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thursday march 28, 2013 vol XXIV issue 13 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

8 College kids deserve respect? Who knew? 9 101 ways to protest 12 The best beef evah 28 Return of roller derby 30 Don’t miss this one 35 Nailed it

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

table of 4 Mailbox 7 Poem What’s His Name?

8

Media Maven The Public’s Beeswax

9 News 101 Ways to Protest

12 Blog Jammin’ 14 On The Cover HumCPR Rising

17 Home & Garden Service Directory

22 The Hum vagabond music

Open Door Community Health Centers Special Insert

24 Music & More! 27 Calendar 30 Filmland Stop Searching, See Sugar Man

31 Workshops 34 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

35 Field Notes The Art of the Riposte

37 Crossword 37 Sudoku 38 Obituary 38 Marketplace 42 Body, Mind & Spirit 43 Real Estate This Week

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  Editor: Thank you for your illuminating cover story “Beasts and Children” (March 14) regarding “People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals” (PETA). While I firmly agree that treating animals and our other fellow life forms with respect, dignity and compassion is our moral duty as a (supposedly) intelligent species, I have nothing but contempt for PETA.  The cover story by Jim Gorant in the Dec. 29, 2008, issue of Sports Illustrated details the saga of the Michael Vick dogs and what happened to them in the aftermath of his trial. To make a long story short (Gorant’s story is available online and well worth the read), PETA, along with the Humane Society of the U.S., advocated for the dogs to be euthanized. Thankfully, other more compassionate and wiser organizations prevailed. This was, in fact, the first time that fighting dogs had been considered “victims” by the court, rather than merely “evidence” to be destroyed after the trial. Of the 51 dogs seized, 47 were saved and only one was euthanized for being too violent. After rehabilitation work and training, most are now living in homes. A few have gone on to become therapy dogs and at least one is a dog agility champion.  … All no thanks to PETA.  As your story recommended, I too believe it is best for people concerned with animal welfare to donate to the many quality local animal rescues in our area. I prefer to use my hard-earned dollars to support groups that actually work to help animals rather than taking the easy way out by euthanizing them and then spending money on fancy advertisements. PETA, in my humble opinion, is morally bankrupt, and I would not be sad to see them fiscally bankrupt as well. Matthew Lang, Eureka  

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4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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Editor: I was a PETA kid, started animal rights groups in high school and college, went vegan, etc. However, the good/evil dichotomy got more complicated as I got older. Many studies have demonstrated that each free-roaming pet cat can kill dozens of native animals, like birds and lizards,

per year. When we fostered kittens down south, there was a volunteer who created an enclosed play yard for her cats, but this is the exception to the rule. Only an estimated 35 percent of pet cats are indoor only. So if we really love animals, should we save the dozens of native animals killed each year by a cat or do we save the cat that kills them? The problem with this question is that it is cerebral not emotional. Cats are the ones who are soft and cuddly, purr on our laps and play with toys. Wildlife doesn’t get that kind of marketing advantage. As one pet owner recently said of her cat, “he’s the cutest little serial killer you will ever meet.” Natalia Collier, Arcata  

Farms Worse Than PETA Editor: I enjoyed reading about Adara Lewis being selected as a finalist for PETA’s Cutest Vegan Kid contest. However, it appears the point of this article was to suggest PETA’s mission was killing homeless pets and to create a slanted bias against PETA.  First, PETA does not have a shelter and uses mobile vans for spaying, neutering and euthanasia services to low income individuals. It is unfair to compare the number of shelter animals adopted versus animals euthanized at the owner’s request. I contacted PETA and learned most of these euthanized animals were too ill to live and were severely neglected. I suggest you read PETA’s animal shelter section on their website. They explain the differences between good no-kill shelters and bad ones. Their position favors having companion animals being adopted and placed in loving homes.  Perhaps instead of slighting PETA you could have focused on the 59 billion animals slaughtered annually on factory farms and questioned whether people should support them by buying meat at their local supermarkets. Animals are routinely abused by workers (see video “Glass Walls” at peta.org); many animals slaughtered are gutted alive; dairy cows have their babies taken away for veal or killed for leather. Pigs are unable to move in stalls; baby pigs are killed by being thumped on their heads. Male chicks can’t lay eggs and are gassed or thrown into dumpsters. Animals are fed 70 percent of

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overpopulation problem at its roots, sterilizing nearly 90,000 animals at low cost to no cost to their guardians since 2001 in our mobile clinics, and educating millions of people about animal adoption, respect and the importance of sterilization with our ads and PSAs. PETA’s Community Animal Project fieldworkers are on the road every day and on call 24/7, providing help to abused and neglected animals. We’ve called on the National Governors Association and even the White House to promote mandatory spay-and-neuter legislation and more. We need everyone’s help. To save lives, let’s always have our animals spayed or neutered, adopt from shelters, and never buy animals from pet stores or breeders. Teresa Chagrin, PETA animal care and control specialist, Norfolk, Va.    

Hurt My Brain, Please

continued on page 7

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Editor: It was a pleasant surprise to see that the North Coast Journal had a medium level Sudoku puzzle in this week’s issue. For the last few weeks it seems that you have focused mainly on the easy or very easy puzzles which, in my opinion, is a waste of valuable print space. Do you really think that you are serving your readers’ best interests by dumbing them down with mediocre puzzles? Do you think the avid Sudoku puzzler finds any satisfaction turning the pages of your publication only to find that the dessert at the end of the meal is only gruel? I for one hope that this isn’t true and that you continue to challenge and engage your

all antibiotics, along with GMO crops, hormones, pesticides and ground-up animals, and chickens eat arsenic. Conventional meat tested showed 50 percent had antibiotic resistant staph and E coli from feces contamination. Consuming animals can cause heart disease, cancer, diabetes and fatal food-borne illnesses. Eating a healthy vegan diet will help save your health, animals and the environment, something PETA promotes. Sheryl Esparza, Arcata   Editor: As Carrie Peyton Dahlberg points out, PETA has a small division that does hands-on work with animals in our community. Most of the animals we take in are society’s rejects; they are abused, sick, elderly, aggressive, unsocialized or otherwise unadoptable. We send most adoptable animals to high-traffic openadmission shelters. I invite readers to visit www.PETASaves.com to see some of the animals PETA has helped.  Unlike many “no-kill” shelters, which make their statistics look good by refusing to accept animals in need, shuffling animals off to hoarders posing as “rescues,” or sending animals out the door with incompetent or cruel people, PETA never turns away any animal who needs help. Virginia officials acknowledged this to USA Today, saying, “PETA will basically take anything that comes through the door, and other shelters won’t do that.” Every caring person wants to end the need for euthanasia, but no amount of money can buy dogs and cats what they need most: loving, lifelong homes. That’s why PETA has spent millions tackling the

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What’s His Name?

continued from page 5 readers with puzzles more befitting the type of intellectual prowess that Humboldt County seems to have a plethora of. Let’s eat cake, shall we? p.s. I am currently setting up a research project to measure the relationship between the level of difficulty in your weekly Sudoku puzzle and the educational value and content of the Journal on a week to week basis. I am already finding some really interesting inverse correlations. Travis Turner, Samoa    

Watch Your Words

Editor: I admire Emily Carlson’s willingness to speak up (“Don’t Be Transphobic,” Mailbox, March 14). My only disagreement with her letter is the line that goes “in a journal that totes itself.” Totes? Carries itself around? Impersonates a carrying bag? I believe the word needed was touts. Webster defines “tout” as “to publicize aggressively.” This brings me to my other objection to the writing in the North Coast Journal: writers who are not accurate in their use of words. A case in point is the recent article about young people going through a “right of passage,” by being on their mission here. Writer, ask yourself: If they didn’t go on a “right of passage,” would it have been a “wrong of passage?” A “left of passage?” I suspect they really go through a “rite of passage,” which Webster defines as “a ceremonial act or procedure customary in religious or

other solemn use.” Repeatedly the NCJ has printed that someone “pulls on the reigns.” Can you, by using your hands, draw to a slower speed the tenures of a few rulers of countries, the way you can slow a horse with the leather straps attached to a horse’s bridle? Spell check isn’t going to help. You have to understand the concept. I think we are losing the power of our own language by misusing it. Yes, a reader might be able to gloss over the mistaken use of a word, and understand the thing meant. But a writer should not rely on that gloss; a writer should be precise. Say what you mean. Capture my interest with your thoroughness, with your understanding of both your subject and your use of this language. Pat Dillman, Bayside    

Correction

In “Picketing for Help” (March 21), the Journal incorrectly identified the party trying to recruit another nephrologist to the Humboldt region. The recruiting is being done by Dr. Allen Mathew of Redwood Renal Associates, but not by St. Joseph Hospital.

Write a letter! Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com l

Hey, man, how ya doing? (What’s his name?) Fine, fine. Was just thinking of one of my favorite reporters. Yeah, you know, uh, uh, You know. Little guy. Ran the local news desk. We thought he sounded like that Italian TV detective. You know, uh, you know? Little guy, with an Italian name. Played by that actor, uh, you know. Always wore a trench coat. Yeah, the reporter sounded just like him. Yeah, his desk was next to the day editor. Big guy, from Texas, with a high-pitched voice. He was married to that great Justice Department reporter. You know, uh, can’t think of her name. (Who is this guy I’m talking to? Pentagon reporter, flew a plane, played mandolin. His father was agriculture reporter.) Hey, good to see you again. Gotta go. And thanks for the memories. — Dave Rosso

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013

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March 28, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 13

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/copy editor Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Andrew Goff calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Illustration by Holly Harvey.

The Public’s Beeswax

A

jury this month declared guilty of corruption five former councilmembers of the city of Bell in Los Angeles County. For running a town that is a little larger than Eureka, with a similar percentage of people living in poverty, they had each received salaries more than 10 times what Eureka pays its city leaders. Bell’s former city manager has yet to be tried. He made about $800,000 a year, or five times the pay of Eureka’s city manager. That story first broke when two reporters from the Los Angeles Times, Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives, requested salary figures for city leaders under the California Public Records Act. That’s a law the Legislature enacted in 1968 to ensure that the state and local governments don’t keep things from the public. States across the country have similar laws, many of which give the public greater access to government documents than does California. The Bell convictions came in the middle of Sunshine Week, which is a national spotlight each year on government transparency. I spent part of Sunshine Week, meanwhile, sitting in the dean of my college’s office at Humboldt State, defending my students’ right to request records from public agencies in the county. He and President Rollin Richmond had gotten hit with complaints from public officials irritated that a school project forced them to waste valuable time. After hearing me out, the dean was great. He agreed that the government officials needed to deal directly with the student journalists. Each spring I teach investigative reporting to roughly 20 students. We form a team and I turn them loose on the community. But first, I think of a valid project for them to do. It has to involve examination of public records and interviews with people. The information we go after must help residents understand how their governments work and spend taxpayer dollars. And we need to be able to publish a story on it. If we can’t pass on our information to the public, there is no point in wasting the valuable time of the people we source. Here’s the message I try to instill in the class: Journalists can and should serve the public good. This is the eighth such project. We’ve investigated the shutdown of an ice company critical to the local fishing industry; we read through every search warrant in the county court; we looked at fees at every school

8 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

in the CalState system; we investigated a jail suicide. Each of these projects required negotiations with public agencies. The Department of Health and Human Services made it difficult to get interviews for the ice house story, but the next year, the public information officer worked with us to set up a system for viewing records and interviewing inspectors that would cause minimal disruption for the folks who work at the health department. The court clerk’s office made it difficult for us to view search warrants until we negotiated for a limited number of students to view records a limited number of hours each week. These negotiations teach students the careful balance between the public’s right to know and public agencies’ need to protect privacy and get public business done. This is the first year I found myself in a triangle with the public agencies and the university administration. Let me explain this year’s project. I wish I could claim that it was my idea but it wasn’t. Journal Editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg suggested that we look into payments public agencies make on legal claims — you know, when a tree on public land that borders your farm falls and crushes your dairy cow and you demand compensation. (We found one such case.) The project met my criteria on three points: It would involve public records and it would produce two types of information the public should know: How much agencies spend on these claims, and the types and frequency of economic or physical injuries people sustain as a result of government negligence or mistakes. To be fair, I intended that students send the same letter to every agency in the county. This way we couldn’t be accused of targeting some agencies and ignoring others. With a population of 130,000 people, how many public agencies could there be? I stopped searching when I hit 70. I didn’t want to bother tiny districts or those so far flung that my students would have to drive two hours to look at documents, so I narrowed the list to 38. It included all of the larger school districts, all the cities, the county, HSU, College of the Redwoods and some community service districts. The latter I considered most important because they receive almost no oversight from local press. Few people even know what they do. We limited our request to payments on claims for the past 10 years. We went back 10 years because some claims take years to work their way through the system.

Under the Public Records Act, agencies must respond to a request within 10 days, but after that, they have a “reasonable amount of time” to fulfill the request. Determining what is reasonable is one of the prime lessons of the course. Some of the agencies we sent letters to responded immediately. Some, like the Harbor District, provided the information we requested in what seemed like record time. Other agencies freaked out. One district took offense to the hostile nature of the letter we sent — a boilerplate letter for public records act requests we downloaded from the website of the Student Press Law Center. Arcata City Councilmember and former mayor Alex Stillman complained to my husband when she ran into him in town. When public officials complain to the university president or dean before contacting and negotiating with students directly, they send a message that Humboldt State students deserve less respect than other citizens of the county or other journalists who work here. Yet these students are Humboldt County residents. They live here. Most work here, and they buy goods and services and pay sales taxes here. They are entitled to the same rights (and have the same responsibilities) as any other resident. The California Public Records Act notes that, saying: Access to information concerning the conduct of the people’s business is a fundamental and necessary right of every person in this state.” Public agencies shouldn’t consider the requesting of public records a nuisance to be thwarted. They should recognize it as the fundamental and necessary right it is by law. If locating public records turns out to get in the way of public business, then we need to set up better systems for public access to records. Maybe that’s the lesson my students could teach Humboldt County — if only government officials would work with them. I’m sure the officials in Bell considered Gottlieb and Vives a nuisance. Sometimes, for journalists to work for the public good, they have to be a pain in the butt.  

– Marcy Burstiner

mib3@humboldt.edu

Marcy Burstiner is chair of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at Humboldt State University.  Next month she promises to get off her high horse.

101 Ways to Protest Despite tree-sits and nudes, Willits bypass churns on By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

I

t was closing on 5 p.m. last Friday, March 22. End of the day at the end of a traditional work week. But Amanda Senseman was talking to a reporter on one of her three cell phones while another rang incessantly and the third charged, sucking power from a small solar panel. She is the “Warbler.” Except at night, when she sleeps, she hasn’t had a moment

Jack Gescheidt, of The TreeSpirit Project, and 40 people staged a demonstration last weekend in Willits, not far from Warbler's tree sit. "We peacefully made a lovely photo, 'Living Valley,' Gescheidt said. "For me, it's a celebration." Photograph © 2013 Jack

Gescheidt, TreeSpiritProject.com

to herself, most days, since Jan. 28, when she climbed into this Ponderosa pine tree alongside Highway 101 just outside Willits. The 24-year-old tree-sitter has vowed she won’t leave work until either the law climbs up and brings her down or the California Department of Transportation agrees not to build a freeway through the Little Lake Valley to divert traffic around the city of Willits. Her tree, and the surrounding verdant

hills and pasture dotted with madrone, oak, pine and cattle, are in the path. Her tree-sit, two others that just sprang up nearby, and accompanying protests on the ground have contributed to off and on delays for Caltrans. In February, the agency began clearing brush and trees to build a fence between the projected freeway and lands that are to remain untouched. The previous day, Thursday, about 50

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protesters, some from Humboldt County, convened at the construction site to block bulldozers and brush-clearing equipment. Dozens of California Highway Patrol officers also showed up. “All of a sudden they started accumulating,” Senseman said, over the phone. “There were more than 20 officers here.” She watched them shoo protestors to the other side of the highway, put up traffic cones to keep others from stopping, arrest eight on the ground who refused to quit blocking workers’ progress, and evict the base camp supplying her tree-sit. The CHP set up a watch near Senseman’s tree. The officers stayed all night. Then all this day, Friday. Now, she said over the phone, a few had left; the rest seemed to be settling in for another night. Protests over the Willits bypass also spilled into the city’s streets last Thursday, when construction workers staged a protest against the anti-bypass protesters. Meanwhile, a group called Save Little Lake Valley has been documenting it all; a petition is being circulated to stop the project; photographer Jack Gescheidt, who poses nudes in nature to take art (and sometimes political art) shots, arranged a nude photo shoot last weekend to, as Gescheidt said continued on next page

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continued from previous page later, “demonstrate our love for Willits Valley”; and Caltrans started a blog to promote the project. Caltrans says the $210 million bypass will reduce congestion through town by diverting much of the pass-through traffic. Opponents say most of the congestion in town is local, hasn’t increased in years — and won’t, at any rate, be fixed by this bypass. They say Caltrans failed to study less environmentally destructive bypass locations, especially two-lane ones — how about that railroad right-of-way through town? Caltrans says it examined at least 30 alternatives, including three using the railroad bed which could entail anything from tearing down houses to possibly moving the tracks. Opponents say the bypass will devastate businesses downtown and burden the city with maintaining the main street — Highway 101, which will be relinquished to the city by the state. Caltrans says the city will then be able to do what it wants downtown — close off the street for a fair, put in traffic calming circles. And so on. The bypass idea is not new. Caltrans has been proposing traffic diversions to ease congestion there since the mid-1950s, says the agency’s website. Over the years, different bypass scenarios have arisen and fizzled, sometimes for lack of local support,

10 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

other times lack of money. One piece of freeway did get built, in 1969, south of Willits. The current bypass effort started up in 1987. Ever since, it’s been one long round of documentation and approvals from various permitting agencies, public scoping sessions, alternatives presented and discarded, and occasional diversions of agency attention and funding to more urgent projects. Finally, the agency settled on building a 5.9-mile bypass through the valley east of town, with interchanges on each end. Environmental documents were completed, aired in public and approved. Land was purchased from ranchers and other property owners for the bypass, and for mitigation within the valley. Contracts for the work were signed. The project is envisioned as a four-lane expressway. But it will happen in two phases: First, the contractors will build two lanes on a four-lane expressway roadbed. Second, when there’s money for it, two more lanes will be added. Last May, several environmental groups and the California Farm Bureau sued Caltrans to stop the project. The suit alleges, among other things, that the agency failed to properly explore other realistic two-lane bypass options; that later construction to make it four-lane would further disrupt the environment; and that the two-lane design shift arose after completion of the environmental impact statement — so a supplemental document was in order. The suit also complained that no funding had been

committed for mitigation, nor had a detailed mitigation plan been vetted. In November, a judge denied the groups’ request for a preliminary injunction to stop the construction, saying they hadn’t proved they were likely to win the suit, nor that an injunction suited the public interest, according to a report from the Willits News. Mendocino County Farm Bureau Executive Director Devon Jones said last week that the bureau is not against the bypass project. “We’re just trying to find a way to minimize impacts to agriculture,” she said. “And we want to make sure this does not establish a precedent for other Caltrans projects in the state.” As mitigation for the loss of 60 acres of wetland to the project, Caltrans bought 2,000 acres of valley land. Much of it was under assorted leases to ranchers and amounted to about 25 percent of the total farmland in the Little Lake Valley, said Jones. Caltrans spokesperson Phil Frisbie said by phone last week that 400 of the 2,000 acres will be retired from production and restored to a natural state. Invasive species removal, and fencing to protect the creeks from cows and their trampling hooves, will begin this summer. The remaining 1,600 acres likely will undergo a more restricted regime of grazing, and under one lessee instead of several, Frisbie said. All 2,000 acres will be managed by the Mendocino Resource Conservation District, and monitored regularly by the

California Department of Fish and Wildlife, he said. Jones said ranchers who lost their leases will have trouble finding new grazing land to move their cattle to. And, she said, the bureau is worried about the huge ratio of mitigated lands to lost wetlands. Would other projects in the state require similar, henceforth? Frisbie agreed the ratio is large. “The preferred way to mitigate for wetlands is for every acre you impact you create or restore two acres,” he said. That’s the rule agreed on by the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers. In 2006, Frisbie said, the EPA issued new guidelines that said if there are no wetland areas to restore, project managers could do what’s called “watershed enhancement” using other acres. This alternative requires a much larger ratio, Frisbie said. And that’s the route Caltrans chose in Little Lake Valley, where there aren’t enough would-be wetlands to make up for those lost. The next court hearing in the bypass lawsuit against Caltrans is June 7. Of late, environmentalists have accused Caltrans of defying federal law that protects migrating birds by doing construction during nesting season, which recently began. In fact, the project did stop for several weeks while the agency reworked its bird nest survey protocols with state Fish and Wildlife, Frisbie said. But as long as Caltrans follows

the protocols, it can continue the work.  “We are following all state and federal laws,” he said. Protestors sent out angry email alerts late last week, after the CHP descended in force to the tree-sit areas and routes leading to them. “We had been stopped by people trespassing several times over the last couple weeks, putting themselves in harm’s way in front of equipment,” said Frisbie. “This is really a safety issue.” Last Friday, up in her tree, Senseman was watching the cops below her and pondering what the night would bring. Fifteen minutes earlier, she said, a woman from Caltrans had arrived, raised a bullhorn to her lips, identified herself — Senseman couldn’t remember her name — and shouted: “To the woman in the tree. …  You are trespassing. If you do not leave immediately, Caltrans will deploy CHP officers to remove you.” The Caltrans employee had left. Over the phone, Senseman said her adrenalin was certainly up. She was worried the CHP might come for her in the middle of the night. Not that the one-time goat and vegetable farmer was scared. “I’m righteously outraged,” she said, the fervor that drove her into the tree coming out in her voice. “I’m furious they continue to do work.” Last we heard, on Monday afternoon, she was still in her tree. l

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Blog Jammin’ MEDIA / BY JUDY HODGSON / MARCH 24, 1:29 P.M.

Journal a Winner

SANGAY PHUENTSHO INSTALLS A GRIDSHARE CIRCUIT ON A HOME IN BHUTAN.

PHOTO COURTESY HSU'S SCHATZ ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER

HUMBOLDT STATE, TECHNOLOGY / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 22, 2:28 P.M.

Brownouts, Be Gone Humboldt State University students designed a cool device to try to help the 50 million households in the world relying on renewable energy mini-grids avoid brownouts by distributing their load on the grid more evenly. And it seems to work. They conceived the grid-share idea, reports Environmental Research Web, when HSU grad student Karma Dorji, who’s from the Bhutan, explained the problem that people in his country were having, notes the story: Many villages in Bhutan have micro hydroelectric mini-grids and brownouts are common, particularly first thing in the morning when people are heating water and in the early evening when people are cooking rice. The students designed a device that tells a homeowner the status of the grid capacity at any given moment. If it’s normal, then it’s a good time to cook. If a brownout’s pending, then maybe the cooking can wait. The device was used in a pilot project in the Bhutan: The data showed that severe brownouts were reduced by over 92% after the GridShare devices were installed. The results of the pilot project were published in the January-March 2013 Environmental Research Letters. ●

The California Newspaper Publishers Association has honored the North Coast Journal for award-winning work in eight categories this year, ranging from investigative reporting to feature writing, from cartooning to graphic illustration. We just got the CNPA awards notice in the mail late last week, and there are lots of congratulations to go around in this year’s Better Newspapers Contest. Ryan Burns won first or second place, to be announced in June, in three categories: coverage of local government (“To Redeem a Felon”), investigative reporting (“Don’t Bother Coming In”) and writing (“Fight”). The entire editorial team won a first or second place, to be announced in June, for breaking news with its June 2012 election coverage (“The Money, The Future, The Vote”). And we are always proud of our “certificates of achievement,” awarded to runners-up who were in the top 10 percent for their category: Carrie Peyton Dahlberg for investigative reporting (“Going Once”) and coverage of the environment (“Dairy Diary”). Holly Harvey for graphic illustration (“Shellfish cultivation in Humboldt Bay”). Scottie Lee Meyers for a feature story (“The Mormon Moment”). Joel Mielke for editorial cartooning (“What bumper stickers mean” and “The everlasting blessing of the season“). See our website for links to the prizewinning work. ● ECONOMY / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 22, 12:42 P.M.

Clint’s Our Man! The San Francisco Chronicle has a feature today about Humboldt County cattleman Clint Victorine, who raises organic grass-fed beef down in the Eel River Valley. It’s a modern-day rags-to-riches — or niches — tale. Local boy wants to raise cattle. Has no family spread to inherit. Old-timers tell him it can’t be done. He does it anyway, and has 40 head of cattle by the time he’s heading for college. Comes back, still talking crazy about raising more cattle. Old timers shake their heads. But others say, organic’s where you gotta be. Then the old folks say, hell, you’ll

CLINT VICTORINE PHOTO COURTESY HUMBOLDT MADE

never make it without giving ‘em growth hormones not to mention worm meds and other health-fortifying drugs. And compete with the big boys? Bah. Well, he did it, went organic — with help from others, including a Headwaters Forest grant, and a partnership with a fellow who knows the food-brokering ropes, Bill Carman, says the story. And now: Now, he runs his herd — about 5,000 head — on the 6,000 acres he leases and the 200 he owns in Loleta. Whole Foods Market in Southern California is their largest account. In Northern California they sell Eel River or Pacific Pastures to independent stores, including Mollie Stone’s, Draeger’s and Andronico’s.” Go read the full story, it’s colorful. You can also check out his profile on Humboldt Made. Of course, we’ve known about local, organic, grass-fed beef-grower Victorine for a long time, now. And we appreciate his telling the world that: “… Humboldt’s got the best grass around.” ● CASINOS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 21, 4:47 P.M.

Wiyot Still In For Gambling Win What’s this? Gov. Brown is announcing the signing of a gaming compact with the Wiyot Tribe? When said compact was signed first by Gov. Schwarzenegger in April 2008, after a nine-year’s-long slog toward said agreement, according to the tribe’s announcement at the time on its website? (See our coverage from back then.) What it is, is evidence of yet more slogging toward gambling-rewards heaven. According to the 2008 compact, the

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Wiyot Tribe relinquishes any right to build a casino on its Humboldt Bay lands — that it is, it agrees to not be a “gaming tribe.” Instead, the 800-member Wiyot Tribe will be given some of the revenues generated by the 1,900-member North Fork Rancheria Tribe’s proposed casino — around $3-5 million a year might go to the Wiyot out of the estimated $100 million generated a year by the casino. The North Fork Rancheria Tribe, in the Sierra foothills of Madera County, in its related compact to have land taken into trust by the federal government to build the casino upon, also agrees not to build gambling digs on other, environmentally sensitive lands. And, according to that tribe’s website, it will be sharing gambling revenues not just with the Wiyot, but with other non-gaming tribes in the state. The details appear to be much the same in today’s newly re-signed compact, if what’s written on the North Fork Rancheria’s website is any indication. Brian Mead, Wiyot tribal administrator, when reached by phone today said he couldn’t say anything about it without permission from the tribal council or chairman. What’s new, it seems, is that the latest governor has concurred with federal findings that the casino promises more benefits than ills to all involved, according to the North Fork Rancheria: The new compact replaces the earlier compact negotiated and signed by Governor Schwarzenegger … . The compact also includes provisions to mitigate the potential economic impacts of the North Fork project on the Chukchansi Indian Tribe. More steps remain: The Department of Interior has to finish the process of taking the land into trust for the rancheria, and both the state legislature and the Secretary of the Interior have to ratify the new state tribal gaming compact. ● CRIME / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 21, 12:02 P.M.

Cart Patrol The Eureka Police Department has made another one of its routine “special operation” sweeps of the city to round up errant shopping carts, says a release from the department today: … numerous subjects were contacted and over 100 shopping carts were recovered. Four subjects were cited and released for misappropriation of property and one subject was arrested for an outstanding warrant for drug related charges. The estimated value of the recovered shopping carts was $18,000.00. These roundups happen after the

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police department gets complaints from business owners. And the business owners are right to be miffed at the theft of their property. As for those who nab the carts, wheel them off into illicit duty as personal-stuff haulers and fort fortifiers and such, no doubt they deserve the sharp words and citations the police throw at them when they’re caught. But that doesn’t mean they don’t need some sort of help. Remember the outdoor hoarder of a couple years back, who seemed to specialize in shopping cart repurposing? Dozens and dozens of carts trundled into the bushes and swamps of Eureka’s behind-buildings lands. That poor fellow seemed cart-addicted. The release is on our website. ● ADVICE, CRIME, SCAMS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 20, 4:43 P.M.

Give Us $300 Citizen, if someone purporting to be “Homeland Security” pops up on your computer screen and says “Gimme $300,” don’t do it. It will threaten you, of course: “The work of your computer has been suspended on the grounds of the violation of the law of the United States of America.” And it will block your computer. Tell you how to pay that $300 fine in order to get unblocked (using what’s called a MoneyPak code through a major retailer such as Kmart or Wal-Mart). Resist. Think back to the early days of the Patriot Act when you strode righteously into the county library and checked out every book you thought might be deemed subversive, or when you drew nuclear power plant cooling towers on cocktail napkins then tried to claim they were just bawdy doodles. (H/T H.S.!) Harness that disobedience, drive it forth. Plus, also, this is a scam. It “appears to be a form of malware/ virus known as ‘ransomware,’” says the Eureka Police Department in a news release, and it’s been hitting on locals recently.

Notes the release: Alternate versions of this same scam may use the FBI’s logo. Anyone receiving this message should not enter a MoneyPak code or any other payment method into the screen. If you get the virus, go into safe mode (reboot your computer into it; but dive under your desk, also, if you think that’ll help), and clean it out. And the EPD suggests you file a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3). And those folks suggest you get professional help to remove the malware. Also, right now, back up your computer. And update your anti-badstuff software. ● EUREKA / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MARCH 20, 1:11 P.M.

Your Civic Duty Calls Your friends are tired of hearing you grouse about a) “those weird metal contraptions the city calls ‘public art’”; b) the peeled-paint, falling down houses in your neighborhood; c) the parking-ticket lady and your long, sad walk from the allday parking lots; and d) the architectural hodgepodge cluttering up your street. Your friends think you’re off your rocker (what’s wrong with the metal contraptions?!). Heck with ‘em. You know what you must do: Apply to be on one of those city bodies that advise the city decision-makers, so you can throw the weight of your body around a little more officially. Right now, the City of Eureka is looking to fill these vacancies, according to a news release: Eureka Art and Culture — one vacancy Housing Advisory Committee — one vacancy Parking Place Commission — two vacancies Planning Commission — one vacancy Get your application by phone: 4414144; in person at the mayor’s office: 531 K St; or online: http://www.ci.eureka. ca.gov/. You must be a registered voter residing within the city limits, the Humboldt Community Services District or Humboldt County Service Area No. 3 — or own a business in Eureka. These positions are unpaid. And you can’t work for the city. Your compensation? Those arch looks you’ll be able to toss at your besmirching friends. ●

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

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HumCPR L Rising How Lee Ulansey and his corporation moved from advocacy into county government By Ryan Burns

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ee Ulansey was drawn into the world of Humboldt County politics during a bizarre game of brinkmanship back in 2007. The stakes were local, including thousands of acres of timberland, but the game was being played in a courtroom on Texas’ Gulf Coast. It was the bankruptcy trial of Pacific Lumber Co., which, under the stewardship of Charles Hurwitz and his Houston-based Maxxam Corp., had spent 20-plus years operating like some rapacious clear-cutting machine straight out of The Lorax. Now drowning in debt, Pacific Lumber presented the bankruptcy judge with an audacious proposal: The company could cash out its remaining chips and pay off its creditors by subdividing some 22,000 acres of Humboldt County timberland, chopping it into 160-acre parcels and selling them as “kingdoms” for the uber-rich. The affluent buyers could then build their dream mansions in the forest because in Humboldt County, unlike some other rural counties in the state, single-family residences are allowable on land zoned for timber production (TPZ). All you need is a building permit. But the Board of Supervisors, which was following the trial closely, didn’t want all of that viable timberland subdivided; it didn’t want a bunch of new homes built in the hinterlands; and moreover, it didn’t want any more dealings with the loathed Maxxam Corp. And so, in a bold counter-maneuver, the board enacted a 45-day moratorium on building permits for TPZ land. In doing so it hoped to send the Texas judge a message — that Pacific Lumber’s mega-ranch liquidation sale would not be tolerated. It seemed to work: The judge rejected Pacific Lumber’s proposal, and eventually the company was dismantled, its assets awarded to the Marathon Capital Group and Mendocino Redwood Co. But the TPZ moratorium — and a subsequent flirtation by the left-leaning board with permanently tightening homebuilding restrictions for TPZ land — had

a dramatic side effect: It pissed certain people off something fierce, among them Lee Ulansey. Although many environmental advocates supported the change as a way to protect rural watersheds and wildlife, property rights advocates, including many of Humboldt County’s 1,700 owners of TPZ land, saw it as a threat to their property values and way of life. They considered themselves stewards of their own land, and their right to build on it sacrosanct. Ulansey, a Kneeland resident who identifies himself as an artist and woodworker, responded by founding the Humboldt Coalition for Property Rights, or HumCPR, a group that quickly attracted commercial developers, contractors and Realtors along with SoHum pot growers and backto-the-land homesteaders, an unlikely alliance bound by a mutual distrust of the government. In the years since its formation, HumCPR has become an ever-more-powerful — and secretive — political force. With financial support from its members, whose names it won’t reveal, the organization has produced and distributed tens of thousands of newsletters filled with warnings about an assault on rural lifestyles. In recent election cycles it has harnessed the resources of sympathetic wealthy developers to flood the campaign coffers of its chosen political candidates. It has called for the removal of planning department leadership and accused county staff, the Planning Commission and various environmental groups of “social engineering” and “forcing our children into cities.” One year, a handful of the group’s most active members got appointed to the Grand Jury, where they had subpoena powers to continue the campaign against county officials and staff. All the while, HumCPR has worked hard to influence the general plan update, and it has filed two lawsuits against the county that have yet to be fully resolved. And now the group’s three most prominent members have become policymakers

HumCPR has accused county staff, the Planning Commission and various environmental groups of “social engineering” and “forcing our children into cities.”

Lee Ulansey addresses Humboldt County Supervisors. Humboldt County Video

in county government, filling one fourth of the 12 available seats on the Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors. On Jan. 7, Estelle Fennell, who spent almost three years as HumCPR’s executive director, assumed the Second District seat on the Board of Supervisors. A week later she appointed to the Planning Commission professional forester/real estate investor Bob Morris, who remains listed as HumCPR’s treasurer and agent of service. And late last month the board voted 3-1-1, with Supervisor Mark Lovelace dissenting and Supervisor Ryan Sundberg abstaining, to appoint Ulansey himself to the Planning Commission. With the long, long-overdue general plan update still under review by the board, and with the Planning Commission yet to craft the details of that plan through zoning ordinances, HumCPR’s rise to power comes at a very opportune moment for shaping the county’s future.

With his burly physique, a

mountain-man beard and hair like steel wool, Ulansey cuts a striking figure. Visually he’d fit in as a prospector on HBO’s Deadwood or, if you add Birkenstocks and tie dye, standing in the beer line at an outdoor blues festival. Friends say he’s smart, passionate and politically savvy. Adversaries say he’s hot-tempered, vindictive and devious. After graduating from Beverly Hills High School in 1978, Ulansey moved to Humboldt County where he took classes at both College of the Redwoods and Humboldt State University. A few years later he moved back to Southern California, attending Pepperdine University in Malibu from 1982-1985 and earning a bachelor’s

degree in business administration. (This information, from Pepperdine University records, differs slightly from the résumé Ulansey provided to the county, which gives his Pepperdine enrollment dates as 1981-1983 and describes a degree in both business administration and economics.) Though he lists his occupation as an artist and woodworker, Ulansey spent years working as a property manager for the Eureka-based commercial real estate firm Carrington Co. He now owns or coowns more than $2 million worth of property in Humboldt County. His holdings include commercial real estate (he owns a storefront on Main Street in Fortuna and half a block of businesses on Eureka’s Fifth Street, including the HumCPR office) as well as several Eureka apartment buildings and nearly 200 acres of redwood TPZ land on Greenwood Heights Drive in Kneeland, where he lives. When the Journal first called Ulansey and requested an interview for this story, he hesitated, remaining silent for almost 30 seconds before saying he needed to give it some thought and check his schedule. Over the next two weeks, Ulansey did not respond to numerous voice messages and emails. Early last week he sent Journal Publisher Judy Hodgson an email declining the interview request. He expressed concerns about his views being portrayed fairly and accurately. In response, the Journal offered to post two audio files of the entire interview on our website — one recorded by Ulansey and the other by the Journal. He again declined, saying in an email that it would be too troublesome for readers to find and listen to the audio files. With HumCPR’s activities readily availcontinued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013

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able in newsletters and online, the Journal was mostly hoping to ask Ulansey about his behind-the-scenes political organizing. It is widely rumored that Ulansey has worked as a political operative of sorts alongside Rob McBeth, co-owner of Arcata-based industrial fabrication company O & M Industries. What’s known is that during the last few election cycles the duo made personal visits to several candidates and potential candidates, urging them to either support their property rights agenda or step aside for someone who would. Annette de Modena, a reSECOND DISTRICT SUPERVISOR ESTELLE FENNELL tired teacher and Republican who ran for the First District did end up with an opponent, losing the Supervisor seat against Rex Bohn and election narrowly to former HumCPR Cheryl Seidner last year, said Ulansey and head Fennell. McBeth came to her home very early in Before voting to appoint Ulansey, the campaign, ostensibly to see if she was Supervisor Virginia Bass admitted that someone they wanted to support. She she had concerns about him, but she said never heard from them again — “never that after meeting with him and asking gave me the courtesy of a phone call,” she some tough questions she felt reassured. said. But Ulansey did call her campaign What were her concerns? “He’s very blunt manager later in the race and tried to conwhen he speaks,” she told the Journal. She vince him that de Modena had no shot of said she told him that staff needs to be winning, she said. treated respectfully, as do public speakers Ulansey also paid a visit to (now who come before the commission — “just former) Second District Supervisor Clif kind of setting out ground rules there,” Clendenen early in the last election cycle, Bass said. telling him that if he didn’t support his Despite these concerns, Bass admires positions on certain issues then Ulansey Ulansey’s “knowledge and passion.” (As a would raise money for a candidate to Eureka City Councilmember she nominatchallenge him — this according to Eric ed him for the city’s Planning Commission Kirk, an attorney who considers Ulansey a but failed to get the 4/5ths vote required friend. Of course, Clendenen to appoint someone who doesn’t live in city limits.) She thinks he’ll do a good job on the commission. Chair Ryan Sundberg, who had ab-

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stained from the vote because he wanted a candidate from McKinleyville, told the Journal that he thinks Ulansey is “a nice guy” and “a smart guy.” “I think he’ll be very strong on property rights,” Sundberg added. In financial disclosure statements to the county Ulansey values the three TPZ parcels he owns on Greenwood Heights at more than a million dollars. And his tax records reveal the value of developing such land. Last year, for example, he was assessed just $7,040 on a 40-acre parcel of redwood timberland. Another $9,856 was assessed for an adjacent 51-acre parcel. But the third parcel, which was purchased from Simpson Timber in 2001, was assessed at $522,336, more than threequarters of which was for a house that the Ulanseys built in 2002. Before Ulansey applied to be a planning commissioner, before he hired Estelle Fennell to run his corporation, before he even launched HumCPR, he submitted a request to the county concerning his TPZ property. This request was made on Oct. 11, 2007, just two days after the Board of Supervisors issued its 45-day moratorium on TPZ building permits. Ulansey asked to have about 30 acres of his TPZ land rezoned as residential agriculture or agriculture general, so that it could be split up into parcels as small as 2½ acres, with the potential for a house on each one. The request went before the Planning Commission, which recommended to the Board of Supervisors that the land remain zoned TPZ. But since the request is related to land use it is now attached as an amendment to the general plan update. The board has yet to rule on his request.

Property rights,

of course, are a complicated thing. Does my right to do anything I want on my property let me dump a reeking cow carcass in the creek that provides my downstream neighbor’s drinking water? Does my right to build a new subdivision entitle me to create a bunch more traffic on your quiet street, or do I have to make amends by paying for a traffic signal? In public policy circles, liberals sometimes accuse conservative business people of wanting to socialize costs while privatizing benefits. That is, taxpayers pay for the costs of growth, while landowners or business owners pocket the profit. Developers of big projects often counter that growth helps everyone, creating more jobs and continued on page 19

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continued from page 16 a stronger economy. Landowners often say that limiting what they can do on their property is pretty much the same as taking it without paying for it. (This was the position the other HumCPR official who is now a planning commissioner, Bob Morris, took in 2003 with an unsuccessful lawsuit against the federal government for preventing him from cutting down old-growth redwood trees.) From all sides, it’s a complicated equation — who has the right to use his own property in ways that make a neighbor miserable? And how miserable? Is a river drained dry OK? Are toxins in the groundwater OK? When does it stop being fair? Ulansey outlined the HumCPR position in its spring 2009 newsletter. “HumCPR has evolved from the basic premise that the people of Humboldt, not a few bureaucrats, should have the absolute choice over where and how we live our lives,” he wrote in a column that bore his picture.

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Absolute choice. Around that message, Ulansey has rallied a diverse coalition of those who disdain government and those who could profit greatly from less of it. Kirk, who also writes the blog SoHum Parlance II, said Ulansey has cleverly tapped into southern Humboldt’s independent streak and developers’ anti-regulation streak and united them under the banner of rural issues. Kirk sees a distinction between what he calls “HumCPR right” — developers, foresters and real estate agents such as Bob Morris, Ben Shepherd and Tina Christensen — and “HumCPR left” — people like Peter Childs, a progressive Democrat living in Miranda, and Charley Custer, whom the San Francisco Chronicle profiled in a story called “Charley Custer, Humboldt County pot grower.” “What HumCPR did, and I think this is political brilliance on the part of Lee … is he put this coalition together way back when the code enforcement stuff

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started happening,” Kirk said. That “stuff” was the campaign by armed and overzealous county agents who roamed the hills, raiding rural residences and enraging locals before the Board of Supervisors reined them in a few years ago. Kirk said that the “back-to-the-land hippies” of southern Humboldt differ from their more urban counterparts. Many of them moved here in the 1960s and ’70s, settling on agricultural parcels that may or may not have been legally subdivided. (The practice continued into this century: In 2000, landowner Bob McKee split up the 13,000-acre Tooby Ranch and sold 49 large parcels. A county lawsuit against McKee has yet to be resolved.) SoHum residents may be socially progressive, Kirk said, but they have a libertarian attitude toward government, and they take pride in their land. “To suggest that their lifestyle might actually be detrimental environmentally, that’s just not a

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concept that a lot of them are willing to stomach,” he said. “And then on top of that,” said Kym Kemp, another SoHum resident and blogger, “people became marijuana growers, and the government was their absolute enemy.” Kemp cited Operation Green Sweep as particularly traumatic for locals. The 1990 federal anti-marijuana campaign brought black helicopters and more than 200 armed feds to the county, including National Guardsmen and a 60-soldier Army unit fresh from invading Panama. (Kemp remembers having a gun drawn on her that summer while she walked down a rural road.) “We have different experiences and attitudes,” Kemp said. Southern Humboldt folks “don’t trust the government to come in and do right by the hill people.” Not everyone sees HumCPR’s alliance as benevolent. At a general plan update meeting last year Arcata City Councilman continued on next page

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continued from previous page Shane Brinton described the group as “an unholy alliance” of pot growers and developers. “The linkage there, really, is buyers and sellers of property,” said former supervisor Clendenen. “Both stand to gain.” Kemp believes that most of Fennell’s supporters cared less about her tenure as executive director of HumCPR than they did about the years she spent as KMUD radio’s news director, when she often gave listeners the heads-up about impending drug raids and forest fires. “She was a friend, a voice in their living room who could be trusted to tell them the truth,” Kemp said. Like Ulansey, Fennell was reluctant to grant an interview request. Ultimately she agreed to answer questions only if they were submitted via email. The response she sent several days later left most of the questions unanswered. She wrote, “I reject the manufactured concerns of my political foes” and added that she has full confidence that Ulansey and Morris “will carry out their duties in a professional and ethical way.” It certainly didn’t hurt Fennell’s campaign to have the financial backing of a long list of donors from the business community, many of whom also made big contributions to Supervisors Bass, Sundberg and Rex Bohn. As the Journal reported previously (see “Interested Parties,” Oct. 14, 2010, and “District Soup,” May 10, 2012) these donors have deep pockets and remarkably lockstep patterns to their contributions. Prevailing wisdom holds that this coordination was not coincidence but rather

the result of careful planning and executheir opponents in the supervisor races. tion by Ulansey and McBeth. The latter And with the exception of Karen Brooks, chairs a political action committee called who failed to unseat Lovelace in the Third the Humboldt Builders Exchange. District, they all won. In all, more than 30 donors contributed $1,000 or more to two, three or all four of public, the above-mentioned supervisors (that is, HumCPR’s most visible presence has been everyone but Mark Lovelace). The effort the full-color newsletters that have blanwas especially coordinated in 2010, when keted the county. The company published at least two dozen donors gave exactly more than 60,000 copies of its latest edi$1,500 to both Sundberg and Bass. McBeth tion, distributing them inside local pubwas among them, and his PAC gave even lications (including more — $4,500 to this one) at public Sundberg and $2,500 meetings and on to Bass. Two years distribution racks at later McBeth gave local businesses. $1,000 to Fennell. Filled with opinMorris, HumCPR’s ion pieces, candidate former secretary, questionnaires and now a planning coma certain amount missioner, gave $1,500 of name calling, the to Bass, $500 to Sunnewsletters have dberg and $250 to consistently critiFennell. Ulansey and/ cized county staff, or his wife gave more called for reversing than $2,000 to Sundor dramatically alterberg, another $2,000 ing the general plan to Fennell, $1,500 to update process and Bass and more than sounded alarm bells $500 to Bohn. about the environThe vast majormental extremists ity of the other big — Lee Ulansey who have allegedly donors came from hijacked the general the development plan and infiltrated crowd: Kramer Investthe county planning ment Corp., C & K department. Johnson Industries, Barnum Timber Co., The other new HumCPR planning Eureka Readymix and many more. All of commissioner, Bob Morris, lamented in the candidates favored by Ulansey, Morris, HumCPR’s summer 2009 edition that the McBeth and these mega-donors outspent

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county has set aside only 158,000 acres for rural homesteads. “This seems like a large number, but let’s analyze it in a little more detail,” Morris wrote. “The County is comprised of approximately 2,300,000 acres, so it is apparent that 93.2% of the County is OFF LIMITS for ‘rural homesteads.’” These limits have financial significance for Morris, whose extensive land holdings exceed even Ulansey’s. He personally owns hundreds of acres of TPZ land and has invested in another 1,000-plus acres through investment groups, limited liability companies and land holding entities. Morris did not respond to half a dozen messages left on his voicemail over a period of two weeks. After years of loud and public calls to action, HumCPR is coming under increasing scrutiny of critics who say it doesn’t walk its own talk. For example: • When HumCPR took on the Resources Legacy Fund Foundation, Ulansey called it a “shadowy” group. And yet, like all nonprofits, the foundation must report its finances annually to the IRS and they’re readily available online. HumCPR, on the other hand, is a private corporation, classified by the state as a “business entity.” As such, its finances are kept hidden from public view. The company is answerable only to its secret financiers. HumCPR does not disclose salaries, its meetings are not open to the public, and its membership is a closely guarded secret. (A list of members used to be listed on HumCPR’s website, but it was removed years ago.) If the nonprofit Resources

Foundation is a “shadowy” group, then HumCPR is completely opaque. • HumCPR called on Supervisor Mark Lovelace to recuse himself from all general plan deliberations because he once served as the executive director of Healthy Humboldt, an environmental coalition which was partly funded by the Resources Legacy Fund Foundation. His refusal to do so is “inherently wrong ethically and morally,” the organization’s board wrote in a newsletter last summer. And in last year’s supervisorial campaign, the HumCPR board said that since Fennell might also be looked on has having a conflict, “We have the utmost in confidence that a Supervisor Fennell would immediately recuse herself from discussion and/ or votes.” Now that Fennell holds that seat, neither Ulansey nor Morris nor anyone else with HumCPR has called on her to recuse herself from voting on the general plan. Asked twice, in two separate emails, whether Ulansey or Morris should recuse themselves from any votes, Fennell declined to respond directly, writing only that many public officials have strong feelings about building on TPZ land. “Should those who represent one point of view be favored over others on a commission that is supposed to represent the whole of Humboldt County’s citizenry?” she asked. • At least five members of HumCPR served on the 19-member 2009 Grand Jury. That jury concluded, among other things, that the county needs to manage its money better, should create an audit committee, and should wring out inefficiencies by having the Board of Supervisors delegate all day-to-day operations to a CEO/manager. HumCPR criticized the county for brushing off the panel’s suggestions. “It is not an appropriate response to a year’s inves-

tigation done by dedicated Jurors,” the board grumbled in its newsletter. “The Jurors are citizen volunteers looking at data from an impartial viewpoint.” Nowhere in the newsletter did HumCPR disclose that that that “impartial” viewpoint came from jurors who were members of its own leadership, including Morris and Ulansey.  • HumCPR supporters and other property rights advocates often suggest going back to the county’s “framework” general plan, which was written in 1984 (and is so out of date that it no longer complies with state law). But in fact, that plan actually set aside even less land for remote rural development — 131,000 acres — than the county’s current level. It also contains a number of concepts that have recently been attributed to environmental extremists, including “clustering development” near existing services and discouraging residential subdivisions on resource land. Which raises the question — what exactly does HumCPR want?  

During its rise to power, one

of HumCPR’s frequent strategies was to dismiss and belittle government. Now its officials and former officials are part of that government. Much of the fine tuning for the county’s land use rules will eventually be handed back to the Planning Commission, which now includes Ulansey and Morris. Disputed issues could rise to the Board of Supervisors, which now includes Fennell and many who received donations from HumCPR allies. According to Senior Planner Michael Richardson, the county will ask the Planning Commission to weigh in on whether to require a conditional use permit to build houses on TPZ land or whether such homes should be principally permit-

ted, meaning they require only a building permit. The state gives significant tax breaks to TPZ landowners in exchange for their commitment to maintain timber production on that land. Counties can make their own rules about building homes on TPZ land. Some rural counties, including Del Norte, Shasta and Trinity, require both a building permit and a conditional use permit. Others, including Humboldt and Mendocino, consider homes on TPZ to be principally permitted. Given their former zero-tolerance policy for conflicts of interest, the Journal had been eager to ask Ulansey and Morris how they feel now about whether to recuse themselves from any of these deliberations. We remain open to scheduling any follow-up interviews. Environmental groups will be watching closely, and if the updated general plan falls short of their standards, lawsuits are likely to follow. Gary Graham Hughes, executive director of the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC), said his group has been telling the county that it needs to develop a habitat conservation plan, “and there’s been no indication that there’s movement in that direction.” Hughes said he doesn’t want to discount the possibility of working with “nontraditional allies,” but he couldn’t help but wonder what people would say if a leader of EPIC had been appointed to the Planning Commission. But Eric Kirk, the SoHum blogger and lawyer, said he’d be surprised if Ulansey, Morris and Fennell govern in the same fiery way that they led HumCPR. Holding public office tends to have a moderating effect, Kirk said. “I do think that people from HumCPR understand that politics can change on a dime. … The group that has come to power, they’re savvy enough to realize that they could lose it quickly. They could lose it just as quickly as they took it.” l

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M

andolinist David Tiller spent years playing with the band ThaMusement. Around the turn of the century, that band went on hiatus and David headed for New York City. While busking in the subway he met a New York banjo picker. Would he like to join in a weekly session at a Brooklyn club? Saying yes led him to meet a fiddler with a rich, beautiful voice, Enion Pelta, another busker invited by the banjo man. By mid-2001, David and Enion had clicked musically and fallen in love. Then the world changed.  “We were on a rooftop right across the river on 9/11,” David recalled. “We sat and wrote music as the towers burned. We decided that day we’d move, but we couldn’t get out for a while since they’d imposed martial law.” Next stop Portland, where David had some music family. That’s where they founded Taarka with a succession of guitar and bass players. David and Enion are brilliant players; they weave notes into intricate patterns and write deep lyrics together. Taarka’s vagabond sound draws on American folk and hints of bluegrass merged with Django gypsy jazz a la Hot Club of Paris. Although they’re now settled in Lyons, Colo., “We’ve been a family of travelers,” said David. Thus the title of the superb new record, Adventures In Vagabondia, although road trips are less frequent with their 5-year-old.

The Taarka family is on the road again this week with longtime bassist Troy Robie and guitarist Greg Ruby from Hot Club Sandwich. You should go hear them Friday night at the Arcata Playhouse. Lotus is another of those post-rock jamband meets electro-dance outfits where guitars mesh with synthesizers, live and electro-drums, heavy basslines and cool samples. The band moved into the upper echelons through relentless touring and an association with String Cheese’s Sci-Fidelity label, now playing mega shows like Bonnaroo, Rothbury and Outside Lands. World Famous brings Lotus to the relatively intimate Arcata Theatre Lounge Thursday night with Denver-based dubstep king, VibesquaD.  Striped Pig Stringband plays old time music Thursday at the Logger with some special support including Lyndsey Battle and Cory Goldman, and Erin Inglish, a Scruggs-style banjo picker from San Luis Obispo who is launching her EarthBikeBanjo 2013 tour in Blue Lake. The Kickstarter-funded journey presents “One new album. One banjo. One bicycle. One woman. One month. 1,000 miles,” as she bikes from here to San Diego, visiting schools and playing music, spreading a message of sustainability with A Melody So Sweet. The Logger Bar roars on Friday with the trio Crag Dweller and the duo Mammoth Salmon down from Portland, bringing

intense sludge and doom with locals White Manna adding even more power and beauty. Rooster McClintock is across town at Mad River Brewery earlier that night laying down downhome honky tonk. My favorite local rapper (and coworker) The L|A Dodger makes one of her rare appearances Friday at The Siren’s Song alongside her electro-rockin’ friends Body Academics and Angel “Onhell” RubioHale. Onhell is about to embark on an international journey of discovery, so catch him while you can. Jolly Jeff from Body Academics and his friend Big Sean are both celebrating birthdays, so expect a par-tee! It’s Easter weekend, which also makes March 29 Good Friday or, as the Beat Vixens put it, “So Bad It’s Good, Friday” at Nocturnum. The burlesque troupe teases with a “sexy sassy dance performance” followed by sexy sassy dancing by you, with Deep Groovers Jsun and Touch providing the soundtrack. Proceeds benefit the Pink Ribbon Program offering free “post operative workout enhancing recovery” to HumCo cancer survivors. Speaking of benefits, Gunsafe plays one Friday at Humboldt Brews for Trillium School (Stella‘s darling boy goes there). Side Shots open. Not sure who that is; I was guessing Gunsafe side project, but it’s not. Green & Lilac play Friday at Robert Goodman and Saturday at Blondie’s. The group started out with Jesse Shrader on cello and Kim Kumada on guitar and added a fiddle until the fiddler left for Bhutan. Second guitar Max Tanti and uke player Jessica Malone came aboard to fill out the sound. “And all of us sing as well,” said Jesse, noting, “Kim and I used to play in another little band — Green & Lilac is quieter with more vocal harmonies, but she still adds a little bit of punk rock influence, so there’s a little tension in there.” G&L shares the bill at Blondie’s with SoCal song slinger Marc B, who according to Jesse has a Jack Johnson-ish “island feel.” Tahoe-based alt. Americana quintet, Dead Winter Carpenters, plays Humboldt Brews Saturday night on a CD release tour for the band’s latest, ain’t it strange (another Kickstarter project). DWC has a rich, rough-hewn sound with electric and acoustic guitars, fiddle, stand-up bass and drums playing whatever-grass with shades of reggae and other sounds in the mix. Good stuff. The Northcoast Environmental Center presents An Evening of Art and Song Saturday at the Arcata Playhouse featuring eco-groovy Seattle songwriter Jim Page, who describes himself as a “human organism with western hemispheric polar disorder, of middle class origin, using music as a tool for constructive cultural argument.” The art part comes from Patricia “Perta”

Sennott, who paints birds, flowers, butterflies and other beautiful things from nature. NEC stalwart Morgan Corviday and her musical partner Mo Hollis add to the eco-party. Also very eco-groovy: the 15th annual Humboldt Seed and Plant Exchange earlier that day at the Arcata Community Center with local farmers and gardeners swapping seeds, starts and plants in general. There’s also music all day including Lyndsey Battle, Jim Silva, Our Weight in Gold and The Bret Harte Breakers. Local cyber-pioneer and energy activist “Redwood” Larry Goldberg celebrates his 60th birthday at the Bayside Grange Saturday night with a benefit for Transition Humboldt featuring two cool tribute bands, Silver Hammer (Beatles) and The Miracle Show (Dead). Guitarist Greg Camphuis and friends play acid jazz Saturday at the Clam Beach Inn under the moniker Fire It Up! The reggae vibe is ever-present in Humboldt: Feel it Saturday night at the Red Fox with a big show by semi-local Stevie Culture (originally from Jamaica) backed by The Demolition Squad. Then on Wednesday (April 3) the reggae party is at Six Rivers with Pato Banton bringing his upbeat positivity. Soul on a Saturday night? Choose between True Gospel Singers playing soul and blues at Old Town Coffee, Soulful Sidekicks at Ramone’s on Harrison (on the folk side) and Vintage Rock ‘n’ Soul, whose the name says it all, at Cher-Ae Heights. (Vintage also plays Cher-Ae Heights Friday.)  Lemon Lemon Cherry is a new experimental folk-jazz collaboration with Anwyn Halliday from Space Biscuit and Small Axe on trumpet, French horn, glockenspiel and “random odd instruments” plus Chris Parreira (guitar, piano, vocals). Sounds interesting. Check them out Saturday at Redwood Curtain Brewing or Monday at The Speakeasy. The soul organ combo Alan Evans Trio features drummer Alan Evans from Soulive, Beau Sasser from Melvin Sparks’ band on organ, and Danny Mayer from On The Spot Trio on guitar — retro-groove jazz at its finest. Opening the show when the trio hits town Wednesday: PC4, a quartet with Pete Ciotti joined by friends from MooGot-2 and the Hip Hop Lounge. Across town at the Arcata Theatre Lounge that same Wednesday, a Bonus/ NHS show with Brooklyn-born rapper Talib Kweli backed by a live band. Talib has a long, storied history in hip hop: He was half of Black Star with Mos Def and worked with Kanye on his early projects. Talib is about to drop his own new collection, Prisoner of Conscious, so you’ll hear fresh tracks along with old faves. Gobi is a special guest; DJ Northstar and JustOne spin. Hip indeed. • northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013

23

Body Academics Friday at The Siren’s Song

venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731 ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200

thur 3/28

fri 3/29

sat 3/30

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Natural Child (Nashville rock) Nipplepotamus (psyche-surf) 11pm

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

DJ Marv Karaoke 9:30-12:30pm

Eureka Brass (swing) 9pm

Taarka (vagabond music) 8pm

Jim Page, Morgan and Mo (folk) 8pm

Children of Men ((Rated R) Doors 7:30pm $5

Random Acts of Comedy Doors 7:30pm $6 All ages

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

Lotus w/ VibeSquaD (EDM) Doors 9:30pm $17.50 21+

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770

Thursday Madness $8 pitchers Free pool in back room 6pm Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

BEAR RIVER CASINO 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644 BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Blue Rhythm Revue (blues rock) no cover 9pm

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells NightHawk (blues rock) no cover 9pm

Open Mic 7pm

Jenifer Breeze (reggae/rock/blues) 9p

Marc B, Green & Lilac (alt. folk) 8pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Eyes Anonymous (‘80s rock) 9pm

Rewind (rock/country) 9pm

Good Company (Celtic) 8pm

CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata

Twango Boys 8pm

CECIL’S 773 Redwood Dr. Garberville CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 8:30pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093 FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852 HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739

www.facebook.com/LikeBarFly

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Vintage Rock N’ Soul (R&B & soul) no cover 9pm

Vintage Rock N’ Soul (R&B & soul) no cover 9pm Fire It Up (acid jazz) 9pm

Dirty Thursday Ladies Night with Presure Anya DJs 9pm

Blues Jam 9pm

St. John and the Sinners (going away party) 9pm

Dinner hours 5-10pm Tuesday through Sunday

Bar open late Friday and Saturday.

Liquid Kactus (funk) 10pm

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Trillium School Benefit featuring Gunsafe & Side Shots 9:30pm $10

Dead Winter Carpenters (Americana/rock) 9:30pm $10

JAMBALAYA 915 H St. Arcata 822-4766 DJ Red Old Skool Hip Hop Night 9pm

River Valley Mud, Sour Cream 9pm

CBaker and Friends 9pm

Blue Lotus Jazz (jazz) 7-10pm

Ali and Baron (guitar/bass) 7-10pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

Striped Pig Stringband (old time)

White Manna, Crag Dweller, Mammoth Salmon (alt. rock) 8pm

Logger Bar’s fab house band: Jeff DeMark and the LaPatinas

The StereoFidelics (alt. funk from Asheville, NC) 6pm

Rooster McClintock 6pm Taqueria La Barca (food truck) 5pm

The Brendas (Blue Lake’s finest girl group) 6pm

LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596 LIGHTHOUSE GRILL Trinidad 677-0077 LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St Eureka 444-1344 THE LOCAL 517 F St. Eureka 497-6320 LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000 MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680 MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd Arcata

Pink! Beat Vixens, Jsun, Touch 10pm

NOCTURNUM Eureka OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017

DJ Lost (dance music) 10pm

Blake Riiter(fiddle) 6-8:30pm

Soulful Sidekicks 6:30pm

DJ Rudeboy 10pm

Pressure/Anya, King Maxwell, Jaymorg

Stevie Culture/Demolition Squad 10p

Open from 3 to 9pm

Start your weekend with Redwood Curtain!

Lemon Lemon Cherry (experimental folk-jazz) 6pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am Tango with Lee & Barbara 7:30pm Buddy Reed (blues) 10pm

Accurate Productions (dance) 10pm

RAMONE’S 2297 Harrison Ave. Eureka RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka RED LION HOTEL 4th & V sts. Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 824 L Street, Arcata 616-6876

Dance music 10pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 9pm

Zumba Toning (Bella) 5:30pm Blues Night w/Brian & Kimberli 8pm

www.redwoodraks.com

THE RITZ 240 F St. Eureka ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Robert Blake 9pm

Green & Lilac (folk) 9pm

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SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka

Falling Rocks (rootsy country swing) 7:30-9:30pm

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Come in for a great dinner! Derby Afterparty: Pressure Anya 10pm

THE SHANTY 213 Third St. Eureka SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St. Eureka Young Democrats Trivia Night 6:30pm Blue & Brews Jam SIX RIVERS BREWERY 9pm Central Ave. McK. 839-7580 THE SPEAKEASY 444-2244 411 Opera Alley, Eureka TIP TOP CLUB 443-5696 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Tim Breed (folk) 7-10pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

The L|A Dodger, Onhell, Body Academics DJ Itchie Fingaz (dance!) 9pm

Ukesperience (alt. uke) 9pm

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed Band (blues) 10pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Throwback Thursdays

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

True Gospel Singers (soul, gospel, blues) 7-9pm

Experience: Fresh roasted coffee & espresso Dance music 10pm

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés NEWN!

bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more sun 3/31

mon 4/1

tues 4/2

wed 4/3

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Anna Hamilton (songs) 6-9pm

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm

Who Framed Roger Rabbit Doors 5:30pm $5 (PG)

Find us on Facebook!!

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Talib Kweli, DJ Just One (hip hop) Doors 10pm $40/$35/$32 21+

Closed Sundays

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 - Free pool

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Sunday Brunch 9am HSU Jazz Ensemble 5-8pm

Book a room online at www.bearrivercasino.com Quiz Night 7pm

Join the Bear River Players Club and receive $10 in free play

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Prime Rib Mondays: $14.99 dinner special in Alice’s Steak & Sushi

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire pints

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

UDO BOWL NOODLE

Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

AND

OPEN 365 DAYS phó Large $799

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

So You Wanna Fight? coming Saturday, April 6

Electric Ladyland (live electronica)

Set’s Revenge (live electronica) 9pm Martini Mondays $5 house Martini

Live Jazz 6-8pm Top Shelf Tuesday

Live Jazz 6-8pm Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 6-7pm

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Closed Mondays.

Open Tuesday-Sunday 5pm Food served until 10pm

Family friendly dining.

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Zero coming April 4 Built to Spill April 24

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Deep Groove Society Sundaze 9pm

Neil Young wsg Bob Dylan

443-6812 2916 Central at Henderson, Eureka www.HappyDonutsAsianFood.com

Alan Evans Trio, PC4 10pm $13 Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

Do it Legally

JD Jeffries (songs) 5-7pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

We also have liquor.

Repeat: We got beer.

Sunday night potluck dinner 6pm

FREE BEER ALL DAY! 9 Ball Tournament 6:30pm signup

Happy Easter!

50 beers on tap!

PING PONG 7pm-midnight Nivekram (Kevin and Mark’s guitar/piano duo) 6pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center

Buddy Reed (blues) 8pm Wednesday Open Mic 8pm Pints For Non Profits - Relay For Life Lizzy and The Moonbeams 6pm

Open Mic 7-10pm Whomp Whomp Wednesday (EDM)

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Happy Growler Day! Fill your growler for less $$$

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is back!

Dry Hop Wednesday!

Dark Tribal with Marjhani 2:30pm Breakdance with Reckless Rex 5-7pm

Live Band Swing Night 7-10pm $5

West African Dance with Dulcel 5:30pm Beginning Argentine Tango 8:15pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am West Coast Swing 7:30pm

Find us on Facebook

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook

Salsa Night (dance!) 9:30pm

Have a signature cocktail in the bar!

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Pato Banton (reggae) 8pm $10

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Lemon Lemon Cherry (experimental folk-jazz) 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

LOTS OF NEW GLASS JUST ARRIVED!

EUREKA BAYSHORE MALL 707-476-0400

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

ARCATA 987 H ST. 707-822-3090

WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

Locally Blown Glass

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

Now serving beer and wine

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

25

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, march 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

There’s a storm a-brewin’ at the North Coast Repertory Theatre. Its 29th season continues with a production of WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S THE TEMPEST. Widely believed to be the Bard’s last play, the story is set on a remote island where the Duke of Milan Prospero plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful status using manipulation and illusion. The show opens with a gala on Thursday, March 28, and runs through April 20.

28 thursday EVENTS

Criminal Justice Dialogue. 6 p.m. Native Forum, HSU. Spotlighting the need to support inmates and families of the incarcerated. Features a discussion with district attorney Paul Gallegos and chief of probation Bill Daminao. E-mail areasontolisten@gmail.com. 530-448-9458. Economic Fuel Elevator Pitch Presentation. 6-8 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Cheer on Humboldt County’s aspiring entrepreneurs as they pitch their business venture in the first judged round of the 2013 Economic Fuel competition. economicfuel.org. 476-2780.

THEATER

The Tempest Gala Opening. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. North Coast

Put a face with the voice on your radio. Syndicated talk show host, author, stand up comedian, blogger and gay activist KAREL — who can be heard locally on KGOE 1480 — adds his presence to a fundraiser for the Humboldt Library Foundation taking place at Wharfinger building on Saturday, March 30, at 1 p.m.

Space out, HumCo. World Famous Productions presents instrumental cosmic electronic jam machine LOTUS on Thursday, March 28, at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. The group mixes live instrumentation, dance beats and synth samples with colorful visuals. Colorado bass music producer VibeSquaD opens.

Repertory Theatre continues its 29th season with William Shakespeare’s classic work. $15. ncrt.net. 442-6278.

MUSIC

Lotus. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Instrumental post-rock and electronic dance group performs. VibeSquaD opens. Presented by World Famous Productions. $17.50. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

ART

It’s a Matter of Perspective. Noon-5 p.m. Redwood Art Association Gallery, 603 F St., Eureka. Exhibition by Humboldt County artists explores the many ways of portraying perspective. redwoodart.org. 362-0168. Woodworking Demonstration. 5 p.m. Humboldt Hardware, 531 Second St., Eureka. Renowned professional carver and instructor Bill Pinches shares his expertise.

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Hammond Trail Hike. 8 a.m. Meet at the south end of Fischer Road. Four to five mile hike led by Ken Burton. 499-1146.

ETC.

Radically Efficient Design for Zero Net Energy Buildings. 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, BSS Room 166, Arcata. Sustainable Futures Speaker Series presents Jonathan Woolley of UC Davis’ Western Cooling Efficiency Center sharing on the integrative design of a Zero Net Energy home in Davis. schatzlab.org. 826-4345. Figure Drawing Group. 7-9 p.m. Cheri Blackerby Gallery,

CAP’N ZACH’S CRAB HOUSE

TRADITIONAL AND FUSION JAPANESE FOOD DINE IN OR TAKE OUT

272 C St., Eureka. In the courtyard. Weekly group. Live model. An Ink People DreamMaker project. 442-0309. Social Media for Business Program Informational Meeting. 4 p.m. Prosperity Center, 520 E St., Eureka. Training program for business owners who have a business plan or marketing plan but would like to enhance marketing with the use of social media. Sponsored by North Coast Small Business Development Center. 445-9720.

continued on next page

Corner of 14th & G Streets. Near Wildberries and only two blocks from HSU. Tuesday - Sunday 11:30am to 8:45pm Closed Monday

822-2227 (707) 444-3318 2120 4TH STREET EUREKA

MONDAY-SATURDAY

11:30AM-9:00PM

Fresh from our Boat to You DUNGENESS CRAB OPEN THURS - SUN

(market and weather permitting)

11am - 6pm • 839-9059 Corner of Central & Reasor, McKinleyville

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

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continued from previous page

29 friday EVENTS

Rampart Indoor Skatepark Benefit. 9 p.m. 700 South G St., Arcata. Featuring performances by Dr. Foxmeat, Big Days Of Tundra and The Wandering. $3/$10 sliding scale. Criminal Justice Dialogue. 6 p.m. Native Forum. See March 28 listing.

Roll On

THEATER

Thousand Kites. 8-9:30 p.m. Native Forum, HSU. Play based on letters received from super max prisoners incarcerated in the Southern U.S. They describe the racism and human rights violations the prisoners have experienced. Music by DJ Goldylocks. $5. E-mail areasontolisten@gmail.com. 530-448-9458. The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See March 28 listing.

MUSIC

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489 Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

Taarka. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Mandolinist David Pelta-Tiller and violinist Enion Pelta-Tiller play songs from their fifth album Adventures in Vagabondia. arcataplayhouse.org. 822-1575. Trillium School Benefit. 9:30 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Featuring music by local maximum bluegrass band Gunsafe. Photo booth, a 50/50 raffle and school gear for sale. $10. 826-2739. Never Thirst Again! 7 p.m. Grace Baptist Church, 220 Buhne, Eureka. Dramatic musical presented by the Grace Baptist Church Celebration Choir. gbceureka. org. 444-9677.

With the Black Friday human stampede at Eureka’s Wal-Mart a fading memory, Humboldt has been jonesin’ for bone-crunching spectacle. Luckily, Humboldt has responded with something infinitely more inspiring. Derby season is upon us, yo! The women of Humboldt Roller Derby return to the track at Redwood Acres Fairgrounds’ Franceschi Hall this Saturday, March 30, for a double header featuring all the community pageantry, fast-paced action and colorful bruises HumCo has come to rely on. Doors open at 5 p.m. The first bout of the evening features your Humboldt Widow Makers putting the hurt to Chico’s Viva Roller Derby. Later, the Redwood Rollers will roll through the Bay Area Derby Girls’ Oakland Outlaws. This year will be HRD’s fifth competitive season and its second as a member of the Women’s Flat

Track Derby Association (WFTDA), the largest international body that governs the sport. In other words, these ladies are legit. Can’t make it to the first bout? Here’s the complete rundown on when you can see Humboldt’s derby warriors in action at Redwood Acres: April 20: HRD vs. Junction City Roller Dolls June 8: HRD vs. Mendocino County Roller Derby July 27: HRD vs. Santa Cruz Derby Girls Aug. 24: HRD vs. Emerald City Roller Girls Sep. 14: HRD vs. Treasure Valley Roller Girls Tickets for Humboldt Roller Derby bouts are $12/$10 in advance (the latter being the best way to go since they’ve sold out every event since 2008). For more info check out humboldtrollerderby.com. Roll on, Humboldt. Roll on. —Andrew Goff

BOOKS

Author Joe Abbott. 7-9 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. College of the Redwoods Visiting Writers Series welcomes author and former CR student reading from his new comedic novel Dickeyville. 476-4370. Author Ray Raphael. 7 p.m. Northtown Books, 957 H St., Arcata. Local author discusses his new book Constitutional Myths. 822-2834.

ETC.

Bridge Club. 1-4 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. Local trick-takin’ gathering. humsenior.org. 443-9747.

30

saturday

EVENTS

Humboldt Seed and Plant Exchange. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Farmers and gardeners swap rare and locally grown seeds, starts and plants. Music by Jim Silva, Lyndsey Battle, Our Weight in Gold and The Bret Harte Breakers. Free. humboldtpermaculture.wordpress.com. 608-957-4829. Humboldt Roller Derby. 6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. First bout of the season features the Widow Makers taking on Chico’s Viva Roller Derby, followed by the Redwood Rollers vs. Bay Area Derby (B.A.D.) Girls’ Oakland Outlaws. humboldtrollerderby.com. $12/$10 adv. 441-1993. Water Day III. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Presentations, panels and posters

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

provide information on the health of the river, water conservation, how to do permaculture or grow organically, and how forest and watershed health affect water supply. 923-4377. Karel. 1-3 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. Humboldt Library Foundation fundraiser with controversial progressive radio talk show host/stand-up comic. $25. www.humboldtlibraryfoundation.org. 618-9274. Humboldt Pie #6. Noon-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Annual fundraiser for Tri-County Independent Living features pie baking and pie eating contests, apron fashion show contest, face painting, pie walk for prizes, children’s activity table and music by the Pilot Rock Ramblers. www.tilinet. org. 445-8404. Transition Humboldt Benefit. 7 p.m.-midnight. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Music by Beatles tribute band Silver Hammer and Dead tribute band Miracle Show. Also, celebrate Larry Goldberg’s 60th birthday. $10. www.transitionhumboldt.org. 845-7272.

EASTER

The Great Zoo Eggstravaganza. Noon-4 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Kids hunt for eggs, play games, make crafts, meet the Easter bunny and watch zoo animals receive Easter treats. 442-5649. SoHum Easter Egg Hunt. Noon-3 p.m. Southern Humboldt Community Park, 934 Sprowl Creek Road, Garberville. Plus, face painting, glitter tattoos and pictures with the Easter Bunny. 923-2287. Easter Egg Hunt. 10 a.m. McKinleyville Shopping Center. 834-6460. Kids Day Event. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 2800 Hubbard Lane., Eureka. Egg hunt, bounce house, face painting, hot dogs, ice cream. E-mail angelab@myrtletownlumber. com. 445-8436.

31 sunday MUSIC

Ferndale Community Choir Spring Concert. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Assumption, Berding St., Ferndale. Sixtyvoice choir will offer a variety of musical styles from the joyous South African freedom song, “Singabahambayo,” to the stirring strains of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” and more. 786-9756. Never Thirst Again! 7 p.m. Grace Baptist Church. See March 29 listing.

MOVIES

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988). 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Special Easter Sunday screening of the story of a man, a woman and a rabbit in a triangle of trouble. arcatatheater.com. 822-1220.

ETC.

Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Fun with words. 677-9242.

1

monday

OUTDOORS

Audubon Society Marsh Field Trip. 8 a.m. Meet at the first pullout on the right on South I Street. Half-day trip looking for spring arrivals such as red-necked phalarope and cliff swallow. 499-1146.

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MUSIC

RUSH. 4:01 p.m. The Boiler Room, Eureka. Prog rock legends return to Humboldt to melt your brains. No joke! $75. rush.com. 555-1234.

2 tuesday ETC.

Foster Parent Informational Tea. 10 a.m. Eureka Church of the Nazarene, 2039 E St. New DirectionsHumboldt County Foster Parent Association hosts an informational meeting for those interested in foster parenting. 442-1391. Hiring Better Now. 10 a.m.-noon. The Job Market, 409 K Street, Eureka. Free workshop for managers and other hiring personnel. thejobmarket.org. 441-4652. Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15-9:30 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly cribbage tournament. $7. cribbage.org. 444-3161.

3 wednesday MUSIC

Talib Kweli. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Bonus Entertainment presents the celebrated rapper along with a live band. $40/$35 adv. 822-1220.

of your favorite songs from the ’60s, ’70s and beyond. www.humboldtfolklife.org. 839-7063.

COMEDY

Savage Henry Comedy Night. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Featuring comedians Keith Lowell Jensen, Johnny Taylor, Joe Deschaine and host Sherae O’Shaughnessy. $10. savagehenrymagazine. com. 826-2739.

ETC.

Timber Harvests and Managed Forests: Good or Bad for Climate Change? 5:30-7 p.m. Humboldt State University, BSS Room 166, Arcata. Sustainable Futures Speaker Series presents University of California Berkeley forestry specialist Dr. Bill Stewart. humboldt.edu. 826-3653. Human Rights Commission Meeting. 5 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, conference room A. 668-4095.

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Heads Up…

Can You Hide Eggs? The Sequoia Park Zoo is seeking volunteers for its 15th annual Great Zoo Egg-stravaganza on Saturday, March 30. Contact volunteer@sequoiaparkzoo.net or 441-4205 for more details. Peace Assistance. The Humboldt Branch of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, WILPF, is seeking applications for the annual Edilith Eckart Memorial Peace Scholarship which awards $300 to a project that promotes peace. For more information contact WILPF@humboldt1.com or 822-5711. Applications will be accepted until April 1. ●

ETC.

Pints for Non-Profits. 1-9 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company, Blue Lake. Music by Lizzy and the Moonbeams at 6 p.m. MRB donates $1 for every pint sold to Relay for Life Team Krewe d’espoir. 668-4151. Kindergarten Orientation. 2-3 p.m. Pine Hill Elemantary School, 5230 Vance Ave, Eureka. For parents of students entering South Bay School District’s kindergarten program. pinehillschool.org. 443-4596. Eureka Fair Wage Act Meeting. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Volunteer training meeting for those interested in a proposed ordinance that would require employers with 25 or more workers in Eureka to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org. Pajama Storyhour: April Showers. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Stories, a puppet show and a craft activity that all feature rainy days. humlib.org. 269-1910. Social Media for Business Program Informational Meeting. Noon. Prosperity Center. See March 28 listing.

Do you tweet obsessively? So do we. Follow us. @ncj_of_humboldt

4 thursday MUSIC

Zion I. 8 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Oakland hip hop duo cosisting of DJ AmpLive and MC Zumbi perform. Opening sets by The Grouch and Eligh. $20. mateel.org. 510-350-8896. Humboldt Folklife Society Group Sing Along. 7-9 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. With host Joel Sonenshein. Sing along to many northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

29

Stop Searching, See Sugar Man Cast elevates Croods but can’t entirely rescue Admission By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN. I’d like to say I’ve known about the life and music of Sixto Rodriguez for years, but even my desire for indie-cred has its limits. Like most people (outside of South Africa anyway), I wouldn’t even know the guy’s name if not for Malik Bendjelloul’s justifiably celebrated, Oscar-anointed documentary. Rodriguez recorded two albums of uniquely poetic rock and roll in the early 1970s. A couple of Detroit record producers found him gigging in the back of a club called the Sewer and decided to make him a star. At least that was the idea: Two wordy, lushly orchestrated records later, he was back to his day-job doing manual labor in the Motor City. Done and done, or so it would seem. But over the next decade (how it happened is still unclear) those two albums became huge hits in South Africa. More to the point, Rodriguez became a culture touchstone for the anti-apartheid movement. He also achieved mythical status when increasingly grisly rumors of his public suicide began to circulate. To summarize Searching for Sugar

Mar. 29 -Apr. 4 Fri Mar 29 - Children of Men (2006)

Doors at 7:30 p.m., $5, Rated R

Sat Mar 30 - Random Acts of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m., $6, All ages Sun Mar 31 - Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (1988) Doors at 5:30 p.m., $5, Rated PG Thurs Apr 4 - Ocean Night Film Screening Doors at 6:30 p.m., $3, All ages

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

Man more extensively would necessarily ruin some of its surprises, and I won’t do that here. Bendjelloul assembles a compelling, finely crafted detective story, told primarily from the perspectives of a journalist and a record-store owner whose paths fortuitously crossed within Rodriguez super-fandom. He eschews most of the techniques that can make documentaries feel staid and conventional. The first half of the movie in particular avoids standard talking-head medium shots, voice-over, etc, instead making brilliant use of animation, music and gorgeous cinematography. The momentum ebbs a little in the middle, when the movie shifts into a mode of reverential biography, but the first act is so strong, so unexpected, that I can easily forgive this minor lapse. The most surprising thing about all this may be the fact that this story hasn’t been told before. There’s significant crosscultural resonance in the scenes about the end of apartheid played against the notion that a minority artist couldn’t move units in America in the 1970s. And the tragic under-representation of the artist is an eerie foreshadow of all the file-sharing turmoil of the late 1990s and early 2000s. My only complaint is that when Bendjelloul sets out to do a little detective work of his own and figure out who actually profited from Rodriguez’s South African success, he loses the trail almost immediately. Maybe it speaks to the vagaries of the business more than any shortcomings of the filmmaking, but it leaves lingering concerns nonetheless. That narrative dead end notwithstanding, Searching for Sugar Man remains a thought-provoking, ultimately heartwarming rock-bio as historical document; well worth the price of admission. PG13. 86m. ADMISSION. I’ve long harbored a school girl crush on Paul Rudd. Fortu-

30 North Coast Journal • Thursday, march 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

nately, my wife likes him too. As far as I’m concerned, he can save just about any movie with his likeability and perfect timing. I’m on board with Tina Fey, too, but I think she’s at her best working from her own material. Other writers rarely give adequate voice to her withering, self-deprecating sarcasm and impeccable joke-craft. And those are the high and low points of this offering: great leads, (among the most charming in the business), and a script that under-serves their talents. Fey plays Portia Nathan, a Princeton University admissions officer stuck in a rut. Rudd’s John Pressman is a rootless free-spirit with an adopted son, currently running a developmental high school in New Hampshire. Their paths cross when one of his students (whom he suspects may be the baby Nathan gave up for adoption, lo these many years ago) expresses an interest in attending Princeton. Very earnest, mature themes develop from there. The premise is a solid one, but director Paul Weitz (American Pie, Little Fockers) takes a broad approach, counting on the chemistry of his cast and the too-obvious tropes of the script (Lily Tomlin as Portia’s hyper-feminist author mom, Rudd’s knee-jerk reaction against his blue-blood family) to carry the day. The strategy almost works, but not quite. Fey and Rudd are as winning as ever, likewise the young supporting cast. On the whole, Admission offers some pleasant, if predictable, distractions. PG13. 117m. THE CROODS. Animated movies have so consistently let me down in the last few years that I approach them only with the lowest of expectations. And the premise of this one — a family of cave-dwellers must confront their fear of change to avoid extinction — didn’t give me much to look forward to. That’ll show me: Thanks to a likeable ensemble (Nicholas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Cloris Leachman, Clark Duke), a unique visual sensibility and general good-heartedness,The Croods won me over handily. Sure, the script spends most of its time in pretty familiar territory, but the way directors Kirk De Micco and Chris Sanders handle it offers some welcome surprises. PG. 96m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

G.I. JOE: Retaliation 3-D. Sci-fi actioner based on the Hasbro toys picks up where G.I. Joe: Rise of Cobra left off. The evil Zartan (Arnold Vosloo), leader of Cobra, is impersonating the U.S. President and has branded General Joe Colton (Bruce Willis) and his cohorts (Dwayne still “The Rock” Johnson, etc.) as traitors. Can

the good guys beat the bad guys and save the world? PG-13. 99m. THE HOST. Sci-fi romance based on Stephenie Meyer’s Invasion of the Bodysnatchers-esque novel stars Saoirse Ronan (Atonement) as Melanie, a love-struck girl who resists having her body inhabited by a parasitic alien “Soul” called Wanderer. Directed by Andrew Niccol (Gattaca, In Time). Rated PG-13. 125 m. SPRING BREAKERS. Former Disney girls (Vanessa Hudgens, Selena Gomez) gone wild as teens on a crime spree who’ve fallen under the influence of a bad dude (James Franco). Written and directed by Harmony Korine (Kids, Gummo). Rated R, 90m.  Arcata Theatre Lounge takes you into a barren dystopian future on Good Friday with director Alfonso Cuarón’s CHILDREN OF MEN, a dark tale with Clive Owen shepherding the last pregnant woman on Earth toward a brighter future. On Easter Bunny Sunday the ATL has the cartoon/live action mash-up WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT? from director Robert Zemeckis. The marvelous murder mystery has Bob Hoskins as a P.I. investigating death by falling piano and tempted by Roger’s ravishing toon wife Jessica — she’s not bad, she’s just drawn that way. — Bob Doran

Continuing

THE CALL. Would-be thriller with 911 operator (Halle Berry) trying to protect a terrified teen (Abigail Breslin) abducted by a deranged serial killer. R. 95m. IDENTITY THIEF. A long-suffering everyman (Jason Bateman) hunts down the crazed throat-puncher who stole his identity (Melissa McCarthy). R. 111m. THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE. Satire of Vegas-style magicians has Steve Carell as Wonderstone facing off against a Criss Angel-ish Jim Carrey. PG13. 100m. JACK THE GIANT SLAYER. This bland, big-budget retelling of the classic fairytale warrants a “Fee-fi-HO-HUM.” Har har! PG13. 114m. OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN. White House action-thriller with a Secret Service agent (Gerard Butler) protecting the President (Aaron Eckhart) from evil Koreans. Yawn. R. 100m. OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL. James Franco stars as the young wizard-to-be in this visually rich but ultimately hollow prequel. PG. 130m. SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK. Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence deliver Oscar-nominated performances (Jen won!) with a twist of mental instability in this bipolar dramedy. R. 122m.

Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema 707-443-3456 ^ = STARTING 3/29

1223 Broadway Street, Eureka ** = ONLY 3/28 Times are for 3/28-4/4 unless otherwise noted.

SPRING BREAKERS^ 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40 THE HOST^ 11:50, 2:50, 5:50, 8:50 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 12:00**, 12:05^, 2:45, 5:30, 8:20 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:25, 3:20, 6:15, 9:10 THE CROODS 3D 12:30, 3:05, 5:40, 8:15 THE CROODS 2D 11:50**, 11:55^,2:20**,2:25^ 4:55, 7:30 ADMISSION 12:50, 3:30, 6:05, 8:45, 9:40** THE CALL 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE 1:00, 6:20 Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 2D 1:40, 4:50, 8:00 Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 3D 11:55**, 12:00^, 2:55**, 3:00, 5:55**, 6:00^, 9:00 JACK THE GIANT SLAYER 2D 3:35, 8:40^, 8:50** IDENTITY THIEF** 12:35, 3:15, 6:00, 8:40 SILvER LININGS PLAYBOOK** 2:30, 5:15, 8:05

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 ^ = STARTING 3/29 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville ** = ONLY 3/28 Times are for 3/28-4/4 unless otherwise noted.

THE HOST^ 12:10, 3:05, 6:05, 9:00 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 1:05^, 6:35 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 3:50, 9:20 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:25^, 3:20, 6:15, 9:10 ADMISSION 12:40^, 3:10**, 3:15^ 5:50, 8:30 THE CROODS 3D 12:20^, 2:55, 5:30, 8:00 THE CROODS 2D 12:00^, 2:35, 5:10, 7:40 THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE 3:55, 4:30**, 7:00**, 9:30 Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 2D 12:55^, 3:00**, 6:00**, 6:25^ 9:00** Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 3D 11:50^, 12:45^, 2:45**, 5:45, 8:45

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata Times are for 3/28-4/4 unless otherwise noted.

GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D THE CROODS Oz THE GREAT AND POWERFUL

1:10, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 1:30, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30 12:40, 3:20, 6:00, 8:40

Fortuna Theater 707-725-2121

* = SAT.-SUN. ONLY ** = FRI.-SAT. ONLY

1241 Main Street, Fortuna Times are for 3/28-4/4 unless otherwise noted.

THE HOST 12:40*, 3:45, 6:50, 9:45** GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 1:30*, 9:40** GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 4:30, 7:10 THE CROODS 3D 12:00*, 2:15*, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10** THE CROODS 2D 1:15*, 3:40, 6:20, 8:30** Oz: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL 1:00*, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40** OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:50*, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35** THE INCREDIBLE BURT WONDERSTONE (3/28) 1:20*, 4:10, 6:35, 9:15**

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville BEAUTIFUL CREATURES

TBA

Computers

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts ADULT CERAMICS. Get your creative juices flowing by learning & practicing ceramics! Basic hand building & pinch pottery for 18 & up. Mon.s & Wed.s, 6:30-8 p.m., starting 4/15. At Ryan Center. $65 fee, includes materials. Registration begins 4/4 online at www. eurekarecreation.com or in person. Call 441-4244 for more info. (AC-0328) GLASS FUSING, SURFACE DESIGN & IMAGE LAYERING. $80/$60 members (materials fees $25 and up). 2 workshops offered: 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thurs., April 11 or Sat., April 13. Explore surface design through the use of glass powders, frit, and under-glaze products. Create several small works of art. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0328) TILE MAKING. $180. Mon., 5:30–7:30 p.m., April 1-June 3. (10 weeks). With Marilyn Allen. Enjoy this decorative, yet functional, art form while exploring a variety of tile-forming and surface-decorating techniques. Suitable for beginners and experienced students. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata. com. (AC-0328) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $180. Wed., April 3–June 5 (10 weeks). 3 classes offered: 9-11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.1:30 p.m., 2-4 p.m. With Peggy Loudon. Complete introduction to basic wheel-throwing and glazing techniques. Perfect for beginning and returning students. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www. fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0328) EUREKA STUDIO ARTS. Classes and workshops in painting, drawing, creativity, art marketing, video production and more! APRIL ARTS ALIVE! DEMO: NEW DRAWING INSTRUCTOR BRENT EVISTON - Live costumed-model figure drawing demonstration. Come see art in action! eurekastudioarts.com. 526 Fifth St., (707) 440-9027 (AC-0404)

Communication

ECOUNTER WITH GOD. Are such encounters real? If so, why doesn’t God appear to anyone who asks him to do so? These questions discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., March 31, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-0328) DESIGNING A GREAT TEAM. Discover how different people approach problem-solving and how to make more efficient use of their differences, allowing more quicker and more effective group decision-making and solutions. With Janet Ruprecht. Fri., April 12, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $100 (includes materials). Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMM-0404)

MICROSOFT EXCEL. Learn the power and capabilities of this spreadsheet software. Create workbooks and design worksheets utilizing formulas and functions such as sum, average, max, min and count. With Joan Dvorak. Mon., April 22-May 13, 6-8 p.m. $75. Preregistration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0411) INTRO TO ADOBE INDESIGN. Fast-paced, hands-on exploration of Indesign page layout software. Demonstration of tools, menus, palettes, page set-up, master pages, guides and margins, color and more. With Annie Reid. Mon., and Wed., April 15-29, 6:30-9 p.m. $135. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (C-0404)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

LEARN 2 HOOP DANCE. Nicole is back in town to teach 3 HOOP DANCE workshops Sat. March 30. Beginning 10 a.m - 12 p.m. Intermediate 1-3 p.m. Advanced Small Hoop 4-6 p.m. Information and registration at www.chakranation.com. Classes at Redwood Raks, Arcata. (DMT-0328) OM SHALA MOVIE NIGHT! Sat., March 30. Featured documentary: The Highest Pass. This film asks the question: Is truly living worth dying for? Doors at 6:30 p.m., movie starts at 7 p.m. $5 suggested. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (DMT-0328) BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, April 8-29 7-8 p.m., Pan Arts Network,1049 Samoa Blvd, Suite C. $50, (707) 407-8998, info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT- 0401) FREE INTRO TO ARGENTINE TANGO. For absolute beginners. Sat., April 13th, 7p.m., Arcata. Experience the most interesting and beautiful dance of all for free! You’ll learn the basics, meet new people and have lots of fun! Partner not required but suggested. More information, www.tangodelsol.net or (858) 205-9832 (DMT-0411) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT-0228) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-0606) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-0606) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1226)

Fitness

NIA-DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6-7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Wed.s, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. $5 dropin, $50/12 classes (707) 441-9102 (F-0328

HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session Feb. 1-June 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-0606) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F-1226) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1226) AIKIBOJITSU. Get your black belt in stick! New beginning classes in Aikibojitsu, The Art of the Staff, taught by Tom Read Sensei, Chief Instructor of Northcoast Aikido, with over 40 years of experience in martial arts. Classes meet Sat.s 9 a.m- 10 a.m., at Northcoast Aikido, 890 G Street, Arcata (entrance in back, by fire station). $20 per class, Visit www. aikibojitsu.com (F-0328) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0606) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (F-1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825-0182. (F-1227) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1226)

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Home & Garden AnnuAl

Young Writers ConferenCe

April 13, 8:30 am to 3 pm

HSu Campus, Founders Hall for students 4th - 9th grade fee: $40, sCholarships available

826-5109

WWW . redWoodWp . org

FRUIT TREE SELECTION & ORCHARD MAINTENANCE ON THE NORTH COAST. Learn to take care of fruit trees, including selecting, pruning, thinning, pest management and soil maintenance. This course will cover apple, pear and other fruiting tree varieties suited for the North Coast. Includes a fieldtrip to an orchard. With Peter Haggard. Tues. and Thurs., April 23 and 25, 6-8 p.m. and Sun., April 28, 1-3 p.m. $60. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (HG-0411) GARDENING STUDY SCHOOL. Course 3 offered by Humboldt District of California Garden Club. Topics include: How to grown outdoor flowers, How to Prune, Plant growth factors for success, Plant identification and Wildflowers. Also tour the Botanical Garden. April 5 & 6, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., in Eureka. Registration $40/1 day, $75/2 days, breakfast & lunch included. Call 442-1387 or email mgoodwin@northcoast.com for information. (HG-0328)

Kids & Teens

CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 4-7. $75. Sat., 9:30-11 a.m., April 6–May 4. With Amanda Steinebach. Children will have a great time creating with clay. They will make one to two pieces per week and each project is designed to bring out their creativity. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata. com. (K-0328)

For the Love of Color: Gina Wilde, Alchemy Yarns

April 27th, 11am to 6 pm

Learn techniques for working with dynamic color from the creative color artist behind fabulous Alchemy yarns. Find your own dazzling color palette through fun, fast and enlightening color exercises and create a gorgeous ascot scarf during class. Choose from an outrageously colorful and decadent treasure trove of Alchemy stash and create a unique palette with Gina for your future projects. Cost $115.00 + materials

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

watch for the

CHINESE CULTURE CAMP. Humboldt County Chinese School presents Chinese Culture Camp on Sat., April 13, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Cutten Elementary School. Activities include language, martial arts, cooking, calligraphy and more. Open to grades K-8. $30 per person. Call Bernie at 445-1781 for more info or email hccslevy@yahoo.com. (K-0411) SOCCER & DANCE CLASSES FOR KIDS. Eureka Recreation offers a variety of classes for kids ages 1½-12 years, from Toddler Soccer, Music & Movement, So You Think You Can Dance, Tiny Tutus Beginning Ballet, Little Kickers, Hip Hop & more! Classes starting 4/12. Days & times vary by class. $25-30. Registration begins 4/4 online at www.eurekarecreation.com or in person. Call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0328) THE MAGIC OF CLAY. Children’s Ceramics Workshops in Trinidad. Seven week hand-building sessions Mon. & Tues. afternoons, STARTING: April 8 & 9. For more information CALL 677-0821 (K-0404) AERIAL DANCE CIRCUS SPRING BREAK CAMP. Ages 6-12. All levels $99/week; $35/day. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. April 1-5 or April 8-12. (773) 206-4706. www.aerialdancecircus.com (K-0328) SEQUOIA PARK ZOO PRESENTS SCHOOLS OUT! Springtime at the Zoo for 8-11 year olds April 9-12. Join us for a wild adventure at the zoo. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo.net for info. (K-0328) YOUNG WRITERS CONFERENCE Redwood Writing Project, Annual Young Writers conference, Sat. April 13, 8:30 am.-3 p.m, HSU Campus, Founders Hall Students 4th-9th graders, fee $40, scholarships available. 826-5109, www.redwoodwp.org (K-0411)

special pullout section

May 9, 2013 edition

Send us your list of events by April 18! calendar@northcoastjournal.com

SPRING BREAK CAMP. Join us in Blue Lake for our Spring Break Camp for 5-13 year olds. Mon.-Fri., April 1-5, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Full-day or halfday option. Roller Skating, Arts & Crafts, Dodge Ball and more! Register today! Download a registration form at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668-5932, for more information. (K-0328)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn selfconfidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www. northcoastselfdefense.com (K-1226)

Lectures

THE GROW IT & KNOW IT EVENT. Presented by 707 Cannabis & Hosted by Area 101 on April 13, at Area 101, 54895 Hwy. 101, Laytonville. Everything you ever wanted to know and about growing, breeding, CBD,therapeutics, cooking with and consuming cannabis from NorCal’s premiere Cannabis educator. 10-11:30 a.m: “Grow like the Pro’s” Learn proven techniques from master cultivator Kevin Jodrey, 11:30 a.m- 1 p.m: Therapeutic Uses of Cannabinoids” seminar, with details on raw vs. heated cannabis & the latest in reach with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist.12p.m: “Live Cannabis Juicing Demo”, learn of the best cannabis juicing techniques with 707 Cannabis College experts. 2-3 p.m: The Endocannabinoid System”, seminar. How cannabis produces effects, eating vs. inhaling , plus reliable results using cannabis with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 3-4 p.m : “Cultivation Optimization” seminar. Learn about cannabis physiology, how to achieve rapid high-CBD isolation , plus THC & CBD potency maximization using vegetative stage testing with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. 4-5 p.m: Cannabis Ingestibles”, seminar. How to calculate dosages, activate cannabinoids & produce a consistent product with Pure Analytics Chief Scientist. Full-day $85 advance/$95 at door, $50 1/2 day, lunch provided. For more info or to purchase advanced tickets email info@707cannabiscollege.com or call (707) 672-9860 (L-0411) FOOD SAFETY. Learn the basics of selecting appropriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially in an emergency, when there is no power. Presented by HSU Regional Training Institute, Community Disaster Preparedness. Wed., April 10, 6-8 p.m. at Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, Eureka. $25. Pre-registration required: www. humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU eLearning & Extended Education at (707) 826-3731. (L-0328)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1226) THE ARMCHAIR TRAVELER. Back of the Bay Byways. Sit back for three virtual tours of the “back of the bay:” Warren Creek, Walker Point and Table Bluff. Discover abandoned water lines, secluded shipping ports and logging sites. With Jerry and Gisela Rohde. Sat., April 20, 1-3 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0411) GENTLE YOGA FOR OLLI. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., April 15-May 20, 1:30-3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0404) IBOOK, ACCESSING THE AUTHOR WITHIN. iBook is a free app from Apple, which allows one to write books. Learn how to compose and publish your own book using iBook with Tom Gage. Thurs., April 18-May 9, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0404)

KING LEAR, NOTHING IS EVERYTHING. Join this class for a full discussion of this provocative Shakepearean text which explores what it means to be human. With Tom Gage. Tues., April 16-May 7, 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0328) MOVING YOUR WORDS, A WRITING CLASS. Go from “I don’t know where to start” to developing ideas, expanding your imagination, and finally moving your words onto paper. With Suzanne Samberg. Tues., April 9-30, 2-4 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O-0328) SOUL COLLAGE, AN EXPLORATION OF THEMES. SoulCollage is an intuitive collage process, and course participants will create SoulCollage cards from the themes of Home, Darkness, The Hero, Animal Guides and Wealth. With Janet Patterson. Mon., April 8-May 13, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0328) THE ART & CRAFT OF LANDSCAPE DESIGN. Get introduced to the landscape design process with Donna Wildearth. Includes a field trip to local gardens. Tues., April 9-30, 6-8 p.m., and Sun., May 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0328) THE BERKELEY UPRISING, 1956-1970. From Panty Raid to Free Speech Movement, University of Calif. at Berkeley was the site of a Youth Quake that spread around the world. With Tom Gage. Wed., April 17-May 8, 6-8 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0328) WATERCOLOR STILL LIFE PAINTING WITH JUDY EVENSON. Held at the Garberville Civic Club, this class explores watercolor’s expressive qualities. Tues., April 9-30, 10 a.m.-Noon. $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt. edu/olli (O-0328)

Spiritual

FREE TALK! BHAKTI YOGA, THE PRACTICE OF DEVOTION. With Shemaia Skywater Lucas. At Om Shala. Sun., March 31, 3-4 p.m. Link to the Divine through movement, art, writing, song & play. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (S-0328) WILD GRACE WISDOM SCHOOL. Exploring Nine Dimensions: 5 Tues’s 6-8, begins March 26. Reiki Jin Kei Do: Level I, 3 Sun’s 1-4, begins March 3. Reading Your Astrology Chart: 6 Wed’s, 6-7:30, begins March 27. Pre-register: astro@salinarain.com (707) 668-5408 (S-0328) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direction of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442-7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www. kdkarcatagroup.org (S-0502) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442-4240 www.tarotofbecoming. com (S-0228) ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@ yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www. arcatazengroup.org. (S-0606)

Sports/Recreation

CHAKRA ACTIVATION. Cleanse and Balance Physical, Mental, Spiritual & Emotional Bodies. Classes available for couples, singles & private sessions. Intensive series begins April 7. Dr. Pepper Hernandez, 405-4208150, Simplyrawsome.com (W-0404)

SENIOR SOFTBALL. 50’s and 60’s plus league needs players. Must be at least 49 to play. www.humboldtseniorsoftball.com Call Brad Golding (707) 982-3223 (SR-0502)

CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE. Explore Chinese herbal medicine: basic concepts, common herbs used, and how it differs from western herbal medicine. Learn to prepare a tea from raw herbs. With Lupine Wread. Thurs., April 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-0411)

TENNIS CLASSES & LESSONS. Classes & Lessons for all Ages & Abilities taught by a certified USPTA Pro. Find out more at www.humboldttennisclub.com or call (707) 616-4781. (SR-0418)

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1226) ADULT SOFTBALL. Form a dream team with your friends, family and co-workers. $600/team plus $10 non-resident fee. Find out more on Wed., April 10 at the Adorni Center, 1011 Waterfront Dr. Women’s meeting 6 p.m., Men’s 6:30 p.m. Call 441-4245. (K-0328)

Therapy/Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk-in support group for anyone suffering from depression. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m -7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839-5691. (T-1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@ yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1226)

Vocational

200-HOUR YOGA TEACHER TRAINING. At Om Shala Yoga. With Janine Melzer. April 6-June 30. Deepen your practice and get certified to teach! 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga. com (V-0328) CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, M.A., and Carolyn Albee, M.A. Fri., April 19, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $30 fee includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (V-0411) CAREER GUIDANCE FOR CREATIVE, INNOVATIVE PEOPLE. Are you a creative person having a hard time finding satisfaction in traditional, structured work environments? This seminar will help you understand yourself better and give you practical strategies for creating a more balanced and fulfilling approach to your career/life choices. With Susan Abbott. Sat., April 6, 2-5 p.m. $90, plus $10 materials. Pre-registration required. Call HSU eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www. humboldt.edu/extended (V-0328)

Wellness/Bodywork

INTRO TO TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE. Curious about acupuncture? Want to know how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) works and what conditions it might benefit? Explore basic TCM theory and tools including acupuncture, herbs, dietary therapy and more. With Lupine Meredith Wread. Thurs., April 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826-3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W-0404)

FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (W-1226) TUES. & THURS. AFTERNOON MASSAGE WITH DIANE DAVIS. Enhance your Pilates or yoga practice or just unwind and relax with a massage session at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Nationally certified since 1997, Diane is trained in Hawaiian Lomi Lomi, Myofascial Release, Swedish, Craniosacral, Acupressure and Reiki. Questions? Call (707) 268-8926 to schedule an appointment. (W-0328) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Three programs: T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis, Traditional Long Form (Wu Style), and The 42 Combined Forms (all 4 major styles). 11-week term starts the week of March 26. Begin as late as the third week. At the martial arts academy in Arcata’s Sunny Brae Shopping Center. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Morning and evening classes. Fees for the 11-week term: $95 for 1 class per week, $155 for 2 or more classes per week. See www.margaretemerson.com or call 822-6508 for schedules. (W-0328) AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & CLEANSING RETREATS. With Traci Webb and Myrica Morningstar, Training meets five weekends (Fri-Sun). May 17-July 14. Learn over 16 Ayurvedic Massages and Herbal Body Therapies for Career Enhancement and Self-Healing (Deadline: April 17). Group & Personal Cleansing Retreats: July 17-Aug. 11. Call for details. NCBTMB Approved CE Provider. REGISTER: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: www.ayurvedicliving.com, info@ ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0411)

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1226) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Intermediate Herbology with Jane Bothwell, April 17- June 12, Wed. evenings, 7-9 p.m., next to Humboldt Herbals in Eureka. Delve deeper into the healing power of plants. $365. (707) 442-8157 www.dandelionherb.com (W-0411) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin June, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1226) ●

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northcoastjournal.com

PRESENTS

THE GROW IT & KNOW IT

EVENT

APRIL 13, 2013 AT AREA 101 54895 HWY 101 LAYTONVILLE, CA

“Everything you ever wanted to know about GROWING, BREEDING, CBD, THERAPEUTICS, COOKING with and CONSUMING cannabis from NorCal’s premiere Cannabis educators”

Topics starting at 10am M Grow Like the Pros with Kevin Jodrey M Therapeutic Uses of Cannabinoids Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Live Cannabis Juicing Demonstration 707 Cannabis’ Donna King M The Endocannabinoid System Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Cultivation Optimization Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller M Cannabis Ingestibles Pure Analytics™ Samantha Miller TICKETS: $85 IN ADVANCE, $95 AT THE DOOR FULL-DAY; $50 FOR ½ DAY; LUNCH PROVIDED

For more info or to buy advance tickets: info@707cannabiscollege.com or 707 672-9860 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

33

classified@northcoastjournal.com

DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 707-445-7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED May 22, 2006, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 213 488-0218. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. On April 5, 2013, at 11:00 A.M., Wade Francis, as duly appointed Substitute Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded on May 31, 2006, as lnst. No 2006-15887-5 ,in book N/A, page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Humboldt County, California, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH OR CASHIER’S CHECK OR OTHER INSTITUTIONAL CHECK ACCEPTABLE TO THE TRUSTEE, (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States) at PLACE OF SALE: Courthouse steps to Eureka County Courthouse: 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA 95501 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and Slate described as: Legal Description: Lot 7 of Parcel Map No. 2 (Deerfield Ranch), as per map recorded in Book 1 of Parcel Maps, pages 2, 3, and 4, Humboldt County Records Trustor: Robert M. Coleman and Lawrence W. Eye The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 28950 State Highway 36, Bridgeville, CA 95526 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the unpaid balance of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $ 141,774.42, including as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located on December 11, 2012 as lnst. No. 2012-030053-4 Trustee or party conducting sale: Wade Francis Date: March 12, 2013 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-76)

34 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Date of Filing Application: March 5, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name of the Applicant is: HUMBOLDT BAY TOURISM CENTER The applicant listed above is applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverages Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 205 G ST EUREKA, CA 95501-0419 Type of License Applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer And Wine Eating Place 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-77)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00143

The following person is doing business as NOTHING BETTER… LAWN & MAINTENANCE at 3172 Matthew Lane, Fortuna, CA 95540. Jessie Ray Genaro 3172 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessie Genaro. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-97)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00145

The following persons are doing business as MAD RIVER BREWING COMPANY at 195 Taylor Way, Blue Lake, CA 95525, P.O. Box 767, Blue Lake, CA 95525. Mad River Brewing Co., Inc. 195 Taylor Way Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s James Crowell, Director. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-91)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00148

The following persons are doing business as THE JOURNEY at 95 Belleview Avenue, Rio Dell, CA 95562, P.O. Box 236, Rio Dell, CA 95562. Assemby of God of Rio Dell 95 Belleview Avenue Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jeff Miller, President/Pastor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County

on March 7, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-90)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00168

The following person is doing business as OLD TOWN CARRIAGE CO. at 2nd & F Street, Eureka, CA 95502, 374 Columbia St., Brooklyn, NY 11231. Brendan Fearon 374 Columbia St. Brooklyn, NY 11231 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/25/13. /s Brendan Fearon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-84)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00172

The following persons are doing business as GRUMPY GOAT WINGERY at 1902 C Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Peter Thomas Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Christine Michelle Gorshe-Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/13. /s Peter Olsen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-87)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00175

The following person is doing business as LOTS OF PEPPER at 4100 Union St., Eureka, CA 95503. Christina Lewis 4100 Union St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Christina Lewis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-96)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00135

The following person is doing business as I AM…SOCIAL JUSTICE, I AM…SAFE ZONE, SHEBANGO at 966 Lloyd Street, Eureka, CA 95503. Jessica Pettitt 966 Lloyd Street Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessica K. Pettitt. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 1, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-78)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00126

The following person is doing business as THE WOODEN SWING SET STOP .COM at 368 Spruce St., Eureka, CA 95503. Daniel Jacob Dixon 368 Spruce St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/25/13. /s Daniel Jacob Dixon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 25, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-86)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R13-00147

The following person is doing business as FOREVER YOUNG BABY/CHILDREN ESSENTIALS at 1034 Riverside Dr., Rio Dell, CA 95562. Heather R. Watkins 1034 Riverside Dr. Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Heather R. Watkins. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-85)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 11-00116

The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: KIDLICIOUS, 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd., Suite J, Fortuna, CA 95540. The fictitious business name was filed in Humboldt County on 2/17/2011. Scott Keith Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 Felicia Gabrielle Thomsson 118 Gulliksen Dr. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business was conducted by Individual Husband & Wife. /s/ Scott Thomsson/Felicia Thomsson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 11, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/13 (13-79)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00115

The following person is doing business as EMBODY CALM MEDITATION CENTER at 1902 Hodgson St., #B, Eureka, CA 95503. Alex Goldenberg 1902 Hodgson St., #B Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Alex Goldenberg. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 22, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-75)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00137

The following persons are doing business as HUMBOLDT PC at 3562 Broadway, Ste. A, Eureka, CA 95503. Humboldt PC Repair, LLC 3562 Broadway, Ste. A Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Corey Edwards, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 1, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-71)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00139

The following person is doing business as ALLIANCE LAWN CARE at 2208 Wisteria Way, Arcata, CA 95521. Tony Tubiola 2208 Wisteria Way Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Tony Tubiola. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-67)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R-13-00142

The following persons are doing business as SCHOOL COMMUNITY REUSE ACTION PROJECT HUMBOLDT at 101 H Street, Ste. D, Arcata, CA 95521. SCRAP 2915 NE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Portland, OR 97212. The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Tibora Girczyc-Blum, Agent. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 5, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-72)

STATEMENT OF WITHDRAWAL FROM PARTNERSHIP OPERATING UNDER FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME R11-00406

Field notes “If I had another face, do you thInk I would wear thIs one?”

The following person has withdrawn as a general partner from the partnership operating under the fictitious business name of: ALLIANCE LAWN AND GARDEN CARE, 2208 Wisteria Way, Arcata, CA 95521. The fictitious business name was filed in Humboldt County on 7/1/2011. Jacob Douglas Farrell 1740 Stewart Ave. Arcata, CA 95521 /s/ Jacob Farrell. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 4, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

photo by alexander Gardner

The Art of the Riposte

3/14, 3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-68)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00107

The following persons are doing business as REDWOOD READING SOLUTIONS at 665 F Street, Suite C, Arcata, CA 95521. Sherry Lee McCoy 2160 Lexington Court McKinleyville, CA 95519 Kirsten Leigh Hartlein Allen 2677 Elizabeth Rd. McKinelyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 2/19/2013. /s Sherry McCoy, Kirsten Hartlein Allen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/7, 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-62)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00128

The following persons are doing business as PEACE POPS at Earth Foundations, 5425 Ericson Way, Arcata, CA 95521. Amber Mascio 2370 2nd Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Corey Mascio 2370 2nd Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Corey Mascio. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on February 26, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 3/7, 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-63)

➤ LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

D

By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

orothy “one martini and I’m under the table, two and I’m under the host” Parker hated her “wisecracker” reputation. But what else do you call someone whose response to the demands of one of her many beaus was, “I’m too fucking busy, and vice versa”? (On being told that former president Calvin Coolidge had died, Parker asked, “How could they tell?”) Ah, the pungent put-down, the ready riposte, the crafty comeback! To honor the upcoming silliness of April Fool’s Day, here’s more, from my now 40-year-old collection of quotations. Winston Churchill had a reputation for verbally parrying with women. When the exasperated British-American politician Nancy Astor railed, “If you were my husband, I’d put poison in your coffee,” Churchill responded, “If I were your husband, I’d drink it!” Another time, Member of Parliament Bessie Braddock said to him (probably correctly), “Winston, you’re drunk!” He replied, “Bessie, you’re ugly, and tomorrow morning I shall be sober.” He didn’t stop with female politicians. Playwright George Bernard Shaw once sent Churchill two tickets for the first night of his new play, “One for yourself and one for a friend — if you have one.” Churchill replied, “I can’t make it, but I would like tickets for the second night — if there is one.” Author and Trotskyite Mary McCarthy detested her “evil twin” literary rival Lillian Hellman, whose infatuation with “Uncle Joe” Stalin she despised. “Every word she writes is a lie, including ‘and’ and ‘the’,” she famously told Dick Cavett on his TV show. That brought on a $2 million libel suit, which only ended with Hellman’s death.

Another female rivalry didn’t stop there. “Just because she’s dead doesn’t mean she’s gonna change,” said Bette Davis of Joan Crawford. Abe Lincoln wasn’t above a quick-witted riposte. When political rival Stephen Douglas called him “two-faced” in one of their seven debates in 1858, Lincoln replied, “I leave it to my audience. If I had another face, do you think I would wear this one?” Hecklers can either be the bane of a stand-up comic’s life or opportunities sent from above. Comedian Jeremy Hardy, getting a hard time from some guy in his audience, finally came back with, “Nigel, it’s over. Can’t you understand that?” And Englishman Jim Smallman’s response to being told by a heckler, “You’re ugly!” was, “And yet your missus still prefers me to you.” Oscar Wilde’s social life sounds like it was one continuous series of comebacks, but James McNeill Whistler got the better of him once. “I wish I’d said that,” said Wilde after a witty remark by Whistler. The painter came back with, “You will, Oscar, you will.” Even soccer players aren’t above the occasional put-down, such as George Best’s take on David Beckham: “He can’t kick with his left foot, he can’t head, he can’t tackle, and he doesn’t score many goals. Apart from that, he’s all right.” Finally, Truman (In Cold Blood) Capote just didn’t see Jack Kerouac as being in his league as an author, declaring of On the Road, “That’s not writing, that’s typing.” l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) always has a witty response … one minute too late. His Field Notes compendia are at Eureka Books and Old Town Books.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

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ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130166 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

continued from previous page.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130167 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL for a decree changing names as follows: Present name PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL to Proposed Name PAMELA DENISE WARWICK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 9, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 21, 2013 Filed: March 21, 2013 /s/ R.E. KOSSOW Judge of the Superior Court

Did you know? that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at northcoastjournal.com

www.northcoastjournal.com

3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-95)

PETITION OF: XIONG YANG TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: XIONG YANG for a decree changing names as follows: Present name XIONG YANG to Proposed Name XY SONG ROYAL YAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 26, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 8, 2013 Filed: March 8, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 3/21, 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-82)

  ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130131 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: TRISTAN ANTHONY FARLOW-WILHOYT TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: TRISTAN ANTHONY FARLOW-WILHOYT for a decree changing names as follows: Present name TRISTAN ANTHONY FARLOW-WILHOYT to Proposed Name TRISTAN WILHOYT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: April 19, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is:

Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: February 25, 2013 Filed: February 26, 2013 /s/ DALE A. REINHOLTSEN Judge of the Superior Court 3/7, 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-64)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DOROTHY L. KLUCK CASE NO. PR130104

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DOROTHY L. KLUCK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LAURENCE A. KLUCK in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LAURENCE A. KLUCK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of the notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LAURENCE A. KLUCK # 123791 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP. 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 MARCH 21, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-92)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KENNETH L. JENSEN CASE NO. PR130088

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KENNETH LEE JENSEN, KENNETH L. JESEN OR KEN L. JENSEN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ERIC N. JENSEN AND CHRIS P. JENSEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, EUREKA. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests ERIC N. JENSEN AND CHRIS P. JENSEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 11, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. CR08. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of the notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in

California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JONATHAN M. MCGEE, ESQ. SBN 271008 MCGEE LAW FIMR, LLC. 5635 N. SCOTTSDALE ROAD, SUITE 170 SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA 85250 (480) 729-6208 JMM@MCGEELAWAZ.COM MARCH 12, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-93)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOHN CURTIS MASON aka JOHN C. MASON, CASE NO. PR130106

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN CURTIS MASON aka JOHN C. MASON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JENNIFER MASON in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JENNIFER MASON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general

personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES, SBN#67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 March 22, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-94)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF SUSAN THOMPSON, CASE NO. PR130097

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SUSAN THOMPSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SARAH BANNING in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SARAH BANNING be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.                                                  IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF LYNETTE F. SULLIVAN, CASE NO. PR130092

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: LYNETTE F. SULLIVAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by STEPHEN MATTES in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that STEPHEN MATTES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an

3/21, 3/28, 4/4/2013 (13-81)

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILLIAM RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK aka RUSS KIRKPATRICK aka RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK, CASE NO. PR130078

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK aka RUSS KIRKPATRICK aka RUSSELL KIRKPATRICK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by NANCY YAGI KIRKPATRICK in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that NANCY YAGI KIRKPATRICK be appointed as personal

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442-1400

legal NOTICES continued on next page ➤

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

HARD #23

www.sudoku.com

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM P. BACHELER, JR., a/k/a WILLIAM BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, JR. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SHAWNA R. BRISCO in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SHAWNA A. BRISCO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 18, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance

3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-89)

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS 1. Andy Warhol genre 7. FedEx competitor 10. Internet hookup letters 13. “What chutzpah!” 14. Sweeping in scope 15. It can’t be returned 16. Kenny Rogers hit about a glossy magazine editor who enjoys walking unhurriedly? 18. What Elmo calls Dagwood in “Blondie” 19. Caesar and others 20. Rock named after a Scandinavian country 21. Imp’s ammo 22. Cause of some wrinkles

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILLIAM P. BACHELER, JR., a/k/a WILLIAM BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, a/k/a BILL BACHELER, JR., CASE NO. PR130096

interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 11, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES, SBN#67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 March 12, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

3/28, 4/4, 4/11/2013 (13-88)

may be in person or by your attorney.                                                 IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES D. POOVEY 83955 937 SIXTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-6744 March 18, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

(1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 March 19, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, March 28, 2013

37

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOHN A. MELLO, CASE NO. PR130081

CONTINuED FROM PREvIOuS PAgE. representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on March 28, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: RICHARD DALY, SBN# 041302 RICHARD DALY, INC. 123 F STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-5471 March 6, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-69)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF THEODORE HAROLD SHELLEY, CASE NO. PR130082

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN A. MELLO, JOHN ARMAS MELLO, JOHN MELLO A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ANGELA MELLO in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ANGELA MELLO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 4, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: TIMOTHY J. WYKLE SB# 216943 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-3758 March 6, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: THEODORE HAROLD SHELLEY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by SHERRY BEYER in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SHERRY BEYER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 4, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JOHN R. STOKES, SB#67715 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822-1771 March 6, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-74)

3/14, 3/21, 3/28/2013 (13-73)

MARCH 28, 28, 20132013 • northcoastjournal.com CoastJournal JourNal• Thursday, • thursday, MarCh • northcoastjournal.com 38 North Coast

obituaries Adrienne Berenson Goldberg 1925-2013 Adrienne Berenson Goldberg, born in Chicago in 1925, the daughter of Clara Rofsky and Leonard Berenson. Her mother’s family emigrated from Russia, her father’s from Lithuania. The famous art critic, Bernard Berenson, was her grandfather’s first cousin. She graduated from Tuley High School in Chicago in 1942, Northwestern University in 1946 and received her Master’s degree from Columbia University in 1948. She was a professor of English and African-American Literature at Queensboro Community College (QCC) of City University of New York. After studying African-American literature at Columbia’s Teachers College with Dr. Bone, she developed the African American studies curriculum of QCC, taught the first African-American literature course in their English Department, and was on QCC’s search committee for African-American faculty. She challenged gender discrimination in promotion against the City of New York, with the help of American Jewish Congress, and prevailed. She was a representative for women in another successful gender discrimination challenge. She also taught at Brooklyn Polytech and Queens College in New York City, and Temple University and Drexel College in Philadelphia. She lived in New York, Philadelphia, Annapolis, and Trinidad, California and travelled throughout the world, including Europe, Israel, Turkey, and Senegal, West Africa. She devoted her life to teaching, charity, justice, literature, and the arts. She was the recipient of many awards for teaching and community service. She died suddenly on March 15, 2013. Contributions can be made in her memory to Mt. Olive Community Life Center, 2 Hicks Ave., Annapolis, MD 21401. Adrienne’s successes, both academically and professionally, reflect her curiosity and keen intellect. Yet her greatest achievement was as a person who truly cared about others. She wanted to know people deeply and the stories of their lives. Her heart was large enough to hold both the love and the pain of others. Her ability to see each person’s unique value and her generous spirit helped each of us strive to be our better selves. She was a remarkable person whom we loved dearly. We keep her close in our hearts and appreciate each moment of life as the rich gift that she knew it to be. In coming months, one memorial service will be held in Trinidad, California and one in Annapolis. Family members are her husband of 65 years, Clarence Goldberg, at goldieg@ aol.com, her son, Larry Goldberg, in Trinidad, at larry@ northcoast.com, her daughter, Susan Goldberg, in Pittsburgh, at goldbergs@duq.edu, daughter-in-law, Kathleen DiCiolla, and grandson, Jacob Alberto DiCiolla Goldberg.

For Obituary information Call 442-1400

Employment PAYROLL TECHNICIAN (JOB #1324). F/T position in Payroll Department. Review: 4/10/13. For more info visit: www.humboldt.edu/ jobs or call (707) 826-3626. HSU is an ADA/Title IX/EOE (E-0404) PHLEBOTOMIST/LAB ASSISTANT. Greet patients, collect and prepare specimens, place orders with reference lab, provide clerical support for lab. Current CA CPT cert. required. Full time with benefits. Jerold Phelps Community Hospital, Garberville. www. shchd.org. (E-0418) AIRLINE CAREERS. begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial assistance available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214 (E-0328) LABORERS. Must have previous production type manual labor exp in an outdoor climate. Applicant must be able to lift/pull 50 lbs repetitively and shovel for long periods of time. Must possess good communication skills and be safety minded. Sawmill exp a plus but not req’d. Must be at least 18 yrs. Accepting applications Sat., April 6, 8-10 a.m. only at Sierra Pacific Industries, 2593 New Navy Base Rd., Arcata. Sierra Pacific is located approx 3 miles from Eureka or Arcata on Hwy 255. Everyone who applies will be given a short interview. We are a drug & tobacco free work place. A verifiable SS # is req’d. EOE (E-0404) MAINTENANCE TECH. Maint. Dept. of large apartment complex in Eureka is seeking a team oriented maint. tech with a positive attitude to join our team. A successful candidate must enjoy working with people, have experience in plumbing, electrical, carpentry or mechanical systems, and be willing to perform any maint. task necessary, including janitiorial. FT with benefits. For a complete job description and application, contact john.hammond@usw.salvationarmy.org or call (707) 445-3141. (E-0404) PRESCHOOL SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS NEEDED! Must be available to start April 10,2013. Experience Required, Units Preferred. Call (707) 444-9623. (E-0404) ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR. Friends of the Eel River is hiring an Administrative Director, 20hrs/wk, $15+/hr DOE. Review the complete job description at www.eelriver.org. (E-0328)

Hiring?

Place your ad online! www. northcoast journal.com

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Employment Humboldt County Department of Health & Human Services is accepting extra help applications for

Public Health Nurse

Share your talent for fun and excitement. Kitchen Manager Responsible for inventory control, food costs, food safety, food quality, and the management of all kitchen staff. Must be able to multi-task and 2+ years experience required, catering experience preferred. Paid vacation, 401k, and competitive compensation. For an application and more information please go to www.bearrivercasino.com or call 707-733-1900 x 167. Qualifications and pay rates vary. For more information please inquire in person at 27 Bear River Dr. Loleta, CA, via email nicoelbuehrer@brb-nsn. gov, via website bearrivercasino.com or via telephone (707)733-1900 ext.167

Police officer CiTy OF FORTunA $40,502 – 49,210 /yR

PATIENT COORDINATOR 1 F/T Eureka DIRECTOR OF NURSING 1 F/T Arcata REGISTERED NURSE 1F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Arcata, 2 F/T Eureka (Pediatrics) REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 P/T Crescent City, 1 F/T

Eureka, 2 P/T Willow Creek

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 TEMP Arcata (3 months-OB Clinic)

DENTAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Willow Creek Call (707) 826-8633 ext 5140 Visit www.opendoorhealth.com

(incentives available)

Law enforcement, crime prevention, traffic control, and crime investigation activities; specialized law enforcement assignments; community outreach. Must be enrolled or a graduate of POST Academy at time of application. Excellent benefits. Requires valid CDL. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna.com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street, Fortuna, (707) 725-7600. Applications deadline is 5:00 pm on Friday, April 5, 2013

Open Door is seeking the following medical professionals:

Physician assistant/FnP (1) Eureka, CA

ant able

r rance Agent ssistant

the

Now Hiring: 14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Controller • Plumber Accounts Payable • P/T Office Asst. Insurance – Commercial Lines MFG Maintenance Rental Application Processor

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

coder PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv. & a certified coder with 2 yrs. coding exp. Pharmacy technician PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv.; current CA Pharmacy Tech Lic.; 6 mo to 3 yrs related retail, hospital, or clinic pharmacy exp. administrative assistant PHV – FT – Must have HS Diploma or equiv. & 1 to 4 yrs related admin assist training or exp. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. For qualifications go to www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes: 3/27/13 @ 5PM.

Family Practice mD/DO (3) Eureka, Crescent City, Arcata

Family Practice mD/DO (locum) Arcata PeDiatrician (2) Eureka, McKinleyville Call (707) 826-8633 ext 5140 Visit www.opendoorhealth.com

Accounting Supervisor • Certified Plumber Budget Analyst • Health Data Analyst NATE Certified Heating Tech Geotechnical Engineer • Class B Driver/Labor Executive Assistant (BS/BA Communications/Journalism) Outside Sales Person • General Manager-Media Insurance Agent Licensed California Tree Climbers - minimum 3 years experience

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

working for various Public Health programs. Placements will be in support of Foster Care Nursing, California Children’s Services and In Home Support Services/Adult Protective Services. Applicants must possess a valid CA RN license, PH Nursing certificate and valid CDL. Candidates selected must be able to pass background screen. CPR cards preferred. Applicants must be willing to work variable hours as needed, up to 40 hours per week, Monday-Friday. Salary for these placements: $ 28.05/hr

Extra help applications & job description may be picked up at: Department of Health & Human Services Employee Services 507 F Street Eureka, Ca 95501 (707)441-5510 AA/EOE Employer INBOUND PHONE SALES/TECHNICAL SUPPORT. Inbound phone sales and technical support. Position requires accurate keyboarding skills, strong written and oral communication via email/phone. Interpersonal and organizational skills a must. Ability to work independently and in a professional manner. Position requires excellent attendance. Working knowledge of Excel and Word. Bilingual a plus. Benefits for full time employees include: paid vacation and holidays. After completion of waiting period, medical insurance and elective supplementary insurances available. Applications available online @ ccrane.com or C. Crane Company, Inc. 558 10th Street, Fortuna CA 95540. Deadline: 4/19/13. We are an equal opportunity employer. (E-0411) CARDIAC STENOGRAPHER FOR HIRE. Available July 1st. Bachelor of Science. Board Certified. Resume available. mimi_dills@ yahoo.com (E-0404) CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW. Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442-4500 #14, www. camentorfha.com (E-1226) AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite 209, Eureka. (707) 476-9262. (E-0411) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly fees. 442-8001. (E-1226)

Journal Readers are the People You want to Hire! 442-1400 • www.northcoastjournal.com

Rentals ARCATA HOUSE FOR RENT $1700. 4 bedrooms 2.5 bathro o m w i t h b ea u t i f u l n ew kitchen, stacking washer and dryer, 3 bedrooms with south facing windows, open living room kitchen, fenced yard, kids and dogs welcome, solid references required with deposit. Available 5/15/13 (707) 498-8981 (R-0328) CHARMING DUPLEX ON 1 ACRE. With indoor jacuzzi tub, large deck, beautiful views of meadow and Redwood forest. $800/ month. Some utilities included. 442-0952 (R-0418) ARCATA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 840 D St. Centrally located. Fireplace, private patio, off street parking. Rent $995, Vac 03/30. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0328) EUREKA 1BD/1BA APARTMENT. 2303 Summer St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. Off street parking, hookups. Rent $570, Vac 03/30. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0328)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, MARCH 28, 2013

39

the

CONTINUED FROM previous page

Rentals

Real Estate

Lodging/Travel

Buy/Sell/Trade

Looking for someone to share a good situation!

ACREAGE IN ARCATA/BLUE LAKE DEVELOPMENT. 1-acre lot on Center Street, Arcata. Great bay and city light views, walking distance to downtown and HSU, trails on site, park setting, $150,000. Opportunity for development in Blue Lake: approx. 1.2 acres, 2 houses and storage units. Up to 11-12 units with completed lot split multi-family and/or commercial use. $290,000. Call Linda for more info (707) 8451215, Linda.Disiere@exprealty. com (RE-0404) AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acresonly $99/month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Owner financing . West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) (RE-0328) EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 443-4811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE0328) REDUCED ! WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1226)

EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountian Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986-7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L-0502)

I love animals, watercolor, walk; teach Tai Chi. Safe neighborhood, public transportation, market. I love quiet, books, outdoors. Room open; Share my apartment.

707-672-4096

EUREKA 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1823 California St. Garbage Pd. Sec 8 OK. Hook-ups, yard, w/c pet Rent $1000, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0328) EUREKA UPSTAIRS STUDIO APARTMENT. 1507 5th St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. On-site laundry. Rent $475, Vac 03/23. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0328) FORTUNA NEWER 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 2999 Rainbow Ln. Garbage Pd. Washer/Dryer included. Rent $975. Vac 03/30. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0328) ARCATA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1226 L St. W/S/G Pd. Sec 8 OK. Cat OK. Rent $750 Vac Now. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0328) FORTUNA 2BD/1.5BA. Appl., No pets, Garbage paid. $850/month + security deposit. (707) 725-6293. (R-0404)

Business Rentals DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1226)

Real Estate

Lodging/Travel

Auto 2006 BUICK LUCERNE CX. V6, 4 door, sunroof, excellent condition. Selling due to illness. $10k obo, (707) 488-2535 or 839-5432. (A-0328) CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808, www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A-0404) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-0606)

PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

Buy/Sell/Trade

AUCTIONS McKinleyville estate continuation, perfect condition Ethan Allen & Heywood Wakefield furniture, vintage collectibles, tons of misc Don’t Miss This Sale!

THURS. APRIL 11TH 5:45 PM Sheriff’s surplus incl. bikes, auto & construction tools + estate furn & household. Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

2 METAL FUEL OR GAS TANKS. 1 tank 300 gallons with hose, second tank 600 gallons with hose and dispenser. 7 ft. wood frame for each tank. Sacrifice price $300 for both tanks. 722-4314. (BST-0328) PLATES & CUPS 1/2 PRICE. Get Ready to Entertain! March 26-30. Yellow Tagged Clothes 25¢. Dream Quest Thrift Store, in Willow Creek, Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. (BST-0328) BOHEMIAN MERMAID SHOP! Hand-dyed natural clothing. Fun styles that fit women! Kidwear, local jewelry and art. 6th & F, Eureka. www.Bohemian-Mermaid.com and Facebook. (BST-0411)

NEW

LO

Garden Center 707-777-3513

n Tow

“Clothes with Soul” IT’S FIREWOOD TIME! Alder, Douglas Fir, Juniper, Madrone (sometimes), Oak, Pepperwood, & Kindling. Call for current availability. We can deliver. Almquist Lumber Company, Boyd Road, Arcata. Open 7 days a week. Stop by or call; (707) 825-8880 (BST-0328) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629-3540. krchase@yahoo. com. (BST-1226)

AKC GERMAN SHEPHERDS. Quality German lines. www.shermanranch.us, 541-281-6829. (P-0418) SEARCHING FOR SCOOTER LOST. Jan. 29 in BlueLake. Small black fixed male with curly tail.white spot middle of tail,also white belly & lower legs Heeler mutt mix, blue collar very cute,very friendly, very missed ! 502-6534 leave message. (P-0328) PLACE

YOUR PET AD!

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, MARCH 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

SELECT PURSES, SHOES AND LEFTOVER MARCHES SALE OF HATS/TIES & SCARVES

Pets

State Hwy 36 • Milemarker 19.5 • Carlotta • Open 9-6

Old

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Sun &Tues.

THURS. MARCH 28 5:45 PM

Swains Flat OUtpost Garden Center

in ION CAT

FLASHBACK

TH

Come on in!

General Store 707-777-3385

Services

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

707.825.7100

Sales

Service

Solutions

FD1963

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

home & garden

Services

Music

do you have a project or idea you would like to build? contact peter portugal (707) 599-2158 over 48 years professional experience in invention design - engineering - art - and fabrication in metal wood - fiberglass - plastic

let’s make something great together

DALLAS CAPITAL FINANCIAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL TAX SERVICE

Fees range from $30 - $80

STOP PAYING TOO MUCH TO FILE YOUR TAXES We offer: No out of pocket fees, Direct Deposit

Walk-ins Welcome 350 E St., Suite 207 (4th and E St.) Eureka • (707) 832-4292

File, and make appointment at dallascapital.net

Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H aarvey’s arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-0606) ST ITCHES - N - BR ITCHES IN MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502-5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches-n-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com (S-0502) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating-$300 Federal Tax Credit-CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail.com, (707) 502-1289 (S-0328) A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1226) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener. com (S-0606) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-0606) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1226)

Legal Services

Greg Rael Law Offices

Practice devoted exclusively to Criminal Defense since 1976

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call. Contact 2guysandatrucksmk777@gmail.com, (707) 845-3087. (S-0328) LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677-3364. (S-0606)

ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155. (S-1226) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. $199/hr. (707) 843-9599 redwoodcoasthelicopters@gmail.com, www. redwoodcoasthelicopters.com (S-0627)

1026 Third Street Eureka

(707) 445-9666

Music PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-0606)

Community ECOUNTER WITH GOD. Are such encounters real? If so, why doesn’t God appear to anyone who asks him to do so? These questions discussed at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., March 31, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 6722919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info. (C-0328) WITNESS 3/15/13 ACCIDENT? At “I” & “7th” in Eureka? Call Eureka Police Services 4414060. (C-0328) S E X / P O R N DA M AG I N G YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1226)

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old Rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. 832-7419. (M-0509) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-0606) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0523) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-0606)

Community CARSON PARK EASTER ADVENTURE. Join us March 30 at Carson Park for an Easter Adventure! FREE event filled with fun games, prizes & treats! Ages 5 & under from 10-11 a.m.; ages 6-10 from 11 a.m.-Noon. Bring your camera for a picture with the Easter Bunny! Call 441-4244 for more info. (C-0328) TOO MANY TUBAS? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-1226)

home & garden

Need some help homethe& garde around house?

servic

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

home &

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

garden

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

service director

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

service directory

service directory see page 17

1-800-273-TALK

sHelter HousinG for YoutH Crisis Hotline

444-2273

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

41

body, mind

Come find your happy place.

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

&Spirit

TAI CHI FOR EVERYONE with Glenda Hesseltine

268-3936

www.taichiforeveryone.net

Energy Life Center HEAT THERAPY

+

ENERGY MEDICINE Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com KICK BUTTS! Stop smoking now with clinical hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. (707) 8453749. www.HumboldtHypnosis. com. (MB-0328) NEED A MASSAGE IN THE EVENING AFTER WORK? Kimberly Grabo CMT now at the Center for Reflexology & Intuitive Healing Arts. Mon., Tues., Wed., 5-9 p.m. Same day appointments available. Call (707) 932-5804 to book your appointment today. (MB-0404) CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED ESTHETICIAN. Organic facials, waxing & aromatherapy massage. Mention this ad and receive 25% off. Located at Beau Monde Salon in Arcata. (707) 953-7619 (MB-0523)

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 1-5

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating. Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

EARTHRITE MASSAGE. CMT with excellent local references. Now practicing at home (Arcata) after working at Mendocino Hot Springs. Offering Introductory Special. $45/hour! Call Rick: (707) 499-6033. You will float away…. (MB-0404) GET WIRED FOR JOY! Learn simple, practical, neurosciencebased tools in a small, supportive group. Rewire stress circuits for better self-regulation, promoting vitality and joy, with Nancy Borge-Riis, LMFT, Certified Emotional Brain Trainer. 707.839.7920 and borgeriis@sbcglobal.net (MB-0418) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822-5253. (MB-0919)

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

725-9627

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1226) FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (MB-1226) FIGHT FLUS AND COLDS. doTERRA essential oils. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 4987749, www.californiadoterra. com, maureen@californiadoterra.com (MB-0516) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-0606)

GIT YER VALSSAGE!

www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

with Margy Emerson Martial Arts Academy Sunny Brae Shopping Ctr., Arcata 11-Week Term Starts Week of March 25

HAS MOVED!

3 ProgrAMS: • Traditional T’ai Chi

Jessica Baker, Licensed Acupuncturist, Herbalist & Instructor 607 F Street in Arcata

• T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis • 42 Combined Forms

Services include Acupuncture, Facial Rejuvenation, Nutritional/Herbal Consultations and Classes

For Schedule and Fees: www.margaretemerson.com or

(707) 822-4300

822-6508 Visit any class free!

ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-0606) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1226)

Take your MoM to go! Keep a copy at home, in your car, at work or check out the online version on your mobile device. It’s always available at www.northcoastjournal.com

Swedish, Deep Tissue

& Therapeutic Massage. Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

707.445.4642

ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy. zumba.com (MB-1226) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching nonviolent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www. northcoastaikido.org, info@ northcoastaikido.org, 8269395. (MB-1226)

739 12th St., Fortuna

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

Place your ad online! 42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

New Lower Prices (707) 826-1165

www.northcoast-medical.com

www.northcoastjournal.com

■ BLUE LAKE

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

real estate

this week

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

RemOdeled CuStOm HOme In Blue lake aRea! Aprx. 2440sf, 3bed/2 ba plus 2 half-baths, a den with built-ins, an office and sauna all on 1 sunny acre; New countertops, cabinets, and island; Fruit trees, greenhouse, and 2 storage sheds. A must see! mls#236352 $499,000

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

FIND HOME IMPROVEMENT EXPERTS Page: 17

$449,900

this week

4 bed, 3 bath, 2,650 sq ft custom Fortuna home, amazing property, dreamlike setting in lush landscaping encircled by forest, koi pond, waterfall, gleaming wood floors, spacious gourmet kitchen

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

$299,000

traditional style Eureka four-plex that has been well maintained and landscaped, on site coin operated laundry room, enclosed carport off alley, off street parking, great investment potential

$219,500

3 bed, 2 bath, 1375 sq ft Myrtletown home with a remodeled kitchen, hardiboard siding, garage is a single car width but is 60 feet long so you can stack cars or utilize as a workshop

home & garden

VICTORIA COPELAND BROKER ASSOCIATE

DRE #01429257 // 707-834-3328 //

real estate

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

VICTORIA@MINGTREE.COM

707.445.8811 ext.124

The houses that you see look like this…

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435



neW

Dinsmore Land/ Property +/-5 acres just ten minutes past the dinsmore

InG!

LISt

store. Enjoy flat oak woodlands, a year round spring, an unfinished (permitted) 900 sq. ft. cabin, secondary small cabin and beautiful views. This property is a prefect summer retreat in need of a little T.L.C.

$159,000

And you really want THIS… photos courtesy of Ready4Remodel.com

FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN BUY THE HOUSE YOU WANT!

Join us for an informative program about the benefits of utilizing an FHA 203K Rehabilitation Loan, to finance the costs of home improvements and repairs into your purchase loan, get home-buying tips and learn the ins & outs of HUD Homeownership opportunities. You will also learn about the REHAB RE-FI & Fannie Mae Renovation Loans.

MARCH 30, 2013, 10:00-NOON

Indian Island Property/House

neW

LISt

InG!

Be one of the elite residents of this unique Gunther Island property with a one bedroom cabin. Boat accessible only. Perfect fisherman’s getaway.

$159,000

neW

LISt

Dinsmore Land/Property

InG!

+/-40 acres on Swayback Ridge. This gently sloping property has multiple building sites, scattered oak woodlands with gorgeous meadows, year round spring and panoramic views.

$149,000

Location: Ming Tree, Realtors Real Living 509 J Street, Eureka (Corner of 5th & J) PRESENTED BY:

JAMELIE S. SAMONTE MANAGER/LOAN OFFICER NMLS #250550

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013

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North Coast Journal 03-28-13 Edition