had some questions of my own after our email exchange. How does Ulansey reconcile his passionate belief in “transparent government” with the fact that he founded a political action organization

home & gardenservice directory

northcoastjournal.com North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal • THURSDAY, Thursday, APRIL April 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 8 NORTH

that over the last two election cycles helped capture super majorities on the two largest, most influential political bodies in the county? This shadowy group has pretty much zero transparency as a private, for-profit corporation. (Ulansey claims 4,000 members, but I think he’s counting those who sign up online for HumCPR newsletters. In that case, the Journal is now a member.) HumCPR has no list of members available (the old one has been removed from its website), no public meetings, a locked office on Fifth Street in Eureka, and currently no executive director. Yet HumCPR, with two active lawsuits against the county, is responsible for pretty much hijacking the General Plan Update (after 11 years of public process, the public is now excluded from the meetings of the ad hoc committee “advising” the county supervisors) and

the ouster of former Planning Director Kirk Girard. And here’s another question: Who exactly wrote the checks for Supervisor Estelle Fennell’s salary as executive director of HumCPR for three years before she became county supervisor? (Fennell also declined to be interviewed but gave a few comments via email.) I love advocacy groups. I joined one myself last year called the Bay Trail Advocates (www.baytrailplan.org). Every member is listed with our contact information on the website. I belong to other, more sophisticated organizations that raise money to fund all kinds of good causes, like Planned Parenthood. They are nonprofits, run by boards of directors who are elected, with financial transparency and accountability. HumCPR’s only accountability is to its wealthy donors. How many are there and who are they? HumCPR may not have 4,000 members but it has spent an enormous amount of money that now influences the daily and weekly politics of Humboldt. Just last


week as we were going to press, county supervisors voted (4-1, of course) to appoint former Eureka City Manager David Tyson to the UpState RailConnect Committee instead of the eminently more qualified retired Humboldt County Public Works Director John Murray. (Does the county want a darn smart engineer who has a lifetime of experience in building massive public works projects, or does it want a committed east-west-yes rail advocate who is already representing other overlapping, redundant organizations?) Perhaps more stunning last week was a decision, in special session on Good Friday, by the Eureka Council members. They did what some of them said they wouldn’t do: Voted to use public money to study an east-west rail line. For more than a year we have been told by east-westers, Tyson included, that private money existed to do this study — and likely to build it because it would be such an attractive and successful business venture. There is no doubt that the feasibility study is a priority of this council, but the council’s

flip flop (again, 4-1) on using public money should be raising eyebrows. And so should the manner in which the council members did it — calling an emergency session on Thursday for Good Friday when anyone who might oppose was either at work or out of town for the holiday or just plain unaware that this expense was being considered. (The council voted to use $17,500 in “staff time” to match a grant from the newly minted “Land Bridge Alliance,” yet another east-west-yes group. The staff time will be used to apply for a $295,000 grant from Caltrans.) Eventually these council members and supervisors will have to stand for re-election. When they do, let’s be sure to ask them a lot of questions about decisions they are making today, and money and time they are spending. In the meantime, we’ll all just have to live with the new political reality. l

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Blog Jammin’

continued on page 12

AMANDA SENSEMAN, THE WARBLER. PHOTO BY JENNIFER POOLE

ENVIRONMENT / BY HEIDI WALTERS / APRIL 2, 9:33 A.M.

Climbers Bring Down Willits Warbler

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Warbler’s tree-sit to stop the Willits Bypass is over. Redwood Nation Earth First! reports that she was removed by climbers early this morning, and that the removal of the other tree-sitters in nearby trees is likely next. The group writes: Warbler was taken down from a height of 55 feet by climbers accompanied by a massive show of force from California Highway Patrol (CHP), who arrived in the early morning fog with eight patrol cars, two command cars and a paddy wagon and many officers. Caltrans has been clearing brush to build a fence along the project site. You can read about the project in last week’s Journal, available on our website – where we also have the full Redwood Nation Earth First! press release. ● HUMBOLDT STATE / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / MARCH 30, 4:23 P.M.

Teen Collapses, Dies after Jog An 18-year-old HSU fresman died Saturday morning after jogging with a friend, the university is reporting. The young woman, Jessica Garcia, had been sitting in the bleachers at the Redwood Bowl when she was stricken. Fellow students and coaches tried to help before she was taken to Mad River Hospital, the university said in a press release. Garcia was from Reseda, and had been living in an on-campus residence, HSU

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 10NORTH 10

BIRDS, CURIOSITIES / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 29, 4:08 P.M.

Man About Town Jack Lincoln is one of the latest strutting habitués of the brick sidewalk in front of Old Town Coffee & Chocolates in Eureka. Handsome, too: blue head, changeable neck — it goes creamy white when he’s content, says his person, Nick, and red when he’s excited (equally with anger, happiness or lust). On this sunny afternoon, Jack, an 11-month-old Rio Grande wild turkey, was participating in a strange feather-shaking dance with passersby. One man decided to cha-cha-cha with Jack, and around and around they stamped and shivered their butts, eyeing each other with ceremony. With every tail shake came, insisted Nick, a “bonnnngggg” sound, a bass wave, issuing from Jack’s belly and booming out the dish-like spread of his tail. “It’s a sign of health,” Nick said. It’s a sign that Jack thinks all the twoleggeds around him are an extension of his turkey tribe. After dancing with the man, Jack repeatedly sidled up to a woman in a short green dress and green rubber boots. She cut a few tight circles with the bird, then left. Next he sidled up repeatedly to a woman in black pants and brown leather boots, and finally pecked her left leg softly then reared up to hump it. Nick pulled Jack away, several times, picked him up and cuddled his feath-

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said. The cause of her death wasn’t immediately known. The press release is on our website. ●


tary School Cafeteria, 730 North Hwy 96, Willow Creek, and 5 p.m. April 17 at the Mattole Grange #569, 36512 Mattole Road, Petrolia. ● POLICE / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 29, 11:14 A.M.

Arcata Cop in Fracas over Parking Space Exits Force

JACK LINCOLN THE TURKEY AND HIS PERSON, NICK. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

ery bulk. Put him down. The sidling and humping resumed. He’s named, Nick said, after the turkey whom President Abe Lincoln granted a reprieve from slaughter for the family’s holiday meal after Lincoln’s boy Tad cried to spare him. Nick has eight other turkeys; sometimes he’ll herd them in a group about town. And they all, in a sense, are pardoned birds. They won’t be slaughtered for eating. In fact, it is Nick’s wish to develop a domesticated house turkey breed, one that can be house-trained and, presumably, taught some general pet-like manners and mores. Now, though, he’s got a more pressing problem. “I have 30 eggs I have to either incubate, sell or eat,” he said. ● MARIJUANA / BY BOB DORAN / MARCH 29, 2:59 P.M.

Talk Pot Ready to offer your opinion on plans for regulating outdoor marijuana grow operations? The supes have scheduled a bunch of community meetings, starting in Garberville Wednesday, April 3, at 5:30 p.m. Garberville Veteran’s Hall, 483 Conger St.. Other meetings are scheduled for 6 p.m. April 15 at the Trinity Valley Elemen-

/blogthing

Arcata Police Officer Kevin Stonebarger is no longer employed with the Arcata Police Department. As readers might recall, Stonebarger was involved in a verbal rumpus over a parking space in February 2012, outside Pho Tien Long restaurant in Eureka, where he and other members of the drug task force were having lunch. APD Chief Tom Chapman would not say whether Stonebarger was terminated or left of his own accord. An internal investigation into the incident had concluded Stonebarger committed several violations of conduct, including using a badge inappropriately, being rude to the public and overstepping his authority as a peace officer when he threatened to arrest a tow truck driver — who was trying to haul away another agent’s vehicle that occupied the space — and the owner of the parking space — who was lawfully trying to record the events, which were taking place in public. Stonebarger was taken off the drug task force and reassigned. He filed a claim against the city refuting the conclusion of the investigation and saying he lost his position as a firearms instructor at College of the Redwoods because of the investigation. (The investigation report can be viewed in the claim document.) The city rejected the claim this January. There was talk Stonebarger would file a lawsuit. ● BUSINESS, FRIVOLITY / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 26, 12:49 P.M.

Yep: TJ Maxx Is Coming A friendly clerk at Kohl’s in the Bayshore Mall said the other day that, no, the prospect of another competitor isn’t threatening. Kohl’s can handle it. It’s known, said the clerk, for its customer service, especially at the Eureka store: “We were just voted No. 1 in customer service in our region, out of 106 stores.” The newbie — T.J. Maxx — (owned by

the same company as Marshall’s) has been written up as a successful sourcer in quality brands. Even so, this news likely ain’t as exciting as a new Wal-Mart coming to town. Well, T.J., welcome to Eureka — and to the pending minimum wage showdown. ● ACTIVISM / BY ANDREW GOFF / MARCH 26, 12:34 P.M.

Local Planned Parenthood labeled ‘The Worst’ The Eureka arm of the 40 Days For Life campaign, the human prayer shield camped out in front of Six Rivers Planned Parenthood since Feb. 13, wrapped up operations on Sunday, March 24. Done. (For previous Journal coverage of the prayer-a-thon, see-eth our website.) So what did we learn? Be careful what you sign up for. Early on in the saga, the Journal signed up for the 40 Days For Life daily newsletters. Then, for 40 straight days we received emails sent out by campaign director Shawn Carney through its headquarters in Fredericksburg, Va. Most of the daily blasts chronicled movement successes and inspirational anecdotes culled from reports from the many encampments around the world — the final number of babies saved they’re goin’ with is 554, by the way. But finally, on Day 38, Eureka got its moment in the spotlight. In an email titled “They’re back!” 40 Days of Life warned its followers about efforts to undermine the campaign’s message and highlighted Clergy for Choice and Six Rivers Planned Parenthood as “the worst of the lot.” Their crime? Mocking God. The aforementioned section of the email follows: Subject: DAY 38: They’re back Dear Andrew, Lots of people love the peaceful approach of 40 Days for Life and see how God has used this effort. BUT … it comes as no surprise to find out that not everybody is a fan. There are people in the abortion industry who call this campaign “40 Days of Harassment.” No one is being harassed, of course (except maybe the prayer volunteers). The truth is that peaceful prayer on the sidewalk is bad for business. So the pro-abortion side is doing whatcontinued on next page

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

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Blog Jammin’

continued from previous page

press releases: newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

letters to the editor: letters@northcoastjournal.com

events/a&e: calendar@northcoastjournal.com

So there. As we previously reported, in response to the 40 Days For Life campaign, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood launched a Pledge-A-Picketeer campaign. In the end it raised over $15,000 for the clinic.

music: thehum@northcoastjournal.com

is no prestige in the abortion trade. • Day 40: Safe and legal? Based on numerous ambulance calls at abortion facilities, “safe” couldn’t be any farther from the truth. And of course, abortion is never “safe” for the baby. Let’s all pray for all of those who’ve convinced themselves that abortion is a moral “choice” — and for all who are deluded into believing that lie.

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staff at abortion clinics around the nation. May they be daily confirmed in the sacred care that they offer women. • Day 27: Today we give thanks for abortion providers around the nation whose concern for women is the driving force in their lives. • Day 40: Today we give thanks and celebrate that abortion is still safe and legal. To respond to each of those “prayer” intentions: • Day 5: Fewer and fewer medical students are interested in abortion. Aging abortionists are retiring and not being replaced. • Day 18: Abortion — the destruction of innocent children — is considered “sacred care”? Unbelievable! • Day 27: The “driving force” for Planned Parenthood is money. There

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ever it can to minimize the impact … by twisting the truth. 40 DAYS OF MOCKERY There are a number of proabortion backlash efforts that have adopted the “40 days” theme. The worst of the lot is jointly sponsored by “Clergy for Choice” and the Planned Parenthood affiliate in Eureka, California. This effort, “40 Days of Prayer to Keep Abortion Safe and Legal,” is really a mockery of 40 Days for Life — and frankly, of God. They use a collection of 40 daily prayer intentions — sounds familiar, doesn’t it? But listen to some of the “Clergy for Choice” intentions: • Day 5: Today we pray for medical students who want to include abortion care in their practice. • Day 18: Today we pray for all the

continued from page 10

Be sure to pick up the Journal’s Do It Green Guide. Available on newsstands all over Humboldt County, at your favorite green merchants and online 24/7 at northcoastjournal. com, under the Special Publications tab.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 12

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“Magnolia spring bouquet” (1981) painting by morris graves

I

On The Lake

The mystic painter Morris Graves and his reclusive life in Humboldt By Bob Doran  Excerpts and images from Morris Graves: Selected Letters, edited by Vicki Halper and Lawrence Fong, used by permission of University of Washington Press opposite Jacket photo “Morris Graves with a Tuning Fork” by Dorothy Norman, circa 1955, from the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Art

14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

n January of 1965 the visionary painter Morris Graves wrote a letter to an old friend in Seattle:

I am now, at last, buying the forest tract of land — near Eureka — which is where I will build a studio and settle. It is a 380-acre tract of virgin forest surrounding a five-acre lake. The forest is magnificent old-growth redwood and white fir and spruce and all the other Pacific forest plants I love to live with, and the little lake is filled with miniature islands which grow miniature salal and blue huckleberry and dwarfed spruce, etc.

Not long after Graves wrote to his mother, Helen: Mother dear - This is just a note in haste to say that on Wednesday the final papers were signed and the new deeds recorded. It’s a terrible tussle to buy something that’s not for sale, and it’s taken three years — as you know — to get the owners to believe that they did want to sell.

He was feeling ecstatic a few months later when he wrote his friend Richard Svare: The land purchase [is] finally signed and sealed, and I am full of joy! Full of tears of joy! Full of joyous tears of joy!  The forest lake is unspeakably beautiful, and I can hardly wait for you to see it so that you’ll know so too and know that it has been waiting since the beginning of the emergence of California from the sea for me! Untouched! Undisturbed! Unspeakably serene. Only seeing it (and me cool and calm as rain-freshened moss) will dispel your uneasiness and worry about if it’s right that I have bought it to educe its latent beauty and still look as though it had never been touched by anything but bird’s feet and deer’s toes and raccoon’s tiptoes! …  The eight-by-fourteen-foot cabin — in a dark grove of trees by the lake’s shore — is finished. The mile-long road through the forest is finished. I have made a huge raft to paddle about on the lake to groom the little islands and prune out the dead twigs and branches. The climate here is eternal autumn. The sky clears at night sometimes, but the Lake is half obscured by mist all day. I

can hear only bird songs and the soughing of the trees if a summer breeze stirs them and the distant foghorns groaning on the sea coast.

  The visionary artist Morris Graves, acclaimed as one of the major figures in American art in the mid-20th century, had found his final home. The enigmatic painter spent the last 30 years of his life in Humboldt and died here, but a scant few knew him. He was almost invisible. By design, he lived a reclusive life dedicated to painting and working in his garden, shunning visitors. A new book, Morris Graves: Selected Letters, takes a deeper look at his seclusion, how he chose Humboldt and how he felt about his art. Some of his correspondence with friends, family and associates is reprinted here.   “I paint to evolve a changing language of symbols with which to remark upon the qualities of our mysterious capacities which direct us toward ultimate reality … to verify the inner eye,”  

Graves wrote Museum of Modern Art curator Dorothy Miller in 1942, when his work was first shown there. “I find painting a relief from the overwhelming pressure of realization. I shout to relax — I paint to rest.”

  Born in 1910, the sixth of eight boys, Graves grew up in the Seattle area, watching birds and learning the names of wildflowers. His life has been chronicled in Deloris Tarzan Ament’s Iridescent Light: The Emergence of Northwest Art and other sources that outline his nomadic ramblings as well as his search for a permanent home. Graves dropped out of high school after his sophomore year, got a job on a ship heading east and explored Japan, China and Manila. He was particularly taken with Japanese aesthetics. He returned to Seattle in his 20s to begin what he saw as his life’s work: being an artist. Bearded, lean and lanky, at 6 foot 4, he cut a striking figure. In 1933, he took top honors at an annual contest at the Seattle Art Museum with a painting of a swan. In all the years that followed, Graves never married. He wrote fond and exuberant letters to male friends. But Graves was a man of his time, and throughout his long life he didn’t speak publicly about his sexuality.


While working for the WPA Federal Art Project in 1939, he met the painter Mark Tobey, 20 years his senior, who taught him new techniques including painting on delicate Chinese paper with tempura. The two artists had a tempestuous relationship, played out in letters that Graves eventually burned, thinking them too personal. Although he spent most of the 1930s traveling and painting, Graves also began his search for a remote and soul-satisfying home. He paid $40 at a tax auction to buy 20 acres on Fidalgo Island near Anacortes, north of Seattle. In 1940 he began work on a house/studio there. Perched on the edge of a cliff with views of the Cascades and Puget Sound, the retreat he called The Rock would be his home until 1947. It was there that he produced some of his most famous work, including the Inner Eye and the Maddened Birds series. Until The Rock, Graves hadn’t sold much work. And he had fallen into reticent ways that lasted all his life, rebuffing gallery owners and museums, needing repeated persuading before agreeing to showings. He resisted at first when Miller from New York’s Museum of Modern Art wanted to include him in a 1942 MoMA show titled, “18 Americans from 9 States.” Eventually he yielded, but downplayed the work in correspondence with Marian Willard of Willard Gallery in New York City, who became his lifelong art dealer and friend. He told her that he sent the MoMa “70 unframed, half-conceived — and far, far less than half-painted things … a heap of half-dreamed-up ideas leaning to the poetic but out of no conviction sufficient to force itself into a language — and coasting on the voiced enthusiasms of friends. I think they prove by their lack of vitality that I’ll never be much of a painter.”

Despite his misgivings, the show was a hit. MoMA ended up buying 11 of his paintings for its permanent collection and everything else he showed sold. He followed that with a solo show at the Willard Gallery and was featured at the prestigious Phillips Memorial Gallery in Washington, D.C. Vanity Fair wrote glowingly of him and his work — all in 1942. Graves shrunk from the attention. He didn’t want to be famous. He wrote to the editor of Vanity Fair complaining, “I consider publicity more than an intrusion. Slight as it has been, it becomes, in the minds of even a few, the threshold of reputation — under such pressure I am rendered vacant. Time would possibly relieve this — but, to avoid obscuring my meaning, I will say that in my very plasm is the need of privacy carried to obscurity.”

Nevertheless, his prominence kept growing. In 1953 Graves, Tobey and fellow painters Guy Anderson and Kenneth Callahan were featured in an extensive 1953 Life magazine piece titled “Mystic Painters of the Northwest.” His place in art history was now solid, freeing him to flirt with departures that would be less well-received, including a sculpture series, “Instruments for a New Navigation,” inspired by U.S. space exploration. All along, Graves kept running up against authorities who didn’t share his worldview. He tried to become a conscientious objector during World War II, and instead spent months in a stockade before a military psychiatrist recognized that he’d never adapt to military life. In 1947, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to study in Japan, but he made it only as far as Hawaii before being refused entry to Occupied Japan. It’s unclear why. But a gay continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

15


continued from previous page draft resister would have had two strikes against him during those years. Graves began trying out a series of homes. There was a cinder block chateau dubbed Careladen, on land he’d bought in Edmonds, Wash. There was Woodtown Manor, an eighteenth-century house outside of Dublin, Ireland. He liked the light in Ireland, mostly because it reminded him of the Northwest, but America was calling him home. In 1957, his brother Wallace Graves wrote him describing what he considered an ideal landing spot: “If I were to define this place where you could remove yourself to, it would be something like this: it would be fairly mountainous, hard to get to by road; … it would be far enough from the present centers of population so that during this century the great increase in population would not reach it in great degree; it would be so contoured that one could own all one could closely see; it would be blessed by Nature not with things which can be converted … but would instead be blessed by a virtue of its own form, a delight in itself.”

MORRIS GRAVES WORKING ON HIS FIRST CABIN (JULY 1965). PHOTO BY WALLACE GRAVES, © MORRIS GRAVES FOUNDATION

Morris Graves had passed through Humboldt in his travels, and liked it enough that he reached out to Floyd Hollenbeck of Holly Realty. In 1962 Hollenbeck helped him find just what he was looking for, a remote wooded area surrounding a lake near Loleta. At the time, Rex and Viola McBride owned the land around Catfish Lake with some partners,

RIGHT “MOUSE HELPING A HEDGEROW ANIMAL CARRY A PRIE-DIEU” (PAINTED IN IRELAND, 1954). BELOW “THE GREAT BLUE HERON YOGI AND THE GREAT RAINBOW TROUT YOGI IN PHENOMENAL SPACE, MENTAL SPACE AND THE SPACE OF CONSCIOUSNESS” (1979), TRIPTYCH FROM THE MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM OF ART COLLECTION.

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

and they had no intention of selling. Convincing them took time. As Graves told the story, the turning point came when Viola, who had studied art, figured out who wanted the place. While on the phone with Hollenbeck, she asked if this was Morris Graves, the artist who painted birds. Yes it was. A deal was crafted. Floyd Hollenbeck’s son Eric (who now

WALLACE GRAVES, ROBERT YARBER AND MORRIS GRAVES ON HUMBOLDT BAY (1985).

operates Blue Ox Millworks in Eureka) helped Graves cut brush to make way for a road to the lake and cleared space for a small cabin. When Graves wrote his mother in mid-1965, his delight seemed unabated. He’d become a Humboldt tree hugger. Something about these great old mature giant trees makes my heart go out to them. I love them more than my fellow man. Or so I feel sometimes. They stand in the forest with such serenity BELOW “TIME OF CHANGE” (1944). ROBERT YARBER EXPLAINED, “THIS AND OTHER PIECES REFLECT THE TIMES WHEN HE STRUGGLED, WHEN THINGS WEREN’T GOING WELL.”


© Morris Graves Foundation

continued on next page

THE

and character, their Robert Yarber with one of the Instruments of a New lives so resolved — so Navigation, part of the 2000 Graves exhibit “Beauty: all-of-a-piece — and Seeing Then, Seeing Now, Seeing Beyond” at the Morris the forest is so deep Graves Museum of Art. photo by Bob Doran and in places almost impenetrable that many of these great trees have never been Graves enlisted Seattle architect Ibsen seen by man. This gives them some deep Nelson to design and build a proper house quietude of their own, and although you for The Lake. It wasn’t easy going. As may think I’m waxing a bit emotional in Nelson wrote to Graves’ art dealer Marian this letter, I lean with my arms outWillard, stretched against these great trees when I discover them and my heart floods The first thing that we discovered with tears of love for them. I am far from when we set out to build the building what’s called a “naturalist” (or what’s was that the foundation conditions next called a “bird-watcher”), but I’m not far to the lake shore were not what we had from what’s called a “solitary.” I love to anticipated, in spite of some considerbe alone in nature where no one has ever able soil investigation. At that time I been and where there’s not a chance that told Morris, “You have two choices, someone is going to be. Morris. You can move the house back up onto solid ground farther away from the lake, or we can bring in a pile driving machine and design a complicated pilesupported system of reinforced concrete structural supports to carry the house over the boggy terrain.” … Morris said we absolutely cannot move the house. You know him well enough that you can probably hear him say so. We had stood there with the roof overhang mocked up on the site and Morris understood the building had to have this special relationship to the lake and it could be no other way. … Picture if you can that wonderful Morris striding around like a giant crane, his dreamy but perceptive eyes missing not a thing, watching every detail of the construction as it progressed. I came down each weekend to review the progress, to solve all of the new problems that had come up, and to discuss each and every aspect of the

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17


continued from previous page house with him — endless discussions about the way the windows operated, the way that we put in the sink, etc., etc., etc. The greatest care was taken with every detail of the house. I believe that it shows. It is an achievement, and I am proud of it.

Graves ended up seriously burdened financially after building The Lake. He had mortgage payments to make and had not paid Ibsen anything at all, holding him responsible for cost overruns. He’d stopped painting to focus on the project, so he only had a little income from painting already with his dealers. Friends offered to help him by selling paintings he’d given to them, but at some point living alone in debt just seemed to be too much. In May 1969, Graves wrote to Rex McBride saying, I have, during the past two years, been able to pay off $40,000 of the $70,000 indebtedness. I am worn out by

MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM CURATOR JEMIMA HARR HOLDS GRAVES’ PAINTING “DWARVES” (CIRCA 1948) IN THE MUSEUM VAULT THAT HOLDS MANY OF THE PIECES GRAVES AND THE MORRIS GRAVES FOUNDATION DONATED TO THE HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL.

this struggle. I cannot seem to organize myself to continue to raise such amounts of money as well as pay taxes and loan interest and monthly living costs. There is $30,000 yet to be paid. This amounts to a burden which I can no longer carry. “Atlas” — Graves! — cannot stagger under this burden any longer. Because the financial load so far exceeds my earning capacity as an art-

M

orris Graves’ life and work have a lasting influence on artists here and elsewhere. Two shows opening this weekend at the Morris Graves Museum of Art demonstrate that influence. California-born sculptor David Kimball Anderson’s “To Morris Graves” is a collection of pieces inspired by the flower paintings Graves did while living at The Lake. In some cases the artist recreates in three dimensions Graves’ two-dimensional medita-

“SPRING BRIAR AND CROCUS” DAVID KIMBALL ANDERSON

THE BACK OF THE SAME PAINTING SHOWS ITS HISTORY. BOTTOM RIGHT IS A LABEL FROM GRAVES’ PRINCIPAL ART DEALER WILLARD GALLERY; ON THE LEFT, A LABEL FROM THE PHILLIPS GALLERY IN WASHINGTON, D.C. THE PIECE WAS INCLUDED IN A MID-1980S TRAVELING SHOW, “MORRIS GRAVES: VISION OF THE INNER EYE.”

ist — straining patience, energy and emotion — my feeling for my house has changed. … I have grown to dislike this beautiful place because I am so burdened and so tired and so trapped. I have decided to sell the place, hoping to salvage both my disposition and health and, sad to admit, my nearly exhausted ability to paint because under this burden I no longer can collect that

tions on the simple beauty of a flower in a vase. Other sculptures are less direct, merely using Graves’ Zen-like work as a starting point. Richard Gabriele, a painter from Philadelphia, is among the artists who have spent time working at The Lake under a fellowship granted by the Morris Graves Foundation. He has used some Gravesstyle techniques, “a manner of painting from improvisation that I discovered during experiments with color washes on thin handmade Japanese paper, when the interaction of layered pigment suggested the image of a bird.” Gabriele thanks Robert and Desiree Yarber “who generously share the natural beauty and solitude of The Lake. I have had the pleasure of exploring the forest while nourishing the creative force at the heart of my painting process, which is introspective and benefits from the quietude of a secluded environment. “Beyond the benefits of living in such a majestic forest, The Lake is, for me, a symbol of hope because it reflects the victory of Morris Graves, whose way of life in the 20th century demonstrates certain values that are increasingly rare in an age when technology and worldly “HEAD OF BUDDHA” (2013) RICHARD GABRIELE distractions flood our daily lives.” ●

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

nervous energy essential to the act of creative painting. You and Viola hold a first-refusal option on this property. She already knows my problems. … Will you please discuss this matter with her as soon as possible. I have asked Peggy Hunt to sell the property for me in case you do not exercise your option.


One of Graves’ bird painting shows Harr’s reflection. photos by bob doran

Loleta population 118 113 artists 3 sculptors 2 potters

continued on page 21

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Lake, taking care of the artist’s day-to-day needs and dealing with outsiders. Now in his 60s, Graves sh ifted into a new phase of minimalist paintings of floral arrangements, works with a Zen-like simplicity intended as statements about the nature of beauty. He unpacked the “Instruments of a New Navigation” sculptures and completed them. He continued working in his garden, tending his flowers and manicuring the landscape of The Lake, refining beauty of a different sort. But mostly he enjoyed his solitary life on The Lake, away from the noise and hustle bustle of civilization — and people. His wry view of the town he called home shows in a whimsical census, written in 1997 and found among his letters, which reads in part:

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Of course he did not, in fact, sell The Lake. Graves was prone to dramatic gestures and statements, and his letter to the McBrides was one of them. He eventually resolved his money problems and got back on track with his work. In 1973, he hired an assistant, Robert Yarber, who lived at The

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Trillium Dance Faculty performing at North Country Fair Samba Parade

Erin with Level 3B & 7B classes at Trillium Dance Studios Erin and hubby, Nate, of McKeever Energy & Electric

Meet our neighbor Erin dances. Her major at Humboldt

State University was elementary education with a minor in dance, which fit together perfectly when she opened her Arcata-based dance studio in 2006. She has already expanded the school to accommodate her growing number of students. The emphasis is on ballet, but she also offers Latin and Modern Dance. Her students range in age from four years old through high school and up to adults. “The faculty and alumni perform as The Trillium Dance Ensemble,” says Erin. “My older students have grown up to become accomplished dancers and also perform

alone as the Junior Ensemble. The whole studio performs twice annually at HSU’s Van Duzer Theater and at Eureka High School’s auditorium. Erin met her husband Nate McKeever at a reggae event. They were each in the early stages of starting their own companies. Nate’s business is McKeever Energy & Electric. “Murphy’s is amazing,” says Erin. “It is so convenient! Murphy’s carries all the everyday things we may need at the studio. It is just a few strides down the walkway and one of the older students

can zip over for batteries, towels, pens … just anything! I can quickly get something easy and delicious for lunch, and I always see my high school students there too, grabbing a snack. I teach into the evening and when I lock up it is wonderful to have Murphy’s open, just a few steps away. Nate and I eat organic and I can get just about everything from there that we can get at a health food store.” Organic food, household items, office supplies, groceries, and convenient hours … that’s what Murphy’s is all about!

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20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com


continued from page 19 114 guitarists, country western 3 mouth organists 118 actors 1 blind man eighty years old 116 TV watchers 12 widows 5 widowers 116 Social Security, Unemployment and Medicare recipients 1 grocery store post office 18 daily meals on wheels 118 lottery ticket buyers 42 school children 106 whites 35 skateboarders 21 Native Americans 1 mulatto 16 divorcees 6 gays 6 lesbians 103 bisexuals 118 masturbators

MORRIS GRAVES IN HIS GARDEN, 1982. POLAROID PHOTO BY ROBERT YARBER, COPYRIGHT MORRIS GRAVES FOUNDATION. MANY THANKS TO ROBERT YARBER AND HIS WIFE DESIREE FOR SHARING PHOTOS AND MEMORIES.

When the Humboldt Arts Council was first getting going, art enthusiast Sally Arnot invited Graves to participate in a group exhibition. He ended up choosing the local artists for the show. “We became friends after that,” said Arnot in a recent conversation in the offices of Eureka’s Morris Graves Museum of Art. “At some point in the ’90s he decided he wanted to give us his personal collection of art, things he’d collected over the years. He believed his collection needed a permanent home. We literally took all the art at The Lake, wrapped it up in blankets and drove it off in our station wagons. He gave us pieces by [Jean] Arp and Mark Tobey, all sorts of things.” In 1996, when the city offered to sell the arts council the old Carnegie Library for $1, Arnot shifted into serious fundraising mode. (See George Ringwald’s Journal story, “Cheerleader for the Arts” Dec. 30, 1999.) “I’d already approached Robert to see if he’d be interested in helping,” said Arnot. Yarber became co-chair of the committee alongside the artist Floyd Bettiga. Pulling together over $1 million to refurbish the library as a museum took a few years. Arnot’s “Brick Buy Brick” campaign allowed for endless naming rights. Graves and the Graves Foundation gave cash and

more art work of untold value. In January 2000, to honor Graves’ contributions, the Carnegie was officially renamed the Morris Graves Museum of Art. “Morris felt very strongly about the local artistic community,” said Arnot. He loved all the artists. He wanted to save this building.” In December 2000, the museum mounted a retrospective exhibition of Graves’ work, curated by Yarber, titled “Beauty: Seeing Then, Seeing Now, Seeing Beyond.” Earlier that year, a tired Graves wrote a note to Yarber: R. My problem is: I’ve lived too long. Life is no longer fun — or funny. M.

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By William S. Kowinski stagematters@northcoastjournal.com

T

he Tempest is Shakespeare’s last play and in some ways a summation. For one thing it’s a kind of anthology of clips from his greatest hits: there’s the royal treachery of his histories, a romance in a pastoral setting, a philosophical protagonist, spectacle, magic, music and a couple of clowns.  It’s rare if not singular that Shakespeare doesn’t base the story on an existing text. Out of numerous sources from reality and literature, his alchemy creates a myth. In it, Prospero uses his learning to command the magic of an uncharted island through the powerful spirit called Ariel, while defending his daughter Miranda against

the animalistic man called Caliban. This myth has fed countless other stories and supplied metaphors for many discussions through the years, just as this play itself has been interpreted and presented on stage in many different ways. As directed by David Hamilton, the production of The Tempest now on stage at North Coast Repertory Theatre in Eureka retains the vague Shakespearian period and imposes nothing significant on the text except perhaps the final image. It’s a thoughtful production but a clear and entertaining one, very accessible to those who’ve never seen the play while providing novel nuance for those who have.   It begins with a shipwreck caused by


Prospero’s magic that deposits Italian nobles and their retinue on this island, including men who are part of Prospero’s past as the deposed duke of Milan. They wander to their fates on Calder Johnson’s earthy brown set that is scattered with magical symbols. Scott Malcolm is a Prospero both sad and angry, with a heaviness about him. Kate Haley is an appealing Miranda, easy to imagine with Bobby Bennett’s believable Ferdinand as star-struck lovers. Kenneth Wigley is a convincing Caliban, constricted, tormented and rebellious.    In this production Ariel is always accompanied by a retinue of undulating nymphs (Eva Brena, Caitlin Volz, Alyssa Rempel, Caitlin Wik and Tenn J. Wilson) and seems a creature more of earth and sea than the usual depiction of Ariel as a spirit of air and fire. This makes her more kin to Caliban than opposite. In any case, Chyna Leigh makes an arresting Ariel, with strong voice and gravity-defying costume.  Her first song is magical, one of the evening’s highlights. Brian Walker as the jester Trinculo and Tyler Egerer as Stephano were funny and skillful in the physical comedy of their two key scenes. They seem so clownish, however, that their conspiracy with Caliban to murder Prospero never seems credible, though Prospero takes it seriously. Ken Klima, Bob Service, Scott Osborn, Pam Service and Annajane Murphy clearly portray the different aspects of the beached nobles, including the ignoble.  The diction was crisp and the acting energetic for the first act on opening night, though clarity tended to fade in the second act and several key scenes seemed obscured. Though this is Shakespeare’s shortest play, it played for nearly three hours.   The shipwreck and Prospero’s magic show for the newly engaged Miranda and Ferdinand were films by Malcolm DeSoto. They worked technically and cinematically, but seemed to drain some energy from the stage. There was some neat stage magic I won’t give away.     Hamilton’s direction did not focus

on the themes of colonialism that some productions do, but they’re in the play and don’t need emphasizing. The earthy emphasis suggests but doesn’t insist on an environmental message, as the island itself suggests the tradition of utopian tales. The biggest addition I detected was at the end, when instead of breaking his magical staff (as he promised), Prospero hands it to Caliban. Caliban is the only character whose fate is not stipulated in the text. All in all, it’s a considered, skillful production. The excellent costumes are by Patricia Hamilton, sound design by Gabriel Groom, makeup by Chyna Leigh. Nathan Emmons was the Shakespeare speech coach. Other actors not already named include Gabriel Butler-Smith and Jeremy Webb. The Tempest plays weekends at NCRT through April 20. I have more thoughts on this play at http://stagematters.blogspot.com. Also of note: Pam Service, who plays Gonzalo, wrote an interesting piece for the Tri-City Weekly on the experience of participating in the production. NCRT has reliably ensured there would be at least one annual North Coast Shakespeare production, but this year there are at least two more to come. Dell’Arte’s summer show will be The Comedy of Errors, and a revived Shakespeare in the Park in Arcata will produce As You Like It and a contemporary play. Auditions for the park productions are on April 6 and 7. More information at www.playsinthepark.org. We sadly note the passing of Sue Bigelow Marsh, a playwright who provided a venue for new work at her Plays in Progress/World Premiere Theatre in Eureka. Especially in the late 1990s it was an exciting place.  With its demise as well as HSU cutbacks, a home for new work is conspicuously missing from the North Coast theatrical ecology.

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23


FAR LEFT: CYNTHIA PEREZ WORKS WITH YOUNGSTERS DURING DISCOVERY MUSEUM'S KIDS ALIVE — THE ALTERNATIVE TO TOTING THE LITTLE ONES ALONG TO ARTS ALIVE! FESTIVITIES. LEFT: DISCOVERY MUSEUM IS FULL OF FASCINATIN' CONTRAPTIONS. PHOTOS BY DEVAN RICHARDS.

While Adults Play … Discovery Museum offers kids a treat during Arts Alive! By Dev Richards

A

n eerie serenity has taken over the normally bustling Discovery Museum in Old Town Eureka. It’s after hours now, on the first Saturday night in February, and the lights in the lobby and gift shop have been turned off. Julia Grosby is shuffling through brightly colored paper, sorting it into piles and cutting out rectangles. Cynthia Perez is parceling out pieces of graham crackers and spooning blobs of peanut butter onto paper plates. It is very, very quiet. Outside, occasional passersby stop to press their faces against the window. Outside, grownups are gearing up for another evening of art, music, food and drink, the monthly meander that is Arts Alive! Inside the shadow-drenched museum, Perez and Grosby are gearing up for Kids Alive — an evening of activities, exploration and allergy-friendly snacks for 3- to 12-year-olds. It’s 5:20 p.m. now, and the noise comes in a wave, silence to cacophony within seconds. Kids bolt through the half-door barrier between the museum’s gift shop and exhibit floor, shedding coats and eagerly awaiting nametags, the one hurdle between them and an educational, kinetic wonderland. Perez plasters pink tags on the little ones 5 and younger,

green on those 6 and older. These kids are regulars. They know each other, know their favorite stations and know how much free-play time they have before the first activity begins. Despite the age range, the kids mingle jovially, sharing stations, lining up for the ship with a slide, maneuvering around each other to get to the next exhibit. The two oldest, at 10½ and 11, finish a scavenger hunt in seconds flat, collect their prizes and make a direct line to the Discovery Nursery. “We usually know how everything works here, and we’re like always the older ones here,” says one, as she and her friend rock bizarrely realistic baby dolls in a crib. The two girls tell me they like being the oldest — they can play with the smaller kids, help the grownups and catch up on important preteen things like determining the cutest member of One Direction. As we talk, several kids with pink name tags disembark from the ship and drop anchor in the nursery, capturing the older girls’ attention. The two groups merge and play until Perez rings a triangle at the front of the museum. It’s story time! Every Kids Alive night has a theme, and tonight’s is Dr. Seuss. The 3- to 6-yearolds are being treated to Cat in the Hat, while the older kids enjoy the tongue

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

twisters of Fox in Socks. Though the older group seems moderately entertained by counting the number of times Perez gets tongue-tied, their unrest eventually squirms to the forefront. A small, lispy voice rises above the tittering to ask, “Are we going to do something funner?!” Honestly, you can’t blame the kid. Sitting at a table filled with arts and craft supplies (paints, glitter, you name it), surrounded by interactive science toys (you guys, there’s a 20 foot ship with a slide!) is not the most conducive environment for reading. Before any more unrest can bubble to the surface, activity time begins: Cat in the Hat masks and Horton Hears a Who ears for everybody! Throughout the evening, as the kids bounce around inside the museum, several adults pop in to ask about vacancies. Grosby smiles and tells them that Kids Alive fills up fast — attendance is capped at 18, and they’re still holding a spot for someone — so it’s best to pay a $5 deposit in advance to hold a place for your child. (The deposit goes toward the $15 fee, which provides fun, food and even a little education from the 5:30 p.m. dropoff time through the 8 p.m. pickup hour.) When the first crafting efforts wind down, the kids break for clean up, some more play time and a snack. Then the two

activity groups switch: masks for the ear gang, ears for the mast crew. The night concludes with more free time, the kids playing with a little more desperation now, knowing the night will soon end. I’ve been waiting all night for one of them to use the Smell Lab, an olfactory guessing game that seemed sure to entertain. But the Water Lab, Shadow Wall and the S.S. Discovery eclipse it. One smiling 4-yearold spends every moment of his free time at the Floating Ball Station, a vertical leaf blower that sends rubber balls flying into the air. As 8 o’clock nears, red-faced parents, either from the wine or the wind, arrive sporadically at first, then in a steadier stream. The youngest kids, grumpy and half-awake, leave with their heads resting on their parent’s shoulders, their craft projects clutched in their tiny hands. Some battle time, pulling parents toward their favorite exhibits, begging for more trips down the slide. Kids, man, they have no idea how much more awesome their childhoods are than the generations before (my generation included). If I were a few years younger, I would have been all over that Smell Lab. ● Dev Richards is allergic to everything and regrets nothing.


northcoastjournal.com

Portraits & Still Lifes

James Moore

First Saturday Night Arts Alive! Saturday, April 6, 6-9 p.m. Presented by the Humboldt Arts Council and Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are held the first Saturday of each month. Contact Eureka Main Street at 707-442-9054 for more information or go to www.eurekamainstreet.org. 1. EUREKA INN 518 Seventh St. Lauren Cogan Jones, mixed media. 2. MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM OF ART 636 F St. Performance Rotunda, music by Marla Joy and Mike Conboy. Thonson Gallery, 12th annual Northwest Eye regional photography competition and exhibit, awards presented at 5:30 p.m.; Atrium & Rotunda Gallery, Selections from the HAC permanent collection; Homer Balabanis Gallery Humboldt Artist Gallery newly relocated, the HAG features many Humboldt County artists, and is designed as an artists’ cooperative; Anderson Gallery “David Kimball Anderson: To Morris Graves” sculptures inspired by the flower paintings by Morris Graves; Knight Gallery Richard Gabriele, “Inward Visions of Man,” new watercolors; Floyd Bettiga Gallery Humboldt Artist Gallery group show; Youth Gallery “Rita’s Excellent Adventure,” a whimsical tale of a sand crab named Rita, illustrated with 20 tapestries. 3. COTTAGE ANNEX 618 F St. Shabby chic, cottage chic, enamelware, floral china and linens, etc.

3a. EUREKA THEATER 612 F St. Local author Amy Stewart, Drunken Botanist book signing and cocktail party, with Eureka Books. 3b. ANNEX 39 608 F St. Art Deco and mid-century modern. 4. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. Artists from Humboldt County and out of area were invited to participate in “The Great Outdoors.” Visitors can vote for their favorite work. 5. BOHEMIAN MERMAID 511 Sixth St. Merit Cape, stone and pearl jewelry; Amber Jones, copper and glass art; Dave J. Struthers, local beach photography; Megan and Michael, acoustic duo performing. 6. DALIANES TRAVEL 522 F St. William Wood, “Africa Remembered,” photographic-digital art inspired by the three years Wood’s spent in East Africa over 40 years ago. 7. F STREET FOTO GALLERY at Swanlund’s Camera 527 F St. Arcata High School students’ “Second Annual Impressions and Perceptions Photo Show,” with black and white silver gelatin prints as well as digitally manipulated images. continued on next page

The Finest Art for your Home, Office & Garden 423 F Street, Eureka, CA

Tues - Sat 10-6pm • Sun Noon-5pm

(707) 269-0617 sewellgallery.com

Old TOwn’s Premier TaTTOO

Sculptures, paintings and puppets created from found materials, evoking the theme of the fool in all of us, are among the works of David White being shown at the HSU First Street Gallery. This is “The Man Who Had His Identity Borrowed,” in acrylic on paper. White, an HSU alumnus, will give a free artist’s talk at the gallery at 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 4. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

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continued from previous page 7a. THE LOCAL 517 F St. Asheley Nordby, mixed media of sound and repurposed objects; Four for Jazz, performing. 8. SACRED PALACE BOUTIQUE - BIKRAM YOGA 516 Fifth St. Augustus Clark, acrylic paintings on recycled wood; Lala’s Lovely Creations, handmade jewelry, hair accessories, garden ornaments. 8b. EUREKA STUDIO ARTS 526 Fifth St. Brent Eviston, drawing demonstration, working from a costumed model provided by Dell’Arte School of Physical Theatre in Blue Lake, 6-8 p.m. Drawings by Eviston and paintings by fellow studio teachers on exhibit. 9. LIVING ROOM GALLERY at Mikk iMoves Real Estate, Inc. 805 Seventh St. John Wesa, serigrapher, 20 original prints. The Heirloom Tomatoes, “LunchBox Envy” art, photos and nibbles; handmade baskets from the Mufindi Highlands in Tanzania; Kulica, performing. 10. MANHARD CONSULTING 611 I St. Cindy Noble, watercolors. 11. SEWELL GALLERY FINE ART 423 F St. James Moore, “Portraits and Still Lifes.” 11a. MELVIN SCHULER COURT GALLERY, second floor of Gross building a Fifth and F streets.

Larger pieces of Mel Schuler’s works from his personal collection, courtesy of Dan and Jayne Ollivier. Julie Froblom and Joe Danatov, classical duo, performing; wood fired pizza, beer and wine sales benefit CASA of Humboldt. 12. EUREKA STUDENT ART EXHIBIT 440 F St. (formerly Indah Bali). Student art featuring Eureka City, Cutten and Ridgewood schools, hosted by the 22nd District PTA. 12a. SURFSIDE BURGER SHACK 445 Fifth St. Robert Walker, photography. 12b. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and Engineering 401 Fifth St. Daniel, artwork. 13. AMIGAS BURRITOS 317 Fifth St. Katherine Ziemer, photography; Vince Cavatio, “Wave and Surfing” photography. 14. PRIMATE TATU 139 Fifth St. Michael Arneson, canvas and acrylic. 15. BAR FLY PUB AND GRUB 91 Commercial St. The Last Match, performing 9 p.m., no cover. 16. CHERI BLACKERBY GALLERY and THE STUDIO 272 C St. Group show, “Repetitons.” 16a. HALL GALLERY 208 C St. Featuring the work of Stephan Alessandri. 17. THE WORKS 210 C St. Terry Walker, artist; live jazz.

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Northern California. 18d. SEE NO EVIL PHOTO GALLERY at SUITE C STUDIO, 129 Second St., Suite C Sonny Belk, digitally enhanced photography. 19. STEVE AND DAVE’S First and C streets. Marni Schneider, photography. 19a. REDWOOD CURTAIN 220 First St. (Main entrance through Snug Alley.) Lobby Gallery Calista Hesseltine, McKinleyville HumHigh b ldSchool t Bay ninth grader, “A Study in Close Up,”ophotography. 20. CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. Traditional Southwest artists’ prints.

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18. SAILORS’ GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo related art, antiques and memorabilia. 18a. LIVELLA STUDIO 120 Second St. Sets Revenge, ambient electronic music, performing, 8-10 p.m. 18b. MANTOVA’S TWO STREET MUSIC 124 Second St. John David Young Trio, classic rock, performing. 18c. THE BLACK FAUN GALLERY 120 Second St. Dara Daniel, new col33a MARCHlection 2013of oil on canvas landscapes inspired by shifting seasons 33b in

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One of the few sharks that will make you go “squeee” swims among a window full of copper sea creatures. The Scott Hemphill creations decorate the offices of Humboldt Baykeeper for this month's Arts Alive. (And the ray is pretty adorable, too.)


northcoastjournal.com

20b. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. Cheri Esparza, “Positively Pin-Up” photography. 21. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Michael Roland, acrylics; Josephine Johnson, performing. 22. THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St. Patronus, performing. 22a. ALTERNATIVE BUILDING CENTER 325 Second St. suite 103. Monica Baird and family, watercolors, color pencils, fabric dying and fabric appliqué; Mike LaBolle and Ken Lawrence, jazz duo, performing. 22b. BRENDA TUXFORD GALLERY 325 Second St. Native American multimedia show, “From the Source: A Continuation.” 22c. RUSTIC WEST TRADING CO. 339 Second St. Karen Nelson, Day of the Dead Jewelry; Rafael Franco, hand-carved bone; Loreta FlemingateBright, Baltic amber; Katelyn Lollich, bead jewelry. 23. CIARA’S IRISH SHOP 334 Second St. Claudia Lima, artist. 23a. HUMBOLDT GLASS BLOWERS 214 E St. Monica Haff, paintings; Pinball tournament. 23b. CLARKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM Third and E streets. Local author Katy M. Tahja, Logging Railroads of Humboldt and Mendocino Counties, book signing; Bayside Brass, performing. 24. BELLA BASKETS 311 E St. Rob Walker, scenic photography. 25. STUDIO 424 424 Third St. James Reid and Mark McKenna, photography. 25a. GEOMATRIX 426 Third St. Grand Opening. Jeff Robinson oil on canvas, Roman Villagrana, mixed media and Robert Busch oil on canvas 25b. SHIPWRECK 430 Third St. Chuck Johnson of Freak Photo, “The Intimacy of People and Places;” Caitlin Jemima, folk/country, performing. 26. CAFÉ NOONER 409 Opera Alley. Matt Beard, original ink drawings; The Living Rooms, performing. 27. HUMBOLDT BAYKEEPER 211 E St. Scott Hemphill, copper aquarium inspired sculpture; Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers, performing. 28. RAMONE’S 209 E St. Cora Norris, paintings. 30. TRUCHAS GALLERY/LOS BAGELS 403 Second St. Allison Marsh, HSU graduate, photography. 31. BELLE STARR 405 Second St. Bobbie Benson, paintings. 31a. NORTH SOLES 407 Second St. Susan Schuessler and Sharolynn Hutton, oil paintings and watercolors. 32a. HSU FIRST STREET GALLERY 422 First St. Annabeth Rosen, “Nature-Morphic,” recent works on paper and nine ceramic sculptures. 33a. BAYFRONT RESTAURANT F Street Plaza. Huichol Indian art from Mexico. 33b. LIVING THE DREAM ICE CREAM One F St. Vetter Family Frames; live music. 34. STRICTLY FOR THE BIRDS 123 F St. Doyle Doss, photographs.

Lecture • Book Signing • Cocktail Party When

Where

April 6 Lecture 5 p.m. Signing & Party 6 to 9 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F Street

Free Admission • All Ages • Door Prizes For more information, call 444-9593.

Sponsored by Eureka Books, The Eureka Theater, North Coast Co-op, Pierson Building Center, and American Harvest Organic Spirit

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

27


northcoastjournal.com

FortUna

continued from previous page 35. EUREKA FABRICS 414 Second St. April Walton, three-dimensional quilted silk wall hangings. 35a. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Abbie Perrott, paintings. 36. YARN 418 Second St. Christina Anastasia, visionary acrylic paintings. 36a. TREASURE TROVE 420 Second St. Darlene Counts and Maureen Dombek, “Vintage Dishware Art.” 38. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Aaron Houser, Trinity Mountain Dulcimers with special guest musician; Cottonwood of Rooster McClintock. 41. THE WINE SPOT 234 F St. Sonny Wong, acrylic on canvas; Erica Brooks, mixed media. 42. OLD TOWN JEWELERS 311 F St. Featuring the artwork of Allison Reed. 43a. DISCOVERY MUSEUM Corner of F and Third streets. Kids Alive Program Drop off 5:30-8 p.m.; call for reservations 443-9694. 44. AMERICAN INDIAN ART GALLERY 241 F St. Dawn Woodman, beaded jewelry. 44a. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 233 F St. Betty Fowler, “Beach Designs,” photography. 44b. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE 526 Opera Alley. Sonny Wong, artwork, and John Demello, performing; roasting facility tours. 46. OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOLATES 211 F St. Tina Gleave, silk artworks; Lizzy and the Moonbeams, blues, rock and funk, performing. 47. OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING Corner of Second and F streets. Jackie Oshiro, “Love of the Natural World,” watercolors. 48. SISTERFRIENDSJEANS 514 Second St. Purses and jewelry, with Spice Catering. 48a. OBERON GRILL 516 Second St. Permanent display: historic photographs of Old Eureka from Historical Society. 49. LINEN CLOSET 127 F St. Amy Lou, local designer, featuring infinity scarves and reversible bags.

First FRiDAy Downtown Fortuna’s First Friday Arts Night, Friday, April 5, 6-9 p.m. Local art, music and fun, returning to spring and summer hours. For more information fortunadowntown@ sbcglobal.net.

“5 Pears” by James Moore is among the still lifes and striking portraits that will be on display at the Sewell Gallery during Arts Alive and through April 28. Moore teaches drawing at Humboldt State University.

49a. FIVE ELEVEN 511 Second St. Shawn Griggs, original paintings and prints; live music. 50a. HUMBOLDT HARDWARE 531 Second St. Lane Thomsen, live woodturning; multiple new artists.

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28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

51. PARASOL ARTS PAINT YOUR OWN POTTERY AND MOSAICS 211 G St. Andrew Daniel, paintings; Matt Cooper, paper cut images, and Robin Friedman, mosaics. 52. ORANGE CUP CORAL SALON 612 Second St. Rob Hampson, abstract oils. 53. PIANTE 620 Second St. William S. Pierson, latest works, photography. 54. DELIGHTFUL EYE PHOTOGRAPHY 622 Second St. Tripwire, performing. 55. SMUG’S PIZZA 626 Second St. Brandon Garland, pen and ink. 57. ORIGIN DESIGN LAB 621 Third St. Jodi Lee of JoLee Designs, textile artist and maker of handbags and totes; music and refreshments. 57a. STUDIO S 717 Third St. Multiple artists, floral paintings. 58. BIGFOOT COMPUTERS AND PHOTOGRAPHY TOO… 905 Third St. YART, Yard and Art Sale. 59. ADORNI CENTER 1011 Waterfront St. Kevin Fernhart, Native American redwood wildlife wood carvings; Charity McAllister, Mexi-Boho style with a pinch of kitsch; Melissa Zielinsky, nature-inspired fused glass art. ●

BARTOW’S JEWELERS, 651 12th St. Art by Susan Genell Schuessler CUDDLY BEAR THRIFT STORE, 751 10th St. Open jam night — bring your instruments! DOWNTOWN STORE FRONT GALLERY, Main Street between 11th and 12th streets. Artists from the Fortuna Arts Council. EEL RIVER BREWING COMPANY, 1777 Alamar Way. Melissa McQuinn will be making a live stencil and acrylic painting, and singing with Mike McQuinn as he plays acoustic guitar. FERNDALE JEWELERS, 1020 Main St. Live music by Bill McBride and Don Hicks. FORTUNA ART & OLD THINGS, 1026 Main St. Holly Garbutt textile art. FORTUNA MUSIC MART, 1040 Main St. Artist Janice Boozer and Live music. FORTUNA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 11th and N streets. Student animation art. HORIZON BUSINESS PRODUCTS, 1044 Main St. Sean Flynn’s handmade scarves. KRAFTER’S KOZY KORNER GIFT, 1103 Main St. Humboldt photography by Grant Thomson. L’S KITCHEN, 734 10th St. Brian Porter’s art carvings from redwood trees. MAIN STREET GALLERY AND SCHOOL, 1006 Main St. Last chance to check out some of the 40,000 Forgotten Photos of Eureka 1919-1945: The Seely Images. MARIAN’S BEAUTY SALON, 741 11th St. Handmade jewelry art by Ashley Bones. MOORE’S SLEEP CENTER, 1201 Main St. Oils by Sanford Pyron. PRECISION INTERMEDIA, 1012 Main St. Artist Penny Fregeau and music by Jenni and David and the Sweet Soul Band. RAIN ALL DAY BOOKS, 1136 Main St. Paula Anderson, watercolors and painted silk scarves. STREHL’S FAMILY SHOES AND REPAIR, 1155 Main St. Janet Frost, watercolors. TACO LOCO, 955 Main St. New landscapes and figure paintings in oil by Richard Leamon. THE PLAYROOM, 1109 Main St. DJ Stir Fry Willie starting at 9 p.m. TRENDZ, 1021 Main St. Customized art on cell phone cases by Robert Slater. ●


LEFT: Carrie Walpole in her solo dance, “In the Void.” ABOVE: Walter Fogler and Kara Ajetunmobi in a dance choreographed by Lizzie Chapman. Right: Dani Gutierrez in her solo dance “Pieces on the Floor.” photos courtesy of HSU

Dancing Into Spring By Stephanie Silvia dance@northcoastjournal.com

F

rom students exploring their powers to established artists venturing in new directions, the spring dance season offers two highlights this weekend, with more coming up soon. This Thursday, April 4, at the Van Duzer, the HSU department of theater, film and dance presents On the Edge of Your Feet, an evening of contemporary dances. The university’s dance program has drawn strong performers, many driven to choreograph, and in this performance they inhabit the spaces in dancing where the personal goes public.   Coached by Sharon Butcher, director of the dance studies program, choreography students have created works about personal growth and social issues. Among them are In the Void by Carrie Walpole, Best Kept Secret by Kelly-May Rogers, Pieces on the Floor by Dani Gutierrez, and, most intriguing, Mirror Mirror on my Thighs, an unflinching self-examination of body image by Keili Simmons Marble. The cast of this show is a young, athletic group, capable of elevated leg extensions, buoyant jumps and leaps, partnered lifts and rhythmic unisons. The dancers glide toward each other, outward toward the audience and inward toward themselves.   Butcher’s students always have a handle on the core components of composition, becoming adept at repetition and variations, the folding and unfolding

of groupings, and a clarity of intention that brings completeness to the shows she directs. These students have also been fortunate to have Laura Muñoz of the Dell’Arte faculty as guest teacher this past semester.  Her earthy approach to dance training, all about the bones releasing into the earth, will inform much of the performing we see, most directly in her own new quintet, Living with Thirst. During an audition open to all students, not just dance majors, Muñoz chose “five very different dancers, short, tall, bigger, smaller. I wasn’t looking for something homogeneous.” The performers look like the antithesis of a ballet corps, yet become a unified ensemble. On the Edge of Your Feet, ThursdaysSaturdays, April 4-6 and 11-13 at 7:30 p.m., with one matinee at 2 p.m. on Sunday April 7, in the Van Duzer Theatre on the HSU campus in Arcata. Tickets available at the HSU Box Office, (707) 826-3928, or at the door. Leslie Castellano-Howabauten’s performance lab Synapsis has achieved a reputation for experimental dance. Now she is bringing a San Francisco show to Eureka for one night on Saturday, April 6, giving audiences a chance to see some of the latest in performance art. The visit comes because Castellano-Howabauten has been traveling to the city to work as a member of Miriam Wolodarski’s San

Francisco-based company, Sense Object. Sense Object’s Of Limb and Language, which recently premiered at CounterPULSE in San Francisco, is described by Wolodarski as “a communicational tragicomedy, a brutal love affair between semantics and somatics.” It explores how we find ways to distance ourselves from the violent events we read about or hear on the news. The dancers are trained in contact improvisation, with movements initiated where bodies touch, and dancers move on top of and beneath each other, casting one another into the air, at times nurturing and at times aggressive. You can expect that collaborative spirit to emerge in Of Limb and Language, whose script and choreography were developed by the cast. The evening opens with The Right to Tell Your Story, directed by Kayleigh Stack, a multimedia project using movement, graphics and audio. Of Limb and Language, Saturday, April 6, 8 p.m., Synapsis, 47 West Third St., Eureka. $8-$15, sliding scale, no one turned away. Synapsis is a small space and reservations are highly recommended. (707) 616-3104.

Upcoming

An evening of family entertainment and carnival mayhem brings stilt-walkers,

aerial artists and giant puppets to Arcata in Cirque de Shawazee, at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 13, at the Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. The evening benefits the Playhouse’s youth program. Adults $15, kids $10.  (707) 616-3104. When local dance teacher Stephanie Carter wanted to free her own inner beast, the dances inside her that were crying out to be choreographed, she figured others had their own inner artistic beasts too. She and Shoshanna of Redwood Raks put out that call to choreographers. The result spans jazz, Middle Eastern and modern dance in two performances. Free the Beasts, at 7 p.m. Saturday, May 4, and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 5, at Redwood Raks World Dance Center, Ninth and L streets in Arcata. Tickets $10 at the door. www. humboldtdancer.net. The quintessential modern dance company, led by the quintessential choreographer Paul Taylor, returns to CenterArts with an evening length program. Paul Taylor Dance Company, Tuesday May 7, 8 p.m., the Van Duzer Theater on the HSU campus. Tickets adult $45, child $25, HSU student $15. Humboldt.edu/centerarts, (707) 826-3928 And that’s only through the beginning of May. There will be more dance to come as spring unfurls. l

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013

29


a chamber music quartet and add vocals and lots of non-chambery ideas? Violinist Irene Sazer, formerly of Turtle Island Quartet, decided to find out. She enlisted violist Dina Maccabee, cellist Jessica Ivry and another violinist, Alisa Rose, and assembled the Real Vocal String Quartet, a singing, improvising powerhouse playing Saturday night at the Arcata Playhouse. RVSQ erases genre boundaries, pulling together a classical feel, jazz, rock, something-grass and worldly sounds from from West Africa and Brazil. As a result, the ensemble was selected by the State Department to become musical ambassadors touring five European countries last fall. There’s a new band playing Thursday at the Jambalaya: The Soulsapiens. It’s what you might call a concept band, with Matt ‘n’ Adam from Missing Link roped in to do the set list. “It was my idea,” said bassist Drew Mohr, who plays in several other bands. “I basically wanted to latch onto the HumBrews Soul Night fame. As far as up to much more than nothing. I’m concerned, soul is the most real music Improv guitarist Joel Harrison arrived out there, and I love how popular Soul in Marin County in the ‘80s looking to Night is, but couldn’t we get a full band expand his musical vision. Initially inspired together to do the same thing?” Yes, they by guitarists like Duane Allman and could. “I’m on bass and singing,” said Drew. Hendrix, he’d been exploring post-bebop “Brett Huska and Tricia Baxter (drum jazz a la Miles and Trane. Ready for new kit and percussion, respectively) are the directions, he enrolled in Ali Akbar Khan’s rhythm section from our other band Steel school in Marin to learn about Indian muStanding. Chase LaRue, from my band sic, studied composition, formed a world Children of the Sun, is on guitar, Aber beat band and Miller on keys, became part Scott Machen of the Bay Area on trombone, neo-jazz scene Ari Davie on that included trumpet and players like Lauren Strella Charlie Hunter, on sax.” Matt Ben Goldberg and Adam and Vijay Iyer. were happy to Since then, help (they’ll be he’s relocated there Thursday to jazz central, to spin some New York City, discs). “And we and continbeefed the list ued pushing up with a few boundaries in other tunes — composition the idea is to and improvisaplay all obscure tion. Thursday, Steve Kimock and Greg Anton. photo by Bob Minkin. soul tunes, a thanks to little JBs, Betty the Redwood Jazz Alliance, we have the Harris, that sort of thing.” Put on your opportunity to see him at the Arcata Playdancing shoes and get ready to funk it up. house with a totally amazing quintet he Along similar lines: funk big band calls Spirit House: on trumpet, Cuong Vu Motherlode follows its wildly successful from the Pat Metheny Group, on bassoon gig with trombonist Fred Wesley with a (yes, bassoon), Paul Hanson, on electric live recording session Friday evening at the and acoustic bass, Kermit Driscoll, who Arcata Playhouse. plays with Bill Frisell, and on drums, Brian Also on Friday, a benefit concert for Blade, currently the rhythm master in Explorations in Afro-Cuban Dance and Wayne Shorter’s quartet. If you love jazz, Drum, the internationally renowned music don’t miss this one. Show up early (7 p.m.) camp that percussionist Howie Kaufman for a “meet the composer” session with runs every summer at HSU. PerformHarrison. ers include the above-mentioned Steel What do you get when you start with Standing, a pan band spin off from the

Something from Nothing

The return of Zero, plus Spirit House, Real Vocal String Quartet, The Soulsapiens and Ghostface Killah By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

I

t started with a musical collaboration between the master of liquid guitar lyricism Steve Kimock, and the dynamic drummer Greg Anton. The year was 1984; the place, Marin County. “Greg and I met playing with Keith and Donna [Godchaux] in Heart of Gold,” recalled Kimock. “Then, tragically and unexpectedly, Keith lost his life in a automobile accident. So that folded up and we were left thinking: Can we keep playing together?” Yes, they could — in a band they called Zero. Kimock continued, “We found some guys, and they were good. We had like a thousand different guys in every position, lots of bass players, keyboard players and second guitarists, miscellaneous percussionists; people writing for us. John Cipollina [guitarist from Quicksilver] was playing with us, after a while we got [saxophonist] Martin Fierro involved. I don’t think we had a specific vision musically — at first it was instrumental, and it was whatever they used to call it: ‘rock/jazz/electric’ or something like that. We played music that suited us, played hard and went long.” The band eventually added vocals and Dead lyricist Robert Hunter, who wrote Zero songs including the signature number “Chance in a Million.” At this point all involved have many other irons in the fire, so the prototypical jamband doesn’t play all that often. As Kimock put it, “It’s kind of rare, but it’s always a pleasure — it’s an easy bike to get back on.” This weekend is one of those times when Zero rides again. Friday the band jams at Humboldt Brews with Kimock on lead, Anton on drums, Pete Sears (from Jefferson Starship and Hot Tuna) on keyboards, Banana (from The Youngbloods) on second guitar and Robin Sylvester (from RatDog) on bass. It adds

30 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt Calypso Band, and ToNaOnDa, an all-percussion samba group playing grooves from Rio and Salvador, Brazil. And, making this a very special night, there’s a resurrection of Sambatá, with three godfathers of Humboldt percussion: Eugene Novotney, David Peñalosa and Kaufman. “This will be our first concert together as Sambatá in over seven years,” said Kaufman. Ghostface Killah from Wu-Tang Clan stars in a live, hip hop extravaganza, “Adrian Younge Presents Ghostface Killah and Twelve Reasons To Die,” on Saturday night at the Mateel. Younge drew on the spaghetti western film music of Ennio Morricone, American soul of the 1960s and ‘70s, and ‘90s hip-hop a la RZA — he calls it “progressive nostalgia” — to create a dark story that’s also being released as a series of six comic books via Black Mask Studio. Younge’s band Venice Dawn provides backing for Ghostface. Saturday night at the Shanty, Miss Lonely Hearts rolls in from the Central Valley with a van full of shit-kickin’ alt. honky tonk/rock ‘n’ country. The allusion to Nathanael West’s dark novel about a newspaper columnist makes it all the more intriguing. Who else would open the show but Gunsafe? Washingtonian world beat wonder Yogoman Burning Band returns to Humboldt for a pair of shows. Saturday night at the Jambalaya, it’s a more-or-less adult affair (over 21 only); Sunday afternoon (1 p.m.) Yogoman and company play an all-ages, family-friendly show, again at the Jam. Kids like to dance too. You have an extremely wide range of musical options on Tuesday, April 9: A Chinese string quartet known as the Beijing Chamber Ensemble plays music by Beethoven and Brahms in HSU Fulkerson Recital Hall. The Palm Lounge has Vandella, a cool band from San Francisco that draws on classic and Southern rock, Motown, folk, blues and indie rock to create a multifaceted sound that defies easy labeling. The Arcata Playhouse welcomes The Vanaver Caravan, a traveling mini-folk festival from New York State led by folk musician Bill Vanaver and his choreographer wife, Livia. The troupe pulls together Pete Seeger-style sing-along and banjo picking with clogging, Irish and Balkan dancing and flamenco — all in the name of world peace. And at The Works, it’s an evening of alt. whatever with Seattle-based psychedelic/ electronic prog-rockers Midday Veil, on tour with Seattle ambient duo Brain Fruit, plus Humboldt’s own tripped out fuzz monsters White Manna and dark garage trio Super Brown. That’s right, all on a Tuesday here behind the Redwood Curtain. •


northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 4, 2013

31


entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731 ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220 BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770 BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

thur 4/4

fri 4/5

sat 4/6

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Joel Harrison (RJA) 8pm

Motherlode (funk) 9pm $10

Real Vocal String Quartet 8pm

Ocean Night Doors 6:30pm $3

HSU Marching Lumberjacks Spring Concert Doors 6:30pm $5 All Ages

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

www.facebook.com/LikeBarFly

Last Match (rock) 9pm

Dr. Squid 9pm

Swingin’ Country 9pm

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm Open Mic 7pm

El Flaco 8pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Lonesome Locomotive (American Roots, Bluegrass, Soul) 9pm

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

So You Wanna Fight? $39/$49 7pm Presure Anya DJs (Dance Beats) 9pm

Presure Anya DJs (DJ Dance Beats) no cover 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 8:30pm Blues Jam 9pm

The Trouble (Americana) 9pm $5

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Mon Petit Chou (French-Canadian) 8pm

CAFE MOKKA 5th & J Arcata

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093

WhoToo & Purple Haze (Tribute Bands) 8pm Mojo Child (Doors Tribute Band) 9pm

Animal Party with Presure Anya DJs 9pm

Amy Stewart’s Drunken Botanist Party 5pm

EUREKA THEATER Eureka Bleep Bloop, Patrick Sexxx, OnHell $12/$10 9pm

FAR NORTH CLIMBING GYM Arcata

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Shugafoot (jazz/blues) 9:30pm

Zero (jam band) 10pm $30

Lynx 9:30pm - $15

HSU Dance Concert JVD 7:30 pm $10/$8

Humboldt Bay Brass Band 8pm $7/$3/FREE

HSU Dance Concert JVD 7:30 pm $10/$8

The Soulsapiens w/ Matt ‘N’ Adam 10pm

DJ Phil Debowl and Grasshoppa 9pm

Yogoman Burning Band 9pm $10

HSU Guitar Group 7-9pm

Claire Bent & Aber Miller 7-10pm

Baron Wolfe and Friends 7-10pm

Ash Reiter, Lost Luvs Companion Animal 10pm $3

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

DOGBONE with John King 7-10pm

Kindered Spirits 9pm

Space Bisquit 10pm The Big Forgive 11pm

MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

Matt Pless & Josephine Johnson (folk-punk) 6pm

Rich McCulley (Americana)

Awesome Dogs here all day

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER Redway

Zion I, The Grouch, Eligh 9pm $20

FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852 HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739 HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Hours Tuesday through Saturday 5-10pm bar open Savage Henry Comedy Night w/ Keith Lowell Jensen 9pm $10

THE INK ANNEX 47B West 3rd St Eureka JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596 LIGHTHOUSE GRILL Trinidad 677-0077 LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St Eureka 444-1344 THE LOCAL 517 F St. Eureka 497-6320

EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

LOTS OF NEW GLASS JUST ARRIVED!

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

Locally Blown Glass

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000

Ghostface Killah 12 Reasons to Die Tour 9pm

MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd. Arcata OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017 RAMONE’S 2297 Harrison Ave. Eureka

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Experience: Fresh roasted coffee & espresso

Lizzie and the Moonbeams 7-9:30pm

Uptown Fridays with Guerilla Takeover 10pm

Arts Alive w/ Jsun

Open Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

The Compost Mountain Boys 6pm 1 UP!!! Arts Alive Mario Party 10pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St. Eureka

GENTLEMEN’S CLUB 2 1 + O N LY

NEW HOURS & SCHEDULE

9pm-2:30am Monday-Thursday 9pm-4am Friday & Saturday, Closed Sundays Northern California’s #1 After Party LADIES GET IN FREE! Every Friday & Saturday Night from 2-4am 2-for-1 Dances, & TWO Dancer Stages! Beer, Wine & Bubbly

STARTING MARCH 18, 2013

Monday – 2-for-1 DD lap dances Tuesdays – $1 off all beers all night long Wednesday – Couples Night Champagne Specials Thursday – Throwback Thursdays AFTER PARTY EVERY FRI. & SAT. NIGHT 2-4am

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

RED LION 1929 4th Ave. Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St. Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 824 L St. Arcata 616-6876

Karaoke Night 9pm-1am 21+ Open from 3 pm to 9 pm today

Start your weekend with Redwood Curtain!

It’s our Third Anniversary, and we’re celebrating all week!

Zumba Toning (Bella) 5:30pm Blues Night w/Brian & Kimberli 8pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am First Friday Folk Dancing Party 7:30pm

www.redwoodraks.com Brian and Gwen Post (jazz) 6-8pm

RENATA’S 1030 G St. Arcata THE RITZ 240 F St. Eureka ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St. Eureka 407-3550

Shugafoot 8pm

Uptown Kings 8pm

Irish Session 9pm

Songwriter Showcase: Matt Pless & Lyndsey Battle 9pm

Have a signature cocktail in the bar!

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ Muziqlement 9pm -12am

Sabata/Steel Standing, ToNaOnDa $10 9pm

Undone (rock) 9pm -12am

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed Band (blues) 8pm A Dance Cabaret 8pm

SYNAPSIS 47 West 3rd St Eureka TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696 THE WORKS 310 3rd St Eureka

DJ music 10pm Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

Come in for a great dinner! Miss Lonely Hearts/Gunsafe 9pm $5

THE SHANTY 213 Third St Eureka

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McKinleyville 839-7580

Rich McCulley (songwriter) 9pm

Throwback Thursdays

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com


Experience bass like never before with Bleep Bloop Friday at Far North Climbing Gym

sun 4/7

mon 4/8

tues 4/9

wed 4/10

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Anna Hamilton (songs) 6-9pm

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Sci-Fi Pint ‘n’ Pizza Night: Robo Vampire Doors 6pm Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows Pt. 1 Voted Best Music Venue 2011 & 2012 Doors 5:30pm $5 Journal Best Of Humboldt readers’ poll! Closed Sundays

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 - Free pool

Sunday Brunch 9am

www.bearrivercasino.com

www.bearrivercasino.com

www.bluelakecasino.com

Prime Rib Mondays!

Taco Tuesday w/$1 Tacos & $5 Margaritas at Wave Lounge

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings and $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool $3 Well Drinks

Cocktail lounge in the historic Eureka Inn

Martini Mondays $5 house Martini

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Closed Sundays and Mondays

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com HSU Dance Concert JVD 2 pm $10/$8

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights Violin/Viola Studio Recital FRH 8pm

Quiz Night 7pm

Yogoman (all ages) 1pm $10/ DGS 10pm

The Poker Den opens at 4 p.m. Monday through Friday Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

Vandella! Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 5-7pm Morgan Corviday Trio 9pm-midnight

Open Tuesday-Saturday 5pm Food served until 10pm

Seafood Specials Daily

Find us on Facebook!

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Beijing Chamber Ensemble FRH 8pm The Wild Things Puppet Show 8pm BA-DUM-CHH Open Mic Comedy 8pm

Paa Kow’s By All Means Band 11pm

“Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.” - Mark Twain

Used Books

• New Books

Special orders welcome for new books!

402 2nd Street • Corner of 2nd & E • Old Town, Eureka • 445-1344

Buddy Reed (Blues Guitar) 7-9pm Sara Torres 5-7pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

We also have liquor.

Repeat: We got beer.

Sunday night potluck dinner 6pm

9 Ball Tournament 6:30pm signup - $5 play 7pm

Double Dread Imperial Red on Tap

Growler Mondays $3 off growler refills

Ping Pong 7pm-midnight Dogbone (feral jazz)

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm Wednesday Open Mic 7-10pm Randles, LaBolle, Amirkan trio (jazz)

m Open Mic 7-9pm Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Open Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Happy Growler Day! Fill your growler for less $$$

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is back!

Pints for Nonprofit Night with SRPP!

Breakdance with Reckless Rex 5-7pm $10

Live Band Swing Night 7-10pm $5

Beginning Salsa with Jessica & Trill 7pm Beginning Argentine Tango 8:15pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am West Coast Swing 7:30pm

Now serving beer and wine

Wutchoodoin’?

No

submit your events online or by e-mail

northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com Deadline: Noon Thursday the week before publication

Karaoke McCoy Tyler 8pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Have a signature cocktail in the bar!

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Closed

Closed

Find us on Facebook

JD Jeffries 8pm -11pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

No Covers 8pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances White Manna/Midday Veil/Brain Fruit 9pm

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

33


Part chamber string quartet, part rollicking stringband, and as the name REAL VOCAL STRING QUARTET states, vocalists too. The Bay Area combo explores the boundaries of modern music, folding classical, jazz and rock into sounds from Africa, Brazil and the Appalachians. See the quartet in action Saturday at the Arcata Playhouse.

4 thursday MUSIC

Joel Harrison and Spirit House. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Improvised music by guitarist Joel Harrison with Paul Hanson on bassoon, Cuong Vu on trumpet, bassist Kermit and drummer Brian Blade. $15/$10 students and seniors. 822-1575. Humboldt Folklife Group Sing Along. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Joel Sonenshein leads your favorite songs from the ‘60s and beyond. www.humboldtfolklife.org. 839-7063. Zion I, The Grouch and Eligh. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Hip hop duo Zion I with The Grouch, Eligh, DJ Fresh and Alexander Spit. $20. 923-3368.

DANCE

On the Edge of Your Feet: HSU Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Explore balancing acts of life with dance studies student and faculty choreography. Sharon Butcher, artistic director. $10/$8 students and seniors. hsustage.blogspot.com. 826-3928.

MOVIES

The Weight of the Nation. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. www.healthykidshumboldt.org. Ocean Night: Trashed and Polyester. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Ocean Conservancy presents two films: one about the rising tide of garbage and one about a surfer. $3. E-mail jsavage@oceanconservancy. org.

COMEDY

Savage Henry Comedy Night. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Featuring comedians Keith Lowell Jensen, Johnny Taylor, Joe Deschaine and host Sherae O’Shaughnessy. $10. savagehenrymagazine. com. 826-2739.

SPOKEN WORD

Accident Slam. 7-9 p.m. Siren’s Song, 325 Second St., Eureka. Featured poet: Felipe Godinez of Metafortunetellers. Speak or spit your piece at the open mic. Music by DJ Goldylocks, live art by Otto Portillo; hosted by A Reason to Listen. $5. 530-448-9458.

ETC.

Human Rights Commission. 5 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, Conference Room A. 668-4095. Timber Harvests and Managed Forests: Good or Bad for Climate Change? 5:30-7 p.m. BSS Room 166, HSU. Sustainable Futures Speaker Series presents UC Berkeley forestry specialist Bill Stewart. humboldt.edu. 826-3653.

5 friday THEATER

The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. William Shakespeare’s classic work. $15/$12 students and seniors. ncrt.net. 442-6278.

MUSIC

Marching Lumberjacks in Concert. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. See HSU’s infamous Marching Lumberjacks rock out in an intimate venue. $5. mlj. kissouraxe.com.

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Saturday night at the Mateel, GHOSTFACE KILLAH from Wu-Tang Clan stars in “Adrian Younge Presents Ghostface Killah and Twelve Reasons To Die.” It’s a live hip hop extravaganza drawing on spaghetti western film music of Ennio Morricone, American soul of the ’60s and ’70s and ’90s hip-hop a la RZA.

Humboldt Bay Brass Band: Venetians and Volcanoes. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Annual HBBB concert unites Renaissance and contemporary sounds. Directed by Gil Cline. $7/$3 students and seniors. 826-3928. Phat Party 04. 9 p.m. Far North Climbing Gym, 10th and K streets, Arcata. Phantom Wave presents Bay Area electronica artists Bleep Bloop and Patrick Sexx plus locals OnHell and DAT-1. $12/$10 advance.

DANCE

Barn Dance. 7:30-11 p.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive, Arcata. Caller Sue Moon; tunes by Empty Bottle Boys. $7. humboldtfolklife. org. 502-1678. World Dance Party. 7:30-11 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Humboldt Folk Dancers party; music by Chubritza, Musaic and guests Bill and Livia Vanaver. No partner needed. $5. www.humboldtfolkdancers.org. 822-8045. On the Edge of Your Feet: HSU Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 4 listing.

COMEDY

Mateel Comedy Cabaret. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Danny Minch and Eddie Trevino headline with guest Nate Follen and Bada Bling Burlesque as servers. www.mateel.org. 923-3368.

BOOKS

Joelle Fraser: Forest House. 7 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Author Joelle Fraser discussses and signs her new book. joellefraser.com. 822-2834.

GARDEN

Gardening Study School-Course 3. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. UC

Redwood Jazz Alliance presents JOEL HARRISON AND SPIRIT HOUSE at the Arcata Playhouse Thursday, an evening of composed and improvised music by guitarist Joel Harrison with an all-star combo including Cuong Vu on trumpet, Paul Hanson on bassoon, bassist Kermit Driscoll and drummer Brian Blade. Come early for a “Meet the Composer” talk by Harrison.


Cooperative Extension Building, 5630 South Broadway, Eureka. Learn to grow flowers and prune trees and shrubs. $40. mgoodwin@northcoast.com. 442-1387.

LECTURE

Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Not Just For the Birds. 7 p.m. Richard J. Guadagno Visitor Center, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Loleta. Slide show lecture by David Thomson showing close-up wildlife photography in the field.

6 saturday EVENTS

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes. 5:30 p.m. Gazebo in Old Town Eureka, Corner of F and Second streets. North Coast Rape Crisis Team encourages men to wear high heels and walk a mile for charity as part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. walkamileinhershoeseureka@ gmail.com. 612-618-0414. CANstruction®. 6-9 p.m. Vance Cafe, Eureka. Community members form teams to design and build sculptures using non-perishable food items, turning mountains of food into art to benefit Food for People. Gunsafe provides a rockin’ soundtrack. www.foodforpeople. org. 445-3166.

THEATER

Shakespeare in the Park Auditions. 2-4 p.m. Redwood Lounge, Redwood Park, Arcata. Shakespeare returns to Redwood Park in August; audition for As You Like It, or a contemporary play. www.playsinthepark.org. 834-0861. The Tempest. 8 p.m. NCRT. See April 5 listing.

MUSIC

Real Vocal String Quartet. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Irene Sazer leads a post-chamber music ensemble mixing classical, jazz, rock and world music — with vocals. $15/$13 HFS/Playhouse member. 822-1575. Ghostface Killah and Twelve Reasons to Die. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Rapper from Wu Tang in a production drawing on Morricone spaghetti westerns, horror movie music, ’60s soul and ’90s hip hop. $20. www.mateel.org. 923-3368.

DANCE

On the Edge of Your Feet: HSU Dance. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 4 listing.

ART

April KEET Kids Club. Noon-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. /www.facebook.com/ HACMGMA. 442-0278.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Arcata Marsh Field Trip. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Ken Burton leads birding tour of Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, rain or shine. 499-1146. Ashley’s Mud Run. 9 a.m. Mud run at Carlotta Country Occasions in Carlotta to benefit local woman in need of organ transplant. www.ashleysmudrun.org. Trail Stewards Work Day. 9-11 a.m. Trail stewards do work on the Hammond Trail. Meet at the Clam Beach parking lot (south). Dress for work. E-mail sbecker@ reninet.com. 826-0163. Lanphere Dunes Tour. 10 a.m. Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata. Friends of the Dunes tour of the Lanphere Dunes. 444-1397. FOAM Arcata Marsh Tour. 2-3:30 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Alex Stillman leads a 90-minute Friends of the Arcata Marsh tour of the wildlife sanctuary. 826-2359.

SPORTS

Redwood Coast Assault of Arms. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. The

HSU Fencing Club hosts a round-robin dueling contest at the West Gym on campus. www.facebook.com/ hsufencing/events.

BOOKS

The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart. 5-6 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Local author talks about her new book featuring plants that create the world’s greatest drinks. www. eurekabooksellers.com. 444-9593.

LECTURE

Tales of the Berkshire Hog. 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Founders Hall 118, HSU. History Conference keynote by Kristin Hoganson, a professor of history at the University of Illinois on “How an Anglo-Saxonist Pig Can Help Us Reconsider the Roots of the Modern American Empire.” pjs26@humboldt.edu. 826-3641. History of the Humboldt County Historical Society. 1 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Past and current presidents of the Humboldt County Historical Society, Arlene Hartin, Don Tuttle and Jerry Rohde, share a brief history of the society itself.

FOR KIDS

Anthropology Day. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Natural History Museum, 1315 G St., Arcata. Hands on exploration of anthropology. Fun. Honest. www.humboldt.edu/natmus. KEET’s Kids Club. Noon-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Free monthly workshops for children, families and childcare providers comprised of viewing a segment of PBS Kid’s programming, reading short stories and doing art activities. Each family receives the book Yuck! Stuck in the Muck. 442-0278.

ETC.

St. Mary’s Annual Rummage Sale. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. St Mary’s Church, 1690 Janes Road, Arcata. Gently used items of all sorts. 599-2297. AAUW Meeting: History of the Eureka Symphony. 9:30 a.m. Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. American Association of University Women breakfast/brunch potluck with program on history of the Eureka Symphony. $5/$15 without potluck dish. E-mail egayner@hotmail.com. 839-4672. World Autism Awareness Event. 3-5:30 p.m. Azalea Hall, 1620 Pickett Road, McKinleyville. www.starfishhero. com. 601-6089. Tartan Day Potluck. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. The North Coast Scottish Society celebrates Tartan Day with a potluck dinner celebrating Scottish culture and the role it has played in the development of the United States. www.northcoastscots.org. 839-4153.

7

sunday

EVENTS

Japanese Tea Ceremony and Taiko Demonstration. Noon-2 p.m. Old Town Eureka Gazebo, corner of F and Second streets. Benefit for Eureka-Kamisu Sister City Association under the Old Town cherry trees, presented by the Horai Center for the Study of Pacific Culture. Kimono and traditional attire encouraged. www. horaizons.blogspot.com. Blue Lake Museum Opening and Mural Unveiling. 1 p.m. Grand reopening of museum at 330 Railroad Ave. followed by unveiling of Jerry Lee Wallace’s mural at the Grange Hall. 668-4188.

THEATER

Thousand Kites. 2 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. Letters from inmates, correctional officers, activists and community members; proceeds go to

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

35


Redwood Coast Assault of Arms

6th Annual Tournament

hosted by HSU Fencing Club.

Sat. April 6th Fencers Dueling round-robin style at HSU Campus West Gym 8am- 4pm Sun. April 7th Champions Fence and Awards, location TBA Noon5pm. Join us for a fun and exciting weekend. More info www.facebook.com/ hsufencing/events.

continued from previous page the Teen Gulch Program in Eureka. $10. areasontolisten@ gmail.com. 530-448-9458. The Tempest matinee. 2 p.m. NCRT. See April 5 listing. Shakespeare in the Park Auditions. 2-4 p.m. Redwood Lounge. See April 6 listing. On the Edge of Your Feet matinee. 2 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. See April 4 listing. 826-3928.

ART

Art Talk with Richard Gabriele. 11 a.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Gabriele discusses his watercolor exhibition, “Inward Visions of Man.” E-mail janine@humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

FOOD

Freshwater Grange Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Grange, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Old fashioned breakfast with buttermilk and whole grain pancakes, ham, sausage and scrambled eggs. 442-7107.

SPORTS

Mattole Valley Charter School

Humboldt County’s most experienced Public Charter School is accepting fall enrollment for K–12th grades. • Learning Centers offer dynamic daily instruction. • Independent study offers choice and flexibility. • We will create a personally tailored program to fit your student. • MVCS serves students county-wide.

Online Live Classes • Virtual Academy College Co-Enrollment • Tutoring • Highly Qualified Credentialed Teachers • WASC Accredited

OPEN HOUSE

April 12, 5:30-7:30 Cutten Resource Center 2120 Campton Rd., Suite H. Eureka

HSU Criterium Bicycle Race. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Starting at the corner of B and Harpst streets, HSU. HSU Cycling Team hosts a loop race on campus. humboldtcycling. wordpress.com. 530-340-2680.

ETC.

Flea Market. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Lots o’ stuff! $1. 822-5292. St. Mary’s Annual Rummage Sale. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. St Mary’s Church. See April 6 listing. Humboldt Yacht Club 75th Anniversary Open House. 9 a.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Annual open house parking lot rummage sale, free sailboat rides.

8 monday DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Eureka Elk’s Lodge, 445 Herrick Avenue. Dancing to music from the 1930s50s for those over 50. $4.

OUTDOORS

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Earth Day Park Cleanup Registration Deadline. 9 a.m. Patrick’s Point State Park, 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive, Trinidad. Volunteer in advance for Earth Day on April 13. calparks.org/earthday. 888-987-2757.

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FOR KIDS

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North Star Quest Spring Break Day Camp for Teen Girls. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Ink People Center for the Arts, 517 Third St., Eureka. A three-day camp for teen girls including zumba, belly dancing, yoga and more. 772-485-8611.

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9 tuesday MUSIC

mattolevalley.com • (707) 629-3634

Shadows and Fog

DANCE

Bill and Livia Vanaver. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. The Vanaver Caravan offers songs, banjo playing, clog dancing, step dancing and Flamenco. $12/$8 students and seniors/$10 HFS members. www. vanavercaravan.org. Beijing Chamber Ensemble. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Quartet of renowned Chinese musicians plays Beethoven and Brahms. $8/$3 students and seniors. HSUMusic.blogspot.com. 826-3928.

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Shadows and Fog: San Francisco Noir is the theme for the Humboldt County Library’s Based on the Book movies series in April. Each Tuesday there’s a screening of a 1940s era crime film shot or set in the fabled Bagdad by the Bay. First up, April 9, the quintessential detective story, The Maltese Falcon, based on the novel by Dashiell Hammett. Humphrey Bogart stars as private eye Sam Spade, hired to find a missing woman, sidetracked by the murder of his partner and mixed up with a femme fatale (Mary Astor) and some colorful crooks (Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre) on the trail of a precious statue. Yours truly serves as host, introducing the film and leading a post-screening discussion. On April 16 it’s The Lady from Shanghai, a twisted tale about a wicked seductress (Rita Hayworth) involved in a fake murder plot with a sailor (Orson Welles). Welles adapted Sherwood King’s novel If I Die Before I Wake; he also directed the film, famous for its climactic shootout in a hall of mirrors. Philip Wright is your host. Series coordinator Michael Logan acts as host for Dark Passage on April 23. Bogart is back,

MOVIES

The Maltese Falcon. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Based on the Book “Shadows and Fog: San Francisco Noir” film series begins with the classic Humphrey Bogart detective tale, hosted by Bob Doran.

ETC.

Sierra Club. 6:30 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Executive committee meets first; public welcome 7:45-8:45 p.m. to discuss local conservation issues. 826-3740.

10 wednesday Property Taxes Due April 10. 5 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Second installment in annual taxes must be paid today by Humboldt County property owners. Otherwise add 10 percent to your bill. 476-2450.

FOR KIDS

North Star Quest Spring Break Day Camp for Teen Girls. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Ink People Center for the Arts. See April 8 listing.

ETC.

Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Help pass an ordinance requiring Eureka employers with 25 or more workers to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org.

HUMPHREY BOGART

co-staring with Lauren Bacall in a story based on a pulp novel by David Goodis. Bogie plays an escaped con hiding out in San Francisco with an artist (Bacall). The series closes April 30 with Thieves’ Highway from director Jules Dassin. Richard Conte stars as a truck driver up against a crooked S.F. produce market kingpin (Lee J. Cobb). The screenplay by A. I. Bezzerides was based on his novel Thieves’ Market. All screenings start at 6:30 p.m. at the Eureka branch of the Humboldt County Library, at 1313 Third St. No charge for admission. More details at co.humboldt.ca.us/library. — Bob Doran

11 thursday EVENTS

Humboldt Fire Pin Up Party 3. 10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A 1940s-themed costume party featuring Snarky Puppy, Vidagua, Beat Vixens and comedy by Sherae O’Shaughnessy. $25/$20 advance. www. arcatatheater.com. 601-5800.

DANCE

On the Edge of Your Feet: HSU Dance Concert. 7:30 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre. See April 4 listing.

ETC.

Mad River Water Use Options. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, BSS Room 166, Arcata. HBMWD General Manager Carol Rische and civil engineer Sheri Woo discuss water use options to protect water rights, rates, and the long term health of the Mad River watershed. 826-4345. Tall Ships. 4 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The tall ships Lady Washington and Hawaiian Chieftain are back in town. www.historicalseaport.org. 800-200-5239. Humboldt Inventors’ Club. 6:30-8 p.m. Meadows Community Center between Myrtle and Harris, in Eureka. Topics include provisional patents, patent search and marketability. joetwohig@gmail.com. 267-0775. Humboldt Handweavers and Spinners Guild. 7 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Kathleen Sartorius on making items using shells, pine nuts and other local materials. Journey into the Soul of the Torah. 7-8 p.m. Chabad


Center, 453 Bayside Court #E. Torah studies with Rabbi Eliyahu Cowen, introductory session free. JewishHumboldt.com/torahstudies. 633-8770.

Heads Up…

Volunteer at the Zoo. Love animals? Sequoia Park Zoo wants volunteers to work weekends in its Zoo Interpreter Program. Training begins April 20; go to www. sequoiaparkzoo.net to sign up. Show your art. The Mateel Community Center is seeking fine artists for its fifth annual Emerald Coast Art Show & Wine Tasting on April 27, at the Mateel. Stop by the Mateel office at 59 Rusk Lane in Redway, email office@mateel.org or call 923-3368 for information about registration. Sing at the Folklife Festival. Humboldt Folklife Society is looking for local musicians to play at the fest July 14-20. Submit an mp3 sample of current work and a description of your music to festival@humboldtfolklife. org or send it to P.O. Box 1061 Arcata, CA, 95518. Deadline April 10. ●

Do you tweet obsessively? So do we. Follow us. @ncj_of_humboldt

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book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief By  Lawrence Wright - Knopf

submit your events online or by e-mail

northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Deadline: Noon Thursday the week before publication

Lawrence Wright’s new book on Scientology is not  the first expose of the church, though it is the first  by a Pulitzer prizewinner. Such a pedigree was still  not enough to ensure its publication in the United  Kingdom, where the book faced challenges from the  fiercely litigious church. The book reveals church founder L. Ron Hubbard  to be an inveterate yarn spinner from very early in life.  Well before he was writing pulp science fiction tales,  he invented self-aggrandizing tales of nonexistent war  injuries, travels to the Far East that never happened,  and heroic Navy exploits in World War II that rarely  check out with military records. After the war, Hubbard befriended rocket scientist  Jack Parsons, one of the founders of the Jet Propulsion  Laboratory. Parsons was also a follower of occultist Aleister Crowley. In his house, dubbed The Parsonage, Parsons  welcomed an odd assortment of bohemians and artists  (an ad for tenants stated “must not believe in God”). It was here that Hubbard combined his sci-fi  speculations, pop Freudianism and a peculiarly  American self-help doctrine in the book Dianetics,  which became a bestseller in 1950. Though the book  brought Hubbard brief success and money, Dianetics  eventually went bankrupt, both because of financial  mismanagement and legal challenges to its scientific  legitimacy. Scientology rose from its ashes, reframing and expanding its pseudo scientific program as a  religion. Throughout Hubbard’s life, he would improvise  further details of his ludicrous theology, continually  keeping his followers waiting for the next revelation. In  his own words: “To keep a person on the Scientology  path, feed him a mystery sandwich.” By the late ’60s, Hubbard had rekindled his grand  visions of naval heroism and founded the Sea Organization, a subset of Scientology drawn from the elite  inner core of the church. Hubbard fashioned himself  “The Commander,” though in Wright’s telling he was a  petty and capricious captain who quickly wore out his  welcome wherever his ship sailed. In 1977 Scientology finally snagged its first big convert: John Travolta. Through the ’70s and ’80s, movie  stars like Travolta and Tom Cruise became the church’s  public image. Wright contrasts the royal treatment  of these stars with the indentured servitude, random  violence and intimidation of rank-in-file members,  some of whom worked for dollars a day. The church  ruthlessly attacked apostates and those who would  expose its dark side, both in the courts and by more  underhanded means. Scientology made important  political connections as well, at one point even  enlisting Bill Clinton to defend the church when it was  challenged in Europe. It was once said that a cult is a religion with no  political power. By that measure, Scientology definitely  qualifies as a religion, though its power to intimidate is  on the wane, in no small part because of books like this.  — Jay Aubrey-Herzog

REDWOOD ACRES

FLEA MARKET Sunday, April 7th 8am-3pm

Redwood Acres Fairground Admission Fee: $1 After 9am Kids 12 & Under FREE Early Birds $2 For Reservations Call Dayton (707) 822.5292

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

37


Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka ** = FRI-SUN Times are for 4/5-4/11 unless otherwise noted.

EVIL DEAD 11:55, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35 JURASSIC PARK 3D 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 SPRING BREAKERS 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 THE HOST 12:30, 3:25, 6:25, 9:15 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 12:05, 2:45, 5:30, 8:20 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:25, 3:20, 6:20, 9:10 THE CROODS 3D 12:45, 6:15 THE CROODS 2D 12:00, 2:30, 3:05, 5:00, 7:30, 8:30 ADMISSION 1:55, 6:55 THE CALL 4:30, 9:30 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D 12:10, 2:55, 5:35, 8:35 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 3D 3:15, 8:45 JACK THE GIANT SLAYER 2D 12:15, 5:55

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville ** = FRI-SUN Times are for 4/5-4/11 unless otherwise noted.

EVIL DEAD 2:15**, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 JURASSIC PARK 3D 12:00**, 3:00, 6:00, 8:55 THE HOST 12:10**, 3:05, 6:05, 9:00 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 1:05**, 6:35 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 3:50, 9:20 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:25**, 3:20, 6:20, 9:10 ADMISSION 4:10, 9:15 THE CROODS 3D 12:45**, 6:15 THE CROODS 2D 1:40, 2:50, 6:45, 8:15 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D 11:55**, 5:20 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 3D 3:15, 8:45

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 4/5-4/11 unless otherwise noted.

GI JOE: RETALIATION THE CROODS Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL

1:10, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 1:30, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30 12:40, 3:20, 6:00, 8:40

Misogynistic male fantasy or biting social critique? Whatevs, pass the Cuervo. Ashley Benson, James Franco and Vanessa Hudgens in Spring Breakers.

Disney Girls Gone Wild A gonzo James Franco enlivens Harmony Korine’s tawdry bacchanalia By Dev Richards

filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

SPRING BREAKERS. I’ve never been tempted to watch a Harmony Korine film twice. He floored me with the raw teenage sexuality of 1995’s Kids, which he cowrote, and disgusted me with sociopathic images in 1997’s Gummo. I can acknowledge the artistic expressions and powerful messages of his films, but then it’s time to pick myself back up and try to restore my faith in humanity. Korine’s latest, Spring Breakers, runs in the same vein. It’s a montage-filled, violence-fueled story about four college girls and their criminal exploits leading to

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 * = SAT.-SUN. ONLY 1241 Main Street, Fortuna ** = FRI.-SAT. ONLY Times are for 4/5-4/11 unless otherwise noted.

EVIL DEAD 1:10*, 4:10, 7:20, 9:30** JURASSIC PARK 3D 1:00*, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40** THE HOST 12:40*, 3:45, 6:50, 9:45** GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 1:30, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40** THE CROODS 12:00*, 2:15, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10** Oz: THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D 1:00*, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40**

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville JACK THE GIANT SLAYER

4/5-4/11: 7:30 EXCEPT 4/10: 6:30

Apr. 4 Apr. 10 Thurs Apr 4 - Ocean Night Film Screening Doors at 6:30 p.m. $3 All ages Sat Apr 6 - NCAA Final Four Games Doors at 2:45 p.m. Free All ages Sun Apr 7 - Harry Potter & the Deathly

Hallows: Part 1

Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG-13 Mon Apr 8 - NCAA Final Four Games Doors at 6 p.m. Free All ages Wed Apr 10 - Sci Fi Night ft. Robo Vampire (1988) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

and through a Floridian spring break. Faith (Selena Gomez), Candy (Vanessa Hudgens), Brit (Ashley Benson) and Cotty (Harmony Korine’s wife, Rachel Korine) escape the banality of college by taking a trip to the sunny, hedonistic beaches of Florida. To fund their escapades, three of the girls rob a local diner and convince the fourth, God-fearing Faith, to enjoy their newfound wealth. Once in Florida, constant partying leads to their bikini-clad arrest. With no hope of making bail, the girls have to face the reality of their dilemma. That is until (cue the heroic trumpets) drug dealer and Dirty South rapper Alien (James Franco) comes to their rescue. He has all of the money and weapons they need to keep the party going, and they have all of the naked skin and sociopathic tendencies he needs to indulge his fantasies. Imagine a cross between Natural Born Killers and Girls Gone Wild, but with more cocaine. Spring Breakers relies heavily on Korine’s usual tools: hand-held camera wobbles, heavy use of montage, and rhythmic shifts of focus to distract you from the repetition. Combined, these tools try to transform the mundane into something surreal. This trick might pay off if used sparingly, but with Korine’s zeal it becomes a constant annoyance. If you can get past the redundancy of

the hypersexual montages you might find some insight into today’s party culture and its potential for sexual exploitation, rape and misogyny. Amid the other violent themes, though, it’s hard to tell whether Korine deserves credit for this insight. For the most part his perspective comes across as masculine view of female sexual exploration. On the plus side, Spring Breakers definitely adds another notch on Franco’s belt. His role is deliberately absurd, and he pulls it off excellently. Alien takes smarmy to a new level, and I love Franco for doing it so well. Korine’s screenplay doesn’t give nearly as much dimension to the female leads, which is a shame considering their previous roles. With the exception of Rachel Korine, the female cast has deep roots in the worlds of Disney and Nickelodeon stardom. They should be commended for breaking free of their wholesome stereotypes, and the blame for their bland performances should fall completely on Korine. Spring Breakers not only fails to shock in Korine’s familiar style, but it also fails to entertain. R. 94m. THE HOST. Stephenie Meyer ruined vampires and werewolves with the Twilight trilogy, so it only seems fair that she should ruin aliens too. Meyer’s novel, adapted for the screen by science fiction ruiner Andrew Niccol (In Time, Gattaca), is a tepid, unoriginal tale about an alien race of body stealers who have almost completely taken over Earth. The only thing that stands in the way of their total domination is a small group of underground rebels led by William Hurt. Typical of both Meyer and Niccol, this sci-fi storyline serves as nothing more than a vehicle for a lackluster and predictable love story. Not just any boring love story, but the peculiar type you get from Meyer: a chaste and melodramatic love triangle (or love rhombus, in this case) with obvious religious undertones, peppered with the sort of high-octane passion usually reserved for daytime soap operas. After an incredibly short and lazy exposition, the film enters a two-hour boredom spiral that no amount of concession stand chocolate can remedy. Melanie Strider’s (Saoirse Ronan) life as a rebel comes to an end when she’s captured by the Seekers, aliens who use Melanie’s body to host one of their own. But Melanie’s consciousness is too strong to let the alien take over completely. Eventually, she and her alien parasite become besties, working together to bolster the resistance. Throughout, the audience is treated to an annoying, echoing voice-over as the inner Melanie battles with the outer alien. I don’t have many rules in life, but one of them is this: I don’t want to watch two hours of someone fighting the voice in his


or her head unless it’s Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin in All of Me. PG13. 125m. —Dev Richards

EUREKA STUDIO ARTS. Classes and workshops in painting, drawing, creativity, art marketing, video production and more! APRIL ARTS ALIVE! DEMO: NEW DRAWING INSTRUCTOR BRENT EVISTON - Live costumed-model figure drawing demonstration. Come see art in action! eurekastudioarts.com. 526 Fifth St., (707) 440-9027 (AC-0404)

Previews

EVIL DEAD. My skepticism about this remake of Sam Raimi’s 1981 camp-horror classic, starring cult icon Bruce Campbell, is tempered by the film’s trailer, which looks scary as hell. R. 91m. JURASSIC PARK 3D. Has it really been 20 years since Spielberg’s dino-ride? It has, which means studio heads are ready to pass out the 3D glasses and milk the money udder. PG13. 126m. Ocean Night rolls into the Arcata Theatre Lounge again Thursday with Trashed, an acclaimed documentary about the mountains of non-biodegradable crap we humans produce (narrated by Jeremy Irons). Cleanse your palette (if not the planet) with Polyester, a 35-minute surf flick. 7 p.m. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010), the penultimate movie in the series, shows Sunday at 6 p.m. And next Wednesday is Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night, featuring Robo-Vampire, a “cut-and-paste” flick assembled from bad movies and redubbed in English to make a (deliberately) worse one. Doors at 6, movie at 7:30. Our metropolitan NorCal neighbor costars in the latest Based on the Book movie series at the Humboldt County Library, Shadows and Fog: San Francisco Noir, which kicks off next Tuesday night with The Maltese Falcon. See Calendar for details.

Continuing

ADMISSION. A Princeton admissions officer (Tina Fey) meets a free-spirit high school administrator (Paul Rudd) in this pleasant, predictable rom-com PG13. 117m. THE CALL. Would-be thriller with 911 operator (Halle Berry) trying to protect a terrified teen (Abigail Breslin) abducted by a deranged serial killer. R. 95m. THE CROODS. A prehistoric family must look for a new cave in this likeable animated comedy featuring the voices of Nic Cage and Emma Stone. PG. 96m. G.I. JOE: RETALIATION. Bruce Willis, “The Rock” and Channing Tatum play guys with big muscles and guns. They shoot stuff. PG13. 99m. JACK THE GIANT SLAYER. This bland, big-budget retelling of the classic fairytale warrants a “Fee-fi-HO-HUM.” Har har! PG13. 114m. OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN. White House action-thriller with a Secret Service agent (Gerard Butler) protecting the President (Aaron Eckhart) from evil Koreans. Yawn. R. 100m. OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL. James Franco stars as the young wizard-to-be in this visually rich but ultimately hollow prequel. PG. 130m. —Ryan Burns

Communication

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts ADULT CERAMICS. Get your creative juices flowing by learning & practicing ceramics! Basic hand building & pinch pottery for 18 & up. Mon.s & Wed.s, 6:30-8 p.m., starting 4/15. At Ryan Center. $65 fee, includes materials. Registration begins 4/4 online at www. eurekarecreation.com or in person. Call 441-4244 for more info. (AC-0404) GLASS FUSING, DESIGNING PART SHEETS, ART GLASS & IMAGERY. $60/$40 members (materials cost depends on size of project made). Wed., May 1, 5:30-8:30 p.m. or Thurs., May 2, 1-4 p.m. Follow up to surface design and Part Sheets workshops, and will focus on incorporating previously made art glass into distinctive and dynamic fused work. Intermediate class, requires glass fusing background. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata. com. (AC-0425) GLASS FUSING, LUNCHEON PLATES & SERVING PLATTER. $125.00/$ 105 members (materials fees $60 and up). Tues./Thurs., May 7 & 9, 5:30–8:30 p.m. or Wed./Fri., May 8 &10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Create a unique luncheon set, including two 6” luncheon plates and a matching 10” serving platter in this two day workshop. Intermediate workshop, requires glass fusing background. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0425) HAND BUILDING. $ 90 (5 weeks). With Otamay Hushing. Thurs.s, 10 a.m.-Noon, May 9-June 6. Flexible format to encourage creativity. Focus on basic techniques with slabs and coils as applied to a variety of projects. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0425) MAKING PHOTOS 2. Wed.s, April 24-June 5, 5:307:30 p.m. $85. CR Eureka Downtown Site at 333 6th Street, Eureka. Explore the artistic side of taking photographs with Jesse Pearson. Create a large body of work that explores a photographic genre of your choosing and demonstrate in a public venue with the class. View us online at www.redwoods.edu, click the Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to register. (AC-0404) RAKU FIRING. Come to Fire Arts and experience the enjoyment of pottery firings. Bring your own bisqueware or select from a variety of unglazed pieces & glazes from Fire Arts. Call Thurs. to reserve space. Glazing at noon & Firing at 1 p.m. on Fri., $6/ piece or $25/kiln load. Fire Arts Center, 707-826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com (AC-0404)

REPUTATION OF CHRISTIANS. Christians can be view as hypocritical, is this reputation deserved? Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., April 7, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-0404) DESIGNING A GREAT TEAM. Discover how different people approach problem-solving and how to make more efficient use of their differences, allowing more quicker and more effective group decision-making and solutions. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., April 12, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $100 (includes materials). Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMM-0404)

Computers

ADOBE CS5 PROJECT WORKSHOP. Get individualized instruction as you create a project of your choice, from start to finish, using one or more of the Adobe applications Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign or Dreamweaver. Create that newsletter, logo, website or digital art projects with guidance from an experienced designer. With Annie Reid. Thurs., April 25-May 9, 6:30-9 p.m. and Sat., April 27 and May 4, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $175. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (C-0418) MICROSOFT EXCEL. Learn the power and capabilities of this spreadsheet software. Create workbooks and design worksheets utilizing formulas and functions such as sum, average, max, min and count. With Joan Dvorak. Mon., April 22-May 13, 6-8 p.m. $75. Preregistration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0411)

Join Humboldt County Chinese School (HCCS) for a very special Chinese Culture Camp Saturday, April 13th 2013 10am to 3:00pm Cutten Elementary School, 4182 Walnut Drive, Eureka This one day camp is designed for children in grades K-8, but open to all interested individuals and families. Cost is $30.00/person and pre-registration is required. Activities include Chinese language, calligraphy, martial arts, Chinese cooking, games, music, and more!

INTRO TO ADOBE INDESIGN. Fast-paced, hands-on exploration of Indesign page layout software. Demonstration of tools, menus, palettes, page set-up, master pages, guides and margins, color and more. With Annie Reid. Mon., and Wed., April 15-29, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0404)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Group & private lessons in ballroom, Latin, swing, & club dance in Humboldt county. We make dancing fun! www.dancewithdebbie.biz, (707) 464-3638 and on Facebook. (DMT-1226) BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, April 8-29 7-8 p.m., Pan Arts Network,1049 Samoa Blvd, Suite C. $50, (707) 407-8998, info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT- 0401) FREE INTRO TO ARGENTINE TANGO. For absolute beginners. Sat., April 13th, 7p.m., Arcata. Experience the most interesting and beautiful dance of all for free! You’ll learn the basics, meet new people and have lots of fun! Partner not required but suggested. More information, www.tangodelsol.net or (858) 205-9832 (DMT-0411) continued on next page northcoastjournal.com• • NORTH North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday, APRIL april 4, 4, 2013 2013 northcoastjournal.com

39


continued from previous page DANCE WITH BRUCE & CAREY HART. Swing, Fox Trot, Waltz, Latin, Western Swing and more! Five-week classes beginning Tues., April 16, Jacoby Creek School and Thurs., April 18, Cutten Elementary School. Beginners: 6:30 p.m., Intermediates: 8 p.m. $30/singles, $50/ couples, $20/high school students or younger. For more information call 839-1792. (DMT-0411) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT-1226) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-0606) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-0606) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1226)

Fitness

BEGINNING TO ADVANCED GROUP PILATES. Increase your potential through a Mindful movement practice at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! BeginningAdvanced group Pilates mat classes, reformer classes and Privates training sessions Mon.-Sat. Trainers are certified from Stott Pilates, an international certification agency Where modern principles of exercise science and rehabilitation are studied. Questions or to sign up Call 845-8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com or visit: arcatacorepilatesstudio. com (F-0404) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session Feb. 1-June 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-0606) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1226) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1226)

NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0606) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1226) NIA-DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6-7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Wed.s, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. $5 dropin, $50/12 classes (707) 441-9102 (F-1226)

Home & Garden

FRUIT TREE SELECTION & ORCHARD MAINTENANCE ON THE NORTH COAST. Learn to take care of fruit trees, including selecting, pruning, thinning, pest management and soil maintenance. This course will cover apple, pear and other fruiting tree varieties suited for the North Coast. Includes a fieldtrip to an orchard. With Peter Haggard. Tues. and Thurs., April 23 and 25, 6-8 p.m. and Sun., April 28, 1-3 p.m. $60. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (HG-0411)

Kids & Teens

CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7-12. $80 (Two 5 week classes offered). May 6-June 3 & May 7-June 4. Mon., 4-6 p.m., Tues., 4-6 p.m. With Bob Raymond. Adventures with clay; Learn various hand building and wheel-throwing techniques. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (K-0425) SUMMER THEATER WORKSHOPS AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE! June 24-28, 2 classes for kids ages 7-9, 9 a.m-Noon. Fantastic Fairy Tales. 12:30-3:30 p.m., Clowning for Kids. 2 classes for kids ages 10-14. 9 a.m -Noon, Commedia and Mask Performance. 12:30-3:30 p.m. Improv in Action. $100 for one class, $75 for a second class. More info and registration at 822-1575! (K-0620) DANCE CLASSES. Eureka Recreation offers a variety of dance classes for kids ages 1½-12 years, from Music & Movement, So You Think You Can Dance, Tiny Tutus Beginning Ballet & Hip Hop! Classes starting 4/12. Days & times vary by class. $25-30. Registration begins 4/4 online at www.eurekarecreation.com or in person. Call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0404)

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

CUB CLUB ANIMAL BABIES. At Sequoia Park Zoo. For 5-7 year olds on Sat, April 13. Join us for a wild adventure at the zoo. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo.net for info. (K-0404) PAGEANT ON THE PLAZA. This summer the Arcata Playhouse is offering a two-week adventure in the creation of outdoor spectacle and performance. Week one includes classes in Movement, Music, Stilts, Puppetry. Week two create a show! July 8-20, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Ages 9 - 16, $300 Call 822-1575 to register today! (K-0627) THE MAGIC OF CLAY. Children’s Ceramics Workshops in Trinidad. Seven week hand-building sessions Mon. & Tues. afternoons, STARTING: April 8 & 9. For more information CALL 677-0821 (K-0404) SOCCER CLASSES. Learn the basics & sharpen gross motor skills in a fun, nurturing environment. Eureka Recreation offers soccer classes for kids ages 2-7 years starting 4/12. Days & times vary by class. $30. Registration begins 4/4 online at www.eurekarecreation.com or in person. Call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0404) CHINESE CULTURE CAMP. Humboldt County Chinese School presents Chinese Culture Camp on Sat., April 13, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Cutten Elementary School. Activities include language, martial arts, cooking, calligraphy and more. Open to grades K-8. $30 per person. Call Bernie at 445-1781 for more info or email hccslevy@yahoo.com. (K-0411)

WRITING STORIES FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULTS. Sat.s, April 20-May 4, 1 p.m.-3 p.m. $59. CR Eureka Downtown Site at 333 6th Street, Eureka. Learn the difference between writing for young people and for adults in both written and picture books. www. redwoods.edu, click the Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to register. (L-0404) WEALTH BUILDING INVESTMENT STRATEGIES. Free Seminar! Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Wed., May 8, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP at (707) 443-2741 or online at www.premieradvisor.com. (L-0502)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1226) THE ARMCHAIR TRAVELER. Back of the Bay Byways. Sit back for three virtual tours of the “back of the bay:” Warren Creek, Walker Point and Table Bluff. Discover abandoned water lines, secluded shipping ports and logging sites. With Jerry and Gisela Rohde. Sat., April 20, 1-3 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0411)

YOUNG WRITERS CONFERENCE Redwood Writing Project, Annual Young Writers conference, Sat. April 13, 8:30 am.-3 p.m, HSU Campus, Founders Hall Students 4th-9th graders, fee $40, scholarships available. 826-5109, www.redwoodwp.org (K-0411)

GENTLE YOGA FOR OLLI. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., April 15-May 20, 1:30-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0404)

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1226)

IBOOK, ACCESSING THE AUTHOR WITHIN. iBook is a free app from Apple, which allows one to write books. Learn how to compose and publish your own book using iBook with Tom Gage. Thurs., April 18-May 9, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0404)

Lectures

Spiritual

THE GROW IT & KNOW IT EVENT. Presented by 707 Cannabis & Hosted by Area 101 on April 13, at Area 101, 54895 Hwy. 101, Laytonville. Everything you ever wanted to know and about growing, breeding, CBD,therapeutics, cooking with and consuming cannabis from NorCal’s premiere Cannabis educator. 10-11:30 a.m: “Grow like the Pro’s” Learn proven techniques from master cultivator Kevin Jodrey, 11:30 a.m- 1 p.m: Therapeutic Uses of Cannabinoids” seminar, with details on raw vs. heated cannabis & the latest in reach with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist.12p.m: “Live Cannabis Juicing Demo”, learn of the best cannabis juicing techniques with 707 Cannabis College experts. 2-3 p.m: The Endocannabinoid System”, seminar. How cannabis produces effects, eating vs. inhaling , plus reliable results using cannabis with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 3-4 p.m : “Cultivation Optimization” seminar. Learn about cannabis physiology, how to achieve rapid high-CBD isolation , plus THC & CBD potency maximization using vegetative stage testing with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 4-5 p.m: Cannabis Ingestibles”, seminar. How to calculate dosages, activate cannabinoids & produce a consistent product with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. Full-day $85 advance/$95 at door, $50 1/2 day, lunch provided. For more info or to purchase advanced tickets email info@707cannabiscollege.com or call (707) 672-9860 (L-0411)

FREE COMMUNITY POTLUCK & KIRTAN AT OM SHALA YOGA. With Seabury Gould. Sat., April 13, 6-9 p.m. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (S-0404) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direction of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442-7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www. kdkarcatagroup.org (S-0502) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442-4240 www.tarotofbecoming. com (S-0228) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-0606)

Sports/Recreation

TENNIS CLASSES & LESSONS. Classes & Lessons for all Ages & Abilities taught by a certified USPTA Pro. Find out more at www.humboldttennisclub.com or call (707) 616-4781. (SR-0418)


ADULT SOFTBALL. Form a dream team with your friends, family and co-workers. $600/team plus $10 non-resident fee. Find out more on Wed., April 10 at the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Women’s meeting 6 p.m., Men’s 6:30 p.m. Call 441-4245. (SR0404) SENIOR SOFTBALL. 50’s and 60’s plus league needs players. Must be at least 49 to play. www.humboldtseniorsoftball.com Call Brad Golding (707) 982-3223 (SR-0502) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1226)

Therapy/Support

ESSURE SUPPORT GROUP. For women who have had Essure and are experiencing a decline in health, you are not alone. Offering support and resources. Tamara, (707) 498-9447. (TS-0425) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk-in support group for anyone suffering from depression. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m -7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839-5691. (T-1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1226)

Vocational

CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, M.A., and Carolyn Albee, M.A. Fri., April 19, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $30 fee includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (V-0411)

Wellness/Bodywork

AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & CLEANSING RETREATS. With Traci Webb and Myrica Morningstar, Training meets five weekends (Fri-Sun). May 17-July 14. Learn over 16 Ayurvedic Massages and Herbal Body Therapies for Career Enhancement and Self-Healing (Deadline: April 17). Group & Personal Cleansing Retreats: July 17-Aug. 11. Call for details. NCBTMB Approved CE Provider. REGISTER: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: www.ayurvedicliving.com, info@ ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0411)

INNER CLOWN TUNE-UP! with Lin-Z Clifford & Damiian Lang. At Om Shala Yoga. Sun, April 14, 10-4 p.m. $30 by April 10th / $40 after. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W-0404)

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1226)

FORREST YOGA WORKSHOPS, ANATOMY & HANDS-ON ASSISTING. With nationally renowned visiting instructor, Brian Campbell. At Om Shala Yoga. April 19-21. Extremely valuable for ALL yoga teachers, students, body workers and anyone involved with manual or movement therapies. Yoga instructors receive 20% discount. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W-0404)

CHAKRA ACTIVATION. Cleanse and Balance Physical, Mental, Spiritual & Emotional Bodies. Classes available for couples, singles & private sessions. Intensive series begins April 7. Dr. Pepper Hernandez, 405-4208150, Simplyrawsome.com (W-0404) CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE. Explore Chinese herbal medicine: basic concepts, common herbs used, and how it differs from western herbal medicine. Learn to prepare a tea from raw herbs. With Lupine Wread. Thurs., April 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-0411) INTRO TO TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Curious about acupuncture? Want to know how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) works and what conditions it might benefit? Explore basic TCM theory and tools including acupuncture, herbs, dietary therapy and more. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., April 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-0404) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Intermediate Herbology with Jane Bothwell, April 17- June 12, Wed. evenings, 7-9 p.m., next to Humboldt Herbals in Eureka. Delve deeper into the healing power of plants. $365. (707) 442-8157 www.dandelionherb.com (W-0411)

START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin June, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1226) ●

SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOPS & CLASSES

ONLINE

FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (W-1226)

northcoastjournal.com

YEAR ROUND VEGETABLE GARDENING BY

For the Love of Color: Gina Wilde, Alchemy Yarns

April 27th, 11am to 6 pm

Learn techniques for working with dynamic color from the creative color artist behind fabulous Alchemy yarns. Find your own dazzling color palette through fun, fast and enlightening color exercises and create a gorgeous ascot scarf during class. Choose from an outrageously colorful and decadent treasure trove of Alchemy stash and create a unique palette with Gina for your future projects. Cost $115.00 + materials

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

EDDIE TANNER

Owner of Deep Seeded Community Farm in Arcata, CA Author of The Humboldt Kitchen Gardener Professional Farmer since 1999 Sat., April 6th @ 10:30 Fee $10 (enters you to win a prize) Call 839-1571x5 to reserve your seat!

PRESENTS

THE GROW IT & KNOW IT

EVENT

APRIL 13, 2013 AT AREA 101 54895 HWY 101 LAYTONVILLE, CA

“Everything you ever wanted to know about GROWING, BREEDING, CBD, THERAPEUTICS, COOKING with and CONSUMING cannabis from NorCal’s premiere Cannabis educators”

Topics starting at 10am M Grow Like the Pros with Kevin Jodrey M Therapeutic Uses of Cannabinoids Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Live Cannabis Juicing Demonstration 707 Cannabis’ Donna King M The Endocannabinoid System Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Cultivation Optimization Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Cannabis Ingestibles Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller TICKETS: $85 IN ADVANCE, $95 AT THE DOOR FULL-DAY; $50 FOR ½ DAY; LUNCH PROVIDED

1828 Central Ave. • McKinleyville Mon.-Sat. 8:30 to 5:30 • Sun. 10 to 4 (Nursery Only) millerfarmsnursery.com

For more info or to buy advance tickets: info@707cannabiscollege.com or 707 672-9860

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

41


Field notes K Street, Sacramento, in the aftermath of the 1861-62 Great flood. one-quarter of taxable real eState in california waS deStroyed, reSultinG in the State declarinG banKruptcy. lithoGraph from u.S. GeoloGical Survey

Megafloods: Coming Our Way? By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

T

he Humboldt Redwoods State Park visitor center at Weott has a fine display, including newsreel movies, telling the story of the 1964 “Christmas flood.” It focuses on Eel River communities, such as Myers Flat, Weott, South Fork, Shively, Pepperwood and Stafford, all of which were essentially wiped out by floodwaters. However, those December rains also affected most of the Pacific Northwest, including virtually every major stream and river on the West Coast. Portland was especially hard-hit, when the Willamette overtopped the city seawall. Back here in Humboldt County, the Christmas flood caused $100 million in damage. The 1964 flood was nothing compared with the last real flood suffered by Californians. That was in 1861, when the Central Valley turned into a 300-mile-long by 20mile wide Central Sea. Thousands of people, and a quarter million head of cattle, died. Sacramento was flooded for six months, prompting the Legislature to move temporarily to San Francisco, while the state went bankrupt. Now that was a flood. Except it was dwarfed by the flood of 1605. Haven’t heard of it? No one had, until climate researchers started comparing hydrological evidence from various parts of California. Their chilling conclusion, as reported in January’s Scientific American (“The Coming Megafloods”), is that not only do huge floods occur on the West Coast on a regular basis — once every 200 years or so — but that, thanks to global warming, their intensity is likely to increase. That’s bad news for the 6 million people now living in the Central Valley. The evidence for huge and regular prehistoric floods comes from multiple sources. Among them are: core samples taken off the Santa Barbara coast, where

no exceptions. All purchase items sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Auctioneer: Rainbow Self-Storage, 707-443-1451, Bond # 40083246. Dated this 4th day of April 2013 and 11th day of April 2013 4/4, 4/11/13 (13-99)

Humboldt bay municipal Water district director division boundary adjustments The Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District (HBMWD) is required to redistrict, or adjust, its Directors’ division boundaries after each decennial U.S. Census, or as determined by its Directors via a two-thirds vote. During the April 11, 2013 Board meeting, the HBMWD’s Board of Directors will discuss finalizing adjustments to the Directors’ Division Boundaries at 9:30 am. Various options have been reviewed during the past four months. Areas under consideration are: 1) Division 2 - area south of the Mad River commonly referred to as the Arcata Bottoms; 2) Division 5 - area east of Arcata around Jacoby Creek; 3) Division 3 - area of the Samoa Peninsula; 4) Division 4 - area south of Hemlock Street and west of Redwood Fields along Walnut Drive to Cypress Street. The Public is welcome to present any comments for consideration prior to finalizing the Division boundary adjustments. The HBMWD office is located at 828 7th Street in Eureka. 4/4/2013 (13-104)

ancient flood-borne sediments can be read like annual tree rings; radiocarbon dating of sediments in marsh cores from around San Francisco Bay; gravel flood terraces at sites in the Klamath basin, including Indian Scotty campground (on the Scott River) and Eagle Creek campground (on the Trinity); and sediment cores taken at Little Packer oxbow lake (near Willows), which only floods when the Sacramento River overtops its banks. What struck the researchers was the consistency of the data from these far-flung sites. Within the margins of error, they found evidence for truly huge floods occurring, on average, every two centuries. They attribute these floods to newly discovered phenomena: eastward-flowing “atmospheric rivers” from the Pacific. Such “rivers in the sky” bring to the West Coast up to 15 times as much the water as the Mississippi River carries. They flow in a 250 mile-wide layer of very humid air, about a mile above the ocean. They’re not all bad: Most years, atmospheric rivers supply up to 50 percent of California’s precipitation in the span of 10 days, including our wellknown “pineapple expresses” from Hawaii. According to the Scientific American article, “six out of seven climate models [predict] the average rain and snow delivered to California by future atmospheric rivers increases by an average of about 10 percent by the year 2100.” Given that we’re hit by megafloods on average every 200 years, and that the last one was in 1861, we might want to reconsider our current California tendency to build on floodplains and live alongside riverbanks. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) thanks Dr. Lynn Ingram of UC Berkeley, co-author of the Scientific American article referenced above, for help with this column.

42 North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

 PUBLIC SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 2170021716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 17th of April, 2013, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage, at 4055 Broadway Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt the following: Heather Yates, Unit # 5019 Theresa Bering, Unit # 5307 Jeremy Brisco, Unit # 5464 The following units are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Paul McNeill, Unit # 2305 Linda Stewart, Unit # 3115 Jimmy Evanow, Uniot # 3408 The following units are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Dusty Rucker, Unit # 1156 Matthew Basham, Unit # 1217 Joann Sovereign, Unit # 1231 Marvin Jerke, Unit # 1307 Pamela Rusk, Unit # 1511 Angela Mixon, Unit # 1794 The following units are located at 105 Indianola Eureka, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Michael Taylor, Unit # 435 (Held in Co. Unit) The following units are located at 180 F Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units.

Lise Kaufman Erbe, Unit # 4308 Jacob Swagert, Unit # 4309 Paul Billups, Unit # 4317 Frantz Cadet, Unit # 4382 Spencer Barrett, Unit # 4550 Janice Harmon, Unit # 6006 Melissa Taylor, Unit # 6152 Randy Vitelli, Unit # 6180 Tashina Surber, Unit # 6182 Hugh Sheeks, Unit # 6195 The following units are located at 940 G Street Arcata, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Richard Jones, Unit # 6348 Kenneth Hunt, Unit # 6354 Amanda Owejan, Unit # 6449 The following units are located at 2394 Central Ave. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Jesse Vandenplas, Unit # 9235 Felicia Lilly, Unit #9238 The following units are located at 1641 Holly St. McKinleyville, Ca, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Devin Boyce, Unit # 1117 Allan Flores, Unit # 3273 Frances Pederson, Unit # 4117 Harmony Doughtery, Unit # 5126 Gary Chisholm, Unit # 6114 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equipment, household appliances, exercise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. Anyone interested in attending the auction must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction,

 DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL  1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C  EUREKA, CA 95501  707-445-7229  NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Date of Filing Application: March 5, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: HUMBOLDT BAY TOURISM CENTER The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 205 G ST EUREKA, CA 95501-0419 Type of License Applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer And Wine Eating Place 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-77)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00169

The following person is doing business as MUSIC FOR MUSIC at 12859 Torrey Pines, Auburn, CA 95602. Martin Francis McLean 6360 ½ Longview Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Martin McLean. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-103)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00187

The following person is doing business as FANCY THAT! FINE CATERING at 1675 Hannah Ct., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Michelle Mei-Ling Foster 1675 Hannah Ct. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/26/13. /s Michelle Foster. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 26, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-102)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00193

The following persons are doing business as BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR at 76 Country Club Dr., Suite A, Willow Creek, CA 95573, P.O. Box 541, Willow Creek, CA 95573.


Ready Davis 920 Newman Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Christopher Todd Hern 926 Newman Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/2011. /s Ready Davis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 28, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-101)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00143

The following person is doing business as NOTHING BETTER… LAWN & MAINTENANCE at 3172 Matthew Lane, Fortuna, CA 95540. Jessie Ray Genaro 3172 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessie Genaro. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-97)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00145

The following persons are doing business as MAD RIVER BREWING COMPANY at 195 Taylor Way, Blue Lake, CA 95525, P.O. Box 767, Blue Lake, CA 95525. Mad River Brewing Co., Inc. 195 Taylor Way Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s James Crowell, Director. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-91)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00148

The following persons are doing business as THE JOURNEY at 95 Belleview Avenue, Rio Dell, CA 95562, P.O. Box 236, Rio Dell, CA 95562. Assemby of God of Rio Dell 95 Belleview Avenue Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jeff Miller, President/Pastor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 7, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-90)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00168

The following person is doing business as OLD TOWN CARRIAGE CO. at 2nd & F Street, Eureka, CA 95502, 374 Columbia St., Brooklyn, NY 11231. Brendan Fearon 374 Columbia St. Brooklyn, NY 11231 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/25/13. /s Brendan Fearon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-84)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00172

The following persons are doing business as GRUMPY GOAT WINGERY at 1902 C Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Peter Thomas Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Christine Michelle Gorshe-Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/13. /s Peter Olsen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-87)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00175

The following person is doing business as LOTS OF PEPPER at 4100 Union St., Eureka, CA 95503. Christina Lewis 4100 Union St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Christina Lewis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-96)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00135

The following person is doing business as I AM…SOCIAL JUSTICE, I AM…SAFE ZONE, SHEBANGO at 966 Lloyd Street, Eureka, CA 95503. Jessica Pettitt 966 Lloyd Street Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessica K. Pettitt. This statement was filed with the

County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 1, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-78)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00126

The following person is doing business as THE WOODEN SWING SET STOP .COM at 368 Spruce St., Eureka, CA 95503. Daniel Jacob Dixon 368 Spruce St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/25/13. /s Daniel Jacob Dixon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 25, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-86)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00147

The following person is doing business as FOREVER YOUNG BABY/ CHILDREN ESSENTIALS at 1034 Riverside Dr., Rio Dell, CA 95562. Heather R. Watkins 1034 Riverside Dr. Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Heather R. Watkins. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-85)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 11-00116

The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: KIDLICIOUS, 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd., Suite J, Fortuna, CA 95540. The fictitious business name was filed in Humboldt County on 2/17/2011. Scott Keith Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 Felicia Gabrielle Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business was conducted by Individual Husband & Wife. /s/ Scott Thomsson/Felicia Thomsson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 11, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/13 (13-79)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00115

The following person is doing business as EMBODY CALM MEDITATION CENTER at 1902 Hodgson St., #B, Eureka, CA 95503.

Alex Goldenberg 1902 Hodgson St., #B Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Alex Goldenberg. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 22, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-75)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00137

The following persons are doing business as HUMBOLDT PC at 3562 Broadway, Ste. A, Eureka, CA 95503. Humboldt PC Repair, LLC 3562 Broadway, Ste. A Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Corey Edwards, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 1, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-71)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00139

The following person is doing business as ALLIANCE LAWN CARE at 2208 Wisteria Way, Arcata, CA 95521. Tony Tubiola 2208 Wisteria Way Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Tony Tubiola. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-67)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00142

The following persons are doing business as SCHOOL COMMUNITY REUSE ACTION PROJECT HUMBOLDT at 101 H Street, Ste. D, Arcata, CA 95521. SCRAP 2915 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Portland, OR 97212. The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Tibora Girczyc-Blum, Agent. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 5, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-72)

Curious about legal advertising?

442-1400

STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL FROM PARTNERSHIP OPERATING UNDER FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME R11-00406

The following person has withdrawn as a general partner from the partnership operating under the fictitious business name of: ALLIANCE LAWN AND GARDEN CARE, 2208 Wisteria Way, Arcata, CA 95521. The fictitious business name was filed in Humboldt County on 7/1/2011. Jacob Douglas Farrell 1740 Stewart Ave. Arcata, CA 95521 /s/ Jacob Farrell. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-68)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130201 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. to Proposed Name DANNY JOSEPH WHITE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 14, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 25, 2013 Filed: March 25, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-98)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130167 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL for a decree changing names as follows: Present name PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL

to Proposed Name PAMELA DENISE WARWICK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 9, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 21, 2013 Filed: March 21, 2013 /s/ R.E. KOSSOW Judge of the Superior Court 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-95)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130166 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: XIONG YANG TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: XIONG YANG for a decree changing names as follows: Present name XIONG YANG to Proposed Name XY SONG ROYAL YAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 26, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 8, 2013 Filed: March 8, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-82)

➤ LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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continued from previous page.

  AMENDED  NOTICE OF PETITION  TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOSHUA D. ANDERSON,  CASE NO. PR130093

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSHUA D. ANDERSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MICHELLE L. ANDERSON AND KATHLEEN REGLI in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that KATHLEEN REGLI be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file

with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: BRADFORD C. FLOYD SBN 136459 LAW OFFICE OF BRADFORD C. FLOYD 819 SEVENTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-9754 March 29, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-106)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF  DOROTHY L. KLUCK  CASE NO. PR130104

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DOROTHY L. KLUCK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LAURENCE A. KLUCK in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LAURENCE A. KLUCK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of the notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as

a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LAURENCE A. KLUCK # 123791 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP. 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 MARCH 21, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-92)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO  ADMINISTER ESTATE OF  KENNETH L. JENSEN  CASE NO. PR130088

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KENNETH LEE JENSEN, KENNETH L. JESEN OR KEN L. JENSEN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ERIC N. JENSEN AND CHRIS P. JENSEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, EUREKA. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests ERIC N. JENSEN AND CHRIS P. JENSEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 11, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. CR08. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of

44 North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of the notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JONATHAN M. MCGEE, ESQ. SBN 271008 MCGEE LAW FIMR, LLC. 5635 N. SCOTTSDALE ROAD, SUITE 170 SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA 85250 (480) 729-6208 JMM@MCGEELAWAZ.COM MARCH 12, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-93)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF  JOHN CURTIS MASON  aka JOHN C. MASON,  CASE NO. PR130106

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN CURTIS MASON aka JOHN C. MASON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JENNIFER MASON in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JENNIFER MASON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the

hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES, SBN#67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 March 22, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-94)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF  SUSAN THOMPSON,  CASE NO. PR130097

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SUSAN THOMPSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SARAH BANNING in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SARAH BANNING be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.                                                  IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 March 19, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-88)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF  WILLIAM P. BACHELER, JR., a/k/a WILLIAM BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER,  a/k/a BILL BACHELER, JR., CASE NO. PR130096

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM P. BACHELER, JR., a/k/a WILLIAM BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, JR. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SHAWNA R. BRISCO in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SHAWNA A. BRISCO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection


3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-81)

 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF  DENNIS A. MORGAN  aka DENNIS ALBERT MORGAN AND DENNIS MORGAN,  CASE NO. PR130111

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DENNIS A. MORGAN, ALSO KNOWN AS DENNIS ALBERT MORGAN AND DENNIS MORGAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DOREN ANTHONY MORGAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DOREN ANTHONY MORGAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be

Did you know? that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at northcoastjournal.com

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

31. Has title to 32. “My lips ____ sealed” 33. Work (up) 34. Country music’s Paisley 35. “Garfield” dog 36. VP of the KGB? 39. New York’s ____ Field 40. Final four? 41. Class that might have finger painting and naptime 42. Prefix with lateral 43. Mia of “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” 44. Just enough to whet one’s appetite 46. Saldana of “Avatar” 47. Cy Young Award factor

48. Writer Umberto 49. One of a snorkeler’s pair 50. VP of the Screen Actors Guild? 53. South American capital city whose name translates to “the peace” 56. Pop ____ 57. Big boats 58. Sundance entry, usually 59. ____ contendere (court plea) 60. Fraction of a min. 61. Burn badly 62. Bite like a rat 63. “Sock ____ me!”

DOWN 1. Fights (off) 2. 1995 Best Supporting Actress winner 3. Affectionate nickname for the TV comedian called “the thief of bad gags” 4. “Don’t ____ me, bro!” 5. Birthplace of St. Francis 6. Crop-damaging animals 7. “Movin’ ____” (“The Jeffersons” theme) 8. 2013 Brad Pitt film 9. Skateboarders and snowboarders compete in them 10. Four-star 11. NYSE listings

12. Thing to drive off of 13. Olive ____ 21. Announced a decision 22. Classic John Updike short story set in a grocery store 26. Tenet of chivalry 27. It may be requested when approaching the bar 28. “Get it?” 30. Jai ____ 31. Language of eastern India 34. It became an Olympic sport at the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing 35. Neither esta nor esa 37. “Didn’t ____ you?” 38. Slangy request for a high-five

39. Informal comeback to “How come?” 43. Took by force 44. “Don’t delay!” 45. “Romanian Rhapsodies” composer 48. ____ Gay, historic plane displayed by the Smithsonian 50. Colorado ski resort 51. Nobel Prize subj. 52. Eastern royal 53. Fleur-de-____ 54. Nelson Mandela’s org. 55. iPhone, e.g., briefly

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

EASY #20

www.sudoku.com

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LYNETTE F. SULLIVAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by STEPHEN MATTES in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that STEPHEN MATTES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required

4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-105)

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS 1. X-rated stuff 5. Declare openly 9. Z-Series Blade maker 14. Yothers of “Family Ties” 15. Prefix with gram 16. Sticky 17. Jump shots have them 18. Talk like thish 19. Adams who photographed Yosemite 20. VP of the CIA? 23. Suffix with legal 24. Battleship letters 25. “Lost” actor Daniel ____ Kim 26. Denom. established in 1830 29. Like some modern pirates

Solution, tips and computer program at

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF  LYNETTE F. SULLIVAN,  CASE NO. PR130092

admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided  in Probate Code 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 March 28, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

www.northcoastjournal.com

3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-89)

to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 11, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES, SBN#67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 March 12, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.                                                 IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES D. POOVEY 83955 937 SIXTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-6744 March 18, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 4, 2013

45


the Employment

Controller Staff Accountant Accounts Payable CPA Loan Officer Commercial Lines Insurance Agent Part Time Office Assistant

Share your talent for fun and excitement. General Manager Position is responsible for entire operation of Casino, and ensuring profitability through effective management marketing, sales, finance, labor management, accounting, budgeting and other operations functions. Must have at least 7 years casino management experience with at least 4 of those in an executive level. At least 5 years experience as a General Manager preferred. Bachelors Degree in Business Administration or a related field preferred or equivalent combination education experience. Qualifications and pay ratesof vary. For moreand information please inquire in person at 27 Bear River Dr. Loleta,go CA, email nicoelbuehrer@brb-nsn. For application information toviawww.bearrivercasino.com, gov, via website bearrivercasino.com or via telephone (707)733-1900 call (707) 733-1900, x.167 or email nicoelbuehrer@brb-nsn.gov. ext.167

Executive Director of Tribal Operations Position directs and oversees organization’s operational activities including office management, procurement, legal, fiscal, and much more. Must have experience leading and directing the work of several teams, excellent management and team building skills and interpersonal skills. Must have at least 5 years experience in a lead role and 5 years as a supervisor. Experience in tribal government preferred. Must have Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. For application information please call (707) 733-1900, x.167 or email nicoelbuehrer@brb-nsn.gov.

Now Hiring: 14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

CPA • Laborers • Plumber Office Assistant • Controller Apprentice Electrician (State Registered) • Medical Assistant Facility Maintenance

Accounting Supervisor  Budget Analyst Medical Records Technician NATE Certified Heating Tech Geotechnical Engineer  Communication Coordinator Outside Sales Person  Certified Plumber General Manager -Media Insurance Agent Licensed California Tree Climbers minimum 3 years experience Class B Driver/Labor

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 1 F/T Arcata REGISTERED NURSE 1F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Arcata

SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR

DININg OpErATIONS SUpErvISOr

HSU Dining Services, full-time,

MEDICAL ASSISTANT Willow Creek

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Mckinleyville DENTAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Willow Creek TEEN CLINIC ADVOCATES (must still be in high school) P/T Crescent City, McKinleyville, Arcata, Willow Creek Call (707) 826-8633 ext 5140 Visit www.opendoorhealth.com

$2,178-3,022/mo, ($12.57-$17.43/hr),

plus medical insurance and retirement benefits. The Operations Supervisor provides leadership, support and guidance to ensure food quality standards, inventory levels, food safety guidelines, and customer service expectations are met in the Depot dining facility. This job requires the following experience: interviewing, hiring, training, and scheduling a sizable employee workforce; cash register and cash activities oversight; proper food handling and ServSafe certified; floor and cooking stations oversight; strong customer service; basic computer literacy; available evenings and some weekends.

DEADLINE: 04/11/2013 To apply: Submit cover letter, resume, 3 work-related references & job application from http://www.humboldt.edu/uc/jobVacancies.html Mail to: Hiring Committee, University Center 1 Harpst Street, Arcata, CA 95521 Or E-mail application materials to: univctrjobs@humboldt.edu

2 F/T Arcata, 1 F/T Eureka (Pediatrics)

REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 P/T Crescent City, 2 P/T

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

Maintenance Worker PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv. & 3 mo to 3 yrs related exp. Front Office assistant - dental PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv. & 2 to 5 yrs dental receptionist training or exp. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. For qualifications go to www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes: 4/10/13 @ 5PM.

46 North Coast Journal • Thursday, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

DRIVERS. CAE Transport. Weekdays/Sat.s, various day shifts. 21+ & clean driving record. Print application at www.cityambulance. com, send WITH COVER LETTER to personnel@cityambulance. com or 135 W. 7th St., Eureka, CA 95501. (E-0425) ELECTRICIAN, INDUSTRIAL. Minimum 3 years industrial electrical experience required. Must know 480V 3-phase motors, PLCs and motor control circuits. Must have all necessary tools and be able to work swing shift, weekend and holidays. Excellent wage and benefit package. Accepting applications Mon. to Fri. between 8-11 a.m. and Noon-4:30 p.m. at Sierra Pacific Industries, 2593 New Navy Base Road, Arcata. We are a drug and tobacco free work place and a verifiable Social Security Number is required. EOE (E-0411) OPENINGS AVAILABLE. Part Time & On-Call Case Managers, Mental Health Aides, Dietary Aides, Housekeepers. Needed for Mental Health Rehabilitation Center. Apply at Crestwood Behavioral Health, 2370 Buhne St, Eureka. (E-0425) MOVIE EXTRAS, ACTORS, MODELS. Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 866-339-0331 (AAN CAN) (E-0404)

THE THINK AND GROW RICH OF THE 21ST CENTURY! Revolutionary breakthrough for success being released! For a FREE CD, please call 1-800-385-8470 (AAN CAN) (E-0418) AIRLINE CAREERS. begin here - Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1-888-242-3214 (E-0404) FACILITY SITE REVIEW NURSE. Temp to Hire. Completes Part C Site reviews for PCP’s. Includes assessment of physical accessibility. Communicates performance scores. Develops action plans as necessary. Current CA RN license. Work from home with frequent travel to Northern CA Rural Counties. For complete job description or to apply visit www.partnershiphp.org. AA/ EOE (E-0404)

Hiring?

Place your ad online! www. northcoast journal.com


CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt! 707-442-4500 #14 www.camentorfha.com

LABORERS. Must have previous production type manual labor exp in an outdoor climate. Applicant must be able to lift/pull 50 lbs repetitively and shovel for long periods of time. Must possess good communication skills and be safety minded. Sawmill exp a plus but not req’d. Must be at least 18 yrs. Accepting applications Sat., April 6, 8-10 a.m. only at Sierra Pacific Industries, 2593 New Navy Base Rd., Arcata. Sierra Pacific is located approx 3 miles from Eureka or Arcata on Hwy 255. Everyone who applies will be given a short interview. We are a drug & tobacco free work place. A verifiable SS # is req’d. EOE (E-0404) MAINTENANCE TECH. Maint. Dept. of large apartment complex in Eureka is seeking a team oriented maint. tech with a positive attitude to join our team. A successful candidate must enjoy working with people, have experience in plumbing, electrical, carpentry or mechanical systems, and be willing to perform any maint. task necessary, including janitiorial. FT with benefits. For a complete job description and application, contact john.hammond@usw.salvationarmy.org or call (707) 445-3141. (E-0404) PAYROLL TECHNICIAN (JOB #1324). F/T position in Payroll Department. Review: 4/10/13. For more info visit: www.humboldt.edu/ jobs or call (707) 826-3626. HSU is an ADA/Title IX/EOE (E-0404) PHLEBOTOMIST/LAB ASSISTANT. Greet patients, collect and prepare specimens, place orders with reference lab, provide clerical support for lab. Current CA CPT cert. required. Full time with benefits. Jerold Phelps Community Hospital, Garberville. www. shchd.org. (E-0418)

Real Estate

Rentals

Employment PRESCHOOL SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS NEEDED! Must be available to start April 10,2013. Experience Required, Units Preferred. Call (707) 444-9623. (E-0404) INBOUND PHONE SALES/TECHNICAL SUPPORT. Inbound phone sales and technical support. Position requires accurate keyboarding skills, strong written and oral communication via email/phone. Interpersonal and organizational skills a must. Ability to work independently and in a professional manner. Position requires excellent attendance. Working knowledge of Excel and Word. Bilingual a plus. Benefits for full time employees include: paid vacation and holidays. After completion of waiting period, medical insurance and elective supplementary insurances available. Applications available online @ ccrane.com or C. Crane Company, Inc. 558 10th Street, Fortuna CA 95540. Deadline: 4/19/13. We are an equal opportunity employer. (E-0411) CARDIAC SONOGRAPHER FOR HIRE. Available July 1. Bachelor of Science. Board Certified. Resume available. mimi_dills@yahoo.com (E-0530) CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW. Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442-4500 #14, www. camentorfha.com (E-1226) AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite 209, Eureka. (707) 476-9262. (E-0411) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN) (E-0425) LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 (AAN CAN) (E-0404) AIRLINE CAREERS. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. (AAN CAN) (E-0418)

HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.mailing-usa.com (AAN CAN) (E-0418) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450, http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) (E-0620) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1226)

Rentals EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 309 E St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. On-site laundry, w/c cat. Rent $495. Vac 04/20. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0404) EUREKA 2BD/1BA TOWNHOUSE. 1500 Goldenwest Ct. W/S/G Pd. On-site laundry, carport parking, w/c cat. Rent $750. Vac 04/14. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0404) CHARMING DUPLEX ON 1 ACRE. With indoor jacuzzi tub, large deck, beautiful views of meadow and Redwood forest. $800/ month. Some utilities included. 442-0952 (R-0418) FORTUNA 2BD/1.5BA. Appl., No pets, Garbage paid. $850/month + security deposit. (707) 725-6293. (R-0404) ARCATA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 840 D St. Centrally located. Fireplace, private patio, off street parking. Rent $995, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0404) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2303 Summer St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. Off street parking, hookups. Rent $570, Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0404) ARCATA HOUSE FOR RENT $1700. 4 bedrooms 2.5 bathroom with beautiful new kitchen, stacking washer and dryer, 3 bedrooms with south facing windows, open living room kitchen, fenced yard, kids and dogs welcome, solid references required with deposit. Available 5/15/13 (707) 498-8981 (R-0404)

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 EUREKA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1823 California St. Garbage Pd. Sec 8 OK. Hook-ups, yard, w/c pet Rent $1000, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0404) FORTUNA NEWER 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 2999 Rainbow Ln. Garbage Pd. Washer/Dryer included. Rent $975. Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0404) ALL AREAS-ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R-0620)

EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 443-4811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE0425) ACREAGE IN ARCATA/BLUE LAKE DEVELOPMENT. 1-acre lot on Center Street, Arcata. Great bay and city light views, walking distance to downtown and HSU, trails on site, park setting, $150,000. Opportunity for development in Blue Lake: approx. 1.2 acres, 2 houses and storage units. Up to 11-12 units with completed lot split multi-family and/or commercial use. $290,000. Call Linda for more info (707) 845-1215, Linda.Disiere@ exprealty.com (RE-0404) REDUCED ! WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1226)

Business Rentals Lodging/Travel DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail. com. (BR-1226)

Real Estate AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acresonly $99/month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) (RE-0404)

Journal Readers are the People You want to Hire! 442-1400 • www.northcoastjournal.com

EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountian Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986-7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L-0502)

Auto

Auto CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808, www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-0606)

Buy/Sell/Trade MENS CLOTHING & SHOES 1/2 PRICE! April 1-6. Pink Tagged Clothes 25¢. Dream Quest Thrift Store in Willow Creek - Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. (BST-0404) BOHEMIAN MERMAID SHOP! Hand-dyed natural clothing. Fun styles that fit women! Kidwear, local jewelry and art. 6th & F, Eureka. www.Bohemian-Mermaid.com and Facebook. (BST-0411) TEMPUR-PEDIC FOR SALE. California King Tempur-Pedic mattress and box springs. This is the BellaSonna model and is about two years old. Entire set is in like new condition. This mattress is medium to firm support. Originally sold for approx. $5,000, selling for $2,000. Injuries from a recent accident are forcing us into a softer mattress. Text message to 845-4698 only. Available to view in the evenings. (BST-1226)

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

2006 BUICK LUCERNE CX. V6, 4 door, sunroof, excellent condition. Selling due to illness. $10k obo, (707) 488-2535 or 839-5432. (A-0404)

le garage sa ›

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

Rummage

this way

SALE KITS • $7

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

47


the Pets

Buy/Sell/Trade

4 APRIL

AUCTIONS

THURS. APRIL 4TH 5:45 PM Estate furniture & household misc. incl. waterfall bedroom set, crystal, silver, china. HUGE ESTATE! DON’T MISS THIS SALE!

THURS. APRIL 11 5:45 PM TH

Sheriff’s surplus incl. 20 bikes, Honda dirt bike + automotive & construction lots, gun cabinets,estate furniture & household misc. BIG SALE! FUTURE THURSDAY AUCTIONS: APRIL 18TH & 25TH

CONTINUED FROM previous page

19th Annual

1 SALE

$ 00

Services

• Grooming & Boarding by Linn • Gentle Professional Grooming Since 1989

Monday, April 15th

t’s New W335hEaStreet, Eureka 445-8079

Spring & Garden SALE

April 12, noon-9pm April 13-14, 9am-4pm

Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • groomingbyLinn.com • 826-0903

AKC GERMAN SHEPHERDS. Quality German lines. www. sherman-ranch.us, 541-281-6829. (P-0418) SEARCHING FOR SCOOTER LOST. Jan. 29 in BlueLake. Small black fixed male with curly tail. white spot middle of tail,also white belly & lower legs Heeler mutt mix, blue collar very cute,very friendly, very missed ! 502-6534 leave message. (P-0411)

Services

at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

DALLAS CAPITAL FINANCIAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL TAX SERVICE

Fees range from $30 - $80

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

STOP PAYING TOO MUCH TO FILE YOUR TAXES We offer: No out of pocket fees, Direct Deposit

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Walk-ins Welcome

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

File, and make appointment at dallascapital.net

IN FULL COLOR

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y

350 E St., Suite 207 (4th and E St.) Eureka • (707) 832-4292

      

 

THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629-3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST-1226)

Place your ad online in the Marketplace at www.northcoastjournal.com. 442-1400 VISA/MC. Too many tubas, overwhelmed with sTuff? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. Visa/MC

FLASHBACK 116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Sun &Tues.

SELECT PURSES, SHOES AND LEFTOVER MARCHES SALE OF HATS/TIES & SCARVES

NEW

in ON AT I LO C

Old

Services BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR HAS MOVED. 76 Country Club Dr., next to Farmer Brown’s Supply. (530) 629-4067. (S-0516) STITCHES -N-BRITCHES IN MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502-5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches-n-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com (S-0502)

n Tow

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

“Clothes with Soul”

48 North Coast Journal • Thursday, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call. Contact 2guysandatrucksmk777@gmail.com, (707) 845-3087. (S-0425) LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, real estate leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677-3364. (S-0606) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808)

this week

Paul Windham, M.D.

General Practice Occupational Medicine 707.497.6342 1915 Harrison Ave., Suite A • Eureka

Accepting New Clients

Check out the listings on page 51

real estate

this week

or online @ www.northcoastjournal.com

real estate


Services

Music

Community

AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating-$300 Federal Tax Credit-CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail.com, (707) 502-1289 (S-0627) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. $199/hr. (707) 8439599 redwoodcoasthelicopters@ gmail.com, www.redwoodcoasthelicopters.com (S-0627) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1226) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 8258074, taichigardener.com (S-0606) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155. (S-1226) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-0606) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-0606) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1226)

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old Rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. 832-7419. (M-0509) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio. com. (707) 502-9469 (M-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-0606) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0523) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-0606)

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) (C-0404) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-1226)

Attorney DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc. FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

rape Crisis team Crisis line

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT:

Community REPUTATION OF CHRISTIANS. Christians can be view as hypocritical, is this reputation deserved? Discuss it at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., April 7, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0404) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice,*Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472, www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN) (C-0418) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 8458973 (C-1226)

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

sHelter HousinG for YoutH Crisis Hotline

444-2273

&Spirit

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

body, mind

Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

SHAWNA BELL

Marriage & Family Therapist, MFC 47122

Gambling Treatment • Trauma Recovery Addiction Treatment • Stress Management DOT/SAP (707) 496-2856 • shawnabmft@gmail.com 381 Bayside Road, Suite C • Arcata, CA 95521

norcalrecoveryservices.com

GIT YER VALSSAGE! Swedish, Deep Tissue & Therapeutic Massage. Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

707-822-5244

Medical Cannabis Evaluations Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years. Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Call for Walk-in Availability

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer

Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems

Parent Educator

co n

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

fi d e n t i a l &

co

assionate mp

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

Looking for a romantic getaway? The Wedding Guide is available at newsstands and wedding retailers throughout Humboldt & online at

northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

49


Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center

$ 85

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 12-6pm Special discount for Seniors, SSI , Veterans & Students New First Tim MMJ Patie e nts

SAVE

$ 50

with men tion of this ad

Lowest Price Evaluations in HC

Medical Cannabis Consultants

(707) 407- 0527 508 I Street, Eureka

(across from HC Court House)

LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH. From the inside out with clinical hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. (707) 845-3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com. (MB-0404) REDUCE STRESS. Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. presents Manifest Positivity Mindfulness Series. Small group meets 6-7pm, April 10, 17, 24. Advance registration required. http:// manifestpositivity.com/reducestress-class. (MB-0404) YOUR next client may be a Journal reader. Offer your health services here in the Marketplace. 442-1400.

Energy Life Center HEAT THERAPY

+

ENERGY MEDICINE Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com NEED A MASSAGE IN THE EVENING AFTER WORK? Kimberly Grabo CMT now at the Center for Reflexology & Intuitive Healing Arts. Mon., Tues., Wed., 5-9 p.m. Same day appointments available. Call (707) 932-5804 to book your appointment today. (MB-0404) CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED ESTHETICIAN. Organic facials, waxing & aromatherapy massage. Mention this ad and receive 25% off. Located at Beau Monde Salon in Arcata. (707) 953-7619 (MB-0523) FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (MB-1226) YOUR IDEAL CLIENT may be a Journal reader. 442-1400. VISA/ MC. Place your ad onlinle at www.northcoastjournal.com

HAS MOVED!

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 1-5

Jessica Baker, Licensed Acupuncturist, Herbalist & Instructor 607 F Street in Arcata Services include Acupuncture, Facial Rejuvenation, Nutritional/Herbal Consultations and Classes

(707) 822-4300 EARTHRITE MASSAGE. CMT with excellent local references. Now practicing at home (Arcata) after working at Mendocino Hot Springs. Offering Introductory Special. $45/hour! Call Rick: (707) 499-6033. You will float away…. (MB-0404) GET WIRED FOR JOY! Learn simple, practical, neurosciencebased tools in a small, supportive group. Rewire stress circuits for better self-regulation, promoting vitality and joy, with Nancy Borge-Riis, LMFT, Certified Emotional Brain Trainer. 707.839.7920 and borgeriis@sbcglobal.net (MB-0418)

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1226) FIGHT FLUS AND COLDS. doTERRA essential oils. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 4987749, www.californiadoterra. com, maureen@californiadoterra.com (MB-0516)

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-0606) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-0606)

ERE H I T ’S

FIND

IT NOW ON NEWSSTANDS, AT LOCAL WEDDING

&

!

PARTY RETAILERS AND ONLINE AT WWW.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM

50 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (MB-1226) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1226) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1226) www.northcoastjournal.com

&Spirit

Do it Legally

All Renewals Starting At

body, mind

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Your fortune... bellies. Happyait you aw


■ Dow’s Prairie

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

real estate

this week

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

BeautIful cuStOm hOme wIth dRamatIc entRy! Soaring ceilings in this lovely 2005 home. The cook’s kitchen adjoins a large dining area, the library/office has many built-in bookcases, and the master suite is downstairs. Includes a secondary, completely separate, home for rental or extended family. MLS#236296 $699,500

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

FIND HOME IMPROVEMENT EXPERTS Page: 17

$449,900

this week

4 bed, 3 bath, 2,650 sq ft custom Fortuna home, amazing property, dreamlike setting in lush landscaping encircled by forest, koi pond, waterfall, gleaming wood floors, spacious gourmet kitchen

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

$299,000

traditional style Eureka four-plex that has been well maintained and landscaped, on site coin operated laundry room, enclosed carport off alley, off street parking, great investment potential

$219,500

3 bed, 2 bath, 1375 sq ft Myrtletown home with a remodeled kitchen, hardiboard siding, garage is a single car width but is 60 feet long so you can stack cars or utilize as a workshop

home & garden

real estate

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Blocksburg Land/ Property 11 beautiful parcels located near Blocksburg. Combination of +/-40, 80, 160 acre GRade a properties featuring year round water, deed access, timber and amazing views. Call today for more information!

$275k-$450k

Orick Land/Property

Beautiful +/-123 acres with mettah Creek running through the property. property boasts open flats, timber, year round water, amazing views and plenty of privacy.

$269,000

Legget Land/ Property

+/-40 acres located in northern mendocino county. this property boasts large year round springs, timber, open meadows, picturesque views, year round access and gently sloping topography.

$249,000

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

51


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North Coast Journal 04-04-13